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Sample records for syndrome gene homologue

  1. Characterization and cloning of TMV resistance gene N homologues ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tobacco cultivars Nicotiana tabacum cv. Samsun NN plants carrying the N gene contain a multitude of N-related genes. We cloned a few N homologues and isolated two full-length cDNAs of NL-C26 and NL-B69 genes from N. tabacum cv. Samsun NN. Nucleotide sequence analysis showed that the coding regions of ...

  2. Detection of a Yersinia pestis gene homologue in rodent samples

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    Timothy A. Giles

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available A homologue to a widely used genetic marker, pla, for Yersinia pestis has been identified in tissue samples of two species of rat (Rattus rattus and Rattus norvegicus and of mice (Mus musculus and Apodemus sylvaticus using a microarray based platform to screen for zoonotic pathogens of interest. Samples were from urban locations in the UK (Liverpool and Canada (Vancouver. The results indicate the presence of an unknown bacterium that shares a homologue for the pla gene of Yersinia pestis, so caution should be taken when using this gene as a diagnostic marker.

  3. The murine homologue of HIRA, a DiGeorge syndrome candidate gene, is expressed in embryonic structures affected in human CATCH22 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Wilming (Laurens); C.A. Snoeren; A.L. Rijswijk (Angelique); C. Meijers (Carel); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractA wide spectrum of birth defects is caused by deletions of the DiGeorge syndrome chromosomal region at 22q11. Characteristic features include cranio-facial, cardiac and thymic malformations, which are thought to arise form disturbances in the interactions

  4. A homologue of the defender against the apoptotic death gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The 327 bp transcript showed an open reading frame of 87 amino acid residues. The deduced amino acid sequence of the putative C. reinhardtii DAD1 homologue showed 54% identity with Oryza sativa, 56% identity with Drosophila melanogaster, 66% identity with Xenopus laevis, and 64% identity with Homo sapiens, Sus ...

  5. DLH1 is a functional Candida albicans homologue of the meiosis-specific gene DMC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diener, A.C.; Fink, G.R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-06-01

    DMC1/LIM15 homologue 1 (DLH1), a gene related to meiosis-specific genes, has been isolated from Candida albicans, a fungus thought not to undergo meiosis. The deduced protein sequence of DLH1 contains 74% amino acid identity with Dmc1p from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and 63% with Lim15p from the plant Lilium longiflorum, meiosis-specific homologous of Escherichia coli RecA. Candida DLH1 complements a dmc1/dmc1 null mutant in S. cerevisiae. High copy expression of DLH1 restores both sporulation and meiotic recombination to a Saccharomyces dmc1/{Delta}/dmc1{Delta} strain. Unlike the DMC1 gene, which is transcribed only in meiotic cells, the heterologous Candida DLH1 gene is transcribed in both vegetative and meiotic cells of S. cerevisiae. Transcription of DLH1 is not detected or induced in C. albicans under conditions that induce DMC1 and meiosis in S. cerevisiae. The presence of an intact homologue of a meiosis-specific gene in C. albicans raises the possibility that this organism has a cryptic meiotic pathway. 25 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Resistance gene homologues in melon are linked to genetic loci conferring disease and pest resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotman, Y.; Silberstein, L.; Kovalski, I.; Perin, C.; Dogimont, C.; Pitrat, M.; Klingler, J.; Thompson, A.; Perl-Treves, R.

    2002-05-01

    Genomic and cDNA fragments with homology to known disease resistance genes (RGH fragments) were cloned from Cucumis melo using degenerate-primer PCR. Fifteen homologues of the NBS-LRR gene family have been isolated. The NBS-LRR homologues show high divergence and, based on the partial NBS-fragment sequences, appear to include members of the two major subfamilies that have been described in dicot plants, one that possesses a TIR-protein element and one that lacks such a domain. Genomic organization of these sequences was explored by DNA gel-blot analysis, and conservation among other Cucurbitaceae was assessed. Two mapping populations that segregate for several disease and pest resistance loci were used to map the RGH probes onto the melon genetic map. Several NBS-LRR related sequences mapped to the vicinity of genetic loci that control resistance to papaya ringspot virus, Fusarium oxysporum race 1, F. oxysporum race 2 and to the insect pest Aphis gossypii. The utility of such markers for breeding resistant melon cultivars and for cloning the respective R-genes is discussed.

  7. Characterizing homologues of crop domestication genes in poorly described wild relatives by high-throughput sequencing of whole genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malory, Sylvia; Shapter, Frances M; Elphinstone, Martin S; Chivers, Ian H; Henry, Robert J

    2011-12-01

    Wild crop relatives represent a source of novel alleles for crop genetic improvement. Screening biodiversity for useful or diverse gene homologues has often been based upon the amplification of targeted genes using available sequence information to design primers that amplify the target gene region across species. The crucial requirement of this approach is the presence of sequences with sufficient conservation across species to allow for the design of universal primers. This approach is often not successful with diverse organisms or highly variable genes. Massively parallel sequencing (MPS) can quickly produce large amounts of sequence data and provides a viable option for characterizing homologues of known genes in poorly described genomes. MPS of genomic DNA was used to obtain species-specific sequence information for 18 rice genes related to domestication characteristics in a wild relative of rice, Microlaena stipoides. Species-specific primers were available for 16 genes compared with 12 genes using the universal primer method. The use of species-specific primers had the potential to cover 92% of the sequence of these genes, while traditional universal primers could only be designed to cover 80%. A total of 24 species-specific primer pairs were used to amplify gene homologues, and 11 primer pairs were successful in capturing six gene homologues. The 23 million, 36-base pair (bp) paired end reads, equated to an average of 2X genome coverage, facilitated the successful amplification and sequencing of six target gene homologues, illustrating an important approach to the discovery of useful genes in wild crop relatives. © 2011 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal © 2011 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  8. The Bactrocera tryoni homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster sex-determination gene doublesex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearman, D C; Frommer, M

    1998-11-01

    A homologue of the bifunctional sex-determining gene, doublesex (dsx), has been identified in the tephritid fruit fly, Bactrocera tryoni, and has been found to be expressed in a sex-specific manner in adult flies. The male- and female-specific cDNAs are identical at their 5' ends but differ at their 3' ends and appear to be the products of alternate splicing. The level of identity of the sex-specific DSX proteins of B. tryoni with the D. melanogaster DSX proteins, across the region corresponding to the DNA binding domain and the oligomerization domains, is greater than 85%. Four sequence motifs which are ten to thirteen bases identical to the TRA/TRA-2 binding sites (thirteen-nucleotide repeat sequences) are present in the female-specific exon of the B. tryoni dsx gene.

  9. The oil palm Shell gene controls oil yield and encodes a homologue of SEEDSTICK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Rajinder; Leslie Low, Eng-Ti; Ooi, Leslie Cheng-Li; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Chin, Ting Ngoot; Nagappan, Jayanthi; Nookiah, Rajanaidu; Amiruddin, Mohd Din; Rosli, Rozana; Abdul Manaf, Mohamad Arif; Chan, Kuang-Lim; Halim, Mohd Amin; Azizi, Norazah; Lakey, Nathan; Smith, Steven W; Budiman, Muhammad A; Hogan, Michael; Bacher, Blaire; Van Brunt, Andrew; Wang, Chunyan; Ordway, Jared M; Sambanthamurthi, Ravigadevi; Martienssen, Robert A

    2014-01-01

    A key event in the domestication and breeding of the oil palm, Elaeis guineensis, was loss of the thick coconut-like shell surrounding the kernel. Modern E. guineensis has three fruit forms, dura (thick-shelled), pisifera (shell-less) and tenera (thin-shelled), a hybrid between dura and pisifera1–4. The pisifera palm is usually female-sterile but the tenera yields far more oil than dura, and is the basis for commercial palm oil production in all of Southeast Asia5. Here, we describe the mapping and identification of the Shell gene responsible for the different fruit forms. Using homozygosity mapping by sequencing we found two independent mutations in the DNA binding domain of a homologue of the MADS-box gene SEEDSTICK (STK) which controls ovule identity and seed development in Arabidopsis. The Shell gene is responsible for the tenera phenotype in both cultivated and wild palms from sub-Saharan Africa, and our findings provide a genetic explanation for the single gene heterosis attributed to Shell, via heterodimerization. This gene mutation explains the single most important economic trait in oil palm, and has implications for the competing interests of global edible oil production, biofuels and rainforest conservation6. PMID:23883930

  10. Expression pattern of zebrafish rxfp2 homologue genes during embryonic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donizetti, Aldo; Fiengo, Marcella; Del Gaudio, Rosanna; Iazzetti, Giovanni; Pariante, Paolo; Minucci, Sergio; Aniello, Francesco

    2015-11-01

    RXFP2 is one of the 4 receptors for relaxin insulin-like peptides, in particular it binds with high affinity the INSL3 peptide. INSL3/RXFP2 pair is essential for testicular descent during placental mammalian development. The evolutionary history of this ligand/receptor pair has received much attention, since its function in vertebrate species lacking testicular descent, such as the fishes, remains elusive. Herein, we analyzed the expression pattern of three rxfp2 homologue genes in zebrafish embryonic development. For all the three rxfp2 genes (rxfp2a, rxfp2b, and rxfp2-like) we showed the presence of maternally derived transcripts. Later in the development, rxfp2a is only expressed at larval stage, whereas rxfp2b is expressed in all the analyzed stage with highest level in the larvae. The rxfp2-like gene is expressed in all the analyzed stage with a transcript level that increased starting at early pharyngula stage. The spatial localization analysis of rxfp2-like gene showed that it is expressed in many cell clusters in the developing brain. In addition, other rxfp2-like-expressing cells were identified in the retina and oral epithelium. This analysis provides new insights to elucidate the evolution of rxfp2 genes in vertebrate lineage and lays the foundations to study their role in vertebrate embryonic development. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A complex rearrangement on chromosome 22 affecting both homologues; haplo-insufficiency of the Cat eye syndrome region may have no clinical relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriek, Marjolein; Szuhai, Karoly; Kant, Sarina G; White, Stefan J; Dauwerse, Hans; Fiegler, Heike; Carter, Nigel P; Knijnenburg, Jeroen; den Dunnen, Johan T; Tanke, Hans J; Breuning, Martijn H; Rosenberg, Carla

    2006-08-01

    The presence of highly homologous sequences, known as low copy repeats, predisposes for unequal recombination within the 22q11 region. This can lead to genomic imbalances associated with several known genetic disorders. We report here a developmentally delayed patient carrying different rearrangements on both chromosome 22 homologues, including a previously unreported rearrangement within the 22q11 region. One homologue carries a deletion of the proximal part of chromosome band 22q11. To our knowledge, a 'pure' deletion of this region has not been described previously. Four copies of this 22q11 region, however, are associated with Cat eye syndrome (CES). While the phenotypic impact of this deletion is unclear, familial investigation revealed five normal relatives carrying this deletion, suggesting that haplo-insufficiency of the CES region has little clinical relevance. The other chromosome 22 homologue carries a duplication of the Velocardiofacial/DiGeorge syndrome (VCFS/DGS) region. In addition, a previously undescribed deletion of 22q12.1, located in a relatively gene-poor region, was identified. As the clinical features of patients suffering from a duplication of the VCFS/DGS region have proven to be extremely variable, it is impossible to postulate as to the contribution of the 22q12.1 deletion to the phenotype of the patient. Additional patients with a deletion within this region are needed to establish the consequences of this copy number alteration. This study highlights the value of using different genomic approaches to unravel chromosomal alterations in order to study their phenotypic impact.

  12. Replacement of the essential Dictyostelium Arp2 gene by its Entamoeba homologue using parasexual genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fütterer Klaus

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell motility is an essential feature of the pathogenesis and morbidity of amoebiasis caused by Entamoeba histolytica. As motility depends on cytoskeletal organisation and regulation, a study of the molecular components involved is key to a better understanding of amoebic pathogenesis. However, little is known about the physiological roles, interactions and regulation of the proteins of the Entamoeba cytoskeleton. Results We have established a genetic strategy that uses parasexual genetics to allow essential Dictyostelium discoideum genes to be manipulated and replaced with modified or tagged homologues. Our results show that actin related protein 2 (Arp2 is essential for survival, but that the Dictyostelium protein can be complemented by E. histolytica Arp2, despite the presence of an insertion of 16 amino acids in an otherwise highly conserved protein. Replacement of endogenous Arp2 with myc-tagged Entamoeba or Dictyostelium Arp2 has no obvious effects on growth and the protein incorporates effectively into the Arp2/3 complex. Conclusion We have established an effective two-step method for replacing genes that are required for survival. Our protocol will allow such genes to be studied far more easily, and also allows an unambiguous demonstration that particular genes are truly essential. In addition, cells in which the Dictyostelium Arp2 has been replaced by the Entamoeba protein are potential targets for drug screens.

  13. Origins of immunity: transcription factors and homologues of effector genes of the vertebrate immune system expressed in sea urchin coelomocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancer, Z; Rast, J P; Davidson, E H

    1999-08-01

    Echinoderms share common ancestry with the chordates within the deuterostome clade. Molecular features that are shared between their immune systems and that of mammals thus illuminate the basal genetic framework on which these immune systems have been constructed during evolution. The immune effector cells of sea urchins are the coelomocytes, whose primary function is protection against invasive marine pathogens; here we identify six genes expressed in coelomocytes, homologues of which are also expressed in cells of the mammalian immune system. Three coelomocyte genes reported here encode transcription factors. These are an NFKB homologue (SpNFKB); a GATA-2/3 homologue (SpGATAc); and a runt domain factor (SpRunt-1). All three of these coelomocyte genes respond sharply to bacterial challenge: SpNFKB and SpRunt-1 genes are rapidly up-regulated, while transcripts of SpGATAc factor disappear within hours of injection of bacteria. Sham injection also activates SpNFKB and SpRunt, though with slower kinetics, but does not affect SpGATAc levels. Another gene, SpHS, encodes a protein related to the signal transduction intermediate HS1 of lymphoid cells. Two other newly discovered genes, SpSRCR1 and SpSRCR5, encode proteins featuring SRCR repeats. These genes are members of a complex family of SRCR genes all expressed specifically in coelomocytes. The SRCR repeats most closely resemble those of mammalian macrophage scavenger receptors. Remarkably, each individual sea urchin expresses a specific pattern of SRCR genes. Our results imply some shared immune functions and more generally, a shared regulatory architecture which underlies immune system gene expression in all deuterostomes. We conclude that the vertebrate immune system has evolved by inserting new genes into old gene regulatory networks dedicated to immunity.

  14. Two WD-repeat genes from cotton are functional homologues of the Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1) gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, John A; Walker, Amanda R; Timmis, Jeremy N; Orford, Sharon J

    2005-01-01

    Cotton fibres are single, highly elongated cells derived from the outer epidermis of ovules, and are developmentally similar to the trichomes of Arabidopsis thaliana. To identify genes involved in the molecular control of cotton fibre initiation, we isolated four putative homologues of the Arabidopsis trichome-associated gene TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1). All four WD-repeat genes are derived from the ancestral D diploid genome of tetraploid cotton and are expressed in many tissues throughout the plant, including ovules and growing fibres. Two of the cotton genes were able to restore trichome formation in ttg1 mutant Arabidopsis plants. Both these genes also complemented the anthocyanin defect in a white-flowered Matthiola incana ttg1 mutant. These results demonstrate parallels in differentiation between trichomes in cotton and Arabidopsis, and indicate that these cotton genes may be functional homologues of AtTTG1.

  15. Validating tyrosinase homologue melA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert E.; Zemp, Roger

    2015-10-01

    To understand the pathogenic processes for infectious bacteria, appropriate research tools are required for replicating and characterizing infections. Fluorescence and bioluminescence imaging have primarily been used to image infections in animal models, but optical scattering in tissue significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. Photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-to-resolution ratio compared to conventional optical imaging, could be useful for visualizing melA-expressing bacteria since melA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue which produces melanin. Escherichia coli-expressing melA was visibly dark in liquid culture. When melA-expressing bacteria in tubes were imaged with a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system, the signal-to-noise ratio of a 9× dilution sample was 55, suggesting that ˜20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. Multispectral (680, 700, 750, 800, 850, and 900 nm) analysis of the photoacoustic signal allowed unmixing of melA-expressing bacteria from blood. To compare photoacoustic reporter gene melA (using Vevo system) with luminescent and fluorescent reporter gene Nano-lantern (using Bruker Xtreme In-Vivo system), tubes of bacteria expressing melA or Nano-lantern were submerged 10 mm in 1% Intralipid, spaced between <1 and 20 mm apart from each other, and imaged with the appropriate imaging modality. Photoacoustic imaging could resolve the two tubes of melA-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were less than 1 mm from each other, while bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging could not resolve the two tubes of Nano-lantern-expressing bacteria even when the tubes were spaced 10 mm from each other. After injecting 100-μL of melA-expressing bacteria in the back flank of a chicken embryo, photoacoustic imaging allowed visualization of melA-expressing bacteria up to 10-mm deep into the embryo. Photoacoustic signal from melA could also be separated from deoxy- and oxy-hemoglobin signal observed within the embryo and

  16. Pepsin homologues in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bateman Alex

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peptidase family A1, to which pepsin belongs, had been assumed to be restricted to eukaryotes. The tertiary structure of pepsin shows two lobes with similar folds and it has been suggested that the gene has arisen from an ancient duplication and fusion event. The only sequence similarity between the lobes is restricted to the motif around the active site aspartate and a hydrophobic-hydrophobic-Gly motif. Together, these contribute to an essential structural feature known as a psi-loop. There is one such psi-loop in each lobe, and so each lobe presents an active Asp. The human immunodeficiency virus peptidase, retropepsin, from peptidase family A2 also has a similar fold but consists of one lobe only and has to dimerize to be active. All known members of family A1 show the bilobed structure, but it is unclear if the ancestor of family A1 was similar to an A2 peptidase, or if the ancestral retropepsin was derived from a half-pepsin gene. The presence of a pepsin homologue in a prokaryote might give insights into the evolution of the pepsin family. Results Homologues of the aspartic peptidase pepsin have been found in the completed genomic sequences from seven species of bacteria. The bacterial homologues, unlike those from eukaryotes, do not possess signal peptides, and would therefore be intracellular acting at neutral pH. The bacterial homologues have Thr218 replaced by Asp, a change which in renin has been shown to confer activity at neutral pH. No pepsin homologues could be detected in any archaean genome. Conclusion The peptidase family A1 is found in some species of bacteria as well as eukaryotes. The bacterial homologues fall into two groups, one from oceanic bacteria and one from plant symbionts. The bacterial homologues are all predicted to be intracellular proteins, unlike the eukaryotic enzymes. The bacterial homologues are bilobed like pepsin, implying that if no horizontal gene transfer has occurred the duplication

  17. Cloning and Characterization of karmoisin Homologue Gene (Nlka in Two Brown Planthopper Strains with Different Eye Colors

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    Liu Shu-hua

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens, is a destructive insect pest of rice throughout Asia. Different from brown-eye color wild type, BPH also has red-eye color mutation phenotype. As a visible genetic marker, the red-eye mutant in BPH is a valuable material. To reveal the eye color mutation mechanism, a karmoisin homologue gene (named as Nlka was cloned from BPH. And karmoisin is always deemd as a xanthommatin-related gene in other insects, encoding phenoxazinone synthetase (PHS. Nlka is consisted of 7 exons and encodes a protein with 502 amino acids (NlKA. NlKA showed high amino acid identities with its insect homologues (48.8%–51.8%. Nlka transcripts can be detected at all the developmental stages and in all tissues tested, including egg, nymph, adult, body wall, ovary, fat body, midgut and Malpighian tubule. However, no constant In/Del or non-synonymous mutation was observed between the mutant and the wild type strains. Quantitative real-time PCR experiment also showed that Nlka transcript level had no significant differences between them. These results indicated that Nlka is not the target gene causing the red-eye color mutation phenotype of BPH. Through the second structure and motif analysis, the present study also showed that all the proteins deduced from the karmoisin genes in insects may be members of monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs rather than PHSs.

  18. An X-linked homologue of the autosomal inprinted gene ZNF127 escapes X inactivation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longstreet, M.; Nicholls, R.D.; Willard, H.F. [Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The ZNF127 gene has been shown to be subject to parental imprinting in both humans and the mouse and maps to within the Prader-Willi/Angelman Syndrome critical region on chromosome 15. We have cloned two X-linked related loci, one of which, ZNFXp is a transcribed gene while the other, ZNFXq, is an untranscribed pseudogene. ZNFXp is 83.6% identical to ZNFXq and 65.4% identical to ZNF127 over 1.4 kb of open reading frame they share in common, Like ZNF127, the predicted protein sequence of ZNFXp contains a C{sub 3}HC{sub 4} zinc finger domain and C{sub 3}H zinc finger-like motifs. Whereas ZNF127 has three C{sub 3}H motifs, ZNFXp has four. A strong CpG island is located within 1 kb 5{prime} of the predicted amino terminus of ZNFXp. Expression of ZNFXp has been detected from mouse/human somatic cell hybrids containing either an active (n=2) or an inactive (n=4) chromosome, and thus escapes X inactivation. Probes made from the 3{prime} UTR of ZNFXp detect a number of related loci in both human and murine DNA, none of which is the ZNF127 locus on chromosome 15. None of the detectable murine bands shows dosage differences between males and females as would be expected for X-linked loci. This raises the possibility that ZNFXp inserted into the human X chromosome after its divergence from a common ancestor with the murine X. We have mapped ZNFXp to Xp11.4 by Southern blotting and PCR of hybrid DNAs and by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). ZNFXq maps within the X Inactivation Center (XIC) region on Xq13.2, approximately 300 kb distal to the XIST gene. We find it intriguing, and perhaps significant, that two members of this gene family are subject to epigenetic regulation -- one autosomal imprinting, and the other escape from X inactivation. These results could imply an evolutionary and mechanistic relationship between these two processes.

  19. A Blumeria graminis gene family encoding proteins with a C-terminal variable region with homologues in pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grell, Morten N; Mouritzen, Peter; Giese, Henriette

    2003-06-05

    In a study aimed at characterising, at the molecular level, the obligate biotrophic fungus Blumeria graminis f. sp. hordei (Bgh), we have identified a novel group of genes, the Egh16H genes, and shown that two of these are up-regulated during primary infection of barley leaves. The genes have partial homology to a previously characterised Bgh gene family, Egh16. Egh16 and Egh16H are subfamilies of a larger multigene family with presently about 15 members identified in Bgh. Egh16H has about ten members, and we show that five of these are expressed as highly conserved mRNAs that are predicted to encode proteins with a C-terminal variable region. Egh16H has high homology to sequences in Magnaporthe grisea and other plant pathogenic fungi, as well as sequences of both the insect pathogen Metarhizium anisopliae and the human pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. No close homologues of Egh16H were found in the non-pathogenic fungi Neurospora crassa and Aspergillus nidulans. We predict that Egh16H plays a general role in the interaction between pathogenic fungi and their hosts. At present, the large number of gene family members with C-terminal variation appears to be unique for Bgh, and the Egh16/Egh16H gene family is to our knowledge the largest gene family so far characterised in this fungus.

  20. Validating tyrosinase homologue MelA as a photoacoustic reporter gene for imaging Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paproski, Robert J.; Li, Yan; Barber, Quinn; Lewis, John D.; Campbell, Robert; Zemp, Roger

    2015-03-01

    Antibiotic drug resistance is a major worldwide issue. Development of new therapies against pathogenic bacteria requires appropriate research tools for replicating and characterizing infections. Previously fluorescence and bioluminescence modalities have been used to image infectious burden in animal models but scattering significantly limits imaging depth and resolution. We hypothesize that photoacoustic imaging, which has improved depth-toresolution ratio, could be useful for visualizing MelA-expressing bacteria since MelA is a bacterial tyrosinase homologue involved in melanin production. Using an inducible expression system, E. coli expressing MelA were visibly black in liquid culture. Phosphate buffered saline (PBS), MelA-expressing bacteria (at different dilutions in PBS), and chicken embryo blood were injected in plastic tubes which were imaged using a VisualSonics Vevo LAZR system. Photoacoustic imaging at 6 different wavelengths (680, 700, 750, 800, 850 and 900nm) enabled spectral de-mixing to distinguish melanin signals from blood. The signal to noise ratio of 9x diluted MelA bacteria was 55, suggesting that ~20 bacteria cells could be detected with our system. When MelA bacteria were injected as a 100 μL bolus into a chicken embryo, photoacoustic signals from deoxy- and oxy- hemoglobin as well as MelA-expressing bacteria could be separated and overlaid on an ultrasound image, allowing visualization of the bacterial location. Photoacoustic imaging may be a useful tool for visualizing bacterial infections and further work incorporating photoacoustic reporters into infectious bacterial strains is warranted.

  1. Leishmania infantum: gene cloning of the GRP94 homologue, its expression as recombinant protein, and analysis of antigenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larreta, R; Soto, M; Alonso, C; Requena, J M

    2000-10-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence for the Leishmania infantum homologue to the glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) gene was determined from the isolation and characterization of a genomic clone. Like the mammalian and plant GRP94s, the L. infantum GRP94 sequence possesses both an N-terminal signal peptide and a putative endoplasmic reticulum retention signal, consisting of the C-terminal tetrapeptide EDDL. Thus, L. infantum is the first protozoan organism in which GRP94 has been identified. Southern blot analysis has indicated that this protein is encoded by a single-copy gene. The L. infantum GRP94 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein used to evaluate its antigenicity and immunogenicity. Eighty-four percent of sera from dogs with visceral leishmaniasis reacted with the protein, indicating that GRP94 is a potent immunogen during Leishmania infection. Given the immunogenic and antigenic properties shown by the L. infantum GRP94, we think that this protein constitutes a valuable molecule for diagnostic purposes and a potential candidate for studies of protective immunogenicity. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  3. Homologues of insecticidal toxin complex genes within a genomic island in the marine bacterium Vibrio parahaemolyticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Kathy F J; Lightner, Donald V

    2014-12-01

    Three insecticidal toxin complex (tc)-like genes were identified in Vibrio parahaemolyticus 13-028/A3, which can cause acute hepatopancreatic necrosis disease in penaeid shrimp. The three genes are a tcdA-like gene (7710 bp), predicted to code for a 284-kDa protein; a tcdB-like gene (4272 bp), predicted to code for a 158-kDa protein; and a tccC3-like gene (2916 bp), predicted to encode a 107-kDa protein. All three predicted proteins contain conserved domains that are characteristic of their respective Tc proteins. By RT-PCR, all three tc-like genes were found to be expressed in this bacterium. Through genome walking and the use of PCR to join contigs surrounding these three genes, a genomic island (87 712 bp, named tc-GIvp) was found on chromosome II localized next to the tRNA Gly. The GC content of this island, which is not found in other Vibrio species, is 40%. The tc-GIvp is characterized to have 60 ORFs encoding regulatory or virulence factors. These include a type 6 secretion protein VgrG, EAL domain-containing proteins, fimbriae subunits and assembly proteins, invasin-like proteins, peptidoglycan-binding proteins, and Tc proteins. The tc-GIvp also contains 21 transposase genes, suggesting that it was acquired through horizontal transfer from other organisms. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  4. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.S.; Gunaratne, P.H.; Greenberg, F.; Shaffer, L.G.; Lupski, J.R. [Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States); Hoheisel, J.D. [German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Young, I.G.; Miklos, G.L.G.; Campbell, H.D. [Australian National Univ., Canberra (Australia)

    1995-01-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous-gene-deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances, and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date, no protein-encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene, fliI, and the homologous human cDNA have been isolated. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for FISH, which localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic-cell hybrid-panel mapping further localized this gene to the SMS critical region. Southern blot analysis of somatic-cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines from 12 SMS patients demonstrates the deletion of one copy of FLI in all SMS patients analyzed. 47 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  5. Cloning of the cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila white gene and mapping to chromosome 21q22.3.

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, H.; Rossier, C.; Lalioti, M. D.; Lynn, A.; Chakravarti, A.; Perrin, G.; Antonarakis, S. E.

    1996-01-01

    In an effort to contribute to the transcript map of human chromosome 21 and the understanding of the pathophysiology of trisomy 21, we have used exon trapping to identify fragments of chromosome 21 genes. Two trapped exons, from pools of chromosome 21-specific cosmids, showed homology to the Drosophila white (w) gene. We subsequently cloned the corresponding cDNA for a human homologue of the Drosophila w gene (hW) from human retina and fetal brain cDNA libraries. The gene belongs to the ATP-b...

  6. Cloning and expression of the rat homologue of the Huntington disease gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt, I.; Epplen, J.T.; Riess, O. [Ruhr-Univ. Bochum (Germany)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Huntington`s disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder which is manifested usually in adult life. The age of onset is variable and leads to progressive symptoms including involuntary choreatic movements and various cognitive and psychiatric disturbances. Recently, a gene (IT15) was cloned containing a (CAG){sub n} repeat which is elongated and unstable in HD patients. IT15 is widely expressed in human tissues but unrelated to any known deduced protein sequence. To further investigate the HD gene, 15 rat cDNA libraries were screened. 24 clones have been identified covering the Huntingtin gene. Comparison of the Huntingtin gene between human and rat revealed homologies between 80% and 87% at the DNA level and about 90% at the protein level. These analyses will help to define biologically important sequence regions, e.g., via evolutionary conservation. One clone contains the (CAG){sub n} repeat which consists of eight triplets compared to seven triplets in the mouse and a median of 17 in human. As in humans there are two transcripts arising from differential 3{prime}-polyadenylation. In the 3{prime}UTR a stretch of about 280 bp is exchanged for a 250 bp fragment with no homology in rodents and man. The cDNA clones are currently used to study Huntingtin gene expression during development in rodent tissues. RNA in situ hybridization of embryonic sections shows predominant signals in all neuronal tissues. In contrast to previously published data Huntingtin mRNA expression in testis is increased in spermatocytes vs. spermatogonia.

  7. Mouse Homologue of the Schizophrenia Susceptibility Gene ZNF804A as a Target of Hoxc8

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyun Joo Chung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using a ChIP-cloning technique, we identified a Zinc finger protein 804a (Zfp804a as one of the putative Hoxc8 downstream target genes. We confirmed binding of Hoxc8 to an intronic region of Zfp804a by ChIP-PCR in F9 cells as well as in mouse embryos. Hoxc8 upregulated Zfp804a mRNA levels and augmented minimal promoter activity in vitro. In E11.5 mouse embryos, Zfp804a and Hoxc8 were coexpressed. Recent genome-wide studies identified Zfp804a (or ZNF804A in humans as a plausible marker for schizophrenia, leading us to hypothesize that this embryogenic regulatory control might also exert influence in development of complex traits such as psychosis.

  8. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  9. Activation of pur Gene Expression by a Homologue of the Bacillus subtilis PurR repressor:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kilstrup, Mogens; Martinussen, Jan

    1998-01-01

    A purR::pGh9:Iss1 mutant was obtained in Lactococcus lactis following transposon mutagenesis of strain MG1363 and selection for purine auxotrophs. After determination of the nucleotide sequence and deduction of the purR reading frame, the PurR product was found to be highly similar to the pur......R encoded repressor from Bacillus subtilis. The wildtype purR gene complements the purine auxotrophy of a purR::Iss1mutant, and it was shown that the purR::Iss1 mutation lowers transcription from the purine regulated L. lactis purD promoter. In a parallel study on the regulation of purC and purD expression...... in L. lactis (Accompanying report) we identified regions (PurBox sequences: AwwwCCGAACwwT) upstream of the promoters, with the central G-residue at exactly position –76 relative to the transcriptional start site. The PurBox’es were found to be required for high promoter activity and purine regulation...

  10. Sequence analysis, identification of evolutionary conserved motifs and expression analysis of murine tcof1 provide further evidence for a potential function for the gene and its human homologue, TCOF1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, J; Hovanes, K; Shiang, R; Dixon, M J

    1997-05-01

    The gene mutated in Treacher Collins syndrome, an autosomal dominant disorder of facial development, has recently been cloned. While the function of the predicted protein, Treacle, is unknown, it has been shown to share a number of features with the highly phosphorylated nucleolar phosphoproteins, which play a role in nucleolar-cytoplasmic transport. In the current study, the murine homologue of the Treacher Collins syndrome gene has been isolated and shown to encode a low complexity, serine/alanine-rich protein of 133 kDa. Interspecies comparison indicates that the proteins display 61.5% identity, with the level of conservation being greatest in the regions of acidic/basic amino acid repeats and nuclear localization signals. These features are shared with the nucleolar phosphoproteins. Confirmation that the gene isolated in the current study is orthologous with the Treacher Collins syndrome gene was provided by the demonstration that it mapped to central mouse chromosome 18 in a conserved syntenic region with human chromosome 5q21-q33. Expression analysis in the mouse indicated that the gene was expressed in a wide variety of embryonic and adult tissues. Peak levels of expression in the developing embryo were observed at the edges of the neural folds immediately prior to fusion, and also in the developing branchial arches at the times of critical morphogenetic events. These observations support a role for the gene in the development of the craniofacial complex and provide further evidence that the gene encodes a protein which may be involved in nucleolar-cytoplasmic transport.

  11. Enhancer of the rudimentary gene homologue (ERH expression pattern in sporadic human breast cancer and normal breast tissue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Knüchel Ruth

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human gene ERH (Enhancer of the Rudimentary gene Homologue has previously been identified by in silico analysis of four million ESTs as a gene differentially expressed in breast cancer. The biological function of ERH protein has not been fully elucidated, however functions in cell cycle progression, pyrimidine metabolism a possible interaction with p21(Cip1/Waf1 via the Ciz1 zinc finger protein have been suggested. The aim of the present study was a systematic characterization of ERH expression in human breast cancer in order to evaluate possible clinical applications of this molecule. Methods The expression pattern of ERH was analyzed using multiple tissue northern blots (MTN on a panel of 16 normal human tissues and two sets of malignant/normal breast and ovarian tissue samples. ERH expression was further analyzed in breast cancer and normal breast tissues and in tumorigenic as well as non-tumorigenic breast cancer cell lines, using quantitative RT-PCR and non-radioisotopic in situ hybridization (ISH. Results Among normal human tissues, ERH expression was most abundant in testis, heart, ovary, prostate, and liver. In the two MTN sets of malignant/normal breast and ovarian tissue,ERH was clearly more abundantly expressed in all tumours than in normal tissue samples. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that ERH expression was significantly more abundant in tumorigenic than in non-tumorigenic breast cancer cell lines (4.5-fold; p = 0.05, two-tailed Mann-Whitney U-test; the same trend was noted in a set of 25 primary invasive breast cancers and 16 normal breast tissue samples (2.5-fold; p = 0.1. These findings were further confirmed by non-radioisotopic ISH in human breast cancer and normal breast tissue. Conclusion ERH expression is clearly up-regulated in malignant as compared with benign breast cells both in primary human breast cancer and in cell models of breast cancer. Since similar results were obtained for ovarian

  12. A gonococcal homologue of meningococcal γ-glutamyl transpeptidase gene is a new type of bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Haruo

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been speculated that the γ-glutamyl transpeptidase (ggt gene is present only in Neisseria meningitidis and not among related species such as Neisseria gonorrhoeae and Neisseria lactamica, because N. meningitidis is the only bacterium with GGT activity. However, nucleotide sequences highly homologous to the meningococcal ggt gene were found in the genomes of N. gonorrhoeae isolates. Results The gonococcal homologue (ggt gonococcal homologue; ggh was analyzed. The nucleotide sequence of the ggh gene was approximately 95 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. An open reading frame in the ggh gene was disrupted by an ochre mutation and frameshift mutations induced by a 7-base deletion, but the amino acid sequences deduced from the artificially corrected ggh nucleotide sequences were approximately 97 % identical to that of the meningococcal ggt gene. The analyses of the sequences flanking the ggt and ggh genes revealed that both genes were localized in a common DNA region containing the fbp-ggt (or ggh-glyA-opcA-dedA-abcZ gene cluster. The expression of the ggh RNA could be detected by dot blot, RT-PCR and primer extension analyses. Moreover, the truncated form of ggh-translational product was also found in some of the gonococcal isolates. Conclusion This study has shown that the gonococcal ggh gene is a pseudogene of the meningococcal ggt gene, which can also be designated as Ψggt. The gonococcal ggh (Ψggt gene is the first identified bacterial pseudogene that is transcriptionally active but phenotypically silent.

  13. Isolation and characterization of the human homologue of rig and its pseudogenes: The functional gene has features characteristic of housekeeping genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiga, Kiyoto; Yamamoto, Hiroshi; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    Rig (rat insulinoma gene) was first isolated from a cDNA library of rat insulinomas and has been found to be activated in various human tumors such as insulinomas, esophageal cancers, and colon cancers. Here the authors isolated the human homologue of rig from a genomic DNA library constructed from a human esophageal carcinoma and determined its complete nucleotide sequence. The gene is composed of about 3,000 nucleotides and divided into four exons separated by three introns: exon 3 encodes the nuclear location signal and the DNA-binding domain of the RIG protein. The transcription initiation site was located at -46 base pairs upstream from the first ATG codon. The 5'-flanking region of the gene has no apparent TATA-box or CAAT-box sequence. However, two GC boxes are found at -189 and -30 base pairs upstream from the transcription initiation site and five GC boxes are also found in introns 1 and 2. The gene is bounded in the 5' region by CpG islands, regions of DNA with a high GC content and a high frequency of CpG dinucleotides relative to the bulk genome. Furthermore, the human genome contains at least six copies of RIG pseudogenes, and four of them have the characteristics of processed pseudogenes. From these results together with the finding that RIG is expressed in a wide variety of tissues and cells, they speculate that RIG belongs to the class of housekeeping genes, whose products are necessary for the growth of all cell types

  14. Analysis of expression of cMOAT (MRP2), MRP3, MRP4, and MRP5, homologues of the multidrug resistance-associated protein gene (MRP1), in human cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kool, M.; de Haas, M.; Scheffer, G. L.; Scheper, R. J.; van Eijk, M. J.; Juijn, J. A.; Baas, F.; Borst, P.

    1997-01-01

    By screening databases of human expressed sequence tags, we have identified three new homologues of MRP1, the gene encoding the multidrug resistance-associated protein, and cMOAT (or MRP2), the canalicular multispecific organic anion transporter gene. We call these new genes MRP3, MRP4, and MRP5.

  15. The human homologue of the Drosophila melanogaster flightless-I gene (fliI) maps within the Smith-Magenis microdeletion critical region in 17p11.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, K.S.; Nguyen, D.; Greenberg, F. [Baylor College of Medicing, Houston, TX (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    The Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) appears to be a contiguous gene deletion syndrome associated with a proximal deletion of the short arm of chromosome 17 in band p11.2. The spectrum of clinical findings includes short stature, brachydactyly, developmental delay, dysmorphic features, sleep disturbances and behavioral problems. The complex phenotypic features suggest deletion of several contiguous genes. However, to date no protein encoding gene has been mapped to the SMS critical region. Recently, Campbell described the cloning and characterization of D. melanogaster fli cDNAs and of homologous cDNAs from caenorhabditis elegans and from humans. Mutations in fliI result in loss of flight ability and, when severe, cause lethality due to incomplete cellularization with subsequent abnormal gastrulation. The amino acid sequence deduced from the FLI cDNA has 52% similarity to the human gelsolin protein and also has a N-terminal leucine-rich domain with 16 consecutive leucine-rich repeats (LRR). Here, we demonstrate that the human homologue (FLI) maps within the SMS critical region. Genomic cosmids were used as probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and localized this gene to the 17p11.2 region. Somatic cell hybrids and/or FISH analysis of lymphoblastoid cell lines form 12 SMS patients demonstrate that one copy of the FLI gene is deleted in all SMS patients analyzed with the common deletion. Further studies are required to determine if haploinsufficiency of FLI or other as yet unidentified genes is important for the expression of the SMS phenotype.

  16. Genetic analysis of the spindle checkpoint genes san-1, mdf-2, bub-3 and the CENP-F homologues hcp-1 and hcp-2 in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moore Landon L

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The spindle checkpoint delays the onset of anaphase until all sister chromatids are aligned properly at the metaphase plate. To investigate the role san-1, the MAD3 homologue, has in Caenorhabditis elegans embryos we used RNA interference (RNAi to identify genes synthetic lethal with the viable san-1(ok1580 deletion mutant. Results The san-1(ok1580 animal has low penetrating phenotypes including an increased incidence of males, larvae arrest, slow growth, protruding vulva, and defects in vulva morphogenesis. We found that the viability of san-1(ok1580 embryos is significantly reduced when HCP-1 (CENP-F homologue, MDF-1 (MAD-1 homologue, MDF-2 (MAD-2 homologue or BUB-3 (predicted BUB-3 homologue are reduced by RNAi. Interestingly, the viability of san-1(ok1580 embryos is not significantly reduced when the paralog of HCP-1, HCP-2, is reduced. The phenotype of san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi embryos includes embryonic and larval lethality, abnormal organ development, and an increase in abnormal chromosome segregation (aberrant mitotic nuclei, anaphase bridging. Several of the san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi animals displayed abnormal kinetochore (detected by MPM-2 and microtubule structure. The survival of mdf-2(RNAi;hcp-1(RNAi embryos but not bub-3(RNAi;hcp-1(RNAi embryos was also compromised. Finally, we found that san-1(ok1580 and bub-3(RNAi, but not hcp-1(RNAi embryos, were sensitive to anoxia, suggesting that like SAN-1, BUB-3 has a functional role as a spindle checkpoint protein. Conclusion Together, these data suggest that in the C. elegans embryo, HCP-1 interacts with a subset of the spindle checkpoint pathway. Furthermore, the fact that san-1(ok1580;hcp-1(RNAi animals had a severe viability defect whereas in the san-1(ok1580;hcp-2(RNAi and san-1(ok1580;hcp-2(ok1757 animals the viability defect was not as severe suggesting that hcp-1 and hcp-2 are not completely redundant.

  17. Homologues of Genetic Transformation DNA Import Genes Are Required for Rhodobacter capsulatus Gene Transfer Agent Recipient Capability Regulated by the Response Regulator CtrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brimacombe, Cedric A; Ding, Hao; Johnson, Jeanette A; Beatty, J Thomas

    2015-08-01

    Gene transfer agents (GTAs) morphologically resemble small, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) bacteriophages; however, their only known role is to package and transfer random pieces of the producing cell genome to recipient cells. The best understood GTA is that of Rhodobacter capsulatus, termed RcGTA. We discovered that homologues of three genes involved in natural transformation in other bacteria, comEC, comF, and comM, are essential for RcGTA-mediated gene acquisition. This paper gives genetic and biochemical evidence that RcGTA-borne DNA entry into cells requires the ComEC and ComF putative DNA transport proteins and genetic evidence that putative cytoplasmic ComM protein of unknown function is required for recipient capability. Furthermore, the master regulator of RcGTA production in bacterial horizontal gene transfer mechanisms, where donor DNA is packaged in transducing phage-like particles and recipient cells take up DNA using natural transformation-related machinery. Both of these differentiated subsets of a culture population, donors and recipients, are dependent on the same response regulator, CtrA. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is a major driver of bacterial evolution and adaptation to environmental stresses. Traits such as antibiotic resistance or metabolic properties can be transferred between bacteria via HGT; thus, HGT can have a tremendous effect on the fitness of a bacterial population. The three classically described HGT mechanisms are conjugation, transformation, and phage-mediated transduction. More recently, the HGT factor GTA was described, where random pieces of producing cell genome are packaged into phage-like particles that deliver DNA to recipient cells. In this report, we show that transport of DNA borne by the R. capsulatus RcGTA into recipient cells requires key genes previously thought to be specific to natural transformation pathways. These findings indicate that RcGTA combines central aspects of phage-mediated transduction and natural

  18. Exclusion of RAI2 as the causative gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S M; Ronce, N; Grayson, C; Dessay, B; Yates, J R; Trump, D; Toutain, A

    1999-05-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked condition characterised by congenital cataracts, microphthalmia and/or microcornea, unusual dental morphology, dysmorphic facial features, and developmental delay in some cases. Recent linkage studies have mapped the NHS disease gene to a 3.5-cM interval on Xp22.2 between DXS1053 and DXS443. We previously identified a human homologue of a mouse retinoic-acid-induced gene (RAI2) within the NHS critical flanking interval and have tested the gene as a candidate for Nance-Horan syndrome in nine NHS-affected families. Direct sequencing of the RAI2 gene and predicted promoter region has revealed no mutations in the families screened; RAI2 is therefore unlikely to be associated with NHS.

  19. The Orf virus E3L homologue is able to complement deletion of the vaccinia virus E3L gene in vitro but not in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vijaysri, Sangeetha; Talasela, Latha; Mercer, Andrew A.; Mcinnes, Colin J.; Jacobs, Bertram L.; Langland, Jeffrey O.

    2003-01-01

    Orf virus (OV), the prototypic parapoxvirus, is resistant to the effects of interferon (IFN) and this function of OV has been mapped to the OV20.0L gene. The protein product of this gene shares 31% amino acid identity to the E3L-encoded protein of vaccinia virus (VV) that is required for the broad host range and IFN-resistant phenotype of VV in cells in culture and for virulence of the virus in vivo. In this study we investigated whether the distantly related OV E3L homologue could complement the deletion of E3L in VV. The recombinant VV (VV/ORF-E3L) expressing the OV E3L homologue in place of VV E3L was indistinguishable from wt VV in its cell-culture phenotype. But VV/ORF-E3L was over a 1000-fold less pathogenic than wt VV (LD 50 > 5 x 10 6 PFU, compared to LD 50 of wtVV = 4 x 10 3 PFU) following intranasal infection of mice. While wt VV spread to the lungs and brain and replicated to high titers in the brain of infected mice, VV/ORF-E3L could not be detected in the lungs or brain following intranasal infection. VV/ORF-E3L was at least 100,000-fold less pathogenic than wt VV on intracranial injection. Domain swap experiments demonstrate that the difference in pathogenesis maps to the C-terminal domain of these proteins. This domain has been shown to be required for the dsRNA binding function of the VV E3L

  20. Light and auxin responsive cytochrome P450s from Withania somnifera Dunal: cloning, expression and molecular modelling of two pairs of homologue genes with differential regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, Sudhakar; Sangwan, Rajender Singh; Tripathi, Sandhya; Mishra, Bhawana; Narnoliya, L K; Misra, L N; Sangwan, Neelam S

    2015-11-01

    Cytochrome P450s (CYPs) catalyse a wide variety of oxygenation/hydroxylation reactions that facilitate diverse metabolic functions in plants. Specific CYP families are essential for the biosynthesis of species-specialized metabolites. Therefore, we investigated the role of different CYPs related to secondary metabolism in Withania somnifera, a medicinally important plant of the Indian subcontinent. In this study, complete complementary DNAs (cDNAs) of four different CYP genes were isolated and christened as WSCYP93Id, WSCYP93Sm, WSCYP734B and WSCYP734R. These cDNAs encoded polypeptides comprising of 498, 496, 522 and 550 amino acid residues with their deduced molecular mass of 56.7, 56.9, 59.4 and 62.2 kDa, respectively. Phylogenetic study and molecular modelling analysis of the four cloned WSCYPs revealed their categorization into two CYP families (CYP83B1 and CYP734A1) belonging to CYP71 and CYP72 clans, respectively. BLASTp searches showed similarity of 75 and 56 %, respectively, between the two CYP members of CYP83B1 and CYP734A1 with major variances exhibited in their N-terminal regions. The two pairs of homologues exhibited differential expression profiles in the leaf tissues of selected chemotypes of W. somnifera as well as in response to treatments such as methyl jasmonate, wounding, light and auxin. Light and auxin regulated two pairs of WSCYP homologues in a developing seedling in an interesting differential manner. Their lesser resemblance and homology with other CYP sequences suggested these genes to be more specialized and distinct ones. The results on chemotype-specific expression patterns of the four genes strongly suggested their key/specialized involvement of the CYPs in the biosynthesis of chemotype-specific metabolites, though their further biochemical characterization would reveal the specificity in more detail. It is revealed that WSCYP93Id and WSCYP93Sm may be broadly involved in the oxygenation reactions in the plant and, thereby, control

  1. Characterization of the Gene BmEm4, a Homologue of Drosophila E(splm4, from the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenghui Zeng

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The Drosophila E(splm4 gene contains some highly conserved motifs (such as the Brd box, GY box, K box, and CAAC motif in its 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR. It was shown to be a microRNA target gene in Drosophila and to play an important role in the regulation of neurogenesis. We identified a homologue of the E(splm4 gene from Bombyx mori called BmEm4 and examined the expression patterns of BmEm4 mRNA and protein. There was a lack of correlation in the expression of the mRNA and protein between the different developmental stages, which raises the possibility of posttranscriptional regulation of the BmEm4 mRNA. Consistent with this idea is the finding that the 3′ UTR contains two putative binding sites for microRNAs. Moreover, given that the expression is the highest in the larval head, as confirmed by immunohistochemistry, we propose that BmEm4 may also be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis. Immunostaining indicated that BmEm4 is located primarily in the cytoplasm.

  2. Characterization of the Gene BmEm4, a Homologue of Drosophila E(spl)m4, from the Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fenghui; Xie, Hongxia; Nie, Zuoming; Chen, Jian; Lv, Zhengbing; Chen, Jianqing; Wang, Dan; Liu, Lili; Yu, Wei; Sheng, Qing; Wu, Xiangfu; Zhang, Yaozhou

    2009-01-01

    The Drosophila E(spl)m4 gene contains some highly conserved motifs (such as the Brd box, GY box, K box, and CAAC motif) in its 3′ untranslated region (3′ UTR). It was shown to be a microRNA target gene in Drosophila and to play an important role in the regulation of neurogenesis. We identified a homologue of the E(spl)m4 gene from Bombyx mori called BmEm4 and examined the expression patterns of BmEm4 mRNA and protein. There was a lack of correlation in the expression of the mRNA and protein between the different developmental stages, which raises the possibility of posttranscriptional regulation of the BmEm4 mRNA. Consistent with this idea is the finding that the 3′ UTR contains two putative binding sites for microRNAs. Moreover, given that the expression is the highest in the larval head, as confirmed by immunohistochemistry, we propose that BmEm4 may also be involved in the regulation of neurogenesis. Immunostaining indicated that BmEm4 is located primarily in the cytoplasm. PMID:19830255

  3. Deep mRNA sequencing of the Tritonia diomedea brain transcriptome provides access to gene homologues for neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission and peptidergic signalling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Senatore

    Full Text Available The sea slug Tritonia diomedea (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Nudibranchia, has a simple and highly accessible nervous system, making it useful for studying neuronal and synaptic mechanisms underlying behavior. Although many important contributions have been made using Tritonia, until now, a lack of genetic information has impeded exploration at the molecular level.We performed Illumina sequencing of central nervous system mRNAs from Tritonia, generating 133.1 million 100 base pair, paired-end reads. De novo reconstruction of the RNA-Seq data yielded a total of 185,546 contigs, which partitioned into 123,154 non-redundant gene clusters (unigenes. BLAST comparison with RefSeq and Swiss-Prot protein databases, as well as mRNA data from other invertebrates (gastropod molluscs: Aplysia californica, Lymnaea stagnalis and Biomphalaria glabrata; cnidarian: Nematostella vectensis revealed that up to 76,292 unigenes in the Tritonia transcriptome have putative homologues in other databases, 18,246 of which are below a more stringent E-value cut-off of 1x10-6. In silico prediction of secreted proteins from the Tritonia transcriptome shotgun assembly (TSA produced a database of 579 unique sequences of secreted proteins, which also exhibited markedly higher expression levels compared to other genes in the TSA.Our efforts greatly expand the availability of gene sequences available for Tritonia diomedea. We were able to extract full length protein sequences for most queried genes, including those involved in electrical excitability, synaptic vesicle release and neurotransmission, thus confirming that the transcriptome will serve as a useful tool for probing the molecular correlates of behavior in this species. We also generated a neurosecretome database that will serve as a useful tool for probing peptidergic signalling systems in the Tritonia brain.

  4. The reduced mycorrhizal colonisation (rmc) mutation of tomato disrupts five gene sequences including the CYCLOPS/IPD3 homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkan, Nicholas J; Ruzicka, Dan R; Edmonds-Tibbett, Tamara; Durkin, Jonathan M H; Jackson, Louise E; Smith, F Andrew; Schachtman, Daniel P; Smith, Sally E; Barker, Susan J

    2013-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis in vascular plant roots is an ancient mutualistic interaction that evolved with land plants. More recently evolved root mutualisms have recruited components of the AM signalling pathway as identified with molecular approaches in model legume research. Earlier we reported that the reduced mycorrhizal colonisation (rmc) mutation of tomato mapped to chromosome 8. Here we report additional functional characterisation of the rmc mutation using genotype grafts and proteomic and transcriptomic analyses. Our results led to identification of the precise genome location of the Rmc locus from which we identified the mutation by sequencing. The rmc phenotype results from a deletion that disrupts five predicted gene sequences, one of which has close sequence match to the CYCLOPS/IPD3 gene identified in legumes as an essential intracellular regulator of both AM and rhizobial symbioses. Identification of two other genes not located at the rmc locus but with altered expression in the rmc genotype is also described. Possible roles of the other four disrupted genes in the deleted region are discussed. Our results support the identification of CYCLOPS/IPD3 in legumes and rice as a key gene required for AM symbiosis. The extensive characterisation of rmc in comparison with its 'parent' 76R, which has a normal mycorrhizal phenotype, has validated these lines as an important comparative model for glasshouse and field studies of AM and non-mycorrhizal plants with respect to plant competition and microbial interactions with vascular plant roots.

  5. The Drosophila homologue of vertebrate myogenic-determination genes encodes a transiently expressed nuclear protein marking primary myogenic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Paterson, B M; Walldorf, U; Eldridge, J; Dübendorfer, A; Frasch, M; Gehring, W J

    1991-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone, called Dmyd for Drosophila myogenic-determination gene, that encodes a protein with structural and functional characteristics similar to the members of the vertebrate MyoD family. Dmyd clone encodes a polypeptide of 332 amino acids with 82% identity to MyoD in the 41 amino acids of the putative helix-loop-helix region and 100% identity in the 13 amino acids of the basic domain proposed to contain the essential recognition code for muscle-specific gene activation...

  6. Capturing sequence variation among flowering-time regulatory gene homologues in the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah eSchiessl

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Flowering, the transition from the vegetative to the generative phase, is a decisive time point in the lifecycle of a plant. Flowering is controlled by a complex network of transcription factors, photoreceptors, enzymes and miRNAs. In recent years, several studies gave rise to the hypothesis that this network is also strongly involved in the regulation of other important lifecycle processes ranging from germination and seed development through to fundamental developmental and yield-related traits. In the allopolyploid crop species Brassica napus, (genome AACC, homoeologous copies of flowering time regulatory genes are implicated in major phenological variation within the species, however the extent and control of intraspecific and intergenomic variation among flowering-time regulators is still unclear. To investigate differences among B. napus morphotypes in relation to flowering-time gene variation, we performed targeted deep sequencing of 29 regulatory flowering-time genes in four genetically and phenologically diverse B. napus accessions. The genotype panel included a winter-type oilseed rape, a winter fodder rape, a spring-type oilseed rape (all B. napus ssp. napus and a swede (B. napus ssp. napobrassica, which show extreme differences in winter-hardiness, vernalization requirement and flowering behaviour. A broad range of genetic variation was detected in the targeted genes for the different morphotypes, including non-synonymous SNPs, copy number variation and presence-absence variation. The results suggest that this broad variation in vernalisation, clock and signaling genes could be a key driver of morphological differentiation for flowering-related traits in this recent allopolyploid crop species.

  7. An indigoidine biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982 contains an unusual IndB homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Dayu; Xu, Fuchao; Valiente, Jonathan; Wang, Siyuan; Zhan, Jixun

    2013-01-01

    A putative indigoidine biosynthetic gene cluster was located in the genome of Streptomyces chromofuscus ATCC 49982. The silent 9.4-kb gene cluster consists of five open reading frames, named orf1, Sc-indC, Sc-indA, Sc-indB, and orf2, respectively. Sc-IndC was functionally characterized as an indigoidine synthase through heterologous expression of the enzyme in both Streptomyces coelicolor CH999 and Escherichia coli BAP1. The yield of indigoidine in E. coli BAP1 reached 2.78 g/l under the optimized conditions. The predicted protein product of Sc-indB is unusual and much larger than any other reported IndB-like protein. The N-terminal portion of this enzyme resembles IdgB and the C-terminal portion is a hypothetical protein. Sc-IndA and/or Sc-IndB were co-expressed with Sc-IndC in E. coli BAP1, which demonstrated the involvement of Sc-IndB, but not Sc-IndA, in the biosynthetic pathway of indigoidine. The yield of indigoidine was dramatically increased by 41.4 % (3.93 g/l) when Sc-IndB was co-expressed with Sc-IndC in E. coli BAP1. Indigoidine is more stable at low temperatures.

  8. The TIR Homologue Lies near Resistance Genes in Staphylococcus aureus, Coupling Modulation of Virulence and Antimicrobial Susceptibility.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine Patot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Toll/interleukin-1 receptor (TIR domains in Toll-like receptors are essential for initiating and propagating the eukaryotic innate immune signaling cascade. Here, we investigate TirS, a Staphylococcus aureus TIR mimic that is part of a novel bacterial invasion mechanism. Its ectopic expression in eukaryotic cells inhibited TLR signaling, downregulating the NF-kB pathway through inhibition of TLR2, TLR4, TLR5, and TLR9. Skin lesions induced by the S. aureus knockout tirS mutant increased in a mouse model compared with wild-type and restored strains even though the tirS-mutant and wild-type strains did not differ in bacterial load. TirS also was associated with lower neutrophil and macrophage activity, confirming a central role in virulence attenuation through local inflammatory responses. TirS invariably localizes within the staphylococcal chromosomal cassettes (SCC containing the fusC gene for fusidic acid resistance but not always carrying the mecA gene. Of note, sub-inhibitory concentration of fusidic acid increased tirS expression. Epidemiological studies identified no link between this effector and clinical presentation but showed a selective advantage with a SCCmec element with SCC fusC/tirS. Thus, two key traits determining the success and spread of bacterial infections are linked.

  9. Hyper-radiation sensitivity of murine scid mutation and mapping of the human homologue HYRC1 gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komatsu, Kenshi; Ohta, Tohru; Niikawa, Norio; Okumura, Yutaka; Kubota, Nobuo.

    1994-01-01

    The murine severe combined immunodeficient mutation (scid) is characterized by a lack of both B and T cells, due to a defect in lymphoid variable-(diversity)-joining(V(D)J) rearrangement. Scid cells are highly sensitive to both radiation-induced killing and chromosomal aberrations. Present experiments also demonstrated the high sensitivity of scid cells to killing, because of a deficient repair of double strand breaks(DSB). Scid cells can repair only 60% of radiation-induced DSB for 3 hours, while normal cells repair 85% of the DSB. Significantly reduced Do and n values were obtained from survival curves of scid cells and were similar to ataxia-telangiectasia(AT) cells (a unique human disease conferring whole body radiosensitivity). However, the kinetics of DNA synthesis after irradiation were different between the two cell types. In contrast with the radioresistant DNA synthesis of AT cells, DNA synthesis of scid cells was markedly inhibited after irradiation. The existence of different mutations was also supported by evidence of complementation in somatic cell hybrids between scid cells and AT cells. Using these hybrid cells, fragments of human chromosome 8 were introduced into scid cells HPRT mutant via X-irradiation and somatic cell fusion. The resulting hybrid clones contained human DNA fragment(s) which complemented the hyper-radiosensitivity of the scid cells. Alu-PCR products from these hybrids were used for chromosome painting using the technique of chromosome in situ suppression hybridization, allowing assignment of the human HYRC1 (hyper-radiosensitivity of murine scid mutation, complementing 1) gene, a candidate for a V(D)J recombinant gene, to human chromosome 8q11. (author)

  10. The Mycobacterium tuberculosis homologue of the Mycobacterium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With the completion of genome sequencing of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and upsurge in the incidence of M. tuberculosis infection worldwide partly as a result of HIV pandemic, there is need for rationale approach to vaccine and chemotherapy discoveries for M. tuberculosis. The homologue of mig gene of. Mycobacterium ...

  11. E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, sensitizes activation of Rap1 in response to epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenei, Veronika; Andersson, Tommy; Jakus, Judit; Dib, Karim

    2005-01-01

    E3B1, a human homologue of the mouse gene product Abi-1, has been implicated in growth-factor-mediated regulation of the small GTPases p21 Ras and Rac. E3b1 is a regulator of Rac because it can form a complex with Sos-1 and eps8, and such a Sos-1-e3B1-eps8 complex serves as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Rac. In the present study, we found that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells sensitized EGF-induced activation of Rac1, whereas it had no impact on EGF-induced activation of p21 Ras . Remarkably, we found that EGF-induced activation of the p21 Ras -related GTPase Rap1 was also sensitized in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells. Thus, in NIH3T3/EGFR-e3B1 cells, maximal EGF-induced activation of Rap1 occurs with a dose of EGF much lower than in NIH3T3/EGFR cells. We also report that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells renders EGF-induced activation of Rap1 completely dependent on Src tyrosine kinases but not on c-Abl. However, EGF-induced tyrosine phosphorylation of the Rap GEF C3G occurred regardless of whether e3B1 was overexpressed or not, and this did not involve Src tyrosine kinases. Accordingly, we propose that overexpression of e3B1 in NIH3T3/EGFR cells leads to mobilization of Src tyrosine kinases that participate in EGF-induced activation of Rap1 and inhibition of cell proliferation

  12. A pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) WD40-repeat gene is a functional homologue of Arabidopsis TTG1 and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis during pomegranate fruit development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Simhon, Zohar; Judeinstein, Sylvie; Nadler-Hassar, Talia; Trainin, Taly; Bar-Ya'akov, Irit; Borochov-Neori, Hamutal; Holland, Doron

    2011-11-01

    Anthocyanins are the major pigments responsible for the pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) fruit skin color. The high variability in fruit external color in pomegranate cultivars reflects variations in anthocyanin composition. To identify genes involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis pathway in the pomegranate fruit skin we have isolated, expressed and characterized the pomegranate homologue of the Arabidopsis thaliana TRANSPARENT TESTA GLABRA1 (TTG1), encoding a WD40-repeat protein. The TTG1 protein is a regulator of anthocyanins and proanthocyanidins (PAs) biosynthesis in Arabidopsis, and acts by the formation of a transcriptional regulatory complex with two other regulatory proteins: bHLH and MYB. Our results reveal that the pomegranate gene, designated PgWD40, recovered the anthocyanin, PAs, trichome and seed coat mucilage phenotype in Arabidopsis ttg1 mutant. PgWD40 expression and anthocyanin composition in the skin were analyzed during pomegranate fruit development, in two accessions that differ in skin color intensity and timing of appearance. The results indicate high positive correlation between the total cyanidin derivatives quantity (red pigments) and the expression level of PgWD40. Furthermore, strong correlation was found between the steady state levels of PgWD40 transcripts and the transcripts of pomegranate homologues of the structural genes PgDFR and PgLDOX. PgWD40, PgDFR and PgLDOX expression also correlated with the expression of pomegranate homologues of the regulatory genes PgAn1 (bHLH) and PgAn2 (MYB). On the basis of our results we propose that PgWD40 is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin biosynthesis during pomegranate fruit development and that expression of PgWD40, PgAn1 and PgAn2 in the pomegranate fruit skin is required to regulate the expression of downstream structural genes involved in the anthocyanin biosynthesis.

  13. Rett syndrome: genes, synapses, circuits and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek eBanerjee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system proceeds through a set of complex checkpoints which arise from a combination of sequential gene expression and early neural activity sculpted by the environment. Genetic and environmental insults lead to neurodevelopmental disorders which encompass a large group of diseases that result from anatomical and physiological abnormalities during maturation and development of brain circuits. Rett syndrome (RTT is a postnatal neurological disorder of genetic origin, caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. It features neuropsychiatric abnormalities like motor dysfunctions and mild to severe cognitive impairment. This review discusses several key questions and attempts to evaluate recently developed animal models, cell-type specific function of MeCP2, defects in neural circuit plasticity and possible therapeutic strategies. Finally, we also discuss how genes, proteins and overlapping signaling pathways affect the molecular etiology of apparently unrelated neuropsychiatric disorders, an understanding of which can offer novel therapeutic strategies.

  14. Brucella melitensis VjbR and C12-HSL regulons: contributions of the N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone signaling molecule and LuxR homologue VjbR to gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garner Harold R

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Quorum sensing is a communication system that regulates gene expression in response to population density and often regulates virulence determinants. Deletion of the luxR homologue vjbR highly attenuates intracellular survival of Brucella melitensis and has been interpreted to be an indication of a role for QS in Brucella infection. Confirmation for such a role was suggested, but not confirmed, by the demonstrated in vitro synthesis of an auto-inducer (AI by Brucella cultures. In an effort to further delineate the role of VjbR to virulence and survival, gene expression under the control of VjbR and AI was characterized using microarray analysis. Results Analyses of wildtype B. melitensis and isogenic ΔvjbR transciptomes, grown in the presence and absence of exogenous N-dodecanoyl homoserine lactone (C12-HSL, revealed a temporal pattern of gene regulation with variances detected at exponential and stationary growth phases. Comparison of VjbR and C12-HSL transcriptomes indicated the shared regulation of 127 genes with all but 3 genes inversely regulated, suggesting that C12-HSL functions via VjbR in this case to reverse gene expression at these loci. Additional analysis using a ΔvjbR mutant revealed that AHL also altered gene expression in the absence of VjbR, up-regulating expression of 48 genes and a luxR homologue blxR 93-fold at stationary growth phase. Gene expression alterations include previously un-described adhesins, proteases, antibiotic and toxin resistance genes, stress survival aids, transporters, membrane biogenesis genes, amino acid metabolism and transport, transcriptional regulators, energy production genes, and the previously reported fliF and virB operons. Conclusions VjbR and C12-HSL regulate expression of a large and diverse number of genes. Many genes identified as virulence factors in other bacterial pathogens were found to be differently expressed, suggesting an important contribution to intracellular

  15. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors...... metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait...... and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664...

  16. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is the most prevalent hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. A significant proportion of variants identified in MMR and other common cancer susceptibility genes are missense or noncoding changes whose...

  17. Characterization of the family of Mistic homologues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castronovo Samantha

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mistic is a unique Bacillus subtilis protein with virtually no detectable homologues in GenBank, which appears to integrate into the bacterial membrane despite an overall hydrophilic composition. These unusual properties have been shown to be useful for high-yield recombinant expression of other membrane proteins through fusion to the C-terminus of Mistic. To better understand the structure and function of Mistic, we systematically searched for and characterized homologous proteins among closely related bacteria. Results Three homologues of Mistic were found with 62% to 93% residue identity, all only 84 residues in length, corresponding to the C-terminal residues of B. subtilis Mistic. In every case, the Mistic gene was found partially overlapping a downstream gene for a K+ channel protein. Residue variation amongst these sequences is restricted to loop regions of the protein's structure, suggesting that secondary structure elements and overall fold have been conserved. Additionally, all three homologues retain the functional ability to chaperone fusion partners to the membrane. Conclusion The functional core of Mistic consists of 84 moderately conserved residues that are sufficient for membrane targeting and integration. Understanding the minimal structural and chemical complexity of Mistic will lead to insights into the mechanistic underpinnings of Mistic-chaperoned membrane integration, as well as how to optimize its use for the recombinant heterologous expression of other integral membrane proteins of interest.

  18. Blood Gene Expression Predicts Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Danger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS, the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, leads to poor long-term survival after lung transplantation. Identifying predictors of BOS is essential to prevent the progression of dysfunction before irreversible damage occurs. By using a large set of 107 samples from lung recipients, we performed microarray gene expression profiling of whole blood to identify early biomarkers of BOS, including samples from 49 patients with stable function for at least 3 years, 32 samples collected at least 6 months before BOS diagnosis (prediction group, and 26 samples at or after BOS diagnosis (diagnosis group. An independent set from 25 lung recipients was used for validation by quantitative PCR (13 stables, 11 in the prediction group, and 8 in the diagnosis group. We identified 50 transcripts differentially expressed between stable and BOS recipients. Three genes, namely POU class 2 associating factor 1 (POU2AF1, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1A (TCL1A, and B cell lymphocyte kinase, were validated as predictive biomarkers of BOS more than 6 months before diagnosis, with areas under the curve of 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78 respectively. These genes allow stratification based on BOS risk (log-rank test p < 0.01 and are not associated with time posttransplantation. This is the first published large-scale gene expression analysis of blood after lung transplantation. The three-gene blood signature could provide clinicians with new tools to improve follow-up and adapt treatment of patients likely to develop BOS.

  19. Translocation breakpoint at 7q31 associated with tics: further evidence for IMMP2L as a candidate gene for Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Cooper-Charles, Lisa; McMullan, Dominic J; Walker, Judith M; Davison, Val; Morton, Jenny

    2011-06-01

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a complex neuropsychiatric disorder with a strong genetic basis. We identified a male patient with Tourette syndrome-like tics and an apparently balanced de novo translocation [46,XY,t(2;7)(p24.2;q31)]. Further analysis using array comparative genomic hybridisation (CGH) revealed a cryptic deletion at 7q31.1-7q31.2. Breakpoints disrupting this region have been reported in one isolated and one familial case of Tourette syndrome. In our case, IMMP2L, a gene coding for a human homologue of the yeast inner mitochondrial membrane peptidase subunit 2, was disrupted by the breakpoint on 7q31.1, with deletion of exons 1-3 of the gene. The IMMP2L gene has previously been proposed as a candidate gene for Tourette syndrome, and our case provides further evidence of its possible role in the pathogenesis. The deleted region (7q31.1-7q31.2) of 7.2 Mb of genomic DNA also encompasses numerous genes, including FOXP2, associated with verbal dyspraxia, and the CFTR gene.

  20. Do the MTHFR gene polymorphism and Down syndrome pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Down syndrome, the most common trisomy 21 arises from abnormal chromosomal segregation. The etiology includes genetic and acquired factors. The main genetic factor that is well appreciated for onset of Down syndrome pregnancy is MTHFR gene polymorphism. But till date, no final conclusion has arrived ...

  1. ADAMTS-13 gene expression in antiphospholipid syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veysel Sabri Hançer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thrombosis and fetal mortality. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA is an important histological finding in catastrophic APS (CAPS and in APS patients with nephropathy. Analysis of familial thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura patients showed that there are mutations in the ADAMTS-13 gene that lead to functional defects in the ADAMTS-13 enzyme. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the aforementioned mutations in APS, as well as to evaluate the level and activity of the ADAMTS-13 enzyme in patients with APS. C365del, Q449stop codon, P475S, and C508Y mutations were analyzed in APS patients. Transcriptions were analyzed using real-time PCR, and the level and activity of ADAMTS-13 were analyzed via fluorogenic assay. None of the mutations tested were present in the patient or control groups. The level of ADAMTS-13 mRNA in the patient group was 50% lower than that in the control group. Although a significant difference in ADAMTS-13 activity was not observed between the patient and control groups, a significant association was observed with the level of ADAMTS-13 (p<0.0001. The level and activity of ADAMTS-13 were not associated with thrombotic complications, thrombocytopenia, or pregnancy complications in the patients with APS.

  2. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  3. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  4. Mutations in the Treacher Collins syndrome gene lead to mislocalization of the nucleolar protein treacle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, K L; Dixon, J; Dixon, M J

    1998-10-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development, the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. The TCS gene ( TCOF1 ), which is localized to chromosome 5q32-q33.1, recently has been identified by positional cloning. Analysis of TCOF1 revealed that the majority of TCS mutations result in the creation of a premature termination codon. The function of the predicted protein, treacle, is unknown, although indirect evidence from database analyses suggests that it may function as a shuttling nucleolar phosphoprotein. In the current study, we provide the first direct evidence that treacle is a nucleolar protein. An antibody generated against treacle shows that it localizes to the nucleolus. Fusion proteins tagged to a green fluorescent protein reporter were shown to localize to different compartments of the cell when putative nuclear localization signals were deleted. Parallel experiments using conserved regions of the murine homologue of TCOF1 confirmed these results. Site-directed mutagenesis has been used to recreate mutations observed in individuals with TCS. The resulting truncated proteins are mislocalized within the cell, which further supports the hypothesis that an integral part of treacle's function involves shuttling between the nucleolus and the cytoplasm. TCS is, therefore, the first Mendelian disorder resulting from mutations which lead to aberrant expression of a nucleolar protein.

  5. Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) is a tumor suppressor gene deleted or mutated in many human cancers such as glioblastoma, spinal tumors, prostate, bladder, adrenals, thyroid, breast, endometrium, and colon cancers. They result from loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for the PTEN ...

  6. Neurospora crassa fmf-1 encodes the homologue of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partial sequencing of this segment revealed a point mutation in the gene NCU 09387.1, a homologue of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe ste11+ regulator of sexual development. The fmf-1 mutation did not complement a NCU 09387.1 deletion mutation, and transformation with wild-type NCU 09387.1 complemented fmf-1.

  7. Isolation and characterization of an AGAMOUS homologue from cocoa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chaidamsari, T.; Sugiarit, H.; Santoso, D.; Angenent, G.C.; Maagd, de R.A.

    2006-01-01

    We report the cloning of a cDNA from TcAG, an AG (Arabidopsis thaliana MADS-box C-type transcription factor gene AGAMOUS) homologue from cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.). TcAG was in the cocoa flower expressed primarily in stamens and ovaries, comparable to AG in Arabidopsis. Additionally, we found that

  8. Dataset of the human homologues and orthologues of lipid-metabolic genes identified as DAF-16 targets their roles in lipid and energy metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavender Yuen-Nam Fan

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the review article entitled ‘Unravelling the role of fatty acid metabolism in cancer through the FOXO3-FOXM1 axis’ (Saavedra-Garcia et al., 2017 [24]. Here, we have matched the DAF-16/FOXO3 downstream genes with their respective human orthologues and reviewed the roles of these targeted genes in FA metabolism. The list of genes listed in this article are precisely selected from literature reviews based on their functions in mammalian FA metabolism. The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans gene orthologues of the genes are obtained from WormBase, the online biological database of C. elegans. This dataset has not been uploaded to a public repository yet.

  9. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  10. Cloning of disease-resistance homologues in end sequences of BAC clones linked to Fom-2, a gene conferring resistance to Fusarium wilt in melon (Cucumis melo L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi-Hong; Choi, Woobong; Thomas, Claude E; Dean, Ralph A

    2002-06-01

    Disease resistance has not yet been characterized at the molecular level in cucurbits, a group of high-value, nutritious, horticultural plants. Previously, we genetically mapped the Fom-2 gene that confers resistance to Fusarium wilt races 0 and I of melon. In this paper, two cosegregating codominant markers (AM, AFLP marker; FM, Fusarium marker) were used to screen a melon bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library. Identified clones were fingerprinted and end sequenced. Fingerprinting analysis showed that clones identified by each marker assembled into two separate contigs at high stringency. GenBank searches produced matches to leucine-rich repeats (LRRs) of resistance genes (R genes); to retroelements and to cellulose synthase in clones identified by FM; and to nucleotide-binding sites (NBSs) of R genes, retroelements, and cytochrome P-450 in clones identified by AM. A 6.5-kb fragment containing both NBS and LRR sequences was found to share high homology to TIR (Toll-interleukin-1 receptor)-NBS-LRR R genes, such as N, with 42% identity and 58% similarity in the TIR-NBS and LRR regions. The sequence information may be useful for identifying NBS-LRR class of R genes in other cucurbits.

  11. Angelman Syndrome Due to UBE3A Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Jyotindra Narayan; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Singhi, Pratibha

    2017-12-18

    A 12-y-old boy presented with developmental delay, autism, epilepsy, limb tremors and behavioral problems which posed a diagnostic challenge. Though his clinical profile and electroencephalogram were suggestive of Angelman syndrome, initial genetic tests were unyielding. Exome sequencing revealed a previously unreported mutation of Ubiquitin Protein Ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene, confirming the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome. The case is aimed to sensitize pediatricians about Angelman syndrome and to highlight the role of sequential investigations in establishing the diagnosis.

  12. Variants of the orexin2/hcrt2 receptor gene identified in patients with excessive daytime sleepiness and patients with Tourette's syndrome comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Miles D; Comings, David E; Abu-Ghazalah, Rashid; Jereseh, Yousef; Lin, Leo; Wade, Judy; Sakurai, Takeshi; Tokita, Shigeru; Yoshida, Tetsuo; Tanaka, Hirokazu; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Burnham, W McIntyre; Moldofsky, Harvey

    2004-08-15

    The orexin-2/hypocretin-2 (OX2R) receptor gene is mutated in canine narcolepsy and disruption of the prepro-orexin/hypocretin ligand gene results in both an animal model of narcolepsy and sporadic cases of the human disease. This evidence suggests that the structure of the OX2R gene, and its homologue, the OX1R gene, both members of the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) family, and the gene encoding the peptide ligands, the prepro-orexin/hypocretin gene, may be variables in the etiology of sleep disorders. We report a single stranded conformational polymorphism (SSCP) analysis of the coding regions of these genes in idiopathic sleep disorder patients diagnosed with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) (n = 28), narcolepsy (n = 28), Tourette's syndrome/chronic vocal or motor tic disorder (n = 70), and control subjects (n = 110). Two EDS patients showed a Pro11Thr change. One Tourette's syndrome patient was found to have a Pro10Ser alteration. The Pro10Ser and Pro11Thr variants were not found in non-disease populations. Analysis of the ability of the mutant receptors to mobilize calcium compared to the wild-type receptor in response to orexin agonists indicated that they resulted in decreased potency at high (etaM) concentrations of orexin ligands. Further work is warranted to study the variability of the orexin/hypocretin system in a variety of disorders characterized by EDS. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. USE OF GENE EXPRESSION ANALYSIS INCORPORATING OPERON-TRANSCRIPTIONAL COUPLING AND TOXICANT DOSE RESPONSE TO DISTINGUISH AMONG STRUCTURAL HOMOLOGUES OF MX

    Science.gov (United States)

    We recently described a general method that can improve microarray analysis of toxicant-exposed cells that uses the intrinsic power of transcriptional coupling and toxicant concentration-expression response data. In this analysis, we characterized changes in global gene expressio...

  14. Use of the Capripoxvirus homologue of Vaccinia virus 30 kDa RNA polymerase subunit (RPO30) gene as a novel diagnostic and genotyping target: development of a classical PCR method to differentiate Goat poxvirus from Sheep poxvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamien, Charles Euloge; Le Goff, Christian; Silber, Roland; Wallace, David B; Gulyaz, Velý; Tuppurainen, Eeva; Madani, Hafsa; Caufour, Philippe; Adam, Tajelser; El Harrak, Mehdi; Luckins, Antony George; Albina, Emmanuel; Diallo, Adama

    2011-04-21

    Sheep poxvirus (SPPV), Goat poxvirus (GTPV) and Lumpy skin disease virus (LSDV) are Capripoxviruses (CaPVs) responsible for causing severe poxvirus disease in sheep, goats and cattle, respectively. Serological differentiation of CaPVs is not possible and strain identification has relied on the implicitly accepted hypothesis that the viruses show well defined host specificity. However, it is now known that cross infections can occur and authentication of identity based on the host animal species from which the strain was first isolated, is not valid and should be replaced with molecular techniques to allow unequivocal strain differentiation. To identify a diagnostic target for strain genotyping, the CaPV homologue of the Vaccinia virus E4L gene which encodes the 30 kDa DNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunit, RPO30 was analyzed. Forty-six isolates from different hosts and geographical origins were included. Most CaPVs fit into one of the three different groups according to their host origins: the SPPV, the GTPV and the LSDV group. A unique 21-nucleotide deletion was found in all SPPV isolates which was exploited to develop a RPO30-based classical PCR test to differentiate SPPV from GTPV that will allow rapid differential diagnosis of disease during CaPV outbreaks in small ruminants. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene dosage effects of the imprinted delta-like homologue 1 (dlk1/pref1 in development: implications for the evolution of imprinting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simao Teixeira da Rocha

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Genomic imprinting is a normal process that causes genes to be expressed according to parental origin. The selective advantage conferred by imprinting is not understood but is hypothesised to act on dosage-critical genes. Here, we report a unique model in which the consequences of a single, double, and triple dosage of the imprinted Dlk1/Pref1, normally repressed on the maternally inherited chromosome, can be assessed in the growing embryo. BAC-transgenic mice were generated that over-express Dlk1 from endogenous regulators at all sites of embryonic activity. Triple dosage causes lethality associated with major organ abnormalities. Embryos expressing a double dose of Dlk1, recapitulating loss of imprinting, are growth enhanced but fail to thrive in early life, despite the early growth advantage. Thus, any benefit conferred by increased embryonic size is offset by postnatal lethality. We propose a negative correlation between gene dosage and survival that fixes an upper limit on growth promotion by Dlk1, and we hypothesize that trade-off between growth and lethality might have driven imprinting at this locus.

  16. A homologue of the yeast SHE4 gene is essential for the transition between the syncytial and cellular stages during sexual reproduction of the fungus Podospora anserina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berteaux-Lecellier, V; Zickler, D; Debuchy, R; Panvier-Adoutte, A; Thompson-Coffe, C; Picard, M

    1998-01-01

    The Podospora anserina cro1 gene was identified as a gene required for sexual sporulation. Crosses homozygous for the cro1-1 mutation yield fruiting bodies which produce few asci due to the formation of giant plurinucleate cells instead of dikaryotic cells after fertilization. This defect does not impair karyogamy, but meioses of the resultant polyploid nuclei are most often abortive. Cytological studies suggest that the primary defect of the mutant is its inability to form septa between the daughter nuclei after each mitosis, a step specific for normal dikaryotic cell divisions. The cro1-1 mutant would thus be unable to leave the syncytial vegetative state while abiding by the meiotic programme. cro1-1 also shows defects in ascospore germination and growth rate. GFP-tagging of the CRO1 protein reveals that it is a cytosolic protein mainly expressed at the beginning of the dikaryotic stage and at the time of ascospore maturation. The CRO1 protein exhibits significant similarity to the SHE4 protein, which is required for asymmetric mating-type switching in budding yeast cells. Thus, a gene involved in asymmetric cell divisions in a unicellular organism plays a key role at the transition between the syncytial (vegetative) state and the cellular (sexual) state in a filamentous fungus. PMID:9482722

  17. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  18. Marfan syndrome gene search intensifies following identification of basic defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, T.

    1990-10-03

    Somewhere, quite possible along chromosomes 8 and/or 15, the gene(s) for Marfan syndrome will be found. The search is intensifying following a report that faulty scaffolding in the body's connective tissue appears to be the long sought after defect behind the syndrome, and inherited disorder that has caused the premature death of young, healthy-looking individuals. Finding that something in the living masonry of the human body has proven to be a 30-year inquisition of nearly two dozen molecules that has engaged investigators worldwide. Historically, researchers have searched for a structural flaw in one of the collagen molecules to explain the cause of Marfan Syndrome. Using monoclonal antibodies, researchers have implicated microfibrils, the extracellular filaments that provide a matrix for the deposit of elastin during embryonic development.

  19. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Kallmann syndrome and ichthyosis: a case of contiguous gene deletion syndrome

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    Irene Berges-Raso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and characterized by anosmia or hyposmia due to hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs; osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome can develop due to longstanding untreated hypogonadism. Kallmann syndrome affects 1 in 10 000 men and 1 in 50 000 women. Defects in 17 genes, including KAL1, have been implicated. Kallmann syndrome can be associated with X-linked ichthyosis, a skin disorder characterized by early onset dark, dry, irregular scales affecting the limb and trunk, caused by a defect of the steroid sulfatase gene (STS. Both KAL1 and STS are located in the Xp22.3 region; therefore, deletions in this region cause a contiguous gene syndrome. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with ichthyosis referred for evaluation of excessive height (2.07 m and weight (BMI: 29.6 kg/m2, microgenitalia and absence of secondary sex characteristics. We diagnosed Kallmann syndrome with ichthyosis due to a deletion in Xp22.3, a rare phenomenon.

  1. Identification of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S P; Ebenezer, N D; Poopalasundaram, S; Lehmann, O J; Moore, A T; Hardcastle, A J

    2004-10-01

    The disease intervals for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS [MIM 302350]) and X linked congenital cataract (CXN) overlap on Xp22. To identify the gene or genes responsible for these diseases. Families with NHS were ascertained. The refined locus for CXN was used to focus the search for candidate genes, which were screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of potential exons and intron-exon splice sites. Genomic structures and homologies were determined using bioinformatics. Expression studies were undertaken using specific exonic primers to amplify human fetal cDNA and mouse RNA. A novel gene NHS, with no known function, was identified as causative for NHS. Protein truncating mutations were detected in all three NHS pedigrees, but no mutation was identified in a CXN family, raising the possibility that NHS and CXN may not be allelic. The NHS gene forms a new gene family with a closely related novel gene NHS-Like1 (NHSL1). NHS and NHSL1 lie in paralogous duplicated chromosomal intervals on Xp22 and 6q24, and NHSL1 is more broadly expressed than NHS in human fetal tissues. This study reports the independent identification of the gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome and extends the number of mutations identified.

  2. Recessive mutations in EPG5 cause Vici syndrome, a multisystem disorder with defective autophagy

    OpenAIRE

    Cullup, Thomas; Kho, Ay L.; Dionisi-Vici, Carlo; Brandmeier, Birgit; Smith, Frances; Urry, Zoe; Simpson, Michael A.; Yau, Shu; Bertini, Enrico; McClelland, Verity; Al-Owain, Mohammed; Koelker, Stefan; Koerner, Christian; Hoffmann, Georg F.; Wijburg, Frits A.

    2012-01-01

    Vici syndrome is a recessively inherited multisystem disorder characterized by callosal agenesis, cataracts, cardiomyopathy, combined immunodeficiency and hypopigmentation. To investigate the molecular basis of Vici syndrome, we carried out exome and Sanger sequence analysis in a cohort of 18 patients. We identified recessive mutations in EPG5 (previously KIAA1632), indicating a causative role in Vici syndrome. EPG5 is the human homologue of the metazoan-specific autophagy gene epg-5, encodin...

  3. nuvA, an Aspergillus nidulans gene involved in DNA repair and recombination, is a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 and Neurospora crassa uvs-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwanejko, L; Cotton, C; Jones, G; Tomsett, B; Strike, P

    1996-03-01

    A 40 kb genomic clone and 2.3 kb EcoRI subclone that rescued the DNA repair and recombination defects of the Aspergillus nidulans nuvA11 mutant were isolated and the subclone sequenced. The subclone hybridized to a cosmid in a chromosome-specific library confirming the assignment of nuvA to linkage group IV and indicating its closeness to bimD. Amplification by PCR clarified the relative positions of nuvA and bimD. A region identified within the subclone, encoding a C3HC4 zinc finger motif, was used as a probe to retrieve a cDNA clone. Sequencing of this clone showed that the nuvA gene has an ORF of 1329 bp with two introns of 51 bp and 60 bp. Expression of nuvA appears to be extremely low. The putative NUVA polypeptide has two zinc finger motifs, a molecular mass of 48906 Da and has 39% identity with the Neurospora crassa uvs-2 and 25% identity with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD18 translation products. Although mutations in nuvA, uvs-2 and RAD18 produce similar phenotypes, only the nuvA11 mutation affects meiotic recombination. A role for nuvA in both DNA repair and genetic recombination is proposed.

  4. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological diseases: genes, syndromes, and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdinguio, Rocio G; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and modifications to histone proteins regulate high-order DNA structure and gene expression. Aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of many diseases, including cancer. The neurological disorder most intensely studied with regard to epigenetic changes is Rett syndrome; patients with Rett syndrome have neurodevelopmental defects associated with mutations in MeCP2, which encodes the methyl CpG binding protein 2, that binds to methylated DNA. Other mental retardation disorders are also linked to the disruption of genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms; such disorders include alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, and Coffin-Lowry syndrome. Moreover, aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification profiles of discrete DNA sequences, and those at a genome-wide level, have just begun to be described for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, and in other neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this Review, we describe epigenetic changes present in neurological diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  5. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  6. Tetralocular ovary and high silique width in yellow sarson lines of Brassica rapa (subspecies trilocularis) are due to a mutation in Bra034340 gene, a homologue of CLAVATA3 in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Satish Kumar; Paritosh, Kumar; Panjabi-Massand, Priya; Gupta, Vibha; Chandra, Atika; Sodhi, Y S; Pradhan, Akshay K; Pental, Deepak

    2014-11-01

    Genetic locus for tetralocular ovary (tet-o) in Brassica rapa was identified and it was shown that the number of locules and width of silique are associated. Brassica rapa is a highly polymorphic species containing many vegetables and oleiferous types. An interesting group of oleiferous types is the yellow sarson group (subspecies trilocularis) grown mostly in eastern India. This group contains lines that have bilocular ovaries, a defining trait of Brassicaceae, but also lines that have tetralocular ovaries. Yellow sarson lines commonly have high silique width which is further enhanced in the tetralocular types. We mapped the locus influencing tetralocular ovary in B. rapa using three mapping populations (F2, F6 and F7) derived from a cross between Chiifu (subspecies pekinensis, having bilocular ovary) and Tetralocular (having tetralocular ovary). QTL mapping of silique width was undertaken using the three mapping populations and a F2 population derived from a cross between Chiifu and YSPB-24 (a bilocular line belonging to yellow sarson group). Qualitative mapping of the trait governing locule number (tet-o) in B. rapa mapped the locus to linkage group A4. QTL mapping for silique width detected a major QTL on LG A4, co-mapping with the tet-o locus in bilocular/tetralocular cross. This QTL was not detected in the bilocular/bilocular cross. Saturation mapping of the tet-o region with SNP markers identified Bra034340, a homologue of CLAVATA3 of Arabidopsis thaliana, as the candidate gene for locule number. A C → T transition at position 176 of the coding sequence of Bra034340 revealed co-segregation with the tetralocular phenotype. The study of silique related traits is of interest both for understanding evolution under artificial selection and for breeding of cultivated Brassica species.

  7. A gene signature for post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, John W; Hagan, Suzanne; Herzyk, Pawel; Cannon, Celia; Behan, Peter O; Chaudhuri, Abhijit

    2009-01-01

    Background At present, there are no clinically reliable disease markers for chronic fatigue syndrome. DNA chip microarray technology provides a method for examining the differential expression of mRNA from a large number of genes. Our hypothesis was that a gene expression signature, generated by microarray assays, could help identify genes which are dysregulated in patients with post-infectious CFS and so help identify biomarkers for the condition. Methods Human genome-wide Affymetrix GeneChip arrays (39,000 transcripts derived from 33,000 gene sequences) were used to compare the levels of gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of male patients with post-infectious chronic fatigue (n = 8) and male healthy control subjects (n = 7). Results Patients and healthy subjects differed significantly in the level of expression of 366 genes. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated functional implications in immune modulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Prototype biomarkers were identified on the basis of differential levels of gene expression and possible biological significance Conclusion Differential expression of key genes identified in this study offer an insight into the possible mechanism of chronic fatigue following infection. The representative biomarkers identified in this research appear promising as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19555476

  8. A gene signature for post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannon Celia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, there are no clinically reliable disease markers for chronic fatigue syndrome. DNA chip microarray technology provides a method for examining the differential expression of mRNA from a large number of genes. Our hypothesis was that a gene expression signature, generated by microarray assays, could help identify genes which are dysregulated in patients with post-infectious CFS and so help identify biomarkers for the condition. Methods Human genome-wide Affymetrix GeneChip arrays (39,000 transcripts derived from 33,000 gene sequences were used to compare the levels of gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of male patients with post-infectious chronic fatigue (n = 8 and male healthy control subjects (n = 7. Results Patients and healthy subjects differed significantly in the level of expression of 366 genes. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated functional implications in immune modulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Prototype biomarkers were identified on the basis of differential levels of gene expression and possible biological significance Conclusion Differential expression of key genes identified in this study offer an insight into the possible mechanism of chronic fatigue following infection. The representative biomarkers identified in this research appear promising as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment.

  9. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. A patient with Werner syndrome and adiponectin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naotake; Hatanaka, Sachiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Kurosawa, Hiroko; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Iwai, Rie; Takahashi, Hidenori; Yoshida, Katsuya; Horie, Atsuya; Sakurai, Kenichi; Yagui, Kazuo; Saito, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shouji

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a premature aging disease characterized by genomic instability and increased cancer risk. Here, we report a 45-year-old diabetic man as the first Werner syndrome patient found to have an adiponectin gene mutation. Showing graying and loss of hair, skin atrophy, and juvenile cataract, he was diagnosed with Werner syndrome type 4 by molecular analysis. His serum adiponectin concentration was low. In the globular domain of the adiponectin gene, I164T in exon 3 was detected. When we examined effects of pioglitazone (15 mg/day) on serum adiponectin multimer and monomer concentrations using selective assays, the patient's relative percentage increased in adiponectin concentration was almost same as that in the 18 diabetic patients without an adiponectin mutation, but the absolute adiponectin concentration was half of those seen in diabetic patients treated with the same pioglitazone dose who had no adiponectin mutation. The response suggested that pioglitazone treatment might help to prevent future Werner syndrome-related acceleration of atherosclerosis. Present and further clinical relevant to atherosclerosis in this patient should be imformative concerning the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis in the presence of hypoadiponectinemia and insulin resistance.

  11. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. AIMS: In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have...... been described in the literature, but the cardiorespiratory phenotype has not been reported. Our aim is to describe clinical and autonomic features of these girls. METHODS: 10 girls with CDKL5 mutations and a diagnosis of Hanefeld variant have been evaluated on axiological and clinical aspects. In all...

  12. Gene screening in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiao Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the causative gene mutation for Marfan syndrome(MFSwith autosomal dominant hereditary in a Chinese family in Liaoning Province,China. METHODS: Venous blood was collected and candidate gene was selected to design primers according to the clinical phenotype. With genomic polymerase chain reaction(PCRperformed, the coding exons and their flanking intron in sequences of candidate gene were sequenced,DNA fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing method was used to determine the pathogenic gene.RESULTS:Phenotype of the proband was presented as ectopic lentis. Sequencing of the coding regions of FBN1 gene showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at nucleotide 640 in the 7 exon of FBN1 and the missense mutation made for Glycine into Serine(G214S. CONCLUSION:A heterozygous mutation of FBN1 c.A640G(p.G214Sis responsible for the Marfan syndrome in the four generation Chinese pedigree.

  13. The gene for death agonist BID maps to the region of human 22q11.2 duplicated in cat eye syndrome chromosomes and to mouse chromosome 6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Footz, T K; Birren, B; Minoshima, S; Asakawa, S; Shimizu, N; Riazi, M A; McDermid, H E

    1998-08-01

    Cat eye syndrome (CES) is associated with a duplication of a segment of human chromosome 22q11.2. Only one gene, ATP6E, has been previously mapped to this duplicated region. We now report the mapping of the human homologue of the apoptotic agonist Bid to human chromosome 22 near locus D22S57 in the CES region. Dosage analysis demonstrated that BID is located just distal to the CES region critical for the majority of malformations associated with the syndrome (CESCR), as previously defined by a single patient with an unusual supernumerary chromosome. However, BID remains a good candidate for involvement in CES-related mental impairment, and its overexpression may subtly add to the phenotype of CES patients. Our mapping of murine Bid confirms that the synteny of the CESCR and the 22q11 deletion syndrome critical region immediately telomeric on human chromosome 22 is not conserved in mice. Bid and adjacent gene Atp6e were found to map to mousechromosome 6, while the region homologous to the DGSCR is known to map to mouse chromosome 16. Copyright 1998 Academic Press.

  14. Crystal chemistry of sartorite homologues and related sulfosalts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berlepsch, Peter; Makovicky, Emil; Balic-Zunic, Tonci

    2001-01-01

    sartorite homologues, sulfosalt, crystal chemistry, coordination polyhedra, bond-pairs, crankshaft chains......sartorite homologues, sulfosalt, crystal chemistry, coordination polyhedra, bond-pairs, crankshaft chains...

  15. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Mariateresa; Amabile, Sonia; Acquaviva, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene ( RAI1 ), or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642) is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models) acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1 , its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path for therapeutic interventions.

  16. Sjogren Syndrome-Gene Therapy and its Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rahpeyma

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren syndrome is one of the autoimmune diseases which is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration to exocrine glands and causes keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Today, a large population, with a majority of women over 40, suffer from this disease and have several complications regarding oral health and reduced life quality such as severe dental caries, painful eyes, olfactory and gustatory deficiency, speech, mastication and swallowing discomforts. Unfortunately, these patients do not respond to the conventional therapies. Nowadays in medical world, which its target is basic therapy and not symptomatic one, several gene therapy approaches, have gained importance in treatment of this apparently incurable diseases. Due to the facts that this disease is the second prevelant autoimmune disease, after rheumatoid arthritis, and the conventional therapies of the disease are all relative and symptomatic, researchers have insisted on the basic and causative therapy through gene transfer more than before. In the Present article, through reviewing 58 references containing recent scientific and investigatory findings it has been tried, to consider the pathogenesis and conventional therapies of this syndrome. Another purpose of this study was to investigate several and potentially very effective gene transfer systems and different theraputic genes (mainly membrane water channels, ione transporter molecules, transcription factors, antifungal proteins and free radical scavengers.

  17. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith–Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falco M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mariateresa Falco,1,* Sonia Amabile,1,* Fabio Acquaviva2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DISMET, Section of Pediatric Clinical Genetics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290 is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene (RAI1, or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642 is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1, its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path

  18. Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders: 25 Years of Gene Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Aline; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder, presenting with skeletal, ocular, skin, and cardiovascular symptoms. Significant clinical overlap with other systemic connective tissue diseases, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS), and the MASS phenotype, has been documented. In MFS and LDS, the cardiovascular manifestations account for the major cause of patient morbidity and mortality, rendering them the main target for therapeutic intervention. Over the past decades, gene identification studies confidently linked the aforementioned syndromes, as well as nonsyndromic aneurysmal disease, to genetic defects in proteins related to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, greatly expanding our knowledge on the disease mechanisms and providing us with novel therapeutic targets. As a result, the focus of the developing pharmacological treatment strategies is shifting from hemodynamic stress management to TGF-β antagonism. In this review, we discuss the insights that have been gained in the molecular biology of MFS and related disorders over the past 25 years. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  19. Triple A syndrome: two novel mutations in the AAAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, Susanne; Huebner, Angela; Baechler-Sadoul, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Triple A syndrome is a rare disease of autosomal recessive inheritance. It was first described in 1978. The typical triad includes adrenocorticotrophic-hormone-resistant glucocorticoid insufficiency, reduced or absent tearing (alacrima) and achalasia. But clinical symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous and of variable clinically expression. This report describes a 7-year-old boy with a 1 year history of fatigue and muscle weakness. Physical examination showed skin and mucosal hyperpigmentation, and hormonal analysis revealed isolated glucocorticoid function. Medical history was marked by megaoesophagus and achalasia. The absence of tears when crying had been noted since birth. In the presence of the classical triad, triple A syndrome was diagnosed. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the AAAS gene on chromosome 12q13. The novel compound heterozygous mutation c.1304delA and c.1292-1294delTTCinsA was found.

  20. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with a hybrid complement gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Venables

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1-5; aliases CFHR1-5. CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS. The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1-21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A that has been previously described in association with aHUS. CONCLUSIONS: CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene.

  1. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Egyptian Turner Syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Manal F; Zarouk, Waheba A; Ruby, Mona O; Mahmoud, Wael M; Gad, Randa S

    2015-01-01

    Folate metabolism dysfunctions can result in DNA hypomethylation and abnormal chromosome segregation. Two common polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) encoding gene (C677T and A1298C) reduce MTHFR activity, but when associated with aneuploidy, the results are conflicting. Turner Syndrome (TS) is an interesting model for investigating the association between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and nondisjunction because of the high frequency of chromosomal mosaicism in this syndrome. To investigate the association of MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in TS patients and their mothers and to correlate these polymorphisms with maternal risk of TS offspring. MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were genotyped in 33 TS patients, their mothers and 15 healthy females with their mothers as controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing technique. Genotype and allele frequencies of both C677T and A1298C were not significantly different between TS cases and controls. There were no significant differences in C677T genotype distribution between the TS mothers and controls (p=1). The MTHFR 1298AA and 1298AC genotypes were significantly increased in TS mothers Vs. control mothers (p=0.002). The C allele frequency of the A1298C polymorphism was significantly different between the TS mothers and controls (p=0.02). The association of A1298C gene polymorphism in TS patients was found to increase with increasing age of both mothers (p=0.026) and fathers (p=0.044) of TS cases. Our findings suggest a strong association between maternal MTHFR A1298C and risk of TS in Egypt.

  2. Paraoxnase1 Gene Polymorphism in Childhood Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eisa, Amal A; Sukumaran, Vazhappilly J; Haider, Mohammad Z

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxonase1 (PON1) is a serum enzyme bound to high-density lipoproteins with antioxidant properties. Molecular studies of PON1 revealed 2 polymorphic sites at amino acids 55 and 192 resulting in 2 different allozymes, the L and M-genotype at residue 55 and A and B at site 192, respectively. We have studied the association between PON1 gene polymorphisms and the minimal change nephrotic syndrome/focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (MCNS/FSGS) types of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) in Kuwaiti Arab children. The PON1 gene, 55 and 192 polymorphisms were analyzed in 50 children with INS (32 MSCN, 18 FSGS) and compared to 50 controls. Serum creatinine, albumin and lipids were measured in all subjects. The LL genotype was detected in 50% of the INS patients compared to 48% of controls (p = 0.84). The heterozygous LM genotype was detected in 42% of INS patients compared 36% of controls (p = 0.68). The MM-genotype was detected in 8% of INS patients and 16% of controls (p = 0.35). The L-allele frequency in its homozygous and heterozygous forms was found in 71% of INS patients compared to 66% controls (p = 0.54). The L-allele frequency (LM and LL) was significantly higher in FSGS compared to MCNS patients (p = 0.0001) and when compared to controls (p = 0.0007). All patients and controls had the AA form of the 192 PON1 gene polymorphism. Our data demonstrate a strong association between the L-allele of PON1 gene 55 polymorphism with FSGS in Kuwaiti Arab children with INS. PON1 genotyping can help in the early prediction of FSGS, which might guide clinicians to a better therapeutic approach. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  4. Molecular Testing of MECP2 Gene in Rett Syndrome Phenotypes in Indian Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallar, Meenakshi; Rai, Archana; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mandal, Kausik; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Phadke, Shubha R

    2018-02-09

    To assess yield of MECP2 gene sequence variations analysis and large deletions in suspected cases of Rett syndrome. Descriptive study. Tertiary-care medical genetics center. Girls with neuroregression, postnatal microcephaly and signs and symptoms suggestive of classical and atypical Rett syndrome were classified into two groups. Group I consisted of girls with Classical and atypical Rett syndrome on basis on the Revised Rett Syndrome diagnostic criteria, 2010. Group II included girls with neuroregression and postnatal microcephaly and other Rett like features but not fulfilling the above criteria. Sanger sequencing of coding regions and large deletional analysis of MECP2 gene. Identification of mutation in MECP2 gene. Mutation in MECP2 gene was identified in 74% (14/19) in group I and none (0/17) in group II. The mutation detection rate was 92% (13/14) in group I classical Rett syndrome girls (2 with large deletions identified with Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification) and 20% (1/5) in group I atypical Rett syndrome girls. One novel MECP2 sequence variation was identified in group I classical Rett syndrome. The yield of the mutation detection in MECP2 is much higher in classical than in atypical Rett syndrome. In girls with some Rett like features, but not fulfilling revised Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria, mutation testing for MECP2 gene has a low yield.

  5. Genetic analysis of the CHD7 gene in Korean patients with CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Ju; Song, Mee Hyun; Choi, Soo-Young; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Jinwook; Kim, Un-Kyung; Bok, Jinwoong; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder known to be caused by the haploinsufficiency of the CHD7 gene. Heterozygous mutations in the CHD7 gene have been identified in approximately 60-70% of patients clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome. Although there have been many reports on the mutational spectrum of the CHD7 gene in patients with CHARGE syndrome worldwide, little is known about this syndrome in the Korean population. In this study, three Korean patients with CHARGE syndrome including one patient with Patau syndrome were evaluated for genetic analysis of the CHD7 gene using direct sequencing of all 38 exons and the flanking intronic regions. One nonsense and two novel missense mutations were identified in the CHD7 gene. Clinical symptoms caused by the missense mutations were much milder compared to the nonsense mutation, confirming the previously determined genotype-phenotype correlation in CHARGE syndrome. Our study demonstrates the importance of mutational screening of CHD7 in patients who have been diagnosed with other syndromes but display clinical features of CHARGE syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. [From gene to disease; EVC, EVC2, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hagen, J M; Baart, J A; Gille, J J P

    2005-04-23

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by short stature with short limbs, postaxial polydactyly and congenital cardiac defects. The syndrome can be caused by mutations in the EVC gene or the EVC2 gene. The genes are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration on chromosome 4p16. Clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by DNA analysis, which is currently offered by two laboratories in Italy.

  7. Evaluation for a novel methicillin resistance (mecC) homologue in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates obtained from injured military personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Anuradha; Crawford, Katrina; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Lloyd, Bradley; Ellis, Michael; Tribble, David R; Weintrob, Amy C

    2013-09-01

    A total of 102 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates collected from 50 injured service members (June 2009 to December 2011) at U.S. military treatment facilities were analyzed for the conventional mecA gene and mecC homologue by using standard PCR-based methods. The prevalence of the mecC homologue was zero.

  8. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  9. A lesion mimic phenotype in tomato obtained by isolating and silencing an Lls1 homologue

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spassieva, S; Hille, J

    Lesion mimic phenotypes serve as a tool to study the regulation of cell death in plants. In order to obtain a tomato lesion mimic phenotype, we used the conservation of the lethal leaf spot 1 (Lls1) genes between plant species. The tomato Lls1 homologue was cloned, sequenced and analyzed. It showed

  10. Baculovirus cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer photolyases show a close relationship with lepidopteran host homologues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biernat, M.A.; Ros, V.I.D.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2011-01-01

    Cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer (CPD) photolyases repair ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage using blue light. To get insight in the origin of baculovirus CPD photolyase (phr) genes, homologues in the lepidopteran insects Chrysodeixis chalcites, Spodoptera exigua and Trichoplusia ni were identified and

  11. Genetic Alterations within the DENND1A Gene in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette B; Nielsen, Michael F B; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disease among premenopausal women, is caused by both genes and environment. We and others previously reported association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the DENND1A gene and PCOS. We therefore sequenced the DENND1A gene...

  12. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  13. Investigation of Monnose-Binding Lectin gene Polymorphism in Patients with Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Toka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monnose-Binding lectin (MBL appears to play an important role in the immune system. The genetic polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene can result in a reduction of serum levels, leading to a predisposition to recurrent infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of a polymorphism in codon 54 of the MBL2 gene on the susceptibility to Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome (EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Material and Methods: Our study included 64 patients who were clinically and/or histopathologically diagnosed with EM, SJS, and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome and 66 healthy control subjects who were genotyped for the MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP method. For all statistical analyses, the level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of the B allele was 18% in the EM, SJS and SJS/TEN patient groups and 13% in the control group. No significant differences in allele frequencies of any polymorphism were observed between the patient and control groups, although the B allele was more frequent in the patient groups (p=0.328.Conclusion: Our results provide no evidence of a relationship between MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism and the susceptibility to EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. However, these findings should be confirmed in studies with a larger sample size.

  14. Genetic basis of prune belly syndrome: screening for HNF1β gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Candace F; Harrison, Steven M; Dajusta, Daniel; Zhang, Shaohua; Hajarnis, Sachin; Igarashi, Peter; Baker, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Although the cause of prune belly syndrome is unknown, familial evidence suggests a genetic component. Recently 2 nonfamilial cases of prune belly syndrome with chromosome 17q12 deletions encompassing the HNF1β gene have made this a candidate gene for prune belly syndrome. To date, there has been no large-scale screening of patients with prune belly syndrome for HNF1β mutations. We assessed the role of HNF1β in prune belly syndrome by screening for genomic mutations with functional characterization of any detected mutations. We studied patients with prune belly syndrome who were prospectively enrolled in our Pediatric Genitourinary DNA Repository since 2001. DNA from patient samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced for coding and splice regions of the HNF1β gene, and compared to control databases. We performed functional assay testing of the ability of mutant HNF1β to activate a luciferase construct with an HNF1β DNA binding site. From 32 prune belly syndrome probands (30 males, 2 females) HNF1β sequencing detected a missense mutation (V61G) in 1 child with prune belly syndrome. Absent in control databases, V61G was previously reported in 2 patients without prune belly syndrome who had congenital genitourinary anomalies. Functional testing showed similar luciferase activity compared to wild-type HNF1β, suggesting the V61G substitution does not disturb HNF1β function. One genomic HNF1β mutation was detected in 3% of patients with prune belly syndrome but found to be functionally normal. Thus, functionally significant HNF1β mutations are uncommon in prune belly syndrome, despite case reports of HNF1β deletions. Further genetic study is necessary, as identification of the genetic basis of prune belly syndrome may ultimately lead to prevention and improved treatments for this rare but severe syndrome. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exon expression and alternatively spliced genes in Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingfang; Liao, Isaac H; Zhan, Xinhua; Gunther, Joan R; Ander, Bradley P; Liu, Dazhi; Lit, Lisa; Jickling, Glen C; Corbett, Blythe A; Bos-Veneman, Netty G P; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Sharp, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is diagnosed based upon clinical criteria including motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that differences in exon expression and splicing might be useful for pathophysiology and diagnosis. To demonstrate exon expression and alternatively spliced gene differences in blood of individuals with TS compared to healthy controls (HC), RNA was isolated from the blood of 26 un-medicated TS subjects and 23 HC. Each sample was run on Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST (HuExon) arrays and on 3' biased U133 Plus 2.0 (HuU133) arrays. To investigate the differentially expressed exons and transcripts, analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed, controlling for age, gender, and batch. Differential alternative splicing patterns between TS and HC were identified using analyses of variance (ANOVA) models in Partek. Three hundred and seventy-six exon probe sets were differentially expressed between TS and HC (raw P |1.2|) that separated TS and HC subjects using hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis. The probe sets predicted TS compared to HC with a >90% sensitivity and specificity using a 10-fold cross-validation. Ninety genes (transcripts) had differential expression of a single exon (raw P < 0.005) and were predicted to be alternatively spliced (raw P < 0.05) in TS compared to HC. These preliminary findings might provide insight into the pathophysiology of TS and potentially provide prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. However, the findings are tempered by the small sample size and multiple comparisons and require confirmation using PCR or deep RNA sequencing and a much larger patient population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Alders, M.; Redeker, B.; Bliek, J.; Steenman, M.; Wiesmeyer, C.; de Meulemeester, M.; Ryan, A.; Kalikin, L.; Voûte, T.; de Kraker, J.; Hoovers, J.; Slater, R.; Feinberg, A.; Little, P.; Westerveld, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated

  17. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  18. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemaes, C.M.R.; van Tol, M.J.D.; Wang, J.; Dam, M.; van Eggermond, M.C.J.A.; Thijssen, P.E.; Aytekin, C.; Brunetti-Pierri, N.; van der Burg, M.; Graham Davies, E.; Ferster, A.; Furthner, D.; Gimelli, G.; Gennery, A.; Kloeckener-Gruissem, B.; Meyn, S.; Powell, C.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Shugar, A.; van den Elsen, P.J.; van der Maarel, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF

  19. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemaes, C.M.R.; Tol, M.J. van; Wang, J; Ostaijen-ten Dam, M.M. van; Eggermond, M.C. van; Thijssen, P.E.; Aytekin, C.; Brunetti-Pierri, N.; Burg, M. van der; aham Davies, E. Gr; Ferster, A.; Furthner, D.; Gimelli, G.; Gennery, A.; Kloeckener-Gruissem, B.; Meyn, S.; Powell, C.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Shugar, A.; Elsen, P.J. van den; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF

  20. Inhibition of natural killer cells by a cytomegalovirus MHC class I homologue in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, H E; Vally, H; Lynch, D M; Fleming, P; Shellam, G R; Scalzo, A A; Davis-Poynter, N J

    1997-04-03

    Herpesviruses, such as murine and human cytomegalovirus (MCMV and HCMV), can establish a persistent infection within the host and have diverse mechanisms as protection from host immune defences. Several herpesvirus genes that are homologous to host immune modulators have been identified, and are implicated in viral evasion of the host immune response. The discovery of a viral major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I homologue, encoded by HCMV, led to speculation that it might function as an immune modulator and disrupt presentation of peptides by MHC class I to cytotoxic T cells. However, there is no evidence concerning the biological significance of this gene during viral infection. Recent analysis of the MCMV genome has also demonstrated the presence of a MHC class I homologue. Here we show that a recombinant MCMV, in which the gene encoding the class I homologue has been disrupted, has severely restricted replication during the acute stage of infection compared with wild-type MCMV. We demonstrate by in vivo depletion studies that natural killer (NK) cells are responsible for the attenuated phenotype of the mutant. Thus the viral MHC class I homologue contributes to immune evasion through interference with NK cell-mediated clearance.

  1. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  2. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc) and Hodges's formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms) was prolonged (pTurner syndrome karyotypes (418.2 ± 24.8 vs. 407.6 ± 25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  4. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene.

  5. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-02-05

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), and 2 female carriers were heterozygous for the same variant. All 3 affected males presented with typical Nance-Horan syndrome features. One female carrier displayed lens opacities centered on the posterior Y-suture in both eyes, as well as mild dental abnormalities. We recorded the clinical features of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome family and broadened the spectrum of mutations in the NHS gene.

  6. Síndrome de Diógenes Diogenes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Perdigão Stumpf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Diógenes (SD caracteriza-se por descuido extremo com a higiene pessoal, negligência com o asseio da própria moradia, isolamento social, suspeição e comportamento paranoico, sendo frequente a ocorrência de colecionismo. A incidência anual é de 5/10.000 entre aqueles acima de 60 anos, e pelo menos a metade é portadora de demência ou algum outro transtorno psiquiátrico. As principais hipóteses etiológicas são: (1 a condição representaria o "estágio final" de um transtorno de personalidade; (2 a síndrome seria uma manifestação de demência do lobo frontal; (3 a SD seria o estágio final do subtipo hoarding do TOC; (4 a SD seria uma via final comum a diferentes transtornos psiquiátricos, especialmente aqueles associados ao colecionismo; (5 a síndrome seria precipitada por estressores biológicos, psicológicos e sociais, associados com a idade, em indivíduos com traços de personalidade predisponentes. É conhecido que existem apenas relatos de casos envolvendo tratamentos específicos para a SD, particularmente a risperidona. Por se tratar de condição grave, com elevada mortalidade por problemas clínicos, estudos se fazem necessários para determinar as melhores estratégias de abordagem desses pacientes. Os autores descrevem o caso de uma paciente com SD e fazem uma breve revisão da literatura.Diogenes syndrome (DSis characterized by extreme self-neglect, domestic squalor, social withdrawal, suspiciousness and paranoid behaviour and is often accompanied by excessive hoarding. The annual incidence is five per ten thousand of the population aged over 60, at least half of whom will have dementia or some other form of mental illness. The main etiological hypotheses are: (1 the condition represents the "end-stage" of a personality disorder; (2 the syndrome is a manifestation of a frontal-lobe dementia; (3 DS may be an end stage of the hoarding subtype of OCD; (4 DS may be a final common pathway of different

  7. Severe visual impairment and retinal changes in a boy with a deletion of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, R; Deconinck, H; Keymolen, K; Jansen, A; Van Esch, H

    2007-01-01

    We present the ophthalmologic findings in a boy with a deletion of Xp22 comprising the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome. Different mechanisms underlying the visual impairment in Nance-Horan syndrome are discussed.

  8. Collectrin gene screening in Turner syndrome patients with kidney ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    common to all TS, generally results in the full syndrome phe- ... Keywords. Turner syndrome; collectrin; horseshoe kidney; human genetics. Journal of ..... J. M. and Alessandrini P. 2006 Multicystic dysplastic kidney with ipsilateral abnormalities of genitourinary tract, experience in children. Urology 67, 603–607. O'Brien J.

  9. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  10. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  11. A family with Townes-Brocks syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism and a novel mutation of the SALL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Ik; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Han Wook; Oh, Sung Hee

    2010-12-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder caused by mutations in the SALL1 gene. Its signs and symptoms overlap with other genetic syndromes, including VACTERL association, Pendred syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, and cat eye syndrome. Structural vertebral abnormalities, hypoplasia of the thumb, and radial bone abnormalities, which are not usually associated with TBS, help in the differential diagnosis of these syndromes. We report the case of a family whose members were diagnosed with TBS with congenital hypothyroidism and had a novel SALL1 gene mutation.

  12. Tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease contiguous gene syndrome with Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jonathan; Modi, Lopa; Ramai, Daryl; Tortora, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are two diseases sharing close genetic loci on chromosome 16. Due to contiguous gene syndrome, also known as contiguous gene deletion syndrome, the proximity of TSC2 and PKD1 genes increases the risk of co-deletion resulting in a shared clinical presentation. Furthermore, Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare vaso-occlusive disease in the circle of Willis. We present the first case of TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome in a patient with MMD along with detailed histopathologic, radiologic, and cytogenetic analyses. We also highlight the clinical presentation and surgical complications in this case. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  13. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  14. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  15. Linked, if not the same, Mi-1 homologues confer resistance to tomato powdery mildew and root-knot nematodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Alireza; Kaloshian, Isgouhi; Vossen, Jack; Che, Daidi; Bhattarai, Kishor K; Fan, Junmei; Naher, Zabun; Goverse, Aska; Tjallingii, W Freddy; Lindhout, Pim; Visser, Richard G F; Bai, Yuling

    2011-04-01

    On the short arm of tomato chromosome 6, a cluster of disease resistance (R) genes have evolved harboring the Mi-1 and Cf genes. The Mi-1 gene confers resistance to root-knot nematodes, aphids, and whiteflies. Previously, we mapped two genes, Ol-4 and Ol-6, for resistance to tomato powdery mildew in this cluster. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Ol-4 and Ol-6 are homologues of the R genes located in this cluster. We show that near-isogenic lines (NIL) harboring Ol-4 (NIL-Ol-4) and Ol-6 (NIL-Ol-6) are also resistant to nematodes and aphids. Genetically, the resistance to nematodes cosegregates with Ol-4 and Ol-6, which are further fine-mapped to the Mi-1 cluster. We provide evidence that the composition of Mi-1 homologues in NIL-Ol-4 and NIL-Ol-6 is different from other nematode-resistant tomato lines, Motelle and VFNT, harboring the Mi-1 gene. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the resistance to both nematodes and tomato powdery mildew in these two NIL is governed by linked (if not the same) Mi-1 homologues in the Mi-1 gene cluster. Finally, we discuss how Solanum crops exploit Mi-1 homologues to defend themselves against distinct pathogens.

  16. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. IMPACT OF ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENE POLYMORPHISM ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF INSULIN RESISTANCE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roitberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the distribution of components of insulin resistance (IR syndrome and to study the frequency of their combinations in relation to the genotypes and allelic variants of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene.Subjects and methods. A group of clinically healthy patients (50 women and 42 men with different genotypes of the ACE gene was examined.The distribution of IR syndrome components and the frequency of their combinations were analyzed in relation to the genotypes and allelicvariants of the ACE gene.Results. A group of D allele carriers compared to A allele ones showed a pronounced tendency for the frequency of IR to reduce due to thehigher proportion of patients with complete IR syndrome. This observation becomes statistically significant in the assessment of homozygous variants of the ACE gene. At the same time dyslipidemia and hypertension in the presence of IR significantly more frequently occurred in patients with the DD genotype than in those with genotype II.Conclusion. There was a marked predominance of the manifestations of IR syndrome with a complete set of components in the DD genotypicgroup, which confirms the significant strong association between ACE gene polymorphism and IR syndrome.

  18. Gene expression signature of cerebellar hypoplasia in a mouse model of Down syndrome during postnatal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitalis Tania

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21. The mechanisms by which this aneuploidy produces the complex and variable phenotype observed in people with Down syndrome are still under discussion. Recent studies have demonstrated an increased transcript level of the three-copy genes with some dosage compensation or amplification for a subset of them. The impact of this gene dosage effect on the whole transcriptome is still debated and longitudinal studies assessing the variability among samples, tissues and developmental stages are needed. Results We thus designed a large scale gene expression study in mice (the Ts1Cje Down syndrome mouse model in which we could measure the effects of trisomy 21 on a large number of samples (74 in total in a tissue that is affected in Down syndrome (the cerebellum and where we could quantify the defect during postnatal development in order to correlate gene expression changes to the phenotype observed. Statistical analysis of microarray data revealed a major gene dosage effect: for the three-copy genes as well as for a 2 Mb segment from mouse chromosome 12 that we show for the first time as being deleted in the Ts1Cje mice. This gene dosage effect impacts moderately on the expression of euploid genes (2.4 to 7.5% differentially expressed. Only 13 genes were significantly dysregulated in Ts1Cje mice at all four postnatal development stages studied from birth to 10 days after birth, and among them are 6 three-copy genes. The decrease in granule cell proliferation demonstrated in newborn Ts1Cje cerebellum was correlated with a major gene dosage effect on the transcriptome in dissected cerebellar external granule cell layer. Conclusion High throughput gene expression analysis in the cerebellum of a large number of samples of Ts1Cje and euploid mice has revealed a prevailing gene dosage effect on triplicated genes. Moreover using an enriched cell

  19. TOR1 and TOR2 are structurally and functionally similar but not identical phosphatidylinositol kinase homologues in yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Helliwell, S. B.; Wagner, P.; Kunz, J.; Deuter-Reinhard, M.; Henriquez, R.; Hall, M. N.

    1994-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes TOR1 and TOR2 were originally identified by mutations that confer resistance to the immunosuppressant rapamycin. TOR2 was previously shown to encode an essential 282-kDa phosphatidylinositol kinase (PI kinase) homologue. The TOR1 gene product is also a large (281 kDa) PI kinase homologue, with 67% identity to TOR2. TOR1 is not essential, but a TOR1 TOR2 double disruption uniquely confers a cell cycle (G1) arrest as does exposure to rapamycin; disruption of T...

  20. Muir-Torre Syndrome: A Case Associated with an Infrequent Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Alexandra; Feser, Christina; Grekin, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of at least one sebaceous gland neoplasm, associated with an underlying visceral malignancy. Muir-Torre syndrome is believed to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome. Affected individuals are found to have germline mutations predominantly in DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, and much less frequently, MLH1. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with multiple cutaneous neoplasms including sebaceoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma; personal history of colorectal and endometrial cancer; and family history of colorectal cancer; found to have a deletion at mismatch repair gene MLH1. It is important to recognize the role of these less common gene deletions in producing the Muir-Torre syndrome phenotype, and consider the correlation of cutaneous manifestations with internal disease. The authors discuss the clinical presentation of Muir-Torre syndrome, methods of diagnosis, and the importance of regular medical surveillance to detect and prevent disease progression in Muir-Torre syndrome patients and their family members.

  1. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  2. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), a...

  3. Polymorphisms in genes RFC-1/CBS as maternal risk factors for Down syndrome in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-shuai; Wang, Chao; Qiao, Fu-yuan; Lv, Juan-juan; Feng, Ling

    2013-08-01

    To explore the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC-1), cystathionine b-synthase (CBS), two key genes in folate metabolism, and the risk of Down syndrome in China. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral lymphocytes of 104 mothers born children with Down syndrome and 184 age-matched control mothers. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction-fragment length polymorphism were used to examine the polymorphisms of RFC-1 A80G, CBS T833C and the relationship between these genotypes and the risk of Down syndrome was analyzed. We found that there were significant differences between RFC-1 G80G, CBS C833C polymorphisms among mothers of children with Down syndrome than among control mothers, with odds ratio of 1.51 (95 % CI 1.05-2.18), 1.53 (95 % CI 1.07-2.18) respectively. The combined presence of RFC1 mutant alleles and the CBS homozygous mutant allele (15/104) was associated with a 4.81-fold increased risk of having a child with Down syndrome (95 % CI 1.82-12.68, P = 0.0007). We concluded that RFC-1 and CBS gene mutation alleles are related to Down syndrome, and women with mutation RFC-1 G80G, CBS C833C OR combined with RFC-1 A80G and CBS 833TT genotype increase the risk of Down syndrome in China.

  4. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down syndrome screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.L.A.; Rodenburg, W.; Imholz, S.; Koster, M.P.H.; van Oostrom, C.T.M.; Breit, T.M.; Schielen, P.C.J.I.; de Vries, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues

  6. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Amna; Alsaleem, Badr

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. ...

  7. Gene expression analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid chromosomal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human aneuploidy is the leading cause of early pregnancy loss, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Due to the high mortality associated with aneuploidy, the pathophysiological mechanisms of aneuploidy syndrome remain largely unknown. Previous studies focused mostly on whether dosage compensation occurs, and the next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq is expected to eventually uncover the mechanisms of gene expression regulation and the related pathological phenotypes in human aneuploidy. Results Using next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq, we profiled the transcriptomes of four human aneuploid induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines generated from monosomy × (Turner syndrome), trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and partial trisomy 11:22 (Emanuel syndrome) as well as two umbilical cord matrix iPSC lines as euploid controls to examine how phenotypic abnormalities develop with aberrant karyotype. A total of 466 M (50-bp) reads were obtained from the six iPSC lines, and over 13,000 mRNAs were identified by gene annotation. Global analysis of gene expression profiles and functional analysis of differentially expressed (DE) genes were implemented. Over 5000 DE genes are determined between aneuploidy and euploid iPSCs respectively while 9 KEGG pathways are overlapped enriched in four aneuploidy samples. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the extra or missing chromosome has extensive effects on the whole transcriptome. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes reveals that the genes most affected in aneuploid individuals are related to central nervous system development and tumorigenesis. PMID:24564826

  8. Atypical progeroid syndrome: An unknown helicase gene defect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M. W. G.; van Andel, R. N. J.; Oshima, J.; Madan, K.; Nieuwint, A. W. M.; Aalfs, C. M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a boy with chromosomal breakage syndrome, who died of hepatocellular carcinoma at the age of 17 years. Other findings included growth retardation, bilateral cataracts, premature graying of hair and elevated levels of urinary hyaluronic acid. Intellectual functions were normal. Although

  9. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos; Melin, Beatrice; Nordling, Margareta; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Nilbert, Mef

    2016-11-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations. Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369 Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder mutation that accounted for 15% of the families with mutations in MLH1. In conclusion, the Swedish Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum is diverse with private MMR gene mutations in two-thirds of the families, has a significant contribution from internationally recognized mutations and a limited effect from founder mutations.

  10. Study on the correlation between KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Liu, Ning; Chen, Xiao Zhuang; Han, Kun Yuan; Zhu, Cai Zhong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome in elderly patients. From January 2014 to January 2015, 54 elderly patients with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in this study as the observation group. During the same period, 46 healthy elderly individuals were enrolled in this study as the control group. KCNJ11 gene polymorphism (rs28502) was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The expression levels of mRNA in different genotypes were detected using FQ-PCR. ELISA was used to evaluate the KCNJ11 protein expression in different genotypes. KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome was studied by measuring the blood pressure levels in patients with different genotypes. Three genotypes of KCNJ11 gene in rs28502 were CC, CT and TT. The CC, CT and TT genotype frequencies in healthy population were 8.5, 9.2 and 82.2%, respectively, while the genotype frequencies in patients with metabolic syndrome were 42.4, 49.8 and 7.8%, respectively. There were significant differences between groups (P≤0.05). However, the genotype frequencies of C/T in healthy individuals and metabolic syndrome patients were 35.3 and 38.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups (P>0.05). FQ-PCR results showed that the KCNJ11 mRNA expression levels in the control and observation groups had no significant differences (P>0.05). However, the results obtained from ELISA analysis revealed that KCNJ11 protein expression level in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (Pmetabolic syndrome in the elderly. Elderly patients with the CC and TT genotypes are more likely to develop metabolic syndrome.

  11. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS.

  12. Identification of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS)

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, S. P.; Ebenezer, N. D.; Poopalasundaram, S.; Lehmann, O. J.; Moore, A. T.; Hardcastle, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene or genes responsible for these diseases. Methods: Families with NHS were ascertained. The refined locus for CXN was used to focus the search for candidate genes, which were screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of potential exons and intron-exon splice sites. Genomic structures and homologies were determined using bioinformatics. Expression studies were undertaken using specific exonic primers to amplify human fetal cDNA and mouse RNA....

  13. Binding thermodynamics of a glutamate transporter homologue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Nicolas; Oh, SeCheol; Boudker, Olga

    2013-01-01

    Glutamate transporters catalyze concentrative uptake of the neurotransmitter into glial cells and neurons. Their transport cycle involves binding and release of the substrate on the extra- and intracellular sides of the plasma membranes, and translocation of the substrate-binding site across the lipid bilayers. The energy of the ionic gradients, mainly sodium, fuels the cycle. Here, we used a cross-linking approach to trap a glutamate transporter homologue from Pyrococcus horikoshii in key conformational states with substrate-binding site facing either the extracellular or intracellular sides of the membrane to study their binding thermodynamics. We show that the chemical potential of sodium ions in solution is exclusively coupled to substrate binding and release, and not to substrate translocation. Despite the structural symmetry, the binding mechanisms are distinct on the opposite sides of the membrane and more complex than the current models suggest. PMID:23563139

  14. Pseudomonas aeruginosa B-band lipopolysaccharide genes wbpA and wbpI and their Escherichia coli homologues wecC and wecB are not functionally interchangeable.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrows, L L; Pigeon, K E; Lam, J S

    2000-08-15

    The O antigen unit of Pseudomonas aeruginosa serotype O5 is a complex trisaccharide containing 2-acetamido-3-acetiminido-2, 3-dideoxy-beta-D-mannuronic acid, 2-acetimido-3-acetimido-2, 3-dideoxy-beta-D-mannuronic acid, and 2-acetimido-2, 6-deoxy-beta-D-galactosamine. Specific knockout mutations in the putative UDP-D-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-D-GlcNAc) epimerase gene, wbpI, or the putative UDP-D-N-acetylmannosamine dehydrogenase gene, wbpA, resulted in strains that no longer produced B-band lipopolysaccharide, confirming the essential roles of these genes in B-band O antigen synthesis. Despite approximately 50% similarity of wbpI and wbpA to the Escherichia coli genes wecB (rffE) and wecC (rffD) involved in enterobacterial common antigen synthesis, cross-complementation experiments were not successful. These results imply that the P. aeruginosa UDP-D-GlcNAc precursor may be di-N-acetylated prior to further modification, preventing the E. coli enzymes from recognizing it as a substrate.

  15. [Sebaceous gland tumor with a rare gene mutation within a tumor syndrome: Muir-Torre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, E; Sommer, F; Geiger, K D; Pillunat, L E

    2014-04-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant subtype of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma and is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of sebaceous gland neoplasms with visceral and urogenital malignancies. This article describes the case of a 72-year-old patient who was referred to our clinic for removal of an upper eyelid tumor, showing the course from the clinical findings to the rare diagnosis of Muir-Torre syndrome.

  16. Collectrin gene screening in Turner syndrome patients with kidney ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    immune basis, suggesting that hap- loinsufficiency for X-chromosome gene(s) impairs beta-cell function predisposing to diabetes mellitus in TS (Bakalov et al. 2004). The loss of the short arm of chromosome X (Xp), common to all TS, generally ...

  17. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  18. Mutations du gene de la filamine et syndromes malformatifs | Koffi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filamin is a cytoskeletal protein that occurs in the control of cytoskeleton structure and activity, the modulation of cell shape and migration as well as in the maintaining of cell shape. Mutations in the genes FLNA and FLNB provoke diverse malformative diseases in human. Mutations in the gene FLNA cause four X-Linked ...

  19. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  20. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Misha; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for long QT syndrome exemplifies patenting and exclusive licensing with different outcomes at different times. Exclusive licensing from the University of Utah changed the business model from sole provider to two US providers of long QT syndrome testing. Long QT syndrome is associated with mutations in many genes, 12 of which are now tested by two competing firms in the United States, PGxHealth and GeneDx. Until 2009, PGxHealth was the sole provider, based largely on exclusive rights to patents from the University of Utah and elsewhere. University of Utah patents were initially licensed to DNA Sciences, whose patent rights were acquired by Genaissance, and then by Clinical Data, Inc., which owns PGxHealth. In 2002, DNA Sciences, Inc., "cleared the market" by sending cease-and-desist patent enforcement letters to university and reference laboratories offering long QT syndrome genetic testing. There was no test on the market for a 1- to 2-year period. From 2005-2008, most long QT syndrome-related patents were controlled by Clinical Data, Inc., and its subsidiary PGxHealth. Bio-Reference Laboratories, Inc., secured countervailing exclusive patent rights starting in 2006, also from the University of Utah, and broke the PGxHealth monopoly in early 2009, creating a duopoly for genetic testing in the United States and expanding the number of genes for which commercial testing is available from 5 to 12.

  1. Treacher Collins Syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp Deletion in the TCOF1 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) w...

  2. Microdeletion syndromes disclose replication timing alterations of genes unrelated to the missing DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedman Jane

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal order of allelic replication is interrelated to the epigenomic profile. A significant epigenetic marker is the asynchronous replication of monoallelically-expressed genes versus the synchronous replication of biallelically-expressed genes. The present study sought to determine whether a microdeletion in the genome affects epigenetic profiles of genes unrelated to the missing segment. In order to test this hypothesis, we checked the replication patterns of two genes – SNRPN, a normally monoallelically expressed gene (assigned to 15q11.13, and the RB1, an archetypic biallelically expressed gene (assigned to 13.q14 in the genomes of patients carrying the 22q11.2 deletion (DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial syndrome and those carrying the 7q11.23 deletion (Williams syndrome. Results The allelic replication timing was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technology performed on peripheral blood cells. As expected, in the cells of normal subjects the frequency of cells showing asynchronous replication for SNRPN was significantly (P -12 higher than the corresponding value for RB1. In contrast, cells of the deletion-carrying patients exhibited a reversal in this replication pattern: there was a significantly lower frequency of cells engaging in asynchronous replication for SNRPN than for RB1 (P -4 and P -3 for DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial and Williams syndromes, respectively. Accordingly, the significantly lower frequency of cells showing asynchronous replication for SNRPN than for RB1 is a new epigenetic marker distinguishing these deletion syndrome genotypes from normal ones. Conclusion In cell samples of each deletion-carrying individual, an aberrant, reversed pattern of replication is delineated, namely, where a monoallelic gene replicates more synchronously than a biallelic gene. This inverted pattern, which appears to be non-deletion-specific, clearly distinguishes cells of deletion-carriers from normal

  3. Gene expression alterations at baseline and following moderate exercise in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, A R; Bateman, L; Jo, D; Hughen, R W; Vanhaitsma, T A; White, A T; Light, K C

    2012-01-01

    To determine mRNA expression differences in genes involved in signalling and modulating sensory fatigue, and muscle pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) at baseline, and following moderate exercise. Forty-eight patients with CFS only, or CFS with comorbid FM, 18 patients with FM that did not meet criteria for CFS, and 49 healthy controls underwent moderate exercise (25 min at 70% maximum age-predicted heart rate). Visual-analogue measures of fatigue and pain were taken before, during and after exercise. Blood samples were taken before and 0.5, 8, 24 and 48 h after exercise. Leucocytes were immediately isolated from blood, number coded for blind processing and analyses and flash frozen. Using real-time, quantitative PCR, the amount of mRNA for 13 genes (relative to control genes) involved in sensory, adrenergic and immune functions was compared between groups at baseline and following exercise. Changes in amounts of mRNA were correlated with behavioural measures and functional clinical assessments. No gene expression changes occurred following exercise in controls. In 71% of patients with CFS, moderate exercise increased most sensory and adrenergic receptor's and one cytokine gene's transcription for 48 h. These postexercise increases correlated with behavioural measures of fatigue and pain. In contrast, for the other 29% of patients with CFS, adrenergic α-2A receptor's transcription was decreased at all time-points after exercise; other genes were not altered. History of orthostatic intolerance was significantly more common in the α-2A decrease subgroup. FM-only patients showed no postexercise alterations in gene expression, but their pre-exercise baseline mRNA for two sensory ion channels and one cytokine were significantly higher than controls.   At least two subgroups of patients with CFS can be identified by gene expression changes following exercise. The larger subgroup showed increases in mRNA for

  4. Do the MTHFR gene polymorphism and Down syndrome pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Srinivasan Muthuswamy

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Down syndrome, the most common trisomy 21 arises from abnormal .... chromosomal segregation, predisposing to trisomy 21 [2]. .... 94. 73 18. 0.49. 51 48. 6. 101. 73. 9. 0.36. Indian studies. Cyril [11]. India. 36/60. 33. 3. 0. 60. 0. 0. 0. 14 19. 3. 26. 21 13. 0.03. Kaur [13]. India. 110/111.

  5. Pearson syndrome in an infant heterozygous for C282Y allele of HFE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefala-Agoropoulou, Kalomoira; Roilides, Emmanuel; Lazaridou, Anna; Karatza, Eliza; Farmaki, Evangelia; Tsantali, Haido; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persephone; Tsiouris, John

    2007-12-01

    Pearson syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disorder characterized by sideroblastic anemia, liver disease, renal tubulopathy and exocrine pancreas deficiency. We describe a female infant suffering from anemia since birth who gradually developed the complete picture of Pearson syndrome by 13 months. Iron overload was disproportionate to blood transfusions. The patient was heterozygous for HFE gene C282Y mutation (type I hemochromatosis). After an initial response to deferoxamine she presented with cutaneous zygomycosis and died after metabolic derangement and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. This is the second case of a Pearson syndrome individual who was also heterozygous for HFE gene mutation C282Y published. It is also the second case report of a Pearson patient suffering from severe iron overload and liver disease that responded to therapy with deferoxamine.

  6. Distinct gene expression profiles in ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome represents a rare subset that typically presents at young age as early-stage tumors with an overrepresentation of endometrioid and clear cell histologies. We investigated the molecular profiles of Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer...... with the aim to identify key discriminators and central tumorigenic mechanisms in hereditary ovarian cancer. Global gene expression profiling using whole-genome c-DNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension, and Ligation was applied to 48 histopathologically matched Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...... for histologic subtype, hierarchical clustering confirmed distinct differences related to heredity in the endometrioid and serous subtypes. Furthermore, separate clustering was achieved in an independent, publically available data set. The distinct genetic signatures in Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...

  7. A Novel Fibrillin-1 Gene Mutation Leading to Marfan Syndrome in a Korean Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Ha, Kee-Soo; Rhie, Young-Jun; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by a connective tissue defect. A nine-year-old girl was referred to our pediatric endocrinology clinic for tall stature. Physical examination revealed a lens dislocation with strabismus, high palate, positive wrist and thumb signs, joint hypermobility, and pes planus. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed dilatation of the aortic root. She was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome based on the revised Ghent diagnostic criteria. Molecular investigation identified a heterozygous c.2810G >A variation in the FBN1 gene in the patient, but not in her parents. To our knowledge, this sequence variant has been reported as a polymorphism (rs113602180), but it is the first report identifying it as the genetic cause of Marfan syndrome. We hypothesize that this de novo novel missense FBN1 mutation disrupts fibrillin-1 function and is probably involved in the development of Marfan syndrome in this patient. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  8. Association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene polymorphisms with hepatorenal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Luo, X.; Ye, J.; Liu, S.; Miu, L.; Bao, J.; Wang, F.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene single nucleotide polymorphisms with type I hepatorenal syndrome. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Hangzhou City Xixi Hospital, Hangzhou, China, from January 2012 to June 2014, and comprised patients with type I hepatorenal syndrome and individuals with cirrhosis who acted as the control group. Arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed by high-resolution melting methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17. Results: Of the 60 participants, 28(46.7%) were in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 32(53.3%) were controls. The mean age was 42.21+-11.30years in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 43.69+-12.60 in the control group (p=0.64). Mean total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin activity levels were 154.76+-51.58, 49.30+-24.67 and 33.42+-3.69 in the hepatorenal syndrome group compared to 181.26+-64.46, 41.78+-17.52 and 32.98+-4.81 among controls (p=0.09, p=0.18 and p=0.70). Statistically significant differences were found in the distributions of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus T allele between type I hepatorenal syndrome patients and the control group (odds ratio= 2.230; p= 0.040). Conclusion: T allele located at arginine vasopressin receptor 1a receptor promoter rs113481894 locus may be associated with the pathogenesis of type I hepatorenal syndrome. (author)

  9. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS

  10. The Brugada Syndrome Susceptibility Gene HEY2 Modulates Cardiac Transmural Ion Channel Patterning and Electrical Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Podliesna, Svitlana; Tadros, Rafik; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Mengarelli, Isabella; de Jonge, Berend; Beekman, Leander; Barc, Julien; Wilders, Ronald; Wilde, Arthur A.; Boukens, Bastiaan J.; Coronel, Ruben; Verkerk, Arie; Remme, Carol Ann; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies previously identified an association of rs9388451 at chromosome 6q22.3 (near HEY2) with Brugada syndrome. The causal gene and underlying mechanism remain unresolved. We used an integrative approach entailing transcriptomic studies in human hearts and

  11. Fragile X syndrome: An overview and update of the FMR1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mila, M; Alvarez-Mora, M I; Madrigal, I; Rodriguez-Revenga, L

    2018-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and the leading form of the monogenic cause of autism. Fragile X mental retardation type 1 (FMR1) gene premutation is the first single-gene cause of primary ovarian failure (Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency [FXPOI]) and one of the most common causes of ataxia (fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome [FXTAS]), multiple additional phenotypes such as fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism, migraine headaches, sleep disturbances, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, central pain syndrome, neuropathy and neuropsychiatric alterations has been described. Clinical involvement in men and women carrying the FMR1 premutation currently constitutes a real health problem in the society that should be taken into account. It is important to highlight that while in FXS there is a loss-of-function of the FMR1 gene, in premutation associated disorders there is a gain of FMR1 mRNA function. To date, the tremendous progress achieved in the understanding of the pathophysiology of FXS, has led to the development of several targeted therapies aimed at preventing or improving the neurological manifestations of the disease. This review is an update of the diseases associated with the FMR1 gene. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. [From gene to disease; tumor necrosis factor receptor and a syndrome of familial periodic fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    Familial Hibernian fever (FHF) is a rare hereditary syndrome that causes periodic attacks of fever and inflammation. It is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. The gene involved in FHF encodes for a receptor for tumour necrosis factor (TNFR1). These mutations are thought to result in impaired

  13. Gene, Brain, and Behavior Relationships in Fragile X Syndrome: Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Amy A.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FraX) remains the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and provides a valuable model for studying gene-brain-behavior relationships. Over the past 15 years, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have emerged with the goal of better understanding the neural pathways contributing to the…

  14. Evaluation of the Effects of SDIA, a LUXR Homologue, on Adherence and Motility of Escherichia coli O157:H7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quorum-sensing (QS) signaling pathways are important regulatory networks for controlling the expression of genes promoting adherence of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) O157:H7 to epithelial cells. A recent study has shown that EHEC O157:H7 encodes a luxR homologue, called sdiA¸ which upon...

  15. Correlation of gene expression with bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Koslov, David S; Keys, Tristan; Evans, Robert J; Badlani, Gopal H; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Walker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, our understanding of disease etiology is poor. We molecularly characterized interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and determined whether there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. Bladder biopsies from female subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and female controls without signs of the disease were collected and divided into those with normal and low anesthetized bladder capacity, respectively. Samples then underwent RNA extraction and microarray assay. Data generated by these assays were analyzed using Omics Explorer (Qlucore, Lund, Sweden), GeneSifter® Analysis Edition 4.0 and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis to determine similarity among samples within and between groups, and measure differentially expressed transcripts unique to each phenotype. A total of 16 subjects were included in study. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clear separation between gene expression in tissues from subjects with low compared to normal bladder capacity. Gene expression in tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had normal bladder capacity did not significantly differ from that in controls without interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Pairwise analysis revealed that pathways related to inflammatory and immune response were most involved. Microarray analysis provides insight into the potential pathological condition underlying interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This pilot study shows that patients with this disorder who have low compared to normal bladder capacity have significantly different molecular characteristics, which may reflect a difference in disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  16. Multi-layered mutation in hedgehog-related genes in Gorlin syndrome may affect the phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Onodera

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance that predisposes the affected individual to a variety of disorders that are attributed largely to heterozygous germline patched1 (PTCH1 mutations. PTCH1 is a hedgehog (Hh receptor as well as a repressor, mutation of which leads to constitutive activation of Hh pathway. Hh pathway encompasses a wide variety of cellular signaling cascades, which involve several molecules; however, no associated genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported. Recently, mutations in Suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU or PTCH2 were reported in patients with Gorlin syndrome. These facts suggest that multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may contribute to the development of Gorlin syndrome. We demonstrated multiple mutations of Hh-related genes in addition to PTCH1, which possibly act in an additive or multiplicative manner and lead to Gorlin syndrome. High-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze exome sequences in four unrelated Gorlin syndrome patient genomes. Mutations in PTCH1 gene were detected in all four patients. Specific nucleotide variations or frameshift variations of PTCH1 were identified along with the inferred amino acid changes in all patients. We further filtered 84 different genes which are closely related to Hh signaling. Fifty three of these had enough coverage of over ×30. The sequencing results were filtered and compared to reduce the number of sequence variants identified in each of the affected individuals. We discovered three genes, PTCH2, BOC, and WNT9b, with mutations with a predicted functional impact assessed by MutationTaster2 or PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 analysis. It is noticeable that PTCH2 and BOC are Hh receptor molecules. No significant mutations were observed in SUFU. Multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may change the activation level of the Hh signals, which may explain the wide phenotypic variability of Gorlin syndrome.

  17. Pathogenic Variants in Complement Genes and Risk of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Relapse after Eculizumab Discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhouri, Fadi; Fila, Marc; Provôt, François; Delmas, Yahsou; Barbet, Christelle; Châtelet, Valérie; Rafat, Cédric; Cailliez, Mathilde; Hogan, Julien; Servais, Aude; Karras, Alexandre; Makdassi, Raifah; Louillet, Feriell; Coindre, Jean-Philippe; Rondeau, Eric; Loirat, Chantal; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2017-01-06

    The complement inhibitor eculizumab has dramatically improved the outcome of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. However, the optimal duration of eculizumab treatment in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome remains debated. We report on the French atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome working group's first 2-year experience with eculizumab discontinuation in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Using the French atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome registry database, we retrospectively identified all dialysis-free patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome who discontinued eculizumab between 2010 and 2014 and reviewed their relevant clinical and biologic data. The decision to discontinue eculizumab was made by the clinician in charge of the patient. All patients were closely monitored by regular urine dipsticks and blood tests. Eculizumab was rapidly (24-48 hours) restarted in case of relapse. Among 108 patients treated with eculizumab, 38 patients (nine children and 29 adults) discontinued eculizumab (median treatment duration of 17.5 months). Twenty-one patients (55%) carried novel or rare complement genes variants. Renal recovery under eculizumab was equally good in patients with and those without complement gene variants detected. After a median follow-up of 22 months, 12 patients (31%) experienced atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome relapse. Eight of 11 patients (72%) with complement factor H variants, four of eight patients (50%) with membrane cofactor protein variants, and zero of 16 patients with no rare variant detected relapsed. In relapsing patients, early reintroduction (≤48 hours) of eculizumab led to rapid (uremic syndrome relapse after eculizumab discontinuation. Prospective studies are needed to identify biomarkers predictive of relapse and determine the best strategy of retreatment in relapsing patients. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  18. Transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue identifies reduced expression of complement complex C1Q Genes in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peijie; Nicholls, Laura; Assareh, Hassan; Fang, Zhiming; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Assareh, Amelia A; Voineagu, Irina

    2016-06-06

    MECP2, the gene mutated in the majority of Rett syndrome cases, is a transcriptional regulator that can activate or repress transcription. Although the transcription regulatory function of MECP2 has been known for over a decade, it remains unclear how transcriptional dysregulation leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder. Notably, little convergence was previously observed between the genes abnormally expressed in the brain of Rett syndrome mouse models and those identified in human studies. Here we carried out a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue from Rett syndrome brain using both RNA-seq and microarrays. We identified over two hundred differentially expressed genes, and identified the complement C1Q complex genes (C1QA, C1QB and C1QC) as a point of convergence between gene expression changes in human and mouse Rett syndrome brain. The results of our study support a role for alterations in the expression level of C1Q complex genes in RTT pathogenesis.

  19. Neuronal target genes of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor in neurospheres derived from fetuses with Down's syndrome: a gene expression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Sabine; Mimmack, Michael; Ryan, Margaret; Caldwell, Maeve A; Jauniaux, Eric; Starkey, Michael; Svendsen, Clive N; Emson, Piers

    2002-01-26

    Identification of genes and characterisation of their function is an essential step towards understanding complex pathophysiological abnormalities in Down's syndrome. We did a study to investigate abnormalities in gene expression in human neuronal stem cells and progenitor cells from Down's syndrome and control post-mortem human fetal tissue. Indexing-based differential display PCR was done on neuronal precursor cells derived from the cortex of a fetus with Down's syndrome, and findings were compared with those of two control samples. Findings were validated against neurosphere preparations from three independent Down's syndrome fetuses and five independent controls by real-time quantitative PCR. Results of differential display PCR analysis showed that SCG10--a neuron--specific growth-associated protein regulated by the neuron-restrictive silencer factor REST-was almost undetectable in the Down's syndrome sample. This finding was validated by real-time PCR. We also found that other genes regulated by the REST transcription factor were selectively repressed, whereas non-REST-regulated genes with similar functions were unaffected. Changes in expression of several key developmental genes in the Down's syndrome stem-cell and progenitor-cell pool correlated with striking changes in neuron morphology after differentiation. Our findings suggest a link between dysregulation of the REST transcription factor and some of the neurological deficits seen in Down's syndrome. Experimental REST downregulation has been shown to trigger apoptosis, which could account for the striking and selective loss of neurons in the differentiated Down's syndrome cell preparations.

  20. Novel polymorphisms and lack of mutations in the ACD gene in patients with ACTH resistance syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Catherine E; Hutz, Janna E; Krause, Andrea S; Koehler, Katrin; Metherell, Louise A; Boikos, Sosipatros; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios; Clark, Adrian J L; Stratakis, Constantine A; Huebner, Angela; Hammer, Gary D

    2007-08-01

    ACTH resistance is a feature of several human syndromes with known genetic causes, including familial glucocorticoid deficiency (types 1 and 2) and triple A syndrome. However, many patients with ACTH resistance lack an identifiable genetic aetiology. The human homolog of the Acd gene, mutated in a mouse model of adrenal insufficiency, was sequenced in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency or triple A syndrome. A 3.4 kilobase genomic fragment containing the entire ACD gene was analysed for mutations in all 25 patients. Samples were obtained by three investigators from different institutions. The primary cohort consisted of 25 unrelated patients, primarily of European or Middle Eastern descent, with a clinical diagnosis of either familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) or triple A syndrome. Patients lacked mutations in other genes known to cause ACTH resistance, including AAAS for patients diagnosed with triple A syndrome and MC2R and MRAP for patients diagnosed with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Thirty-five additional patients with adrenal disease phenotypes were added to form an expanded cohort of 60 patients. Identification of DNA sequence changes in the ACD gene in the primary cohort and analysis of putative ACD haplotypes in the expanded cohort. No disease-causing mutations were found, but several novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two putative haplotypes were identified. The overall frequency of SNPs in ACD is low compared to other gene families. No mutations were identified in ACD in this collection of patients with ACTH resistance phenotypes. However, the newly identified SNPs in ACD should be more closely examined for possible links to disease.

  1. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  2. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  3. Heterochromatic genes undergo epigenetic changes and escape silencing in immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, facial anomalies (ICF syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Elisabeth Brun

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by a marked immunodeficiency, severe hypomethylation of the classical satellites 2 and 3 associated with disruption of constitutive heterochromatin, and facial anomalies. Sixty percent of ICF patients have mutations in the DNMT3B (DNA methyltransferase 3B gene, encoding a de novo DNA methyltransferase. In the present study, we have shown that, in ICF lymphoblasts and peripheral blood, juxtacentromeric heterochromatic genes undergo dramatic changes in DNA methylation, indicating that they are bona fide targets of the DNMT3B protein. DNA methylation in heterochromatic genes dropped from about 80% in normal cells to approximately 30% in ICF cells. Hypomethylation was observed in five ICF patients and was associated with activation of these silent genes. Although DNA hypomethylation occurred in all the analyzed heterochromatic genes and in all the ICF patients, gene expression was restricted to some genes, every patient having his own group of activated genes. Histone modifications were preserved in ICF patients. Heterochromatic genes were associated with histone modifications that are typical of inactive chromatin: they had low acetylation on H3 and H4 histones and were slightly enriched in H3K9Me(3, both in ICF and controls. This was also the case for those heterochromatic genes that escaped silencing. This finding suggests that gene activation was not generalized to all the cells, but rather was restricted to a clonal cell population that may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in ICF syndrome. A slight increase in H3K27 monomethylation was observed both in heterochromatin and active euchromatin in ICF patients; however, no correlation between this modification and activation of heterochromatic genes was found.

  4. Heterochromatic Genes Undergo Epigenetic Changes and Escape Silencing in Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Lana, Erica; Rivals, Isabelle; Lefranc, Gérard; Sarda, Pierre; Claustres, Mireille; Mégarbané, André; De Sario, Albertina

    2011-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by a marked immunodeficiency, severe hypomethylation of the classical satellites 2 and 3 associated with disruption of constitutive heterochromatin, and facial anomalies. Sixty percent of ICF patients have mutations in the DNMT3B (DNA methyltransferase 3B) gene, encoding a de novo DNA methyltransferase. In the present study, we have shown that, in ICF lymphoblasts and peripheral blood, juxtacentromeric heterochromatic genes undergo dramatic changes in DNA methylation, indicating that they are bona fide targets of the DNMT3B protein. DNA methylation in heterochromatic genes dropped from about 80% in normal cells to approximately 30% in ICF cells. Hypomethylation was observed in five ICF patients and was associated with activation of these silent genes. Although DNA hypomethylation occurred in all the analyzed heterochromatic genes and in all the ICF patients, gene expression was restricted to some genes, every patient having his own group of activated genes. Histone modifications were preserved in ICF patients. Heterochromatic genes were associated with histone modifications that are typical of inactive chromatin: they had low acetylation on H3 and H4 histones and were slightly enriched in H3K9Me3, both in ICF and controls. This was also the case for those heterochromatic genes that escaped silencing. This finding suggests that gene activation was not generalized to all the cells, but rather was restricted to a clonal cell population that may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in ICF syndrome. A slight increase in H3K27 monomethylation was observed both in heterochromatin and active euchromatin in ICF patients; however, no correlation between this modification and activation of heterochromatic genes was found. PMID:21559330

  5. Isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) gene region

    OpenAIRE

    Vortkamp, Andrea; Gessler, Manfred; Paslier, D. Le; Elaswarapu, R.; Smith, S.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the zinc finger gene GLI3 has been shown to be the cause of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), at least in some GCPS translocation patients. To characterize this genomic region on human chromosome 7p13, we have isolated a VAC contig of more than 1000 kb including the GLI3 gene. In this contig the gene itself spans at least 200-250 kb. A CpG island is located in the vicinity of the 5' region of the known GLI3 cDNA, implying a potential promoter region.

  6. Treacher Collins Syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp Deletion in the TCOF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen-Hua Su

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  7. Treacher Collins syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp deletion in the TCOF1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-06-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  8. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... are pathogenic, precludes targeted healthcare for both carriers and their relatives. To facilitate the identification of pathogenic VUS, we have developed an in cellulo genetic screen-based procedure for the large-scale mutagenization, identification, and cataloging of residues of MMR genes critical for MMR gene...

  9. Genes with high penetrance for syndromic and non-syndromic autism typically function within the nucleus and regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Emily L; Sharp, Julia L; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sumi, Nahid Sultana; Casanova, Manuel F

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID), autism, and epilepsy share frequent yet variable comorbidities with one another. In order to better understand potential genetic divergence underlying this variable risk, we studied genes responsible for monogenic IDs, grouped according to their autism and epilepsy comorbidities. Utilizing 465 different forms of ID with known molecular origins, we accessed available genetic databases in conjunction with gene ontology (GO) to determine whether the genetics underlying ID diverge according to its comorbidities with autism and epilepsy and if genes highly penetrant for autism or epilepsy share distinctive features that set them apart from genes that confer comparatively variable or no apparent risk. The genetics of ID with autism are relatively enriched in terms associated with nervous system-specific processes and structural morphogenesis. In contrast, we find that ID with highly comorbid epilepsy (HCE) is modestly associated with lipid metabolic processes while ID without autism or epilepsy comorbidity (ID only) is enriched at the Golgi membrane. Highly comorbid autism (HCA) genes, on the other hand, are strongly enriched within the nucleus, are typically involved in regulation of gene expression, and, along with IDs with more variable autism, share strong ties with a core protein-protein interaction (PPI) network integral to basic patterning of the CNS. According to GO terminology, autism-related gene products are integral to neural development. While it is difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding IDs unassociated with autism, it is clear that the majority of HCA genes are tightly linked with general dysregulation of gene expression, suggesting that disturbances to the chronology of neural maturation and patterning may be key in conferring susceptibility to autism spectrum conditions.

  10. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Ide, S.E. [National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wright, M. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellisvan Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Z{sub max} = 6.91 at {theta} = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Genetic characterization of the Drosophila birt-hogg-dubé syndrome gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Folliculin (FLCN is a conserved tumor suppressor gene whose loss is associated with the human Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD syndrome. However, its molecular functions remain largely unknown. In this work, we generated a Drosophila BHD model through genomic deletion of the FLCN gene (DBHD(- . The DBHD mutant larvae grew slowly and stopped development before pupation, displaying various characteristics of malnutrition. We found the growth delay was sensitive to the nutrient supplies. It became more severe upon restrictions of the dietary yeast; while high levels of yeast significantly restored the normal growth, but not viability. We further demonstrated that leucine was able to substitute for yeast to provide similar rescues. Moreover, the human FLCN could partially rescue the DBHD(- phenotypes, indicating the two genes are involved in certain common mechanisms. Our work provides a new animal model of the BHD syndrome and suggests that modulation of the local nutrient condition might be a potential treatment of the BHD lesions.

  12. Three cases with L1 syndrome and two novel mutations in the L1CAM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Rosario; Ley-Martos, Miriam; Gutiérrez, Gema; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Felicidad; Arroyo, Diego; Mora-López, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the L1CAM gene have been identified in the following various X-linked neurological disorders: congenital hydrocephalus; mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. These conditions are currently considered different phenotypes of a single entity known as L1 syndrome. We present three families with L1 syndrome. Sequencing of the L1CAM gene allowed the identification of the following mutations involved: a known splicing mutation (c.3531-12G>A) and two novel ones: a missense mutation (c.1754A>C; p.Asp585Ala) and a nonsense mutation (c.3478C>T; p.Gln1160Stop). The number of affected males and carrier females identified in a relatively small population suggests that L1 syndrome may be under-diagnosed. L1 syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intellectual disability or mental retardation in children, especially when other signs such as hydrocephalus or adducted thumbs are present.

  13. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation. PMID:28066228

  14. Is the prosthetic homologue necessary for embodiment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chelsea Dornfeld

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of 5 hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures. Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  15. Is the Prosthetic Homologue Necessary for Embodiment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dornfeld, Chelsea; Swanston, Michelle; Cassella, Joseph; Beasley, Casey; Green, Jacob; Moshayev, Yonatan; Wininger, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Embodiment is the process by which patients with limb loss come to accept their peripheral device as a natural extension of self. However, there is little guidance as to how exacting the prosthesis must be in order for embodiment to take place: is it necessary for the prosthetic hand to look just like the absent hand? Here, we describe a protocol for testing whether an individual would select a hand that looks like their own from among a selection of five hands, and whether the hand selection (regardless of homology) is consistent across multiple exposures to the same (but reordered) set of candidate hands. Pilot results using healthy volunteers reveals that hand selection is only modestly consistent, and that selection of the prosthetic homologue is atypical (61 of 192 total exposures). Our protocol can be executed in minutes, and makes use of readily available equipment and softwares. We present both a face-to-face and a virtual protocol, for maximum flexibility of implementation.

  16. Truncation of the Down syndrome candidate gene DYRK1A in two unrelated patients with microcephaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Kübart, Sabine; Hoeltzenbein, Maria

    2008-01-01

    .2. DYRK1A belongs to the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase (DYRK) family, which is highly conserved throughout evolution. Given its localization in both the Down syndrome critical region and in the minimal region for partial monosomy 21, the gene has been studied intensively...... in animals and in humans, and DYRK1A has been proposed to be involved in the neurodevelopmental alterations associated with these syndromes. In the present study, we show that truncating mutations of DYRK1A result in a clinical phenotype including microcephaly....

  17. Numerous BAF complex genes are mutated in Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-09-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS; OMIM#135900) is a rare congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, coarse face, hypertrichosis, and absence/hypoplasia of the fifth digits' nails. As the majority of patients are sporadic, an autosomal dominant inheritance model has been postulated. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) emerged as a comprehensive analytical method for rare variants. We applied WES on five CSS patients and found two de novo mutations in SMARCB1. SMARCB1 was completely sequenced in 23 CSS patients and the mutations were found in two more patients. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the BAF complex functioning as a chromatin remodeling factor, mutations in 15 other subunit genes may cause CSS and thus were analyzed in 23 CSS patients. We identified heterozygous mutations in either of six genes (SMARCA4, SMARCB1, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A, and ARID1B) in 20 out of 23 CSS patients. The patient with a SMARCA2 mutation was re-evaluated and identified as having Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (OMIM#601358), which is similar to but different from CSS. Additionally, 49 more CSS patients were analyzed as a second cohort. Together with the first cohort, 37 out of 71 (22 plus 49) patients were found to have a mutation in either one of five BAF complex genes. Furthermore, two CSS patients were reported to have a PHF6 abnormality, which can also cause Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (OMIM#301900), an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome with epilepsy and endocrine abnormalities. The current list of mutated genes in CSS is far from being complete and analysis of more patients is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Large deletions encompassing the TCOF1 and CAMK2A genes are responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Marie; Collet, Corinne; Verloes, Alain; Lambert, Laetitia; Herlin, Christian; Blanchet, Catherine; Sanchez, Elodie; Drunat, Séverine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Puechberty, Jacques; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome.

  19. Targeting the Enhancer of Zeste Homologue 2 in Medulloblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimova, Irina; Venkataraman, Sujatha; Harris, Peter; Marquez, Victor E.; Northcott, Paul A; Dubuc, Adrian; Taylor, Michael D; Foreman, Nicholas K; Vibhakar, Rajeev

    2012-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homologue 2 (EZH2) is the catalytic subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 2 that catalyzes the trimethylation of histone H3 on Lys 27, and represses gene transcription. EZH2 enhances cancer-cell proliferation and regulates stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Here, we demonstrate that EZH2 is highly expressed in medulloblastoma, a highly malignant brain tumor of childhood, and this altered expression is correlated with genomic gain of chromosome 7 in a subset of medulloblastoma. Inhibition of EZH2 by RNAi suppresses medulloblastoma tumor cell growth. We show that 3-deazaneplanocin A, a chemical inhibitor of EZH2, can suppress medulloblastoma cell growth partially by inducing apoptosis. Suppression of EZH2 expression diminishes the ability of tumor cells to form spheres in culture and strongly represses the ability of known oncogenes to transform neural stem cells. These findings establish a role of EZH2 in medulloblastoma and identify EZH2 as a potential therapeutic target especially in high-risk tumors. PMID:22287205

  20. Physiological and pathological functions of the prion protein homologue Dpl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Axel

    2003-01-01

    A misfolded version of the prion protein PrP(C), known as PrP(Sc), is the major component of scrapie infectivity, the pathological agent in transmissible spongiform encephalopathies. The Prnp gene that encodes the cellular PrP(C) protein was cloned almost 20 years ago, but remained without sequence or structural relatives for over a decade. Only recently a novel protein, named Doppel (Dpl), was identified, which shares significant biochemical and structural homology with PrP(C). When overexpressed, Dpl is neurotoxic and causes a neurological disease. Strikingly, Dpl neurotoxicity is counteracted and prevented by PrP(C). In contrast to its homologue PrP(C), Dpl is dispensable for prion disease progression and for the generation of PrP(Sc), but Dpl appears to have an essential function in male spermatogenesis. Although Dpl research is still in its infancy, the discovery of Dpl has already solved some enigmas of prion biology and an understanding of its physiological function is emerging.

  1. Severe neonatal marfan syndrome resulting from a De Novo 3-bp insertion into the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewicz, D.M.; Duvic, M. (Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Severe neonatal Marfan syndrome has features of the Marfan syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly present at birth, along with unique features such as loose, redundant skin and pulmonary emphysema. Since the Marfan syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly are due to mutations in different genes, it has been uncertain whether neonatal Marfan syndrome is due to mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 or in another gene. The authors studied an infant with severe neonatal Marfan syndrome. Dermal fibroblasts were metabolically labeled and found to secrete fibrillin inefficiently when compared with control cells. Reverse transcription and amplification of the proband's fibroblast RNA was used to identify a 3-bp insertion between nucleotides 480-481 or 481-482 of the fibrillin cDNA. The insertion maintains the reading frame of the protein and inserts a cysteine between amino acids 160 and 161 in an epidermal growth-factor-like motif of fibrillin. This 3-bp insertion was not found in the fibrillin gene in 70 unrelated, unaffected individuals and 11 unrelated individuals with the Maran syndrome. The authors conclude that neonatal Marfan syndrome is the result of mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 and is part of the Marfan syndrome spectrum. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  2. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Associated with Abnormal Gene Dosage: Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Fresneda, Juanita; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are reciprocal contiguous gene syndromes within the well-characterized 17p11.2 region. Approximately 3.6 Mb microduplication of 17p11.2, known as PTLS, represents the mechanistically predicted homologous recombination reciprocal of the SMS microdeletion, both resulting in multiple congenital anomalies. Mouse model studies have revealed that the retinoic acid-inducible 1 gene (RAI1) within the SMS and PTLS critical genomic interval is the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the major phenotypic features in these disorders. Even though PTLS and SMS share the same genomic region, clinical manifestations and behavioral issues are distinct and in fact some mirror traits may be on opposite ends of a given phenotypic spectrum. We describe the neurobehavioral phenotypes of SMS and PTLS patients during different life phases as well as clinical guidelines for diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach once diagnosis is confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization or RAI1 gene sequencing. The main goal is to increase awareness of these rare disorders because an earlier diagnosis will lead to more timely developmental intervention and medical management which will improve clinical outcome.

  3. Cytochrome C oxydase deficiency: SURF1 gene investigation in patients with Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalej, Marwa; Kammoun, Thouraya; Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Kharrat, Marwa; Ammar, Marwa; Felhi, Rahma; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Keskes, Leila; Hachicha, Mongia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2018-03-18

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy. The most common clinical signs reported in LS are growth retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, dystonia, hypotonia, seizures and respiratory disorders. The paper reported a manifestation of 3 Tunisian patients presented with LS syndrome. The aim of this study is the MT[HYPHEN]ATP6 and SURF1 gene screening in Tunisian patients affected with classical Leigh syndrome and the computational investigation of the effect of detected mutations on its structure and functions by clinical and bioinformatics analyses. After clinical investigations, three Tunisian patients were tested for mutations in both MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes by direct sequencing followed by in silico analyses to predict the effects of sequence variation. The result of mutational analysis revealed the absence of mitochondrial mutations in MT-ATP6 gene and the presence of a known homozygous splice site mutation c.516-517delAG in sibling patients added to the presence of a novel double het mutations in LS patient (c.752-18 A > C/c. c.751 + 16G > A). In silico analyses of theses intronic variations showed that it could alters splicing processes as well as SURF1 protein translation. Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy. The most common clinical signs reported in LS are growth retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, dystonia, hypotonia, seizures and respiratory disorders. The paper reported a manifestation of 3 Tunisian patients presented with LS syndrome. The aim of this study is MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes screening in Tunisian patients affected with classical Leigh syndrome and the computational investigation of the effect of detected mutations on its structure and functions. After clinical investigations, three Tunisian patients were tested for mutations in both MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes by direct sequencing followed by in

  4. Microduplication of the ARID1A gene causes intellectual disability with recognizable syndromic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidart, Marie; El Atifi, Michèle; Miladi, Sarra; Rendu, John; Satre, Véronique; Ray, Pierre F; Bosson, Caroline; Devillard, Françoise; Lehalle, Daphné; Malan, Valérie; Amiel, Jeanne; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Baldassarri, Margherita; Renieri, Alessandra; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Vieville, Gaëlle; Thevenon, Julien; Amblard, Florence; Berger, François; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Coutton, Charles

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether duplication of the ARID1A gene is responsible for a new recognizable syndrome. We describe four patients with a 1p36.11 microduplication involving ARID1A as identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization . We performed comparative transcriptomic analysis of patient-derived fibroblasts using RNA sequencing and evaluated the impact of ARID1A duplication on the cell cycle using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Functional relationships between differentially expressed genes were investigated with ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). Combining the genomic data, we defined a small (122 kb), minimally critical region that overlaps the full ARID1A gene. The four patients shared a strikingly similar phenotype that included intellectual disability and microcephaly. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the deregulated expression of several genes previously linked to microcephaly and developmental disorders as well as the involvement of signaling pathways relevant to microcephaly, among which the polo-like kinase (PLK) pathway was especially notable. Cell-cycle analysis of patient-derived fibroblasts showed a significant increase in the proportion of cells in G1 phase at the expense of G2-M cells. Our study reports a new microduplication syndrome involving the ARID1A gene. This work is the first step in clarifying the pathophysiological mechanism that links changes in the gene dosage of ARID1A with intellectual disability and microcephaly.Genet Med advance online publication 01 December 2016.

  5. Identification of gene networks and pathways associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The underlying change of gene network expression of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS remains elusive. We sought to identify GBS-associated gene networks and signaling pathways by analyzing the transcriptional profile of leukocytes in the patients with GBS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Quantitative global gene expression microarray analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes was performed on 7 patients with GBS and 7 healthy controls. Gene expression profiles were compared between patients and controls after standardization. The set of genes that significantly correlated with GBS was further analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analyses. 256 genes and 18 gene networks were significantly associated with GBS (fold change ≥2, P<0.05. FOS, PTGS2, HMGB2 and MMP9 are the top four of 246 significantly up-regulated genes. The most significant disease and altered biological function genes associated with GBS were those involved in inflammatory response, infectious disease, and respiratory disease. Cell death, cellular development and cellular movement were the top significant molecular and cellular functions involved in GBS. Hematological system development and function, immune cell trafficking and organismal survival were the most significant GBS-associated function in physiological development and system category. Several hub genes, such as MMP9, PTGS2 and CREB1 were identified in the associated gene networks. Canonical pathway analysis showed that GnRH, corticotrophin-releasing hormone and ERK/MAPK signaling were the most significant pathways in the up-regulated gene set in GBS. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals the gene networks and canonical pathways associated with GBS. These data provide not only networks between the genes for understanding the pathogenic properties of GBS but also map significant pathways for the future development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  6. Syndromic Craniosynostosis Can Define New Candidate Genes for Suture Development or Result from the Non-specifc Effects of Pleiotropic Genes: Rasopathies and Chromatinopathies as Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Zollino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniosynostosis is a heterogeneous condition caused by the premature fusion of cranial sutures, occurring mostly as an isolated anomaly. Pathogenesis of non-syndromic forms of craniosynostosis is largely unknown. In about 15–30% of cases craniosynostosis occurs in association with other physical anomalies and it is referred to as syndromic craniosynostosis. Syndromic forms of craniosynostosis arise from mutations in genes belonging to the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR family and the interconnected molecular pathways in most cases. However it can occur in association with other gene variants and with a variety of chromosome abnormalities as well, usually in association with intellectual disability (ID and additional physical anomalies. Evaluating the molecular properties of the genes undergoing intragenic mutations or copy number variations (CNVs along with prevalence of craniosynostosis in different conditions and animal models if available, we made an attempt to define two distinct groups of unusual syndromic craniosynostosis, which can reflect direct effects of emerging new candidate genes with roles in suture homeostasis or a non-specific phenotypic manifestation of pleiotropic genes, respectively. RASopathies and 9p23p22.3 deletions are reviewed as examples of conditions in the first group. In particular, we found that craniosynostosis is a relatively common component manifestation of cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC syndrome. Chromatinopathies and neurocristopathies are presented as examples of conditions in the second group. We observed that craniosynostosis is uncommon on average in these conditions. It was randomly associated with Kabuki, Koolen-de Vries/KANSL1 haploinsufficiency and Mowat–Wilson syndromes and in KAT6B-related disorders. As an exception, trigonocephaly in Bohring-Opitz syndrome reflects specific molecular properties of the chromatin modifier ASXL1 gene. Surveillance for craniosynostosis in syndromic forms of

  7. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 (angstrom) above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the rational

  8. Antidepressant Binding Site in a Bacterial Homologue of Neurotransmitter Transporters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh,S.; Yamashita, A.; Gouaux, E.

    2007-01-01

    Sodium-coupled transporters are ubiquitous pumps that harness pre-existing sodium gradients to catalyse the thermodynamically unfavourable uptake of essential nutrients, neurotransmitters and inorganic ions across the lipid bilayer. Dysfunction of these integral membrane proteins has been implicated in glucose/galactose malabsorption, congenital hypothyroidism, Bartter's syndrome, epilepsy, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Sodium-coupled transporters are blocked by a number of therapeutically important compounds, including diuretics, anticonvulsants and antidepressants, many of which have also become indispensable tools in biochemical experiments designed to probe antagonist binding sites and to elucidate transport mechanisms. Steady-state kinetic data have revealed that both competitive and noncompetitive modes of inhibition exist. Antagonist dissociation experiments on the serotonin transporter (SERT) have also unveiled the existence of a low-affinity allosteric site that slows the dissociation of inhibitors from a separate high-affinity site. Despite these strides, atomic-level insights into inhibitor action have remained elusive. Here we screen a panel of molecules for their ability to inhibit LeuT, a prokaryotic homologue of mammalian neurotransmitter sodium symporters, and show that the tricyclic antidepressant (TCA) clomipramine noncompetitively inhibits substrate uptake. Cocrystal structures show that clomipramine, along with two other TCAs, binds in an extracellular-facing vestibule about 11 {angstrom} above the substrate and two sodium ions, apparently stabilizing the extracellular gate in a closed conformation. Off-rate assays establish that clomipramine reduces the rate at which leucine dissociates from LeuT and reinforce our contention that this TCA inhibits LeuT by slowing substrate release. Our results represent a molecular view into noncompetitive inhibition of a sodium-coupled transporter and define principles for the

  9. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in an Indonesian patient with folliculin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyono, Wiwien Heru; Nurwidya, Fariz; Baskoro, Hario; Putra, Andika Chandra

    2016-11-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that affects the skin, kidney, and lungs. Affected individuals have an increased risk of developing multiple cysts in the lungs and a spontaneous pneumothorax. Germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene have been confirmed as the aetiology of BHD syndrome. A 51-year-old Indonesian female presented with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, multiple cysts in both lungs, and a renal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood sampling was performed to extract genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes. We identified an aberrant band in the DNA fragment derived from FLCN exon 6. Moreover, direct sequencing of FLCN exon 6 by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) showed a pathogenic mutation, which caused premature termination of folliculin protein translation. This is the first reported case of BHD syndrome in an Indonesian patient confirmed by detection of a FLCN exon 6 mutation.

  10. Three TFL1 homologues regulate floral initiation in the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaoqiong; Fu, Qiantang; Niu, Longjian; Luo, Li; Chen, Jianghua; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2017-01-01

    Recent research revealed that TERMINAL FLOWER 1 (TFL1) homologues are involved in the critical developmental process of floral initiation in several plant species. In this study, the functions of three putative TFL1 homologues (JcTFL1a, JcTFL1b and JcTFL1c) in the biofuel plant Jatropha curcas were analysed using the transgenic approach. JcTFL1b and JcTFL1c, but not JcTFL1a, could complement the TFL1 function and rescue early flowering and determinate inflorescence phenotype in tfl1-14 Arabidopsis mutant, thus suggesting that JcTFL1b and JcTFL1c may be homologues of TFL1. Transgenic Jatropha overexpressing JcTFL1a, JcTFL1b or JcTFL1c showed late flowering, whereas only JcTFL1b and JcTFL1c overexpression delayed flowering in transgenic Arabidopsis. JcTFL1b-RNAi transgenic Jatropha consistently exhibited moderately early flowering phenotype. JcFT and JcAP1 were significantly downregulated in transgenic Jatropha overexpressing JcTFL1a, JcTFL1b or JcTFL1c, which suggested that the late flowering phenotype of these transgenic Jatropha may result from the repressed expression of JcFT and JcAP1. Our results indicate that these three JcTFL1 genes play redundant roles in repressing flowering in Jatropha. PMID:28225036

  11. A case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA with a novel PLOD1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ayşe; Kurtgoz, Serkan; Dursun, Siar; Bozkurt, Gokay

    2014-10-01

    The kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by soft extensible skin, laxity of joints, severe muscle hypotonia at birth, and kyphoscoliosis. We describe a 3-year-old girl with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome whose parents were cousins. She was born with breech presentation by vaginal delivery at term after a normal pregnancy. At birth she manifested hypotonia and congenital kyphosis. On the second postnatal day, subdural and intraparenchymal hemorrhages were detected by magnetic resonance imaging. During follow-up at 18 months of age, strabismus, umbilical hernia, kyphoscoliosis, joint laxity, bilateral hip dislocation, muscular hypotonia, and motor developmental delay. The cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormal signal related to previous hemorrhage. Metabolic investigations and neuromuscular evaluation were normal, excluding other possible explanations of hypotonia. An analysis of urinary cross-links demonstrated an increase in the lysyl-pyridinoline to hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline ratio, suggesting the diagnosis of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Molecular analysis of the PLOD1 gene revealed that she had a novel homozygous p.Pro622Argfs*3 (c. 1863_1864dupCG) mutation in exon 17 that is expected to cause complete loss of the enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 1 and to cause kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We describe a child with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a novel mutation of the PLOD1 gene. Our observations suggest that vascular lesions in the neonatal period may be a rare additional clinical feature of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-12-30

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS diagnosis was confirmed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria and tic severity measured using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for 26 un-medicated subjects with TS. Whole blood was collected and Ribonucleic acid (RNA) processed on Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) identified 3627 genes correlated with tic severity (pGene Ontology, Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, and PubMed determined genes associated with catecholamines and located in the basal ganglia. Using GeneCards, PubMed, and manual curation, seven genes associated with TS were further examined: DRD2, HRH3, MAOB, BDNF, SNAP25, SLC6A4, and SLC22A3. These genes are highly associated with TS and have also been implicated in other movement disorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Correlation of gene expression in peripheral blood with tic severity may allow inferences about catecholamine pathway dysfunction in TS subjects. Findings built on previous work suggest that at least some genes expressed peripherally are relevant for central nervous system (CNS) pathology in the brain of individuals with TS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. [Study on relationship between constitution and syndrome of MMP-9, IL-6 and MTHFR gene in patients with ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuai-Ling; Xie, Yan-Ming; Zhang, Yin; Wang, Zhi-Fei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Dan-Qiao; Jiao, Yue; Chen, Jun; Tao, Yan-Hui

    2017-09-01

    By studying the relationship between syndromes, physique and MMP-9, IL-6 and MTHFR gene polymorphisms in patients with ischemic stroke,The relationship between MMP-9, IL-6 and MTHFR gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients with ischemic stroke.The data were collected by collecting the data of patients with ischemic stroke, and the statistical analysis was carried out. Syndrome:61 cases of ischemic stroke patients with stroke phlegm stasis syndrome in patients with the highest frequency, a total of 30 cases; Physical constitution: phlegm is ischemic stroke patients prone to physical, a total of 20 cases; The analysis of the relationship between constitution and syndrome shows that the patients with qi deficiency constitution tend to show qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome after onset, The analysis of the relationship between constitution and syndrome shows that the patients with qi deficiency constitution tend to show qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome after onset, Phlegm constitution and physical condition after the onset of symptoms tend to wind phlegm stasis syndrome; Syndrome and MMP-9, IL-6 relationship:The distribution of MMP-9 and IL-6 in patients with qi and phlegm stasis syndrome and qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome was significantly different from that in Z test (Prelationship between syndromes and physique in patients with ischemic stroke,Phlegm and dampness, flat quality patients after the onset of easy to show the wind phlegm stasis syndrome; Qi deficiency after the onset of symptoms in patients with Qi and blood stasis. Suggesting that before the onset of such as for the partial physical conditioning, may be on the prevention of ischemic stroke have a certain effect; Analysis of the relationship between syndromes and MMP-9 and IL-6 in patients with ischemic stroke, Wind phlegm stasis syndrome and IL-6 levels are related, Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome and MMP-9 levels are related. Analysis of the relationship between

  14. WS1 gene mutation analysis of Wolfram syndrome in a Chinese patient and a systematic review of literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang; Yu, Man-li; Wang, Jia-feng; Gao, Cong-rong; Chen, Zhong-jin

    2010-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The outcome of this disease is always poor. WFS1 gene mutation is the main cause of this disease. A patient with diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, renal tract disorder, psychiatric abnormality, and cataract was diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome. Mutations in open reading frame (ORF) of WFS1 gene was analyzed by sequencing. Mutations in WFS1 gene was also summarized by a systematic review in Pubmed and Chinese biological and medical database. Sequencing of WFS1 gene in this patient showed a new mutation, 1962G>A, and two other non-sense mutations, 2433A>G and 2565G>A. Systematic review included 219 patients in total and identified 172 WFS1 gene mutations, most of which were located in Exon 8. These mutations in WFS1 gene might be useful in prenatal diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome.

  15. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene negatively regulates ER stress signaling in rodent and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sonya G; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Oslowski, Christine M; Lu, Simin; Lipson, Kathryn L; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Hayashi, Emiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Permutt, M Alan; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by nonautoimmune loss of beta cells, and neurological dysfunctions. We have previously shown that mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene cause Wolfram syndrome and that WFS1 has a protective function against ER stress. However, it remained to be determined how WFS1 mitigates ER stress. Here we have shown in rodent and human cell lines that WFS1 negatively regulates a key transcription factor involved in ER stress signaling, activating transcription factor 6alpha (ATF6alpha), through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. WFS1 suppressed expression of ATF6alpha target genes and repressed ATF6alpha-mediated activation of the ER stress response element (ERSE) promoter. Moreover, WFS1 stabilized the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, brought ATF6alpha to the proteasome, and enhanced its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to suppression of ER stress signaling. Consistent with these data, beta cells from WFS1-deficient mice and lymphocytes from patients with Wolfram syndrome exhibited dysregulated ER stress signaling through upregulation of ATF6alpha and downregulation of HRD1. These results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of ER stress signaling and in the pathogenesis of diseases involving chronic, unresolvable ER stress, such as pancreatic beta cell death in diabetes.

  16. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. A single base-pair deletion in the WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Katherine; James, Chela; Kochar, Inderpal S; Kapoor, Akshay; Jain, Shilpi; Hussain, Khalid; Bennett, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness). The majority of cases are caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. WFS1 is located at 4p16.1 and encodes wolframin, a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein involved in the negative regulation of ER stress signalling. To date, over 120 WFS1 mutations have been described. In this study, we report a consanguineous family with three siblings affected by Wolfram syndrome. A homozygous single base pair deletion (c.877delC, L293fsX303) was found in the WFS1 gene in all three affected siblings.

  18. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. The histology of the resected polyps was consistent with juvenile polyps. Subsequent genetic screening revealed a novel mutation in SMAD4, exon 5 (p.Ser144Stop. To the best of our knowledge, this mutation has not been reported before. Offering genotypic diagnosis for patients with JPS is an important step for strategic plan of management.

  19. Treacher Collins syndrome may result from insertions, deletions or splicing mutations, which introduce a termination codon into the gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, A. J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S. K.; Edwards, S.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Dixon, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Recently, the Treacher Collins syndrome gene (TCOF1) has been positionally cloned and a series of five mutations within the coding sequence

  20. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  1. Correlations of gene expression with ratings of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in tourette syndrome : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Ander, Bradley P.; Jickling, Glen C.; Gunther, Joan R.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Bos-Veneman, Netty G. P.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Schweitzer, Julie B.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inattentiveness, impulsivity and hyperactivity are the primary behaviors associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Previous studies showed that peripheral blood gene expression signatures can mirror central nervous system disease. Tourette syndrome (TS) is

  2. Chronic granulomatous disease, the McLeod phenotype and the contiguous gene deletion syndrome-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Casey E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD, a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, results in phagocyte functional defects and subsequent infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans. Deletions and missense, frameshift, or nonsense mutations in the gp91phox gene (also termed CYBB, located in the Xp21.1 region of the X chromosome, are associated with the most common form of CGD. When larger X-chromosomal deletions occur, including the XK gene deletion, a so-called "Contiguous Gene Deletion Syndrome" may result. The contiguous gene deletion syndrome is known to associate the Kell phenotype/McLeod syndrome with diseases such as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. These patients are often complicated and management requires special attention to the various facets of the syndrome.

  3. Inactivation of Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes causes kidney defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Deng-Fu; Beyer, Andreas M.; Yang, Baoli; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2011-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare hereditary autosomal recessive disease associated with several features including obesity, hypertension, and renal abnormalities. The underlying mechanisms of renal defects associated with BBS remain poorly defined. We examined the histological, molecular, and functional renal changes in BBS mouse models that have features of the human disorder. Interestingly, obese hypertensive Bbs4−/− mice exhibited inflammatory infiltration and renal cysts, whereas the obese normotensive Bbs2−/− mice had only minor inflammatory infiltration. Accordingly, the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase was elevated in the kidney of both BBS mice with a more marked increase in Bbs4−/− mice. In contrast, endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression was decreased in Bbs4−/−, but not Bbs2−/−, mice. Similarly, the expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and 4 channels as well as β- and γ-subunits of epithelial Na channel were significantly reduced only in the kidney of Bbs4−/− mice. Metabolic studies revealed changes in urine output and urinary concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium with a more pronounced effect in Bbs4−/− mice. Finally, we found that calorie restriction which prevented obesity in BBS mice reversed the morphological and molecular changes found in Bbs2−/− and Bbs4−/− mice, indicating the kidney abnormalities associated with BBS are obesity related. These findings extend our understanding of the function of BBS proteins and emphasize the importance of these proteins in renal physiology. PMID:21106857

  4. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  5. [Clinical and genetic analysis of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome in TCOF1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Xu; Li, Zhenyue; Chen, Jing; Lu, Yu; Jia, Jingjie; Yuan, Huijun; Han, Dongyi

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the clinical and genetic features of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), and identify the mutation in TCOF1 gene. The medical history was taken, and general physical examinations and otological examinations were conducted in this patient. Genomic DNA was extracted from this patient and his parents and complete TCOF1 gene coding exons were amplified by specific PCR primers. Direct sequencing was carried out to identify the mutations. The raw data was analyzed with GeneTool software and molecular biological website. We detected a heterozygous c. 1639 delAG mutation in exon 11 of TCOF1, which resulted in a truncated protein lacking normal function. This mutation is a novel mutation and the second case identified in exon 11 of in TCS. TCS patient reported in this study has unique clinical phenotype. TCOF1 gene mutation is the specific risk factor.

  6. An R1632C variant in the SCN5A gene causing Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina, Esperanza; Sabater-Molina, María; Muñoz, Carmen; Ruiz-Espejo, Francisco; Gimeno, Juan R

    2016-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BS) is an electrical disease, inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. BS is caused by mutations in up to 13 different genes. SCN5A is the gene most frequently mutated in BS, although this presents an incomplete penetrance. The present case study investigated the SCN5A gene in a family exhibiting BS. Direct sequencing of the SCN5A gene was performed to identify mutations and a familial investigation was performed. A novel variant was identified in the voltage‑sensing domain of the SCN5A protein. This familial investigation revealed one novel asymptomatic carrier in the family. Genetic investigations are useful to classify individuals who require more frequent clinical monitoring and to stratify the risk of developing the disease.

  7. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  8. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  9. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

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    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  10. Novel frameshift mutation in the KCNQ1 gene responsible for Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

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    Azam Amirian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Jervell and Lange–Nielsen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes. The disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and long QT syndrome. Methods: Here we present a 3.5-year-old female patient, an offspring of consanguineous marriage, who had a history of recurrent syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. The patient and the family members were screened for mutations in KCNQ1 gene by linkage analysis and DNA sequencing. Results: DNA sequencing showed a c.1532_1534delG (p. A512Pfs*81 mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in homozygous form. The results of short tandem repeat (STR markers showed that the disease in the family is linked to the KCNQ1 gene. The mutation was confirmed in the parents in heterozygous form. Conclusion: This is the first report of this variant in KCNQ1 gene in an Iranian family. The data of this study could be used for early diagnosis of the condition in the family and genetic counseling.

  11. Non-syndromic hearing loss gene identification: A brief history and glimpse into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vona, Barbara; Nanda, Indrajit; Hofrichter, Michaela A H; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Haaf, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    From the first identified non-syndromic hearing loss gene in 1995, to those discovered in present day, the field of human genetics has witnessed an unparalleled revolution that includes the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 to the $1000 genome in 2014. This review highlights the classical and cutting-edge strategies for non-syndromic hearing loss gene identification that have been used throughout the twenty year history with a special emphasis on how the innovative breakthroughs in next generation sequencing technology have forever changed candidate gene approaches. The simplified approach afforded by next generation sequencing technology provides a second chance for the many linked loci in large and well characterized families that have been identified by linkage analysis but have presently failed to identify a causative gene. It also discusses some complexities that may restrict eventual candidate gene discovery and calls for novel approaches to answer some of the questions that make this simple Mendelian disorder so intriguing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

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    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  13. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  14. Mutation spectrum of genes associated with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiqiang; He, Qingnan; Zhen, Yan; He, Xiaoxie; Yi, Zhuwen; Zhu, Kuichun

    2017-08-20

    Approximately 20% of children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome do not respond to steroid therapy. More than 30 genes have been identified as disease-causing genes for the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Few reports were from the Chinese population. The coding regions of genes commonly associated with SRNS were analyzed to characterize the gene mutation spectrum in children with SRNS in central China. The first phase study involved 38 children with five genes (NPHS1, NPHS2, PLCE1, WT1, and TRPC6) by Sanger sequencing. The second phase study involved 33 children with 17 genes by next generation DNA sequencing (NGS. 22 new patients, and 11 patients from first phase study but without positive findings). Overall deleterious or putatively deleterious gene variants were identified in 19 patients (31.7%), including four NPHS1 variants among five patients and three PLCE1 variants among four other patients. Variants in COL4A3, COL4A4, or COL4A5 were found in six patients. Eight novel variants were identified, including two in NPHS1, two in PLCE1, one in NPHS2, LAMB2, COL4A3, and COL4A4, respectively. 55.6% of the children with variants failed to respond to immunosuppressive agent therapy, while the resistance rate in children without variants was 44.4%. Our results show that screening for deleterious variants in some common genes in children clinically suspected with SRNS might be helpful for disease diagnosis as well as prediction of treatment efficacy and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Mutation analysis of the MKKS gene in McKusick-Kaufman syndrome and selected Bardet-Biedl syndrome patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slavotinek, A. M.; Searby, C.; Al-Gazali, L.; Hennekam, R. C. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Orcana-Losa, M.; Pardo-Reoyo, S.; Cantani, A.; Kumar, D.; Capellini, Q.; Neri, G.; Zackai, E.; Biesecker, L. G.

    2002-01-01

    McKusick-Kaufman syndrome comprises hydrometrocolpos, polydactyly, and congenital heart defects and overlaps with Bardet-Biedl syndrome, comprising retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, obesity, mental retardation, and renal and genital anomalies. Bardet-Biedl syndrome is genetically heterogeneous with

  16. Expression profile of immune response genes in patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

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    Tai Dessmon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS emerged in later February 2003, as a new epidemic form of life-threatening infection caused by a novel coronavirus. However, the immune-pathogenesis of SARS is poorly understood. To understand the host response to this pathogen, we investigated the gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from SARS patients, and compared with healthy controls. Results The number of differentially expressed genes was found to be 186 under stringent filtering criteria of microarray data analysis. Several genes were highly up-regulated in patients with SARS, such as, the genes coding for Lactoferrin, S100A9 and Lipocalin 2. The real-time PCR method verified the results of the gene array analysis and showed that those genes that were up-regulated as determined by microarray analysis were also found to be comparatively up-regulated by real-time PCR analysis. Conclusions This differential gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with SARS strongly suggests that the response of SARS affected patients seems to be mainly an innate inflammatory response, rather than a specific immune response against a viral infection, as we observed a complete lack of cytokine genes usually triggered during a viral infection. Our study shows for the first time how the immune system responds to the SARS infection, and opens new possibilities for designing new diagnostics and treatments for this new life-threatening disease.

  17. [Change in gene expression of inflammation-related genes induced in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome induced by infection of injuries in rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yu; Shen, Hong; Li, Tan-shi

    2007-03-01

    To study the changes in inflammation-related gene expression in liver tissue during the course of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) induced by infection of injuries and its implication. The rats model with MODS following trauma and infection was reproduced in rat. Liver tissue was harvested. The differences of gene expressions between the simple trauma group and MODS group were detected by means of cDNA microarray. Comparison between the two groups, differentially expressed genes included enhanced expression of genes related both of tissue damage and repair. There was also up-regulation of expression of both inflammation-related and anti-inflammation related genes. A few genes appeared down-regulated. The differences of expression extent were significant. There were up-regulation of some genes related to apoptosis and fibrosis. Differential expressions of genes in the liver tissue include both that related to the inflammation and anti-inflammation, with down-regulation and up-regulation at the same time. There is a difference in the intensity. There is also an expression of genes related to intrinsic protection, as manifested by co-existence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and compensation anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) under the condition of MODS. There is an imbalance in inflammatory reaction. The simultaneous up-regulation of the tissue damage and repair related genes suggests that cellular injury is accompanied by repair in the organs during the course of MODS.

  18. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

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    Md. Zahidus Sayeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh.

  19. Connected Gene Communities Underlie Transcriptional Changes in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Imène; Fournier, Éric; Baguette, Audrey; Vallée, Maxime; Lamaze, Fabien C; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a complex multisystem developmental disorder caused by mutations in cohesin subunits and regulators. While its precise molecular mechanisms are not well defined, they point toward a global deregulation of the transcriptional gene expression program. Cohesin is associated with the boundaries of chromosome domains and with enhancer and promoter regions connecting the three-dimensional genome organization with transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that connected gene communities, structures emerging from the interactions of noncoding regulatory elements and genes in the three-dimensional chromosomal space, provide a molecular explanation for the pathoetiology of CdLS associated with mutations in the cohesin-loading factor NIPBL and the cohesin subunit SMC1A NIPBL and cohesin are important constituents of connected gene communities that are centrally positioned at noncoding regulatory elements. Accordingly, genes deregulated in CdLS are positioned within reach of NIPBL- and cohesin-occupied regions through promoter-promoter interactions. Our findings suggest a dynamic model where NIPBL loads cohesin to connect genes in communities, offering an explanation for the gene expression deregulation in the CdLS. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  20. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Noncoding Mismatch Repair Gene Promoter Variants in Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Thompson, Bryony A; Ward, Robyn L; Hesson, Luke B; Sloane, Mathew A

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common familial cancer condition that mainly predisposes to tumors of the colon and endometrium. Cancer susceptibility is caused by the autosomal dominant inheritance of a loss-of-function mutation or epimutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Cancer risk assessment is often possible with nonsynonymous coding region mutations, but in many cases patients present with DNA sequence changes within noncoding regions, including the promoters, of MMR genes. The pathogenic role of promoter variants, and hence clinical significance, is unclear and this hinders the clinical management of carriers. In this review, we provide an overview of the classification of MMR gene variants, outline the laboratory assays and online resources that can be used to assess the causality of promoter variants in Lynch syndrome, and highlight some of the practical challenges of demonstrating the pathogenicity of these variants. In conclusion, we propose a guide that could be integrated into the current InSiGHT classification scheme to help determine if a MMR gene promoter variant is pathogenic. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. Novel LRP5 gene mutation in a patient with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Levasseur, Régis; Cormier, Catherine; Bonneau, Jessica; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Allanore, Yannick

    2010-03-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe juvenile-onset osteoporosis and congenital or early-onset blindness. This serious illness is due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) that is a major actor in pathways involved in bone remodelling. Here, we report a novel frameshift mutation identified in a 22 year-old Tunisian boy of a consanguineous family. This patient had low bone mineral density (BMD), experienced multiple fractures during childhood and suffered ocular alterations with blindness. Direct DNA sequencing showed a homozygous 5 base pair insertion in exon 5 of the LRP5 gene. This new mutation is located in the first EGF-like domain and gives rise to a truncated protein of 384 amino acids. The functional significance of this mutation clearly indicates a loss-of-function mutation of the LRP5 gene leading to the observed OPPG phenotype. Rheumatologists must be aware of LRP5 gene that in addition to being a major gene in the mendelian disease that is OPPG syndrome seems to be involved in osteoporosis in the general population through some of its polymorphisms. Copyright 2009 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: report of a case with a TCF4 gene mutation

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    Orsini Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims We will discuss the clinical and genetic diagnosis of a child with severe psychomotor delay, who at 3 years of age presented with paroxysms of hyperpnea-apnea and seizures unrelated to breathing anomalies. Methods The child underwent genetic (karyotype, FISH telomeres and neuroradiological (cranial CT and MRI tests, which proved to be normal. He came under our clinical observation at 3 years and 5 months of age. Due to severe psychomotor delay and facial dysmorphisms we completed the genetic investigations based on his clinical feature and analysis of the available literature. Results The presence of severe mental retardation associated with anomalous breathing pattern may suggest the Joubert and Rett syndrome, however these were excluded on the basis of clinical and genetic examination. Angelman syndrome, suspected for facial dysmorphisms and absent language, was also excluded because of the presence of a normal pattern of methylation at SNRPN locus. Another possible diagnosis was the Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PHS, characterized by severe mental retardation, breathing anomalies (paroxisms of hyperpnea-apnea, dysmorphisms and sometimes epilepsy. Haploinsufficiency of TCF4 gene located at 18q21.2 region has been recently identified as causative of this syndrome. In our patient the research of TCF4 mutation by the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany, showed a de novo mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, an underdiagnosed cause of mental retardation, was based on clinical and genetic findings. Searching for TCF4 mutations is highly recommended when others overlapping syndromes was excluded. At our knowledge our patient is the first italian case of PHS diagnosed at molecular level.

  3. Expression profiling of the GBP1 gene as a candidate gene for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, S; Estany, J; Fraile, L J; Pena, R N

    2015-12-01

    A genomic region in pig chromosome 4 has been previously associated with higher viraemia levels and lower weight gain following porcine reproduction and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. The region includes the marker WUR1000125, a G>A polymorphism next to a putative polyadenylation site in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the guanylate-binding protein 1, interferon-induced (GBP1) gene. The protein encoded by GBP1 is a negative regulator of T-cell responses. We show here that GBP1 expression is lower in liver and tonsils of pigs carrying the WUR1000125-G allele due to differential allele expression (allele A expression is 1.9-fold higher than for allele G). We also show that the GBP1 gene has two active polyadenylation signals 421 bp apart and that polyadenylation usage is dependent on the WUR1000125 genotype. The distal site is the most prevalently used in all samples, but the presence of the A allele favours the generation of shorter transcripts from the proximal site. This is confirmed by a differential allele expression study in AG genotype liver and tonsil samples. The interaction between WUR1000125 and other mutations identified in the 5'- and 3'-UTR regions of this gene needs to be studied. In conclusion, our study indicates that the WUR1000125 mutation is associated with changes in the expression of the negative T-cell regulator GBP1 gene. However, the chromosome 4 locus for PRRSV viraemia levels and weight gain contains a cluster of four other GBP genes that remain to be studied as candidate genes for this QTL. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  4. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  5. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  6. The urokinase receptor and its structural homologue C4.4A in human cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, B; Ploug, M

    2008-01-01

    The urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) and its structural homologue C4.4A are multidomain members of the Ly6/uPAR/alpha-neurotoxin protein domain family. Both are glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored membrane glycoproteins encoded by neighbouring genes located on chromosome 19q13...... in a number of human cancers including colon adenocarcinoma and pulmonary squamous cell carcinoma. Targeting uPAR in experimental animal models has also provided promising results regarding the interference with pathogenic plasminogen activation. In the case of C4.4A, very recent data have demonstrated...

  7. Altered expression of immune-related genes in children with Down syndrome.

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    Bruna Lancia Zampieri

    Full Text Available Individuals with Down syndrome (DS have a high incidence of immunological alterations with increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and high frequency of different types of hematologic malignancies and autoimmune disorders. In the current study, we profiled the expression pattern of 92 immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of two different groups, children with DS and control children, to identify differentially expressed genes that might be of pathogenetic importance for the development and phenotype of the immunological alterations observed in individuals with DS. PBMCs samples were obtained from six DS individuals with karyotypically confirmed full trisomy 21 and six healthy control individuals (ages 2-6 years. Gene expression was profiled in duplicate according to the manufacturer's instructions provided by commercially available TaqMan Human Immune Array representing 92 immune function genes and four reference genes on a 96-plex gene card. A set of 17 differentially expressed genes, not located on chromosome 21 (HSA21, involved in immune and inflammatory pathways was identified including 13 genes (BCL2, CCL3, CCR7, CD19, CD28, CD40, CD40LG, CD80, EDN1, IKBKB, IL6, NOS2 and SKI significantly down-regulated and four genes (BCL2L1, CCR2, CCR5 and IL10 significantly up-regulated in children with DS. These findings highlight a list of candidate genes for further investigation into the molecular mechanism underlying DS pathology and reinforce the secondary effects of the presence of a third copy of HSA21.

  8. Characterization of ORF89 - A latency-related gene of white spot syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kwang, Jimmy

    2004-01-01

    Open reading frame 89 (ORF89) is one of the three genes that are believed to be involved in the latent infection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Here, we report the structure and functional characterization of ORF89. cDNA sequencing, 5' RLM-RACE, and 3' RLM-RACE showed that ORF89 gene is transcribed into an unspliced mRNA of 4436 nucleotides, which is predicted to encode a protein of 1437 amino acids. ORF89 expressed an approximately 165-kDa protein in Sf9 cells that localized in the nucleus. Amino acids 678-683 were found to be essential for nuclear localization. Cotransfection assays demonstrated that ORF89 protein repressed its own promoter as well as those of a protein kinase and the thymidine-thymidylate kinase genes of WSSV. SYBR Green real-time PCR indicated that the repression occurred at the transcriptional level

  9. A Case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome Due To a Novel Mutation in Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Thulasi BA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by motor, sensory, and cranial neuronopathies, associated with mutations in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3 genes that code for human riboflavin transporters RFVT2 and RFVT3, respectively. The authors describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl with Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome and a novel homozygous mutation c.1156T>C in the SLC52A3 gene, who presented at the age of 2.5 years with progressive brain stem dysfunction including ptosis, facial weakness, hearing loss, dysphagia, anarthria with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, and ataxic gait. She subsequently developed respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy and worsening dysphagia necessitating a gastrostomy. Following riboflavin supplementation, resolution of facial diplegia and ataxia, improvements in ptosis, and bulbar function including vocalization and respiration were noted. However, her sensorineural hearing loss remained unchanged. Similar to other cases of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, our patient responded favorably to early riboflavin supplementation with significant but not complete neurologic recovery.

  10. Recurrent Stroke in a Child with TRMA Syndrome and SLC19A2 Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Moosavian, Toktam; Moosavian, Hamidreza

    2018-01-01

    Here we report a 5-month-old boy with thiamine Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia syndrome (TRMA syndrome) with several attacks of stroke, admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran, in 2016. In addition to the cardinal clinical manifestations of the syndrome, other manifestations comprise thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and sensor neural hearing loss. The patient showed the ischemic attack of stroke. Megaloblastic anemia and diabetes were diagnosed at 8 months and was successfully treated with vitamin and insulin prescription. After treatment of thiamine, diabetes was controlled and insulin was discontinued. In spite of the thiamine administration, the second stroke as hemorrhagic stroke occurred in the patient after a few months. TRAMA is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. TRMA was confirmed by mutation in SLC19A2. A homozygous splice site variant was detected in SLC19A2 gene. Stroke was not reported in this syndrome (only in one report about one attack in an adult patient) but in this patient, several attacks of stroke were reported before and after thiamin administration.

  11. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannens, M; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Wiesmeyer, C; de Meulemeester, M; Ryan, A; Kalikin, L; Voûte, T; De Kraker, J; Hoovers, J; Slater, R; Feinberg, A; Little, P; Westerveld, A

    1996-11-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated childhood tumors to 11p15. High resolution mapping of 8 rare balanced chromosomal BWS rearrangements enabled us to identify three distinct regions on chromosome 11p15 that might harbor genes involved in the above-mentioned disorders. These results suggest genetic heterogeneity that correlates with the clinical heterogeneity seen in the patients studied. Expressed candidate gene sequences from these regions have been cloned and partly sequenced. These transcripts are either disrupted by or are at least within a few kb of these BWS chromosome breakpoints. So far, zinc-finger sequences and one Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) domain were found in independent candidate genes which are compatible with a regulating function of growth promoting genes. The abundance of expression of these genes varies from low abundant in all adult and fetal tissues tested to detectable on Northern blots of adult tissues. In addition to our 11p15 studies we have analyzed additional chromosome regions, in particular 1p. Cytogenetic, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) studies have identified 1p35 as a region of interest. A positional cloning effort to identify a balanced 1p35 translocation found in a Wilms tumor has led to the isolation of a YAC, crossing this breakpoint.

  12. A 380-kb Duplication in 7p22.3 Encompassing the LFNG Gene in a Boy with Asperger Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; de Brouwer, A.F.; de Leeuw, N.; Obihara, C.C.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2012-01-01

    De novo genomic aberrations are considered an important cause of autism spectrum disorders. We describe a de novo 380-kb gain in band p22.3 of chromosome 7 in a patient with Asperger syndrome. This duplicated region contains 9 genes including the LNFG gene that is an important regulator of NOTCH

  13. Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Down Syndrome: Effects of the Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Gina Marie; Spanó, Goffredina; Edgin, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined individual differences in ADHD symptoms and executive function (EF) in children with Down syndrome (DS) in relation to the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene, a gene often linked to ADHD in people without DS. Participants included 68 individuals with DS (7-21 years), assessed through laboratory tasks, caregiver reports, and…

  14. Polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription: a molecular mechanism to improve the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S D

    2001-04-01

    This review addresses the hypothesis that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly those of the (n-3) family, play pivotal roles as "fuel partitioners" in that they direct fatty acids away from triglyceride storage and toward oxidation, and that they enhance glucose flux to glycogen. In doing this, PUFA may protect against the adverse symptoms of the metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of heart disease. PUFA exert their beneficial effects by up-regulating the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation while simultaneously down-regulating genes encoding proteins of lipid synthesis. PUFA govern oxidative gene expression by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. PUFA suppress lipogenic gene expression by reducing the nuclear abundance and DNA-binding affinity of transcription factors responsible for imparting insulin and carbohydrate control to lipogenic and glycolytic genes. In particular, PUFA suppress the nuclear abundance and expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and reduce the DNA-binding activities of nuclear factor Y, Sp1 and possibly hepatic nuclear factor-4. Collectively, the studies discussed suggest that the fuel "repartitioning" and gene expression actions of PUFA should be considered among criteria used in defining the dietary needs of (n-6) and (n-3) and in establishing the dietary ratio of (n-6) to (n-3) needed for optimum health benefit.

  15. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  16. Bilateral renal tumors in an adult man with Smith-Magenis syndrome: The role of the FLCN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardour, Leila; Verleyen, Pieter; Lesage, Karl; Holvoet, Maureen; Devriendt, Koen

    2016-10-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a contiguous-gene disorder most commonly caused by a deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. We report a 57 year-old man with SMS who presents bilateral renal tumors. This is most likely related to haploinsufficiency of FLCN gene, located in the deleted region, and a known tumor suppressor gene. Haploinsufficiency of FLCN causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), characterized by pulmonary cysts, renal and skin tumors. The present observation suggests that the follow-up of patients with SMS should also focus on possible manifestations of BHDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in Chinese patients with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Luo, Mingyao; Chen, Qianlong; Fu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Qian, Xiangyang; Sun, Xiaogang; Fan, Yuxin; Zhou, Zhou; Chang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder typically involving the ocular, skeletal and cardiovascular systems, and aortic aneurysms/dissection mainly contributes to its mortality. Here, we performed genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in 39 Chinese probands with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome and their related family members by Sanger sequencing. In total, 29 pathogenic/likely pathogenic FBN1 mutations, including 17 novel ones, were identified. In addition, most MFS patients with aortic disease (62%) had a truncating or splicing mutation. These results expand the FBN1 mutation spectrum and enrich our knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations. Genetic testing for MFS and its related aortic diseases is increasingly important for early intervention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Altered clock gene expression in obese visceral adipose tissue is associated with metabolic syndrome.

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    Elaine Vieira

    Full Text Available Clock gene expression was associated with different components of metabolic syndrome (MS in human adipose tissue. However, no study has been done to compare the expression of clock genes in visceral adipose tissue (VAT from lean and obese subjects and its clinical implications. Therefore, we studied in lean and obese women the endogenous 24 h expression of clock genes in isolated adipocytes and its association with MS components. VAT was obtained from lean (BMI 21-25 kg/m2; n = 21 and morbidly obese women (BMI >40 kg/m2; n = 28. The 24 h pattern of clock genes was analyzed every 6 hours using RT-PCR. Correlation of clinical data was studied by Spearman analysis. The 24 h pattern of clock genes showed that obesity alters the expression of CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA in adipocytes with changes found in CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA throughout the 24 h period. The same results were confirmed in VAT and stromal cells (SC showing an upregulation of CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA from obese women. A positive correlation was observed for REV-ERB ALPHA gene expression with BMI and waist circumference in the obese population. Expression of ROR ALPHA was correlated with HDL levels and CLOCK with LDL. Obese subjects with MS exhibited positive correlation in the PER2 gene with LDL cholesterol, whereas REV-ERB ALPHA was correlated with waist circumference. We identified CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA as the clock genes upregulated in obesity during the 24 h period and that REV-ERB ALPHA is an important gene associated with MS.

  19. Monolayer structures of alkyl aldehydes: Odd-membered homologues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, T.K.; Clarke, S.M.; Bhinde, T.; Castro, M.A.; Millan, C.; Medina, S.

    2011-01-01

    Crystalline monolayers of three aldehydes with an odd number of carbon atoms in the alkyl chain (C 7 , C 9 and C 11 ) at low coverages are observed by a combination of X-ray and neutron diffraction. Analysis of the diffraction data is discussed and possible monolayer crystal structures are proposed; although unique structures could not be ascertained for all molecules. We conclude that the structures are flat on the surface, with the molecules lying in the plane of the layer. The C 11 homologue is determined to have a plane group of either p2, pgb or pgg, and for the C 7 homologue the p2 plane group is preferred.

  20. Gene expression analysis of urine sediment: evaluation for potential noninvasive markers of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Eric M; Korrect, Garrett S; Stromberg, Arnold J; Erickson, Deborah R

    2012-02-01

    We determined whether gene expression profiles in urine sediment could provide noninvasive markers for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome with and/or without Hunner lesions. Fresh catheterized urine was collected and centrifuged from 5 controls, and 5 Hunner lesion-free and 5 Hunner lesion bearing patients. RNA was extracted from pelleted material and quantified by gene expression microarray using the GeneChip® Human Gene ST Array. Three biologically likely hypotheses were tested, including 1) all 3 groups are distinct from each other, 2) controls are distinct from the 2 types combined of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and 3) patients with Hunner lesion-interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome are distinct from controls and patients with nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome combined. For statistical parity an unlikely fourth hypothesis was included, that is patients with nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome are distinct from controls and patients with Hunner lesion-interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome combined. Analysis supported selective up-regulation of genes in the Hunner lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome group (hypothesis 3), which were primarily associated with inflammation. The inflammatory profile was statistically similar to that reported in a prior Hunner lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome bladder biopsy study. Gene expression analysis of urine sediment was feasible in this pilot study. Expression profiles failed to discriminate nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome from controls and they are unlikely to be a noninvasive marker for nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. In contrast, patients with Hunner lesion had increased proinflammatory gene expression in urine sediment, similar to that in a prior microarray study of bladder biopsies. If these preliminary results are validated in

  1. Association of eNOS gene intron 4 a/b VNTR polymorphisms in children with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Hasan; Noyan, Aytul; Matyar, Selcuk; Buyukcelik, Mithat; Soran, Mustafa; Cengiz, Nurcan; Bayazit, Aysun K; Seydaoglu, Gulsah; Attila, Gulen; Anarat, Ali

    2013-06-15

    To investigate the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4 (eNOS4) polymorphisms with nephrotic syndrome, the eNOS4 genotypes were assessed in 161 children with nephrotic syndrome in comparison with 78 healthy subjects. We classified the children with nephritic syndrome into 2 groups: as steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) (n=125) and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) (n=36). The eNOS4 polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. The frequencies of eNOS4 aa, ab and bb genotypes were 3%, 31%, and 66% in all the nephrotic syndrome groups, and 1%, 23%, and 76% in the control group (x(2)=2.87, p>0.05). In addition, the frequencies of eNOS4 aa, ab and bb genotypes were 2%, 33%, and 65% in SSNS group, and 5%, 28%, and 67% in the SRNS group (x(2)=1.13, p=0.567). The present study is the first to investigate eNOS4 gene polymorphisms in children with SSNS and SRNS. Our data show that the eNOS4 gene polymorphisms were not associated with the development, frequent relapse and response to steroid in nephritic syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Relation of Trp64Arg polymorphism of beta 3 adrenoreceptor gene with metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance in obese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luis Román, Daniel Antonio; Primo, David; Izaola, Olatz; Aller, Rocío

    2017-03-30

    Trp64Arg variant in beta 3 adrenoreceptor has been reported to be associated with increased body weight and insulin resistance. These risk factors are the ones that make up the so-called metabolic syndrome. The aim of our study was to investigate the relationship between metabolic syndrome and Trp64Arg polymorphism in the beta3 adrenoreceptor gene in obese women. A population of 531 obese women was analyzed in cross-sectional survey. A bioimpedance, blood pressure, a serial assessment of nutritional intake with 3 days written food records and biochemical analysis were performed. Genotype of beta 3 adrenoreceptor gene polymorphism (Trp64Arg) was studied. Prevalence of metabolic syndrome (MS) with ATP III definition was 47.1% (250 patients) and 52.9% patients without MS (n = 281 patients). Prevalence of beta 3 genotypes was similar in patients with metabolic syndrome (87.6% wild genotype and 12.4% mutant genotype) and without metabolic syndrome (87.9% wild genotype and 12.1% mutant genotype). Insulin and HOMA levels were higher in patients with mutant genotype than wild type, in patients with and without metabolic syndrome. In mutant group of beta3 adrenoreceptor gene patients have higher insulin and HOMA levels than wild type group, without relation with metabolic syndrome.

  3. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down Syndrome screening.

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    Jeroen L A Pennings

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues were chosen as target. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Placenta and fetal liver at 15.5 days gestation were analyzed by microarray profiling. We confirmed increased expression of genes located at the trisomic chromosomal region. Overall, between the two genotypes more differentially expressed genes were found in fetal liver than in placenta. Furthermore, the fetal liver data are in line with the hematological aberrations found in humans with Down Syndrome as well as Ts1Cje mice. Together, we found 25 targets that are predicted (by Gene Ontology, UniProt, or the Human Plasma Proteome project to be detectable in human serum. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Fetal liver might harbor more promising targets for Down Syndrome screening studies. We expect these new targets will help focus further experimental studies on identifying and validating human maternal serum biomarkers for Down Syndrome screening.

  4. Unusual presentation of Kallmannn syndrome with contiguous gene deletion in three siblings of a family

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    Sri Venkat Madhu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of 3 brothers aged 34, 24, and 22 years, unmarried, who presented to our endocrinology clinic with absence of secondary sexual characters. There was no such history in other siblings, but their maternal uncle had similar complaints. On examination, all 3 had pre-pubertal appearance, voice, and genitalia along with anosmia and bimanual synkinesia. Cryptorchidism was noticed in 2 while third person had small hypoplastic testes. It was also noted that all 3 patients had icthyosis mainly involving trunk, back, and limbs. The hormonal assays were consistent with isolated hypogonadotrophic hypogonadism. IQ testing revealed mental retardation in the 2 patients. Ultrasound showed ectopic right kidney in one patient, atrophic right kidney in the second patient while the third patient had normal kidneys. MRI brain of all the patients showed poorly visualized olfactory tract and bulb. Kallmann syndrome (KS was diagnosed based on hormonal evaluation and MRI results. Of the four types of KS: Synkinesia, renal anomaly, and X-linked pedigree pattern in our patients pointed towards X-linked type 1 KS as the possible cause. But, icthyosis and mental retardation are not usual presentation of type 1 KS. They are usually seen as a result of contiguous gene deletion of KAL1, steroid sulfatase (STS, and mental retardation (MRX gene on X chromosome. Hence, the possible gene defect in our cases is inherited defect in contiguous gene deletion. The contiguous gene deletion as the cause of KS in 3 patients of same family is very rare and worth reporting. Also, the significance of phenotype-genotypic association in Kallmann syndrome is discussed

  5. Phenotypic Heterogeneity by Germline Mismatch Repair Gene Defect in Lynch Syndrome Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernâni-Eusébio, Jorge; Barbosa, Elisabete

    2016-10-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common form of hereditary colorectal cancer, being also responsible for endometrial and other types of cancers. It is associated with germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair genes and microsatellite instability. MLH1 and MSH2 mutations have a "classical" Lynch syndrome phenotype, with MSH2 having a higher association with extracolonic cancer. MSH6 and PMS2 mutations have an atypical phenotype. Clinical expression is heterogeneous, with correlation between mismatch repair mutated gene and phenotypic patterns. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients fulfilling Amsterdam criteria or having mismatch repair gene mutations, between September 2012 and October 2015. We identified 28 patients. Seventeen had colorectal cancer with right colon predominance. Five developed endometrial cancer (median age of diagnosis - 53), with no MSH6 mutations. Five developed other cancers. All mutated mismatch repair cases studied had microsatellite instability. Most cases had MSH2 mutations despite MLH1 being described in the literature as the most frequently mutated. Interestingly, colorectal cancer patients showed no tendency for high inflammatory infiltrate. Despite the high incidence of synchronous and metachronous tumours, most patients underwent a partial colectomy. Prophylactic hysterectomy and adnexectomy was performed in menopausal/perimenopausal patients. A standardized registration of patient's data may lead to better management and knowledge about Lynch syndrome. Use of Bethesda Guidelines might identify new cases non-identified by Amsterdam criteria. Microsatellite instability analysis must be performed in a much larger scale. The genotypic/phenotypic correlation described in the literature was not verified in our study with statistical significance, perhaps due to small data sample and insufficient clinical registration.

  6. Entamoeba histolytica: identification and characterization of an N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion protein homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Libros-Ziv, Pazit; Villalobo, Eduardo; Mirelman, David

    2005-07-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is a phagocytic cell with numerous vesicles of different sizes and shapes but without a well-defined Golgi apparatus. Despite this, genes implied in membrane trafficking have been identified in the genome of this parasite. One of these genes is homologous to the N-ethylmaleimide sensitive fusion factor (NSF), whose protein has been shown to play an important role in vesicle fusion in other eukaryotic cells. In this report, we investigated the NSF homologue gene from a pathogenic E. histolytica, characterized its protein product and two of its activities, ATPase and in vitro intra-Golgi transport. The finding of an active NSF protein in E. histolytica indicates that a simple or primordial Golgi apparatus probably exists in this microorganism, as has been proposed by others.

  7. Expression of toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 gene of Staphylococcus aureus in milk: Proof of concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milijana Babić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the expression of a toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1 gene of Staphylococcus aureus in different types of milk, depending on inadequate temperature and storage conditions. Pasteurized and UHT milk were inoculated with monotoxic TSST-1 strain of S. aureus and growth kinetics was determined by the drop plate method using Baird-Parker agar medium in accordance with EN ISO 6888-1. The patterns of gene regulation were detected by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR. Relative quantification method for statistical significance testing was used to detect significant gene expression responses. The results of experiments showed the dependence of the growth rate and consequent up-regulation of TSST-1 encoding gene on storage time-temperature and type of milk. In contaminated pasteurized and UHT milk kept at both 15 °C and 22 °C S. aureus significantly increased its virulent potential over time. This effect was a bit more emphasized in UHT milk serving as a “proof of concept”. Possible explanation could be a presence of lactic acid bacteria in pasteurized milk which is known to have down-regulatory effect on TSST-1 gene. Maintenance of the milk storage temperature below 8 °C and employment of microbiological control measures in hygienic practices, from milk producer through retailer and on to the consumer is of utmost importance to decrease risk of non-emetic staphylococcal poisoning.

  8. Neurogenetics and gene therapy for reward deficiency syndrome: are we going to the Promised Land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Thanos, Peter K; Badgaiyan, Rajendra D; Febo, Marcelo; Oscar-Berman, Marlene; Fratantonio, James; Demotrovics, Zsolt; Gold, Mark S

    2015-07-01

    Addiction is a substantial health issue with limited treatment options approved by the FDA and as such currently available. The advent of neuroimaging techniques that link neurochemical and neurogenetic mechanisms to the reward circuitry brain function provides a framework for potential genomic-based therapies. Through candidate and genome-wide association studies approaches, many gene polymorphisms and clusters have been implicated in drug, food and behavioral dependence linked by the common rubric reward deficiency syndrome (RDS). The results of selective studies that include the role of epigenetics, noncoding micro RNAs in RDS behaviors especially drug abuse involving alcohol, opioids, cocaine, nicotine, pain and feeding are reviewed in this article. New targets for addiction treatment and relapse prevention, treatment alternatives such as gene therapy in animal models, and pharmacogenomics and nutrigenomics methods to manipulate transcription and gene expression are explored. The recognition of the clinical benefit of early genetic testing to determine addiction risk stratification and dopaminergic agonistic, rather than antagonistic therapies are potentially the genomic-based wave of the future. In addition, further development, especially in gene transfer work and viral vector identification, could make gene therapy for RDS a possibility in the future.

  9. Chediak-Higashi syndrome: novel mutation of the CHS1/LYST gene in 3 Omani patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Tamemi, Salem; Al-Zadjali, Shoaib; Al-Ghafri, Fahad; Dennison, David

    2014-05-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is a rare, autosomal, recessive lysosomal disorder with hematological and immunologic abnormalities; however, stem-cell transplantation from a matched or related donor may be curative. Many mutations of the CHS1/LYST gene have been reported to date. We report a novel nonsense mutation of the CHS1/LYST gene in 3 Omani patients. Three patients from 2 different families presented with clinical and laboratory features of CHS and a history of death of a previous sibling because of a severe illness, suggestive of the accelerated phase of CHS. Giant granules were present in the myeloid cell lines. Before the stem-cell transplant, the first patient underwent gene sequencing of all exons of the lysosome trafficking regulator (CHS1/LYST) gene and revealed a nonsense mutation in exon 5 (c.925C>T, p.R309X). Subsequently, upon presentation, the second and third patients' direct gene sequencing of exon 5 revealed the same mutation. We report a nonsense mutation in exon 5 (c.925C>T, p.R309X). This supports the allelic heterogeneity of CHS and is in line with most reported mutation types that lead to a truncated protein. Identification of the mutation type will facilitate timely diagnosis, management, and family counseling for those with affected children in Oman.

  10. Genetic variation in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene is associated with Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Agnese; Warrier, Varun; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev

    2014-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are a group of neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by impairments in communication and social interaction, alongside unusually repetitive behaviors and narrow interests. ASC are highly heritable and have complex patterns of inheritance where multiple genes are involved, alongside environmental and epigenetic factors. Asperger Syndrome (AS) is a subgroup of these conditions, where there is no history of language or cognitive delay. Animal models suggest a role for oxytocin (OXT) and oxytocin receptor (OXTR) genes in social-emotional behaviors, and several studies indicate that the oxytocin/oxytocin receptor system is altered in individuals with ASC. Previous studies have reported associations between genetic variations in the OXTR gene and ASC. The present study tested for an association between nine single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the OXTR gene and AS in 530 individuals of Caucasian origin, using SNP association test and haplotype analysis. There was a significant association between rs2268493 in OXTR and AS. Multiple haplotypes that include this SNP (rs2268493-rs2254298, rs2268490-rs2268493-rs2254298, rs2268493-rs2254298-rs53576, rs237885-rs2268490-rs2268493-rs2254298, rs2268490-rs2268493-rs2254298-rs53576) were also associated with AS. rs2268493 has been previously associated with ASC and putatively alters several transcription factor-binding sites and regulates chromatin states, either directly or through other variants in linkage disequilibrium (LD). This study reports a significant association of the sequence variant rs2268493 in the OXTR gene and associated haplotypes with AS.

  11. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Lv, Ruijuan; Wang, Zhihao; Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming; Chen, Yuguo; Tang, Mengxiong

    2013-01-01

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients

  12. Association of polymorphisms of interleukin-18 gene promoter region with polycystic ovary syndrome in chinese population

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    Li Mei-zhi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Recent research shows that polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS may have an association with low-grade chronic inflammation, and that PCOS may induce an increase in serum interleukin-18 (IL-18 levels. Methods To investigate the polymorphisms of the IL-18 gene promoters with PCOS, two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in the promoter of the IL-18 gene (at positions -607C/A and -137G/C in 118 Chinese women with PCOS and 79 controls were evaluated using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results No significant differences were found in the genotype distribution, allele frequency and haplotype frequency between the PCOS and control groups. Further analysis demonstrated a relationship between IL-18 gene promoter polymorphisms and PCOS insulin resistance (IR. Regarding the -137 allele frequency, G and C allele frequencies were 93.5% and 6.5%, respectively, in the PCOS with IR patients; G and C allele frequencies were 85.4% and 14.6%, respectively, in PCOS patients without IR (chi2 = 3.601, P = 0.048. Conclusions The presence of a polymorphism in the IL-18 gene was found to have no correlation with the occurrence of PCOS. Carriage of the C allele at position -137 in the promoter of the IL-18 gene may play a protective role from the development of PCOS IR.

  13. ALK7 Gene Polymorphism is Associated with Metabolic Syndrome Risk and Cardiovascular Remodeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Lv, Ruijuan [Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Wang, Zhihao [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Geriatrics, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Shang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Yun; Zhong, Ming [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Chen, Yuguo; Tang, Mengxiong, E-mail: tangmengxiongsdu8@163.com [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Public Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China); Department of Emergency, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan (China)

    2013-08-15

    Activin receptor-like kinase 7 (ALK7) is a type I receptor for the TGF-β superfamily and has recently been demonstrated to play an important role in the maintenance of metabolic homeostasis. To investigate the association of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients. The single nucleotide polymorphism rs13010956 in the ALK7 gene was genotyped in 351 Chinese subjects undergoing carotid and cardiac ultrasonography. The associations of the ALK7 gene polymorphism with the MetS phenotype, MetS parameters, and cardiovascular ultrasonic features were analyzed. The rs13010956 polymorphism in the ALK7 gene was found to be significantly associated with the MetS phenotype in females (p < 0.05) and was also significantly associated with blood pressure in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.01). Further analysis revealed that rs13010956 was associated with mean intima-media thickness of the carotid arteries in females (p < 0.05). After control for body mass index, blood pressure, fasting blood glucose, and triglycerides, rs13010956 was also found to be significantly associated with left ventricular mass index in the total (p < 0.05) and female populations (p < 0.05). Our findings suggested that the ALK7 gene polymorphism rs13010956 was significantly associated with MetS risk in females and may be involved in cardiovascular remodeling in MetS patients.

  14. Nucleocapsid gene analysis from an imported case of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Malaysia

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    Nor-Aziyah Mat-Rahim

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the complete nucleocapsid (N gene region of Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV from imported case in Malaysia and the relations with human- and camel-derived MERS-CoV. Methods: Combination of throat and nasal swab specimens was subjected to viral RNA extraction. For screening, the extracted RNA was subjected to real-time RT-PCR targeting upstream of E gene, open reading frame 1b and open reading frame 1a. For confirmation, the RNA was subjected to RT-PCR targeting partial part of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and nucleocapsid, followed by amplification of complete N gene region. Nucleotide sequencing of the first Malaysian case of MERS-CoV was performed following the confirmation with real-time RT-PCR detection. Results: Initial analysis of partial RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and N gene revealed that the nucleotides had high similarity to Jeddah_1_2013 strain. Analysis of complete N gene region (1 242 nucleotides from the case showed high similarity and yet distinct to the nucleotide sequences of camel-derived MERS-CoV. Conclusions: From the finding, there are possibilities that the patient acquired the infection from zoonotic transmission from dromedary camels.

  15. Association of Rho-kinase Gene Polymorphisms with Respiratory Distress Syndrome in Preterm Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaya, Gül; Sivasli, Ercan; Oztuzcu, Serdar; Melekoglu, Nuriye A; Ozkara, Esma; Sarikabadayi, Unal; Demiryürek, Abdullah T

    2017-02-01

    Respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) of the newborn is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality in preterm infants. Our objective was to determine the association between Rho-kinase (ROCK1 and ROCK2) gene polymorphisms and RDS in preterm neonates. A total of 193 preterm infants with RDS and 186 preterm infants without respiratory problems were included in this study. Polymorphisms were analyzed in genomic DNA using a BioMark 96.96 dynamic array system. We observed that ROCK1 gene rs2271255 (Lys222Glu) and rs35996865 polymorphisms, and ROCK2 gene rs726843, rs2290156, rs10178332, and rs35768389 (Asp601Val) polymorphisms were associated with RDS. However, no associations were found with rs73963110, rs1515219, rs965665, rs2230774 (Thr431Asn), rs6755196, and rs10929732 polymorphisms. Additionally, 12 haplotypes (6 in ROCK1 and 6 in ROCK2) were found to be markedly associated with RDS. This is the first study to examine the involvement of ROCK gene variation in the risk of incident RDS. The results strongly suggest that ROCK gene polymorphisms may modify individual susceptibility to RDS in the Turkish population. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. [Common deafness gene mutations of non-syndromic hearing loss in Liaoning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ying; Wang, Zheng; Yang, Ning; Hui, Lian; Jiang, Xuejun

    2014-08-01

    Investigate common deafness gene mutations in patients with severe and profound non-syndromic hearing loss in Liaoning in order to understand their hereditary etiologies and characteristics at the molecular level. Peripheral blood samples were obtained and the DNA templates were extracted from 128 non-syndromic hearing loss patients who are sporadic in clinics. The deafness gene chip was applied to detect hot-spot deafness gene mutations including GJB2, GJB3, SLC26A4 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA. Deafness etiology questionnaires, pure tone audiometry, auditory brainstem response, tympanometry and temporal bone CT were also applied. Various types of gene locus mutations were seen in 52 of the 128 patients (40.6%); (1) GJB2 gene mutations (n=22) included c. 235 del C homozygous mutation (n=10), c. 235 del C heterozygous mutation (n=5); c. 176_191 del 16 heterozygous mutation (n=l); c 35 del G heterozygous mutation (n=l); c. 235 del C/c. 299_300 del AT mutation (n=l), c. 235 del C/c. 176_191 del 16 mutation (n=l), c. 35 del G/c. 176_191 del 16 mutation (n=l); c. 299_300 del AT/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=l), c. 235 del C/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=l). (2) SLC26A4 gene mutations (n=30) included c. 919-2 A>G homozygous mutation (n=6), c. 919-2 A>G heterozygous mutation (n=17), c. 2168 A>G homozygous mutation (n=l), c. 2168 A>G heterozygous mutation (n=2), c. 2168 A>G/c. 919-2 A>G mutation (n=2), c. 919-2 A>G/GJB2 c. 235 del C mutation (n=2); (3) No GJB3 and mitochondrial 12S rRNA mutation. Genetic deafness was confirmed at the gene level in 24 cases (18.8%) and 28 patients (21.9%) were diagnosed as carriers of genetic deafness gene mutations. Genetic deafness occupies a large population in deaf community in Liaoning. Molecular genetic screening for these mutations and genetic counseling are effective methods to prevent the occurrence of hereditary hearing loss and provide theoretical guidance.

  17. Association of Glu298Asp Polymorphism of Endothelial NO Synthase Gene with Metabolic Syndrome Development: a Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fattakhov, N S; Skuratovskaya, D A; Vasilenko, M A; Kirienkova, E V; Zatolokin, P A; Mironyuk, N I; Litvinova, L S

    2017-03-01

    We studied association of single nucleotide polymorphism Glu298Asp (rs1799983) of the NOS3 gene with the risk of metabolic syndrome in the Slavic population. Blood samples were obtained from 128 patients with metabolic syndrome and 100 healthy individuals. Polymorphism Glu298Asp of the NOS3 gene was genotyped by allele-specific PCR. Allele Asp (OR=1.95, 95%CI 1.29-2.95, p=0.007) and genotype Asp/Asp (OR=2.56, 95%CI 0.98-6.72, p=0.04) were associated with the risk of metabolic syndrome in Slavic population. Patients with metabolic syndrome carrying genotype Asp/Asp had higher serum endothelin-1 level in comparison with Glu/Asp and Glu/Glu carriers.

  18. Cloning and expression analysis of a partial LEAFY homologue from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A partial homologue of LEAFY, designated as AcLFY (Genebank accession no HQ433335), was isolated from pineapple (Ananas comosus L. cv. Comte de Paris) by PCR. The conserved cDNA fragment of AcLFY is 256 bp in length and contained an open reading frame of 248 bp, which encodes 82 amino acids protein.

  19. Neurospora crassa fmf-1 encodes the homologue of the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Neurospora crassa fmf-1 encodes the homologue of the. Schizosaccharomyces pombe Ste11p regulator of sexual development. Srividhya V. Iyer, Mukund Ramakrishnan and Durgadas P. Kasbekar. J. Genet. 88, 33–39. Figure 1. Sequence at the junction of the proximal breakpoint of T(AR173) has homology with Cen-VII ...

  20. The mutational spectrum in Waardenburg syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, A.P.; Tassabehji, M.; Liu, X.Z. [and others

    1994-09-01

    101 individuals or families with Waardenburg syndrome (WS) or related abnormalities have been screened for mutations in the PAX3 gene. PAX3 mutations were seen in 19 of 35 individuals or families with features of Type I Waardenburg syndrome. None of the 47 Type 2 WS families showed any PAX3 mutation, nor did any of 19 individuals with other neural crest syndromes or pigmentary disturbances. PAX3 mutations included substitutions of highly conserved amino acids, splice site mutations, nonsense mutations and frameshifting deletions or insertions. One patient (with Type 1 WS, mental retardation and growth retardation) had a chromosomal deletion of 7-8 Mb encompassing the PAX3 gene. Mutations were seen in each of exons 2-6, with a concentration in the 5{prime} part of the paired box (exon 2) and the 3{prime} part of the homeobox (exon 6). There was no evident relation between the molecular change and the clinical manifestations in mutation carriers. We conclude that PAX3 dosage effects very specifically produce dystopia canthorum, the distinguishing feature of Type 1 WS, and variably produce the other features of Type 1 WS depending on genetic background or chance events. Two of the Type 2 families showed linkage to markers from 3p14, the location of the MITF gene. MITF encodes a basic helix-loop-helix-zipper protein which is the homologue of the mouse microphthalmia gene product. It is likely that mutations in MITF cause some but not all Type 2 WS.

  1. Angelman syndrome due to a termination codon mutation of the UBE3A gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Maawali, Almundher; Machado, Jerry; Fang, Ping; Dupuis, Lucie; Faghfoury, Hannaneh; Mendoza-Londono, Roberto

    2013-03-01

    Angelman syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by global developmental delay, mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, and severe speech delay. It may be caused by deletion of chromosome region 15q11.2 of the maternally inherited chromosome, mutations in the UBE3A gene, uniparental disomy, or imprinting defects. Most patients with this diagnosis have a severe phenotype, and a few have a mild form of the disease. We report a patient with a novel mutation in the UBE3A gene that consists of a deletion of the termination codon (c.2556-*+6del GTAAAACAAA) and results in an elongated protein E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase. Our patient has a mild phenotype compared with other patients in general and specifically to patients with UBE3A mutations. He has mild developmental delay, moderate speech delay, and no seizures. Recognition of this genotype-phenotype correlation will allow better genetic counseling to other patients with similar stop codon mutations.

  2. Differential allelic expression of a fibrillin gene (FBNI) in patients with Marfan syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewett, D.; Lynch, J.; Sykes, B. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom); Firth, H. [Churchill Hospital, Oxford (United Kingdom); Child, A. [St. George`s Hospital Medical School, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective-tissue disorder affecting cardiovascular, skeletal, and ocular systems. The major Marfan locus has been identified as the FBN1 gene on chromosome 15; this codes for the extracellular-matrix protein fibrillin, a 350-kD constituent of the 8-10-nm elastin-associated microfibrils. The authors identified five MFS patients who were heterozygous for an RsaI restriction-site dimorphism in the 3{prime} UTR of the FBN1 gene. This expressed variation was used to distinguish the mRNA output from each of the two FBN1 alleles in fibroblast cultures from these five patients. Three of the patients were shown to produce <5% of the normal level of FBN1 transcripts from one of their alleles. This null-allele phenotype was not observed in 10 nonmarfanoid fibroblast cell lines. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  3. Gene localisation for Wilson-Turner syndrome (WTS:MIM 309585)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-07-12

    The gene for this syndrome of X-linked mental retardation with gynecomastia, obesity, speech difficulties, tapering fingers and small feet was mapped between Xp21.1 and Xq22. Linkage to DXS255 at Xp11 was firmly established, with no recombination. Subsequent characterization of numerous microsatellite markers and development of the background genetic map in this region of the X chromosome has enabled significant reduction to the localization of the gene for WTS in the one family so far reported. The new linkage data were obtained as described previously and are presented in Table I. The closest flanking markers are DXS426 at Xp11.3 and DXS990 at Xq21.3. The regional localization is significantly reduced from the previous interval of 66 cM to an interval of 25 cM. The maximum two-point lod score is now 6.07 at AR. 6 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Novel insertion in exon 5 of the TCOF1 gene in twin sisters with Treacher Collins syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marszałek-Kruk, Bożena Anna; Wójcicki, Piotr; Śmigiel, Robert; Trzeciak, Wiesław H.

    2012-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is associated with an abnormal differentiation of the first and second pharyngeal arches during fetal development. This causes mostly craniofacial deformities, which require numerous corrective surgeries. TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder and it occurs in the general population at a frequency of 1 in 50,000 live births. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the serine/alanine-rich protein named Treacle. Over 120 mutations of t...

  5. Analysis of Ellis van Creveld syndrome gene products: implications for cardiovascular development and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, Kristen Lipscomb; Roelker, Stephanie; Ramachandran, Vijaya; Durbin, Lisa; Benson, D Woodrow

    2009-05-15

    Mutations identified in a cohort of patients with atrioventricular septal defects as a part of Ellis van Creveld syndrome (EvC syndrome) led us to study the role of two non-homologous genes, EVC and LBN, in heart development and disease pathogenesis. To address the cause of locus heterogeneity resulting in an indistinguishable heart-hand phenotype, we carried out in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence and identified co-localization of Evc and Lbn mRNA and protein. In the heart, expression was identified to be strongest in the secondary heart field, including both the outflow tract and the dorsal mesenchymal protrusion, but was also found in mesenchymal structures of the atrial septum and the atrioventricular cushions. Finally, we studied the transcriptional hierarchy of EVC and LBN but did not find any evidence of direct transcriptional interregulation between the two. Due to the locus heterogeneity of human mutations predicted to result in a loss of protein function, a bidirectional genomic organization and overlapping expression patterns, we speculate that these proteins function coordinately in cardiac development and that loss of this coordinate function results in the characteristics of EvC syndrome.

  6. Investigation of the Matrix Metalloproteinase-2 Gene in Patients with Non-Syndromic Mitral Valve Prolapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maëlle Perrocheau

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Non-syndromic mitral valve prolapse (MVP is a common degenerative valvulopathy, predisposing to arrhythmia and sudden death. The etiology of MVP is suspected to be under genetic control, as supported by familial cases and its manifestation in genetic syndrome (e.g., Marfan syndrome. One candidate etiological mechanism is a perturbation of the extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling of the valve. To test this hypothesis, we assessed the role of genetic variants in the matrix metalloproteinase 2 gene (MMP2 known to regulate the ECM turnover by direct degradation of proteins and for which transgenic mice develop MVP. Direct sequencing of exons of MMP2 in 47 unrelated patients and segregation analyses in families did not reveal any causative mutation. We studied eight common single nucleotide polymorphisms (TagSNPs, which summarize the genetic information at the MMP2 locus. The association study in two case controls sets (NCases = 1073 and NControls = 1635 provided suggestive evidence for the association of rs1556888 located downstream MMP2 with the risk of MVP, especially in patients with the fibroelastic defiency form. Our study does not support the contribution of MMP2 rare variation in the etiology to MVP in humans, though further genetic and molecular investigation is required to confirm our current suggestive association of one common variant.

  7. Transcriptome Analysis and Gene Identification in the Pulmonary Artery of Broilers with Ascites Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yang

    Full Text Available Pulmonary arterial hypertension, also known as Ascites syndrome (AS, remains a clinically challenging disease with a large impact on both humans and broiler chickens. Pulmonary arterial remodeling presents a key step in the development of AS. The precise molecular mechanism of pulmonary artery remodeling regulating AS progression remains unclear.We obtained pulmonary arteries from two positive AS and two normal broilers for RNA sequencing (RNA-seq analysis and pathological observation. RNA-seq analysis revealed a total of 895 significantly differentially expressed genes (DEGs with 437 up-regulated and 458 down-regulated genes, which were significantly enriched to 12 GO (Gene Ontology terms and 4 KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways (Padj<0.05 regulating pulmonary artery remodeling and consequently occurrence of AS. These GO terms and pathways include ribosome, Jak-STAT and NOD-like receptor signaling pathways which regulate pulmonary artery remodeling through vascular smooth cell proliferation, inflammation and vascular smooth cell proliferation together. Some notable DEGs within these pathways included downregulation of genes like RPL 5, 7, 8, 9, 14; upregulation of genes such as IL-6, K60, STAT3, STAT5 Pim1 and SOCS3; IKKα, IkB, P38, five cytokines IL-6, IL8, IL-1β, IL-18, and MIP-1β. Six important regulators of pulmonary artery vascular remodeling and construction like CYP1B1, ALDH7A1, MYLK, CAMK4, BMP7 and INOS were upregulated in the pulmonary artery of AS broilers. The pathology results showed that the pulmonary artery had remodeled and become thicker in the disease group.Our present data suggested some specific components of the complex molecular circuitry regulating pulmonary arterial remodeling underlying AS progression in broilers. We revealed some valuable candidate genes and pathways that involved in pulmonary artery remodeling further contributing to the AS progression.

  8. Otitis Media in a New Mouse Model for CHARGE Syndrome with a Deletion in the Chd7 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Cong; Yu, Heping; Yang, Bin; Han, Fengchan; Zheng, Ye; Bartels, Cynthia F.; Schelling, Deborah; Arnold, James E.; Scacheri, Peter C.; Zheng, Qing Yin

    2012-01-01

    Otitis media is a middle ear disease common in children under three years old. Otitis media can occur in normal individuals with no other symptoms or syndromes, but it is often seen in individuals clinically diagnosed with genetic diseases such as CHARGE syndrome, a complex genetic disease caused by mutation in the Chd7 gene and characterized by multiple birth defects. Although otitis media is common in human CHARGE syndrome patients, it has not been reported in mouse models of CHARGE syndrome. In this study, we report a mouse model with a spontaneous deletion mutation in the Chd7 gene and with chronic otitis media of early onset age accompanied by hearing loss. These mice also exhibit morphological alteration in the Eustachian tubes, dysregulation of epithelial proliferation, and decreased density of middle ear cilia. Gene expression profiling revealed up-regulation of Muc5ac, Muc5b and Tgf-β1 transcripts, the products of which are involved in mucin production and TGF pathway regulation. This is the first mouse model of CHARGE syndrome reported to show otitis media with effusion and it will be valuable for studying the etiology of otitis media and other symptoms in CHARGE syndrome. PMID:22539951

  9. De novo dominant mutation of SOX10 gene in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kaitian; Zong, Ling; Liu, Min; Zhan, Yuan; Wu, Xuan; Zou, Wenting; Jiang, Hongyan

    2014-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a rare genetic disorder, inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. The condition is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and pigment disturbances of the hair, skin, and iris. The de novo mutation in the SOX10 gene, responsible for Waardenburg syndrome type II, is rarely seen. The present study aimed to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese family. Clinical and molecular evaluations were conducted in a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II. A novel SOX10 heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation was identified. Heterozygosity was not observed in the parents and sister of the proband, indicating that the mutation has arisen de novo. The novel frameshift mutation, located in exon 3 of the SOX10 gene, disrupted normal amino acid coding from Leu87, leading to premature termination at nucleotide 396 (TGA). The high mobility group domain of SOX10 was inferred to be partially impaired. The novel heterozygous c.259-260delCT mutation in the SOX10 gene was considered to be the cause of Waardenburg syndrome in the proband. The clinical and genetic characterization of this family would help elucidate the genetic heterogeneity of SOX10 in Waardenburg syndrome type II. Moreover, the de novo pattern expanded the mutation data of SOX10. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Updated catalogue of homologues to human disease-related proteins in the yeast genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrade, M A; Sander, C; Valencia, A

    1998-04-10

    The recent availability of the full Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome offers a perfect opportunity for revising the number of homologues to human disease-related proteins. We carried out automatic analysis of the complete S. cerevisiae genome and of the set of human disease-related proteins as identified in the SwissProt sequence data base. We identified 285 yeast proteins similar to 155 human disease-related proteins, including 239 possible cases of human-yeast direct functional equivalence (orthology). Of these, 40 cases are suggested as new, previously undiscovered relationships. Four of them are particularly interesting, since the yeast sequence is the most phylogenetically distant member of the protein family, including proteins related to diseases such as phenylketonuria, lupus erythematosus, Norum and fish eye disease and Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome.

  11. Identification of four novel mutations of the WFS1 gene in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahraman, Martha; Abbaszadegan, Mohammad Reza; Vakili, Rahim; Hosseini, Sousan; Fardi Golyan, Fatemeh; Ghaemi, Nosrat; Forghanifard, Mohammad Mahdi

    2016-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare neurodegenerative disorder with an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance characterized by various clinical manifestations. The related gene, WFS1, encodes a transmembrane glycoprotein, named wolframin. Genetic analyses demonstrated that mutations in this gene are associated with WS type 1. Our aim in this study was to sequence WFS1 coding region in Iranian Wolfram syndrome pedigrees. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral blood of 12 WS patients and their healthy parents. Exons 2-8 and the exon-intron junctions of WFS1 were sequenced. DNA sequences were compared to the reference using Sequencher software. Molecular analysis of WFS1 revealed six different mutations. Four novel and two previously reported mutations were identified. One novel mutation, c.1379_1381del, is predicted to produce an aberrant protein. A second novel mutation, c.1384G > T, encodes a truncated protein. Novel mutation, c.1097-1107dup (11 bp), causes a frameshift which results in a premature stop codon. We screened for the novel missense mutation, c.1010C > T, in 100 control alleles. This mutation was not found in any of the healthy controls. Our study increased the spectrum of WFS1 mutations and supported the role of WFS1 in susceptibility to WS. We hope that these findings open new horizons to future molecular investigations which may help to prevent and treat this devastating disease.

  12. Genetic mapping of the gene for Usher syndrome: Linkage analysis in a large Samaritan kindred

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonne-Tamir, B.; Korostishevsky, M.; Kalinsky, H.; Seroussi, E.; Beker, R.; Weiss, S. (Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Ramat-Aviv (Israel)); Godel, V. (Ichilov Hospital, Tel-Aviv (Israel))

    1994-03-01

    Usher syndrome is a group of autosomal recessive disorders associated with congenital sensorineural deafness and progressive visual loss due to retinitis pigmentosa. Sixteen members of the small inbred Samaritan isolate with autosomal recessive deafness from 59 individuals including parents and affected and nonaffected sibs were typed for markers on chromosomes 1q and 11q for which linkage has recently been established for Usher syndrome types II and I. Statistically significant linkage was observed with four markers on 11q (D11S533, D11S527, OMP, and INT2) with a maximum six-point location score of 11.61 at the D11S533 locus. Analysis of haplotypes supports the notion that the mutation arose only once in an ancestral chromosome carrying a specific haplotype. The availability of markers closely linked to the disease locus allows indirect genotype analysis and identifies all carriers of the gene within the community. Furthermore, the detection of complete linkage disequilibrium between the D11S533 marker and the Usher gene suggests that these loci are either identical or adjacent and narrows the critical region to which physical mapping efforts are currently directed. 35 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Functional analysis of the murine cytomegalovirus chemokine receptor homologue M33: ablation of constitutive signaling is associated with an attenuated phenotype in vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, Ruth; Sharp, Emma; Benned-Jensen, Tau

    2007-01-01

    The murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) M33 gene is conserved among all betaherpesviruses and encodes a homologue of seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMR) with the capacity for constitutive signaling. Previous studies have demonstrated that M33 is important for MCMV dissemination to or replication within...

  14. Role of transcription regulatory sequence in regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chengbao; Meng, Han; Gao, Yujin; Gao, Hui; Guo, Kangkang; Almazan, Fernando; Sola, Isabel; Enjuanes, Luis; Zhang, Yanming; Abrahamyan, Levon

    2017-08-10

    In order to gain insight into the role of the transcription regulatory sequences (TRSs) in the regulation of gene expression and replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) gene, under the control of the different structural gene TRSs, was inserted between the N gene and 3'-UTR of the PRRSV genome and EGFP expression was analyzed for each TRS. TRSs of all the studied structural genes of PRRSV positively modulated EGFP expression at different levels. Among the TRSs analyzed, those of GP2, GP5, M, and N genes highly enhanced EGFP expression without altering replication of PRRSV. These data indicated that structural gene TRSs could be an extremely useful tool for foreign gene expression using PRRSV as a vector.

  15. Cholesterol Transporters ABCA1 and ABCG1 Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells in Patients with Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Tavoosi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes encode the cholesterol transporter proteins that play a key role in cholesterol and phospholipids homeostasis. This study was aimed at evaluating and comparing ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes expression in metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals. This case-control study was performed on 36 patients with metabolic syndrome and the same number of healthy individuals in Hamadan (west of Iran during 2013-2014. Total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells and purified using RNeasy Mini Kit column. The expression of ABCA1 and ABCG1 genes was performed by qRT-PCR. Lipid profile and fasting blood glucose were measured using colorimetric procedures. ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients was significantly lower (about 75% compared to that of control group, while for ABCA1 expression, there was no significant difference between the two studied groups. Comparison of other parameters such as HDL-C, FBS, BMI, waist circumference, and systolic and diastolic blood pressure between metabolic syndrome patients and healthy individuals showed significant differences (P<0.05. Decrease in ABCG1 expression in metabolic syndrome patients compared to healthy individuals suggests that hyperglycemia, related metabolites, and hyperlipidemia over the transporter capacity resulted in decreased expression of ABCG1. Absence of a significant change in ABCA1 gene expression between two groups can indicate a different regulation mechanism for ABCA1 expression.

  16. Regenerating Gene Protein as a Novel Autoantigen in the Pathogenesis of Sjögren’s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Fujimoto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome, an autoimmune disease characterized by exocrine gland dysfunction leading to dry mouth and dry eye diseases, is typified by lymphoplasmacytic infiltrations and a progressive destruction of the salivary and lacrimal glands. Despite an ever-increasing focus on identifying the underlying etiology of Sjögren’s syndrome, the factors that initiate this autoimmune disease and the mechanisms that cause the subsequent exocrine gland dysfunction remain a mystery. The original explanatory concept for the pathogenesis of Sjögren’s syndrome proposed a specific, self-perpetuating, immune-mediated loss of acinar and ductal cells as the principal cause of salivary gland dysfunction. We highlight the possible involvement of regenerating gene (Reg in the regeneration and destruction of salivary gland acinar and ductal cells in Sjögren’s syndrome. The Reg gene was originally isolated as a gene specifically overexpressed in regenerating pancreatic islets and constitutes a growth factor family (Reg family. We describe how salivary gland dysfunction is initiated and maintained and how it can be regenerated or progressed, mediated by the Reg gene, Reg protein, and anti-REG autoantibodies in Sjögren’s syndrome.

  17. Study of duplication 24bp of ARX gene among patients presenting a Mental Retardation with a syndromic and non syndromic forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essouissi, Imen

    2006-01-01

    Mental Retardation (MR) is the most frequent handicap. It touches 3% of the general population. The genetic causes of this handicap account for 40% of these cases. ARX gene (Aristaless related homeobox gene) belongs to the family of the genes homeobox located in Xp22.1. It is considered as the most frequently muted gene after the FMR1 gene. It is implicated in various forms of syndromic and nonsyndromic MR. Several types of mutation were identified on the level of this gene, including deletions/insertions, duplications, missense and nonsense mutations, responsible for a wide spectrum of phenotypes. The goal of this work is to seek the most frequent change of gene ARX: duplication 24pb (at the origin of an expansion of the field poly has protein ARX in the position 144-155AA) among Tunisian boys presenting in particular family forms of non specific MR, sporadic forms of non specific MR like certain patients presenting a West syndrome.To prove the duplication of 24 Pb, we used in this work the Pcr technique. The change of duplication 24pb was not found in our series, this could be explained by the low number of cases family studied (38 families) and by the absence of connection studies accusing a mode of transmission related to X chromosome in particular for the sporadic cases. (Author)

  18. MASA syndrome is caused by mutations in the neural cell adhesion gene, L1CAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, C.E.; Wang, Y.; Schroer, R.J.; Stevenson, R.E. [Greenwood Genetic Center, SC (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The MASA syndrome is a recessive X-linked disorder characterized by Mental retardation, Adducted thumbs, Shuffling gait and Aphasia. Recently we found that MASA in one family was likely caused by a point mutation in exon 6 of the L1CAM gene. This gene has also been shown to be involved in X-linked hydrocephalus (HSAS). We have screened 60 patients with either sporadic HSAS or MASA as well as two additional families with MASA. For the screening, we initially utilized 3 cDNA probes for the L1CAM gene. In one of the MASA families, K8310, two affected males were found to have an altered BglII band. The band was present in their carrier mother but not in their normal brothers. This band was detected by the entire cDNA probe as well as the cDNA probe for 3{prime} end of the gene. Analysis of the L1CAM sequence indicated the altered BglII site is distal to the exon 28 but proximal to the punative poly A signal site. It is hypothesized that this point mutation alters the stability of the L1CAM mRNA. This is being tested using cell lines established from the two affected males.

  19. Gene expression in response to exercise in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome: a pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Keech

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is a debilitating disorder of unknown pathogenesis, characterised by fatigue, which is exacerbated after minimal exercise. We examined the effect of a single bout of aerobic exercise on leucocyte mRNA expression of genes putatively linked to exaggerated afferent signalling as an under-pinning of the fatigue state. A carefully-characterised sample of patients with CFS (N = 10 and healthy matched control participants (N = 12 were included. Participant ratings of fatigue and other symptoms, as well as blood samples, were obtained at baseline, and five other time-points up to 72 hours after 25 minutes of moderate-intensity cycling exercise. Leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes was examined using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Patients with CFS reported substantial fatigue, functional impairment and poor sleep at baseline (all p < 0.02, and exercise immediately induced worsened patients’ fatigue (effect size, ES = 1.17. There were no significant changes in gene expression after exercise and patients did not differ from control participants at any time point. Higher levels of expression of ficolin (FCN1 and a purinergic receptor (P2RX4 in patients with CFS were found when all time points were combined. Patients with CFS did not show significant exercise-induced changes in leucocyte mRNA of 19 metabolite-sensing, adrenergic, immune and neurotransmission genes despite a prominent exacerbation of fatigue.

  20. Insulin gene polymorphisms in type 1 diabetes, Addison's disease and the polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hahner Stefanie

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polymorphisms within the insulin gene can influence insulin expression in the pancreas and especially in the thymus, where self-antigens are processed, shaping the T cell repertoire into selftolerance, a process that protects from β-cell autoimmunity. Methods We investigated the role of the -2221Msp(C/T and -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms within the insulin gene in patients with a monoglandular autoimmune endocrine disease [patients with isolated type 1 diabetes (T1D, n = 317, Addison's disease (AD, n = 107 or Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT, n = 61], those with a polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type II (combination of T1D and/or AD with HT or GD, n = 62 as well as in healthy controls (HC, n = 275. Results T1D patients carried significantly more often the homozygous genotype "CC" -2221Msp(C/T and "AA" -23HphI(A/T polymorphisms than the HC (78.5% vs. 66.2%, p = 0.0027 and 75.4% vs. 52.4%, p = 3.7 × 10-8, respectively. The distribution of insulin gene polymorphisms did not show significant differences between patients with AD, HT, or APS-II and HC. Conclusion We demonstrate that the allele "C" of the -2221Msp(C/T and "A" -23HphI(A/T insulin gene polymorphisms confer susceptibility to T1D but not to isolated AD, HT or as a part of the APS-II.

  1. Safe and Effective Gene Therapy for Murine Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Using an Insulated Lentiviral Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swati Singh

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a life-threatening immunodeficiency caused by mutations within the WAS gene. Viral gene therapy to restore WAS protein (WASp expression in hematopoietic cells of patients with WAS has the potential to improve outcomes relative to the current standard of care, allogeneic bone marrow transplantation. However, the development of viral vectors that are both safe and effective has been problematic. While use of viral transcriptional promoters may increase the risk of insertional mutagenesis, cellular promoters may not achieve WASp expression levels necessary for optimal therapeutic effect. Here we evaluate a self-inactivating (SIN lentiviral vector combining a chromatin insulator upstream of a viral MND (MPSV LTR, NCR deleted, dl587 PBS promoter driving WASp expression. Used as a gene therapeutic in Was−/− mice, this vector resulted in stable WASp+ cells in all hematopoietic lineages and rescue of T and B cell defects with a low number of viral integrations per cell, without evidence of insertional mutagenesis in serial bone marrow transplants. In a gene transfer experiment in non-human primates, the insulated MND promoter (driving GFP expression demonstrated long-term polyclonal engraftment of GFP+ cells. These observations demonstrate that the insulated MND promoter safely and efficiently reconstitutes clinically effective WASp expression and should be considered for future WAS therapy.

  2. Altered expression of circadian clock genes in polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelousi, Anna; Nasiri-Ansari, Narjes; Spilioti, Eliana; Mantzou, Emilia; Kalotyxou, Vasiliki; Chrousos, George; Kaltsas, Gregory; Kassi, Eva

    2018-01-01

    Circadian timing system is a highly conserved, ubiquitous molecular "clock" which creates internal circadian rhythmicity. Dysregulation of clock genes expression is associated with various diseases including immune dysregulation. In this study we investigated the circadian pattern of Clock-related genes in patients with polyglandular autoimmune syndrome type III (PAS type III). Nineteen patients diagnosed with PAS type III and 12 healthy controls were enrolled. mRNA and protein expression of Clock-related genes (CLOCK, BMAL1, ROR and Per-1,-2,-3), as well as the GR-a and the GILZ genes were determined by real-time quantitative PCR and western blot analysis from blood samples drawn at 8 pm and 8am. Serum cortisol and TSH, as well as plasma ACTH, were measured by chemiluminescence. There were no statistical significant differences in the metabolic profile, cortisol, ACTH and TSH levels between patients and controls. Patients with PAS type III expressed higher transcript levels of CLOCK, BMAL1 and Per-1 in the evening than in the morning (p = 0.03, p = 0.029, p = 0.013, respectively), while the ratios (R pm/am ) of GR-a, CLOCK, BMAL1, and Per-3 mRNA levels were statistically different between patients and controls. Cortisol circadian variation (F pm/am ) was positively correlated with GILZ mRNA circadian pattern (R pm/am ) in the patient group and with the GR-a mRNA (R pm/am ) in the control group. Our findings suggest that there is an aberrant circadian rhythm of Clock-related genes in patients with PAS type III. The disruption of the expression of 4 circadian Clock-related genes could indicate a possible association with the pathogenesis of the disease.

  3. [Association between angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 gene polymorphisms and childhood primary nephrotic syndrome].

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    Qiu, Ming-Yu; Xie, Qin-Fang; Wang, Li-Na; Yu, Li

    2015-03-01

    Angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) gene polymorphisms have been shown to be implicated in hypertension, diabetic nephropathy, and other diseases. However, it remains unclear whether ACE2 gene polymorphisms are involved in the development of primary nephrotic syndrome (PNS) in children. The aim of this study was to assess the association between A9570G polymorphisms of ACE2 gene and PNS in a group of Han children in Guangdong Province, China. The genotype distribution and allele frequency of ACE2 gene A9570G in 66 children with PNS and 60 healthy subjects (control group) were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction and restriction fragment length polymorphism. Allele frequency and genotype distribution showed no significant difference between the PNS and control groups whether in female or in male children (P>0.05). The PNS group was classified into the glucocorticoid-sensitive and glucocorticoid-resistant subgroups according to glucocorticoid treatment response. Subgroup analysis revealed that in female children, the frequency of GG genotype was 17% in the glucocorticoid-sensitive group vs 45% in the glucocorticoid-sensitive group (P=0.018); the frequency of G allele was 31% in the glucocorticoid-sensitive group vs 61% in the glucocorticoid-resistant group (P=0.023). In male children, the frequency of G genotype/G allele was 36% in the glucocorticoid-sensitive group vs 64% in the glucocorticoid-resistant group (P=0.017). There is no clear association between ACE2 gene A9570G polymorphisms and childhood PNS, but ACE2 gene A9570G polymorphisms might be associated with glucocorticoid treatment response in children with PNS. The G allele might be a genetic susceptibility factor of glucocorticoid resistance in children with PNS.

  4. Molecular characterization of homologues of both subunits A (SPO11) and B of the archaebacterial topoisomerase 6 in plants.

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    Hartung, F; Puchta, H

    2001-06-13

    The Spo11 protein is an eukaryotic homologue of the topoisomerase 6 subunit A from archaebacteria. In yeast Spo11p has been found to bind covalently to double-strand breaks (DSBs) during meiosis. Single homologues of the SPO11 gene exist in various eukaryotes, except plants. Previously, we found in the Arabidopsis thaliana genome two ancient paralogs, AtSPO11-1 and 2. Here we report on the molecular characterization of a third one, AtSPO11-3. This puzzling finding might be explained by the fact that we detected additionally--for the first time outside of the archaebacterial kingdom--a homologue of the subunit B of topoisomerase 6, AtTOP6B. Both AtSPO11-3 and AtTOP6B are abundantly expressed in Arabidopsis and EST comparisons indicate the presence of both genes in various plant species. Via two hybrid studies we could demonstrate that full length AtTop6B is able to interact with AtSpo11-2 and 3 but not with AtSpo11-1. Our data suggest that plants possess in contrast to other eukaryotes an additional archaebacterial kind of topoisomerase.

  5. Gradual disintegration of the floral symmetry gene network is implicated in the evolution of a wind-pollination syndrome

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    Preston, Jill C.; Martinez, Ciera C.; Hileman, Lena C.

    2011-01-01

    Angiosperms exhibit staggering diversity in floral form, and evolution of floral morphology is often correlated with changes in pollination syndrome. The showy, bilaterally symmetrical flowers of the model species Antirrhinum majus (Plantaginaceae) are highly specialized for bee pollination. In A. majus, CYCLOIDEA (CYC), DICHOTOMA (DICH), RADIALIS (RAD), and DIVARICATA (DIV) specify the development of floral bilateral symmetry. However, it is unclear to what extent evolution of these genes has resulted in flower morphological divergence among closely related members of Plantaginaceae differing in pollination syndrome. We compared floral symmetry genes from insect-pollinated Digitalis purpurea, which has bilaterally symmetrical flowers, with those from closely related Aragoa abietina and wind-pollinated Plantago major, both of which have radially symmetrical flowers. We demonstrate that Plantago, but not Aragoa, species have lost a dorsally expressed CYC-like gene and downstream targets RAD and DIV. Furthermore, the single P. major CYC-like gene is expressed across all regions of the flower, similar to expression of its ortholog in closely related Veronica serpyllifolia. We propose that changes in the expression of duplicated CYC-like genes led to the evolution of radial flower symmetry in Aragoa/Plantago, and that further disintegration of the symmetry gene pathway resulted in the wind-pollination syndrome of Plantago. This model underscores the potential importance of gene loss in the evolution of ecologically important traits. PMID:21282634

  6. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in two Chinese families with mutations in the FLCN gene.

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    Hou, Xiaocan; Zhou, Yuan; Peng, Yun; Qiu, Rong; Xia, Kun; Tang, Beisha; Zhuang, Wei; Jiang, Hong

    2018-01-22

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominant hereditary condition caused by mutations in the folliculin-encoding gene FLCN (NM_144997). It is associated with skin lesions such as fibrofolliculoma, acrochordon and trichodiscoma; pulmonary lesions including spontaneous pneumothorax and pulmonary cysts and renal cancer. Genomic DNA was extracted from peripheral venous blood samples of the propositi and their family members. Genetic analysis was performed by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing aiming at corresponding exons in FLCN gene to explore the genetic mutations of these two families. In this study, we performed genetic analysis by whole exome sequencing and Sanger sequencing aiming at corresponding exons in FLCN gene to explore the genetic mutations in two Chinese families. Patients from family 1 mostly suffered from pneumothorax and pulmonary cysts, several of whom also mentioned skin lesions or kidney lesions. While in family 2, only thoracic lesions were found in the patients, without any other clinical manifestations. Two FLCN mutations have been identified: One is an insertion mutation (c.1579_1580insA/p.R527Xfs on exon 14) previously reported in three Asian families (one mainland family and two Taiwanese families); while the other is a firstly reviewed mutation in Asian population (c.649C > T / p.Gln217X on exon 7) that ever been detected in a French family. Overall, The detection of these two mutations expands the spectrum of FLCN mutations and will provide insight into genetic diagnosis and counseling of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

  7. Prenatal diagnosis of the fragile X syndrome : loss of mutation owing to a double recombinant or gene conversion event at the FMR1 locus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Losekoot, M; Hoogendoorn, E; Olmer, R; Jansen, CCAM; Oosterwijk, JC; vandenOuweland, AMW; Halley, DJJ; Warren, ST; Willemsen, R; Oostra, BA; Bakker, E

    1997-01-01

    The fragile X syndrome, an X linked mental retardation syndrome, is caused by an expanded CGG repeat in the first exon of the FMR1 gene. In patients with an expanded repeat the FMR1 promoter is methylated and, consequently, the gene is silenced and no FMR1 protein (FMRP) is produced, thus leading to

  8. A novel mutation of WFS1 gene in a Chinese patient with Wolfram syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Liu, Jia; Yi, Huan; Xu, Li; Zhong, Xiufeng; Peng, Fuhua

    2018-03-17

    Wolfram syndrome (WS), caused by mutations of the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene on chromosome 4p16.1, is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus (DI), neuro-psychiatric disorders, hearing deficit, and urinary tract anomalies. Here we report a 11-year-old Chinese boy who presented with visual loss, was suspected with optic neuritis (ON) or neuromyelitis optica (NMO) and referred to our department for further diagnosis. Finally he was diagnosed with WS because of diabetes mellitus (DM) and optic atrophy (OA). Eight exons and flanking introns of WFS1 gene were analyzed by sequencing. A novel mutation c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8 was identified. This report reviews a case of WS associated with a novel mutation, c.1760G > A in WFS1 gene of exon 8, and emphasizes that WS should be taken into account for juveniles with visual loss and diabetes mellitus.

  9. Association study of serotonin transporter SLC6A4 gene with Chinese Han irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Jing Yuan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a common clinical gastrointestinal dysfunction disorders. 5-sertonon (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT is a very important neurotransmitter, which is involved in gastrointestinal motion and sensation. Solute carrier family 6 member 4 (SLC6A4 gene encode serotonin transporter (SERT which function is to rapidly reuptake the most of 5-HT. Therefore, it is needed to explore the association between SLC6A4 gene polymorphisms and IBS. METHODS: 119 patients and 238 healthy controls were administrated to detect the SLC6A4 gene polymorphisms including 5-HT-transporter-gene-linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR, variable number of tandem repeats (VNTRs and three selected tag Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs rs1042173, rs3794808, rs2020936 by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR and TaqMan® SNP Genotyping. RESULTS: There were significant difference for 5-HTTLPR between IBS and control groups (X2 = 106.168, P<0.0001. In control group, genotypes were mainly L/L (58.4%, however, the genotypes in IBS were S/S (37.8%. The significant difference was shown in D-IBS subjects when compared to the controls (X(2 = 50.850, P<0.0001 for 5-HTTLPR. For STin2 VNTR, rs1042173, rs3794808, and rs2020936 polymorphisms, there were no any significant differences between IBS and control groups. There were no statistical significantly haplotypes for 5-HTTLPR, VNTRs and the three SNPs between IBS and controls. CONCLUSION: The S allele in 5-HTTLPR was a susceptible allele with Chinese Han IBS, but other associations of VNTRs, three selected Tag SNPs and positive haplotype with IBS were not found. It is indicated that much research are needed to study the relationship between other polymorphisms in SLC6A4 gene and IBS.

  10. Genetic variant rs17225178 in the ARNT2 gene is associated with Asperger Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Napoli, Agnese; Warrier, Varun; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev

    2015-01-01

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are neurodevelopmental conditions characterized by difficulties in communication and social interaction, alongside unusually repetitive behaviours and narrow interests. Asperger Syndrome (AS) is one subgroup of ASC and differs from classic autism in that in AS there is no language or general cognitive delay. Genetic, epigenetic and environmental factors are implicated in ASC and genes involved in neural connectivity and neurodevelopment are good candidates for studying the susceptibility to ASC. The aryl-hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator 2 (ARNT2) gene encodes a transcription factor involved in neurodevelopmental processes, neuronal connectivity and cellular responses to hypoxia. A mutation in this gene has been identified in individuals with ASC and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have been nominally associated with AS and autistic traits in previous studies. In this study, we tested 34 SNPs in ARNT2 for association with AS in 118 cases and 412 controls of Caucasian origin. P values were adjusted for multiple comparisons, and linkage disequilibrium (LD) among the SNPs analysed was calculated in our sample. Finally, SNP annotation allowed functional and structural analyses of the genetic variants in ARNT2. We tested the replicability of our result using the genome-wide association studies (GWAS) database of the Psychiatric Genomics Consortium (PGC). We report statistically significant association of rs17225178 with AS. This SNP modifies transcription factor binding sites and regions that regulate the chromatin state in neural cell lines. It is also included in a LD block in our sample, alongside other genetic variants that alter chromatin regulatory regions in neural cells. These findings demonstrate that rs17225178 in the ARNT2 gene is associated with AS and support previous studies that pointed out an involvement of this gene in the predisposition to ASC.

  11. Adiponectin gene polymorphism is selectively associated with the concomitant presence of metabolic syndrome and essential hypertension.

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    Hsin-Bang Leu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Cardiovascular risk increases with the presence of both metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypertension (HTN. Although the adiponectin (ADIPOQ gene has been reported to be involved in MetS, its association with HTN remained undetermined. This study aimed to investigate the association of ADIPOQ gene with the phenotypes of HTN and MetS. METHODS: A total of 962 participants from 302 families from the Taiwan young-onset hypertension genetic study were enrolled. Plasma adiponectin were measured, and association analysis was conducted by using GEE regression-based method. Another study, of 1448 unrelated participants, was conducted to replicate the association between ADIPOQ gene and variable phenotypes of MetS with or without HTN. RESULTS: Among 962 subjects from family samples, the lowest plasma adiponectin value was observed in MetS with HTN component (9.3±0.47 µg/ml compared with hypertensives (13.4±0.74 µg /ml or MetS without HTN (11.9±0.60 µg/ml, P<0.05. The SNP rs1501299 (G276T in ADIPOQ gene was found associated with the presence of HTN in MetS (odds ratio for GG+GT vs. TT = 2.46; 95% CI: 1.14-5.3, p = 0.02, but not rs2241766 (T45G. No association of ADIPOQ gene with HTN alone or MetS without HTN was observed. The significant association of the SNP rs1501299 (G276T with the phenotype of presence of HTN in MetS was confirmed (odds ratio for GG+GT vs. TT = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.1-4.3 in the replication study. CONCLUSIONS: ADIPOQ genetic variants were selectively and specifically associated with the concomitant presence of MetS and HTN, suggesting potential genetic linkage between MetS and HTN.

  12. Uteroglobin gene polymorphism (G38A) may be a risk factor in childhood idiopathic nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demircioglu Kılıc, Beltinge; Buyukcelik, Mithat; Oguzkan Balcı, Sibel; Pehlivan, Sacide; Kul, Seval; Col, Nilgun; Balat, Ayse

    2018-02-01

    Uteroglobin (UG) is a multifunctional protein with anti-inflammatory properties. The aim of this study was to first evaluate the role of UG gene G38A polymorphism in childhood idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS), and determine whether this variation may be related to the occurrence of INS or a steroid response. One hundred and thirty-six children diagnosed with INS in Gaziantep University, Department of Pediatric Nephrology, and 70 healthy volunteers were included. Children with INS were divided into two groups: steroid-sensitive (n = 84), and steroid-resistant (n = 52). Samples were examined using the polymerase chain reaction restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) enzyme method. The distributions of AA, GG, and AG genotypes of UG gene G38A (G/A) were 16.9%, 44.9%, and 38.2% in the all-INS group, whereas they were 14.3%, 48.8%, and 36.9% in the steroid-sensitive INS (SSINS) group compared with 21.1%, 38.5%, and 40.4% in steroid-resistant INS (SRINS), and 5.7%, 41.4%, and 52.9% in controls. The risk of INS was increased almost 4-fold in children with the AA genotype (p = 0.016). The risk of having SSINS was increased 3.5-fold (p = 0.042) whereas the risk of SRINS was increased 4.8-fold in the same genotype (p = 0.014). The uteroglobin gene may play an important role in the development of INS, and the AA genotype of UG gene G38A polymorphism was found more frequently in those children. Further studies evaluating all polymorphisms in larger patient groups are needed to exactly determine the effect of UG gene on the development of INS and steroid response in children.

  13. Clinical Auditory Phenotypes Associated with GATA3 Gene Mutations in Familial Hypoparathyroidism-deafness-renal Dysplasia Syndrome

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    Wang, Li; Lin, Qiong-Fen; Wang, Hong-Yang; Guan, Jing; Lan, Lan; Xie, Lin-Yi; Yu, Lan; Yang, Ju; Zhao, Cui; Liang, Jin-Long; Zhou, Han-Lin; Yang, Huan-Ming; Xiong, Wen-Ping; Zhang, Qiu-Jing; Wang, Da-Yong; Wang, Qiu-Ju

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypoparathyroidism-deafness-renal dysplasia (HDR) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder primarily caused by haploinsufficiency of GATA binding protein 3 (GATA3) gene mutations, and hearing loss is the most frequent phenotypic feature. This study aimed at identifying the causative gene mutation for a three-generation Chinese family with HDR syndrome and analyzing auditory phenotypes in all familial HDR syndrome cases. Methods: Three affected family members underwent otologic examinations, biochemistry tests, and other clinical evaluations. Targeted genes capture combining next-generation sequencing was performed within the family. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm the causative mutation. The auditory phenotypes of all reported familial HDR syndrome cases analyzed were provided. Results: In Chinese family 7121, a heterozygous nonsense mutation c.826C>T (p.R276*) was identified in GATA3. All the three affected members suffered from sensorineural deafness and hypocalcemia; however, renal dysplasia only appeared in the youngest patient. Furthermore, an overview of thirty HDR syndrome families with corresponding GATA3 mutations revealed that hearing impairment occurred earlier in the younger generation in at least nine familial cases (30%) and two thirds of them were found to carry premature stop mutations. Conclusions: This study highlights the phenotypic heterogeneity of HDR and points to a possible genetic anticipation in patients with HDR, which needs to be further investigated. PMID:28303854

  14. Overexpression of DYRK1A, a Down Syndrome Candidate gene, Impairs Primordial Germ Cells Maintenance and Migration in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanyan; Lin, Ziyuan; Liu, Mingfeng; Wang, He; Sun, Huaqin

    2017-11-10

    DYRK1A, located on chromosome 21, is a major candidate gene of Down syndrome (DS, trisomy21), and its overexpression is associated with abnormal phenotype of Down syndrome patients. The defects of gonads and germ cells in Down Syndrome suggest that overexpression of DYRK1A has potential effect on primordial germ cells (PGCs) development. Human and zebrafish DYRK1A protein sequence possess 75.6% similarity and same function domains, suggesting the evolutional conservation. Here, we used zebrafish model to detect the definite role of excessive expression of DYRK1A in PGCs development during embryogenesis. We injected DYRK1A mRNA into embryos and detected the PGCs marker gene vasa and nanos1. Results showed depletion in numbers and disordering migration of PGCs in human or zebrafish DYRK1A overexpressed zebrafish embryos. Quantitative proteome analysis indicated that embryonic proteins were significantly altered in DYRK1A overexpressed embryos. Of note, ca15b and piwil1, two identified critical factors for PGCs development, showed ectopic expression induced by overexpressed DYRK1A. In brief, we demonstrate that overexpression of DYRK1A, a candidate gene of Down's syndrome, impairs PGCs development during early embryogenesis by altering key factors in embryos. Importantly, our work may provide a conceivable mechanism for the gonads and germ cells defects of Down syndrome patients.

  15. Homozygous c.1160C>T (P38L) in the MECP2 gene in a female Rett syndrome patient.

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    Bhanushali, Aparna A; Mandsaurwala, A; Das, Bibhu R

    2016-03-01

    Rett syndrome is a severe X-linked dominant neurodevelopmental disorder. Mutations in the MECP2 gene on chromosome Xq28 have been shown to be the cause of Rett syndrome. Sequencing of the MECP2 gene in a patient with clinical suspicion of Rett syndrome revealed c.1160C>T (P387L) in exon 4 of the MECP2 gene homozygously. Females with Rett syndrome are usually heterozygous for a mutation in MECP2. Uniparental disomy as a probable cause for the homozygous presence of this mutation was ruled out by quantitative fluorescence-polymerase chain reaction. Moreover to our knowledge this mutation has only been reported in males with X-linked mental retardation (MRX). We hypothesize that the presence of this mutation c.1160C>T (P387L) in the homozygous form is responsible for the Rett syndrome-like phenotype seen in this patient. This novel report reveals for the first time the homozygous presence of a mutation which has hitherto only been reported in males with MRX. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Mutation analysis of GJB2 gene and prenatal diagnosis in a non-syndromic deafness family

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    Xiao-hua CHEN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective To identify the pathogenic gene in a non-syndromic deafness family, provide an accurate genetic consultation and early intervention for deaf family to reduce the incidence of congenital deafness. Methods Mutation analysis was carried out by polymerase chain reaction followed by DNA sequencing of coding region of GJB2 gene. The fetal DNA was extracted from the amniotic fluid cells by amniocentesis at 20 weeks during pregnancy. The genotype of the fetus was characterized for predicting the status of hearing. Results Complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp were detected in the proband of the family, heterozygous mutation 176-191del16bp was detected in the father, and 235delC was detected in the mother. Fetus carried 235delC heterozygous mutation inherited from his mother. Conclusions The proband's hearing loss is resulted from the complex heterozygous mutations 235delC and 176-191del16bp in GJB2 gene. Fetus is a heterozygous mutation 235delC carrier. Prenatal diagnosis for deafness assisted by genetic test can provide efficient guidance about offspring's hearing condition, and prevent another deaf-mute member from birth. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2014.07.09

  17. Epigenetic Regulation of Werner Syndrome Gene in Age-Related Cataract

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    Xi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the promoter methylation and histone modification of WRN (Werner syndrome gene, a DNA repair gene, and their relationship with the gene expression in age-related cataract (ARC lens. Methods. We collected the lenses after cataract surgery from 117ARC patients and 39 age-matched non-ARC. WRN expression, DNA methylation and histone modification around the CpG island were assessed. The methylation status of Human-lens-epithelium cell (HLEB-3 was chemically altered to observe the relationship between methylation and expression of WRN. Results. The WRN expression was significantly decreased in the ARC anterior lens capsules comparing with the control. The CpG island of WRN promoter in the ARC anterior lens capsules displayed hypermethylation comparing with the controls. The WRN promoter was almost fully methylated in the cortex of ARC and control lens. Acetylated H3 was lower while methylated H3-K9 was higher in ARC anterior lens capsules than that of the controls. The expression of WRN in HLEB-3 increased after demethylation of the cells. Conclusions. A hypermethylation in WRN promoter and altered histone modification in anterior lens capsules might contribute to the ARC mechanism. The data suggest an association of altered DNA repair capability in lens with ARC pathogenesis.

  18. Analysis of Lynch Syndrome Mismatch Repair Genes in Women with Endometrial Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, Izaskun; Ibáñez-Feijoo, Eduardo; Andrés, Leire; Aguirre, Elena; Balmaña, Judith; Blay, Pilar; Llort, Gemma; González-Santiago, Santiago; Maortua, Hiart; Tejada, Maria Isabel; Martinez-Bouzas, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Endometrial cancer is the second most frequent neoplasm in women with Lynch syndrome (LS). We sought to assess whether analyzing women with endometrial cancer would identify families with LS not identified with current clinical criteria. We included women diagnosed with endometrial cancer younger than 50 years and also older if they had a family cancer history associated with LS. In blood samples obtained, we analyzed mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes, as well as protein expression by immunohistochemistry and microsatellite instability (MSI) in tumour tissue. A total of 103 patients were enrolled. We detected 14 pathogenic mutations and 4 genetic variants of unknown clinical significance in MMR genes. We found MSI in 41.66% of the women with a pathogenic mutation. In this group, 76.92% showed loss of at least one MMR protein. Women with mutations were younger at diagnosis, but all of them had a family history compatible with LS. Analysis of the MMR genes, in particular MSH6, seems to be appropriate in women with endometrial cancer and a family history of tumours associated with LS. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Mutations in the gene encoding epsilon-sarcoglycan cause myoclonus-dystonia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimprich, A; Grabowski, M; Asmus, F; Naumann, M; Berg, D; Bertram, M; Scheidtmann, K; Kern, P; Winkelmann, J; Müller-Myhsok, B; Riedel, L; Bauer, M; Müller, T; Castro, M; Meitinger, T; Strom, T M; Gasser, T

    2001-09-01

    The dystonias are a common clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of movement disorders. More than ten loci for inherited forms of dystonia have been mapped, but only three mutated genes have been identified so far. These are DYT1, encoding torsin A and mutant in the early-onset generalized form, GCH1 (formerly known as DYT5), encoding GTP-cyclohydrolase I and mutant in dominant dopa-responsive dystonia, and TH, encoding tyrosine hydroxylase and mutant in the recessive form of the disease. Myoclonus-dystonia syndrome (MDS; DYT11) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by bilateral, alcohol-sensitive myoclonic jerks involving mainly the arms and axial muscles. Dystonia, usually torticollis and/or writer's cramp, occurs in most but not all affected patients and may occasionally be the only symptom of the disease. In addition, patients often show prominent psychiatric abnormalities, including panic attacks and obsessive-compulsive behavior. In most MDS families, the disease is linked to a locus on chromosome 7q21 (refs. 11-13). Using a positional cloning approach, we have identified five different heterozygous loss-of-function mutations in the gene for epsilon-sarcoglycan (SGCE), which we mapped to a refined critical region of about 3.2 Mb. SGCE is expressed in all brain regions examined. Pedigree analysis shows a marked difference in penetrance depending on the parental origin of the disease allele. This is indicative of a maternal imprinting mechanism, which has been demonstrated in the mouse epsilon-sarcoglycan gene.

  20. Novel mutations of TCOF1 gene in European patients with Treacher Collins syndrome.

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    Conte, Chiara; D'Apice, Maria Rosaria; Rinaldi, Fabrizio; Gambardella, Stefano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Novelli, Giuseppe

    2011-09-27

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is one of the most severe autosomal dominant congenital disorders of craniofacial development and shows variable phenotypic expression. TCS is extremely rare, occurring with an incidence of 1 in 50.000 live births. The TCS distinguishing characteristics are represented by down slanting palpebral fissures, coloboma of the eyelid, micrognathia, microtia and other deformity of the ears, hypoplastic zygomatic arches, and macrostomia. Conductive hearing loss and cleft palate are often present. TCS results from mutations in the TCOF1 gene located on chromosome 5, which encodes a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phospho-protein called Treacle. However, alterations in the TCOF1 gene have been implicated in only 81-93% of TCS cases. In this study, the entire coding regions of the TCOF1 gene, including newly described exons 6A and 16A, were sequenced in 46 unrelated subjects suspected of TCS clinical indication. Fifteen mutations were reported, including twelve novel and three already described in 14 sporadic patients and in 3 familial cases. Moreover, seven novel polymorphisms were also described. Most of the mutations characterised were microdeletions spanning one or more nucleotides, in addition to an insertion of one nucleotide in exon 18 and a stop mutation. The deletions and the insertion described cause a premature termination of translation, resulting in a truncated protein. This study confirms that almost all the TCOF1 pathogenic mutations fall in the coding region and lead to an aberrant protein.

  1. Another face of the Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) gene: identification of additional exons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    So, Rolando B; Gonzales, Bianca; Henning, Dale; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Valdez, Benigno C

    2004-03-17

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is characterized by an abnormality in craniofacial development during early embryogenesis. TCS is caused by mutations in the gene TCOF1, which encodes the nucleolar phosphoprotein treacle. Genetic and proteomic characterizations of TCS/treacle are based on the previously reported 26 exons of TCOF1. Here, we report the identification of 231-nucleotide (nt) exon 6A (between exons 6 and 7) and 108-nt exon 16A (between exons 16 and 17). Isoforms with exon 6A are up to 3.7-fold more abundant than alternatively spliced variants without exon 6A, but only minor isoforms contain exon 16A. Exon 6A encodes a peptide sequence containing basic and acidic domains similar to 10 other exons of TCOF1. Unlike the other exons, exon 6A encodes a nuclear localization signal (NLS) which does not, however, alter the nucleolar localization of full-length treacle. The discovery of exons 6A and 16A is relevant to mutational analysis of the TCOF1 gene in TCS patients, and to functional analysis of its gene product.

  2. Novel mutations of TCOF1 gene in European patients with treacher Collins syndrome

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    Rinaldi Fabrizio

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is one of the most severe autosomal dominant congenital disorders of craniofacial development and shows variable phenotypic expression. TCS is extremely rare, occurring with an incidence of 1 in 50.000 live births. The TCS distinguishing characteristics are represented by down slanting palpebral fissures, coloboma of the eyelid, micrognathia, microtia and other deformity of the ears, hypoplastic zygomatic arches, and macrostomia. Conductive hearing loss and cleft palate are often present. TCS results from mutations in the TCOF1 gene located on chromosome 5, which encodes a serine/alanine-rich nucleolar phospho-protein called Treacle. However, alterations in the TCOF1 gene have been implicated in only 81-93% of TCS cases. Methods In this study, the entire coding regions of the TCOF1 gene, including newly described exons 6A and 16A, were sequenced in 46 unrelated subjects suspected of TCS clinical indication. Results Fifteen mutations were reported, including twelve novel and three already described in 14 sporadic patients and in 3 familial cases. Moreover, seven novel polymorphisms were also described. Most of the mutations characterised were microdeletions spanning one or more nucleotides, in addition to an insertion of one nucleotide in exon 18 and a stop mutation. The deletions and the insertion described cause a premature termination of translation, resulting in a truncated protein. Conclusion This study confirms that almost all the TCOF1 pathogenic mutations fall in the coding region and lead to an aberrant protein.

  3. Single nucleotide polymorphism rs6716901 in SLC25A12 gene is associated with Asperger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durdiaková, Jaroslava; Warrier, Varun; Baron-Cohen, Simon; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev

    2014-03-31

    Autism Spectrum Conditions (ASC) are a group of developmental conditions which affect communication, social interactions and behaviour. Mitochondrial oxidative dysfunction has been suggested as a mechanism of autism based on the results of multiple genetic association and expression studies. SLC25A12 is a gene encoding a calcium-binding carrier protein that localizes to the mitochondria and is involved in the exchange of aspartate for glutamate in the inner membrane of the mitochondria regulating the cytosolic redox state. rs2056202 SNP in this gene has previously been associated with ASC. SNPs rs6716901 and rs3765166 analysed in this study have not been previously explored in association with AS. We genotyped three SNPs (rs2056202, rs3765166, and rs6716901) in SLC25A12 in n?=?117 individuals with Asperger syndrome (AS) and n?=?426 controls, all of Caucasian ancestry. rs6716901 showed significant association with AS (P?=?0.008) after correcting for multiple testing. We did not replicate the previously identified association between rs2056202 and AS in our sample. Similarly, rs3765166 (P?=?0.11) showed no significant association with AS. The present study, in combination with previous studies, provides evidence for SLC25A12 as involved in the etiology of AS. Further cellular and molecular studies are required to elucidate the role of this gene in ASC.

  4. Birt-Hogg-Dube Syndrome with a Novel Mutation in the FLCN Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayhan, Gulsum; Yılmaz Demirci, Nilgun; Turktas, Haluk; Ergun, Mehmet Ali

    2017-10-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dube syndrome (BHDS) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by hair follicle hamartomas, kidney tumors, and spontaneous pneumothorax; its cause is a heterozygous mutation in the FLCN gene. Colorectal polyps and carcinoma have also been reported in BHDS. FLCN mutations can be detected in patients with isolated primary spontaneous pneumothorax (PSP), so PSP may present as part of BHDS. The aim of this report is to enhance awareness that patients presenting with spontaneous PSP should be evaluated for FLCN mutations. A 44-year-old woman with PSP and her parents were analyzed for FLCN mutations. One of the patient's paternal aunts had a PSP and two of her paternal aunts had colon cancer diagnosed at early ages. A novel in-frame deletion in the FLCN gene, c.932_933delCT (P311Rfs*78), was detected in the proband and in her unaffected father. We recommend that molecular analysis of the FLCN gene be performed in patients with PSP and their families, and that mutation carriers be examined for kidney and colon tumors.

  5. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T gene polymorphism in Turkish patients with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadeniz, Muammer; Erdogan, Mehmet; Zengi, Ayhan; Eroglu, Zuhal; Tamsel, Sadik; Olukman, Murat; Saygili, Fusun; Yilmaz, Candeger

    2010-08-01

    Higher Levels of Hcy are associated with several clinical conditions, among them non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, endometrial dysplasia and hypertension with insulin resistance, and polycystic ovary syndrome. The purpose of this study was to investigate the serum homocystein levels and other metabolic parameters in relationship with the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism in patients with PCOS. Our study included 86 young women with PCOS constituting the study group and 70 healthy women constituting the control group. Homocystein levels, metabolic, and hormonal parameters were measured, and genetic analysis of the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism was performed in all the subjects. A statistically significant difference was observed in mean homocystein levels between patients with PCOS when compared to the control group. The MTHFR 677 CC genotypes had significantly higher proportions in the control group compared to the PCOS patients (χ(2) = 21.381, P homocystein levels were higher than normal subjects in patients with PCOS and that the MTHFR C677T gene polymorphism does not influence homocystein levels of patients with PCOS.

  6. Interferons in Sjögren’s syndrome: genes, mechanisms, and effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He eLi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Sjögren’s syndrome (SS is a common, progressive autoimmune exocrinopathy distinguished by dry eyes and mouth and affects ~0.7% of European population. Overexpression of transcripts induced by interferons (IFN, termed as an ‘IFN signature’, has been found in SS patients. Four microarray studies have been published in SS that identified dysregulated genes within type I IFN signaling in either salivary glands or peripheral blood of SS patients. The mechanism of this type I IFN activation is still obscure, but several possible explanations have been proposed, including virus infection-initiated and immune-complex-initiated type I IFN production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs. Genetic predisposition to increased type I IFN signaling is supported by candidate gene studies showing evidence for association of variants within IFN-related genes. Once activated, IFN signaling may contribute to numerous aspects of SS pathophysiology, including lymphocyte infiltration into exocrine glands, autoantibody production, and glandular cell apoptosis. Thus, dysregulation of IFN pathways is an important feature that can be potentially used as a serum biomarker for diagnosis and targeting of new treatments in this complex autoimmune disease.

  7. Genotyping Rs2274625 Marker in NPHS2 Gene Associated with Nephrotic Syndrome in Isfahan Population

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    L Esmaili Chamgordani

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Nephrotic syndrome (NS is a genetic disease belonging to a heterogeneous group of glomerular disorders, which mainly occurs within the children. Linkage analysis using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP is used as an indirect method in molecular diagnosis of the disease. A large number of SNP markers have been introduced in NPHS2gene in the available electronic databases. Method: In the present study, the genotype and informative status of rs2274625 marker in NPHS2 genewas investigated in 120 unrelated healthy individuals using Tetra-primer ARMS PCR technique and newly designed primers. Allelic frequency and presence of Hardy Weinberg Equilibrium (HWE was estimated using GenePop website. Furthermore, PowerMarker software was utilized in order to compute the index of polymorphism information content (PIC. Results: The study results indicated allele frequency of 97% and 3% for C and T alleles, respectively, in regard with rs2274625 marker within Isfahan population. Moreover, the PIC for the rs2274625 marker was 0.5%, and HWE revealed the equilibruim of the study population in regard with the related marker. Conclusion: As the study findings indicated, rs2274625 could be introduced as an SNP marker in the linkage analysis in order to molecularly trace NPHS2 gene mutations in molecular NS diagnosis in Isfahan population as a representative sample of the Iranian population.

  8. Nonalcoholic fatty liver in patients with Laron syndrome and GH gene deletion - preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laron, Zvi; Ginsberg, Shira; Webb, Muriel

    2008-10-01

    There is little information on the relationship between growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-I (GH/IGF-I) deficiency or IGF-I treatment on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) a disorder linked to obesity and insulin resistance. To find out whether the markedly obese patients with Laron syndrome (LS) and GH gene deletion have fatty livers. We studied 11 untreated adult patients with LS (5M, 6F), five girls with LS treated by IGF-I and five adult patients with GH gene deletion (3M, 3F), four previously treated by hGH in childhood. Fatty liver was quantitatively evaluated by ultrasonography using a phase array US system (HITACHI 6500, Japan). Body adiposity was determined by DEXA, and insulin resistance was estimated by HOMA-IR using the fasting serum glucose and insulin values. Six out of 11 adult patients with LS, two out of the five IGF-I treated girls with LS and three out of five adult hGH gene deletion patients were found to have NAFLD (nonalcoholic fatty liver disease). NAFLD is a frequent complication in untreated and treated congenital IGF-I deficiency. No correlation between NAFLD and age, sex, degree of obesity, blood lipids, or degree of insulin resistance was observed.

  9. Diagnosing Smith-Magenis syndrome and duplication 17p11.2 syndrome by RAI1 gene copy number variation using quantitative real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoa T; Solaymani-Kohal, Sara; Baker, Kevin R; Girirajan, Santhosh; Williams, Stephen R; Vlangos, Christopher N; Smith, Ann C M; Bunyan, David J; Roffey, Paul E; Blanchard, Christopher L; Elsea, Sarah H

    2008-03-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and duplication 17p11.2 (dup17p11.2) syndrome are multiple congenital anomalies/mental retardation disorders resulting from either a deletion or duplication of the 17p11.2 region, respectively. The retinoic acid induced 1 (RAI1) gene is the causative gene for SMS and is included in the 17p11.2 region of dup17p11.2 syndrome. Currently SMS and dup17p11.2 syndrome are diagnosed using a combination of clinically recognized phenotypes and molecular cytogenetic analyses such as fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). However, these methods have proven to be highly expensive, time consuming, and dependent upon the low resolving capabilities of the assay. To address the need for improved diagnostic methods for SMS and dup17p11.2 syndrome, we designed a quantitative real-time PCR (Q-PCR) assay that measures RAI1 copy number using the comparative C(t) method, DeltaDeltaC(t). We tested our assay with samples blinded to their previous SMS or dup17p11.2 syndrome status. In all cases, we were able to determine RAI1 copy number status and render a correct diagnosis accordingly. We validated these results by both FISH and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). We conclude that Q-PCR is an accurate, reproducible, low-cost, and reliable assay that can be employed for routine use in SMS and dup17p11.2 diagnosis.

  10. ANGIOTENSIN CONVERTING ENZIME GENE I/D POLYMORPHISM AND PROMISSING OF RENOPROTECTIVE AND IMMUNOSUPRESSIVE THERAPY IN CHILDREN WITH NEPHROTIC SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zh.P. Sharnova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of i/d polymorphism gene angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE in promissing of renoprotective and immunosupressive therapy in children with nephrotic syndrome syndrome (NS we determined the genotypes of ACE in 76 children with ns including 22 children with chronic renal failure (CRF. the analysis of treatment effect with inhibitor ace in patients with steroid resistant ns (SRNS demonstrated decreasing of renoprotective effect of these drugs in patients with DD genotype compared with ii and id genotypes (р = 0,033 by similar degree of the glomerular filtration rate (GFR, proteinuria and blood pressure decrease in these patients. Percentage of DD genotype in patients with ns refractory to therapy of cyclosporin a were height compared with patients, sensitive to this therapy.Key words: nephrotic syndrome, chronic renal failure, polymorphism of genes, renin-angiotensin system.

  11. Novel germline mutations in FLCN gene identified in two Chinese patients with Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Teng; Ning, Xianghui; He, Qun; Gong, Kan

    2017-01-09

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome, a hereditary renal cancer syndrome caused by mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene, is characterized by the presence of fibrofolliculomas, pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, and renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Few BHD syndrome cases have been reported in Asian countries, and cutaneous presentations are relatively rare in Asian patients. Asian BHD patients may be misdiagnosed due to their atypical manifestations. Here, we report two Chinese BHD patients with novel FLCN mutations (c.946-947delAG in exon 9 and c.770-772delCCT in exon 7). Both of them had RCC and spontaneous pneumothorax without fibrofolliculomas. In patients with RCC and pulmonary cysts but without cutaneous lesions, screening for mutations in the FLCN gene should be performed, especially for those with a family history of RCC or pulmonary cysts (pneumothorax).

  12. A novel and de novo deletion in the OCRL1 gene associated with a severe form of Lowe syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peces, Ramón; Peces, Carlos; de Sousa, Erika; Vega, Cristina; Selgas, Rafael; Nevado, Julián

    2013-12-01

    The oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe (OCRL) is an X-linked disorder. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5) bisphosphate (PIP2P) 5-phosphatase, is responsible for the phenotypic characteristics of the disease. We report a 22-year-old male with a severe form of OCRL syndrome, diagnosed on the basis of congenital cataracts, severe psychomotor and cognitive deficits, and renal tubular dysfunction without Fanconi syndrome. The patient presented low molecular weight proteinuria, nephrocalcinosis, nephrolithiasis, rickets, and growth retardation and developed progressive renal failure. Genetic analysis showed a novel and de novo deletion of exons 10-13 in the OCRL1 gene.

  13. A new mutation in the gene encoding mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase as a cause of HUPRA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Henry; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Delmiro, Aitor; García-Silva, María Teresa; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; Muley, Rafael; Arenas, Joaquín; Martín, Miguel A; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2013-09-13

    HUPRA syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disease characterized by hyperuricemia, pulmonary hypertension, renal failure in infancy and alkalosis. This syndrome was previously described in three patients with a homozygous mutation c.1169A > G (p.D390G) in SARS2, encoding the mitochondrial seryl-tRNA synthetase. Here we report the clinical and genetic findings in a girl and her brother. Both patients were clinically diagnosed with the HUPRA syndrome. Analysis of the pedigree identified a new homozygous mutation c.1205G > A (p.R402H) in SARS2 gene. This mutation is very rare in the population and it is located at the C-terminal globular domain of the homodimeric enzyme very close to p.D390G. Several data support that p.R402H mutation in SARS2 is a new cause of HUPRA syndrome.

  14. Wolfram syndrome 1 (Wfs1) gene expression in the normal mouse visual system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, June; Tanizawa, Yukio; Shinoda, Koh

    2008-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome (OMIM 222300) is a neurodegenerative disorder defined by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus and progressive optic atrophy. This syndrome has been attributed to mutations in the WFS1 gene, which codes for a putative multi-spanning membrane glycoprotein of the endoplasmic reticulum. The function of WFS1 (wolframin), the distribution of this protein in the mammalian visual system, and the pathogenesis of optic atrophy in Wolfram syndrome are unclear. In this study we made a detailed analysis of the distribution of Wfs1 mRNA and protein in the normal mouse visual system by using in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. The mRNA and protein were observed in the retina, optic nerve, and brain. In the retina, Wfs1 expression was strong in amacrine and Müller cells, and moderate in photoreceptors and horizontal cells. In addition, it was detectable in bipolar and retinal ganglion cells. Interestingly, moderate Wfs1 expression was seen in the optic nerve, particularly in astrocytes, while little Wfs1 was expressed in the optic chiasm or optic tract. In the brain, moderate Wfs1 expression was observed in the zonal, superficial gray, and intermediate gray layers of the superior colliculus, in the dorsomedial part of the suprachiasmatic nucleus, and in layer II of the primary and secondary visual cortices. Thus, Wfs1 mRNA and protein were widely distributed in the normal mouse visual system. This evidence may provide clues as to the physiological role of Wfs1 protein in the biology of vision, and help to explain the selective vulnerability of the optic nerve to WFS1 loss-of-function. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Identification of possible targets of the Aspergillus fumigatus CRZ1 homologue, CrzA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldman Gustavo H

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Calcineurin, a serine/threonine-specific protein phosphatase, plays an important role in the control of cell morphology and virulence in fungi. Calcineurin regulates localization and activity of a transcription factor called CRZ1. Recently, we characterize Aspergillus fumigatus CRZ1 homologue, AfCrzA. Here, we investigate which pathways are influenced by A. fumigatus AfCrzA during a short pulse of calcium by comparatively determining the transcriptional profile of A. fumigatus wild type and ΔAfcrzA mutant strains. Results We were able to observe 3,622 genes modulated in at least one timepoint in the mutant when compared to the wild type strain (3,211 and 411 at 10 and 30 minutes, respectively. Decreased mRNA abundance in the ΔcrzA was seen for genes encoding calcium transporters, transcription factors and genes that could be directly or indirectly involved in calcium metabolism. Increased mRNA accumulation was observed for some genes encoding proteins involved in stress response. AfCrzA overexpression in A. fumigatus increases the expression of several of these genes. The deleted strain of one of these genes, AfRcnA, belonging to a class of endogenous calcineurin regulators, calcipressins, had more calcineurin activity after exposure to calcium and was less sensitive to menadione 30 μM, hydrogen peroxide 2.5 mM, EGTA 25 mM, and MnCl2 25 mM. We constructed deletion, overexpression, and GFP fusion protein for the closely related A. nidulans AnRcnA. GFP::RcnA was mostly detected along the germling, did not accumulate in the nuclei and its location is not affected by the cellular response to calcium chloride. Conclusion We have performed a transcriptional profiling analysis of the A. fumigatus ΔAfcrzA mutant strain exposed to calcium stress. This provided an excellent opportunity to identify genes and pathways that are under the influence of AfCrzA. AfRcnA, one of these selected genes, encodes a modulator of calcineurin

  16. Sjogren-Larsson syndrome: Novel mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene in a French cohort

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarret, Catherine; Rigal, Mélanie; Vaurs-Barrière, Catherine; Dorboz, Imen; Eymard-Pierre, Eléonore; Combes, Patricia; Giraud, Geneviève; Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Afenjar, Alexandra; Francannet, Christine; Boespflug-Tanguy, Odile

    2012-01-01

    Sjogren-Larsson syndrome (SLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by ichthyosis, spastic di- or tetraplegia and mental retardation due a defect of the fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase (FALDH), related to mutations in the ALDH3A2 gene. In this study, we screened a French cohort of

  17. Genotype-phenotype correlation in the long-QT syndrome: gene-specific triggers for life-threatening arrhythmias

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schwartz, P. J.; Priori, S. G.; Spazzolini, C.; Moss, A. J.; Vincent, G. M.; Napolitano, C.; Denjoy, I.; Guicheney, P.; Breithardt, G.; Keating, M. T.; Towbin, J. A.; Beggs, A. H.; Brink, P.; Wilde, A. A.; Toivonen, L.; Zareba, W.; Robinson, J. L.; Timothy, K. W.; Corfield, V.; Wattanasirichaigoon, D.; Corbett, C.; Haverkamp, W.; Schulze-Bahr, E.; Lehmann, M. H.; Schwartz, K.; Coumel, P.; Bloise, R.

    2001-01-01

    The congenital long-QT syndrome (LQTS) is caused by mutations on several genes, all of which encode cardiac ion channels. The progressive understanding of the electrophysiological consequences of these mutations opens unforeseen possibilities for genotype-phenotype correlation studies. Preliminary

  18. The crucial role of Campylobacter jejuni genes in anti-ganglioside antibody induction in Guillain-Barré syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.C. Jacobs (Bart); H.P. Endtz (Hubert); A.P. Heikema (Astrid); M. Gilbert (Michel); T. Komagamine (Tomoko); C.W. Ang (Wim); J. Glerum (Jobine); D. Brochu (Denis); J. Li (Jianjun); N. Yuki (Nobuhiro); A.F. van Belkum (Alex); P.C.R. Godschalk (Peggy)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractMolecular mimicry of Campylobacter jejuni lipo-oligosaccharides (LOS) with gangliosides in nervous tissue is considered to induce cross-reactive antibodies that lead to Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), an acute polyneuropathy. To determine whether specific bacterial genes

  19. The fragile X syndrome: Isolation of the FMR-1 gene and characterization of the fragile X mutation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B.A. Oostra (Ben); A. Verkerk

    1992-01-01

    markdownabstractConclusion Rapid progress has been made in the analysis of the fragile X syndrome during 1991. Different groups have discovered that fragile X chromosomes are preferentially methylated. In these X chromosomes an insertion has been found in the methylated region. The FMR-1 gene,

  20. A case of Donohue syndrome “Leprechaunism” with a novel mutation in the insulin receptor gene

    OpenAIRE

    Kirel, Birgül; Bozdağ, Özkan; Köşger, Pelin; Aydoğdu, Sultan Durmuş; Alıncak, Eylem; Tekin, Neslihan

    2017-01-01

    Donohue syndrome (Leprechaunism) is characterized by severe insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, postprandial hyperglycemia, preprandial hypoglycemia, intrauterine and postnatal growth retardation, dysmorphic findings, and clinical and laboratory findings of hyperandrogenemia due to homozygous or compound heterozygous inactivating mutations in the insulin receptor gene. A female newborn presented with lack of subcutaneous fat tissue, bilateral simian creases, hypertrichosis, especially on he...

  1. The long-term outcome of boys with partial androgen insensitivity syndrome and a mutation in the androgen receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lucas-Herald, A.; S. Bertelloni (Silvano); A. Juul (Anders); J. Bryce (Jillian); Jiang, J.; M. Rodie (Martina); R. Sinnott (Richard); Boroujerdi, M.; Lindhardt Johansen, M.; O. Hiort (Olaf); P-M. Holterhus (Paul-Martin); M.L. Cools (Martine); Guaragna-Filho, G.; Guerra-Junior, G.; N. Weintrob (Naomi); S.E. Hannema (Sabine); S.L.S. Drop (Stenvert); T. Guran (Tulay); F. Darendeliler (Feyza); A. Nordenström (Anna); I.A. Hughes (Ieuan A.); Acerini, C.; Tadokoro-Cuccaro, R.; S.F. Ahmed (Faisal)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractBackground: In boys with suspected partial androgen insensitivity syndrome (PAIS), systematic evidence that supports the long-term prognostic value of identifying a mutation in the androgen receptor gene (AR) is lacking. Objective: To assess the clinical characteristics and long-term

  2. Detection of mutations in the COL4A5 gene by SSCP in X-linked Alport syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertz, Jens Michael; Juncker, I; Persson, U

    2001-01-01

    of type IV-collagen. We performed mutation analysis of the COL4A5 gene by PCR-SSCP analysis of each of the 51 exons with flanking intronic sequences in 81 patients suspected of X-linked Alport syndrome including 29 clear X-linked cases, 37 cases from families with a pedigree compatible with X...

  3. Mutations in two nonhomologous genes in a head-to-head configuration cause Ellis-van Creveld syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruiz-Perez, V.L.; Tompson, S.W.; Blair, H.J.; Espinoza-Valdez, C.; Lapunzina, P.; Silva, E.O.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Gibbs, J.L.; Young, I.D.; Wright, M.J.; Goodship, J.A.

    2003-01-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia. Elsewhere, we described mutations in EVC in patients with this condition (Ruiz-Perez et al. 2000). We now report that mutations in EVC2 also cause EvC. These two genes lie in a head-to-head configuration that is conserved

  4. Immunogenetics of rheumatoid arthritis and primary Sjögren's syndrome: DNA polymorphism of HLA class II genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels; Andersen, V; Fugger, L

    1992-01-01

    We investigated the DNA restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the Major Histocompatability Complex (MHC) class II genes: HLA-DRB, -DQA, -DQB, DPA, and -DFB in 24 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), in 19 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrome (primary SS), and healthy Danes. T...

  5. Aarskog-Scott syndrome: clinical update and report of nine novel mutations of the FGD1 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orrico, A; Galli, L; Faivre, L

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the FGD1 gene have been shown to cause Aarskog-Scott syndrome (AAS), or facio-digito-genital dysplasia (OMIM#305400), an X-linked disorder characterized by distinctive genital and skeletal developmental abnormalities with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. To date, 20 distinct ...

  6. A novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia linked to a mutation in the human insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Hansen, Torben; Lajer, Maria

    2004-01-01

    a missense mutation (Arg1174Gln) in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene that cosegregated with the disease phenotype (logarithm of odds [LOD] score 3.21). In conclusion, we report a novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The findings demonstrate...

  7. Mutation analysis of the WFS1 gene in seven Danish Wolfram syndrome families; four new mutations identified

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Eiberg, Hans Rudolf Lytchoff; Barrett, Timothy

    2005-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) is a neuro-degenerative autosomal recessive (AR) disorder (OMIM #222300) caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene on 4p16.1. More than 120 mutations have been identified in WFS1 associated with AR WS, as well as autosomal dominant nonsyndromic low-frequency sensorineural hearing...

  8. Mutational spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and psychiatric disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cryns, K; Sivakumaran, TA; Van den Ouweland, JMW; Pennings, RJE; Cremers, CWRJ; Flothmann, K; Young, TL; Smith, RJH; Lesperance, MM; Van Camp, G

    2003-01-01

    WFS1 is a novel gene and encodes an 890 amino-acid glycoprotein (wolframin), predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in WFS1 underlie autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome and autosomal dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) DFNA6/14. In addition,

  9. Mutational spectrum of the WFS1 gene in Wolfram syndrome, nonsyndromic hearing impairment, diabetes mellitus, and psychiatric disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cryns, K.; Sivakumaran, T.A.; Ouweland, J.M.W. van den; Pennings, R.J.E.; Cremers, C.W.R.J.; Flothmann, K.; Young, T.L.; Smith, R.J.H.; Lesperance, M.M.; Camp, G. van

    2003-01-01

    WFS1 is a novel gene and encodes an 890 amino-acid glycoprotein (wolframin), predominantly localized in the endoplasmic reticulum. Mutations in WFS1 underlie autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome and autosomal dominant low frequency sensorineural hearing impairment (LFSNHI) DFNA6/14. In addition,

  10. Sepsis syndrome and death in trauma patients are associated with variation in the gene encoding tumor necrosis factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menges, T.; Konig, I.R.; Hossain, H.; Little, S.; Tchatalbachev, S.; Thierer, F.; Hackstein, H.; Franjkovic, I.; Colaris, T.; Martens, F.; Weismuller, K.; Langefeld, T.; Stricker, J.; Hempelmann, G.; Vos, P.E.; Ziegler, A.; Jacobs, B.; Chakraborty, T.; Bein, G.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients encountering severe trauma are at risk of developing sepsis syndrome and subsequent multiple organ failure. This is often associated with fatal outcome despite survival of the initial injury. We postulate that variation of the gene coding for tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha is

  11. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Are Weak Activators of the FMR1 Gene in Fragile X Syndrome Cell Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Dolskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. It is a result of CGG repeat expansion in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene. This gene encodes the FMRP protein that is involved in neuronal development. Repeat expansion leads to heterochromatinization of the promoter, gene silencing, and the subsequent absence of FMRP. To date, there is no specific therapy for the syndrome. All treatments in clinic practice provide symptomatic therapy. The development of drug therapy for Fragile X syndrome treatment is connected with the search for inhibitors of enzymes that are responsible for heterochromatinization. Here, we report a weak transcriptional activity of the FMR1 gene and the absence of FMRP protein after Fragile X syndrome cell lines treatment with two FDA approved inhibitors of histone deacetylases, romidepsin and vorinostat. We demonstrate that romidepsin, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, does not activate FMR1 expression in patient cell cultures, whereas vorinostat, an inhibitor of classes I and II histone deacetylases, activates a low level of FMR1 expression in some patient cell lines.

  12. Searching for Tourette’s syndrome gene. Part 1. Heterogeneity of clinical phenotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kowalska

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The French neuropsychiatrist Georges Gilles de la Tourette described in 1885 the “Maladie des Tics” which later was named after him, as Gilles de la Tourette syndrome (GTS. Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by simple and complex motor and vocal tics with multiple neuropsychiatric comorbidities. GTS is often concurrent with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. There are several clinical GTS subtypes: GTS only, GTS OCD, and GTS OCD ADHD. Additional clinical aspects of the disorder include occurrence of anger episodes, anxiety and mood disorders, and learning and sleeping disturbances. The genetics of GTS is complex and remains unclear. So far, no causative candidate genes have been identified. However, segregation studies in families and twins with GTS provide strong evidence for the existence of a genetic background associated with a multifactorial mode of inheritance. Progress in studies on genome variability among patients with GTS is necessary to improve pharmacotherapeutic strategies of the disorder.

  13. NHS Gene Mutations in Ashkenazi Jewish Families with Nance-Horan Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoshany, Nadav; Avni, Isaac; Morad, Yair; Weiner, Chen; Einan-Lifshitz, Adi; Pras, Eran

    2017-09-01

    To describe ocular and extraocular abnormalities in two Ashkenazi Jewish families with infantile cataract and X-linked inheritance, and to identify their underlying mutations. Seven affected members were recruited. Medical history, clinical findings, and biometric measurements were recorded. Mutation analysis of the Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) gene was performed by direct sequencing of polymerase chain reaction-amplified exons. An unusual anterior Y-sutural cataract was documented in the affected male proband. Other clinical features among examined patients included microcorneas, long and narrow faces, and current or previous dental anomalies. A nonsense mutation was identified in each family, including a previously described 742 C>T, p.(Arg248*) mutation in Family A, and a novel mutation 2915 C>A, p.(Ser972*) in Family B. Our study expands the repertoire of NHS mutations and the related phenotype, including newly described anterior Y-sutural cataract and dental findings.

  14. [Allgrove syndrome (triple A). Finding of a mutation not described in the AAAS gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capataz Ledesma, M; Méndez Pérez, P; Rodríguez López, R; Galán Gómez, E

    2013-02-01

    Allgrove syndrome (triple A) is a rare autosomal recessive disease. The classic triad includes, congenital adrenal insufficiency due to ACTH resistance, achalasia of the cardia and alacrimia. Neurological abnormalities are associated with autonomic neuropathy, sensory and motor defects, deafness, mental retardation, Parkinsonism and dementia. The gene responsible is the ADRACALIN or AAAS encoding a protein called ALADIN. We report a case of a 19 year-old male, assessed when he was 10 years old in our department due to suspected storage disease. Mild mental and language retardation, hypernasal voice, sensory-motor neuropathy with autonomic involvement and signs of spastic paraparesis, alacrimia. gastroesophageal reflux, and achalasia. Molecular studies showed to mutations, the undescribed p.Tyr 19 Cys, and IVS14 +1 G. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. Generation of a lentiviral vector producer cell clone for human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome gene therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Wielgosz

    Full Text Available We have developed a producer cell line that generates lentiviral vector particles of high titer. The vector encodes the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS protein. An insulator element has been added to the long terminal repeats of the integrated vector to limit proto-oncogene activation. The vector provides high-level, stable expression of WAS protein in transduced murine and human hematopoietic cells. We have also developed a monoclonal antibody specific for intracellular WAS protein. This antibody has been used to monitor expression in blood and bone marrow cells after transfer into lineage negative bone marrow cells from WAS mice and in a WAS negative human B-cell line. Persistent expression of the transgene has been observed in transduced murine cells 12–20 weeks following transplantation. The producer cell line and the specific monoclonal antibody will facilitate the development of a clinical protocol for gene transfer into WAS protein deficient stem cells.

  16. Analysis of unstable DNA sequence in FRM1 gene in Polish families with fragile X syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milewski, Michal; Bal, Jerzy; Obersztyn, Ewa; Bocian, Ewa; Mazurczak, Tadeusz; Zygulska, Marta; Horst, Juergen; Deelen, Wout H.; Halley, Dicky J.J.

    1996-01-01

    The unstable DNA sequence in the FMR1 gene was analyzed in 85 individuals from Polish families with fragile X syndrome in order to characterize mutations responsible for the disease in Poland. In all affected individuals classified on the basis of clinical features and expression of the fragile site at X(q27.3) a large expansion of the unstable sequence (full mutation) was detected. About 5% (2 of 43) of individuals with full mutation did not express the fragile site. Among normal alleles, ranging in size from 20 to 41 CGC repeats, allele with 29 repeats was the most frequent (37%). Transmission of premutated and fully mutated alleles to the offspring was always associated with size increase. No change in repeat number was found when normal alleles were transmitted. (author). 19 refs., 4 figs, 1 tab

  17. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Danielle C.; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Innes, A. Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E.; Lemire, Edmond G.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Taylor, Juliet P.; Zackai, Elaine H.; McLeod, D. Ross; Kirk, Edwin P.; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Boycott, Kym; MacKenzie, Alex; Brudno, Michael; Bulman, Dennis; Dyment, David; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Bernier, Francois P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development. PMID:25047197

  18. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Danielle C; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Innes, A Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E; Lemire, Edmond G; Chodirker, Bernard N; Taylor, Juliet P; Zackai, Elaine H; McLeod, D Ross; Kirk, Edwin P; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Bernier, Francois P

    2014-07-22

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development.

  19. The 4G/5G polymorphism in the plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 gene is not associated with HELLP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muetze, Sabine; Eggermann, Thomas; Leeners, Brigitte; Birke, Cornelia; Kuse, Sabine; Ortlepp, Jan Rudolf; Rudnik-Schoeneborn, Sabine; Zerres, Klaus; Rath, Werner

    2009-02-01

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) is a major inhibitor of fibrinolysis, and a single nucleotide insertion/deletion (4G/5G) polymorphism in the promoter region of the PAI-1 gene has been identified. Subjects homozygous for the 4G allele have the highest PAI-levels due to increased PAI-1 gene transcription. Pre-eclampsia, and one of its most severe forms, the HELLP (hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, low platelets) syndrome, are characterized by increased placental thrombosis based on a procoagulatory state in the mother. Several studies have investigated the role of the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism in pre-eclampsia, but no study has focused especially on HELLP syndrome. Therefore we aimed to assess the association between HELLP syndrome and the 4G/5G polymorphism in the PAI-1 gene. Genotyping of the PAI-1 4G/5G promoter polymorphism was performed in 102 Caucasian women with HELLP syndrome and 102 Caucasian women with uncomplicated pregnancies. The 4G/4G genotype was more frequent in women with HELLP syndrome than in controls (35.3% vs. 22.5%, respectively) but this difference was not significantly different (P = 0.129). The frequency of the 4G allele was 0.588 in patients and 0.515 in controls. These data suggest that women carrying a 4G/4G genotype of the PAI-1 gene are not at increased risk for developing HELLP syndrome and are thus in line with the majority of previous studies on the association between the PAI-1 4G/5G polymorphism and pre-eclampsia.

  20. Mutations in Three Genes Encoding Proteins Involved in Hair Shaft Formation Cause Uncombable Hair Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ü Basmanav, F Buket; Cau, Laura; Tafazzoli, Aylar; Méchin, Marie-Claire; Wolf, Sabrina; Romano, Maria Teresa; Valentin, Frederic; Wiegmann, Henning; Huchenq, Anne; Kandil, Rima; Garcia Bartels, Natalie; Kilic, Arzu; George, Susannah; Ralser, Damian J; Bergner, Stefan; Ferguson, David J P; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Wehner, Maria; Thiele, Holger; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Swan, Daniel; Houniet, Darren; Büchner, Aline; Weibel, Lisa; Wagner, Nicola; Grimalt, Ramon; Bygum, Anette; Serre, Guy; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Sprecher, Eli; Schoch, Susanne; Oji, Vinzenz; Hamm, Henning; Farrant, Paul; Simon, Michel; Betz, Regina C

    2016-12-01

    Uncombable hair syndrome (UHS), also known as "spun glass hair syndrome," "pili trianguli et canaliculi," or "cheveux incoiffables" is a rare anomaly of the hair shaft that occurs in children and improves with age. UHS is characterized by dry, frizzy, spangly, and often fair hair that is resistant to being combed flat. Until now, both simplex and familial UHS-affected case subjects with autosomal-dominant as well as -recessive inheritance have been reported. However, none of these case subjects were linked to a molecular genetic cause. Here, we report the identification of UHS-causative mutations located in the three genes PADI3 (peptidylarginine deiminase 3), TGM3 (transglutaminase 3), and TCHH (trichohyalin) in a total of 11 children. All of these individuals carry homozygous or compound heterozygous mutations in one of these three genes, indicating an autosomal-recessive inheritance pattern in the majority of UHS case subjects. The two enzymes PADI3 and TGM3, responsible for posttranslational protein modifications, and their target structural protein TCHH are all involved in hair shaft formation. Elucidation of the molecular outcomes of the disease-causing mutations by cell culture experiments and tridimensional protein models demonstrated clear differences in the structural organization and activity of mutant and wild-type proteins. Scanning electron microscopy observations revealed morphological alterations in hair coat of Padi3 knockout mice. All together, these findings elucidate the molecular genetic causes of UHS and shed light on its pathophysiology and hair physiology in general. Copyright © 2016 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Metabolic syndrome, diabetes and atherosclerosis: Influence of gene-environment interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreassi, Maria Grazia, E-mail: andreas@ifc.cnr.it [CNR Institute of Clinical Physiology, G. Pasquinucci Hospital, Via Aurelia Sud, Massa (Italy)

    2009-07-10

    Despite remarkable progress in diagnosis and understanding of risk factors, cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the world's developed countries. The metabolic syndrome, a cluster of risk factors (visceral obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia, and hypertension), is increasingly being recognized as a new risk factor for type 2 diabetes and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Nevertheless, there is wide variation in both the occurrence of disease and age of onset, even in individuals who display very similar risk profiles. There is now compelling evidence that a complex interplay between genetic determinants and environmental factors (still largely unknown) is the reason for this large inter-individual variation in disease susceptibility. The purpose of the present review is to describe the current status of our knowledge concerning the gene-environment interactions potentially implicated in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. It focuses predominantly on studies of genes (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma, alcohol dehydrogenase type 1C, apolipoprotein E, glutathione S-transferases T1 and M1) that are known to be modified by dietary and lifestyle habits (fat diet, intake of alcohol and smoking habit). It also describes the limited current understanding of the role of genetic variants of xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes and their interactions with environmental toxicants. Additional studies are needed in order to clarify whether inter-individual differences in detoxification of environmental toxicants may have an essential role in the development of CVD and contribute to the emerging field of 'environmental cardiology'. Such knowledge may be particularly relevant for improving cardiovascular risk stratification and conceiving the development of 'personalized intervention program'.

  2. Targeted next-generation sequencing of 22 mismatch repair genes identifies Lynch syndrome families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talseth-Palmer, Bente A; Bauer, Denis C; Sjursen, Wenche; Evans, Tiffany J; McPhillips, Mary; Proietto, Anthony; Otton, Geoffrey; Spigelman, Allan D; Scott, Rodney J

    2016-05-01

    Causative germline mutations in mismatch repair (MMR) genes can only be identified in ~50% of families with a clinical diagnosis of the inherited colorectal cancer (CRC) syndrome hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC)/Lynch syndrome (LS). Identification of these patients are critical as they are at substantially increased risk of developing multiple primary tumors, mainly colorectal and endometrial cancer (EC), occurring at a young age. This demonstrates the need to develop new and/or more thorough mutation detection approaches. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) was used to screen 22 genes involved in the DNA MMR pathway in constitutional DNA from 14 HNPCC and 12 sporadic EC patients, plus 2 positive controls. Several softwares were used for analysis and functional annotation. We identified 5 exonic indel variants, 42 exonic nonsynonymous single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and 1 intronic variant of significance. Three of these variants were class 5 (pathogenic) or class 4 (likely pathogenic), 5 were class 3 (uncertain clinical relevance) and 40 were classified as variants of unknown clinical significance. In conclusion, we have identified two LS families from the sporadic EC patients, one without a family history of cancer, supporting the notion for universal MMR screening of EC patients. In addition, we have detected three novel class 3 variants in EC cases. We have, in addition discovered a polygenic interaction which is the most likely cause of cancer development in a HNPCC patient that could explain previous inconsistent results reported on an intronic EXO1 variant. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Clinical characteristics and STK11 gene mutations in Chinese children with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Zhiheng; Miao, Shijian; Wang, Lin; Zhang, Ping; Wu, Bingbing; Wu, Jie; Huang, Ying

    2015-11-25

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disease characterized by gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps and mucocutaneous melanin spots. Germline mutation of the serine/threonine kinase 11 (STK11) gene are responsible for PJS. In this study, we investigated the clinical characteristics and molecular basis of the disease in Chinese children with PJS. Thirteen children diagnosed with PJS in our hospital were enrolled in this study from 2011 to 2015, and their clinical data on polyp characteristics, intussusceptions events, family histories, etc. were described. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole-blood samples from each subject, and the entire coding sequence of the STK11 gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction and analyzed by direct sequencing. The median age at the onset of symptoms was 2 years and 4 months. To date, these children have undergone 40 endoscopy screenings, 17 laparotomies and 9 intussusceptions. Polyps were found in the stomach, duodenum, small bowel, colon and rectum, with large polyps found in 7 children. Mutations were found in eleven children, including seven novel mutations (c.481het_dupA, c.943_944het_delCCinsG, c.397het_delG, c.862 + 1G > G/A, c.348_349het_delGT, and c.803_804het_delGGinsC and c.121_139de l19insTT) and four previously reported mutations (c.658C > C/T, c.890G > G/A, c.1062 C > C/G, and c.290 + 1G > G/A). One PJS patient did not have any STK11 mutations. The polyps caused significant clinical consequences in children with PJS, and mutations of the STK11 gene are generally the cause of PJS in Chinese children. This study expands the spectrum of known STK11 gene mutations.

  4. The Treacher Collins syndrome (TCOF1) gene product is involved in pre-rRNA methylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Bianca; Henning, Dale; So, Rolando B; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J; Valdez, Benigno C

    2005-07-15

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is characterized by defects in craniofacial development, which results from mutations in the TCOF1 gene. TCOF1 encodes the nucleolar phosphoprotein treacle, which interacts with upstream binding factor (UBF) and affects transcription of the ribosomal DNA gene. The present study shows participation of treacle in the 2'-O-methylation of pre-rRNA. Antisense-mediated down-regulation of treacle expression in Xenopus laevis oocytes reduced 2'-O-methylation of pre-rRNA. Analysis of RNA isolated from wild-type and Tcof1+/- heterozygous mice embryos from strains that exhibit a lethal phenotype showed significant reduction in 2'-O-methylation at nucleotide C463 of 18S rRNA. The level of pseudouridylation of U1642 of 18S rRNA from the same RNA samples was not affected suggesting specificity. There is no significant difference in rRNA methylation between wild-type and heterozygous embryos of DBA x BALB/c mice, which have no obvious craniofacial phenotype. The function of treacle in pre-rRNA methylation is most likely mediated by its direct physical interaction with NOP56, a component of the ribonucleoprotein methylation complex. Although treacle co-localizes with UBF throughout mitosis, it co-localizes with NOP56 and fibrillarin, a putative methyl transferase, only during telophase when rDNA gene transcription and pre-rRNA methylation are known to commence. These observations suggest that treacle might link RNA polymerase I-catalyzed transcription and post-transcriptional modification of pre-rRNA. We hypothesize that haploinsufficiency of treacle in TCS patients results in inhibition of production of properly modified mature rRNA in addition to inhibition of rDNA gene transcription, which consequently affects proliferation and proper differentiation of specific embryonic cells during development.

  5. Translational implication of Kallmann syndrome-1 gene expression in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuri; Kanda, Mitsuro; Sugimoto, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Dai; Sueoka, Satoshi; Takami, Hideki; Ezaka, Kazuhiro; Hashimoto, Ryoji; Okamura, Yukiyasu; Iwata, Naoki; Tanaka, Chie; Yamada, Suguru; Fujii, Tsutomu; Nakayama, Goro; Koike, Masahiko; Nomoto, Shuji; Fujiwara, Michitaka; Kodera, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of epigenetic alterations causes inactivation of tumor suppressors and contributes to the initiation and progression of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Identification of methylated genes is necessary to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis of HCC and develop novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets. The Kallmann syndrome-1 (KAL1) gene encodes an extracellular matrix-related protein with diverse oncological functions. However, the function of KAL1 in HCC has not been examined. We investigated the methylation status of the KAL1 promoter region in HCC cell lines, and evaluated KAL1 mRNA levels and those of genes encoding potential interacting cell adhesion factors. KAL1 mRNA expression level was heterogeneous in nine HCC cell lines, and reactivation of KAL1 mRNA expression was observed in cells with promoter hypermethylation of KAL1 gene after demethylation. In addition, KAL1 mRNA levels inversely correlated with those of ezrin in all nine HCC cell lines. KAL1 expression levels in 144 pairs of surgically-resected tissues were determined and correlated to clinicopathological parameters. KAL1 mRNA level was independent of the background liver status, whereas HCC tissues showed significantly lower KAL1 mRNA levels than corresponding noncancerous liver tissues. Downregulation of KAL1 mRNA in HCC was significantly associated with malignant phenotype characteristics, including elevated tumor markers, larger tumor size, vascular invasion, and hypermethylation of KAL1. Patients with downregulation of KAL1 were more likely to have a shorter overall survival than other patients, and multivariate analysis identified downregulation of KAL1 as an independent prognostic factor (hazard ratio 2.04, 95% confidence interval 1.11-3.90, P=0.022). Our results indicated that KAL1 may act as a putative tumor suppressor in HCC and is inactivated by promoter hypermethylation. KAL1 may serve as a biomarker of malignant phenotype of HCC.

  6. Surfactant protein B gene polymorphism in preterm babies with respiratory distress syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.P.R. Lyra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS is multifactorial and multigenic. Studies have suggested that polymorphisms and mutations in the surfactant protein B (SP-B gene are associated with the pathogenesis of RDS. The objectives of this study were to determine and compare the frequencies of SP-B gene polymorphisms in preterm babies with and without RDS. We studied 151 neonates: 79 preterm babies without RDS and 72 preterm newborns with RDS. The following four SP-B gene polymorphisms were analyzed: A/C at -18, C/T at 1580, A/G at 9306, and G/C at nucleotide 8714. The polymorphisms were detected by PCR amplification of genomic DNA and genotyping. The genotypes were determined using PCR-based converted restriction fragment length polymorphisms. The control group consisted of 42 (53% girls and 37 (47% boys. Weight ranged from 1170 to 3260 g and mean gestational age (GA was 33.9 weeks (range: 29 to 35 weeks and 6 days. The RDS group consisted of 31 (43% girls and 41 (57% boys. Weight ranged from 614 to 2410 g and mean GA was 32 weeks (range: 26 to 35 weeks. The logistic regression model showed that GA was the variable that most contributed to the occurrence of RDS. The AG genotype of the A/G polymorphism at position 9306 of the SP-B gene was a protective factor in this population (OR = 0.1681; 95%CI = 0.0426-0.6629. We did not detect differences in the frequencies of the other polymorphisms between the two groups of newborns.

  7. Structural characterization and expression analysis of a beta-thymosin homologue (Tβ) in disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasthuri, Saranya Revathy; Premachandra, H K A; Umasuthan, Navaneethaiyer; Whang, Ilson; Lee, Jehee

    2013-09-15

    Repertoires of proteins and small peptides play numerous physiological roles as hormones, antimicrobial peptides, and cellular signaling factors. The beta-thymosins are a group of small acidic peptides involved in processes such as actin sequestration, neuronal development, wound healing, tissue repair, and angiogenesis. Recent characterization of the beta thymosins as immunological regulators in invertebrates led to our identification and characterization of a beta-thymosin homologue (Tβ) from Haliotis discus discus. The cDNA possessed an ORF of 132 bp encoding a protein of 44 amino acids with a molecular mass of 4977 Da. The amino acid sequence shows high identity with another molluskan beta-thymosin and has a characteristic actin binding motif (LKKTET) and glutamyl donors. Phylogenetic analysis showed a close relationship with molluskan homologues, as well as its distinct identity and common ancestral origin. Genomic analysis revealed a 3 exon-2 intron structure similar to the other homologues. In silico promoter analysis also revealed significant transcription factor binding sites, providing evidence for the expression of this gene under different cellular conditions, including stress or pathogenic attack. Tissue distribution profiling revealed a ubiquitous presence in all the examined tissues, but with the highest expression in mantle and hemocyte. Immune challenge with lipopolysaccharide, poly I:C and Vibrio parahemolyticus induced beta-thymosin expression in gill and hemocytes, affirming an immune-related role in invertebrates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Are mice pigmentary genes throwing light on humans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose S

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available In this article the rapid advances made in the molecular genetics of inherited disorders of hypo and hyperpigmentation during the past three years are reviewed. The main focus is on studies in mice as compared to homologues in humans. The main hypomelanotic diseases included are, piebaldism (white spotting due to mutations of c-KIT, PDGF and MGF genes; vitiligo (microphathalmia mice mutations of c-Kit and c-fms genes; Waardenburg syndrome (splotch locus mutations of mice PAX-3 or human Hup-2 genes; albinism (mutations of tyrosinase genes, Menkes disease (Mottled mouse, premature graying (mutations in light/brown locus/gp75/ TRP-1; Griscelli disease (mutations in TRP-1 and steel; Prader-willi and Angelman syndromes, tyrosinase-positive oculocutaneous albinism and hypomelanosis of lto (mutations of pink-eyed dilution gene/mapping to human chromosomes 15 q 11.2 - q12; and human platelet storage pool deficiency diseases due to defects in pallidin, an erythrocyte membrane protein (pallid mouse / mapping to 4.2 pallidin gene. The genetic characterization of hypermelanosis includes, neurofibromatosis 1 (Café-au-lait spots and McCune-Albright Syndrome. Rapid evolving knowledge about pigmentary genes will increase further the knowledge about these hypo and hyperpigmentary disorders.

  9. Novel mutations in PRG4 gene in two Indian families with camptodactyly-arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajashree S Nandagopalan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Camptodactyly - arthropathy- coxa vara- pericarditis (CACP syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the PRG4 (proteoglycan 4 gene. Hallmarks of the syndrome include congenital or early-onset camptodactyly and arthropathy with synovial hyperplasia, progressive coxa vara deformity and non-inflammatory pericardial effusions. Till date only around 25 pathogenic mutations have been reported in this gene and none have been reported from India. We report here the mutations in the PRG4 gene in three patients of CACP from two unrelated families from India. Methods: Molecular genetic studies were done for the three patients with the CACP syndrome, from two unrelated Indian families, through sequence analysis of all coding exons and the exon-intron boundaries of the PRG4 gene. Results: Two novel frame-shift deletion mutations leading to premature protein termination were found. One patient was identified to be homozygous for a 2 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2645_2646delGA and the two affected siblings from the other family were found to be homozygous for a 4 base pair deletion in exon 6 (c.2883_2886delAAGA. Conclusions: This is perhaps the first report of PRG4 mutations from India. Further mutation studies in Indian CACP cases will help to determine the mutation spectrum of the PRG4 gene in the Indian population and also help to further elucidate the molecular pathology and the genotype-phenotype correlation of this rare disease.

  10. Kearns-Sayre syndrome with facial and white matter extensive involvement: a (mitochondrial and nuclear gene related? neurocristopathy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agostino Berio

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The Authors report on a patient with Kearns-Sayre syndrome, large mtDNA deletion (7/kb, facial abnormalities and severe central nervous system (CNS white matter radiological features, commonly attributed to spongy alterations. The common origin from neural crest cell (NCC of facial structures (cartilagineous, osseous, vascular and of the peripheral nervous system and of peripheral glia and partially of the CNS white matter are underlined and the facial and glial abnormalities are attributed to the abnormal reproduction/migration of NCC. In this view, the CNS spongy alterations in KSS may be not only a dystrophic process (leukodystrophy but also a dysplastic condition (leukodysplasia. The Authors hypothesize that the symptoms may be related to mtDNA mutations associated to NCC nuclear gene abnormality. SOX 10 gene may be a nuclear candidate gene, as reported in some case of Waardenburg IV syndrome.

  11. Roles of Mn-catalase and a possible heme peroxidase homologue in protection from oxidative stress in Thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebihara, Akio; Manzoku, Miho; Fukui, Kenji; Shimada, Atsuhiro; Morita, Rihito; Masui, Ryoji; Kuramitsu, Seiki

    2015-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produces hydroxyl radicals that directly attack a variety of biomolecules and cause severe cellular dysfunction. An extremely thermophilic bacterium, Thermus thermophilus HB8, possesses at least three enzymes that can scavenge H2O2: manganese-containing catalase (TTHA0122, MnCAT), a possible peroxiredoxin homologue (TTHA1300), and a possible heme peroxidase (HPX) homologue (TTHA1714). To investigate the roles of these proteins, we attempted to disrupt each of these genes in T. thermophilus HB8. Although we were able to completely disrupt ttha1300, we were unable to completely delete ttha0122 and ttha1714 because of polyploidy. Quantitative real-time PCR showed that, compared to the wild type, 31 % of ttha0122 and 11 % of ttha1714 remained in the ∆ttha0122 and ∆ttha1714 disruption mutants, respectively. Mutants with reduced levels of ttha0122 or ttha1714 exhibited a significant increase in spontaneous mutation frequency. ∆ttha1714 grew slower than the wild type under normal conditions. ∆ttha0122 grew very poorly after exposure to H2O2. Moreover, ∆ttha0122 did not show H2O2-scavenging activity, whereas ∆ttha1300 and ∆ttha1714 scavenged H2O2, a property similar to that exhibited by the wild type. MnCAT purified from T. thermophilus HB8 cells scavenged H2O2 in vitro. The recombinant form of the possible HPX homologue, reconstituted with hemin, showed peroxidase activity with H2O2 as an oxidant substrate. Based on these results, we propose that not only MnCAT but also the possible HPX homologue is involved in protecting the cell from oxidative stress in T. thermophilus.

  12. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Back, Susan J. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Andronikou, Savvas [University of the Witwatersrand, Radiology Department, Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg (South Africa); Kilborn, Tracy [University of Cape Town, Red Cross War Memorial Children' s Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa); Kaplan, Bernard S. [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Division of Nephrology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Darge, Kassa [The Children' s Hospital of Philadelphia, Department of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); University of Pennsylvania, Perelman School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  13. Imaging features of tuberous sclerosis complex with autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease: a contiguous gene syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Back, Susan J.; Andronikou, Savvas; Kilborn, Tracy; Kaplan, Bernard S.; Darge, Kassa

    2015-01-01

    Genes for tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) type 2 and autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) type 1 are both encoded over a short segment of chromosome 16. When deletions involve both genes, an entity known as the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome, variable phenotypes of TSC and ADPKD are exhibited. This syndrome has not been reviewed in the radiology literature. Unlike renal cysts in TSC, cystic disease in TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome results in hypertension and renal failure. A radiologist might demonstrate polycystic kidney disease before the patient develops other stigmata of TSC. Conversely, in patients with known TSC, enlarged and polycystic kidneys should signal the possibility of the TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome and not simply TSC. Distinguishing these diagnoses has implications in prognosis, treatment and genetic counseling. To describe the clinical and imaging findings of tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease in seven pediatric patients. We retrospectively reviewed renal and brain imaging of children and young adults with genetically proven or high clinical suspicion for TSC2/ADPKD1 contiguous gene syndrome. We included seven pediatric patients from two referral institutions. Ages ranged from birth to 21 years over the course of imaging. The mean follow-up period was 9 years 8 months (4 years 6 months to 20 years 6 months). No child progressed to end-stage renal disease during this period. Three patients were initially imaged for stigmata of TSC, three for abdominal distension and one for elevated serum creatinine concentration. All patients developed enlarged, polycystic kidneys. The latest available imaging studies demonstrated that in 12 of the 14 kidneys 50% or more of the parenchyma was ultimately replaced by >15 cysts, resulting in significant cortical thinning. The largest cysts in each kidney ranged from 2.4 cm to 9.3 cm. Echogenic lesions were present in 13 of the 14 kidneys, in keeping with

  14. Two novel NIPBL gene mutations in Chinese patients with Cornelia de Lange syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei, Libin; Liang, Desheng; Huang, Yanru; Pan, Qian; Wu, Lingqian

    2015-01-25

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a dominantly inherited developmental disorder characterized by distinctive facial features, mental retardation, and upper limb defects, with the involvement of multiple organs and systems. To date, mutations have been identified in five genes responsible for CdLS: NIPBL, SMC1A, SMC3, RAD21, and HDAC8. Here, we present a clinical and molecular characterization of five unrelated Chinese patients whose clinical presentation is consistent with that of CdLS. There were no chromosomal abnormalities in the five children. In three patients, DNA sequencing revealed a previously reported frameshift mutation c.2479delA (p.Arg827GlyfsX20), and two novel mutations including a heterozygous mutation c.6272 G>T (p.Cys2091Phe) and a frameshift mutation c.1672delA (p.Thr558LeufsX7) in NIPBL. For the remaining patients, large deletions and/or duplications within the NIPBL gene were excluded as playing a role in the pathogenesis, by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification (MLPA) analysis. These findings broaden the mutation spectrum of NIPBL and further our understanding of the diverse and variable effects of NIPBL mutations on CdLS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Nucleotide sequence analysis of NIPBL gene in Indian Cornelia de Lange syndrome cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajaj, Shailesh; Ranade, Suvidya; Gambhir, Prakash

    2013-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a multisystem developmental disorder in children. The disorder is caused mainly due to mutations in Nipped-B-like protein. The molecular data for CdLS is available from developed countries, but not available in developing countries like India. In the present study, the hotspot region of NIPBL gene was screened by Polymerase Chain Reaction which includes exon 2, 22, 42, and a biggest exon 10, in six CdLS patients and ten controls. The method adopted in present study was amplification of the target exon by using polymerase chain reaction, qualitative confirmation of amplicons by Agarose Gel Electrophoresis and use of amplicons for Conformation Sensitive Gel Electrophoresis to find heteroduplex formation followed by sequencing. We report two polymorphisms in the studied region of gene NIPBL. The polymorphisms are in the region of intron 1 and in exon 10. The polymorphism C/A is present in intron 1 region and polymorphism T/G in exon 10. The intronic region polymorphism may have a role in intron splicing whereas the polymorphism in exon 10 results in amino acid change (Val to Gly). These polymorphisms are disease associated as these are found in CdLS patients only and not in controls.

  16. Identification of fibrillin 1 gene mutations in patients with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) without Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) is the most frequent congenital heart disease with frequent involvement in thoracic aortic dilatation, aneurysm and dissection. Although BAV and Marfan syndrome (MFS) share some clinical features, and some MFS patients with BAV display mutations in FBN1, the gene encoding fibrillin-1, the genetic background of isolated BAV is poorly defined. Methods Ten consecutive BAV patients [8 men, age range 24–42 years] without MFS were clinically characterized. BAV phenotype and function, together with evaluation of aortic morphology, were comprehensively assessed by Doppler echocardiography. Direct sequencing of each FBN1 exon with flanking intron sequences was performed on eight patients. Results We detected three FBN1 mutations in two patients (aged 24 and 25 years) displaying aortic root aneurysm ≥50 mm and moderate aortic regurgitation. In particular, one patient had two mutations (p.Arg2726Trp and p.Arg636Gly) one of which has been previously associated with variable Marfanoid phenotypes. The other patient showed a pArg529Gln substitution reported to be associated with an incomplete MFS phenotype. Conclusions The present findings enlarge the clinical spectrum of isolated BAV to include patients with BAV without MFS who have involvement of FBN1 gene. These results underscore the importance of accurate phenotyping of BAV aortopathy and of clinical characterization of BAV patients, including investigation of systemic connective tissue manifestations and genetic testing. PMID:24564502

  17. A functional alternative splicing mutation in AIRE gene causes autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junyu Zhang

    Full Text Available Autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome type 1 (APS-1 is a rare autosomal recessive disease defined by the presence of two of the three conditions: mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism, and Addison's disease. Loss-of-function mutations of the autoimmune regulator (AIRE gene have been linked to APS-1. Here we report mutational analysis and functional characterization of an AIRE mutation in a consanguineous Chinese family with APS-1. All exons of the AIRE gene and adjacent exon-intron sequences were amplified by PCR and subsequently sequenced. We identified a homozygous missense AIRE mutation c.463G>A (p.Gly155Ser in two siblings with different clinical features of APS-1. In silico splice-site prediction and minigene analysis were carried out to study the potential pathological consequence. Minigene splicing analysis and subsequent cDNA sequencing revealed that the AIRE mutation potentially compromised the recognition of the splice donor of intron 3, causing alternative pre-mRNA splicing by intron 3 retention. Furthermore, the aberrant AIRE transcript was identified in a heterozygous carrier of the c.463G>A mutation. The aberrant intron 3-retaining transcript generated a truncated protein (p.G155fsX203 containing the first 154 AIRE amino acids and followed by 48 aberrant amino acids. Therefore, our study represents the first functional characterization of the alternatively spliced AIRE mutation that may explain the pathogenetic role in APS-1.

  18. Characterization of the Nucleolar Gene Product, Treacle, in Treacher Collins Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaac, Cynthia; Marsh, Karen L.; Paznekas, William A.; Dixon, Jill; Dixon, Michael J.; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Meier, U. Thomas

    2000-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development caused by mutations in the gene TCOF1. Its gene product, treacle, consists mainly of a central repeat domain, which shows it to be structurally related to the nucleolar phosphoprotein Nopp140. Treacle remains mostly uncharacterized to date. Herein we show that it, like Nopp140, is a highly phosphorylated nucleolar protein. However, treacle fails to colocalize with Nopp140 to Cajal (coiled) bodies. As in the case of Nopp140, casein kinase 2 appears to be responsible for the unusually high degree of phosphorylation as evidenced by its coimmunoprecipitation with treacle. Based on these and other observations, treacle and Nopp140 exhibit distinct but overlapping functions. The majority of TCOF1 mutations in TCS lead to premature termination codons that could affect the cellular levels of the full-length treacle. We demonstrate however, that the cellular amount of treacle varies less than twofold among a collection of primary fibroblasts and lymphoblasts and regardless of whether the cells were derived from TCS patients or healthy individuals. Therefore, cells of TCS patients possess a mechanism to maintain wild-type levels of full-length treacle from a single allele. PMID:10982400

  19. RFC - 1 Gene Polymorphism and the Risk of Down Syndrome in Romanian Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neagos, Daniela; Cretu, Ruxandra; Tutulan-Cunita, Andreea; Stoian, Veronica; Bohiltea, Laurentiu Camil

    2010-12-01

    There is evidence that the polymorphisms of the genes involved in folate metabolism may be associated with higher risk of Down syndrome (DS) pregnancy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of A80G polymorphism in reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC1) gene on the maternal risk for DS. In our study, twenty-two DS mothers and forty-two mothers who had no children with DS were evaluated. Genomic DNA was isolated from whole peripheral blood collected on EDTA, using peqGOLD blood DNA mini kit (ATP Biotech) following the manufacturer's instructions. The results show that the frequencies of RFC1 alleles, as well as the frequencies of RFC1 A80G genotypes (GG, GA, AA, GA+AA) do not correlate with DS pregnancies, demonstrating no difference between the case and control groups. In the present study, we did not find any statistically significant association between RFC-1 polymorphic genotype and history of DS pregnancies; thus, the relationship between RFC-1 polymorphism and DS appears to be only a supposition and the next step in our study is the catamnestic evaluation of our patients with DS babies for two years.

  20. Cataract as a phenotypic marker for a mutation in WFS1, the Wolfram syndrome gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titah, Salah Mohamed Cherif; Meunier, Isabelle; Blanchet, Catherine; Lopez, Severine; Rondouin, Gerard; Lenaers, Guy; Amati-Bonneau, Patrizia; Reynier, Pascal; Paquis-Flucklinger, Veronique; Hamel, Christian P

    2012-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome (WS) or diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (DIDMOAD) (OMIM 222300) is an inherited neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy as the 2 major criteria, followed later in life by deafness, diabetes insipidus, and various signs of neurologic impairment. The presence of a cataract has been variably mentioned in WS. Two members of a family had thorough ophthalmic examination and their DNA was screened for mutations in mitochondrial DNA, WFS1, OPA1, and OPA3 genes. We report a patient who first had surgery for bilateral cataract at age 5 and who subsequently presented typical signs of WS, i.e., diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy with reduced visual acuity at 20/400 on both eyes at age 22, and mild deafness. The patient was found to be a compound heterozygote for 2 truncating mutations in WFS1, the major WS gene. She carried the previously reported c.1231_1233 delCT and a novel c.2431_2465dup35 mutation. She also was heterozygote for a novel OPA1 sequence variant, c.929A>G in exon 9, whose pathogenicity remains uncertain. The patient's mother was a heterozygous carrier of the c.2431_2465dup35 mutation. She did not have diabetes mellitus or optic atrophy but had bilateral polar cataract. She did not carry the OPA1 sequence variant. Cataract could be a marker for the WFS1 heterozygosity in this family, namely the c.2431_2465dup35 mutation.

  1. Novel mutation in forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) gene in an Indian patient with Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Dhanjit Kumar; Jadhav, Vaishali; Ghattargi, Vikas C; Udani, Vrajesh

    2014-03-15

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by the progressive loss of intellectual functioning, fine and gross motor skills and communicative abilities, deceleration of head growth, and the development of stereotypic hand movements, occurring after a period of normal development. The classic form of RTT involves mutation in MECP2 while the involvement of CDKL5 and FOXG1 genes has been identified in atypical RTT phenotype. FOXG1 gene encodes for a fork-head box protein G1, a transcription factor acting primarily as transcriptional repressor through DNA binding in the embryonic telencephalon as well as a number of other neurodevelopmental processes. In this report we have described the molecular analysis of FOXG1 gene in Indian patients with Rett syndrome. FOXG1 gene mutation analysis was done in a cohort of 34 MECP2/CDKL5 mutation negative RTT patients. We have identified a novel mutation (p. D263VfsX190) in FOXG1 gene in a patient with congenital variant of Rett syndrome. This mutation resulted into a frameshift, thereby causing an alteration in the reading frames of the entire coding sequence downstream of the mutation. The start position of the frameshift (Asp263) and amino acid towards the carboxyl terminal end of the protein was found to be well conserved across species using multiple sequence alignment. Since the mutation is located at forkhead binding domain, the resultant mutation disrupts the secondary structure of the protein making it non-functional. This is the first report from India showing mutation in FOXG1 gene in Rett syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The rationale and design of Insight into Nephrotic Syndrome: Investigating Genes, Health and Therapeutics (INSIGHT): a prospective cohort study of childhood nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Neesha; Zello, J Anastasia; Vasilevska-Ristovska, Jovanka; Banh, Tonny M; Patel, Viral P; Patel, Pranali; Battiston, Christopher D; Hebert, Diane; Licht, Christoph P B; Piscione, Tino D; Parekh, Rulan S

    2013-01-26

    Nephrotic syndrome is one of the most commonly diagnosed kidney diseases in childhood and its progressive forms can lead to chronic kidney disease (CKD) and/or end-stage renal disease (ESRD). There have been few longitudinal studies among a multi-ethnic cohort to determine potential risk factors influencing disease susceptibility, treatment response, and progression of nephrotic syndrome. Temporal relationships cannot be studied through cross-sectional study design. Understanding the interaction between various factors is critical to developing new strategies for treating children with kidney disease. We present the rationale and the study design of a longitudinal cohort study of children with nephrotic syndrome, the Insight into Nephrotic Syndrome: Investigating Genes, Health and Therapeutics (INSIGHT) study. The specific aims are to determine: 1) socio-demographic, environmental, and genetic factors that influence disease susceptibility; 2) rates of steroid treatment resistance and steroid treatment dependence, and identify factors that may modify treatment response; 3) clinical and genetic factors that influence disease susceptibility and progression to CKD and ESRD; and 4) the interaction between the course of illness and socio-demographic, environmental, and clinical risk factors. INSIGHT is a disease-based observational longitudinal cohort study of children with nephrotic syndrome. At baseline, participants complete questionnaires and provide biological specimen samples (blood, urine, and toenail clippings). Follow-up questionnaires and repeat biological specimen collections are performed annually for up to five years. The proposed cohort will provide the structure to test various risk factors predicting or influencing disease susceptibility, treatment response, and progression to CKD among children with nephrotic syndrome. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01605266.

  3. Novel PSTPIP1 gene mutation in a patient with pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum and acne (PAPA) syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindwall, Elvira; Singla, Shikha; Davis, William E; Quinet, Robert J

    2015-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that usually presents in childhood with recurrent sterile arthritis. As the child ages into puberty, cutaneous features develop and arthritis subsides. We report the case of a now 25-year-old male patient with PAPA syndrome with the E250K mutation in PSTPIP1. We also present a systematic literature review of other PAPA cases. We conducted a literature search of PubMed using the following search terms: E250K mutation, PSTPIP1, and PAPA. PAPA syndrome is caused by mutations on chromosome 15q affecting the proline-serine-threonine phosphatase-interacting protein 1 (PSTPIP1) gene, also known as CD2-binding protein 1 (CD2BP1). The reported cases of PAPA syndrome currently in the literature involve mutations in A230T and E250Q. One case of a novel E250K mutation has been reported, which presented with a different phenotype to previously described cases of PAPA syndrome. With variation present between disease presentations from case to case, it is possible that the spectrum of PAPA syndrome is wider than currently thought. Further research is needed which may uncover an as-yet undiscovered genetic abnormality linking these interrelated diseases together. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Innate immune evasion mediated by the Ambystoma tigrinum virus eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2alpha homologue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jancovich, James K; Jacobs, Bertram L

    2011-05-01

    Ranaviruses (family Iridoviridae, genus Ranavirus) are large, double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) viruses whose replication is restricted to ectothermic vertebrates. Many highly pathogenic members of the genus Ranavirus encode a homologue of the eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2α (eIF2α). Data in a heterologous vaccinia virus system suggest that the Ambystoma tigrinum virus (ATV) eIF2α homologue (vIF2αH; open reading frame [ORF] 57R) is involved in evading the host innate immune response by degrading the interferon-inducible, dsRNA-activated protein kinase, PKR. To test this hypothesis directly, the ATV vIF2αH gene (ORF 57R) was deleted by homologous recombination, and a selectable marker was inserted in its place. The ATVΔ57R virus has a small plaque phenotype and is 8-fold more sensitive to interferon than wild-type ATV (wtATV). Infection of fish cells with the ATVΔ57R virus leads to eIF2α phosphorylation, in contrast to infection with wtATV, which actively inhibits eIF2α phosphorylation. The inability of ATVΔ57R to prevent phosphorylation of eIF2α correlates with degradation of fish PKZ, an interferon-inducible enzyme that is closely related to mammalian PKR. In addition, salamanders infected with ATVΔ57R displayed an increased time to death compared to that of wtATV-infected salamanders. Therefore, in a biologically relevant system, the ATV vIF2αH gene acts as an innate immune evasion factor, thereby enhancing virus pathogenesis.

  5. Novel PITX2 gene mutations in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifi, Morteza; Footz, Tim; Taylor, Sherry A M; Elhady, Ghada M; Abdalla, Ebtesam M; Walter, Michael A

    2016-11-01

    Mutations in the bicoid-like transcription factor PITX2 gene often result in Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome (ARS), an autosomal-dominant inherited disorder. We report here the discovery and characterization of novel PITX2 deletions in a small kindred with ARS. Two familial patients (father and son) from a consanguineous family were examined in the present study. Patient DNA samples were screened for PITX2 mutations by DNA sequencing and for copy number variation by SYBR Green quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. We report a novel deletion involving the coding region of PITX2 in both patients. The minimum size of the deletion is 1 421 914 bp that spans one upstream regulatory element (CE4), PITX2 and a minimum of 13 neighbouring genes. The maximum size of the deletion is 3 789 983 bp. The proband (son) additionally possesses a novel 2-bp deletion in a non-coding exon of the remaining PITX2 allele predicted to alter correct splicing. Our findings implicate a novel deletion of the PITX2 gene in the pathogenesis of ARS in the affected family. This ARS family presented with an atypical and extremely severe phenotype that resulted in four miscarriages and the death at 10 months of age of a sib of the proband. As the phenotypic manifestations in the proband are more severe than that of the father, we hypothesize that the deletion of the entire PITX2 allele plus a novel 2-bp deletion (observed in the proband) within the remaining PITX2 allele together contributed to the atypical ARS presentation in this family. This is the first study reporting on bi-allelic changes of PITX2 potentially contributing to a more severe ARS phenotype. © 2016 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Association of apolipoprotein A5 gene variants with metabolic syndrome in Tunisian population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefi, Rym; Hechmi, Meriem; Dallali, Hamza; Elouej, Sahar; Jmel, Haifa; Halima, Yossra Ben; Nagara, Majdi; Chargui, Mariem; Fadhel, Sihem Ben; Romdhane, Safa; Kamoun, Ines; Turki, Zinet; Abid, Abdelmajid; Bahri, Sonia; Bahlous, Afaf; Gomis, Ramon; Baraket, Abdelhamid; Grigorescu, Florin; Normand, Christophe; Jamoussi, Henda; Abdelhak, Sonia

    2017-07-01

    APOA5 has been linked to metabolic syndrome (MetS) or its traits in several populations. In North Africa, only the Moroccan population was investigated. Our aim is to assess the association between APOA5 gene polymorphisms with the susceptibility to MetS and its components in the Tunisian population. A total of 594 participants from the Tunisian population were genotyped for two polymorphisms rs3135506 and rs651821 located in APOA5 gene using KASPar technology. Statistical analyses were performed using R software. The SNP rs651821 increased the risk of MetS under the dominant model (OR=1.91 [1.17-3.12], P=0.008) whereas the variant rs3135506 was not associated with MetS. After stratification of the cohort following the sex, only the variant rs651821 showed a significant association with MetS among the women group. The influence of the geographic origin of the studied population on the genotype distribution of APOA5 variants showed that the variant rs651821 was significantly associated with MetS only for the Northern population. The association analyses of the variants rs651821 and rs3135506 with different quantitative traits of MetS showed a significant association only between the variant rs3135506 and triglycerides levels. This is the first study reporting the association of APOA5 gene variants with MetS in Tunisia. Our study emphasizes the role of APOA5 variants in the regulation of the triglycerides blood levels. Further studies are needed to confirm the clinical relevance of these associations and to better understand the physiopathology of the MetS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  7. Activation of Stimulator of Interferon Genes (STING) and Sjögren Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papinska, J; Bagavant, H; Gmyrek, G B; Sroka, M; Tummala, S; Fitzgerald, K A; Deshmukh, U S

    2018-03-01

    Sjögren syndrome (SS), a chronic autoimmune disorder causing dry mouth, adversely affects the overall oral health in patients. Activation of innate immune responses and excessive production of type I interferons (IFNs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of this disorder. Recognition of nucleic acids by cytosolic nucleic acid sensors is a major trigger for the induction of type I IFNs. Upon activation, cytosolic DNA sensors can interact with the stimulator of interferon genes (STING) protein, and activation of STING causes increased expression of type I IFNs. The role of STING activation in SS is not known. In this study, to investigate whether the cytosolic DNA sensing pathway influences SS development, female C57BL/6 mice were injected with a STING agonist, dimethylxanthenone-4-acetic acid (DMXAA). Salivary glands (SGs) were studied for gene expression and inflammatory cell infiltration. SG function was evaluated by measuring pilocarpine-induced salivation. Sera were analyzed for cytokines and autoantibodies. Primary SG cells were used to study the expression and activation of STING. Our data show that systemic DMXAA treatment rapidly induced the expression of Ifnb1, Il6, and Tnfa in the SGs, and these cytokines were also elevated in circulation. In contrast, increased Ifng gene expression was dominantly detected in the SGs. The type I innate lymphoid cells present within the SGs were the major source of IFN-γ, and their numbers increased significantly within 3 d of treatment. STING expression in SGs was mainly observed in ductal and interstitial cells. In primary SG cells, DMXAA activated STING and induced IFN-β production. The DMXAA-treated mice developed autoantibodies, sialoadenitis, and glandular hypofunction. Our study demonstrates that activation of the STING pathway holds the potential to initiate SS. Thus, apart from viral infections, conditions that cause cellular perturbations and accumulation of host DNA within the cytosol should also be

  8. Cnbp ameliorates Treacher Collins Syndrome craniofacial anomalies through a pathway that involves redox-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Peralta, Mauro S Porcel; Mouguelar, Valeria S; Sdrigotti, María Antonella; Ishiy, Felipe A A; Fanganiello, Roberto D; Passos-Bueno, Maria R; Coux, Gabriela; Calcaterra, Nora B

    2016-10-06

    Treacher Collins Syndrome (TCS) is a rare congenital disease (1:50 000 live births) characterized by craniofacial defects, including hypoplasia of facial bones, cleft palate and palpebral fissures. Over 90% of the cases are due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which codifies the nucleolar protein Treacle. Here we report a novel TCS-like zebrafish model displaying features that fully recapitulate the spectrum of craniofacial abnormalities observed in patients. As it was reported for a Tcof1 +/- mouse model, Treacle depletion in zebrafish caused reduced rRNA transcription, stabilization of Tp53 and increased cell death in the cephalic region. An increase of ROS along with the overexpression of redox-responsive genes was detected; furthermore, treatment with antioxidants ameliorated the phenotypic defects of craniofacial anomalies in TCS-like larvae. On the other hand, Treacle depletion led to a lowering in the abundance of Cnbp, a protein required for proper craniofacial development. Tcof1 knockdown in transgenic zebrafish overexpressing cnbp resulted in barely affected craniofacial cartilage development, reinforcing the notion that Cnbp has a role in the pathogenesis of TCS. The cnbp overexpression rescued the TCS phenotype in a dose-dependent manner by a ROS-cytoprotective action that prevented the redox-responsive genes' upregulation but did not normalize the synthesis of rRNAs. Finally, a positive correlation between the expression of CNBP and TCOF1 in mesenchymal cells from both control and TCS subjects was found. Based on this, we suggest CNBP as an additional target for new alternative therapeutic treatments to reduce craniofacial defects not only in TCS but also in other neurocristopathies.

  9. [Molecular pathogenesis of Waardenburg syndrome type II resulting from SOX10 gene mutation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hua; Chen, Hongsheng; Feng, Yong; Qian, Minfei; Li, Jiping; Liu, Jun; Zhang, Chun

    2016-08-01

    To explore the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome type II (WS2) resulting from SOX10 gene mutation E248fs through in vitro experiment. 293T cells were transiently transfected with wild type (WT) SOX10 and mutant type (MT) E248fs plasmids. The regulatory effect of WT/MT SOX10 on the transcriptional activity of MITF gene and influence of E248fs on WT SOX10 function were determined with a luciferase activity assay. The DNA binding capacity of the WT/MT SOX10 with the promoter of the MITF gene was determined with a biotinylated double-stranded oligonucleotide probe containing the SOX10 binding sequence cattgtc to precipitate MITF and E248fs, respectively. The stability of SOX10 and E248fs were also analyzed. As a loss-of-function mutation, the E248fs mutant failed to transactivate the MITF promoter as compared with the WT SOX10 (P<0.01), which also showed a dominant-negative effect on WT SOX10. The WT SOX10 and E248fs mutant were also able to bind specifically to the cattgtc motif in the MITF promoter, whereas E248fs had degraded faster than WT SOX10. Despite the fact that the E248fs has a dominant-negative effect on SOX10, its reduced stability may down-regulate the transcription of MITF and decrease the synthesis of melanin, which may result in haploinsufficiency of SOX10 protein and cause the milder WS2 phenotype.

  10. Factor H Competitor Generated by Gene Conversion Events Associates with Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goicoechea de Jorge, Elena; Tortajada, Agustín; García, Sheila Pinto; Gastoldi, Sara; Merinero, Héctor Martín; García-Fernández, Jesús; Arjona, Emilia; Cao, Mercedes; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Noris, Marina; Rodríguez de Córdoba, Santiago

    2018-01-01

    Atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome (aHUS), a rare form of thrombotic microangiopathy caused by complement pathogenic variants, mainly affects the kidney microvasculature. A retrospective genetic analysis in our aHUS cohort ( n =513) using multiple ligation probe amplification uncovered nine unrelated patients carrying a genetic abnormality in the complement factor H related 1 gene ( CFHR1 ) that originates by recurrent gene conversion events between the CFH and CFHR1 genes. The novel CFHR1 mutants encode an FHR-1 protein with two amino acid substitutions, L290S and A296V, converting the FHR-1 C terminus into that of factor H (FH). Next-generation massive-parallel DNA sequencing (NGS) analysis did not detect these genetic abnormalities. In addition to the CFHR1 mutant, six patients carried the previously uncharacterized CFH-411T variant. In functional analyses, the mutant FHR-1 protein strongly competed the binding of FH to cell surfaces, impairing complement regulation, whereas the CFH-411T polymorphism lacked functional consequences. Carriers of the CFHR1 mutation presented with severe aHUS during adulthood; 57% of affected women in this cohort presented during the postpartum period. Analyses in patients and unaffected carriers showed that FH plasma levels determined by the nonmutated chromosome modulate disease penetrance. Crucially, in the activated endothelial (HMEC-1) cell assay, reduced FH plasma levels produced by the nonmutated chromosome correlated inversely with impairment of complement regulation, measured as C5b-9 deposition. Our data advance understanding of the genetic complexities underlying aHUS, illustrate the importance of performing functional analysis, and support the use of complementary assays to disclose genetic abnormalities not revealed by current NGS analysis. Copyright © 2018 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. The prognostic impact of mutations in spliceosomal genes for myelodysplastic syndrome patients without ring sideroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Min-Gu; Kim, Hye-Ran; Seo, Bo-Young; Lee, Jun Hyung; Choi, Seok-Yong; Kim, Soo-Hyun; Shin, Jong-Hee; Suh, Soon-Pal; Ahn, Jae-Sook; Shin, Myung-Geun

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in genes that are part of the splicing machinery for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), including MDS without ring sideroblasts (RS), have been widely investigated. The effects of these mutations on clinical outcomes have been diverse and contrasting. We examined a cohort of 129 de novo MDS patients, who did not harbor RS, for mutations affecting three spliceosomal genes (SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2). The mutation rates of SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 were 7.0 %, 7.8 %, and 10.1 %, respectively. Compared with previously reported results, these rates were relatively infrequent. The SRSF2 mutation strongly correlated with old age (P < 0.001), while the mutation status of SF3B1 did not affect overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) transformation. In contrast, MDS patients with mutations in U2AF1 or SRSF2 exhibited inferior PFS. The U2AF1 mutation was associated with inferior OS in low-risk MDS patients (P = 0.035). The SRSF2 mutation was somewhat associated with AML transformation (P = 0.083). Our findings suggest that the frequencies of the SF3B1, U2AF1, and SRSF2 splicing gene mutations in MDS without RS were relatively low. We also demonstrated that the U2AF1 and SRSF2 mutations were associated with an unfavorable prognostic impact in MDS patients without RS. The online version of this article (doi:10.1186/s12885-015-1493-5) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users

  12. Cell and gene therapy for genetic diseases: inherited disorders affecting the lung and those mimicking sudden infant death syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeler, Allison M; Flotte, Terence R

    2012-06-01

    Some of the first human gene therapy trials targeted diseases of the lung and provided important information that will continue to help shape future trials. Here we describe both cell and gene therapies for lung diseases such as cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin disorder as well as fatty acid oxidation disorders that mimic sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Human clinical gene therapy trials for cystic fibrosis and alpha-1 antitrypsin have been performed using a variety of vectors including adenovirus, adeno-associated virus, and nonviral vectors. No human clinical gene therapy trials have been performed for disorders of fatty acid oxidation; however, important proof-of-principle studies have been completed for multiple fatty acid oxidation disorders. Important achievements have been made and have yet to come for cell and gene therapies for disorders of the lung and those mimicking SIDS.

  13. Morquio A syndrome: Cloning, sequence, and structure of the human N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase (GALNS) gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, C.P.; Guo, Xiao-Hui; Apostolou, S. [Adelaide Children`s Hospital, North Adelaide (Australia)] [and others

    1994-08-01

    Deficiency of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetylgalactosamine 6-sulfatase (GALNS;EC 3.1.6.4), results in the storage of the glycosaminoglycans, keratan sulfate and chrondroitin 6-sulfate, which leads to the lysosomal storage disorder Morquio A syndrome. Four overlapping genomic clones derived from a chromosome 16-specific gridded cosmid library containing the entire GALNS gene were isolated. The structure of the gene and the sequence of the exon/intron boundaries and the 5{prime} promoter region were determined. The GALNS gene is split into 14 exons spanning approximately 40 kb. The potential promoter for GALNS lacks a TATA box but contains GC box consensus sequences, consistent with its role as a housekeeping gene. The GALNS gene contains an Alu repeat in intron 5 and a VNTR-like sequence in intron 6. 12 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Gene expression profiling reveals the defining features of monocytes from septic patients with compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ping-bo; Lou, Jing-Sheng; Ren, Yu; Miao, Chang-Hong; Deng, Xiao-ming

    2012-11-01

    To characterize the expression profiles of genes in purified monocytes from septic patients during systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS), and then to investigate the potential mechanism of monocyte deactivation. Lipopolysaccharides (LPS)-induced cytokine responses, phagocytosis assay and migration assay were performed in monocytes from SIRS patients, CARS patients and healthy volunteers (n = 8). After functional assays, each pair of samples from the same group was pooled into one for gene expression analysis. All new samples (n = 4) were hybridized on NimbleGen human gene expression 12 × 135 K microarrays, and selected genes were validated by real-time polymerase chain reaction. Pathway analysis and Gene Ontology analysis were performed on differentially expressed genes using Agilent GeneSpring (version 11.0). A set of genes related to pro-inflammation, phagocytosis, chemotaxis, antigen presentation, and anti-apoptosis were significantly down-regulated, while some genes associated with pro-apoptosis and anti-inflammation were up-regulated instead on monocytes from CARS patients compared with SIRS patients and healthy volunteers. Monocytes from CARS patients showed impaired production of TNF-α and IL-6, and increased release of IL-10 when stimulated by LPS. Functional analysis confirmed reduced phagocytosis and migratory activity of monocytes from CARS patients. Human leukocyte antigen-DR (HLA-DR) measurements demonstrated decreased expression of HLA-DR on monocytes from CARS patients. Monocytes from CARS patients exhibited significant changes in mRNA expression of genes associated with phagocytosis, antigen presentation, inflammatory response, cell migration, and apoptosis, which might cause deactivation of monocytes during CARS. Copyright © 2012 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Familial cryptic translocation resulting in Angelman syndrome: Implications for imprinting or location of the Angelman gene?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burke, L.W.; Wiley, J.E.; Smith, A.J.W.; Kushnick, T. [East Carolina Univ. School of Medicine, Greenville, NC (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is associated with a loss of maternal genetic information, which typically occurs as a result of a deletion at 15q11-q13 or paternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15. We report a patient with AS as a result of an unbalanced cryptic translocation whose breakpoint, at 15q11.2, falls within this region. The proband was diagnosed clinically as having Angelman syndrome, but without a detectable cytogenetic deletion, by using high-resolution G-banding. FISH detected a deletion of D15S11 (IR4-3R), with an intact GABRB3 locus. Subsequent studies of the proband`s mother and sister detected a cryptic reciprocal translocation between chromosomes 14 and 15 with the breakpoint being between SNRPN and D15S10. The proband was found to have inherited an unbalanced form, being monosomic from 15pter through SNRPN and trisomic for 14pter to 14q11.2. DNA methylation studies showed that the proband had a paternal-only DNA methylation pattern at SNRPN, D15S63 (PW71), and ZNF127. The mother and unaffected sister, both having the balanced translocation, demonstrated normal DNA methylation patterns at all three loci. These data suggest that the gene for AS most likely lies proximal to D15S10, in contrast to the previously published position, although a less likely possibility is that the maternally inherited imprinting center acts in trans in the unaffected balanced translocation carrier sister. 27 refs., 6 figs.

  16. Structure and Evolution of the Smith-Magenis Syndrome Repeat Gene Clusters, SMS-REPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Sup; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Bi, Weimin; Shaw, Christine; Lehoczky, Jessica; Dewar, Ken; Birren, Bruce; Lupski, James R.

    2002-01-01

    An ∼4-Mb genomic segment on chromosome 17p11.2, commonly deleted in patients with the Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and duplicated in patients with dup(17)(p11.2p11.2) syndrome, is flanked by large, complex low-copy repeats (LCRs), termed proximal and distal SMS-REP. A third copy, the middle SMS-REP, is located between them. SMS-REPs are believed to mediate nonallelic homologous recombination, resulting in both SMS deletions and reciprocal duplications. To delineate the genomic structure and evolutionary origin of SMS-REPs, we constructed a bacterial artificial chromosome/P1 artifical chromosome contig spanning the entire SMS region, including the SMS-REPs, determined its genomic sequence, and used fluorescence in situ hybridization to study the evolution of SMS-REP in several primate species. Our analysis shows that both the proximal SMS-REP (∼256 kb) and the distal copy (∼176 kb) are located in the same orientation and derived from a progenitor copy, whereas the middle SMS-REP (∼241 kb) is inverted and appears to have been derived from the proximal copy. The SMS-REP LCRs are highly homologous (>98%) and contain at least 14 genes/pseudogenes each. SMS-REPs are not present in mice and were duplicated after the divergence of New World monkeys from pre-monkeys ∼40–65 million years ago. Our findings potentially explain why the vast majority of SMS deletions and dup(17)(p11.2p11.2) occur at proximal and distal SMS-REPs and further support previous observations that higher-order genomic architecture involving LCRs arose recently during primate speciation and may predispose the human genome to both meiotic and mitotic rearrangements. PMID:11997339

  17. A novel missense mutation in the EVC gene underlies Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in a Pakistani family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umm-E-Kalsoom; Wasif, Naveed; Tariq, Muhammad; Ahmad, Wasim

    2010-04-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EVC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by skeletal, ectodermal and cardiac defects. This syndrome is caused by mutations in EVC and EVC2 genes, which are separated by 2.6 kb of genomic sequence on chromosome 4p16. In the present study we ascertained a four-generation pedigree of Pakistani origin with features of EVC. Linkage was searched by genotyping microsatellite markers linked to chromosome 4p16. Affected individuals showed homozygosity to the microsatellite markers tightly linked to EVC and EVC2 genes on chromosome 4p16. It was then subjected to direct sequencing of the EVC and EVC2 genes. Mutation analysis of the EVC and EVC2 genes identified a novel missense change (c.617G>A; p.S206N) in the EVC gene. We herein report on the first family from Pakistan with a large number of individuals affected by EVC. DNA sequence analysis led to the identification of the fifth missense mutation in the EVC gene.

  18. Brittle Cornea Syndrome: Case Report with Novel Mutation in the PRDM5 Gene and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Avgitidou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 3-year-old boy presented with acute corneal hydrops on the left eye and spontaneous corneal rupture on the right eye. A diagnosis of brittle cornea syndrome was confirmed by molecular analysis. A novel mutation, the homozygous variant c.17T>G, p.V6G, was found in the gene for PR-domain-containing protein 5 (PRDM5 in exon 1. Brittle cornea syndrome is a rare connective tissue disease with typical ocular, auditory, musculoskeletal, and cutaneous disorders. Almost all patients suffer from declined vision due to corneal scarring, thinning, and rupture. The most common ophthalmologic findings include keratoconus, progressive central corneal thinning, high myopia, irregular astigmatism, retinal detachment, and high risk for spontaneous corneal or scleral rupture. In addition to describing the case with a novel mutation here we review the current literature on brittle cornea syndrome pathogenesis, clinical findings, and therapy.

  19. ABCD syndrome is caused by a homozygous mutation in the EDNRB gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verheij, JBGM; Kunze, J; Osinga, J; van Essen, AJ; Hofstra, RMW

    2002-01-01

    ABCD syndrome is an autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by albinism, black lock, cell migration disorder of the neurocytes of the gut (Hirschsprung disease [HSCR]), and deafness. This phenotype clearly overlaps with the features of the Shah-Waardenburg syndrome, comprising sensorineural

  20. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and matched control subjects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whistler, Toni; Jones, James F; Unger, Elizabeth R; Vernon, Suzanne D

    2005-01-01

    Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Results Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS. PMID:15790422

  1. Exercise responsive genes measured in peripheral blood of women with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and matched control subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unger Elizabeth R

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS is defined by debilitating fatigue that is exacerbated by physical or mental exertion. To search for markers of CFS-associated post-exertional fatigue, we measured peripheral blood gene expression profiles of women with CFS and matched controls before and after exercise challenge. Results Women with CFS and healthy, age-matched, sedentary controls were exercised on a stationary bicycle at 70% of their predicted maximum workload. Blood was obtained before and after the challenge, total RNA was extracted from mononuclear cells, and signal intensity of the labeled cDNA hybridized to a 3800-gene oligonucleotide microarray was measured. We identified differences in gene expression among and between subject groups before and after exercise challenge and evaluated differences in terms of Gene Ontology categories. Exercise-responsive genes differed between CFS patients and controls. These were in genes classified in chromatin and nucleosome assembly, cytoplasmic vesicles, membrane transport, and G protein-coupled receptor ontologies. Differences in ion transport and ion channel activity were evident at baseline and were exaggerated after exercise, as evidenced by greater numbers of differentially expressed genes in these molecular functions. Conclusion These results highlight the potential use of an exercise challenge combined with microarray gene expression analysis in identifying gene ontologies associated with CFS.

  2. Whole-exome sequencing identifies a variant of the mitochondrial MT-ND1 gene associated with epileptic encephalopathy: west syndrome evolving to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delmiro, Aitor; Rivera, Henry; García-Silva, María Teresa; García-Consuegra, Inés; Martín-Hernández, Elena; Quijada-Fraile, Pilar; de Las Heras, Rogelio Simón; Moreno-Izquierdo, Ana; Martín, Miguel Ángel; Arenas, Joaquín; Martínez-Azorín, Francisco

    2013-12-01

    We describe a West syndrome (WS) patient with unidentified etiology that evolved to Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. The mitochondrial respiratory chain of the patient showed a simple complex I deficiency in fibroblasts. Whole-exome sequencing (WES) uncovered two heterozygous mutations in NDUFV2 gene that were reassigned to a pseudogene. With the WES data, it was possible to obtain whole mitochondrial DNA sequencing and to identify a heteroplasmic variant in the MT-ND1 (MTND1) gene (m.3946G>A, p.E214K). The expression of the gene in patient fibroblasts was not affected but the protein level was significantly reduced, suggesting that protein stability was affected by this mutation. The lower protein level also affected assembly of complex I and supercomplexes (I/III2 /IV and I/III2 ), leading to complex I deficiency. While ATP levels at steady state under stress conditions were not affected, the amount of ROS produced by complex I was significantly increased. © 2013 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  3. [Study on gene differential expressions of substance and energy metabolism in chronic superficial gastritis patients of Pi deficiency syndrome and of pi-wei hygropyrexia syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ze-Min; Chen, Wei-Wen; Wang, Ying-Fang

    2012-09-01

    To analyze the metabolic levels of energy and substance in chronic superficial gastritis (CSG) patients of Pi deficiency syndrome (PDS) and of Pi-Wei hygropyrexia syndrome (PWHS), including lipid, protein, nucleic acid, carbohydrate, trace element, and energy metabolism, and to study the pathogenesis mechanism of PDS from substance and energy metabolisms. Recruited were 8 CSG patients who visited at First Affiliated Hospital of Guangzhou University of Traditional Chinese Medicine and Guangdong Provincial Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine from June 2004 to March 2005, including 4 patients of PDS and 4 of PWHS. Their gastric mucosae were used for experiments of DNA microarray. The dual-channel DNA microarray data were bioinformatically analyzed by BRB ArrayTools and IPA Software. Obtained were fifty-six differentially expressed genes involved in substance and energy metabolisms with the expression fold more than 2, including 11 genes up-regulated and 45 genes down-regulated. Of them, genes correlated to lipid metabolism included CRLS1, LRP11, FUT9, GPCPD1, PIGL, SULT1A4, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, and ACADVL, mainly involved in the metabolic processes of fatty acid, cholesterol, phospholipids, and glycolipid. Genes correlated to protein metabolism included ASRGL1, AARSD1, EBNA1BP2, PUM2, MRPL52, C120RF65, PSMB8, PSME2, UBA7, RNF11, FBXO44, ZFYVE26, CHMP2A, SSR4, SNX4, RAB3B, RABL2A, GOLGA2, KDELR1, PHPT1, ACPP, PTPRF, CRKL, HDAC7, ADPRHL2, B3GNT1, ST8SIA4, DDOST, and FUT9, mainly involved in the biosynthesis processes of protein, ubiquitination, targeted transport and post-translation modification. Genes correlated to nucleic acid metabolism included DFFB, FLJ35220, TOP2A, SF3A3, CREB3, CRTC2, NR1D2, MED6, GTF2IRD1, C1ORF83, ZNF773, and ZMYND11, mainly involved in DNA replication and repair, transcription regulation. Genes correlated to carbohydrate metabolism included AGL, B3GNT1, FUT9, ST8SIA4, SULT1A4, DDOST, and PIGL, mainly involved in glucogen degradation and

  4. A Case of Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) Syndrome Harboring a Novel Folliculin (FLCN) Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Takuro; Fukazawa, Takuya; Yoshida, Masakazu; Morita, Ichiro; Kato, Katsuya; Monobe, Yasumasa; Furuya, Mitsuko; Naomoto, Yoshio

    2016-10-26

    BACKGROUND Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder clinically characterized by pulmonary cysts, spontaneous pneumothorax, renal cell cancer, and skin fibrofolliculomas. The disorder is caused by germline mutations in the FLCN gene. CASE REPORT A 56-year-old female was admitted to our hospital with a diagnosis of bilateral spontaneous pneumothorax. A computed tomography (CT) scan of the chest revealed bilateral multiple bullae predominantly located in the subpleural and mediastinal areas in the bilateral upper and lower lobes. Although she was cured by thoracic cavity drainage, she underwent resection of bilateral lung bullae because she had a prior history of right pneumothorax at 37- and 45-years of age. She had no signs of renal tumor but had fibrofolliculoma in her face and a family history of pneumothorax, we therefore suspected BHD syndrome. DNA sequence analyses determined that there was a two base pair deletion in exon 4 of the FLCN gene, confirming the diagnosis of BHD syndrome. CONCLUSIONS Here we report a case of BHD syndrome with a previously unreported FLCN mutation.

  5. Polymorphisms in the LPL and CETP Genes and Haplotype in the ESR1 Gene Are Associated with Metabolic Syndrome in Women from Southwestern Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Ángel Cahua-Pablo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome (MetS is a combination of metabolic disorders associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD. Studies in women reported associations between polymorphisms in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes and MetS. Our aim was to evaluate the association between variants in ESR1, LPL and CETP genes with MetS and its components. Four hundred and eighty women were analyzed, anthropometric features and biochemical profiles were evaluated, and genotyping was performed by real-time PCR. We found an association with elevated glucose levels (odds ratio (OR = 2.9; p = 0.013 in carrying the AA genotype of rs1884051 in the ESR1 gene compared with the GG genotype, and the CC genotype of rs328 in the LPL gene was associated with MetS compared to the CG or GG genotype (OR = 2.8; p = 0.04. Moreover, the GA genotype of rs708272 in the CETP gene is associated with MetS compared to the GG or AA genotype (OR = 1.8; p = 0.006. In addition the ACTCCG haplotype in the ESR1 gene is associated with a decrease in the risk of MetS (OR = 0.02; p < 0.001. In conclusion, our results show the involvement of the variants of ESR1, LPL and CETP genes in metabolic events related to MetS or some of its features.

  6. Truncating mutation in the NHS gene: phenotypic heterogeneity of Nance-Horan syndrome in an asian Indian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramprasad, Vedam Lakshmi; Thool, Alka; Murugan, Sakthivel; Nancarrow, Derek; Vyas, Prateep; Rao, Srinivas Kamalakar; Vidhya, Authiappan; Ravishankar, Krishnamoorthy; Kumaramanickavel, Govindasamy

    2005-01-01

    A four-generation family containing eight affected males who inherited X-linked developmental lens opacity and microcornea was studied. Some members in the family had mild to moderate nonocular clinical features suggestive of Nance-Horan syndrome. The purpose of the study was to map genetically the gene in the large 57-live-member Asian-Indian pedigree. PCR-based genotyping was performed on the X-chromosome, by using fluorescent microsatellite markers (10-cM intervals). Parametric linkage analysis was performed by using two disease models, assuming either recessive or dominant X-linked transmission by the MLINK/ILINK and FASTLINK (version 4.1P) programs (http:www.hgmp.mrc.ac.uk/; provided in the public domain by the Human Genome Mapping Project Resources Centre, Cambridge, UK). The NHS gene at the linked region was screened for mutation. By fine mapping, the disease gene was localized to Xp22.13. Multipoint analysis placed the peak LOD of 4.46 at DSX987. The NHS gene mapped to this region. Mutational screening in all the affected males and carrier females (heterozygous form) revealed a truncating mutation 115C-->T in exon 1, resulting in conversion of glutamine to stop codon (Q39X), but was not observed in unaffected individuals and control subjects. conclusions. A family with X-linked Nance-Horan syndrome had severe ocular, but mild to moderate nonocular, features. The clinical phenotype of the truncating mutation (Q39X) in the NHS gene suggests allelic heterogeneity at the NHS locus or the presence of modifier genes. X-linked families with cataract should be carefully examined for both ocular and nonocular features, to exclude Nance-Horan syndrome. RT-PCR analysis did not suggest nonsense-mediated mRNA decay as the possible mechanism for clinical heterogeneity.

  7. Clinical genetic testing using a custom-designed steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome gene panel: analysis and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Ethan S; Dean, Philip; Yarram-Smith, Laura; Bierzynska, Agnieszka; Woodward, Geoff; Buxton, Chris; Dennis, Gemma; Welsh, Gavin I; Williams, Maggie; Saleem, Moin A

    2017-12-01

    There are many single-gene causes of steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) and the list continues to grow rapidly. Prompt comprehensive diagnostic testing is key to realising the clinical benefits of a genetic diagnosis. This report describes a bespoke-designed, targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) diagnostic gene panel assay to detect variants in 37 genes including the ability to identify copy number variants (CNVs). This study reports results of 302 patients referred for SRNS diagnostic gene panel analysis. Phenotype and clinical impact data were collected using a standard proforma. Candidate variants detected by NGS were confirmed by Sanger sequencing/Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification with subsequent family segregation analysis where possible. Clinical presentation was nephrotic syndrome in 267 patients and suspected Alport syndrome (AS) in 35. NGS panel testing determined a likely genetic cause of disease in 44/220 (20.0%) paediatric and 10/47 (21.3%) adult nephrotic cases, and 17/35 (48.6%) of haematuria/AS patients. Of 71 patients with genetic disease, 32 had novel pathogenic variants without a previous disease association including two with deletions of one or more exons of NPHS1 or NPHS2 . Gene panel testing provides a genetic diagnosis in a significant number of patients presenting with SRNS or suspected AS. It should be undertaken at an early stage of the care pathway and include the ability to detect CNVs as an emerging mechanism for genes associated with this condition. Use of clinical genetic testing after diagnosis of SRNS has the potential to stratify patients and assist decision-making regarding management. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Multi-exon deletions of the FBN1 gene in Marfan syndrome

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    Schrijver Iris

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mutations in the fibrillin -1 gene (FBN1 cause Marfan syndrome (MFS, an autosomal dominant multi-system connective tissue disorder. The 200 different mutations reported in the 235 kb, 65 exon-containing gene include only one family with a genomic multi-exon deletion. Methods We used long-range RT-PCR for mutation detection and long-range genomic PCR and DNA sequencing for identification of deletion breakpoints, allele-specific transcript analyses to determine stability of the mutant RNA, and pulse-chase studies to quantitate fibrillin synthesis and extracellular matrix deposition in cultured fibroblasts. Southern blots of genomic DNA were probed with three overlapping fragments covering the FBN1 coding exons Results Two novel multi-exon FBN1 deletions were discovered. Identical nucleotide pentamers were found at or near the intronic breakpoints. In a Case with classic MFS, an in-frame deletion of exons 42 and 43 removed the C-terminal 24 amino acids of the 5th LTBP (8-cysteine domain and the adjacent 25th calcium-binding EGF-like (6-cysteine domain. The mutant mRNA was stable, but fibrillin synthesis and matrix deposition were significantly reduced. A Case with severe childhood-onset MFS has a de novo deletion of exons 44–46 that removed three EGF-like domains. Fibrillin protein synthesis was normal, but matrix deposition was strikingly reduced. No genomic rearrangements were detected by Southern analysis of 18 unrelated MFS samples negative for FBN1 mutation screening. Conclusions Two novel deletion cases expand knowledge of mutational mechanisms and genotype/phenotype correlations of fibrillinopathies. Deletions or mutations affecting an LTBP domain may result in unstable mutant protein cleavage products that interfere with microfibril assembly.

  9. Mutation inactivation of Nijmegen breakage syndrome gene (NBS1 in hepatocellular carcinoma and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma.

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    Yan Wang

    Full Text Available Nijmegen breakage syndrome (NBS with NBS1 germ-line mutation is a human autosomal recessive disease characterized by genomic instability and enhanced cancer predisposition. The NBS1 gene codes for a protein, Nbs1(p95/Nibrin, involved in the processing/repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC is a complex and heterogeneous tumor with several genomic alterations. Recent studies have shown that heterozygous NBS1 mice exhibited a higher incidence of HCC than did wild-type mice. The objective of the present study is to assess whether NBS1 mutations play a role in the pathogenesis of human primary liver cancer, including HBV-associated HCC and intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (ICC. Eight missense NBS1 mutations were identified in six of 64 (9.4% HCCs and two of 18 (11.1% ICCs, whereas only one synonymous mutation was found in 89 control cases of cirrhosis and chronic hepatitis B. Analysis of the functional consequences of the identified NBS1 mutations in Mre11-binding domain showed loss of nuclear localization of Nbs1 partner Mre11, one of the hallmarks for Nbs1 deficiency, in one HCC and two ICCs with NBS1 mutations. Moreover, seven of the eight tumors with NBS1 mutations had at least one genetic alteration in the TP53 pathway, including TP53 mutation, MDM2 amplification, p14ARF homozygous deletion and promoter methylation, implying a synergistic effect of Nbs1 disruption and p53 inactivation. Our findings provide novel insight on the molecular pathogenesis of primary liver cancer characterized by mutation inactivation of NBS1, a DNA repair associated gene.

  10. Corticotropin-releasing hormone receptor 1 gene variants in irritable bowel syndrome.

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    Naoko Sato

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH acts mainly via the CRH receptor 1 (CRH-R1 and plays a crucial role in the stress-induced pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS. Several studies have demonstrated that variants of the CRH-R1 gene carry a potential risk for depression, but evidence for an association between CRH-R1 genotypes and IBS is lacking. We tested the hypothesis that genetic polymorphisms and haplotypes of CRH-R1 moderate the IBS phenotype and negative emotion in IBS patients. METHODS: A total of 103 patients with IBS and 142 healthy controls participated in the study. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms of the CRH-R1 gene (rs7209436, rs242924, and rs110402 were genotyped. Subjects' emotional states were evaluated using the Perceived-Stress Scale, the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory, and the Self-rating Depression Scale. RESULTS: The TT genotype of rs7209436 (P = 0.01 and rs242924 (P = 0.02 was significantly more common in patients with IBS than in controls. Total sample analysis showed significant association between bowel pattern (normal, diarrhea, constipation, or mixed symptoms and the T allele of rs7209436 (P = 0.008, T allele of rs242924 (P = 0.019, A allele of rs110402 (P = 0.047, and TAT haplocopies (P = 0.048. Negative emotion was not associated with the examined CRH-R1 SNPs. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms and the CRH-R1 haplotypes moderate IBS and related bowel patterns. There was no clear association between CRH-R1 genotypes and negative emotion accompanying IBS. Further studies on the CRH system are therefore warranted.

  11. A new germline TP53 gene mutation in a family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockhorn-Dworniczak, B; Wolff, J; Poremba, C; Schäfer, K L; Ritter, J; Gullotta, F; Jürgens, H; Böcker, W

    1996-07-01

    This report describes an unusual clinical presentation of Li-Fraumeni syndrome. Family history revealed a mild aggregation of adult cancers in one generation, and an unusual clustering of brain tumours of early childhood in the following generation. In order to evaluate the genetic basis for cancer predisposition in this family, molecular genetic analysis for the occurrence of germline TP53 tumour suppressor gene mutations was performed on 12 siblings of two generations. Indirect mutation analysis was performed by the single-strand conformation polymorphism (SSCP) technique. Alterations were characterised by automated direct fluorescence sequencing analysis. Tumour material was also examined for p53 protein accumulation by immunohistochemistry. Initially, a TP53 gene germline missense mutation was detected in an 11-year-old kindred with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) following intensive treatment of a brain tumour. In peripheral blood and bone marrow samples of this proband, a reduction to hemizygosity occurred. During AML treatment, detection of LOH of 17p was used as a marker for clonality and treatment control. The mutation was found to be inherited from the proband's mother, who was diagnosed with breast cancer at the age of 48 years. Further, three siblings were carriers, and two are apparently healthy at the age of 21 and 23 years. Knowledge of germline mutations may allow accurate DNA-based carrier diagnosis which is of important clinical significance for treatment strategy and control. Furthermore, the occurrence of unaffected carriers in this family raises questions about appropriate methods of cancer surveillance and counselling for these people.

  12. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome with homozygous missense mutation of the KCNQ1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kılıç, Esra; Ertuğrul, İlker; Özer, Sema; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet; Aktaş, Dilek; Boduroğlu, Koray; Ütine, Gülen Eda

    2014-01-01

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome (JLNS) is an autosomal recessive cardioauditory ion channel disorder characterized by congenital bilateral sensorineural deafness and long QT interval. JLNS is a ventricular repolarization abnormality and is caused by mutations in the KCNQ1 or KCNE1 gene. It has a high mortality rate in childhood due to ventricular tachyarrhythmias, episodes of torsade de pointes which may cause syncope or sudden cardiac death. Here, we present a 4.5-year-old female patient who had a history of syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. She had a cochlear implant operation at 15 months of age and received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) at 3 years of age because of recurrent syncope attacks. Five months after cochlear implant placement, she could say her first words and is now able to speak. With β-blocker therapy and ICD, she has remained syncope-free for a year. On the current admission, the family visited the genetics department to learn about the possibility of prenatal diagnosis of sensorineural deafness, as the mother was 9 weeks pregnant. A diagnosis of JLNS was established for the first time, and a homozygous missense mutation in the KCNQ1 gene (c.128 G>A, p.R243H) was detected. Heterozygous mutations of KCNQ1 were identified in both parents, thereby allowing future prenatal diagnoses. The family obtained prenatal diagnosis for the current pregnancy, and fetal KCNQ1 analysis revealed the same homozygous mutation. The pregnancy was terminated at the 12th week of gestation. The case presented here is the third molecularly confirmed Turkish JLNS case; it emphasizes the importance of timely genetic diagnosis, which allows appropriate genetic counseling and prenatal diagnosis, as well as proper management of the condition.

  13. Variable penetrance of hypogonadism in a sibship with Kallmann syndrome due to a deletion of the KAL gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parenti, G.; Rizzolo, M.G.; Ghezzi, M. [Federico II University, Naples (Italy)] [and others

    1995-07-03

    We report on the clinical and molecular characterization of 3 sibs with X-linked ichthyosis and variable expression of Kallmann syndrome. One of the affected brothers had mild hyposmia and showed normal pubertal progression. However, we demonstrated the same partial deletion of the X-linked Kallmann gene, sparing the first exon in the mildly affected patient as well as in one of his severely affected brothers. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  14. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap-25) gene Polymorphism frequency in fibromyalgia syndrome and relationship with clinical symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Balkarli, Ayse; Sengül, Cem; Tepeli, Emre; Balkarli, Huseyin; Cobankara, Veli

    2014-01-01

    Background SNAP-25 protein is contributory to plasma membrane and synaptic vesicle fusions that are critical points in neurotransmission. SNAP-25 gene is associated with behavioral symptoms, personality and psychological disorders. In addition, SNAP-25 protein can be related to different neurotransmitter functions due to its association with vesicle membrane transition and fusion. This is important because neurologic, cognitive, and psychologic disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) can be ...

  15. Relative frequency of GJB2 gene mutations in autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL patients in Lorestan population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mitra Sapahvand

    2007-01-01

    Conclusion: Unexpectedly, in this research just 17 percent of cases are covered. In this study 510 insCGAA mutation was seen. This is a new mutation which is not reported in other studied populations in the world. Hence, this research shows that – at least in our studied population- the effect of other genes that could cause non-syndromic hearing loss is possible and should be studied

  16. Waardenburg Syndrome: description of two novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, one of which incompletely penetrant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliete Pardono

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe two different novel mutations in the PAX3 gene, detected in two families with cases of Waardenburg syndrome type I (WSI. The missense mutation detected in one family involved a single substitution in exon 2 (c.142 G > T and was present both in the affected individual and in his clinically normal father. The mutation found in the second family consisted of a deletion of 13 bases, c.764-776del(TTACCCTGACATT, in exon 5.

  17. Detection of Brazilian hantavirus by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction amplification of N gene in patients with hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Marcos Lázaro Moreli; Ricardo Luiz Moro de Sousa; Luiz Tadeu Moraes Figueiredo

    2004-01-01

    We report a nested reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for hantavirus using primers selected to match high homology regions of hantavirus genomes detected from the whole blood of hantavirus cardiopulmonary syndrome (HCPS) patients from Brazil, also including the N gene nucleotide sequence of Araraquara virus. Hantavirus genomes were detected in eight out of nine blood samples from the HCPS patients by RT-PCR (88.9% positivity) and in all 9 blood samples (100% positi...

  18. Targeted next generation sequencing approach identifies eighteen new candidate genes in normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and Kallmann Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Quaynor, SD; Bosley, ME; Duckworth, CG; Porter, KR; Kim, S-H; Kim, H-G; Chorich, LP; Sullivan, ME; Choi, J-H; Cameron, RS; Layman, LC

    2016-01-01

    The genetic basis is unknown for ∼60% of normosmic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (nHH)/Kallmann syndrome (KS). DNAs from (17 male and 31 female) nHH/KS patients were analyzed by targeted next generation sequencing (NGS) of 261 genes involved in hypothalamic, pituitary, and/or olfactory pathways, or suggested by chromosome rearrangements. Selected variants were subjected to Sanger DNA sequencing, the gold standard. The frequency of Sanger-confirmed variants was determined using the ExAC databa...

  19. Myelination Delay and Allan-Herndon-Dudley Syndrome Caused by a Novel Mutation in the SLC16A2 Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Piana, Roberta; Vanasse, Michel; Brais, Bernard; Bernard, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome is an X-linked disease caused by mutations in the solute carrier family 16 member 2 (SLC16A2) gene. As SLC16A2 encodes the monocarboxylate transporter 8 (MCT8), a thyroid hormone transporter, patients with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome present a specific altered thyroid hormone profile. Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome has been associated with myelination delay on the brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of affected subjects. We report a patient with Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome characterized by developmental delay, hypotonia, and delayed myelination caused by a novel SLC16A2 mutation (p.L291R). The thyroid hormones profile in our patient was atypical for Allan-Herndon-Dudley syndrome. The follow-up examinations showed that the progression of the myelination was not accompanied by a clinical improvement. Our paper suggests that SLC16A2 mutations should be investigated in patients with myelination delay even when the thyroid function is not conclusively altered. © The Author(s) 2014.

  20. Tietz/Waardenburg type 2A syndrome associated with posterior microphthalmos in two unrelated patients with novel MITF gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-González, Vianney; Zenteno, Juan Carlos; Guzmán-Sánchez, Martín; Giordano-Herrera, Verónica; Guadarrama-Vallejo, Dalia; Ruíz-Quintero, Narlly; Villanueva-Mendoza, Cristina

    2016-12-01

    Tietz syndrome and Waardenburg syndrome type 2A are allelic conditions caused by MITF mutations. Tietz syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by congenital deafness and generalized skin, hair, and eye hypopigmentation, while Waardenburg syndrome type 2A typically includes variable degrees of sensorineural hearing loss and patches of de-pigmented skin, hair, and irides. In this paper, we report two unrelated families with MITF mutations. The first family showed an autosomal dominant pattern and variable expressivity. The second patient was isolated. MITF gene analysis in the first family demonstrated a c.648A>C heterozygous mutation in exon 8 c.648A>C; p. (R216S), while in the isolated patient, an apparently de novo heterozygous c.1183_1184insG truncating mutation was demonstrated in exon 10. All patients except one had bilateral reduced ocular anteroposterior axial length and a high hyperopic refractive error corresponding to posterior microphthalmos, features that have not been described as part of the disease. Our results suggest that posterior microphthalmos might be part of the clinical characteristics of Tietz/Waardenburg syndrome type 2A and expand both the clinical and molecular spectrum of the disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Role of folate-homocysteine pathway gene polymorphisms and nutritional cofactors in Down syndrome: A triad study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukla, K K; Jaiswal, S K; Rai, A K; Mishra, O P; Gupta, V; Kumar, A; Raman, R

    2015-08-01

    Do gene-gene and gene-environment interactions in folate-homocysteine (Hcy) pathway have a predisposing role for Down syndrome (DS)? The study provides evidence that in addition to advanced age, maternal genotype, micronutrient deficiency and elevated Hcy levels, individually and in combination, are risk factors for Down syndrome. Polymorphisms in certain folate-Hcy-pathway genes (especially the T allele of MTHFR C677T), elevated Hcy and poor folate levels in mothers during pregnancy have been shown to be risk factors for Down syndrome in certain Asian populations (including the eastern region of India), while the same SNPs are not a risk factor in European populations. This conflicting situation alludes to differential gene-environment (nutrition) interactions in different populations which needs to be explored. Between 2008 and 2012, 151 Down syndrome triads and 200 age-matched controls (Control mothers n = 186) were included in the study. Seven polymorphisms in six genes of folate-Hcy metabolic pathway, along with Hcy, cysteine (Cys), vitamin B12 (vit-B12) and folate levels, were analysed and compared among the case and control groups. Genotyping was performed by the PCR-RFLP technique. Levels of homocysteine and cysteine were measured by HPLC while vitamin B12 and folate were estimated by chemiluminescence. We demonstrate that polymorphisms in the folate-Hcy pathway genes in mothers collectively constitute a genotypic risk for DS which is effectively modified by interactions among genes and by the environment affecting folate, Hcy and vitamin B12 levels. The study also supports the idea that these maternal risk factors provide an adaptive advantage during pregnancy supporting live birth of the DS child. Our inability to obtain genotype and nutritional assessments of unaffected siblings of the DS children was an important limitation of the study. Also, its confinement to a specific geographic region (the eastern part) of India, and relatively small sample size

  2. Metabolic syndrome alters expression of insulin signaling-related genes in swine mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conley, Sabena M; Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Eirin, Alfonso; Tang, Hui; Lerman, Amir; van Wijnen, Andre J; Lerman, Lilach O

    2018-02-20

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is associated with insulin resistance (IR) and impaired glucose metabolism in muscle, fat, and other cells, and may induce inflammation and vascular remodeling. Endogenous reparative systems, including adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC), are responsible for repair of damaged tissue. MSC have also been proposed as an exogenous therapeutic intervention in patients with cardiovascular and chronic kidney disease (CKD). The feasibility of using autologous cells depends on their integrity, but whether in MetS IR involves adipose tissue-derived MSC remains unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the expression of mRNA involved in insulin signaling in MSC from subjects with MetS. Domestic pigs consumed a lean or obese diet (n=6 each) for 16weeks. MSC were collected from subcutaneous abdominal fat and analyzed using high-throughput RNA-sequencing for expression of genes involved in insulin signaling. Expression profiles for enriched (fold change>1.4, pinsulin signaling. Enriched mRNAs were implicated in biological pathways including hepatic glucose metabolism, adipocyte differentiation, and transcription regulation, and down-regulated mRNAs in intracellular calcium signaling and cleaving peptides. Functional analysis suggested that overall these alterations could increase IR. MetS alters mRNA expression related to insulin signaling in adipose tissue-derived MSC. These observations mandate caution during administration of autologous MSC in subjects with MetS. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. FLCN: The causative gene for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Laura S; Linehan, W Marston

    2018-01-15

    Germline mutations in the novel tumor suppressor gene FLCN are responsible for the autosomal dominant inherited disorder Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome that predisposes to fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and spontaneous pneumothorax, and an increased risk for developing kidney tumors. Although the encoded protein, folliculin (FLCN), has no sequence homology to known functional domains, x-ray crystallographic studies have shown that the C-terminus of FLCN has structural similarity to DENN (differentially expressed in normal cells and neoplasia) domain proteins that act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for small Rab GTPases. FLCN forms a complex with folliculin interacting proteins 1 and 2 (FNIP1, FNIP2) and with 5' AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). This review summarizes FLCN functional studies which support a role for FLCN in diverse metabolic pathways and cellular processes that include modulation of the mTOR pathway, regulation of PGC1α and mitochondrial biogenesis, cell-cell adhesion and RhoA signaling, control of TFE3/TFEB transcriptional activity, amino acid-dependent activation of mTORC1 on lysosomes through Rag GTPases, and regulation of autophagy. Ongoing research efforts are focused on clarifying the primary FLCN-associated pathway(s) that drives the development of fibrofolliculomas, lung cysts and kidney tumors in BHD patients carrying germline FLCN mutations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutations in a new gene in Ellis-van Creveld syndrome and Weyers acrodental dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Perez, V L; Ide, S E; Strom, T M; Lorenz, B; Wilson, D; Woods, K; King, L; Francomano, C; Freisinger, P; Spranger, S; Marino, B; Dallapiccola, B; Wright, M; Meitinger, T; Polymeropoulos, M H; Goodship, J

    2000-03-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EvC, MIM 225500) is an autosomal recessive skeletal dysplasia characterized by short limbs, short ribs, postaxial polydactyly and dysplastic nails and teeth. Congenital cardiac defects, most commonly a defect of primary atrial septation producing a common atrium, occur in 60% of affected individuals. The disease was mapped to chromosome 4p16 in nine Amish subpedigrees and single pedigrees from Mexico, Ecuador and Brazil. Weyers acrodental dysostosis (MIM 193530), an autosomal dominant disorder with a similar but milder phenotype, has been mapped in a single pedigree to an area including the EvC critical region. We have identified a new gene (EVC), encoding a 992-amino-acid protein, that is mutated in individuals with EvC. We identified a splice-donor change in an Amish pedigree and six truncating mutations and a single amino acid deletion in seven pedigrees. The heterozygous carriers of these mutations did not manifest features of EvC. We found two heterozygous missense mutations associated with a phenotype, one in a man with Weyers acrodental dysostosis and another in a father and his daughter, who both have the heart defect characteristic of EvC and polydactyly, but not short stature. We suggest that EvC and Weyers acrodental dysostosis are allelic conditions.

  5. Age-Dependent Defects of Regulatory B Cells in Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome Gene Knockout Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadafumi Yokoyama

    Full Text Available The Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS is a rare X-linked primary immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent infections, thrombocytopenia, eczema, and high incidence of malignancy and autoimmunity. The cellular mechanisms underlying autoimmune complications in WAS have been extensively studied; however, they remain incompletely defined. We investigated the characteristics of IL-10-producing CD19+CD1dhighCD5+ B cells (CD1dhighCD5+ Breg obtained from Was gene knockout (WKO mice and found that their numbers were significantly lower in these mice compared to wild type (WT controls. Moreover, we found a significant age-dependent reduction of the percentage of IL-10-expressing cells in WKO CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells as compared to age-matched WT control mice. CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice did not suppress the in vitro production of inflammatory cytokines from activated CD4+ T cells. Interestingly, CD1dhighCD5+ Breg cells from older WKO mice displayed a basal activated phenotype which may prevent normal cellular responses, among which is the expression of IL-10. These defects may contribute to the susceptibility to autoimmunity with age in patients with WAS.

  6. Cathepsin C gene 5'-untranslated region mutation in papillon-lefèvre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosem, Rok; Debeljak, Maruša; Repič Lampret, Barbka; Kansky, Aleksej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma together with a severe form of generalized aggressive periodontitis and associated with mutations in cathepsin C gene (CTSC). To investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics of 6 PLS patients from 4 unrelated Slovenian families. CTSC mutational and functional analyses were performed. In all patients, a novel homozygous substitution, c.-55C>A, in the CTSC 5'-untranslated region (UTR) was detected on genomic DNA level and confirmed by mRNA analysis, resulting in the almost complete loss of CTSC mRNA expression and CTSC activity. In silico analysis revealed the potential of the mutation to disrupt putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) for AP-2 and Sp families of transcription factors. Identification of a novel CTSC 5'-UTR mutation together with a severe reduction of CTSC mRNA expression and virtually nonexistent CTSC activity was suggestive of a novel mechanism of TFBS dysfunction associated with PLS. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Molecular and Neural Functions of Rai1, the Causal Gene for Smith-Magenis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei-Hsiang; Guenthner, Casey J; Xu, Jin; Nguyen, Tiffany; Schwarz, Lindsay A; Wilkinson, Alex W; Gozani, Or; Chang, Howard Y; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Luo, Liqun

    2016-10-19

    Haploinsufficiency of Retinoic Acid Induced 1 (RAI1) causes Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), which is associated with diverse neurodevelopmental and behavioral symptoms as well as obesity. RAI1 encodes a nuclear protein but little is known about its molecular function or the cell types responsible for SMS symptoms. Using genetically engineered mice, we found that Rai1 preferentially occupies DNA regions near active promoters and promotes the expression of a group of genes involved in circuit assembly and neuronal communication. Behavioral analyses demonstrated that pan-neural loss of Rai1 causes deficits in motor function, learning, and food intake. These SMS-like phenotypes are produced by loss of Rai1 function in distinct neuronal types: Rai1 loss in inhibitory neurons or subcortical glutamatergic neurons causes learning deficits, while Rai1 loss in Sim1 + or SF1 + cells causes obesity. By integrating molecular and organismal analyses, our study suggests potential therapeutic avenues for a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Metabolomics of the Wolfram Syndrome 1 Gene (Wfs1) Deficient Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porosk, Rando; Terasmaa, Anton; Mahlapuu, Riina; Soomets, Ursel; Kilk, Kalle

    2017-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disease characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. Mutations in the WFS1 gene encoding the wolframin glycoprotein can lead to endoplasmic reticulum stress and unfolded protein responses in cells, but the pathophysiology at whole organism level is poorly understood. In this study, several organs (heart, liver, kidneys, and pancreas) and bodily fluids (trunk blood and urine) of 2- and 6-month old Wfs1 knockout (KO), heterozygote (HZ), and wild-type (WT) mice were analyzed by untargeted and targeted metabolomics using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. The key findings were significant perturbations in the metabolism of pancreas and heart before the onset of related clinical signs such as glycosuria that precedes hyperglycemia and thus implies a kidney dysfunction before the onset of classical diabetic nephropathy. The glucose use and gluconeogenesis in KO mice are intensified in early stages, but later the energetic needs are mainly covered by lipolysis. Furthermore, in young mice liver and trunk blood hypouricemia, which in time turns to hyperuricemia, was detected. In summary, we show that the metabolism in Wfs1-deficient mice markedly differs from the metabolism of WT mice in many aspects and discuss the future biological and clinical relevance of these observations.

  9. Lack of association of matrix metalloproteinase-9 promoter gene polymorphism in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalcınkaya, Mustafa; Erbek, Selim S; Babakurban, Seda Turkoglu; Kupeli, Elif; Bozbas, Serife; Terzi, Yunus K; Sahin, Feride Iffet

    2015-09-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a public health problem. There is an effort to establish the genetic contributions to the development of OSAS. One is matrix metalloproteinases, extracellular matrix degrading enzymes related to systemic inflammation. However, the impact of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) genotypes on the development of OSAS is unknown. Our aim was to determine whether MMP-9 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) (MMP-9 -1562C > T) is related to susceptibility to OSAS. A total of 106 patients with a history of sleep apnea and 88 controls without a history of sleep apnea were enrolled in this study. Genotypes were determined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analyses after polymerase chain reaction. Genotypes and allele frequencies of the MMP-9 -1562C > T SNP was not statistically different between the patient and control groups (p > 0.05). There was a statistical association between apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and body mass index (BMI), and also between AHI and neck circumference (p 0.05). We found no association between MMP-9 -1562C > T SNP and OSAS. Studies to investigate the role of other polymorphisms and expression of MMP-9 gene will provide more information. Copyright © 2015 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. To Screen Inactivation Mutation of Exon 1 of FSHR Gene in Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome: A South Indian Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekar, Nishu; Yeole, Samiksha; Pradeep, Rashmi; Prabhu, Yogamaya D.; Renu, Kaviyarasi; Ramgir, Shalaka S.; Abilash, V. G.

    2017-11-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is an endocrine disorder. Irregular menstrual cycle, acne, facial hair and elevated androgen levels are the most common signs for PCOS. PCOS has an estimated prevalence of 4-12% among reproductive age women, thus making it a forerunner in female infertility. FSHR plays an important role in FSH signaling pathway making it an important gene for PCOS. In this study, we aim to focus on any association between the FSHR gene and PCOS. Our study was to evaluate any polymorphism of exon 1 of FSHR gene associated with PCOS.PCR-RFLP technique was performed on the PCOS samples. Hormonal changes were found in the patients. Exon 1 inactivation mutation of FSHR gene was not observed in the patient sample. A study of this association needs to be done using large sample size.

  11. Heat stress and sudden infant death syndrome--stress gene expression after exposure to moderate heat stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rohde, Marianne Cathrine; Corydon, Thomas Juhl; Hansen, Jakob

    2013-01-01

    time points measured, and may be less related to heat stress. Being found dead in the prone position (a known risk factor for SIDS) was related to a lower HSPA1B up-regulation in SIDS compared to SIDS found on their side or back. The study demonstrates the potential usefulness of gene expression......The aim of the present study was to investigate stress gene expression in cultured primary fibroblasts established from Achilles tendons collected during autopsies from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) cases, and age-matched controls (infants dying in a traumatic event). Expression of 4 stress...... responsive genes, HSPA1B, HSPD1, HMOX1, and SOD2, was studied by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis of RNA purified from cells cultured under standard or various thermal stress conditions. The expression of all 4 genes was highly influenced by thermal stress in both SIDS and control cells. High...

  12. Genetics and Gene Expression Involving Stress and Distress Pathways in Fibromyalgia with and without Comorbid Chronic Fatigue Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen C. Light

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In complex multisymptom disorders like fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS that are defined primarily by subjective symptoms, genetic and gene expression profiles can provide very useful objective information. This paper summarizes research on genes that may be linked to increased susceptibility in developing and maintaining these disorders, and research on resting and stressor-evoked changes in leukocyte gene expression, highlighting physiological pathways linked to stress and distress. These include the adrenergic nervous system, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and serotonergic pathways, and exercise responsive metabolite-detecting ion channels. The findings to date provide some support for both inherited susceptibility and/or physiological dysregulation in all three systems, particularly for catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT genes, the glucocorticoid and the related mineralocorticoid receptors (NR3C1, NR3C2, and the purinergic 2X4 (P2X4 ion channel involved as a sensory receptor for muscle pain and fatigue and also in upregulation of spinal microglia in chronic pain models. Methodological concerns for future research, including potential influences of comorbid clinical depression and antidepressants and other medications, on gene expression are also addressed.

  13. Investigating Seven Recently Identified Genes in 100 Iranian Families with Autosomal Recessive Non-syndromic Hearing Loss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reihaneh Alikhani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Hearing loss (HL is the most common sensory disorder, and affects 1 in 1000 newborns. About 50% of HL is due to genetics and 70% of them are non-syndromic with a recessive pattern of inheritance. Up to now, more than 50 genes have been detected which are responsible for autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss, (ARNSHL. In  Iran, HL is one of the most common disabilities due to consanguineous marriages. The aim was to investigate the prevalence of three new ARHL genes (GJB4, GJC3, and SLITRK6 reported in neighboring countries among Iranian families with ARNSHL. Methods: One hundred unrelated families with at least two affected siblings in consanguineous marriage, who were negative for GJB2 gene mutations, were selected. By using three STR markers for each gene, homozygosity mapping was performed. Results: Two families showed linkage to GJB4, six families were linked to GJC3 and only one family linked to SLITRK6. The samples of these families who showed linkage were sent for Sanger sequencing to detect the causative mutations. However, after analyzing the sequencing results, no mutation could be detected in either of the families. Molecular analysis for these nine families is underway in order to determine the pathogenic mutations using whole exome sequencing. Discussion: These data demonstrate a very low prevalence of mutation in these three genes (GJB4, GJC3, and SLITRK6 in the Iranian population, since no mutation was detected in our study group of 100 families.

  14. Waardenburg syndrome type II in a Chinese patient caused by a novel nonsense mutation in the SOX10 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Tie-Song; Lin, Ken; Sun, Hao; Jiang, Hong-Chao; Yang, Yan-Li; Low, Fan; Gao, Ying-Qin; Ruan, Biao

    2016-06-01

    Waardenburg syndrome is a congenital genetic disorder. It is the most common type of syndromic hearing impairment with highly genetic heterogeneity and proved to be related by 6 genes as follows: PAX3, MITF, SNAI2, EDN3, EDNRB and SOX10. This article aims to identify the genetic causes of a Chinese WS child patient. A Chinese WS child was collected for clinical data collection by questionnaire survey. DNA samples of proband and his parents were extracted from peripheral blood samples. Six candidate genes were sequenced by the Trusight One sequencing panel on the illumina NextSeq 500 platform. A novel nonsense heterozygous mutation was found in the coding region of exon 2 in the SOX10 gene of proband. The novel nonsense heterozygous mutation could cause the replacement of the 55th lysine codon by stop codon (484T > C, C142R) and further more possibly cause terminating the protein translation in advance. However, both proband's parents had no mutation of genes above mentioned. The gene mutation of SOX10 [NM_006941.3 c.163A > T] is a novel nonsense mutation. No record of this mutation has been found in dbSNP, HGMD, 1000 Genomes Project, ClinVar and ESP6500 databases. It meets the condition of PS2 of strong evidence in 2015 ACMG Standards and Guidelines. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Associations between neurodevelopmental genes, neuroanatomy, and ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Carlie A; Karelis, Jason; Middleton, Frank A; Gentile, Karen; Coman, Ioana L; Radoeva, Petya D; Mehta, Rashi; Fremont, Wanda P; Antshel, Kevin M; Faraone, Stephen V; Kates, Wendy R

    2017-04-01

    22q11.2 deletion syndrome is a neurogenetic disorder resulting in the deletion of over 40 genes. Up to 40% of individuals with 22q11.2DS develop schizophrenia, though little is known about the underlying mechanisms. We hypothesized that allelic variation in functional polymorphisms in seven genes unique to the deleted region would affect lobar brain volumes, which would predict risk for psychosis in youth with 22q11.2DS. Participants included 56 individuals (30 males) with 22q11.2DS. Anatomic MR images were collected and processed using Freesurfer. Participants were genotyped for 10 SNPs in the COMT, DGCR8, GNB1L, PIK4CA, PRODH, RTN4R, and ZDHHC8 genes. All subjects were assessed for ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis. Allelic variation of the rs701428 SNP of RTN4R was significantly associated with volumetric differences in gray matter of the lingual gyrus and cuneus of the occipital lobe. Moreover, occipital gray matter volumes were robustly associated with ultra high risk symptoms of psychosis in the presence of the G allele of rs701428. Our results suggest that RTN4R, a relatively under-studied gene at the 22q11 locus, constitutes a susceptibility gene for psychosis in individuals with this syndrome through its alteration of the architecture of the brain. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Novel frameshift mutation in theKCNQ1gene responsible for Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amirian, Azam; Dalili, Seyed Mohammad; Zafari, Zahra; Saber, Siamak; Karimipoor, Morteza; Akbari, Vahid; Fazelifar, Amir Farjam; Zeinali, Sirous

    2018-01-01

    Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes. The disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and long QT syndrome. Here we present a 3.5-year-old female patient, an offspring of consanguineous marriage, who had a history of recurrent syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. The patient and the family members were screened for mutations in KCNQ1 gene by linkage analysis and DNA sequencing. DNA sequencing showed a c.1532_1534delG (p. A512Pfs*81) mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in homozygous form. The results of short tandem repeat (STR) markers showed that the disease in the family is linked to the KCNQ1 gene. The mutation was confirmed in the parents in heterozygous form. This is the first report of this variant in KCNQ1 gene in an Iranian family. The data of this study could be used for early diagnosis of the condition in the family and genetic counseling.

  17. Identification of a novel germ-line mutation in the TP53 gene in a Mexican family with Li-Fraumeni syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Taja-Chayeb, Lucia; Vidal-Mill?n, Silvia; Guti?rrez-Hern?ndez, Olga; Trejo-Becerril, Catalina; P?rez-C?rdenas, Enrique; Ch?vez-Blanco, Alma; de la Cruz-Hern?ndez, Erick; Due?as-Gonz?lez, Alfonso

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Germ-line mutations of the TP53 gene are known to cause Li-Fraumeni syndrome, an autosomal, dominantly inherited, high-penetrance cancer-predisposition syndrome characterized by the occurrence of a variety of cancers, mainly soft tissue sarcomas, adrenocortical carcinoma, leukemia, breast cancer, and brain tumors. Methods Mutation analysis was based on Denaturing high performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) screening of exons 2-11 of the TP53 gene, sequencing, and clonin...

  18. Identification of four new PITX2 gene mutations in patients with Axenfeld-Rieger syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Veronique; David, Gabriel; Roche, Olivier; de la Houssaye, Guillaume; Boutboul, Sandrine; Arbogast, Laurence; Kobetz, Alexandra; Orssaud, Christophe; Camand, Olivier; Schorderet, Daniel F; Munier, Francis; Rossi, Annick; Delezoide, Anne Lise; Marsac, Cecile; Ricquier, Daniel; Dufier, Jean-Louis; Menasche, Maurice; Abitbol, Marc

    2006-12-01

    Axenfeld Rieger syndrome (ARS) is an autosomal dominant inherited disorder affecting development of the ocular anterior chamber, abdomen, teeth and facial structures. The PITX2 gene is a major gene encoding a major transcription factor associated with ARS. ARS patients were collected from six unrelated families. Patients and their families were ophthalmologically phenotyped and their blood was collected for DNA extraction. We screened the coding region of human PITX2 gene by direct sequencing. The consequences of the mutations described were investigated by generating crystallographic representations of the amino acid changes. In order to better understand the occurrence of glaucoma in ARS patients, we studied the PITX2 gene expression in human embryonic and fetal ocular tissue sections. We identified four novel PITX2 genetic alterations in four unrelated families with ARS. These mutations included two nonsense mutations (E55X and Y121X), an eight nucleotides insertion (1251 ins CGACTCCT) and a substitution (F58L), in familial and sporadic cases of ARS. We also showed for the first time that PITX2 is expressed at early stages of the human embryonic and fetal periocular mesenchyme, as well as at later stages of human development in the fetal ciliary body, ciliary processes, irido corneal angle and corneal endothelium. The human fetal eye PITX2 gene expression pattern reported here for the first time provides a strong basis for explaining the frequent occurrence of glaucoma in patients affected by PITX2 gene mutations. Two mutations identified affect the homeodomain (E55X and F58L). The E55X nonsense mutation is likely to alter dramatically the DNA-binding capabilities of the PITX2 homeodomain. Furthermore, there is a complete loss of the carboxy-terminal part of the PITX2 protein beyond the site of the mutation. The phenylalanine F58 is known to contribute to the hydrophobic network of the homeodomain. The crystallographic representations of the mutation F58L show

  19. Influence of white spot syndrome virus infection on hepatopancreas gene expression of `Huanghai No. 2' shrimp ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianhong; Shi, Xiaoli; Kong, Jie; Luan, Sheng; Luo, Kun; Cao, Baoxiang; Liu, Ning; Lu, Xia; Li, Xupeng; Deng, Kangyu; Cao, Jiawang; Zhang, Yingxue; Zhang, Hengheng

    2017-10-01

    To elucidate the molecular response of shrimp hepatopancreas to white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection, microarray was applied to investigate the differentially expressed genes in the hepatopancreas of `Huanghai No. 2' ( Fenneropenaeus chinensis). A total of 59137 unigenes were designed onto a custom-made 60K Agilent chip. After infection, the gene expression profiles in the hepatopancreas of the shrimp with a lower viral load at early (48-96 h), peak (168-192 h) and late (264-288 h) infection phases were analyzed. Of 18704 differentially expressed genes, 6412 were annotated. In total, 5453 differentially expressed genes (1916 annotated) expressed at all three phases, and most of the annotated were either up- or down-regulated continuously. These genes function diversely in, for example, immune response, cytoskeletal system, signal transduction, stress resistance, protein synthesis and processing, metabolism among others. Some of the immune-related genes, including antilipopolysaccharide factor, Kazal-type proteinase inhibitor, C-type lectin and serine protease encoding genes, were up-regulated after WSSV infection. These genes have been reported to be involved in the anti-WSSV responses. The expression of genes related to the cytoskeletal system, including β-actin and myosin but without tubulin genes, were down-regulated after WSSV infection. Astakine was found for the first time in the WSSV-infected F. chinensis. To further confirm the expression of differentially expressed genes, quantitative real-time PCR was performed to test the expression of eight randomly selected genes and verified the reliability and accuracy of the microarray expression analysis. The data will provide valuable information to understanding the immune mechanism of shrimp's response to WSSV.

  20. Integrated genomic analysis implicates haploinsufficiency of multiple chromosome 5q31.2 genes in de novo myelodysplastic syndromes pathogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy A Graubert

    Full Text Available Deletions spanning chromosome 5q31.2 are among the most common recurring cytogenetic abnormalities detectable in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS. Prior genomic studies have suggested that haploinsufficiency of multiple 5q31.2 genes may contribute to MDS pathogenesis. However, this hypothesis has never been formally tested. Therefore, we designed this study to systematically and comprehensively evaluate all 28 chromosome 5q31.2 genes and directly test whether haploinsufficiency of a single 5q31.2 gene may result from a heterozygous nucleotide mutation or microdeletion. We selected paired tumor (bone marrow and germline (skin DNA samples from 46 de novo MDS patients (37 without a cytogenetic 5q31.2 deletion and performed total exonic gene resequencing (479 amplicons and array comparative genomic hybridization (CGH. We found no somatic nucleotide changes in the 46 MDS samples, and no cytogenetically silent 5q31.2 deletions in 20/20 samples analyzed by array CGH. Twelve novel single nucleotide polymorphisms were discovered. The mRNA levels of 7 genes in the commonly deleted interval were reduced by 50% in CD34+ cells from del(5q MDS samples, and no gene showed complete loss of expression. Taken together, these data show that small deletions and/or point mutations in individual 5q31.2 genes are not common events in MDS, and implicate haploinsufficiency of multiple genes as the relevant genetic consequence of this common deletion.

  1. Evolutionary trajectories of duplicated FT homologues and their roles in soybean domestication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Faqiang; Sedivy, Eric J; Price, William Brian; Haider, Waseem; Hanzawa, Yoshie

    2017-06-01

    To clarify the molecular bases of flowering time evolution in crop domestication, here we investigate the evolutionary fates of a set of four recently duplicated genes in soybean: FT2a, FT2b, FT2c and FT2d that are homologues of the floral inducer FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT). While FT2a maintained the flowering inducer function, other genes went through contrasting evolutionary paths. FT2b evolved attenuated expression potentially associated with a transposon insertion in the upstream intergenic region, while FT2c and FT2d obtained a transposon insertion and structural rearrangement, respectively. In contrast to FT2b and FT2d whose mutational events occurred before the separation of G. max and G. soja, the evolution of FT2c is a G. max lineage specific event. The FT2c allele carrying a transposon insertion is nearly fixed in soybean landraces and differentiates domesticated soybean from wild soybean, indicating that this allele spread at the early stage of soybean domestication. The domesticated allele causes later flowering than the wild allele under short day and exhibits a signature of selection. These findings suggest that FT2c may have underpinned the evolution of photoperiodic flowering regulation in soybean domestication and highlight the evolutionary dynamics of this agronomically important gene family. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene polymorphism and scoliosis in Prader-Willi syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G; Hossain, Waheeda; Hassan, Maaz; Manzardo, Ann M

    2018-04-01

    A growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene polymorphism impacts sensitivity to endogenous and exogenous growth hormone (GH) to moderate growth and development. Increased sensitivity may accelerate spinal growth and contribute to scoliosis, particularly in GH-deficient and treated populations such as Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS). Therefore, we examined the relationship between GHR genotype and scoliosis (case and control) in PWS cohorts. We utilized a case-control design in a study of 73 subjects (34M; 39F) with genetically confirmed PWS in 32 individuals previously diagnosed with moderate to severe scoliosis (mean age=16.9±10.2years; age range of 1 to 41years) and 41 adults with no evidence of scoliosis (mean age=30.8±9.7years; age range of 18 to 56years). The GHR gene polymorphism was determined using PCR specific primers to capture the two recognized GHR gene fragment sizes [i.e., full length (fl) or exon 3 deletions (d3)]. Twenty-three (72%) of the 32 case subjects with scoliosis required surgical correction with an approximately equal balance for gender and PWS genetic subtype among cases and 41 control subjects without scoliosis. The GHR d3/d3 genotype was identified in N=2 of 8 (25%) cases with scoliosis and the d3/fl genotype was identified in N=11 of 25 (44%) cases with scoliosis but the distribution difference did not statistically differ. The GHR fl/fl genotype was correlated with a significantly faster rate and heavier weight gain among case subjects. Our examination of demographic and genetic markers associated with scoliosis and surgical repair in PWS found no evidence to support differences in gender, PWS genetic subtype or GHR d3 allele distributions among the case vs control groups. Those with fl/fl alleles were heavier than those with d3/d3 or d3/fl genotypes and warrant further study with a larger sample size and possibly to include other vulnerable populations requiring growth hormone treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA gene variation in polycystic ovary syndrome in a Tunisian women population

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    Assila Ben Salem

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is characterized by the growth of a number of small cysts on the ovaries which leads to sex hormonal imbalance. Women who are affected by this syndrome suffer from irregular menstrual cycles, decline in their fertility, excessive hair growth, obesity, acne and most importantly cardiac function problems. The vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF plays a pivotal role in tissue vascularization in general and in the pathogenesis of many diseases. The PCOS was found to be associated with high expression levels of VEGF. In women who undergo assisted reproductive procedures (ART, VEGF was found to be a key mediator of other factors to control ovary angiogenesis. Here, we set out to examine the association of VEGFA gene polymorphism with PCOS and its components in a population of Tunisia women to enhance our understanding of the genetic background leading angiogenesis and vascularization abnormalities in PCOS. Methods The association of VEGFA gene with PCOS and its components was examined in a cohort of 268 women from Tunisia involving 118 PCOS patients and 150 controls. VEGFA gene variations were assessed through the analysis of the following SNPs rs699947 (A/C, rs833061 (C/T, rs1570360 (G/A, rs833068 (G/A, rs3025020 (C/T, and rs3025039 (C/T. The linkage disequilibrium between SNPs was assessed using HAPLOVIEW software while combination of SNPs into haplotypes in the population and the reconstruction of the cladogram were carried-out by PHASE and ARLEQUIN programs, respectively. Genetic association and genotype-phenotype correlations were calculated by logistic regression and non-parametric tests (Kruskall-Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests, respectively, using StatView program. Results We observed 10 haplotypes in our studied cohort whereH1 (ACGG, H2 (ACAG, H7 (CTGG and H8 (CTGA were the most frequent. We observed the association of the genotype CT of the SNP rs30225039 with PCOS phenotype (P = 0

  4. Hypoxanthine Guanine Phosphoribosyl Transferase Is the Most Stable Reference Gene for Gene Expression Analysis by Quantitative PCR in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells from Women with the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milutinović Danijela Vojnović

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS is a frequent endocrine disorder that affects women of reproductive age. As the syndrome is strongly associated with obesity, it is of interest to examine the gene expression diffe rences that accompany its development and the associ a ted metabolic disturbances. Real-time RT PCR is a standard method for studying changes in gene expression. However, to obtain accurate and reliable results, validation of reference genes is obligatory. The aim of this study was to identify a suitable reference for the normalization of gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from obese and normal-weight women with PCOS.

  5. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome.

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    L Simo-Riudalbas

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9, marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues.In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific

  6. Genome-Wide DNA Methylation Analysis Identifies Novel Hypomethylated Non-Pericentromeric Genes with Potential Clinical Implications in ICF Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simo-Riudalbas, L; Diaz-Lagares, A; Gatto, S; Gagliardi, M; Crujeiras, A B; Matarazzo, M R; Esteller, M; Sandoval, J

    2015-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, centromeric instability and facial anomalies syndrome (ICF) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, characterized by severe hypomethylation in pericentromeric regions of chromosomes (1, 16 and 9), marked immunodeficiency and facial anomalies. The majority of ICF patients present mutations in the DNMT3B gene, affecting the DNA methyltransferase activity of the protein. In the present study, we have used the Infinium 450K DNA methylation array to evaluate the methylation level of 450,000 CpGs in lymphoblastoid cell lines and untrasformed fibroblasts derived from ICF patients and healthy donors. Our results demonstrate that ICF-specific DNMT3B variants A603T/STP807ins and V699G/R54X cause global DNA hypomethylation compared to wild-type protein. We identified 181 novel differentially methylated positions (DMPs) including subtelomeric and intrachromosomic regions, outside the classical ICF-related pericentromeric hypomethylated positions. Interestingly, these sites were mainly located in intergenic regions and inside the CpG islands. Among the identified hypomethylated CpG-island associated genes, we confirmed the overexpression of three selected genes, BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221, in ICF compared to healthy controls, which are supposed to be expressed in germ line and silenced in somatic tissues. In conclusion, this study contributes in clarifying the direct relationship between DNA methylation defect and gene expression impairment in ICF syndrome, identifying novel direct target genes of DNMT3B. A high percentage of the DMPs are located in the subtelomeric regions, indicating a specific role of DNMT3B in methylating these chromosomal sites. Therefore, we provide further evidence that hypomethylation in specific non-pericentromeric regions of chromosomes might be involved in the molecular pathogenesis of ICF syndrome. The detection of DNA hypomethylation at BOLL, SYCP2 and NCRNA00221 may pave the way for the development of specific clinical biomarkers

  7. Apa-I polymorphism in VDR gene is related to metabolic syndrome in polycystic ovary syndrome: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Betânia Rodrigues; Lecke, Sheila Bunecker; Spritzer, Poli Mara

    2018-04-18

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common endocrine disorder determined by polygenic traits as well as environmental factors. Lower vitamin D levels have been detected in PCOS women and related to hormone and metabolic disturbances. Vitamin D acts in tissues through the vitamin D receptor (VDR). VDR gene variants have been associated with worse metabolic profile in the general population. We investigated the genotype and haplotype distribution of the Bsm-I (rs1544410), Apa-I (rs7975232), and Taq-I (rs731236) VDR gene polymorphisms in PCOS and non-hirsute women from southern Brazil. We further investigated the associations of these gene variants and their haplotypes with PCOS, vitamin D levels, and metabolic abnormalities, including the metabolic syndrome (MetS). A group of 191 women with PCOS (Rotterdam criteria) and 100 non-hirsute controls with regular ovulatory cycles were genotyped for all polymorphisms by real-time PCR, with allelic discrimination assays. MetS and the cutoffs for its isolated components were defined in accordance with the Joint Scientific Statement. Women with PCOS were younger and had significantly higher BMI and total testosterone levels than controls (p Apa-I entailed higher risk of MetS in PCOS (OR: 2.133; 95% CI 1.020-4.464, p = 0.042), and was associated with higher systolic blood pressure (p = 0.009), total cholesterol (p = 0.040), and LDL-cholesterol (p = 0.038) in both PCOS and control groups (two-way ANOVA). The frequencies of VDR haplotypes were similar in PCOS and control women. The present results suggest that the Apa-I variant in VDR gene may be associated with MetS in southern Brazilian women with PCOS, and with blood pressure, total cholesterol, and LDL-c in women with and without PCOS.

  8. Role of the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel gene expressions and TRP melastatin (TRPM) channel gene polymorphisms in obesity-related metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabur, S; Oztuzcu, S; Duzen, I V; Eraydin, A; Eroglu, S; Ozkaya, M; Demiryürek, A T

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is correlated with increased cardiovascular risk and characterized by several factors, including visceral obesity, hypertension, dyslipidemia, and insulin resistance. The etiology of MetS is complex, and can be influenced by genetic susceptibility. The aim of this study was to investigate a possible association of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels gene expressions and TRP melastatin (TRPM) gene polymorphisms with MetS in a Turkish population. A total of 142 patients with obesity-related MetS and 166 healthy controls with similar age and sex were enrolled to this study. For polymorphism studies, genomic DNA from the participants was analyzed by a BioMark 96.96 dynamic array system (Fluidigm, South San Francisco, CA, USA). For gene expression studies, mRNA from blood samples was extracted, and real time polymerase chain reaction on the BioMark HD system was performed. There was an increase in A allele (64.6% in patients vs. 49.5% in controls) and decrease in G allele frequencies (35.4% in patients vs. 50.5% in control, p = 0.0019) of the TRPM5 gene rs4929982 (Arg578Gln) polymorphism. We also observed that the distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of the TRPM8 gene rs12472151 in MetS patients were significantly different from controls (p TRPM5, TRPV4, TRPV5, TRPV6, MCOLN2 (TRPML2), and MCOLN3 (TRPML3) gene expressions, an augmentation was noted in TRPC6 gene expression. Genetic polymorphisms in TRPM5 and TRPM8 genes may modify individual susceptibility to MetS in the Turkish population. This study also revealed that there is a significant relationship between TRP channels gene expressions and MetS.

  9. A novel mutation in the PAX3 gene causes Waardenburg syndrome type I in an Iranian family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Nazanin; Tabatabaiefar, Mohammad Amin; Farhadi, Mohammad; Bahrami, Tayyeb; Noori-Daloii, Mohammad Reza

    2015-10-01

    Sensorineural hearing impairment (HI) is one of the most frequent congenital defects, with a prevalence of 1 in 500 among neonates. Although there are over 400 syndromes involving HI, most cases of HI are nonsyndromic (70%), 20% of which follow autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. Waardenburg syndrome (WS) ranks first among autosomal dominant syndromic forms of HI. WS is characterized by sensorineural hearing impairment, pigmentation abnormalities of hair and skin and hypoplastic blue eyes or heterochromia iridis. WS is subdivided into four major types, WS1-WS4. WS1 is diagnosed by the presence of dystopia canthorum and PAX3 is the only gene involved. This study aims to determine the pathogenic mutation in a large Iranian pedigree affected with WS1 in order to further confirm the clinical diagnosis. In the present study, a family segregating HI was ascertained in a genetic counseling center. Upon clinical inspection, white forelock, dystopia canthorum, broad high nasal root and synophrys, characteristic of WS1 were evident. In order to clarify the genetic etiology and confirm the clinical data, primers were designed to amplify exons and exon-intron boundaries of the responsible gene, PAX3 with 10 exons, followed by the Sanger DNA sequencing method. Genetic analysis of PAX3 revealed a novel mutation in PAX3 (c.1024_1040 del AGCACGATTCCTTCCAA). Our data provide genotype-phenotype correlation for the mutation in PAX3 and WS1 in the studied family, with implications for genetic counseling, which necessitates detailed clinical inspection of HI patients to distinguish syndromic HI from the more common non-syndromic cases. Our results reveal the value of phenotype-directed genetic analysis and could further expand the spectrum of PAX3 mutations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Mediterranean dietary pattern and VEGF +405 G/C gene polymorphisms in patients with metabolic syndrome: An aspect of gene-nutrient interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajiluian, Ghazaleh; Abbasalizad Farhangi, Mahdieh; Jahangiry, Leila

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the relationship between Mediterranean dietary pattern, anthropometric and metabolic biomarkers and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) +405 G/C gene polymorphism in patient with metabolic syndrome (Mets). In this study 150 patients with Mets and 50 healthy subjects were enrolled. Dietary intakes were evaluated with a semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) and Mediterranean dietary quality index (Med-DQI) was assessed. Anthropometric assessments and blood pressure measurement were performed. Biochemical assays including fasting serum glucose (FSG), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), liver enzymes and lipid profiles were also assessed. Polymorphism of +405 G/C VEGF gene was determined utilizing polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragments length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method. Serum high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) was significantly lower and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC) concentrations and FSG were significantly higher in metabolic syndrome patients compared with control group (P consumption of "cholesterol" had significantly upper serum TG; also high consumption of "fish" and "vegetables-fruits" was associated with a significantly lower serum LDL concentrations. In metabolic syndrome patients with CC genotype, mean score of "saturated fatty acid" subgroup was significantly higher compared with other genotypes; whereas, in healthy individuals, mean score of "fruit-vegetable" subgroup in individuals of CC and GG genotype was significantly higher (P<0.05). Our findings indicated a significant relationship between Mediterranean dietary quality index and both anthropometric and metabolic risk factors. We also indicated a higher "saturated fatty acid" intake in CC genotype among metabolic syndrome patients.

  11. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  12. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  13. Novel insertion in exon 5 of the TCOF1 gene in twin sisters with Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marszałek-Kruk, Bożena Anna; Wójcicki, Piotr; Smigiel, Robert; Trzeciak, Wiesław H

    2012-08-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is associated with an abnormal differentiation of the first and second pharyngeal arches during fetal development. This causes mostly craniofacial deformities, which require numerous corrective surgeries. TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder and it occurs in the general population at a frequency of 1 in 50,000 live births. The syndrome is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the serine/alanine-rich protein named Treacle. Over 120 mutations of the TCOF1 gene responsible for TCS have been described. About 70% of recognized mutations are deletions, which lead to a frame shift, formation of a termination codon, and shortening of the protein product of the gene. Herewith, a new heterozygotic insertion, c.484_668ins185bp, was described in two monozygotic twin sisters suffering from TCS. This mutation was absent in their father, brother, and uncle, indicating a de novo origin. The insertion causes a shift in the reading frame and premature termination of translation at 167 aa. The novel insertion is the longest ever found in the TCOF1 gene and the only one found among monozygotic twin sisters.

  14. Heterozygous deletion at the SOX10 gene locus in two patients from a Chinese family with Waardenburg syndrome type II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzhi, He; Ruijin, Wen; Jieliang, Li; Xiaoyan, Ma; Haibo, Liu; Xiaoman, Wang; Jiajia, Xian; Shaoying, Li; Shuanglin, Li; Qing, Li

    2015-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a rare disease characterized by sensorineural deafness and pigment disturbance. To date, almost 100 mutations have been reported, but few reports on cases with SOX10 gene deletion. The inheritance pattern of SOX10 gene deletion is still unclear. Our objective was to identify the genetic causes of Waardenburg syndrome type II in a two-generation Chinese family. Clinical evaluations were conducted in both of the patients. Microarray analysis and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA) were performed to identify disease-related copy number variants (CNVs). DNA sequencing of the SOX10, MITF and SNAI2 genes was performed to identify the pathogenic mutation responsible for WS2. A 280kb heterozygous deletion at the 22q13.1 chromosome region (including SOX10) was detected in both of the patients. No mutation was found in the patients, unaffected family members and 30 unrelated healthy controls. This report is the first to describe SOX10 heterozygous deletions in Chinese WS2 patients. Our result conform the thesis that heterozygous deletions at SOX10 is an important pathogenicity for WS, and present as autosomal dominant inheritance. Nevertheless, heterozygous deletion of the SOX10 gene would be worth investigating to understand their functions and contributions to neurologic phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. TRBP and eIF6 homologue in Marsupenaeus japonicus play crucial roles in antiviral response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuai Wang

    Full Text Available Plants and invertebrates can suppress viral infection through RNA silencing, mediated by RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC. Trans-activation response RNA-binding protein (TRBP, consisting of three double-stranded RNA-binding domains, is a component of the RISC. In our previous paper, a TRBP homologue in Fenneropenaeus chinensis (Fc-TRBP was reported to directly bind to eukaryotic initiation factor 6 (Fc-eIF6. In this study, we further characterized the function of TRBP and the involvement of TRBP and eIF6 in antiviral RNA interference (RNAi pathway of shrimp. The double-stranded RNA binding domains (dsRBDs B and C of the TRBP from Marsupenaeus japonicus (Mj-TRBP were found to mediate the interaction of TRBP and eIF6. Gel-shift assays revealed that the N-terminal of Mj-TRBP dsRBD strongly binds to double-stranded RNA (dsRNA and that the homodimer of the TRBP mediated by the C-terminal dsRBD increases the affinity to dsRNA. RNAi against either Mj-TRBP or Mj-eIF6 impairs the dsRNA-induced sequence-specific RNAi pathway and facilitates the proliferation of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV. These results further proved the important roles of TRBP and eIF6 in the antiviral response of shrimp.

  16. Functional Promiscuity of Homologues of the Bacterial ArsA ATPases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rostislav Castillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The ArsA ATPase of E. coli plays an essential role in arsenic detoxification. Published evidence implicates ArsA in the energization of As(III efflux via the formation of an oxyanion-translocating complex with ArsB. In addition, eukaryotic ArsA homologues have several recognized functions unrelated to arsenic resistance. By aligning ArsA homologues, constructing phylogenetic trees, examining ArsA encoding operons, and estimating the probable coevolution of these homologues with putative transporters and auxiliary proteins unrelated to ArsB, we provide evidence for new functions for ArsA homologues. They may play roles in carbon starvation, gas vesicle biogenesis, and arsenic resistance. The results lead to the proposal that ArsA homologues energize four distinct and nonhomologous transporters, ArsB, ArsP, CstA, and Acr3.

  17. The Coprinopsis cinerea Tup1 homologue Cag1 is required for gill formation during fruiting body morphogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Masuda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The pileus (cap of the fruiting body in homobasidiomycete fungi bears the hymenium, a layer of cells that includes the basidia where nuclear fusion, meiosis and sporulation occur. Coprinopsis cinerea is a model system for studying fruiting body development. The hymenium of C. cinerea forms at the surface of the gills in the pileus. In a previous study, we identified a mutation called cap-growthless1-1 (cag1-1 that blocks gill formation, which yields primordia that never mature. In this study, we found that the cag1 gene encodes a homologue of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Tup1. The C. cinerea genome contains another Tup1 homologue gene called Cc.tupA. Reciprocal tagging of Cag1 and Cc.TupA with green and red fluorescent proteins revealed that the relative ratios of the amounts of the two Tup1 paralogues varied among tissues. Compared with Cc.TupA, Cag1 was preferentially expressed in the gill trama tissue cells, suggesting that the function of Cag1 is required for gill trama tissue differentiation and maintenance. Yeast two-hybrid analysis and co-localisation of Cag1 and Cc.TupA suggested that Cag1 interacts with Cc.TupA in the nuclei of certain cells.

  18. Epigenetic variation in the mu-opioid receptor gene in infants with neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachman, Elisha M; Hayes, Marie J; Lester, Barry M; Terrin, Norma; Brown, Mark S; Nielsen, David A; Davis, Jonathan M

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) from in utero opioid exposure is highly variable with genetic factors appearing to play an important role. Epigenetic changes in cytosine:guanine (CpG) dinucleotide methylation can occur after drug exposure and may help to explain NAS variability. We correlated DNA methylation levels in the mu-opioid receptor (OPRM1) promoter in opioid-exposed infants with NAS outcomes. DNA samples from cord blood or saliva were analyzed for 86 infants who were being treated for NAS according to institutional protocol. Methylation levels at 16 OPRM1 CpG sites were determined and correlated with NAS outcome measures, including need for treatment, treatment with ≥ 2 medications, and length of hospital stay. We adjusted for covariates and multiple genetic testing. Sixty-five percent of infants required treatment for NAS, and 24% required ≥ 2 medications. Hypermethylation of the OPRM1 promoter was measured at the -10 CpG in treated vs nontreated infants (adjusted difference δ = 3.2% [95% CI, 0.3-6.0%], P = .03; nonsignificant after multiple testing correction). There was hypermethylation at the -14 (δ = 4.9% [95% CI, 1.8%-8.1%], P = .003), -10 (δ = 5.0% [95% CI, 2.3-7.7%], P = .0005), and +84 (δ = 3.5% [95% CI, 0.6-6.4], P = .02) CpG sites in infants requiring ≥ 2 medications, which remained significant for -14 and -10 after multiple testing correction. Increased methylation within the OPRM1 promoter is associated with worse NAS outcomes, consistent with gene silencing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A common polymorphism in a Williams syndrome gene predicts amygdala reactivity and extraversion in healthy adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swartz, Johnna R.; Waller, Rebecca; Bogdan, Ryan; Knodt, Annchen R.; Sabhlok, Aditi; Hyde, Luke W.; Hariri, Ahmad R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Williams syndrome (WS), a genetic disorder resulting from hemizygous microdeletion of chromosome 7q11.23, has emerged as a model for identifying the genetic architecture of socioemotional behavior. Recently, common polymorphisms in GTF2I, which is found within the WS microdeletion, have been associated with reduced social anxiety in the general population. Identifying neural phenotypes affected by these polymorphisms will help advance our understanding not only of this specific genetic association but also the broader neurogenetic mechanisms of variability in socioemotional behavior. Methods Through an ongoing parent protocol, the Duke Neurogenetics Study, we measured threat-related amygdala reactivity to fearful and angry facial expressions using functional MRI (fMRI), assessed trait personality using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, and imputed GTF2I rs13227433 from saliva-derived DNA using custom Illumina arrays. Participants included 808 non-Hispanic Caucasian, African American, and Asian university students. Results The GTF2I rs13227433 AA genotype, previously associated with lower social anxiety, predicted decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity. An indirect effect of GTF2I genotype on the warmth facet of extraversion was mediated by decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity in women but not men. Conclusions A common polymorphism in the WS gene GTF2I associated with reduced social anxiety predicts decreased threat-related amygdala reactivity, which mediates an association between genotype and increased warmth in women. These results are consistent with reduced threat-related amygdala reactivity in WS and suggest that common variation in GTF2I contributes to broader variability in socioemotional brain function and behavior, with implications for understanding the neurogenetic bases of WS as well as social anxiety. PMID:26853120

  20. Association between two common polymorphisms of PPARgamma gene and metabolic syndrome families in a Chinese population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li Lan; Hua, Qi; Liu, Rong Kun; Yang, Zheng

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the association between the two common polymorphisms, C1431T and Pro12Ala of PPARgamma gene, and metabolic syndrome (MS) in a Chinese population. We included 423 subjects with MS and families without MS. Subjects were divided into three groups: MS probands and first- and second-degree relatives of probands, spouses and controls. Each group was then divided into two subgroups according to genotype (Pro/Pro and Pro/Ala for Pro12Ala, CC and CT + TT for 1431C/T). Anthropometric indices, fasting plasma glucose, lipid profile, Sv1 + Rv5 of electrocardiogram and single nucleotide polymorphisms were detected. Frequencies of C1431T genotypes, but not Pro12Ala, were different among the three groups. MS patients with Pro/Ala genotype had higher fasting blood sugar (FBS) levels and Sv1 + Rv5. Controls with Ala allele had lower total cholesterol levels. In relatives, Ala carriers had higher high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c) levels. BMI of the different groups were not significant. MS patients with T allele had higher FBS and Sv1 + Rv5. In relatives of MS subjects, T-allele carriers had lower blood uric acid, creatinine and higher HDL-c levels and Sv1 + Rv5. C1431T, but not Pro12Ala polymorphisms, are associated with MS in a Chinese population. In MS patients, Ala allele and T allele are both associated with higher fasting blood sugar and higher left ventricular voltage. In controls, Ala carriers have lower total cholesterol. In MS relatives, Ala carriers had higher HDL-c levels and T-allele carriers had lower uric acid, creatinine and higher HDL-c levels and left ventricular voltage.

  1. Mutations in the Chromatin Regulator Gene BRPF1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability and Deficient Histone Acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Kezhi; Rousseau, Justine; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Kiss, Courtney; Lehman, Anna; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Stumpel, Constance T R; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Robak, Laurie; Scaglia, Fernando; Nguyen, Thi Tuyet Mai; Fu, He; Ajeawung, Norbert F; Camurri, Maria Vittoria; Li, Lin; Gardham, Alice; Panis, Bianca; Almannai, Mohammed; Sacoto, Maria J Guillen; Baskin, Berivan; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Xia, Fan; Bi, Weimin; Cho, Megan T; Potjer, Thomas P; Santen, Gijs W E; Parker, Michael J; Canham, Natalie; McKinnon, Margaret; Potocki, Lorraine; MacKenzie, Jennifer J; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Campeau, Philippe M; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2017-01-05

    Identification of over 500 epigenetic regulators in humans raises an interesting question regarding how chromatin dysregulation contributes to different diseases. Bromodomain and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multivalent chromatin regulator possessing three histone-binding domains, one non-specific DNA-binding module, and several motifs for interacting with and activating three lysine acetyltransferases. Genetic analyses of fish brpf1 and mouse Brpf1 have uncovered an important role in skeletal, hematopoietic, and brain development, but it remains unclear how BRPF1 is linked to human development and disease. Here, we describe an intellectual disability disorder in ten individuals with inherited or de novo monoallelic BRPF1 mutations. Symptoms include infantile hypotonia, global developmental delay, intellectual disability, expressive language impairment, and facial dysmorphisms. Central nervous system and spinal abnormalities are also seen in some individuals. These clinical features overlap with but are not identical to those reported for persons with KAT6A or KAT6B mutations, suggesting that BRPF1 targets these two acetyltransferases and additional partners in humans. Functional assays showed that the resulting BRPF1 variants are pathogenic and impair acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23, an abundant but poorly characterized epigenetic mark. We also found a similar deficiency in different lines of Brpf1-knockout mice. These data indicate that aberrations in the chromatin regulator gene BRPF1 cause histone H3 acetylation deficiency and a previously unrecognized intellectual disability syndrome. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluvastatin increases insulin-like growth factor-1 gene expression in rat model of metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansy, Wael H.; Sourour, Doaa A.; Shaker, Olfat G.; Mahfouz, Mahmoud M.

    2008-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) was found to have a role in both glucose homeostasis and cardiovascular diseases. The present study was designed to compare the effects of fluvastatin and metformin on IGF-1 mRNA expression within the liver and other individual components of the metabolic syndrome induced in rats by high fructose feeding. Rats fed 60% fructose in diet for 6 weeks were treated daily with fluvastatin (3.75 mg/kg/day) during the last two weeks and were compared with untreated fructose fed group. Fasting levels of plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin, nitric oxide products, IGF-1 mRNA within the liver as well as systolic blood pressure and body weight were determined. Compared to control rats, the fructose fed group developed hypertension, hyperlipidemia, hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia and endothelial dysfunction as well as decreased levels of plasma IGF-1 and its mRNA within the liver. Fructose fed rats treated with fluvastatin or metformin for 2 weeks showed significant decrease in plasma cholesterol, triglyceride, insulin and glucose levels compared to untreated fructose fed group. Also, both drugs increased significantly plasma levels of nitric oxide products and IGF-1 together with significant increase in IGF-1 mRNA within the liver. However, only metformin treated rats showed significant decrease in systolic blood pressure compared to fructose fed group. This study showed that in a rat model of insulin resistance, fluvastatin improves the metabolic profile and increases plasma level of IGF-1 and its gene expression as effective as metformin. (author)

  3. Loss of magel2, a candidate gene for features of Prader-Willi syndrome, impairs reproductive function in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca E Mercer

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: MAGEL2 is one of several genes typically inactivated in the developmental obesity disorder Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS. The physiological consequences of loss of MAGEL2, but without the concurrent loss of other PWS genes, are not well understood. Gene-targeted mutation of Magel2 in mice disrupts circadian rhythm and metabolism causing reduced total activity, reduced weight gain before weaning, and increased adiposity after weaning. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We now show that loss of Magel2 in mice causes reduced fertility in both males and females through extended breeding intervals and early reproductive decline and termination. Female Magel2-null mice display extended and irregular estrous cycles, while males show decreased testosterone levels, and reduced olfactory preference for female odors. CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that loss of MAGEL2 contributes to the reproductive deficits seen in people with PWS, and further highlights the role of normal circadian rhythm in the maintenance of fertility.

  4. Characterization of a novel mutation in PAX9 gene in a family with non-syndromic dental agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddaji Mastouri, Marwa; De Coster, Peter; Zaghabani, Aicha; Trabelsi, Saoussen; May, Yosra; Saad, Ali; Coucke, Paul; H'mida Ben Brahim, Dorra

    2016-11-01

    Dental agenesis is the most common developmental anomaly in man and may present either as an isolated trait or as part of a syndrome, such as ectodermal dysplasia. Until now, the underlying molecular pathogenic mechanisms responsible for dental agenesis are still largely unknown. Several genetic and molecular studies have demonstrated that at least 300 genes are involved in tooth formation and development, coding for specific transcriptional factors, receptors or growth factors that are expressed at specific developmental stages. Dental agenesis in this respect is believed to result from altered expression of one or more of these factors during initiation and early morphogenesis of the tooth germ, and the first actors identified were MSX1 and PAX9. In this study, we focalized on a Tunisian family with a non-syndromic autosomal dominant form of tooth agenesis. In order to screen for the eventual genetic cause of dental agenesis in this family we sequenced 4 genes; PAX9, WNT10A, MSX1 and AXIN2 using Sanger sequencing. Direct Screening analysis of PAX9 gene, revealed a novel mutation p.Asp200Serfs*13. It consists of a duplication of 5 basepairs leading to a codon stop 13 position downstream. This novel mutation was found in all affected family members. In this report, we present the first genetic study of a Tunisian family with a non-syndromic autosomal dominant form of tooth agenesis, in which we identified in PAX9 gene a novel mutation. It most likely results in nonsense mediated RNA decay and haploinsifficiency that reduce the transactivation capacity of PAX9. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Pathophysiological, genetic and gene expression features of a novel rodent model of the cardio-metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H Wallis

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Complex etiology and pathogenesis of pathophysiological components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome have been demonstrated in humans and animal models.We have generated extensive physiological, genetic and genome-wide gene expression profiles in a congenic strain of the spontaneously diabetic Goto-Kakizaki (GK rat containing a large region (110 cM, 170 Mb of rat chromosome 1 (RNO1, which covers diabetes and obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL, introgressed onto the genetic background of the normoglycaemic Brown Norway (BN strain. This novel disease model, which by the length of the congenic region closely mirrors the situation of a chromosome substitution strain, exhibits a wide range of abnormalities directly relevant to components of the cardio-metabolic syndrome and diabetes complications, including hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, enhanced insulin secretion both in vivo and in vitro, insulin resistance, hypertriglyceridemia and altered pancreatic and renal histological structures. Gene transcription data in kidney, liver, skeletal muscle and white adipose tissue indicate that a disproportionately high number (43-83% of genes differentially expressed between congenic and BN rats map to the GK genomic interval targeted in the congenic strain, which represents less than 5% of the total length of the rat genome. Genotype analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in strains genetically related to the GK highlights clusters of conserved and strain-specific variants in RNO1 that can assist the identification of naturally occurring variants isolated in diabetic and hypertensive strains when different phenotype selection procedures were applied.Our results emphasize the importance of rat congenic models for defining the impact of genetic variants in well-characterised QTL regions on in vivo pathophysiological features and cis-/trans- regulation of gene expression. The congenic strain reported here provides a novel and sustainable model for

  6. Syndrome differentiation in traditional Chinese medicine and E-cadherin/ICAM-1 gene protein expression in gastric carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Da-Zhi; Xu, Ling; Wei, Pin-Kang; Liu, Long; He, Jin

    2007-08-28

    To explore the syndrome differentiation in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and gene protein expression in gastric carcinoma. Preoperative data of gastric cancer cases were collected from the General Surgery Department and classified according to the criteria for syndrome differentiation in TCM. E-cadherin (E-cad) and ICAM-1 gene protein expressions were detected in postoperative specimens from these cases by the immunohistochemical EnVision two-step method. The E-cad positive expression rate was 90% in 100 cases of gastric carcinoma. The difference in E-cad expression was significant between the different syndrome differentiation types in TCM (P cad expression between the stagnation of phlegm-damp type and the deficiency in both qi and blood and the deficiency-cold of stomach and spleen types, where E-cad expression was high. There was no significant difference between the internal obstruction of stagnant toxin type and the in-coordination between liver and stomach type, where E-cad expression was relatively low. The ICAM-1 positive expression rate was 58%, and there was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (c2 = 8.999, P > 0.05). E-cad expression is relatively low in the internal obstruction of stagnant toxin type and the in-coordination between liver and stomach type, where tumor development and metastasis may be associated with low E-cad expression, or with low homogeneous adhesiveness between tumor cells.

  7. Gene mapping of Usher syndrome type IIa: Localization of the gene to a 2.1-cM segment on chromosome 1q41

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimberling, W.J.; Weston, M.D.; Ing, P.S.; Connolly, C. [Center for Hereditary Communication Disorders, Omaha, NE (United States); Sumegi, J. [Univ. of Nebraska, Omaha, NE (United States); Moeller, C. [Univ. of Linkoeping Medical School (Sweden); Aarem, A. van; Cremers, C.W.R.J. [University Hospital, Nijmegen (Netherlands); Martini, A.; Milani, M. [and others

    1995-01-01

    Usher syndrome type II is associated with hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa but not with any vestibular problems. It is known to be genetically heterogeneous, and one locus (termed USH2A) has been linked to chromosome 1q41. In an effort to refine the localization of USH2A, the genetic map of the region between and adjacent to the marker loci previously recognized as flanking USH2A (D1S70 and PPOL) is updated. Analysis of marker data on 68 Usher II families places the USH2A gene into a 2.1-cM region between the markers D1S237 and D1S229. The gene for transforming growth factor {beta}2 (TGFB2) and the gene for the homeodomain box (HLX1) are both eliminated as candidates for USH2A, by virtue of their localization outside these flanking markers. The earlier finding of genetic heterogeneity was confirmed in six new families, and the proportion of unlinked Usher II families is estimated at 12.5%. The placement of the USH2A gene into this region will aid in the physical mapping and isolation of the gene itself. 30 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Klinefelter syndrome comorbidities linked to increased X chromosome gene dosage and altered protein interactome activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belling, Kirstine González-Izarzugaza; Russo, Francesco; Jensen, Anders Boeck

    2017-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS) (47,XXY) is the most common male sex chromosome aneuploidy. Diagnosis and clinical supervision remain a challenge due to varying phenotypic presentation and insufficient characterization of the syndrome. Here we combine health data-driven epidemiology and molecular level...

  9. (GPR98) gene in an Iranian family with Usher syndrome type II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-12-04

    Dec 4, 2014 ... Usher syndrome (USH) is an autosomal recessive disease characterized by bilateral sensorineural ... Usher syndrome type 1 (USH1) which is manifested by severe to profound congenital ... down-sloping moderate sensorineural HL across all frequencies in this family. (c) Segregation of c.10019T>G (p.

  10. Correlation between clinical features and MECP2 gene mutations in patients with Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Megahed

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Mutation screening for MECP2 is a fast and reliable method to diagnose patients clinically suspected to suffer from Rett syndrome or female patients with atypical Rett syndrome features, mental retardation, developmental delay and other neurological abnormalities who do not fit any specific diagnosis. Also, patients with MECP2 mutation presented with a more severe phenotype.

  11. The Behavioural Phenotype of Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Evidence for a Gene-Environment Interaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, L.; Oliver, C.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Behaviour problems and a preference for adult contact are reported to be prominent in the phenotype of Smith-Magenis syndrome. In this study we examined the relationship between social interactions and self-injurious and aggressive/disruptive behaviour in Smith-Magenis syndrome to explore potential operant reinforcement of problem…

  12. Sex and Genes, Part 1: Sexuality and down, Prader-Willi, and Williams Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Shelley Lynn; Richards, Deborah A.; Miodrag, Nancy; Fedoroff, J. Paul

    2012-01-01

    Specific genetic syndromes affect individuals' sexual development, experiences, and fertility. Individuals with specific syndromes can also display inappropriate sexual behavior resulting from vulnerabilities presented by their genetic makeup. Using clinical case studies, we discuss the specific impact that Down, Prader-Willi, and Williams…

  13. Gene Expression Factor Analysis to Differentiate Pathways Linked to Fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, and Depression in a Diverse Patient Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iacob, Eli; Light, Alan R; Donaldson, Gary W; Okifuji, Akiko; Hughen, Ronald W; White, Andrea T; Light, Kathleen C

    2016-01-01

    To determine if independent candidate genes can be grouped into meaningful biologic factors, and whether these factors are associated with the diagnosis of chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), while controlling for comorbid depression, sex, and age. We included leukocyte messenger RNA gene expression from a total of 261 individuals, including healthy controls (n = 61), patients with FMS only (n = 15), with CFS only (n = 33), with comorbid CFS and FMS (n = 79), and with medication-resistant (n = 42) or medication-responsive (n = 31) depression. We used exploratory factor analysis (EFA) on 34 candidate genes to determine factor scores and regression analysis to examine whether these factors were associated with specific diagnoses. EFA resulted in 4 independent factors with minimal overlap of genes between factors, explaining 51% of the variance. We labeled these factors by function as 1) purinergic and cellular modulators, 2) neuronal growth and immune function, 3) nociception and stress mediators, and 4) energy and mitochondrial function. Regression analysis predicting these biologic factors using FMS, CFS, depression severity, age, and sex revealed that greater expression in factors 1 and 3 was positively associated with CFS and negatively associated with depression severity (Quick Inventory for Depression Symptomatology score), but not associated with FMS. Expression of candidate genes can be grouped into meaningful clusters, and CFS and depression are associated with the same 2 clusters, but in opposite directions, when controlling for comorbid FMS. Given high comorbid disease and interrelationships between biomarkers, EFA may help determine patient subgroups in this population based on gene expression. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  14. Central precocious puberty in a patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita and Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Won Koh

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is caused by the mutation of DAX-1 gene (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1, and can occur as part of a contiguous gene deletion syndrome in association with glycerol kinase (GK deficiency, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and X-linked interleukin-1 receptor accessory protein-like 1 (IL1RAPL1 gene deficiency. It is usually associated with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, although in rare cases, it has been reported to occur in normal puberty or even central precocious puberty. This study addresses a case in which central precocious puberty developed in a boy with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita who had complete deletion of the genes DAX-1, GK and IL1RAPL1 (Xp21 contiguous gene deletion syndrome. Initially he was admitted for the management of adrenal crisis at the age of 2 months, and managed with hydrocortisone and florinef. At 45 months of age, his each testicular volumes of 4 mL and a penile length of 5 cm were noted, with pubic hair of Tanner stage 2. His bone age was advanced and a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH stimulation test showed a luteinizing hormone peak of 8.26 IU/L, confirming central precocious puberty. He was then treated with a GnRH agonist, as well as steroid replacement therapy. In Korea, this is the first case of central precocious puberty developed in a male patient with X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita.

  15. What Causes Rett Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it? Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Rett syndrome? Most cases of Rett syndrome are ... in the MECP2 gene represent the most prevalent causes of Rett syndrome. The development and severity of ...

  16. Role of sequence variations in the human ether-a-go-go-related gene (HERG, KCNH2) in the Brugada syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerk, Arie O.; Wilders, Ronald; Schulze-Bahr, Eric; Beekman, Leander; Bhuiyan, Zahurul A.; Bertrand, Jessica; Eckardt, Lars; Lin, Dongxin; Borggrefe, Martin; Breithardt, Günter; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tan, Hanno L.; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2005-01-01

    Background: Brugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited electrical disorder associated with a high incidence of sudden death. In a minority of patients, it has been linked to mutations in SCN5A, the gene encoding the pore-forming alpha-subunit of the cardiac Na+ channel. Other causally related genes

  17. Molecular Screening of "MECP2" Gene in a Cohort of Lebanese Patients Suspected with Rett Syndrome: Report on a Mild Case with a Novel Indel Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corbani, S.; Chouery, E.; Fayyad, J.; Fawaz, A.; El Tourjuman, O.; Badens, C.; Lacoste, C.; Delague, V.; Megarbane, A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Rett syndrome (RTT), an X-linked, dominant, neurodevelopment disorder represents 10% of female subjects with profound intellectual disability. Mutations in the "MECP2" gene are responsible for up to 95% of the classical RTT cases, and nearly 500 different mutations distributed throughout the gene have been reported. Methods:…

  18. The C15orf2 gene in the Prader-Willi syndrome region is subject to genomic imprinting and positive selection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wawrzik, Michaela; Unmehopa, Unga Arifa; Swaab, Dick Frans; van de Nes, Johannes; Buiting, Karin; Horsthemke, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    C15orf2 (Chromosome 15 open reading frame 2) is an intronless gene, which is located in the Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) chromosomal region on human chromosome 15. Mice do not have an orthologous gene. Here we show that expression of C15orf2 in the fetal human brain is imprinted. Using Western blot

  19. Cloning and expression analysis of two ROR-γ homologues (ROR-γa1 and ROR-γa2) in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, Milena M; Wang, Tiehui; Costa, Maria M; Harun, Nor Omaima; Secombes, Chris J

    2012-08-01

    This paper describes the cloning and characterisation of two retinoid-related orphan receptor (ROR)-γ homologues (ROR-γa1 and -γa2) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The coding region predicted for both homologues consists of 1410 base pairs (bp), which translate into two 469 amino acid (aa) proteins. The trout ROR-γs revealed a high conservation of both DNA- and ligand-binding domains (functional regions of the nuclear receptor family), and shared a high homology to mammalian ROR-γt. A phylogenetic tree containing ROR family members confirmed that both trout homologues clustered within the ROR-γ group. Both results suggested that these molecules are likely to be ROR-γ homologues, more similar to the mammalian splice variant ROR-γt than the full length ROR-γ. Expression analysis of tissues obtained from healthy fish revealed highest constitutive expression of trout ROR-γ in muscle, followed by the brain, heart and skin. This suggests that these genes may play an important role in such tissues. In vitro studies, using trout cell lines, demonstrated that ROR-γ is induced significantly by LPS and down-regulated by the presence of PolyI:C and recombinant interferon (IFN)-γ. Moreover, analysis of this gene in head kidney macrophages and mixed primary leucocyte cultures indicated that differences were apparent between the different cell types/sources used, indicating that its expression may be cell-type dependent. Additional studies to investigate the regulation of this gene in vivo demonstrated that its expression was significantly higher in vaccinated vs unvaccinated fish following bacterial (Yersinia ruckeri) challenge but it was down-regulated after a viral (VHSV) infection. This suggests a potential role of trout ROR-γ, a putative T(H)17 transcription factor, in protection against extracellular bacteria. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Frameshift mutational target gene analysis identifies similarities and differences in constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency and Lynch syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maletzki, Claudia; Huehns, Maja; Bauer, Ingrid; Ripperger, Tim; Mork, Maureen M; Vilar, Eduardo; Klöcking, Sabine; Zettl, Heike; Prall, Friedrich; Linnebacher, Michael

    2017-07-01

    Mismatch-repair deficient (MMR-D) malignancies include Lynch Syndrome (LS), which is secondary to germline mutations in one of the MMR genes, and the rare childhood-form of constitutional mismatch repair-deficiency (CMMR-D); caused by bi-allelic MMR gene mutations. A hallmark of LS-associated cancers is microsatellite instability (MSI), characterized by coding frameshift mutations (cFSM) in target genes. By contrast, tumors arising in CMMR-D patients are thought to display a somatic mutation pattern differing from LS. This study has the main goal to identify cFSM in MSI target genes relevant in CMMR-D and to compare the spectrum of common somatic mutations, including alterations in DNA polymerases POLE and D1 between LS and CMMR-D. CMMR-D-associated tumors harbored more somatic mutations compared to LS cases, especially in the TP53 gene and in POLE and POLD1, where novel mutations were additionally identified. Strikingly, MSI in classical mononucleotide markers BAT40 and CAT25 was frequent in CMMR-D cases. MSI-target gene analysis revealed mutations in CMMR-D-associated tumors, some of them known to be frequently hit in LS, such as RNaseT2, HT001, and TGFβR2. Our results imply a general role for these cFSM as potential new drivers of MMR-D tumorigenesis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [The clinical application of gene chips combined with CT examination in the diagnosis of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Feng; Lin, Ying; Luo, Qiong; Chen, Xiaoke; Huang, Lifen; Liang, Zijian; Wang, Haitao; Yu, Feng

    2013-10-01

    To explore the feasibility and superiority of the gene chip method and temporal bone CT in diagnosis of large vestibular aqueduct syndrome. One hundred and eighty-eight cases of deaf students in Guangzhou were selected,the microarray detection of the SLC26A4 gene locus was performed,and the 26 cases of students with detected SLC26A4 gene mutations received temporal bone CT imaging. Among the detected 26 cases of patients with hearing loss, IVS7-2A>G homozygous mutation was found in 7 cases, 17 cases were heterozygous mutation, 2168A>G heterozygous mutation presented in three cases, including one case of IVS7-2A>G and 2168A>G compound heterozygous mutations. Temporal bone CT findings of 25 cases among the 26 patients showed bilateral large vestibular aqueduct,among which 9 cases exhibited bilateral cochlear malformations, and 1 case was normal. Among the different SLC26A4 gene mutations, IVS7-2A>G point mutation rates the highest, followed by 2168A>G. Most of the CT examination prompted the expansion of the vestibular aqueduct. Deafness gene chip hotspot detection of SLC26A4 gene mutations can diagnose such patients before CT examination,which can be used for screening people with high risk of deafness prenatal screening. The early detection and early diagnosis can guide proper precautionary measures in advance to prevent the occurrence of prelingual deafness.

  2. AIRE variations in Addison's disease and autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS): partial gene deletions contribute to APS I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bøe Wolff, A S; Oftedal, B; Johansson, S; Bruland, O; Løvås, K; Meager, A; Pedersen, C; Husebye, E S; Knappskog, P M

    2008-03-01

    Autoimmune Addison's disease (AAD) is often associated with other components in autoimmune polyendocrine syndromes (APS). Whereas APS I is caused by mutations in the AIRE gene, the susceptibility genes for AAD and APS II are unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether polymorphisms or copy number variations in the AIRE gene were associated with AAD and APS II. First, nine SNPs in the AIRE gene were analyzed in 311 patients with AAD and APS II and 521 healthy controls, identifying no associated risk. Second, in a subgroup of 25 of these patients, AIRE sequencing revealed three novel polymorphisms. Finally, the AIRE copy number was determined by duplex quantitative PCR in 14 patients with APS I, 161 patients with AAD and APS II and in 39 healthy subjects. In two Scandinavian APS I patients previously reported to be homozygous for common AIRE mutations, we identified large deletions of the AIRE gene covering at least exon 2 to exon 8. We conclude that polymorphisms in the AIRE gene are not associated with AAD and APS II. We further suggest that DNA analysis of the parents of patients found to be homozygous for mutations in AIRE, always should be performed.

  3. Expansion of the clinical ocular spectrum of Wolfram Syndrome in a family carrying a novel WFS1 gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacón-Camacho, Oscar; Arce-Gonzalez, Rocio; Granillo-Alvarez, Mariella; Flores-Limas, Sanjuanita; Ramírez, Magdalena; Zenteno, Juan C

    2013-12-01

    To present the results of the clinical and molecular analyses of a familial case of Wolfram Syndrome (WFS) associated with a novel ocular anomaly. Full ophthalmologic examination was performed in two WFS siblings. Visante OCT imaging was used for assessing anterior segment anomalies. Genetic analysis included PCR amplification and exon-by-exon nucleotide sequencing of the WFS1 gene. Ocular anomalies in both affected siblings included congenital cataract, glaucoma, and optic atrophy. Interestingly, microspherophakia, a feature that has not been previously associated with WFS, was observed in both siblings. Genetic analysis disclosed a novel c.1525_1539 homozygous deletion in exon 8 of WFS1 in DNA from both affected patients. The recognition of microspherophakia in two siblings carrying a novel WFS1 mutation expands the clinical and molecular spectrum of Wolfram syndrome.

  4. Dysregulation of X-Linked Gene Expression in Klinefelter’s Syndrome and Association With Verbal Cognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vawter, Marquis P.; Harvey, Philip D.; DeLisi, Lynn E.

    2007-01-01

    Klinefelter’s Syndrome (KS) is a chromosomal karyotype with one or more extra X chromosomes. KS individuals often show language impairment and the phenotype might be due to overexpression of genes on the extra X chromosome(s). We profiled mRNA derived from lymphoblastoid cell lines from males with documented KS and control males using the Affymetrix U133P microarray platform. There were 129 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) in KS group compared with controls after Benjamini–Hochberg false discovery adjustment. The DEGs included 14 X chromosome genes which were significantly over-represented. The Y chromosome had zero DEGs. In exploratory analysis of gene expression–cognition relationships, 12 DEGs showed significant correlation of expression with measures of verbal cognition in KS. Overexpression of one pseudoautosomal gene, GTPBP6 (GTP binding protein 6, putative) was inversely correlated with verbal IQ (r = −0.86, P < 0.001) and four other measures of verbal ability. Overexpression of XIST was found in KS compared to XY controls suggesting that silencing of many genes on the X chromosome might occur in KS similar to XX females. The microarray findings for eight DEGs were validated by quantitative PCR. The 14 X chromosome DEGs were not differentially expressed in prior studies comparing female and male brains suggesting a dysregulation profile unique to KS. Examination of X-linked DEGs, such as GTPBP6, TAF9L, and CXORF21, that show verbal cognition–gene expression correlations may establish a causal link between these genes, neurodevelopment, and language function. A screen of candidate genes may serve as biomarkers of KS for early diagnosis. PMID:17347996

  5. Correlations of gene expression with ratings of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in Tourette syndrome: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Ander, Bradley P; Jickling, Glen C; Gunther, Joan R; Corbett, Blythe A; Bos-Veneman, Netty G P; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Schweitzer, Julie B; Sharp, Frank R

    2012-10-30

    Inattentiveness, impulsivity and hyperactivity are the primary behaviors associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Previous studies showed that peripheral blood gene expression signatures can mirror central nervous system disease. Tourette syndrome (TS) is associated with inattention (IA) and hyperactivity/impulsivity (HI) symptoms over 50% of the time. This study determined if gene expression in blood correlated significantly with IA and/or HI rating scale scores in participants with TS. RNA was isolated from the blood of 21 participants with TS, and gene expression measured on Affymetrix human U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. To identify the genes that correlated with Conners' Parents Ratings of IA and HI ratings of symptoms, an analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) was performed, controlling for age, gender and batch. There were 1201 gene probesets that correlated with IA scales, 1625 that correlated with HI scales, and 262 that correlated with both IA and HI scale scores (P0.4). Immune, catecholamine and other neurotransmitter pathways were associated with IA and HI behaviors. A number of the identified genes (n=27) have previously been reported in ADHD genetic studies. Many more genes correlated with either IA or HI scales alone compared to those that correlated with both IA and HI scales. These findings support the concept that the pathophysiology of ADHD and/or its subtypes in TS may involve the interaction of multiple genes. These preliminary data also suggest gene expression may be useful for studying IA and HI symptoms that relate to ADHD in TS and perhaps non-TS participants. These results will need to be confirmed in future studies.

  6. Initial characterization of a bolA homologue from Pseudomonas fluorescens indicates different roles for BolA-like proteins in P. fluorescens and Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Birgit; Nybroe, Ole

    2006-01-01

    A expression. The mutant grew slower than the wild-type strain in minimal medium with L-serine as the sole nitrogen source, while growth rates were similar on a mixture of L-serine and L-cysteine. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis indicated that the bolA homologue is the second gene...

  7. [Association between pre-excitation syndrome and 7q3 D7S505 pseudonym gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wenling; Liu, Guoshu; Hu, Dayi; Qi, Yu; Shan, Zhaoliang; Luo, Leiming; Zhang, Minghua; Wang, Li; Yi, Jun

    2002-06-25

    Pre-excitation syndrome is considered to be autosomal dominant hereditary disease. The objective of this study was to search the genetic foundation of the pre-excitation syndrome. Genomic DNA was isolated from peripheral lymphocytes obtained from 44 cases of patients with pre-excitation syndrome and 53 normal persons. Polymorphic short tandem repeats(STR) were amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The genotype of each individual was determined by polymorphic STR including D7S505,D7S688,D7S483. Association analysis between the pre-excitation syndrome and the 3 STR (D7S505,D7S483 and D7S688) was tested by genotyping. The relative risk(RR) of alleles A2 A3 A4 and A6 of D7S505 were 1.051 6, 3.432,1.563 1 and 1.714 3 respectively all of which were more than 1, but only the RR of A3 had statistic significant difference, P < 0.05 after tested by kappa(2). It supposed that the distribution of allele A3(266 bp) of D7S505 in patients with pre-excitation syndrome was much higher than that in normal controls, which suggested that pre-excitation syndrome is associated with D7S505. Whereas, there were no significant difference in every allele of D7S483 between the pre-excitation syndrome and normal persons, which suggested that pre-excitation syndrome is not associated with D7S483. The pre-excitation syndrome is associated with D7S505,the result is the foundation of the molecular genetics of the disease.

  8. The first missense mutation of NHS gene in a Tunisian family with clinical features of NHS syndrome including cardiac anomaly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chogr