WorldWideScience

Sample records for syndrome history molecular

  1. Impostor Syndrome, a Reparative History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Simmons

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This is an attempt to insert the stories we tell about fear and shame into a history of twentieth-century psychology and its obsession with achievement and modernization. It is an attempt to write an affective history of achievement at the turn of the millennium - and to make this feeling history. Impostor Syndrome is a pop-psychological diagnosis, employed to explain the low presence of women in STEM fields, business and academic administration and ’thought leadership’ in the pubic sphere. The article follows the intellectual lineage of two precursors of Impostor Syndrome, Fear of Success and the Impostor Phenomenon. It argues that the grouping of gender/ race/ success/ affect was a keystone of twentieth-century American psychology and development theory. The history of this feeling has consequences for thinking about situated knowledge, realism and epistemic justice.

  2. Impostor Syndrome, a Reparative History

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, D

    2016-01-01

    This is an attempt to insert the stories we tell about fear and shame into a history of twentieth-century psychology and its obsession with achievement and modernization. It is an attempt to write an affective history of achievement at the turn of the millennium - and to make this feeling history. Impostor Syndrome is a pop-psychological diagnosis, employed to explain the low presence of women in STEM fields, business and academic administration and ’thought leadership’ in the pubic sphere. T...

  3. Alport syndrome. Molecular genetic aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael

    2009-01-01

    a highly efficient and sensitive molecular diagnostic approach for analysing the COL4A5 gene in putative AS cases. Based on the present results and the litterature, an algorithm for molecular genetic analysis of the COL4A5 gene is suggested. The overall mutation detection rate was found to be 53......Alport syndrome (AS) is a progressive renal disease that is characterised by hematuria and progressive renal failure, and often accompanied by progressive high-tone sensorineural hearing loss and ocular changes in form of macular flecks and lenticonus. AS is a genetic heterogenous disease, and X...... practice for carrier detection and prenatal diagnosis, in order to be able to offer a better genetic counselling to the families. Knowledge of a possible correlation between genotype and phenotype can be of help in predicting the prognosis. Samples from 135 probands suspected of AS and 359...

  4. History of the molecular biology of cytomegaloviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinski, Mark F

    2014-01-01

    The history of the molecular biology of cytomegaloviruses from the purification of the virus and the viral DNA to the cloning and expression of the viral genes is reviewed. A key genetic element of cytomegalovirus (the CMV promoter) contributed to our understanding of eukaryotic cell molecular biology and to the development of lifesaving therapeutic proteins. The study of the molecular biology of cytomegaloviruses also contributed to the development of antivirals to control the viral infection.

  5. Molecular aspects of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Samikshan; Nandagopal, Krishnadas; Gangopadhyay, Prasanta Kumar; Mukhopadhyay, Kanchan

    2005-04-01

    Molecular aspects of Down syndrome (DS), a major genetic cause for mental retardation, commonly associated with trisomy 21 are discussed. Two different hypotheses have been speculated to better understand the disease. One believes that increased gene dosage contributes to the phenotypic abnormalities; the other correlates genetic imbalance with DS pathogenesis. To sustain these hypotheses, different murine models have been developed. Experimental models as well as sequencing of human chromosome 21 helped in speculating a few possible candidate genes for DS. However, the phenotypic changes involved with this neurological disorder vis-a-vis the enhanced number of genes, still remain unexplained. Improvement in screening pattern, model system, as well as better understanding of the disease etiology may help in developing efficacious therapeutic regimes for DS.

  6. Molecular Biology of Exfoliation Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlötzer-Schrehardt, Ursula

    2018-02-06

    Exfoliation syndrome (XFS) is a common age-related matrix process resulting from excessive production and disordered assembly of elastic microfibrillar components into highly cross-linked fibrillary aggregates throughout the anterior eye segment and various organ systems. The underlying molecular pathophysiology involves a complex interplay of pro-fibrotic protagonists including growth factors, proteolytic enzymes and inhibitors, pro-inflammatory cytokines, chaperones, and dysregulated stress response pathways including insufficient autophagy. Interaction between individual genetic predisposition and stress factors is a plausible theory explaining the development of XFS in the aging individual. Genome-wide association studies have identified robust genetic associations with LOXL1, CACNA1A, and five additional genes including POMP and TMEM136, which provide new biological insights into the pathology of XFS and highlight a role for abnormal matrix cross-linking processes, Ca channel deficiency, blood-aqueous barrier dysfunction, and abnormal ubiquitin-proteasome signaling in XFS pathophysiology. However, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms, the functional role of genetic risk variants and gene-environmental interactions still remain to be characterized.

  7. Cugini's syndrome: its clinical history and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gasbarrone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article deals with the description and diagnosis of a new nosographic syndrome, which received the eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" by the name of the Author who discovered its clinical picture. This syndrome is characterized by the binomial: "minimal target organ damage associated to monitoring prehypertension". CLINICAL HISTORY AND DIAGNOSIS: Between the years 1997 and 2002, the Author published a series of investigations regarding some office normotensives who inexplicably showed incipient signs of target organ damage (TOD. Investigated via ambulatory (A blood (B pressure (P monitoring (M, these subjects were surprisingly found not to be hypertensive. Neverthless, the office normotensives with TOD exibited the daily mean level of their systolic (S and diastolic (D BP (DML SBP/DBP significantly more elevated as compared to true normotensives. Because of these ABPM findings, the Author realized that the investigated subjects were false normotensives whose TOD was associated with a monitoring prehypertension (ABPM-diagnosable prehypertension alias monitoring prehypertension alias masked prehypertension. The year after the last Cugini's investigation, the INC-7 Reports introduced the term: "prehypertension" in its classification of arterial hypertension, as an office sphygmomanometric condition in between office normotension and office hypertension. The ABPM cut-off upper limits for a differential diagnosis between monitoring normotension, prehypertension and hypertension are reported, as calculated by the Author in its collection of ABPMs. The eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" was assigned in 2007 and confirmed in 2009. CONCLUSIVE REMARKS: The monitoring prehypertension is a further condition of discrepancy between office sphygmomanometry and ABPM, as per a masked prehypertension, whose diagnosis has to be immediately diagnosed, for preventing the onset of a TOD. There are reported the present investigations dealing with the possible

  8. Molecular changes in fetal Down syndrome brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engidawork, Ephrem; Lubec, Gert

    2003-03-01

    Trisomy of human chromosome 21 is a major cause of mental retardation and other phenotypic abnormalities collectively known as Down syndrome. Down syndrome is associated with developmental failure followed by processes of neurodegeneration that are known to supervene later in life. Despite a widespread interest in Down syndrome, the cause of developmental failure is unclear. The brain of a child with Down syndrome develops differently from that of a normal one, although characteristic morphological differences have not been noted in prenatal life. On the other hand, a review of the existing literature indicates that there are a series of biochemical alterations occurring in fetal Down syndrome brain that could serve as substrate for morphological changes. We propose that these biochemical alterations represent and/or precede morphological changes. This review attempts to dissect these molecular changes and to explain how they may lead to mental retardation.

  9. History of Nephrotic Syndrome and Evolution of its Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhijeet ePal

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The recognition, evaluation, and early treatment of nephrotic syndrome in infants and children originates from physicians dating back to Hippocrates. It took nearly another thousand years before the condition was described for its massive edema requiring treatment with herbs and other remedies. A rich history of observations and interpretations followed over the course of centuries until the recognition of the combination of clinical findings of foamy urine, swelling of the body, and measurements of urinary protein and blood analyses showed the phenotypic characteristics of the syndrome that were eventually linked to the early anatomic descriptions from first kidney autopsies and then renal biopsy analyses. Coincident with these findings were a series of treatment modalities involving the use of natural compounds to a host of immunosuppressive agents that are applied today. With the advent of molecular and precision medicine, the field is poised to make major advances in our understanding and effective treatment of nephrotic syndrome and prevent its long-term sequelae.

  10. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, A.; Buiting, K.; Williams, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Angelman syndrome is caused by disruption of the UBE3A gene and is clinically delineated by the combination of severe mental disability, seizures, absent speech, hypermotoric and ataxic movements, and certain remarkable behaviors. Those with the syndrome have a predisposition toward apparent happiness and paroxysms of laughter, and this finding helps distinguish Angelman syndrome from other conditions involving severe developmental handicap. Accurate diagnosis rests on a combination of clinical criteria and molecular and/or cytogenetic testing. Analysis of parent-specific DNA methylation imprints in the critical 15q11.2–q13 genomic region identifies 75–80% of all individuals with the syndrome, including those with cytogenetic deletions, imprinting center defects and paternal uniparental disomy. In the remaining group, UBE3A sequence analysis identifies an additional percentage of patients, but 5–10% will remain who appear to have the major clinical phenotypic features but do not have any identifiable genetic abnormalities. Genetic counseling for recurrence risk is complicated because multiple genetic mechanisms can disrupt the UBE3A gene, and there is also a unique inheritance pattern associated with UBE3A imprinting. Angelman syndrome is a prototypical developmental syndrome due to its remarkable behavioral phenotype and because UBE3A is so crucial to normal synaptic function and neural plasticity. PMID:22670133

  11. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa. ... Conclusion: Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome.

  12. Natural history of cardiovascular manifestations in Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Karnebeek, C. D.; Naeff, M. S.; Mulder, B. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Offringa, M.

    2001-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the natural history of mitral valve and aortic abnormalities in patients with Marfan syndrome during childhood and adolescence. METHODS: Fifty two patients with Marfan syndrome were followed for a mean of 7.9 years. Occurrence of adverse cardiovascular outcomes was measured

  13. The pediatric nephrotic syndrome spectrum: Clinical homogeneity and molecular heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Schachter, Asher D.

    2004-01-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is the most common glomerular disorder of childhood. Recurrence of nephrotic syndrome immediately following renal transplantation is rapid, results in a high rate of graft loss, and represents the most severe form of nephrotic syndrome. This review discusses the molecular heterogeneity of pediatric nephrotic syndrome across the spectrum of disease activity. A schema is offered for a molecular approach to pediatric nephrotic syndrome, including immune-mediated and...

  14. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: its history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muensterer, Oliver J; Berdon, Walter; McManus, Chris; Oestreich, Alan; Lachman, Ralph S; Cohen, M Michael; Done, Stephen

    2013-08-01

    The story of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is one of serendipity. By chance, Simon van Creveld and Richard Ellis purportedly met on a train and combined their independently encountered patients with short stature, dental anomalies and polydactyly into one landmark publication in 1940. They included a patient used in work published previously by Rustin McIntosh without naming McIntosh as a coauthor. This patient was followed radiologically by Caffey for nearly two decades. In 1964, Victor McKusick felt compelled to investigate a brief report in an obscure pharmaceutical journal on an unusual geographic cluster of short-statured Amish patients in Pennsylvania. This review highlights the lives of the individuals involved in the discovery of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in their historic context.

  15. The chequered history of the antiphospholipid syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayakody Arachchillage, Deepa; Greaves, Mike

    2014-06-01

    Consideration of the chronology of advances in medical knowledge can provide useful insights into the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of diseases. The antiphospholipid syndrome is an enigmatic disorder and this is reinforced by the misleading associated terminology, the adoption of which results directly from early discoveries relating to the condition. Thus the target antigen of the causative autoantibodies in antiphospholipid syndrome does not reside on phospholipid, and the frequently associated lupus anticoagulant is not restricted to subjects with systemic lupus erythematosus and, paradoxically, despite causing prolongation of clotting times in vitro it is associated with a pronounced tendency to thrombosis. Recognition of the antiphospholipid syndrome has its origins in the identification of subjects with so-called biological false-positive serological reactions for syphilis in the middle years of the last century. Since that time there have been considerable advances in our understanding of the pathogenesis of the disease and the clinical manifestations and associations, improved diagnostic accuracy and an evolving evidence base for optimal therapy. However many gaps in our knowledge remain. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Molecular beam epitaxy a short history

    CERN Document Server

    Orton, J W

    2015-01-01

    This volume describes the development of molecular beam epitaxy from its origins in the 1960s through to the present day. It begins with a short historical account of other methods of crystal growth, both bulk and epitaxial, to set the subject in context, emphasising the wide range of semiconductor materials employed. This is followed by an introduction to molecular beams and their use in the Stern-Gerlach experiment and the development of the microwave MASER.

  17. Fecal microbiota transplantation in metabolic syndrome: History, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, P F; Frissen, M N; de Clercq, N C; Nieuwdorp, M

    2017-05-04

    The history of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) dates back even to ancient China. Recently, scientific studies have been looking into FMT as a promising treatment of various diseases, while in the process teaching us about the interaction between the human host and its resident microbial communities. Current research focuses mainly on Clostridium difficile infections, however interest is rising in other areas such as inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and the metabolic syndrome. With regard to the latter, the intestinal microbiota might be causally related to the progression of insulin resistance and diabetes. FMT in metabolic syndrome has proven to be an intriguing method to study the role of the gut microbiota and open the way to new therapies by dissecting in whom insulin resistance is driven by microbiota. In this article we review the history of FMT, the present evidence on its role in the pathophysiology of metabolic syndrome and its efficacy, limitations and future prospects.

  18. Treacher Collins Syndrome; Anesthetic considerations and Molecular Findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Sayyadi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS is a rare disease with mandibulofacial dysostosis. The deformities accompanied by this syndrome could cause especial challenges for anesthesiologist. On the other hand Treacher protein is well recognized in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. In this report we want to present a successful management of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome and also describe new advances in the molecular aspect of this disease.

  19. Duplication 3q syndrome: Molecular delineation of the critical region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aqua, M.S.; Rizzu, P.; Lindsay, E.A. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1995-01-02

    The phenotype of dup(3q) syndrome partially overlaps with Brachmann-de Lange phenotype. Convulsions and eye, palate renal, and cardiac anomalies are more frequent in dup(3q) syndrome, while limb deficiencies, hirsutism, and synophrys are more characteristic of Brachmann-de Lange syndrome. Whether the two syndromes have a biological relationship has yet to be demonstrated. Using two patient translocation cell lines, each involving distal 3q, we have narrowed the critical region of the dup(3q) syndrome to the interval 3q26.31-q27.3 and initiated its molecular characterization. We have mapped in this region 6 cosmid clones spanning approximately 3 - 5 Mb. The critical region appears to overlap with the region where a balanced translocation was found in a Brachmann-de Lange patient. This work provides the mapping framework for finer molecular analysis dup(3q) syndrome. 25 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Molecular characterization of a patient presumed to have prader-willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falaleeva, Marina; Sulsona, Carlos R; Zielke, Horst R; Currey, Kathleen M; de la Grange, Pierre; Aslanzadeh, Vahid; Driscoll, Daniel J; Stamm, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the loss of RNA expression from an imprinted region on chromosome 15 that includes SNRPN, SNORD115, and SNORD116. Currently, there are no mouse models that faithfully reflect the human phenotype and investigations rely on human post-mortem material. During molecular characterization of tissue deposited in a public brain bank from a patient diagnosed with Prader-Willi syndrome, we found RNA expression from SNRPN, SNORD115, and SNORD116 which does not support a genetic diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome. The patient was a female, Caucasian nursing home resident with history of morbid obesity (BMI 56.3) and mental retardation. She died at age of 56 from pulmonary embolism. SNORD115 and SNORD116 are unexpectedly stable in post mortem tissue and can be used for post-mortem diagnosis. Molecular characterization of PWS tissue donors can confirm the diagnosis and identify those patients that have been misdiagnosed.

  1. Griscelli syndrome: A case report of Reye′s syndrome and atopic dermatitis history

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirzioglu Z

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome (GS is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that results in pigmentary dilution of the skin and the hair (silver hair, with the presence of large clumps of pigment in hair shafts, and an accumulation of melanosomes in melanocytes. Sixty cases of GS have been reported in the literature, but we could find no description of its oro-dental symptoms. Reye′s syndrome (RS is characterized by acute noninflammatory encephalopathy and renal and hepatic failure, while atopic dermatitis (AD is a skin disorder with an immunologic basis. The aim of this paper is to describe the oro-dental and physical findings in a girl who had been diagnosed with GS at 3.5 years of age; she also had AD as well as a history of RS at infancy. We discuss the possible relationship between the three syndromes.

  2. The Natural History of Scoliosis in Females With Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jennepher; Torode, Ian; Wong, Kingsley; Ellaway, Carolyn; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Christodoulou, John; Jacoby, Peter; Thomson, Margaret R; Izatt, Maree T; Askin, Geoffrey N; McPhee, Bruce I; Bridge, Corinne; Cundy, Peter; Leonard, Helen

    2016-05-01

    Population-based longitudinal observational study. To describe the prevalence of scoliosis in Rett syndrome, structural characteristics and progression, taking into account the influences of age, genotype, and ambulatory status. Scoliosis is the most common orthopedic comorbidity in Rett syndrome yet very little is known about its natural history and influencing factors such as age, genotype, and ambulatory status. The infrastructure of the Australian Rett Syndrome Database was used to identify all cases with confirmed Rett syndrome in Australia and collect data on genotype and walking status. We identified radiological records and described the Cobb angle of each curve. Time to event analysis was used to estimate the median age of onset of scoliosis and the log-rank test to compare by mutation type. Latent class group analysis was used to identify groups for the trajectory of walking status over time and a multilevel linear model used to assess trajectories of scoliosis development by mutation type and walking status. We used a logistic regression model to estimate the probability of developing a scoliosis with a Cobb angle >60° at 16 years in relation to Cobb angle and walking status at 10 years of age. The median age of scoliosis onset was 11 years with earliest onset in those with a p.Arg255 mutation or large deletion. Scoliosis was progressive for all mutation types except for those with the p.Arg306Cys mutation. Scoliosis progression was reduced when there was capacity to walk independently or with assistance. Cobb angle and walking ability at age 10 can be reliably used to identify those who will develop a very severe scoliosis by age 16. These data on prognosis of scoliosis inform clinical decision making about the likelihood of progression to very severe scoliosis and the need for surgical management. 4.

  3. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  4. Clinicopathologic, Immunohistochemical, and Molecular Features of Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Landa, Victoria; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro María; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Alegre, Victor; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Requena, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is a rare histopathologic variant of Sweet syndrome. The nature of the histiocytoid infiltrate has generated considerable controversy in the literature. The main goal of this study was to conduct a comprehensive overview of the immunohistochemical phenotype of the infiltrate in histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. We also analyze whether this variant of Sweet syndrome is more frequently associated with hematologic malignancies than classic Sweet syndrome. This is a retrospective case series study of the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 33 patients with a clinicopathologic diagnosis of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was conducted in the dermatology departments of 5 university hospitals and a private laboratory of dermatopathology. The clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and follow-up features of 33 patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome were analyzed. In some cases, cytogenetic studies of the dermal infiltrate were also performed. We compare our findings with those of the literature. The dermal infiltrate from the 33 study patients (20 female; median age, 49 years; age range, 5-93 years; and 13 male; median age, 42 years; age range, 4-76 years) was mainly composed of myeloperoxidase-positive immature myelomonocytic cells with histiocytoid morphology. No cytogenetic anomalies were found in the infiltrate except in 1 case in which neoplastic cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia were intermingled with the cells of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. Authentic histiocytes were also found in most cases, with a mature immunoprofile, but they appeared to be a minor component of the infiltrate. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was not more frequently related with hematologic malignancies than classic neutrophilic Sweet syndrome. The dermal infiltrate of cutaneous lesions of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is composed mostly of immature cells of myeloid lineage. This infiltrate should not be interpreted as leukemia cutis.

  5. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS type 1 validating case histories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has been advocated as the corner stone and most important aspect of treatment in the rehabilitation of these individuals but unfortunately it has been difficult to execute when pain is exacerbated due to allodynia (unbearable to touch or move and hyperalgesia. Best results have been obtained if the patients are recognised and treated in the early or acute phase and it has been found that through careful assessment and analysis these patients can be recognised by previous events that have occurred in their initial case history. The treatment in the acute stage with physiotherapy modalities such as electrical stimulation and acupuncture will produce an early cessation of the symptoms and prevention of the disease developing into the fully blown CRPS type 1 with irreversible and possibly atrophic consequences. Case histories have been presented that illustrate these important aspects and demonstrate  the value of early and the appropriate physiotherapy that may be more successful than other pharmacological and physical interventions in this disease.

  6. History of suicide attempts in adults with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paquette-Smith, Melissa; Weiss, Jonathan; Lunsky, Yona

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) may be at higher risk for attempting suicide compared to the general population. This study examines the issue of suicidality in adults with AS. An online survey was completed by 50 adults from across Ontario. The sample was dichotomized into individuals who had attempted suicide (n = 18) and those who had not (n = 32). We examined the relationship between predictor variables and previous attempts, and compared the services that both groups are currently receiving. Over 35% of individuals with AS reported that they had attempted suicide in the past. Individuals who attempted suicide were more likely to have a history of depression and self-reported more severe autism symptomatology. Those with and without a suicidal history did not differ in terms of the services they were currently receiving. This study looks at predictors retrospectively and cannot ascertain how long ago the attempt was made. Although efforts were made to obtain a representative sample, there is the possibility that the individuals surveyed may be more or less distressed than the general population with AS. The suicide attempt rate in our sample is much higher than the 4.6% lifetime prevalence seen in the general population. These findings highlight a need for more specialized services to help prevent future attempts and to support this vulnerable group.

  7. Metabolic syndrome: clinical concept and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia and is a common basis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, a practical definition is needed. A worldwide definition that considers increased waist circumference as an essential component has been settled. Visceral fat locates upstream of the liver. Free fatty acids and glycerol derived from visceral fat reach the liver and stimulate lipoprotein synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. The adipose tissue produces a variety of bioactive substances conceptualized as 'adipocytokines'. Overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tumor necrosis factor- seems to relate to the thrombotic and inflammatory tendency. On the other hand, adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic activities, is reduced in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the waist circumference criterion based on visceral fat accumulation has been adopted. The concept of this syndrome has been widely publicized, and health promotion programs based on the concept have commenced in various areas of the country. Such 'Adipo-Do-It' movement is an incentive to encourage physical exercise to reduce visceral fat and is a big challenge to prevent life-style-related diseases and CVD.

  8. The Molecular Genetics of Restless Legs Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rye, David B

    2015-09-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common sensorimotor trait defined by symptoms that interfere with sleep onset and maintenance in a clinically meaningful way. Nonvolitional myoclonus while awake and asleep is a sign of the disorder and an informative endophenotype. The genetic contributions to RLS/periodic leg movements are substantial, are among the most robust defined to date for a common disease, and account for much of the variance in disease expressivity. The disorder is polygenic, as revealed by recent genome-wide association studies. Experimental studies are revealing mechanistic details of how these common variants might influence RLS expressivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  10. Molecular and cytogenetic characterization of del(9p) syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Micale, M.A.; Haren, J.M.; Schwartz, S. [Case Western Reserve Univ. School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The del(9p) syndrome is characterized by mental retardation, trigonocephaly, midface hypoplasia, upward slanting palpebral fissures, a long philtrum, and is typically associated with a breakpoint at 9p22. Seventeen unrelated patients with del(9p) and their parents were analyzed by high resolution chromosome studies, molecular analysis using a series of highly polymorphic dinucleotide repeat markers for 9p, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to characterize precisely the extent of chromosome loss. Eleven patients were found to have an interstitial deletion with breakpoints assigned to 9p22.1 and 9p24.3 in most cases. Two patients had familial unbalanced translocations of maternal origin and four had de novo complex rearrangements identified by high resolution analysis and FISH utilizing chromosome libraries. PCR analysis of eleven families with eight minisatellite markers determined paternal origin of the deletion in six cases and maternal origin in five. This suggests that the molecular event resulting in the deletion is equally prevalent in both male and female gametogenesis and that genomic imprinting does not play a role in the pathogenesis of del(9p) syndrome. Increased precision in mapping these minisatellite markers was also possible through this work. This study demonstrates the existence of molecular heterogeneity as six patients with a cytological breakpoint at 9p22.1 revealed three different molecular breakpoints. These findings suggest that genotype-phenotype correlations in deletion syndromes such as this should be based on high-resolution molecular analysis of the deleted chromosome segment. Work is in progress to map a series of cosmid probes by FISH relative to chromosomal breakpoints in these patients. These combined studies should provide a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of del(9p) syndrome and may identify loci where genes responsible for one or more aspects of the del(9p) phenotype may reside.

  11. Adrenogenital syndrome: molecular mechanisms of development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.P. Pishak

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available On the long multistage pathway of biosynthesis of steroid hormones from cholesterol to cortisol, testo­sterone and estradiol, due to mutations in genes, there is the deficiency of steroidogenesis enzymes in the adrenal glands: cholesterol desmolase, 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, 17α-hydroxylase, 21-hydroxylase, and enzymes of steroidogenesis in the testis: 17,20-desmolasis, 17β-hydroxystyrol dehydroreductase and others, as well as a complex of widespread congenital diseases of heterogeneous group with autosomal recessive type of inheritance — adrenogenital syndrome (AGS. Deficiency of any of these enzymes or transport proteins leads to partial or complete loss of their activity. Phenotypic manifestations of AGS are quite polymorphic: phenomenon of hypoadrenocorticism; violation of the nature and rates of sexual development; bilateral increasing of adrenal glands; hypercorticotropinemia sensitive to dexamethasone; oligo- or amenorrhea; anovulatory infertility, miscarriage in early pregnancy. Pathogenetic component of these signs is congenital disorder of steroidogenesis caused by 11β-hydroxylase deficiency and symptoms of androgen excess. In AGS, there are distinguished a phenotype and nonclassical forms of steroidogenesis enzyme deficiency. In most cases, both types of diseases occur in persons of both sexes with different course — from mild to severe forms of the disease.

  12. Molecular genetic analysis of Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David

    2009-07-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is caused by trisomy of all or part of human chromosome 21 (HSA21) and is the most common genetic cause of significant intellectual disability. In addition to intellectual disability, many other health problems, such as congenital heart disease, Alzheimer's disease, leukemia, hypotonia, motor disorders, and various physical anomalies occur at an elevated frequency in people with DS. On the other hand, people with DS seem to be at a decreased risk of certain cancers and perhaps of atherosclerosis. There is wide variability in the phenotypes associated with DS. Although ultimately the phenotypes of DS must be due to trisomy of HSA21, the genetic mechanisms by which the phenotypes arise are not understood. The recent recognition that there are many genetically active elements that do not encode proteins makes the situation more complex. Additional complexity may exist due to possible epigenetic changes that may act differently in DS. Numerous mouse models with features reminiscent of those seen in individuals with DS have been produced and studied in some depth, and these have added considerable insight into possible genetic mechanisms behind some of the phenotypes. These mouse models allow experimental approaches, including attempts at therapy, that are not possible in humans. Progress in understanding the genetic mechanisms by which trisomy of HSA21 leads to DS is the subject of this review.

  13. [Molecular basis of Rett syndrome: A current look].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantaleón F, Gretta; Juvier R, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that exclusively affects girls, and occurs along with autism. It is very uncommon, and has five distinct forms, one classic and the others atypical, which generally compromise manual skills, language, and mobility, and widely associated with the appearance of stereotypy and early epilepsy. With the aim of updating the information about RS, a search was performed in the computer data bases of PubMed, Hinari, SCIELO and Medline, as well as consulting other web sites including OMIM, ORPHANET, GeneMap, Genetests, Proteins and Gene, using the descriptors "Síndrome de Rett", "genes y Síndrome de Rett", "Rett Syndrome gene", "Rett Syndrome", "Rett Syndrome gene therapy", and "Rett Syndrome review". Of the 1,348 articles found, 42 articles were selected, which reported 3 genes causing the syndrome: MECP2, CDKL5 and FOXG. The MECP2 gene is mutated in 80% of patients with classic RS, as well as in 40% of those affected by any of its atypical forms. RS with early epilepsy and the congenital variant are mainly due to variations in the CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes, respectively. The diagnosis of RS is based on clinical criteria. However, the advances in molecular biology and genetics have opened a wide range of possibilities for diagnosing the different clinical forms that could not be classified before. Molecular analysis can help confirm the clinical criteria and provided information as regards the prognosis of the patient. Copyright © 2015. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  14. Genetic analysis of CHARGE syndrome identifies overlapping molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moccia, Amanda; Srivastava, Anshika; Skidmore, Jennifer M; Bernat, John A; Wheeler, Marsha; Chong, Jessica X; Nickerson, Deborah; Bamshad, Michael; Hefner, Margaret A; Martin, Donna M; Bielas, Stephanie L

    2018-01-04

    PurposeCHARGE syndrome is an autosomal-dominant, multiple congenital anomaly condition characterized by vision and hearing loss, congenital heart disease, and malformations of craniofacial and other structures. Pathogenic variants in CHD7, encoding adenosine triphosphate-dependent chromodomain helicase DNA binding protein 7, are present in the majority of affected individuals. However, no causal variant can be found in 5-30% (depending on the cohort) of individuals with a clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome.MethodsWe performed whole-exome sequencing (WES) on 28 families from which at least one individual presented with features highly suggestive of CHARGE syndrome.ResultsPathogenic variants in CHD7 were present in 15 of 28 individuals (53.6%), whereas 4 (14.3%) individuals had pathogenic variants in other genes (RERE, KMT2D, EP300, or PUF60). A variant of uncertain clinical significance in KDM6A was identified in one (3.5%) individual. The remaining eight (28.6%) individuals were not found to have pathogenic variants by WES.ConclusionThese results demonstrate that the phenotypic features of CHARGE syndrome overlap with multiple other rare single-gene syndromes. Additionally, they implicate a shared molecular pathology that disrupts epigenetic regulation of multiple-organ development.GENETICS in MEDICINE advance online publication, 4 January 2018; doi:10.1038/gim.2017.233.

  15. The natural history of fetal long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuneo, Bettina F; Strasburger, Janette F; Wakai, Ronald T

    Fetal magnetocardiography (fMCG), the magnetic analog of ECG, has provided invaluable insight into the mechanisms of fetal arrhythmias. In the past 15years, we have evaluated over 300 fetuses with arrhythmia by fMCG. We review the unique characteristics and natural history of the long QT syndrome (LQTS) rhythms. We reviewed the fMCGs of subjects referred with suspected LQTS based on either a positive family history or echo diagnosis of the LQTS rhythms (sinus bradycardia, ventricular tachycardia, or 2:1 AV conduction) to the Biomagnetism laboratory in the Department of Medical Physics, UW-Madison. We recorded fMCGs using a 37-channel (Magnes, 4D Neuroimaging, Inc., San Diego, CA) superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) biomagnetometer, housed in a magnetically-shielded room for 1200-6000s. Signal processing was used to remove maternal interference. Cardiac intervals (R-R, p, QRS, QT) were measured and compared to published normals. We correlated fetal heart rate (FHR) patterns and effects of fetal movement on FHR and rhythm using actocardiography. Thirty-nine fetuses were studied at a mean of 28 (19-38) weeks of gestation. All had structurally normal hearts. One was on amiodarone for suspected supraventricular tachycardia and hydrops. Five had serial fMCGs. Isolated sinus bradycardia with a QTc >490ms was found in 35: 33 had a KCNQ1 mutation There was one false positive and one false negative LQTS diagnosis. Four fetuses had torsades de pointes (TdP) and 3 had periods of 2:1 conduction and either KCNH2 or SCN5A mutations. TdP was rarely initiated with a preceding long-short pattern and did not degenerate into ventricular fibrillation. One fetus with TdP died in utero, 2 with fetal TdP had postnatal cardiac arrest. Fetal LQTS is diagnosed by an fMCG QTc >490ms with an 89% sensitivity and specificity. TdP are seen with uncharacterized, KCNH2 or SCN5A R1623q mutations. Fetal TdP occurs when QTc ≥620ms. Identifying fetal LQTS and defining its rhythms by f

  16. Natural History of Aging in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    KLINE, ANTONIE D.; GRADOS, MARCO; SPONSELLER, PAUL; LEVY, HOWARD P.; BLAGOWIDOW, NATALIE; SCHOEDEL, CHRISTIANNE; RAMPOLLA, JONI; CLEMENS, DOUGLAS K.; KRANTZ, IAN; KIMBALL, AMY; PICHARD, CARMEN; TUCHMAN, DAVID

    2016-01-01

    Observations about the natural history of aging in Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) are made, based on 49 patients from a multidisciplinary clinic for adolescents and adults. The mean age was 17 years. Although most patients remain small, obesity may develop. Gastroesophageal reflux persists or worsens, and there are early long-term sequelae, including Barrett esophagus in 10%; other gastrointestinal findings include risk for volvulus, rumination, and chronic constipation. Submucous cleft palate was found in 14%, most undetected before our evaluation. Chronic sinusitis was noted in 39%, often with nasal polyps. Blepharitis improves with age; cataracts and detached retina may occur. Decreased bone density is observed, with occasional fractures. One quarter have leg length discrepancy and 39% scoliosis. Most females have delayed or irregular menses but normal gynecologic exams and pap smears. Benign prostatic hypertrophy occurred in one male prior to 40 years. The phenotype is variable, but there is a distinct pattern of facial changes with aging. Premature gray hair is frequent; two patients had cutis verticis gyrata. Behavioral issues and specific psychiatric diagnoses, including self-injury, anxiety, attention-deficit disorder, autistic features, depression, and obsessive-compulsive behavior, often worsen with age. This work presents some evidence for accelerated aging in CdLS. Of 53% with mutation analysis, 55% demonstrate a detectable mutation in NIPBL or SMC1A. Although no specific genotype–phenotype correlations have been firmly established, individuals with missense mutations in NIPBL and SMC1A appear milder than those with other mutations. Based on these observations, recommendations for clinical management of adults with CdLS are made. PMID:17640042

  17. Defining Moments in MMWR History: Toxic-Shock Syndrome -- 1980

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-11-03

    In the late 1970s and early 1980s, an outbreak of a disease called Toxic Shock Syndrome made healthy women sick. CDC’s disease detectives helped unravel the link between Toxic Shock Syndrome and high-absorbency tampons. MMWR was the first scientific publication to break the news of these cases. In this podcast, Dr. Kathy Shands, former chief of CDC’s Toxic Shock Syndrome Task Force, recalls her experience working with state epidemiologists to identify the link between toxic shock syndrome and tampon use.  Created: 11/3/2017 by MMWR.   Date Released: 11/3/2017.

  18. Molecular genetics, natural history and the demise of childhood leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greaves, M

    1999-12-01

    The patterns of genetic change, clonal evolution, natural history and latency are very different in the paediatric leukaemias compared with adult epithelial cancers but are similar to those in other childhood cancers of mesenchymal stem cell origin. This distinction has a biological logic in the context of the selective pressures for clonal emergence in different developmental and cellular contexts and has a major impact on curability. Most childhood leukaemias and some other mesenchymal stem cell tumours are of fetal origin and can metastasize without corruption of restraints on cell proliferation or bypassing apoptosis. In marked contrast to most invasive or metastatic epithelial carcinomas in adults, these former cancers then retain sensitivity to therapeutic apoptosis. Moreover, their abbreviated and less complex evolutionary status is associated with less genetic diversity and instability, minimising opportunity for clonal selection for resistance. A minority of leukaemias in children and a higher fraction in adults do, however, have genetic alterations that bypass cell cycle controls and apoptosis imposition. These are the 'bad news' genotypes. The cellular and molecular diversity of acute leukaemia impacts also on aetiology. Paediatric acute leukaemias can be initiated prenatally by illegitimate recombination and fusion gene formation in fetal haemopoiesis. For acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in children, twin studies suggest that a secondary postnatal molecular event is also required. This may be promoted by an abnormal or delayed response to common infections. Even for a classic case of a cancer that is intrinsically curable by systematic chemotherapy i.e. childhood ALL, prevention may turn out to be the preferred option.

  19. Molecular Pathogenesis of Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licht, Miyamotoa

    2018-01-01

    Familial Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is an autosomal dominant inherited disease and consists of a small percentage of WPW syndrome which exhibits ventricular pre-excitation by development of accessory atrioventricular pathway. A series of mutations in PRKAG2 gene encoding gamma2 subunit of 5'AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) has been identified as the cause of familial WPW syndrome. AMPK is one of the most important metabolic regulators of carbohydrates and lipids in many types of tissues including cardiac and skeletal muscles. Patients and animals with the mutation in PRKAG2 gene exhibit aberrant atrioventricular conduction associated with cardiac glycogen overload. Recent studies have revealed "novel" significance of canonical pathways leading to glycogen synthesis and provided us profound insights into molecular mechanism of the regulation of glycogen metabolism by AMPK. This review focuses on the molecular basis of the pathogenesis of cardiac abnormality due to PRKAG2 mutation and will provide current overviews of the mechanism of glycogen regulation by AMPK. J. Med. Invest. 65:1-8, February, 2018.

  20. Metabolic syndrome and Cancer: Do they share common molecular pathways?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veniou E.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome, a clustering of risk factors including obesity, has emerged as a global health plague. A lot of epidemiological and clinical evidence suggests that the metabolic syndrome is linked not only to cardiovascular diseases and diabetes mellitus type 2 but also to cancer development and progression. In this review the potential mechanisms tying the metabolic syndrome with cancer are presented. The role of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia, the activation of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1 pathway, and the induction of cytotoxic products are highlighted. Subsequent effects leading to oxidative stress, release of lipokines with signaling properties by adipocytes, development of a sustained systemic inflammation, production of inflammatory cytokines, and establishment of a tumorigenic environment are also discussed. The importance of the metabolic syndrome and obesity coupled with the deeper understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms has trigger intensive clinical research with an aim to prevent the risk of cancer and improve outcomes. Moreover, the need for lifestyle changes with increased physical activity and improved dietary quality has been emerged as urgent health priority.

  1. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic......Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...

  2. History of obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Guilleminault

    2017-08-01

    Thus, the neurophysiological studies carried out since then, as well as the European Society of Neurology conference held in 1964, the description of the syndrome in pediatric patients, the confirmation of cardiovascular co-morbidity associated with the disease, tracheostomy as treatment and the creation of hypoglossal nerve stimulus implants —including Sullivan’s discovery of positive pressure as a home treatment— have been essential for the understanding of this syndrome

  3. Molecular and clinical study of 61 Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, Shinji; Harada, Naoki; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; Fukushima; Yoshimitsu; Sugimoto, Tateo; Renedo, Monica

    1994-08-15

    We analyzed 61 Angelman syndrome (AS) patients by cytogenetic and molecular techniques. On the basis of molecular findings, the patients were classified into the following 4 groups: familial cases without deletion, familial cases with submicroscopic deletion, sporadic cases with deletion, and sporadic cases without deletion. Among 53 sporadic cases, 37 (70%) had molecular deletion, which commonly extended from D15S9 to D15S12, although not all deletions were identical. Of 8 familial cases, 3 sibs from one family had a molecular deletion involving only 2 loci, D15S10 and GABRB3, which define the critical region for AS phenotypes. The parental origin of deletion, both in sporadic and familial cases, was exclusively maternal and consistent with a genomic imprinting hypothesis. Among sporadic and familial cases without deletion, no uniparental disomy was found and most of them were shown to inherit chromosomes 15 from both parents (biparental inheritance). A discrepancy between cytogenetic and molecular deletion was observed in 14 (26%) of 53 patients in whom cytogenetic analysis could be performed. Ten (43%) of 23 patients with a normal karyotype showed a molecular deletion, and 4 (13%) of 30 patients with cytogenetic deletion, del(15) (q11q13), showed no molecular deletion. Most clinical manifestations, including neurological signs and facial characteristics, were not distinct in each group except for hypopigmentation of skin or hair. Familial cases with submicroscopic deletion were not associated with hypopigmentation. These findings suggested that a gene for hypopigmentation is located outside the critical region of AS and is not imprinted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Silver-Russell Syndrome and Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome: Opposite Phenotypes with Heterogeneous Molecular Etiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Õunap, Katrin

    2016-01-01

    Silver-Russell syndrome (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) are 2 clinically opposite growth-affecting disorders belonging to the group of congenital imprinting disorders. The expression of both syndromes usually depends on the parental origin of the chromosome in which the imprinted genes reside. SRS is characterized by severe intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation with various additional clinical features such as hemihypertrophy, relative macrocephaly, fifth finger clinodactyly, and triangular facies. BWS is an overgrowth syndrome with many additional clinical features such as macroglossia, organomegaly, and an increased risk of childhood tumors. Both SRS and BWS are clinically and genetically heterogeneous, and for clinical diagnosis, different diagnostic scoring systems have been developed. Six diagnostic scoring systems for SRS and 4 for BWS have been previously published. However, neither syndrome has common consensus diagnostic criteria yet. Most cases of SRS and BWS are associated with opposite epigenetic or genetic abnormalities in the 11p15 chromosomal region leading to opposite imbalances in the expression of imprinted genes. SRS is also caused by maternal uniparental disomy 7, which is usually identified in 5-10% of the cases, and is therefore the first imprinting disorder that affects 2 different chromosomes. In this review, we describe in detail the clinical diagnostic criteria and scoring systems as well as molecular causes in both SRS and BWS. PMID:27587987

  5. Molecular pathogenesis of long QT syndrome type 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Wu, PhD

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome type 1 (LQT1 is a subtype of a congenital cardiac syndrome caused by mutation in the KCNQ1 gene, which encodes the α-subunit of the slow component of delayed rectifier K+ current (IKs channel. Arrhythmias in LQT1 are characterized by prolongation of the QT interval on ECG, as well as the occurrence of life-threatening cardiac events, frequently triggered by adrenergic stimuli (e.g., physical or emotional stress. During the past two decades, much advancement has been made in understanding the molecular pathogenesis underlying LQT1. Uncovering the genotype-phenotype correlations in LQT1 is of clinical importance to better understand the gene-specific differences that may influence the propensity for developing life-threatening arrhythmias under specific conditions. Elucidation of these mechanisms will also help to improve the diagnosis and management of this cardiac disorder based on gene-specific considerations. This review describes the current medical consensus and recent developments regarding the molecular pathogenesis of LQT1 and provides a novel insight into the adrenergic regulation of this disease.

  6. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea M J Weiner

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  7. Fishing the molecular bases of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Andrea M J; Scampoli, Nadia L; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, and mutations in the TCOF1 gene are responsible for over 90% of TCS cases. The knowledge about the molecular mechanisms responsible for this syndrome is relatively scant, probably due to the difficulty of reproducing the pathology in experimental animals. Zebrafish is an emerging model for human disease studies, and we therefore assessed it as a model for studying TCS. We identified in silico the putative zebrafish TCOF1 ortholog and cloned the corresponding cDNA. The derived polypeptide shares the main structural domains found in mammals and amphibians. Tcof1 expression is restricted to the anterior-most regions of zebrafish developing embryos, similar to what happens in mouse embryos. Tcof1 loss-of-function resulted in fish showing phenotypes similar to those observed in TCS patients, and enabled a further characterization of the mechanisms underlying craniofacial malformation. Besides, we initiated the identification of potential molecular targets of treacle in zebrafish. We found that Tcof1 loss-of-function led to a decrease in the expression of cellular proliferation and craniofacial development. Together, results presented here strongly suggest that it is possible to achieve fish with TCS-like phenotype by knocking down the expression of the TCOF1 ortholog in zebrafish. This experimental condition may facilitate the study of the disease etiology during embryonic development.

  8. Epilepsy in Individuals with a History of Asperger's Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben; Mouridsen, Svend Erik Birkebæk

    2013-01-01

    We performed a nationwide, register-based retrospective follow-up study of epilepsy in all people who were born between January 1, 1980 and June 29, 2006 and registered in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register with Asperger's syndrome on February 7, 2011. All 4,180 identified cases with AS (3,4...

  9. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic...

  10. Fragile X syndrome: a review of clinical and molecular diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Claudia; Fontana, Laura; Milani, Donatella; Tabano, Silvia; Miozzo, Monica; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-04-19

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the second cause of intellectual disability after Down syndrome and the most prevalent cause of intellectual disability in males, affecting 1:5000-7000 men and 1:4000-6000 women. It is caused by an alteration of the FMR1 gene, which maps at the Xq27.3 band: more than 99% of individuals have a CGG expansion (>200 triplets) in the 5' UTR of the gene, and FMR1 mutations and duplication/deletion are responsible for the remaining (<1%) molecular diagnoses of FXS. The aim of this review was to gather the current clinical and molecular knowledge about FXS to provide clinicians with a tool to guide the initial assessment and follow-up of FXS and to offer to laboratory workers and researchers an update about the current diagnostic procedures. FXS is a well-known condition; however, most of the studies thus far have focused on neuropsychiatric features. Unfortunately, some of the available studies have limitations, such as the paucity of patients enrolled or bias due to the collection of the data in a single-country population, which may be not representative of the average global FXS population. In recent years, insight into the adult presentation of the disease has progressively increased. Pharmacological treatment of FXS is essentially symptom based, but the growing understanding of the molecular and biological mechanisms of the disease are paving the way to targeted therapy, which may reverse the effects of FMRP deficiency and be a real cure for the disease itself, not just its symptoms. The clinical spectrum of FXS is wide, presenting not only as an isolated intellectual disability but as a multi-systemic condition, involving predominantly the central nervous system but potentially affecting any apparatus. Given the relative high frequency of the condition and its complex clinical management, FXS appears to have an important economic and social burden.

  11. The natural history of Cri du Chat Syndrome. A report from the Italian Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainardi, Paola Cerruti; Pastore, Guido; Castronovo, Chiara; Godi, Michela; Guala, Andrea; Tamiazzo, Stefania; Provera, Sandro; Pierluigi, Mauro; Bricarelli, Franca Dagna

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this report is to provide an update on the natural history of the Cri du Chat Syndrome by means of the Italian Register (I.R.). Two hundred twenty patients were diagnosed by standard cytogenetic methods and 112 of these were also characterised by molecular-cytogenetic investigation (FISH). FISH analysis showed interstitial deletions, short terminal deletions and other rare rearrangements not previously correctly diagnosed by standard cytogenetics. The diagnosis was made in the first month of life in 42% and within first year in 82% of cases. The remaining 18% were diagnosed at an age ranging from 13 months to 47 years. At the last follow-up, patient age ranged from 8 months to 61 years. Mortality, already low, has decreased over time as it is lower between 1984-2002 compared to 1965-1983. Mortality was higher in patients with unbalanced translocations resulting in 5p deletions. Our data confirm that the cat-like cry and peculiar timbre of voice are the most typical signs of the syndrome, not only at birth but also later and these are the only signs which might suggest the diagnosis in patients with small deletions and mild clinical picture. A cytogenetic and clinical variability must be underlined. Cardiac, cerebral, renal and gastrointestinal malformations were more frequent in the patients with unbalanced translocations resulting in 5p deletions. Sucking and feeding difficulties and respiratory infections are frequent in the first months or years of life. Intubation difficulties linked to larynx anomalies must be considered. Psychomotor development is delayed in all patients but there is a variability related to deletion size and type as well as other genetic and environmental factors. However, the results showed an improvement in the acquisition of the development skills and progress in social introduction which should encourage caregivers and parents to work together in carrying out the rehabilitative and educational interventions.

  12. Molecular evolution and the natural history of select virus epidemics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne

    Molecular evolution of pathogenic viruses with RNA based genomes is most often fast enough to leave an informative genomic sequence signal within a timeframe that is relevant for the study of both recent and on-­‐going epidemics (and epizootics). The true power of molecular evolutionary methodolo...

  13. Overlap of PIV syndrome, VACTERL and Pallister-Hall syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, C E; Abbott, M; McKusick, V A; Biesecker, L G

    2000-07-01

    The polydactyly, imperforate anus, vertebral anomalies syndrome (PIV, OMIM 174100) was determined as a distinct syndrome by Say and Gerald in 1968 (Say B, Gerald PS. Lancet 1968: 2: 688). We noted that the features of PIV overlap with the VATER association and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS, OMIM 146510), which includes polydactyly, (central or postaxial), shortened fingers, hypoplastic nails, renal anomalies, imperforate anus, and hypothalamic hamartoma. Truncation mutations in GL13, a zinc finger transcription factor gene, have been shown to cause PHS. We performed a molecular evaluation on a patient diagnosed with PIV, whose mother, grandfather, and maternal aunt had similar malformations. We sequenced the GLI3 gene in the patient to determine if she had a mutation. The patient was found to have a deletion in nucleotides 2188-2207 causing a frameshift mutation that predicts a truncated protein product of the gene. Later clinical studies demonstrated that the patient also has a hypothalamic hamartoma, a finding in PHS. We concluded that this family had atypical PHS and not PIV. This result has prompted us to re-evaluate the PIV literature to see if PIV is a valid entity. Based on these data and our examination of the literature, we conclude that PIV is not a valid diagnostic entity. We conclude that patients diagnosed with PIV should be reclassified as having VACTERL, or PHS, or another syndrome with overlapping malformations.

  14. [Study on the history of formulas corresponding to syndromes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Xing-Jiang

    2010-06-01

    The theory of formulas corresponding to syndromes is a relatively mature and integrated method contained in the classics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) for diagnosing and treatment of diseases. The development of the theory mainly includes three stages, i.e. prototype stage before Han Dynasty, sublimation stage of late Eastern Han Dynasty and the following improving stage. People recorded what they saw and heard of during their medical activities in prototype stage. In sublimation stage, Treatise on Febrile Diseases written by Zhang Zhong-jing found out the relationship of structure-fixed prescriptions used more often with symptoms and signs. Doctors after Han Dynasty repeated and verified the truth of classical prescriptions and the theory of formulas corresponding to syndromes. They also developed and improved the theory. Based on clinical experience, and classics, it was enriched, advanced and improved by doctors after then. It could provide reference for clinical treatment through systematically hackling the theories.

  15. Complex regional pain syndromes (CRPS) type 1 validating case histories

    OpenAIRE

    P. Berger

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) type 1 is challenging and unpredictable as the condition presents with vascular and neuropathic symptoms after nil or even minor injury to a peripheral nerve. The condition is one of a pain and motor dysfunction. The pathophysiology is not well understood and the relief of symptoms may change from being sympathetically mediated to sympathetically independent during  the course of the disease. At any stage physiotherapy has b...

  16. Proteus syndrome review: molecular, clinical, and pathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M Michael

    2014-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is caused by an activating AKT1 mutation (c.49G>A, p.Glu17Lys). Many variable features are possible in this mosaic disorder, including: (i) disproportionate, asymmetric, and distorting overgrowth; (ii) bone abnormalities different from those observed in other disorders; (iii) a characteristic cerebriform connective tissue nevus made up of highly collagenized connective tissue; (iv) epidermal nevi in early life, consisting of acanthosis and hyperkeratosis; (v) vascular malformations of the capillary, venous, or lymphatic types; (vi) dysregulated adipose tissue including lipomas, lipohypoplasia, fatty overgrowth, and localized fat deposits; (vii) other unusual features, including bullous lung alterations; specific neoplasms; a facial phenotype associated with intellectual disability and/or seizures, and/or brain malformations; and (viii) deep vein thrombosis, resulting in premature death. Concluding remarks address diagnostic criteria, natural history, management, psychosocial issues, and differential diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Molecular evolution and the natural history of select virus epidemics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Christian Anders Wathne

    Molecular evolution of pathogenic viruses with RNA based genomes is most often fast enough to leave an informative genomic sequence signal within a timeframe that is relevant for the study of both recent and on-­‐going epidemics (and epizootics). The true power of molecular evolutionary methodolo...... be termed a modern synthesis of infectious disease epidemiology. The present work can be seen as an advocate of moving towards such a completely integrative approach....

  18. Fecal microbiota transplantation in metabolic syndrome: History, present and future

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, P. F.; Frissen, M. N.; de Clercq, N. C.; Nieuwdorp, M.

    2017-01-01

    The history of fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) dates back even to ancient China. Recently, scientific studies have been looking into FMT as a promising treatment of various diseases, while in the process teaching us about the interaction between the human host and its resident microbial

  19. Parent stress across molecular subtypes of children with Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miodrag, N; Peters, S

    2015-09-01

    Parenting stress has been consistently reported among parents of children with developmental disabilities. However, to date, no studies have investigated the impact of a molecular subtype of Angelman syndrome (AS) on parent stress, despite distinct phenotypic differences among subtypes. Data for 124 families of children with three subtypes of AS: class I and II deletions (n = 99), imprinting centre defects (IC defects; n = 11) and paternal uniparental disomy (UPD; n = 14) were drawn from the AS Rare Diseases Clinical Research Network (RDCRN) database and collected from five research sites across the Unites States. The AS study at the RDCRN gathered health information to understand how the syndrome develops and how to treat it. Parents completed questionnaires on their perceived psychological stress, the severity of children's aberrant behaviour and children's sleep patterns. Children's adaptive functioning and developmental levels were clinically evaluated. Child-related stress reached clinical levels for 40% of parents of children with deletions, 100% for IC defects and 64.3% for UPD. Sleep difficulties were similar and elevated across subtypes. There were no differences between molecular subtypes for overall child and parent-related stress. However, results showed greater isolation and lack of perceived parenting skills for parents of children with UPD compared with deletions. Better overall cognition for children with deletions was significantly related to more child-related stress while their poorer adaptive functioning was associated with more child-related stress. For all three groups, the severity of children's inappropriate behaviour was positively related to different aspects of stress. How parents react to stress depends, in part, on children's AS molecular subtype. Despite falling under the larger umbrella term of AS, it is important to acknowledge the unique aspects associated with children's molecular subtype. Identifying these factors can

  20. Novel Implications in Molecular Diagnosis of Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raffaella Liccardo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available About 10% of total colorectal cancers are associated with known Mendelian inheritance, as Familial Adenomatous Polyposis (FAP and Lynch syndrome (LS. In these cancer types the clinical manifestations of disease are due to mutations in high-risk alleles, with a penetrance at least of 70%. The LS is associated with germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes. However, the mutation detection analysis of these genes does not always provide informative results for genetic counseling of LS patients. Very often, the molecular analysis reveals the presence of variants of unknown significance (VUSs whose interpretation is not easy and requires the combination of different analytical strategies to get a proper assessment of their pathogenicity. In some cases, these VUSs may make a more substantial overall contribution to cancer risk than the well-assessed severe Mendelian variants. Moreover, it could also be possible that the simultaneous presence of these genetic variants in several MMR genes that behave as low risk alleles might contribute in a cooperative manner to increase the risk of hereditary cancer. In this paper, through a review of the recent literature, we have speculated a novel inheritance model in the Lynch syndrome; this could pave the way toward new diagnostic perspectives.

  1. Analysis of Downs syndrome with molecular techniques for future diagnoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    May Salem Al-Nbaheen

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is a genetic disorder appeared due to the presence of trisomy in chromosome 21 in the G-group of the acrocentric region. DS is also known as non-Mendelian inheritance, due to the lack of Mendel’s laws. The disorder in children is identified through clinical symptoms and chromosomal analysis and till now there are no biochemical and molecular analyses. Presently, whole exome sequencing (WES has largely contributed in identifying the new disease-causing genes and represented a significant breakthrough in the field of human genetics and this technique uses high throughput sequencing technologies to determine the arrangement of DNA base pairs specifying the protein coding regions of an individual’s genome. Apart from this next generation sequencing and whole genome sequencing also contribute for identifying the disease marker. From this review, the suggestion was to perform the WES is DS children to identify the marker region. Keywords: Downs syndrome, Exome sequencing, Chromosomal analysis, Genes, Genetics

  2. The Natural History and Clinical Syndromes of Degenerative Cervical Spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy

  3. The natural history and clinical syndromes of degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John C

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy.

  4. Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS): a history in pictures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, A; Carey, J C; Viskochil, D H; Cederholm, P; Opitz, J M

    2000-01-01

    The Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a well known chromosomal disorder, due to a deletion of distal chromosome 4p. The classical gestalt is striking and poses few diagnostic problems. However, due to the difficulty of detecting very small deletions by standard cytogenetics, diagnosis can be sometimes very difficult, particularly in older patients. In this paper we show the changes, occurring over time, in facial appearance of affected individuals, to improve insight into the evolution of the phenotype, and to increase its diagnostic potential.

  5. Natural history of seminiferous tubule degeneration in Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Wikström, Anne M; Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa

    2006-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates dramatic......Klinefelter syndrome (47,XXY) is characterized by small, firm testis, gynaecomastia, azoospermia and hypergonadotropic hypogonadism. Degeneration of the seminiferous tubules in 47,XXY males is a well-described phenomenon. It begins in the fetus, progresses through infancy and accelerates...... and ends at a low-normal level in young adults. Likewise, serum concentration of inhibin B exhibits a dramatic decline to a low, often undetectable level, concomitantly with a rise in FSH, reflecting the degeneration of the seminiferous tubules. Many hypotheses about the underlying mechanism...... of the depletion of the germ cells in Klinefelter males have been reported and include insufficient supranumerary X-chromosome inactivation, Leydig cell insufficiency and disturbed regulation of apoptosis of Sertoli and Leydig cells. However, at present, the exact mechanism remains unclear. In this article, we...

  6. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be diagnosed reliably using history and physical examination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winters, M.; Bakker, E. W. P.; Moen, M. H.; Barten, C. C.; Teeuwen, R.; Weir, A.

    2017-01-01

    The majority of sporting injuries are clinically diagnosed using history and physical examination as the cornerstone. There are no studies supporting the reliability of making a clinical diagnosis of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Our aim was to assess if MTSS can be diagnosed reliably, using

  7. Long-term follow-up in patients with a history of (H)ELLP syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pampus, M. G.; Wolf, H.; Mayruhu, G.; Treffers, P. E.; Bleker, O. P.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide long-term follow-up data on women with a history of hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelets [(H)ELLP] syndrome regarding the risk of recurrence in subsequent pregnancies and disease in later life. METHODS: All women admitted to the Academic Medical Centre between

  8. What history tells us XVI. A third pillar for molecular biology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-02-27

    Feb 27, 2009 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 34; Issue 1. What history tells us XVI. A third pillar for molecular biology: Molecular embryology. Michel Morange. Series Volume 34 Issue 1 March 2009 pp 17-20. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Planetary biology--paleontological, geological, and molecular histories of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Steven A; Caraco, M Daniel; Thomson, J Michael; Gaucher, Eric A

    2002-05-03

    The history of life on Earth is chronicled in the geological strata, the fossil record, and the genomes of contemporary organisms. When examined together, these records help identify metabolic and regulatory pathways, annotate protein sequences, and identify animal models to develop new drugs, among other features of scientific and biomedical interest. Together, planetary analysis of genome and proteome databases is providing an enhanced understanding of how life interacts with the biosphere and adapts to global change.

  10. Molecular surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. History and perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    A personal account is given of how the author became involved with modern surface science and how it was employed for studies of the chemistry of surfaces and heterogeneous catalysis. New techniques were developed for studying the properties of the surface monolayers: Auger electron spectroscopy, LEED, XPS, molecular beam surface scattering, etc. An apparatus was developed and used to study hydrocarbon conversion reactions on Pt, CO hydrogenation on Rh and Fe, and NH 3 synthesis on Fe. A model has been developed for the working Pt reforming catalyst. The three molecular ingredients that control catalytic properties are atomic surface structure, an active carbonaceous deposit, and the proper oxidation state of surface atoms. 40 references, 21 figures

  11. Molecular surface science of heterogeneous catalysis. History and perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Somorjai, G.A.

    1983-08-01

    A personal account is given of how the author became involved with modern surface science and how it was employed for studies of the chemistry of surfaces and heterogeneous catalysis. New techniques were developed for studying the properties of the surface monolayers: Auger electron spectroscopy, LEED, XPS, molecular beam surface scattering, etc. An apparatus was developed and used to study hydrocarbon conversion reactions on Pt, CO hydrogenation on Rh and Fe, and NH/sub 3/ synthesis on Fe. A model has been developed for the working Pt reforming catalyst. The three molecular ingredients that control catalytic properties are atomic surface structure, an active carbonaceous deposit, and the proper oxidation state of surface atoms. 40 references, 21 figures. (DLC)

  12. Early diagnosis of Lemierre's syndrome based on a medical history and physical findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Yutaka; Wada, Mikio; Kawashima, Atsushi; Kagawa, Keizo

    2013-01-01

    A 37-year-old woman presented with fever and rigor after experiencing respiratory symptoms the previous week that had resolved within a few days. On presentation, her neck was swollen along the right sternocleidomastoid muscle, and chest CT showed pulmonary septic embolisms. Lemierre's syndrome was strongly suspected based on the patient's medical history and physical findings. Further examination revealed venous thrombus, and Fusobacterium necrophorum was later isolated from blood cultures. Antibiotics for anaerobes were administered before a final diagnosis was made, and the patient's symptoms thereafter improved. A rapid diagnosis is essential, since Lemierre's syndrome can be fatal with a diagnostic delay.

  13. The neurobehavioral and molecular phenotype of Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, Logan K; Fitzpatrick, Sarah; Shaffer, Rebecca; Melnyk, Sophia; Begtrup, Amber H; Fox, Emma; Schaefer, Tori L; Mathieu-Frasier, Lauren; Ray, Balmiki; Lahiri, Debomoy; Horn, Paul A; Erickson, Craig A

    2015-11-01

    Angelman Syndrome (AS) is a rare neurodevelopmental disorder associated with developmental delay, speech impairment, gait ataxia, and a unique behavioral profile. AS is caused by loss of maternal expression of the paternally imprinted UBE3A gene. In this study we aim to contribute to understanding of the neurobehavioral phenotype of AS with particular focus on the neuropsychiatric presentation of the disorder. We also undertake initial exploration of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plasma levels in AS. Twelve individuals ages 3 years or older with a confirmed genetic diagnosis of AS underwent detailed medical history, phenotypic characterization, and BDNF plasma sampling. The results of this study demonstrate that individuals with AS suffer from significant developmental delay, impaired adaptive behavior, and sleep disruption. Additionally, hyperactivity/impulsivity appears to be the primary behavioral domain noted in these individuals. The majority of individuals in this project met criteria for autism spectrum disorder on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS); however, a negative correlation was noted between ADOS score and developmental age. BDNF plasma levels in AS individuals were significantly elevated compared to neurotypical controls. This is the first report of abnormal BDNF levels in AS, and one that necessitates larger future studies. The results provide a clue to understanding abnormal neuronal development in AS and may help guide future AS research. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Inference of population history and patterns from molecular data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tataru, Paula

    , the existing mathematical models and computational methods need to be reformulated. I address this from an inference perspective in two areas of bioinformatics. Population genetics studies the influence exerted by various factors on the dynamics of a population's genetic variation. These factors cover...... evolutionary forces, such as mutation and selection, but also changes in population size. The aim in population genetics is to untangle the history of a population from observed genetic variation. This subject is dominated by two dual models, the Wright-Fisher and coalescent. I first introduce a new...... how standard algorithms can be improved by including pattern occurrence in the hidden structure of observed sequences. Such a hidden structure could be the localization and composition of genes within a DNA sequence. The second problem I target is the computational prediction of the pattern...

  15. The clinical and molecular spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O.; Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Holterhus, P.M.; Nitsche, E.M.; Kruse, K. [Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-05-03

    Androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) are due to end-organ resistance to androgenic steroids in males leading to defective virilization of the external genitalia. The phenotype encompasses a wide array of genital ambiguity and may range from completely female to undervirilized but unequivocally male with infertility. This disorder is caused by mutations of the androgen receptor and is an X-linked recessive trait. We have studied 47 patients with AIS and have characterized the underlying molecular abnormality in the androgen receptor gene. Twenty patients had complete AIS and twenty-seven had partial AIS. Of the latter, 11 were of predominantly female phenotypic appearance and gender was assigned accordingly, while 16 were raised as males. Within the group of complete AIS, two patients had gross deletions within the gene, one had a small deletion, and one had an insertion. In the other patients with complete AIS, as well as all individuals with partial AIS, single nucleotide substitutions within the coding region were detected, each leading to an amino acid alteration. Seven codons were involved in more than one mutation in different cases. In addition, in one patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, an elongation of a glutamine-repeat was characterized. We conclude that mutations in the androgen receptor gene may be present throughout the whole coding region. However, our study provides evidence that several mutational hot spots exist. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  16. Tcof1-Related Molecular Networks in Treacher Collins Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Wang, Minjiao; Huang, Li; Fang, Bing; Shi, Jun; Wang, Xudong; Shen, Guofang

    2016-09-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by craniofacial deformities, and is primarily caused by mutations in the Tcof1 gene. This article was aimed to perform a comprehensive literature review and systematic bioinformatic analysis of Tcof1-related molecular networks in TCS. First, the up- and down-regulated genes in Tcof1 heterozygous haploinsufficient mutant mice embryos and Tcof1 knockdown and Tcof1 over-expressed neuroblastoma N1E-115 cells were obtained from the Gene Expression Omnibus database. The GeneDecks database was used to calculate the 500 genes most closely related to Tcof1. Then, the relationships between 4 gene sets (a predicted set and sets comparing the wildtype with the 3 Gene Expression Omnibus datasets) were analyzed using the DAVID, GeneMANIA and STRING databases. The analysis results showed that the Tcof1-related genes were enriched in various biological processes, including cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, differentiation, and migration. They were also enriched in several signaling pathways, such as the ribosome, p53, cell cycle, and WNT signaling pathways. Additionally, these genes clearly had direct or indirect interactions with Tcof1 and between each other. Literature review and bioinformatic analysis finds imply that special attention should be given to these pathways, as they may offer target points for TCS therapies.

  17. Molecular Bases and Phenotypic Determinants of Aromatase Excess Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maki Fukami

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aromatase excess syndrome (AEXS is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by gynecomastia. This condition is caused by overexpression of CYP19A1 encoding aromatase, and three types of cryptic genomic rearrangement around CYP19A1, that is, duplications, deletions, and inversions, have been identified in AEXS. Duplications appear to have caused CYP19A1 overexpression because of an increased number of physiological promoters, whereas deletions and inversions would have induced wide CYP19A1 expression due to the formation of chimeric genes consisting of a noncoding exon(s of a neighboring gene and CYP19A1 coding exons. Genotype-phenotype analysis implies that phenotypic severity of AEXS is primarily determined by the expression pattern of CYP19A1 and the chimeric genes and by the structural property of the fused exons with a promoter function (i.e., the presence or the absence of a natural translation start codon. These results provide novel information about molecular mechanisms of human genetic disorders and biological function of estrogens.

  18. Angelman syndrome: review of clinical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird LM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lynne M Bird1Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Division of Genetics, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, California, USAAbstract: “Angelman syndrome” (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder whose main features are intellectual disability, lack of speech, seizures, and a characteristic behavioral profile. The behavioral features of AS include a happy demeanor, easily provoked laughter, short attention span, hypermotoric behavior, mouthing of objects, sleep disturbance, and an affinity for water. Microcephaly and subtle dysmorphic features, as well as ataxia and other movement disturbances, are additional features seen in most affected individuals. AS is due to deficient expression of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A gene, which displays paternal imprinting. There are four molecular classes of AS, and some genotype–phenotype correlations have emerged. Much remains to be understood regarding how insufficiency of E6-AP, the protein product of UBE3A, results in the observed neurodevelopmental deficits. Studies of mouse models of AS have implicated UBE3A in experience-dependent synaptic remodeling.Keywords: Angelman syndrome, chromosome 15q11-13, UBE3A, imprinting

  19. Molecular subtypes and phenotypic expression of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Wendy N; Luharia, Anita; Evans, Gail A; Raza, Hussain; Haire, Antonita C; Grundy, Richard; Bowdin, Sarah C; Riccio, Andrea; Sebastio, Gianfranco; Bliek, Jet; Schofield, Paul N; Reik, Wolf; Macdonald, Fiona; Maher, Eamonn R

    2005-09-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) results from mutations or epigenetic events involving imprinted genes at 11p15.5. Most BWS cases are sporadic and uniparental disomy (UPD) or putative imprinting errors predominate in this group. Sporadic cases with putative imprinting defects may be subdivided into (a) those with loss of imprinting (LOI) of IGF2 and H19 hypermethylation and silencing due to a defect in a distal 11p15.5 imprinting control element (IC1) and (b) those with loss of methylation at KvDMR1, LOI of KCNQ1OT1 (LIT1) and variable LOI of IGF2 in whom there is a defect at a more proximal imprinting control element (IC2). We investigated genotype/epigenotype-phenotype correlations in 200 cases with a confirmed molecular genetic diagnosis of BWS (16 with CDKN1C mutations, 116 with imprinting centre 2 defects, 14 with imprinting centre 1 defects and 54 with UPD). Hemihypertrophy was strongly associated with UPD (Pmanagement and surveillance of BWS children such that screening for Wilms' tumour and hepatoblastoma can be focused on those at highest risk.

  20. Association between history of abortion and metabolic syndrome in middle-aged and elderly Chinese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baihui; Zhang, Jie; Xu, Yu; Lu, Jieli; Xu, Min; Chen, Yuhong; Bi, Yufang; Ning, Guang

    2013-03-01

    Epidemiologic studies have suggested that abortion may cause long term health consequences such as cardiovascular disease. Until recently, studies focusing on the association between history of abortion and metabolic diseases were limited. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the association between history of abortion and metabolic syndrome (MetS) in middle-aged and elderly Chinese women. A cross-sectional survey was performed in 6302 women (age ≥ 40 years) in Shanghai. Standardized questionnaire was used to obtain the information about reproductive histories. Overall, we observed a positive association between history of induced abortion and the prevalence of MetS, independent of potential confounding factors. A multivariable-adjusted logistic regression analysis revealed that compared to those without a history of induced abortion, women with a history of induced abortion remained at 1.25 times more likely to have MetS (OR = 1.25, 95% CI = 1.06-1.47, P spontaneous abortion and the prevalence of MetS was observed. Compared to those without a history of spontaneous abortion, the multivariate-adjusted odds ratio associated with a history of spontaneous abortion for MetS was 0.88 (95% CI = 0.65-1.19, P > 0.05).

  1. Molecular medicine of fragile X syndrome: based on known molecular mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shi-Yu; Wu, Ling-Qian; Duan, Ran-Hui

    2016-02-01

    Extensive research on fragile X mental retardation gene knockout mice and mutant Drosophila models has largely expanded our knowledge on mechanism-based treatment of fragile X syndrome (FXS). In light of these findings, several clinical trials are now underway for therapeutic translation to humans. Electronic literature searches were conducted using the PubMed database and ClinicalTrials.gov. The search terms included "fragile X syndrome", "FXS and medication", "FXS and therapeutics" and "FXS and treatment". Based on the publications identified in this search, we reviewed the neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS patients and the potential pathogenic mechanisms to monitor the progress of FXS research, from basic studies to clinical trials. The pathological mechanisms of FXS were categorized on the basis of neuroanatomy, synaptic structure, synaptic transmission and fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) loss of function. The neuroanatomical abnormalities in FXS were described to motivate extensive research into the region-specific pathologies in the brain responsible for FXS behavioural manifestations. Mechanism-directed molecular medicines were classified according to their target pathological mechanisms, and the most recent progress in clinical trials was discussed. Current mechanism-based studies and clinical trials have greatly contributed to the development of FXS pharmacological therapeutics. Research examining the extent to which these treatments provided a rescue effect or FMRP compensation for the developmental impairments in FXS patients may help to improve the efficacy of treatments.

  2. Molecular Phylogenetic: Organism Taxonomy Method Based on Evolution History

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L.P Indi Dharmayanti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Phylogenetic is described as taxonomy classification of an organism based on its evolution history namely its phylogeny and as a part of systematic science that has objective to determine phylogeny of organism according to its characteristic. Phylogenetic analysis from amino acid and protein usually became important area in sequence analysis. Phylogenetic analysis can be used to follow the rapid change of a species such as virus. The phylogenetic evolution tree is a two dimensional of a species graphic that shows relationship among organisms or particularly among their gene sequences. The sequence separation are referred as taxa (singular taxon that is defined as phylogenetically distinct units on the tree. The tree consists of outer branches or leaves that represents taxa and nodes and branch represent correlation among taxa. When the nucleotide sequence from two different organism are similar, they were inferred to be descended from common ancestor. There were three methods which were used in phylogenetic, namely (1 Maximum parsimony, (2 Distance, and (3 Maximum likehoood. Those methods generally are applied to construct the evolutionary tree or the best tree for determine sequence variation in group. Every method is usually used for different analysis and data.

  3. The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere and Fazio Londe syndrome revisited: natural history, genetics, treatment and future perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bosch Annet M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare neurological disorder which may present at all ages with sensorineural deafness, bulbar palsy and respiratory compromise. Fazio-Londe syndrome is considered to be the same disease entity. Recently it was demonstrated that in some patients the disease is caused by mutations in the SLC52A3 gene which encodes the intestinal (hRFT2 riboflavin transporter. In these patients riboflavin deficiency is the cause of the BVVL/FL syndrome and supplementation of riboflavin proved a life saving treatment. Mutations in the SLC52A2 gene and the SLC52A1 (GPR172B gene, coding for human riboflavin transporters hRFT3 and hRFT1 have been associated with the BVVL syndrome as well. We performed a review of the literature, with emphasis on the natural history and the effects of treatment in these patients. A total of 35 publications were traced reporting on the clinical presentation of 74 patients who presented before age 18. The most prevalent symptoms were bulbar palsy, hearing loss, facial weakness and respiratory compromise. Death was reported in 28 of the 61 untreated patients, with a very low survival in patients presenting before age 4. All 13 patients who were treated with riboflavin survived, with a strong clinical improvement after days to months of treatment in eight patients. Three patients demonstrated a stable clinical course and treatment was stopped early in two patients. Abnormalities in plasma flavin levels and/or plasma acylcarnitine profiles were observed in some but not in all patients, and also patients with normal plasma flavin levels and acylcarnitine profiles demonstrated a striking clinical improvement on riboflavin supplementation. It is now clear that proper diagnosis requires mutation analysis of all three transporter genes and treatment should be started immediately without first awaiting results of molecular analysis. Clinical improvement may be rapid or gradual over a period of

  4. Molecular Study of the Amazonian Macabea Cattle History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Julio; Landi, Vincenzo; Martínez, Amparo; Gómez, Mayra; Camacho, María Esperanza; Álvarez, Luz Ángela; Aguirre, Lenin; Delgado, Juan Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Macabea cattle are the only Bos taurus breed that have adapted to the wet tropical conditions of the Amazon. This breed has integrated into the culture of the indigenous Shuar-Asuar nations probably since its origins, being one of the few European zoogenetic resources assimilated by the deep-jungle Amazon communities. Despite its potential for local endogenous sustainable development, this breed is currently endangered. The present study used molecular genetics tools to investigate the within- and between-breeds diversity, in order to characterize the breed population, define its associations with other breeds, and infer its origin and evolution. The within-breed genetic diversity showed high values, as indicated by all genetic parameters, such as the mean number of alleles (MNA = 7.25±2.03), the observed heterozygosity (Ho = 0.72±0.02) and the expected heterozygosity (He = 0.72±0.02). The between-breeds diversity analysis, which included factorial correspondence analysis, Reynolds genetic distance, neighbor-joining analysis, and genetic structure analysis, showed that the Macabea breed belongs to the group of the American Creoles, with a Southern-Spain origin. Our outcomes demonstrated that the Macabea breed has a high level of purity and null influences of exotic cosmopolitan breeds with European or Asiatic origin. This breed is an important zoogenetic resource of Ecuador, with relevant and unique attributes; therefore, there is an urgent need to develop conservation strategies for the Macabea breed.

  5. Molecular evidence for the early history of living amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feller, A E; Hedges, S B

    1998-06-01

    The evolutionary relationships of the three orders of living amphibians (lissamphibians) has been difficult to resolve, partly because of their specialized morphologies. Traditionally, frogs and salamanders are considered to be closest relatives, and all three orders are thought to have arisen in the Paleozoic (>250 myr). Here, we present evidence from the DNA sequences of four mitochondrial genes (2.7 kilobases) that challenges the conventional hypothesis and supports a salamander-caecilian relationship. This, in light of the fossil record and distribution of the families, suggests a more recent (Mesozoic) origin for salamanders and caecilians directly linked to the initial breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea. We propose that this single geologic event isolated salamanders and archaeobatrachian frogs on the northern continents (Laurasia) and the caecilians and neobatrachian frogs on the southern continents (Gondwana). Among the neobatrachian frog families, molecular evidence supports a South American clade and an African clade, inferred here to be the result of mid-Cretaceous vicariance. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  6. Importance of donor history of restless leg syndrome and pica to asses iron deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Chaudhary, Rajendra; Sonker, Atul; Pandey, Hem Chandra

    2016-04-01

    Iron deficiency is associated with neuropsychological changes such as restless leg syndrome (RLS), pica, hair loss, etc. Our objective was to assess usefulness of history of RLS and pica in relation with iron stores in blood donors. During medical examination, apart from routine questionnaires specific history of RLS and pica was elicited. Along with hemoglobin markers of iron deficiency such as s. iron, s. ferritin and mean corpuscular volume were analyzed. Out of 400 blood donors 41 had h/o pica/RLS/pagophagia. Positive and negative predictive value of above history is 73.17% and 80.5% respectively. We recommend the use of a screening question for pica and/or RLS in blood donor questionnaire. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Muscle stiffness of posterior lower leg in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, J; Nakamura, M; Nakao, S; Fujita, K; Yanase, K; Ichihashi, N

    2018-01-01

    Previous history of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS) is a risk factor for MTSS relapse, which suggests that there might be some physical factors that are related to MTSS development in runners with a history of MTSS. The relationship between MTSS and muscle stiffness can be assessed in a cross-sectional study that measures muscle stiffness in subjects with a history of MTSS, who do not have pain at the time of measurement, and in those without a history of MTSS. The purpose of this study was to compare the shear elastic modulus, which is an index of muscle stiffness, of all posterior lower leg muscles of subjects with a history of MTSS and those with no history and investigate which muscles could be related to MTSS. Twenty-four male collegiate runners (age, 20.0±1.7 years; height, 172.7±4.8 cm; weight, 57.3±3.7 kg) participated in this study; 14 had a history of MTSS, and 10 did not. The shear elastic moduli of the lateral gastrocnemius, medial gastrocnemius, soleus, peroneus longus, peroneus brevis, flexor hallucis longus, flexor digitorum longus, and tibialis posterior were measured using shear wave elastography. The shear elastic moduli of the flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior were significantly higher in subjects with a history of MTSS than in those with no history. However, there was no significant difference in the shear elastic moduli of other muscles. The results of this study suggest that flexor digitorum longus and tibialis posterior stiffness could be related to MTSS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. What history tells us III. André Lwoff: From protozoology to molecular ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2005-11-15

    Nov 15, 2005 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 30; Issue 5. What history tells us III. André Lwoff: From protozoology to molecular definition of viruses. Michel Morange. Series Volume 30 Issue 5 December 2005 pp 591-594. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  10. Clinical and Molecular Genetic Features of Autoinflammatory Syndromes in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. I. Alexeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to study the prevalence and clinical features of autoinflammatory syndromes among patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Methods: A prospective nonrandomized study was conducted. All its members have been studied for mutations in TNFRSF1A and NLRP3 genes by the sequencing method. Results: 90 children (27 boys, 63 girls aged from 1 to 17 (average age 8.2 years, with a guide diagnosis: «Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis», were examined. As a result, 10 (14% patients showed mutations in TNFRSF1A gene, leading to the development of TRAPS-syndrome (8 had the most common mutation of R92Q; 3 — not previously described mutations in NLRP3 gene. 2 patients had the diagnosis of CINCA/NOMID Syndrome, 1 — Muckle–Wells Syndrome. In three cases, mutations leading to the development of TRAPS-syndromethe were identified in the first line of descent. Classical examples of autoinflammatory syndromes such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS, and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS. The data about their pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment is presented. Conclusion: It is shown that early detection and adequate treatment of patients with autoinflammatory syndromes, characterized by severe disease and serious prognosis, is difficult due to lack of awareness of pediatricians and unavailability of genetic diagnosis of these syndromes. The necessity of the development of a universal model of the diagnostic algorithm for identification of autoinflammatory syndromes using next-generation sequencing technologies is grounded. 

  11. Molecular Etiology of Hereditary Single-Side Deafness: Its Association With Pigmentary Disorders and Waardenburg Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Shin Hye; Kim, Ah Reum; Choi, Hyun Seok; Kim, Min Young; Chun, Eun Hi; Oh, Seung-Ha; Choi, Byung Yoon

    2015-10-01

    Unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (USNHL)/single-side deafness (SSD) is a frequently encountered disability in children. The etiology of a substantial portion of USNHL/SSD still remains unknown, and genetic causes have not been clearly elucidated. In this study, the authors evaluated the heritability of USNHL/SSD.The authors sequentially recruited 50 unrelated children with SSD. For an etiologic diagnosis, we performed a rigorous review on the phenotypes of family members of all children and conducted, if necessary, molecular genetic tests including targeted exome sequencing of 129 deafness genes.Among the 50 SSD children cohort, the authors identify 4 (8%) unrelated SSD probands from 4 families (SH136, SB173, SB177, and SB199) with another hearing impaired family members. Notably, all 4 probands in our cohort with a familial history of SSD also have pigmentary abnormalities such as brown freckles or premature gray hair within first degree relatives, which may indicate that genes whose products are involved with pigmentary disorder could be candidates for heritable SSD. Indeed, SH136 and SB199 turned out to segregate a mutation in MITF and PAX3, respectively, leading to a molecular diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (WS).We report, for the first time in the literature, a significant heritability of pediatric SSD. There is a strong association between the heritability of USNHL/SSD and the pigmentary abnormality, shedding a new light on the understanding of the molecular basis of heritable USNHL/SSD. In case of children with congenital SSD, it would be mandatory to rigorously screen pigmentary abnormalities. WS should also be included in the differential diagnosis of children with USNHL/SSD, especially in a familial form.

  12. Non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome in psychiatric patients with a history of undiagnosed Wernicke's encephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakaros, Georgios; Ilonen, Tuula; Kurki, Timo; Paju, Janina; Papageorgiou, Sokratis G; Vataja, Risto

    2016-11-15

    Wernicke's encephalopathy is often undiagnosed, particularly in non-alcoholics. There are very few reports of non-alcoholic patients diagnosed with Korsakoff syndrome in the absence of a prior diagnosis of Wernicke's encephalopathy and no studies of diffusion tensor imaging in non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome. We report on three non-alcoholic psychiatric patients (all women) with long-term non-progressive memory impairment that developed after malnutrition accompanied by at least one of the three Wernicke's encephalopathy manifestations: ocular abnormalities, ataxia or unsteadiness, and an altered mental state or mild memory impairment. In neuropsychological examination, all patients had memory impairment, including intrusions. One patient had mild cerebellar vermis atrophy in MRI taken after the second episode of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The same patient had mild hypometabolism in the lateral cortex of the temporal lobes. Another patient had mild symmetrical atrophy and hypometabolism of the superior frontal lobes. Two patients were examined with diffusion tensor imaging. Reduced fractional anisotropy values were found in the corona radiata in two patients, and the uncinate fasciculus and the inferior longitudinal fasciculus in one patient. Our results suggest that non-alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome is underdiagnosed. Psychiatric patients with long-term memory impairment may have Korsakoff syndrome and, therefore, they should be evaluated for a history of previously undiagnosed Wernicke's encephalopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in patients with Wolfram syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Cryns, K.; Pennings, R.J.E.; Walraven, I.; Janssen, G.M.; Maassen, J.A.; Veldhuijzen, B.F.; Arntzenius, A.B.; Lindhout, D.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Camp, G. van; Dikkeschei, L.D.

    2003-01-01

    Wolfram (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, and sensorineural hearing impairment. A gene responsible for

  14. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in patients with Wolfram syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van den Ouweland, JMW; Cryns, K; Pennings, RJE; Walraven, [No Value; Janssen, GMC; Maassen, JA; Veldhuijzen, BFE; Arntzenius, AB; Lindhout, D; Cremers, CWRJ; Van Camp, G; Dikkeschei, LD

    Wolfram (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness) syndrome is a rare autosomal-recessive neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized by juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, diabetes insipidus, and sensorineural hearing impairment. A gene responsible for

  15. Chromosomal fragility syndrome and family history of radiosensitivity as indicators for radiotherapy dose modification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alsbeih, Ghazi; Story, Michael D.; Maor, Moshe H.; Geara, Fady B.; Brock, William A.

    2003-01-01

    Beside a few known radiosensitive syndromes, a patient's reaction to radiotherapy is difficult to predict. In this report we describe the management of a pediatric cancer patient presented with a family history of radiosensitivity and cancer proneness. Laboratory investigations revealed a chromosomal fragility syndrome and an increased cellular radiosensitivity in vitro. AT gene sequencing revealed no mutations. The patient was treated with reduced radiation doses to avoid the presumed increased risks of toxicity to normal tissues. The patient tolerated well the treatment with no significant acute or late radiation sequelae. Five years later, the patient remains both disease and complications free. While an accurate laboratory test for radiosensitivity is still lacking, assessments of chromosomal fragility, cell survival and clinical medicine will continue to be useful for a small number of patients

  16. Dissecting molecular stress networks: identifying nodes of divergence between life-history phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Tonia S; Bronikowski, Anne M

    2013-02-01

    The complex molecular network that underlies physiological stress response is comprised of nodes (proteins, metabolites, mRNAs, etc.) whose connections span cells, tissues and organs. Variable nodes are points in the network upon which natural selection may act. Thus, identifying variable nodes will reveal how this molecular stress network may evolve among populations in different habitats and how it might impact life-history evolution. Here, we use physiological and genetic assays to test whether laboratory-born juveniles from natural populations of garter snakes (Thamnophis elegans), which have diverged in their life-history phenotypes, vary concomitantly at candidate nodes of the stress response network, (i) under unstressed conditions and (ii) in response to an induced stress. We found that two common measures of stress (plasma corticosterone and liver gene expression of heat shock proteins) increased under stress in both life-history phenotypes. In contrast, the phenotypes diverged at four nodes both under unstressed conditions and in response to stress: circulating levels of reactive oxygen species (superoxide, H(2)O(2)); liver gene expression of GPX1 and erythrocyte DNA damage. Additionally, allele frequencies for SOD2 diverge from neutral markers, suggesting diversifying selection on SOD2 alleles. This study supports the hypothesis that these life-history phenotypes have diverged at the molecular level in how they respond to stress, particularly in nodes regulating oxidative stress. Furthermore, the differences between the life-history phenotypes were more pronounced in females. We discuss the responses to stress in the context of the associated life-history phenotype and the evolutionary pressures thought to be responsible for divergence between the phenotypes. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. The Relationship of Restless Legs Syndrome to History of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kandati, Sahiti; Flack, Kathryn L.; Agarwal, Parul; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a burdensome sleep disorder, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension, diabetes, and related disorders. However, the relationship of RLS to history of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), a predictor of subsequent CVD, diabetes, and associated conditions, remains little explored. In this study, we investigated the relationship of RLS to history of PIH in a sample of primary care patients. Methods: Participants were women aged ≥40 years drawn from an anonymous survey study of West Virginia primary care patients. Data collected included detailed information on demographics, lifestyle factors, sleep patterns, and reproductive/medical history; the survey also included an RLS diagnostic questionnaire. Women who were pregnant or unsure about their pregnancy status were excluded from the analyses. Results: Of the 498 participants in the final analytic sample, 24.5% met diagnostic criteria for RLS (17.9% with symptoms ≥once/week, 11.9% with symptoms ≥3 times/week); 73 (16.5% of parous women) reported a history of PIH, defined as physician-diagnosed preeclampsia or gestational hypertension. After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle characteristics, obesity, reproductive history, health conditions, and other factors, those reporting a history of PIH were approximately twice as likely to meet criteria for RLS (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 3.6). These associations increased in magnitude with increasing symptom frequency (adjusted OR for RLS with symptoms ≥3 times/week = 3.8; CI 1.9, 7.6; p for trend = 0.003). Conclusions: History of PIH was strongly and positively related to current RLS in this study of primary care patients; these findings further support a possible role for metabolic dysregulation in RLS etiology. PMID:26913940

  18. The Relationship of Restless Legs Syndrome to History of Pregnancy-Induced Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innes, Kim E; Kandati, Sahiti; Flack, Kathryn L; Agarwal, Parul; Selfe, Terry Kit

    2016-04-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a burdensome sleep disorder, has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), hypertension, diabetes, and related disorders. However, the relationship of RLS to history of pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH), a predictor of subsequent CVD, diabetes, and associated conditions, remains little explored. In this study, we investigated the relationship of RLS to history of PIH in a sample of primary care patients. Participants were women aged ≥40 years drawn from an anonymous survey study of West Virginia primary care patients. Data collected included detailed information on demographics, lifestyle factors, sleep patterns, and reproductive/medical history; the survey also included an RLS diagnostic questionnaire. Women who were pregnant or unsure about their pregnancy status were excluded from the analyses. Of the 498 participants in the final analytic sample, 24.5% met diagnostic criteria for RLS (17.9% with symptoms ≥once/week, 11.9% with symptoms ≥3 times/week); 73 (16.5% of parous women) reported a history of PIH, defined as physician-diagnosed preeclampsia or gestational hypertension. After adjustment for demographics, lifestyle characteristics, obesity, reproductive history, health conditions, and other factors, those reporting a history of PIH were approximately twice as likely to meet criteria for RLS (odds ratio [OR] = 1.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.1, 3.6). These associations increased in magnitude with increasing symptom frequency (adjusted OR for RLS with symptoms ≥3 times/week = 3.8; CI 1.9, 7.6; p for trend = 0.003). History of PIH was strongly and positively related to current RLS in this study of primary care patients; these findings further support a possible role for metabolic dysregulation in RLS etiology.

  19. Molecular targets for the therapy of cancer associated with metabolic syndrome (transcription and growth factors).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunusova, Natalia V; Kondakova, Irina V; Kolomiets, Larisa A; Afanas'ev, Sergey G; Chernyshova, Alena L; Kudryavtsev, Igor V; Tsydenova, Anastasia A

    2017-11-08

    Metabolic syndrome (MS) is one of the leading risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes mellitus and reproductive system diseases. Currently, not only cardiovascular disease and reproductive history risks related with MS are frequently discussed, but it has been also shown that MS is associated with increased risk of some common cancers (endometrial cancer, postmenopausal breast cancer, colorectal cancer, biliary tract cancers and liver cancer for men). Further studies are required to understand the mechanisms of the involvement of MS components in the pathogenesis of malignant neoplasms. Changes in the expression of transcription and growth factors in the peripheral tissues as well as in cancer tissues of patients with MS were revealed. Transcription factors (AMP-activated protein kinase-1, STAT3, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ), leptin and adiponectin receptors seem to be the most promising molecular targets for the therapy of cancers associated with MS. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  20. Comparative study between clinical history and polysomnogram in the obstructive sleep apnea/ hypopnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gondim, Lys Maria Allenstein; Matumoto, Luciana Matshie; Melo Júnior, Marco Antônio Cezário de; Bittencourt, Sérgio; Ribeiro, Ulisses José

    2007-01-01

    Recognizing sleep-disordered breathing is on the rise every year. Manifestations, such as snoring, that were earlier considered mere inconvenients are now acquiring greater importance concerning life quality and social impact. To compare the clinical history to polysomnogram (PSG) results in the Obstructive Sleep Apnea/Hypopnea Syndrome (OSAHS). 125 patients were analyzed, in a retrospective study. Specific questionnaires, avaliations of Body Mass Index and Epworth Scale were carried out. Among the patients, 75 were males and 50 were females. The main symptom was snoring. 46% had normal PSG, 30% had light OSAHS, 15% moderate and 9% severe OSAHS and it was not observed a correlation between clinical data and PSG results. Concerning clinical symptoms, only insomnia has shown relevance when univariably analyzed in normal and light OSAHS patients (plosing its importance when analyzed together with other factors. the clinical history, per se, is not sufficient to define OSAHS' diagnosis or it's severity.

  1. Higher molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lønne Enggrob, Kirsten

    High molecular weight dissolved organic nitrogen turnover as affected by soil management history *Kirsten Lønne Enggrob,1 Lars Elsgaard,1 and Jim Rasmussen1 1Aarhus University, Dept. of Agroecology, Foulum, Denmark 1. Introduction Dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) play an important role in soil N...... cycling. DON, as a collective term, refers to a diversity of organic N compounds which can operationally be grouped into high molecular weight (Mw) DON (Mw > 1 kDa) and low Mw DON (... of different management histories on the turnover of high Mw DON. Further, we distinguished between several classes of high Mw DON, i.e., 1-10 kDa and >10 kDa. 3. Materials and methods With the use of micro-lysimeters, the turnover of triple-labeled (15N, 14C and 13C) high Mw DON was studied in a sandy soil...

  2. Evolutionary and molecular analysis of the emergent severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Liu, Wei; Bowden, Thomas A; Cui, Ning; Zhuang, Lu; Liu, Kun; Zhang, Yao-Yun; Cao, Wu-Chun; Pybus, Oliver G

    2013-03-01

    In 2009, a novel Bunyavirus, called severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was identified in the vicinity of Huaiyangshan, China. Clinical symptoms of this zoonotic virus included severe fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia, with a mortality rate of ~10%. By the end of 2011 the disease associated with this pathogen had been reported from eleven Chinese provinces and human-to-human transmission suspected. However, current understanding of the evolution and molecular epidemiology of SFTSV before and after its identification is limited. To address this we undertake phylogenetic, evolutionary and structural analyses of all available SFTSV genetic sequences, including a new SFTSV complete genome isolated from a patient from Henan in 2011. Our discovery of a mosaic L segment sequence, which is descended from two major circulating lineages of SFTSV in China, represents the first evidence that homologous recombination plays a role in SFTSV evolution. Selection analyses indicate that negative selection is predominant in SFTSV genes, yet differences in selective forces among genes are consistent between Phlebovirus species. Further analysis reveals structural conservation between SFTSV and Rift Valley fever virus in the residues of their nucleocapsids that are responsible for oligomerisation and RNA-binding, suggesting the viruses share similar modes of higher-order assembly. We reconstruct the epidemic history of SFTSV using molecular clock and coalescent-based methods, revealing that the extant SFTSV lineages originated 50-150 years ago, and that the viral population experienced a recent growth phase that concurs with and extends the earliest serological reports of SFTSV infection. Taken together, our combined structural and phylogenetic analyses shed light into the evolutionary behaviour of SFTSV in the context of other, better-known, pathogenic Phleboviruses. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Natural history of Brugada syndrome: insights for risk stratification and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priori, Silvia G; Napolitano, Carlo; Gasparini, Maurizio; Pappone, Carlo; Della Bella, Paolo; Giordano, Umberto; Bloise, Raffaella; Giustetto, Carla; De Nardis, Roberto; Grillo, Massimiliano; Ronchetti, Elena; Faggiano, Giovanna; Nastoli, Janni

    2002-03-19

    Treatment of patients with Brugada syndrome is complicated by the incomplete information on the natural history of the disease related to the small number of cases reported. Furthermore, the value of programmed electrical stimulation (PES) for risk stratification is highly debated. The objective of this study was to search for novel parameters to identify patients at risk of sudden death. Clinical data were collected for 200 patients (152 men, 48 women; age, 41+/-18 years) and stored in a dedicated database. Genetic analysis was performed, and mutations on the SCN5A gene were identified in 28 of 130 probands and in 56 of 121 family members. The life-table method of Kaplan-Meier used to define the cardiac arrest-free interval in patients undergoing PES failed to demonstrate an association between PES inducibility and spontaneous occurrence of ventricular fibrillation. Multivariate Cox regression analysis showed that after adjusting for sex, family history of sudden death, and SCN5A mutations, the combined presence of a spontaneous ST-segment elevation in leads V1 through V3 and the history of syncope identifies subjects at risk of cardiac arrest (HR, 6.4; 95% CI, 1.9 to 21; Pinformation on the natural history of patients obtained in this study allowed elaboration of a risk-stratification scheme to quantify the risk for sudden cardiac death and to target the use of the implantable cardioverter-defibrillator.

  4. Metabolic syndrome and parental history of cardiovascular disease in young adults in urban Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeboah, Kwame; Dodam, Kennedy Konlan; Affrim, Patrick Kormla; Adu-Gyamfi, Linda; Bado, Anormah Rashid; Owusu Mensah, Richard N A; Adjei, Afua Bontu; Gyan, Ben

    2017-08-03

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) in young adults poses significant cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk for later years. Parental history of CVDs is known to affect the prevalence of CVD risk in adulthood. In sub-Saharan Africa, the burden of MetS in young adults and its relationship with parental CVDs is largely unknown. We studied the gender-specific prevalence of MetS and its association with parental history of diabetes, hypertension and CVDs in young adults resident in urban Ghana. In a cross-sectional design, 364 young adults aged 20-30 years were randomly recruited from students of University of Ghana. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on demography, lifestyle, medical and parental medical history. Anthropometric indices and blood pressures were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure plasma levels of glucose, lipid profile, urea and creatinine. MetS was defined according to the Joint Scientific Statement criteria. The prevalence of MetS was 12.4%, higher in females than male participants (18.4% vs 5.7, p = 0.019). Female participants had higher levels of all the components of MetS than the male participants. Compared to participants with no history of parental CVDs, participants with parental CVDs had a higher proportion of abdominal obesity. A positive history of parental CVDs was associated with increase in odds of MetS [OR (95% CI): 1.23 (1.12-3.04), p = 0.037]. In our study population, there is relatively high prevalence of MetS; higher in females compared to male participants. Parental history of CVDs was associated with MetS.

  5. Metabolic syndrome and parental history of cardiovascular disease in young adults in urban Ghana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwame Yeboah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Metabolic syndrome (MetS in young adults poses significant cardiovascular diseases (CVD risk for later years. Parental history of CVDs is known to affect the prevalence of CVD risk in adulthood. In sub-Saharan Africa, the burden of MetS in young adults and its relationship with parental CVDs is largely unknown. We studied the gender-specific prevalence of MetS and its association with parental history of diabetes, hypertension and CVDs in young adults resident in urban Ghana. Methods In a cross-sectional design, 364 young adults aged 20–30 years were randomly recruited from students of University of Ghana. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on demography, lifestyle, medical and parental medical history. Anthropometric indices and blood pressures were measured. Fasting blood samples were collected to measure plasma levels of glucose, lipid profile, urea and creatinine. MetS was defined according to the Joint Scientific Statement criteria. Results The prevalence of MetS was 12.4%, higher in females than male participants (18.4% vs 5.7, p = 0.019. Female participants had higher levels of all the components of MetS than the male participants. Compared to participants with no history of parental CVDs, participants with parental CVDs had a higher proportion of abdominal obesity. A positive history of parental CVDs was associated with increase in odds of MetS [OR (95% CI: 1.23 (1.12–3.04, p = 0.037]. Conclusion In our study population, there is relatively high prevalence of MetS; higher in females compared to male participants. Parental history of CVDs was associated with MetS.

  6. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; de Laet, Corinne; de Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; van Coster, Rudy N. A.; van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease

  7. Molecular subtypes and phenotypic expression of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cooper, Wendy N.; Luharia, Anita; Evans, Gail A.; Raza, Hussain; Haire, Antonita C.; Grundy, Richard; Bowdin, Sarah C.; Riccio, Andrea; Sebastio, Gianfranco; Bliek, Jet; Schofield, Paul N.; Reik, Wolf; Macdonald, Fiona; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2005-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome (BWS) results from mutations or epigenetic events involving imprinted genes at 11p15.5. Most BWS cases are sporadic and uniparental disomy (UPD) or putative imprinting errors predominate in this group. Sporadic cases with putative imprinting defects may be subdivided into

  8. Churg-Strauss vasculitis and idiopathic hypereosinophyl syndrome: role of molecular biology in the differential diagnosis of hypereosinophyl syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. d'Ascanio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Hypereosinophilic syndromes are a heterogeneous group of uncommon disorders characterized by the presence of marked peripheral blood eosinophilia, tissue eosinophilia, or both, resulting in a wide variety of clinical manifestations, often without an identifiable cause. Churg-Strauss syndrome is a systemic vasculitis characterized by prominent peripheral eosinophilia, asthma and systemic involvement. The presence of mild to severe eosinophilia and systemic involvement raise the search of many trigger factor that need to be ruled out. Distinguishing CSS from idiopathic hypereosinophilic syndrome may be particularly challenging, especially in ANCA negative patients. Methods: The aim of the present study was to present a small case series of patients referred to a Rheumatology Unit for mild to severe eosinophilia and signs and symptoms of systemic involvement and to outline the clinical significance of molecular biology in the work-up of hypereosinophilia. Results: Eleven patients with moderate to severe peripheral eosinophylia, were referred to our Unit from 1996 to 2007. Female to male ratio was 7/4, mean age 40.54 (range 22-75. Three out of eleven patients resulted positive for molecular biology. The diagnosis of idiopathic hypereosinophylia was confirmed in one out of three on the basis of the clinical picture and bone marrow biopsy. Conclusions: Molecular biology may be useful in the screening and in the follow-up of a new hypereosinophylic patient.

  9. Diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and a history of polycystic ovary syndrome: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R; Pace, R; Rahme, E; Dasgupta, K

    2017-12-01

    To investigate whether polycystic ovary syndrome further increases postpartum diabetes risk in women with gestational diabetes mellitus and to explore relationships between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes in women who do not develop gestational diabetes. This retrospective cohort study (Quebec Physician Services Claims; Hospitalization Discharge Databases; Birth and Death registries) included 34 686 women with gestational diabetes during pregnancy (live birth), matched 1:1 to women without gestational diabetes by age group, year of delivery and health region. Diagnostic codes were used to define polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Cox regression models were used to examine associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and incident diabetes. Polycystic ovary syndrome was present in 1.5% of women with gestational diabetes and 1.2% of women without gestational diabetes. There were more younger mothers and mothers who were not of white European ancestry among those with polycystic ovary syndrome. Those with polycystic ovary syndrome more often had a comorbidity and a lower proportion had a previous pregnancy. Polycystic ovary syndrome was associated with incident diabetes (hazard ratio 1.52; 95% CI 1.27, 1.82) among women with gestational diabetes. No conclusive associations between polycystic ovary syndrome and diabetes were identified (hazard ratio 0.94; 95% CI 0.39, 2.27) in women without gestational diabetes. In women with gestational diabetes, polycystic ovary syndrome confers additional risk for incident diabetes postpartum. In women without gestational diabetes, an association between PCOS and incident diabetes was not observed. Given the already elevated risk of diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes, a history of both polycystic ovary syndrome and gestational diabetes signal a critical need for diabetes surveillance and prevention. © 2017 Diabetes UK.

  10. Data Mining FAERS to Analyze Molecular Targets of Drugs Highly Associated with Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Burkhart, Keith K.; Abernethy, Darrell; Jackson, David

    2015-01-01

    Drug features that are associated with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) have not been fully characterized. A molecular target analysis of the drugs associated with SJS in the FDA Adverse Event Reporting System (FAERS) may contribute to mechanistic insights into SJS pathophysiology. The publicly available version of FAERS was analyzed to identify disproportionality among the molecular targets, metabolizing enzymes, and transporters for drugs associated with SJS. The FAERS in-house version was al...

  11. Ankle and toe muscle strength characteristics in runners with a history of medial tibial stress syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Junya; Nakamura, Masatoshi; Nakao, Sayaka; Fujita, Kosuke; Yanase, Ko; Morishita, Katsuyuki; Ichihashi, Noriaki

    2017-01-01

    A high proportion of flexor digitorum longus attachment is found at the posteromedial border of the tibia, which is the most common location of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Therefore, plantar flexion strength of the lesser toes could be related to MTSS; however, the relationship between MTSS and muscle strength of the hallux and lesser toes is not yet evaluated due to the lack of quantitative methods. This study investigated the muscle strength characteristics in runners with a history of MTSS by using a newly developed device to measure the muscle strength of the hallux, lesser toes, and ankle. This study comprised 27 collegiate male runner participants (20.0 ± 1.6 years, 172.1 ± 5.1 cm, 57.5 ± 4.0 kg). Maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) torque of the plantar flexion, dorsiflexion, inversion, and eversion of the ankle were measured by using an electric dynamometer. MVIC torque of the 1st metatarsophalangeal joint (MTPJ) and 2nd-5th MTPJ were measured by using a custom-made torque-measuring device. MVIC torques were compared between runners with and without a history of MTSS. MVIC torque of the 1st MTPJ plantar flexion was significantly higher in runners with a history of MTSS than in those without it. In contrast, there were no significant differences in the MVIC torque values of the 2nd-5th MTPJ plantar flexion and each MVIC torque of the ankle between runners with and without a history of MTSS. A history of MTSS increased the isometric FHL strength.

  12. Cytogenetic and Molecular Investigation in Children with Possible Fragile X Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onur Ozer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Fragile X syndrome (FXS is the most common cause of inherited mental retardation and is due to a mutation in the X-linked FMR1 gene. Molecular genetic testing and chromosome analysis are indicated for this disorder. In this context, we tried to determine the frequency of the FXS, and other chro¬mosomal abnormalities of Turkish pediatric neurology outpatients. Materials and Methods: Cytogenetic and molecular screenings were performed to esti-mate the prevalence of the fragile X in 107 patients with mental retardation, language disorders, hyperactivity, develop¬mental delay or fragile X syndrome phenotype. Only 26 out of 107 patients were screened, molecularly. Results: Cytogenetically fragile X-positive cells was found in 8 cases (7.5% of 107 patients; in 4.7% of males and in 2.8% of females. The autosomal fragile sites (FS was found in 14 (13.1% cases. One (0.9% patient had pericentric inversion of chromosome 9. Molecular analysis were performed for 26 patients and all patients showed normal CGG expansion. Conclusion: In diagnosis of fragile X syndrome, chromosome analysis must be run in conjunction with the molecular studies. It is recommended that all members of the fragile X family under risk should be screened both by cytogenetic and molecular methods. Genetic counseling can be useful to patients and families considering genetic testing. [Cukurova Med J 2012; 37(2.000: 76-83

  13. [Adipocytokines and metabolic syndrome--molecular mechanism and clinical implication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Morihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2004-06-01

    Recent progress in adipocyte-biology shows that adipocytes are not merely fat-storing cells but that they secrete a variety of hormones, cytekines, growth factors and other bioactive substabces, conceptualized as adipocytokines. These include plasminogen activator inhibitor 1(PAI-1), tumor necrosis factor(TNF-alpha), leptin and adiponectin. Dysregulated productions of these adipocytekines participate in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated metabolic syndrome such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and vascular diseases. Increased productions of PAI-1 and TNF-alpha from accumulated fat contribute to the formation of thrombosis and insulin resistance in obesity, respectively. Lack of leptin causes metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin exerts insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic effects, hence decrease of plasma adiponectin is causative for insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in obesity.

  14. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome: a molecular study and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, S; De Meirleir, L; De Schepper, J; Balduck, N; Jochmans, K; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1997-05-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) lesions can cause a heterogeneous group of mitochondrial degenerative disorders. We report on a 5-year-old patient suffering from the full-blown picture of Pearson syndrome. His symptoms started in the first year of life with failure to thrive, followed by chronic diarrhoea and lactic acidosis at 18 months of age. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed large amounts of mt DNA molecules with a 2.7 kb deletion in all tissues examined. The diagnosis of Pearson syndrome was made initially in the absence of haematological disturbances. In the following months neutropenia, sideroblastic anaemia and hypoparathyroidism developed. Daily administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) and bicarbonate controls the lactic acidosis, while episodic treatments with filgastrim (Neupogen) reverse episodes of severe neutropenia. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation compensate for the hypoparathyroidism. Chronic administration of DCA and supportive treatment for a long period help to stabilize patients with multiorgan dysfunction.

  15. Facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome and Bell's palsy: familial history and recurrence tendency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Baochun; Zhou, Chengyong; Han, Zeli

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to compare genetic predilection and recurrence tendency between facial palsy in Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) and Bell's palsy We carried out an investigation on patients with facial palsy in MRS and those with Bell's palsy who visited the outpatient department in our hospital between February 2009 and February 2013. They were asked about familial history and whether it was the first episode, with the results recorded and compared. There were 16 patients with facial palsy in MRS and 860 patients with Bell's palsy involved in the study. Familial history was positive in 5 of 16 patients (31.3%) with facial palsy in MRS and 56 of 860 patients (6.5%) with Bell's palsy (P palsy in MRS and 88 of 860 cases (10.2%) with Bell's palsy had a history of facial palsy in the past (P Bell's palsy, facial palsy in MRS has an obvious genetic predilection and recurrence tendency. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Phenotype, Cancer Risk, and Surveillance in Beckwith-Wiedemann Syndrome Depending on Molecular Genetic Subgroups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maas, Saskia M.; Vansenne, Fleur; Kadouch, Daniel J. M.; Ibrahim, Abdulla; Bliek, Jet; Hopman, Saskia; Mannens, Marcel M.; Merks, Johannes H. M.; Maher, Eamonn R.; Hennekam, Raoul C.

    Patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) have an increased risk to develop cancer in childhood, especially Wilms tumor and hepatoblastoma. The risk varies depending on the cause of BWS. We obtained clinical and molecular data in our cohort of children with BWS, including tumor occurrences,

  17. Clinical features, diagnosis, treatment and molecular studies in paediatric Cushing's syndrome due to primary nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storr, Helen L; Mitchell, J H; Swords, F M

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Primary nodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PNAH) is a well recognized, but infrequently studied cause of paediatric Cushing's syndrome (CS). OBJECTIVE: To assess presentation, diagnosis, radiological imaging, treatment and molecular analysis of patients with childhood-onset CS due...... to PNAH. PATIENTS: Four males and two females (median age 12.9 years, range 10.9-16.9 years) were studied. RESULTS: All had growth failure (mean height SDS -1.2; range -2.5-0.0), weight gain [mean body mass index (BMI) SDS 3.5; range 2.5-4.6] and clinical virilization, while five had hypertension [mean...... systolic blood pressure (SBP) 130 mmHg, diastolic blood pressure (DBP) 83 mmHg]. One patient had generalized lentigines, one had a tibial chondromyxomatous cyst and two had facial freckling. One patient had a family history of primary nodular adrenocortical disease. The diagnosis of CS was based...

  18. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease...... identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from...

  19. A Concise History of Asperger Syndrome: the short reign of a troublesome diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo eBarahona-Correa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available First described in 1944 by Hans Asperger, it was not before 1994 that Asperger Syndrome (AS was included in the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, only to disappear in the Manual’s 5th edition in 2013. During its brief existence as a diagnostic entity, AS aroused immense interest and controversy. Similar to patients with autism, AS patients show deficits in social interaction, inappropriate communication skills, and interest restriction, but also display a rich variety of subtle clinical characteristics that for many distinguish AS from autism. However, difficulties operationalising diagnostic criteria and differentiating AS from autism ultimately led to its merging into the unifying category of Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Here we briefly review the short history of this fascinating condition.

  20. A Concise History of Asperger Syndrome: The Short Reign of a Troublesome Diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barahona-Corrêa, J B; Filipe, Carlos N

    2015-01-01

    First described in 1944 by Hans Asperger (1944), it was not before 1994 that Asperger Syndrome (AS) was included in the fourth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, only to disappear in the Manual's fifth edition in 2013. During its brief existence as a diagnostic entity, AS aroused immense interest and controversy. Similar to patients with autism, AS patients show deficits in social interaction, inappropriate communication skills, and interest restriction, but also display a rich variety of subtle clinical characteristics that for many distinguish AS from autism. However, difficulties operationalising diagnostic criteria and differentiating AS from autism ultimately led to its merging into the unifying category of Autistic Spectrum Disorders. Here we briefly review the short history of this fascinating condition.

  1. [The Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome. Its natural history and levels of prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez y Martínez, R; Martínez-Carboney, R

    1997-01-01

    We attempted here the delineation of the natural history of the disease and corresponding prevention levels (NHD and PL) of the Wiedemann-Beckwith syndrome according to the classical model of Leavell and Clark for infectious-contagious diseases. This proposal was based on our own series of 39 patients and our previous reports on the didactics of the NHD and PL model, as well as on the relevant literature; with this approach we obtained an useful model which includes the health-disease status, the analysis of risk factors and the integration of the clinical practice with socio-epidemiological medicine. Furthermore, the NHD and PL model allow the selection of the preventive management depending on the clinical stage, namely health or disease. This approach to a Mendelian condition emphasizes that the Leavell and Clark concepts can be advantageously applied to any genetic disease.

  2. Nodding syndrome: origins and natural history of a longstanding epileptic disorder in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, P S; Palmer, V S; Jilek-Aall, L

    2013-06-01

    Repetitive involuntary head nodding was first reported in the 1960s in the Wapogoro tribe of Tanzania. We describe the natural history of head nodding in the Wapogoro tribe, with special reference to the earliest reported dates of onset. We analyzed clinical data from 150 historical patients seen between 1960 and 1971. Head nodding with or without grand mal convulsions was present in 33/150 (∼20%) cases, was mostly familial and equally distributed by gender. Age at onset of head nodding ranged from 2-22 years (mean: ∼10 years) in the period 1934-1962. Head nodding preceded onset of grand mal convulsions by up to 12 months, and motor and psychomotor deficits indicative of brain damage developed with time. Fourteen of the 33 cases died at 13-39 years of age (mean: ∼20 years) while nineteen aged 16-28 years (mean: ∼16 years) were still alive. Historical accounts of head nodding (amesinzia kichwa, Swahili) among the Wapogoro tribe fit the August 2012 World Health Organization (WHO) case definition of probable Nodding Syndrome. Reported to have existed in this population for at least 80 years, Nodding Syndrome is a progressive seizure disorder that leads to generalized convulsions (kifafa), brain damage and death.

  3. Non-syndromic hearing loss gene identification: A brief history and glimpse into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vona, Barbara; Nanda, Indrajit; Hofrichter, Michaela A H; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Haaf, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    From the first identified non-syndromic hearing loss gene in 1995, to those discovered in present day, the field of human genetics has witnessed an unparalleled revolution that includes the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 to the $1000 genome in 2014. This review highlights the classical and cutting-edge strategies for non-syndromic hearing loss gene identification that have been used throughout the twenty year history with a special emphasis on how the innovative breakthroughs in next generation sequencing technology have forever changed candidate gene approaches. The simplified approach afforded by next generation sequencing technology provides a second chance for the many linked loci in large and well characterized families that have been identified by linkage analysis but have presently failed to identify a causative gene. It also discusses some complexities that may restrict eventual candidate gene discovery and calls for novel approaches to answer some of the questions that make this simple Mendelian disorder so intriguing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. A further case of a Prader-Willi syndrome phenotype in a patient with Angelman syndrome molecular defect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Molfetta Greice Andreotti

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS and Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS are distinct human neurogenetic disorders; however, a clinical overlap between AS and PWS has been identified. We report on a further case of a patient showing the PWS phenotype with the AS molecular defect. Despite the PWS phenotype, the DNA methylation analysis of SNRPN revealed an AS pattern. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis showed normal chromosomes 15 and microsatellite analysis showed heterozygous loci inside and outside the 15q11-13 region. The presence of these atypical cases could be more frequent than previously expected and we reinforce that the DNA methylation analysis is important for the correct diagnosis of severe mental deficiency, congenital hypotonia and obesity.

  5. Tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 and Down syndrome: Molecular definition of the region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daumer-Haas, C.; Schuffenhauer, S.; Walther, J.U. [Universitaet Muenchen (Germany); Portsmann, T. [Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Korenberg, J.R.; Schipper, R.D. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    Down syndrome is usually caused by complete trisomy 21. Rarely, it is due to partial trisomy of the segment 21q22. We report on a 33-month-old girl with tetrasomy 21 pter {yields} q22.1 resulting from an extra chromosome idic(21)(q22.1). She has craniofacial traits typical of Down syndrome, including brachycephaly, third fontanel, upward slanting palpebral fissures, round face, and protruding tongue. Speech development is quite delayed whereas motor development is only mildly retarded. The molecular content of the extra isodicentric chromosome was defined by molecular genetic investigations using 13 single copy probes unique to chromosome 21, and SOD1 expression studies. The child was found to have 4 copies of the region defined by D21S16 (21cen) through D21S93 on 21q22.1 and two copies of the remaining region defined by SOD1 {yields} D21S55 {yields} D21S123. In view of the recent assignment of Down syndrome facial characters to the 21q22 region, defined in part by D21S55, it is significant that this child shows a subset of Down syndrome facial manifestations, without duplication of this region. These results suggest that genes contributing to the facial and some of the hand manifestations of Down syndrome also exist in the chromosomal region proximal to D21S55 in band 21q22.1. 34 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: Clinical and molecular aspects of recently identified kidney cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Yukiko; Furuya, Mitsuko; Yao, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that predisposes patients to develop fibrofolliculoma, lung cysts and bilateral multifocal renal tumors, histologically hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The predominant forms of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated renal tumors, hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma are typically less aggressive, and a therapeutic principle for these tumors is a surgical removal with nephron-sparing. The timing of surgery is the most critical element for postoperative renal function, which is one of the important prognostic factors for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome patients. The folliculin gene (FLCN) that is responsible for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome was isolated as a novel tumor suppressor for kidney cancer. Recent studies using murine models for FLCN, a protein encoded by the FLCN gene, and its two binding partners, folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) and folliculin-interacting protein 2 (FNIP2), have uncovered important roles for FLCN, FNIP1 and FNIP2 in cell metabolism, which include AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated energy sensing, Ppargc1a-driven mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a hereditary hamartoma syndrome, which is triggered by metabolic alterations under a functional loss of FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 complex, a critical regulator of kidney cell proliferation rate; a mechanistic insight into the FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 pathway could provide us a basis for developing new therapeutics for kidney cancer. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  7. The natural history of children with joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type: a longitudinal cohort study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheper, Mark C.; Nicholson, Lesley L.; Adams, Roger D.; Tofts, Louise; Pacey, Verity

    2017-01-01

    The objective of the manuscript was to describe the natural history of complaints and disability in children diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and to identify the constructs that underlie functional decline. One hundred and one JHS/EDS-HT

  8. Conventional and molecular cytogenetic features of myelodysplastic syndrome in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L- J; Li, J- Y; Zhu, Y; Qiu, H- R; Pan, J- L; Wang, R; Qian, S- X; Xu, W; Xue, Y- Q

    2007-12-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) constitutes a heterogeneous group of hematopoietic stem cell disorder characterized by peripheral blood cytopenia(s), in the presence of hypercellular bone marrow with features of ineffective hematopoiesis, and susceptibility to acute leukemia (AL). Although the precise pathogenesis of MDS remains to be clarified, cytogenetic abnormalities seem to be involved in its pathogenesis and are considered as an important factor in diagnosis and predicting clinical outcome. To explore the cytogenetic features of Chinese patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Conventional cytogenetic analysis was performed in 88 MDS patients and among them, 34 cases were studied by interphase fluorescence in situ hybridization (I-FISH) with precisely chromosome 8 centromere specific DNA probe and DNA specific probes for 7q32 , 5q31. Of the 88 patients, 45 (51.1%) showed clonal karyotypic abnormalities by CC at diagnosis, including numerical changes (18 cases, 20.5%), structural changes (12 cases, 13.6%), and numerical and structural changes simultaneously(15 cases, 17.0%). Trisomy 8, -5/5q-, and -7/ 7q- account for 20.5%, 15.9%, and 5.7% respectively. Complex karyotypes were observed in 17 patients, the incidence being 19.3% in the whole series of cases. Among 34 MDS patients studied by I-FISH, -5/5q-, -7/7q- and trisomy 8 occurring in 4, 2 and 10 cases respectively for CC were confirmed by I-FISH. 5 cases in 30 cases who did not show -5/5q- by CC displayed this abnormality by I-FISH. 3 cases without -7/7q- by CC presented this aberration by I-FISH. 5 cases with trisomy 8 for I-FISH was not identified this change by CC. The frequent abnormalities are trisomy 8, -5/5q- and -7/ 7q-. FISH is very useful in detecting these alterations in MDS and it is an important complement to CC.

  9. Medial tibial stress syndrome can be diagnosed reliably using history and physical examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, M; Bakker, E W P; Moen, M H; Barten, C C; Teeuwen, R; Weir, A

    2017-02-08

    The majority of sporting injuries are clinically diagnosed using history and physical examination as the cornerstone. There are no studies supporting the reliability of making a clinical diagnosis of medial tibial stress syndrome (MTSS). Our aim was to assess if MTSS can be diagnosed reliably, using history and physical examination. We also investigated if clinicians were able to reliably identify concurrent lower leg injuries. A clinical reliability study was performed at multiple sports medicine sites in The Netherlands. Athletes with non-traumatic lower leg pain were assessed for having MTSS by two clinicians, who were blinded to each others' diagnoses. We calculated the prevalence, percentage of agreement, observed percentage of positive agreement (Ppos), observed percentage of negative agreement (Pneg) and Kappa-statistic with 95%CI. Forty-nine athletes participated in this study, of whom 46 completed both assessments. The prevalence of MTSS was 74%. The percentage of agreement was 96%, with Ppos and Pneg of 97% and 92%, respectively. The inter-rater reliability was almost perfect; k=0.89 (95% CI 0.74 to 1.00), phistory and physical examination, in clinical practice and research settings. We also found that concurrent lower leg injuries are common in athletes with MTSS. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Clinical, cytogenetic, and molecular diagnosis of Angelman syndrome: Estimated prevalence rate in a Danish country

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, M.B.; Brondum-Nielsen, K.; Hansen, L.K.; Wulff, K.

    1995-06-19

    Angelman syndrome (AS) was initially considered a rather rare abnormality, but in later years, with the possibilities for cytogenetic and molecular diagnosis an increasing number of patients have been reported. The incidence is quoted to be around 1:20,000. The etiology of AS is associated with the lack of maternal allele(s) of one or more loci at 15q11-q13, and is considered an effect of parental imprinting of that region, since a similar deficiency of paternal alleles leads to Prader-Willi syndrome. 9 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Molecular Characterization of a Patient Presumed to Have Prader-Willi Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Falaleeva, Marina; Sulsona, Carlos R.; Zielke, Horst R.; Currey, Kathleen M.; de la Grange, Pierre; Aslanzadeh, Vahid; Driscoll, Daniel J.; Stamm, Stefan

    2013-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is caused by the loss of RNA expression from an imprinted region on chromosome 15 that includes SNRPN, SNORD115, and SNORD116. Currently, there are no mouse models that faithfully reflect the human phenotype and investigations rely on human post-mortem material. During molecular characterization of tissue deposited in a public brain bank from a patient diagnosed with Prader-Willi syndrome, we found RNA expression from SNRPN, SNORD115, and SNORD116 which does not su...

  12. Testosterone deficiency syndrome: cellular and molecular mechanism of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Malcolm

    2013-02-01

    There is virtually no correlation between what are generally accepted to be the symptoms of deficient androgen in men and levels of androgens as measured in the laboratory. Now that androgen deficiency is being shown to play a part in conditions as diverse as metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and coronary heart disease, a hypothesis is needed to explain this apparent discrepancy between measured androgen levels and our understanding of the symptoms of androgen deficiency. When the possible mechanisms for androgen actions are considered, one explanation emerges that androgen may act much like insulin in persons with type 2 diabetes mellitus: the degree of androgen resistance may be variable depending on the organs or systems considered. Therefore, the symptoms can result from altered or damaged synthesis of androgen synthesis or regulation, elevated androgen binding, a reduction in tissue response, or decreased as a result of polymorphism and aging. Genomic transcription and translation may also be affected. As with diabetes, in adult male androgen deficiency, it is suggested that the definition of androgen deficiency should be based on individual physiology, with the requirements of the individual at a particular stage of life setting the baseline against which any deficiency of androgens or androgen metabolites, either absolute or relative, is determined. This approach will affect the terminology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of androgen deficiency.

  13. Molecular mechanisms of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zabel Peter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS is a new infectious disease caused by a novel coronavirus that leads to deleterious pulmonary pathological features. Due to its high morbidity and mortality and widespread occurrence, SARS has evolved as an important respiratory disease which may be encountered everywhere in the world. The virus was identified as the causative agent of SARS due to the efforts of a WHO-led laboratory network. The potential mutability of the SARS-CoV genome may lead to new SARS outbreaks and several regions of the viral genomes open reading frames have been identified which may contribute to the severe virulence of the virus. With regard to the pathogenesis of SARS, several mechanisms involving both direct effects on target cells and indirect effects via the immune system may exist. Vaccination would offer the most attractive approach to prevent new epidemics of SARS, but the development of vaccines is difficult due to missing data on the role of immune system-virus interactions and the potential mutability of the virus. Even in a situation of no new infections, SARS remains a major health hazard, as new epidemics may arise. Therefore, further experimental and clinical research is required to control the disease.

  14. Thermal histories of chondrules in solar nebula shocks, including the effect of molecular line cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Melissa A.

    Chondrules are millimeter-sized, silicate (mostly ferromagnesian) igneous spheres found within chondritic meteorites. They are some of the oldest materials in our Solar System, having formed within a few million years of its birth. Chondrules were melted at high temperature (over 1800 K), while they were free-floating objects in the early solar nebula. Their petrology and chemistry constrain their formation, especially their thermal histories. Chondrules provide some of the most powerful constraints on conditions in the solar nebula. Models in which chondrule precursors melted by passage through solar nebula shocks are very promising, and meet most constraints on chondrule formation in broad brush. However, these models have been lacking in some of the relevant physics. Previous shock models have used incorrect approximations to the input radiation boundary condition, and the opacity of solids has been treated simply. Most important, a proper treatment of cooling due to molecular line emission has not been included. In this thesis, the shock model is significantly improved in order to determine if it remains consistent with observational constraints. The appropriate boundary condition for the input radiation and the proper method for calculation of the opacity of solids are determined, and a complete treatment of molecular line cooling due to water is included. Previous estimates of the effect of line cooling predicted chondrule cooling rates in excess of 10,000 K per hour. However, once molecular line cooling due to water was incorporated into the full shock model, it was found that line cooling has a minimal effect on the thermal histories of gas and chondrules. This behavior is attributed mostly to the thermal buffering of the gas due to hydrogen dissociation and recombination, which tends to keep the gas temperature at approximately 2000 K until the column densities of water become optically thick to line emission. Chondrule cooling rates in the range of 10

  15. Freeman–Sheldon Syndrome: First Molecularly Confirmed Case from Sub-Saharan Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ali

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a male baby who has characteristic signs of Freeman–Sheldon syndrome, a rare but recognizable, severe autosomal dominant form of distal arthrogryposis. Diagnosis was based on the distinctive clinical characteristics of the syndrome and confirmed by genetic analysis that showed a de novo missense mutation c.2015G>A (p.Arg672His of the MYH3 gene. We highlight the different features present in our patient and describe the etiology of the Freeman–Sheldon phenotype and how its clinical complications can be dealt with. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first molecularly confirmed case of Freeman–Sheldon syndrome in sub-Saharan Africa.

  16. Next generation sequencing for molecular confirmation of hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez, Manlio F; Cruz-Robles, David; Ines-Real, Selene; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Cárdenas, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Hereditary sudden cardiac death syndromes comprise a wide range of diseases resulting from alteration in cardiac ion channels. Genes involved in these syndromes represent diverse mutations that cause the altered encoding of the diverse proteins constituting these channels, thus affecting directly the currents of the corresponding ions. In the present article we will briefly review how to arrive to a clinical diagnosis and we will present the results of molecular genetic studies made in Mexican subjects attending the SCD Syndromes Clinic of the National Institute of Cardiology of Mexico City. Copyright © 2014 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Angelman syndrome: review of clinical and molecular aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Lynne M

    2014-01-01

    “Angelman syndrome” (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder whose main features are intellectual disability, lack of speech, seizures, and a characteristic behavioral profile. The behavioral features of AS include a happy demeanor, easily provoked laughter, short attention span, hypermotoric behavior, mouthing of objects, sleep disturbance, and an affinity for water. Microcephaly and subtle dysmorphic features, as well as ataxia and other movement disturbances, are additional features seen in most affected individuals. AS is due to deficient expression of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene, which displays paternal imprinting. There are four molecular classes of AS, and some genotype–phenotype correlations have emerged. Much remains to be understood regarding how insufficiency of E6-AP, the protein product of UBE3A, results in the observed neurodevelopmental deficits. Studies of mouse models of AS have implicated UBE3A in experience-dependent synaptic remodeling. PMID:24876791

  18. Evolutionary history of genus Macrobrachium inferred from mitochondrial markers: a molecular clock approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jose, Deepak; Harikrishnan, Mahadevan

    2018-04-17

    Caridea, an infraorder of shrimps coming under Pleocyemata was first reported from the oceans before 417 million years followed by their radiation recorded during the Permian period. Hitherto, about 3877 extant caridean species were accounted within which one quarter constitute freshwater species. Freshwater prawns of genus Macrobrachium (Infraorder Caridea; Family Palaemonidae), with more than 240 species are inhabitants of diverse aquatic habitats like coastal lagoons, lakes, tropical streams, ponds and rivers. Previous studies on Macrobrachium relied on the highly variable morphological characters which were insufficient for accurate diagnosis of natural species groups. Present study focuses on the utility of molecular markers (viz. COI and 16S rRNA) for resolving the evolutionary history of genus Macrobrachium using a combination of phylogeny and timescale components. It is for the first time a molecular clock approach had been carried out towards genus Macrobrachium in a broad aspect with the incorporation of congeners inhabiting diverse geographical realms including endemic species M. striatum from South West coast of India. Molecular results obtained revealed the phylogenetic relationships between congeners of genus Macrobrachium at intra/inter-continental level along with the corresponding evolutionary time estimates.

  19. Molecular genetic analysis of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkonen, H.M.; Kahkonen, T.M.; Leisti, J. [Oulu Univ. Central Hospital (Finland)

    1994-09-01

    Angelman (AS) and Prader-Willi (PWS) syndromes are caused by the loss of either maternal (AS) or paternal (PWS) contributions to chromosome 15q11-q13 region, which is subject to genomic imprinting. DNA methylation has been postulated to play a crucial role in genomic imprinting and the diagnostic test used is based on the differential parental methylation of 15q11-q13. We report here the DNA studies of 39 classical PWS and 12 AS patients. For DNA polymorphism and dosage studies we used nine genomic probes and five microsatellite markers specific for chromosome 15. To study the methylation patterns the probes DN34 (D15S9) and PW71 (D15S63), which show a parental-specific DNA methylation imprint, were used. Among the PWS patients, 29 (77%) cases with a deletion belonging to four different size classes and 9 (23%) with maternal uniparental disomy were found, respectively. Of the AS patients, 8 (67%) had a deletion, 1 (8%) paternal uniparental disomy and 3 (25%) biparental inheritance, respectively. Two sibs with biparental disomy showed a typical methylation pattern for AS, indicating that the maternal chromosome 15 carried a paternal methylation imprint. In the DNA methylation analysis the probe PW71 was useful: in our study it detected all deletions and uniparental disomy patients as well as potential imprinting mutations. The probe DN34 couldn`t identify patients which have a deletion outside the D15S9 locus. In the diagnosis of AS and PWS, the differential methylation of the parental 15q11-q13 offers a rapid diagnostic test but does not distinguish between a deletion and uniparental disomy. In our material the probe 4a.1, which detects DNA sequences from both the locus SNRPN (15q12) and SNRPNP1 (6pter-p21), proved to be reliable detecting all deletions. For detection of parental origin of deletion or uniparental disomy, microsatellite markers proved useful.

  20. Molecular and clinical characterization of Angelman syndrome in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J-L; Qu, Y-J; Jin, Y-W; Wang, H; Yang, Y-L; Jiang, Y-W; Yang, X-Y; Zou, L-P; Song, F

    2014-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurobehavioral disorder caused by lack of function of the maternal copy of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene. In our study, 49 unrelated patients with classic AS phenotypes were confirmed by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR) analysis, short tandem repeat linkage analysis, and mutation screening of the UBE3A gene. Among the Chinese AS patients, 83.7% (41/49) had deletions on maternal chromosome 15q11.2-13. Paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting defects, and UBE3A gene mutations each accounted for 4.1% (2/49). Two AS patients were confirmed by MS-PCR analysis, but the pathogenic mechanism was unknown because their parents' samples were unavailable. Of the two described UBE3A gene mutations, that is, p.Pro400His (c.1199C>A) and p.Asp563Gly (c.1688A>G), the latter has not been reported previously. Mutation transmission analysis showed that the p.Pro400His and p.Asp563Gly mutations originated from asymptomatic mothers. The patients with the maternal deletion showed AS clinical manifestations that were consistent with other studies. However, the incidence of microcephaly (36.7%, 11/30) was lower than that in the Caucasian population (approximately 80%), but similar to that of the Japanese population (34.5%). Our study demonstrated that the occurrence of microcephaly in AS may vary among different populations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Diagnostic yield of molecular autopsy in patients with sudden arrhythmic death syndrome using targeted exome sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nunn, Laurence M; Lopes, Luis R; Syrris, Petros

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: The targeted genetic screening of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS) probands in a molecular autopsy has a diagnostic yield of up to 35%. Exome sequencing has the potential to improve this yield. The primary aim of this study is to examine the feasibility and diagnostic utility...... previously published rare (0.02-0.5%) candidate mutations-a total yield of 29%. Co-segregation fully confirmed two private SCN5A Na channel mutations. Variants of unknown significance were detected in a further 34% of probands. CONCLUSION: Molecular autopsy using targeted exome sequencing has a relatively...

  2. PPAR? population shift produces disease-related changes in molecular networks associated with metabolic syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Jurkowski, W; Roomp, K; Crespo, I; Schneider, J G; del Sol, A

    2011-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation and has an important role in metabolic syndrome. Phosphorylation of the receptor's ligand-binding domain at serine 273 has been shown to change the expression of a large number of genes implicated in obesity. The difference in gene expression seen when comparing wild-type phosphorylated with mutant non-phosphorylated PPARγ may have important consequences for the cellular molecular network,...

  3. Ellis-Van Creveld Syndrome: Prenatal Diagnosis, Molecular Analysis and Genetic Counseling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: Prenatal sonographic identification of endocardial cushion defects in association with shortening of the long bones should alert clinicians to the possibility of EvC syndrome and prompt a careful search of hexadactyly of the hands. Molecular analysis of the EVC and EVC2 genes is helpful in genetic counseling in cases with prenatally detected postaxial polydactyly, thoracic narrowness, short limbs and endocardial cushion defects.

  4. Evolutionary and molecular analysis of the emergent severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Tommy Tsan-Yuk; Liu, Wei; Bowden, Thomas A.; Cui, Ning; Zhuang, Lu; Liu, Kun; Zhang, Yao-Yun; Cao, Wu-Chun; Pybus, Oliver G.

    2013-01-01

    In 2009, a novel Bunyavirus, called severe fever with thrombocytopenia syndrome virus (SFTSV) was identified in the vicinity of Huaiyangshan, China. Clinical symptoms of this zoonotic virus included severe fever, thrombocytopenia, and leukocytopenia, with a mortality rate of ?10%. By the end of 2011 the disease associated with this pathogen had been reported from eleven Chinese provinces and human-to-human transmission suspected. However, current understanding of the evolution and molecular e...

  5. Expert consensus document: Clinical and molecular diagnosis, screening and management of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: an international consensus statement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brioude, Frédéric; Kalish, Jennifer M.; Mussa, Alessandro; Foster, Alison C.; Bliek, Jet; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Boonen, Susanne E.; Cole, Trevor; Baker, Robert; Bertoletti, Monica; Cocchi, Guido; Coze, Carole; de Pellegrin, Maurizio; Hussain, Khalid; Ibrahim, Abdulla; Kilby, Mark D.; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Kratz, Christian P.; Ladusans, Edmund J.; Lapunzina, Pablo; Le Bouc, Yves; Maas, Saskia M.; Macdonald, Fiona; Õunap, Katrin; Peruzzi, Licia; Rossignol, Sylvie; Russo, Silvia; Shipster, Caroleen; Skórka, Agata; Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Tenorio, Jair; Tortora, Chiara; Grønskov, Karen; Netchine, Irène; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Prawitt, Dirk; Tümer, Zeynep; Eggermann, Thomas; Mackay, Deborah J. G.; Riccio, Andrea; Maher, Eamonn R.

    2018-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS), a human genomic imprinting disorder, is characterized by phenotypic variability that might include overgrowth, macroglossia, abdominal wall defects, neonatal hypoglycaemia, lateralized overgrowth and predisposition to embryonal tumours. Delineation of the molecular

  6. Molecular and Cellular Mechanisms Elucidating Neurocognitive Basis of Functional Impairments Associated with Intellectual Disability in Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rachidi, Mohammed; Lopes, Carmela

    2010-01-01

    Down syndrome, the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability, is associated with brain disorders due to chromosome 21 gene overdosage. Molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the neuromorphological alterations and cognitive impairments are reported herein in a global model. Recent advances in Down syndrome research have lead to…

  7. A survey of the clinicopathological and molecular characteristics of patients with suspected Lynch syndrome in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Benedito Mauro; Palmero, Edenir Inêz; López-Kostner, Francisco; Sarroca, Carlos; Vaccaro, Carlos Alberto; Spirandelli, Florencia; Ashton-Prolla, Patricia; Rodriguez, Yenni; de Campos Reis Galvão, Henrique; Reis, Rui Manuel; Escremim de Paula, André; Capochin Romagnolo, Luis Gustavo; Alvarez, Karin; Della Valle, Adriana; Neffa, Florencia; Kalfayan, Pablo German; Spirandelli, Enrique; Chialina, Sergio; Gutiérrez Angulo, Melva; Castro-Mujica, Maria Del Carmen; Sanchez de Monte, Julio; Quispe, Richard; da Silva, Sabrina Daniela; Rossi, Norma Teresa; Barletta-Carrillo, Claudia; Revollo, Susana; Taborga, Ximena; Morillas, L Lena; Tubeuf, Hélène; Monteiro-Santos, Erika Maria; Piñero, Tamara Alejandra; Dominguez-Barrera, Constantino; Wernhoff, Patrik; Martins, Alexandra; Hovig, Eivind; Møller, Pål; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2017-09-05

    Genetic counselling and testing for Lynch syndrome (LS) have recently been introduced in several Latin America countries. We aimed to characterize the clinical, molecular and mismatch repair (MMR) variants spectrum of patients with suspected LS in Latin America. Eleven LS hereditary cancer registries and 34 published LS databases were used to identify unrelated families that fulfilled the Amsterdam II (AMSII) criteria and/or the Bethesda guidelines or suggestive of a dominant colorectal (CRC) inheritance syndrome. We performed a thorough investigation of 15 countries and identified 6 countries where germline genetic testing for LS is available and 3 countries where tumor testing is used in the LS diagnosis. The spectrum of pathogenic MMR variants included MLH1 up to 54%, MSH2 up to 43%, MSH6 up to 10%, PMS2 up to 3% and EPCAM up to 0.8%. The Latin America MMR spectrum is broad with a total of 220 different variants which 80% were private and 20% were recurrent. Frequent regions included exons 11 of MLH1 (15%), exon 3 and 7 of MSH2 (17 and 15%, respectively), exon 4 of MSH6 (65%), exons 11 and 13 of PMS2 (31% and 23%, respectively). Sixteen international founder variants in MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6 were identified and 41 (19%) variants have not previously been reported, thus representing novel genetic variants in the MMR genes. The AMSII criteria was the most used clinical criteria to identify pathogenic MMR carriers although microsatellite instability, immunohistochemistry and family history are still the primary methods in several countries where no genetic testing for LS is available yet. The Latin America LS pathogenic MMR variants spectrum included new variants, frequently altered genetic regions and potential founder effects, emphasizing the relevance implementing Lynch syndrome genetic testing and counseling in all of Latin America countries.

  8. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (Bone marrow syndrome, Aplastic Anemia): Molecular Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Dmitri

    Key Words: Aplastic Anemia (AA), Pluripotential Stem Cells (PSC) Introduction: Aplastic Anemia (AA) is a disorder of the pluripotential stem cells involve a decrease in the number of cells of myeloid, erythroid and megakaryotic lineage [Segel et al. 2000 ]. The etiology of AA include idiopathic cases and secondary aplastic anemia after exposure to drugs, toxins, chemicals, viral infections, lympho-proliferative diseases, radiation, genetic causes, myelodisplastic syndromes and hypoplastic anemias, thymomas, lymphomas. [Brodskyet al. 2005.,Modan et al. 1975., Szklo et al. 1975]. Hematopoietic Acute Radiation Syndrome (or Bone marrow syndrome, or Radiation-Acquired Aplastic Anemia) is the acute toxic syndrome which usually occurs with a dose of irradiation between 0.7 and 10 Gy (70- 1000 rads), depending on the species irradiated. [Waselenko et al., 2004]. The etiology of bone morrow damage from high-level radiation exposure results depends on the radiosensitivity of certain bone marrow cell lines. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Aplastic anemia after radiation exposure is a clinical syndrome that results from a marked disorder of bone marrow blood cell production. [Waselenko et al. 2004] Radiation hematotoxicity is mediated via genotoxic and other specific toxic mechanisms, leading to aplasia, cell apoptosis or necrosis, initiation via genetic mechanisms of clonal disorders, in cases such as the acute radiation-acquired form of AA. AA results from radiation injury to pluripotential and multipotential stem cells in the bone marrow. The clinical signs displayed in reticulocytopenia, anemia, granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and thrombocytopenia. The number of marrow CD34+ cells (multipotential hematopoietic progenitors) and their derivative colony-forming unit{granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) and burst forming unit {erythroid (BFU{E) are reduced markedly in patients with AA. [Guinan 2011, Brodski et al. 2005, Beutler et al.,2000] Cells expressing CD34 (CD34+ cell) are normally

  9. Environmental Catastrophes in the Earth's History Due to Solar Systems Encounters with Giant Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlov, Alexander A.

    2011-01-01

    In its motion through the Milky Way galaxy, the solar system encounters an average density (>=330 H atoms/cubic cm) giant molecular cloud (GMC) approximately every 108 years, a dense (approx 2 x 103 H atoms/cubic cm) GMC every approx 109 years and will inevitably encounter them in the future. However, there have been no studies linking such events with severe (snowball) glaciations in Earth history. Here we show that dramatic climate change can be caused by interstellar dust accumulating in Earth's atmosphere during the solar system's immersion into a dense (approx ,2 x 103 H atoms/cubic cm) GMC. The stratospheric dust layer from such interstellar particles could provide enough radiative forcing to trigger the runaway ice-albedo feedback that results in global snowball glaciations. We also demonstrate that more frequent collisions with less dense GMCs could cause moderate ice ages.

  10. Diagnosis, natural history, and management in vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byers, Peter H; Belmont, John; Black, James; De Backer, Julie; Frank, Michael; Jeunemaitre, Xavier; Johnson, Diana; Pepin, Melanie; Robert, Leema; Sanders, Lynn; Wheeldon, Nigel

    2017-03-01

    Vascular Ehlers Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is an uncommon genetic disorders characterized by arterial aneurysm, dissection and rupture, bowel rupture, and rupture of the gravid uterus. The frequency is estimated as 1/50,000-1/200,000 and results from pathogenic variants in COL3A1, which encodes the chains of type III procollagen, a major protein in vessel walls and hollow organs. Initial diagnosis depends on the recognitions of clinical features, including family history. Management is complex and requires multiple specialists who can respond to and manage the major complications. A summary of recommendations for management include: Identify causative variants in COL3A1 prior to application of diagnosis, modulate life style to minimize injury, risk of vessel/organ rupture, identify and create care team, provide individual plans for emergency care ("vascular EDS passport") with diagnosis and management plan for use when traveling, centralize management at centers of excellence (experience) when feasible, maintain blood pressure in the normal range and treat hypertension aggressively, surveillance of vascular tree by doppler ultrasound, CTA (low radiation alternatives) or MRA if feasible on an annual basis. These recommendations represent a consensus of an international group of specialists with a broad aggregate experience in the care of individuals with vascular EDS that will need to be assessed on a regular basis as new information develops. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Family History of Type 2 Diabetes is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Female Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ticiana Costa Rodrigues

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the association between the family history (FH of type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome (MetS in a group of non-diabetic obese female subjects. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 239 female patients with obesity, regularly attending the Internal Medicine Division’s outpatient clinic (Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, Brazil. The inclusion criteria were patients with body mass index ?30 kg/m2 and absence of type 2 diabetes. The FH was considered positive if a first degree relative had a diagnosis of diabetes. Seventy-four of 239 patients evaluated (30% had a positive FH for type 2 diabetes. Patients with positive FH had higher waist/hip ratio and MetS more often than patients with negative FH. FH of type 2 diabetes was associated with MetS in this sample of non-diabetic obese female patients. Waist/hip ratio and fasting plasma glucose, markers of insulin resistance, were also associated with FH of type 2 diabetes. The simple question: “Do you have a FH of type 2 diabetes?” may help to identify the obese patients that should be better evaluated and intensively treated with the objective of preventing type 2 diabetes.

  12. Practice guidelines for the molecular analysis of Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birch Rachael

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS and Angelman syndrome (AS are clinically distinct neurodevelopmental genetic disorders that map to 15q11-q13. The primary phenotypes are attributable to loss of expression of imprinted genes within this region which can arise by means of a number of mechanisms. The most sensitive single approach to diagnosing both PWS and AS is to study methylation patterns within 15q11-q13; however many techniques exist for this purpose. Given the diversity of techniques available, there is a need for consensus testing and reporting guidelines. Methods Testing and reporting guidelines have been drawn up and agreed in accordance with the procedures of the UK Clinical Molecular Genetics Society and the European Molecular Genetics Quality Network. Results A practical set of molecular genetic testing and reporting guidelines has been developed for these two disorders. In addition, advice is given on appropriate reporting policies, including advice on test sensitivity and recurrence risks. In considering test sensitivity, the possibility of differential diagnoses is discussed. Conclusion An agreed set of practice guidelines has been developed for the diagnostic molecular genetic testing of PWS and AS.

  13. Inside the Melanoplinae: new molecular evidence for the evolutionary history of the Eurasian Podismini (Orthoptera: Acrididae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintauan-Marquier, Ioana C; Amédégnato, Christiane; Nichols, Richard A; Pompanon, François; Grandcolas, Philippe; Desutter-Grandcolas, Laure

    2014-02-01

    The Podismini are melanopline grasshoppers with a Holarctic distribution and well represented in the Eurasian fauna. To investigate their controversial taxonomy and evolutionary history, we studied 86%, 78% and 33% respectively of the Eurasian, European and Asian Palaearctic genera (Otte, 1995; Eades et al., 2013). We reconstructed parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian phylogenies using fragments of four genes (ITS1, 16S, 12S, CO2). We applied a Bayesian molecular clock to estimate the times of species divergence, and the event-based parsimony method to depict the biogeographic framework of the diversification. Our results suggest that the selected Eurasian Podismini constitute a monophyletic group inside the Melanoplinae, provided it includes the North American genus Phaulotettix. The clades proposed by the present study inside the Podismini do not fit the older morphological or cytological classifications, but are in agreement with more recent proposals. Furthermore, our results can be explained by a plausible biogeographic history in which the present geographical distribution of the Eurasian Podismini resulted from known changes, to the Cenozoic climate and vegetation, induced by major geological events including the genesis of high mountain chains (e.g., Himalayas, Altay, Alps) and large deserts (e.g., Gobi, Karakoum, Taklamakan), and the opening of marginal seas (e.g., Bering, Japanese and Yellow Seas). Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. The history of Old World camelids in the light of molecular genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burger, Pamela Anna

    2016-06-01

    Old World camels have come into the focus as sustainable livestock species, unique in their morphological and physiological characteristics and capable of providing vital products even under extreme environmental conditions. The evolutionary history of dromedary and Bactrian camels traces back to the middle Eocene (around 40 million years ago, mya), when the ancestors of Camelus emerged on the North American continent. While the genetic status of the two domestic species has long been established, the wild two-humped camel has only recently been recognized as a separate species, Camelus ferus, based on molecular genetic data. The demographic history established from genome drafts of Old World camels shows the independent development of the three species over the last 100,000 years with severe bottlenecks occurring during the last glacial period and in the recent past. Ongoing studies involve the immune system, relevant production traits, and the global population structure and domestication of Old World camels. Based on the now available whole genome drafts, specific metabolic pathways have been described shedding new light on the camels' ability to adapt to desert environments. These new data will also be at the origin for genome-wide association studies to link economically relevant phenotypes to genotypes and to conserve the diverse genetic resources in Old World camelids.

  15. Self-Perceptions of a High School Female Adolescent with Asperger Syndrome: A Case History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Kemberly V.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to increase the knowledge base about female adolescents with Asperger syndrome (AS). The findings will be useful in providing educators with an insight into the social world of Asperger syndrome in order to give them a better understanding of the syndrome, and to assist them in teaching students more effectively. The…

  16. Bacterial exchange via nanotubes: Lessons learned from the history of molecular biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Ficht

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available DNA transfer between bacteria has a long and storied history. Starting shortly after the discovery by Avery, MacLeod and McCarty that DNA was the genetic material, the exchange of DNA between bacteria confirmed that DNA transfer could stably change the phenotypic behavior of organisms. Continued efforts along these lines led to the discovery of conjugation systems, bacteriophage transduction, bacterial genome mapping, and to some represents the birth of molecular biology. Recent findings by Dubey and Ben-Yehuda expand on these early results by suggesting that exchange between bacteria may occur continuously under certain growth conditions via nanotubes. These nanotubes have a structure similar to cell membranes and are sensitive to mild detergent treatment. Transfer of protein and plasmid DNA was demonstrated directly between neighboring and distant bacteria of the same and different genera. Transfer of RNA cannot be ruled out and the transfer of chromosomal DNA was not addressed. This work may reveal an important mechanism behind the spread of antibiotic resistance, however, much work remains to be done in order to confirm or refute the role of this mechanism in the dangerous spread of antibiotic resistance within the prokaryotic biosphere. The work of early molecular biology pioneers can be used as inspiration, if not as a direct template to guide future experimental confirmation.

  17. Malignant Tregs express low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 in Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsgaard, T; Gjerdrum, L M; Ralfkiaer, E

    2008-01-01

    Sézary syndrome (SS) is an aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. During disease progression, immunodeficiency develops; however, the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms are not fully understood. Here, we study the regulatory T cell (Treg) function and the expression of FOXP3...... in SS. We demonstrate that malignant T cells in 8 of 15 patients stain positive with an anti-FOXP3 antibody. Western blotting analysis shows expression of two low molecular splice forms of FOXP3, but not of wild-type (wt) FOXP3. The malignant T cells produce interleukin-10 and TGF-beta and suppress...... the growth of non-malignant T cells. The Treg phenotype and the production of suppressive cytokines are driven by aberrant activation of Jak3 independent of the FOXP3 splice forms. In contrast to wt FOXP3, the low molecular splice forms of FOXP3 have no inhibitory effect on nuclear factor-kappaB (NF...

  18. Chemical and molecular factors in irritable bowel syndrome: current knowledge, challenges, and unanswered questions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilleri, Michael; Oduyebo, Ibironke; Halawi, Houssam

    2016-11-01

    Several chemical and molecular factors in the intestine are reported to be altered and to have a potentially significant role in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), particularly in IBS with diarrhea. These include bile acids; short-chain fatty acids; mucosal barrier proteins; mast cell products such as histamine, proteases, and tryptase; enteroendocrine cell products; and mucosal mRNAs, proteins, and microRNAs. This article reviews the current knowledge and unanswered questions in the pathobiology of the chemical and molecular factors in IBS. Evidence continues to point to significant roles in pathogenesis of these chemical and molecular mechanisms, which may therefore constitute potential targets for future research and therapy. However, it is still necessary to address the interaction between these factors in the gut and to appraise how they may influence hypervigilance in the central nervous system in patients with IBS. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  19. The endemic gastropod fauna of Lake Titicaca: correlation between molecular evolution and hydrographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroll, Oliver; Hershler, Robert; Albrecht, Christian; Terrazas, Edmundo M; Apaza, Roberto; Fuentealba, Carmen; Wolff, Christian; Wilke, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    Lake Titicaca, situated in the Altiplano high plateau, is the only ancient lake in South America. This 2- to 3-My-old (where My is million years) water body has had a complex history that included at least five major hydrological phases during the Pleistocene. It is generally assumed that these physical events helped shape the evolutionary history of the lake's biota. Herein, we study an endemic species assemblage in Lake Titicaca, composed of members of the microgastropod genus Heleobia, to determine whether the lake has functioned as a reservoir of relic species or the site of local diversification, to evaluate congruence of the regional paleohydrology and the evolutionary history of this assemblage, and to assess whether the geographic distributions of endemic lineages are hierarchical. Our phylogenetic analyses indicate that the Titicaca/Altiplano Heleobia fauna (together with few extralimital taxa) forms a species flock. A molecular clock analysis suggests that the most recent common ancestor (MRCAs) of the Altiplano taxa evolved 0.53 (0.28-0.80) My ago and the MRCAs of the Altiplano taxa and their extralimital sister group 0.92 (0.46-1.52) My ago. The endemic species of Lake Titicaca are younger than the lake itself, implying primarily intralacustrine speciation. Moreover, the timing of evolutionary branching events and the ages of two precursors of Lake Titicaca, lakes Cabana and Ballivián, is congruent. Although Lake Titicaca appears to have been the principal site of speciation for the regional Heleobia fauna, the contemporary spatial patterns of endemism have been masked by immigration and/or emigration events of local riverine taxa, which we attribute to the unstable hydrographic history of the Altiplano. Thus, a hierarchical distribution of endemism is not evident, but instead there is a single genetic break between two regional clades. We also discuss our findings in relation to studies of other regional biota and suggest that salinity tolerance was

  20. Molecular genetics and clinical features of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2015-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an inherited renal cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are at risk of developing benign cutaneous fibrofolliculomas, bilateral pulmonary cysts and spontaneous pneumothoraces, and kidney tumours. Bilateral multifocal renal tumours that develop in BHD syndrome are most frequently hybrid oncocytic tumours and chromophobe renal carcinoma, but can present with other histologies. Germline mutations in the FLCN gene on chromosome 17 are responsible for BHD syndrome--BHD-associated renal tumours display inactivation of the wild-type FLCN allele by somatic mutation or chromosomal loss, confirming that FLCN is a tumour suppressor gene that fits the classic two-hit model. FLCN interacts with two novel proteins, FNIP1 and FNIP2, and with AMPK, a negative regulator of mTOR. Studies with FLCN-deficient cell and animal models support a role for FLCN in modulating the AKT-mTOR pathway. Emerging evidence links FLCN with a number of other molecular pathways and cellular processes important for cell homeostasis that are frequently deregulated in cancer, including regulation of TFE3 and/or TFEB transcriptional activity, amino-acid-dependent mTOR activation through Rag GTPases, TGFβ signalling, PGC1α-driven mitochondrial biogenesis, and autophagy. Currently, surgical intervention is the only therapy available for BHD-associated renal tumours, but improved understanding of the FLCN pathway will hopefully lead to the development of effective forms of targeted systemic therapy for this disease.

  1. Craniofacial development: current concepts in the molecular basis of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gijn, Daniel Richard; Tucker, Abigail S; Cobourne, Martyn T

    2013-07-01

    The human face and skull are an elegant example of the anatomical sophistication that results from the interplay between the molecular cascades and the tissue interactions that are necessary for the proper development of the craniofacial complex. When it fails to develop normally the consequences can have life-long implications for the biological, psychological, and aesthetic wellbeing of an affected person. Among the many syndromes that affect the region, understanding of the biology that underlies Treacher Collins syndrome has advanced in the last decade, particularly concerning the causative TCOF1 gene that encodes TREACLE protein, a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phosphoprotein with an essential function during ribosome biogenesis in cranial neural crest cells. Abnormal growth and differentiation of these cells affect much of the craniofacial skeleton. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Molecular genetics of beta-galactosidase deficiency (GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio syndrome type B)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, K; Yanagisawa, N

    1993-09-01

    Recent advances in the molecular study of beta-galactosidase deficiency (GM1-gangliosidosis and Morquio syndrome type B) are reviewed. Until now, 14 different mutations have been found in the beta-galactosidase gene in patients with this disorder. Gene mutations are heterogeneous, but common and specific mutations have been identified for three types of protracted clinical course; 51Ile-->Thr mutation for Japanese adult/chronic GM1-gangliosidosis, 201Arg-->Cys for Japanese late infantile/juvenile GM1-gangliosidosis and 273Trp-->Leu for Caucasian Morquio syndrome type B. These phenotype-specific mutant genes produce mutant proteins with significant residual enzyme activity, whereas mutant proteins associated with infantile GM1-gangliosidosis patients show complete loss of enzyme activity. The phenotypic variations of this disorder may be related to different mode of intracellular processing and turnover of mutant enzyme proteins.

  3. [Algorithm for the molecular analysis of Bardet-Biedl syndrome in Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Sánchez, Sheila; Álvarez-Satta, María; Pereiro, Inés; Piñeiro-Gallego, M Teresa; Valverde, Diana

    2015-08-21

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a multisystemic genetic disorder, which is not widespread among the Caucasian population, characterized by a highly variable phenotype and great genetic heterogeneity. BBS belongs to a group of diseases called ciliopathies, caused by defects in the structure and/or function of cilia. Due to the diagnostic complexity of the syndrome, the objective of this study was to analyse our whole group of patients in order to create an algorithm to facilitate the routine molecular diagnosis of BBS. We also calculated several epidemiological parameters in our cohort. We analysed 116 BBS patients belonging to 89 families from the whole Spanish geography. All probands fulfilled diagnosis criteria established for BBS. For this, we used: genotyping microarray, direct sequencing and homozygosis mapping (in consanguineous families). By means of the different approaches, it was possible to diagnose 47% of families (21% by genotyping microarray, 18% by direct sequencing of predominant BBS genes, and 8% by homozygosis mapping). With regard to epidemiological data, a prevalence value of 1:407,000 was obtained for BBS in Spain, and a sex ratio of 1.4:1 (men:women). The proposed algorithm, based on the analysis of predominant BBS genes combined with homozygosis mapping, allowed us to confirm the molecular diagnosis in a significant percentage of families with clinically suspected BBS. This diagnostic algorithm will be useful for the improvement of the efficiency of molecular analysis in BBS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular analyses of 17p11.2 deletions in 62 Smith-Magenis syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juyal, R.C.; Figuera, L.E.; Hauge, X. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a clinically recognizable, multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome caused by an interstitial deletion involving band p11.2 of chromosome 17. Toward the molecular definition of the interval defining this microdeletion syndrome, 62 unrelated SMS patients in conjunction with 70 available unaffected parents were molecularly analyzed with respect to the presence or absence of 14 loci in the proximal region of the short arm of chromosome 17. A multifaceted approach was used to determine deletion status at the various loci that combined (1) FISH analysis, (2) PCR and Southern analysis of somatic cell hybrids retaining the deleted chromosome 17 from selected patients, and (3) genotype determination of patients for whom a parent(s) was available at four microsatellite marker loci and at four loci with associated RFLPs. The relative order of two novel anonymous markers and a new microsatellite marker was determined in 17p11.2. The results confirmed that the proximal deletion breakpoint in the majority of SMS patients is located between markers D17S58 (EW301) and D17S446 (FG1) within the 17p11.1-17p11.2 region. The common distal breakpoint was mapped between markers cCI17-638, which lies distal to D17S71, and cCI17-498, which lies proximal to the Charcot Marie-Tooth disease type 1A locus. The locus D17S258 was found to be deleted in all 62 patients, and probes from this region can be used for diagnosis of the SMS deletion by FISH. Ten patients demonstrated molecularly distinct deletions; of these, two patients had smaller deletions and will enable the definition of the critical interval for SMS. 49 refs.

  5. Molecular phylogenetics and evolutionary history of ariid catfishes revisited: a comprehensive sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betancur-R, Ricardo

    2009-07-23

    Ariids or sea catfishes are one of the two otophysan fish families (out of about 67 families in four orders) that inhabit mainly marine and brackish waters (although some species occur strictly in fresh waters). The group includes over 150 species placed in approximately 29 genera and two subfamilies (Galeichthyinae and Ariinae). Despite their global distribution, ariids are largely restricted to the continental shelves due in part to their specialized reproductive behavior (i.e., oral incubation). Thus, among marine fishes, ariids offer an excellent opportunity for inferring historical biogeographic scenarios. Phylogenetic hypotheses available for ariids have focused on restricted geographic areas and comprehensive phylogenies are still missing. This study inferred phylogenetic hypotheses for 123 ariid species in 28 genera from different biogeographic provinces using both mitochondrial and nuclear sequences (up to approximately 4 kb). While the topologies obtained support the monophyly of basal groups, up to ten genera validated in previous morphological studies were incongruent with the molecular topologies. New World ariines were recovered as paraphyletic and Old World ariines were grouped into a well-supported clade that was further divided into subclades mainly restricted to major Gondwanan landmasses. A general area cladogram derived from the area cladograms of ariines and three other fish groups was largely congruent with the geological area cladogram of Gondwana. Nonetheless, molecular clock estimations provided variable results on the timing of ariine diversification (approximately 105-41 mya). This study provides the most comprehensive phylogeny of sea catfishes to date and highlights the need for re-assessment of their classification. While from a topological standpoint the evolutionary history of ariines is mostly congruent with vicariance associated with the sequence of events during Gondwanan fragmentation, ambiguous divergence time estimations

  6. High-resolution molecular epidemiology and evolutionary history of HIV-1 subtypes in Albania.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Salemi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 epidemic in Western Europe is largely due to subtype B. Little is known about the HIV-1 in Eastern Europe, but a few studies have shown that non-B subtypes are quite common. In Albania, where a recent study estimated a ten-fold increase of AIDS incidence during the last six years, subtype A and B account for 90% of the know infections.We investigated the demographic history of HIV-1 subtype A and B in Albania by using a statistical framework based on coalescent theory and phylogeography. High-resolution phylogenetic and molecular clock analysis showed a limited introduction to the Balkan country of subtype A during the late 1980s followed by an epidemic outburst in the early 1990 s. In contrast, subtype B was apparently introduced multiple times between the mid-1970s and mid-1980s. Both subtypes are growing exponentially, although the HIV-1A epidemic displays a faster growth rate, and a significantly higher basic reproductive number R(0. HIV-1A gene flow occurs primarily from the capital Tirane, in the center of the country, to the periphery, while HIV-1B flow is characterized by a balanced exchange between center and periphery. Finally, we calculated that the actual number of infections in Albania is at least two orders of magnitude higher than previously thought.Our analysis demonstrates the power of recently developed computational tools to investigate molecular epidemiology of pathogens, and emphasize the complex factors involved in the establishment of HIV-1 epidemics. We suggest that a significant correlation exists between HIV-1 exponential spread and the socio-political changes occurred during the Balkan wars. The fast growth of a relatively new non-B epidemic in the Balkans may have significant consequences for the evolution of HIV-1 epidemiology in neighboring countries in Eastern and Western Europe.

  7. Molecular genetics of experimental hypertension and the metabolic syndrome: from gene pathways to new therapies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pravenec, Michal; Kurtz, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (2007), s. 941-952 ISSN 0194-911X R&D Projects: GA MZd(CZ) NR8545; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/04/0390; GA ČR(CZ) GA301/06/0028 Grant - others:The Howard Hughes Institute(US) HHMI55005624 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : SHR * CD36 * metabolic syndrome Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.194, year: 2007

  8. Do microplastic particles affect Daphnia magna at the morphological, life history and molecular level?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes K Imhof

    Full Text Available Microplastic particles are ubiquitous not only in marine but also in freshwater ecosystems. However, the impacts of microplastics, consisting of a large variety of synthetic polymers, on freshwater organisms remains poorly understood. We examined the effects of two polymer mixtures on the morphology, life history and on the molecular level of the waterflea Daphnia magna (three different clones. Microplastic particles of ~40 μm were supplied at a low concentration (1% of the food particles leading to an average of ~30 particles in the digestive tract which reflects a high microplastic contamination but still resembles a natural situation. Neither increased mortality nor changes on the morphological (body length, width and tail spine length or reproductive parameters were observed for adult Daphnia. The analyses of juvenile Daphnia revealed a variety of small and rather subtle responses of morphological traits (body length, width and tail spine length. For adult Daphnia, alterations in expression of genes related to stress responses (i.e. HSP60, HSP70 & GST as well as of other genes involved in body function and body composition (i.e. SERCA were observed already 48h after exposure. We anticipate that the adverse effects of microplastic might be influenced by many additional factors like size, shape, type and even age of the particles and that the rather weak effects, as detected in a laboratory, may lead to reduced fitness in a natural multi-stressor environment.

  9. Do microplastic particles affect Daphnia magna at the morphological, life history and molecular level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusek, Jakub; Thiel, Michaela; Wolinska, Justyna; Laforsch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Microplastic particles are ubiquitous not only in marine but also in freshwater ecosystems. However, the impacts of microplastics, consisting of a large variety of synthetic polymers, on freshwater organisms remains poorly understood. We examined the effects of two polymer mixtures on the morphology, life history and on the molecular level of the waterflea Daphnia magna (three different clones). Microplastic particles of ~40 μm were supplied at a low concentration (1% of the food particles) leading to an average of ~30 particles in the digestive tract which reflects a high microplastic contamination but still resembles a natural situation. Neither increased mortality nor changes on the morphological (body length, width and tail spine length) or reproductive parameters were observed for adult Daphnia. The analyses of juvenile Daphnia revealed a variety of small and rather subtle responses of morphological traits (body length, width and tail spine length). For adult Daphnia, alterations in expression of genes related to stress responses (i.e. HSP60, HSP70 & GST) as well as of other genes involved in body function and body composition (i.e. SERCA) were observed already 48h after exposure. We anticipate that the adverse effects of microplastic might be influenced by many additional factors like size, shape, type and even age of the particles and that the rather weak effects, as detected in a laboratory, may lead to reduced fitness in a natural multi-stressor environment. PMID:29145427

  10. Do microplastic particles affect Daphnia magna at the morphological, life history and molecular level?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhof, Hannes K; Rusek, Jakub; Thiel, Michaela; Wolinska, Justyna; Laforsch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Microplastic particles are ubiquitous not only in marine but also in freshwater ecosystems. However, the impacts of microplastics, consisting of a large variety of synthetic polymers, on freshwater organisms remains poorly understood. We examined the effects of two polymer mixtures on the morphology, life history and on the molecular level of the waterflea Daphnia magna (three different clones). Microplastic particles of ~40 μm were supplied at a low concentration (1% of the food particles) leading to an average of ~30 particles in the digestive tract which reflects a high microplastic contamination but still resembles a natural situation. Neither increased mortality nor changes on the morphological (body length, width and tail spine length) or reproductive parameters were observed for adult Daphnia. The analyses of juvenile Daphnia revealed a variety of small and rather subtle responses of morphological traits (body length, width and tail spine length). For adult Daphnia, alterations in expression of genes related to stress responses (i.e. HSP60, HSP70 & GST) as well as of other genes involved in body function and body composition (i.e. SERCA) were observed already 48h after exposure. We anticipate that the adverse effects of microplastic might be influenced by many additional factors like size, shape, type and even age of the particles and that the rather weak effects, as detected in a laboratory, may lead to reduced fitness in a natural multi-stressor environment.

  11. Unraveling molecular pathways shared by Kabuki and Kabuki-like syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lintas, C; Persico, A M

    2017-01-31

    Kabuki syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic syndrome characterized by a typical facial gestalt, variable degrees of intellectual disability, organ malformations, postnatal growth retardation and skeletal abnormalities. So far, KMT2D or KDM6A mutation has been identified as the main cause of KS, accounting for 56%-75% and 3%-8% of cases, respectively. Patients without mutations in 1 of the 2 causative KS genes are often referred to as affected by Kabuki-like syndrome. Overall, they represent approximately 30% of KS cases, pointing toward substantial genetic heterogeneity for this condition. Here, we review all currently available literature describing KS-like phenotypes (or phenocopies) associated with genetic variants located in loci different from KMT2D and KDM6A . We also report on a new KS phenocopy harboring a 5 Mb de novo deletion in chr10p11.22-11.21. An enrichment analysis aimed at identifying functional Gene Ontology classes shared by the 2 known KS causative genes and by new candidate genes currently associated with KS-like phenotypes primarily converges upon abnormal chromatin remodeling and transcriptional dysregulation as pivotal to the pathophysiology of KS phenotypic hallmarks. The identification of mutations in genes belonging to the same functional pathways of KMT2D and KDM6A can help design molecular screenings targeted to KS-like phenotypes. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Molecular biology of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome: injury, adaptation, and apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobb, J P; Buchman, T G; Karl, I E; Hotchkiss, R S

    2000-01-01

    Injury will equal or surpass communicable disease in the year 2020 as the number one cause of lost disability-adjusted life-years worldwide. The major cause of "late death" after trauma is organ dysfunction, commonly as a complication of shock or sepsis. The pathophysiology of injury-induced organ dysfunction is poorly characterized but has been linked to systemic inflammation as a result of infection (either obvious or occult) or massive tissue injury (systemic inflammatory response syndrome, SIRS). Subsequent complications of organ dysfunction, including death, may also stem from immunosuppression characteristic of what has been called the counter-regulatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS). At the cellular level, injurious stimuli trigger adaptive stress responses that include changes in gene expression. Multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) is the summation of these stress responses to severe systemic injury, integrated at the cellular, organ, and host levels. We hypothesize that a complete understanding at the molecular level of the stress responses induced by injury will aid in the development of therapeutic strategies for treating MODS in the critically ill surgical patient. This paper reviews recent data from our Cellular Injury and Adaptation Laboratory relevant to our understanding of MODS pathophysiology, particularly as it relates to stress-induced cell death by apoptosis. Our data suggest that inhibition of stress-induced apoptosis may improve survival after severe injury.

  13. Genotypic classification of patients with Wolfram syndrome: insights into the natural history of the disease and correlation with phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Heredia, Miguel López; Clèries, Ramón; Nunes, Virginia

    2013-07-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a degenerative, recessive rare disease with an onset in childhood. It is caused by mutations in WFS1 or CISD2 genes. More than 200 different variations in WFS1 have been described in patients with Wolfram syndrome, which complicates the establishment of clear genotype-phenotype correlation. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the role of WFS1 mutations and update the natural history of the disease. This study analyzed clinical and genetic data of 412 patients with Wolfram syndrome published in the last 15 years. (i) 15% of published patients do not fulfill the current -inclusion criterion; (ii) genotypic prevalence differences may exist among countries; (iii) diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy might not be the first two clinical features in some patients; (iv) mutations are nonuniformly distributed in WFS1; (v) age at onset of diabetes mellitus, hearing defects, and diabetes insipidus may depend on the patient's genotypic class; and (vi) disease progression rate might depend on genotypic class. New genotype-phenotype correlations were established, disease progression rate for the general population and for the genotypic classes has been calculated, and new diagnostic criteria have been proposed. The conclusions raised could be important for patient management and counseling as well as for the development of treatments for Wolfram syndrome.

  14. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  15. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of human microtia via a pig model of HOXA1 syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruimin Qiao

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Microtia is a congenital malformation of the outer ears. Although both genetic and environmental components have been implicated in microtia, the genetic causes of this innate disorder are poorly understood. Pigs have naturally occurring diseases comparable to those in humans, providing exceptional opportunity to dissect the molecular mechanism of human inherited diseases. Here we first demonstrated that a truncating mutation in HOXA1 causes a monogenic disorder of microtia in pigs. We further performed RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq analysis on affected and healthy pig embryos (day 14.25. We identified a list of 337 differentially expressed genes (DEGs between the normal and mutant samples, shedding light on the transcriptional network involving HOXA1. The DEGs are enriched in biological processes related to cardiovascular system and embryonic development, and neurological, renal and urological diseases. Aberrant expressions of many DEGs have been implicated in human innate deformities corresponding to microtia-associated syndromes. After applying three prioritizing algorithms, we highlighted appealing candidate genes for human microtia from the 337 DEGs. We searched for coding variants of functional significance within six candidate genes in 147 microtia-affected individuals. Of note, we identified one EVC2 non-synonymous mutation (p.Asp1174Asn as a potential disease-implicating variant for a human microtia-associated syndrome. The findings advance our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying human microtia, and provide an interesting example of the characterization of human disease-predisposing variants using pig models.

  16. The prospect of molecular therapy for Angelman syndrome and other monogenic neurologic disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Angelman syndrome is a monogenic neurologic disorder that affects 1 in 15,000 children, and is characterized by ataxia, intellectual disability, speech impairment, sleep disorders, and seizures. The disorder is caused by loss of central nervous system expression of UBE3A, a gene encoding a ubiquitin ligase. Current treatments focus on the management of symptoms, as there have not been therapies to treat the underlying molecular cause of the disease. However, this outlook is evolving with advances in molecular therapies, including artificial transcription factors a class of engineered DNA-binding proteins that have the potential to target a specific site in the genome. Results Here we review the recent progress and prospect of targeted gene expression therapies. Three main issues that must be addressed to advance toward human clinical trials are specificity, toxicity, and delivery. Conclusions Artificial transcription factors have the potential to address these concerns on a level that meets and in some cases exceeds current small molecule therapies. We examine the possibilities of such approaches in the context of Angelman syndrome, as a template for other single-gene, neurologic disorders. PMID:24946931

  17. Biological chemistry as a foundation of DNA genealogy: the emergence of "molecular history".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klyosov, A A

    2011-05-01

    foundation for "molecular history", in which the principal tool is high-technology analysis of DNA molecules of both our contemporaries and excavated ancient DNA samples, along with their biological kinetics.

  18. A molecular and histological characterization of cartilage from patients with Morquio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franceschi, L; Roseti, L; Desando, G; Facchini, A; Grigolo, B

    2007-11-01

    To investigate the gene expression profile and the histological aspects of articular cartilage of patients affected by Morquio syndrome, a lysosomal storage disease characterized by the accumulation of glycosaminoglycans within the cells which result in abnormal formation and growth of the skeletal system. Articular cartilage samples were obtained from the femoral condyle of two siblings with Morquio syndrome during surgery performed to treat valgus knee. As controls, four biopsy samples of healthy cartilage were obtained from four different male multiorgan donors. A Real-Time Polymerase Chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of type I and II collagens and aggrecan mRNAs. Histological and immunohistochemical analyses for some matrix proteins were carried out on paraffin embedded sections. Type I collagen mRNA mean level was higher in the samples of patients with Morquio syndrome compared to controls. Type II collagen and aggrecan mRNAs' mean expression was instead lower. The morphological appearance of the cartilage showed a poorly organized tissue structure with not homogeneously distributed cells that were larger compared to normal chondrocytes due to the presence inside the vacuoles of proteoglycans which were not metabolized. Chondrocytes were negative for collagen II immunostaining while the extracellular matrix was weakly positive. Collagen type I immunostaining was positive at cellular level. Keratan sulfate showed diffuse positivity and chondroitin-6-sulfate was present throughout the cartilaginous thickness. In cartilage of patients with Morquio syndrome, a low expression of collagen type II and a high expression of collagen type I both at protein and molecular levels are evidentiated. This finding could give evidence of the reduction in ankle and knee joint movement observable in these patients.

  19. Concepts, Diagnosis and the History of Medicine: Historicising Ian Hacking and Munchausen Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millard, Chris

    2017-08-01

    Concepts used by historians are as historical as the diagnoses or categories that are studied. The example of Munchausen syndrome (deceptive presentation of illness in order to adopt the 'sick role') is used to explore this. Like most psychiatric diagnoses, Munchausen syndrome is not thought applicable across time by social historians of medicine. It is historically specific, drawing upon twentieth-century anthropology and sociology to explain motivation through desire for the 'sick role'. Ian Hacking's concepts of 'making up people' and 'looping effects' are regularly utilised outside of the context in which they are formed. However, this context is precisely the same anthropological and sociological insight used to explain Munchausen syndrome. It remains correct to resist the projection of Munchausen syndrome into the past. However, it seems inconsistent to use Hacking's concepts to describe identity formation before the twentieth century as they are given meaning by an identical context.

  20. Molecular and life-history effects of a natural toxin on herbivorous and non-target soil arthropods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Ommen Kloeke, A. E. Elaine; Gestel, Cornelis A. M. van; Styrishave, Bjarne

    2012-01-01

    -expression of especially stress-related genes and sugar metabolism. The regulation of a gene encoding a precursor of follistatin, furthermore, implied the inhibition of reproduction and may be an important molecular target that can be linked to the observed adverse effect of life-history traits.......Natural toxins, such as isothiocyanate (ITC), are harmful secondary metabolites produced by plants. Many natural toxins occur in commercial crops, yet their possible negative repercussions on especially non-target soil organisms are largely unknown. This study examined life-history and gene...

  1. The molecular basis of variable phenotypic severity among common missense mutations causing Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Kyla; Selfridge, Jim; Lagger, Sabine; Connelly, John; De Sousa, Dina; Kerr, Alastair; Webb, Shaun; Guy, Jacky; Merusi, Cara; Koerner, Martha V; Bird, Adrian

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome is caused by mutations in the X-linked MECP2 gene, which encodes a chromosomal protein that binds to methylated DNA. Mouse models mirror the human disorder and therefore allow investigation of phenotypes at a molecular level. We describe an Mecp2 allelic series representing the three most common missense Rett syndrome (RTT) mutations, including first reports of Mecp2[R133C] and Mecp2[T158M] knock-in mice, in addition to Mecp2[R306C] mutant mice. Together these three alleles comprise ∼25% of all RTT mutations in humans, but they vary significantly in average severity. This spectrum is mimicked in the mouse models; R133C being least severe, T158M most severe and R306C of intermediate severity. Both R133C and T158M mutations cause compound phenotypes at the molecular level, combining compromised DNA binding with reduced stability, the destabilizing effect of T158M being more severe. Our findings contradict the hypothesis that the R133C mutation exclusively abolishes binding to hydroxymethylated DNA, as interactions with DNA containing methyl-CG, methyl-CA and hydroxymethyl-CA are all reduced in vivo. We find that MeCP2[T158M] is significantly less stable than MeCP2[R133C], which may account for the divergent clinical impact of the mutations. Overall, this allelic series recapitulates human RTT severity, reveals compound molecular aetiologies and provides a valuable resource in the search for personalized therapeutic interventions. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... worldwide. This condition has a higher prevalence in Denmark, Sweden, and Norway, where it affects at least ... I. The Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: natural history, molecular basis, and clinical outcome. Circulation. 2006 Feb ...

  3. Treacher Collins syndrome: a clinical and molecular study based on a large series of patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Marie; Geneviève, David; Ostertag, Agnès; Marlin, Sandrine; Lacombe, Didier; Martin-Coignard, Dominique; Coubes, Christine; David, Albert; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Vilain, Catheline; Dieux-Coeslier, Anne; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Isidor, Bertrand; Jacquemont, Marie-Line; Julia, Sophie; Layet, Valérie; Naudion, Sophie; Odent, Sylvie; Pasquier, Laurent; Pelras, Sybille; Philip, Nicole; Pierquin, Geneviève; Prieur, Fabienne; Aboussair, Nisrine; Attie-Bitach, Tania; Baujat, Geneviève; Blanchet, Patricia; Blanchet, Catherine; Dollfus, Hélène; Doray, Bérénice; Schaefer, Elise; Edery, Patrick; Giuliano, Fabienne; Goldenberg, Alice; Goizet, Cyril; Guichet, Agnès; Herlin, Christian; Lambert, Laetitia; Leheup, Bruno; Martinovic, Jelena; Mercier, Sandra; Mignot, Cyril; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Perez, Marie-José; Pinson, Lucile; Puechberty, Jacques; Willems, Marjolaine; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Szakszon, Kateline; Szaskon, Kateline; Toutain, Annick; Verloes, Alain; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Sanchez, Elodie; Sarda, Pierre; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Collet, Corinne

    2016-01-01

    Treacher Collins/Franceschetti syndrome (TCS; OMIM 154500) is a disorder of craniofacial development belonging to the heterogeneous group of mandibulofacial dysostoses. TCS is classically characterized by bilateral mandibular and malar hypoplasia, downward-slanting palpebral fissures, and microtia. To date, three genes have been identified in TCS:,TCOF1, POLR1D, and POLR1C. We report a clinical and extensive molecular study, including TCOF1, POLR1D, POLR1C, and EFTUD2 genes, in a series of 146 patients with TCS. Phenotype-genotype correlations were investigated for 19 clinical features, between TCOF1 and POLR1D, and the type of mutation or its localization in the TCOF1 gene. We identified 92/146 patients (63%) with a molecular anomaly within TCOF1, 9/146 (6%) within POLR1D, and none within POLR1C. Among the atypical negative patients (with intellectual disability and/or microcephaly), we identified four patients carrying a mutation in EFTUD2 and two patients with 5q32 deletion encompassing TCOF1 and CAMK2A in particular. Congenital cardiac defects occurred more frequently among patients with TCOF1 mutation (7/92, 8%) than reported in the literature. Even though TCOF1 and POLR1D were associated with extreme clinical variability, we found no phenotype-genotype correlation. In cases with a typical phenotype of TCS, 6/146 (4%) remained with an unidentified molecular defect.

  4. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome: prenatal diagnosis, molecular analysis and genetic counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Su, Yi-Ning; Hsu, Chin-Yuan; Chern, Schu-Rern; Tsai, Fuu-Jen; Wu, Pei-Chen; Chen, Po-Tsang; Wang, Wayseen

    2010-12-01

    To present the perinatal findings and molecular genetic analysis of two siblings with Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome. A 33-year-old woman, gravida 3, para 1, was referred for genetic counseling at 18 gestational weeks because of recurrent fetal skeletal dysplasia. Two years previously, she had delivered a 1,316-g dead male baby at 28 gestational weeks with a karyotype of 46,XY, postaxial polydactyly of the hands, thoracic narrowness, endocardial cushion defects, transposition of the great arteries, shortening of the long bones, malposition of the toes, and hypoplastic nails. During this pregnancy, prenatal ultrasound at 18 gestational weeks revealed shortening of the long bones (equivalent to 15 weeks), postaxial polydactyly of both hands, thoracic narrowness, and endocardial cushion defects. The pregnancy was subsequently terminated, and a 236-g female fetus was delivered with a karyotype of 46,XX, postaxial polydactyly of the hands, thoracic dysplasia, endocardial cushion defects, shortening of the long bones, and malposition of the toes and hypoplastic nails. The phenotype of each of the two siblings was consistent with EVC syndrome. Molecular analysis of the EVC and EVC2 genes revealed heterozygous mutations in the EVC2 gene. A heterozygous deletion mutation of a 26-bp deletion of c.871-2_894del26 encompassing the junction between intron 7 and exon 8 of the EVC2 gene was found in the mother and two siblings, and a heterozygous nonsense mutation of c.1195C >T, p.R399X in exon 10 of the EVC2 gene was found in the father and two siblings. Prenatal sonographic identification of endocardial cushion defects in association with shortening of the long bones should alert clinicians to the possibility of EvC syndrome and prompt a careful search of hexadactyly of the hands. Molecular analysis of the EVC and EVC2 genes is helpful in genetic counseling in cases with prenatally detected postaxial polydactyly, thoracic narrowness, short limbs and endocardial cushion defects

  5. Patients with history of hyperemesis gravidarum have similar symptoms during egg stimulation and develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: case series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejzo, Marlena S.; Romero, Roberto; Goodwin, T. Murphy

    2009-01-01

    Objective To investigate the symptoms and outcomes of ovarian stimulation in patients with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum. Design Retrospective case series. Setting Research laboratory of a university hospital. Patients Participants in an ongoing study on hyperemesis gravidarum that reported ovarian stimulation for gestational surrogacy. Interventions Review of medical records. Main Outcome Measures Pregnancy history, symptoms, estradiol level and mature oocyte number in cases, and nausea and vomiting level reported in surrogate. Results Three cases in their early thirties with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum presented with severe nausea and vomiting during ovarian stimulation and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Gestational carriers reported normal nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Conclusions This series provides lessons for in vitro fertilization for cases with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum and their gestational carriers as well as insight into the cause of hyperemesis gravidarum and its potential role in fertility. A link between hyperemesis gravidarum and an evolutionary advantage of increased fertility suggests a novel theory to explain the selection for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. PMID:19878938

  6. Patients with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum have similar symptoms during egg stimulation and develop ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome: case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejzo, Marlena S; Romero, Roberto; Goodwin, T Murphy

    2010-01-01

    To investigate the symptoms and outcomes of ovarian stimulation in patients with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum. Retrospective case series. Research laboratory of a university hospital. Participants in an ongoing study on hyperemesis gravidarum that reported ovarian stimulation for gestational surrogacy. Review of medical records. Pregnancy history, symptoms, estradiol level and mature oocyte number in cases, and nausea and vomiting level reported in surrogate. Three cases in their early thirties with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum presented with severe nausea and vomiting during ovarian stimulation and ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome. Gestational carriers reported normal nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. This series provides lessons for in vitro fertilization for cases with a history of hyperemesis gravidarum and their gestational carriers as well as insight into the cause of hyperemesis gravidarum and its potential role in fertility. A link between hyperemesis gravidarum and an evolutionary advantage of increased fertility suggests a novel theory to explain the selection for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy. Copyright 2010 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology of Staphylococcal Toxic Shock Syndrome in the United Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Hema; Smith, Debra; Turner, Claire E.; Game, Laurence; Pichon, Bruno; Hope, Russell; Hill, Robert; Kearns, Angela

    2018-01-01

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) was originally described in menstruating women and linked to TSS toxin 1 (TSST-1)–producing Staphylococcus aureus. Using UK national surveillance data, we ascertained clinical, molecular and superantigenic characteristics of TSS cases. Average annual TSS incidence was 0.07/100,000 population. Patients with nonmenstrual TSS were younger than those with menstrual TSS but had the same mortality rate. Children types are strongly associated with the tst+ clonal complex (CC) 30 methicillin-sensitive S. aureus lineage, which accounted for 49.4% of all TSS and produced more TSST-1 and superantigen bioactivity than did tst+ CC30 methicillin-resistant S. aureus strains. Better understanding of this MSSA lineage and infections in children could focus interventions to prevent TSS in the future. PMID:29350159

  9. Prenatal molecular testing for Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggermann, Thomas; Brioude, Frédéric; Russo, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann and Silver-Russell syndromes (BWS/SRS) are two imprinting disorders (IDs) associated with disturbances of the 11p15.5 chromosomal region. In BWS, epimutations and genomic alterations within 11p15.5 are observed in >70% of patients, whereas in SRS they are observed in about 60% ......, the consequences for prenatal genetic testing and counseling and our cumulative experience in dealing with these disorders.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 28 October 2015; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2015.224....... molecular findings underlying these disorders are a challenge not only for laboratories offering these tests but also for geneticists counseling affected families. The scope of counseling must consider the range of detectable disturbances and their origin, the lack of precise quantitative knowledge...

  10. Ellis-van Creveld Syndrome in Grey Alpine Cattle: Morphologic, Immunophenotypic, and Molecular Characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscatello, L V; Benazzi, C; Dittmer, K E; Thompson, K G; Murgiano, L; Drögemüller, C; Avallone, G; Gentile, A; Edwards, J F; Piffer, C; Bolcato, M; Brunetti, B

    2015-09-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a human autosomal recessive disorder caused by a mutation in either the EVC or EVC2 gene, and presents with short limbs, polydactyly, and ectodermal and heart defects. The aim of this study was to understand the pathologic basis by which deletions in the EVC2 gene lead to chondrodysplastic dwarfism and to describe the morphologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular hallmarks of EvC syndrome in cattle. Five Grey Alpine calves, with a known mutation in the EVC2 gene, were autopsied. Immunohistochemistry was performed on bone using antibodies to collagen II, collagen X, sonic hedgehog, fibroblast growth factor 2, and Ki67. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was performed to analyze EVC1 and EVC2 gene expression. Autopsy revealed long bones that were severely reduced in length, as well as genital and heart defects. Collagen II was detected in control calves in the resting, proliferative, and hypertrophic zones and in the primary and secondary spongiosa, with a loss of labeling in the resting zone of 2 dwarfs. Collagen X was expressed in hypertrophic zone in the controls but was absent in the EvC cases. In affected calves and controls, sonic hedgehog labeled hypertrophic chondrocytes and primary and secondary spongiosa similarly. FGF2 was expressed in chondrocytes of all growth plate zones in the control calves but was lost in most EvC cases. The Ki67 index was lower in cases compared with controls. EVC and EVC2 transcripts were detected. Our data suggest that EvC syndrome of Grey Alpine cattle is a disorder of chondrocyte differentiation, with accelerated differentiation and premature hypertrophy of chondrocytes, and could be a spontaneous model for the equivalent human disease. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Molecular basis for the Kallmann syndrome-linked fibroblast growth factor receptor mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thurman, Ryan D.; Kathir, Karuppanan Muthusamy; Rajalingam, Dakshinamurthy [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States); Kumar, Thallapuranam K. Suresh, E-mail: sthalla@uark.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701 (United States)

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural basis of the Kallmann syndrome is elucidated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann syndrome mutation (A168S) induces a subtle conformational change(s). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural interactions mediated by beta-sheet G are most perturbed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ligand (FGF)-receptor interaction(s) is completely abolished by Kallmann mutation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Kallmann mutation directly affects the FGF signaling process. -- Abstract: Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a developmental disease that expresses in patients as hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia. KS is commonly associated with mutations in the extracellular D2 domain of the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR). In this study, for the first time, the molecular basis for the FGFR associated KS mutation (A168S) is elucidated using a variety of biophysical experiments, including multidimensional NMR spectroscopy. Secondary and tertiary structural analysis using far UV circular dichroism, fluorescence and limited trypsin digestion assays suggest that the KS mutation induces subtle tertiary structure change in the D2 domain of FGFR. Results of isothermal titration calorimetry experiments show the KS mutation causes a 10-fold decrease in heparin binding affinity and also a complete loss in ligand (FGF-1) binding. {sup 1}H-{sup 15}N chemical perturbation data suggest that complete loss in the ligand (FGF) binding affinity is triggered by a subtle conformational change that disrupts crucial structural interactions in both the heparin and the FGF binding sites in the D2 domain of FGFR. The novel findings reported in this study are expected to provide valuable clues toward a complete understanding of the other genetic diseases linked to mutations in the FGFR.

  12. Phenotypic and molecular assessment of seven patients with 6p25 deletion syndrome: Relevance to ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritch Robert

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Thirty-nine patients have been described with deletions involving chromosome 6p25. However, relatively few of these deletions have had molecular characterization. Common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome patients include hydrocephalus, hearing loss, and ocular, craniofacial, skeletal, cardiac, and renal malformations. Molecular characterization of deletions can identify genes that are responsible for these phenotypes. Methods We report the clinical phenotype of seven patients with terminal deletions of chromosome 6p25 and compare them to previously reported patients. Molecular characterization of the deletions was performed using polymorphic marker analysis to determine the extents of the deletions in these seven 6p25 deletion syndrome patients. Results Our results, and previous data, show that ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most highly penetrant phenotypes of the 6p25 deletion syndrome. While deletion of the forkhead box C1 gene (FOXC1 probably underlies the ocular dysgenesis, no gene in this region is known to be involved in hearing impairment. Conclusions Ocular dysgenesis and hearing impairment are the two most common phenotypes of 6p25 deletion syndrome. We conclude that a locus for dominant hearing loss is present at 6p25 and that this locus is restricted to a region distal to D6S1617. Molecular characterization of more 6p25 deletion patients will aid in refinement of this locus and the identification of a gene involved in dominant hearing loss.

  13. Molecular characterization of HDAC8 deletions in individuals with atypical Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helgeson, Maria; Keller-Ramey, Jennifer; Knight Johnson, Amy; Lee, Jennifer A; Magner, Daniel B; Deml, Brett; Deml, Jacea; Hu, Ying-Ying; Li, Zejuan; Donato, Kirsten; Das, Soma; Laframboise, Rachel; Tremblay, Sandra; Krantz, Ian; Noon, Sarah; Hoganson, George; Burton, Jennifer; Schaaf, Christian P; Del Gaudio, Daniela

    2018-03-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a rare neurodevelopmental syndrome for which mutations in five causative genes that encode (SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21) or regulate (NIPBL, HDAC8) the cohesin complex, account for ~70% of cases. Herein we report on four female Subjects who were found to carry novel intragenic deletions in HDAC8. In one case, the deletion was found in mosaic state and it was determined to be present in ~38% of blood lymphocytes and in nearly all cells of a buccal sample. All deletions, for which parental blood samples were available, were shown to have arisen de novo. X-chromosome inactivation studies demonstrated marked skewing, suggesting strong selection against the mutated HDAC8 allele. Based on an investigation of the deletion breakpoints, we hypothesize that microhomology-mediated replicative mechanisms may be implicated in the formation of some of these rearrangements. This study broadens the mutational spectrum of HDAC8, provides the first description of a causative HDAC8 somatic mutation and increases the knowledge on possible mutational mechanisms underlying copy number variations in HDAC8. Moreover our findings highlight the clinical utility of considering copy number analysis in HDAC8 as well as the analysis on DNA from more than one tissue as an indispensable part of the routine molecular diagnosis of individuals with CdLS or CdLS-overlapping features.

  14. Unambiguous molecular detections with multiple genetic approach for the complicated chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Lung-Huang

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome 22q11 deletion syndrome (22q11DS causes a developmental disorder during the embryonic stage, usually because of hemizygous deletions. The clinical pictures of patients with 22q11DS vary because of polymorphisms: on average, approximately 93% of affected individuals have a de novo deletion of 22q11, and the rest have inherited the same deletion from a parent. Methods using multiple genetic markers are thus important for the accurate detection of these microdeletions. Methods We studied 12 babies suspected to carry 22q11DS and 18 age-matched healthy controls from unrelated Taiwanese families. We determined genomic variance using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA. Results Changes in genomic copy number were significantly associated with clinical manifestations for the classical criteria of 22q11DS using MPLA and qPCR (p Conclusion Both MLPA and qPCR could produce a clearly defined range of deleted genomic DNA, whereas there must be a deleted genome that is not distinguishable using MLPA. These data demonstrate that such multiple genetic approaches are necessary for the unambiguous molecular detection of these types of complicated genomic syndromes.

  15. Molecular cytogenetic detection of chromosome 15 deletions in patients with Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chadwick, D.E.; Weksberg, R.; Shuman, C. [Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are clinically distinct genetic disorders involving alterations of chromosome 15q11-q13. Approximately 75% of individuals with PWS and AS have deletions within 15q11-q13 by molecular analysis. We have evaluated fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for the clinical laboratory detection of del(15)(q11q13) using the cosmid probes D15S11 and GABRB3 (ONCOR, Gaithersburg, NY). 4/4 PWS and 1/1 AS patients previously identified as having cytogenetic deletions were deleted for both probes. In a prospectively ascertained series of 54 patient samples referred to rule out either PWS or AS, 8 were deleted for D15S11 and GABRB3. In addition, an atypical deletion patient with PWS was also identified who was found to be deleted for GABRB3 but not D15S11. The SNRPN locus was also deleted in this patient. Only 4 of the 9 patient samples having molecular cytogenetic deletions were clearly deleted by high resolution banding (HRB) analysis. The microscopic and submicroscopic deletions have been confirmed by dinucleotide (CA) repeat analysis. Microsatellite polymorphism analysis was also used to demonstrate that five non-deletion patients in this series had biparental inheritance of chromosome 15, including region q11-q13. Deletions were not detected by either HRB, FISH or microsatellite polymorphism analysis in samples obtained from parents of the deletion patients. Methylation studies of chromosome 15q11-q13 are in progress for this series of PWS and AS families. FISH analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 in patients with PWS and AS is a rapid, sensitive and reliable method for deletion detection.

  16. Molecular and clinical analysis of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in the United Arab Emirates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Aiman

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ellis-van Creveld (EvC syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplastic condition with clinical manifestations that include short-limbs and ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. In about two thirds of patients, mutations in either EVC or EVC2 genes have been found to be the underlying cause. Methods In this paper, we describe the molecular (DNA sequencing and clinical analysis of six children diagnosed with EvC from four different families from the United Arab Emirates (UAE. Results All the children had the common clinical and radiological features of this syndrome. However, DNA sequence analysis of the genes shown to be involved (EVC and EVC2 revealed a novel splice site mutation (c.2047-1G>T in intron 13 of EVC2 gene in one family. In addition, we confirm previous mutational analyses that showed a truncating mutation in exon 13 of EVC gene (c.1813C>T; p.Q605X in the second family and a single nucleotide deletion (c.981delG; p.K327fs in exon 8 of EVC2 gene in the third family. No mutations in the exons, splice sites or the promoter regions of either gene have been found in the index case of the fourth family who exhibited "EvC-like" features. Conclusions Given the small population size of UAE, our data illustrates further the molecular heterogeneity observed in EvC patients and excludes the possibility of a common founder effect for this condition in the UAE reflecting the current ethnic diversity of the country.

  17. Molecular and clinical analysis of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in the United Arab Emirates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bassam R; Akawi, Nadia A; Chedid, Faris; Bakir, Mahmood; Ur Rehman, Moghis; Rahmani, Aiman; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2010-02-25

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is an autosomal recessive chondrodysplastic condition with clinical manifestations that include short-limbs and ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. In about two thirds of patients, mutations in either EVC or EVC2 genes have been found to be the underlying cause. In this paper, we describe the molecular (DNA sequencing) and clinical analysis of six children diagnosed with EvC from four different families from the United Arab Emirates (UAE). All the children had the common clinical and radiological features of this syndrome. However, DNA sequence analysis of the genes shown to be involved (EVC and EVC2) revealed a novel splice site mutation (c.2047-1G>T) in intron 13 of EVC2 gene in one family. In addition, we confirm previous mutational analyses that showed a truncating mutation in exon 13 of EVC gene (c.1813C>T; p.Q605X) in the second family and a single nucleotide deletion (c.981delG; p.K327fs) in exon 8 of EVC2 gene in the third family. No mutations in the exons, splice sites or the promoter regions of either gene have been found in the index case of the fourth family who exhibited "EvC-like" features. Given the small population size of UAE, our data illustrates further the molecular heterogeneity observed in EvC patients and excludes the possibility of a common founder effect for this condition in the UAE reflecting the current ethnic diversity of the country.

  18. Brief Report: Life History and Neuropathology of a Gifted Man with Asperger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenheim, Karen, M.; Escobar, Alfonso; Rapin, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    Despite recent interest in the pathogenesis of the autism spectrum disorders (pervasive developmental disorders), neuropathological descriptions of brains of individuals with well documented clinical information and without potentially confounding symptomatology are exceptionally rare. Asperger syndrome differs from classic autism by lack of…

  19. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullegama, Sureni V.; Alaimo, Joseph T.; Chen, Li; Elsea, Sarah H.

    2015-01-01

    Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5) is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention. PMID:25853262

  20. Phenotypic and Molecular Convergence of 2q23.1 Deletion Syndrome with Other Neurodevelopmental Syndromes Associated with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sureni V. Mullegama

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Roughly 20% of autism spectrum disorders (ASD are syndromic with a well-established genetic cause. Studying the genes involved can provide insight into the molecular and cellular mechanisms of ASD. 2q23.1 deletion syndrome (causative gene, MBD5 is a recently identified genetic neurodevelopmental disorder associated with ASD. Mutations in MBD5 have been found in ASD cohorts. In this study, we provide a phenotypic update on the prevalent features of 2q23.1 deletion syndrome, which include severe intellectual disability, seizures, significant speech impairment, sleep disturbance, and autistic-like behavioral problems. Next, we examined the phenotypic, molecular, and network/pathway relationships between nine neurodevelopmental disorders associated with ASD: 2q23.1 deletion Rett, Angelman, Pitt-Hopkins, 2q23.1 duplication, 5q14.3 deletion, Kleefstra, Kabuki make-up, and Smith-Magenis syndromes. We show phenotypic overlaps consisting of intellectual disability, speech delay, seizures, sleep disturbance, hypotonia, and autistic-like behaviors. Molecularly, MBD5 possibly regulates the expression of UBE3A, TCF4, MEF2C, EHMT1 and RAI1. Network analysis reveals that there could be indirect protein interactions, further implicating function for these genes in common pathways. Further, we show that when MBD5 and RAI1 are haploinsufficient, they perturb several common pathways that are linked to neuronal and behavioral development. These findings support further investigations into the molecular and pathway relationships among genes linked to neurodevelopmental disorders and ASD, which will hopefully lead to common points of regulation that may be targeted toward therapeutic intervention.

  1. Chronic renal disease is more prevalent in patients with hemolytic uremic syndrome who had a positive history of diarrhea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ajay P; Filler, Guido; Dwight, Prabo; Clark, William F

    2010-09-01

    Many uncontrolled studies and a subsequent meta-analysis suggest that hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) with a positive history for diarrhea is associated with a significant increase in chronic renal disease. Two recent controlled studies that followed children with this type of HUS after Escherichia coli O157:H7 outbreaks, and where the controls were selected from a group exposed in the outbreak, gave conflicting results. To clarify this apparent difference, we retrospectively compared a cohort of 30 children with sporadic diarrhea-positive HUS with 30 healthy controls who had no history of bloody diarrhea or HUS and who had similar age and gender. Significantly more children with previous HUS than the controls had albuminuria over a median follow-up of 6.2 years. Of these albuminuric patients, one-third had macroalbuminuria compared with none of the controls. Following HUS, children were three times more prone to hypertension and prehypertension, although the difference was not statistically significant. Glomerular filtration rates, estimated by cystatin C, were significantly lower by 30 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Thus, children with sporadic HUS with positive history of diarrhea compared with unexposed controls had a higher prevalence of chronic renal disease; results consistent with the meta-analysis. Prospective studies with appropriate controls are needed to completely resolve this issue.

  2. Molecular and Neural Functions of Rai1, the Causal Gene for Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Guenthner, Casey J; Xu, Jin; Nguyen, Tiffany; Schwarz, Lindsay A; Wilkinson, Alex W; Gozani, Or; Chang, Howard Y; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Luo, Liqun

    2016-10-19

    Haploinsufficiency of Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), which is associated with diverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral symptoms as well as obesity. RAI1 encodes a nuclear protein but little is known about its molecular function or the cell types responsible for SMS symptoms. Using genetically engineered mice, we found that Rai1 preferentially occupies DNA regions near active promoters and promotes the expression of a group of genes involved in circuit assembly and neuronal communication. Behavioral analyses demonstrated that pan-neural loss of Rai1 causes deficits in motor function, learning, and food intake. These SMS-like phenotypes are produced by loss of Rai1 function in distinct neuronal types: Rai1 loss in inhibitory neurons or subcortical glutamatergic neurons causes learning deficits, while Rai1 loss in Sim1 + or SF1 + cells causes obesity. By integrating molecular and organismal analyses, our study suggests potential therapeutic avenues for a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Case report of a 3-year-old girl with pleuropulmonary blastoma and family history of a tumor predisposition syndrome with c. 2830 gene mutation in DICER1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Puckett

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB is a childhood mesenchymal pleural-based tumor that is associated with a germline mutation in DICER1 gene in familial PPB. It occurs most commonly in children between the ages of 2 and 5. Approximately 25% of patients have familial cancer syndrome which can include different combinations of PPB, lung cysts, thyroid tumors, cystic nephroma, Wilms tumor, embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors, juvenile granulosa cell tumor, gynandroblastoma, medulloblastoma, other childhood central nervous system tumors, nasal chondral mesenchymal hamartoma, and small bowel polyps. Our case report presents a child diagnosed with PPB with maternal history of bilateral ovarian Sertoli-Leydig cell tumors and papillary carcinoma of the thyroid. Molecular analysis performed on the patient and mother showed a specific gene change (c. 2830 in the DICER1 gene. The patient underwent surgical resection of the tumor and five cycles of chemotherapy. Despite this aggressive treatment, she eventually succumbed to brain metastases and was made comfort care after suffering a massive brain hemorrhage several months after the initial diagnosis of her disease.

  4. Cardiovocal Syndrome: A rare cause of hoarseness in a patient with a history of pulmonary tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakul Nambiar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Hoarseness is a common clinical condition with underlying causes which can vary from reversible and benign to life-threatening and malignant. Cardiovocal syndrome may cause hoarseness secondary to left recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy when the recurrent laryngeal nerve is mechanically affected due to enlarged cardiovascular structures. We report a 28-year-old male who presented to the Government Medical College, Thiruvananthapuram, India, in 2013 with hoarseness. He had undergone irregular treatment for pulmonary tuberculosis (TB two years previously. Fiber-optic laryngoscopy indicated left vocal cord palsy and a computed tomography scan of the chest revealed features of pulmonary hypertension with extensive enlargement of the pulmonary arteries. An echocardiogram confirmed severe pulmonary arterial hypertension with severe tricuspid regurgitation. He was diagnosed with left recurrent laryngeal palsy secondary to cardiovocal syndrome. Although reports exist of recurrent laryngeal palsy in TB, this case appears to be the first to report cardiovocal syndrome in a patient treated for pulmonary TB.

  5. Clinical spectrum and molecular diagnosis of Angelman and Prader-Willi syndrome patients with an imprinting mutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saitoh, S.; Cassidy, S.B.; Conroy, J.M. [Univ. of Hospitals of Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1997-01-20

    Recent studies have identified a new class of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) patients who have biparental inheritance, but neither the typical deletion nor uniparental disomy (UPD) or translocation. However, these patients have uniparental DNA methylation throughout 15q11-q13, and thus appear to have a mutation in the imprinting process for this region. Here we describe detailed clinical findings of five AS imprinting mutation patients (three families) and two PWS imprinting mutation patients (one new family). All these patients have essentially the classical clinical phenotype for the respective syndrome, except that the incidence of microcephaly is lower in imprinting mutation AS patients than in deletion AS patients. Furthermore, imprinting mutation AS and PWS patients do not typically have hypopigmentation, which is commonly found in patients with the usual large deletion. Molecular diagnosis of these cases is initially achieved by DNA methylation analyses of the DN34/ZNF127, PW71 (D15S63), and SNRPN loci. The latter two probes have clear advantages in the simple molecular diagnostic analysis of PWS and AS patients with an imprinting mutation, as has been found for typical deletion or UPD PWS and AS cases. With the recent finding of inherited microdeletions in PWS and AS imprinting mutation families, our studies define a new class of these two syndromes. The clinical and molecular identification of these PWS and AS patients has important genetic counseling consequences. 49 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Molecular phylogenetics of the genus Neoconocephalus (orthoptera, tettigoniidae and the evolution of temperate life histories.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert L Snyder

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The katydid genus Neoconocephalus (25+ species has a prominent acoustic communication system and occurs in large parts of the Neotropics and Nearctic. This group has been subject of numerous behavioral, physiological, and evolutionary studies of its acoustic communication system. Two distinct life histories occur in this group: The tropical life history incorporates multiple generations/year and direct egg development without environmental triggers. Temperate life history is characterized by overwintering in the egg stage, cold trigger of egg development, and one generation/year. This study reconstructs the phylogenetic relationships within the genus to (1 determine the evolutionary history of the temperate life history, and (2 to support comparative studies of evolutionary and physiological problems in this genus. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP, and sequences of two nuclear loci and one mitochondrial locus to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships. The analysis included 17 ingroup and two outgroup species. AFLP and mitochondrial data provided resolution at the species level while the two nuclear loci revealed only deeper nodes. The data sets were combined in a super-matrix to estimate a total evidence tree. Seven of the temperate species form a monophyletic group; however, three more temperate species were placed as siblings of tropical species. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our analyses support the reliability of the current taxonomic treatment of the Neoconocephalus fauna of Caribbean, Central, and North America. Ancestral state reconstruction of life history traits was not conclusive, however at least four transitions between life histories occurred among our sample of species. The proposed phylogeny will strengthen conclusions from comparative work in this group.

  7. Molecular diagnostic testing for Klinefelter syndrome and other male sex chromosome aneuploidies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hager Karl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Male sex chromosome aneuploidies are underdiagnosed despite concomitant physical and behavioral manifestations. Objective To develop a non-invasive, rapid and high-throughput molecular diagnostic assay for detection of male sex chromosome aneuploidies, including 47,XXY (Klinefelter, 47,XYY, 48,XXYY and 48,XXXY syndromes. Methods The assay utilizes three XYM and four XA markers to interrogate Y:X and X:autosome ratios, respectively. The seven markers were PCR amplified using genomic DNA isolated from a cohort of 323 males with aneuploid (n = 117 and 46,XY (n = 206 karyotypes. The resulting PCR products were subjected to Pyrosequencing, a quantitative DNA sequencing method. Results Receiver operator characteristic (ROC curves were used to establish thresholds for the discrimination of aneuploid from normal samples. The XYM markers permitted the identification of 47,XXY, 48,XXXY and 47,XYY syndromes with 100% sensitivity and specificity in both purified DNA and buccal swab samples. The 48,XXYY karyotype was delineated by XA marker data from 46,XY; an X allele threshold of 43% also permitted detection of 48,XXYY with 100% sensitivity and specificity. Analysis of X chromosome-specific biallelic SNPs demonstrated that 43 of 45 individuals (96% with 48,XXYY karyotype had two distinct X chromosomes, while 2 (4% had a duplicate X, providing evidence that 48,XXYY may result from nondisjunction during early mitotic divisions of a 46,XY embryo. Conclusions Quantitative Pyrosequencing, with high-throughput potential, can detect male sex chromosome aneuploidies with 100% sensitivity.

  8. Natural history and clinical outcome of "uncorrected" scimitar syndrome patients: a multicenter study of the italian society of pediatric cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vida, Vladimiro L; Padrini, Maddalena; Boccuzzo, Giovanna; Agnoletti, Gabriella; Bondanza, Sara; Butera, Gianfranco; Chiappa, Enrico; Marasini, Maurizio; Pilati, Mara; Pongiglione, Giacomo; Prandstraller, Daniela; Russo, Maria Giovanna; Castaldi, Biagio; Santoro, Giuseppe; Spadoni, Isabella; Stellin, Giovanni; Milanesi, Ornella

    2013-07-01

    To analyze the clinical status of patients with "uncorrected" scimitar syndrome in a multicenter Italian study. The natural history of scimitar syndrome was analyzed in 44 affected individuals (from 9 Italian centers). The median age at diagnosis was 1.05 years (range, 1 day-41 years). Thirty-three patients (75%) had an isolated form; 11 patients (25%) had associated congenital heart diseases. Twenty-two patients (50%) were symptomatic at diagnosis, including respiratory symptoms (n=20) and congestive heart failure (n=6). Patients with associated congenital heart defects had a higher prevalence of congestive heart failure (4 of 11 [36.4%] vs 2 of 33 [6.1%]; P=.027), pulmonary arterial hypertension (7 of 11 [63.6%] vs 2 of 33 [6.1%]; P=.027) than patients with isolated forms. Ten patients (22.7%) underwent correction of associated cardiac defects, leaving the anomalous pulmonary venous drainage intact. The median length of follow-up after diagnosis was 6.4 years (range, 0.2-27.5 years). Two patients died, both with associated cardiac defects and severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Of 42 survivors, 39 (92.8%) were asymptomatic at the last follow-up visit; 3 patients still complained respiratory symptoms. There was no difference between isolated and associated forms of the disease. In most patients, scimitar syndrome presented as an isolated lesion with a benign outcome. Nonetheless, when associated with other cardiac defects and pulmonary arterial hypertension, there was an increased risk of congestive heart failure and mortality. Correction of associated cardiac defects (transforming "associated" into "isolated" forms), together with the therapeutic occlusion of anomalous arterial supply to the lung, led to a benign outcome comparable to that in primarily isolated forms. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Epilepsy in Angelman syndrome: a questionnaire-based assessment of the natural history and current treatment options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibert, Ronald L; Conant, Kerry D; Braun, Eileen K; Bruno, Patricia; Said, Rana R; Nespeca, Mark P; Thiele, Elizabeth A

    2009-11-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) commonly presents with epilepsy (>80%). The goal of this study was to examine the natural history and various treatments of epilepsy in AS in a large population. A detailed electronic survey containing comprehensive questions regarding epilepsy in AS was conducted through the Angelman Syndrome Foundation. There were responses from 461 family members of individuals with AS, of whom 86% had epilepsy (60% with multiple seizure types), the most common being atonic, generalized tonic-clonic, absence, and complex partial. Partial-onset seizures only were reported in 11% of those with epilepsy. Epilepsy was most common among those with maternal deletions and unknown subtypes, with catastrophic epilepsies present in only these two subtypes. These epilepsies were refractory to medication, with only 15% responding to the first antiepileptic drug (AED). The most commonly prescribed AED were valproic acid and clonazepam, but lamotrigine and levetiracetam appeared to have similar efficacy and tolerability. This is the largest study to date assessing epilepsy in AS. Although epilepsy in AS is considered a generalized epilepsy, there was a high prevalence of partial seizures. There are few previous data regarding the use of newer AED in AS, and the results of this study suggest that these newer agents, specifically levetiracetam and lamotrigine, may have efficacy similar to that of valproic acid and clonazepam, and that they appear to have similar or better side-effect profiles. Nonpharmacologic therapies such as dietary therapy and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) also suggest favorable efficacy and tolerability, although further studies are needed.

  10. Histological and molecular biology diagnosis of neurocysticercosis in a patient without history of travel to endemic areas – Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L’Ollivier C.

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: in endemic areas, neurocysticercosis appears mainly as a single, large, spherical and non-enhancing intracranial cyst. Case presentation: an atypical case of neurocysticercosis (NCC in a French Caucasian, without history of travel to endemic areas, was confirmed by histology and molecular speciation. Imaging was atypical, showing several hook-bearing scolices visible in the cyst, while the serology employed was non-contributary. Conclusions: NCC should be considered when multiple taeniid scolices are observed within the same cystic lesion.

  11. Alterações moleculares em síndrome mielodisplásica Molecular abnormalities in myelodysplastic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes L. F. Chauffaille

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome mielodisplásica (SMD representa um grupo heterogêneo de doenças hematopoéticas clonais. As alterações cromossômicas observadas em SMD foram o ponto de partida para uma série de estudos para a caracterização da patogênese molecular nessa doença. A perda de material genético leva à hipótese de inativação de genes supressores tumorais (GST, mas essa teoria não explica o evento inicial desencadeador da vantagem de crescimento das células progenitoras hematopoéticas, estando outros mecanismos envolvidos, dos quais sobressaem a ativação de oncogenes, alteração de vias de sinalização e fatores de transcrição. Mutações de oncogenes, como RAS, P53, PDGF, FLT3 e MLL, dentre outros, podem contribuir para o desenvolvimento da SMD. A mutação em tandem do FLT3 é evento genético tardio no curso da doença e os pacientes portadores da mesma tendem a apresentar prognóstico desfavorável e transformação iminente para leucemia aguda. Tanto aberrações qualitativas como quantitativas de fatores de transcrição induzem o desequilíbrio ou bloqueio de diferenciação da célula hematopoética, que, por sua vez, se traduz em hematopoese ineficaz. Alterações epigenéticas são caracterizadas por metilação de DNA que tem papel no controle da expressão gênica. Hipermetilação e inativação de genes reguladores exercem função no desenvolvimento da doença. SMD de alto risco está associada à elevada prevalência de inativação do gene supressor tumoral p15INK4B por hipermetilação do promotor. Encurtamento do telômero correlaciona-se a cariótipos complexos, indicando instabilidade genômica e pior prognóstico.Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS is a heterogenous group of clonal hematopoietic disorders. Chromosomal abnormalities detected in this disease were the start to many studies in order to characterize molecular pathogenesis. The loss of genetic material observed in most patients with MDS leads to the

  12. Myhre and LAPS syndromes : clinical and molecular review of 32 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michot, Caroline; Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clementine; Afenjar, Alexandra; Brooks, Alice S.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Destree, Anne; Di Rocco, Maja; Donnai, Dian; Hennekam, Raoul; Heron, Delphine; Jacquemont, Sebastien; Kannu, Peter; Lin, Angela E.; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Mansour, Sahar; Marlin, Sandrine; McGowan, Ruth; Murphy, Helen; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rio, Marlene; Simon, Marleen; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Stone, James R.; Sznajer, Yves; Tolmie, John; Touraine, Renaud; van den Ende, Jenneke; Van der Aa, Nathalie; van Essen, Ton; Verloes, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valerie

    2014-01-01

    Myhre syndrome is characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, facial features, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, joint limitation and hearing loss. We identified SMAD4 mutations as the cause of Myhre syndrome. SMAD4 mutations have also been identified in laryngotracheal stenosis, arthropathy,

  13. Myhre and LAPS syndromes: clinical and molecular review of 32 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Michot, Caroline; Le Goff, Carine; Mahaut, Clémentine; Afenjar, Alexandra; Brooks, Alice S.; Campeau, Philippe M.; Destree, Anne; Di Rocco, Maja; Donnai, Dian; Hennekam, Raoul; Heron, Delphine; Jacquemont, Sébastien; Kannu, Peter; Lin, Angela E.; Manouvrier-Hanu, Sylvie; Mansour, Sahar; Marlin, Sandrine; McGowan, Ruth; Murphy, Helen; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Rio, Marlène; Simon, Marleen; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Stone, James R.; Sznajer, Yves; Tolmie, John; Touraine, Renaud; van den Ende, Jenneke; van der Aa, Nathalie; van Essen, Ton; Verloes, Alain; Munnich, Arnold; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Myhre syndrome is characterized by short stature, brachydactyly, facial features, pseudomuscular hypertrophy, joint limitation and hearing loss. We identified SMAD4 mutations as the cause of Myhre syndrome. SMAD4 mutations have also been identified in laryngotracheal stenosis, arthropathy,

  14. Fragile X Syndrome: Keys to the Molecular Genetics of Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombroso, Paul J.; Ogren, Marilee P.

    2008-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited mental retardation is discussed. The relationship between specific impairments in synaptic plasticity and Fragile X syndrome is investigated as it strengthens synaptic contacts between neurons.

  15. Sexual orientation and medical history among Iranian people with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorashad, Behzad S; Roshan, Ghasem M; Reid, Alistair G; Aghili, Zahra; Hiradfar, Mehran; Afkhamizadeh, Mozhgan; Talaei, Ali; Aarabi, Azadeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Taghehchian, Negin; Saberi, Hedieh; Farahi, Nazanin; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza

    2017-01-01

    To report sexual orientation, relationship status and medical history of Iranian people with Differences of Sex Development (DSD) who were raised female. Our participants consisted of nineteen 46,XY individuals with Complete Androgen Insensitivity Syndrome (CAIS) and eighteen 46,XX individuals with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH) who were raised as females and older than 13years. As well as their relationship status and detailed medical history, an expert psychiatrist assessed their sexual orientation by a semi-structured psychiatric interview with them and, where applicable, their parents. Five percent of CAH participants and 42% of CAIS participants were in a relationship, which was significantly different. All CAH individuals had been diagnosed at birth; 89% of CAIS had been diagnosed after puberty and due to primary amenorrhea and 11% were diagnosed in childhood due to inguinal hernia. Genital reconstructive surgery had been performed in 100% of CAH participants and 37% of CAIS. Regarding sexual contact experiences and sexual fantasies (androphilic, gynephilic or both), no significant differences were found. However, CAH females had significantly more gynephilic dreams (P=0.045). This study, notable as one of the rare from a non-western culture, described sexual, medical and socioeconomic status of 46,XX CAH and 46,XY CAIS individuals living in Iran. Although broadly in line with previous findings from Western cultures, Iranian CAH individuals had fewer romantic relationships, but in contrast to previous studies their sexual orientation was only different from CAIS in the contents of sexual dreams. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cytogenetic and molecular characterization of 57 individuals with the Parder-Willi syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butler, M.G.; Forrest, K.B.; Miller, L.K. [Vanderbilt Univ. School of Medicine, Nashville, TN (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is characterized by hypotonia, early childhood obesity, mental deficiency, hypogonadism and an interstitial deletion of 15q11q13 of paternal origin in 50-70% of patients. The remaining patients have either submicroscopic deletions, maternal disomy or other anomalies of chromosome 15. We have undertaken cytogenetic and molecular genetic studies of 57 individuals presenting with features consistent with PWS (28 males and 29 females; age range of 3 months to 38 years), 25 with recognizable 15q11q13 deletions (44%), 28 with normal appearing chromosomes (49%), and four patients with other chromosome 15 anomalies (7%). High resolution chromosome analysis and PCR amplification were performed utilizing 17 STRs from 15q11q13 region, quantitative Southern hybridization using seven 15q11q13 probes, and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using four 15q11q13 probes (4-3R, SNRPN, 3-21, and GABRB3). The cytogenetic deletion was paternal in all PWS families studied but the deletion varied in size in 10 patients. Parental DNA studies from 20 of 28 non-deletion patients showed maternal disomy in 7 patients and biparental inheritance in 13 non-deletion patients. In order to evaluate for submicroscopic deletions, PCR amplification with several loci in the area of the PWS minimal critical region, FISH using SNRPN and quantitative hybridization using a PCR product generated from primers of exons E and H of the SNRPN gene were undertaken on the non-deletion patients. Quantitative hybridization and FISH using SNRPN from 3 of 11 non-deletion patients (excluding maternal disomy cases) showed a submicroscopic deletion. One of these patients also showed a paternal deletion of D15S128 and MN1. We furthur support the use of both cytogenetic and molecular genetic methods for determining the genetic status of PWS patients.

  17. CNS involvement in OFD1 syndrome: a clinical, molecular, and neuroimaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Giudice, Ennio; Macca, Marina; Imperati, Floriana; D'Amico, Alessandra; Parent, Philippe; Pasquier, Laurent; Layet, Valerie; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Stamboul-Darmency, Veronique; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Franco, Brunella

    2014-05-10

    Oral-facial-digital type 1 syndrome (OFD1; OMIM 311200) belongs to the expanding group of disorders ascribed to ciliary dysfunction. With the aim of contributing to the understanding of the role of primary cilia in the central nervous system (CNS), we performed a thorough characterization of CNS involvement observed in this disorder. A cohort of 117 molecularly diagnosed OFD type I patients was screened for the presence of neurological symptoms and/or cognitive/behavioral abnormalities on the basis of the available information supplied by the collaborating clinicians. Seventy-one cases showing CNS involvement were further investigated through neuroimaging studies and neuropsychological testing. Seventeen patients were molecularly diagnosed in the course of this study and five of these represent new mutations never reported before. Among patients displaying neurological symptoms and/or cognitive/behavioral abnormalities, we identified brain structural anomalies in 88.7%, cognitive impairment in 68%, and associated neurological disorders and signs in 53% of cases. The most frequently observed brain structural anomalies included agenesis of the corpus callosum and neuronal migration/organisation disorders as well as intracerebral cysts, porencephaly and cerebellar malformations. Our results support recent published findings indicating that CNS involvement in this condition is found in more than 60% of cases. Our findings correlate well with the kind of brain developmental anomalies described in other ciliopathies. Interestingly, we also described specific neuropsychological aspects such as reduced ability in processing verbal information, slow thought process, difficulties in attention and concentration, and notably, long-term memory deficits which may indicate a specific role of OFD1 and/or primary cilia in higher brain functions.

  18. Integrating molecular and structural findings: Wnt as a possible actor in shaping cognitive impairment in Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avagliano, Laura; Grazioli, Paolo; Mariani, Milena; Bulfamante, Gaetano P; Selicorni, Angelo; Massa, Valentina

    2017-11-21

    Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS) is a choesinopathy: a severe genetic disorder caused by mutations in the cohesin complex genes. The phenotype is characterized by typical facial dysmorphism, growth impairment and multiorgan abnormalities including brain alterations. Wnt pathway is known to play a fundamental role in central nervous system development and it has been shown that Wnt pathway is disrupted in CdLS animal models and patients cells. In this review we investigate the possible link between Wnt pathway disruption and brain abnormalities in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome as such molecular impairment could lead to an abnormal embryonic development resulting in brain abnormalities (i.e. microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, abnormal cortical development) in patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

  19. Integrating molecular and structural findings: Wnt as a possible actor in shaping cognitive impairment in Cornelia de Lange syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Avagliano

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cornelia de Lange Syndrome (CdLS is a choesinopathy: a severe genetic disorder caused by mutations in the cohesin complex genes. The phenotype is characterized by typical facial dysmorphism, growth impairment and multiorgan abnormalities including brain alterations. Wnt pathway is known to play a fundamental role in central nervous system development and it has been shown that Wnt pathway is disrupted in CdLS animal models and patients cells. In this review we investigate the possible link between Wnt pathway disruption and brain abnormalities in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome as such molecular impairment could lead to an abnormal embryonic development resulting in brain abnormalities (i.e. microcephaly, cerebellar hypoplasia, abnormal cortical development in patients with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

  20. Molecular analysis of DiGeorge Syndrome-related translocation breakpoints in 22q11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chieffo, C.; Barnoski, B.L.; Emanuel, B.S. [Children`s Hospital of Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    22q11 demonstrates a high frequency of disease-specific rearrangements. Several of the rearrangements are associated with developmental abnormalities such as DiGeorge Syndrome (DGS), Velocardiofacial Syndrome (VCFS), Cat Eye Syndrome (CES) and Supernumerary der(22)t(11;22) Syndrome. DGS and VCFS involve deletions of 22q11.2 resulting from unbalanced translocations or microdeletions. In contrast, CES and Supernumerary der(22)t(11;22) Syndrome result from duplications of this region via inter- or intra- chromosomal exchange. Although the molecular mechanism giving rise to these rearrangements has yet to be elucidated, the presence of known 22q11 repetitive elements are likely to be involved. GM5878 is a 46,XY,t(10;22) cell line from a balanced translocation carrier father of an unbalanced DGS patient. GM0980 is a cell line from a patient with features of DGS/VCFS with an unbalanced karyotype. Using FISH cosmids, we have localized these translocation breakpoints near pH160b (D22S66) which maps to the center of the DiGeorge chromosomal region (DGCR). To further localize the breakpoint of GM5878, overlapping cosmids spanning this region were used as probes for FISH. Use of additional overlapping cosmids allowed the sublocalization of the breakpoint to a 10kb region. A 4.8 kb BglII fragment predicted to cross the breakpoint was isolated. When this fragment was used as a probe to normal and GM5878 DNA, novel bands were detected in GM5878 DNA digested with EcoRI and BglII. Similar analysis of the GM0980 breakpoint is being pursued. Full molecular characterization of these translocations is in progress using inverse PCR to clone the junctional fragments for sequencing. Detailed analysis of the region may reveal molecular features which make this a rearrangement prone area of the genome and help elucidate its relationship to human cytogenetic disease.

  1. The History of Molecular Structure Determination Viewed through the Nobel Prizes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, William P.; Palenik, Gus J.; Suh, Il-Hwan

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the importance of complex molecular structures. Emphasizes their individual significance through examination of the Nobel Prizes of the 20th century. Highlights prizes awarded to Conrad Rontgen, Francis H.C. Crick, James D. Watson, Maurice H.F. Wilkins, and others. (SOE)

  2. Some Histories of Molecular Evolution: Amniote Phylogeny, Vertebrate Eye Lens Evolution, and the Prion Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheede, T. van

    2004-01-01

    In this thesis, the principles of molecular evolution and phylogeny are introduced in Chapter 1, while the subsequent chapters deal with the three topics mentioned in the title. Part I: Birds, reptiles and mammals are Amniota, organisms that have an amnion during their embryonal development. Even

  3. Parasite histories and novel phylogenetic tools: alternative approaches to inferring parasite evolution from molecular markers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hypša, Václav

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 36, č. 2 (2006), s. 141-155 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/04/0520 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : molecular phylogeny * parasite evolution Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.337, year: 2006

  4. Utility of the History and Physical Examination in the Detection of Acute Coronary Syndromes in Emergency Department Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary DW Dezman

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chest pain accounts for approximately 6% of all emergency department (ED visits and is the most common reason for emergency hospital admission. One of the most serious diagnoses emergency physicians must consider is acute coronary syndrome (ACS. This is both common and serious, as ischemic heart disease remains the single biggest cause of death in the western world. The history and physical examination are cornerstones of our diagnostic approach in this patient group. Their importance is emphasized in guidelines, but there is little evidence to support their supposed association. The purpose of this article was to summarize the findings of recent investigations regarding the ability of various components of the history and physical examination to identify which patients presenting to the ED with chest pain require further investigation for possible ACS. Previous studies have consistently identified a number of factors that increase the probability of ACS. These include radiation of the pain, aggravation of the pain by exertion, vomiting, and diaphoresis. Traditional cardiac risk factors identified by the Framingham Heart Study are of limited diagnostic utility in the ED. Clinician gestalt has very low predictive ability, even in patients with a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG, and gestalt does not seem to be enhanced appreciably by clinical experience. The history and physical alone are unable to reduce a patient’s risk of ACS to a generally acceptable level (<1%. Ultimately, our review of the evidence clearly demonstrates that “atypical” symptoms cannot rule out ACS, while “typical” symptoms cannot rule it in. Therefore, if a patient has symptoms that are compatible with ACS and an alternative cause cannot be identified, clinicians must strongly consider the need for further investigation with ECG and troponin measurement.

  5. Brief report: life history and neuropathology of a gifted man with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weidenheim, Karen M; Escobar, Alfonso; Rapin, Isabelle

    2012-03-01

    Despite recent interest in the pathogenesis of the autism spectrum disorders (pervasive developmental disorders), neuropathological descriptions of brains of individuals with well documented clinical information and without potentially confounding symptomatology are exceptionally rare. Asperger syndrome differs from classic autism by lack of cognitive impairment or delay in expressive language acquisition. We examined the 1,570 g brain of a 63 year old otherwise healthy mathematician with an Autistic Spectrum Disorder of Asperger subtype. Except for an atypical gyral pattern and megalencephaly, we detected no specific neuropathologic abnormality. Taken together, the behavioral data and pathological findings in this case are compatible with an early neurodevelopmental process affecting multiple neuroanatomic networks, but without a convincing morphologic signature detectable with routine neuropathologic technology.

  6. Molecular Characterization of Peripheral Extracellular Vesicles in Clinically Isolated Syndrome: Preliminary Suggestions from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Nuzziello

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, nanoparticles originated from different cell types, seem to be implicated in several cellular activities. In the Central Nervous System (CNS, glia and neurons secrete EVs and recent studies have demonstrated that the intercellular communication mediated by EVs has versatile functional impact in the cerebral homeostasis. This essential role may be due to their proteins and RNAs cargo that possibly modify the phenotypes of the targeted cells. Despite the increasing importance of EVs, little is known about their fluctuations in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. Furthermore, only few studies have investigated the contents of contemporary EVs subgroups (microvesicles, MVs and exosomes, EXOs with the purpose of discriminating between their features and functional roles. In order to possibly shed light on these issues, we performed a pilot study in which MVs and EXOs extracted from serum samples of a little cohort of subjects (patients with the first clinical evidence of CNS demyelination, also known as Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Healthy Controls were submitted to deep small-RNA sequencing. Data were analysed by an in-home bioinformatics platform. In line with previous reports, distinct classes of non-coding RNAs have been detected in both the EVs subsets, offering interesting suggestions on their origins and functions. We also verified the feasibility of this extensive molecular approach, thus supporting its valuable use for the analysis of circulating biomarkers (e.g., microRNAs in order to investigate and monitor specific diseases.

  7. Trapped neutrophil syndrome in a Border Collie dog: clinical, clinico-pathologic, and molecular findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizukami, Keijiro; Shoubudani, Tomoaki; Nishimoto, Seira; Kawamura, Ryuta; Yabuki, Akira; Yamato, Osamu

    2012-06-01

    Trapped neutrophil syndrome (TNS) is an autosomal recessive inherited neutropenia known in Border Collies since the 1990's. Recently, the causative mutation has been identified in the canine VPS13B gene and a DNA-based diagnosis has now become available. The present paper describes clinical and clinico-pathologic findings in a Border Collie with TNS that was molecularly diagnosed for the first time in Japan. In a 10-week-old male Border Collie with microgenesis and symptoms related to recurrent infections, a hematological examination revealed severe leukopenia due to neutropenia, suggesting the dog to be affected by inherited neutropenic immunodeficiency. Direct DNA sequencing demonstrated that the dog was homozygous for the causative mutation of TNS and both its parents were heterozygous carriers. In addition, a simple and rapid polymerase chain reaction-based length polymorphism analysis coupled with microchip electrophoresis was developed for the genotyping of TNS. This assay could discriminate clearly all genotypes, suggesting that it was suitable for both individual diagnosis and large-scale surveys for prevention.

  8. PPARγ population shift produces disease-related changes in molecular networks associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurkowski, W; Roomp, K; Crespo, I; Schneider, J G; Del Sol, A

    2011-08-11

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a key regulator of adipocyte differentiation and has an important role in metabolic syndrome. Phosphorylation of the receptor's ligand-binding domain at serine 273 has been shown to change the expression of a large number of genes implicated in obesity. The difference in gene expression seen when comparing wild-type phosphorylated with mutant non-phosphorylated PPARγ may have important consequences for the cellular molecular network, the state of which can be shifted from the healthy to a stable diseased state. We found that a group of differentially expressed genes are involved in bi-stable switches and form a core network, the state of which changes with disease progression. These findings support the idea that bi-stable switches may be a mechanism for locking the core gene network into a diseased state and for efficiently propagating perturbations to more distant regions of the network. A structural analysis of the PPARγ-RXRα dimer complex supports the hypothesis of a major structural change between the two states, and this may represent an important mechanism leading to the differential expression observed in the core network.

  9. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavan Kumar P

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  10. TBX3 regulates splicing in vivo: a novel molecular mechanism for Ulnar-mammary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar P, Pavan; Franklin, Sarah; Emechebe, Uchenna; Hu, Hao; Moore, Barry; Lehman, Chris; Yandell, Mark; Moon, Anne M

    2014-03-01

    TBX3 is a member of the T-box family of transcription factors with critical roles in development, oncogenesis, cell fate, and tissue homeostasis. TBX3 mutations in humans cause complex congenital malformations and Ulnar-mammary syndrome. Previous investigations into TBX3 function focused on its activity as a transcriptional repressor. We used an unbiased proteomic approach to identify TBX3 interacting proteins in vivo and discovered that TBX3 interacts with multiple mRNA splicing factors and RNA metabolic proteins. We discovered that TBX3 regulates alternative splicing in vivo and can promote or inhibit splicing depending on context and transcript. TBX3 associates with alternatively spliced mRNAs and binds RNA directly. TBX3 binds RNAs containing TBX binding motifs, and these motifs are required for regulation of splicing. Our study reveals that TBX3 mutations seen in humans with UMS disrupt its splicing regulatory function. The pleiotropic effects of TBX3 mutations in humans and mice likely result from disrupting at least two molecular functions of this protein: transcriptional regulation and pre-mRNA splicing.

  11. Diagnostic yield of molecular autopsy in patients with sudden arrhythmic death syndrome using targeted exome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunn, Laurence M; Lopes, Luis R; Syrris, Petros; Murphy, Cian; Plagnol, Vincent; Firman, Eileen; Dalageorgou, Chrysoula; Zorio, Esther; Domingo, Diana; Murday, Victoria; Findlay, Iain; Duncan, Alexis; Carr-White, Gerry; Robert, Leema; Bueser, Teofila; Langman, Caroline; Fynn, Simon P; Goddard, Martin; White, Anne; Bundgaard, Henning; Ferrero-Miliani, Laura; Wheeldon, Nigel; Suvarna, Simon K; O'Beirne, Aliceson; Lowe, Martin D; McKenna, William J; Elliott, Perry M; Lambiase, Pier D

    2016-06-01

    The targeted genetic screening of Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome (SADS) probands in a molecular autopsy has a diagnostic yield of up to 35%. Exome sequencing has the potential to improve this yield. The primary aim of this study is to examine the feasibility and diagnostic utility of targeted exome screening in SADS victims, utilizing familial clinical screening whenever possible. To determine the feasibility and diagnostic yield of targeted exome sequencing deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) was isolated from 59 SADS victims (mean age 25 years, range 1-51 years). Targeted exome sequencing of 135 genes associated with cardiomyopathies and ion channelopathies was performed on the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. Non-synonymous, loss-of-function, and splice-site variants with a minor allele frequency autopsy using targeted exome sequencing has a relatively low diagnostic yield of very rare potentially disease causing mutations. Candidate pathogenic variants with a higher frequency in control populations are relatively common and should be interpreted with caution. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Integrative Genomics Identifies the Molecular Basis of Resistance to Azacitidine Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Unnikrishnan

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia are blood disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and progressive marrow failure that can transform into acute leukemia. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine (AZA is the most effective pharmacological option, but only ∼50% of patients respond. A response only manifests after many months of treatment and is transient. The reasons underlying AZA resistance are unknown, and few alternatives exist for non-responders. Here, we show that AZA responders have more hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs in the cell cycle. Non-responder HPC quiescence is mediated by integrin α5 (ITGA5 signaling and their hematopoietic potential improved by combining AZA with an ITGA5 inhibitor. AZA response is associated with the induction of an inflammatory response in HPCs in vivo. By molecular bar coding and tracking individual clones, we found that, although AZA alters the sub-clonal contribution to different lineages, founder clones are not eliminated and continue to drive hematopoiesis even in complete responders.

  13. Susceptibility to DNA damage as a molecular mechanism for non-syndromic cleft lip and palate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerson Shigeru Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic cleft lip/palate (NSCL/P is a complex, frequent congenital malformation, determined by the interplay between genetic and environmental factors during embryonic development. Previous findings have appointed an aetiological overlap between NSCL/P and cancer, and alterations in similar biological pathways may underpin both conditions. Here, using a combination of transcriptomic profiling and functional approaches, we report that NSCL/P dental pulp stem cells exhibit dysregulation of a co-expressed gene network mainly associated with DNA double-strand break repair and cell cycle control (p = 2.88×10(-2-5.02×10(-9. This network included important genes for these cellular processes, such as BRCA1, RAD51, and MSH2, which are predicted to be regulated by transcription factor E2F1. Functional assays support these findings, revealing that NSCL/P cells accumulate DNA double-strand breaks upon exposure to H2O2. Furthermore, we show that E2f1, Brca1 and Rad51 are co-expressed in the developing embryonic orofacial primordia, and may act as a molecular hub playing a role in lip and palate morphogenesis. In conclusion, we show for the first time that cellular defences against DNA damage may take part in determining the susceptibility to NSCL/P. These results are in accordance with the hypothesis of aetiological overlap between this malformation and cancer, and suggest a new pathogenic mechanism for the disease.

  14. Proteomics of follicular fluid from women with polycystic ovary syndrome suggests molecular defects in follicular development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambekar, Aditi S; Kelkar, Dhanashree S; Pinto, Sneha M; Sharma, Rakesh; Hinduja, Indira; Zaveri, Kusum; Pandey, Akhilesh; Prasad, T S Keshava; Gowda, Harsha; Mukherjee, Srabani

    2015-02-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), a major cause of anovulatory infertility, is characterized by arrested follicular growth. Altered protein levels in the follicular fluid surrounding the ovum may reflect the molecular defects of folliculogenesis in these women. To identify differentially regulated proteins in PCOS by comparing the follicular fluid protein repertoire of PCOS with healthy women. The follicular fluid samples were collected from PCOS and normo-ovulatory women undergoing in vitro fertilization. Follicular fluid proteins were subjected to digestion using trypsin, and resultant peptides were labeled with isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification reagents and analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Differential abundance of selected proteins was confirmed by ELISA. A total of 770 proteins were identified, of which 186 showed differential abundance between controls and women with PCOS. Proteins involved in various processes of follicular development including amphiregulin; heparan sulfate proteoglycan 2; tumor necrosis factor, α-induced protein 6; plasminogen; and lymphatic vessel endothelial hyaluronan receptor 1 were found to be deregulated in PCOS. We also identified a number of new proteins from follicular fluid, whose function in the ovary is not yet clearly established. These include suprabasin; S100 calcium binding protein A7; and helicase with zinc finger 2, transcriptional coactivator. Proteins indispensable for follicular growth were found to be differentially expressed in follicular fluid of women with PCOS, which may in part explain the aberrant folliculogenesis observed in these women.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of blister formation in bullous impetigo and staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanakawa, Yasushi; Schechter, Norman M.; Lin, Chenyan; Garza, Luis; Li, Hong; Yamaguchi, Takayuki; Fudaba, Yasuyuki; Nishifuji, Koji; Sugai, Motoyuki; Amagai, Masayuki; Stanley, John R.

    2002-01-01

    Bullous impetigo due to Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most common bacterial infections of man, and its generalized form, staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS), is a frequent manifestation of staphylococcal epidemics in neonatal nurseries. Both diseases are mediated by exfoliative toxins (ETs), which show exquisite pathologic specificity in blistering only the superficial epidermis. We show that these toxins act as serine proteases with extremely focused molecular specificity to cleave mouse and human desmoglein 1 (Dsg1) once after glutamic acid residue 381 between extracellular domains 3 and 4. Mutation of the predicted catalytically active serine to alanine completely inhibits cleavage. The mutated ETs bind specifically to Dsg1 by immunofluorescence colocalization and by coimmunoprecipitation. Thus, ETs, through specific recognition and proteolytic cleavage of one structurally critical peptide bond in an adhesion molecule, cause its dysfunction and allow S. aureus to spread under the stratum corneum, the main barrier of the skin, explaining how, although they circulate through the entire body in SSSS, they cause pathology only in the superficial epidermis. PMID:12093888

  16. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  17. Cytological and molecular studies of chromosomal radiosensitivity in Down Syndrome cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLaren, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular, cellular and cytogenetic studies were conducted to determine if altered levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a DNA repair-related enzyme, is responsible for the reported formation of excess X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in cells derived from Down Syndrome (DS) patients. Nonstimulated lymphocytes from normal and DS subjects were pretreated with 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, for 30 minutes before exposure to X-rays and the levels of induced chromosome aberrations were determined in mitotic cells. DS lymphocytes exhibited significantly higher frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide that normal lymphocytes. No difference was observed in the absence of 3-aminobenzamide. Additional studies were done using normal and DS lymphoblastoid cell lines which exhibited a similar response at the DNA level as the lymphocytes. Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity based on incorporation of the substrate, NAD + , into acid insoluble materials, revealed that there was no significant difference in the ability to form poly (ADP-ribose) in the DS or normal cells. 3-aminobenzamide effectively inhibited poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in both the normal and DS cells

  18. Novel molecular variants of the Na-Cl cotransporter gene are responsible for Gitelman syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mastroianni, N.; De Fusco, M.; Casari, G. [Univsersita` di Milano (Italy)] [and others

    1996-11-01

    A hereditary defect of the distal tubule accounts for the clinical features of Gitelman syndrome (GS), an autosomal recessive disease characterized by hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia, metabolic alkalosis, and hypocalciuria. Recently, we cloned the cDNA coding for the human Na-Cl thiazide-sensitive cotransporter (TSC; also known as {open_quotes}NCCT{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}SLC12A3{close_quotes}) as a possible candidate for GS, and Simon et al., independently, described rotation in patients with GS. Now, we show 12 additional mutations consistent with a loss of function of the Na-Cl cotransporter in GS. Two missense replacements, R09W and P349L, are common to both studies and could represent ancient mutations. The other mutations include three deletions, two insertions, and six missense mutations. When all mutations from both studies are considered, missense mutations seem to be more frequently localized within the intracellular domains of the molecule, rather than in transmembrane or extracellular domains. One family, previously reported as a GS form with dominant inheritance, has proved to be recessive, with the affected child being a compound heterozygote. A highly informative intragenic tetranucleotide marker, useful for molecular diagnostic studies, has been identified at the acceptor splice site of exon 9. 12 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Toward Fulfilling the Promise of Molecular Medicine in Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krueger, Dilja D.; Bear, Mark F.

    2011-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common inherited form of mental retardation and a leading known cause of autism. It is caused by loss of expression of the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), an RNA-binding protein that negatively regulates protein synthesis. In neurons, multiple lines of evidence suggest that protein synthesis at synapses is triggered by activation of group 1 metabotropic glutamate receptors (Gp1 mGluRs) and that many functional consequences of activating these receptors are altered in the absence of FMRP. These observations have led to the theory that exaggerated protein synthesis downstream of Gp1 mGluRs is a core pathogenic mechanism in FXS. This excess can be corrected by reducing signaling by Gp1 mGluRs, and numerous studies have shown that inhibition of mGluR5, in particular, can ameliorate multiple mutant phenotypes in animal models of FXS. Clinical trials based on this therapeutic strategy are currently under way. FXS is therefore poised to be the first neurobehavioral disorder in which corrective treatments have been developed from the bottom up: from gene identification to pathophysiology in animals to novel therapeutics in humans. The insights gained from FXS and other autism-related single-gene disorders may also assist in identifying molecular mechanisms and potential treatment approaches for idiopathic autism. PMID:21090964

  20. Integrative Genomics Identifies the Molecular Basis of Resistance to Azacitidine Therapy in Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unnikrishnan, Ashwin; Papaemmanuil, Elli; Beck, Dominik; Deshpande, Nandan P; Verma, Arjun; Kumari, Ashu; Woll, Petter S; Richards, Laura A; Knezevic, Kathy; Chandrakanthan, Vashe; Thoms, Julie A I; Tursky, Melinda L; Huang, Yizhou; Ali, Zara; Olivier, Jake; Galbraith, Sally; Kulasekararaj, Austin G; Tobiasson, Magnus; Karimi, Mohsen; Pellagatti, Andrea; Wilson, Susan R; Lindeman, Robert; Young, Boris; Ramakrishna, Raj; Arthur, Christopher; Stark, Richard; Crispin, Philip; Curnow, Jennifer; Warburton, Pauline; Roncolato, Fernando; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Lynch, Kevin; Jacobsen, Sten Eirik W; Mufti, Ghulam J; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Wilkins, Marc R; MacKenzie, Karen L; Wong, Jason W H; Campbell, Peter J; Pimanda, John E

    2017-07-18

    Myelodysplastic syndromes and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia are blood disorders characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and progressive marrow failure that can transform into acute leukemia. The DNA methyltransferase inhibitor 5-azacytidine (AZA) is the most effective pharmacological option, but only ∼50% of patients respond. A response only manifests after many months of treatment and is transient. The reasons underlying AZA resistance are unknown, and few alternatives exist for non-responders. Here, we show that AZA responders have more hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) in the cell cycle. Non-responder HPC quiescence is mediated by integrin α5 (ITGA5) signaling and their hematopoietic potential improved by combining AZA with an ITGA5 inhibitor. AZA response is associated with the induction of an inflammatory response in HPCs in vivo. By molecular bar coding and tracking individual clones, we found that, although AZA alters the sub-clonal contribution to different lineages, founder clones are not eliminated and continue to drive hematopoiesis even in complete responders. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Molecular and cellular mechanisms of tight junction dysfunction in the irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Peng; Yao, Jianning; Wang, Chunfeng; Zhang, Lianfeng; Kong, Wuming

    2015-09-01

    The pathophysiological mechanisms of the irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders, are complex and have not been fully elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms of tight junction (TJ) dysfunction in IBS. Intestinal tissues of IBS and non‑IBS patients were examined to observe cellular changes by cell chemical tracer electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy, and intestinal claudin‑1 protein was detected by immunohistochemistry, western blot analysis and fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Compared with the control group, TJ broadening and the tracer extravasation phenomenon were observed in the diarrhea‑predominant IBS group, and a greater number of neuroendocrine cells and mast cells filled with high‑density particles in the endocrine package pulp as well as a certain extent of vacuolization were present. The expression of claudin‑1 in diarrhea‑predominant IBS patients was decreased, while it was increased in constipation‑predominant IBS patients. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that changes in cellular structure and claudin‑1 levels were associated with Tjs in IBS.

  2. Rates of Molecular Evolution Suggest Natural History of Life History Traits and a Post-K-Pg Nocturnal Bottleneck of Placentals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiaqi; Yonezawa, Takahiro; Kishino, Hirohisa

    2017-10-09

    Life history and behavioral traits are often difficult to discern from the fossil record, but evolutionary rates of genes and their changes over time can be inferred from extant genomic data. Under the neutral theory, molecular evolutionary rate is a product of mutation rate and the proportion of neutral mutations [1, 2]. Mutation rates may be shared across the genome, whereas proportions of neutral mutations vary among genes because functional constraints vary. By analyzing evolutionary rates of 1,185 genes in a phylogeny of 89 mammals, we extracted historical profiles of functional constraints on these rates in the form of gene-branch interactions. By applying a novel statistical approach to these profiles, we reconstructed the history of ten discrete traits related to activity, diet, and social behaviors. Our results indicate that the ancestor of placental mammals was solitary, seasonally breeding, insectivorous, and likely nocturnal. The results suggest placental diversification began 10-20 million years before the K-Pg boundary (66 million years ago), with some ancestors of extant placental mammals becoming diurnal and adapted to different diets. However, from the Paleocene to the Eocene-Oligocene transition (EOT, 33.9 mya), we detect a post-K-Pg nocturnal bottleneck where all ancestral lineages of extant placentals were nocturnal. Although diurnal placentals may have existed during the elevated global temperatures of the Paleocene-Eocene thermal maximum [3], we hypothesize that diurnal placentals were selectively extirpated during or after the global cooling of the EOT, whereas some nocturnal lineages survived due to preadaptations to cold environments [4]. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Integrated Modules Analysis to Explore the Molecular Mechanisms of Phlegm-Stasis Cementation Syndrome with Ischemic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei-Ming; Yang, Kuo; Jiang, Li-Jie; Hu, Jing-Qing; Zhou, Xue-Zhong

    2018-01-01

    Background: Ischemic heart disease (IHD) has been the leading cause of death for several decades globally, IHD patients usually hold the symptoms of phlegm-stasis cementation syndrome (PSCS) as significant complications. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PSCS complicated with IHD have not yet been fully elucidated. Materials and Methods: Network medicine methods were utilized to elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms of IHD phenotypes. Firstly, high-quality IHD-associated genes from both human curated disease-gene association database and biomedical literatures were integrated. Secondly, the IHD disease modules were obtained by dissecting the protein-protein interaction (PPI) topological modules in the String V9.1 database and the mapping of IHD-associated genes to the PPI topological modules. After that, molecular functional analyses (e.g., Gene Ontology and pathway enrichment analyses) for these IHD disease modules were conducted. Finally, the PSCS syndrome modules were identified by mapping the PSCS related symptom-genes to the IHD disease modules, which were further validated by both pharmacological and physiological evidences derived from published literatures. Results: The total of 1,056 high-quality IHD-associated genes were integrated and evaluated. In addition, eight IHD disease modules (the PPI sub-networks significantly relevant to IHD) were identified, in which two disease modules were relevant to PSCS syndrome (i.e., two PSCS syndrome modules). These two modules had enriched pathways on Toll-like receptor signaling pathway (hsa04620) and Renin-angiotensin system (hsa04614), with the molecular functions of angiotensin maturation (GO:0002003) and response to bacterium (GO:0009617), which had been validated by classical Chinese herbal formulas-related targets, IHD-related drug targets, and the phenotype features derived from human phenotype ontology (HPO) and published biomedical literatures. Conclusion: A network medicine

  4. Clinical and molecular analyses of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome: Comparison between spontaneous conception and assisted reproduction techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenorio, Jair; Romanelli, Valeria; Martin-Trujillo, Alex; Fernández, García-Moya; Segovia, Mabel; Perandones, Claudia; Pérez Jurado, Luis A; Esteller, Manel; Fraga, Mario; Arias, Pedro; Gordo, Gema; Dapía, Irene; Mena, Rocío; Palomares, María; Pérez de Nanclares, Guiomar; Nevado, Julián; García-Miñaur, Sixto; Santos-Simarro, Fernando; Martinez-Glez, Víctor; Vallespín, Elena; Monk, David; Lapunzina, Pablo

    2016-10-01

    Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth syndrome characterized by an excessive prenatal and postnatal growth, macrosomia, macroglossia, and hemihyperplasia. The molecular basis of this syndrome is complex and heterogeneous, involving genes located at 11p15.5. BWS is correlated with assisted reproductive techniques. BWS in individuals born following assisted reproductive techniques has been found to occur four to nine times higher compared to children with to BWS born after spontaneous conception. Here, we report a series of 187 patients with to BWS born either after assisted reproductive techniques or conceived naturally. Eighty-eight percent of BWS patients born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypomethylation of KCNQ1OT1:TSS-DMR in comparison with 49% for patients with BWS conceived naturally. None of the patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had hypermethylation of H19/IGF2:IG-DMR, neither CDKN1 C mutations nor patUPD11. We did not find differences in the frequency of multi-locus imprinting disturbances between groups. Patients with BWS born via assisted reproductive techniques had an increased frequency of advanced bone age, congenital heart disease, and decreased frequency of earlobe anomalies but these differences may be explained by the different molecular background compared to those with BWS and spontaneous fertilization. We conclude there is a correlation of the molecular etiology of BWS with the type of conception. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. A survey of nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer substitution rates across angiosperms: an approximate molecular clock with life history effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, Kathleen M; Whittall, Justen B; Hodges, Scott A

    2006-01-01

    Background A full understanding of the patterns and processes of biological diversification requires the dating of evolutionary events, yet the fossil record is inadequate for most lineages under study. Alternatively, a molecular clock approach, in which DNA or amino acid substitution rates are calibrated with fossils or geological/climatic events, can provide indirect estimates of clade ages and diversification rates. The utility of this approach depends on the rate constancy of molecular evolution at a genetic locus across time and across lineages. Although the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region (nrITS) is increasingly being used to infer clade ages in plants, little is known about the sources or magnitude of variation in its substitution rate. Here, we systematically review the literature to assess substitution rate variation in nrITS among angiosperms, and we evaluate possible correlates of the variation. Results We summarize 28 independently calibrated nrITS substitution rates ranging from 0.38 × 10-9 to 8.34 × 10-9 substitutions/site/yr. We find that herbaceous lineages have substitution rates almost twice as high as woody plants, on average. We do not find any among-lineage phylogenetic constraint to the rates, or any effect of the type of calibration used. Within life history categories, both the magnitude of the rates and the variance among rates tend to decrease with calibration age. Conclusion Angiosperm nrITS substitution rates vary by approximately an order of magnitude, and some of this variation can be attributed to life history categories. We make cautious recommendations for the use of nrITS as an approximate plant molecular clock, including an outline of more appropriate phylogenetic methodology and caveats against over interpretation of results. We also suggest that for lineages with independent calibrations, much of the variation in nrITS substitution rates may come from uncertainty in calibration date estimates, highlighting

  6. Estimating relatedness and inbreeding using molecular markers and pedigrees: the effect of demographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, S P; Simmons, L W; Kennington, W J

    2013-12-01

    Estimates of inbreeding and relatedness are commonly calculated using molecular markers, although the accuracy of such estimates has been questioned. As a further complication, in many situations, such estimates are required in populations with reduced genetic diversity, which is likely to affect their accuracy. We investigated the correlation between microsatellite- and pedigree-based coefficients of inbreeding and relatedness in laboratory populations of Drosophila melanogaster that had passed through bottlenecks to manipulate their genetic diversity. We also used simulations to predict expected correlations between marker- and pedigree-based estimates and to investigate the influence of linkage between loci and null alleles. Our empirical data showed lower correlations between marker- and pedigree-based estimates in our control (nonbottleneck) population than were predicted by our simulations or those found in similar studies. Correlations were weaker in bottleneck populations, confirming that extreme reductions in diversity can compromise the ability of molecular estimates to detect recent inbreeding events. However, this result was highly dependent on the strength of the bottleneck and we did not observe or predict any reduction in correlations in our population that went through a relatively severe bottleneck of N = 10 for one generation. Our results are therefore encouraging, as molecular estimates appeared robust to quite severe reductions in genetic diversity. It should also be remembered that pedigree-based estimates may not capture realized identity-by-decent and that marker-based estimates may actually be more useful in certain situations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Two Antarctic penguin genomes reveal insights into their evolutionary history and molecular changes related to the Antarctic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cai; Zhang, Yong; Li, Jianwen; Kong, Lesheng; Hu, Haofu; Pan, Hailin; Xu, Luohao; Deng, Yuan; Li, Qiye; Jin, Lijun; Yu, Hao; Chen, Yan; Liu, Binghang; Yang, Linfeng; Liu, Shiping; Zhang, Yan; Lang, Yongshan; Xia, Jinquan; He, Weiming; Shi, Qiong; Subramanian, Sankar; Millar, Craig D; Meader, Stephen; Rands, Chris M; Fujita, Matthew K; Greenwold, Matthew J; Castoe, Todd A; Pollock, David D; Gu, Wanjun; Nam, Kiwoong; Ellegren, Hans; Ho, Simon Yw; Burt, David W; Ponting, Chris P; Jarvis, Erich D; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Lambert, David M; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Guojie

    2014-01-01

    Penguins are flightless aquatic birds widely distributed in the Southern Hemisphere. The distinctive morphological and physiological features of penguins allow them to live an aquatic life, and some of them have successfully adapted to the hostile environments in Antarctica. To study the phylogenetic and population history of penguins and the molecular basis of their adaptations to Antarctica, we sequenced the genomes of the two Antarctic dwelling penguin species, the Adélie penguin [Pygoscelis adeliae] and emperor penguin [Aptenodytes forsteri]. Phylogenetic dating suggests that early penguins arose ~60 million years ago, coinciding with a period of global warming. Analysis of effective population sizes reveals that the two penguin species experienced population expansions from ~1 million years ago to ~100 thousand years ago, but responded differently to the climatic cooling of the last glacial period. Comparative genomic analyses with other available avian genomes identified molecular changes in genes related to epidermal structure, phototransduction, lipid metabolism, and forelimb morphology. Our sequencing and initial analyses of the first two penguin genomes provide insights into the timing of penguin origin, fluctuations in effective population sizes of the two penguin species over the past 10 million years, and the potential associations between these biological patterns and global climate change. The molecular changes compared with other avian genomes reflect both shared and diverse adaptations of the two penguin species to the Antarctic environment.

  8. Molecular phylogeography and evolutionary history of Poropuntius huangchuchieni (Cyprinidae in Southwest China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Wu

    Full Text Available The evolution of the Yunnan Plateau's drainages network during the Pleistocene was dominated by the intense uplifts of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. In the present study, we investigated the association between the evolutionary histories of three main drainage systems and the geographic patterns of genetic differentiation of Poropuntius huangchuchieni.We sequenced the complete sequences of mitochondrial control region for 304 specimens and the sequences of Cytochrome b gene for 15 specimens of the species P. huangchuchieni and 5 specimens of Poropuntius opisthoptera. Phylogenetic analysis identified five major lineages, of which lineages MK-A and MK-B constrained to the Mekong River System, lineages RL and LX to the Red River System, and lineage SW to the Salween River System. The genetic distance and network analysis detected significant divergences among these lineages. Mismatch distribution analysis implied that the population of P. huangchuchieni underwent demographic stability and the lineage MK-B, sublineages MK-A1 and LX-1 underwent a recent population expansion. The divergence of the 5 major lineages was dated back to 0.73-1.57 MYA.Our results suggest that P. opisthoptera was a paraphyletic group of P. huangchuchieni. The phylogenetic pattern of P. huangchuchieni was mostly associated with the drainage's structures and the geomorphological history of the Southwest Yunnan Plateau. Also the differentiation of the major lineages among the three drainages systems coincides with the Kunlun-Yellow River Movement (1.10-0.60 MYA. The genetic differentiation within river basins and recent demographical expansions that occurred in some lineages and sublineages are consistent with the palaeoclimatic oscillations during the Pleistocene. Additionally, our results also suggest that the populations of P. huangchuchieni had keep long term large effective population sizes and demographic stability in the recent evolutionary history, which may be

  9. Clostridium difficile infection: Early history, diagnosis and molecular strain typing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, C; Van Broeck, J; Taminiau, B; Delmée, M; Daube, G

    2016-08-01

    Recognised as the leading cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated diarrhoea, the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) remains high despite efforts to improve prevention and reduce the spread of the bacterium in healthcare settings. In the last decade, many studies have focused on the epidemiology and rapid diagnosis of CDI. In addition, different typing methods have been developed for epidemiological studies. This review explores the history of C. difficile and the current scope of the infection. The variety of available laboratory tests for CDI diagnosis and strain typing methods are also examined. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Clinical features and pregnancy outcome in antiphospholipid syndrome patients with history of severe pregnancy complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Yuko; Atsumi, Tatsuya; Yamaguchi, Koushi; Hisano, Michi; Arata, Naoko; Oku, Kenji; Watanabe, Noriyoshi; Sago, Haruhiko; Takasaki, Yoshinari; Murashima, Atsuko

    2015-03-01

    Abstract Objective. To clarify the clinical significance of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL) profile in patients with obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). Methods. Clinical records of 13 pregnant patients (15 pregnancies) with obstetrical APS were reviewed over 10 years. Patients who met the Sapporo Criteria fully were studied, whereas those with only early pregnancy loss were excluded. In addition to classical aPL: lupus anticoagulant (LA), anticardiolipin antibody (aCL), and anti-β2-glycoprotein I (aβ2GPI); phosphatidylserine-dependent anti-prothrombin antibody (aPS/PT) and kininogen-dependent anti-phosphatidylethanolamine antibody (aPE) were also examined in each case. Results. Cases were divided into two groups according to patient response to standard treatment: good and poor outcome groups. All cases with poor outcome presented LA, with IgG aβ2GPI and IgG aPS/PT were also frequently observed. IgG aPE did not correlate with pregnancy outcome. Conclusion. aPL profile may predict pregnancy outcome in patients with this subset of obstetric APS.

  11. Mycotic Aneurysm following a Dog Bite: The Value of the Clinical History and Molecular Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Terry J; Lyons, Oliver T; Brown, Aisling; Price, Nicholas; Bell, Rachel E; Sallam, Morad

    2016-04-01

    A 63-year-old Caucasian taxi driver presented with a 3-week history of malaise, night sweats, 7 kg weight loss, generalized arthralgia, and persistent mid-lower abdominal pain. Blood inflammatory markers were raised, and a computed tomography scan demonstrated an irregular degeneration of the infrarenal aorta, with a differential diagnosis including aortic infection. An urgent type IV thoracoabdominal aneurysm repair was performed with a rifampicin-soaked aortic tube graft during an open procedure. No organisms were grown from multiple peripheral blood cultures or culture of the affected aorta. However, subsequent 16S ribosomal polymerase chain reaction analysis of the resected aorta identified Capnocytophaga canimorsus as the causative organism-a commensal that lives in the mouth of dogs and cats. The patient subsequently gave a history of multiple bites from his pet dog over recent months-the likely source of infection. He was treated with 8 weeks of intravenous antibiotics before switching to oral antibiotics for an additional 6 weeks. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. History, Molecular Mechanisms, and Endoscopic Treatment of Barrett’s Esophagus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spechler, Stuart Jon; Fitzgerald, Rebecca C.; Prasad, Ganapathy A.; Wang, Kenneth K.

    2010-01-01

    This report is written as an adjunct to the American Gastroenterological Association Institute’s medical position statement and technical review on the management of Barrett’s esophagus, which will be published in the near future. Those documents will consider a number of broad questions on the diagnosis, clinical features, and management of patients with Barrett’s esophagus, and the reader is referred to the technical review for an in-depth discussion of those topics. In this report, we review historical, molecular, and endoscopic therapeutic aspects of Barrett’s esophagus that are of interest to clinicians and researchers. PMID:20080098

  13. Periodic limb movements and restless legs syndrome in children with a history of prematurity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cielo, Christopher M; DelRosso, Lourdes M; Tapia, Ignacio E; Biggs, Sarah N; Nixon, Gillian M; Meltzer, Lisa J; Traylor, Joel; Kim, Ji Young; Marcus, Carole L

    2017-02-01

    Little is known about the pediatric population at an increased risk of restless legs syndrome (RLS) and periodic limb movement disorder (PLMD). Polysomnographic data from the Caffeine for Apnea of Prematurity-Sleep (CAPS) study showed a high prevalence of elevated periodic limb movement index (PLMI) in a cohort of ex-preterm children, but the clinical importance of this finding, such as association with RLS, is unknown. We hypothesized that ex-preterm children would have a high prevalence of RLS and PLMD. Ex-preterm children enrolled in CAPS, now aged 5-12 years, completed home polysomnography (PSG) and standardized questionnaires. A diagnosis of RLS or PLMD was established by participants meeting the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition, criteria based on questionnaires and polysomnograms. The clinically available serum ferritin levels were assessed. In total, 167 participants underwent polysomnography and completed all questionnaires. The overall prevalence of RLS was 14/167 (8.4%). An additional 13 subjects (7.8%) were found to have PLMD. Of the 26 participants who had PLMI > 5/h, seven (26.9%) had RLS and 13 (50%) had PLMD. The serum ferritin levels were prematurity have a high prevalence of RLS, particularly those with elevated periodic limb movements. Iron deficiency likely contributes to RLS and PLMD symptoms in this population. Clinicians evaluating ex-preterm children with sleep disturbances should evaluate for RLS and PLMD. Further studies including serum ferritin evaluation are required to confirm these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. A History of constitutive modeling via molecular dynamics: Shock waves in fluids and gases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Holian B.L.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available From its inception in the mid-Fifties, the method of molecular-dynamics (MD computer simulations has been used to probe the foundations of statistical mechanics, first for equilibrium equation-of-state averages, and then for transport properties from equilibrium fluctuations. Traditional statistical mechanical theoreticians were shocked to see that this new-fangled computational physics approach was feasible, even with incredibly tiny samples (on the order of a hundred atoms. When direct measurement of transport coefficients by non-equilibrium molecular dynamics (NEMD was proposed in the early Seventies, even greater resistance was encountered from the traditionalists – though evidence for convergence with the equilibrium fluctuation method gradually accumulated. In the late Seventies and early Eighties, shock-wave simulations by NEMD made it possible to test directly the principal continuum constitutive theory for fluids, namely, Navier-Stokes viscous flow and Fourier’s Law of heat conduction. To everyone’s surprise – and the consternation of many – NEMD, once again, demonstrated that continuum theory applies at embarrassingly small (atomistic time and length scales. We pursue this early line of work into the modern era, showing how NEMD shock-wave simulations can still provide surprising insights and improvements upon our understanding of constitutive modeling.

  15. Clinical and molecular characterization of enhanced S-cone syndrome in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hull, Sarah; Arno, Gavin; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I; Tiffin, Peter; Borman, Arundhati Dev; Chandra, Aman; Robson, Anthony G; Holder, Graham E; Webster, Andrew R; Moore, Anthony T

    2014-11-01

    Enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) forms part of the differential diagnosis of night blindness in childhood. To report in detail the clinical phenotype and molecular genetic findings in a series of children with ESCS. Nine children with ESCS from 5 families underwent full ophthalmic examination, electrophysiological testing, and retinal imaging at a genetic eye disease clinic of a tertiary referral eye hospital. Bidirectional Sanger sequencing of all exons and intron-exon boundaries of NR2E3 was performed. Results of ophthalmic examination and sequence analysis of NR2E3. In total, 5 girls and 4 boys with a diagnosis of ESCS were included in the study. All patients had developed nyctalopia from early childhood. Visual acuity ranged from 0.00 to 1.20 logMAR (20/20 to 20/320 Snellen). All patients had hyperopia. Three patients had nummular pigmentary lesions along the arcades as typically seen in adults, 4 patients had mild pigmentary disturbance or white dots along the arcades, and 2 patients had a normal retinal appearance, although their fundus autofluorescence imaging demonstrated foci of increased autofluorescence along the arcades. Three patients had macular schisis-like changes on optical coherence tomography. Eight patients had electrophysiological testing at a mean age of 8.6 years (age range, 3-14 years), and in each patient the findings were consistent with the diagnosis of ESCS. Direct sequencing of NR2E3 identified 3 previously described mutations and 4 novel mutations. Seven patients were compound heterozygous for mutations in NR2E3, and 2 additional sibling patients were presumed to be homozygous for a missense change based on parental sequencing. In this sample, children with ESCS had an early onset of night blindness and hyperopia but no nystagmus. Based on this study, children with ESCS may initially manifest a normal fundus appearance but later develop mottled retinal pigment epithelium change along the arcades, followed by the appearance of white dots

  16. Molecular phylogenetics and evolutionary history of sect. Quinquefoliae (Pinus): implications for Northern Hemisphere biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Zhen-Zhen; Liu, Yan-Yan; Nazaire, Mare; Wei, Xiao-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-06-01

    Climatic changes and tectonic events in the Cenozoic have greatly influenced the evolution and geographic distribution of the temperate flora. Such consequences should be most evident in plant groups that are ancient, widespread, and diverse. As one of the most widespread genera of trees, Pinus provides a good model for investigating the history of species diversification and biogeographic disjunction in the Northern Hemisphere. In this study, we reconstructed the phylogeny and investigated the evolutionary and biogeographic history of sect. Quinquefoliae (Pinus), a species-rich lineage disjunctly distributed in Asia, Europe and North America, based on complete taxon sampling and by using nine DNA fragments from chloroplast (cp), mitochondrial (mt) and nuclear genomes. The monophyly of the three subsections, Krempfianae, Gerardianae, and Strobus, is well-supported by cpDNA and nuclear gene phylogenies. However, neither subsect. Gerardianae nor subsect. Strobus forms a monophyletic group in the mtDNA phylogeny, in which sect. Quinquefoliae was divided into two major clades, one consisting of the North American and northeastern Asian species as well as the European P. peuce of subsect. Strobus, and the other comprising the remaining Eurasian species belonging to three subsections. The significant topological incongruence among the gene trees, in conjunction with divergence time estimation and ancestral area reconstruction, indicates that both ancient and relatively recent introgressive hybridization events occurred in the evolution of sect. Quinquefoliae, particularly in northeastern Asia and northwestern North America. In addition, the phylogenetic analysis suggests that the species of subsect. Strobus from subtropical eastern Asia and neighboring areas may have a single origin, although species non-monophyly is very widespread in the nuclear gene trees. Moreover, our study seems to support a Tethyan origin of sect. Quinquefoliae given the distributions and

  17. Natural history of aortic root dilation through young adulthood in a hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Alyssa; Atzinger, Carrie; Hays, Brandon; James, Jeanne; Shikany, Amy; Neilson, Derek; Martin, Lisa; Weaver, Kathryn Nicole

    2017-06-01

    Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is a common inherited connective tissue disorder characterized by joint hypermobility. The natural history of aortic root dilation (AoD), a potential complication of EDS, has not been well characterized in this population. We describe the natural history of aortic root size in a large cohort of patients with hEDS. A cohort of 325 patients with HEDS was identified at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC), including 163 patients from a previous study. Medical records were reviewed and each participant's height, weight, and aortic dimensions from up to four echocardiograms were documented. Aortic root z-scores were calculated using two established formulas based on age (Boston or Devereux). Overall prevalence of AoD and prevalence by age were calculated and longitudinal regression was performed. The prevalence of AoD with a z-score ≥ 2.0 was 14.2% (46/325) and with a z-score of ≥3.0 was 5.5% (18/325). No significant increases in z-score were seen over time for patients with multiple echocardiograms. Participants under the age of 15 years had an average decline of 0.1 standard deviations (SDs)/year. No significant change was found after 15 of age. Between the ages of 15 and 21 years, Boston z-scores were 0.96 higher than Devereux z-scores. The nearly 1 z-score unit difference between formulas indicates caution prior to diagnosing AoD in patients with hEDS. In light of the low prevalence and lack of progression of AoD, routine echocardiograms may not be warranted for pediatric patients with hEDS. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. A model for the molecular underpinnings of tooth defects in Axenfeld–Rieger syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao; Venugopalan, Shankar R.; Cao, Huojun; Pinho, Flavia O.; Paine, Michael L.; Snead, Malcolm L.; Semina, Elena V.; Amendt, Brad A.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Axenfeld–Rieger Syndrome (ARS) present various dental abnormalities, including hypodontia, and enamel hypoplasia. ARS is genetically associated with mutations in the PITX2 gene, which encodes one of the earliest transcription factors to initiate tooth development. Thus, Pitx2 has long been considered as an upstream regulator of the transcriptional hierarchy in early tooth development. However, because Pitx2 is also a major regulator of later stages of tooth development, especially during amelogenesis, it is unclear how mutant forms cause ARS dental anomalies. In this report, we outline the transcriptional mechanism that is defective in ARS. We demonstrate that during normal tooth development Pitx2 activates Amelogenin (Amel) expression, whose product is required for enamel formation, and that this regulation is perturbed by missense PITX2 mutations found in ARS patients. We further show that Pitx2-mediated Amel activation is controlled by chromatin-associated factor Hmgn2, and that Hmgn2 prevents Pitx2 from efficiently binding to and activating the Amel promoter. Consistent with a physiological significance to this interaction, we show that K14-Hmgn2 transgenic mice display a severe loss of Amel expression on the labial side of the lower incisors, as well as enamel hypoplasia—consistent with the human ARS phenotype. Collectively, these findings define transcriptional mechanisms involved in normal tooth development and shed light on the molecular underpinnings of the enamel defect observed in ARS patients who carry PITX2 mutations. Moreover, our findings validate the etiology of the enamel defect in a novel mouse model of ARS. PMID:23975681

  19. Clinical and Molecular Phenotype of Aicardi-Goutières Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Gillian ; Patrick, Teresa ; Parmar, Rekha ; Taylor, Claire F. ; Aeby, Alec ; Aicardi, Jean ; Artuch, Rafael ; Montalto, Simon Attard ; Bacino, Carlos A. ; Barroso, Bruno ; Baxter, Peter ; Benko, Willam S. ; Bergmann, Carsten ; Bertini, Enrico ; Biancheri, Roberta ; Blair, Edward M. ; Blau, Nenad ; Bonthron, David T. ; Briggs, Tracy ; Brueton, Louise A. ; Brunner, Han G. ; Burke, Christopher J. ; Carr, Ian M. ; Carvalho, Daniel R. ; Chandler, Kate E. ; Christen, Hans-Jürgen ; Corry, Peter C. ; Cowan, Frances M. ; Cox, Helen ; D’Arrigo, Stefano ; Dean, John ; De Laet, Corinne ; De Praeter, Claudine ; Déry, Catherine ; Ferrie, Colin D. ; Flintoff, Kim ; Frints, Suzanna G. M. ; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels ; Gener, Blanca ; Goizet, Cyril ; Goutières, Françoise ; Green, Andrew J. ; Guët, Agnès ; Hamel, Ben C. J. ; Hayward, Bruce E. ; Heiberg, Arvid ; Hennekam, Raoul C. ; Husson, Marie ; Jackson, Andrew P. ; Jayatunga, Rasieka ; Jiang, Yong-Hui ; Kant, Sarina G. ; Kao, Amy ; King, Mary D. ; Kingston, Helen M. ; Klepper, Joerg ; van der Knaap, Marjo S. ; Kornberg, Andrew J. ; Kotzot, Dieter ; Kratzer, Wilfried ; Lacombe, Didier ; Lagae, Lieven ; Landrieu, Pierre Georges ; Lanzi, Giovanni ; Leitch, Andrea ; Lim, Ming J. ; Livingston, John H. ; Lourenco, Charles M. ; Lyall, E. G. Hermione ; Lynch, Sally A. ; Lyons, Michael J. ; Marom, Daphna ; McClure, John P. ; McWilliam, Robert ; Melancon, Serge B. ; Mewasingh, Leena D. ; Moutard, Marie-Laure ; Nischal, Ken K. ; Østergaard, John R. ; Prendiville, Julie ; Rasmussen, Magnhild ; Rogers, R. Curtis ; Roland, Dominique ; Rosser, Elisabeth M. ; Rostasy, Kevin ; Roubertie, Agathe ; Sanchis, Amparo ; Schiffmann, Raphael ; Scholl-Bürgi, Sabine ; Seal, Sunita ; Shalev, Stavit A. ; Corcoles, C. Sierra ; Sinha, Gyan P. ; Soler, Doriette ; Spiegel, Ronen ; Stephenson, John B. P. ; Tacke, Uta ; Tan, Tiong Yang ; Till, Marianne ; Tolmie, John L. ; Tomlin, Pam ; Vagnarelli, Federica ; Valente, Enza Maria ; Van Coster, Rudy N. A. ; Van der Aa, Nathalie ; Vanderver, Adeline ; Vles, Johannes S. H. ; Voit, Thomas ; Wassmer, Evangeline ; Weschke, Bernhard ; Whiteford, Margo L. ; Willemsen, Michel A. A. ; Zankl, Andreas ; Zuberi, Sameer M. ; Orcesi, Simona ; Fazzi, Elisa ; Lebon, Pierre ; Crow, Yanick J. 

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutières syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3′→5′ exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease complex. To define the molecular spectrum of AGS, we performed mutation screening in patients, from 127 pedigrees, with a clinical diagnosis of the disease. Biallelic mutations in TREX1, RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were observed in 31, 3, 47, and 18 families, respectively. In five families, we identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from northern Europe. Almost all mutations in RNASEH2A, RNASEH2B, and RNASEH2C were missense. We identified an RNASEH2C founder mutation in 13 Pakistani families. We also collected clinical data from 123 mutation-positive patients. Two clinical presentations could be delineated: an early-onset neonatal form, highly reminiscent of congenital infection seen particularly with TREX1 mutations, and a later-onset presentation, sometimes occurring after several months of normal development and occasionally associated with remarkably preserved neurological function, most frequently due to RNASEH2B mutations. Mortality was correlated with genotype; 34.3% of patients with TREX1, RNASEH2A, and RNASEH2C mutations versus 8.0% RNASEH2B mutation–positive patients were known to have died (P=.001). Our analysis defines the phenotypic spectrum of AGS and suggests a coherent mutation-screening strategy in this heterogeneous disorder. Additionally, our data indicate that at least one further AGS-causing gene remains to be identified. PMID:17846997

  20. Molecular biomarkers predictive of sertraline treatment response in young children with fragile X syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlOlaby, Reem Rafik; Sweha, Stefan R; Silva, Marisol; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Yrigollen, Carolyn M; Pretto, Dalyir; Hagerman, Randi J; Tassone, Flora

    2017-06-01

    Several neurotransmitters involved in brain development are altered in fragile X syndrome (FXS), the most common monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Serotonin plays a vital role in synaptogenesis and postnatal brain development. Deficits in serotonin synthesis and abnormal neurogenesis were shown in young children with autism, suggesting that treating within the first years of life with a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor might be the most effective time. In this study we aimed to identify molecular biomarkers involved in the serotonergic pathway that could predict the response to sertraline treatment in young children with FXS. Genotypes were determined for several genes involved in serotonergic pathway in 51 children with FXS, ages 24-72months. Correlations between genotypes and deviations from baseline in primary and secondary outcome measures were modeled using linear regression models. A significant association was observed between a BDNF polymorphism and improvements for several clinical measures, including the Clinical Global Impression scale (P=0.008) and the cognitive T score (P=0.017) in those treated with sertraline compared to those in the placebo group. Additionally, polymorphisms in the MAOA, Cytochrome P450 2C19 and 2D6, and in the 5-HTTLPR gene showed a significant correlation with some of the secondary measures included in this study. This study shows that polymorphisms of genes involved in the serotonergic pathway could play a potential role in predicting response to sertraline treatment in young children with FXS. Larger studies are warranted to confirm these initial findings. Copyright © 2017 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. The antioxidative and antilipidemic effects of different molecular weight chitosans in metabolic syndrome model rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anraku, Makoto; Michihara, Akihiro; Yasufuku, Taira; Akasaki, Kenji; Tsuchiya, Daiju; Nishio, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Toru; Otagiri, Masaki; Maezaki, Yuji; Kondo, Yuko; Tomida, Hisao

    2010-01-01

    The effect of high and low molecular weight chitosans (HMC; 1000 kDa, LMC; 30 kDa) on oxidative stress and hypercholesterolemia was investigated using male 6-week-old Wistar Kyoto rats as a normal model (Normal-rats) and spontaneously hypertensive rat/ND mcr-cp (SHP/ND) as a metabolic syndrome model (MS-rats), respectively. In Normal-rats, the ingestion of both chitosans over a 4 week period resulted in a significant decrease in total body weight (BW), glucose (Gl), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and serum creatinine (Cre) levels. The ingestion of both chitosans also resulted in a lowered ratio of oxidized to reduced albumin and an increase in total plasma antioxidant activity. In addition to similar results in Normal-rats, the ingestion of only HMC over a 4 week period resulted in a significant decrease in total cholesterol levels in MS-rats. Further, the ingestion of LMC resulted in a significantly higher antioxidant activity than was observed for HMC in both rat models. In in vitro studies, LMC caused a significantly higher reduction in the levels of two stable radicals, compared to HMC, and the effect was both dose- and time-dependent. The findings also show that LDL showed strong binding in the case of HMC. These results suggest that LMC has a high antioxidant activity as well as antilipidemic effects, while HMC results in a significant reduction in the levels of pro-oxidants such as LDL in the gastrointestinal tract, thereby inhibiting the subsequent development of oxidative stress in the systemic circulation in metabolic model rats.

  2. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  3. Molecular Testing of MECP2 Gene in Rett Syndrome Phenotypes in Indian Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallar, Meenakshi; Rai, Archana; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mandal, Kausik; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Phadke, Shubha R

    2018-02-09

    To assess yield of MECP2 gene sequence variations analysis and large deletions in suspected cases of Rett syndrome. Descriptive study. Tertiary-care medical genetics center. Girls with neuroregression, postnatal microcephaly and signs and symptoms suggestive of classical and atypical Rett syndrome were classified into two groups. Group I consisted of girls with Classical and atypical Rett syndrome on basis on the Revised Rett Syndrome diagnostic criteria, 2010. Group II included girls with neuroregression and postnatal microcephaly and other Rett like features but not fulfilling the above criteria. Sanger sequencing of coding regions and large deletional analysis of MECP2 gene. Identification of mutation in MECP2 gene. Mutation in MECP2 gene was identified in 74% (14/19) in group I and none (0/17) in group II. The mutation detection rate was 92% (13/14) in group I classical Rett syndrome girls (2 with large deletions identified with Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification) and 20% (1/5) in group I atypical Rett syndrome girls. One novel MECP2 sequence variation was identified in group I classical Rett syndrome. The yield of the mutation detection in MECP2 is much higher in classical than in atypical Rett syndrome. In girls with some Rett like features, but not fulfilling revised Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria, mutation testing for MECP2 gene has a low yield.

  4. Rosalind Franklin and the DNA molecular structure: A case of history of science to learn about the nature of science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Antonio Acevedo-Díaz

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The Rosalind Franklin’s case regarding the elucidation of the molecular structure of DNA is presented as an interesting story of the history of science to address a set of questions related to the nature of science (NOS from an explicit and reflective approach. The teaching proposal is aimed to the pre-service teachers training in NOS issues and its didactics. Attention is given to both epistemic and non-epistemic aspects in the narration and the NOS questions asked for reflecting about them. Also, some methodological recommendations for implementing the didactic proposal in science classroom are offered. This involves the follows: (i in small groups, the students read the controversy and respond to some questions on NOS; (ii they present their responses to the whole-class; and (iii they revise their initial responses in light of the whole-class discussion.

  5. Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: history, molecular mechanisms and epidemiological aspects of an emerging global threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa-Lourenço, Ana Paula Ramalho da; Barros Dos Santos, Késia Thaís; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer; Fracalanzza, Sergio Eduardo Longo; Bonelli, Raquel Regina

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the agent of gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted infection with an estimate from The World Health Organization of 78 million new cases in people aged 15-49 worldwide during 2012. If left untreated, complications may include pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. Antimicrobial treatment is usually effective; however, resistance has emerged successively through various molecular mechanisms for all the regularly used therapeutic agents throughout decades. Detection of antimicrobial susceptibility is currently the most critical aspect for N. gonorrhoeae surveillance, however poorly structured health systems pose difficulties. In this review, we compiled data from worldwide reports regarding epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, and highlight the relevance of the implementation of surveillance networks to establish policies for gonorrhea treatment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae: history, molecular mechanisms and epidemiological aspects of an emerging global threat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Ramalho da Costa-Lourenço

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Neisseria gonorrhoeae is the agent of gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted infection with an estimate from The World Health Organization of 78 million new cases in people aged 15-49 worldwide during 2012. If left untreated, complications may include pelvic inflammatory disease and infertility. Antimicrobial treatment is usually effective; however, resistance has emerged successively through various molecular mechanisms for all the regularly used therapeutic agents throughout decades. Detection of antimicrobial susceptibility is currently the most critical aspect for N. gonorrhoeae surveillance, however poorly structured health systems pose difficulties. In this review, we compiled data from worldwide reports regarding epidemiology and antimicrobial resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, and highlight the relevance of the implementation of surveillance networks to establish policies for gonorrhea treatment.

  7. Traditional Taxonomic Groupings Mask Evolutionary History: A Molecular Phylogeny and New Classification of the Chromodorid Nudibranchs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Rebecca Fay; Gosliner, Terrence M.

    2012-01-01

    Chromodorid nudibranchs (16 genera, 300+ species) are beautiful, brightly colored sea slugs found primarily in tropical coral reef habitats and subtropical coastal waters. The chromodorids are the most speciose family of opisthobranchs and one of the most diverse heterobranch clades. Chromodorids have the potential to be a model group with which to study diversification, color pattern evolution, are important source organisms in natural products chemistry and represent a stunning and widely compelling example of marine biodiversity. Here, we present the most complete molecular phylogeny of the chromodorid nudibranchs to date, with a broad sample of 244 specimens (142 new), representing 157 (106 new) chromodorid species, four actinocylcid species and four additional dorid species utilizing two mitochondrial markers (16s and COI). We confirmed the monophyly of the Chromodorididae and its sister group relationship with the Actinocyclidae. We were also able to, for the first time, test generic monophyly by including more than one member of all 14 of the non-monotypic chromodorid genera. Every one of these 14 traditional chromodorid genera are either non-monophyletic, or render another genus paraphyletic. Additionally, both the monotypic genera Verconia and Diversidoris are nested within clades. Based on data shown here, there are three individual species and five clades limited to the eastern Pacific and Atlantic Oceans (or just one of these ocean regions), while the majority of chromodorid clades and species are strictly Indo-Pacific in distribution. We present a new classification of the chromodorid nudibranchs. We use molecular data to untangle evolutionary relationships and retain a historical connection to traditional systematics by using generic names attached to type species as clade names. PMID:22506002

  8. Diagnostic Strategies for Early Lynch Syndrome Detection: From Molecular Testing to Economic Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.H.M. Leenen (Celine)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Lynch syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominant inherited syndrome that predisposes to multiple malignancies, in particular colorectal cancer (CRC) and endometrial cancer (EC). The lifetime risk of developing CRC for a LS mutation carrier is 25 to 70%, while women

  9. A Malay boy with the Cornelia de Lange syndrome: clinical and molecular findings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhuiyan, Z. A.; Zilfalil, B. A.; Hennekam, R. C. M.

    2006-01-01

    The Cornelia de Lange syndrome is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome characterised by dysmorphic facial features, hirsutism, severe growth and developmental delays, and malformed upper limbs. The prevalence is estimated to be one per 10,000. Recently, several independent groups proved that

  10. Organic molecular paleohypsometry: A new approach to reconstructing the paleoelevation history of an orogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hren, M. T.; Ouimet, W. B.

    2017-12-01

    Paleoelevation data is critical to understanding the links and feedbacks between rock-uplift and erosion yet few approaches have proved successful in quantifying changes in paleoelevation rapidly eroding, tropical landscapes. In addition, quantitative methods of reconstructing paleoelevation from marine sedimentary archives are lacking. Here we present a new approach to quantifying changes in paleoelevation that is based on the geochemical signature of organic matter exported via the main river networks of an orogen. This new approach builds on fundamentals of stable isotope paleoaltimetry and is akin to the theory behind cosmogenic isotope records of catchment-integrated erosion. Specifically, we utilize predictable patterns of precipitation and organic molecular biomarker stable isotopes to relate the hypsometry of organic matter in a catchment to the geochemical signal in exported organic carbon. We present data from two sites (the cold temperate White Mountains of New Hampshire, USA and the tropical, rapidly eroding landscape of Taiwan) to demonstrate this relationship between exported carbon geochemistry and catchment hypsometry and the validity of this approach.

  11. Testing advances in molecular discrimination among Chinook salmon life histories: evidence from a blind test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael A; Jacobson, David P; Meusnier, Isabelle; Greig, Carolyn A; Rashbrook, Vanessa K; Ardren, William R; Smith, Christian T; Bernier-Latmani, Jeremiah; Van Sickle, John; O'Malley, Kathleen G

    2014-06-01

    The application of DNA-based markers toward the task of discriminating among alternate salmon runs has evolved in accordance with ongoing genomic developments and increasingly has enabled resolution of which genetic markers associate with important life-history differences. Accurate and efficient identification of the most likely origin for salmon encountered during ocean fisheries, or at salvage from fresh water diversion and monitoring facilities, has far-reaching consequences for improving measures for management, restoration and conservation. Near-real-time provision of high-resolution identity information enables prompt response to changes in encounter rates. We thus continue to develop new tools to provide the greatest statistical power for run identification. As a proof of concept for genetic identification improvements, we conducted simulation and blind tests for 623 known-origin Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) to compare and contrast the accuracy of different population sampling baselines and microsatellite loci panels. This test included 35 microsatellite loci (1266 alleles), some known to be associated with specific coding regions of functional significance, such as the circadian rhythm cryptochrome genes, and others not known to be associated with any functional importance. The identification of fall run with unprecedented accuracy was demonstrated. Overall, the top performing panel and baseline (HMSC21) were predicted to have a success rate of 98%, but the blind-test success rate was 84%. Findings for bias or non-bias are discussed to target primary areas for further research and resolution. © 2014 The Authors. Animal Genetics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  12. Lack of association between dopamine-β hydroxylase gene and a history of suicide attempt in schizophrenia: comparison of molecular and statistical haplotype analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, Aaron S; Leung, Tiffany; Bani-Fatemi, Ali; Souza, Renan; Tampakeras, Maria; Zai, Clement; Kennedy, James L; Strauss, John; De Luca, Vincenzo

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, we examined whether there was an association between dopamine-β hydroxylase (DBH) promoter polymorphisms (a 5'-ins/del and a GTn repeats) and a history of suicide attempt in 223 chronic schizophrenia individuals using statistical and molecular analyses. Within the genetic association study design, we compared the statistical haplotype phase with the molecular phase produced by the amplicon size analysis. The two DBH polymorphisms were analysed using the Applied Biosystem 3130 and the statistical analyses were carried out using UNPHASED v.3.1.5 and PHASE v.2.1.1 to determine the haplotype frequencies and infer the phase in each patient. Then, DBH polymorphisms were incorporated into the Haploscore analysis to test the association with a history of suicide attempt. In our sample, 62 individuals had a history of suicide attempt. There was no association between DBH polymorphisms and a history of suicide attempt across the different analytical strategies applied. There was no significant difference between the haplotype frequencies produced by the amplicon size analysis and statistical analytical strategies. However, some of the haplotype pairs inferred in the PHASE analysis were inconsistent with the molecular haplotype size measured by the ABI 3130. The amplicon size analysis proved to be the most accurate method using the haplotype as a possible genetic marker for future testing. Although the results were not significant, further molecular analyses of the DBH gene and other candidate genes can clarify the utility of the molecular phase in psychiatric genetics and personalized medicine.

  13. [Genetic and molecular basis for sodium channel-mediated Brugada syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barajas-Martínez, Héctor; Hu, Dan; Antzelevitch, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Brugada syndrome is a genetic disease that is characterized by abnormal electrocardiogram findings and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. This syndrome is linked to mutations in the SCN5A gene in approximately 20% of Brugada syndrome probands. SCN5A encodes the α subunit of the cardiac sodium channel. Studies conducted over the past decade have identified 11 other Brugada syndrome susceptibility genes besides to SCN5A, pointing to genetic heterogeneity of the syndrome. Transmission of the disease shows an autosomal dominant inheritance pattern. This brief review focuses on a reported case of sodium channel-mediated Brugada syndrome, guiding the reader through the process of identification of the genetic variants responsible for the clinically-diagnosed syndrome, mutagenesis to clone SCN5A with and without the 2 variants identified and transfection of the 2 variants into TSA201 cells to determine the functional consequence of these genetic variants on sodium channel expression and function. Copyright © 2013 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Published by Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  14. Application of whole-exome sequencing to unravel the molecular basis of undiagnosed syndromic congenital neutropenia with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier-Vasserot, Alexandra; Thauvin-Robinet, Christel; Bruel, Ange-Line; Duffourd, Yannis; St-Onge, Judith; Jouan, Thibaud; Rivière, Jean-Baptiste; Heron, Delphine; Donadieu, Jean; Bellanné-Chantelot, Christine; Briandet, Claire; Huet, Frédéric; Kuentz, Paul; Lehalle, Daphné; Duplomb-Jego, Laurence; Gautier, Elodie; Maystadt, Isabelle; Pinson, Lucile; Amram, Daniel; El Chehadeh, Salima; Melki, Judith; Julia, Sophia; Faivre, Laurence; Thevenon, Julien

    2017-01-01

    Neutropenia can be qualified as congenital when of neonatal onset or when associated with extra-hematopoietic manifestations. Overall, 30% of patients with congenital neutropenia (CN) remain without a molecular diagnosis after a multidisciplinary consultation and tedious diagnostic strategy. In the rare situations when neutropenia is identified and associated with intellectual disability (ID), there are few diagnostic hypotheses to test. This retrospective multicenter study reports on a clinically heterogeneous cohort of 10 unrelated patients with CN associated with ID and no molecular diagnosis prior to whole-exome sequencing (WES). WES provided a diagnostic yield of 40% (4/10). The results suggested that in many cases neutropenia and syndromic manifestations could not be assigned to the same molecular alteration. Three sub-groups of patients were highlighted: (i) severe, symptomatic chronic neutropenia, detected early in life, and related to a known mutation in the CN spectrum (ELANE); (ii) mild to moderate benign intermittent neutropenia, detected later, and associated with mutations in genes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders (CHD2, HUWE1); and (iii) moderate to severe intermittent neutropenia as a probably undiagnosed feature of a newly reported syndrome (KAT6A). Unlike KAT6A, which seems to be associated with a syndromic form of CN, the other reported mutations may not explain the entire clinical picture. Although targeted gene sequencing can be discussed for the primary diagnosis of severe CN, we suggest that performing WES for the diagnosis of disorders associating CN with ID will not only provide the etiological diagnosis but will also pave the way towards personalized care and follow-up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Molecular diagnosis of fragile X syndrome using methylation sensitive techniques in a cohort of patients with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Adeel G; Hussein, Ibtessam R; Abuzenadah, Adel; Gari, Mamdouh; Bassiouni, Randa; Sogaty, Samira; Lary, Sahira; Al-Quaiti, Maha; Al Balwi, Mohammed; Al Qahtani, Mohammed

    2014-04-01

    Fragile X syndrome, the most common form of inherited intellectual disability, is caused by expansion of CGG trinucleotide repeat at the 5' untranslated region of the FMR1 gene at Xq27. In affected individuals, the CGG repeat expansion leads to hypermethylation and the gene is transcriptionally inactive. Our aim was to identify fragile X syndrome among children with intellectual disability in Saudi Arabia. The study included 63 patients (53 males, 10 females) presented with intellectual disability, 29 normal subjects, and 23 other family members. DNA samples from six patients previously diagnosed with fragile X syndrome by Southern blot technique were used as positive controls. The method was based on bisulfite treatment of DNA followed by two different techniques. The first technique applied polymerase chain reaction amplification using one set of primers specific for amplifying methylated CpG dinucleotide region; another set designed to amplify the unmethylated CGG repeats. The second technique used the methylation-specific melting curve analysis for detection of methylation status of the FMR1 promoter region. Molecular testing using methylation sensitive polymerase chain reaction had shown amplified products in all normal subjects using unmethylated but not methylated primers indicating normal alleles, whereas amplified products were obtained using methylated polymerase chain reaction primers in fragile X syndrome-positive samples and in 9 of 53 males, indicating affected individuals. Molecular testing using melting curve analysis has shown a single low melting peak in all normal males and in (44/53) patients indicating unmethylated FMR1 gene, whereas high melting peak indicating methylated gene was observed in the fragile X syndrome-positive samples and in 9 of 53 patients. We found 100% concordance between results of both techniques and the results of Southern blot analysis. Three samples have shown both methylated and unmethylated alleles, indicating possible

  16. Is chronic fatigue syndrome an autoimmune disorder of endogenous neuropeptides, exogenous infection and molecular mimicry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staines, Donald R

    2004-01-01

    Chronic fatigue syndrome is a disorder characterised by prolonged fatigue and debility and is mostly associated with post-infection sequelae although ongoing infection is unproven. Immunological aberration is likely and this may prove to be associated with an expanding group of vasoactive neuropeptides in the context of molecular mimicry and inappropriate immunological memory. Vasoactive neuropeptides including vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and pituitary adenylate activating polypeptide (PACAP) belong to the secretin/glucagon superfamily and act as hormones, neurotransmitters, immune modulators and neurotrophes. They are readily catalysed to smaller peptide fragments by antibody hydrolysis. They and their binding sites are immunogenic and are known to be associated with a range of autoimmune conditions. Vasoactive neuropeptides are widely distributed in the body particularly in the central, autonomic and peripheral nervous systems and have been identified in the gut, adrenal gland, reproductive organs, vasculature, blood cells and other tissues. They have a vital role in maintaining vascular flow in organs, and in thermoregulation, memory and concentration. They are co-transmitters for acetylcholine, nitric oxide, endogenous opioids and insulin, are potent immune regulators with primarily anti-inflammatory activity, and have a significant role in protection of the nervous system to toxic assault, promotion of neural development and the maintenance of homeostasis. This paper describes a biologically plausible mechanism for the development of CFS based on loss of immunological tolerance to the vasoactive neuropeptides following infection, significant physical exercise or de novo. It is proposed that release of these substances is accompanied by a loss of tolerance either to them or their receptor binding sites in CFS. Such an occurrence would have predictably serious consequences resulting from compromised function of the key roles these substances perform. All

  17. The effect of sugar and artificial sweetener on molecular markers of metabolic syndrome: a mice study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subali, D.,

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The usage of aspartame, as one of the most widely used sweetener, has been approved in many types of food products. Moreover, many studies have proven that replacing sugar with aspartame would contribute favorable effects on several health parameters; such as, body weight, blood glucose level, and inflammatory status. In this experiment, we examined the effects of aspartame consumption on some biomarkers; which potentially acted as early signals for a personal metabolic status. This study was aimed to investigate the effect of aspartame on the expression of a number of molecular markers related with appetite regulation (fto, fat accumulation markers (fabp4 and alt2 and inflammation marker (tnf-α in Sprague Dawley rats. The population of Clostridium coccoides was also observed to give an insight about the effect of sweetener consumption on gut microbiota profiles. 15 healthy, male, eight-weeks old Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a standard diet and divided into 3 groups (n=5 for each: water only, sucrose (30% b/v, and aspartame (0.15% b/v. Body weight was measured weekly and blood glucose measurement was carried out on day 1 and 40. At the end of the experiment, all rats were euthanized and blood was collected from the vein. The liver, brain, and visceral adipose tissue were excised, weighed, and grinded with liquid nitrogen. Feces samples were collected on day 0 and 40. At the end of our experimental period; the body weight, liver weight, and blood glucose level of sucrose-treated rats were significantly higher (p <0.05 than aspartame and control group. Sucrose showed the lowest level of fto gene expression; yet, the fto gene expression in aspartame group was still lower than the control group. Expression of several genes considered as metabolic syndrome-related biomarkers were measured (fabp4, alt2, and tnf-α; and our data demonstrated that sucrose treatment gave the highest increase in expression level of those genes; while aspartame treatment

  18. Pendred syndrome in two Galician families: insights into clinical phenotypes through cellular, genetic, and molecular studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palos, Fernando; García-Rendueles, María E R; Araujo-Vilar, David; Obregon, Maria Jesús; Calvo, Rosa Maria; Cameselle-Teijeiro, Jose; Bravo, Susana B; Perez-Guerra, Oscar; Loidi, Lourdes; Czarnocka, Barbara; Alvarez, Paula; Refetoff, Samuel; Dominguez-Gerpe, Lourdes; Alvarez, Clara V; Lado-Abeal, Joaquin

    2008-01-01

    We studied two families from Galicia (northwest Spain) with Pendred syndrome (PS) and unusual thyroid phenotypes. In family A, the proposita had a large goiter and hypothyroxinemia but normal TSH and free T3 (FT3). In family B, some affected members showed deafness but not goiter. Our objective was to identify the mutations causing PS and molecular mechanisms underlying the thyroid phenotypes. Interventions included extraction of DNA and of thyroid tissue. Propositi and 10 members of the two families participated in the study. Main outcome measures included SLC26A4 gene analysis, deiodinase activities in thyroid tissue, and c.416-1G-->A effects on SLC26A4 splicing. In addition, a primary PS thyrocyte culture, T-PS2, was obtained from propositus B and compared with another culture of normal human thyrocytes, NT, by Western blotting, confocal microscopy, and iodine uptake kinetics. Proposita A was heterozygous for c.578C-->T and c.279delT, presented with goiter, and had normal TSH and FT3 but low FT4 attributable to high type 1 and type 2 iodothyronine deiodinase activities in the goiter. Propositus B bore c.279delT and a novel mutation c.416-1G-->A; some deaf relatives were homozygous for c.416-1G-->A but did not present goiter. The c.279delT mutation was associated with identical haplotype in the two families. T-PS2 showed truncated pendrin retained intracellularly and high iodine uptake with low efflux leading to iodine retention. c.279delT is a founder mutation in Galicia. Proposita A adapted to poor organification by increasing deiodinase activities in the goiter, avoiding hypothyroidism. Lack of goiter in subjects homozygous for c.416-1G-->A was due to incomplete penetrance allowing synthesis of some wild-type pendrin. Intracellular iodine retention, as seen in T-PS2, could play a role in thyroid alterations in PS.

  19. High-molecular weight adiponectin/HOMA-IR ratio as a biomarker of metabolic syndrome in urban multiethnic Brazilian subjects

    OpenAIRE

    de Abreu, Virg?nia Genelhu; Martins, Cyro Jos? de Moraes; de Oliveira, Patricia Aguiar Cardoso; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has an important epidemiological relevance due to its increasing prevalence and association with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance is a core feature of the MetS. HOMA-IR is a robust clinical and epidemiological marker of MetS. Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory functions; its levels decrease as number of components of MetS increases. High-molecular weight adiponectin (HMWA) is the multimer responsib...

  20. Angelman syndrome: Validation of molecular cytogenetic analysis of chromosome 15q11-q13 for deletion detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, L.; Knoll, J.H.M. [Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1995-03-13

    In a series of 18 individuals comprising parents of Angelman syndrome (AS) patients and AS patients with large deletions, microdeletions, and no deletions, we utilized fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with genomic phage clones for loci D15S63 and GABRB3 for deletion detection of chromosome 15q11-q13. Utilization of probes at these loci allows detection of common large deletions and permits discrimination of less common small deletions. In all individuals the molecular cytogenetic data were concordant with the DNA deletion analyses. FISH provides an accurate method of deletion detection for chromosome 15q11-q13. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Clinical features and molecular genetic analysis of a boy with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by an imprinting defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A; Hansen, Claus; Baekgaard, P

    1997-01-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) is a neuroendocrine disorder caused by a non-functioning paternally derived gene(s) within the chromosome region 15q11-q13. Most cases result from microscopically visible deletions of paternal origin, or maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. In both instances...... no recurrence has been reported. In rare cases, PWS is associated with lack of gene expression from the paternal allele due to an imprinting defect. We report the clinical features and the molecular genetic analysis of the first Danish child with PWS due to a defect of the putative imprinting centre (IC). When...

  2. Production of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus in human and nonhuman cells transfected with an infectious molecular clone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, A.; Gendelman, H.E.; Koenig, S.; Folks, T.; Willey, R.; Rabson, A.; Martin, M.A.

    1986-01-01

    The authors considered an infectious molecular clone of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome-associated retrovirus. Upon transfection, this clone directed the production of infectious virus particles in a wide variety of cells in addition to human T4 cells. The progeny, infectious virions, were synthesized in mouse, mink, monkey, and several human non-T cell lines, indicating the absence of any intracellular obstacle to viral RNA or protein production or assembly. During the course of these studies, a human colon carcinoma cell line, exquisitely sensitive to DNA transfection, was identified

  3. Integrating the pace-of-life syndrome across species, sexes and individuals: covariation of life history and personality under pesticide exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debecker, Sara; Sanmartín-Villar, Iago; de Guinea-Luengo, Miguel; Cordero-Rivera, Adolfo; Stoks, Robby

    2016-05-01

    The pace-of-life syndrome (POLS) hypothesis integrates covariation of life-history traits along a fast-slow continuum and covariation of behavioural traits along a proactive-reactive personality continuum. Few studies have investigated these predicted life-history/personality associations among species and between sexes. Furthermore, whether and how contaminants interfere with POLS patterns remains unexplored. We tested for covariation patterns in life history and in behaviour, and for life-history/personality covariation among species, among individuals within species and between sexes. Moreover, we investigated whether pesticide exposure affects covariation between life history and behaviour and whether species and sexes with a faster POLS strategy have a higher sensitivity to pesticides. We reared larvae of four species of Ischnura damselflies in a common garden experiment with an insecticide treatment (chlorpyrifos absent/present) in the final instar. We measured four life-history traits (larval growth rate during the pesticide treatment, larval development time, adult mass and life span) and two behavioural traits (larval feeding activity and boldness, each before and after the pesticide treatment). At the individual level, life-history traits and behavioural traits aligned along a fast-slow and a proactive-reactive continuum, respectively. Species-specific differences in life history, with fast-lived species having a faster larval growth and development, a lower mass at emergence and a shorter life span, suggested that time constraints in the larval stage were predictably driving life-history evolution both in the larval stage and across metamorphosis in the adult stage. Across species, females were consistently more slow-lived than males, reflecting that a large body size and a long life span are generally more important for females. In contrast to the POLS hypothesis, there was only little evidence for the expected positive coupling between life-history

  4. Gastrointestinal Polyposis Syndromes : Clinical and molecular aspects of Familial Adenomatous Polyposis and Juvenile Polyposis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brosens, L.A.A.

    2008-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is an important cause death. In the Netherlands, approximately 10.000 patients are diagnosed with CRC each year. Rare hereditary gastrointestinal polyposis syndromes predisposing to CRC, including familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), juvenile polyposis (JPS) and

  5. The concept of metabolic syndrome: contribution of visceral fat accumulation and its molecular mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Yuji; Funahashi, Tohru; Nakamura, Tadashi

    2011-01-01

    Although abdominal obesity or visceral obesity is considered to be one of the components of metabolic syndrome and to have an important role in a cluster of cardiovascular risks, there is no consensus about the definition and diagnostic criteria for this syndrome, probably because there is considerable disagreement about the location and definition of abdominal obesity or visceral obesity.In this review article, the important role of visceral fat accumulation in the development of a variety of lifestyle-related diseases is shown, including cardiovascular disease based on our clinical studies using CT scans, and the mechanism of these disorders is discussed, focusing on adipocytokines, especially adiponectin.The importance of diagnosing metabolic syndrome, in which visceral fat accumulation plays an essential role in the development of multiple risk factors, should be emphasized because lifestyle modification for the reduction of visceral fat may be very effective for the reduction of risks of this type, namely metabolic syndrome in the narrow sense.

  6. Cardiac aspects of DiGeorge syndrome: a report of two cases with molecular analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senka Mesihović Dinarević

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available DiGeorge syndrome (DGS which is also known as velocardiofacial syndrome is caused by a submicroscopic chromosome deletion of band 22q11. It is associated with a disturbed development of the pharyngeal arches. In this report we describe two unrelated male children with clinical features consistent with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome characterized by cardiac defect, recurrent respiratory infections and developmental deficiency. Definitive diagnosis is made by Fluorescence In Situ Hybridization analysis (FISH. Children underwent surgical correction of congenital heart defects. During surgery thymic aplasia was confirmed in both children, postoperative course proceeded without major complications. Our report suggests that the criteria in searching for microdeletion 22q11.2 should be expanded and applied in patients with conotruncal and non-conotruncal congenital heart defects and at least one typical feature of this syndrome.

  7. Clinical and molecular characteristics of East Asian patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Meihua; Chu, Ying-Hsia; Tan, Hwei Ling; Bessho, Hideharu; Ngeow, Joanne; Tang, Tiffany; Tan, Min-Han

    2016-08-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is a dominantly inherited multisystem cancer syndrome caused by a heterozygous mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies suggested that similar populations of Caucasian and Japanese patients have similar genotype or phenotype characteristics. In this comprehensive study of East Asian patients, we investigated the genetic and clinical characteristics of patients with VHL syndrome. To create a registry of clinical characteristics and mutations reported in East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, we conducted a comprehensive review of English language and non-English language articles identified through a literature search. Publications in Japanese or Chinese language were read by native speakers of the language, who then performed the data extraction. Of 237 East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, 154 unique kindreds were identified for analysis. Analyzed by kindred, missense mutations were the most common (40.9%, 63/154), followed by large/complete deletions (32.5%, 50/154) and nonsense mutations (11.7%, 18/154). Compared with a previously reported study of both East Asian and non-East Asian patients, we found several key differences. First, missense and frameshift mutations in the VHL gene occurred less commonly in our population of East Asian patients (40.9% vs. 52.0%; P = 0.012 and 8.4% vs. 13.0%; P syndrome, the incidence of retinal capillary hemangioblastoma was lower, whereas the incidence of renal cell carcinoma was higher. Evidence suggests that the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of East Asian patients with VHL syndrome differ from other populations. This should be considered when making screening recommendations for VHL syndrome in Asia.

  8. The natural history of children with joint hypermobility syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos hypermobility type: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheper, Mark C; Nicholson, Lesley L; Adams, Roger D; Tofts, Louise; Pacey, Verity

    2017-12-01

    The objective of the manuscript was to describe the natural history of complaints and disability in children diagnosed with joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS)/Ehlers-Danlos-hypermobility type (EDS-HT) and to identify the constructs that underlie functional decline. One hundred and one JHS/EDS-HT children were observed over 3 years and assessed at three time points on the following: functional impairments, quality of life, connective tissue laxity, muscle function, postural control and musculoskeletal and multi-systemic complaints. Cluster analysis was performed to identify subgroups in severity. Clinical profiles were determined for these subgroups, and differences were assessed by multivariate analysis of covariance. Mixed linear regression models were used to determine the subsequent trajectories. Finally, an exploratory factor analysis was used to uncover the underlying constructs of functional impairment. Three clusters of children were identified in terms of functional impairment: mild, moderately and severely affected. Functional impairment at baseline was predictive of worsening trajectories in terms of reduced walking distance and decreased quality of life (P ⩽ 0.05) over 3 years. Multiple interactions between the secondary outcomes were observed, with four underlying constructs identified. All four constructs (multi-systemic effects, pain, fatigue and loss of postural control) contributed significantly to disability (P ⩽ 0.046). Children diagnosed with JHS/EDS-HT who have a high incidence of multi-systemic complaints (particularly, orthostatic intolerance, urinary incontinence and diarrhoea) and poor postural control in addition to high levels of pain and fatigue at baseline are most likely to have a deteriorating trajectory of functional impairment and, accordingly, warrant clinical prioritization. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please

  9. Syncope in Brugada syndrome: prevalence, clinical significance, and clues from history taking to distinguish arrhythmic from nonarrhythmic causes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R A; Vink, Arja S; Wilde, Arthur A M; de Lange, Freek J; de Jong, Jonas S S G; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke; Tan, Hanno L

    2015-02-01

    Syncope in Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients is a sign of increased risk for sudden cardiac death and usually is ascribed to cardiac arrhythmias. However, syncope often occurs in the general population, mostly from nonarrhythmic causes (eg, reflex syncope). The purpose of this study was to distinguish arrhythmic events from nonarrhythmic syncope in BrS and to establish the clinical relevance of nonarrhythmic syncope. We reviewed the patient records of 342 consecutively included BrS patients and conducted systematic interviews in 141 patients with aborted cardiac arrest (ACA) or syncope. In total, 23 patients (7%) experienced ECG-documented ACA and 118 (34%) syncope; of these 118, 67 (57%) were diagnosed with suspected nonarrhythmic syncope. Compared to suspected nonarrhythmic syncope patients, ACA patients were older at first event (45 vs 20 years), were more likely to be male (relative risk 2.1) and to have urinary incontinence (relative risk 4.6), and were less likely to report prodromes. ACA was never triggered by hot/crowded surroundings, pain or other emotional stress, seeing blood, or prolonged standing. During follow-up (median 54 months), ACA rate was 8.7% per year among ACA patients and 0% per year among suspected nonarrhythmic syncope patients. Syncope, especially nonarrhythmic syncope, often occurs in BrS. The high incidence of nonarrhythmic syncope must be taken into account during risk stratification. Arrhythmic events and nonarrhythmic syncope may be distinguished by clinical characteristics (absence of prodromes and, particularly, specific triggers), demonstrating the importance of systematic history taking. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Editorial: X-chromosome-linked Kallmann's syndrome: Pathology at the molecular level

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prager, D.; Braunstein, G.D. (Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Kallmann's syndrome or olfactogenital dysplasia refers to a disorder characterized by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia or hyposmia which can occur sporadically or in a familial setting. Originally described in 1856, the first familial cases were reported by Kallmann et al., in 1944. Based on segregation analysis of multiple families, three modes of transmission have been documented: X-linked, autosomal dominant with variable penetrance, and autosomal recessive. Kallmann's syndrome occurs in less than 1 in 10,000 male births, with a 5-fold excess of affected males to females, suggesting that the X-linked form is the most frequent. By genetic linkage analysis the X-linked form of Kallmann's syndrome was localized to Xp22.3. This was confirmed by the description of patients with contiguous gene syndromes due to deletions of various portions of the distal short arm of the X-chromosome. Such patients present with complex phenotypes characterized by a combination of Kallmann's syndrome with X-linked icthyosis due to steroid sulfatase deficiency, chondrodysplasia punctata, short stature, and mental retardation. DNA analysis has identified and mapped the genes responsible for these disorders. 10 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Molecular data and ecological niche modelling reveal a highly dynamic evolutionary history of the East Asian Tertiary relict Cercidiphyllum (Cercidiphyllaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xin-Shuai; Chen, Chen; Comes, Hans Peter; Sakaguchi, Shota; Liu, Yi-Hui; Tanaka, Nobuyuki; Sakio, Hitoshi; Qiu, Ying-Xiong

    2012-10-01

    East Asia's temperate deciduous forests served as sanctuary for Tertiary relict trees, but their ages and response to past climate change remain largely unknown. To address this issue, we elucidated the evolutionary and population demographic history of Cercdiphyllum, comprising species in China/Japan (Cercdiphyllum japonicum) and central Japan (Cercdiphyllum magnificum). Fifty-three populations were genotyped using chloroplast and ribosomal DNA sequences and microsatellite loci to assess molecular structure and diversity in relation to past (Last Glacial Maximum) and present distributions based on ecological niche modelling. Late Tertiary climate cooling was reflected in a relatively recent speciation event, dated at the Mio-/Pliocene boundary. During glacials, the warm-temperate C. japonicum experienced massive habitat losses in some areas (north-central China/north Japan) but increases in others (southwest/-east China, East China Sea landbridge, south Japan). In China, the Sichuan Basin and/or the middle-Yangtze were source areas of postglacial northward recolonization; in Japan, this may have been facilitated through introgressive hybridization with the cool-temperate C. magnificum. Our findings challenge the notion of relative evolutionary and demographic stability of Tertiary relict trees, and may serve as a guideline for assessing the impact of Neogene climate change on the evolution and distribution of East Asian temperate plants. © 2012 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2012 New Phytologist Trust.

  12. Molecular Basis of DFNB73: Mutations of BSND Can Cause Nonsyndromic Deafness or Bartter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riazuddin, Saima; Anwar, Saima; Fischer, Martin; Ahmed, Zubair M.; Khan, Shahid Y.; Janssen, Audrey G.H.; Zafar, Ahmad U.; Scholl, Ute; Husnain, Tayyab; Belyantseva, Inna A.; Friedman, Penelope L.; Riazuddin, Sheikh; Friedman, Thomas B.; Fahlke, Christoph

    2009-01-01

    BSND encodes barttin, an accessory subunit of renal and inner ear chloride channels. To date, all mutations of BSND have been shown to cause Bartter syndrome type IV, characterized by significant renal abnormalities and deafness. We identified a BSND mutation (p.I12T) in four kindreds segregating nonsyndromic deafness linked to a 4.04-cM interval on chromosome 1p32.3. The functional consequences of p.I12T differ from BSND mutations that cause renal failure and deafness in Bartter syndrome type IV. p.I12T leaves chloride channel function unaffected and only interferes with chaperone function of barttin in intracellular trafficking. This study provides functional data implicating a hypomorphic allele of BSND as a cause of apparent nonsyndromic deafness. We demonstrate that BSND mutations with different functional consequences are the basis for either syndromic or nonsyndromic deafness. PMID:19646679

  13. The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere and Fazio Londe syndrome revisited: natural history, genetics, treatment and future perspectives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, Annet M.; Stroek, Kevin; Abeling, Nico G.; Waterham, Hans R.; Ijlst, Lodewijk; Wanders, Ronald J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare neurological disorder which may present at all ages with sensorineural deafness, bulbar palsy and respiratory compromise. Fazio-Londe syndrome is considered to be the same disease entity. Recently it was demonstrated that in some patients the disease

  14. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA): clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA) (OMIM 225400) is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4) due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP) and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP) crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial), independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity. PMID:21699693

  15. Phenotypic variability of the kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA: clinical, molecular and biochemical delineation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kariminejad Ariana

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kyphoscoliotic type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS VIA (OMIM 225400 is a rare inheritable connective tissue disorder characterized by a deficiency of collagen lysyl hydroxylase 1 (LH1; EC 1.14.11.4 due to mutations in PLOD1. Biochemically this results in underhydroxylation of collagen lysyl residues and, hence, an abnormal pattern of lysyl pyridinoline (LP and hydroxylysyl pyridinoline (HP crosslinks excreted in the urine. Clinically the disorder is characterized by hypotonia and kyphoscoliosis at birth, joint hypermobility, and skin hyperelasticity and fragility. Severe hypotonia usually leads to delay in gross motor development, whereas cognitive development is reported to be normal. Methods We describe the clinical, biochemical and molecular characterisation, as well as electron microscopy findings of skin, in 15 patients newly diagnosed with this rare type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Results Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 months to 27 years, with only 1/3 of the patients been diagnosed correctly in the first year of life. A similar disease frequency was found in females and males, however a broad disease severity spectrum (intra- and interfamilial, independent of molecular background or biochemical phenotype, was observed. Kyphoscoliosis, one of the main clinical features was not present at birth in 4 patients. Importantly we also noted the occurrence of vascular rupture antenatally and postnatally, as well as developmental delay in 5 patients. Conclusion In view of these findings we propose that EDS VIA is a highly variable clinical entity, presenting with a broad clinical spectrum, which may also be associated with cognitive delay and an increased risk for vascular events. Genotype/phenotype association studies and additional molecular investigations in more extended EDS VIA populations will be necessary to further elucidate the cause of the variability of the disease severity.

  16. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gordillo, Miriam; Vega, Hugo; Trainer, Alison H.; Hou, Fajian; Sakai, Norio; Luque, Ricardo; Kayserili, Hülya; Basaran, Seher; Skovby, Flemming; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.; Uzielli, Maria L. Giovannucci; Schnur, Rhonda E.; Manouvrier, Sylvie; Chang, Susan; Blair, Edward; Hurst, Jane A.; Forzano, Francesca; Meins, Moritz; Simola, Kalle O. J.; Raas-Rothschild, Annick; Schultz, Roger A.; McDaniel, Lisa D.; Ozono, Keiichi; Inui, Koji; Zou, Hui; Jabs, Ethylin Wang

    2008-01-01

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia (RBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with growth retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and limb reduction. Cellular alterations in RBS include lack of cohesion at the heterochromatic regions around centromeres and the long arm of the Y chromosome, reduced growth

  17. Elastins from patients with Williams-Beuren syndrome and healthy individuals differ on the molecular level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heinz, Andrea; Huertas, Angela C Mora; Schräder, Christoph U

    2016-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome (WBS) is a congenital disorder, which involves the heterozygous deletion of the elastin gene and other genes on chromosome 7. Clinical symptoms that are associated with hemizygosity of the essential extracellular matrix protein elastin include premature aging of the skin...

  18. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordillo, M.; Vega, H.; Trainer, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia (RBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with growth retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and limb reduction. Cellular alterations in RBS include lack of cohesion at the heterochromatic regions around centromeres and the long arm of the Y chromosome, reduced grow...

  19. A molecular analysis of fecal and mucosal bacterial communities in irritable bowel syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Codling, Caroline

    2010-02-01

    The objectives of this study were, firstly, to determine the diversity of the host\\'s gut microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) using a culture-independent method (DGGE of the 16S rRNA gene) and, secondly, to examine mucosal biopsies of IBS patients and compare them to their own fecal microbiota.

  20. Phenotype guided characterization and molecular analysis of Indian patients with long QT syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijal Vyas

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions: This study in a cohort of Asian Indian patients highlights the mutation spectrum of common Long QT syndromes. The clinical utility for prevention of unexplained sudden cardiac deaths is an important sequel to identification of the mutation in at-risk family members.

  1. Molecular characterization of Salmonella strains in individuals with acute diarrhea syndrome in the State of Sucre, Venezuela.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodulfo, Hectorina; De Donato, Marcos; Luiggi, Jesús; Michelli, Elvia; Millán, Adriana; Michelli, Miriam

    2012-06-01

    In Venezuela, acute diarrheic syndrome (ADS) is a primary cause of morbi-mortality, often involving the Salmonella genus. Salmonella infections are associated with acute gastroenteritis, one of the most common alimentary intoxications, and caused by the consumption of contaminated water and food, especially meat. Conventional and molecular methods were used to detect Salmonella strains from 330 fecal samples from individuals of different ages and both sexes with ADS. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used for the molecular characterization of Salmonella, using invA, sefA, and fliC genes for the identification of this genus and the serotypes Enteritidis and Typhimurium, respectively. The highest frequency of individuals with ADS was found in children 0-2 years old (39.4%), and the overall frequency of positive coprocultures was 76.9%. A total of 14 (4.2%) strains were biochemically and immunologically identified as Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica, of which 7 were classified as belonging to the Enteritidis serotype, 4 to the Typhimurium serotype, and 3 to other serotypes. The S. enterica strains were distributed more frequently in the age groups 3-4 and 9-10 years old. The molecular characterization method used proved to be highly specific for the typing of S. enterica strains using DNA extracted from both the isolated colonies and selective enrichment broths directly inoculated with fecal samples, thus representing a complementary tool for the detection and identification of ADS-causing bacteria.

  2. Evidence for an agitated-aggressive syndrome in early-onset psychosis correlated with antisocial personality disorder, forensic history, and substance use disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Christian G; Hochstrasser, Lisa; Meister, Klara; Schimmelmann, Benno G; Lambert, Martin

    2016-08-01

    Agitation, aggression, and violence are increased in psychotic disorders. Additionally, an earlier age at onset may be associated with aggressive behavior. However, the relationship of age at onset, an agitated-aggressive syndrome as measured with the Positive And Negative Syndrome Scale for Schizophrenia - Excited Component (PANSS-EC), and its potential correlates in first-episode psychosis (FEP) has not been studied. This study assessed the association between age at onset, an agitated-aggressive syndrome, and its potential correlates in a prospective sample of 52 FEP patients with early-onset and adult-onset followed up for 12months. Twenty-six patients conformed to the criteria of early-onset psychosis. Early age at onset was associated with antisocial personality disorder (p=0.004; φc=0.39), a history of legal involvement (p=0.005; φc=0.39), and higher rates of lifetime substance use disorder (SUD; p=0.002; φc=0.42). Early-onset patients had significantly higher PANSS-EC scores over the course of observation (F(1,44.4)=5.39; p=0.025; d=0.656), but no significant group differences emerged for the remaining PANSS subscores. PANSS-EC scores were correlated positively with antisocial personality disorder and forensic history at 6weeks, 3months, 6months, and 12months, and with lifetime substance use disorder at 3months and 6months. Patients with early onset psychosis may have increased levels of agitation/aggressiveness, and, more likely, antisocial personality disorder, forensic history, and lifetime substance use disorder. These variables were linked to suicidality, aggressiveness, and involuntary treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Diagnostic values of chest pain history, ECG, troponin and clinical gestalt in patients with chest pain and potential acute coronary syndrome assessed in the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokhtari, Arash; Dryver, Eric; Söderholm, Martin; Ekelund, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    In the assessment of chest pain patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in the emergency department (ED), physicians rely on global diagnostic impressions ('gestalt'). The aim of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of the ED physician's overall assessment of ACS likelihood, and the values of the main diagnostic modalities underlying this assessment, namely the chest pain history, the ECG and the initial troponin result. 1,151 consecutive ED chest pain patients were prospectively included. The ED physician's interpretation of the chest pain history, the ECG, and the global likelihood of ACS were recorded on special forms. The discharge diagnoses were retrieved from the medical records. A chart review was carried out to determine whether patients with a non-ACS diagnosis at the index visit had ACS or suffered cardiac death within 30 days. The gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in ("Obvious ACS", LR 29) and at ruling out ("No Suspicion of ACS", LR 0.01) ACS. In the "Strong suspicion of ACS" group, 60% of the patients did not have ACS. A positive TnT (LR 24.9) and an ischemic ECG (LR 8.3) were strong predictors of ACS and seemed superior to pain history for ruling in ACS. In patients with a normal TnT and non-ischemic ECG, chest pain history typical of AMI was not a significant predictor of AMI (LR 1.9) while pain history typical of unstable angina (UA) was a moderate predictor of UA (LR 4.7). Clinical gestalt was better than its components both at ruling in and at ruling out ACS, but overestimated the likelihood of ACS when cases were assessed as strong suspicion of ACS. Among the components of the gestalt, TnT and ECG were superior to the chest pain history for ruling in ACS, while pain history was superior for ruling out ACS.

  4. Evolutionary history of the grey-faced Sengi, Rhynchocyon udzungwensis, from Tanzania: a molecular and species distribution modelling approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucinda P Lawson

    Full Text Available Rhynchocyon udzungwensis is a recently described and poorly understood sengi (giant elephant-shrew endemic to two small montane forests in Southern Tanzania, and surrounded in lower forests by R. cirnei reichardi. In this study, we investigate the molecular genetic relationship between R. udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi, and the possible role that shifting species distributions in response to climate fluctuations may have played in shaping their evolutionary history. Rhynchocyon udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi individuals were sampled from five localities for genetic analyses. Three mitochondrial and two nuclear loci were used to construct species trees for delimitation and to determine whether introgression was detectable either from ancient or ongoing hybridization. All species-tree results show R. udzungwensis and R. c. reichardi as distinct lineages, though mtDNA shows evidence of introgression in some populations. Nuclear loci of each species were monophyletic, implying introgression is exclusively historical. Because we found evidence of introgression, we used distribution data and species distribution modelling for present, glacial, and interglacial climate cycles to predict how shifting species distributions may have facilitated hybridization in some populations. Though interpretations are affected by the limited range of these species, a likely scenario is that the mtDNA introgression found in eastern mid-elevation populations was facilitated by low numbers of R. udzungwensis that expanded into lowland heavily occupied R. c. reichardi areas during interglacial climate cycles. These results imply that relationships within the genus Rhynchocyon may be confounded by porous species boundaries and introgression, even if species are not currently sympatric.

  5. Prenatal diagnosis of chromosome 15 abnormalities in the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome region by traditional and molecular cytogenetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toth-Fejel, S.; Magenis, R.E.; Leff, S. [Oregon Health Sciences Univ., Portland, OR (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-13

    With improvements in culturing and banding techniques, amniotic fluid studies now achieve a level of resolution at which the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) region may be questioned. Chromosome 15 heteromorphisms, detected with Q- and R-banding and used in conjunction with PWS/AS region-specific probes, can confirm a chromosome deletion and establish origin to predict the clinical outcome. We report four de novo cases of an abnormal-appearing chromosome 15 in amniotic fluid samples referred for advanced maternal age or a history of a previous chromosomally abnormal child. The chromosomes were characterized using G-, Q-, and R-banding, as well as isotopic and fluorescent in situ hybridization of DNA probes specific for the proximal chromosome 15 long arm. In two cases, one chromosome 15 homolog showed a consistent deletion of the ONCOR PWS/AS region A and B. In the other two cases, one of which involved an inversion with one breakpoint in the PWS/AS region, all of the proximal chromosome 15 long arm DNA probes used in the in situ hybridization were present on both homologs. Clinical follow-up was not available on these samples, as in all cases the parents chose to terminate the pregnancies. These cases demonstrate the ability to prenatally diagnose chromosome 15 abnormalities associated with PWS/AS. In addition, they highlight the need for a better understanding of this region for accurate prenatal diagnosis. 41 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome: Ultrasonography and molecular karyotyping results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhen, Li; Fan, Shu-Shu; Huang, Lv-Yin; Pan, Min; Han, Jin; Yang, Xin; Li, Dong-Zhi

    2018-03-31

    To present the experience on prenatal diagnosis of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) to further delineate the fetal presentation of this syndrome. This was a retrospective analysis of ten pregnancies with fetal WHS identified by chromosomal microarray (CMA). Clinical data were reviewed for these cases, including maternal demographics, indications for invasive testing, sonographic findings, CMA results and pregnancy outcomes. Three cases were diagnosed at the first trimester because of an increased NT or cystic hygroma. The remaining seven cases were identified at late gestation for abnormal ultrasound findings. CMA revealed 4p deletions to be terminal in all of the ten cases. Deletion sizes ranged from 2.05 to 19.02 Mb. Prenatal findings such as increased NT, severe and early onset intrauterine growth retardation, and renal dysplasia or oligohydramnios should warrant the diagnosis of WHS and invasive testing using CMA. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Scientific Statement on the Diagnostic Criteria, Epidemiology, Pathophysiology, and Molecular Genetics of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumesic, Daniel A.; Oberfield, Sharon E.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Marshall, John C.; Laven, Joop S.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous and complex disorder that has both adverse reproductive and metabolic implications for affected women. However, there is generally poor understanding of its etiology. Varying expert-based diagnostic criteria utilize some combination of oligo-ovulation, hyperandrogenism, and the presence of polycystic ovaries. Criteria that require hyperandrogenism tend to identify a more severe reproductive and metabolic phenotype. The phenotype can vary by race and ethnicity, is difficult to define in the perimenarchal and perimenopausal period, and is exacerbated by obesity. The pathophysiology involves abnormal gonadotropin secretion from a reduced hypothalamic feedback response to circulating sex steroids, altered ovarian morphology and functional changes, and disordered insulin action in a variety of target tissues. PCOS clusters in families and both female and male relatives can show stigmata of the syndrome, including metabolic abnormalities. Genome-wide association studies have identified a number of candidate regions, although their role in contributing to PCOS is still largely unknown. PMID:26426951

  8. Isolated micropenis reveals partial androgen insensitivity syndrome confirmed by molecular analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Bhangoo, Amrit; Paris, Francoise; Philibert, Pascal; Audran, Francoise; Ten, Svetlana; Sultan, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS) is the milder variant of androgen receptor (AR) defects. The subtle effects of AR mutations present in a patient with micropenis, peno-scrotal hypospadias, infertility, clitoromegaly and posterior labial fusion. We studied the association of isolated micropenis with the genetic defects resulting in androgen resistance, that is, AR gene defects and 5-α reductase type 2 (SRD5A2) deficiency. We describe two cases of isolated micropenis: one in a 14-...

  9. Long QT syndrome and life threatening arrhythmia in a newborn: molecular diagnosis and treatment response

    OpenAIRE

    Schulze-Bahr, E; Fenge, H; Etzrodt, D; Haverkamp, W; Mönnig, G; Wedekind, H; Breithardt, G; Kehl, H-G

    2004-01-01

    Intrauterine and neonatal manifestations of congenital long QT syndrome are associated with a high cardiac risk, particularly when atrioventricular block and excessive QT prolongation (> 600 ms1/2) are present. In a female newborn with these features, treatment with propranolol and mexiletine led to complete reduction of arrhythmia that was maintained 1.5 years later. High throughput genetic analysis found a sodium channel gene (LQT3) mutation. Disappearance of the 2:1 atrioventricular block ...

  10. Molecular study of chromosome 15 in 22 patients with Angelman syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beuten, J.; Mangelschots, K.; Buntinx, I.; Coucke, P.; Brouwer, O. F.; Hennekam, R. C.; van Broeckhoven, C.; Willems, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    DNA studies in 22 families with Angelman syndrome (AS) were performed using the chromosome 15 marker loci D15S9, D15S10, D15S11, D15S12, D15S13, D15S18, D15S24, D15S86, the alpha-actin gene and the GABA beta 3 receptor gene (GABRB3). Uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 was excluded in all patients.

  11. Molecular pathogenesis of a malformation syndrome associated with a pericentric chromosome 2 inversion

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Manuela

    2017-01-01

    Tese de mestrado em Biologia Humana e do Ambiente, apresentada à Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, 2017. Orientador Dezso David - Departamento de Genética Humana do Instituto Nacional de Saúde Congenital malformation syndromes can be caused by genomic and/or chromosome rearrangements. It is difficult to establish the underlying causes of malformations because of their high level of complexity. Although balanced chromosome inversions are in most cases subclinical, those di...

  12. Identification of mutations in TCOF1: use of molecular analysis in the pre- and postnatal diagnosis of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Jill; Ellis, Ian; Bottani, Armand; Temple, Karen; Dixon, Michael James

    2004-06-15

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of facial development, which results from mutations in TCOF1. TCS comprises conductive hearing loss, hypoplasia of the mandible and maxilla, downward sloping palpebral fissures and cleft palate. Although, there is usually a reasonable degree of bilateral symmetry, a high degree of both inter- and intrafamilial variability is characteristic of TCS. The wide variation in the clinical presentation of different patients, together with the fact that more than 60% of cases arise de novo, can complicate the diagnosis of mild cases and genetic counselling. In the current study, we describe how molecular techniques have been used to facilitate pre- and postnatal disease diagnoses in 13 TCS families. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Wolfram syndrome in the Japanese population; molecular analysis of WFS1 gene and characterization of clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsunaga, Kimie; Tanabe, Katsuya; Inoue, Hiroshi; Okuya, Shigeru; Ohta, Yasuharu; Akiyama, Masaru; Taguchi, Akihiko; Kora, Yukari; Okayama, Naoko; Yamada, Yuichiro; Wada, Yasuhiko; Amemiya, Shin; Sugihara, Shigetaka; Nakao, Yuzo; Oka, Yoshitomo; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WFS) is a recessive neurologic and endocrinologic degenerative disorder, and is also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, progressive Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1). However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism, rarity and molecular complexity of this disease complicate our efforts to understand WFS. To address this limitation, we aimed to describe complications and to elucidate the contributions of WFS1 mutations to clinical manifestations in Japanese patients with WFS. The minimal ascertainment criterion for diagnosing WFS was having both early onset diabetes mellitus and bilateral optic atrophy. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. Sixty-seven patients were identified nationally for a prevalence of one per 710,000, with 33 patients (49%) having all 4 components of DIDMOAD. In 40 subjects who agreed to participate in this investigation from 30 unrelated families, the earliest manifestation was DM at a median age of 8.7 years, followed by OA at a median age of 15.8 years. However, either OA or DI was the first diagnosed feature in 6 subjects. In 10, features other than DM predated OA. Twenty-seven patients (67.5%) had a broad spectrum of recessive mutations in WFS1. Two patients had mutations in only one allele. Eleven patients (27.5%) had intact WFS1 alleles. Ages at onset of both DM and OA in patients with recessive WFS1 mutations were indistinguishable from those in patients without WFS1 mutations. In the patients with predicted complete loss-of-function mutations, ages at the onsets of both DM and OA were significantly earlier than those in patients with predicted partial-loss-of function mutations. This study emphasizes the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in patients with WFS. Genotype-phenotype correlations may exist in patients with WFS1 mutations, as demonstrated by the disease onset.

  14. Morphologic and molecular characteristics of uterine leiomyomas in hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cancer (HLRCC) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Ortega, Julian; Vocke, Cathy; Stratton, Pamela; Linehan, William Marston; Merino, Maria J

    2013-01-01

    Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell cancer (HLRCC) is a hereditary cancer syndrome in which affected individuals are predisposed to the development of multiple leiomyomas of the skin and uterus and aggressive forms of kidney cancer. Affected individuals harbor a germline heterozygous loss-of-function mutation of the fumarate hydratase (FH) gene. Uterine leiomyomas are present in up to 77% of women with this syndrome. Previous studies have shown that inactivation of the FH gene is unusual for nonsyndromic leiomyomas. Therefore, it might be possible to distinguish 2 genetic groups of smooth muscle tumors: the most common group of sporadic uterine leiomyomas without FH gene inactivation and the more unusual group of HLRCC leiomyomas in patients who harbor a germline mutation of FH, although the exact prevalence of hereditary HLRCC is unknown. We reviewed the clinical, morphologic, and genotypic features of uterine leiomyomas in 19 HLRCC patients with FH germline mutations. Patients with HLRCC syndrome were younger in age compared with those with regular leiomyomata. DNA was extracted by microdissection, and analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at 1q43 was performed. Uterine leiomyomas in HLRCC have young age of onset and are multiple, with size ranging from 1 to 8 cm. Histopathologically, HLRCC leiomyomas frequently had increased cellularity, multinucleated cells, and atypia. All cases showed tumor nuclei with large orangeophilic nucleoli surrounded by a perinucleolar halo similar to the changes found in HLRCC. Occasional mitoses were found in 3 cases; however, the tumors did not fulfill the criteria for malignancy. Our study also showed that LOH at 1q43 was frequent in HLRCC leiomyomas (8/10 cases), similarly to what has been previously found in renal cell carcinomas from HLRCC patients. LOH is considered to be the second hit that inactivates the FH gene. We conclude that uterine leiomyomas associated with HLRCC syndrome have characteristic morphologic

  15. A mother and son with Noonan syndrome resulting from a PTPN11 mutation: first report of molecularly proven cases from Turkey.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demir, K.; Yntema, H.G.; Altincik, A.; Bober, E.

    2010-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by short stature, typical craniofacial features, and congenital heart defects. The underlying genetic defects were not clear until 2001. This report is the first to describe a molecular analysis and associated clinical features of a

  16. Homozygous and compound heterozygous mutations in the FBN1 gene: unexpected findings in molecular diagnosis of Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, Pauline; Hanna, Nadine; Aubart, Mélodie; Leheup, Bruno; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Naudion, Sophie; Lacombe, Didier; Milleron, Olivier; Odent, Sylvie; Faivre, Laurence; Bal, Laurence; Edouard, Thomas; Collod-Beroud, Gwenaëlle; Langeois, Maud; Spentchian, Myrtille; Gouya, Laurent; Jondeau, Guillaume; Boileau, Catherine

    2017-02-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal-dominant connective tissue disorder usually associated with heterozygous mutations in the gene encoding fibrillin-1 (FBN1). Homozygous and compound heterozygous cases are rare events and have been associated with a clinical severe presentation. Report unexpected findings of homozygosity and compound heterozygosity in the course of molecular diagnosis of heterozygous MFS and compare the findings with published cases. In the context of molecular diagnosis of heterozygous MFS, systematic sequencing of the FBN1 gene was performed in 2500 probands referred nationwide. 1400 probands carried a heterozygous mutation in this gene. Unexpectedly, among them four homozygous cases (0.29%) and five compound heterozygous cases (0.36%) were identified (total: 0.64%). Interestingly, none of these cases carried two premature termination codon mutations in the FBN1 gene. Clinical features for these carriers and their families were gathered and compared. There was a large spectrum of severity of the disease in probands carrying two mutated FBN1 alleles, but none of them presented extremely severe manifestations of MFS in any system compared with carriers of only one mutated FBN1 allele. This observation is not in line with the severe clinical features reported in the literature for four homozygous and three compound heterozygous probands. Homozygotes and compound heterozygotes were unexpectedly identified in the course of molecular diagnosis of MFS. Contrary to previous reports, the presence of two mutated alleles was not associated with severe forms of MFS. Although homozygosity and compound heterozygosity are rarely found in molecular diagnosis, they should not be overlooked, especially among consanguineous families. However, no predictive evaluation of severity should be provided. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  17. Clinical, endocrinological, and molecular characterization of Kallmann syndrome and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: a single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun-Jeong Shin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available PurposeIsolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH deficiency (IGD is classified as Kallmann syndrome (KS with anosmia and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH. This study was undertaken to investigate the clinical, endocrinological, and molecular characteristics in Korean patients with KS and nIHH.MethodsTwenty-six patients from 25 unrelated families were included. Their clinical, endocrinological, and radiological findings were analyzed retrospectively. Mutation analysis of the GNRH1, GNRHR, KISS1, KISS1R, PROK2, PROKR2, TAC3, TACR3, FGF8, FGFR1, and KAL1 genes was performed in all patients. CHD7 and SOX10 were analyzed in patients with CHARGE (Coloboma, Heart defects, choanae Atresia, Growth retardation, Genitourinary abnormality, Ear abnormality features or deafness.ResultsOf the 26 patients, 16 had KS and 10 had nIHH. At diagnosis, mean chronologic age was 18.1 years in males and 18.0 years in females; height SDS were -0.67±1.35 in males, -1.12±1.86 in females; testis volume was 2.0±1.3 mL; and Tanner stage was 1.5. There were associated anomalies in some of the KS patients: hearing loss (n=6 and congenital heart disease (n=4. Absence or hypoplasia of the olfactory bulb/sulci was found in 84.62% of patients with KS. Molecular defects in KAL1, SOX10, and CHD7 were identified in 5 patients from 4 families (16.0%, 4/25 pedigrees. After sex hormone replacement therapy, there were improvement in sexual characteristics and the sexual function.ConclusionThis study described the clinical, endocrinological, and molecular genetic features in IGD patients in Korea. Although the mutation screening was performed in 10 genes that cause IGD, molecular defects were identified in relatively small proportions of the cohort.

  18. Clinical, endocrinological, and molecular characterization of Kallmann syndrome and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism: a single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sun-Jeong; Sul, Yeonah; Kim, Ja Hye; Cho, Ja Hyang; Kim, Gu-Hwan; Kim, Jae Hyun; Choi, Jin-Ho; Yoo, Han-Wook

    2015-03-01

    Isolated gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) deficiency (IGD) is classified as Kallmann syndrome (KS) with anosmia and normosmic idiopathic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nIHH). This study was undertaken to investigate the clinical, endocrinological, and molecular characteristics in Korean patients with KS and nIHH. Twenty-six patients from 25 unrelated families were included. Their clinical, endocrinological, and radiological findings were analyzed retrospectively. Mutation analysis of the GNRH1, GNRHR, KISS1, KISS1R, PROK2, PROKR2, TAC3, TACR3, FGF8, FGFR1, and KAL1 genes was performed in all patients. CHD7 and SOX10 were analyzed in patients with CHARGE (Coloboma, Heart defects, choanae Atresia, Growth retardation, Genitourinary abnormality, Ear abnormality) features or deafness. Of the 26 patients, 16 had KS and 10 had nIHH. At diagnosis, mean chronologic age was 18.1 years in males and 18.0 years in females; height SDS were -0.67±1.35 in males, -1.12±1.86 in females; testis volume was 2.0±1.3 mL; and Tanner stage was 1.5. There were associated anomalies in some of the KS patients: hearing loss (n=6) and congenital heart disease (n=4). Absence or hypoplasia of the olfactory bulb/sulci was found in 84.62% of patients with KS. Molecular defects in KAL1, SOX10, and CHD7 were identified in 5 patients from 4 families (16.0%, 4/25 pedigrees). After sex hormone replacement therapy, there were improvement in sexual characteristics and the sexual function. This study described the clinical, endocrinological, and molecular genetic features in IGD patients in Korea. Although the mutation screening was performed in 10 genes that cause IGD, molecular defects were identified in relatively small proportions of the cohort.

  19. Spectrum of novel mutations found in Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 2: implications for molecular genetic diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wildhardt, Gabriele; Zirn, Birgit; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Wechtenbruch, Juliane; Suckfüll, Markus; Buske, Annegret; Bohring, Axel; Kubisch, Christian; Vogt, Stefanie; Strobl-Wildemann, Gertrud; Greally, Marie; Bartsch, Oliver; Steinberger, Daniela

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Till date, mutations in the genes PAX3 and MITF have been described in Waardenburg syndrome (WS), which is clinically characterised by congenital hearing loss and pigmentation anomalies. Our study intended to determine the frequency of mutations and deletions in these genes, to assess the clinical phenotype in detail and to identify rational priorities for molecular genetic diagnostics procedures. Design Prospective analysis. Patients 19 Caucasian patients with typical features of WS underwent stepwise investigation of PAX3 and MITF. When point mutations and small insertions/deletions were excluded by direct sequencing, copy number analysis by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification was performed to detect larger deletions and duplications. Clinical data and photographs were collected to facilitate genotype–phenotype analyses. Setting All analyses were performed in a large German laboratory specialised in genetic diagnostics. Results 15 novel and 4 previously published heterozygous mutations in PAX3 and MITF were identified. Of these, six were large deletions or duplications that were only detectable by copy number analysis. All patients with PAX3 mutations had typical phenotype of WS with dystopia canthorum (WS1), whereas patients with MITF gene mutations presented without dystopia canthorum (WS2). In addition, one patient with bilateral hearing loss and blue eyes with iris stroma dysplasia had a de novo missense mutation (p.Arg217Ile) in MITF. MITF 3-bp deletions at amino acid position 217 have previously been described in patients with Tietz syndrome (TS), a clinical entity with hearing loss and generalised hypopigmentation. Conclusions On the basis of these findings, we conclude that sequencing and copy number analysis of both PAX3 and MITF have to be recommended in the routine molecular diagnostic setting for patients, WS1 and WS2. Furthermore, our genotype–phenotype analyses indicate that WS2 and TS correspond to a clinical spectrum

  20. Clinical and Molecular Features of Renal and Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma Tumor Association Syndrome (RAPTAS): Case Series and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Ruth T; Warren, Anne Y; Martin, Jose Ezequiel; Challis, Benjamin G; Rattenberry, Eleanor; Whitworth, James; Andrews, Katrina A; Roberts, Thomas; Clark, Graeme R; West, Hannah; Smith, Philip S; Docquier, France M; Rodger, Fay; Murray, Vicki; Simpson, Helen L; Wallis, Yvonne; Giger, Olivier; Tran, Maxine; Tomkins, Susan; Stewart, Grant D; Park, Soo-Mi; Woodward, Emma R; Maher, Eamonn R

    2017-11-01

    The co-occurrence of pheochromocytoma (PC) and renal tumors was linked to the inherited familial cancer syndrome von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) disease more than six decades ago. Subsequently, other shared genetic causes of predisposition to renal tumors and to PC, paraganglioma (PGL), or head and neck paraganglioma (HNPGL) have been described, but case series of non-VHL-related cases of renal tumor and pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma tumor association syndrome (RAPTAS) are rare. To determine the clinical and molecular features of non-VHL RAPTAS by literature review and characterization of a case series. A review of the literature was performed and a retrospective study of referrals for investigation of genetic causes of RAPTAS. Literature review revealed evidence of an association, in addition to VHL disease, between germline mutations in SDHB, SDHC, SDHD, TMEM127, and MAX genes and RAPTAS [defined here as the co-occurrence of tumors from both classes (PC/PGL/HNPGL and renal tumors) in the same individual or in first-degree relatives]. In both the literature review and our case series of 22 probands with non-VHL RAPTAS, SDHB mutations were the most frequent cause of non-VHL RAPTAS. A genetic cause was identified in 36.3% (8/22) of kindreds. Renal tumors and PC/PGL/HNPGL tumors share common molecular features and their co-occurrence in an individual or family should prompt genetic investigations. We report a case of MAX-associated renal cell carcinoma and confirm the role of TMEM127 mutations with renal cell carcinoma predisposition. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  1. A comprehensive molecular study on Coffin-Siris and Nicolaides-Baraitser syndromes identifies a broad molecular and clinical spectrum converging on altered chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, Dagmar; Bögershausen, Nina; Beleggia, Filippo; Steiner-Haldenstätt, Sabine; Pohl, Esther; Li, Yun; Milz, Esther; Martin, Marcel; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Alanay, Yasemin; Kayserili, Hülya; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Böhringer, Stefan; Wollstein, Andreas; Albrecht, Beate; Boduroglu, Koray; Caliebe, Almuth; Chrzanowska, Krystyna; Cogulu, Ozgur; Cristofoli, Francesca; Czeschik, Johanna Christina; Devriendt, Koenraad; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Elcioglu, Nursel; Gener, Blanca; Goecke, Timm O; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; Guillén-Navarro, Encarnación; Hayek, Joussef; Houge, Gunnar; Kilic, Esra; Simsek-Kiper, Pelin Özlem; López-González, Vanesa; Kuechler, Alma; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Mari, Francesca; Marozza, Annabella; Mathieu Dramard, Michèle; Mikat, Barbara; Morin, Gilles; Morice-Picard, Fanny; Ozkinay, Ferda; Rauch, Anita; Renieri, Alessandra; Tinschert, Sigrid; Utine, G Eda; Vilain, Catheline; Vivarelli, Rossella; Zweier, Christiane; Nürnberg, Peter; Rahmann, Sven; Vermeesch, Joris; Lüdecke, Hermann-Josef; Zeschnigk, Michael; Wollnik, Bernd

    2013-12-20

    Chromatin remodeling complexes are known to modify chemical marks on histones or to induce conformational changes in the chromatin in order to regulate transcription. De novo dominant mutations in different members of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex have recently been described in individuals with Coffin-Siris (CSS) and Nicolaides-Baraitser (NCBRS) syndromes. Using a combination of whole-exome sequencing, NGS-based sequencing of 23 SWI/SNF complex genes, and molecular karyotyping in 46 previously undescribed individuals with CSS and NCBRS, we identified a de novo 1-bp deletion (c.677delG, p.Gly226Glufs*53) and a de novo missense mutation (c.914G>T, p.Cys305Phe) in PHF6 in two individuals diagnosed with CSS. PHF6 interacts with the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylation (NuRD) complex implicating dysfunction of a second chromatin remodeling complex in the pathogenesis of CSS-like phenotypes. Altogether, we identified mutations in 60% of the studied individuals (28/46), located in the genes ARID1A, ARID1B, SMARCB1, SMARCE1, SMARCA2, and PHF6. We show that mutations in ARID1B are the main cause of CSS, accounting for 76% of identified mutations. ARID1B and SMARCB1 mutations were also found in individuals with the initial diagnosis of NCBRS. These individuals apparently belong to a small subset who display an intermediate CSS/NCBRS phenotype. Our proposed genotype-phenotype correlations are important for molecular screening strategies.

  2. Unfractionated heparin and low-molecular-weight heparin in acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikelboom, J W; Anand, S S; Malmberg, K; Weitz, J I; Ginsberg, J S; Yusuf, S

    2000-06-03

    In acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation, the role of unfractionated and low-molecular-weight heparin in aspirin-treated patients remains unclear, and there is conflicting evidence regarding the efficacy and safety of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) relative to unfractionated heparin. We did a systematic overview of the randomised trials to assess the effect of unfractionated heparin and LMWH on death, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding. Randomised trials comparing unfractionated heparin or LMWH with placebo or untreated control, or comparing unfractionated heparin with LMWH, for the short-term and long-term management of patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation, were identified by electronic and manual searches and through contact with experts and industry representatives. Odds ratios for death, myocardial infarction, and major bleeding were calculated for each trial, and results for the individual trials were combined by a modification of the Mantel-Haenszel method. 12 trials, involving a total of 17157 patients, were included. The summary odds ratio (OR) for myocardial infarction or death during short-term (up to 7 days) unfractionated heparin or LMWH compared with placebo or untreated control was 0.53 (95% CI 0.38-0.73; p=0.0001) or 29 events prevented per 1000 patients treated; during short-term LMWH compared with unfractionated heparin was 0.88 (0.69-1.12; p=0.34); and during long-term LMWH (up to 3 months) compared with placebo or untreated control was 0.98 (0.81-1.17; p=0.80). Long-term LMWH was associated with a significantly increased risk of major bleeding (OR 2.26, [95% CI 1.63-3.14], paspirin-treated patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation, short-term unfractionated heparin or LMWH halves the risk of myocardial infarction or death. There is no convincing difference in efficacy or safety between LMWH and unfractionated heparin. Long-term LMWH has not been proven to confer benefit additional to

  3. Molecular analysis of T-B-NK+ severe combined immunodeficiency and Omenn syndrome cases in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Kayal Fadi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Children with Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID lack autologous T lymphocytes and present with multiple infections early in infancy. Omenn syndrome is characterized by the sole emergence of oligoclonal auto-reactive T lymphocytes, resulting in erythroderma and enteropathy. Omenn syndrome (OS shares the genetic aetiology of T-B-NK+ SCID, with mutations in RAG1, RAG2, or DCLRE1C. Methods Patients diagnosed with T-B-NK+ SCID or phenotypes suggestive of Omenn syndrome were investigated by molecular genetic studies using gene tightly linked microsatellite markers followed by direct sequencing of the coding regions and splice sites of the respective candidate genes. Results We report the molecular genetic basis of T-B-NK+ SCID in 22 patients and of OS in seven patients all of Arab descent from Saudi Arabia. Among the SCID patients, six (from four families displayed four homozygous missense mutations in RAG1 including V433M, R624H, R394W, and R559S. Another four patients (from three familes showed 3 novel homozygous RAG2 mutations including K127X, S18X, and Q4X; all of which predict unique premature truncations of RAG2 protein. Among Omenn patients, four (from two families have S401P and R396H mutations in RAG1, and a fifth patient has a novel I444M mutation in RAG2. Seven other patients (six SCID and one OS showed a gross deletion in exons 1-3 in DCLRE1C. Altogether, mutations in RAG1/2 and DCLRE1C account for around 50% and 25%, respectively, in our study cohort, a proportion much higher than in previous reported series. Seven (24% patients lack a known genetic aetiology, strongly suggesting that they carry mutations in novel genes associated with SCID and Omenn disorders that are yet to be discovered in the Saudi population. Conclusion Mutation-free patients who lack a known genetic aetiology are likely to carry mutations in the regulatory elements in the SCID-causing genes or in novel genes that are yet to be discovered

  4. The molecular mechanism underlying Roberts syndrome involves loss of ESCO2 acetyltransferase activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordillo, M.; Vega, H.; Trainer, A.H.

    2008-01-01

    Roberts syndrome/SC phocomelia (RBS) is an autosomal recessive disorder with growth retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and limb reduction. Cellular alterations in RBS include lack of cohesion at the heterochromatic regions around centromeres and the long arm of the Y chromosome, reduced growth...... and nonsense mutations associated with decreased levels of mRNA and absence of protein. We found decreased proliferation capacity in RBS cell lines associated with cell death, but not with increased cell cycle duration, which could be a factor in the development of phocomelia and cleft palate in RBS...

  5. Effect of in situ exposure history on the molecular responses of freshwater bivalve Anodonta anatina (Unionidae) to trace metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falfushynska, Halina I; Gnatyshyna, Lesya L; Stoliar, Oksana B

    2013-03-01

    The goal of the study was to assess the adequacy of molecular responses in mollusks in relation to their in situ exposure history. Freshwater male bivalve mollusks Anadonta anatina (Unionidae) from polluted (A) and unpolluted (F) sites were subjected to 14 days of exposure to copper (Cu(2+), 10 μg L(-1)), zinc (Zn(2+), 130 μg L(-1)) or cadmium (Cd(2+), 15 μg L(-1)). The comparison of two control groups showed that the specimens from site A had higher levels of Cu, Zn and Cd and metallothionein (measured both through metal (MT-Me), and protein (MT-SH) levels) in the tissues. Cytotoxicity (low lysosomal membrane stability), low glutathione level, high antioxidant and apoptotic enzymes activities, lipid and protein oxidative injury, depletion of ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD) in digestive gland, high vitellogenin-like protein (Vtg-LP) concentration in gonads confirmed the effect of toxic environment on this group. Exposures provoked increased number of hemocytes with micronuclei (by 100-500%) and nuclear abnormalities (by 50-400%) (genotoxicity), elevation of caspase-3 (in 1.5-10 times) and/or Vtg-LP (by 70-310%) levels in all groups. However, the responses were strongly dependent on the origin of mussels. Exposed mussels from site F demonstrated typical for the effect of toxic metals elevation of MT-SH (by 100-380%) and MT-Me (up to seven times) levels and accumulation of metals (with a few exceptions) in the tissues. Conversely, in the mussels inhabiting site A, exposures caused the decrease of metal (by 37% for Cu, by 62% for Zn, by 50% for Cd), MT-SH (by 68% in ZnA group) and MT-Me (by 50-68%) levels. That was accompanied with increase of cytotoxicity and EROD activity (by 144-240%). High level of protein carbonyls was the distinguished feature of all groups from site A. Hence, despite high efficiency of metal detoxification and oxidative stress responses in the mussels, in the specimens from spontaneously polluted site they were impaired. Copyright

  6. Narcolepsy and familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome: molecular genetics of sleep disorders.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tafti, M.; Dauvilliers, Y.; Overeem, S.

    2007-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very prevalent and represent an emerging worldwide epidemic. However, research into the molecular genetics of sleep disorders remains surprisingly one of the least active fields. Nevertheless, rapid progress is being made in several prototypical disorders, leading recently to the

  7. Changes in the folding landscape of the WW domain provide a molecular mechanism for an inherited genetic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pucheta-Martinez, Encarna; D'Amelio, Nicola; Lelli, Moreno; Martinez-Torrecuadrada, Jorge L.; Sudol, Marius; Saladino, Giorgio; Gervasio, Francesco Luigi

    2016-07-01

    WW domains are small domains present in many human proteins with a wide array of functions and acting through the recognition of proline-rich sequences. The WW domain belonging to polyglutamine tract-binding protein 1 (PQBP1) is of particular interest due to its direct involvement in several X chromosome-linked intellectual disabilities, including Golabi-Ito-Hall (GIH) syndrome, where a single point mutation (Y65C) correlates with the development of the disease. The mutant cannot bind to its natural ligand WBP11, which regulates mRNA processing. In this work we use high-field high-resolution NMR and enhanced sampling molecular dynamics simulations to gain insight into the molecular causes the disease. We find that the wild type protein is partially unfolded exchanging among multiple beta-strand-like conformations in solution. The Y65C mutation further destabilizes the residual fold and primes the protein for the formation of a disulphide bridge, which could be at the origin of the loss of function.

  8. Incidence, Phenotypic Features and Molecular Genetics of Kallmann Syndrome in Finland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommiska Johanna

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Kallmann syndrome (KS, comprised of congenital hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH and anosmia, is a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder. Its exact incidence is currently unknown, and a mutation in one of the identified KS genes has only been found in ~30% of the patients. Methods Herein, we investigated epidemiological, clinical, and genetic features of KS in Finland. Results The minimal incidence estimate of KS in Finland was 1:48 000, with clear difference between males (1:30 000 and females (1:125 000 (p = 0.02. The reproductive phenotype of 30 probands (25 men; 5 women ranged from severe HH to partial puberty. Comprehensive mutation analysis of all 7 known KS genes (KAL1, FGFR1, FGF8, PROK2, PROKR2, CHD7, and WDR11 in these 30 well-phenotyped probands revealed mutations in KAL1 (3 men and FGFR1 (all 5 women vs. 4/25 men, but not in other genes. Conclusions Our results suggest that Finnish KS men harbor mutations in gene(s yet-to-be discovered with sex-dependent penetrance of the disease phenotype. In addition, some KS patients without CHD7 mutations display CHARGE-syndrome associated phenotypic features (e.g. ear or eye anomalies, possibly implying that, in addition to CHD7, there may be other genes associated with phenotypes ranging from KS to CHARGE.

  9. Natural history and Predictors of Progression to Sjögren's Syndrome Among Participants of the SICCA registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shiboski, Caroline H; Baer, Alan N; Shiboski, Stephen C

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND/PURPOSE: To explore changes in the phenotypic features of Sjoögren's syndrome (SS), and in SS status among participants in the Sjoögren's International Collaborative Clinical Alliance (SICCA) registry over a 2 to 3-year interval. METHODS: All participants in the SICCA registry who were...

  10. Epilepsy in Individuals with a History of Asperger's Syndrome: A Danish Nationwide Register-Based Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouridsen, Svend Erik; Rich, Bente; Isager, Torben

    2013-01-01

    We performed a nationwide, register-based retrospective follow-up study of epilepsy in all people who were born between January 1, 1980 and June 29, 2006 and registered in the Danish Psychiatric Central Register with Asperger's syndrome on February 7, 2011. All 4,180 identified cases with AS (3,431 males and 749 females) were screened through the…

  11. Syncope in Brugada syndrome: prevalence, clinical significance, and clues from history taking to distinguish arrhythmic from nonarrhythmic causes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; Vink, Arja S.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; de Lange, Freek J.; de Jong, Jonas S. S. G.; Wieling, Wouter; van Dijk, Nynke; Tan, Hanno L.

    2015-01-01

    Syncope in Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients is a sign of increased risk for sudden cardiac death and usually is ascribed to cardiac arrhythmias. However, syncope often occurs in the general population, mostly from nonarrhythmic causes (eg, reflex syncope). The purpose of this study was to distinguish

  12. Phenotype and natural history in 101 individuals with Pitt-Hopkins syndrome through an internet questionnaire system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Winter, Channa F.; Baas, Melanie; Bijlsma, Emilia K.; van Heukelingen, John; Routledge, Sue; Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2016-01-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (PTHS; MIM# 610954) is a genetically determined entity mainly caused by mutations in TransCription Factor 4 (TCF4). We have developed a new way to collect information on (ultra-)rare disorders through a web-based database which we call 'waihonapedia' (waihona [meaning treasure

  13. C-reactive protein, high-molecular-weight adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome in the Japanese general population: a longitudinal cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshifumi Saisho

    Full Text Available AIMS: To clarify predictive values of C-reactive protein (CRP and high-molecular-weight (HMW adiponectin for development of metabolic syndrome. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We conducted a prospective cohort study of Japanese workers who had participated in an annual health checkup in 2007 and 2011. A total of 750 subjects (558 men and 192 women, age 46±8 years who had not met the criteria of metabolic syndrome and whose CRP and HMW-adiponectin levels had been measured in 2007 were enrolled in this study. Associations between CRP, HMW-adiponectin and development of metabolic syndrome after 4 years were assessed by logistic regression analysis and their predictive values were compared by receiver operating characteristic analysis. RESULTS: Among 750 subjects, 61 (8.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by modified National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel III (NCEP-ATP III criteria and 53 (7.1% developed metabolic syndrome defined by Japan Society for the Study of Obesity (JASSO in 2011. Although CRP and HMW-adiponectin were both significantly correlated with development of metabolic syndrome, multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that HMW-adiponectin but not CRP was associated with metabolic syndrome independently of BMI or waist circumference. Adding these biomarkers to BMI or waist circumference did not improve the predictive value for metabolic syndrome. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that the traditional markers of adiposity such as BMI or waist circumference remain superior markers for predicting metabolic syndrome compared to CRP, HMW-adiponectin, or the combination of both among the Japanese population.

  14. Molecular characterization of Cystoisospora belli and unizoite tissue cyst in patients with Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velásquez, Jorge Néstor; Osvaldo, Germán Astudillo; Di Risio, Cecilia; Etchart, Cristina; Chertcoff, Agustín Víctor; Perissé, Gladys Elisabet; Carnevale, Silvana

    2011-03-01

    Cystoisospora belli is a coccidian protozoan that can cause chronic diarrhoea, acalculous cholecystitis and cholangiopathy in AIDS patients. We applied molecular methods to identify Cystoisospora at species level in AIDS patients presenting with and without the presence of unizoites in lamina propria. Coprological and histological analyses were performed in stool and/or biopsy samples from 8 Cystoisospora-infected patients. DNA from the same samples was used to amplify 2 fragments of the SSU-rRNA gene and the ITS-1 region. Sequencing of the resulting amplicons identified C. belli infections in all cases, independent of the presence or absence of unizoite tissue cysts. Further work should be considered in order to find molecular targets related to strain variations in C. belli.

  15. Mowat-Wilson syndrome: neurological and molecular study in seven patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Albino da Paz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective To present a seven-cases serie of Mowat-Wilson syndrome (MWS. Method All patients with positive mutation for the ZEB2 were evaluated by a geneticist and a neurologist, with clinical and laboratorial characterization. Results A peculiar facies and mental retardation were present in all patients. The Denver II scale showed intense delay in all aspects, especially fine motor and adaptive. Acquired microcephaly was observed in five patients. Only one patient did not present epilepsy. Epilepsy was focal and predominating in sleep, with status epilepticus in three patients. The initial seizure was associated with fever in most patients (4/6. The EEG showed epileptic focal activity (5/7. The imaging studies revealed total agenesis (4/7 and partial agenesis of the corpus callosum (1/7. Conclusion Physicians who care for patients with mental retardation and epilepsy should be aware of SMW.

  16. The blind leading the obese: the molecular pathophysiology of a human obesity syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheffield, Val C

    2010-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a genetically heterogeneous disorder affecting multiple organ systems and resulting in blindness, obesity, cognitive impairment, and congenital defects. Interest in the etiology of this disorder stems, in part, from the fact that patients with BBS develop common clinical problems, including obesity, diabetes and hypertension. Twelve genes independently causing BBS have been identified. The heterogeneity is explained by the existence of two BBS complexes, the BBSome consisting of seven known BBS proteins, and the BBS chaperone complex consisting of three known BBS proteins. The formation of the BBSome requires the function of the BBS chaperone complex. Both mouse and zebrafish data support a role for BBS genes in cilia function, and in intracellular and intraflagellar trafficking. From the work described here, a common primary function of BBS proteins has emerged, specifically the mediation and regulation of microtubule-based intracellular transport.

  17. Myelodysplastic syndromes: advantages of a combined cytogenetic and molecular diagnostic workup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciabatti, Elena; Valetto, Angelo; Bertini, Veronica; Ferreri, Maria Immacolata; Guazzelli, Alice; Grassi, Susanna; Guerrini, Francesca; Petrini, Iacopo; Metelli, Maria Rita; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Rossi, Simona; Galimberti, Sara

    2017-10-03

    In this study we present a new diagnostic workup for the myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) including FISH, aCGH, and somatic mutation assays in addition to the conventional cytogenetics (CC). We analyzed 61 patients by CC, FISH for chromosome 5, 7, 8 and PDGFR rearrangements, aCGH, and PCR for ASXL1, EZH2, TP53, TET2, RUNX1, DNMT3A, SF3B1 somatic mutations. Moreover, we quantified WT1 and RPS14 gene expression levels, in order to find their possible adjunctive value and their possible clinical impact. CC analysis showed 32% of patients with at least one aberration. FISH analysis detected chromosomal aberrations in 24% of patients and recovered 5 cases (13.5%) at normal karyotype (two 5q- syndromes, one del(7) case, two cases with PDGFR rearrangement). The aGCH detected 10 "new" unbalanced cases in respect of the CC, including one with alteration of the ETV6 gene. After mutational analysis, 33 patients (54%) presented at least one mutation and represented the only marker of clonality in 36% of all patients. The statistical analysis confirmed the prognostic role of CC either on overall or on progression-free-survival. In addition, deletions detected by aCGH and WT1 over-expression negatively conditioned survival. In conclusion, our work showed that 1) the addition of FISH (at least for chr. 5 and 7) can improve the definition of the risk score; 2) mutational analysis, especially for the TP53 and SF3B1, could better define the type of MDS and represent a "clinical warning"; 3) the aCGH use could be probably applied to selected cases (with suboptimal response or failure).

  18. Pathogenicity and molecular characterization of emerging porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Vietnam in 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metwally, S; Mohamed, F; Faaberg, K; Burrage, T; Prarat, M; Moran, K; Bracht, A; Mayr, G; Berninger, M; Koster, L; To, T L; Nguyen, V L; Reising, M; Landgraf, J; Cox, L; Lubroth, J; Carrillo, C

    2010-10-01

    In 2007, Vietnam experienced swine disease outbreaks causing clinical signs similar to the 'porcine high fever disease' that occurred in China during 2006. Analysis of diagnostic samples from the disease outbreaks in Vietnam identified porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV-2). Additionally, Escherichia coli and Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus were cultured from lung and spleen, and Streptococcus suis from one spleen sample. Genetic characterization of the Vietnamese PRRSV isolates revealed that this virus belongs to the North American genotype (type 2) with a high nucleotide identity to the recently reported Chinese strains. Amino acid sequence in the nsp2 region revealed 95.7-99.4% identity to Chinese strain HUN4, 68-69% identity to strain VR-2332 and 58-59% identity to strain MN184. A partial deletion in the nsp2 gene was detected; however, this deletion did not appear to enhance the virus pathogenicity in the inoculated pigs. Animal inoculation studies were conducted to determine the pathogenicity of PRRSV and to identify other possible agents present in the original specimens. Pigs inoculated with PRRSV alone and their contacts showed persistent fever, and two of five pigs developed cough, neurological signs and swollen joints. Necropsy examination showed mild to moderate bronchopneumonia, enlarged lymph nodes, fibrinous pericarditis and polyarthritis. PRRSV was re-isolated from blood and tissues of the inoculated and contact pigs. Pigs inoculated with lung and spleen tissue homogenates from sick pigs from Vietnam developed high fever, septicaemia, and died acutely within 72 h, while their contact pigs showed no clinical signs throughout the experiment. Streptococcus equi subspecies zooepidemicus was cultured, and PRRSV was re-isolated only from the inoculated pigs. Results suggest that the cause of the swine deaths in Vietnam is a multifactorial syndrome with PRRSV as a major factor. © 2010

  19. [Molecular cytogenetic analysis of a case with ring chromosome 3 syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kaihui; Song, Fengling; Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Haiyan; Wang, Ying; Dong, Rui; Zhang, Yufeng; Liu, Yi; Gai, Zhongtao

    2016-12-10

    To investigate the genetic cause for a child with developmental delay and congenital heart disease through molecular cytogenetic analysis. G-banded karyotyping and chromosomal microarray analysis (CMA) were performed for the patient and his parents. The proband's karyotype was detected as ring chromosome 3, and a 3q26.3-25.3 deletion encompassing 45 genes has been found with CMA. Testing of both parents was normal. Clinical phenotype of the patient with ring chromosome 3 mainly depends on the involved genes. It is necessary to combine CMA and karyotyping for the diagnosis of ring chromosome, as CMA can provide more accurate information for variations of the genome.

  20. Wolfram syndrome in the Japanese population; molecular analysis of WFS1 gene and characterization of clinical features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimie Matsunaga

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Wolfram syndrome (WFS is a recessive neurologic and endocrinologic degenerative disorder, and is also known as DIDMOAD (Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, progressive Optic Atrophy and Deafness syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene (WFS1. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism, rarity and molecular complexity of this disease complicate our efforts to understand WFS. To address this limitation, we aimed to describe complications and to elucidate the contributions of WFS1 mutations to clinical manifestations in Japanese patients with WFS. METHODOLOGY: The minimal ascertainment criterion for diagnosing WFS was having both early onset diabetes mellitus and bilateral optic atrophy. Genetic analysis for WFS1 was performed by direct sequencing. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Sixty-seven patients were identified nationally for a prevalence of one per 710,000, with 33 patients (49% having all 4 components of DIDMOAD. In 40 subjects who agreed to participate in this investigation from 30 unrelated families, the earliest manifestation was DM at a median age of 8.7 years, followed by OA at a median age of 15.8 years. However, either OA or DI was the first diagnosed feature in 6 subjects. In 10, features other than DM predated OA. Twenty-seven patients (67.5% had a broad spectrum of recessive mutations in WFS1. Two patients had mutations in only one allele. Eleven patients (27.5% had intact WFS1 alleles. Ages at onset of both DM and OA in patients with recessive WFS1 mutations were indistinguishable from those in patients without WFS1 mutations. In the patients with predicted complete loss-of-function mutations, ages at the onsets of both DM and OA were significantly earlier than those in patients with predicted partial-loss-of function mutations. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: This study emphasizes the clinical and genetic heterogeneity in patients with WFS. Genotype-phenotype correlations may

  1. A cohort of 17 patients with kyphoscoliotic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14: expansion of the clinical and mutational spectrum and description of the natural history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giunta, Cecilia; Baumann, Matthias; Fauth, Christine; Lindert, Uschi; Abdalla, Ebtesam M; Brady, Angela F; Collins, James; Dastgir, Jahannaz; Donkervoort, Sandra; Ghali, Neeti; Johnson, Diana S; Kariminejad, Ariana; Koch, Johannes; Kraenzlin, Marius; Lahiri, Nayana; Lozic, Bernarda; Manzur, Adnan Y; Morton, Jenny E V; Pilch, Jacek; Pollitt, Rebecca C; Schreiber, Gudrun; Shannon, Nora L; Sobey, Glenda; Vandersteen, Anthony; van Dijk, Fleur S; Witsch-Baumgartner, Martina; Zschocke, Johannes; Pope, F Michael; Bönnemann, Carsten G; Rohrbach, Marianne

    2018-01-01

    Purpose In 2012 we reported in six individuals a clinical condition almost indistinguishable from PLOD1-kyphoscoliotic Ehlers–Danlos syndrome (PLOD1-kEDS), caused by biallelic mutations in FKBP14, and characterized by progressive kyphoscoliosis, myopathy, and hearing loss in addition to connective tissue abnormalities such as joint hypermobility and hyperelastic skin. FKBP14 is an ER-resident protein belonging to the family of FK506-binding peptidyl-prolyl cis–trans isomerases (PPIases); it catalyzes the folding of type III collagen and interacts with type III, type VI, and type X collagens. Only nine affected individuals have been reported to date. Methods We report on a cohort of 17 individuals with FKBP14-kEDS and the follow-up of three previously reported patients, and provide an extensive overview of the disorder and its natural history based on clinical, biochemical, and molecular genetics data. Results Based on the frequency of the clinical features of 23 patients from the present and previous cohorts, we define major and minor features of FKBP14-kEDS. We show that myopathy is confirmed by histology and muscle imaging only in some patients, and that hearing impairment is predominantly sensorineural and may not be present in all individuals. Conclusion Our data further support the extensive clinical overlap with PLOD1-kEDS and show that vascular complications are rare manifestations of FKBP14-kEDS. PMID:28617417

  2. Revisiting the Molecular Mechanism of Neurological Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Beyond Vascular Damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carecchio, M.; Cantello, R.; Comi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is a multiorgan disease often affecting the central nervous system (CNS). Typically, neurological manifestations of APS include thrombosis of cerebral vessels leading to stroke and requiring prompt initiation of treatment with antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulant therapy. In these cases, alterations of the coagulation system at various levels caused by multiple effects of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) have been postulated to explain the vascular damage to the CNS in APS. However, several nonvascular neurological manifestations of APS have progressively emerged over the past years. Nonthrombotic, immune-mediated mechanisms altering physiological basal ganglia function have been recently suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of these manifestations that include, among others, movement disorders such as chorea and behavioral and cognitive alterations. Similar clinical manifestations have been described in other autoimmune CNS diseases such as anti-NMDAR and anti-VGCK encephalitis, suggesting that the spectrum of immune-mediated basal ganglia disorders is expanding, possibly sharing some pathophysiological mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on thrombotic and nonthrombotic neurological manifestations of APS with particular attention to immune-mediated actions of aPL on the vascular system and the basal ganglia. PMID:24741580

  3. Molecular Typing of Staphylococcus aureus Isolated from Patients with Autosomal Dominant Hyper IgE Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inka Sastalla

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Autosomal dominant hyper IgE syndrome (AD-HIES is a primary immunodeficiency caused by a loss-of-function mutation in the Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3. This immune disorder is clinically characterized by increased susceptibility to cutaneous and sinopulmonary infections, in particular with Candida and Staphylococcus aureus. It has recently been recognized that the skin microbiome of patients with AD-HIES is altered with an overrepresentation of certain Gram-negative bacteria and Gram-positive staphylococci. However, these alterations have not been characterized at the species- and strain-level. Since S. aureus infections are influenced by strain-specific expression of virulence factors, information on colonizing strain characteristics may provide insights into host-pathogen interactions and help guide management strategies for treatment and prophylaxis. The aim of this study was to determine whether the immunodeficiency of AD-HIES selects for unique strains of colonizing S. aureus. Using multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, protein A (spa typing, and PCR-based detection of toxin genes, we performed a detailed analysis of the S. aureus isolates (n = 13 found on the skin of twenty-one patients with AD-HIES. We found a low diversity of sequence types, and an abundance of strains that expressed methicillin resistance, Panton-Valentine leukocidin (PVL, and staphylococcal enterotoxins K and Q (SEK, SEQ. Our results indicate that patients with AD-HIES may often carry antibiotic-resistant strains that harbor key virulence factors.

  4. Revisiting the Molecular Mechanism of Neurological Manifestations in Antiphospholipid Syndrome: Beyond Vascular Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carecchio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is a multiorgan disease often affecting the central nervous system (CNS. Typically, neurological manifestations of APS include thrombosis of cerebral vessels leading to stroke and requiring prompt initiation of treatment with antiplatelet drugs or anticoagulant therapy. In these cases, alterations of the coagulation system at various levels caused by multiple effects of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL have been postulated to explain the vascular damage to the CNS in APS. However, several nonvascular neurological manifestations of APS have progressively emerged over the past years. Nonthrombotic, immune-mediated mechanisms altering physiological basal ganglia function have been recently suggested to play a central role in the pathogenesis of these manifestations that include, among others, movement disorders such as chorea and behavioral and cognitive alterations. Similar clinical manifestations have been described in other autoimmune CNS diseases such as anti-NMDAR and anti-VGCK encephalitis, suggesting that the spectrum of immune-mediated basal ganglia disorders is expanding, possibly sharing some pathophysiological mechanisms. In this review, we will focus on thrombotic and nonthrombotic neurological manifestations of APS with particular attention to immune-mediated actions of aPL on the vascular system and the basal ganglia.

  5. Cellular and molecular defects in a patient with Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome type 5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Stephen

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS is a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders typically manifesting with tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism, bleeding diathesis, and pulmonary fibrosis, in some subtypes. Most HPS subtypes are associated with defects in Biogenesis of Lysosome-related Organelle Complexes (BLOCs, which are groups of proteins that function together in the formation and/or trafficking of lysosomal-related endosomal compartments. BLOC-2, for example, consists of the proteins HPS3, HPS5, and HPS6. Here we present an HPS patient with defective BLOC-2 due to a novel intronic mutation in HPS5 that activates a cryptic acceptor splice site. This mutation leads to the insertion of nine nucleotides in-frame and results in a reduced amount of HPS5 at the transcript and protein level. In studies using skin fibroblasts derived from the proband and two other individuals with HPS-5, we found a perinuclear distribution of acidified organelles in patient cells compared to controls. Our results suggest the role of HPS5 in the endo-lysosomal dynamics of skin fibroblasts.

  6. Polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription: a molecular mechanism to improve the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S D

    2001-04-01

    This review addresses the hypothesis that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly those of the (n-3) family, play pivotal roles as "fuel partitioners" in that they direct fatty acids away from triglyceride storage and toward oxidation, and that they enhance glucose flux to glycogen. In doing this, PUFA may protect against the adverse symptoms of the metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of heart disease. PUFA exert their beneficial effects by up-regulating the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation while simultaneously down-regulating genes encoding proteins of lipid synthesis. PUFA govern oxidative gene expression by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. PUFA suppress lipogenic gene expression by reducing the nuclear abundance and DNA-binding affinity of transcription factors responsible for imparting insulin and carbohydrate control to lipogenic and glycolytic genes. In particular, PUFA suppress the nuclear abundance and expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and reduce the DNA-binding activities of nuclear factor Y, Sp1 and possibly hepatic nuclear factor-4. Collectively, the studies discussed suggest that the fuel "repartitioning" and gene expression actions of PUFA should be considered among criteria used in defining the dietary needs of (n-6) and (n-3) and in establishing the dietary ratio of (n-6) to (n-3) needed for optimum health benefit.

  7. Molecular genetic analysis of individuals with Williams syndrome and supravalvar aortic stenosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smoot, L.B.; Lacro, R.V.; Kunkel, L.M. [Children`s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pober, B. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mutations at the elastin locus (chromosome 7q11.23) have been demonstrated in individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) and familial supravalvar aortic stenosis (SVAS). Relationships between elastin mutations and vascular and/or neurodevelopmental pathology have yet to be defined. In determining phenotype-genotype correlations in WS/SVAS, we examined 35 individuals with sporadic WS, families with SVAS affecting multiple members, and sporadic cases of isolated obstructive vascular disease. Full length elastin cDNA was used to probe a human genomic library from which multiple elastin genomic clones have been isolated and ordered relative to the elastin gene, covering a minimum of 35 kb. (Additional genomic clones are being obtained by {open_quote}walking{close_quote} 5{prime} and 3{prime} to elastin.) Elastin genomic clones were used as probes in fluorescent in situ hybridization of metaphase chromosomes from WS/SVAS patients. Preliminary analysis confirms elastin deletions in WS patients, but have not yet been demonstrated in patients with isolated vascular disease using this technique. Results of deletional analysis in individuals representing a wide spectrum of phenotypes will be presented.

  8. Genetics Home Reference: DOORS syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This Page Campeau PM, Hennekam RC; DOORS syndrome collaborative group. DOORS syndrome: phenotype, genotype and comparison with ... M. DOOR syndrome: clinical report, literature review and discussion of natural history. Am J Med Genet A. ...

  9. Restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease diagnostic criteria: updated International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) consensus criteria--history, rationale, description, and significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Richard P; Picchietti, Daniel L; Garcia-Borreguero, Diego; Ondo, William G; Walters, Arthur S; Winkelman, John W; Zucconi, Marco; Ferri, Raffaele; Trenkwalder, Claudia; Lee, Hochang B

    2014-08-01

    In 2003, following a workshop at the National Institutes of Health, the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group (IRLSSG) developed updated diagnostic criteria for restless legs syndrome/Willis-Ekbom disease (RLS/WED). These criteria were integral to major advances in research, notably in epidemiology, biology, and treatment of RLS/WED. However, extensive review of accumulating literature based on the 2003 NIH/IRLSSG criteria led to efforts to improve the diagnostic criteria further. The clinical standards workshop, sponsored by the WED Foundation and IRLSSG in 2008, started a four-year process for updating the diagnostic criteria. That process included a rigorous review of research advances and input from clinical experts across multiple disciplines. After broad consensus was attained, the criteria were formally approved by the IRLSSG executive committee and membership. Major changes are: (i) addition of a fifth essential criterion, differential diagnosis, to improve specificity by requiring that RLS/WED symptoms not be confused with similar symptoms from other conditions; (ii) addition of a specifier to delineate clinically significant RLS/WED; (iii) addition of course specifiers to classify RLS/WED as chronic-persistent or intermittent; and (iv) merging of the pediatric with the adult diagnostic criteria. Also discussed are supportive features and clinical aspects that are important in the diagnostic evaluation. The IRLSSG consensus criteria for RLS/WED represent an international, interdisciplinary, and collaborative effort intended to improve clinical practice and promote further research. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Analysis of molecular forms of urine Retinol-Binding Protein in Fanconi Syndrome and design of an accurate immunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burling, Keith A; Cutillas, Pedro R; Church, David; Lapsley, Marta; Norden, Anthony G W

    2012-02-18

    Retinol-Binding Protein in urine (uRBP), a biomarker for the proximal renal tubular disease of congenital and acquired Fanconi Syndrome (FS) occurs in multiple forms. However these have not had quantitative mass spectrometric (MS) analysis, nor is there a validated assay for defined molecular species of uRBP with linearity on sample dilution. A 'Top-down' MS approach identified distinct forms of uRBP differing by only one amino acid. Based on this, we designed a dual-monoclonal antibody-based fluorescence immunoassay calibrated with intact plasma RBP4. LC-MS showed that uRBP in FS (one Dent disease urine) comprised intact plasma RBP4 and C-terminal-truncated RBP4, desL-RBP4 and desLL-RBP4 in molar ratio 2:2:1. DELFIA® assay calibrated with plasma RBP4, formulated with two monoclonal antibodies (HyTest, Finland), mAb48 for capture and biotinylated-mAb42 for detection, provided good sensitivity (1 μg/L), working range>500 μg/L and good linearity on sample dilution. The three predominant forms of uRBP were equipotent over the assay working range. uRBP reference range was <3 μg/mmol creatinine and FS patients had concentrations of 1000-5000 μg/mmol creatinine. Using 'Top-down' MS analysis of uRBP we devised an accurate, linear, fluorescence immunoassay with defined RBP molecular targets optimal for uRBP measurement. Discrimination of elevated uRBP from the upper limit of normal was some 10-fold greater than previous assays. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of a novel mutation in POLG associated with Alpers syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chardot Christophe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background DNA polymerase γ (POLG is the only known mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA polymerase. It mediates mtDNA replication and base excision repair. Mutations in the POLG gene lead to reduction of functional mtDNA (mtDNA depletion and/or deletions and are therefore predicted to result in defective oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS. Many mutations map to the polymerase and exonuclease domains of the enzyme and produce a broad clinical spectrum. The most frequent mutation p.A467T is localised in the linker region between these domains. In compound heterozygote patients the p.A467T mutation has been described to be associated amongst others with fatal childhood encephalopathy. These patients have a poorer survival rate compared to homozygotes. Methods mtDNA content in various tissues (fibroblasts, muscle and liver was quantified using quantitative PCR (qPCR. OXPHOS activities in the same tissues were assessed using spectrophotometric methods and catalytic stain of BN-PAGE. Results We characterise a novel splice site mutation in POLG found in trans with the p.A467T mutation in a 3.5 years old boy with valproic acid induced acute liver failure (Alpers-Huttenlocher syndrome. These mutations result in a tissue specific depletion of the mtDNA which correlates with the OXPHOS-activities. Conclusions mtDNA depletion can be expressed in a high tissue-specific manner and confirms the need to analyse primary tissue. Furthermore, POLG analysis optimises clinical management in the early stages of disease and reinforces the need for its evaluation before starting valproic acid treatment.

  12. Absence of family history and phenotype-genotype correlation in pediatric Brugada syndrome: more burden to bear in clinical and genetic diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daimi, Houria; Khelil, Amel Haj; Ben Hamda, Khaldoun; Aranega, Amelia; Chibani, Jemni B E; Franco, Diego

    2015-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an autosomal-dominant genetic cardiac disorder caused in 18-30 % of the cases by SCN5A gene mutations and manifested by an atypical right bundle block pattern with ST segment elevation and T wave inversion in the right precordial leads. The syndrome is usually detected after puberty. The identification of BrS in pediatric patients is thus a rare occurrence, and most of the reported cases are unmasked after febrile episodes. Usually, having a family history of sudden death represents the first reason to perform an ECG in febrile children. However, this practice makes the sporadic cases of cardiac disease and specially the asymptomatic ones excluded from this diagnosis. Here, we report a sporadic case of a 2-month-old male patient presented with vaccination-related fever and ventricular tachycardia associated with short breathing, palpitation and cold sweating. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 BrS. SCN5A gene analysis of the proband and his family revealed a set of mutations and polymorphisms differentially distributed among family members, however, without any clear genotype-phenotype correlation. Based on our findings, we think that genetic testing should be pursued as a routine practice in symptomatic and asymptomatic pediatric cases of BrS, with or without family history of sudden cardiac death. Similarly, our study suggests that pediatrician should be encouraged to perform an ECG profiling in suspicious febrile children and quickly manage fever since it is the most important factor unmasking BrS in children.

  13. Recurrent thrombosis prevention with intravenous immunoglobulin and hydroxychloroquine during pregnancy in a patient with history of catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mar, Nataliya; Kosowicz, Rebecca; Hook, Karen

    2014-01-01

    We report a case of a 36-year old patient with prior history of thrombosis in a setting of antiphospholipid antibody syndrome (APS) as well as pregnancy-associated catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS), resulting in multi-organ infarction and pregnancy loss. The episode of CAPS occurred while she was receiving antepartum low-dose aspirin and therapeutic-dose enoxaparin. This patient presented again at 6 weeks gestation and ultrasounds were consistent with fetal growth restriction, concerning for placental insufficiency and thrombosis. This time, hydroxychloroquine and monthly intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) infusions were added to her prophylaxis regimen, resulting in a successful delivery. Platelet count and antiphospholipid antibody titers were routinely monitored throughout pregnancy as markers of disease activity for APS. Current thromboprophylaxis guidelines do not address therapeutic options to prevent further pregnancy morbidity in women who develop recurrent episodes of thrombosis or CAPS despite receiving adequate anti-thrombotic treatment. Use of hydroxychloroquine and IVIG has been associated with good outcomes in this subset of patients.

  14. Molecular Origin of Gerstmann-Str ussler-Scheinker Syndrome: Insight from Computer Simulation of an Amyloidogenic Prion Peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diadone, Isabella [University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila, Italy; DiNola, Alfredo [University of Rome; Smith, Jeremy C [ORNL

    2011-01-01

    Prion proteins become pathogenic through misfolding. Here, we characterize the folding of a peptide consisting of residues 109 122 of the Syrian hamster prion protein (the H1 peptide) and of a more amyloidogenic A117V point mutant that leads in humans to an inheritable form of the Gerstmann-Straeussler-Scheinker syndrome. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations are performed for 2.5 s. Both peptides lose their -helical starting conformations and assume a -hairpin that is structurally similar in both systems. In each simulation several unfolding/refolding events occur, leading to convergence of the thermodynamics of the conformational states to within 1 kJ/mol. The similar stability of the -hairpin relative to the unfolded state is observed in the two peptides. However, substantial differences are found between the two unfolded states. A local minimum is found within the free energy unfolded basin of the A117V mutant populated by misfolded collapsed conformations of comparable stability to the -hairpin state, consistent with increased amyloidogenicity. This population, in which V117 stabilizes a hydrophobic core, is absent in the wild-type peptide. These results are supported by simulations of oligomers showing a slightly higher stability of the associated structures and a lower barrier to association for the mutated peptide. Hence, a single point mutation carrying only two additional methyl groups is here shown to be responsible for rather dramatic differences of structuring within the unfolded (misfolded) state.

  15. ISOLATION OF EGG DROP SYNDROME VIRUS AND ITS MOLECULAR CHARACTERIZATION USING SODIUM DODECYL SULPHATE POLYACRYLAMIDE GEL ELECTROPHORESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Rasool, S. U. Rahman and M. K. Mansoor

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Six isolates of egg drop syndrome (EDS virus were recovered from five different outbreaks of EDS in commercial laying hens in and around Faisalabad. The aberrant eggs were fed to the susceptible laying hens for experimental induction of infection. The samples from infected birds (egg washing, cloacal swabs, oviducts and spleens were collected, processed and inoculated into 11-day old duck embryos. The presence of virus in harvested allanto-amniotic fluid was monitored by spot and microhaemagglutination tests and confirmed by haemagglutination inhibition and agar gel precipitation tests. The EDS virus grew well in duck embryos and agglutinated only avian but not mammalian red blood cells. These isolates were purified through velocity density gradient centrifugation. Protein concentration was determined through Lowry method and sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was conducted by loading 300 µg protein concentration on 12.5% gel using discontinuous buffer system. All the six isolates showed 13 polypeptides, which were identical to those described in the referral EDS-76 virus (strain-127. The molecular weights of the polypeptides ranged from 6.5 KDa to 126 KDa.

  16. Targeted next-generation sequencing makes new molecular diagnoses and expands genotype-phenotype relationship in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Ruwan A; Vandrovcova, Jana; Kanonidou, Christina; Mueller, Michael; Gampawar, Piyush; Ibrahim, Yousef; Norsworthy, Penny; Biggs, Jennifer; Abdullah, Abdulshakur; Ross, David; Black, Holly A; Ferguson, David; Cheshire, Nicholas J; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Grahame, Rodney; Ghali, Neeti; Vandersteen, Anthony; Pope, F Michael; Aitman, Timothy J

    2016-11-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of overlapping hereditary disorders of connective tissue with significant morbidity and mortality, including major vascular complications. We sought to identify the diagnostic utility of a next-generation sequencing (NGS) panel in a mixed EDS cohort. We developed and applied PCR-based NGS assays for targeted, unbiased sequencing of 12 collagen and aortopathy genes to a cohort of 177 unrelated EDS patients. Variants were scored blind to previous genetic testing and then compared with results of previous Sanger sequencing. Twenty-eight pathogenic variants in COL5A1/2, COL3A1, FBN1, and COL1A1 and four likely pathogenic variants in COL1A1, TGFBR1/2, and SMAD3 were identified by the NGS assays. These included all previously detected single-nucleotide and other short pathogenic variants in these genes, and seven newly detected pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants leading to clinically significant diagnostic revisions. Twenty-two variants of uncertain significance were identified, seven of which were in aortopathy genes and required clinical follow-up. Unbiased NGS-based sequencing made new molecular diagnoses outside the expected EDS genotype-phenotype relationship and identified previously undetected clinically actionable variants in aortopathy susceptibility genes. These data may be of value in guiding future clinical pathways for genetic diagnosis in EDS.Genet Med 18 11, 1119-1127.

  17. Molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of Chinese Han deaf patients with type I and type II Waardenburg Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lianhua; Li, Xiaohua; Shi, Jun; Pang, Xiuhong; Hu, Yechen; Wang, Xiaowen; Wu, Hao; Yang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigmentary abnormalities is genetically heterogeneous and phenotypically variable. This study investigated the molecular etiology and genotype-phenotype correlation of WS in 36 Chinese Han deaf probands and 16 additional family members that were clinically diagnosed with WS type I (WS1, n = 8) and type II (WS2, n = 42). Mutation screening of six WS-associated genes detected PAX3 mutations in 6 (86%) of the 7 WS1 probands. Among the 29 WS2 probands, 13 (45%) and 10 (34%) were identified with SOX10 and MITF mutations, respectively. Nineteen of the 26 detected mutations were novel. In WS2 probands whose parental DNA samples were available, de novo mutations were frequently seen for SOX10 mutations (7/8) but not for MITF mutations (0/5, P = 0.005). Excessive freckle, a common feature of WS2 in Chinese Hans, was frequent in WS2 probands with MITF mutations (7/10) but not in those with SOX10 mutations (0/13, P = 4.9 × 10−4). Our results showed that mutations in SOX10 and MITF are two major causes for deafness associated with WS2. These two subtypes of WS2 can be distinguished by the high de novo rate of the SOX10 mutations and the excessive freckle phenotype exclusively associated with the MITF mutations. PMID:27759048

  18. Proxy molecular diagnosis from whole-exome sequencing reveals Papillon-Lefevre syndrome caused by a missense mutation in CTSC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Mesut Erzurumluoglu

    Full Text Available Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe early onset periodontitis and palmoplantar hyperkeratosis. A previously reported missense mutation in the CTSC gene (NM_001814.4:c.899G>A:p.(G300D was identified in a homozygous state in two siblings diagnosed with PLS in a consanguineous family of Arabic ancestry. The variant was initially identified in a heterozygous state in a PLS unaffected sibling whose whole exome had been sequenced as part of a previous Primary ciliary dyskinesia study. Using this information, a proxy molecular diagnosis was made on the PLS affected siblings after consent was given to study this second disorder found to be segregating within the family. The prevalence of the mutation was then assayed in the local population using a representative sample of 256 unrelated individuals. The variant was absent in all subjects indicating that the variant is rare in Saudi Arabia. This family study illustrates how whole-exome sequencing can generate findings and inferences beyond its primary goal.

  19. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of 100K gene of fowl adenovirus-4 for prevention and control of hydropericardium syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M S; Ashraf, A; Khan, M I; Rahman, M; Habib, M; Qureshi, J A

    2016-01-01

    Fowl adenovirus-4 is an infectious agent causing Hydropericardium syndrome in chickens. Adenovirus are non-enveloped virions having linear, double stranded DNA. Viral genome codes for few structural and non structural proteins. 100K is an important non-structural viral protein. Open reading frame for coding sequence of 100K protein was cloned with oligo histidine tag and expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein. Nucleotide sequence of the gene revealed that 100K gene of FAdV-4 has high homology (98%) with the respective gene of FAdV-10. Recombinant 100K protein was expressed in E. coli and purified by nickel affinity chromatography. Immunization of chickens with recombinant 100K protein elicited significant serum antibody titers. However challenge protection test revealed that 100K protein conferred little protection (40%) to the immunized chicken against pathogenic viral challenge. So it was concluded that 100K gene has 2397 bp length and recombinant 100K protein has molecular weight of 95 kDa. It was also found that the recombinant protein has little capacity to affect the immune response because in-spite of having an important role in intracellular transport & folding of viral capsid proteins during viral replication, it is not exposed on the surface of the virus at any stage. Copyright © 2015 The International Alliance for Biological Standardization. All rights reserved.

  20. Respiratory Failure due to Severe Obesity and Kyphoscoliosis in a 24-Year-Old Male with Molecularly Confirmed Prader-Willi Syndrome in Tertiary Hospital in Northern Tanzania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elichilia R. Shao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity, mild intellectual disability, hypotonia, poor sucking, cryptorchidism in males, hypogonadism, and kyphoscoliosis are common features of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS. We report a case who had severe respiratory complications due to extreme obesity and kyphoscoliosis, which are important causes of morbidity and mortality, and discuss management. Furthermore, this is the first molecularly confirmed PWS case in Sub-Saharan Africa outside South Africa.

  1. Molecular analysis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5 reveals a specific spectrum of molecular mutations with prognostic impact: a study on 123 patients and 27 genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Torsten

    2017-01-01

    The only cytogenetic aberration defining a myelodysplastic syndrome subtype is the deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, which, along with morphological features, leads to the diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. These patients show a good prognosis and respond to treatment such as lenalidomide, but some cases progress to acute myeloid leukemia; however, the molecular mutation pattern is rarely characterized. Therefore, we investigated a large cohort of 123 myelodysplastic syndrome patients with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, diagnosed following the World Health Organization classifications 2008 and 2016, by sequencing 27 genes. A great proportion of patients showed no or only one mutation. Only seven genes showed mutation frequencies >5% (SF3B1, DNMT3A, TP53, TET2, CSNK1A1, ASXL1, JAK2). However, the pattern of recurrently mutated genes was comparable to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes by comparison to a reference cohort, except that of TP53 which was significantly more often mutated in myelodysplastic syndrome with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5. As expected, SF3B1 was frequently mutated and correlated with ring sider-oblasts, while JAK2 mutations correlated with elevated platelet counts. Surprisingly, SF3B1 mutations led to significantly worse prognosis within cases with isolated deletion of the long arm of chromosome 5, but showed a comparable outcome to other myelodysplastic syndrome subtypes with SF3B1 mutation. However, addressing genetic stability in follow-up cases might suggest different genetic mechanisms for progression to secondary acute myeloid leukemia compared to overall myelodysplastic syndrome patients. PMID:28642303

  2. Molecular-genetic diagnostics of von Hippel-Lindau syndrome (VHL) in Bulgaria: first complex mutation event in the VHL gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glushkova, Maria; Dimova, Petia; Yordanova, Iglika; Todorov, Tihomir; Tourtourikov, Ivan; Mitev, Vanyo; Todorova, Albena

    2018-02-01

    Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is an autosomal-dominant disease characterized by the formation of various tumours and cysts in many different parts of the body. Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome is caused by VHL gene mutations leading to production of impaired tumor suppressor Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome protein or its complete absence. To study five patients with clinically suspected Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, who were referred for molecular genetic testing. Sanger sequencing of the coding regions of the VHL gene. Five clinically relevant germline mutations were detected. One of the pathogenic variants has not been previously reported. This novel mutation is a complex mutation event combining a duplication and an indel, rearranging exon 3 of the VHL gene - c. [516_517dupGTCAAGCCT; 532_542delCTGGACATCGTinsATTA], p. (Glu173Serfs*4). Overall, our results showed that the diagnosis of Von Hippel-Lindau syndrome in our country is difficult most probably because of its heterogeneous clinical manifestation and insufficient knowledge on the diagnostic criteria for the disease. From genetic point of view our results add some novel data on the mutation profile of the VHL gene. In order to prove or revise the diagnosis, early genetic testing is strongly recommended in affected patients and their family members to ensure appropriate follow-up and treatment of the malignancies.

  3. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Yosemite FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite History of HPS Related Links Prevent Rodent Infestations Cleaning Up After Rodents Diseases From Rodent Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is ...

  4. Long-term growth hormone therapy changes the natural history of body composition and motor function in children with prader-willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrel, Aaron L; Myers, Susan E; Whitman, Barbara Y; Eickhoff, Jens; Allen, David B

    2010-03-01

    Children with Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) have decreased muscle mass, hypotonia, and impaired linear growth. Recombinant human GH (hGH) treatment reportedly improves body composition and physical function in children with PWS, but these studies lack long-term control data. To assess the impact of hGH therapy begun early in life on the natural history of PWS, we compared height, body composition, and strength in similar-age children with PWS naïve to hGH with those treated with hGH for 6 yr. Forty-eight children with PWS were studied: 21 subjects (aged 6-9 yr) treated with hGH for 6 yr (beginning at 4-32 months, mean 13 +/- 6 months) were compared with 27 children of similar age (5-9 yr) prior to treatment with hGH. Percent body fat, lean body mass, carbohydrate/lipid metabolism, and motor strength were compared using analysis of covariance. PWS children treated with hGH demonstrated lower body fat (mean, 36.1 +/- 2.1 vs. 44.6 +/- 1.8%, P fasting glucose or insulin. hGH treatment in children with PWS, begun prior to 2 yr of age, improves body composition, motor function, height, and lipid profiles. The magnitude of these effects suggests that long-term hGH therapy favorably alters the natural history of PWS to an extent that exceeds risks and justifies consideration for initiation during infancy.

  5. High-molecular weight adiponectin/HOMA-IR ratio as a biomarker of metabolic syndrome in urban multiethnic Brazilian subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Abreu, Virgínia Genelhu; Martins, Cyro José de Moraes; de Oliveira, Patricia Aguiar Cardoso; Francischetti, Emilio Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has an important epidemiological relevance due to its increasing prevalence and association with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Insulin resistance is a core feature of the MetS. HOMA-IR is a robust clinical and epidemiological marker of MetS. Adiponectin is an adipokine with insulin-sensitizing and anti-inflammatory functions; its levels decrease as number of components of MetS increases. High-molecular weight adiponectin (HMWA) is the multimer responsible for the relationship of adiponectin with insulin sensitivity. HOMA-IR and HMWA are suitable candidates for MetS biomarkers. The ratio of adiponectin to HOMA-IR has been validated as a powerful index of MetS and considered a better marker of its presence, than either HOMA-IR or adiponectin alone, in selected homogeneous populations. We compared the strength of association between HMWA, HOMA-IR and HMWA/HOMA-IR ratio with MetS and its key components. Our data have shown that the median (25th, 75th percentile) of HMWA/HOMA-IR ratio was lower in subjects with MetS [0.51 (0.33, 1.31)] as compared to those without it [2.19 (1.13, 4.71)]. The correlation coefficient (r) was significantly higher for HMWA/HOMA-IR ratio as compared to HMWA for waist circumference (-0.65; -0.40, respectively); mean blood pressure (-0.27; -0.14, respectively); fasting glucose (-0.38; -0.19, respectively); HDL-cholesterol (0.44; 0.40, respectively); and triglycerides (-0.35; -0.18, respectively). In a multivariable logistic regression analysis, the HMWA/HOMA-IR ratio was a sensitive predictor for MetS, being the only marker that was significantly associated with each and all the individual components of the syndrome. These results expand on previous studies in that we used the active circulating form of adiponectin, i.e. HMWA, and represent a typical Brazilian cohort characterized by intense interethnic admixture. Thus, the HMWA/HOMA-IR ratio is a minimally invasive biomarker for MetS that could be

  6. Evolutionary history of larval skeletal morphology in sea urchin Echinometridae (Echinoidea: Echinodermata) as deduced from mitochondrial DNA molecular phylogeny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinjo, Sonoko; Shirayama, Yoshihisa; Wada, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    The larval skeletons of sea urchins show considerable morphological diversity, even between closely related species, although the evolutionary history and functional significance of this diversity are poorly understood. To infer the evolutionary history of the skeletal morphology, we focused on echinometrid species for which the morphological variation in larval skeletons had been investigated qualitatively and quantitatively. We reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among 14 echinometrid species based on mitochondrial ND1 and ND2 genes and mapped the morphological characters onto the resultant trees. The monophyly of each genus in the Echinometridae was well supported by our results, as was the close affinity between Colobocentrotus, Heterocentrotus, and Echinometra. The mapping of the morphological characters of the larval skeletons indicated that the length, direction, and density of spines on the postoral rods was well conserved in each group of Echinometridae and that the abundance of spines and the size and shape of the body skeleton changed relatively frequently and hence were less conserved. In Echinometrid species, morphological variation in relatively unconserved features tends to be associated with latitudinal distributions, rather than phylogenetic relationships, indicating that the morphological diversity of larval skeletons could have been caused by adaptation to the habitat environment. Some morphological differences, however, seem to be nonfunctional and generated by the constraints on larval skeletogenesis. Thus, echinometrid species can be a good model with which to study the evolutionary history from both ecological and developmental standpoints.

  7. Molecular and clinical characterization of Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian cohort with two novel PAX3 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayeb; Emamdjomeh, Hesam; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-12-15

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a disease of abnormal neural-crest derived melanocyte development characterized by hearing loss and pigmentary disturbances in hair, eyes and skin. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4, where WS1 is recognized by the presence of dystopia canthorum, with PAX3 being the only known gene involved. This study aimed at investigating PAX3 mutations and clinical characteristics of WS1 in a group of Iranian patients. A total of 12 WS1 patients from four unrelated Iranian families were enrolled. Waardenburg consortium guidelines were used for WS1 diagnosis. A detailed family history was traced and a thorough clinical examination was performed for all participants. Furthermore, WS1 patients underwent screening for PAX3 mutations using PCR-sequencing. Dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys were observed in all patients. Early graying, hair discoloration, hypoplastic blue eyes (characteristic brilliant blue iris) and hearing loss were the most common features observed, while heterochromia iridis was the least frequently observed sign among the studied Iranian WS1 patients. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed four mutations including c.667C>T, c.784C>T, c.951delT and c.451+3A>C. Two of the four mutations reported here (c.951delT and c.451+3A>C) are being reported for the first time in this study. Our data provide insight into genotypic and phenotypic spectrum of WS1 in an Iranian series of patients. Our results expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations and may have implications for the genetic counseling of WS in Iran. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. An experimental test of the role of environmental temperature variability on ectotherm molecular, physiological and life-history traits: implications for global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folguera, Guillermo; Bastías, Daniel A; Caers, Jelle; Rojas, José M; Piulachs, Maria-Dolors; Bellés, Xavier; Bozinovic, Francisco

    2011-07-01

    Global climate change is one of the greatest threats to biodiversity; one of the most important effects is the increase in the mean earth surface temperature. However, another but poorly studied main characteristic of global change appears to be an increase in temperature variability. Most of the current analyses of global change have focused on mean values, paying less attention to the role of the fluctuations of environmental variables. We experimentally tested the effects of environmental temperature variability on characteristics associated to the fitness (body mass balance, growth rate, and survival), metabolic rate (VCO(2)) and molecular traits (heat shock protein expression, Hsp70), in an ectotherm, the terrestrial woodlouse Porcellio laevis. Our general hypotheses are that higher values of thermal amplitude may directly affect life-history traits, increasing metabolic cost and stress responses. At first, results supported our hypotheses showing a diversity of responses among characters to the experimental thermal treatments. We emphasize that knowledge about the cellular and physiological mechanisms by which animals cope with environmental changes is essential to understand the impact of mean climatic change and variability. Also, we consider that the studies that only incorporate only mean temperatures to predict the life-history, ecological and evolutionary impact of global temperature changes present important problems to predict the diversity of responses of the organism. This is because the analysis ignores the complexity and details of the molecular and physiological processes by which animals cope with environmental variability, as well as the life-history and demographic consequences of such variability. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Molecular responses of the Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mouse models of Down syndrome to MK-801.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, A; Lacroix, T; Stasko, M R; Scott-McKean, J J; Costa, A C S; Gardiner, K J

    2008-10-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of human chromosome 21 (chr21), is the most common genetic cause of intellectual disability. The Ts65Dn mouse model of DS is trisomic for orthologs of 94 chr21-encoded, confirmed protein-coding genes and displays a number of behavioral deficits. Recently, Ts65Dn mice were shown to be hypersensitive to the locomotor stimulatory effects of the high-affinity N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor (NMDAR) channel blocker, MK-801. This is consistent with the functions of several chr21 proteins that are predicted directly or indirectly to impact NMDAR function or NMDAR-mediated signaling. In this study, we show that a second mouse model of DS, the Ts1Cje, which is trisomic for 70 protein-coding genes, is also hypersensitive to MK-801. To investigate the molecular basis for the responses to MK-801, we have measured levels of a subset of chr21 and phosphorylated non-chr21 proteins, in the cortex and hippocampus of Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mice and euploid controls, with and without treatment with MK-801. We show that in euploid mice, the chr21-encoded proteins, TIAM1 and DYRK1A, and phosphorylation of AKT, ERK1/2 and the transcription factor ELK are involved in the MK-801 response. However, in both Ts65Dn and Ts1Cje mice, levels of phosphorylation are constitutively elevated in naïve, unstimulated mice, and the MK-801-induced changes in TIAM1 and DYRK1A and in phosphorylation are either absent or abnormal, with both genotype and brain-region-specific patterns. These results emphasize the complexities of the pathway perturbations that arise with segmental trisomy.

  10. Epidemiology and Molecular Characteristics of Mycoplasma pneumoniae During an Outbreak of M. pneumoniae-associated Stevens-Johnson Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Louise K Francois; Olson, Daniel; Diaz, Maureen H; Lin, Xia; Demirjian, Alicia; Benitez, Alvaro J; Winchell, Jonas M; Robinson, Christine C; Bol, Kirk A; Glodé, Mary P; Dominguez, Samuel R; Miller, Lisa A; Kutty, Preeta K

    2017-06-01

    An increase in Mycoplasma pneumoniae-associated Stevens-Johnson syndrome (SJS) cases at a Colorado pediatric hospital led to an outbreak investigation. We describe the epidemiologic and molecular characteristics of M. pneumoniae among SJS case-patients and surrounding community members during the outbreak. M. pneumoniae polymerase chain reaction-positive respiratory specimens from 5 Colorado hospitals and 4 referral laboratories underwent confirmatory polymerase chain reaction testing; positive specimens then underwent multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) and macrolide resistance testing. Three SJS-M. pneumoniae case-patient households were surveyed using a standardized questionnaire, and nasopharyngeal/oropharyngeal swabs were obtained from all consenting/assenting household contacts. International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision codes were used to identify pneumonia cases among Colorado patients 5-21 years of age from January 2009 to March 2014. Three different M. pneumoniae MLVA types were identified among the 5 SJS case-patients with confirmed infection; MLVA type 3-X-6-2 was seen more commonly in SJS case-patients (60%) than in 69 non-SJS community specimens (29%). Macrolide resistance was identified in 7% of community specimens but not among SJS case-patients. Of 15 household contacts, 5 (33%) were M. pneumoniae positive; all MLVA types were identical to those of the corresponding SJS case-patient, although the specimen from 1 contact was macrolide resistant. Overall pneumonia cases as well as those caused by M. pneumoniae specifically peaked in October 2013, coinciding with the SJS outbreak. The outbreak of M. pneumoniae-associated SJS may have been associated with a community outbreak of M. pneumoniae; clinicians should be aware of the M. pneumoniae-SJS relationship. Household transmission of M. pneumoniae was common within the households investigated.

  11. The potential impact of family history of metabolic syndrome and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus: In a highly endogamous population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulbari Bener

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aims to determine the potential impact of positive family history of Metabolic Syndrome (MetS among two generations, on developing Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM and the potential relation of consanguineous marriage among patients with MetS to the risk of developing T2DM among a sample of Qataris. Design: A cross-sectional study. Setting: Primary healthcare (PHC centers. Materials and Methods: The survey and measurement were conducted from April 2011 to December 2012 among Qatari nationals above 20 years of age. Of the 2,182 subjects, who were approached to participate in the study, 1,552 (71% gave their consent. Face-to-face interviews were conducted using a structured questionnaire followed by anthropometric measurements and laboratory tests. Metabolic syndrome was defined using the National Cholesterol Education Program-Third Adult Treatment Panel (ATP III as well as International Diabetes Federation (IDF. Results: Overall, the prevalence of MetS was 26.2% according to ATP III and 36.9% according to IDF (P < 0.0001. The mean age of MetS patients with T2DM was significantly higher than those without T2DM (Mean 48 ± 9.9 vs. 42.5 ± 9.2; P < 0.001. The proportion of females was higher among MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (61% vs. 51%; P = 0.053. In addition, there were significant differences between MetS patients with and without DM in terms of co-morbidities of hypertension, coronary heart disease, and high cholesterol. The proportion of MetS patients with positive family history for MetS was significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to those without T2DM (46.7% vs. 33.8%; P = 0.009. The proportion of positive family history of MetS among fathers (35% vs. 21.9%; P = 0.005, mothers (30.5% vs. 18.8%; P = 0.008, maternal aunt (18.3% vs. 11.2%; P = 0.055, and maternal grand father (19.5% vs. 10%; P = 0.010 were significantly higher in MetS patients with T2DM as compared to the

  12. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  13. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical and genetic analysis in two sisters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Maalouf, T; Jonveaux, P; Guerci, B; Angioi, K

    2011-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a severe genetic disorder defined by the association of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and diabetes insipidus. Two sisters complained of progressive visual loss. Fundus examination evidenced optic atrophy. Their past medical history revealed diabetes mellitus and deafness since childhood. The association of these symptoms made the diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome possible. It was confirmed by molecular analysis, which evidenced composite WFS1 heterozygous mutations inherited from both their mother and father. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J Scott; Edwards, Danielle L; Fisher, Robert N; Harlow, Peter S

    2008-10-27

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  15. Molecular and morphological analysis of the critically endangered Fijian iguanas reveals cryptic diversity and a complex biogeographic history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keogh, J.S.; Edwards, D.L.; Fisher, R.N.; Harlow, P.S.

    2008-01-01

    The Pacific iguanas of the Fijian and Tongan archipelagos are a biogeographic enigma in that their closest relatives are found only in the New World. They currently comprise two genera and four species of extinct and extant taxa. The two extant species, Brachylophus fasciatus from Fiji, Tonga, and Vanuatu and Brachylophus vitiensis from western Fiji, are of considerable conservation concern with B. vitiensis listed as critically endangered. A recent molecular study has shown that Brachylophus comprised three evolutionarily significant units. To test these conclusions and to reevaluate the phylogenetic and biogeographic relationships within Brachylophus, we generated an mtDNA dataset consisting of 1462 base pairs for 61 individuals from 13 islands, representing both Brachylophus species. Unweighted parsimony analyses and Bayesian analyses produced a well-resolved phylogenetic hypothesis supported by high bootstrap values and posterior probabilities within Brachylophus. Our data reject the monophyly of specimens previously believed to comprise B. fasciatus. Instead, our data demonstrate that living Brachylophus comprise three robust and well-supported clades that do not correspond to current taxonomy. One of these clades comprises B. fasciatus from the Lau group of Fiji and Tonga (type locality for B. fasciatus), while a second comprises putative B. fasciatus from the central regions of Fiji, which we refer to here as B. n. sp. Animals in this clade form the sister group to B. vitiensis rather than other B. fasciatus. We herein describe this clade as a new species of Brachylophus based on molecular and morphological data. With only one exception, every island is home to one or more unique haplotypes. We discuss alternative biogeographic hypotheses to explain their distribution in the Pacific and the difficulties of distinguishing these. Together, our molecular and taxonomic results have important implications for future conservation initiatives for the Pacific

  16. The evolutionary history and spatiotemporal dynamics of the fever, thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia syndrome virus (FTLSV) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xueyong; Liu, Licheng; Du, Yanhua; Wu, Weili; Wang, Haifeng; Su, Jia; Tang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Qi; Yang, Yinhui; Jiang, Yongqiang; Chen, Weijun; Xu, Bianli

    2014-10-01

    In 2007, a novel bunyavirus was found in Henan Province, China and named fever, thrombocytopenia and leukocytopenia syndrome virus (FTLSV); since then, FTLSV has been found in ticks and animals in many Chinese provinces. Human-to-human transmission has been documented, indicating that FTLSV should be considered a potential public health threat. Determining the historical spread of FTLSV could help curtail its spread and prevent future movement of this virus. To examine the pattern of FTLSV evolution and the origin of outbreak strains, as well to examine the rate of evolution, the genome of 12 FTLSV strains were sequenced and a phylogenetic and Bayesian phylogeographic analysis of all available FTLSV sequences in China were performed. Analysis based on the FTLSV L segment suggests that the virus likely originated somewhere in Huaiyangshan circa 1790 (95% highest probability density interval: 1756-1817) and began spreading around 1806 (95% highest probability density interval: 1773-1834). Analysis also indicates that when FTLSV arrived in Jiangsu province from Huaiyangshan, Jiangsu Province became another source for the spread of the disease. Bayesian factor test analysis identified three major transmission routes: Huaiyangshan to Jiangsu, Jiangsu to Liaoning, and Jiangsu to Shandong. The speed of FTLSV movement has increased in recent decades, likely facilitated by modern human activity and ecosystem changes. In addition, evidence of RNA segment reassortment was found in FTLSV; purifying selection appears to have been the dominant force in the evolution of this virus. Results presented in the manuscript suggest that the Huaiyangshan area is likely be the origin of FTLSV in China and identified probable viral migration routes. These results provide new insights into the origin and spread of FTLSV in China, and provide a foundation for future virological surveillance and control.

  17. Sheldon-Hall syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bamshad Michael J

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sheldon-Hall syndrome (SHS is a rare multiple congenital contracture syndrome characterized by contractures of the distal joints of the limbs, triangular face, downslanting palpebral fissures, small mouth, and high arched palate. Epidemiological data for the prevalence of SHS are not available, but less than 100 cases have been reported in the literature. Other common clinical features of SHS include prominent nasolabial folds, high arched palate, attached earlobes, mild cervical webbing, short stature, severe camptodactyly, ulnar deviation, and vertical talus and/or talipes equinovarus. Typically, the contractures are most severe at birth and non-progressive. SHS is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern but about half the cases are sporadic. Mutations in either MYH3, TNNI2, or TNNT3 have been found in about 50% of cases. These genes encode proteins of the contractile apparatus of fast twitch skeletal muscle fibers. The diagnosis of SHS is based on clinical criteria. Mutation analysis is useful to distinguish SHS from arthrogryposis syndromes with similar features (e.g. distal arthrogryposis 1 and Freeman-Sheldon syndrome. Prenatal diagnosis by ultrasonography is feasible at 18–24 weeks of gestation. If the family history is positive and the mutation is known in the family, prenatal molecular genetic diagnosis is possible. There is no specific therapy for SHS. However, patients benefit from early intervention with occupational and physical therapy, serial casting, and/or surgery. Life expectancy and cognitive abilities are normal.

  18. [Familial Wolfram syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessahraoui, M; Paquis, V; Rouzier, C; Bouziane-Nedjadi, K; Naceur, M; Niar, S; Zennaki, A; Boudraa, G; Touhami, M

    2014-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive progressive neurodegenerative disorder, and it is mainly characterized by the presence of diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Other symptoms such as diabetes insipidus, deafness, and psychiatric disorders are less frequent. The WFS1 gene, responsible for the disease and encoding for a transmembrane protein called wolframin, was localized in 1998 on chromosome 4p16. In this report, we present a familial observation of Wolfram syndrome (parents and three children). The propositus was a 6-year-old girl with diabetes mellitus and progressive visual loss. Her family history showed a brother with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness since childhood and a sister with diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and bilateral hydronephrosis. Thus, association of these familial and personal symptoms is highly suggestive of Wolfram syndrome. The diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis (biology), which showed the presence of WFS1 homozygous mutations c.1113G>A (p.Trp371*) in the three siblings and a heterozygote mutation in the parents. Our observation has demonstrated that pediatricians should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Bilateral Renal Tumour as Indicator for Birt-Hogg-Dubé Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Johannesma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD syndrome is a cancer disorder caused by a pathogenic FLCN mutation characterized by fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts, pneumothorax, benign renal cyst, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC. In this case we describe a patient with bilateral renal tumour and a positive familial history for pneumothorax and renal cancer. Based on this clinical presentation, the patient was suspected for BHD syndrome, which was confirmed after molecular testing. We discuss the importance of recognizing this autosomal dominant cancer disorder when a patient is presented at the urologist with a positive family history of chromophobe renal cell cancer or a positive familial history for renal cell cancer and pneumothorax.

  20. Molecular diagnosis of Prader-Willi syndrome: Parent-of-origin dependent methylation sites and non-isotopic detection of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lerer, I.; Meiner, V.; Pashut-Lavon, I.; Abeliovich, D.

    1994-08-01

    We describe our experience in the molecular diagnosis of 22 patients suspected of Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) using a DNA probe PW71 (D15S63) which detects a parent-of-origin specific methylated site in the PWS critical region. The cause of the syndrome was determined as deletion or uniparental disomy according to the segregation of (CA){sub n} dinucleotide repeat polymorphisms of the PWS/AS region and more distal markers of chromosome 15. In 10 patients the clinical diagnosis was confirmed by the segregation of (CA){sub n}, probably due to paternal microdeletion in the PWs critical region which did not include the loci D15S97, D15S113, GABRB3, and GABRA5. This case demonstrates the advantage of the DNA probe PW71 in the diagnosis of PWS. 31 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. Molecular cytogenetic analysis of Inv Dup(15) chromosomes, using probes specific for the Pradar-Willi/Angelman syndrome region: Clinical implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leana-Cox, J. (Univ. of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Jenkins, L. (Kaiser Permanente Medical Group, San Jose, CA (United States)); Palmer, C.G.; Plattner, R. (Indiana School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)); Sheppard, L. (Palo Verde Laboratory, Inc., Chandler, AZ (United States)); Flejter, W.L. (Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)); Zackowski, J. (Univ. of Florida Health Science Center, Gainsville, FL (United States)); Tsien, F. (Tulane Univ. School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA (United States)); Schwartz, S. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States))

    1994-05-01

    Twenty-seven cases of inverted duplications of chromosome 15 (inv dup[15]) were investigated by FISH with two DNA probes specific for the Prader-Willi syndrome/Angelman syndrome (PWS/AS) region on proximal 15q. Sixteen of the marker chromosomes displayed two copies of each probe, while in the remaining 11 markers no hybridization was observed. A significant association was found between the presence of this region and an abnormal phenotype (P<.01). This is the largest study to date of inv dup(15) chromosomes, that uses molecular cytogenetic methods and is the first to report a significant association between the presence of a specific chromosomal region in such markers and an abnormal phenotype. 30 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  2. Molecular Study of Three Lebanese and Syrian Patients with Waardenburg Syndrome and Report of Novel Mutations in the EDNRB and MITF Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N.M.; Ente, D.; Chouery, E.; Jalkh, N.; Mehawej, C.; Khoueir, Z.; Pingault, V.; Mégarbané, A.

    2011-01-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a genetic disorder characterized primarily by depigmentation of the skin and hair, heterochromia of the irides, sensorineural deafness, and sometimes by dystopia canthorum, and Hirschsprung disease. WS presents a large clinical and genetic heterogeneity. Four different types have been individualized and linked to 5 different genes. We report 2 cases of WS type II and 1 case of WS type IV from Lebanon and Syria. The genetic studies revealed 2 novel mutations in the MITF gene of the WS type II cases and 1 novel homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene of the WS type IV case. This is the first molecular study of patients from the Arab world. Additional cases will enable a more detailed description of the clinical spectrum of Waardenburg syndrome in this region. PMID:21373256

  3. Congenital abnormalities of cranial nerve development: overview, molecular mechanisms, and further evidence of heterogeneity and complexity of syndromes with congenital limitation of eye movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traboulsi, Elias I

    2004-01-01

    The clinical and molecular genetic classification of syndromes with congenital limitation of eye movements and evidence of cranial nerve dysgenesis continues to evolve. This monograph details clinical and molecular genetic data on a number of families and isolated patients with congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles (CFEOM) and related disorders, and presents an overview of the mechanisms of abnormal patterns of motor and sensory cranial nerve development in these rare syndromes. Clinical examination of one patient with CFEOM1, one family with clinical features of CFEOM2, one family with recessive CFEOM3, one family with horizontal gaze palsy and progressive scoliosis (HGPPS), and four patients with various combinations of congenital cranial nerve abnormalities. Genotyping of families with CFEOM and HGPPS for polymorphic markers in the regions of the three known CFEOM loci and in the HGPPS region, and mutation analysis of the ARIX and KIF21A genes in patients with CFEOM were performed according to standard published protocols. The patient with CFEOM1 had the second most common mutation in KIF21A, a 2861 G>A mutation that resulted in an R954Q substitution. The family with CFEOM2 phenotype did not map to the CFEOM2 locus. The family with recessive CFEOM3 did not map to any of the known loci. The HGPPS family mapped to 11q23-q25. One patient had optic nerve hypoplasia and fifth nerve dysfunction. Two patients had the rare combination of Möbius syndrome and CFEOM. One patient had Möbius syndrome and fifth nerve dysfunction. There is genetic heterogeneity in CFEOM2 and CFEOM3. Abnormalities in sensory nerves can also accompany abnormalities of motor nerves, further substantiating the effect of individual mutations on developing motor as well as sensory cranial nerve nuclei.

  4. Mandibulofacial dysostosis (Treacher-Collins syndrome) in the fetus: novel association with Pectus carinatum in a molecularly confirmed case and review of the fetal phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinidou, Anastasia E; Tasoulas, Jason; Kallipolitis, Georgios; Gasparatos, Spyros; Velissariou, Voula; Paraskevakou, Helen

    2013-12-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is the most common mandibulofacial dysostosis of autosomal dominant or, rarely, recessive inheritance. Affected fetuses may be identified by prenatal ultrasound or diagnosed at autopsy in case of perinatal death or pregnancy termination. We describe the ultrasonographic, autopsy, and molecular findings in a 25-week-gestation affected fetus, and review the clinical, prenatal, and postmortem findings in 15 previously reported fetal and perinatal cases. A nearly complete spectrum of the typical facial characteristics can be present by the early second trimester of gestation, including subtle defects such as lower eyelid colobomas. Mandibular hypoplasia and bilateral auricle defects were constant findings in the affected fetal population. Downslanting palpebral fissures were the second more common feature, followed by midface hypoplasia, polyhydramnios, and ocular defects. Association with Pierre Robin sequence was common (38%) in the reviewed series. Previously unreported pectus carinatum was noted in our case bearing a heterozygous TCOF1 mutation. Other unique reported findings include salivary gland hyperplasia, single umbilical artery, and tracheo-esophageal fistula, all in molecularly unconfirmed cases. Treacher Collins syndrome can be prenatally detected by ultrasound and should be included in the wide range of genetic syndromes that can be diagnosed at perinatal autopsy. Affected fetuses tend to have a more severe phenotype than living patients. The reported association of Treacher Collins syndrome type 1 with pectus carinatum expands the phenotype, provides information on genotype-phenotype correlation, and suggests possible pathogenetic interactions between neural crest cell disorders and the formation of the sternum that merit investigation. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Update on the clinical features and natural history of Wolf-Hirschhorn (4p-) syndrome: experience with 87 patients and recommendations for routine health supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Agatino; Filippi, Tiziana; Carey, John C

    2008-11-15

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is a well-known multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation syndrome, firstly described in 1961 by Cooper and Hirschhorn. Its frequency is estimated as 1/50,000-1/20,000 births, with a female predilection of 2:1. The disorder is caused by partial loss of material from the distal portion of the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p16.3), and is considered a contiguous gene syndrome. No single gene deletions or intragenic mutations have been shown to confer the full WHS phenotype. Since the disorder was brought to the attention of geneticists, many additional cases have been published. Only in 1999, however, were the first data on the natural history brought to the attention of the medical community. The purpose of the present study is to help delineate in more detail and over a longer period of time, the natural history of WHS, in order to establish appropriate health supervision and anticipatory guidance for individuals with this disorder. We have collected information on 87 patients diagnosed with WHS (54 females and 33 males) both in USA and Italy. Age at first observation ranged between newborn and 17 years. Twenty patients have been followed from 4 months to 23 years. The deletion proximal breakpoint varied from 4p15.32 to 4p16.3, and, by FISH, was terminal and included both WHSCR. Deletion was detected by standard cytogenetics in 44/87 (50.5%) patients, whereas FISH was necessary in the other 43 (49.5%). Array-CGH analysis at 1 Mb resolution was performed in 34/87 patients, and, in 15/34 (44%), showed an unbalanced translocation leading to both a 4p monosomy and a partial trisomy for another chromosome arm. Six more patients had been previously shown to have an unbalanced translocation by karyotype analysis or FISH with a WHS-specific probe. Sixty-five of 87 patients had an apparent pure, de novo, terminal deletion; and 1/87 a tandem duplication of 4p16.1p16.3 associated with 4p16.3pter deletion. Age at diagnosis varied between 7

  6. A culture-bound syndrome 'amafufunyana' and a culture-specific event 'ukuthwasa': differentiated by a family history of schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehaus, D J H; Oosthuizen, P; Lochner, C; Emsley, R A; Jordaan, E; Mbanga, N I; Keyter, N; Laurent, C; Deleuze, J-F; Stein, D J

    2004-01-01

    'Amafufunyana' and 'ukuthwasa' are two culture-specific descriptive terms used by Xhosa traditional healers to explain aberrant behavioral and psychological phenomena. Some overlap between these conditions and schizophrenia (DSM-IV) is apparent. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which amafufunyana and ukuthwasa were used as cultural explanatory models by traditional healers for DSM-IV-defined schizophrenia and whether there were significant phenomenological differences in schizophrenia symptoms in patients with the diagnosis of amafufunyana rather than ukuthwasa. Xhosa patients with schizophrenia underwent a structured clinical diagnostic interview (Diagnostic Interview for Genetic Studies). The use of traditional diagnostic and treatment methods was assessed by structured open-ended interviewer-rated questions. The sample was then stratified for the presence/absence of a past/current diagnosis of amafufunyana and/or ukuthwasa. The clinical parameters were compared across groups by means of the chi2 or Student t tests. 247 adult subjects participated in the study. 106 (53%) patients reported a previous diagnosis of amafufunyana, and 9 (4.5%) reported a diagnosis of ukuthwasa. A family history of schizophrenia (p = 0.004) or any psychiatric disorder (p = 0.008) was more common in the ukuthwasa group. Subjects with a primary diagnosis other than amafufunyana or ukuthwasa were more likely to be married (p = 0.004), to have a history of stressor(s) prior to illness onset (p = 0.026), to be from a rural environment (p = 0.007) or to have a history of cannabis abuse/dependency (p = 0.015). The culture-bound syndrome amafufunyana and the culture-specific phenomenon of ukuthwasa are both used to explain symptoms in patients with schizophrenia (DSM-IV). Identification of cases as amafufunyana and ukuthwasa may correlate with a distinction between familial and sporadic cases of schizophrenia. Whether the positive connotations associated with ukuthwasa, as

  7. Evolutionary history of tall fescue morphotypes inferred from molecular phylogenetics of the Lolium-Festuca species complex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stewart Alan V

    2010-10-01

    phylogenetic analysis of the Festuca genus to include representatives of each tall fescue morphotype, and to use low copy nuclear gene-derived sequences to identify putative progenitors of the polyploid species. The demonstration of distinct tall fescue lineages has implications for both taxonomy and molecular breeding strategies, and may facilitate the generation of morphotype and/or sub-genome-specific molecular markers.

  8. Evolution of man in the light of molecular genetics: a review. Part I. Our evolutionary history and genomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portin, Petter

    2007-07-01

    The discovery in the mid 1970s of efficient methods of DNA sequencing and their subsequent development into more and more rapid procedures followed by sequencing the genomes of many species, including man in 2001, revolutionised the whole of biology. Remarkably, new light could be cast on the evolutionary relations of different species, and the tempo and mode of evolution within a given species, notably man, could quantitatively be illuminated including ongoing evolution possibly involving also the size of the brains. This review is a short summary of the results of the molecular genetic investigations of human evolution including the time and place of the formation of our species, our evolutionary relation to the closest living species relatives as well as extinct forms of the genus Homo. The nature and amount of genetic polymorphism in man is also considered with special emphasis on the causes of this variation, and the role of natural selection in human evolution. A consensus about the mosaic nature of our genome and the rather dynamic structure of our ancestral population is gradually emerging. The modern gene pool has most likely been contributed to several different ancestral demes either before or after the emergence of the anatomically modern human phenotype in the extent that even the nature of the evolutionary lineage leading to the anatomically modern man as a distinct biological species is disputable. Regulation of the function of genes, as well as the evolution of brains will be dealt with in the second part of this review.

  9. Evolutionary history of the PER3 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR): idiosyncratic aspect of primate molecular circadian clock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabino, Flávia Cal; Ribeiro, Amanda Oliveira; Tufik, Sérgio; Torres, Laila Brito; Oliveira, José Américo; Mello, Luiz Eugênio Araújo Moraes; Cavalcante, Jeferson Souza; Pedrazzoli, Mario

    2014-01-01

    The PER3 gene is one of the clock genes, which function in the core mammalian molecular circadian system. A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) locus in the 18th exon of this gene has been strongly associated to circadian rhythm phenotypes and sleep organization in humans, but it has not been identified in other mammals except primates. To better understand the evolution and the placement of the PER3 VNTR in a phylogenetical context, the present study enlarges the investigation about the presence and the structure of this variable region in a large sample of primate species and other mammals. The analysis of the results has revealed that the PER3 VNTR occurs exclusively in simiiforme primates and that the number of copies of the primitive unit ranges from 2 to 11 across different primate species. Two transposable elements surrounding the 18th exon of PER3 were found in primates with published genome sequences, including the tarsiiforme Tarsius syrichta, which lacks the VNTR. These results suggest that this VNTR may have evolved in a common ancestor of the simiiforme branch and that the evolutionary copy number differentiation of this VNTR may be associated with primate simiiformes sleep and circadian phenotype patterns.

  10. Evolutionary history of the PER3 variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR: idiosyncratic aspect of primate molecular circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Cal Sabino

    Full Text Available The PER3 gene is one of the clock genes, which function in the core mammalian molecular circadian system. A variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR locus in the 18th exon of this gene has been strongly associated to circadian rhythm phenotypes and sleep organization in humans, but it has not been identified in other mammals except primates. To better understand the evolution and the placement of the PER3 VNTR in a phylogenetical context, the present study enlarges the investigation about the presence and the structure of this variable region in a large sample of primate species and other mammals. The analysis of the results has revealed that the PER3 VNTR occurs exclusively in simiiforme primates and that the number of copies of the primitive unit ranges from 2 to 11 across different primate species. Two transposable elements surrounding the 18th exon of PER3 were found in primates with published genome sequences, including the tarsiiforme Tarsius syrichta, which lacks the VNTR. These results suggest that this VNTR may have evolved in a common ancestor of the simiiforme branch and that the evolutionary copy number differentiation of this VNTR may be associated with primate simiiformes sleep and circadian phenotype patterns.

  11. Primary Dermal Melanoma in a Patient with a History of Multiple Malignancies: A Case Report with Molecular Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Germana Sini

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Primary dermal melanoma (PDM is a recently described clinical entity accounting for less than 1% of all melanomas. Histologically, it is located in the dermis or subcutaneous tissue, and it shows no connections with the overlying epidermis. The differential diagnosis is principally made along with that of metastatic cutaneous melanoma. Case Report: A 72-year-old Caucasian woman with a history of multiple cancers (metachronous bilateral breast cancer, meningioma, clear cell renal cell carcinoma, uterine fibromatosis and intestinal adenomatous polyposis, came to our attention with a nodular lesion on her back. After removal of the lesion, the histology report indicated malignant PDM or metastatic malignant melanoma. The clinical and instrumental evaluation of the patient did not reveal any other primary tumour, suggesting the primitive nature of the lesion. The absence of an epithelial component argued for a histological diagnosis of PDM. Subsequently, the patient underwent a wide surgical excision with sentinel node biopsy, which was positive for metastatic melanoma. Finally, the mutational status was studied in the main genes that regulate proliferation, apoptosis and cellular senescence. No pathogenetic mutations in CDKN2A, BRAF, NRAS, KRAS, cKIT, TP53 and PTEN genes were observed. This suggests that alternative pathways and low-frequency alterations may be involved. Conclusions: The differential diagnosis between PDM and isolated metastatic melanoma depends on the negativity of imaging studies and clinical findings for other primary lesions. This distinction is important because 5-year survival rates in such cases are higher than in metastatic cases (80-100 vs. 5-20%, respectively.

  12. Inferring Population Size History from Large Samples of Genome-Wide Molecular Data - An Approximate Bayesian Computation Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Boitard

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Inferring the ancestral dynamics of effective population size is a long-standing question in population genetics, which can now be tackled much more accurately thanks to the massive genomic data available in many species. Several promising methods that take advantage of whole-genome sequences have been recently developed in this context. However, they can only be applied to rather small samples, which limits their ability to estimate recent population size history. Besides, they can be very sensitive to sequencing or phasing errors. Here we introduce a new approximate Bayesian computation approach named PopSizeABC that allows estimating the evolution of the effective population size through time, using a large sample of complete genomes. This sample is summarized using the folded allele frequency spectrum and the average zygotic linkage disequilibrium at different bins of physical distance, two classes of statistics that are widely used in population genetics and can be easily computed from unphased and unpolarized SNP data. Our approach provides accurate estimations of past population sizes, from the very first generations before present back to the expected time to the most recent common ancestor of the sample, as shown by simulations under a wide range of demographic scenarios. When applied to samples of 15 or 25 complete genomes in four cattle breeds (Angus, Fleckvieh, Holstein and Jersey, PopSizeABC revealed a series of population declines, related to historical events such as domestication or modern breed creation. We further highlight that our approach is robust to sequencing errors, provided summary statistics are computed from SNPs with common alleles.

  13. Molecular phylogeny and biogeographic history of the armored neotropical catfish subfamilies hypoptopomatinae, neoplecostominae and otothyrinae (siluriformes: loricariidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio F Roxo

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this study are estimate a species-dense, time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae, and Otothyrinae, which together comprise a group of armoured catfishes that is widely distributed across South America, to place the origin of major clades in time and space, and to demonstrate the role of river capture on patterns of diversification in these taxa. We used maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods to estimate a time-calibrated phylogeny of 115 loricariid species, using three mitochondrial and one nuclear genes to generate a matrix of 4,500 base pairs, and used parametric biogeographic analyses to estimate ancestral geographic ranges and to infer the effects of river capture events on the geographic distributions of these taxa. Our analysis recovered Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae, and Otothyrinae as monophyletic with strong statistical support, and Neoplecostominae as more closely related to Otothyrinae than to Hypoptopomatinae. Our time-calibrated phylogeny and ancestral-area estimations indicate an origin of Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae, and Otothyrinae during the Lower Eocene in the Atlantic Coastal Drainages, from which it is possible to infer several dispersal events to adjacent river basins during the Neogene. In conclusion we infer a strong influence of river capture in: (1 the accumulation of modern clade species-richness values; (2 the formation of the modern basin-wide species assemblages, and (3 the presence of many low-diversity, early-branching lineages restricted to the Atlantic Coastal Drainages. We further infer the importance of headwater stream capture and marine transgressions in shaping patterns in the distributions of Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae and Otothyrinae throughout South America.

  14. Molecular phylogeny and biogeographic history of the armored neotropical catfish subfamilies hypoptopomatinae, neoplecostominae and otothyrinae (siluriformes: loricariidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roxo, Fábio F; Albert, James S; Silva, Gabriel S C; Zawadzki, Cláudio H; Foresti, Fausto; Oliveira, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    The main objectives of this study are estimate a species-dense, time-calibrated molecular phylogeny of Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae, and Otothyrinae, which together comprise a group of armoured catfishes that is widely distributed across South America, to place the origin of major clades in time and space, and to demonstrate the role of river capture on patterns of diversification in these taxa. We used maximum likelihood and Bayesian methods to estimate a time-calibrated phylogeny of 115 loricariid species, using three mitochondrial and one nuclear genes to generate a matrix of 4,500 base pairs, and used parametric biogeographic analyses to estimate ancestral geographic ranges and to infer the effects of river capture events on the geographic distributions of these taxa. Our analysis recovered Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae, and Otothyrinae as monophyletic with strong statistical support, and Neoplecostominae as more closely related to Otothyrinae than to Hypoptopomatinae. Our time-calibrated phylogeny and ancestral-area estimations indicate an origin of Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae, and Otothyrinae during the Lower Eocene in the Atlantic Coastal Drainages, from which it is possible to infer several dispersal events to adjacent river basins during the Neogene. In conclusion we infer a strong influence of river capture in: (1) the accumulation of modern clade species-richness values; (2) the formation of the modern basin-wide species assemblages, and (3) the presence of many low-diversity, early-branching lineages restricted to the Atlantic Coastal Drainages. We further infer the importance of headwater stream capture and marine transgressions in shaping patterns in the distributions of Hypoptopomatinae, Neoplecostominae and Otothyrinae throughout South America.

  15. X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin M syndrome: molecular genetic study and long-time follow-up of three generations of a Chinese family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Sheng-Chieh; Shyur, Shyh-Dar; Lee, Wen-I; Ma, Yi-Chun; Huang, Li-Hsin

    2006-01-01

    X-linked hyper-immunoglobulin M (IgM) syndrome (XHIGM) is a rare immunodeficiency disease caused by mutations of the CD40 ligand gene. Patients are subject to recurrent infections and have normal or elevated levels of IgM but markedly decreased serum IgG. We describe molecular genetic studies and clinical manifestations in three generations of one family, as well as results of long-term treatment of 2 young men with the disorder. Of 37 living family members, mutational analysis of the CD40 ligand gene was performed in 36 members. Laboratory data for patients and carriers were reviewed. Four male family members had died of unexplained causes. The 3 patients with XHIGM syndrome and the 5 carriers all had a novel mutation located at Tyr 169 Asn (T526A) in exon 5, the tumor necrosis factor domain of the CD40 ligand gene. In the 3 patients, CD40 ligand expression in activated CD4+ T cells was below 1%. In the carriers, about half of activated CD4+ cells expressed CD40 ligand. One carrier had malignant lymphoma. Long-term (>20 years) intravenous immunoglobulin therapy in 2 patients improved IgG levels but did not fully suppress the high levels of IgM, nor did it prevent late complications (bronchiectasis and sclerosing cholangitis). Diagnosis of a genetic immunodeficiency, especially an X-linked disease such as XHIGM syndrome, should prompt a survey of the entire family. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Two Likely Pathogenic Variants of COL2A1 in Unrelated Korean Patients With Ocular-Only Variants of Stickler Syndrome: The First Molecular Diagnosis in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Je Moon; Jang, Mi-Ae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Sang Jin

    2016-03-01

    Stickler syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous disorder that affects the ocular, auditory, and musculoskeletal systems. Ocular-only variant of Stickler syndrome type 1 (OSTL1) is characterized by high risk of retinal detachment without systemic involvement and is caused by alternatively spliced exon 2 mutation of COL2A1. We report the cases of two Korean families with OSTL1 carrying likely pathogenic variants of COL2A1. All patients presented with membranous vitreous anomaly, peripheral retinal degeneration, and/or rhegmatogenous retinal detachment, but no systemic manifestations. By genetic analysis, two likely pathogenic non-exon 2 variants, c.2678dupC (p.Ala895Serfs*49) and c.3327+ 1G>C, were identified in COL2A1. Our results demonstrate that COL2A1 defects in OSTL1 are not confined to mutations in exon 2. Together with molecular data, ophthalmologists should consider genetic diagnosis of Stickler syndrome in patients with vitreous anomaly to prevent blindness from retinal detachment. To our knowledge, this is the first report of genetically confirmed OSTL1 in Korea.

  17. Male patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmann, Philip; Christiansen, Peter; Johannsen, Trine Holm

    2012-01-01

    To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome.......To describe the natural history of phenotype, growth and gonadal function in patients with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome....

  18. Discovery of molecular mechanism of a clinical herbal formula upregulating serum HDL-c levels in treatment of metabolic syndrome by in vivo and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meimei; Yang, Fafu; Kang, Jie; Gan, Huijuan; Lai, Xinmei; Gao, Yuxing

    2018-01-15

    Decreased HDL cholesterol (HDL-c) is considered as an independent risk factor of cardiovascular disease in metabolic syndrome (Mets). Wendan decoction (WDD), a famous clinical traditional Chinese medicine formula in Mets in China, which can obviously up-regulate serum HDL-c levels in Mets. However, till now, the molecular mechanism of up-regulation still remained unclear. In this study, an integrated approach that combined serum ABCA1 in vivo assay, QSAR modeling and molecular docking was developed to explore the molecular mechanism and chemical substance basis of WDD upregulating HDL-c levels. Compared with Mets model group, serum ABCA1 and HDL-c levels intervened by two different doses of WDD for two weeks were significantly up-regulated. Then, kohonen and LDA were applied to develop QSAR models for ABCA1 up-regulators based flavonoids. The derived QSAR model produced the overall accuracy of 100%, a very powerful tool for screening ABCA1 up-regulators. The QSAR model prediction revealed 67 flavonoids in WDD were ABCA1 up-regulators. Finally, they were subjected to the molecular docking to understand their roles in up-regulating ABCA1 expression, which led to discovery of 23 ABCA1 up-regulators targeting LXR beta. Overall, QSAR modeling and docking studies well accounted for the observed in vivo activities of ABCA1 affected by WDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular typing of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1- and Enterotoxin A-producing methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus isolates from an outbreak in a neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Franziska; Sanchini, Andrea; Strommenger, Birgit; Cuny, Christiane; Breier, Ann-Christin; Proquitté, Hans; Bührer, Christoph; Schenkel, Karl; Bätzing-Feigenbaum, Jörg; Greutelaers, Benedikt; Nübel, Ulrich; Gastmeier, Petra; Eckmanns, Tim; Werner, Guido

    2015-10-01

    Outbreaks of Staphylococcus aureus are common in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Usually they are documented for methicillin-resistant strains, while reports involving methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) strains are rare. In this study we report the epidemiological and molecular investigation of an MSSA outbreak in a NICU among preterm neonates. Infection control measures and interventions were commissioned by the Local Public Health Authority and supported by the Robert Koch Institute. To support epidemiological investigations molecular typing was done by spa-typing and Multilocus sequence typing; the relatedness of collected isolates was further elucidated by DNA SmaI-macrorestriction, microarray analysis and bacterial whole genome sequencing. A total of 213 neonates, 123 healthcare workers and 205 neonate parents were analyzed in the period November 2011 to November 2012. The outbreak strain was characterized as a MSSA spa-type t021, able to produce toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 and Enterotoxin A. We identified seventeen neonates (of which two died from toxic shock syndrome), four healthcare workers and three parents putatively involved in the outbreak. Whole-genome sequencing permitted to exclude unrelated cases from the outbreak and to discuss the role of healthcare workers as a reservoir of S. aureus on the NICU. Genome comparisons also indicated the presence of the respective clone on the ward months before the first colonized/infected neonates were detected. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular epidemiology and functional assessment of novel allelic variants of SLC26A4 in non-syndromic hearing loss patients with enlarged vestibular aqueduct in China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongyi Yuan

    Full Text Available Mutations in SLC26A4, which encodes pendrin, are a common cause of deafness. SLC26A4 mutations are responsible for Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA. The mutation spectrum of SLC26A4 varies widely among ethnic groups. To investigate the incidence of EVA in Chinese population and to provide appropriate genetic testing and counseling to patients with SLC26A4 variants, we conducted a large-scale molecular epidemiological survey of SLC26A4.A total of 2352 unrelated non-syndromic hearing loss patients from 27 different regions of China were included. Hot spot regions of SLC26A4, exons 8, 10 and 19 were sequenced. For patients with one allelic variant in the hot spot regions, the other exons were sequenced one by one until two mutant alleles had been identified. Patients with SLC26A4 variants were then examined by temporal bone computed tomography scan for radiological diagnosis of EVA. Ten SLC26A4 variants were cloned for functional study. Confocal microscopy and radioisotope techniques were used to examine the membrane expression of pendrin and transporter function.Of the 86 types of variants found, 47 have never been reported. The ratio of EVA in the Chinese deaf population was at least 11%, and that in patients of Han ethnicity reached at least 13%. The mutational spectrum and mutation detection rate of SLC26A4 are distinct among both ethnicities and regions of Mainland China. Most of the variants caused retention of pendrin in the intracellular region. All the mutant pendrins showed significantly reduced transport capability.An overall description of the molecular epidemiological findings of SLC26A4 in China is provided. The functional assessment procedure can be applied to identification of pathogenicity of variants. These findings are valuable for genetic diagnosis, genetic counseling, prenatal testing and pre-implantation diagnosis in EVA families.

  1. Testing the evolutionary and biogeographical history of Glypthelmins (Digenea: Plagiorchiida), a parasite of anurans, through a simultaneous analysis of molecular and morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razo-Mendivil, Ulises; de León, Gerardo Pérez-Ponce

    2011-05-01

    The genus Glypthelmins includes some of the most common digeneans inhabiting the intestine of anurans in the Americas. Phylogenetic analyses of eight species of Glypthelmins and five outgroups, using 26 morphological characters and sequences of cox1, 18S, 5.8S, 28S genes and ITS2 were performed. Additionally, 2 species for which no molecular data have been obtained were included in the analyses. Following a simultaneous analysis approach and using different methods of phylogenetic inference we obtained a phylogenetic tree where the eight studied species conform a monophyletic clade which is well supported by Bremer support, bootstrap, and posterior probabilities. The mapping of morphological characters showed that traits such as serrate scale-like spines, bipartite seminal vesicle, metraterm running dorsal to the cirrus pouch, and ovary sinistral are unequivocal synapomorphies that support the monophyly of Glypthelmins. Phylogenetic hypothesis based on combined data sets was used to re-evaluate the evolutionary and biogeographical history of this group of digeneans. New information provided in this study, in the context of a more robust analytical method allowed us to corroborate that members of the "Rana pipiens" group were the plesiomorphic group of hosts for Glypthelmins, with two host switching events occurring from the "Rana pipiens" group to the "Rana palmipes" group and to Hylidae during the evolutionary history of this group of parasites, and the origin of the group is proposed in Nearctic frogs, with a colonization of Neotropical hosts represented by a monophyletic clade constituted by G. brownorumae, G. facioi, and G. tuxtlasensis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  3. Positive Family History, Infection, Low Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC), and Absent Thymic Shadow: Diagnostic Clues for All Molecular Forms of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency (SCID).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McWilliams, Laurie M; Dell Railey, Mary; Buckley, Rebecca H

    2015-01-01

    Severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) is a syndrome uniformly fatal during infancy unless recognized and treated successfully by bone marrow transplantation or gene therapy. Because infants with SCID have no abnormal physical appearance, diagnosis is usually delayed unless newborn screening is performed. In this study, we sought to evaluate the presenting features of all 172 patients with SCID transplanted at this institution over the past 31 years. We reviewed original charts from 172 consecutive patients with classic SCID who received either T-cell-depleted HLA-haploidentical (N = 154) or HLA-identical (N = 18) nonablative related marrow transplants at Duke University Medical Center from 1982 to 2013. The mean age at presentation was 4.87 months. When there was a family history of early infant death or known SCID (37%), the mean presentation age was much earlier, 2.0 months compared with 6.6 months. Failure to thrive was common, with 84 patients (50%) having a weight less than the 5th percentile. The leading infections included oral moniliasis (43%), viral infections (35.5%), and Pneumocystis jiroveci (26%) pneumonia. The group mean absolute lymphocyte count (ALC) was 1454/cmm; 88% of the infants had an ALC less than 3000/cmm. An absent thymic shadow was seen in 92% of infants with electronic radiographic data available. An absence of T-cell function was found in all patients. Infants with SCID appear normal at birth but later present with failure to thrive and/or recurrent fungal, viral, and bacterial infections. Low ALCs and an absent thymic shadow on chest x-ray are key diagnostic clues. The absence of T-cell function confirms the diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A molecular analysis of the yemenite deaf-blind hypopigmentation syndrome: SOX10 dysfunction causes different neurocristopathies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondurand, N.; Kuhlbrodt, K.; Pingault, V.; Enderich, J.; Sajus, M.; Tommerup, N.; Warburg, M.; Hennekam, R. C.; Read, A. P.; Wegner, M.; Goossens, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Yemenite deaf-blind hypopigmentation syndrome was first observed in a Yemenite sister and brother showing cutaneous hypopigmented and hyperpigmented spots and patches, microcornea, coloboma and severe hearing loss. A second case, observed in a girl with similar skin symptoms and hearing loss but

  5. Clinical and molecular findings in a Moroccan family with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adadi, N.; Lahrouchi, N.; Bouhouch, R.; Fellat, I.; Amri, R.; Alders, M.; Sefiani, A.; Bezzina, C.; Ratbi, I.

    2017-01-01

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 220400) is a rare autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder that affects 1/200,000 to 1/1,000,000 children. It is characterized by congenital profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, a long QT interval,

  6. Diagnostic criteria for congenital long QT syndrome in the era of molecular genetics: do we need a scoring system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Kääb, Stefan; van Langen, Irene M.; Tanck, Michael W. T.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Tan, Hanno L.

    2007-01-01

    AIMS: Previously published diagnostic systems, based on ECG analysis and clinical parameters (Schwartz criteria and Keating criteria), have been used to estimate the probability of inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS). Nowadays, a certain diagnosis can often be made by DNA testing. We aimed to

  7. Diagnostic criteria for congenital long QT syndrome in the era of molecular genetics: Do we need a scoring system?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hofman, Nynke; Wilde, Arthur A.M.; Kääb, Stefan; Van Langen, Irene M.; Tanck, Michael W.T.; Mannens, Marcel M.A.M.; Hinterseer, Martin; Beckmann, Britt-Maria; Tan, Hanno L.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: Previously published diagnostic systems, based on ECG analysis and clinical parameters (Schwartz criteria and Keating criteria), have been used to estimate the probability of inherited long QT syndrome (LQTS). Nowadays, a certain diagnosis can often be made by DNA testing. We aimed to

  8. Cellular and molecular deviations in bovine in vitro-produced embryos are related to the large offspring syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lazzari, G.; Wrenzycki, C.; Herrmann, D.; Duchi, R.; Kruip, T.; Niemann, H.; Galli, C.

    2002-01-01

    The large offspring syndrome (LOS) is observed in bovine and ovine offspring following transfer of in vitro-produced (IVP) or cloned embryos and is characterized by a multitude of pathologic changes, of which extended gestation length and increased birthweight are predominant features. In the

  9. Importance of molecular cell biology investigations in human medicine in the story of the Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Raška, Ivan

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 3, č. 3 (2010), s. 89-93 ISSN 1337-6853 Grant - others:GA MŠk(CZ) LC535 Program:LC Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : laminopathies * Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome * progerin Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  10. Molecular characterization of a heterothallic mating system in Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the fungus causing white-nose syndrome of bats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonathan M. Palmer; Alena Kubatova; Alena. Novakova; Andrew M. Minnis; Miroslav Kolarik; Daniel L. Lindner

    2014-01-01

    White-nose syndrome (WNS) of bats has devastated bat populations in eastern North America since its discovery in 2006. WNS, caused by the fungus Pseudogymnoascus destructans, has spread quickly in North America and has become one of the most severe wildlife epidemics of our time. While P. destructans is spreading rapidly in North...

  11. Histology and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography of the inner ear in a molecularly confirmed case of CHARGE syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glueckert, R.; Rask-Andersen, H.; Sergi, C.; Schmutzhard, J.; Mueller, B.; Beckmann, F.; Rittinger, O.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; Schrott-Fischer, A.; Janecke, A.R.

    2010-01-01

    CHARGE (Coloboma of the iris or retina, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital anomalies, ear anomalies) syndrome (OMIM #214800) affects about 1 in 10,000 children and is most often caused by chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein-7 (CHD7)

  12. Molecular epidemiology and evolutionary histories of human coronavirus OC43 and HKU1 among patients with upper respiratory tract infections in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khannaq, Maryam Nabiel; Ng, Kim Tien; Oong, Xiang Yong; Pang, Yong Kek; Takebe, Yutaka; Chook, Jack Bee; Hanafi, Nik Sherina; Kamarulzaman, Adeeba; Tee, Kok Keng

    2016-02-25

    Despite the worldwide circulation of human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) and HKU1 (HCoV-HKU1), data on their molecular epidemiology and evolutionary dynamics in the tropical Southeast Asia region is lacking. The study aimed to investigate the genetic diversity, temporal distribution, population history and clinical symptoms of betacoronavirus infections in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia between 2012 and 2013. A total of 2,060 adults presented with acute respiratory symptoms were screened for the presence of betacoronaviruses using multiplex PCR. The spike glycoprotein, nucleocapsid and 1a genes were sequenced for phylogenetic reconstruction and Bayesian coalescent inference. A total of 48/2060 (2.4 %) specimens were tested positive for HCoV-OC43 (1.3 %) and HCoV-HKU1 (1.1 %). Both HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-HKU1 were co-circulating throughout the year, with the lowest detection rates reported in the October-January period. Phylogenetic analysis of the spike gene showed that the majority of HCoV-OC43 isolates were grouped into two previously undefined genotypes, provisionally assigned as novel lineage 1 and novel lineage 2. Sign of natural recombination was observed in these potentially novel lineages. Location mapping showed that the novel lineage 1 is currently circulating in Malaysia, Thailand, Japan and China, while novel lineage 2 can be found in Malaysia and China. Molecular dating showed the origin of HCoV-OC43 around late 1950s, before it diverged into genotypes A (1960s), B (1990s), and other genotypes (2000s). Phylogenetic analysis revealed that 27.3 % of the HCoV-HKU1 strains belong to genotype A while 72.7 % belongs to genotype B. The tree root of HCoV-HKU1 was similar to that of HCoV-OC43, with the tMRCA of genotypes A and B estimated around the 1990s and 2000s, respectively. Correlation of HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-HKU1 with the severity of respiratory symptoms was not observed. The present study reported the molecular complexity and evolutionary dynamics of human

  13. A multi-method approach to the molecular diagnosis of overt and borderline 11p15.5 defects underlying Silver-Russell and Beckwith-Wiedemann syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Silvia; Calzari, Luciano; Mussa, Alessandro; Mainini, Ester; Cassina, Matteo; Di Candia, Stefania; Clementi, Maurizio; Guzzetti, Sara; Tabano, Silvia; Miozzo, Monica; Sirchia, Silvia; Finelli, Palma; Prontera, Paolo; Maitz, Silvia; Sorge, Giovanni; Calcagno, Annalisa; Maghnie, Mohamad; Divizia, Maria Teresa; Melis, Daniela; Manfredini, Emanuela; Ferrero, Giovanni Battista; Pecile, Vanna; Larizza, Lidia

    2016-01-01

    Multiple (epi)genetic defects affecting the expression of the imprinted genes within the 11p15.5 chromosomal region underlie Silver-Russell (SRS) and Beckwith-Wiedemann (BWS) syndromes. The molecular diagnosis of these opposite growth disorders requires a multi-approach flowchart to disclose known primary and secondary (epi)genetic alterations; however, up to 20 and 30 % of clinically diagnosed BWS and SRS cases remain without molecular diagnosis. The complex structure of the 11p15 region with variable CpG methylation and low-rate mosaicism may account for missed diagnoses. Here, we demonstrate the relevance of complementary techniques for the assessment of different CpGs and the importance of testing multiple tissues to increase the SRS and BWS detection rate. Molecular testing of 147 and 450 clinically diagnosed SRS and BWS cases provided diagnosis in 34 SRS and 185 BWS patients, with 9 SRS and 21 BWS cases remaining undiagnosed and herein referred to as "borderline." A flowchart including complementary techniques and, when applicable, the analysis of buccal swabs, allowed confirmation of the molecular diagnosis in all borderline cases. Comparison of methylation levels by methylation-specific multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MS-MLPA) in borderline and control cases defined an interval of H19/IGF2:IG-DMR loss of methylation that was distinct between "easy to diagnose" and "borderline" cases, which were characterized by values ≤mean -3 standard deviations (SDs) compared to controls. Values ≥mean +1 SD at H19/IGF2: IG-DMR were assigned to borderline hypermethylated BWS cases and those ≤mean -2 SD at KCNQ1OT1: TSS-DMR to hypomethylated BWS cases; these were supported by quantitative pyrosequencing or Southern blot analysis. Six BWS cases suspected to carry mosaic paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 11 were confirmed by SNP array, which detected mosaicism till 10 %. Regarding the clinical presentation, borderline SRS were representative

  14. Sustained High Levels of Both Total and High Molecular Weight Adiponectin in Plasma during the Convalescent Phase of Haemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Are Associated with Disease Severity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Tang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Haemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS is characterised by an uncontrolled immune response that causes vascular leakage. Adiponectin (APN is an adipocytokine involved in prorevascularisation and immunomodulation. To investigate the possible effects of APN in the pathogenesis of HFRS, total and high molecular weight (HMW APN levels in the plasma of patients with HFRS were quantified using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA. Compared with those in healthy controls, the plasma total and HMW APN levels in patients were elevated to different degrees from the fever onset and remained high at the convalescent phase. Consistent with these results, western blot analysis additionally showed that low molecular weight (LMW, middle molecular weight (MMW, and HMW APN levels were all elevated and contributed to the elevation of the total APN level. Importantly, sustained high levels of total and HMW APN at the convalescent phase were significantly higher in patients with critical disease than those in patients with mild or moderate disease. Moreover, total and HMW APN levels negatively correlated with white blood cell count and positively correlated with platelet count and serum albumin level. These results may provide insights into understanding the roles of total and HMW APN in the pathogenesis of HFRS.

  15. C5b-9-targeted molecular MR imaging in rats with Heymann nephritis: a new approach in the evaluation of nephrotic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiang Huang

    Full Text Available Membranous nephropathy (MN is the major cause of adult nephrotic syndrome, which severely affects patients' quality of life. Currently, percutaneous renal biopsy is required to definitively diagnose MN. However, this technique is invasive and may cause severe complications. Therefore, an urgent clinical need exists for dynamic noninvasive monitoring of the renal state. In-depth molecular imaging studies could assist in finding a solution. Membrane attack complex C5b-9 is the key factor in the development of MN, and this protein primarily deposits in the glomerulus. The present study bound polyclonal antibodies to C5b-9 with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO nanoparticles to obtain C5b-9-targeted magnetic resonance molecular imaging probes. The probes were injected intravenously into rats with Heymann nephritis, a classic disease model of MN. The signal intensity in the T2*-weighted imaging of kidneys in vivo using 7.0 Tesla magnetic resonance imaging decreased significantly 24 hours after injection compared to the untargeted and control groups. This signal change was consistent with the finding of nanoparticle deposits in pathological glomeruli. This study demonstrated a novel molecular imaging technique for the assessment of MN.

  16. História natural da síndrome de Kleine-Levin: revisão e discussão Natural history of the Kleine-Levin syndrome: review and discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dênio Lima

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Neste artigo, os autores fazem um levantamento da história natural da síndrome de Kleine-Levin mediante a revisão e discussão críticas da literatura científica publicada até a data sobre o assunto. Prestam uma atenção especial aos correlatos psiquiátricos desta síndrome neuropsiquiátrica, focando os dilemas de diagnóstico deles decorrentes. Discutem as dificuldades e equacionam o perfil que os conhecimentos do estado da arte permitem delinear para a história natural da síndrome Kleine-Levin.In this article, we provide a picture of the so-called natural history of the Kline-Levin syndrome by means of a critical review and discussion of the scientific literature published so far about this topic. We focused special attention on the psychiatric correlates of this neuropsychiatric syndrome, addressing the diagnostic dilemmas raised from them. We also discuss the difficulties and show the profile that the knowledge about the state of the art in this area allows us to outline for the natural history of this syndrome.

  17. Clinical and Molecular Genetic Analysis in Three Children with Wolfram Syndrome: A Novel WFS1 Mutation (c.2534T>A).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelmeli, Gamze; Türkkahraman, Doğa; Çürek, Yusuf; Houghton, Jayne; Akçurin, Sema; Bircan, İffet

    2017-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in WFS1 gene. The clinical features include diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus (DM), optic atrophy, deafness, and other variable clinical manifestations. In this paper, we present the clinical and genetic characteristics of 3 WS patients from 3 unrelated Turkish families. Clinical characteristics of the patients and the age of onset of symptoms were quite different in each pedigree. The first two cases developed all symptoms of the disease in their first decade of life. The heterozygous father of case 2 was symptomatic with bilateral deafness. The first ocular finding of one patient (patient 3) was bilateral cataract which was accompanying DM as a first feature of the syndrome. In this patient's family, there were two members with features suggestive of WS. Previously known homozygous mutations, c.460+1G>A in intron 4 and c.1885C>T in exon 8, were identified in these cases. A novel homozygous c.2534T>A mutation was also detected in the exon 8 of WFS1 gene. Because of the rarity and heterogeneity of WS, detection of specific and nonspecific clinical signs including ocular findings and family history in non-autoimmune, insulinopenic diabetes cases should lead to a tentative diagnosis of WS. Genetic testing is required to confirm the diagnosis.

  18. New insights into the molecular pathophysiology of fragile X syndrome and therapeutic perspectives from the animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busquets-Garcia, Arnau; Maldonado, Rafael; Ozaita, Andrés

    2014-08-01

    Fragile X syndrome is the most common monogenetic form of intellectual disability and is a leading cause of autism. This syndrome is produced by the reduced transcription of the fragile X mental retardation (FMR1) gene, and it is characterized by a range of symptoms heterogeneously expressed in patients such as cognitive impairment, seizure susceptibility, altered pain sensitivity and anxiety. The recent advances in the understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved have opened novel potential therapeutic approaches identified in preclinical rodent models as a necessary preliminary step for the subsequent evaluation in patients. Among those possible therapeutic approaches, the modulation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor signaling or the GABA receptor signaling have focused most of the attention. New findings in the animal models open other possible therapeutic approaches such as the mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway or the endocannabinoid system. This review summarizes the emerging data recently obtained in preclinical models of fragile X syndrome supporting these new therapeutic perspectives. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical and molecular findings in a Moroccan family with Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adadi, N; Lahrouchi, N; Bouhouch, R; Fellat, I; Amri, R; Alders, M; Sefiani, A; Bezzina, C; Ratbi, I

    2017-04-02

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man 220400) is a rare autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder that affects 1/200,000 to 1/1,000,000 children. It is characterized by congenital profound bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, a long QT interval, ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and episodes of torsade de pointes on an electrocardiogram. Cardiac symptoms arise mostly in early childhood and consist of syncopal episodes during periods of stress, exercise, or fright and are associated with a high risk of sudden cardiac death. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome is caused by homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in KCNQ1 on 11p15.5 or KCNE1 on 1q22.1-q22.2. We report the case of a 10-year-old Moroccan boy with congenital hearing loss and severely prolonged QT interval who presented with multiple episodes of syncope. His parents are first-degree cousins. We performed Sanger sequencing and identified a homozygous variant in KCNQ1 (c.1343dupC, p.Glu449Argfs*14). The identification of the genetic substrate in this patient confirmed the clinical diagnosis of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome and allowed us to provide him with appropriate management and genetic counseling to his family. In addition, this finding contributes to our understanding of genetic disease in the Moroccan population.

  20. Skeletal stigmata as keys to access to the composite and ancient Gorlin-Goltz syndrome history: The Egypt, Pompeii and Herculaneum lessons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, Giovanni; Pellacani, Giovanni; Tomasi, Aldo; Sammaria, Giuliano; Manfredini, Marco

    2016-09-10

    There are several genetic diseases with a wide spectrum of congenital bone stigmata in association to cutaneous and visceral benign and malignant neoplasms. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also named nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, is an autosomal dominant systemic disease with almost complete penetrance and high intra-familial phenotypic variability, caused by germline mutations of the gene PTCH1. The syndrome is characterized by unusual skeletal changes and high predisposition to the development of multiple basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts tumors and other visceral tumors. The Gorlin syndrome, clinically defined as distinct syndrome in 1963, existed during Dynastic Egyptian times, as revealed by a costellation of skeletal findings compatible with the syndrome in mummies dating back to 3000years ago and, most likely, in the ancient population of Pompeii. These paleogenetic and historical evidences, together with the clinical and biomolecular modern evidences, confirm the quite benign behavior of the syndrome and the critical value of the multiple and synchronous skeletal anomalies in the recognition of these rare and complex genetic disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of fragile X syndrome and other fragile X-associated disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Valérie; Glaeser, Dieter; McQuaid, Shirley; Steinbach, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Different mutations occurring in the unstable CGG repeat in 5' untranslated region of FMR1 gene are responsible for three fragile X-associated disorders. An expansion of over ∼200 CGG repeats when associated with abnormal methylation and inactivation of the promoter is the mutation termed 'full mutation' and is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a neurodevelopmental disorder described as the most common cause of inherited intellectual impairment. The term 'abnormal methylation' is used here to distinguish the DNA methylation induced by the expanded repeat from the 'normal methylation' occurring on the inactive X chromosomes in females with normal, premutation, and full mutation alleles. All male and roughly half of the female full mutation carriers have FXS. Another anomaly termed 'premutation' is characterized by the presence of 55 to ∼200 CGGs without abnormal methylation, and is the cause of two other diseases with incomplete penetrance. One is fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI), which is characterized by a large spectrum of ovarian dysfunction phenotypes and possible early menopause as the end stage. The other is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting males and females. Because of the particular pattern and transmission of the CGG repeat, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal genetic counselling in the three fragile X-associated disorders. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for genetic analysis and reporting in FXS, FXPOI, and FXTAS, including carrier and prenatal testing.

  2. Sanger sequencing as a first-line approach for molecular diagnosis of Andersen-Tawil syndrome [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armando Totomoch-Serra

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1977, Frederick Sanger developed a new method for DNA sequencing based on the chain termination method, now known as the Sanger sequencing method (SSM.  Recently, massive parallel sequencing, better known as next-generation sequencing (NGS,  is replacing the SSM for detecting mutations in cardiovascular diseases with a genetic background. The present opinion article wants to remark that “targeted” SSM is still effective as a first-line approach for the molecular diagnosis of some specific conditions, as is the case for Andersen-Tawil syndrome (ATS. ATS is described as a rare multisystemic autosomal dominant channelopathy syndrome caused mainly by a heterozygous mutation in the KCNJ2 gene. KCJN2 has particular characteristics that make it attractive for “directed” SSM. KCNJ2 has a sequence of 17,510 base pairs (bp, and a short coding region with two exons (exon 1=166 bp and exon 2=5220 bp, half of the mutations are located in the C-terminal cytosolic domain, a mutational hotspot has been described in residue Arg218, and this gene explains the phenotype in 60% of ATS cases that fulfill all the clinical criteria of the disease. In order to increase the diagnosis of ATS we urge cardiologists to search for facial and muscular abnormalities in subjects with frequent ventricular arrhythmias (especially bigeminy and prominent U waves on the electrocardiogram.

  3. Molecular investigation by whole exome sequencing revealed a high proportion of pathogenic variants among Thai victims of sudden unexpected death syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoom Suktitipat

    Full Text Available Sudden unexpected death syndrome (SUDS is an important cause of death in young healthy adults with a high incident rate in Southeast Asia; however, there are no molecular autopsy reports about these victims. We performed a combination of both a detailed autopsy and a molecular autopsy by whole exome sequencing (WES to investigate the cause of SUDS in Thai sudden death victims.A detailed forensic autopsy was performed to identify the cause of death, followed by a molecular autopsy, in 42 sudden death victims who died between January 2015 and August 2015. The coding sequences of 98 SUDS-related genes were sequenced using WES. Potentially causative variants were filtered based on the variant functions annotated in the dbNSFP database. Variants with inconclusive clinical significance evidence in ClinVar were resolved with a variant prediction algorithm, metaSVM, and the frequency data of the variants found in public databases, such as the 1000 Genome Project, ESP6500 project, and the Exome Aggregation Consortium (ExAc project.Combining both autopsy and molecular autopsy enabled the potential identification of cause of death in 81% of the cases. Among the 25 victims with WES data, 72% (18/25 were found to have potentially causative SUDS mutations. The majority of the victims had at a mutation in the TTN gene (8/18 = 44%, and only one victim had an SCN5A mutation.WES can help to identify the genetic causes in victims of SUDS and may help to further guide investigations into their relatives to prevent additional SUDS victims.

  4. Investigation of 305 patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and 20q deletion for associated cytogenetic and molecular genetic lesions and their prognostic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacher, Ulrike; Haferlach, Torsten; Schnittger, Susanne; Zenger, Melanie; Meggendorfer, Manja; Jeromin, Sabine; Roller, Andreas; Grossmann, Vera; Krauth, Maria-Theresa; Alpermann, Tamara; Kern, Wolfgang; Haferlach, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    In patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), sole 20q deletion [del(20q)] is a recurrent favourable abnormality. We studied additional molecular and cytogenetic lesions and their prognostic impact in 305 MDS patients with del(20q) (229 males/76 females; 29-90 years). All patients were investigated by cytomorphology and chromosome banding analysis (CBA), subsets by fluorescence in situ hybridization, molecular mutation screening, and array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). By aCGH (n = 30), the minimal common deleted region (CDR) was flanked by PTPRT (20q13·11) and EYA2 (20q13·12). 210 (68·9%) patients had 'early MDS' without blast increase, 95 (31·1%) 'advanced' MDS with blast increase (5-19%). Additional chromosomal abnormalities (ACAs) were detected in 88/305 (28·9%) patients. Patients with advanced MDS more frequently had ACAs (P = 0·003) and had a higher mean number of ACAs (P = 0·020) and of molecular mutations (P = 0·060). Spliceosome mutations were frequent (U2AF1: n = 31/155; 20·0%; SRSF2: n = 31/159; 19·5%; SF3B1mut: n = 8/159; 5·0%). ASXL1mut (25/153; 16·3%) were associated with advanced MDS (P = 0·001). Presence of ≥3 ACAs (P = 0·003) and ASXL1mut (P = 0·002) were associated with worse 2-year survival. In conclusion, the cytogenetic subgroup of MDS with del(20q) has a good prognosis but may be further subclassified by additional cytogenetic and molecular lesions. U2AF1mut is overrepresented in MDS with del(20q), and ASXL1mut is prognostically adverse. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Molecular and morphological phylogeny of hooded shrimps, genera Betaeus and Betaeopsis (Decapoda, Alpheidae): testing the center of origin biogeographic model and evolution of life history traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anker, Arthur; Baeza, J Antonio

    2012-09-01

    The phylogenetic relationships of the alpheid shrimp genera Betaeus (Dana, 1852) (15 species) and Betaeopsis (Yaldwyn, 1971) (three species), collectively known as hooded shrimps, are analyzed with morphological, molecular (16S and H3) and combined "total evidence" (morphology+DNA) datasets. The tree topology resulting from morphological and combined analyses places Betaeus jucundus as sister to all the remaining species of Betaeus and Betaeopsis, rendering Betaeus paraphyletic. On the other hand, Betaeopsis is recovered as monophyletic. Betaeus australis is positioned as sister to the remaining species of Betaeus s. str. (excluding B. jucundus), which is composed of three well-supported and resolved clades. Mapping of biogeographic traits on the combined tree suggests at least two possible historic scenarios. In the first scenario, the North-East Pacific harboring the highest diversity of hooded shrimps (seven species of Betaeus), acted as the "center of origin", where species appeared, matured and eventually migrated toward peripheral regions. In the second scenario, Betaeus+Betaeopsis originated in the southern Indo-West Pacific and subsequently colonized the North-East Pacific, where a major radiation involving dispersal/vicariance events took place. The mapping of life history traits (symbiosis vs. free living and gregariousness vs. single/pair living) in the combined tree suggests (1) that different types of symbioses with dissimilar host organisms (sea urchins, abalones, other decapods, spoon worms) evolved independently more than once in the group (in B. jucundus and in various lineages of Betaeus s. str.), and (2) that gregariousness was ancestral in the Betaeus s. str. -Betaeopsis clade and later shifted toward single/pair living in several lineages. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Evolution of life history traits in Asian freshwater prawns of the genus Macrobrachium (Crustacea: Decapoda: Palaemonidae) based on multilocus molecular phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wowor, Daisy; Muthu, Victor; Meier, Rudolf; Balke, Michael; Cai, Yixiong; Ng, Peter K L

    2009-08-01

    Freshwater prawns of the genus Macrobrachium are free-living decapod crustaceans that are commonly encountered in tropical streams and lakes. We present a molecular phylogenetic analysis of the diverse Southeast and East Asian fauna based on >3 kb sequence data from three nuclear and two mitochondrial markers for almost 50% of the described fauna. We reconstruct the phylogenetic relationships and track the evolution of key life history traits. Our tree suggests that the last common ancestor of the Asian Macrobrachium laid numerous small eggs and had prolonged larval development ("PLD") in saline coastal waters after which the adults matured in freshwater habitats. We also argue for five independent losses of the marine larval phase to yield five clades of species that develop entirely in freshwater and have fewer and larger eggs than the species with PLD. These species have either semi-abbreviated (two origins) with at least one free-swimming stage or abbreviated larval development ("ALD": three origins) which lack free-swimming larvae. A Shimodaira-Hasegawa test rejects all trees that would imply a single loss of the marine larval phase, but alternative and equally parsimonious optimizations exist that imply a smaller number of losses. However, these scenarios would require the re-acquisition of free-swimming larvae. A concentrated-change test supports Pereira and Garcia's [Pereira, G.A., Garcia, J.V., 1995. Larval development of Macrobrachium reyesi Pereira (Decapoda, Palaemonidae), with a discussion on the origin of abbreviated development in palaemonids. J. Crust. Biol. 15, 117-133] hypothesis of a significant correlation between living in freshwater and the origin of semi-abbreviated and abbreviated larval development. Our phylogenetic tree also reveals that Asian Macrobrachium have independently become cavernicolous at least twice, and invaded the highly acidic waters of freshwater and peat swamps two or three times.

  7. Histology and synchrotron radiation-based microtomography of the inner ear in a molecularly confirmed case of CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glueckert, Rudolf; Rask-Andersen, Helge; Sergi, Consolato; Schmutzhard, Joachim; Mueller, Bert; Beckmann, Felix; Rittinger, Olaf; Hoefsloot, Lies H; Schrott-Fischer, Anneliese; Janecke, Andreas R

    2010-03-01

    CHARGE (Coloboma of the iris or retina, heart defects, atresia of the choanae, retardation of growth and/or development, genital anomalies, ear anomalies) syndrome (OMIM #214800) affects about 1 in 10,000 children and is most often caused by chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein-7 (CHD7) mutations. Inner ear defects and vestibular abnormalities are particularly common. Specifically, semicircular canal (SCC) hypoplasia/aplasia and the presence of a Mondini malformation can be considered pathognomonic in the context of congenital malformations of the CHARGE syndrome. We obtained a temporal bone (TB) of a patient with CHARGE syndrome who died from bacteremia at 3 months of age. The clinical diagnosis was confirmed in the patient by direct DNA sequencing and the detection of a de novo, truncating CHD7 mutation, c.6169dup (p.R2057fs). We assessed changes of the TB and the degree of neural preservation, which may influence the potential benefit of cochlear implantation. The TB was analyzed using synchrotron radiation-based micro computed tomography, and by light microscopy. The vestibular partition consisted of a rudimentary vestibule with agenesis of the SCCs. The cochlea was hypoplastic with poor or deficient interscaling and shortened (Mondini dysplasia). The organ of Corti had near normal structure and innervation. Modiolus and Rosenthal's canal were hypoplastic with perikarya displaced along the axon bundles into the internal acoustic meatus, which may be explained by the arrest or limited migration and translocation of the cell nuclei into the cochlear tube during development. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Molecular characterization of two proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndrome patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christian, S.L.; Huang, B.; Ledbetter, D.H. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1995-07-01

    Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) and Angelman syndrome (AS) are distinct mental retardation syndromes caused by paternal and maternal deficiencies, respectively, in chromosome 15q11{minus}q13. Approximately 70% of these patients have a large deletion of {approximately}4 Mb extending from D15S9 (ML34) through D15S12 (IR10A). To further characterize the deletion breakpoints proximal to D15S9, three new polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed that showed observed heterozygosities of 60%-87%. D15S541 and D15S542 were isolated for YAC A124A3 containing the D15S18 (IR39) locus. D15S543 was isolated from a cosmid cloned from the proximal right end of YAC 254B5 containing the D15S9 (ML34) locus. Gene-centromere mapping of these markers, using a panel of ovarian teratomas of known meiotic origin, extended the genetic map of chromosome 15 by 2-3 cM toward the centromere. Analysis of the more proximal S541/S542 markers on 53 Prader-Willi and 33 Angelman deletion patients indicated two classes of patients: 44% (35/80) of the informative patients were deleted for these markers (class I), while 56% (45/80) were not deleted (class II), with no difference between PWS and AS. In contrast, D15S543 was deleted in all informative patients (13/48) or showed the presence of a single allele (in 35/48 patients), suggesting that this marker is deleted in the majority of PWS and AS cases. These results confirm the presence of two common proximal deletion breakpoint regions in both Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes and are consistent with the same deletion mechanism being responsible for paternal and maternal deletions. One breakpoint region lies between D15S541/S542 and D15S543, with an additional breakpoint region being proximal to D15S541/S542. 46 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  9. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  10. Molecular Characterization of a Heterothallic Mating System in Pseudogymnoascus destructans, the Fungus Causing White-Nose Syndrome of Bats

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Palmer, J.M.; Kubátová, Alena; Nováková, Alena; Minnis, A.M.; Kolařík, Miroslav; Lindner, D.L.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 9 (2014), s. 1755-1763 ISSN 2160-1836 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP506/12/1064 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : geomyces * sexual reproduction * mating type Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.198, year: 2014

  11. Molecular characterization of WFS1 in an Iranian family with Wolfram syndrome reveals a novel frameshift mutation associated with early symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Maryam; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Rajab, Asadollah; Kajbafzadeh, Abdol-Mohammad; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2013-10-10

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder that represents a likely source of childhood diabetes especially among countries in the consanguinity belt. The main responsible gene is WFS1 for which over one hundred mutations have been reported from different ethnic groups. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular etiology of WS and to perform a possible genotype-phenotype correlation in Iranian kindred. An Iranian family with two patients was clinically studied and WS was suspected. Genetic linkage analysis via 5 STR markers was carried out. For identification of mutations, DNA sequencing of WFS1 including all the exons, exon-intron boundaries and the promoter was performed. Linkage analysis indicated linkage to the WFS1 region. After DNA sequencing of WFS1, one novel pathogenic mutation, which causes frameshift alteration c.2177_2178insTCTTC (or c.2173_2177dupTCTTC) in exon eight, was found. The genotype-phenotype correlation analysis suggests that the presence of the homozygous mutation may be associated with early onset of disease symptoms. This study stresses the necessity of considering the molecular analysis of WFS1 in childhood diabetes with some symptoms of WS. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Diagnosis of Familial Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome due to a Paternal Cryptic Chromosomal Rearrangement by Conventional and Molecular Cytogenetic Techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Venegas-Vega

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of conventional cytogenetic techniques in combination with fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH and single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarrays is necessary for the identification of cryptic rearrangements in the diagnosis of chromosomal syndromes. We report two siblings, a boy of 9 years and 9 months of age and his 7-years- and 5-month-old sister, with the classic Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS phenotype. Using high-resolution GTG- and NOR-banding karyotypes, as well as FISH analysis, we characterized a pure 4p deletion in both sibs and a balanced rearrangement in their father, consisting in an insertion of 4p material within a nucleolar organizing region of chromosome 15. Copy number variant (CNV analysis using SNP arrays showed that both siblings have a similar size of 4p deletion (~6.5 Mb. Our results strongly support the need for conventional cytogenetic and FISH analysis, as well as high-density microarray mapping for the optimal characterization of the genetic imbalance in patients with WHS; parents must always be studied for recognizing cryptic balanced chromosomal rearrangements for an adequate genetic counseling.

  13. Vaccination and Infection as Causative Factors in Japanese Patients With Rasmussen Syndrome: Molecular Mimicry and HLA Class I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukitoshi Takahashi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Rasmussen syndrome is an intractable epilepsy with a putative causal relation with cellular and humoral autoimmunity. Almost half of the patients have some preceding causative factors, with infections found in 38.2%, vaccinations in 5.9% and head trauma in 8.9% of Japanese patients. In a patient with seizure onset after influenza A infections, cross-reaction of the patient's lymphocytes with GluRε2 and influenza vaccine components was demonstrated by lymphocyte stimulation test. Database analyses revealed that influenza A virus hemagglutinin and GluRε2 molecules contain peptides with the patient's HLA class I binding motif (HLA ࢤ A*0201. The relative risks of HLA class I genotypes for Rasmussen syndrome are 6.1 (A*2402, 6.4 (A*0201, 6.3 (A*2601 and 11.4 (B*4601. The relative risks of HLA class I-A and B haplotypes are infinity (A*2601+B*5401, 21.1 (A*2402+B*1501, 13.3 (A*2402+B*4801 and 5.1 (A*2402+B*5201. Some alleles and haplotypes of HLA class I may be the risk factors in Japanese patients. Cross-reactivity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes may contribute to the processes leading from infection to the involvement of CNS.

  14. Molecular Characterization of Three Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus Isolates and Their Susceptibility to Antiviral Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongxia Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV is one of the most common swine pathogens that cause severe economic losses to the pig industry worldwide irrespective of the use of live or inactivated vaccines. This study aims to investigate the biological characteristics of three PRRSV isolates and their susceptibility to two antiviral drugs. Sequence analysis of the NSP2 gene classified two isolates as highly pathogenic (isolates FY and ZS and one as classically pathogenic (isolate JX. Isolate FY grew faster than the other two isolates in MARC-145 cells; however, its RNA replication was lower than isolate ZS. By contrast, isolate JX exhibited slower growth and lower RNA replication capability. PRRSV infection suppressed the production of interferon β induced by poly (I:C. The viruses also differed in their susceptibility to antiviral drugs. Ribavirin exerted potent antiviral activity against all three viral isolates at concentrations of 7.5 and 15 μg/mL in MARC-145 cells. Acyclovir was found effective only on the classically pathogenic isolate. We suggest that ribavirin could have potential as an antiviral therapy for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome when vaccination is not able to provide effective protection.

  15. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  16. [The Othello syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alarcon, R

    1980-12-01

    A case is described and 7 others are discussed of the Othello Syndrome, characterized by cognitive, affective and conative manifestations plus non-specific psychosomatic accesory symptoms. The nuclear symptom is the delusional or delusion-like idea of jealousy. The syndrome is seen in both sexes, as part of a number of clinical entities (paranoia, psychoses, organic brain syndromes, neuroses and personality disorders). Premorbid personality and family history are always abnormal. Cases of cocaine abuse, involutional melancholia and borderline syndrome are remarkers. The management of this syndrome and of its social sequelae is emphasized.

  17. Molecular Characterization of Down Syndrome Embryonic Stem Cells Reveals a Role for RUNX1 in Neural Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Down syndrome (DS is the leading genetic cause of mental retardation and is caused by a third copy of human chromosome 21. The different pathologies of DS involve many tissues with a distinct array of neural phenotypes. Here we characterize embryonic stem cell lines with DS (DS-ESCs, and focus on the neural aspects of the disease. Our results show that neural progenitor cells (NPCs differentiated from five independent DS-ESC lines display increased apoptosis and downregulation of forehead developmental genes. Analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested RUNX1 as a key transcription regulator in DS-NPCs. Using genome editing we were able to disrupt all three copies of RUNX1 in DS-ESCs, leading to downregulation of several RUNX1 target developmental genes accompanied by reduced apoptosis and neuron migration. Our work sheds light on the role of RUNX1 and the importance of dosage balance in the development of neural phenotypes in DS.

  18. Molecular and functional characterization of Kv 7 channels in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum of healthy and metabolic syndrome rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepps, T A; Olesen, S P; Greenwood, I A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: KCNQ-encoded voltage-dependent potassium channels (Kv 7) are involved in the regulation of vascular tone. In this study we evaluated the influence of Kv 7 channel activation on smooth muscle relaxation in rat penile arteries and corpus cavernosum from normal...... and spontaneously hypertensive, heart failure-prone (SHHF) rats - a rat model of human metabolic syndrome. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH: Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry were used to determine the expression of KCNQ isoforms in penile tissue. Isometric tension was measured in intracavernous arterial rings...... and corpus cavernosum strips isolated from normal and SHHF rats. KEY RESULTS: Transcripts for KCNQ3, KCNQ4 and KCNQ5 were detected in penile arteries and corpus cavernosum. KCNQ1 was only found in corpus cavernosum. Immunofluorescence signals to Kv 7.4 and Kv 7.5 were found in penile arteries, penile veins...

  19. EMQN best practice guidelines for the molecular genetic testing and reporting of fragile X syndrome and other fragile X-associated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biancalana, Valérie; Glaeser, Dieter; McQuaid, Shirley; Steinbach, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Different mutations occurring in the unstable CGG repeat in 5' untranslated region of FMR1 gene are responsible for three fragile X-associated disorders. An expansion of over ∼200 CGG repeats when associated with abnormal methylation and inactivation of the promoter is the mutation termed ‘full mutation' and is responsible for fragile X syndrome (FXS), a neurodevelopmental disorder described as the most common cause of inherited intellectual impairment. The term ‘abnormal methylation' is used here to distinguish the DNA methylation induced by the expanded repeat from the ‘normal methylation' occurring on the inactive X chromosomes in females with normal, premutation, and full mutation alleles. All male and roughly half of the female full mutation carriers have FXS. Another anomaly termed ‘premutation' is characterized by the presence of 55 to ∼200 CGGs without abnormal methylation, and is the cause of two other diseases with incomplete penetrance. One is fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency (FXPOI), which is characterized by a large spectrum of ovarian dysfunction phenotypes and possible early menopause as the end stage. The other is fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome (FXTAS), which is a late onset neurodegenerative disorder affecting males and females. Because of the particular pattern and transmission of the CGG repeat, appropriate molecular testing and reporting is very important for the optimal genetic counselling in the three fragile X-associated disorders. Here, we describe best practice guidelines for genetic analysis and reporting in FXS, FXPOI, and FXTAS, including carrier and prenatal testing. PMID:25227148

  20. An innovative strategy for the molecular diagnosis of Usher syndrome identifies causal biallelic mutations in 93% of European patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bonnet, Crystel; Riahi, Zied; Chantot-Bastaraud, Sandra

    2016-01-01

    of vestibular dysfunction, and the age of onset of the retinitis pigmentosa. A total of 10 causal genes, 6 for USH1, 3 for USH2, and 1 for USH3, and an USH2 modifier gene, have been identified. A robust molecular diagnosis is required not only to improve genetic counseling, but also to advance gene therapy.......5% mutation characterization rate, the diagnosis efficiency was substantially improved compared with previously reported methods.European Journal of Human Genetics advance online publication, 27 July 2016; doi:10.1038/ejhg.2016.99....

  1. Clinical features and molecular genetic analysis of a boy with Prader-Willi syndrome caused by an imprinting defect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, A; Hansen, Claus; Baekgaard, P

    1997-01-01

    no recurrence has been reported. In rare cases, PWS is associated with lack of gene expression from the paternal allele due to an imprinting defect. We report the clinical features and the molecular genetic analysis of the first Danish child with PWS due to a defect of the putative imprinting centre (IC). When...... the imprinting mutation is inherited from a carrier father, the risk that future children will be affected is theoretically 50%. It is therefore important that these families are referred to a geneticist for counselling and further investigation. Prenatal diagnosis is currently only feasible when the mutation...

  2. Impairment of different protein domains causes variable clinical presentation within Pitt-Hopkins syndrome and suggests intragenic molecular syndromology of TCF4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedeschi, Maria Francesca; Marangi, Giuseppe; Calvello, Maria Rosaria; Ricciardi, Stefania; Leone, Francesca Pia Chiara; Baccarin, Marco; Guerneri, Silvana; Orteschi, Daniela; Murdolo, Marina; Lattante, Serena; Frangella, Silvia; Keena, Beth; Harr, Margaret H; Zackai, Elaine; Zollino, Marcella

    2017-11-01

    Pitt-Hopkins syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by severe intellectual disability and a distinctive facial gestalt. It is caused by haploinsufficiency of the TCF4 gene. The TCF4 protein has different functional domains, with the NLS (nuclear localization signal) domain coded by exons 7-8 and the bHLH (basic Helix-Loop-Helix) domain coded by exon 18. Several alternatively spliced TCF4 variants have been described, allowing for translation of variable protein isoforms. Typical PTHS patients have impairment of at least the bHLH domain. To which extent impairment of the remaining domains contributes to the final phenotype is not clear. There is recent evidence that certain loss-of-function variants disrupting TCF4 are associated with mild ID, but not with typical PTHS. We describe a frameshift-causing partial gene deletion encompassing exons 4-6 of TCF4 in an adult patient with mild ID and nonspecific facial dysmorphisms but without the typical features of PTHS, and a c.520C > T nonsense variant within exon 8 in a child presenting with a severe phenotype largely mimicking PTHS, but lacking the typical facial dysmorphism. Investigation on mRNA, along with literature review, led us to suggest a preliminary phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants affecting TCF4. An intragenic phenotypic map of loss-of-function variants in TCF4 is suggested here for the first time: variants within exons 1-4 and exons 4-6 give rise to a recurrent phenotype with mild ID not in the spectrum of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (biallelic preservation of both the NLS and bHLH domains); variants within exons 7-8 cause a severe phenotype resembling PTHS but in absence of the typical facial dysmorphism (impairment limited to the NLS domain); variants within exons 9-19 cause typical Pitt-Hopkins syndrome (impairment of at least the bHLH domain). Understanding the TCF4 molecular syndromology can allow for proper nosology in the current era of whole genomic investigations. Copyright

  3. Korsakoff's syndrome is preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Wijnia, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a life-threatening neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with mammillary body edema and small vessel ischemia. Many patients who develop WKS have a history of serious alcoholism and

  4. Does sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome remain the autopsy negative disorder: a gross, microscopic, and molecular autopsy investigation in Southern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyong; Tester, David J.; Lang, Di; Chen, Yili; Zheng, Jinxiang; Gao, Rui; Corliss, Robert F.; Tang, Shuangbo; Kyle, John W.; Liu, Chao; Ackerman, Michael J.; Makielski, Jonathan C.; Cheng, Jianding

    2016-01-01

    Objective To look for previously unrecognized cardiac structural abnormalities and address the genetic cause for sudden unexplained nocturnal death syndrome (SUNDS). Methods and Results 148 SUNDS victims and 444 controls (matched 1:3 on gender, race, and age of death within 1 year) were collected from Sun Yat-sen University from January 1, 1998 to December 31, 2014 to search morphological changes. Additional 17 Brugada syndrome (BrS) patients collected from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2014 served as a comparative disease cohort. The Target Captured Next Generation sequencing for 80 genes associated with arrhythmia/cardiomyopathy were performed in 44 SUNDS victims and 17 BrS patients to characterize the molecular spectrum. SUNDS had slight but statistically significantly increased heart weight and valve circumference compared to controls. 12/44 SUNDS victims (SCN5A, SCN1B, CACNB2, CACNA1C, AKAP9, KCNQ1, KCNH2, KCNJ5, GATA4, NUP155, ABCC9) and 6/17 BrS patients (SCN5A, CACNA1C, P>.05) carried rare variants in primary arrhythmia-susceptibility genes. Only 2/44 SUNDS cases compared to 5/17 BrS patients hosted a rare variant in the most common BrS causing gene, SCN5A (P=.01). Using the strict American College of Medical Genetics guideline-based definition, only 2/44 (KCNQ1) SUNDS and 3/17 (SCN5A) BrS patients hosted a “(likely) pathogenic” variant. The 14/44 SUNDS cases with cardiomyopathy-related variants had a subtle but significantly decreased circumference of cardiac valves, and tended to die on average 5–6 years younger compared to the remaining 30 cases (P=.02). Conclusions We present the first comprehensive autopsy evidence that SUNDS victims may have concealed cardiac morphological changes. SUNDS and BrS may result from different molecular pathological underpinnings. The distinct association between cardiomyopathy-related rare variants and SUNDS warrants further investigation. PMID:27707468

  5. História clínica e exame físico em SAOS: clinical history and physical examination Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gleison Marinho Guimarães

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Embora SAOS seja uma patologia comum, é frequentemente subdiagnosticada. Seus sinais e sintomas são, na sua maioria, subjetivos e, portanto, deve haver suspeição diagnóstica quando existir roncos, sonolência diurna, cansaço, desânimo e alteração de humor. Escalas e tabelas com boa sensibilidade, que incluem os sintomas clínicos mais relevantes e dados do exame físico, podem indicar o diagnóstico de SAOS. A confirmação diagnóstica é realizada através de polissonografia, considerada o método padrão ouro.Although obstructive sleep apnea syndrome is a common disease, it often goes undiagnosed. The signs and symptoms of the syndrome are mostly subjective. Therefore, snoring, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, dejection and mood changes should raise the suspicion of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Scales and tables that have good sensitivity and include the most relevant clinical symptoms and physical examination results can suggest a diagnosis of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The diagnosis is confirmed by polysomnography, which is considered the gold standard method.

  6. Physical development and medical history of children who were treated antenatally with corticosteroids to prevent respiratory distress syndrome: a 10- to 12-year follow-up

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smolders-de Haas, H.; Neuvel, J.; Schmand, B.; Treffers, P. E.; Koppe, J. G.; Hoeks, J.

    1990-01-01

    Potential side effects of antenatal administration of corticosteroids to prevent neonatal respiratory distress syndrome were studied in 10- to 12-year-old children whose mothers had participated in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of betamethasone. The children had a general

  7. Molecular-genetic risk assessement of determining angiotensin-converting enzyme hyperactivity in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildar R. Minniakhmetov

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The present study was designed to investigate changes in angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE blood activity and angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene polymorphism as a possible disease predictor in hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS. Four hundred and nine patients (346 males and 63 females with HFRS serologic confirmation were enrolled in the study. Their age ranged from 15 to 65 years. ACE blood activity was assessed kinetically using the Bühlmann (Switzerland kit. Peripheral blood genomic DNA was isolated by a phenol-chloroform extraction. The genotyping of DNA loci was done using a polymerase chain reaction of DNA synthesis. Statistically, ACE blood activity was significantly higher throughout the entire HFRS course with diverse severity apart from the feverish phase of moderate-to-severe uncomplicated disease forms. *A1166 and *C1166 alleles, *A1166/*A1166 and *C1166/*C1166 genotypes of angiotensin II type 1 receptor gene were not associated with HFRS severity. The results of this study indicate that high ACE activity has not adaptive characteristics due to abnormalities in angiotensin II reception. It is an adequate metabolic response of the body to endotheliotropic virus activity.

  8. Molecular effect of fenofibrate on PBMC gene transcription related to lipid metabolism in patients with metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Indias, I; Tinahones, F J; Clemente-Postigo, M; Castellano-Castillo, D; Fernández-García, J C; Macias-Gonzalez, M; Queipo-Ortuño, M I; Cardona, F

    2017-06-01

    Both fasting and postprandial hypertriglyceridaemia are considered independent risk factors for atherosclerosis. Treatment of hypertriglyceridaemia is based on fibrates, which activate the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). However, the metabolic pathways that activate or inhibit fibrates, and how the postprandial triglyceride levels are modified, have not yet been fully described. Accordingly, the aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to study the effects of fenofibrate in patients with the metabolic syndrome. A fat overload was given to 50 patients before and after treatment with fenofibrate for 3 months. Anthropometric and biochemical variables as well as gene expression in PBMC were analysed. After treatment with fenofibrate, we observed a decrease in both baseline and postprandial (3 h after the fat overload) levels of serum triglycerides, cholesterol and uric acid and an increase in HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI levels. After treatment, there was also a rise in PPARα and RXRα expression and changes in genes regulated by PPARα, both baseline and postprandial. Furthermore, in vitro experiments showed that a PPARα agonist changed the expression of genes related with lipid metabolism. Treatment with fenofibrate reduced fasting and postprandial serum triglyceride levels, possibly through a mechanism related with an increase in the expression of RXRα and PPARα, by activating the pathways involved in the uptake and degradation of triglycerides and increasing the synthesis of apolipoprotein. These results suggest that PBMC may be useful for the easy study of fenofibrate actions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. A molecular signature of normal breast epithelial and stromal cells from Li-Fraumeni syndrome mutation carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Brittney-Shea; Chanoux, Rebecca A; Liu, Yunlong; Baenziger, Peter H; Goswami, Chirayu P; McClintick, Jeanette N; Edenberg, Howard J; Pennington, Robert E; Lipkin, Steven M; Kopelovich, Levy

    2010-10-01

    Specific changes in gene expression during cancer initiation should enable discovery of biomarkers for risk assessment, early detection and targets for chemoprevention. It has been previously demonstrated that altered mRNA and proteome signatures of morphologically normal cells bearing a single inherited "hit" in a tumor suppressor gene parallel many changes observed in the corresponding sporadic cancer. Here, we report on the global gene expression profile of morphologically normal, cultured primary breast epithelial and stromal cells from Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) TP53 mutation carriers. Our analyses identified multiple changes in gene expression in both morphologically normal breast epithelial and stromal cells associated with TP53 haploinsufficiency, as well as interlocking pathways. Notably, a dysregulated p53 signaling pathway was readily detectable. Pharmacological intervention with the p53 rescue compounds CP-31398 and PRIMA-1 provided further evidence in support of the central role of p53 in affecting these changes in LFS cells and treatment for this cancer. Because loss of signaling mediated by TP53 is associated with the development and survival of many human tumors, identification of gene expression profiles in morphologically normal cells that carry "one-hit" p53 mutations may reveal novel biomarkers, enabling the discovery of potential targets for chemoprevention of sporadic tumors as well.

  10. Clinical and molecular genetic analysis of a new mutation in children with Wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qianqian; Qu, Huaiyu; Wei, Shihui

    2013-03-01

    A 12‑year‑old Chinese girl presented with gradual vision loss and insulin‑dependent diabetes mellitus and was suspected to suffer from Wolfram syndrome (WFS). A series of clinical examinations were performed, as well as direct DNA sequencing to screen the entire coding region of the WFS1 gene in the patient's family, including her parents and a brother. Ophthalmological examination revealed counting fingers/10 cm in the right eye and hand motions/10 cm in the left eye. Ophthalmoscopical examination identified bilateral optic atrophy without any signs of diabetic retinopathy. A hearing test was performed and revealed that the hearing ability for high frequency sounds was decreased. Urinary output in 24 h was >5,000 ml. In addition, a base substitution at c.2411T>C (Leu804Pro) in exon 8 was identified which was homozygous with the patient and heterozygous with the healthy parents and the brother. In the present case, a neuroophthalmology consult performed in the early stages of the disease was crucial for early diagnosis. In addition, this case study highlights the importance of performing a hearing test as well as collecting and analyzing 24‑h urine output in patients presenting with juvenile diabetes mellitus patients and optic atrophy without any signs of diabetic retinopathy.

  11. Mucosal pathobiology and molecular signature of epithelial barrier dysfunction in the small intestine in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Castro, Ana M; Martínez, Cristina; Salvo-Romero, Eloísa; Fortea, Marina; Pardo-Camacho, Cristina; Pérez-Berezo, Teresa; Alonso-Cotoner, Carmen; Santos, Javier; Vicario, María

    2017-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent gastrointestinal disorders in developed countries. Its etiology remains unknown; however, a common finding, regardless of IBS subtype, is the presence of altered intestinal barrier. In fact, signaling and location of cell-to-cell adhesion proteins, in connection with increased immune activity, seem abnormal in the intestinal epithelium of IBS patients. Despite that most research is performed on distal segments of the intestine, altered permeability has been reported in both, the small and the large bowel of all IBS subtypes. The small intestine carries out digestion and nutrient absorption and is also the site where the majority of immune responses to luminal antigens takes place. In fact, the upper intestine is more exposed to environmental antigens than the colon and is also a site of symptom generation. Recent studies have revealed small intestinal structural alterations of the epithelial barrier and mucosal immune activation in association with intestinal dysfunction, suggesting the commitment of the intestine as a whole in the pathogenesis of IBS. This review summarizes the most recent findings on mucosal barrier alterations and its relationship to symptoms arising from the small intestine in IBS, including epithelial structural abnormalities, mucosal immune activation, and microbial dysbiosis, further supporting the hypothesis of an organic origin of IBS. © 2016 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Molecular diagnosis of Fragile X syndrome in subjects with intellectual disability of unknown origin: implications of its prevalence in regional Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madiha Kanwal

    Full Text Available Fragile-X syndrome (FXS is the most common form of inherited intellectual disability (ID and affects 0.7-3.0% of intellectually compromised population of unknown etiology worldwide. It is mostly caused by repeat expansion mutations in the FMR1 at chromosome Xq27.3. The present study aimed to develop molecular diagnostic tools for a better detection of FXS, to assess implementation of diagnostic protocols in a developing country and to estimate the prevalence of FXS in a cohort of intellectually disabled subjects from Pakistan. From a large pool of individuals with below normal IQ range, 395 subjects with intellectual disability of unknown etiology belonging to different regions of the country were recruited. Conventional-PCR, modified-PCR and Southern blot analysis methods were employed for the detection of CGG repeat polymorphisms in the FMR1 gene. Initial screening with conventional-PCR identified 13 suspected patients. Subsequent investigations through modified PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed the presence of the FMR1 mutation, suggesting a prevalence of 3.5% and 2.8% (mean 3.3% among the male and female ID patients, respectively. These diagnostic methods were further customized with the in-house conditions to offer robust screening of referral patients/families for diagnostics and genetic counseling. Prescreening and early diagnosis are crucial for designing a prudent strategy for the management of subjects with ID. Outcome of the study recommends health practitioners for implementation of molecular based FXS diagnosis in routine clinical practice to give a better care for patients similar to the ones included in the study.

  13. A rapid NGS strategy for comprehensive molecular diagnosis of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in patients with primary spontaneous pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinxin; Ma, Dehua; Zou, Wei; Ding, Yibing; Zhu, Chengchu; Min, Haiyan; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Wei; Chen, Baofu; Ye, Minhua; Cai, Minghui; Pan, Yanqing; Cao, Lei; Wan, Yueming; Jin, Yu; Gao, Qian; Yi, Long

    2016-05-27

    Primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP) or pulmonary cysts is one of the manifestations of Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) that is caused by heterozygous mutations in FLCN gene. Most of the mutations are SNVs and small indels, and there are also approximately 10 % large intragenic deletions and duplications of the mutations. These molecular findings are generally obtained by disparate methods including Sanger sequencing and Multiple Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification in the clinical laboratory. In addition, as a genetically heterogeneous disorder, PSP may be caused by mutations in multiple genes include FBN1, COL3A1, CBS, SERPINA1 and TSC1/TSC2 genes. For differential diagnosis, these genes should also be screened which makes the diagnostic procedure more time-consuming and labor-intensive. Forty PSP patients were divided into 2 groups. Nineteen patients with different pathogenic mutations of FLCN previously identified by conventional Sanger sequencing and MLPA were included in test group, 21 random PSP patients without any genetic screening were included in blinded sample group. 7 PSP genes including FLCN, FBN1, COL3A1, CBS, SERPINA1 and TSC1/TSC2 were designed and enriched by Haloplex system, sequenced on a Miseq platform and analyzed in the 40 patients to evaluate the performance of the targeted-NGS method. We demonstrated that the full spectrum of genes associated with pneumothorax including FLCN gene mutations can be identified simultaneously in multiplexed sequence data. Noteworthy, by our in-house copy number analysis of the sequence data, we could not only detect intragenic deletions, but also determine approximate deletion junctions simultaneously. NGS based Haloplex target enrichment technology is proved to be a rapid and cost-effective screening strategy for the comprehensive molecular diagnosis of BHDS in PSP patients, as it can replace Sanger sequencing and MLPA by simultaneously detecting exonic and intronic SNVs, small indels, large intragenic

  14. Molecular Detection and Identification of Α-L-Iduronidase Gene Mutations in 5 Iranian Families Suspected for Muller Syndrome (Mucopolysaccharidosis I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B Nasr- Esfahani

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Mucopolysaccharidosis I (MPS-I is an autosomal recessive lysosomal storage diseases, caused by α-L-iduronidase (IDUA enzyme deficiency. The clinical manifestations of MPS-I patients are variable ranging from severe to mild, and therefore prediction of disease severity is difficult. From when IDUA gene has been cloned more than 109 distinct mutations have been identified in it and this number is increasing. This mutation analysis has provided some molecular explanations for the range of MPS-I phenotypes. The aim of this study was identification and molecular characterization of IDUA gene mutations in our subset of MPS I patients. Methods: The present study performed on 5 Iranian families, each with a suspected child for MPS-I. Initially by using enzyme activity assay, the Hurler syndrome was verified and then presence of L123R mutation was evaluated by PCR-SSCP. Finally by PCR amplification of all 14 exons of the gene, SSCP and sequencing the mutations underlying the disease were identified and characterized. Results: The detected mutations turned to be L123R (in 2 patients, W402X, P533R and G51D mutations in other 3 patients. Discussion: L123R mutation, which was reported for the first time from our centre, was also present in 2 of the patients of this study but other 3 mutations were not novel. From our results, as well others, it can be concluded that the range of mutations in IDUA gene differ in different geographical areas. This should be considered when designing mutation detection strategies for MPS-I.

  15. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  16. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus: antigenic and molecular diversity of British isolates and implications for diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frossard, Jean-Pierre; Fearnley, Catherine; Naidu, Brindha; Errington, Jane; Westcott, David G; Drew, Trevor W

    2012-08-17

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an endemic disease of pigs, caused by PRRS virus, a member of the Arteriviridae family. First seen in Britain in 1991, the disease continues to be a significant economic and welfare problem for pig producers. To date, only PRRSV genotype 1 has been found in Britain. At the genetic level, a considerable increase has been reported in the diversity of PRRS viruses isolated in Britain between 2003 and 2007, versus the early 1990 s. In this study, the diversity has been shown to extend to the antigenic level too, with potential consequences for diagnostic methods. Antigenic diversity was assessed using a panel of twelve monoclonal antibodies, only one of which reacted with all isolates tested. Nine diverse viruses were compared as potential antigens in immunoperoxidase monolayer assays, where each one produced quite different results for a common panel of sera. As a single virus is used in each diagnostic assay, results must therefore be interpreted cautiously. For a real-time RT-PCR assay, published oligonucleotide primer and probe sequences were evaluated against available genetic sequences of British and European viruses, and were re-designed where considerable mismatches were found. The multiplex assay incorporating these modified primers to detect genotype 1 and 2 PRRS viruses was then validated for use with diagnostic sera and tissues. As the increasing degree of diversity exhibited by British strains is mirrored in other countries, PRRSV will continue to provide an ongoing challenge to diagnosis at a global, as well as national level. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular Analysis of Collagen XVIII Reveals Novel Mutations, Presence of a Third Isoform, and Possible Genetic Heterogeneity in Knobloch Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, O. T.; Sertié, A. L.; Der Kaloustian, V. M.; Kok, F.; Carpenter, M.; Murray, J.; Czeizel, A. E.; Kliemann, S. E.; Rosemberg, S.; Monteiro, M.; Olsen, B. R.; Passos-Bueno, M. R.

    2002-01-01

    Knobloch syndrome (KS) is a rare disease characterized by severe ocular alterations, including vitreoretinal degeneration associated with retinal detachment and occipital scalp defect. The responsible gene, COL18A1, has been mapped to 21q22.3, and, on the basis of the analysis of one family, we have demonstrated that a mutation affecting only one of the three COL18A1 isoforms causes this phenotype. We report here the results of the screening of both the entire coding region and the exon-intron boundaries of the COL18A1 gene (which includes 43 exons), in eight unrelated patients with KS. Besides 20 polymorphic changes, we identified 6 different pathogenic changes in both alleles of five unrelated patients with KS (three compound heterozygotes and two homozygotes). All are truncating mutations leading to deficiency of one or all collagen XVIII isoforms and endostatin. We have verified that, in exon 41, the deletion c3514-3515delCT, found in three unrelated alleles, is embedded in different haplotypes, suggesting that this mutation has occurred more than once. In addition, our results provide evidence of nonallelic genetic heterogeneity in KS. We also show that the longest human isoform (NC11-728) is expressed in several tissues (including the human eye) and that lack of either the short variant or all of the collagen XVIII isoforms causes similar phenotypes but that those patients who lack all forms present more-severe ocular alterations. Despite the small sample size, we found low endostatin plasma levels in those patients with mutations leading to deficiency of all isoforms; in addition, it seems that absence of all collagen XVIII isoforms causes predisposition to epilepsy. PMID:12415512

  18. Morphological and molecular characterizations of psychrophilic fungus Geomyces destructans from New York bats with White Nose Syndrome (WNS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishnu Chaturvedi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Massive die-offs of little brown bats (Myotis lucifugus have been occurring since 2006 in hibernation sites around Albany, New York, and this problem has spread to other States in the Northeastern United States. White cottony fungal growth is seen on the snouts of affected animals, a prominent sign of White Nose Syndrome (WNS. A previous report described the involvement of the fungus Geomyces destructans in WNS, but an identical fungus was recently isolated in France from a bat that was evidently healthy. The fungus has been recovered sparsely despite plentiful availability of afflicted animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have investigated 100 bat and environmental samples from eight affected sites in 2008. Our findings provide strong evidence for an etiologic role of G. destructans in bat WNS. (i Direct smears from bat snouts, Periodic Acid Schiff-stained tissue sections from infected tissues, and scanning electron micrographs of bat tissues all showed fungal structures similar to those of G. destructans. (ii G. destructans DNA was directly amplified from infected bat tissues, (iii Isolations of G. destructans in cultures from infected bat tissues showed 100% DNA match with the fungus present in positive tissue samples. (iv RAPD patterns for all G. destructans cultures isolated from two sites were indistinguishable. (v The fungal isolates showed psychrophilic growth. (vi We identified in vitro proteolytic activities suggestive of known fungal pathogenic traits in G. destructans. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Further studies are needed to understand whether G. destructans WNS is a symptom or a trigger for bat mass mortality. The availability of well-characterized G. destructans strains should promote an understanding of bat-fungus relationships, and should aid in the screening of biological and chemical control agents.

  19. History of food allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Brunello

    2014-01-01

    with the use of recombinant molecular allergens or chip arrays, such as the ISAC technique, hold a lot of promise. With regard to the clinical situation, a subjective selection is given, touching on the pollen-associated food allergies ('birch-mugwort-celery-spice syndrome'), as well as the new phenomenon of lethal food allergies that have appeared since the 1980s. Finally, rare ways of elicitation of a 'derivative allergy', first described by Erich Fuchs (1921-2008), for example by kissing, as well as 'oral allergy syndrome' and oral hyposensitization are considered. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Molecular dissection of a contiguous gene syndrome: Frequent submicroscopic deletions, evolutionarily conserved sequences, and a hypomethylated island in the Miller-Dieker chromosome region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ledbetter, D.H.; Ledbetter, S.A.; vanTuinen, P.

    1989-01-01

    The Miller-Dieker syndrome (MDS), composed of characteristic facial abnormalities and a severe neuronal migration disorder affecting the cerebral cortex, is caused by visible or submicroscopic deletions of chromosome band 17p13. Twelve anonymous DNA markers were tested against a panel of somatic cell hybrids containing 17p deletions from seven MDS patients. All patients, including three with normal karyotypes, are deleted for a variable set of 5-12 markers. Two highly polymorphic VNTR (variable number of tandem repeats) probes, YNZ22 and YNH37, are codeleted in all patients tested and make molecular diagnosis for this disorder feasible. By pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, YNZ22 and YNH37 were shown to be within 30 kilobases (kb) of each other. Cosmid clones containing both VNTR sequences were identified, and restriction mapping showed them to be 100 kb were completely deleted in all patients, providing a minimum estimate of the size of the MDS critical region. A hypomethylated island and evolutionarily conserved sequences were identified within this 100-kb region, indications of the presence of one or more expressed sequences potentially involved in the pathophysiology of this disorder. The conserved sequences were mapped to mouse chromosome 11 by using mouse-rat somatic cell hybrids, extending the remarkable homology between human chromosome 17 and mouse chromosome 11 by 30 centimorgans, into the 17p telomere region

  1. Combining low-molecular-weight heparin and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists for the treatment of acute coronary syndromes: the NICE 3 story. National Investigators Collaborating on Enoxaparin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, J J

    2000-12-01

    In recent years, a number of new therapies have become available that have significantly improved the care of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). A number of studies have documented the significant superiority of the low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH), enoxaparin, over unfractionated heparin (UFH) in the treatment of ACS. However, there are insufficient data regarding the safety of using LMWH in combination with glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa antagonists. The NICE 3 study is an open-labeled, non-randomized, observational study examining the feasibility, safety, and preliminary efficacy of the LMWH, enoxaparin, in combination with each of the three commercially available GP IIb/IIIa antagonists in ACS patients. Approximately 600 patients at 45 clinical centers in North America will be divided between the three arms of the trial, representing each of the three GP IIb/IIIa antagonists. Once therapy is initiated, patients will receive no UFH (unless they require a coronary artery bypass graft) and will continue treatment even if invasive cath lab procedures are necessary. NICE 3 builds on the previous experiences of NICE 1 and NICE 4 with LMWH in the cath lab (with or without GP IIb/IIIa antagonists) to more aggressively extend the use of LMWHs into the medical management of ACS patients.

  2. Molecular epidemiology of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Central China since 2014: The prevalence of NADC30-like PRRSVs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lin-Jian; Xie, Weitao; Chen, Xin-Xin; Qiao, Songlin; Zhao, Mengmeng; Gu, Yu; Zhao, Bao-Lei; Zhang, Gaiping

    2017-08-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS), characterized by respiratory disorders in piglets and reproductive failure in sows, is still the great threat of swine industry. Recently, Emergence of the novel NADC30-like PRRS viruses (PRRSVs) has caused widespread outbreaks of PRRS. To investigate the epidemic characteristics of PRRSVs in Central China since 2014, 6372 clinical serum samples were tested by ELISA, 250 tissue samples were tested by RT-PCR, and among these, 30 ORF5 and 17 Nsp2 genes sequences were analyzed. Phylogenetic tree based on ORF5 revealed that, 17 isolates were clustered into subgroup 1, represented by the NADC30. And for the Nsp2, The strains which had a discontinuous 131-amino-acid deletion in Nsp2, called NADC30-like strains, were clustered into subgroup 2. Our data suggested that the NADC30-like PRRSV strains spread quickly and are now circulating and prevalent in Central China as well as the classical HP-PRRSV strains. In addition, amino acid variation analysis of GP5 revealed that the amino acid sequences of NADC30-like PRRSV strains underwent rapid evolution and contained extensive amino acid substitutions in important motifs, such as potential neutralization epitope and the N-glycosylation sites. In summary, our data would provide a large amount of detailed information on molecular variation and genetic diversity of PRRSV in central China. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Usher syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shzeena, Dad; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. METHODS: Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic...

  4. Exophthalmos in Cushing's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, W

    1996-08-01

    Exophthalmos was noted in 4 of the 12 patients reported by Harvey Cushing in 1932. Although exophthalmos has often been included in clinical descriptions, no previous study has reported actual measurements in patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome, and in control patients. The aim of this study was to obtain these measurements. Thirty-one patients with active Cushing's syndrome (19 iatrogenic), 15 with treated Cushing's syndrome, 18 with Graves' ophthalmopathy, 59 control patients, and 3 patients with active Cushing's syndrome plus a family or personal history of thyroid disease. A consecutive series of patients with active and treated Cushing's syndrome were assessed. They were compared with patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy, and with control patients. Exophthalmos was assessed by the author using a Hertel meter. Urinary free cortisol was measured on patients with Cushing's syndrome, and serum thyroxine was estimated for them, and for the patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Exophthalmos exceeding 16 mm (> 2 SD above normal mean) was found in 45% of active Cushing's syndrome, 21% of iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, 20% of treated Cushing's syndrome, 2% of normal controls, and 77% of patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. No patient with Cushing's syndrome had significant symptoms due to exophthalmos. Patients with active Cushing's syndrome have statistically significant exophthalmos. This rarely causes symptoms, and diminishes when cortisol concentrations become normal. Cushing's syndrome and autoimmune thyroid disease may coexist in patients with exophthalmos.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Lennox-Gastaut syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a history of recurrent seizures beginning in infancy (infantile spasms) or a related condition called West syndrome. In ... death among children with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome and infantile spasms. J Child Neurol. 2010 Apr;25(4):441- ...

  6. Polyposis syndromes: pediatric implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, W

    2001-10-01

    The diagnosis of a polyposis syndrome, such as juvenile polyposis, Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, and familial adenomatous polyposis, requires knowledge of the site, number, and histologic type of the polyps and an appreciation of relevant family history. Children and adolescents with polyposis syndromes are faced with not only the immediate complications of the polyps, such as intussusception or bleeding, but also the extraintestinal manifestations and the long-term risk for malignancy. This article reviews the diagnosis, clinical management, surveillance, and surgical options for children with polyposis syndromes and discusses genetics and appropriate screening programs.

  7. Prothrombin 20210 G: a mutation and Factor V Leiden mutation in women with a history of severe preeclampsia and (H)ELLP syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Pampus, M. G.; Wolf, H.; Koopman, M. M.; van den Ende, A.; Buller, H. R.; Reitsma, P. H.

    2001-01-01

    The 20210 G-A prothrombin gene variant and the Factor V Leiden mutation are mutations associated with venous thrombotic risk. The aim of our study was to assess the prevalence of these specific mutations in women with a history of preeclampsia or hemolysis elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet

  8. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  9. A history of a prior myocardial infarct does not negate the utility of myocardial perfusion imaging in the evaluation of acute chest pain syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Danbing; Jonathan Knott; Leeanne Grigg; Meir Lichtenstein; Nathan Better

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Acute myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) for evaluation of patients with acute chest pain and a non-diagnostic electrocardiogram (ECG) has a high sensitivity and moderate specificity to detect acute ischaemia and predict cardiac events. However, previous studies excluded patients with a history of prior myocardial infarction (MI). The purpose of our study was to assess the utility of acute MPI for evaluating patients with acute chest pain and a non-diagnostic ECG. We aim to study patients both with and without a history of prior MI, including normal and abnormal studies, as well as to assess the independent predictive value of a prior MI history in determining patient outcome. Methods: We studied 367 consecutive patients with (group 1, n--107) and without. (group 2, n=260) a history of prior MI. 800 MBq Tc99m sestamibi was injected while chest pain was present ('HOT' MIBI). SPECT imaging was performed 1-6 hours post injection. Scan results were reported as,normal, ischaemia, infarct or equivocal. For patients with a defect, a 24-hour painfree study ( C OLD' MIBI) was offered to differentiate ischaemia from infarct. Follow-up was at 1 year by review of the patient's medical record. Outcomes were (1) Hard cardiac events (HE), defined as cardiac death and non-fatal MI, and (2) Total cardiac events (TE), defined as HE or revascularisation. Results: For the total study population, 206 had a normal study, with a HE rate 0.97% (2/206), while 161 had an abnormal study, with HE rate 12.4% (20/161). Patients in Group 2 were much more likely to have a normal study than those in Group 1 (p<.001). An equivocal result is seen in 5 patients, with no cardiac events, while 5 patients had a non-cardiac death. These groups were too small for separate analysis. A COLD MIBI was required in 77.6% of group 1, but only 24.2% of group 2 patients (p<0.001). On univariate analysis, acute ischaemia on MIBI scan, history of prior MI, diabetes, Q wave on ECG and age are all predictors

  10. Triple A syndrome: two novel mutations in the AAAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, Susanne; Huebner, Angela; Baechler-Sadoul, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Triple A syndrome is a rare disease of autosomal recessive inheritance. It was first described in 1978. The typical triad includes adrenocorticotrophic-hormone-resistant glucocorticoid insufficiency, reduced or absent tearing (alacrima) and achalasia. But clinical symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous and of variable clinically expression. This report describes a 7-year-old boy with a 1 year history of fatigue and muscle weakness. Physical examination showed skin and mucosal hyperpigmentation, and hormonal analysis revealed isolated glucocorticoid function. Medical history was marked by megaoesophagus and achalasia. The absence of tears when crying had been noted since birth. In the presence of the classical triad, triple A syndrome was diagnosed. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the AAAS gene on chromosome 12q13. The novel compound heterozygous mutation c.1304delA and c.1292-1294delTTCinsA was found.

  11. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  12. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  13. Neurogenetics and Nutrigenomics of Neuro-Nutrient Therapy for Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS): Clinical Ramifications as a Function of Molecular Neurobiological Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Stuller, Elizabeth; Miller, David; Giordano, John; Morse, Siobhan; McCormick, Lee; Downs, William B; Waite, Roger L; Barh, Debmalya; Neal, Dennis; Braverman, Eric R; Lohmann, Raquel; Borsten, Joan; Hauser, Mary; Han, David; Liu, Yijun; Helman, Manya; Simpatico, Thomas

    2012-11-27

    In accord with the new definition of addiction published by American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) it is well-known that individuals who present to a treatment center involved in chemical dependency or other documented reward dependence behaviors have impaired brain reward circuitry. They have hypodopaminergic function due to genetic and/or environmental negative pressures upon the reward neuro-circuitry. This impairment leads to aberrant craving behavior and other behaviors such as Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Neurogenetic research in both animal and humans revealed that there is a well-defined cascade in the reward site of the brain that leads to normal dopamine release. This cascade has been termed the "Brain Reward Cascade" (BRC). Any impairment due to either genetics or environmental influences on this cascade will result in a reduced amount of dopamine release in the brain reward site. Manipulation of the BRC has been successfully achieved with neuro-nutrient therapy utilizing nutrigenomic principles. After over four decades of development, neuro-nutrient therapy has provided important clinical benefits when appropriately utilized. This is a review, with some illustrative case histories from a number of addiction professionals, of certain molecular neurobiological mechanisms which if ignored may lead to clinical complications.

  14. Neurogenetics and Nutrigenomics of Neuro-Nutrient Therapy for Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS): Clinical Ramifications as a Function of Molecular Neurobiological Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Stuller, Elizabeth; Miller, David; Giordano, John; Morse, Siobhan; McCormick, Lee; Downs, William B; Waite, Roger L; Barh, Debmalya; Neal, Dennis; Braverman, Eric R; Lohmann, Raquel; Borsten, Joan; Hauser, Mary; Han, David; Liu, Yijun; Helman, Manya; Simpatico, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    In accord with the new definition of addiction published by American Society of Addiction Medicine (ASAM) it is well-known that individuals who present to a treatment center involved in chemical dependency or other documented reward dependence behaviors have impaired brain reward circuitry. They have hypodopaminergic function due to genetic and/or environmental negative pressures upon the reward neuro-circuitry. This impairment leads to aberrant craving behavior and other behaviors such as Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Neurogenetic research in both animal and humans revealed that there is a well-defined cascade in the reward site of the brain that leads to normal dopamine release. This cascade has been termed the “Brain Reward Cascade” (BRC). Any impairment due to either genetics or environmental influences on this cascade will result in a reduced amount of dopamine release in the brain reward site. Manipulation of the BRC has been successfully achieved with neuro-nutrient therapy utilizing nutrigenomic principles. After over four decades of development, neuro-nutrient therapy has provided important clinical benefits when appropriately utilized. This is a review, with some illustrative case histories from a number of addiction professionals, of certain molecular neurobiological mechanisms which if ignored may lead to clinical complications. PMID:23926462

  15. Transcriptome analysis of skin fibroblasts with dominant negative COL3A1 mutations provides molecular insights into the etiopathology of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarelli, Nicola; Carini, Giulia; Zoppi, Nicoletta; Ritelli, Marco; Colombi, Marina

    2018-01-01

    Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS) is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene that encodes type III collagen (COLLIII), which is the major expressed collagen in blood vessels and hollow organs. The majority of disease-causing variants in COL3A1 are glycine substitutions and in-frame splice mutations in the triple helix domain that through a dominant negative effect are associated with the severe clinical spectrum potentially lethal of vEDS, characterized by fragility of soft connective tissues with arterial and organ ruptures. To shed lights into molecular mechanisms underlying vEDS, we performed gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from three patients with different structural COL3A1 mutations. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the expression levels of several genes involved in maintenance of cell redox and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) homeostasis, COLLs folding and extracellular matrix (ECM) organization, formation of the proteasome complex, and cell cycle regulation. Protein analyses showed that aberrant COLLIII expression is associated with the disassembly of many structural ECM constituents, such as fibrillins, EMILINs, and elastin, as well as with the reduction of the proteoglycans perlecan, decorin, and versican, all playing an important role in the vascular system. Furthermore, the altered distribution of the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase PDI and the strong reduction of the COLLs-modifying enzyme FKBP22 are consistent with the disturbance of ER-related homeostasis and COLLs biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, indicated by microarray analysis. Our findings add new insights into the pathophysiology of this severe vascular disorder, since they provide a picture of the gene expression changes in vEDS skin fibroblasts and highlight that dominant negative mutations in COL3A1 also affect post-translational modifications and deposition into the ECM of

  16. Global Liver Gene Expression Analysis on a Murine Metabolic Syndrome Model Treated by Low-molecular-weight Lychee Fruit Polyphenol (Oligonol®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Hironobu; Uehara, Kaori; Nagashima, Takayuki; Nakata, Akifumi; Sato, Keisuke; Mihara, Yoshihiro; Komatsu, Ken-Ich; Takanari, Jun; Shimizu, Shigeomi; Wakame, Koji

    2016-07-01

    Oligonol® (OLG) is a low-molecular-weight lychee fruit polyphenol mainly containing catechin-type monomers and oligomers of proanthocyanidins. Dietary OLG supplementation reportedly improves lipid metabolism disorder and lowers the visceral fat level in animal and human studies. Thus, we investigated the mechanism behind the protective and beneficial effects of OLG on a Western diet (WD)-induced metabolic syndrome (MetS) of a murine model. Using the C57BL/6J mouse for the MetS model, mice were divided into three groups: control (normal diet: ND), Western diet (WD) and WD + 0.5% OLG (OLG) groups. The WD group was fed a high-calorie (high fructose plus high fat) diet for 12 weeks to develop MetS. At week 12, all mice were sacrificed and the blood and liver were obtained for histological and biological examinations and RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Body weight, liver weight, plasma triglycerides (TG), total cholesterol (T-Cho) and alanine aminotransferase (ATS) levels of both OLG groups were significantly lower than those of the WD group. On histological examination of the liver, the area of fatty deposits was shown to be suppressed by OLG administration. Expression gene analysis in the liver of WD- versus OLG-fed mice by RNA-Seq showed that 464/45,706 genes exhibited a significant change of expression (corrected p-value metabolism-related genes Lpin1, Adig and Cidea were regulated by OLG administration. OLG may function to suppress MetS and the progression of geriatric diseases in WD-fed mice by regulating the expression of lipid metabolism, inflammation and tumor-related genes in the liver. Copyright© 2016 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  17. Transcriptome analysis of skin fibroblasts with dominant negative COL3A1 mutations provides molecular insights into the etiopathology of vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Chiarelli

    Full Text Available Vascular Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (vEDS is a dominantly inherited connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the COL3A1 gene that encodes type III collagen (COLLIII, which is the major expressed collagen in blood vessels and hollow organs. The majority of disease-causing variants in COL3A1 are glycine substitutions and in-frame splice mutations in the triple helix domain that through a dominant negative effect are associated with the severe clinical spectrum potentially lethal of vEDS, characterized by fragility of soft connective tissues with arterial and organ ruptures. To shed lights into molecular mechanisms underlying vEDS, we performed gene expression profiling in cultured skin fibroblasts from three patients with different structural COL3A1 mutations. Transcriptome analysis revealed significant changes in the expression levels of several genes involved in maintenance of cell redox and endoplasmic reticulum (ER homeostasis, COLLs folding and extracellular matrix (ECM organization, formation of the proteasome complex, and cell cycle regulation. Protein analyses showed that aberrant COLLIII expression is associated with the disassembly of many structural ECM constituents, such as fibrillins, EMILINs, and elastin, as well as with the reduction of the proteoglycans perlecan, decorin, and versican, all playing an important role in the vascular system. Furthermore, the altered distribution of the ER marker protein disulfide isomerase PDI and the strong reduction of the COLLs-modifying enzyme FKBP22 are consistent with the disturbance of ER-related homeostasis and COLLs biosynthesis and post-translational modifications, indicated by microarray analysis. Our findings add new insights into the pathophysiology of this severe vascular disorder, since they provide a picture of the gene expression changes in vEDS skin fibroblasts and highlight that dominant negative mutations in COL3A1 also affect post-translational modifications and deposition

  18. High-molecular-weight adiponectin is selectively reduced in women with polycystic ovary syndrome independent of body mass index and severity of insulin resistance.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Connor, A

    2010-03-01

    Context: High-molecular-weight (HMW) adiponectin contributes to insulin resistance (IR), which is closely associated with the pathophysiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Abnormalities in adipocyte function have been identified in PCOS and potentially contribute to lower adiponectin concentrations. Objective: Our objective was to determine which variables in plasma and adipose tissue influence HMW adiponectin in a well characterized cohort of women with PCOS. Design: This was a cross-sectional study. Settings and Participants: A teaching hospital. Women with PCOS (n = 98) and body mass index (BMI)-matched controls (n = 103) (including 68 age-, BMI-, and IR-matched pairs). Interventions: A standard 75-g oral glucose tolerance test was performed for each participant. Subcutaneous adipose tissue samples were taken by needle biopsy for a subset of PCOS women (n = 9) and controls (n = 8). Main Outcome Measures: Serum levels of HMW adiponectin and their relation to indices of insulin sensitivity, body composition, and circulating androgens as well as adipose tissue expression levels of ADIPOQ, TNFalpha, PPARgamma, and AR were assessed. Results: HMW adiponectin was significantly lower in women with PCOS compared with both BMI- and BMI- and IR-matched controls (P = 0.009 and P = 0.027, respectively). Although BMI and IR were the main predictors of HMW adiponectin, an interaction between waist to hip ratio and plasma testosterone contributed to its variance (P = 0.026). Adipose tissue gene expression analysis demonstrated that AR and TNFalpha (P = 0.008 and P = 0.035, respectively) but not ADIPOQ mRNA levels were increased in PCOS compared with controls. Conclusions: HMW adiponectin is selectively reduced in women with PCOS, independent of BMI and IR. Gene expression analysis suggests that posttranscriptional\\/translational modification contributes to reduced HMW adiponectin in PCOS.

  19. Profiling and functional data on the developing olfactory/GnRH system reveal cellular and molecular pathways essential for this process and potentially relevant for the Kallmann syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eGaraffo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During embryonic development, immature neurons in the olfactory epithelium (OE extend axons through the nasal mesenchyme, to contact projection neurons in the olfactory bulb. Axon navigation is accompanied by migration of the GnRH+ neurons, which enter the anterior forebrain and home in the septo-hypothalamic area. This process can be interrupted at various points and lead to the onset of the Kallmann syndrome (KS, a disorder characterized by anosmia and central hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Several genes has been identified in human and mice that cause KS or a KS-like phenotype. In mice a set of transcription factors appears to be required for olfactory connectivity and GnRH neuron migration; thus we explored the transcriptional network underlying this developmental process by profiling the OE and the adjacent mesenchyme at three embryonic ages. We also profiled the OE from embryos null for Dlx5, a homeogene that causes a KS-like phenotype when deleted. We identified 20 interesting genes belonging to the following categories: 1 transmembrane adhesion/receptor, 2 axon-glia interaction, 3 scaffold/adapter for signalling, 4 synaptic proteins. We tested some of them in zebrafish embryos: the depletion of five (of six Dlx5 targets affected axonal extension and targeting, while three (of three affected GnRH neuron position and neurite organization. Thus, we confirmed the importance of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions and identified new molecules needed for olfactory connection and GnRH neuron migration. Using available and newly generated data, we predicted/prioritized putative KS-disease genes, by building conserved co-expression networks with all known disease genes in human and mouse. The results show the overall validity of approaches based on high-throughput data and predictive bioinformatics to identify genes potentially relevant for the molecular pathogenesis of KS. A number of candidate will be discussed, that should be tested in

  20. Circulating pathogen-associated molecular pattern - binding proteins and High Mobility Group Box protein 1 in nascent metabolic syndrome: implications for cellular Toll-like receptor activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jialal, I; Rajamani, U; Adams-Huet, B; Kaur, H

    2014-09-01

    The Metabolic Syndrome, (MetS) a global epidemic, is a state of low grade chronic inflammation and confers an increased risk for diabetes and CVD. We have previously reported increased activity of the pathogen recognition receptors, Toll-like receptors (TLRs), TLR2 and TLR4 in MetS. We hypothesized that increased TLR activity in MetS is due in part to increased levels of circulating PAMP-binding proteins, soluble CD14 (sCD14), lipopolysaccharide binding protein (LBP) and the damage associated molecular pattern (DAMP), High Mobility Group Box protein 1 (HMGB-1). We measured sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 in fasting plasma from nascent MetS (n = 37) and healthy control subjects (n = 32) by ELISA. We also investigated the effects of sCD14 and LBP on TLR4 activity in human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs). Following adjustment for body mass index and waist circumference, sCD14, LBP and HMGB-1 levels remained significantly increased in MetS. Also their levels increased with increasing numbers of MetS risk factors. Only sCD14 correlated significantly with monocyte TLR4 protein and activity. None of these soluble biomarkers correlated with TLR2 protein. Both sCD14 and HMGB-1 correlated significantly with HOMA-IR. In LPS primed HAECs, sCD14 compared to LBP, resulted in a greater increase in both TLR4 abundance and inflammatory biomediators (NF-κB, IL-1β, IL-8 and TNF-α). Thus, we make the novel observation that sCD14 reflects increased monocyte TLR4 protein and activity in nascent MetS and by contributing to increased cellular inflammation could explain, in part, the increased risk for diabetes and CVD. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  1. Novel Nsp2 deletion based on molecular epidemiology and evolution of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus in Shandong Province from 2013 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Feng-Xue; Qin, Li-Ting; Liu, Ying; Liu, Xing; Sun, Na; Yang, Yong; Chen, Ting; Zhu, Hong-Wei; Ren, Jing-Qiang; Sun, Ying-Jun; Cheng, Shi-Peng; Wen, Yong-Jun

    2015-07-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is an economically important swine disease affecting swine worldwide. In this study, a total of 385 samples were collected from Shandong pig farms during 2013 and 2014, when pigs were not inoculated with any vaccine. Results indicated that, out of 385 samples, 47 (12.21%) were PRRSV-RNA-positive. The gene sequence analysis of 12 ORF5, 12 ORF7, and 8 Nsp2 of these samples was used to determine the molecular epidemiology of PRRSV in different parts of China's Shandong Province. The phylogenetic tree based on these 3 genes indicated that the Chinese PRRSV strains could be divided into five subgroups and two large groups. The 8 study strains were clustered into subgroup IV, another 4 strains into subgroup I. The first 8 strains shared considerable homology with VR-2332 in ORF5 (96-97.5%), the other 4 strains shared considerable homology with JXA1 (94-98%). Phylogenetic tree of GP5 showed that the eight isolates formed a tightly novel clustered branch, subgroup V, which resembled but differed from isolate VR-2332. When examined using Nsp2 alone, the first 8 strains showed considerable homology with a U.S. vaccine strain, Ingelvac MLV (89.6-98.4%). One novel pattern of deletion was observed in Nsp2. The genetic diversity of genotype 2 PRRSV tended to vary in the field. The emergence of novel variants will probably be the next significant branch of PRRSV study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Autosomal Dominant STAT3 Deficiency and Hyper-IgE Syndrome Molecular, Cellular, and Clinical Features From a French National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Melki, Isabelle; Natividad, Angels; Puel, Anne; Fieschi, Claire; Yun, Ling; Thumerelle, Caroline; Oksenhendler, Eric; Boutboul, David; Thomas, Caroline; Hoarau, Cyrille; Lebranchu, Yvon; Stephan, Jean-Louis; Cazorla, Celine; Aladjidi, Nathalie; Micheau, Marguerite; Tron, Fran[cedil]cois; Baruchel, Andre; Barlogis, Vincent; Palenzuela, Gilles; Mathey, Catherine; Dominique, Stephane; Body, Gerard; Munzer, Martine; Fouyssac, Fanny; Jaussaud, Rolland; Bader-Meunier, Brigitte; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Blanche, Stephane; Debre, Marianne; Le Bourgeois, Muriel; Gandemer, Virginie; Lambert, Nathalie; Grandin, Virginie; Ndaga, Stephanie; Jacques, Corinne; Harre, Chantal; Forveille, Monique; Alyanakian, Marie-Alexandra; Durandy, Anne; Bodemer, Christine; Suarez, Felipe; Hermine, Olivier; Lortholary, Olivier; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; Fischer, Alain; Picard, Capucine

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal dominant deficiency of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is the main genetic etiology of hyper-immunoglobulin (Ig) E syndrome. We documented the molecular, cellular, and clinical features of 60 patients with heterozygous STAT3 mutations from 47 kindreds followed in France. We identified 11 known and 13 new mutations of STAT3. Low levels of interleukin (IL)-6-dependent phosphorylation and nuclear translocation (or accumulation) of STAT3 were observed in Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B lymphocytes (EBV-B cells) from all STAT3-deficient patients tested. The immunologic phenotype was characterized by high serum IgE levels (96% of the patients), memory B-cell lymphopenia (94.5%), and hypereosinophilia (80%). A low proportion of IL-17A-producing circulating T cells was found in 14 of the 15 patients tested. Mucocutaneous infections were the most frequent, typically caused by Staphylococcus aureus (all patients) and Candida albicans (85%). Up to 90% of the patients had pneumonia, mostly caused by Staph. aureus (31%) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (30%). Recurrent pneumonia was associated with secondary bronchiectasis and pneumatocele (67%), as well as secondary aspergillosis (22%). Up to 92% of the patients had dermatitis and connective tissue abnormalities, with facial dysmorphism (95%), retention of decidual teeth (65%), osteopenia (50%), and hyperextensibility (50%). Four patients developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma. The clinical outcome was favorable, with 56 patients, including 43 adults, still alive at the end of study (mean age, 21 yr; range, 1 mo to 46 yr). Only 4 patients died, 3 from severe bacterial infection (aged 1, 15, and 29 yr, respectively). Antibiotic prophylaxis (90% of patients), antifungal prophylaxis (50%), and IgG infusions (53%) improved patient health, as demonstrated by the large decrease in pneumonia recurrence. Overall, the prognosis of STAT3 deficiency may be considered good, provided that multiple prophylactic

  3. Clinical-neurologic, cytogenetic and molecular aspects of the Prader-Willi and Angelman Syndromes Aspectos clínico-neurológicos, citogenéticos e moleculares das síndromes de Prader-Willi e Angelman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João M. de Pina-Neto

    1997-06-01

    Full Text Available The Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS and the Angelman syndrome (AS are human neurogenetic disorders involving the imprinting mechanism, at the 15q11-13 chromosome region. The predominant genetic defects in PW are 15q 11-13 deletions of paternal origin and maternal chromosome 15 uniparental disomy. In contrast, maternal deletions and paternal chromosome 15 uniparental disomy are associated with a different neurogenetic disorder, the AS. In both disorders, these mutations are associated with parent-of-origin specific methylation at several 15q 11-13 loci. We studied 5 patients suspect of PWS and 4 patients suspect of AS who were referred to the Medical Genetics Unit at the University Hospital of Medical School from Ribeirão Preto. Our objective was to establish the correct clinical and etiological diagnosis in these cases. We used conventional cytogenetics, methylation analysis with the probe KB 17 (CpG island of the SNRPN gene by Southern blotting after digestion with the Xba I and Not I restriction enzymes. We studied in patients and their parents the segregation of the (CAn repeats polymorphisms by PCR, using the primers 196 and IR4-3R. All the patients had normal conventional cytogenetical analysis. We confirmed 3 cases of PWS: one by de novo deletion, one by maternal chromosome 15 uniparental disomy and one case with no defined cause determined by the used primers. We confirmed 2 cases of AS, caused by de novo deletion at the 15q 11-13 region, and one case with normal molecular analysis but with strong clinical characteristics.A síndrome de Prader-Willi (SPW e a síndrome de Angelman (SA são doenças neurogenéticas consideradas como exemplos do fenômeno de imprinting em seres humanos, estando relacionadas com alterações envolvendo a região cromossômica 15q11-13. As alterações genéticas predominantes na SPW são deleções na região 15q 11-13 de origem paterna e dissomia uniparental materna. Na SA encontra-se deleções na região 15q

  4. The Chronic Encephalopathy of Parry Romberg Syndrome and En Coupe De Sabre with a 31-Year-History in a West Indian Woman: Clinical, Immunologic and Neuroimaging Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seegobin, Karan; Abdool, Kamille; Ramcharan, Kanterpersad; Dyaanand, Haramnauth; Rampersad, Fidel

    2016-09-30

    We describe a case of Parry Romberg syndrome/ en coupe de sabre in a woman whose disease started as seizures at age 8 but was diagnosed at the age 39. During these 31 years she got married, completed a first degree at university, had two successful pregnancies and has been gainfully employed. The features of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, autoimmune abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, morphea en coup de sabre and brain imaging abnormalities were present. Areas of parietal lobe cerebral calcification were encountered on the computed tomographic scan and bilateral periventricular white matter changes on the magnetic resonance imaging with frontal, temporal and parietal lobe brain atrophy ipsilateral to the facial hemiatrophy. Clinical, immunologic and neuroradiological abnormalities are discussed. In some cases, this illness can run a benign and stable course.

  5. The chronic encephalopathy of Parry Romberg Syndrome and en coupe de sabre with a 31-year-history in a West Indian woman: clinical, immunologic and neuroimaging abnormalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karan Seegobin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of Parry Romberg syndrome/ en coupe de sabre in a woman whose disease started as seizures at age 8 but was diagnosed at the age 39. During these 31 years she got married, completed a first degree at university, had two successful pregnancies and has been gainfully employed. The features of generalized tonic-clonic seizures, autoimmune abnormalities, ocular abnormalities, morphea en coup de sabre and brain imaging abnormalities were present. Areas of parietal lobe cerebral calcification were encountered on the computed tomographic scan and bilateral periventricular white matter changes on the magnetic resonance imaging with frontal, temporal and parietal lobe