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Sample records for syndrome gene histone

  1. Mutations in the Chromatin Regulator Gene BRPF1 Cause Syndromic Intellectual Disability and Deficient Histone Acetylation.

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    Yan, Kezhi; Rousseau, Justine; Littlejohn, Rebecca Okashah; Kiss, Courtney; Lehman, Anna; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Stumpel, Constance T R; Stegmann, Alexander P A; Robak, Laurie; Scaglia, Fernando; Nguyen, Thi Tuyet Mai; Fu, He; Ajeawung, Norbert F; Camurri, Maria Vittoria; Li, Lin; Gardham, Alice; Panis, Bianca; Almannai, Mohammed; Sacoto, Maria J Guillen; Baskin, Berivan; Ruivenkamp, Claudia; Xia, Fan; Bi, Weimin; Cho, Megan T; Potjer, Thomas P; Santen, Gijs W E; Parker, Michael J; Canham, Natalie; McKinnon, Margaret; Potocki, Lorraine; MacKenzie, Jennifer J; Roeder, Elizabeth R; Campeau, Philippe M; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2017-01-05

    Identification of over 500 epigenetic regulators in humans raises an interesting question regarding how chromatin dysregulation contributes to different diseases. Bromodomain and PHD finger-containing protein 1 (BRPF1) is a multivalent chromatin regulator possessing three histone-binding domains, one non-specific DNA-binding module, and several motifs for interacting with and activating three lysine acetyltransferases. Genetic analyses of fish brpf1 and mouse Brpf1 have uncovered an important role in skeletal, hematopoietic, and brain development, but it remains unclear how BRPF1 is linked to human development and disease. Here, we describe an intellectual disability disorder in ten individuals with inherited or de novo monoallelic BRPF1 mutations. Symptoms include infantile hypotonia, global developmental delay, intellectual disability, expressive language impairment, and facial dysmorphisms. Central nervous system and spinal abnormalities are also seen in some individuals. These clinical features overlap with but are not identical to those reported for persons with KAT6A or KAT6B mutations, suggesting that BRPF1 targets these two acetyltransferases and additional partners in humans. Functional assays showed that the resulting BRPF1 variants are pathogenic and impair acetylation of histone H3 at lysine 23, an abundant but poorly characterized epigenetic mark. We also found a similar deficiency in different lines of Brpf1-knockout mice. These data indicate that aberrations in the chromatin regulator gene BRPF1 cause histone H3 acetylation deficiency and a previously unrecognized intellectual disability syndrome. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Inhibitors of Histone Deacetylases Are Weak Activators of the FMR1 Gene in Fragile X Syndrome Cell Lines

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    Alexander A. Dolskiy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability in humans. It is a result of CGG repeat expansion in the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR of the FMR1 gene. This gene encodes the FMRP protein that is involved in neuronal development. Repeat expansion leads to heterochromatinization of the promoter, gene silencing, and the subsequent absence of FMRP. To date, there is no specific therapy for the syndrome. All treatments in clinic practice provide symptomatic therapy. The development of drug therapy for Fragile X syndrome treatment is connected with the search for inhibitors of enzymes that are responsible for heterochromatinization. Here, we report a weak transcriptional activity of the FMR1 gene and the absence of FMRP protein after Fragile X syndrome cell lines treatment with two FDA approved inhibitors of histone deacetylases, romidepsin and vorinostat. We demonstrate that romidepsin, an inhibitor of class I histone deacetylases, does not activate FMR1 expression in patient cell cultures, whereas vorinostat, an inhibitor of classes I and II histone deacetylases, activates a low level of FMR1 expression in some patient cell lines.

  3. Genomic profiling in Down syndrome acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies histone gene deletions associated with altered methylation profiles

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    Loudin, Michael G.; Wang, Jinhua; Leung, Hon-Chiu Eastwood; Gurusiddappa, Sivashankarappa; Meyer, Julia; Condos, Gregory; Morrison, Debra; Tsimelzon, Anna; Devidas, Meenakshi; Heerema, Nyla A.; Carroll, Andrew J.; Plon, Sharon E.; Hunger, Stephen P.; Basso, Giuseppe; Pession, Andrea; Bhojwani, Deepa; Carroll, William L.; Rabin, Karen R.

    2014-01-01

    Patients with Down syndrome (DS) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have distinct clinical and biological features. Whereas most DS-ALL cases lack the sentinel cytogenetic lesions that guide risk assignment in childhood ALL, JAK2 mutations and CRLF2 overexpression are highly enriched. To further characterize the unique biology of DS-ALL, we performed genome-wide profiling of 58 DS-ALL and 68 non-Down syndrome (NDS) ALL cases by DNA copy number, loss of heterozygosity, gene expression, and methylation analyses. We report a novel deletion within the 6p22 histone gene cluster as significantly more frequent in DS-ALL, occurring in 11 DS (22%) and only two NDS cases (3.1%) (Fisher’s exact p = 0.002). Homozygous deletions yielded significantly lower histone expression levels, and were associated with higher methylation levels, distinct spatial localization of methylated promoters, and enrichment of highly methylated genes for specific pathways and transcription factor binding motifs. Gene expression profiling demonstrated heterogeneity of DS-ALL cases overall, with supervised analysis defining a 45-transcript signature associated with CRLF2 overexpression. Further characterization of pathways associated with histone deletions may identify opportunities for novel targeted interventions. PMID:21647151

  4. Whole-exome-sequencing identifies mutations in histone acetyltransferase gene KAT6B in individuals with the Say-Barber-Biesecker variant of Ohdo syndrome.

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    Clayton-Smith, Jill; O'Sullivan, James; Daly, Sarah; Bhaskar, Sanjeev; Day, Ruth; Anderson, Beverley; Voss, Anne K; Thomas, Tim; Biesecker, Leslie G; Smith, Philip; Fryer, Alan; Chandler, Kate E; Kerr, Bronwyn; Tassabehji, May; Lynch, Sally-Ann; Krajewska-Walasek, Malgorzata; McKee, Shane; Smith, Janine; Sweeney, Elizabeth; Mansour, Sahar; Mohammed, Shehla; Donnai, Dian; Black, Graeme

    2011-11-11

    Say-Barber-Biesecker-Young-Simpson syndrome (SBBYSS or Ohdo syndrome) is a multiple anomaly syndrome characterized by severe intellectual disability, blepharophimosis, and a mask-like facial appearance. A number of individuals with SBBYSS also have thyroid abnormalities and cleft palate. The condition usually occurs sporadically and is therefore presumed to be due in most cases to new dominant mutations. In individuals with SBBYSS, a whole-exome sequencing approach was used to demonstrate de novo protein-truncating mutations in the highly conserved histone acetyltransferase gene KAT6B (MYST4/MORF)) in three out of four individuals sequenced. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm truncating mutations of KAT6B, clustering in the final exon of the gene in all four individuals and in a further nine persons with typical SBBYSS. Where parental samples were available, the mutations were shown to have occurred de novo. During mammalian development KAT6B is upregulated specifically in the developing central nervous system, facial structures, and limb buds. The phenotypic features seen in the Qkf mouse, a hypomorphic Kat6b mutant, include small eyes, ventrally placed ears and long first digits that mirror the human phenotype. This is a further example of how perturbation of a protein involved in chromatin modification might give rise to a multisystem developmental disorder. Copyright © 2011 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Identification and characterization of the genes encoding the core histones and histone variants of Neurospora crassa.

    OpenAIRE

    Hays, Shan M; Swanson, Johanna; Selker, Eric U

    2002-01-01

    We have identified and characterized the complete complement of genes encoding the core histones of Neurospora crassa. In addition to the previously identified pair of genes that encode histones H3 and H4 (hH3 and hH4-1), we identified a second histone H4 gene (hH4-2), a divergently transcribed pair of genes that encode H2A and H2B (hH2A and hH2B), a homolog of the F/Z family of H2A variants (hH2Az), a homolog of the H3 variant CSE4 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (hH3v), and a highly diverged ...

  6. Histone deacetylase inhibition rescues structural and functional brain deficits in a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome

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    Bjornsson, Hans T.; Benjamin, Joel S.; Zhang, Li; Weissman, Jacqueline; Gerber, Elizabeth E.; Chen, Yi-Chun; Vaurio, Rebecca G.; Potter, Michelle C.; Hansen, Kasper D.; Dietz, Harry C.

    2015-01-01

    Kabuki syndrome is caused by haploinsufficiency for either of two genes that promote the opening of chromatin. If an imbalance between open and closed chromatin is central to the pathogenesis of Kabuki syndrome, agents that promote chromatin opening might have therapeutic potential. We have characterized a mouse model of Kabuki syndrome with a heterozygous deletion in the gene encoding the lysine-specific methyltransferase 2D (Kmt2d), leading to impairment of methyltransferase function. In vitro reporter alleles demonstrated a reduction in histone 4 acetylation and histone 3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3) activity in mouse embryonic fibroblasts from Kmt2d+/βGeo mice. These activities were normalized in response to AR-42, a histone deacetylase inhibitor. In vivo, deficiency of H3K4me3 in the dentate gyrus granule cell layer of Kmt2d+/βGeo mice correlated with reduced neurogenesis and hippocampal memory defects. These abnormalities improved upon postnatal treatment with AR-42. Our work suggests that a reversible deficiency in postnatal neurogenesis underlies intellectual disability in Kabuki syndrome. PMID:25273096

  7. Myelodysplastic Syndrome and Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors: “To Be or Not to Be Acetylated”?

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    Stintzing, Sebastian; Kemmerling, Ralf; Kiesslich, Tobias; Alinger, Beate; Ocker, Matthias; Neureiter, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases with clonal proliferation, bone marrow failure and increasing risk of transformation into an acute myeloid leukaemia. Structured guidelines are developed for selective therapy based on prognostic subgroups, age, and performance status. Although many driving forces of disease phenotype and biology are described, the complete and possibly interacting pathogenetic pathways still remain unclear. Epigenetic investigations of cancer and haematologic diseases like MDS give new insights into the pathogenesis of this complex disease. Modifications of DNA or histones via methylation or acetylation lead to gene silencing and altered physiology relevant for MDS. First clinical trials give evidence that patients with MDS could benefit from epigenetic treatment with, for example, DNA methyl transferase inhibitors (DNMTi) or histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi). Nevertheless, many issues of HDACi remain incompletely understood and pose clinical and translational challenges. In this paper, major aspects of MDS, MDS-associated epigenetics and the potential use of HDACi are discussed. PMID:21629744

  8. Genome-wide analysis of regions similar to promoters of histone genes

    KAUST Repository

    Chowdhary, Rajesh

    2010-05-28

    Background: The purpose of this study is to: i) develop a computational model of promoters of human histone-encoding genes (shortly histone genes), an important class of genes that participate in various critical cellular processes, ii) use the model so developed to identify regions across the human genome that have similar structure as promoters of histone genes; such regions could represent potential genomic regulatory regions, e.g. promoters, of genes that may be coregulated with histone genes, and iii/ identify in this way genes that have high likelihood of being coregulated with the histone genes.Results: We successfully developed a histone promoter model using a comprehensive collection of histone genes. Based on leave-one-out cross-validation test, the model produced good prediction accuracy (94.1% sensitivity, 92.6% specificity, and 92.8% positive predictive value). We used this model to predict across the genome a number of genes that shared similar promoter structures with the histone gene promoters. We thus hypothesize that these predicted genes could be coregulated with histone genes. This hypothesis matches well with the available gene expression, gene ontology, and pathways data. Jointly with promoters of the above-mentioned genes, we found a large number of intergenic regions with similar structure as histone promoters.Conclusions: This study represents one of the most comprehensive computational analyses conducted thus far on a genome-wide scale of promoters of human histone genes. Our analysis suggests a number of other human genes that share a high similarity of promoter structure with the histone genes and thus are highly likely to be coregulated, and consequently coexpressed, with the histone genes. We also found that there are a large number of intergenic regions across the genome with their structures similar to promoters of histone genes. These regions may be promoters of yet unidentified genes, or may represent remote control regions that

  9. Histone deacetylase regulation of immune gene expression in tumor cells

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    Tomasi, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications of chromatin, such as histone acetylation, are involved in repression of tumor antigens and multiple immune genes that are thought to facilitate tumor escape. The status of acetylation in a cell is determined by the balance of the activities of histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDACi) can enhance the expression of immunologically important molecules in tumor cells and HDACi treated tumor cells are able to induce immune responses in vitro and in vivo. Systemic HDACi are in clinical trails in cancer and also being used in several autoimmune disease models. To date, 18 HDACs have been reported in human cells and more than thirty HDACi identified, although only a few immune targets of these inhibitors have been identified. Here, we discuss the molecular pathways employed by HDACi and their potential role in inducing immune responses against tumors. We review data suggesting that selection of target specific HDACi and combinations with other agents and modalities, including those that activate stress pathways, may further enhance the efficacy of epigenetic therapies. PMID:18213528

  10. ATRX ADD Domain Links an Atypical Histone Methylation Recognition Mechanism to Human Mental-Retardation Syndrome

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    S Iwase; B Xiang; S Ghosh; T Ren; P Lewis; J Cochrane; C Allis; D Picketts; D Patel; et al.

    2011-12-31

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  11. ATRX ADD domain links an atypical histone methylation recognition mechanism to human mental-retardation syndrome

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    Iwase, Shigeki; Xiang, Bin; Ghosh, Sharmistha; Ren, Ting; Lewis, Peter W.; Cochrane, Jesse C.; Allis, C. David; Picketts, David J.; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Li, Haitao; Shi, Yang (Harvard-Med); (Ottawa Hosp.); (MSKCC); (Rockefeller); (CH-Boston); (Tsinghua); (Mass. Gen. Hosp.)

    2011-07-19

    ATR-X (alpha-thalassemia/mental retardation, X-linked) syndrome is a human congenital disorder that causes severe intellectual disabilities. Mutations in the ATRX gene, which encodes an ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeler, are responsible for the syndrome. Approximately 50% of the missense mutations in affected persons are clustered in a cysteine-rich domain termed ADD (ATRX-DNMT3-DNMT3L, ADD{sub ATRX}), whose function has remained elusive. Here we identify ADD{sub ATRX} as a previously unknown histone H3-binding module, whose binding is promoted by lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me3) but inhibited by lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3). The cocrystal structure of ADD{sub ATRX} bound to H3{sub 1-15}K9me3 peptide reveals an atypical composite H3K9me3-binding pocket, which is distinct from the conventional trimethyllysine-binding aromatic cage. Notably, H3K9me3-pocket mutants and ATR-X syndrome mutants are defective in both H3K9me3 binding and localization at pericentromeric heterochromatin; thus, we have discovered a unique histone-recognition mechanism underlying the ATR-X etiology.

  12. A cell cycle-regulated histone H3 gene of alfalfa with an atypical promoter structure.

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    Robertson, A J; Kapros, T; Waterborg, J H

    1997-01-01

    The control of cell cycle expression of histone genes in plants is incompletely understood. A new histone H3 gene was cloned from alfalfa (Medicago sativa) that codes for the replication-dependent histone H3.1 variant protein. Despite lacking all promoter sequence motifs that have been associated with cell cycle-dependent histone gene expression in plants, northern analysis of synchronized cells clearly linked gene expression to DNA replication. TTAATNA was recognized as a new sequence element in the 3' untranslated regions of this and all other cell cycle-dependent histone H3 genes of dicotyledonous plants. It is not found in the replication-independent histone H3 genes.

  13. Chromosomal mapping reveals a dynamic organization of the histone genes in aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae

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    M. Mandrioli

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Despite their involvement in different processes, histone genes have been analysed in few insects. In order to improve the knowledge about this important gene family, genes coding for histones have been analysed in the aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum showing that at the amino acid level, aphid histones are highly conserved. In particular, data from A. pisum confirm that H1 is the most variable of the five histones, whereas histones H3 and H4 are highly conserved with the H3 almost identical from insects to vertebrates. A. pisum histone genes are organized in a quintet with the H1 gene followed by H2A and H2B genes that are adjacent and transcribed in same directions, in the opposite strand in respect to the H1 gene. At the 3’ end of the histone cluster, genes H3 and H4 constitute an oppositely transcribed pair. The span of the aphid histone genes (more than 7 kb is greater than the average length of the histone cluster till now reported in insects (about 5 kb. Furthermore, spacers that separate the aphid histone genes vary in length. The histone genes have been mapped in A. pisum and successively in the aphids Myzus persicae and Rhopalosiphum padi showing that they are present in a single large cluster located in an interstitial position of autosomes 1, differently from what reported in the Russian wheat aphid Diuraphis noxia, where histone genes have been localized in a telomere of the two X chromosomes suggesting a dynamic organization of this multigene family in aphids.

  14. Extracellular histones play an inflammatory role in acid aspiration-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome.

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    Zhang, Yanlin; Wen, Zongmei; Guan, Li; Jiang, Ping; Gu, Tao; Zhao, Jinyuan; Lv, Xin; Wen, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Systemic inflammation is a key feature in acid aspiration-induced acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), but the factors that trigger inflammation are unclear. The authors hypothesize that extracellular histones, a newly identified inflammatory mediator, play important roles in the pathogenesis of ARDS. The authors used a hydrochloric acid aspiration-induced ARDS model to investigate whether extracellular histones are pathogenic and whether targeting histones are protective. Exogenous histones and antihistone antibody were administered to mice. Heparin can bind to histones, so the authors studied whether heparin could protect from ARDS using cell and mouse models. Furthermore, the authors analyzed whether extracellular histones are clinically involved in ARDS patients caused by gastric aspiration. Extracellular histones in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of acid-treated mice were significantly higher (1.832 ± 0.698) at 3 h after injury than in sham-treated group (0.63 ± 0.153; P = 0.0252, n = 5 per group). Elevated histones may originate from damaged lung cells and neutrophil infiltration. Exogenous histones aggravated lung injury, whereas antihistone antibody markedly attenuated the intensity of ARDS. Notably, heparin provided a similar protective effect against ARDS. Analysis of plasma from ARDS patients (n = 21) showed elevated histones were significantly correlated with the degree of ARDS and were higher in nonsurvivors (2.723 ± 0.2933, n = 7) than in survivors (1.725 ± 0.1787, P = 0.006, n = 14). Extracellular histones may play a contributory role toward ARDS by promoting tissue damage and systemic inflammation and may become a novel marker reflecting disease activity. Targeting histones by neutralizing antibody or heparin shows potent protective effects, suggesting a potentially therapeutic strategy.

  15. Germline mutations affecting the histone H4 core cause a developmental syndrome by altering DNA damage response and cell cycle control.

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    Tessadori, Federico; Giltay, Jacques C; Hurst, Jane A; Massink, Maarten P; Duran, Karen; Vos, Harmjan R; van Es, Robert M; Scott, Richard H; van Gassen, Koen L I; Bakkers, Jeroen; van Haaften, Gijs

    2017-11-01

    Covalent modifications of histones have an established role as chromatin effectors, as they control processes such as DNA replication and transcription, and repair or regulate nucleosomal structure. Loss of modifications on histone N tails, whether due to mutations in genes belonging to histone-modifying complexes or mutations directly affecting the histone tails, causes developmental disorders or has a role in tumorigenesis. More recently, modifications affecting the globular histone core have been uncovered as being crucial for DNA repair, pluripotency and oncogenesis. Here we report monoallelic missense mutations affecting lysine 91 in the histone H4 core (H4K91) in three individuals with a syndrome of growth delay, microcephaly and intellectual disability. Expression of the histone H4 mutants in zebrafish embryos recapitulates the developmental anomalies seen in the patients. We show that the histone H4 alterations cause genomic instability, resulting in increased apoptosis and cell cycle progression anomalies during early development. Mechanistically, our findings indicate an important role for the ubiquitination of H4K91 in genomic stability during embryonic development.

  16. Histone and Ribosomal RNA Repetitive Gene Clusters of the Boll Weevil are Linked in a Tandem Array

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    Histones are the major protein component of chromatin structure. The histone family is made up of a quintet of proteins, four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 & H4) and the linker histones (H1). Spacers are found between the coding regions. Among insects this quintet of genes is usually clustered and ...

  17. Pitx2-dependent occupancy by histone deacetylases is associated with T-box gene regulation in mammalian abdominal tissue.

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    Hilton, Traci; Gross, Michael K; Kioussi, Chrissa

    2010-04-09

    The homeodomain transcription factor Pitx2 and the T-box transcription factors are essential for organogenesis. Pitx2 and T-box genes are induced by growth factors and function as transcriptional activators or repressors. Gene expression analyses on abdominal tissue were used to identify seven of the T-box genes of the genome as Pitx2 target genes in the abdomen at embryonic day.10.5. Pitx2 activated Tbx4, Tbx15, and Mga and repressed Tbx1, Tbx2, Tbx5, and Tbx6 expression. As expected, activated genes showed reduced expression patterns, and repressed T-box genes showed increased expression patterns in the abdomen of Pitx2 mutants. Pitx2 occupied chromatin sites near all of these T-box genes. Co-occupancy by coactivators, corepressors, and histone acetylation at these sites was frequently Pitx2-dependent. Genes repressed by Pitx2 generally showed increased histone acetylation and decreased histone deacetylase (HDAC)/corepressor occupancy in Pitx2 mutants. The lower N-CoR, HDAC1, and HDAC3 occupancy observed at multiple sites along Tbx1 chromatin in mutants is consistent with the model that increased histone acetylation and gene expression of Tbx1 may result from a loss of recruitment of corepressors by Pitx2. Genes activated by Pitx2 showed less consistent patterns in chromatin analyses. Reduced H4 acetylation and increased HDAC1/nuclear receptor corepressor (N-CoR) occupancy at some Tbx4 sites were accompanied by increased H3 acetylation and reduced HDAC3 occupancy at the same or other more distal chromatin sites in mutants. Pitx2-dependent occupancy by corepressors resulted in alteration of the acetylation levels of several T-box genes, whereas Pitx2-dependent occupancy by coactivators was more site-localized. These studies will provide the basic scientific underpinning to understand abdominal wall syndromes.

  18. Identification of three highly expressed replacement histone H3 genes of alfalfa.

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    Robertson, A J; Kapros, T; Dudits, D; Waterborg, J H

    1996-01-01

    One genomic and six cDNA clones for the replacement histone H3.2 protein of alfalfa (Medicago sativa) were isolated and sequenced. By gene organization they represent 3 distinct genes. PCR methods were used to confirm that only three intron-bearing histone H3.2 genes of this type exist per haploid genome. They co-exist with approximately 56 copies of the previously characterized replication-dependent, intronless histone H3.1 variant gene. Comparison of the relative expression of few constitutive H3.2 genes with the high S phase expression of the abundant cell cycle-dependent H3.1 genes by mRNA levels and protein synthesis measurements revealed that the replacement histone H3.2 genes are very highly expressed. Structural analysis of the genomic replacement H3.2 gene revealed a unique feature. A repeated polypyrimidine sequence motif in the 5' untranslated region of this gene replaces the ubiquitous intron present in all known replacement H3 genes. A hypothesis is presented that this motif and other, non-randomly distributed polypyrimidine sequences in the introns of replacement histone H3 genes of alfalfa and Arabidopsis, may affect nucleosome assembly. Chromatin repression of these replacement genes would be avoided, consistent with the high, constitutive expression of replacement H3 histone genes in plants.

  19. Dynamic changes in the interchromosomal interaction of early histone gene loci during development of sea urchin.

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    Matsushita, Masaya; Ochiai, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Ken-Ichi T; Hayashi, Sayaka; Yamamoto, Takashi; Awazu, Akinori; Sakamoto, Naoaki

    2017-12-15

    The nuclear positioning and chromatin dynamics of eukaryotic genes are closely related to the regulation of gene expression, but they have not been well examined during early development, which is accompanied by rapid cell cycle progression and dynamic changes in nuclear organization, such as nuclear size and chromatin constitution. In this study, we focused on the early development of the sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and performed three-dimensional fluorescence in situ hybridization of gene loci encoding early histones (one of the types of histone in sea urchin). There are two non-allelic early histone gene loci per sea urchin genome. We found that during the morula stage, when the early histone gene expression levels are at their maximum, interchromosomal interactions were often formed between the early histone gene loci on separate chromosomes and that the gene loci were directed to locate to more interior positions. Furthermore, these interactions were associated with the active transcription of the early histone genes. Thus, such dynamic interchromosomal interactions may contribute to the efficient synthesis of early histone mRNA during the morula stage of sea urchin development. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. The organization structure and regulatory elements of Chlamydomonas histone genes reveal features linking plant and animal genes.

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    Fabry, S; Müller, K; Lindauer, A; Park, P B; Cornelius, T; Schmitt, R

    1995-09-01

    The genome of the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii contains approximately 15 gene clusters of the nucleosomal (or core) histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 genes and at least one histone H1 gene. Seven non-allelic histone gene loci were isolated from a genomic library, physically mapped, and the nucleotide sequences of three isotypes of each core histone gene species and one linked H1 gene determined. The core histone genes are organized in clusters of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 pairs, in which each gene pair shows outwardly divergent transcription from a short (< 300 bp) intercistronic region. These intercistronic regions contain typically conserved promoter elements, namely a TATA-box and the three motifs TGGCCAG-G(G/C)-CGAG, CGTTGACC and CGGTTG. Different from the genes of higher plants, but like those of animals and the related alga Volvox, the 3' untranslated regions contain no poly A signal, but a palindromic sequence (3' palindrome) essential for mRNA processing is present. One single H1 gene was found in close linkage to a H2A-H2B pair. The H1 upstream region contains the octameric promoter element GGTTGACC (also found upstream of the core histone genes) and two specific sequence motifs that are shared only with the Volvox H1 promoters. This suggests differential transcription of the H1 and the core histone genes. The H1 gene is interrupted by two introns. Unlike Volvox H3 genes, the three sequenced H3 isoforms are intron-free. Primer-directed PCR of genomic DNA demonstrated, however, that at least 8 of the about 15 H3 genes do contain one intron at a conserved position. In synchronized C. reinhardtii cells, H4 mRNA levels (representative of all core histone mRNAs) peak during cell division, suggesting strict replication-dependent gene control. The derived peptide sequences place C. reinhardtii core histones closer to plants than to animals, except that the H2A histones are more animal-like. The peptide sequence of histone H1 is closely related to the V. carteri VH1-II

  1. Pulmonary endothelial activation caused by extracellular histones contributes to neutrophil activation in acute respiratory distress syndrome.

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    Zhang, Yanlin; Guan, Li; Yu, Jie; Zhao, Zanmei; Mao, Lijun; Li, Shuqiang; Zhao, Jinyuan

    2016-11-21

    During the acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), neutrophils play a central role in the pathogenesis, and their activation requires interaction with the endothelium. Extracellular histones have been recognized as pivotal inflammatory mediators. This study was to investigate the role of pulmonary endothelial activation during the extracellular histone-induced inflammatory response in ARDS. ARDS was induced in male C57BL/6 mice by intravenous injection with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or exogenous histones. Concurrent with LPS administration, anti-histone H4 antibody (anti-H4) or non-specific IgG was administered to study the role of extracellular histones. The circulating von Willebrand factor (vWF) and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) were measured with ELISA kits at the preset time points. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity in lung tissue was measured with a MPO detection kit. The translocation of P-selectin and neutrophil infiltration were measured by immunohistochemical detection. For in vitro studies, histone H4 in the supernatant of mouse lung vascular endothelial cells (MLVECs) was measured by Western blot. The binding of extracellular histones with endothelial membrane was examined by confocal laser microscopy. Endothelial P-selectin translocation was measured by cell surface ELISA. Adhesion of neutrophils to MLVECs was assessed with a color video digital camera. The results showed that during LPS-induced ARDS extracellular histones caused endothelial and neutrophil activation, as seen by P-selectin translocation, release of vWF, an increase of circulating sTM, lung neutrophil infiltration and increased MPO activity. Extracellular histones directly bound and activated MLVECs in a dose-dependent manner. On the contrary, the direct stimulatory effect of exogenous histones on neutrophils was very limited, as measured by neutrophil adhesion and MPO activity. With the contribution of activated endothelium, extracellular histones could effectively activating

  2. Comparative analysis of expression of histone H2a genes in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaru Yasuhiro

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At least 18 replication-dependent histone H2a genes are distributed in 3 Hist gene clusters on different chromosomes of the mouse genome. In this analysis we designed specific PCR primers for each histone H2a transcript and studied the expression levels and patterns using quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR. In addition, we compared histone H3 K9 acetylation levels in the promoter regions of H2a genes by ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation – quantitative PCR (qPCR analysis. Results RT-PCR analysis indicated that all 20 histone H2a genes assessed in this study are expressed. The replication-dependent histone H2a genes have different expression levels but similar expression patterns. Among the 20 histone H2a genes, the expression-level of H2afz, a replication-independent gene, was highest, and that of Hist1h2aa, a replication-dependent gene, was lowest. Among 18 replication-dependent H2a genes, the expression level of Hist3h2a was highest. The ChIP-qPCR analysis showed that histone H3 K9 acetylation levels in promoter regions of both H2afz and Hist3h2a are clearly higher than that in the promoter region of Hist1h2aa. The H3 K9 acetylation level in the promoter of Hist1h2aa is similar to that in the γ-satellite region. Conclusion These results strongly suggest that histone H3 K9 acetylation plays a role in the expression of histone genes.

  3. The histone genes in HeLa cells are on individual transcriptional units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hackett, P.B.; Traub, P.; Gallwitz, D.

    1978-01-01

    The distances of the five major histone genes from their promotors have been investigated in order to determine whether in human cells these genes could be transcribed as a single polycistronic transcriptional unit. By measuring the decreases of both histone protein and histone mRNA synthesis as functions of the ultraviolet light dosage, it was possible to calculate the distances of the histone genes from their promotors. The inactivation kinetics for histone genes H1 and H3 are first-order, indicating a single type of transcriptional unit for each gene. The dose-response kinetics for genes H2A, H2B and H4 are first-order with two distinct rates; 10 to 15% of the genes for each of these histones appear to be much more sensitive to ultraviolet light inactivation than are the majority. It is concluded that the transcriptional units for 85 to 90% of the genes for H2A, H2B and H4 are similar. As determined by the inhibition of protein synthesis, the inactivation coefficients for the major component of each histone are: H1, 907 mm 2 /erg; H2A, 878 mm 2 /erg; H2B, 871 mm 2 /erg; H3, 965 mm 2 /erg; and H4, 792 mm 2 /erg. The sensitivities of histone mRNA synthesis to irradiation were measured by translation in vitro with similar results. The calculated target sizes for the genes (in base-pairs) are: H1, 1190; H2A, 1240; H2B, 1250; H3, 1130; and H4, 1380. This similarity in target sizes for all five of the histones genes indicates that they are primarily transcribed from individual transcriptional units. (author)

  4. Prepatterning of developmental gene expression by modified histones before zygotic genome activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindeman, Leif C.; Andersen, Ingrid S.; Reiner, Andrew H.

    2011-01-01

    A hallmark of anamniote vertebrate development is a window of embryonic transcription-independent cell divisions before onset of zygotic genome activation (ZGA). Chromatin determinants of ZGA are unexplored; however, marking of developmental genes by modified histones in sperm suggests a predictive...... role of histone marks for ZGA. In zebrafish, pre-ZGA development for ten cell cycles provides an opportunity to examine whether genomic enrichment in modified histones is present before initiation of transcription. By profiling histone H3 trimethylation on all zebrafish promoters before and after ZGA......, we demonstrate here an epigenetic prepatterning of developmental gene expression. This involves pre-ZGA marking of transcriptionally inactive genes involved in homeostatic and developmental regulation by permissive H3K4me3 with or without repressive H3K9me3 or H3K27me3. Our data suggest that histone...

  5. Synergistic effects between natural histone mixtures and polyethylenimine in non-viral gene delivery in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneeweiss, Anne; Buyens, Kevin; Giese, Matthias; Sanders, Niek; Ulbert, Sebastian

    2010-11-15

    Nanoparticles made of plasmid DNA (pDNA) and cationic polymers are promising strategies for non-viral gene delivery. However, many cationic polymers are toxic to cells when used in higher concentrations. Positively charged proteins, such as histones, are biodegradable and a good alternative, especially for potential in vivo applications. It has previously been shown that histones are able to complex DNA and mediate transfection of cells. To investigate possible synergistic effects between the different histone types and to avoid the use of recombinant proteins, we analysed whether natural histone mixtures would be functional as gene carriers. Core and linker histones from calf thymus and from chicken erythrocytes were used to transfect different cell lines. The protein mixtures efficiently complexed the pDNA, and the resulting particles entered the cells. However, only marginal expression of the gene encoded by the pDNA was observed. Transfection rates increased drastically when minimal amounts of the basic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) were added to the particles. Neither PEI nor histones alone mediated any transfection under the conditions where a combination of both worked efficiently, and the combined particles were well tolerated by the cells. These results demonstrate that histone mixtures from natural sources in combination with minimal amounts of PEI can be used as gene carriers. This might have consequences for the development of novel gene delivery strategies, such as DNA vaccines, with minimal side-effects. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Genome-wide integration on transcription factors, histone acetylation and gene expression reveals genes co-regulated by histone modification patterns.

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    Yayoi Natsume-Kitatani

    Full Text Available N-terminal tails of H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 histone families are subjected to posttranslational modifications that take part in transcriptional regulation mechanisms, such as transcription factor binding and gene expression. Regulation mechanisms under control of histone modification are important but remain largely unclear, despite of emerging datasets for comprehensive analysis of histone modification. In this paper, we focus on what we call genetic harmonious units (GHUs, which are co-occurring patterns among transcription factor binding, gene expression and histone modification. We present the first genome-wide approach that captures GHUs by combining ChIP-chip with microarray datasets from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our approach employs noise-robust soft clustering to select patterns which share the same preferences in transcription factor-binding, histone modification and gene expression, which are all currently implied to be closely correlated. The detected patterns are a well-studied acetylation of lysine 16 of H4 in glucose depletion as well as co-acetylation of five lysine residues of H3 with H4 Lys12 and H2A Lys7 responsible for ribosome biogenesis. Furthermore, our method further suggested the recognition of acetylated H4 Lys16 being crucial to histone acetyltransferase ESA1, whose essential role is still under controversy, from a microarray dataset on ESA1 and its bypass suppressor mutants. These results demonstrate that our approach allows us to provide clearer principles behind gene regulation mechanisms under histone modifications and detect GHUs further by applying to other microarray and ChIP-chip datasets. The source code of our method, which was implemented in MATLAB (http://www.mathworks.com/, is available from the supporting page for this paper: http://www.bic.kyoto-u.ac.jp/pathway/natsume/hm_detector.htm.

  7. Histone Lysine Methyltransferase Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome Candidate 1 Is Involved in Human Carcinogenesis through Regulation of the Wnt Pathway

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    Gouji Toyokawa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available A number of histone methyltransferases have been identified and biochemically characterized, but the pathologic roles of their dysfunction in human diseases like cancer are not well understood. Here, we demonstrate that Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome candidate 1 (WHSC1 plays important roles in human carcinogenesis. Transcriptional levels of this gene are significantly elevated in various types of cancer including bladder and lung cancers. Immunohistochemical analysis using a number of clinical tissues confirmed significant up-regulation of WHSC1 expression in bladder and lung cancer cells at the protein level. Treatment of cancer cell lines with small interfering RNA targeting WHSC1 significantly knocked down its expression and resulted in the suppression of proliferation. Cell cycle analysis by flow cytometry indicated that knockdown of WHSC1 decreased the cell population of cancer cells at the S phase while increasing that at the G2/M phase. WHSC1 interacts with some proteins related to the WNT pathway including β-catenin and transcriptionally regulates CCND1, the target gene of the β-catenin/Tcf-4 complex, through histone H3 at lysine 36 trimethylation. This is a novel mechanism for WNT pathway dysregulation in human carcinogenesis, mediated by the epigenetic regulation of histone H3. Because expression levels of WHSC1 are significantly low in most normal tissue types, it should be feasible to develop specific and selective inhibitors targeting the enzyme as antitumor agents that have a minimal risk of adverse reaction.

  8. Lateral Thinking: How Histone Modifications Regulate Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Moyra; Daujat, Sylvain; Schneider, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The DNA of each cell is wrapped around histone octamers, forming so-called 'nucleosomal core particles'. These histone proteins have tails that project from the nucleosome and many residues in these tails can be post-translationally modified, influencing all DNA-based processes, including chromatin compaction, nucleosome dynamics, and transcription. In contrast to those present in histone tails, modifications in the core regions of the histones had remained largely uncharacterised until recently, when some of these modifications began to be analysed in detail. Overall, recent work has shown that histone core modifications can not only directly regulate transcription, but also influence processes such as DNA repair, replication, stemness, and changes in cell state. In this review, we focus on the most recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications, particularly those on the lateral surface of the nucleosome. This region is in direct contact with the DNA and is formed by the histone cores. We suggest that these lateral surface modifications represent a key insight into chromatin regulation in the cell. Therefore, lateral surface modifications form a key area of interest and a focal point of ongoing study in epigenetics. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Histone deacetylases suppress CGG repeat-induced neurodegeneration via transcriptional silencing in models of fragile X tremor ataxia syndrome.

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    Peter K Todd

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X Tremor Ataxia Syndrome (FXTAS is a common inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by expansion of a CGG trinucleotide repeat in the 5'UTR of the fragile X syndrome (FXS gene, FMR1. The expanded CGG repeat is thought to induce toxicity as RNA, and in FXTAS patients mRNA levels for FMR1 are markedly increased. Despite the critical role of FMR1 mRNA in disease pathogenesis, the basis for the increase in FMR1 mRNA expression is unknown. Here we show that overexpressing any of three histone deacetylases (HDACs 3, 6, or 11 suppresses CGG repeat-induced neurodegeneration in a Drosophila model of FXTAS. This suppression results from selective transcriptional repression of the CGG repeat-containing transgene. These findings led us to evaluate the acetylation state of histones at the human FMR1 locus. In patient-derived lymphoblasts and fibroblasts, we determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation that there is increased acetylation of histones at the FMR1 locus in pre-mutation carriers compared to control or FXS derived cell lines. These epigenetic changes correlate with elevated FMR1 mRNA expression in pre-mutation cell lines. Consistent with this finding, histone acetyltransferase (HAT inhibitors repress FMR1 mRNA expression to control levels in pre-mutation carrier cell lines and extend lifespan in CGG repeat-expressing Drosophila. These findings support a disease model whereby the CGG repeat expansion in FXTAS promotes chromatin remodeling in cis, which in turn increases expression of the toxic FMR1 mRNA. Moreover, these results provide proof of principle that HAT inhibitors or HDAC activators might be used to selectively repress transcription at the FMR1 locus.

  10. Overexpression of Histone Deacetylase 6 Enhances Resistance to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus in Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Tianyu; Song, Zhiyuan; Li, Qiuyan; Li, Zhiguo; Wang, Meng; Liu, Lin; Tian, Kegong; Li, Ning

    2017-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is one of the most economically relevant viral pathogens in pigs and causes substantial losses in the pig industry worldwide each year. At present, PRRSV vaccines do not effectively prevent and control this disease. Consequently, it is necessary to develop new antiviral strategies to compensate for the inefficacy of the available vaccines. Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) is an important member of the histone deacetylase family that is responsible for regulating many important biological processes. Studies have shown that HDAC6 has anti-viral activities during the viral life cycle. However, whether HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV in pigs remains unknown. In this study, we used a somatic cell cloning method to produce transgenic (TG) pigs that constitutively overexpress porcine HDAC6. These TG pigs showed germ line transmission with continued overexpression of HDAC6. In vitro, virus-challenged porcine alveolar macrophages (PAMs) overexpressed HDAC6, which suppressed viral gene expression and PRRSV production. In vivo, resistance to PRRSV in TG pigs was evaluated by direct or cohabitation mediated infection with a highly pathogenic PRRSV (HP-PRRSV) strain. Compared with non-TG (NTG) siblings, TG pigs showed a significantly lower viral load in the lungs and an extended survival time after infection with HP-PRRSV via intramuscular injection. In the cohabitation study, NTG pigs housed with challenged NTG pigs exhibited significantly worse clinical symptoms than the other three in-contact groups. These results collectively suggest that HDAC6 overexpression enhances resistance to PRRSV infection both in vitro and in vivo. Our findings suggest the potential involvement of HDAC6 in the response to PRRSV, which will facilitate the development of novel therapies for PRRSV.

  11. Genes are often sheltered from the global histone hyperacetylation induced by HDAC inhibitors.

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    John Halsall

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi are increasingly used as therapeutic agents, but the mechanisms by which they alter cell behaviour remain unclear. Here we use microarray expression analysis to show that only a small proportion of genes (∼9% have altered transcript levels after treating HL60 cells with different HDACi (valproic acid, Trichostatin A, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid. Different gene populations respond to each inhibitor, with as many genes down- as up-regulated. Surprisingly, HDACi rarely induced increased histone acetylation at gene promoters, with most genes examined showing minimal change, irrespective of whether genes were up- or down-regulated. Many genes seem to be sheltered from the global histone hyperacetyation induced by HDACi.

  12. Intranuclear and higher-order chromatin organization of the major histone gene cluster in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Andrew J; Ghule, Prachi N; Boyd, Joseph R; Tye, Coralee E; Page, Natalie A; Hong, Deli; Shirley, David J; Weinheimer, Adam S; Barutcu, Ahmet R; Gerrard, Diana L; Frietze, Seth; van Wijnen, Andre J; Zaidi, Sayyed K; Imbalzano, Anthony N; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2018-02-01

    Alterations in nuclear morphology are common in cancer progression. However, the degree to which gross morphological abnormalities translate into compromised higher-order chromatin organization is poorly understood. To explore the functional links between gene expression and chromatin structure in breast cancer, we performed RNA-seq gene expression analysis on the basal breast cancer progression model based on human MCF10A cells. Positional gene enrichment identified the major histone gene cluster at chromosome 6p22 as one of the most significantly upregulated (and not amplified) clusters of genes from the normal-like MCF10A to premalignant MCF10AT1 and metastatic MCF10CA1a cells. This cluster is subdivided into three sub-clusters of histone genes that are organized into hierarchical topologically associating domains (TADs). Interestingly, the sub-clusters of histone genes are located at TAD boundaries and interact more frequently with each other than the regions in-between them, suggesting that the histone sub-clusters form an active chromatin hub. The anchor sites of loops within this hub are occupied by CTCF, a known chromatin organizer. These histone genes are transcribed and processed at a specific sub-nuclear microenvironment termed the major histone locus body (HLB). While the overall chromatin structure of the major HLB is maintained across breast cancer progression, we detected alterations in its structure that may relate to gene expression. Importantly, breast tumor specimens also exhibit a coordinate pattern of upregulation across the major histone gene cluster. Our results provide a novel insight into the connection between the higher-order chromatin organization of the major HLB and its regulation during breast cancer progression. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Opposite replication polarities of transcribed and nontranscribed histone H5 genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trempe, J.P.; Lindstrom, Y.I.; Leffak, M.

    1988-01-01

    The authors used an in vitro nuclear runoff replication assay to analyze the direction of replication of the active and inactive histone H5 genes in avian cells. In embryonic erythrocytes the transcribed histone H5 gene displayed sensitivity to endogenous nuclease cleavage. In contrast, this gene was insensitive to endogenous nuclease digestion under the same conditions in nuclei of the lymphoblastoid cell line MSB-1, and histone H5 gene transcripts were not detectable by dot-blot analysis of MSB-1 cell RNA. When nuclei were isolated from embryonic erythrocyctes and incubated with bromodeoxyuridine triphosphate, runoff replication from endogenous nuclease cleavage sites led to a relative enrichment for fragments near the 3' end of the histone H5 gene in the density-labeled DNA. In nuclei of MSB-1 cells or chicken embryo fibroblasts, however, runoff replication from restriction enzyme-cut sites (or induced endogenous nuclease-cut sites in MSB-1 nuclei) led to a relative enrichment for fragments near the 5' end of the H5 gene in dense DNA. Based on the enhanced incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into origin-distal regions of DNA during the in vitro runoff replication assay, the authors conclude that the active histone H5 gene in embryonic erythrocytes is preferentially replicated in the transcriptional direction from an origin in the 5'-flanking DNA, whereas its inactive counterparts in MSB-1 cells and chicken embryo fibroblasts are preferentially replicated in the opposite direction

  14. Study of the repeatability of histone genes in the ploidy series of wheat and Aegilops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vakhitov, V.A.; Kulikov, A.M.

    1986-01-01

    The hDNA content and number of histone genes in the genomes of different wheat and Aegilops species have been determined by molecular hybridization of DNA with 125 I-histone DNA of Drosophila (L-repeat) on nitrocellulose filters. It has been demonstrated that the proportion of hDNA in the total DNA of diploid and polyploid wheat species is (1.3-7.7) x 10 -3 % (57-850 genes), and in the ploidy series of Aegilops species (2.0-8.0) x 10 -3 % (89-780 genes). The repeatability of the histone genes generally increases at each ploidy level in the species with higher DNA content. At the same time, it has been demonstrated that the DNA content is not the only factor determining repeatability of the histone genes, as some diploid and allopolyploid species have similar number of these genes. It has been concluded that genetic mechanisms are involved in the regulation of the number of histone genes

  15. Modulation of histone deacetylase attenuates naloxone-precipitated opioid withdrawal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehni, Ashish K; Singh, Nirmal; Rachamalla, Mahesh; Tikoo, Kulbhushan

    2012-06-01

    The present study has been designed to investigate the effect of selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase and/or N-acetyl-Asp-Glu-Val-Asp-al (Ac-DEVD-CHO), a selective interleukin-1β converting enzyme inhibitor, on the development of naloxone-induced opioid withdrawal syndrome both in vitro and in vivo and the effect of histone deacetylase inhibition on histone H3 acetylation in brain. Sub-acute morphine administration followed by a single injection of naloxone (8 mg/kg, i.p.) was used to precipitate opioid withdrawal syndrome in mice. Behavioral observations were made immediately after naloxone treatment. Withdrawal syndrome was quantitatively assessed in terms of withdrawal severity score and frequency of jumping, rearing, fore paw licking and circling. Separately naloxone-induced contraction in morphine-dependent isolated rat ileum was employed as an in vitro model. An isobolographic study design was employed to assess potential synergistic activity between trichostatin A and Ac-DEVD-CHO. Brain histone acetylation status was examined by western blotting. Injection of naloxone precipitated a severe form of abstinence syndrome in morphine-dependent mice along with strong contracture in isolated rat ileum. Administration of tributyrin (1.5, 3 and 6 g/kg, p.o.), trichostatin A (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o.) and Ac-DEVD-CHO (0.3, 1.0 and 3.0 mg/kg, p.o.) markedly and dose dependently attenuated naloxone-induced morphine withdrawal syndrome in vivo as well as in vitro in rat ileum. Trichostatin A was also observed to exert a synergistic interaction with Ac-DEVD-CHO. Western blot analysis revealed that multiple administration with the effective dose of tributyrin or trichostatin A in the in vivo experiments induced hyperacetylation of histone H3 in the mouse brain. Thus, it is proposed that histone deacetylase activation linked mechanism might be involved in the development of opioid dependence and the precipitation of its withdrawal syndrome.

  16. Epigenetic mechanisms in neurological diseases: genes, syndromes, and therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urdinguio, Rocio G; Sanchez-Mut, Jose V; Esteller, Manel

    2009-11-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms such as DNA methylation and modifications to histone proteins regulate high-order DNA structure and gene expression. Aberrant epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the development of many diseases, including cancer. The neurological disorder most intensely studied with regard to epigenetic changes is Rett syndrome; patients with Rett syndrome have neurodevelopmental defects associated with mutations in MeCP2, which encodes the methyl CpG binding protein 2, that binds to methylated DNA. Other mental retardation disorders are also linked to the disruption of genes involved in epigenetic mechanisms; such disorders include alpha thalassaemia/mental retardation X-linked syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, and Coffin-Lowry syndrome. Moreover, aberrant DNA methylation and histone modification profiles of discrete DNA sequences, and those at a genome-wide level, have just begun to be described for neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Huntington's disease, and in other neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, epilepsy, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. In this Review, we describe epigenetic changes present in neurological diseases and discuss the therapeutic potential of epigenetic drugs, such as histone deacetylase inhibitors.

  17. Dynamics of gene expression with positive feedback to histone modifications at bivalent domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Rongsheng; Lei, Jinzhi

    2018-03-01

    Experiments have shown that in embryonic stem cells, the promoters of many lineage-control genes contain “bivalent domains”, within which the nucleosomes possess both active (H3K4me3) and repressive (H3K27me3) marks. Such bivalent modifications play important roles in maintaining pluripotency in embryonic stem cells. Here, to investigate gene expression dynamics when there are regulations in bivalent histone modifications and random partition in cell divisions, we study how positive feedback to histone methylation/demethylation controls the transition dynamics of the histone modification patterns along with cell cycles. We constructed a computational model that includes dynamics of histone marks, three-stage chromatin state transitions, transcription and translation, feedbacks from protein product to enzymes to regulate the addition and removal of histone marks, and the inheritance of nucleosome state between cell cycles. The model reveals how dynamics of both nucleosome state transition and gene expression are dependent on the enzyme activities and feedback regulations. Results show that the combination of stochastic histone modification at each cell division and the deterministic feedback regulation work together to adjust the dynamics of chromatin state transition in stem cell regenerations.

  18. Recruitment of Histone Deacetylase 3 to the Interferon-A Gene Promoters Attenuates Interferon Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Génin, Pierre; Lin, Rongtuan; Hiscott, John; Civas, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Background Induction of Type I Interferon (IFN) genes constitutes an essential step leading to innate immune responses during virus infection. Sendai virus (SeV) infection of B lymphoid Namalwa cells transiently induces the transcriptional expression of multiple IFN-A genes. Although transcriptional activation of IFN-A genes has been extensively studied, the mechanism responsible for the attenuation of their expression remains to be determined. Principal Findings In this study, we demonstrate that virus infection of Namalwa cells induces transient recruitment of HDAC3 (histone deacetylase 3) to IFN-A promoters. Analysis of chromatin-protein association by Chip-QPCR demonstrated that recruitment of interferon regulatory factor (IRF)3 and IRF7, as well as TBP correlated with enhanced histone H3K9 and H3K14 acetylation, whereas recruitment of HDAC3 correlated with inhibition of histone H3K9/K14 acetylation, removal of IRF7 and TATA-binding protein (TBP) from IFN-A promoters and inhibition of virus-induced IFN-A gene transcription. Additionally, HDAC3 overexpression reduced, and HDAC3 depletion by siRNA enhanced IFN-A gene expression. Furthermore, activation of IRF7 enhanced histone H3K9/K14 acetylation and IFN-A gene expression, whereas activation of both IRF7 and IRF3 led to recruitment of HDAC3 to the IFN-A gene promoters, resulting in impaired histone H3K9 acetylation and attenuation of IFN-A gene transcription. Conclusion Altogether these data indicate that reversal of histone H3K9/K14 acetylation by HDAC3 is required for attenuation of IFN-A gene transcription during viral infection. PMID:22685561

  19. Gene profile analysis of osteoblast genes differentially regulated by histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamblin Anne-Francoise

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoblast differentiation requires the coordinated stepwise expression of multiple genes. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs accelerate the osteoblast differentiation process by blocking the activity of histone deacetylases (HDACs, which alter gene expression by modifying chromatin structure. We previously demonstrated that HDIs and HDAC3 shRNAs accelerate matrix mineralization and the expression of osteoblast maturation genes (e.g. alkaline phosphatase, osteocalcin. Identifying other genes that are differentially regulated by HDIs might identify new pathways that contribute to osteoblast differentiation. Results To identify other osteoblast genes that are altered early by HDIs, we incubated MC3T3-E1 preosteoblasts with HDIs (trichostatin A, MS-275, or valproic acid for 18 hours in osteogenic conditions. The promotion of osteoblast differentiation by HDIs in this experiment was confirmed by osteogenic assays. Gene expression profiles relative to vehicle-treated cells were assessed by microarray analysis with Affymetrix GeneChip 430 2.0 arrays. The regulation of several genes by HDIs in MC3T3-E1 cells and primary osteoblasts was verified by quantitative real-time PCR. Nine genes were differentially regulated by at least two-fold after exposure to each of the three HDIs and six were verified by PCR in osteoblasts. Four of the verified genes (solute carrier family 9 isoform 3 regulator 1 (Slc9a3r1, sorbitol dehydrogenase 1, a kinase anchor protein, and glutathione S-transferase alpha 4 were induced. Two genes (proteasome subunit, beta type 10 and adaptor-related protein complex AP-4 sigma 1 were suppressed. We also identified eight growth factors and growth factor receptor genes that are significantly altered by each of the HDIs, including Frizzled related proteins 1 and 4, which modulate the Wnt signaling pathway. Conclusion This study identifies osteoblast genes that are regulated early by HDIs and indicates pathways that

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of the core histone doublet and DNA topo II genes of Marseilleviridae: evidence of proto-eukaryotic provenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erives, Albert J

    2017-11-28

    While the genomes of eukaryotes and Archaea both encode the histone-fold domain, only eukaryotes encode the core histone paralogs H2A, H2B, H3, and H4. With DNA, these core histones assemble into the nucleosomal octamer underlying eukaryotic chromatin. Importantly, core histones for H2A and H3 are maintained as neofunctionalized paralogs adapted for general bulk chromatin (canonical H2 and H3) or specialized chromatin (H2A.Z enriched at gene promoters and cenH3s enriched at centromeres). In this context, the identification of core histone-like "doublets" in the cytoplasmic replication factories of the Marseilleviridae (MV) is a novel finding with possible relevance to understanding the origin of eukaryotic chromatin. Here, we analyze and compare the core histone doublet genes from all known MV genomes as well as other MV genes relevant to the origin of the eukaryotic replisome. Using different phylogenetic approaches, we show that MV histone domains encode obligate H2B-H2A and H4-H3 dimers of possible proto-eukaryotic origin. MV core histone moieties form sister clades to each of the four eukaryotic clades of canonical and variant core histones. This suggests that MV core histone moieties diverged prior to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations associated with paired linear chromosomes and variant histone octamer assembly. We also show that MV genomes encode a proto-eukaryotic DNA topoisomerase II enzyme that forms a sister clade to eukaryotes. This is a relevant finding given that DNA topo II influences histone deposition and chromatin compaction and is the second most abundant nuclear protein after histones. The combined domain architecture and phylogenomic analyses presented here suggest that a primitive origin for MV histone genes is a more parsimonious explanation than horizontal gene transfers + gene fusions + sufficient divergence to eliminate relatedness to eukaryotic neofunctionalizations within the H2A and H3 clades without loss of relatedness to each of

  1. Modulation of histone methylation and MLH1 gene silencing by hexavalent chromium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Hong; Zhou Xue; Chen Haobin; Li Qin; Costa, Max

    2009-01-01

    Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a mutagen and carcinogen, and occupational exposure can lead to lung cancers and other adverse health effects. Genetic changes resulting from DNA damage have been proposed as an important mechanism that mediates chromate's carcinogenicity. Here we show that chromate exposure of human lung A549 cells increased global levels of di- and tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 4 (H3K4) but decreased the levels of tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) and di-methylated histone H3 arginine 2 (H3R2). Most interestingly, H3K9 dimethylation was enriched in the human MLH1 gene promoter following chromate exposure and this was correlated with decreased MLH1 mRNA expression. Chromate exposure increased the protein as well as mRNA levels of G9a a histone methyltransferase that specifically methylates H3K9. This Cr(VI)-induced increase in G9a may account for the global elevation of H3K9 dimethylation. Furthermore, supplementation with ascorbate, the primary reductant of Cr(VI) and also an essential cofactor for the histone demethylase activity, partially reversed the H3K9 dimethylation induced by chromate. Thus our studies suggest that Cr(VI) may target histone methyltransferases and demethylases, which in turn affect both global and gene promoter specific histone methylation, leading to the silencing of specific tumor suppressor genes such as MLH1.

  2. Independent regulation of gene expression level and noise by histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohuan; Li, Ke; Li, Yingshu; Zhao, Tong; Li, Ting; Yang, Yu-Fei; Qian, Wenfeng

    2017-06-01

    The inherent stochasticity generates substantial gene expression variation among isogenic cells under identical conditions, which is frequently referred to as gene expression noise or cell-to-cell expression variability. Similar to (average) expression level, expression noise is also subject to natural selection. Yet it has been observed that noise is negatively correlated with expression level, which manifests as a potential constraint for simultaneous optimization of both. Here, we studied expression noise in human embryonic cells with computational analysis on single-cell RNA-seq data and in yeast with flow cytometry experiments. We showed that this coupling is overcome, to a certain degree, by a histone modification strategy in multiple embryonic developmental stages in human, as well as in yeast. Importantly, this epigenetic strategy could fit into a burst-like gene expression model: promoter-localized histone modifications (such as H3K4 methylation) are associated with both burst size and burst frequency, which together influence expression level, while gene-body-localized ones (such as H3K79 methylation) are more associated with burst frequency, which influences both expression level and noise. We further knocked out the only "writer" of H3K79 methylation in yeast, and observed that expression noise is indeed increased. Consistently, dosage sensitive genes, such as genes in the Wnt signaling pathway, tend to be marked with gene-body-localized histone modifications, while stress responding genes, such as genes regulating autophagy, tend to be marked with promoter-localized ones. Our findings elucidate that the "division of labor" among histone modifications facilitates the independent regulation of expression level and noise, extend the "histone code" hypothesis to include expression noise, and shed light on the optimization of transcriptome in evolution.

  3. Recurrent Gene Duplication Leads to Diverse Repertoires of Centromeric Histones in Drosophila Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kursel, Lisa E; Malik, Harmit S

    2017-06-01

    Despite their essential role in the process of chromosome segregation in most eukaryotes, centromeric histones show remarkable evolutionary lability. Not only have they been lost in multiple insect lineages, but they have also undergone gene duplication in multiple plant lineages. Based on detailed study of a handful of model organisms including Drosophila melanogaster, centromeric histone duplication is considered to be rare in animals. Using a detailed phylogenomic study, we find that Cid, the centromeric histone gene, has undergone at least four independent gene duplications during Drosophila evolution. We find duplicate Cid genes in D. eugracilis (Cid2), in the montium species subgroup (Cid3, Cid4) and in the entire Drosophila subgenus (Cid5). We show that Cid3, Cid4, and Cid5 all localize to centromeres in their respective species. Some Cid duplicates are primarily expressed in the male germline. With rare exceptions, Cid duplicates have been strictly retained after birth, suggesting that they perform nonredundant centromeric functions, independent from the ancestral Cid. Indeed, each duplicate encodes a distinct N-terminal tail, which may provide the basis for distinct protein-protein interactions. Finally, we show some Cid duplicates evolve under positive selection whereas others do not. Taken together, our results support the hypothesis that Drosophila Cid duplicates have subfunctionalized. Thus, these gene duplications provide an unprecedented opportunity to dissect the multiple roles of centromeric histones. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  4. Genomic amplification and oncogenic properties of the GASC1 histone demethylase gene in breast cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liu, G.; Bollig-Fischer, A.; Kreike, B.; van de Vijver, M. J.; Abrams, J.; Ethier, S. P.; Yang, Z.-Q.

    2009-01-01

    Earlier, mapping of the 9p23-24 amplicon in esophageal cancer cell lines led us to the positional cloning of gene amplified in squamous cell carcinoma 1 (GASC1), which encodes a nuclear protein with a Jumonji C domain that catalyzes lysine (K) demethylation of histones. However, the transforming

  5. Transcriptomic sequencing reveals a set of unique genes activated by butyrate-induced histone modification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butyrate is a nutritional element with strong epigenetic regulatory activity as an inhibitor of histone deacetylases (HDACs). Based on the analysis of differentially expressed genes induced by butyrate in the bovine epithelial cell using deep RNA-sequencing technology (RNA-seq), a set of unique gen...

  6. The organization of the histone genes in the genome of Xenopus laevis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, W.; de Laaf, L.; Zaal, R.; Moorman, A.; Destrée, O.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied the organization of the histone genes in the DNA from several individuals of Xenopus laevis. For that purpose, Southern blots of genomic DNA, that was digested with several restriction enzymes, were hybridized with radioactively labeled DNA fragments from clone X1-hi-1 (14),

  7. Histone gene expression remains coupled to DNA synthesis during in vitro cellular senescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zambetti, G.; Stein, G.; Stein, J.; Dell'Orco, R.

    1987-01-01

    Despite a decrease in the extent to which confluent monolayers of late compared to early passage CF3 human diploid fibroblasts can be stimulated to proliferate, the time course of DNA synthesis onset is similar regardless of the in vitro age of the cells. A parallel and stoichiometric relationship is maintained between the rate of DNA synthesis and the cellular levels of histone mRNA independent of the age of the cell cultures. Furthermore, DNA synthesis and cellular histone mRNA levels decline in a coordinate manner after inhibition of DNA replication by hydroxyurea treatment. These results indicate that while the proliferative activity of human diploid fibroblasts decreases with passage in culture, those cells that retain the ability to proliferate continue to exhibit a tight coupling of DNA replication and histone gene expression

  8. Long non-coding RNA ROR decoys gene-specific histone methylation to promote tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jiayan; Xing, Yue; Wen, Xuyang; Jia, Renbin; Ni, Hongyan; He, Jie; Ding, Xia; Pan, Hui; Qian, Guanxiang; Ge, Shengfang; Hoffman, Andrew R; Zhang, He; Fan, Xianqun

    2015-07-14

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are not translated into proteins and were initially considered to be part of the 'dark matter' of the genome. Recently, it has been shown that lncRNAs play a role in the recruitment of chromatin modifying complexes and can influence gene expression. However, it is unknown if lncRNAs function in a similar way in cancer. Here, we show that the lncRNA ROR occupies and activates the TESC promoter by repelling the histone G9A methyltransferase and promoting the release of histone H3K9 methylation. Suppression of ROR in tumors results in silencing of TESC expression, and G9A-mediated histone H3K9 methylation in the TESC promoter is restored, which significantly reduces tumor growth and metastasis. Without ROR silencing, TESC knockdown presents consistent and significant reductions in tumor progression. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which ROR may serve as a decoy oncoRNA that blocks binding surfaces, preventing the recruitment of histone modifying enzymes, thereby specifying a new pattern of histone modifications that promote tumorigenesis.

  9. Suppression of gluconeogenic gene expression by LSD1-mediated histone demethylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongning Pan

    Full Text Available Aberrant gluconeogenic gene expression is associated with diabetes, glycogen storage disease, and liver cancer. However, little is known how these genes are regulated at the chromatin level. In this study, we investigated in HepG2 cells whether histone demethylation is a potential mechanism. We found that knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of histone demethylase LSD1 causes remarkable transcription activation of two gluconeogenic genes, FBP1 and G6Pase, and consequently leads to increased de novo glucose synthesis and decreased intracellular glycogen content. Mechanistically, LSD1 occupies the promoters of FBP1 and G6Pase, and modulates their H3K4 dimethylation levels. Thus, our work identifies an epigenetic pathway directly governing gluconeogenic gene expression, which might have important implications in metabolic physiology and diseases.

  10. Comparative effects of histone deacetylases inhibitors and resveratrol on Trypanosoma cruzi replication, differentiation, infectivity and gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanina A. Campo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone post-translational modification, mediated by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases, is one of the most studied factors affecting gene expression. Recent data showing differential histone acetylation states during the Trypanosoma cruzi cell cycle suggest a role for epigenetics in the control of this process. As a starting point to study the role of histone deacetylases in the control of gene expression and the consequences of their inhibition and activation in the biology of T. cruzi, two inhibitors for different histone deacetylases: trichostatin A for class I/II and sirtinol for class III and the activator resveratrol for class III, were tested on proliferative and infective forms of this parasite. The two inhibitors tested caused histone hyperacetylation whereas resveratrol showed the opposite effect on both parasite forms, indicating that a biologically active in vivo level of these compounds was achieved. Histone deacetylase inhibitors caused life stage-specific effects, increasing trypomastigotes infectivity and blocking metacyclogenesis. Moreover, these inhibitors affected specific transcript levels, with sirtinol causing the most pronounced change. On the other hand, resveratrol showed strong anti-parasitic effects. This compound diminished epimastigotes growth, promoted metacyclogenesis, reduced in vitro infection and blocked differentiation and/or replication of intracellular amastigotes. In conclusion, the data presented here supports the notion that these compounds can modulate T. cruzi gene expression, differentiation, infection and histones deacetylase activity. Furthermore, among the compounds tested in this study, the results point to Resveratrol as promising trypanocidal drug candidate.

  11. [Correlation between histone H3-K9 methylation, DNA methylation and expression of gene MGMT in Hep-2 cell line].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jing; He, Liria; Ji, Wenyue; Jin, Mingzhu; Zhao, Xudong

    2012-11-01

    To explore the correlation between histone H3-K9 methylation, DNA methylation and expression of carcinoma suppressor gene MGMT in laryngeal carcinoma Hep-2 cell line. 5-Aza-dC was used to deal with Hep-2 cell cultured in vitro. ChIP, MSP and Realtime-PCR were used to detect H3-K9 methylation, DNA methylation, of MGMT gene promoter region and MGMT gene expression before and after treatment with drugs. (1) In Hep-2 cell line, gene MGMT was characterized by DNA methylation and histone H3-K9 hypermethylation. (2) 5-Aza-dC was able to reduce H3-K9 methylation of MGMT gene histone in Hep-2 cell line, 5-Aza-dC was able to reverse DNA methylation of MGMT gene histone in Hep-2 cell line, 5-Aza-dC was able to upregulate the down-regulated gene expression of tumor suppressor genes MGMT. Promoter methylation of cancer suppressor gene MGMT may induce the gene inactivity. DNA methylation may increase H3-K9 methylation. 5-Aza-dC can reduce H3-K9 methylation of tumor suppressor gene MGMT histone by reversing DNA methylation of tumor suppressor gene MGMT, and then the expression of tumor suppressor genes is increased and tumor development is inhibited.

  12. Profiling Analysis of Histone Modifications and Gene Expression in Lewis Lung Carcinoma Murine Cells Resistant to Anti-VEGF Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Li

    Full Text Available Tumor cells become resistant after long-term use of anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor agents. Our previous study shows that treatment with a VEGF inhibitor (VEGF-Trap facilitates to develop tumor resistance through regulating angiogenesis-related genes. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain elusive. Histone modifications as a key epigenetic factor play a critical role in regulation of gene expression. Here, we explore the potential epigenetic gene regulatory functions of key histone modifications during tumor resistance in a mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC cell line. We generated high resolution genome-wide maps of key histone modifications in sensitive tumor sample (LLC-NR and resistant tumor sample (LLC-R after VEGF-Trap treatment. Profiling analysis of histone modifications shows that histone modification levels are effectively predictive for gene expression. Composition of promoters classified by histone modification state is different between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines regardless of CpG content. Histone modification state change between LLC-NR and LLC-R cell lines shows different patterns in CpG-rich and CpG-poor promoters. As a consequence, genes with different level of CpG content whose gene expression level are altered are enriched in distinct functions. Notably, histone modification state change in promoters of angiogenesis-related genes consists with their expression alteration. Taken together, our findings suggest that treatment with anti-VEGF therapy results in extensive histone modification state change in promoters with multiple functions, particularly, biological processes related to angiogenesis, likely contributing to tumor resistance development.

  13. Molecular landscape of modified histones in Drosophila heterochromatic genes and euchromatin-heterochromatin transition zones.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro C Yasuhara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Constitutive heterochromatin is enriched in repetitive sequences and histone H3-methylated-at-lysine 9. Both components contribute to heterochromatin's ability to silence euchromatic genes. However, heterochromatin also harbors hundreds of expressed genes in organisms such as Drosophila. Recent studies have provided a detailed picture of sequence organization of D. melanogaster heterochromatin, but how histone modifications are associated with heterochromatic sequences at high resolution has not been described. Here, distributions of modified histones in the vicinity of heterochromatic genes of normal embryos and embryos homozygous for a chromosome rearrangement were characterized using chromatin immunoprecipitation and genome tiling arrays. We found that H3-di-methylated-at-lysine 9 (H3K9me2 was depleted at the 5' ends but enriched throughout transcribed regions of heterochromatic genes. The profile was distinct from that of euchromatic genes and suggests that heterochromatic genes are integrated into, rather than insulated from, the H3K9me2-enriched domain. Moreover, the profile was only subtly affected by a Su(var3-9 null mutation, implicating a histone methyltransferase other than SU(VAR3-9 as responsible for most H3K9me2 associated with heterochromatic genes in embryos. On a chromosomal scale, we observed a sharp transition to the H3K9me2 domain, which coincided with increased retrotransposon density in the euchromatin-heterochromatin (eu-het transition zones on the long chromosome arms. Thus, a certain density of retrotransposons, rather than specific boundary elements, may demarcate Drosophila pericentric heterochromatin. We also demonstrate that a chromosome rearrangement that created a new eu-het junction altered H3K9me2 distribution and induced new euchromatic sites of enrichment as far as several megabases away from the breakpoint. Taken together, the findings argue against simple classification of H3K9me as the definitive signature

  14. Evidence for gene-specific rather than transcription rate-dependent histone H3 exchange in yeast coding regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gat-Viks, Irit; Vingron, Martin

    2009-02-01

    In eukaryotic organisms, histones are dynamically exchanged independently of DNA replication. Recent reports show that different coding regions differ in their amount of replication-independent histone H3 exchange. The current paradigm is that this histone exchange variability among coding regions is a consequence of transcription rate. Here we put forward the idea that this variability might be also modulated in a gene-specific manner independently of transcription rate. To that end, we study transcription rate-independent replication-independent coding region histone H3 exchange. We term such events relative exchange. Our genome-wide analysis shows conclusively that in yeast, relative exchange is a novel consistent feature of coding regions. Outside of replication, each coding region has a characteristic pattern of histone H3 exchange that is either higher or lower than what was expected by its RNAPII transcription rate alone. Histone H3 exchange in coding regions might be a way to add or remove certain histone modifications that are important for transcription elongation. Therefore, our results that gene-specific coding region histone H3 exchange is decoupled from transcription rate might hint at a new epigenetic mechanism of transcription regulation.

  15. Natural variation of histone modification and its impact on gene expression in the rat genome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rintisch, C.; Heinig, M.; Bauerfeind, A.; Schafer, S.; Mieth, Ch.; Patone, G.; Hummel, O.; Chen, W.; Cook, S.; Cuppen, E.; Colomé-Tatché, M.; Johannes, F.; Jansen, R. C.; Neil, H.; Werner, M.; Pravenec, Michal; Vingron, M.; Hubner, N.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 24, JUN (2014), s. 942-953 ISSN 1088-9051 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7E10067; GA ČR(CZ) GAP301/10/0290; GA MŠk(CZ) LL1204 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : ChIP - seq * histone modification * gene expression * genetic linkage analysis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 14.630, year: 2014

  16. The Histone Methyltransferase DOT1L Promotes Neuroblastoma by Regulating Gene Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Matthew; Tee, Andrew E L; Milazzo, Giorgio; Bell, Jessica L; Poulos, Rebecca C; Atmadibrata, Bernard; Sun, Yuting; Jing, Duohui; Ho, Nicholas; Ling, Dora; Liu, Pei Yan; Zhang, Xu Dong; Hüttelmaier, Stefan; Wong, Jason W H; Wang, Jenny; Polly, Patsie; Perini, Giovanni; Scarlett, Christopher J; Liu, Tao

    2017-05-01

    Myc oncoproteins exert tumorigenic effects by regulating expression of target oncogenes. Histone H3 lysine 79 (H3K79) methylation at Myc-responsive elements of target gene promoters is a strict prerequisite for Myc-induced transcriptional activation, and DOT1L is the only known histone methyltransferase that catalyzes H3K79 methylation. Here, we show that N-Myc upregulates DOT1L mRNA and protein expression by binding to the DOT1L gene promoter. shRNA-mediated depletion of DOT1L reduced mRNA and protein expression of N-Myc target genes ODC1 and E2F2 DOT1L bound to the Myc Box II domain of N-Myc protein, and knockdown of DOT1L reduced histone H3K79 methylation and N-Myc protein binding at the ODC1 and E2F2 gene promoters and reduced neuroblastoma cell proliferation. Treatment with the small-molecule DOT1L inhibitor SGC0946 reduced H3K79 methylation and proliferation of MYCN gene-amplified neuroblastoma cells. In mice xenografts of neuroblastoma cells stably expressing doxycycline-inducible DOT1L shRNA, ablating DOT1L expression with doxycycline significantly reduced ODC1 and E2F2 expression, reduced tumor progression, and improved overall survival. In addition, high levels of DOT1L gene expression in human neuroblastoma tissues correlated with high levels of MYCN, ODC1 , and E2F2 gene expression and independently correlated with poor patient survival. Taken together, our results identify DOT1L as a novel cofactor in N-Myc-mediated transcriptional activation of target genes and neuroblastoma oncogenesis. Furthermore, they characterize DOT1L inhibitors as novel anticancer agents against MYCN-amplified neuroblastoma. Cancer Res; 77(9); 2522-33. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. The Arabidopsis histone chaperone FACT is required for stress-induced expression of anthocyanin biosynthetic genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfab, Alexander; Breindl, Matthias; Grasser, Klaus D

    2018-03-01

    The histone chaperone FACT is involved in the expression of genes encoding anthocyanin biosynthetic enzymes also upon induction by moderate high-light and therefore contributes to the stress-induced plant pigmentation. The histone chaperone FACT consists of the SSRP1 and SPT16 proteins and associates with transcribing RNAPII (RNAPII) along the transcribed region of genes. FACT can promote transcriptional elongation by destabilising nucleosomes in the path of RNA polymerase II, thereby facilitating efficient transcription of chromatin templates. Transcript profiling of Arabidopsis plants depleted in SSRP1 or SPT16 demonstrates that only a small subset of genes is differentially expressed relative to wild type. The majority of these genes is either up- or down-regulated in both the ssrp1 and spt16 plants. Among the down-regulated genes, those encoding enzymes of the biosynthetic pathway of the plant secondary metabolites termed anthocyanins (but not regulators of the pathway) are overrepresented. Upon exposure to moderate high-light stress several of these genes are up-regulated to a lesser extent in ssrp1/spt16 compared to wild type plants, and accordingly the mutant plants accumulate lower amounts of anthocyanin pigments. Moreover, the expression of SSRP1 and SPT16 is induced under these conditions. Therefore, our findings indicate that FACT is a novel factor required for the accumulation of anthocyanins in response to light-induction.

  18. The tumor suppressor Rb and its related Rbl2 genes are regulated by Utx histone demethylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terashima, Minoru; Ishimura, Akihiko; Yoshida, Masakazu [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan); Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio [Graduate School of Frontier Sciences, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa 277-8561, Chiba (Japan); Suzuki, Takeshi, E-mail: suzuki-t@staff.kanazawa-u.ac.jp [Division of Functional Genomics, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, Ishikawa (Japan)

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} Utx increases expression of Rb and Rbl2 genes through its demethylase activity. {yields} Utx changes histone H3 methylation on the Rb and Rbl2 promoters. {yields} Utx induces decreased cell proliferation of mammalian primary cells. -- Abstract: Utx is a candidate tumor suppressor gene that encodes histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase. In this study, we found that ectopic expression of Utx enhanced the expression of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene Rb and its related gene Rbl2. This activation was dependent on the demethylase activity of Utx, and was suggested to contribute to the decreased cell proliferation induced by Utx. A chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that over-expressed Utx was associated with the promoter regions of Rb and Rbl2 resulting in the removal of repressive H3K27 tri-methylation and the increase in active H3K4 tri-methylation. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated knockdown of Utx revealed the recruitment of endogenous Utx protein on the promoters of Rb and Rbl2 genes. These results indicate that Rb and Rbl2 are downstream target genes of Utx and may play important roles in Utx-mediated cell growth control.

  19. Crosstalk between histone modifications maintains the developmental pattern of gene expression on a tissue-specific locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosey, Alison M; Chaturvedi, Chandra-Prakash; Brand, Marjorie

    2010-05-16

    Genome wide studies have provided a wealth of information related to histone modifications. Particular modifications, which can encompass both broad and discrete regions, are associated with certain genomic elements and gene expression status. Here we focus on how studies on the beta-globin gene cluster can complement the genome wide effort through the thorough dissection of histone modifying protein crosstalk. The beta-globin locus serves as a model system to study both regulation of gene expression driven at a distance by enhancers and mechanisms of developmental switching of clustered genes. We investigate recent studies, which uncover that histone methyltransferases, recruited at the beta-globin enhancer, control gene expression by long range propagation on chromatin. Specifically, we focus on how seemingly antagonistic complexes, such as those including MLL2, G9a and UTX, can cooperate to functionally regulate developmentally controlled gene expression. Finally, we speculate on the mechanisms of chromatin modifying complex propagation on genomic domains.

  20. Altered histone mark deposition and DNA methylation at homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M; Gudas, Lorraine J

    2014-10-01

    We recently reported a role of polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC2 trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the regulation of homeobox (HOX) (Marcinkiewicz and Gudas, 2013, Exp Cell Res) gene transcript levels in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT1R) and tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. Here, we assessed both the levels of various histone modifications at a subset of homeobox genes and genome wide DNA methylation patterns in OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells by using ERRBS (enhanced reduced representation bisulfite sequencing). We detected the H3K9me3 mark at HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 at levels higher in OKF6-TERT1R than in SCC-9 cells; at IRX1 and SIX2 the H3K9me3 levels were conversely higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R. The H3K79me3 mark was detectable only at IRX1 in OKF6-TERT1R and at IRX4 in SCC-9 cells. The levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks correlate with the transcript levels of the assessed homeobox genes in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9. We detected generally lower CpG methylation levels on DNA in SCC-9 cells at annotated genomic regions which were differentially methylated between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells; however, some genomic regions, including the HOX gene clusters, showed DNA methylation at higher levels in SCC-9 than OKF6-TERT1R. Thus, both altered histone modification patterns and changes in DNA methylation are associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human oral cavity SCC cells, and this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic phenotype of oral keratinocytes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Genes and Syndromic Hearing Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keats, Bronya J. B.

    2002-01-01

    This article provides a description of the human genome and patterns of inheritance and discusses genes that are associated with some of the syndromes for which hearing loss is a common finding, including: Waardenburg, Stickler, Jervell and Lange-Neilsen, Usher, Alport, mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, and sensorineural hearing loss. (Contains…

  2. Gene expression profiling of epigenetic chromatin modification enzymes and histone marks by cigarette smoke: implications for COPD and lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Isaac K; Rahman, Irfan

    2016-12-01

    Chromatin-modifying enzymes mediate DNA methylation and histone modifications on recruitment to specific target gene loci in response to various stimuli. The key enzymes that regulate chromatin accessibility for maintenance of modifications in DNA and histones, and for modulation of gene expression patterns in response to cigarette smoke (CS), are not known. We hypothesize that CS exposure alters the gene expression patterns of chromatin-modifying enzymes, which then affects multiple downstream pathways involved in the response to CS. We have, therefore, analyzed chromatin-modifying enzyme profiles and validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). We also performed immunoblot analysis of targeted histone marks in C57BL/6J mice exposed to acute and subchronic CS, and of lungs from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We found a significant increase in expression of several chromatin modification enzymes, including DNA methyltransferases, histone acetyltransferases, histone methyltransferases, and SET domain proteins, histone kinases, and ubiquitinases. Our qPCR validation data revealed a significant downregulation of Dnmt1, Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Hdac2, Hdac4, Hat1, Prmt1, and Aurkb We identified targeted chromatin histone marks (H3K56ac and H4K12ac), which are induced by CS. Thus CS-induced genotoxic stress differentially affects the expression of epigenetic modulators that regulate transcription of target genes via DNA methylation and site-specific histone modifications. This may have implications in devising epigenetic-based therapies for COPD and lung cancer. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  3. DNA methylation in an intron of the IBM1 histone demethylase gene stabilizes chromatin modification patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigal, Mélanie; Kevei, Zoltán; Pélissier, Thierry; Mathieu, Olivier

    2012-06-29

    The stability of epigenetic patterns is critical for genome integrity and gene expression. This highly coordinated process involves interrelated positive and negative regulators that impact distinct epigenetic marks, including DNA methylation and dimethylation at histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9me2). In Arabidopsis, mutations in the DNA methyltransferase MET1, which maintains CG methylation, result in aberrant patterns of other epigenetic marks, including ectopic non-CG methylation and the relocation of H3K9me2 from heterochromatin into gene-rich chromosome regions. Here, we show that the expression of the H3K9 demethylase IBM1 (increase in BONSAI methylation 1) requires DNA methylation. Surprisingly, the regulatory methylated region is contained in an unusually large intron that is conserved in IBM1 orthologues. The re-establishment of IBM1 expression in met1 mutants restored the wild-type H3K9me2 nuclear patterns, non-CG DNA methylation and transcriptional patterns at selected loci, which included DNA demethylase genes. These results provide a mechanistic explanation for long-standing puzzling observations in met1 mutants and reveal yet another layer of control in the interplay between DNA methylation and histone modification, which stabilizes DNA methylation patterns at genes.

  4. Comparative effects of histone deacetylases inhibitors and resveratrol on Trypanosoma cruzi replication, differentiation, infectivity and gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campo, Vanina A

    2017-04-01

    Histone post-translational modification, mediated by histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases, is one of the most studied factors affecting gene expression. Recent data showing differential histone acetylation states during the Trypanosoma cruzi cell cycle suggest a role for epigenetics in the control of this process. As a starting point to study the role of histone deacetylases in the control of gene expression and the consequences of their inhibition and activation in the biology of T. cruzi, two inhibitors for different histone deacetylases: trichostatin A for class I/II and sirtinol for class III and the activator resveratrol for class III, were tested on proliferative and infective forms of this parasite. The two inhibitors tested caused histone hyperacetylation whereas resveratrol showed the opposite effect on both parasite forms, indicating that a biologically active in vivo level of these compounds was achieved. Histone deacetylase inhibitors caused life stage-specific effects, increasing trypomastigotes infectivity and blocking metacyclogenesis. Moreover, these inhibitors affected specific transcript levels, with sirtinol causing the most pronounced change. On the other hand, resveratrol showed strong anti-parasitic effects. This compound diminished epimastigotes growth, promoted metacyclogenesis, reduced in vitro infection and blocked differentiation and/or replication of intracellular amastigotes. In conclusion, the data presented here supports the notion that these compounds can modulate T. cruzi gene expression, differentiation, infection and histones deacetylase activity. Furthermore, among the compounds tested in this study, the results point to Resveratrol as promising trypanocidal drug candidate. Copyright © 2017 The Author. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Histone Acetylation Modifications Affect Tissue-Dependent Expression of Poplar Homologs of C4 Photosynthetic Enzyme Genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone modifications play important roles in regulating the expression of C4 photosynthetic genes. Given that all enzymes required for the C4 photosynthesis pathway are present in C3 plants, it has been hypothesized that this expression regulatory mechanism has been conserved. However, the relationship between histone modification and the expression of homologs of C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes has not been well determined in C3 plants. In the present study, we cloned nine hybrid poplar (Populus simonii × Populus nigra homologs of maize (Zea mays C4 photosynthetic enzyme genes, carbonic anhydrase (CA, pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK, phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase (PEPC, and investigated the correlation between the expression levels of these genes and the levels of promoter histone acetylation modifications in four vegetative tissues. We found that poplar homologs of C4 homologous genes had tissue-dependent expression patterns that were mostly well-correlated with the level of histone acetylation modification (H3K9ac and H4K5ac determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A further confirmed the role of histone acetylation in the regulation of the nine target genes. Collectively, these results suggest that both H3K9ac and H4K5ac positively regulate the tissue-dependent expression pattern of the PsnCAs, PsnPPDKs, PsnPCKs, and PsnPEPCs genes and that this regulatory mechanism seems to be conserved among the C3 and C4 species. Our findings provide new insight that will aid efforts to modify the expression pattern of these homologs of C4 genes to engineer C4 plants from C3 plants.

  6. Arsenic Induces Polyadenylation of Canonical Histone mRNA by Down-regulating Stem-Loop-binding Protein Gene Expression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocato, Jason; Fang, Lei; Chervona, Yana; Chen, Danqi; Kiok, Kathrin; Sun, Hong; Tseng, Hsiang-Chi; Xu, Dazhong; Shamy, Magdy; Jin, Chunyuan; Costa, Max

    2014-01-01

    The replication-dependent histone genes are the only metazoan genes whose messenger RNA (mRNA) does not terminate with a poly(A) tail at the 3′-end. Instead, the histone mRNAs display a stem-loop structure at their 3′-end. Stem-loop-binding protein (SLBP) binds the stem-loop and regulates canonical histone mRNA metabolism. Here we report that exposure to arsenic, a carcinogenic metal, decreased cellular levels of SLBP by inducing its proteasomal degradation and inhibiting SLBP transcription via epigenetic mechanisms. Notably, arsenic exposure dramatically increased polyadenylation of canonical histone H3.1 mRNA possibly through down-regulation of SLBP expression. The polyadenylated H3.1 mRNA induced by arsenic was not susceptible to normal degradation that occurs at the end of S phase, resulting in continued presence into mitosis, increased total H3.1 mRNA, and increased H3 protein levels. Excess expression of canonical histones have been shown to increase sensitivity to DNA damage as well as increase the frequency of missing chromosomes and induce genomic instability. Thus, polyadenylation of canonical histone mRNA following arsenic exposure may contribute to arsenic-induced carcinogenesis. PMID:25266719

  7. Gene expression profiling in response to the histone deacetylase inhibitor BL1521 in neuroblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruijter, Annemieke J.M. de; Meinsma, Rutger J.; Bosma, Peter; Kemp, Stephan; Caron, Huib N.; Kuilenburg, Andre B.P. van

    2005-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is a childhood tumor with a poor survival in advanced stage disease despite intensive chemotherapeutic regimes. The new histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor BL1521 has shown promising results in neuroblastoma. Inhibition of HDAC resulted in a decrease in proliferation and metabolic activity, induction of apoptosis and differentiation of neuroblastoma cells. In order to elucidate the mechanism mediating the effects of BL1521 on neuroblastoma cells, we investigated the gene expression profile of an MYCN single copy (SKNAS) and an MYCN amplified (IMR32) neuroblastoma cell line after treatment with BL1521 using the Affymetrix oligonucleotide array U133A. An altered expression of 255 genes was observed in both neuroblastoma cell lines. The majority of these genes were involved in gene expression, cellular metabolism, and cell signaling. We observed changes in the expression of vital genes belonging to the cell cycle (cyclin D1 and CDK4) and apoptosis (BNIP3, BID, and BCL2) pathway in response to BL1521. The expression of 37 genes was altered by both BL1521 and Trichostatin A, which could indicate a common gene set regulated by different HDAC inhibitors. BL1521 treatment changed the expression of a number of MYCN-associated genes. Several genes in the Wnt and the Delta/Notch pathways were changed in response to BL1521 treatment, suggesting that BL1521 is able to induce the differentiation of neuroblastoma cells into a more mature phenotype

  8. PSG gene expression is up-regulated by lysine acetylation involving histone and nonhistone proteins.

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    Soledad A Camolotto

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine acetylation is an important post-translational modification that plays a central role in eukaryotic transcriptional activation by modifying chromatin and transcription-related factors. Human pregnancy-specific glycoproteins (PSG are the major secreted placental proteins expressed by the syncytiotrophoblast at the end of pregnancy and represent early markers of cytotrophoblast differentiation. Low PSG levels are associated with complicated pregnancies, thus highlighting the importance of studying the mechanisms that control their expression. Despite several transcription factors having been implicated as key regulators of PSG gene family expression; the role of protein acetylation has not been explored. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we explored the role of acetylation on PSG gene expression in the human placental-derived JEG-3 cell line. Pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases (HDACs up-regulated PSG protein and mRNA expression levels, and augmented the amount of acetylated histone H3 associated with PSG 5'regulatory regions. Moreover, PSG5 promoter activation mediated by Sp1 and KLF6, via the core promoter element motif (CPE, -147/-140, was markedly enhanced in the presence of the HDAC inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA. This effect correlated with an increase in Sp1 acetylation and KLF6 nuclear localization as revealed by immunoprecipitation and subcellular fractionation assays. The co-activators PCAF, p300, and CBP enhanced Sp1-dependent PSG5 promoter activation through their histone acetylase (HAT function. Instead, p300 and CBP acetyltransferase domain was dispensable for sustaining co-activation of PSG5 promoter by KLF6. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Results are consistent with a regulatory role of lysine acetylation on PSG expression through a relaxed chromatin state and an increase in the transcriptional activity of Sp1 and KLF6 following an augmented Sp1 acetylation and KLF6 nuclear localization.

  9. Alcohol-induced histone acetylation reveals a gene network involved in alcohol tolerance.

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    Alfredo Ghezzi

    Full Text Available Sustained or repeated exposure to sedating drugs, such as alcohol, triggers homeostatic adaptations in the brain that lead to the development of drug tolerance and dependence. These adaptations involve long-term changes in the transcription of drug-responsive genes as well as an epigenetic restructuring of chromosomal regions that is thought to signal and maintain the altered transcriptional state. Alcohol-induced epigenetic changes have been shown to be important in the long-term adaptation that leads to alcohol tolerance and dependence endophenotypes. A major constraint impeding progress is that alcohol produces a surfeit of changes in gene expression, most of which may not make any meaningful contribution to the ethanol response under study. Here we used a novel genomic epigenetic approach to find genes relevant for functional alcohol tolerance by exploiting the commonalities of two chemically distinct alcohols. In Drosophila melanogaster, ethanol and benzyl alcohol induce mutual cross-tolerance, indicating that they share a common mechanism for producing tolerance. We surveyed the genome-wide changes in histone acetylation that occur in response to these drugs. Each drug induces modifications in a large number of genes. The genes that respond similarly to either treatment, however, represent a subgroup enriched for genes important for the common tolerance response. Genes were functionally tested for behavioral tolerance to the sedative effects of ethanol and benzyl alcohol using mutant and inducible RNAi stocks. We identified a network of genes that are essential for the development of tolerance to sedation by alcohol.

  10. Steric Clash in the SET Domain of Histone Methyltransferase NSD1 as a Cause of Sotos Syndrome and Its Genetic Heterogeneity in a Brazilian Cohort

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    Kyungsoo Ha

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Most histone methyltransferases (HMTase harbor a predicted Su(var3–9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax (SET domain, which transfers a methyl group to a lysine residue in their substrates. Mutations of the SET domains were reported to cause intellectual disability syndromes such as Sotos, Weaver, or Kabuki syndromes. Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability caused by haploinsufficiency of the nuclear receptor binding SET domain protein 1 (NSD1 gene, an HMTase at 5q35.2–35.3. Here, we analyzed NSD1 in 34 Brazilian Sotos patients and identified three novel and eight known mutations. Using protein modeling and bioinformatic approaches, we evaluated the effects of one novel (I2007F and 21 previously reported missense mutations in the SET domain. For the I2007F mutation, we observed conformational change and loss of structural stability in Molecular Dynamics (MD simulations which may lead to loss-of-function of the SET domain. For six mutations near the ligand-binding site we observed in simulations steric clashes with neighboring side chains near the substrate S-Adenosyl methionine (SAM binding site, which may disrupt the enzymatic activity of NSD1. These results point to a structural mechanism underlying the pathology of the NSD1 missense mutations in the SET domain in Sotos syndrome. NSD1 mutations were identified in only 32% of the Brazilian Sotos patients in our study cohort suggesting other genes (including unknown disease genes underlie the molecular etiology for the majority of these patients. Our studies also found NSD1 expression to be profound in human fetal brain and cerebellum, accounting for prenatal onset and hypoplasia of cerebellar vermis seen in Sotos syndrome.

  11. Expression of P. falciparum var Genes Involves Exchange of the Histone Variant H2A.Z at the Promoter

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    Petter, Michaela; Lee, Chin Chin; Byrne, Timothy J.; Boysen, Katja E.; Volz, Jennifer; Ralph, Stuart A.; Cowman, Alan F.; Brown, Graham V.; Duffy, Michael F.

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum employs antigenic variation to evade the human immune response by switching the expression of different variant surface antigens encoded by the var gene family. Epigenetic mechanisms including histone modifications and sub-nuclear compartmentalization contribute to transcriptional regulation in the malaria parasite, in particular to control antigenic variation. Another mechanism of epigenetic control is the exchange of canonical histones with alternative variants to generate functionally specialized chromatin domains. Here we demonstrate that the alternative histone PfH2A.Z is associated with the epigenetic regulation of var genes. In many eukaryotic organisms the histone variant H2A.Z mediates an open chromatin structure at promoters and facilitates diverse levels of regulation, including transcriptional activation. Throughout the asexual, intraerythrocytic lifecycle of P. falciparum we found that the P. falciparum ortholog of H2A.Z (PfH2A.Z) colocalizes with histone modifications that are characteristic of transcriptionally-permissive euchromatin, but not with markers of heterochromatin. Consistent with this finding, antibodies to PfH2A.Z co-precipitate the permissive modification H3K4me3. By chromatin-immunoprecipitation we show that PfH2A.Z is enriched in nucleosomes around the transcription start site (TSS) in both transcriptionally active and silent stage-specific genes. In var genes, however, PfH2A.Z is enriched at the TSS only during active transcription in ring stage parasites. Thus, in contrast to other genes, temporal var gene regulation involves histone variant exchange at promoter nucleosomes. Sir2 histone deacetylases are important for var gene silencing and their yeast ortholog antagonises H2A.Z function in subtelomeric yeast genes. In immature P. falciparum parasites lacking Sir2A or Sir2B high var transcription levels correlate with enrichment of PfH2A.Z at the TSS. As Sir2A knock out parasites mature the var genes are

  12. PfSETvs methylation of histone H3K36 represses virulence genes in Plasmodium falciparum.

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    Jiang, Lubin; Mu, Jianbing; Zhang, Qingfeng; Ni, Ting; Srinivasan, Prakash; Rayavara, Kempaiah; Yang, Wenjing; Turner, Louise; Lavstsen, Thomas; Theander, Thor G; Peng, Weiqun; Wei, Guiying; Jing, Qingqing; Wakabayashi, Yoshiyuki; Bansal, Abhisheka; Luo, Yan; Ribeiro, José M C; Scherf, Artur; Aravind, L; Zhu, Jun; Zhao, Keji; Miller, Louis H

    2013-07-11

    The variant antigen Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), which is expressed on the surface of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells, is a critical virulence factor for malaria. Each parasite has 60 antigenically distinct var genes that each code for a different PfEMP1 protein. During infection the clonal parasite population expresses only one gene at a time before switching to the expression of a new variant antigen as an immune-evasion mechanism to avoid the host antibody response. The mechanism by which 59 of the 60 var genes are silenced remains largely unknown. Here we show that knocking out the P. falciparum variant-silencing SET gene (here termed PfSETvs), which encodes an orthologue of Drosophila melanogaster ASH1 and controls histone H3 lysine 36 trimethylation (H3K36me3) on var genes, results in the transcription of virtually all var genes in the single parasite nuclei and their expression as proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. PfSETvs-dependent H3K36me3 is present along the entire gene body, including the transcription start site, to silence var genes. With low occupancy of PfSETvs at both the transcription start site of var genes and the intronic promoter, expression of var genes coincides with transcription of their corresponding antisense long noncoding RNA. These results uncover a previously unknown role of PfSETvs-dependent H3K36me3 in silencing var genes in P. falciparum that might provide a general mechanism by which orthologues of PfSETvs repress gene expression in other eukaryotes. PfSETvs knockout parasites expressing all PfEMP1 proteins may also be applied to the development of a malaria vaccine.

  13. CD8 T cell-specific downregulation of histone hyperacetylation and gene activation of the IL-4 gene locus by ROG, repressor of GATA.

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    Omori, Miyuki; Yamashita, Masakatsu; Inami, Masamichi; Ukai-Tadenuma, Maki; Kimura, Motoko; Nigo, Yukiko; Hosokawa, Hiroyuki; Hasegawa, Akihiro; Taniguchi, Masaru; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2003-08-01

    Chromatin remodeling of type 2 cytokine gene loci occurs during differentiation of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells into type 2 helper (Th2) and cytotoxic (Tc2) T cells. IL-4 production and histone hyperacetylation in IL-4-associated nucleosomes in developing Tc2 cells were significantly lower than those of Th2 cells; however, cytokine production and histone hyperacetylation of IL-5 and IL-13 genes were equivalent. Developing Tc2 cells expressed lower GATA3 levels and dramatically increased levels of repressor of GATA (ROG). A ROG response element in the IL-13 gene exon 4 displayed Tc2-specific binding of ROG, HDAC1, and HDAC2 and exhibited repression of IL-4 gene activation. Thus, ROG may confer CD8 T cell-specific repression of histone hyperacetylation and activation of the IL-4 gene locus.

  14. The Histone Database: an integrated resource for histones and histone fold-containing proteins

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    Mariño-Ramírez, Leonardo; Levine, Kevin M.; Morales, Mario; Zhang, Suiyuan; Moreland, R. Travis; Baxevanis, Andreas D.; Landsman, David

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic chromatin is composed of DNA and protein components—core histones—that act to compactly pack the DNA into nucleosomes, the fundamental building blocks of chromatin. These nucleosomes are connected to adjacent nucleosomes by linker histones. Nucleosomes are highly dynamic and, through various core histone post-translational modifications and incorporation of diverse histone variants, can serve as epigenetic marks to control processes such as gene expression and recombination. The Histone Sequence Database is a curated collection of sequences and structures of histones and non-histone proteins containing histone folds, assembled from major public databases. Here, we report a substantial increase in the number of sequences and taxonomic coverage for histone and histone fold-containing proteins available in the database. Additionally, the database now contains an expanded dataset that includes archaeal histone sequences. The database also provides comprehensive multiple sequence alignments for each of the four core histones (H2A, H2B, H3 and H4), the linker histones (H1/H5) and the archaeal histones. The database also includes current information on solved histone fold-containing structures. The Histone Sequence Database is an inclusive resource for the analysis of chromatin structure and function focused on histones and histone fold-containing proteins. Database URL: The Histone Sequence Database is freely available and can be accessed at http://research.nhgri.nih.gov/histones/. PMID:22025671

  15. Histone Acetylation and the Regulation of Major Histocompatibility Class II Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, K; Luo, Y

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules are essential for processing and presenting exogenous pathogen antigens to activate CD4 + T cells. Given their central role in adaptive immune responses, MHC class II genes are tightly regulated in a tissue- and activation-specific manner. The regulation of MHC class II gene expression involves various transcription factors that interact with conserved proximal cis-acting regulatory promoter elements, as well as MHC class II transactivator that interacts with a variety of chromatin remodeling machineries. Recent studies also identified distal regulatory elements within MHC class II gene locus that provide enormous insight into the long-range coordination of MHC class II gene expression. Novel therapeutic modalities that can modify MHC class II genes at the epigenetic level are emerging and are currently in preclinical and clinical trials. This review will focus on the role of chromatin remodeling, particularly remodeling that involves histone acetylation, in the constitutive and inducible regulation of MHC class II gene expression. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Specific phosphorylation of histone demethylase KDM3A determines target gene expression in response to heat shock.

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    Mo-bin Cheng

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone lysine (K residues, which are modified by methyl- and acetyl-transferases, diversely regulate RNA synthesis. Unlike the ubiquitously activating effect of histone K acetylation, the effects of histone K methylation vary with the number of methyl groups added and with the position of these groups in the histone tails. Histone K demethylases (KDMs counteract the activity of methyl-transferases and remove methyl group(s from specific K residues in histones. KDM3A (also known as JHDM2A or JMJD1A is an H3K9me2/1 demethylase. KDM3A performs diverse functions via the regulation of its associated genes, which are involved in spermatogenesis, metabolism, and cell differentiation. However, the mechanism by which the activity of KDM3A is regulated is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrated that mitogen- and stress-activated protein kinase 1 (MSK1 specifically phosphorylates KDM3A at Ser264 (p-KDM3A, which is enriched in the regulatory regions of gene loci in the human genome. p-KDM3A directly interacts with and is recruited by the transcription factor Stat1 to activate p-KDM3A target genes under heat shock conditions. The demethylation of H3K9me2 at the Stat1 binding site specifically depends on the co-expression of p-KDM3A in the heat-shocked cells. In contrast to heat shock, IFN-γ treatment does not phosphorylate KDM3A via MSK1, thereby abrogating its downstream effects. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that a KDM can be modified via phosphorylation to determine its specific binding to target genes in response to thermal stress.

  17. Histone H2B monoubiquitination facilitates the rapid modulation of gene expression during Arabidopsis photomorphogenesis.

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    Clara Bourbousse

    Full Text Available Profiling of DNA and histone modifications has recently allowed the establishment of reference epigenomes from several model organisms. This identified a major chromatin state for active genes that contains monoubiquitinated H2B (H2Bub, a mark linked to transcription elongation. However, assessment of dynamic chromatin changes during the reprogramming of gene expression in response to extrinsic or developmental signals has been more difficult. Here we used the major developmental switch that Arabidopsis thaliana plants undergo upon their initial perception of light, known as photomorphogenesis, as a paradigm to assess spatial and temporal dynamics of monoubiquitinated H2B (H2Bub and its impact on transcriptional responses. The process involves rapid and extensive transcriptional reprogramming and represents a developmental window well suited to studying cell division-independent chromatin changes. Genome-wide H2Bub distribution was determined together with transcriptome profiles at three time points during early photomorphogenesis. This revealed de novo marking of 177 genes upon the first hour of illumination, illustrating the dynamic nature of H2Bub enrichment in a genomic context. Gene upregulation was associated with H2Bub enrichment, while H2Bub levels generally remained stable during gene downregulation. We further report that H2Bub influences the modulation of gene expression, as both gene up- and downregulation were globally weaker in hub1 mutant plants that lack H2Bub. H2Bub-dependent regulation notably impacted genes with fast and transient light induction, and several circadian clock components whose mRNA levels are tightly regulated by sharp oscillations. Based on these findings, we propose that H2B monoubiquitination is part of a transcription-coupled, chromatin-based mechanism to rapidly modulate gene expression.

  18. Testis-Specific Histone Variant H3t Gene Is Essential for Entry into Spermatogenesis

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    Jun Ueda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular differentiation is associated with dynamic chromatin remodeling in establishing a cell-type-specific epigenomic landscape. Here, we find that mouse testis-specific and replication-dependent histone H3 variant H3t is essential for very early stages of spermatogenesis. H3t gene deficiency leads to azoospermia because of the loss of haploid germ cells. When differentiating spermatogonia emerge in normal spermatogenesis, H3t appears and replaces the canonical H3 proteins. Structural and biochemical analyses reveal that H3t-containing nucleosomes are more flexible than the canonical nucleosomes. Thus, by incorporating H3t into the genome during spermatogonial differentiation, male germ cells are able to enter meiosis and beyond.

  19. Cocaine Administration and Its Withdrawal Enhance the Expression of Genes Encoding Histone-Modifying Enzymes and Histone Acetylation in the Rat Prefrontal Cortex.

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    Sadakierska-Chudy, Anna; Frankowska, Małgorzata; Jastrzębska, Joanna; Wydra, Karolina; Miszkiel, Joanna; Sanak, Marek; Filip, Małgorzata

    2017-07-01

    Chronic exposure to cocaine, craving, and relapse are attributed to long-lasting changes in gene expression arising through epigenetic and transcriptional mechanisms. Although several brain regions are involved in these processes, the prefrontal cortex seems to play a crucial role not only in motivation and decision-making but also in extinction and seeking behavior. In this study, we applied cocaine self-administration and extinction training procedures in rats with a yoked triad to determine differentially expressed genes in prefrontal cortex. Microarray analysis showed significant upregulation of several genes encoding histone modification enzymes during early extinction training. Subsequent real-time PCR testing of these genes following cocaine self-administration or early (third day) and late (tenth day) extinction revealed elevated levels of their transcripts. Interestingly, we found the enrichment of Brd1 messenger RNA in rats self-administering cocaine that lasted until extinction training during cocaine withdrawal with concomitant increased acetylation of H3K9 and H4K8. However, despite elevated levels of methyl- and demethyltransferase-encoded transcripts, no changes in global di- and tri-methylation of histone H3 at lysine 4, 9, 27, and 79 were observed. Surprisingly, at the end of extinction training (10 days of cocaine withdrawal), most of the analyzed genes in the rats actively and passively administering cocaine returned to the control level. Together, the alterations identified in the rat prefrontal cortex may suggest enhanced chromatin remodeling and transcriptional activity induced by early cocaine abstinence; however, to know whether they are beneficial or not for the extinction of drug-seeking behavior, further in vivo evaluation is required.

  20. Comparative gene expression profiling of P. falciparum malaria parasites exposed to three different histone deacetylase inhibitors.

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    Katherine T Andrews

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitors are being intensively pursued as potential new drugs for a range of diseases, including malaria. HDAC inhibitors are also important tools for the study of epigenetic mechanisms, transcriptional control, and other important cellular processes. In this study the effects of three structurally related antimalarial HDAC inhibitors on P. falciparum malaria parasite gene expression were compared. The three hydroxamate-based compounds, trichostatin A (TSA, suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA; Vorinostat® and a 2-aminosuberic acid derivative (2-ASA-9, all caused profound transcriptional effects, with ~2-21% of genes having >2-fold altered expression following 2 h exposure to the compounds. Only two genes, alpha tubulin II and a hydrolase, were up-regulated by all three compounds after 2 h exposure in all biological replicates examined. The transcriptional changes observed after 2 h exposure to HDAC inhibitors were found to be largely transitory, with only 1-5% of genes being regulated after removing the compounds and culturing for a further 2 h. Despite some structural similarity, the three inhibitors caused quite diverse transcriptional effects, possibly reflecting subtle differences in mode of action or cellular distribution. This dataset represents an important contribution to our understanding of how HDAC inhibitors act on malaria parasites and identifies alpha tubulin II as a potential transcriptional marker of HDAC inhibition in malaria parasites that may be able to be exploited for future development of HDAC inhibitors as new antimalarial agents.

  1. Cloning and Molecular Characterization of the Schistosoma mansoni Genes RbAp48 and Histone H4

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    Patrícia P Souza

    2002-10-01

    Full Text Available The human nuclear protein RbAp48 is a member of the tryptophan/aspartate (WD repeat family, which binds to the retinoblastoma (Rb protein. It also corresponds to the smallest subunit of the chromatin assembly factor and is able to bind to the helix 1 of histone H4, taking it to the DNA in replication. A cDNA homologous to the human gene RbAp48 was isolated from a Schistosoma mansoni adult worm library and named SmRbAp48. The full length sequence of SmRbAp48 cDNA is 1036 bp long, encoding a protein of 308 amino acids. The transcript of SmRbAp48 was detected in egg, cercariae and schistosomulum stages. The protein shows 84% similarity with the human RbAp48, possessing four WD repeats on its C-terminus. A hypothetical tridimensional structure for the SmRbAp48 C-terminal domain was constructed by computational molecular modeling using the b-subunit of the G protein as a model. To further verify a possible interaction between SmRbAp48 and S. mansoni histone H4, the histone H4 gene was amplified from adult worm genomic DNA using degenerated primers. The gene fragment of SmH4 is 294 bp long, encoding a protein of 98 amino acids which is 100% identical to histone H4 from Drosophila melanogaster.

  2. Heterochromatic genes undergo epigenetic changes and escape silencing in immunodeficiency, centromeric instability, facial anomalies (ICF syndrome.

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    Marie-Elisabeth Brun

    Full Text Available Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by a marked immunodeficiency, severe hypomethylation of the classical satellites 2 and 3 associated with disruption of constitutive heterochromatin, and facial anomalies. Sixty percent of ICF patients have mutations in the DNMT3B (DNA methyltransferase 3B gene, encoding a de novo DNA methyltransferase. In the present study, we have shown that, in ICF lymphoblasts and peripheral blood, juxtacentromeric heterochromatic genes undergo dramatic changes in DNA methylation, indicating that they are bona fide targets of the DNMT3B protein. DNA methylation in heterochromatic genes dropped from about 80% in normal cells to approximately 30% in ICF cells. Hypomethylation was observed in five ICF patients and was associated with activation of these silent genes. Although DNA hypomethylation occurred in all the analyzed heterochromatic genes and in all the ICF patients, gene expression was restricted to some genes, every patient having his own group of activated genes. Histone modifications were preserved in ICF patients. Heterochromatic genes were associated with histone modifications that are typical of inactive chromatin: they had low acetylation on H3 and H4 histones and were slightly enriched in H3K9Me(3, both in ICF and controls. This was also the case for those heterochromatic genes that escaped silencing. This finding suggests that gene activation was not generalized to all the cells, but rather was restricted to a clonal cell population that may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in ICF syndrome. A slight increase in H3K27 monomethylation was observed both in heterochromatin and active euchromatin in ICF patients; however, no correlation between this modification and activation of heterochromatic genes was found.

  3. Heterochromatic Genes Undergo Epigenetic Changes and Escape Silencing in Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF) Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun, Marie-Elisabeth; Lana, Erica; Rivals, Isabelle; Lefranc, Gérard; Sarda, Pierre; Claustres, Mireille; Mégarbané, André; De Sario, Albertina

    2011-01-01

    Immunodeficiency, Centromeric Instability, Facial Anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder that is characterized by a marked immunodeficiency, severe hypomethylation of the classical satellites 2 and 3 associated with disruption of constitutive heterochromatin, and facial anomalies. Sixty percent of ICF patients have mutations in the DNMT3B (DNA methyltransferase 3B) gene, encoding a de novo DNA methyltransferase. In the present study, we have shown that, in ICF lymphoblasts and peripheral blood, juxtacentromeric heterochromatic genes undergo dramatic changes in DNA methylation, indicating that they are bona fide targets of the DNMT3B protein. DNA methylation in heterochromatic genes dropped from about 80% in normal cells to approximately 30% in ICF cells. Hypomethylation was observed in five ICF patients and was associated with activation of these silent genes. Although DNA hypomethylation occurred in all the analyzed heterochromatic genes and in all the ICF patients, gene expression was restricted to some genes, every patient having his own group of activated genes. Histone modifications were preserved in ICF patients. Heterochromatic genes were associated with histone modifications that are typical of inactive chromatin: they had low acetylation on H3 and H4 histones and were slightly enriched in H3K9Me3, both in ICF and controls. This was also the case for those heterochromatic genes that escaped silencing. This finding suggests that gene activation was not generalized to all the cells, but rather was restricted to a clonal cell population that may contribute to the phenotypic variability observed in ICF syndrome. A slight increase in H3K27 monomethylation was observed both in heterochromatin and active euchromatin in ICF patients; however, no correlation between this modification and activation of heterochromatic genes was found. PMID:21559330

  4. The tobacco smoke component acrolein induces glucocorticoid resistant gene expression via inhibition of histone deacetylase.

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    Randall, Matthew J; Haenen, Guido R M M; Bouwman, Freek G; van der Vliet, Albert; Bast, Aalt

    2016-01-05

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the leading cause of cigarette smoke-related death worldwide. Acrolein, a crucial reactive electrophile found in cigarette smoke mimics many of the toxic effects of cigarette smoke-exposure in the lung. In macrophages, cigarette smoke is known to hinder histone deacetylases (HDACs), glucocorticoid-regulated enzymes that play an important role in the pathogenesis of glucocorticoid resistant inflammation, a common feature of COPD. Thus, we hypothesize that acrolein plays a role in COPD-associated glucocorticoid resistance. To examine the role of acrolein on glucocorticoid resistance, U937 monocytes, differentiated with PMA to macrophage-like cells were treated with acrolein for 0.5h followed by stimulation with hydrocortisone for 8h, or treated simultaneously with LPS and hydrocortisone for 8h without acrolein. GSH and nuclear HDAC activity were measured, or gene expression was analyzed by qPCR. Acrolein-mediated TNFα gene expression was not suppressed by hydrocortisone whereas LPS-induced TNFα expression was suppressed. Acrolein also significantly inhibited nuclear HDAC activity in macrophage-like cells. Incubation of recombinant HDAC2 with acrolein led to the formation of an HDAC2-acrolein adduct identified by mass spectrometry. Therefore, these results suggest that acrolein-induced inflammatory gene expression is resistant to suppression by the endogenous glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines

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    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To identify the relationship between DNA hyper-methylation and histone modification at a hyperme-thylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification.

  6. The progeny of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to salt exhibit changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and gene expression.

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    Andriy Bilichak

    Full Text Available Plants are able to acclimate to new growth conditions on a relatively short time-scale. Recently, we showed that the progeny of plants exposed to various abiotic stresses exhibited changes in genome stability, methylation patterns and stress tolerance. Here, we performed a more detailed analysis of methylation patterns in the progeny of Arabidopsis thaliana (Arabidopsis plants exposed to 25 and 75 mM sodium chloride. We found that the majority of gene promoters exhibiting changes in methylation were hypermethylated, and this group was overrepresented by regulators of the chromatin structure. The analysis of DNA methylation at gene bodies showed that hypermethylation in the progeny of stressed plants was primarily due to changes in the 5' and 3' ends as well as in exons rather than introns. All but one hypermethylated gene tested had lower gene expression. The analysis of histone modifications in the promoters and coding sequences showed that hypermethylation and lower gene expression correlated with the enrichment of H3K9me2 and depletion of H3K9ac histones. Thus, our work demonstrated a high degree of correlation between changes in DNA methylation, histone modifications and gene expression in the progeny of salt-stressed plants.

  7. Re-expression of methylation-induced tumor suppressor gene silencing is associated with the state of histone modification in gastric cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chun-Feng; Zhu, Xin-Jiang; Peng, Guo; Dai, Dong-Qiu

    2007-12-14

    To identify the relationship between DNA hyper-methylation and histone modification at a hyperme-thylated, silenced tumor suppressor gene promoter in human gastric cancer cell lines and to elucidate whether alteration of DNA methylation could affect histone modification. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay to assess the status of histone acetylation and methylation in promoter regions of the p16 and mutL homolog 1 (MLH1) genes in 2 gastric cancer cell lines, SGC-7901 and MGC-803. We used methylation-specific PCR (MSP) to evaluate the effect of 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine (5-Aza-dC), trichostatin A (TSA) or their combination treatment on DNA methylation status. We used RT-PCR to determine whether alterations of histone modification status after 5-Aza-dC and TSA treatment are reflected in gene expression. For the p16 and MLH1 genes in two cell lines, silenced loci associated with DNA hypermethylation were characterized by histone H3-K9 hypoacetylation and hypermethylation and histone H3-K4 hypomethylation. Treatment with TSA resulted in moderately increased histone H3-K9 acetylation at the silenced loci with no effect on histone H3-K9 methylation and minimal effects on gene expression. In contrast, treatment with 5-Aza-dC rapidly reduced histone H3-K9 methylation at the silenced loci and resulted in reactivation of the two genes. Combined treatment with 5-Aza-dC and TSA was synergistic in reactivating gene expression at the loci showing DNA hypermethylation. Similarly, histone H3-K4 methylation was not affected after TSA treatment, and increased moderately at the silenced loci after 5-Aza-dC treatment. Hypermethylation of DNA in promoter CpG islands is related to transcriptional silencing of tumor suppressor genes. Histone H3-K9 methylation in different regions of the promoters studied correlates with DNA methylation status of each gene in gastric cancer cells. However, histone H3-K9 acetylation and H3-K4 methylation inversely correlate with DNA methylation

  8. PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajakumara, Eerappa; Wang, Zhentian; Ma, Honghui; Hu, Lulu; Chen, Hao; Lin, Yan; Guo, Rui; Wu, Feizhen; Li, Haitao; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Xu, Yanhui; Patel, Dinshaw J.; Shi, Yang (MSKCC); (Constellation); (Fudan); (Tsinghua)

    2011-08-29

    Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

  9. PHD Finger Recognition of Unmodified Histone H3R2 Links UHRF1 to Regulation of Euchromatic Gene Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    E Rajakumara; Z Wang; H Ma; L Hu; H Chen; Y Lin; R Guo; F Wu; H Li; et al.

    2011-12-31

    Histone methylation occurs on both lysine and arginine residues, and its dynamic regulation plays a critical role in chromatin biology. Here we identify the UHRF1 PHD finger (PHD{sub UHRF1}), an important regulator of DNA CpG methylation, as a histone H3 unmodified arginine 2 (H3R2) recognition modality. This conclusion is based on binding studies and cocrystal structures of PHD{sub UHRF1} bound to histone H3 peptides, where the guanidinium group of unmodified R2 forms an extensive intermolecular hydrogen bond network, with methylation of H3R2, but not H3K4 or H3K9, disrupting complex formation. We have identified direct target genes of UHRF1 from microarray and ChIP studies. Importantly, we show that UHRF1's ability to repress its direct target gene expression is dependent on PHD{sub UHRF1} binding to unmodified H3R2, thereby demonstrating the functional importance of this recognition event and supporting the potential for crosstalk between histone arginine methylation and UHRF1 function.

  10. Identification of Histone Deacetylase 2 as a Functional Gene for Skeletal Muscle Development in Chickens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Shahjahan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A previous genome-wide association study (GWAS exposed histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2 as a possible candidate gene for breast muscle weight in chickens. The present research has examined the possible role of HDAC2 in skeletal muscle development in chickens. Gene expression was measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction in breast and thigh muscles during both embryonic (four ages and post-hatch (five ages development and in cultures of primary myoblasts during both proliferation and differentiation. The expression of HDAC2 increased significantly across embryonic days (ED in breast (ED 14, 16, 18, and 21 and thigh (ED 14 and 18, and ED 14 and 21 muscles suggesting that it possibly plays a role in myoblast hyperplasia in both breast and thigh muscles. Transcript abundance of HDAC2 identified significantly higher in fast growing muscle than slow growing in chickens at d 90 of age. Expression of HDAC2 during myoblast proliferation in vitro declined between 24 h and 48 h when expression of the marker gene paired box 7 (PAX7 increased and cell numbers increased throughout 72 h of culture. During induced differentiation of myoblasts to myotubes, the abundance of HDAC2 and the marker gene myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1, both increased significantly. Taken together, it is suggested that HDAC2 is most likely involved in a suppressive fashion in myoblast proliferation and may play a positive role in myoblast differentiation. The present results confirm the suggestion that HDAC2 is a functional gene for pre-hatch and post-hatch (fast growing muscle development of chicken skeletal muscle.

  11. Determination of histone epigenetic marks in Arabidopsis and tomato genes in the early response to Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo-Salvador, Óscar; Escamilla-Aguilar, Mónica; López-Cruz, Jaime; López-Rodas, Gerardo; González-Bosch, Carmen

    2018-01-01

    Determination of histone epigenetic marks in Arabidopsis and tomato genes in the early response to Botrytis cinerea may contribute to find biomarkers of the early detection of this devastating pathogen. Recent studies have linked epigenetic modifications with plant responses to biotic stresses. Information about specific histone marks upon necrotrophic pathogens is scarce. Here we wondered whether the altered responsiveness of specific genes in plants infected with Botrytis cinerea was associated with changes in chromatin structure. We performed a chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis that obtained differential epigenetic signature of activating marks H3K4me3, H3K9ac, and the repressor one H3K27me3 on both the promoter and the body of the highly induced PR1 in Arabidopsis plants infected with B. cinerea at 24 and 33 h after inoculation. We also determined the histone marks' profile in two differentially expressed genes in response to B. cinerea, as well as to oxidative stress, given its relevance in this infection. These are both the induced CYP71A13, which encodes a cytochrome P450 involved in camalexin synthesis, and is essential against this necrotroph and the repressed EXL7 (Exordium-like 1). We also adapted our protocol in tomato plants infected with B. cinerea. At 24 hpi, H3K4me3 level increased on the promoter and at different locations of the body of the genes induced upon B. cinerea, including DES (divinyl ethyl synthase), LoxD (lipoxygenase D), DOX1 (α-dioxygenase 1), PR2 (pathogenesis-related protein2), WRKY53 and WRKY33. The histone modifications determined herein will allow future studies on epigenetic marks and their transgenerational inheritance in plants infected with B. cinerea. In addition, the analyzed genes are potential biomarkers of B. cinerea infection that could contribute to its early detection in tomato and related crops.

  12. Arid5b facilitates chondrogenesis by recruiting the histone demethylase Phf2 to Sox9-regulated genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Kenji; Takashima, Rikako; Amano, Katsuhiko; Ono, Koichiro; Nakanishi, Masako; Yoshida, Michiko; Wakabayashi, Makoto; Matsuda, Akio; Maeda, Yoshinobu; Suzuki, Yutaka; Sugano, Sumio; Whitson, Robert H.; Nishimura, Riko; Yoneda, Toshiyuki

    2013-11-01

    Histone modification, a critical step for epigenetic regulation, is an important modulator of biological events. Sox9 is a transcription factor critical for endochondral ossification; however, proof of its epigenetic regulation remains elusive. Here we identify AT-rich interactive domain 5b (Arid5b) as a transcriptional co-regulator of Sox9. Arid5b physically associates with Sox9 and synergistically induces chondrogenesis. Growth of Arid5b-/- mice is retarded with delayed endochondral ossification. Sox9-dependent chondrogenesis is attenuated in Arid5b-deficient cells. Arid5b recruits Phf2, a histone lysine demethylase, to the promoter region of Sox9 target genes and stimulates H3K9me2 demethylation of these genes. In the promoters of chondrogenic marker genes, H3K9me2 levels are increased in Arid5b-/- chondrocytes. Finally, we show that Phf2 knockdown inhibits Sox9-induced chondrocyte differentiation. Our findings establish an epigenomic mechanism of skeletal development, whereby Arid5b promotes chondrogenesis by facilitating Phf2-mediated histone demethylation of Sox9-regulated chondrogenic gene promoters.

  13. Altered binding of human histone gene transcription factors during the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation in HL-60 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, G.; Lian, J.; Stein, J.; Shalhoub, V.; Wright, K.; Pauli, U.; Van Wijnen, A.; Briggs, R.

    1989-01-01

    Two sites of protein-DNA interaction have been identified in vivo and in vitro in the proximal promoter regions of an H4 and an H3 human histone gene. In proliferating cells, these genes are transcribed throughout the cell cycle, and both the more distal site I and the proximal site II are occupied by promoter-binding factors. In this report the authors demonstrate that during the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation of the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 into cells that exhibit phenotypic properties of monocytes, histone gene expression is down-regulated at the level of transcription. In vivo occupancy of site I by promoter factors persists in the differentiated HL-60 cells, but protein-DNA interactions at site II are selectively lost. Furthermore, in vitro binding activity of the site II promoter factor HiNF-D is lost in differentiated cells, and nuclear extracts from differentiated cells do not support in vitro transcription of these histone genes. The results suggest that the interaction of HiNF-D with proximal promoter site II sequences plays a primary role in rendering cell growth-regulated histone genes transcribable in proliferating cells. It appears that while cell-cycle control of histone gene expression is mediated by both transcription and mRNA stability, with the shutdown of proliferation and onset of differentiation, histone gene expression is regulated at the transcriptional level

  14. Coexpression of nuclear receptors and histone methylation modifying genes in the testis: implications for endocrine disruptor modes of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison M Anderson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Endocrine disruptor chemicals elicit adverse health effects by perturbing nuclear receptor signalling systems. It has been speculated that these compounds may also perturb epigenetic mechanisms and thus contribute to the early origin of adult onset disease. We hypothesised that histone methylation may be a component of the epigenome that is susceptible to perturbation. We used coexpression analysis of publicly available data to investigate the combinatorial actions of nuclear receptors and genes involved in histone methylation in normal testis and when faced with endocrine disruptor compounds. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The expression patterns of a set of genes were profiled across testis tissue in human, rat and mouse, plus control and exposed samples from four toxicity experiments in the rat. Our results indicate that histone methylation events are a more general component of nuclear receptor mediated transcriptional regulation in the testis than previously appreciated. Coexpression patterns support the role of a gatekeeper mechanism involving the histone methylation modifiers Kdm1, Prdm2, and Ehmt1 and indicate that this mechanism is a common determinant of transcriptional integrity for genes critical to diverse physiological endpoints relevant to endocrine disruption. Coexpression patterns following exposure to vinclozolin and dibutyl phthalate suggest that coactivity of the demethylase Kdm1 in particular warrants further investigation in relation to endocrine disruptor mode of action. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This study provides proof of concept that a bioinformatics approach that profiles genes related to a specific hypothesis across multiple biological settings can provide powerful insight into coregulatory activity that would be difficult to discern at an individual experiment level or by traditional differential expression analysis methods.

  15. Integrated epigenome profiling of repressive histone modifications, DNA methylation and gene expression in normal and malignant urothelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Dudziec

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is commonly altered in human cancer. We have observed alterations of DNA methylation and microRNA expression that reflect the biology of bladder cancer. This common disease arises by distinct pathways with low and high-grade differentiation. We hypothesized that epigenetic gene regulation reflects an interaction between histone and DNA modifications, and differences between normal and malignant urothelial cells represent carcinogenic events within bladder cancer. To test this we profiled two repressive histone modifications (H3K9m3 and H3K27m3 using ChIP-Seq, cytosine methylation using MeDIP and mRNA expression in normal and malignant urothelial cell lines. In genes with low expression we identified H3K27m3 and DNA methylation each in 20-30% of genes and both marks in 5% of genes. H3K9m3 was detected in 5-10% of genes but was not associated with overall expression. DNA methylation was more closely related to gene expression in malignant than normal cells. H3K27m3 was the epigenetic mark most specifically correlated to gene silencing. Our data suggest that urothelial carcinogenesis is accompanied by a loss of control of both DNA methylation and H3k27 methylation. From our observations we identified a panel of genes with cancer specific-epigenetic mediated aberrant expression including those with reported carcinogenic functions and members potentially mediating a positive epigenetic feedback loop. Pathway enrichment analysis revealed genes marked by H3K9m3 were involved with cell homeostasis, those marked by H3K27m3 mediated pro-carcinogenic processes and those marked with cytosine methylation were mixed in function. In 150 normal and malignant urothelial samples, our gene panel correctly estimated expression in 65% of its members. Hierarchical clustering revealed that this gene panel stratified samples according to the presence and phenotype of bladder cancer.

  16. The histone lysine methyltransferase KMT2D sustains a gene expression program that represses B cell lymphoma development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Molina, Ana; Boss, Isaac W; Canela, Andres; Pan, Heng; Jiang, Yanwen; Zhao, Chunying; Jiang, Man; Hu, Deqing; Agirre, Xabier; Niesvizky, Itamar; Lee, Ji-Eun; Chen, Hua-Tang; Ennishi, Daisuke; Scott, David W; Mottok, Anja; Hother, Christoffer; Liu, Shichong; Cao, Xing-Jun; Tam, Wayne; Shaknovich, Rita; Garcia, Benjamin A; Gascoyne, Randy D; Ge, Kai; Shilatifard, Ali; Elemento, Olivier; Nussenzweig, Andre; Melnick, Ari M; Wendel, Hans-Guido

    2015-10-01

    The gene encoding the lysine-specific histone methyltransferase KMT2D has emerged as one of the most frequently mutated genes in follicular lymphoma and diffuse large B cell lymphoma; however, the biological consequences of KMT2D mutations on lymphoma development are not known. Here we show that KMT2D functions as a bona fide tumor suppressor and that its genetic ablation in B cells promotes lymphoma development in mice. KMT2D deficiency also delays germinal center involution and impedes B cell differentiation and class switch recombination. Integrative genomic analyses indicate that KMT2D affects methylation of lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3K4) and expression of a set of genes, including those in the CD40, JAK-STAT, Toll-like receptor and B cell receptor signaling pathways. Notably, other KMT2D target genes include frequently mutated tumor suppressor genes such as TNFAIP3, SOCS3 and TNFRSF14. Therefore, KMT2D mutations may promote malignant outgrowth by perturbing the expression of tumor suppressor genes that control B cell-activating pathways.

  17. The Autotaxin–Lysophosphatidic Acid Axis Modulates Histone Acetylation and Gene Expression during Oligodendrocyte Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Natalie A.; Lister, James A.

    2015-01-01

    During development, oligodendrocytes (OLGs), the myelinating cells of the CNS, undergo a stepwise progression during which OLG progenitors, specified from neural stem/progenitor cells, differentiate into fully mature myelinating OLGs. This progression along the OLG lineage is characterized by well synchronized changes in morphology and gene expression patterns. The latter have been found to be particularly critical during the early stages of the lineage, and they have been well described to be regulated by epigenetic mechanisms, especially by the activity of the histone deacetylases HDAC1 and HDAC2. The data presented here identify the extracellular factor autotaxin (ATX) as a novel upstream signal modulating HDAC1/2 activity and gene expression in cells of the OLG lineage. Using the zebrafish as an in vivo model system as well as rodent primary OLG cultures, this functional property of ATX was found to be mediated by its lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) activity, which has been well characterized to generate the lipid signaling molecule lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). More specifically, the lysoPLD activity of ATX was found to modulate HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during a time window coinciding with the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG. In contrast, HDAC1/2 regulated gene expression during the transition from neural stem/progenitor to OLG progenitor appeared unaffected by ATX and its lysoPLD activity. Thus, together, our data suggest that an ATX–LPA–HDAC1/2 axis regulates OLG differentiation specifically during the transition from OLG progenitor to early differentiating OLG and via a molecular mechanism that is evolutionarily conserved from at least zebrafish to rodent. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The formation of the axon insulating and supporting myelin sheath by differentiating oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in the CNS is considered an essential step during vertebrate development. In addition, loss and/or dysfunction of the myelin sheath has

  18. H3K9me-independent gene silencing in fission yeast heterochromatin by Clr5 and histone deacetylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Klavs R; Hazan, Idit; Shanker, Sreenath

    2011-01-01

    . The genomic targets of Clr5 also include Ste11, a master regulator of sexual differentiation. Hence Clr5, like the multi-functional Atf1 transcription factor which also modulates chromatin structure in the mating-type region, controls sexual differentiation and genome integrity at several levels. Globally......, our results point to histone deacetylases as prominent repressors of gene expression in fission yeast heterochromatin. These deacetylases can act in concert with, or independently of, the widely studied H3K9me mark to influence gene silencing at heterochromatic loci....

  19. UTX and JMJD3 are histone H3K27 demethylases involved in HOX gene regulation and development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    -methylation of Lys 27 on histone H3 (H3K27me2/me3). Owing to the essential role of the PRC2 complex in repressing a large number of genes involved in somatic processes, the H3K27me3 mark is associated with the unique epigenetic state of stem cells. The rapid decrease of the H3K27me3 mark during specific stages......The trithorax and the polycomb group proteins are chromatin modifiers, which play a key role in the epigenetic regulation of development, differentiation and maintenance of cell fates. The polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) mediates transcriptional repression by catalysing the di- and tri...... associates with the H3K4me3 histone methyltransferase MLL2 (ref. 8) supports a model in which the coordinated removal of repressive marks, polycomb group displacement, and deposition of activating marks are important for the stringent regulation of transcription during cellular differentiation....

  20. Altered Histone Mark Deposition and DNA Methylation at Homeobox Genes in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    We recently reported a role of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and PRC2 trimethylation of histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the regulation of homeobox (HOX) (Marcinkiewicz and Gudas, 2013) gene transcript levels in human oral keratinocytes (OKF6-TERT1R) and tongue squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells. Here, we assessed both the levels of various histone modifications at a subset of homeobox genes and genome wide DNA methylation patterns in OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells by using ERRBS (enhanced reduced representation bisulfite sequencing). We detected the H3K9me3 mark at HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13 and HOXD8 at levels higher in OKF6-TERT1R than in SCC-9 cells; at IRX1 and SIX2 the H3K9me3 levels were conversely higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R. The H3K79me3 mark was detectable only at IRX1 in OKF6-TERT1R and at IRX4 in SCC-9 cells. The levels of H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 marks correlate with the transcript levels of the assessed homeobox genes in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9. We detected generally lower CpG methylation levels on DNA in SCC-9 cells at annotated genomic regions which were differentially methylated between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells; however, some genomic regions, including the HOX gene clusters, showed DNA methylation at higher levels in SCC-9 than OKF6-TERT1R. Thus, both altered histone modification patterns and changes in DNA methylation are associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human oral cavity SCC cells, and this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic phenotype of oral keratinocytes. PMID:24519855

  1. Developmental activation of the lysozyme gene in chicken macrophage cells is linked to core histone acetylation at its enhancer elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Fiona A.; Lefevre, Pascal; Mantouvalou, Evangelia; Bruce, Kimberley; Lacroix, Claire; Bonifer, Constanze; Thorne, Alan W.; Crane-Robinson, Colyn

    2006-01-01

    Native chromatin IP assays were used to define changes in core histone acetylation at the lysozyme locus during developmental maturation of chicken macrophages and stimulation to high-level expression by lipo-polysaccharide. In pluripotent precursors the lysozyme gene (Lys) is inactive and there is no acetylation of core histones at the gene, its promoter or at the upstream cis-control elements. In myeloblasts, where there is a very low level of Lys expression, H4 acetylation appears at the cis-control elements but not at the Lys gene or its promoter: neither H3 nor H2B become significantly acetylated in myeloblasts. In mature macrophages, Lys expression increases 5-fold: H4, H2B and H2A.Z are all acetylated at the cis-control elements but H3 remains unacetylated except at the −2.4 S silencer. Stimulation with LPS increases Lys expression a further 10-fold: this is accompanied by a rise in H3 acetylation throughout the cis-control elements; H4 and H2B acetylation remain substantial but acetylation at the Lys gene and its promoter remains low. Acetylation is thus concentrated at the cis-control elements, not at the Lys gene or its immediate promoter. H4 acetylation precedes H3 acetylation during development and H3 acetylation is most directly linked to high-level Lys expression. PMID:16914441

  2. Epigenetic Regulation of Werner Syndrome Gene in Age-Related Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To examine the promoter methylation and histone modification of WRN (Werner syndrome gene, a DNA repair gene, and their relationship with the gene expression in age-related cataract (ARC lens. Methods. We collected the lenses after cataract surgery from 117ARC patients and 39 age-matched non-ARC. WRN expression, DNA methylation and histone modification around the CpG island were assessed. The methylation status of Human-lens-epithelium cell (HLEB-3 was chemically altered to observe the relationship between methylation and expression of WRN. Results. The WRN expression was significantly decreased in the ARC anterior lens capsules comparing with the control. The CpG island of WRN promoter in the ARC anterior lens capsules displayed hypermethylation comparing with the controls. The WRN promoter was almost fully methylated in the cortex of ARC and control lens. Acetylated H3 was lower while methylated H3-K9 was higher in ARC anterior lens capsules than that of the controls. The expression of WRN in HLEB-3 increased after demethylation of the cells. Conclusions. A hypermethylation in WRN promoter and altered histone modification in anterior lens capsules might contribute to the ARC mechanism. The data suggest an association of altered DNA repair capability in lens with ARC pathogenesis.

  3. Vorinostat, a histone deacetylase inhibitor, facilitates fear extinction and enhances expression of the hippocampal NR2B-containing NMDA receptor gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Yosuke; Morinobu, Shigeru; Takei, Shiro; Fuchikami, Manabu; Matsumoto, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Shigeto; Yamawaki, Shigeto

    2012-05-01

    Histone acetylation, which alters the compact chromatin structure and changes the accessibility of DNA to regulatory proteins, is emerging as a fundamental mechanism for regulating gene expression. Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors increase histone acetylation and enhance fear extinction. In this study, we examined whether vorinostat, an HDAC inhibitor, facilitates fear extinction, using a contextual fear conditioning (FC) paradigm, in Sprague-Dawley rats. We found that vorinostat facilitated fear extinction. Next, the levels of global acetylated histone H3 and H4 were measured by Western blotting. We also assessed the effect of vorinostat on the hippocampal levels of NMDA receptor mRNA by real-time quantitative PCR (RT-PCR) and protein by Western blotting. 2 h after vorinostat administration, the levels acetylated histones and NR2B mRNA, but not NR1 or NR2A mRNA, were elevated in the hippocampus. The NR2B protein level was elevated 4 h after vorinostat administration. Last, we investigated the levels of acetylated histones and phospho-CREB (p-CREB) binding at the promoter of the NR2B gene using the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay followed by RT-PCR. The ChIP assay revealed increases in the levels of acetylated histones and they were accompanied by enhanced binding of p-CREB to its binding site at the promoter of the NR2B gene 2 h after vorinostat administration. These findings suggest that vorinostat increases the expression of NR2B in the hippocampus by enhancing histone acetylation, and this process may be implicated in fear extinction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Experience Modulates the Effects of Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors on Gene and Protein Expression in the Hippocampus: Impaired Plasticity in Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sewal, Angila S.; Patzke, Holger; Perez, Evelyn J.; Park, Pul; Lehrmann, Elin; Zhang, Yongqing; Becker, Kevin G.; Fletcher, Bonnie R.; Long, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) treatment has attracted considerable attention in the emerging area of cognitive neuroepigenetics. The possibility that ongoing cognitive experience importantly regulates the cell biological effects of HDACi administration, however, has not been systematically examined. In an initial experiment addressing this issue, we tested whether water maze training influences the gene expression response to acute systemic HDACi administration in the young adult rat hippocampus. Training powerfully modulated the response to HDACi treatment, increasing the total number of genes regulated to nearly 3000, including many not typically linked to neural plasticity, compared with experience was provided together with HDACi administration. Next, we tested whether the synaptic protein response to HDACi treatment is similarly dependent on recent cognitive experience, and whether this plasticity is altered in aged rats with memory impairment. Whereas synaptic protein labeling in the young hippocampus was selectively increased when HDACi administration was provided in conjunction with water maze training, combined treatment had no effect on synaptic proteins in the aged hippocampus. Our findings indicate that ongoing experience potently regulates the molecular consequences of HDACi treatment and that the interaction of recent cognitive experience with histone acetylation dynamics is disrupted in the aged hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The possibility that interventions targeting epigenetic regulation could be effective in treating a range of neurodegenerative disorders has attracted considerable interest. Here we demonstrate in the rat hippocampus that ongoing experience powerfully modifies the molecular response to one such intervention, histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) administration. A single learning episode dramatically shifts the gene expression profile induced by acute HDACi treatment, yielding a

  5. A selective histone deacetylase-6 inhibitor improves BDNF trafficking in hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout mice:implications for Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin eXu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome (RTT is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the transcriptional modulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2. One of the most prominent gene targets of MeCP2 is brain-derived neurotrophic factor (Bdnf, a potent modulator of activity-dependent synaptic development, function and plasticity. Dysfunctional BDNF signaling has been demonstrated in several pathophysiological mechanisms of RTT disease progression. To evaluate whether the dynamics of BDNF trafficking is affected by Mecp2 deletion, we analyzed movements of BDNF tagged with yellow fluorescent protein (YFP in cultured hippocampal neurons by time-lapse fluorescence imaging. We found that both anterograde and retrograde vesicular trafficking of BDNF-YFP are significantly impaired in Mecp2 knockout hippocampal neurons. Selective inhibitors of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6 show neuroprotective effects in neurodegenerative diseases and stimulate microtubule-dependent vesicular trafficking of BDNF-containing dense core vesicles. Here, we show that the selective HDAC6 inhibitor Tubastatin-A increased the velocity of BDNF-YFP vesicles in Mecp2 knockout neurons in both directions by increasing αtubulin acetylation. Tubastatin-A also restored activity-dependent BDNF release from Mecp2 knockout neurons to levels comparable to those shown by wildtype neurons. These findings demonstrate that a selective HDAC6 inhibitor is a potential pharmacological strategy to reverse cellular and synaptic impairments in RTT resulting from impaired BDNF signaling.

  6. A mouse speciation gene encodes a meiotic histone H3 methyltransferase

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mihola, Ondřej; Trachtulec, Zdeněk; Vlček, Čestmír; Schimenti, J.C.; Forejt, Jiří

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 323, č. 5912 (2009), s. 373-375 ISSN 0036-8075 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : hybrid sterility * histone H3K4 methyltransferase * Prdm9 Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 29.747, year: 2009

  7. Histone deactylase gene expression profiles are associated with outcomes in blunt trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sillesen, Martin; Bambakidis, Ted; Dekker, Simone E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Treatment with histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, such as valproic acid, increases survival in animal models of trauma and sepsis. Valproic acid is a pan-inhibitor that blocks most of the known HDAC isoforms. Targeting individual HDAC isoforms may increase survival and reduce...

  8. The histone variant macroH2A is an epigenetic regulator of key developmental genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buschbeck, Marcus; Uribesalgo, Iris; Wibowo, Indra

    2009-01-01

    The histone variants macroH2A1 and macroH2A2 are associated with X chromosome inactivation in female mammals. However, the physiological function of macroH2A proteins on autosomes is poorly understood. Microarray-based analysis in human male pluripotent cells uncovered occupancy of both macroH2A ...

  9. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu; Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression

  10. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu [Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China); Yao, Ya-Li [Department of Biotechnology, Asia University, Taichung 41354, Taiwan (China); Yang, Wen-Ming, E-mail: yangwm@nchu.edu.tw [Institute of Molecular Biology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 40227, Taiwan (China)

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  11. Inhibition of Histone Deacetylation and DNA Methylation Improves Gene Expression Mediated by the Adeno-Associated Virus/Phage in Cancer Cells

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    Amin Hajitou

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Bacteriophage (phage, viruses that infect bacteria only, have become promising vectors for targeted systemic delivery of genes to cancer, although, with poor efficiency. We previously designed an improved phage vector by incorporating cis genetic elements of adeno-associated virus (AAV. This novel AAV/phage hybrid (AAVP specifically targeted systemic delivery of therapeutic genes into tumors. To advance the AAVP vector, we recently introduced the stress-inducible Grp78 tumor specific promoter and found that this dual tumor-targeted AAVP provides persistent gene expression, over time, in cancer cells compared to silenced gene expression from the CMV promoter in the parental AAVP. Herein, we investigated the effect of histone deacetylation and DNA methylation on AAVP-mediated gene expression in cancer cells and explored the effect of cell confluence state on AAVP gene expression efficacy. Using a combination of AAVP expressing the GFP reporter gene, flow cytometry, inhibitors of histone deacetylation, and DNA methylation, we have demonstrated that histone deacetylation and DNA methylation are associated with silencing of gene expression from the CMV promoter in the parental AAVP. Importantly, inhibitors of histone deacetylases boost gene expression in cancer cells from the Grp78 promoter in the dual tumor-targeted AAVP. However, cell confluence had no effect on AAVP-guided gene expression. Our findings prove that combination of histone deacetylase inhibitor drugs with the Grp78 promoter is an effective approach to improve AAVP-mediated gene expression in cancer cells and should be considered for AAVP-based clinical cancer gene therapy.

  12. Application of machine learning methods to histone methylation ChIP-Seq data reveals H4R3me2 globally represses gene expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background In the last decade, biochemical studies have revealed that epigenetic modifications including histone modifications, histone variants and DNA methylation form a complex network that regulate the state of chromatin and processes that depend on it including transcription and DNA replication. Currently, a large number of these epigenetic modifications are being mapped in a variety of cell lines at different stages of development using high throughput sequencing by members of the ENCODE consortium, the NIH Roadmap Epigenomics Program and the Human Epigenome Project. An extremely promising and underexplored area of research is the application of machine learning methods, which are designed to construct predictive network models, to these large-scale epigenomic data sets. Results Using a ChIP-Seq data set of 20 histone lysine and arginine methylations and histone variant H2A.Z in human CD4+ T-cells, we built predictive models of gene expression as a function of histone modification/variant levels using Multilinear (ML) Regression and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS). Along with extensive crosstalk among the 20 histone methylations, we found H4R3me2 was the most and second most globally repressive histone methylation among the 20 studied in the ML and MARS models, respectively. In support of our finding, a number of experimental studies show that PRMT5-catalyzed symmetric dimethylation of H4R3 is associated with repression of gene expression. This includes a recent study, which demonstrated that H4R3me2 is required for DNMT3A-mediated DNA methylation--a known global repressor of gene expression. Conclusion In stark contrast to univariate analysis of the relationship between H4R3me2 and gene expression levels, our study showed that the regulatory role of some modifications like H4R3me2 is masked by confounding variables, but can be elucidated by multivariate/systems-level approaches. PMID:20653935

  13. Arabidopsis TFL2/LHP1 specifically associates with genes marked by trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27.

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    Franziska Turck

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available TERMINAL FLOWER 2/LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (TFL2/LHP1 is the only Arabidopsis protein with overall sequence similarity to the HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN 1 (HP1 family of metazoans and S. pombe. TFL2/LHP1 represses transcription of numerous genes, including the flowering-time genes FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC, as well as the floral organ identity genes AGAMOUS (AG and APETALA 3 (AP3. These genes are also regulated by proteins of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2, and it has been proposed that TFL2/LHP1 represents a potential stabilizing factor of PRC2 activity. Here we show by chromatin immunoprecipitation and hybridization to an Arabidopsis Chromosome 4 tiling array (ChIP-chip that TFL2/LHP1 associates with hundreds of small domains, almost all of which correspond to genes located within euchromatin. We investigated the chromatin marks to which TFL2/LHP1 binds and show that, in vitro, TFL2/LHP1 binds to histone H3 di- or tri-methylated at lysine 9 (H3K9me2 or H3K9me3, the marks recognized by HP1, and to histone H3 trimethylated at lysine 27 (H3K27me3, the mark deposited by PRC2. However, in vivo TFL2/LHP1 association with chromatin occurs almost exclusively and co-extensively with domains marked by H3K27me3, but not H3K9me2 or -3. Moreover, the distribution of H3K27me3 is unaffected in lhp1 mutant plants, indicating that unlike PRC2 components, TFL2/LHP1 is not involved in the deposition of this mark. Rather, our data suggest that TFL2/LHP1 recognizes specifically H3K27me3 in vivo as part of a mechanism that represses the expression of many genes targeted by PRC2.

  14. Suv4-20h histone methyltransferases promote neuroectodermal differentiation by silencing the pluripotency-associated Oct-25 gene.

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    Dario Nicetto

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications (PTMs of histones exert fundamental roles in regulating gene expression. During development, groups of PTMs are constrained by unknown mechanisms into combinatorial patterns, which facilitate transitions from uncommitted embryonic cells into differentiated somatic cell lineages. Repressive histone modifications such as H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 have been investigated in detail, but the role of H4K20me3 in development is currently unknown. Here we show that Xenopus laevis Suv4-20h1 and h2 histone methyltransferases (HMTases are essential for induction and differentiation of the neuroectoderm. Morpholino-mediated knockdown of the two HMTases leads to a selective and specific downregulation of genes controlling neural induction, thereby effectively blocking differentiation of the neuroectoderm. Global transcriptome analysis supports the notion that these effects arise from the transcriptional deregulation of specific genes rather than widespread, pleiotropic effects. Interestingly, morphant embryos fail to repress the Oct4-related Xenopus gene Oct-25. We validate Oct-25 as a direct target of xSu4-20h enzyme mediated gene repression, showing by chromatin immunoprecipitaton that it is decorated with the H4K20me3 mark downstream of the promoter in normal, but not in double-morphant, embryos. Since knockdown of Oct-25 protein significantly rescues the neural differentiation defect in xSuv4-20h double-morphant embryos, we conclude that the epistatic relationship between Suv4-20h enzymes and Oct-25 controls the transit from pluripotent to differentiation-competent neural cells. Consistent with these results in Xenopus, murine Suv4-20h1/h2 double-knockout embryonic stem (DKO ES cells exhibit increased Oct4 protein levels before and during EB formation, and reveal a compromised and biased capacity for in vitro differentiation, when compared to normal ES cells. Together, these results suggest a regulatory mechanism, conserved

  15. Methylation patterns of histone H3 Lys 4, Lys 9 and Lys 27 in transcriptionally active and inactive Arabidopsis genes and in atx1 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Venegas, Raul; Avramova, Zoya

    2005-01-01

    Covalent modifications of histone-tail amino acid residues communicate information via a specific 'histone code'. Here, we report histone H3-tail lysine methylation profiles of several Arabidopsis genes in correlation with their transcriptional activity and the input of the epigenetic factor ARABIDOPSIS HOMOLOG OF TRITHORAX (ATX1) at ATX1-regulated loci. By chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays, we compared modification patterns of a constitutively expressed housekeeping gene, of a tissue-specific gene, and among genes that differed in degrees of transcriptional activity. Our results suggest that the di-methylated isoform of histone H3-lysine4 (m2K4/H3) provide a general mark for gene-related sequences distinguishing them from non-transcribed regions. Lys-4 (K4/H3), lys-9 (K9/H3) and lys-27 (K27/H3) nucleosome methylation patterns of plant genes may be gene-, tissue- or development-regulated. Absence of nucleosomes from the LTP-promotor was not sufficient to provoke robust transcription in mutant atx1-leaf chromatin, suggesting that the mechanism repositioning nucleosomes at transition to flowering functioned independently of ATX1.

  16. Histone chaperone networks shaping chromatin function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammond, Colin; Strømme, Caroline Bianchi; Huang, Hongda

    2017-01-01

    The association of histones with specific chaperone complexes is important for their folding, oligomerization, post-translational modification, nuclear import, stability, assembly and genomic localization. In this way, the chaperoning of soluble histones is a key determinant of histone availability...... and fate, which affects all chromosomal processes, including gene expression, chromosome segregation and genome replication and repair. Here, we review the distinct structural and functional properties of the expanding network of histone chaperones. We emphasize how chaperones cooperate in the histone...... chaperone network and via co-chaperone complexes to match histone supply with demand, thereby promoting proper nucleosome assembly and maintaining epigenetic information by recycling modified histones evicted from chromatin....

  17. Expression of a linker histone-like gene in the primordial germ cells in zebrafish

    OpenAIRE

    Müller, Katja; Thisse, Christine; Thisse, Bernard; Raz, Erez

    2002-01-01

    Similar to many other organisms, specification of primordial germ cells (PGCs) in zebraftsh occurs during early development and depends on inheritance of 'germ plasm' determinants. Following their specification, the PGCs exhibit characteristic transcriptional profile and cell behaviour. Here we describe the cloning, expression pattern and sub-cellular localization of the zebrafish H I type linker histone, HIM, which is specifically expressed in the PGCs in the second phase of their developmen...

  18. Over-expression of histone H3K4 demethylase gene JMJ15 enhances salt tolerance in Arabidopsis

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    Yuan eShen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation (H3K4me3 has been shown to be involved in stress-responsive gene expression and gene priming in plants. However, the role of H3K4me3 resetting in the processes is not clear. In this work we studied the expression and function of Arabidopsis H3K4 demethylase gene JMJ15. We show that the expression of JMJ15 was relatively low and was limited to a number of tissues during vegetative growth but was higher in young floral organs. Over-expression of the gene in gain-of-function mutants reduced the plant height with accumulation of lignin in stems, while the loss-of-function mutation did not produce any visible phenotype. The gain-of-function mutants showed enhanced salt tolerance, whereas the loss-of-function mutant was more sensitive to salt compared to the wild type. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that over-expression of JMJ15 down-regulated many genes which are preferentially marked by H3K4me3 and H3K4me2. Many of the down-regulated genes encode transcription regulators involved in stress responses. The data suggest that increased JMJ15 levels may regulate the gene expression program that enhances stress tolerance.

  19. A Histone-Like Protein Induces Plasmid DNA to Form Liquid Crystals in Vitro and Gene Compaction in Vivo

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    Shiyong Sun

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The liquid crystalline state is a universal phenomenon involving the formation of an ordered structure via a self-assembly process that has attracted attention from numerous scientists. In this study, the dinoflagellate histone-like protein HCcp3 is shown to induce super-coiled pUC18 plasmid DNA to enter a liquid crystalline state in vitro, and the role of HCcp3 in gene condensation in vivo is also presented. The plasmid DNA (pDNA-HCcp3 complex formed birefringent spherical particles with a semi-crystalline selected area electronic diffraction (SAED pattern. Circular dichroism (CD titrations of pDNA and HCcp3 were performed. Without HCcp3, pUC18 showed the characteristic B conformation. As the HCcp3 concentration increased, the 273 nm band sharply shifted to 282 nm. When the HCcp3 concentration became high, the base pair (bp/dimer ratio fell below 42/1, and the CD spectra of the pDNA-HCcp3 complexes became similar to that of dehydrated A-form DNA. Microscopy results showed that HCcp3 compacted the super-coiled gene into a condensed state and that inclusion bodies were formed. Our results indicated that HCcp3 has significant roles in gene condensation both in vitro and in histone-less eukaryotes in vivo. The present study indicates that HCcp3 has great potential for applications in non-viral gene delivery systems, where HCcp3 may compact genetic material to form liquid crystals.

  20. Histone Acetylome-wide Association Study of Autism Spectrum Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenjie; Poschmann, Jeremie; Cruz-Herrera Del Rosario, Ricardo; Parikshak, Neelroop N; Hajan, Hajira Shreen; Kumar, Vibhor; Ramasamy, Ramalakshmi; Belgard, T Grant; Elanggovan, Bavani; Wong, Chloe Chung Yi; Mill, Jonathan; Geschwind, Daniel H; Prabhakar, Shyam

    2016-11-17

    The association of histone modification changes with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) has not been systematically examined. We conducted a histone acetylome-wide association study (HAWAS) by performing H3K27ac chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq) on 257 postmortem samples from ASD and matched control brains. Despite etiological heterogeneity, ≥68% of syndromic and idiopathic ASD cases shared a common acetylome signature at >5,000 cis-regulatory elements in prefrontal and temporal cortex. Similarly, multiple genes associated with rare genetic mutations in ASD showed common "epimutations." Acetylome aberrations in ASD were not attributable to genetic differentiation at cis-SNPs and highlighted genes involved in synaptic transmission, ion transport, epilepsy, behavioral abnormality, chemokinesis, histone deacetylation, and immunity. By correlating histone acetylation with genotype, we discovered >2,000 histone acetylation quantitative trait loci (haQTLs) in human brain regions, including four candidate causal variants for psychiatric diseases. Due to the relative stability of histone modifications postmortem, we anticipate that the HAWAS approach will be applicable to multiple diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The Hos2 Histone Deacetylase Controls Ustilago maydis Virulence through Direct Regulation of Mating-Type Genes.

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    Alberto Elías-Villalobos

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Morphological changes are critical for host colonisation in plant pathogenic fungi. These changes occur at specific stages of their pathogenic cycle in response to environmental signals and are mediated by transcription factors, which act as master regulators. Histone deacetylases (HDACs play crucial roles in regulating gene expression, for example by locally modulating the accessibility of chromatin to transcriptional regulators. It has been reported that HDACs play important roles in the virulence of plant fungi. However, the specific environment-sensing pathways that control fungal virulence via HDACs remain poorly characterised. Here we address this question using the maize pathogen Ustilago maydis. We find that the HDAC Hos2 is required for the dimorphic switch and pathogenic development in U. maydis. The deletion of hos2 abolishes the cAMP-dependent expression of mating type genes. Moreover, ChIP experiments detect Hos2 binding to the gene bodies of mating-type genes, which increases in proportion to their expression level following cAMP addition. These observations suggest that Hos2 acts as a downstream component of the cAMP-PKA pathway to control the expression of mating-type genes. Interestingly, we found that Clr3, another HDAC present in U. maydis, also contributes to the cAMP-dependent regulation of mating-type gene expression, demonstrating that Hos2 is not the only HDAC involved in this control system. Overall, our results provide new insights into the role of HDACs in fungal phytopathogenesis.

  2. Histone gene expression in early development of Xenopus laevis. Analysis of histone mRNA in oocytes and embryos by blot-hybridization and cell-free translation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, W. M.; Moorman, A. F.; Destrée, O. H.

    1983-01-01

    This study comprises the hybridization analysis of electrophoretically separated histone mRNAs from oocytes and embryos of Xenopus laevis, and analysis of in vitro translation products of these mRNAs on polyacrylamide gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) or Triton X-100. In oocytes and

  3. Insulin-induced inhibition of gluconeogenesis genes, including glutamic pyruvic transaminase 2, is associated with reduced histone acetylation in a human liver cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honma, Kazue; Kamikubo, Michiko; Mochizuki, Kazuki; Goda, Toshinao

    2017-06-01

    Hepatic glutamic pyruvic transaminase (GPT; also known as alanine aminotransferase) is a gluconeogenesis enzyme that catalyzes conversions between alanine and pyruvic acid. It is also used as a blood biomarker for hepatic damage. In this study, we investigated whether insulin regulates GPT expression, as it does for other gluconeogenesis genes, and if this involves the epigenetic modification of histone acetylation. Human liver-derived HepG2 cells were cultured with 0.5-100nM insulin for 8h, and the mRNA expression of GPT, glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (GOT), γ-glutamyltransferase (GGT), PCK1, G6PC and FBP1 was measured. We also investigated the extent of histone acetylation around these genes. Insulin suppressed the mRNA expression of gluconeogenesis genes (GPT2, GOT1, GOT2, GGT1, GGT2, G6PC, and PCK1) in HepG2 cells in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA levels of GPT2, but not GPT1, were decreased by insulin. Histone acetylation was also reduced around GPT2, G6PC, and PCK1 in response to insulin. The expression of GPT2 and other gluconeogenesis genes such as G6PC and PCK1 was suppressed by insulin, in association with decreases in histone H3 and H4 acetylation surrounding these genes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epigenetic reprogramming, gene expression and in vitro development of porcine SCNT embryos are significantly improved by a histone deacetylase inhibitor--m-carboxycinnamic acid bishydroxamide (CBHA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yuran; Hai, Tang; Wang, Ying; Guo, Runfa; Li, Wei; Wang, Liu; Zhou, Qi

    2014-05-01

    Insufficient epigenetic reprogramming of donor nuclei is believed to be one of the most important causes of low development efficiency of mammalian somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Previous studies have shown that both the in vitro and in vivo development of mouse SCNT embryos could be increased significantly by treatment with various histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi), including Trichostatin A, Scriptaid, and m-carboxycinnamic acid bishydroxamide (CBHA), in which only the effect of CBHA has not yet been tested in other species. In this paper we examine the effect of CBHA treatment on the development of porcine SCNT embryos. We have discovered the optimum dosage and time for CBHA treatment: incubating SCNT embryos with 2 μmol/L CBHA for 24 h after activation could increase the blastocyst rate from 12.7% to 26.5%. Immunofluorescence results showed that the level of acetylation at histone 3 lysine 9 (AcH3K9), acetylation at histone 3 lysine 18 (AcH3K18), and acetylation at histone 4 lysine 16 (AcH4K16) was raised after CBHA treatment. Meanwhile, CBHA treatment improved the expression of development relating genes such as pou5f1, cdx2, and the imprinted genes like igf2. Despite these promising in vitro results and histone reprogramming, the full term development was not significantly increased after treatment. In conclusion, CBHA improves the in vitro development of pig SCNT embryos, increases the global histone acetylation and corrects the expression of some developmentally important genes at early stages. As in mouse SCNT, we have shown that nuclear epigenetic reprogramming in pig early SCNT embryos can be modified by CBHA treatment.

  5. Embryogenic potential and expression of embryogenesis-related genes in conifers are affected by treatment with a histone deacetylase inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uddenberg, Daniel; Valladares, Silvia; Abrahamsson, Malin; Sundström, Jens Fredrik; Sundås-Larsson, Annika; von Arnold, Sara

    2011-09-01

    Somatic embryogenesis is used for vegetative propagation of conifers. Embryogenic cultures can be established from zygotic embryos; however, the embryogenic potential decreases during germination. In Arabidopsis, LEAFY COTYLEDON (LEC) genes are expressed during the embryonic stage, and must be repressed to allow germination. Treatment with the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) causes de-repression of LEC genes. ABSCISIC ACID3 (ABI3) and its Zea mays ortholog VIVIPAROUS1 (VP1) act together with the LEC genes to promote embryo maturation. In this study, we have asked the question whether TSA treatment in a conifer affects the embryogenic potential and the expression of embryogenesis-related genes. We isolated two conifer LEC1-type HAP3 genes, HAP3A and HAP3B, from Picea abies and Pinus sylvestris. A comparative phylogenetic analysis of plant HAP3 genes suggests that HAP3A and HAP3B are paralogous genes originating from a duplication event in the conifer lineage. The expression of HAP3A is high, in both somatic and zygotic embryos, during early embryo development, but decreases during late embryogeny. In contrast, the expression of VP1 is initially low but increases during late embryogeny. After exposure to TSA, germinating somatic embryos of P. abies maintain the competence to differentiate embryogenic tissue, and simultaneously the germination progression is partially inhibited. Furthermore, when embryogenic cultures of P. abies are exposed to TSA during embryo maturation, the maturation process is arrested and the expression levels of PaHAP3A and PaVP1 are maintained, suggesting a possible link between chromatin structure and expression of embryogenesis-related genes in conifers.

  6. The histone demethylase Kdm6b regulates a mature gene expression program in differentiating cerebellar granule neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijayatunge, Ranjula; Liu, Fang; Shpargel, Karl B; Wayne, Nicole J; Chan, Urann; Boua, Jane-Valeriane; Magnuson, Terry; West, Anne E

    2018-03-01

    The histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27) demethylase Kdm6b (Jmjd3) can promote cellular differentiation, however its physiological functions in neurons remain to be fully determined. We studied the expression and function of Kdm6b in differentiating granule neurons of the developing postnatal mouse cerebellum. At postnatal day 7, Kdm6b is expressed throughout the layers of the developing cerebellar cortex, but its expression is upregulated in newborn cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Atoh1-Cre mediated conditional knockout of Kdm6b in CGN precursors either alone or in combination with Kdm6a did not disturb the gross morphological development of the cerebellum. Furthermore, RNAi-mediated knockdown of Kdm6b in cultured CGN precursors did not alter the induced expression of early neuronal marker genes upon cell cycle exit. By contrast, knockdown of Kdm6b significantly impaired the induction of a mature neuronal gene expression program, which includes gene products required for functional synapse maturation. Loss of Kdm6b also impaired the ability of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) to induce expression of Grin2c and Tiam1 in maturing CGNs. Taken together, these data reveal a previously unknown role for Kdm6b in the postmitotic stages of CGN maturation and suggest that Kdm6b may work, at least in part, by a transcriptional mechanism that promotes gene sensitivity to regulation by BDNF. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The histone-like protein HU has a role in gene expression during the acid adaptation response in Helicobacter pylori.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Alhejandra; Toledo, Héctor

    2017-08-01

    Gastritis, ulcers, and gastric malignancy have been linked to human gastric epithelial colonization by Helicobacter pylori. Characterization of the mechanisms by which H. pylori adapts to the human stomach environment is of crucial importance to understand H. pylori pathogenesis. In an effort to extend our knowledge of these mechanisms, we used proteomic analysis and qRT-PCR to characterize the role of the histone-like protein HU in the response of H. pylori to low pH. Proteomic analysis revealed that genes involved in chemotaxis, oxidative stress, or metabolism are under control of the HU protein. Also, expression of the virulence factors Ggt and NapA is affected by the null mutation of hup gene both at neutral and acid pH, as evidenced by qRT-PCR analysis. Those results showed that H. pylori gene expression is altered by shift to low pH, thus confirming that acid exposure leads to profound changes in genomic expression, and suggest that the HU protein is a regulator that may help the bacterium adapt to the acid stress. In accordance with previous reports, we found that the HU protein participates in gene expression regulation when the microorganism is exposed to acid stress. Such transcriptional regulation underlies protein accumulation in the H. pylori cell. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Rett syndrome: genes, synapses, circuits and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek eBanerjee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system proceeds through a set of complex checkpoints which arise from a combination of sequential gene expression and early neural activity sculpted by the environment. Genetic and environmental insults lead to neurodevelopmental disorders which encompass a large group of diseases that result from anatomical and physiological abnormalities during maturation and development of brain circuits. Rett syndrome (RTT is a postnatal neurological disorder of genetic origin, caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. It features neuropsychiatric abnormalities like motor dysfunctions and mild to severe cognitive impairment. This review discusses several key questions and attempts to evaluate recently developed animal models, cell-type specific function of MeCP2, defects in neural circuit plasticity and possible therapeutic strategies. Finally, we also discuss how genes, proteins and overlapping signaling pathways affect the molecular etiology of apparently unrelated neuropsychiatric disorders, an understanding of which can offer novel therapeutic strategies.

  9. Requirement of a novel splicing variant of human histone deacetylase 6 for TGF-{beta}1-mediated gene activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuang, Yan [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Nguyen, Hong T. [Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Lasky, Joseph A. [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Cao, Subing [Graduate Program in Biomedical Sciences, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Li, Cui [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Hunan 41008 (China); Hu, Jiyao; Guo, Xinyue; Burow, Matthew E. [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States); Shan, Bin, E-mail: bshan@tulane.edu [Department of Medicine, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, LA 70112 (United States)

    2010-02-19

    Histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) belongs to the family of class IIb HDACs and predominantly deacetylates non-histone proteins in the cytoplasm via the C-terminal deacetylase domain of its two tandem deacetylase domains. HDAC6 modulates fundamental cellular processes via deacetylation of {alpha}-tubulin, cortactin, molecular chaperones, and other peptides. Our previous study indicates that HDAC6 mediates TGF-{beta}1-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells. In the current study, we identify a novel splicing variant of human HDAC6, hHDAC6p114. The hHDAC6p114 mRNA arises from incomplete splicing and encodes a truncated isoform of the hHDAC6p114 protein of 114 kDa when compared to the major isoform hHDAC6p131. The hHDAC6p114 protein lacks the first 152 amino acids from N-terminus in the hHDAC6p131 protein, which harbors a nuclear export signal peptide and 76 amino acids of the N-terminal deacetylase domain. hHDAC6p114 is intact in its deacetylase activity against {alpha}-tubulin. The expression hHDAC6p114 is elevated in a MCF-7 derivative that exhibits an EMT-like phenotype. Moreover, hHDAC6p114 is required for TGF-{beta}1-activated gene expression associated with EMT in A549 cells. Taken together, our results implicate that expression and function of hHDAC6p114 is differentially regulated when compared to hHDAC6p131.

  10. Histone Lysine Methylation and Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeong-Hoon Kim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Methylation of several lysine residues of histones is a crucial mechanism for relatively long-term regulation of genomic activity. Recent molecular biological studies have demonstrated that the function of histone methylation is more diverse and complex than previously thought. Moreover, studies using newly available genomics techniques, such as exome sequencing, have identified an increasing number of histone lysine methylation-related genes as intellectual disability-associated genes, which highlights the importance of accurate control of histone methylation during neurogenesis. However, given the functional diversity and complexity of histone methylation within the cell, the study of the molecular basis of histone methylation-related neurodevelopmental disorders is currently still in its infancy. Here, we review the latest studies that revealed the pathological implications of alterations in histone methylation status in the context of various neurodevelopmental disorders and propose possible therapeutic application of epigenetic compounds regulating histone methylation status for the treatment of these diseases.

  11. Dimethylated H3K27 Is a Repressive Epigenetic Histone Mark in the Protist Entamoeba histolytica and Is Significantly Enriched in Genes Silenced via the RNAi Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Bardees M.; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a fundamental biological process that plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression in many organisms. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is one of the important nuclear roles of RNAi. Our previous data show that Entamoeba histolytica has a robust RNAi pathway that links to TGS via Argonaute 2-2 (Ago2-2) associated 27-nucleotide small RNAs with 5′-polyphosphate termini. Here, we report the first repressive histone mark to be identified in E. histolytica, dimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27Me2), and demonstrate that it is enriched at genes that are silenced by RNAi-mediated TGS. An RNAi-silencing trigger can induce H3K27Me2 deposits at both episomal and chromosomal loci, mediating gene silencing. Our data support two phases of RNAi-mediated TGS: an active silencing phase where the RNAi trigger is present and both H3K27Me2 and Ago2-2 concurrently enrich at chromosomal loci; and an established silencing phase in which the RNAi trigger is removed, but gene silencing with H3K27Me2 enrichment persist independently of Ago2-2 deposition. Importantly, some genes display resistance to chromosomal silencing despite induction of functional small RNAs. In those situations, the RNAi-triggering plasmid that is maintained episomally gets partially silenced and has H3K27Me2 enrichment, but the chromosomal copy displays no repressive histone enrichment. Our data are consistent with a model in which H3K27Me2 is a repressive histone modification, which is strongly associated with transcriptional repression. This is the first example of an epigenetic histone modification that functions to mediate RNAi-mediated TGS in the deep-branching eukaryote E. histolytica. PMID:26149683

  12. Dimethylated H3K27 Is a Repressive Epigenetic Histone Mark in the Protist Entamoeba histolytica and Is Significantly Enriched in Genes Silenced via the RNAi Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Bardees M; Singh, Upinder

    2015-08-21

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a fundamental biological process that plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression in many organisms. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is one of the important nuclear roles of RNAi. Our previous data show that Entamoeba histolytica has a robust RNAi pathway that links to TGS via Argonaute 2-2 (Ago2-2) associated 27-nucleotide small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini. Here, we report the first repressive histone mark to be identified in E. histolytica, dimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27Me2), and demonstrate that it is enriched at genes that are silenced by RNAi-mediated TGS. An RNAi-silencing trigger can induce H3K27Me2 deposits at both episomal and chromosomal loci, mediating gene silencing. Our data support two phases of RNAi-mediated TGS: an active silencing phase where the RNAi trigger is present and both H3K27Me2 and Ago2-2 concurrently enrich at chromosomal loci; and an established silencing phase in which the RNAi trigger is removed, but gene silencing with H3K27Me2 enrichment persist independently of Ago2-2 deposition. Importantly, some genes display resistance to chromosomal silencing despite induction of functional small RNAs. In those situations, the RNAi-triggering plasmid that is maintained episomally gets partially silenced and has H3K27Me2 enrichment, but the chromosomal copy displays no repressive histone enrichment. Our data are consistent with a model in which H3K27Me2 is a repressive histone modification, which is strongly associated with transcriptional repression. This is the first example of an epigenetic histone modification that functions to mediate RNAi-mediated TGS in the deep-branching eukaryote E. histolytica. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. Histone deacetylase inhibitors are potent inducers of gene expression in latent EBV and sensitize lymphoma cells to nucleoside antiviral agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sajal K; Perrine, Susan P; Williams, Robert M; Faller, Douglas V

    2012-01-26

    Induction of EBV lytic-phase gene expression, combined with exposure to an antiherpes viral drug, represents a promising targeted therapeutic approach to EBV-associated lymphomas. Short-chain fatty acids or certain chemotherapeutics have been used to induce EBV lytic-phase gene expression in cultured cells and mouse models, but these studies generally have not translated into clinical application. The recent success of a clinical trial with the pan-histone deacetylase (pan-HDAC) inhibitor arginine butyrate and the antiherpes viral drug ganciclovir in the treatment of EBV lymphomas prompted us to investigate the potential of several HDAC inhibitors, including some new, highly potent compounds, to sensitize EBV(+) human lymphoma cells to antiviral agents in vitro. Our study included short-chain fatty acids (sodium butyrate and valproic acid); hydroxamic acids (oxamflatin, Scriptaid, suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid, panobinostat [LBH589], and belinostat [PXD101]); the benzamide MS275; the cyclic tetrapeptide apicidin; and the recently discovered HDAC inhibitor largazole. With the exception of suberoyl anilide hydroxamic acid and PXD101, all of the other HDAC inhibitors effectively sensitized EBV(+) lymphoma cells to ganciclovir. LBH589, MS275, and largazole were effective at nanomolar concentrations and were 10(4) to 10(5) times more potent than butyrate. The effectiveness and potency of these HDAC inhibitors make them potentially applicable as sensitizers to antivirals for the treatment of EBV-associated lymphomas.

  14. Phylogenetic reconstruction at the species and intraspecies levels in the genus Pisum (L.) (peas) using a histone H1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Olga O; Bogdanova, Vera S; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2012-08-10

    A phylogenetic analysis of the genus Pisum (peas), embracing diverse wild and cultivated forms, which evoke problems with species delimitation, was carried out based on a gene coding for histone H1, a protein that has a long and variable functional C-terminal domain. Phylogenetic trees were reconstructed on the basis of the coding sequence of the gene His5 of H1 subtype 5 in 65 pea accessions. Early separation of a clear-cut wild species Pisum fulvum is well supported, while cultivated species Pisum abyssinicum appears as a small branch within Pisum sativum. Another robust branch within P. sativum includes some wild and almost all cultivated representatives of P. sativum. Other wild representatives form diverse but rather subtle branches. In a subset of accessions, PsbA-trnH chloroplast intergenic spacer was also analysed and found less informative than His5. A number of accessions of cultivated peas from remote regions have a His5 allele of identical sequence, encoding an electrophoretically slow protein product, which earlier attracted attention as likely positively selected in harsh climate conditions. In PsbA-trnH, a 8bp deletion was found, which marks cultivated representatives of P. sativum. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Comparative genomic analysis of SET domain family reveals the origin, expansion, and putative function of the arthropod-specific SmydA genes as histone modifiers in insects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Feng; Liu, Qing; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Jie; Wang, Huimin; Song, Tianqi; Yang, Meiling

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The SET domain is an evolutionarily conserved motif present in histone lysine methyltransferases, which are important in the regulation of chromatin and gene expression in animals. In this study, we searched for SET domain–containing genes (SET genes) in all of the 147 arthropod genomes sequenced at the time of carrying out this experiment to understand the evolutionary history by which SET domains have evolved in insects. Phylogenetic and ancestral state reconstruction analysis revealed an arthropod-specific SET gene family, named SmydA, that is ancestral to arthropod animals and specifically diversified during insect evolution. Considering that pseudogenization is the most probable fate of the new emerging gene copies, we provided experimental and evolutionary evidence to demonstrate their essential functions. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analysis and in vitro methyltransferase activity assays showed that the SmydA-2 gene was transcriptionally active and retained the original histone methylation activity. Expression knockdown by RNA interference significantly increased mortality, implying that the SmydA genes may be essential for insect survival. We further showed predominantly strong purifying selection on the SmydA gene family and a potential association between the regulation of gene expression and insect phenotypic plasticity by transcriptome analysis. Overall, these data suggest that the SmydA gene family retains essential functions that may possibly define novel regulatory pathways in insects. This work provides insights into the roles of lineage-specific domain duplication in insect evolution. PMID:28444351

  16. Nup98 regulation of histone methylation promotes normal gene expression and may drive leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sump, Bethany; Brickner, Jason H

    2017-11-15

    Nuclear pore proteins (Nups) interact with chromosomes to regulate gene expression and chromatin structure. A new study by Franks and colleagues (pp. 2222-2234) provides new mechanistic insight into the molecular basis by which Nup98 promotes gene activation in normal hematopoietic cells and how that process is altered by translocations to cause excess expression of developmental genes in leukemia. © 2017 Sump and Brickner; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  17. Chromosomal mapping of rRNA genes, core histone genes and telomeric sequences in Brachidontes puniceus and Brachidontes rodriguezi (Bivalvia, Mytilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasantes Juan J

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chromosome rearrangements are an important part of the speciation process in many taxa. The study of chromosome evolution in bivalves is hampered by the absence of clear chromosomal banding patterns and the similarity in both chromosome size and morphology. For this reason, obtaining good chromosome markers is essential for reliable karyotypic comparisons. To begin this task, the chromosomes of the mussels Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi were studied by means of fluorochrome staining and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH. Results Brachidontes puniceus and B. rodriguezi both have 2n = 32 chromosomes but differing karyotype composition. Vertebrate-type telomeric sequences appear at both ends of every single chromosome. B. puniceus presents a single terminal major rRNA gene cluster on a chromosome pair while B. rodriguezi shows two. Both mussels present two 5S rDNA and two core histone gene clusters intercalary located on the long arms of two chromosome pairs. Double and triple-FISH experiments demonstrated that one of the 5S rDNA and one of the major rDNA clusters appear on the same chromosome pair in B. rodriguezi but not in B. puniceus. On the other hand, the second 5S rDNA cluster is located in one of the chromosome pairs also bearing one of the core histone gene clusters in the two mussel species. Conclusion Knowledge of the chromosomal distribution of these sequences in the two species of Brachidontes is a first step in the understanding of the role of chromosome changes on bivalve evolution.

  18. Inhibition of histone deacetylases in rats self-administering cocaine regulates lissencephaly gene-1 and reelin gene expression, as revealed by microarray technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host, Lionel; Anglard, Patrick; Romieu, Pascal; Thibault, Christelle; Dembele, Doulaye; Aunis, Dominique; Zwiller, Jean

    2010-04-01

    Injection of the histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TsA) to rats has been shown to decrease their motivation to self-administer cocaine. In the present study, we investigated alterations in gene expression patterns in the anterior cingulate cortex and nucleus accumbens of rats self-administering cocaine and treated with TsA. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we identified 722 probe sets in the cortex and 136 probe sets in the nucleus accumbens that were differentially expressed between vehicle and TsA-treated rats that self-administered cocaine. Microarray data were validated by real-time PCR for seven genes. Using immunohistochemistry, we further investigated the expression of Lis1 and reelin genes, because (i) they were similarly regulated by TsA at the mRNA level; (ii) they belong to the same signal transduction pathway; (iii) mutations within both genes cause lissencephaly. Cocaine self-injection was sufficient to activate the two genes at both the mRNA and protein levels. TsA treatment was found to up-regulate both Lis1 and reelin protein expression in the cortex and to down-regulate it in the nucleus accumbens of rats self-administering cocaine. The data suggest that the two proteins contribute to establish neurobiological mechanisms underlying brain plasticity whereby TsA lowers the motivation for cocaine.

  19. PfSETvs methylation of histone H3K36 represses virulence genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Lubin; Mu, Jianbing; Zhang, Qingfeng

    2013-01-01

    parasite nuclei and their expression as proteins on the surface of individual infected red blood cells. PfSETvs-dependent H3K36me3 is present along the entire gene body, including the transcription start site, to silence var genes. With low occupancy of PfSETvs at both the transcription start site of var...

  20. mRNA levels of related Abcb genes change opposite to each other upon histone deacetylase inhibition in drug-resistant rat hepatoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adám Sike

    Full Text Available The multidrug-resistant phenotype of tumor cells is acquired via an increased capability of drug efflux by ABC transporters and causes serious problems in cancer treatment. With the aim to uncover whether changes induced by epigenetic mechanisms in the expression level of drug transporter genes correlates with changes in the drug resistance phenotypes of resistant cells, we studied the expression of drug transporters in rat hepatoma cell lines. We found that of the three major rat ABC transporter genes Abcb1a, Abcb1b and Abcc1 the activity of only Abcb1b increased significantly in colchicine-selected, drug-resistant cells. Increased transporter expression in drug-resistant cells results primarily from transcriptional activation. A change in histone modification at the regulatory regions of the chromosomally adjacent Abcb1a and Abcb1b genes differentially affects the levels of corresponding mRNAs. Transcriptional up- and down-regulation accompany an increase in acetylation levels of histone H3 lysine 9 at the promoter regions of Abcb1b and Abcb1a, respectively. Drug efflux activity, however, does not follow tightly the transcriptional activity of drug transporter genes in hepatoma cells. Our results point out the need for careful analysis of cause-and-effect relationships between changes in histone modification, drug transporter expression and drug resistance phenotypes.

  1. Pleiotropic genes for metabolic syndrome and inflammation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraja, Aldi T; Chasman, Daniel I; North, Kari E

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) has become a health and financial burden worldwide. The MetS definition captures clustering of risk factors that predict higher risk for diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Our study hypothesis is that additional to genes influencing individual MetS risk factors...... metabolic traits and 6 inflammatory markers by using existing GWAS published genetic summary results, with about 2.5 million SNPs from twelve predominantly largest GWAS consortia. These analyses yielded 130 unique SNPs/genes with pleiotropic associations (a SNP/gene associating at least one metabolic trait...... and one inflammatory marker). Of them twenty-five variants (seven loci newly reported) are proposed as MetS candidates. They map to genes MACF1, KIAA0754, GCKR, GRB14, COBLL1, LOC646736-IRS1, SLC39A8, NELFE, SKIV2L, STK19, TFAP2B, BAZ1B, BCL7B, TBL2, MLXIPL, LPL, TRIB1, ATXN2, HECTD4, PTPN11, ZNF664...

  2. Complete sequence of Sipunculus nudus erythrocyte histone H2B and its gene. Identification of an N,N-dimethylproline residue at the amino-terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmiécik, D; Bélaïche, D; Sautière, P; Loucheux-Lefebvre, M H; Kerckaert, J P

    1991-06-01

    The complete amino acid sequence (122 residues) of histone H2B from erythrocytes of the marine worm Sipunculus nudus, has been established from sequence analysis of peptides generated by highly specific cleavage of the protein and from the nucleotide sequence of the encoding gene. The isolation of the H2B gene was facilitated by using a highly specific nucleotide probe, devised from amino acids 58-68 of the protein. The presence of an N,N-dimethylproline residue at the amino-terminus of the protein was established from data provided by mass spectrometry and NMR spectroscopy. This unusual post-translational modification of histone H2B generates a stable positive charge which could strongly interact with the linker DNA.

  3. Pathological assessment of mismatch repair gene variants in Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lene Juel; Heinen, Christopher D; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2012-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is caused by germline mutations in DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes and is the most prevalent hereditary colorectal cancer syndrome. A significant proportion of variants identified in MMR and other common cancer susceptibility genes are missense or noncoding changes whose...

  4. Comprehensive mapping of the effects of azacitidine on DNA methylation, repressive/permissive histone marks and gene expression in primary cells from patients with MDS and MDS-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobiasson, Magnus; Abdulkadir, Hani; Lennartsson, Andreas; Katayama, Shintaro; Marabita, Francesco; De Paepe, Ayla; Karimi, Mohsen; Krjutskov, Kaarel; Einarsdottir, Elisabet; Grövdal, Michael; Jansson, Monika; Ben Azenkoud, Asmaa; Corddedu, Lina; Lehmann, Sören; Ekwall, Karl; Kere, Juha; Hellström-Lindberg, Eva; Ungerstedt, Johanna

    2017-04-25

    Azacitidine (Aza) is first-line treatment for patients with high-risk myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), although its precise mechanism of action is unknown. We performed the first study to globally evaluate the epigenetic effects of Aza on MDS bone marrow progenitor cells assessing gene expression (RNA seq), DNA methylation (Illumina 450k) and the histone modifications H3K18ac and H3K9me3 (ChIP seq). Aza induced a general increase in gene expression with 924 significantly upregulated genes but this increase showed no correlation with changes in DNA methylation or H3K18ac, and only a weak association with changes in H3K9me3. Interestingly, we observed activation of transcripts containing 15 endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) confirming previous cell line studies. DNA methylation decreased moderately in 99% of all genes, with a median β-value reduction of 0.018; the most pronounced effects seen in heterochromatin. Aza-induced hypomethylation correlated significantly with change in H3K9me3. The pattern of H3K18ac and H3K9me3 displayed large differences between patients and healthy controls without any consistent pattern induced by Aza. We conclude that the marked induction of gene expression only partly could be explained by epigenetic changes, and propose that activation of ERVs may contribute to the clinical effects of Aza in MDS.

  5. Arabidopsis Histone Methyltransferase SET DOMAIN GROUP8 Mediates Induction of the Jasmonate/Ethylene Pathway Genes in Plant Defense Response to Necrotrophic Fungi1[W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berr, Alexandre; McCallum, Emily J.; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Heintz, Dimitri; Heitz, Thierry; Shen, Wen-Hui

    2010-01-01

    As sessile organisms, plants have to endure a wide variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, and accordingly they have evolved intricate and rapidly inducible defense strategies associated with the activation of a battery of genes. Among other mechanisms, changes in chromatin structure are thought to provide a flexible, global, and stable means for the regulation of gene transcription. In support of this idea, we demonstrate here that the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) histone methyltransferase SET DOMAIN GROUP8 (SDG8) plays a crucial role in plant defense against fungal pathogens by regulating a subset of genes within the jasmonic acid (JA) and/or ethylene signaling pathway. We show that the loss-of-function mutant sdg8-1 displays reduced resistance to the necrotrophic fungal pathogens Alternaria brassicicola and Botrytis cinerea. While levels of JA, a primary phytohormone involved in plant defense, and camalexin, a major phytoalexin against fungal pathogens, remain unchanged or even above normal in sdg8-1, induction of several defense genes within the JA/ethylene signaling pathway is severely compromised in response to fungal infection or JA treatment in mutant plants. Both downstream genes and, remarkably, also upstream mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase genes MKK3 and MKK5 are misregulated in sdg8-1. Accordingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis shows that sdg8-1 impairs dynamic changes of histone H3 lysine 36 methylation at defense marker genes as well as at MKK3 and MKK5, which normally occurs upon infection with fungal pathogens or methyl JA treatment in wild-type plants. Our data indicate that SDG8-mediated histone H3 lysine 36 methylation may serve as a memory of permissive transcription for a subset of defense genes, allowing rapid establishment of transcriptional induction. PMID:20810545

  6. Blood Gene Expression Predicts Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Danger

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS, the main manifestation of chronic lung allograft dysfunction, leads to poor long-term survival after lung transplantation. Identifying predictors of BOS is essential to prevent the progression of dysfunction before irreversible damage occurs. By using a large set of 107 samples from lung recipients, we performed microarray gene expression profiling of whole blood to identify early biomarkers of BOS, including samples from 49 patients with stable function for at least 3 years, 32 samples collected at least 6 months before BOS diagnosis (prediction group, and 26 samples at or after BOS diagnosis (diagnosis group. An independent set from 25 lung recipients was used for validation by quantitative PCR (13 stables, 11 in the prediction group, and 8 in the diagnosis group. We identified 50 transcripts differentially expressed between stable and BOS recipients. Three genes, namely POU class 2 associating factor 1 (POU2AF1, T-cell leukemia/lymphoma protein 1A (TCL1A, and B cell lymphocyte kinase, were validated as predictive biomarkers of BOS more than 6 months before diagnosis, with areas under the curve of 0.83, 0.77, and 0.78 respectively. These genes allow stratification based on BOS risk (log-rank test p < 0.01 and are not associated with time posttransplantation. This is the first published large-scale gene expression analysis of blood after lung transplantation. The three-gene blood signature could provide clinicians with new tools to improve follow-up and adapt treatment of patients likely to develop BOS.

  7. Nucleoporin Nup98 associates with Trx/MLL and NSL histone-modifying complexes and regulates Hox gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Garcia, Pau; Jeong, Jieun; Capelson, Maya

    2014-10-23

    The nuclear pore complex is a transport channel embedded in the nuclear envelope and made up of 30 different components termed nucleoporins (Nups). In addition to their classical role in transport, a subset of Nups has a conserved role in the regulation of transcription via direct binding to chromatin. The molecular details of this function remain obscure, and it is unknown how metazoan Nups are recruited to their chromatin locations or what transcription steps they regulate. Here, we demonstrate genome-wide and physical association between Nup98 and histone-modifying complexes MBD-R2/NSL [corrected] and Trx/MLL. Importantly, we identify a requirement for MBD-R2 in recruitment of Nup98 to many of its genomic target sites. Consistent with its interaction with the Trx/MLL complex, Nup98 is shown to be necessary for Hox gene expression in developing fly tissues. These findings introduce roles of Nup98 in epigenetic regulation that may underlie the basis of oncogenicity of Nup98 fusions in leukemia.

  8. Nucleoporin Nup98 Associates with Trx/MLL and NSL Histone-Modifying Complexes and Regulates Hox Gene Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pau Pascual-Garcia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear pore complex is a transport channel embedded in the nuclear envelope and made up of 30 different components termed nucleoporins (Nups. In addition to their classical role in transport, a subset of Nups has a conserved role in the regulation of transcription via direct binding to chromatin. The molecular details of this function remain obscure, and it is unknown how metazoan Nups are recruited to their chromatin locations or what transcription steps they regulate. Here, we demonstrate genome-wide and physical association between Nup98 and histone-modifying complexes MBR-R2/NSL and Trx/MLL. Importantly, we identify a requirement for MBD-R2 in recruitment of Nup98 to many of its genomic target sites. Consistent with its interaction with the Trx/MLL complex, Nup98 is shown to be necessary for Hox gene expression in developing fly tissues. These findings introduce roles of Nup98 in epigenetic regulation that may underlie the basis of oncogenicity of Nup98 fusions in leukemia.

  9. RNA polymerase II phosphorylation at serine 2 and histone H3 tri-methylation at lysine 36 are key steps for thyroid hormone receptor β gene activation by thyroid hormone in Rana catesbeiana tadpole liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Kazuki; Ishihara, Akinori; Goda, Toshinao; Yamauchi, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-20

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is essential for amphibian metamorphosis, during which the expression of many genes is controlled directly or indirectly through TH receptors (TRs). Thyroid hormone binding to TRs induces coregulator switching on regulatory regions of TH-inducible genes: corepressors complexed with unliganded TRs are replaced by coactivators complexed with liganded TR resulting in transcriptionally active states. The coregulator switching is linked to histone acetylation. In our study, we have investigated the acetylation and methylation states of histones H3 and H4 using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays on the 5' coding region of the TRβ gene, a primary TH-response gene, in the liver from Rana catesbeiana tadpoles either treated with or not treated with 3,3',5-triiodothyronine (T3). 3,3',5-Triiodothyronine treatment for 3 days increased the amount of TRβ transcript by 19-fold. This increase was associated with increases in the acetylation of histone H4 and lysine 9 in histone H3 (H3-K9), and tri-methylation of lysine 36 in histone H3 (H3-K36). In addition, the amounts of RNA polymerase II (PolII) and serine 2 phosphorylation in PolII (PolII-S2) increased. These results suggest that T3 treatment enhances the elongation activity of PolII on the TRβ gene in the liver by increasing histone H3-K36 tri-methylation through PolII-S2 phosphorylation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CTCF-KDM4A complex correlates with histone modifications that negatively regulate CHD5 gene expression in cancer cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra-Calderas, Lissania; González-Barrios, Rodrigo; Patiño, Carlos César; Alcaraz, Nicolás; Salgado-Albarrán, Marisol; de León, David Cantú; Hernández, Clementina Castro; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; Maldonado-Martínez, Héctor Aquiles; De la Rosa-Velazquez, Inti A.; Vargas-Romero, Fernanda; Herrera, Luis A.; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Soto-Reyes, Ernesto

    2018-01-01

    Histone demethylase KDM4A is involved in H3K9me3 and H3K36me3 demethylation, which are epigenetic modifications associated with gene silencing and RNA Polymerase II elongation, respectively. KDM4A is abnormally expressed in cancer, affecting the expression of multiple targets, such as the CHD5 gene. This enzyme localizes at the first intron of CHD5, and the dissociation of KDM4A increases gene expression. In vitro assays showed that KDM4A-mediated demethylation is enhanced in the presence of CTCF, suggesting that CTCF could increase its enzymatic activity in vivo, however the specific mechanism by which CTCF and KDM4A might be involved in the CHD5 gene repression is poorly understood. Here, we show that CTCF and KDM4A form a protein complex, which is recruited into the first intron of CHD5. This is related to a decrease in H3K36me3/2 histone marks and is associated with its transcriptional downregulation. Depletion of CTCF or KDM4A by siRNA, triggered the reactivation of CHD5 expression, suggesting that both proteins are involved in the negative regulation of this gene. Furthermore, the knockout of KDM4A restored the CHD5 expression and H3K36me3 and H3K36me2 histone marks. Such mechanism acts independently of CHD5 promoter DNA methylation. Our findings support a novel mechanism of epigenetic repression at the gene body that does not involve promoter silencing. PMID:29682202

  11. [The comparison of heparan sulfate and its fragments on the protection against extracellular histones during the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y L; Guan, L; Zheng, Y M; Zhao, Z M; Mao, L J; Li, S Q; Zhao, J Y

    2018-01-20

    Objective: In order to explore the role of heparan sulfate (HS) during the pathogenesis of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) , the protective effect of HS and its fragments against extracellular histones was compared. Methods: Calf thymus histones (CTH) were injected via femoral vein to induce ARDS in rats. HS, HS fragments or saline was intraperitoneally injected (10mg/kg, Q6h, 24h) to test the protective effect against CTH. The ratio of wet/dry lung weight, protein content in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) , total leukocyte and neutrophil count in BALF were measured. Results: After CTH injection, the ratio of wet/dry lung weight (5.7±0.95) was much higher than the saline control group (3.1±0.15). The protein content (0.47±0.086mg/ml) , total leukocyte[ (97.4±15.6l) ×10(4)/ml] and neutrophil (18±3.4/LPF) in BALF were obviously increased compared with the saline control group. The intervention of HS evidently decreased ratio of wet/dry lung weight (4.2±0.41) , protein content[ (0.26±0.019) mg/ml], leukocyte[ (61.3±5.74) ×10(4)/ml] and neutrophil (12±1.8/LPF) in BALF. HS fragments also decreased ratio of wet/dry lung weight, protein content, leukocyte and neutrophil count in BALF though the strength was much less than HS. Conclusion: HS and its fragments could provide protection against extracellular histones during the pathogenesis of ARDS. For the protective effect full length HS was much better than HS fragments.

  12. Tet-Mediated DNA Demethylation Is Required for SWI/SNF-Dependent Chromatin Remodeling and Histone-Modifying Activities That Trigger Expression of the Sp7 Osteoblast Master Gene during Mesenchymal Lineage Commitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepulveda, Hugo; Villagra, Alejandro; Montecino, Martin

    2017-10-15

    Here we assess histone modification, chromatin remodeling, and DNA methylation processes that coordinately control the expression of the bone master transcription factor Sp7 (osterix) during mesenchymal lineage commitment in mammalian cells. We find that Sp7 gene silencing is mediated by DNA methyltransferase1/3 (DNMT1/3)-, histone deacetylase 1/2/4 (HDAC1/2/4)-, Setdb1/Suv39h1-, and Ezh1/2-containing complexes. In contrast, Sp7 gene activation involves changes in histone modifications, accompanied by decreased nucleosome enrichment and DNA demethylation mediated by SWI/SNF- and Tet1/Tet2-containing complexes, respectively. Inhibition of DNA methylation triggers changes in the histone modification profile and chromatin-remodeling events leading to Sp7 gene expression. Tet1/Tet2 silencing prevents Sp7 expression during osteoblast differentiation as it impairs DNA demethylation and alters the recruitment of histone methylase (COMPASS)-, histone demethylase (Jmjd2a/Jmjd3)-, and SWI/SNF-containing complexes to the Sp7 promoter. The dissection of these interconnected epigenetic mechanisms that govern Sp7 gene activation reveals a hierarchical process where regulatory components mediating DNA demethylation play a leading role. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Identification and Interrogation of Combinatorial Histone Modifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly R Karch

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone proteins are dynamically modified to mediate a variety of cellular processes including gene transcription, DNA damage repair, and apoptosis. Regulation of these processes occurs through the recruitment of non-histone proteins to chromatin by specific combinations of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs. Mass spectrometry has emerged as an essential tool to discover and quantify histone PTMs both within and between samples in an unbiased manner. Developments in mass spectrometry that allow for characterization of large histone peptides or intact protein has made it possible to determine which modifications occur simultaneously on a single histone polypeptide. A variety of techniques from biochemistry, biophysics, and chemical biology have been employed to determine the biological relevance of discovered combinatorial codes. This review first describes advancements in the field of mass spectrometry that have facilitated histone PTM analysis and then covers notable approaches to probe the biological relevance of these modifications in their nucleosomal context.

  14. Do the MTHFR gene polymorphism and Down syndrome pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Down syndrome, the most common trisomy 21 arises from abnormal chromosomal segregation. The etiology includes genetic and acquired factors. The main genetic factor that is well appreciated for onset of Down syndrome pregnancy is MTHFR gene polymorphism. But till date, no final conclusion has arrived ...

  15. ADAMTS-13 gene expression in antiphospholipid syndrome

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    Veysel Sabri Hançer

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS is an autoimmune disorder characterized by recurrent thrombosis and fetal mortality. Thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA is an important histological finding in catastrophic APS (CAPS and in APS patients with nephropathy. Analysis of familial thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura patients showed that there are mutations in the ADAMTS-13 gene that lead to functional defects in the ADAMTS-13 enzyme. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of the aforementioned mutations in APS, as well as to evaluate the level and activity of the ADAMTS-13 enzyme in patients with APS. C365del, Q449stop codon, P475S, and C508Y mutations were analyzed in APS patients. Transcriptions were analyzed using real-time PCR, and the level and activity of ADAMTS-13 were analyzed via fluorogenic assay. None of the mutations tested were present in the patient or control groups. The level of ADAMTS-13 mRNA in the patient group was 50% lower than that in the control group. Although a significant difference in ADAMTS-13 activity was not observed between the patient and control groups, a significant association was observed with the level of ADAMTS-13 (p<0.0001. The level and activity of ADAMTS-13 were not associated with thrombotic complications, thrombocytopenia, or pregnancy complications in the patients with APS.

  16. Genes and Disease: Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MD): National Center for Biotechnology Information (US); 1998-. Genes and Disease [Internet]. Show details National Center for ... 45K) PDF version of this title (3.8M) Gene sequence Genome view see gene locations Entrez Gene ...

  17. A ChIP-on-chip tiling array approach detects functional histone-free regions associated with boundaries at vertebrate HOX genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surabhi Srivastava

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Hox genes impart segment identity to body structures along the anterior–posterior axis and are crucial for proper development. A unique feature of the Hox loci is the collinearity between the gene position within the cluster and its spatial expression pattern along the body axis. However, the mechanisms that regulate collinear patterns of Hox gene expression remain unclear, especially in higher vertebrates. We recently identified novel histone-free regions (HFRs that can act as chromatin boundary elements demarcating successive murine Hox genes and help regulate their precise expression domains (Srivastava et al., 2013. In this report, we describe in detail the ChIP-chip analysis strategy associated with the identification of these HFRs. We also provide the Perl scripts for HFR extraction and quality control analysis for this custom designed tiling array dataset.

  18. Maternal nutrition during the first 50 days of gestation alters expression of histone and histone modifying genes in bovine fetal liver

    Science.gov (United States)

    During the first 50 d of gestation, organogenesis is taking place. Nutritional influences during this time may alter the mammalian phenotype through affecting gene regulatory mechanisms, thus “programming” potential susceptibilities to chronic disease and metabolic issues into the animal’s genome. W...

  19. All-trans retinoic acid promotes TGF-β-induced Tregs via histone modification but not DNA demethylation on Foxp3 gene locus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Ling; Ma, Jilin; Li, Zhiyuan; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Liu, Ya; Xia, Zanxian; Wang, Julie; Han, Yuanping; Shi, Wei; Quesniaux, Valerie; Ryffel, Bernhard; Brand, David; Li, Bin; Liu, Zhongmin; Zheng, Song Guo

    2011-01-01

    It has been documented all-trans retinoic acid (atRA) promotes the development of TGF-β-induced CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (iTreg) that play a vital role in the prevention of autoimmune responses, however, molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive. Our objective, therefore, was to determine how atRA promotes the differentiation of iTregs. Addition of atRA to naïve CD4(+)CD25(-) cells stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies in the presence of TGF-β not only increased Foxp3(+) iTreg differentiation, but maintained Foxp3 expression through apoptosis inhibition. atRA/TGF-β-treated CD4(+) cells developed complete anergy and displayed increased suppressive activity. Infusion of atRA/TGF-β-treated CD4(+) cells resulted in the greater effects on suppressing symptoms and protecting the survival of chronic GVHD mice with typical lupus-like syndromes than did CD4(+) cells treated with TGF-β alone. atRA did not significantly affect the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and still promoted iTreg differentiation in CD4(+) cells isolated from Smad3 KO and Smad2 conditional KO mice. Conversely, atRA markedly increased ERK1/2 activation, and blockade of ERK1/2 signaling completely abolished the enhanced effects of atRA on Foxp3 expression. Moreover, atRA significantly increased histone methylation and acetylation within the promoter and conserved non-coding DNA sequence (CNS) elements at the Foxp3 gene locus and the recruitment of phosphor-RNA polymerase II, while DNA methylation in the CNS3 was not significantly altered. We have identified the cellular and molecular mechanism(s) by which atRA promotes the development and maintenance of iTregs. These results will help to enhance the quantity and quality of development of iTregs and may provide novel insights into clinical cell therapy for patients with autoimmune diseases and those needing organ transplantation.

  20. All-trans retinoic acid promotes TGF-β-induced Tregs via histone modification but not DNA demethylation on Foxp3 gene locus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Lu

    Full Text Available It has been documented all-trans retinoic acid (atRA promotes the development of TGF-β-induced CD4(+Foxp3(+ regulatory T cells (iTreg that play a vital role in the prevention of autoimmune responses, however, molecular mechanisms involved remain elusive. Our objective, therefore, was to determine how atRA promotes the differentiation of iTregs.Addition of atRA to naïve CD4(+CD25(- cells stimulated with anti-CD3/CD28 antibodies in the presence of TGF-β not only increased Foxp3(+ iTreg differentiation, but maintained Foxp3 expression through apoptosis inhibition. atRA/TGF-β-treated CD4(+ cells developed complete anergy and displayed increased suppressive activity. Infusion of atRA/TGF-β-treated CD4(+ cells resulted in the greater effects on suppressing symptoms and protecting the survival of chronic GVHD mice with typical lupus-like syndromes than did CD4(+ cells treated with TGF-β alone. atRA did not significantly affect the phosphorylation levels of Smad2/3 and still promoted iTreg differentiation in CD4(+ cells isolated from Smad3 KO and Smad2 conditional KO mice. Conversely, atRA markedly increased ERK1/2 activation, and blockade of ERK1/2 signaling completely abolished the enhanced effects of atRA on Foxp3 expression. Moreover, atRA significantly increased histone methylation and acetylation within the promoter and conserved non-coding DNA sequence (CNS elements at the Foxp3 gene locus and the recruitment of phosphor-RNA polymerase II, while DNA methylation in the CNS3 was not significantly altered.We have identified the cellular and molecular mechanism(s by which atRA promotes the development and maintenance of iTregs. These results will help to enhance the quantity and quality of development of iTregs and may provide novel insights into clinical cell therapy for patients with autoimmune diseases and those needing organ transplantation.

  1. Histone Methylation and Epigenetic Silencing in Breast Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Simon, Jeffrey A; Lange, Carol A

    2008-01-01

    .... EZH2 is a histone methyltransferase which modifies lysine-27 of histone H3 an epigenetic mark which is generally linked to gene silencing and is implicated in tumor suppressor silencing during breast cancer progression...

  2. Plant Responses to Abiotic Stress Regulated by Histone Deacetylases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Luo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In eukaryotic cells, histone acetylation and deacetylation play an important role in the regulation of gene expression. Histone acetylation levels are modulated by histone acetyltransferases and histone deacetylases (HDACs. Recent studies indicate that HDACs play essential roles in the regulation of gene expression in plant response to environmental stress. In this review, we discussed the recent advance regarding the plant HDACs and their functions in the regulation of abiotic stress responses. The role of HDACs in autophagy was also discussed.

  3. ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling and histone binding by the Cockayne syndrome B DNA repair-transcription coupling factor.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Citterio (Elisabetta); V. van den Boom (Vincent); G. Schnitzler; R. Kanaar (Roland); E. Bonte (Edgar); R.E. Kingston; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractThe Cockayne syndrome B protein (CSB) is required for coupling DNA excision repair to transcription in a process known as transcription-coupled repair (TCR). Cockayne syndrome patients show UV sensitivity and severe neurodevelopmental abnormalities. CSB is a DNA-dependent ATPase of the

  4. Class 1-Selective Histone Deacetylase (HDAC) Inhibitors Enhance HIV Latency Reversal while Preserving the Activity of HDAC Isoforms Necessary for Maximal HIV Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaikos, Thomas D; Painter, Mark M; Sebastian Kettinger, Nadia T; Terry, Valeri H; Collins, Kathleen L

    2018-03-15

    Combinations of drugs that affect distinct mechanisms of HIV latency aim to induce robust latency reversal leading to cytopathicity and elimination of the persistent HIV reservoir. Thus far, attempts have focused on combinations of protein kinase C (PKC) agonists and pan-histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) despite the knowledge that HIV gene expression is regulated by class 1 histone deacetylases. We hypothesized that class 1-selective HDIs would promote more robust HIV latency reversal in combination with a PKC agonist than pan-HDIs because they preserve the activity of proviral factors regulated by non-class 1 histone deacetylases. Here, we show that class 1-selective agents used alone or with the PKC agonist bryostatin-1 induced more HIV protein expression per infected cell. In addition, the combination of entinostat and bryostatin-1 induced viral outgrowth, whereas bryostatin-1 combinations with pan-HDIs did not. When class 1-selective HDIs were used in combination with pan-HDIs, the amount of viral protein expression and virus outgrowth resembled that of pan-HDIs alone, suggesting that pan-HDIs inhibit robust gene expression induced by class 1-selective HDIs. Consistent with this, pan-HDI-containing combinations reduced the activity of NF-κB and Hsp90, two cellular factors necessary for potent HIV protein expression, but did not significantly reduce overall cell viability. An assessment of viral clearance from in vitro cultures indicated that maximal protein expression induced by class 1-selective HDI treatment was crucial for reservoir clearance. These findings elucidate the limitations of current approaches and provide a path toward more effective strategies to eliminate the HIV reservoir. IMPORTANCE Despite effective antiretroviral therapy, HIV evades eradication in a latent form that is not affected by currently available drug regimens. Pharmacologic latency reversal that leads to death of cellular reservoirs has been proposed as a strategy for

  5. The histone demethylase LSD1 is required for estrogen-dependent S100A7 gene expression in human breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Eun [Department of Systems Biology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomolecule Research Initiative, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Jang, Yeun Kyu, E-mail: ykjang@yonsei.ac.kr [Department of Systems Biology, College of Life Science and Biotechnology, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yonsei Biomolecule Research Initiative, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S100A7 gene is up-regulated in response to estrogen in breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Histone demethylase LSD1 can associate physically with S100A7 gene promoters. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer E2-induced S100A7 expression requires the enzymatic activity of LSD1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer S100A7 inhibits cell proliferation, implying its tumor suppressor-like function. -- Abstract: S100A7, a member of S100 calcium binding protein family, is highly associated with breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of S100A7 regulation remains unclear. Here we show that long-term treatment with estradiol stimulated S100A7 expression in MCF7 breast cancer cells at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Both treatment with a histone demethylase LSD1 inhibitor and shRNA-based knockdown of LSD1 expression significantly decreased 17{beta}-estradiol (E2)-induced S100A7 expression. These reduced E2-mediated S100A7 expression are rescued by the overexpressed wild-type LSD1 but not by its catalytically inactive mutant. Our data showed in vivo association of LSD1 with S100A7 promoters, confirming the potential role of LSD1 in regulating S100A7 expression. S100A7 knockdown increased both normal cell growth and estrogen-induced cell proliferation, suggesting a negative influence by S100A7 on the growth of cancer cells. Together, our data suggest that estrogen-induced S100A7 expression mediated by the histone demethylase LSD1 may downregulate breast cancer cell proliferation, implying a potential tumor suppressor-like function for S100A7.

  6. The histone demethylase LSD1 is required for estrogen-dependent S100A7 gene expression in human breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Seung Eun; Jang, Yeun Kyu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► S100A7 gene is up-regulated in response to estrogen in breast cancer cells. ► Histone demethylase LSD1 can associate physically with S100A7 gene promoters. ► E2-induced S100A7 expression requires the enzymatic activity of LSD1. ► S100A7 inhibits cell proliferation, implying its tumor suppressor-like function. -- Abstract: S100A7, a member of S100 calcium binding protein family, is highly associated with breast cancer. However, the molecular mechanism of S100A7 regulation remains unclear. Here we show that long-term treatment with estradiol stimulated S100A7 expression in MCF7 breast cancer cells at both the transcriptional and translational levels. Both treatment with a histone demethylase LSD1 inhibitor and shRNA-based knockdown of LSD1 expression significantly decreased 17β-estradiol (E2)-induced S100A7 expression. These reduced E2-mediated S100A7 expression are rescued by the overexpressed wild-type LSD1 but not by its catalytically inactive mutant. Our data showed in vivo association of LSD1 with S100A7 promoters, confirming the potential role of LSD1 in regulating S100A7 expression. S100A7 knockdown increased both normal cell growth and estrogen-induced cell proliferation, suggesting a negative influence by S100A7 on the growth of cancer cells. Together, our data suggest that estrogen-induced S100A7 expression mediated by the histone demethylase LSD1 may downregulate breast cancer cell proliferation, implying a potential tumor suppressor-like function for S100A7.

  7. Nance-Horan syndrome: a contiguous gene syndrome involving deletion of the amelogenin gene? A case report and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, E; Hodgson, S; Lench, N; Roberts, G J

    1995-03-01

    A case of Nance-Horan syndrome in a male is presented, with some features of the condition in his carrier mother and her mother. It is proposed that Nance-Horan syndrome might be a contiguous gene syndrome mapping to chromosome Xp21.2-p22.3. The proband had congenital cataract microphthalmia and dental abnormalities including screwdriver shaped incisors and evidence of enamel pitting hypoplasia. The region Xp21.2-p22.3 also contains the tooth enamel protein gene, amelogenin (AMGX). Using molecular genetic techniques, we have shown that there is no evidence that the AMGX gene is deleted in this case of the Nance-Horan syndrome.

  8. Intermittent Ethanol during Adolescence Leads to Lasting Behavioral Changes in Adulthood and Alters Gene Expression and Histone Methylation in the PFC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer T. Wolstenholme

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Adolescents primarily consume alcohol in binges, which can be particularly harmful to the developing frontal cortex and increase risk for an adult alcohol use disorder. We conducted a study investigating immediate and long lasting changes to the prefrontal cortex (PFC transcriptome to determine the molecular mechanisms underlying adult ethanol behavioral sensitivity following binge ethanol in adolescence. DBA/2J mice were orally dosed with 4 g/kg ethanol intermittently from day 29 to 42. Adolescent mice were tested for anxiety-like behavior and ethanol sensitivity using the loss of righting reflex task. As adults, mice were tested for cognitive changes using the novel object recognition task, ethanol-induced anxiolysis and ethanol sensitivity. Adolescent binge ethanol altered ethanol sensitivity in young mice and led to lasting memory deficits in the object recognition test and greater ethanol sensitivity in adulthood. Using genomic profiling of transcripts in the PFC, we found that binge ethanol reduced myelin-related gene expression and altered chromatin modifying genes involved in histone demethylation at H3K9 and H3K36. We hypothesize that ethanol’s actions on histone methylation may be a switch for future transcriptional changes that underlie the behavioral changes lasting into adulthood.

  9. Histone acetylation: molecular mnemonics on the chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gräff, Johannes; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2013-02-01

    Long-lasting memories require specific gene expression programmes that are, in part, orchestrated by epigenetic mechanisms. Of the epigenetic modifications identified in cognitive processes, histone acetylation has spurred considerable interest. Whereas increments in histone acetylation have consistently been shown to favour learning and memory, a lack thereof has been causally implicated in cognitive impairments in neurodevelopmental disorders, neurodegeneration and ageing. As histone acetylation and cognitive functions can be pharmacologically restored by histone deacetylase inhibitors, this epigenetic modification might constitute a molecular memory aid on the chromatin and, by extension, a new template for therapeutic interventions against cognitive frailty.

  10. The gene signature in CCAAT-enhancer-binding protein alpha dysfunctional acute myeloid leukemia predicts responsiveness to histone deacetylase inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Liss, A.; Ooi, C.; Zjablovskaja, Polina; Benoukraf, T.; Radomska, H.S.; Ju, C.; Wu, M.C.; Balaštík, Martin; Delwel, R.; Brdička, Tomáš; Tan, P.; Tenen, D.G.; Alberich-Jorda, Meritxell

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 99, č. 4 (2014), s. 697-705 ISSN 0390-6078 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LK21307; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11213 Grant - others:NIH(US) CA66996; NIH(US) CA118316 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 Keywords : C/EBPa * histone deacetylase inhibitor * acute myeloid leukemia Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 5.814, year: 2014

  11. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  12. Developing a Novel Gene-Delivery Vector System Using the Recombinant Fusion Protein of Pseudomonas Exotoxin A and Hyperthermophilic Archaeal Histone HPhA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xin; Zhang, Guoli; Zhang, Ling; Feng, Yan; Li, Zehong; Wu, GuangMou; Yue, Yuhuan; Li, Gensong; Cao, Yu; Zhu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Non-viral gene delivery system with many advantages has a great potential for the future of gene therapy. One inherent obstacle of such approach is the uptake by endocytosis into vesicular compartments. Receptor-mediated gene delivery method holds promise to overcome this obstacle. In this study, we developed a receptor-mediated gene delivery system based on a combination of the Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE), which has a receptor binding and membrane translocation domain, and the hyperthermophilic archaeal histone (HPhA), which has the DNA binding ability. First, we constructed and expressed the rPE-HPhA fusion protein. We then examined the cytotoxicity and the DNA binding ability of rPE-HPhA. We further assessed the efficiency of transfection of the pEGF-C1 plasmid DNA to CHO cells by the rPE-HPhA system, in comparison to the cationic liposome method. The results showed that the transfection efficiency of rPE-HPhA was higher than that of cationic liposomes. In addition, the rPE-HPhA gene delivery system is non-specific to DNA sequence, topology or targeted cell type. Thus, the rPE-HPhA system can be used for delivering genes of interest into mammalian cells and has great potential to be applied for gene therapy.

  13. DNA microarray profiling of genes differentially regulated by the histone deacetylase inhibitors vorinostat and LBH589 in colon cancer cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenz Heinz-Josef

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the significant progress made in colon cancer chemotherapy, advanced disease remains largely incurable and novel efficacious chemotherapies are urgently needed. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi represent a novel class of agents which have demonstrated promising preclinical activity and are undergoing clinical evaluation in colon cancer. The goal of this study was to identify genes in colon cancer cells that are differentially regulated by two clinically advanced hydroxamic acid HDACi, vorinostat and LBH589 to provide rationale for novel drug combination partners and identify a core set of HDACi-regulated genes. Methods HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer cells were treated with LBH589 or vorinostat and growth inhibition, acetylation status and apoptosis were analyzed in response to treatment using MTS, Western blotting and flow cytometric analyses. In addition, gene expression was analyzed using the Illumina Human-6 V2 BeadChip array and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis. Results Treatment with either vorinostat or LBH589 rapidly induced histone acetylation, cell cycle arrest and inhibited the growth of both HCT116 and HT29 cells. Bioinformatic analysis of the microarray profiling revealed significant similarity in the genes altered in expression following treatment with the two HDACi tested within each cell line. However, analysis of genes that were altered in expression in the HCT116 and HT29 cells revealed cell-line-specific responses to HDACi treatment. In addition a core cassette of 11 genes modulated by both vorinostat and LBH589 were identified in both colon cancer cell lines analyzed. Conclusion This study identified HDACi-induced alterations in critical genes involved in nucleotide metabolism, angiogenesis, mitosis and cell survival which may represent potential intervention points for novel therapeutic combinations in colon cancer. This information will assist in the identification of novel pathways and targets

  14. Angelman Syndrome Due to UBE3A Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Jyotindra Narayan; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Singhi, Pratibha

    2017-12-18

    A 12-y-old boy presented with developmental delay, autism, epilepsy, limb tremors and behavioral problems which posed a diagnostic challenge. Though his clinical profile and electroencephalogram were suggestive of Angelman syndrome, initial genetic tests were unyielding. Exome sequencing revealed a previously unreported mutation of Ubiquitin Protein Ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene, confirming the diagnosis of Angelman syndrome. The case is aimed to sensitize pediatricians about Angelman syndrome and to highlight the role of sequential investigations in establishing the diagnosis.

  15. Histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC 3) as emerging drug target in NF-kappa B-mediated inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leus, Niek G. J.; Zwinderman, Martijn R. H.; Dekker, Frank J.

    Activation of inflammatory gene expression is regulated, among other factors, by post-translational modifications of histone proteins. The most investigated type of histone modifications is lysine acetylations. Histone deacetylases (HDACs) remove acetylations from lysines, thereby influencing

  16. Ascorbic Acid Protects against Hypertension through Downregulation of ACE1 Gene Expression Mediated by Histone Deacetylation in Prenatal Inflammation-Induced Offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Yin, Na; Deng, Youcai; Wei, Yanling; Huang, Yinhu; Pu, Xiaoyun; Li, Li; Zheng, Yingru; Guo, Jianxin; Yu, Jianhua; Li, Xiaohui; Yi, Ping

    2016-12-20

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Prenatal exposure to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) leads to hypertension in a rat offspring. However, the mechanism is still unclear. This study unraveled epigenetic mechanism for this and explored the protective effects of ascorbic acid against hypertension on prenatal inflammation-induced offspring. Prenatal LPS exposure resulted in an increase of intrarenal oxidative stress and enhanced angiotensin-converting enzyme 1 (ACE1) gene expression at the mRNA and protein levels in 6- and 12-week-old offspring, correlating with the augmentation of histone H3 acetylation (H3AC) on the ACE1 promoter. However, the prenatal ascorbic acid treatment decreased the LPS-induced expression of ACE1, protected against intrarenal oxidative stress, and reversed the altered histone modification on the ACE1 promoter, showing the protective effect in offspring of prenatal LPS stimulation. Our study demonstrates that ascorbic acid is able to prevent hypertension in offspring from prenatal inflammation exposure. Thus, ascorbic acid can be a new approach towards the prevention of fetal programming hypertension.

  17. Erasing the methyl mark: histone demethylases at the center of cellular differentiation and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper; Agger, Karl

    2008-01-01

    The enzymes catalyzing lysine and arginine methylation of histones are essential for maintaining transcriptional programs and determining cell fate and identity. Until recently, histone methylation was regarded irreversible. However, within the last few years, several families of histone...... demethylases erasing methyl marks associated with gene repression or activation have been identified, underscoring the plasticity and dynamic nature of histone methylation. Recent discoveries have revealed that histone demethylases take part in large multiprotein complexes synergizing with histone deacetylases......, histone methyltransferases, and nuclear receptors to control developmental and transcriptional programs. Here we review the emerging biochemical and biological functions of the histone demethylases and discuss their potential involvement in human diseases, including cancer....

  18. Diagnostic test for prenatal identification of Down's syndrome and mental retardation and gene therapy therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Desmond J.; Rubin, Edward M.

    2000-01-01

    A a diagnostic test useful for prenatal identification of Down syndrome and mental retardation. A method for gene therapy for correction and treatment of Down syndrome. DYRK gene involved in the ability to learn. A method for diagnosing Down's syndrome and mental retardation and an assay therefor. A pharmaceutical composition for treatment of Down's syndrome mental retardation.

  19. p300-mediated acetylation of the Rothmund-Thomson-syndrome gene product RECQL4 regulates its subcellular localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietschy, Tobias; Shevelev, Igor; Pena Diaz, Javier

    2009-01-01

    RECQL4 belongs to the conserved RecQ family of DNA helicases, members of which play important roles in the maintenance of genome stability in all organisms that have been examined. Although genetic alterations in the RECQL4 gene are reported to be associated with three autosomal recessive disorders...... (Rothmund-Thomson, RAPADILINO and Baller-Gerold syndromes), the molecular role of RECQL4 still remains poorly understood. Here, we show that RECQL4 specifically interacts with the histone acetyltransferase p300 (also known as p300 HAT), both in vivo and in vitro, and that p300 acetylates one or more...... of the lysine residues at positions 376, 380, 382, 385 and 386 of RECQL4. Furthermore, we report that these five lysine residues lie within a short motif of 30 amino acids that is essential for the nuclear localization of RECQL4. Remarkably, the acetylation of RECQL4 by p300 in vivo leads to a significant shift...

  20. Robust Thyroid Gene Expression and Radioiodine Uptake Induced by Simultaneous Suppression of BRAF V600E and Histone Deacetylase in Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weiwei; Liu, Rengyun; Zhu, Guangwu; Wang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Context: Use of BRAF V600E inhibitors to restore thyroid iodide-handling gene expression and radioactive iodine (RAI) avidity is an attractive therapeutic strategy for RAI-refractory thyroid cancer, but recent initial clinical responses were modest. Given histone deacetylation at the sodium/iodide symporter promoter by histone deacetylase (HDAC) as a mechanism, simultaneously targeting BRAF V600E and HDAC could be a more effective strategy. Objectives: The objective of the study was to test whether suppressing both BRAF V600E and HDAC could more effectively induce thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Research Design: We tested the BRAF V600E inhibitor PLX4032 (vemurafenib) and the HDAC inhibitor SAHA (vorinostat), two major anticancer drugs currently approved for clinical use, in inducing thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells. Results: PLX4032 alone induced a modest expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake preferentially in thyroid cancer cells harboring BRAF V600E. SAHA showed an effect in a genetic-independent manner in all the cells. A robust synergistic effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake was observed in BRAF V600E-positive thyroid cancer cells when the two inhibitors were simultaneously used. This was dramatically enhanced further by TSH; triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH showed the most robust effect on thyroid gene expression and RAI uptake in cells harboring BRAF V600E. Abundant sodium/iodide symporter protein expression in thyroid cancer cells under these conditions was confirmed by immunofluorescent microscopy. Conclusions: Simultaneously suppressing BRAF V600E and HDAC, particularly when cotreated with TSH, induced a far more robust expression of thyroid genes and RAI uptake in thyroid cancer cells than suppressing BRAF V600E alone. Triple combination of PLX4032, SAHA, and TSH is a specific robust regimen to restore RAI avidity in RAI-refractory BRAF V600E-positive thyroid

  1. Marfan syndrome gene search intensifies following identification of basic defect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Randall, T.

    1990-10-03

    Somewhere, quite possible along chromosomes 8 and/or 15, the gene(s) for Marfan syndrome will be found. The search is intensifying following a report that faulty scaffolding in the body's connective tissue appears to be the long sought after defect behind the syndrome, and inherited disorder that has caused the premature death of young, healthy-looking individuals. Finding that something in the living masonry of the human body has proven to be a 30-year inquisition of nearly two dozen molecules that has engaged investigators worldwide. Historically, researchers have searched for a structural flaw in one of the collagen molecules to explain the cause of Marfan Syndrome. Using monoclonal antibodies, researchers have implicated microfibrils, the extracellular filaments that provide a matrix for the deposit of elastin during embryonic development.

  2. Single Gene and Syndromic Causes of Obesity: Illustrative Examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Merlin G

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a significant health problem in westernized societies, particularly in the United States where it has reached epidemic proportions in both adults and children. The prevalence of childhood obesity has doubled in the past 30 years. The causation is complex with multiple sources, including an obesity promoting environment with plentiful highly dense food sources and overall decreased physical activity noted for much of the general population, but genetic factors clearly play a role. Advances in genetic technology using candidate gene approaches, genome-wide association studies, structural and expression microarrays, and next generation sequencing have led to the discovery of hundreds of genes recognized as contributing to obesity. Polygenic and monogenic causes of obesity are now recognized including dozens of examples of syndromic obesity with Prader-Willi syndrome, as a classical example and recognized as the most common known cause of life-threatening obesity. Genetic factors playing a role in the causation of obesity will be discussed along with the growing evidence of single genes and the continuum between monogenic and polygenic obesity. The clinical and genetic aspects of four classical but rare obesity-related syndromes (ie, Prader-Willi, Alström, fragile X, and Albright hereditary osteodystrophy) will be described and illustrated in this review of single gene and syndromic causes of obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Kallmann syndrome and ichthyosis: a case of contiguous gene deletion syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Berges-Raso

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome is a genetically heterogeneous form of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism caused by gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and characterized by anosmia or hyposmia due to hypoplasia of the olfactory bulbs; osteoporosis and metabolic syndrome can develop due to longstanding untreated hypogonadism. Kallmann syndrome affects 1 in 10 000 men and 1 in 50 000 women. Defects in 17 genes, including KAL1, have been implicated. Kallmann syndrome can be associated with X-linked ichthyosis, a skin disorder characterized by early onset dark, dry, irregular scales affecting the limb and trunk, caused by a defect of the steroid sulfatase gene (STS. Both KAL1 and STS are located in the Xp22.3 region; therefore, deletions in this region cause a contiguous gene syndrome. We report the case of a 32-year-old man with ichthyosis referred for evaluation of excessive height (2.07 m and weight (BMI: 29.6 kg/m2, microgenitalia and absence of secondary sex characteristics. We diagnosed Kallmann syndrome with ichthyosis due to a deletion in Xp22.3, a rare phenomenon.

  4. Candidate gene association studies in syndromic and non-syndromic cleft lip and palate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daack-Hirsch, S.; Basart, A.; Frischmeyer, P. [Univ. of Iowa, IA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Using ongoing case ascertainment through a birth defects registry, we have collected 219 nuclear families with non-syndromic cleft lip and/or palate and 111 families with a collection of syndromic forms. Syndromic cases include 24 with recognized forms and 72 with unrecognized syndromes. Candidate gene studies as well as genome-wide searches for evidence of microdeletions and isodisomy are currently being carried out. Candidate gene association studies, to date, have made use of PCR-based polymorphisms for TGFA, MSX1, CLPG13 (a CA repeat associated with a human homologue of a locus that results in craniofacial dysmorphogenesis in the mouse) and an STRP found in a Van der Woude syndrome microdeletion. Control tetranucleotide repeats, which insure that population-based differences are not responsible for any observed associations, are also tested. Studies of the syndromic cases have included the same list of candidate genes searching for evidence of microdeletions and a genome-wide search using tri- and tetranucleotide polymorphic markers to search for isodisomy or structural rearrangements. Significant associations have previously been identified for TGFA, and, in this report, identified for MSX1 and nonsyndromic cleft palate only (p = 0.04, uncorrected). Preliminary results of the genome-wide scan for isodisomy has returned no true positives and there has been no evidence for microdeletion cases.

  5. Identification of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, S P; Ebenezer, N D; Poopalasundaram, S; Lehmann, O J; Moore, A T; Hardcastle, A J

    2004-10-01

    The disease intervals for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS [MIM 302350]) and X linked congenital cataract (CXN) overlap on Xp22. To identify the gene or genes responsible for these diseases. Families with NHS were ascertained. The refined locus for CXN was used to focus the search for candidate genes, which were screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of potential exons and intron-exon splice sites. Genomic structures and homologies were determined using bioinformatics. Expression studies were undertaken using specific exonic primers to amplify human fetal cDNA and mouse RNA. A novel gene NHS, with no known function, was identified as causative for NHS. Protein truncating mutations were detected in all three NHS pedigrees, but no mutation was identified in a CXN family, raising the possibility that NHS and CXN may not be allelic. The NHS gene forms a new gene family with a closely related novel gene NHS-Like1 (NHSL1). NHS and NHSL1 lie in paralogous duplicated chromosomal intervals on Xp22 and 6q24, and NHSL1 is more broadly expressed than NHS in human fetal tissues. This study reports the independent identification of the gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome and extends the number of mutations identified.

  6. Histone demethylases in development and disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    Histone modifications serve as regulatory marks that are instrumental for the control of transcription and chromatin architecture. Strict regulation of gene expression patterns is crucial during development and differentiation, where diverse cell types evolve from common predecessors. Since...... the first histone lysine demethylase was discovered in 2004, a number of demethylases have been identified and implicated in the control of gene expression programmes and cell fate decisions. Histone demethylases are now emerging as important players in developmental processes and have been linked to human...

  7. GATA-1 Inhibits PU.1 Gene via DNA and Histone H3K9 Methylation of Its Distal Enhancer in Erythroleukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavel Burda

    Full Text Available GATA-1 and PU.1 are two important hematopoietic transcription factors that mutually inhibit each other in progenitor cells to guide entrance into the erythroid or myeloid lineage, respectively. PU.1 controls its own expression during myelopoiesis by binding to the distal URE enhancer, whose deletion leads to acute myeloid leukemia (AML. We herein present evidence that GATA-1 binds to the PU.1 gene and inhibits its expression in human AML-erythroleukemias (EL. Furthermore, GATA-1 together with DNA methyl Transferase I (DNMT1 mediate repression of the PU.1 gene through the URE. Repression of the PU.1 gene involves both DNA methylation at the URE and its histone H3 lysine-K9 methylation and deacetylation as well as the H3K27 methylation at additional DNA elements and the promoter. The GATA-1-mediated inhibition of PU.1 gene transcription in human AML-EL mediated through the URE represents important mechanism that contributes to PU.1 downregulation and leukemogenesis that is sensitive to DNA demethylation therapy.

  8. Differential deposition of H2A.Z in combination with histone modifications within related genes in Oryza sativa callus and seedling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kang; Xu, Wenying; Wang, Chunchao; Yi, Xin; Zhang, Wenli; Su, Zhen

    2017-01-01

    As a histone variant, H2A.Z is highly conserved among species and plays a significant role in diverse cellular processes. Here, we generated genome-wide maps of H2A.Z in Oryza sativa (rice) callus and seedling by combining chromatin immunoprecipitation using H2A.Z antibody and high-throughput sequencing. We found a significantly high peak and a small peak of H2A.Z distributed at the 5' and 3' ends of highly expressed genes, respectively. H2A.Z was also associated with inactive genes in both tissues. H3 lysine 4 trimethylation was associated with H2A.Z deposition at the 5' end of expressed genes, and H3 lysine 27 trimethylation peaks were partially associated with H2A.Z. In summary, our study provides global analysis data for the distribution of H2A.Z in the rice genome. Our results demonstrate that the differential deposition of H2A.Z might play important roles in gene transcription during rice development. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Antibodies from the sera of HIV-infected patients efficiently hydrolyze all human histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranova, Svetlana V; Buneva, Valentina N; Nevinsky, Georgy A

    2016-08-01

    Histones and their post-translational modifications have key roles in chromatin remodeling and gene transcription. Besides intranuclear functions, histones act as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules when they are released into the extracellular space. Administration of exogenous histones to animals leads to systemic inflammatory and toxic responses through activating Toll-like receptors and inflammasome pathways. Here, using ELISA it was shown that sera of HIV-infected patients and healthy donors contain autoantibodies against histones. Autoantibodies with enzymic activities (abzymes) are a distinctive feature of autoimmune diseases. It was interesting whether antibodies from sera of HIV-infected patients can hydrolyze human histones. Electrophoretically and immunologically homogeneous IgGs were isolated from sera of HIV-infected patients by chromatography on several affinity sorbents. We present first evidence showing that 100% of IgGs purified from the sera of 32 HIV-infected patients efficiently hydrolyze from one to five human histones. Several rigid criteria have been applied to show that the histone-hydrolyzing activity is an intrinsic property of IgGs of HIV-infected patients. The relative efficiency of hydrolysis of histones (H1, H2a, H2b, H3, and H4) significantly varied for IgGs of different patients. IgGs from the sera of 40% of healthy donors also hydrolyze histones but with an average efficiency approximately 16-fold lower than that of HIV-infected patients. Similar to proteolytic abzymes from the sera of patients with several autoimmune diseases, histone-hydrolyzing IgGs from HIV-infected patients were inhibited by specific inhibitors of serine and of metal-dependent proteases, but an unexpected significant inhibition of the activity by specific inhibitor of thiol-like proteases was also observed. Because IgGs can efficiently hydrolyze histones, a negative role of abzymes in development of acquired immune deficiency syndrome cannot be

  10. A Marfan syndrome gene expression phenotype in cultured skin fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emond Mary

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Marfan syndrome (MFS is a heritable connective tissue disorder caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene. This syndrome constitutes a significant identifiable subtype of aortic aneurysmal disease, accounting for over 5% of ascending and thoracic aortic aneurysms. Results We used spotted membrane DNA macroarrays to identify genes whose altered expression levels may contribute to the phenotype of the disease. Our analysis of 4132 genes identified a subset with significant expression differences between skin fibroblast cultures from unaffected controls versus cultures from affected individuals with known fibrillin-1 mutations. Subsequently, 10 genes were chosen for validation by quantitative RT-PCR. Conclusion Differential expression of many of the validated genes was associated with MFS samples when an additional group of unaffected and MFS affected subjects were analyzed (p-value -6 under the null hypothesis that expression levels in cultured fibroblasts are unaffected by MFS status. An unexpected observation was the range of individual gene expression. In unaffected control subjects, expression ranges exceeding 10 fold were seen in many of the genes selected for qRT-PCR validation. The variation in expression in the MFS affected subjects was even greater.

  11. A distinctive gene expression fingerprint in mentally retarded male patients reflects disease-causing defects in the histone demethylase KDM5C.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jensen, L.R.; Bartenschlager, H.; Rujirabanjerd, S.; Tzschach, A.; Numann, A.; Janecke, A.R.; Sporle, R.; Stricker, S.; Raynaud, M.; Nelson, J.; Hackett, A.; Fryns, J.P.; Chelly, J.; Brouwer, A.P.M. de; Hamel, B.C.J.; Gecz, J.; Ropers, H.H.; Kuss, A.W.

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Mental retardation is a genetically heterogeneous disorder, as more than 90 genes for this disorder has been found on the X chromosome alone. In addition the majority of patients are non-syndromic in that they do not present with clinically recognisable features. This makes it

  12. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Blotnick

    Full Text Available Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  13. Histones bundle F-actin filaments and affect actin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blotnick, Edna; Sol, Asaf; Muhlrad, Andras

    2017-01-01

    Histones are small polycationic proteins complexed with DNA located in the cell nucleus. Upon apoptosis they are secreted from the cells and react with extracellular polyanionic compounds. Actin which is a polyanionic protein, is also secreted from necrotic cells and interacts with histones. We showed that both histone mixture (histone type III) and the recombinant H2A histone bundles F-actin, increases the viscosity of the F-actin containing solution and polymerizes G-actin. The histone-actin bundles are relatively insensitive to increase of ionic strength, unlike other polycation, histatin, lysozyme, spermine and LL-37 induced F-actin bundles. The histone-actin bundles dissociate completely only in the presence of 300-400 mM NaCl. DNA, which competes with F-actin for histones, disassembles histone induced actin bundles. DNase1, which depolymerizes F- to G-actin, actively unbundles the H2A histone induced but slightly affects the histone mixture induced actin bundles. Cofilin decreases the amount of F-actin sedimented by low speed centrifugation, increases light scattering and viscosity of F-actin-histone mixture containing solutions and forms star like superstructures by copolymerizing G-actin with H2A histone. The results indicate that histones are tightly attached to F-actin by strong electrostatic and hydrophobic forces. Since both histones and F-actin are present in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis, therefore, the formation of the stable histone-actin bundles can contribute to the pathology of this disease by increasing the viscosity of the sputum. The actin-histone interaction in the nucleus might affect gene expression.

  14. MS_HistoneDB, a manually curated resource for proteomic analysis of human and mouse histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Kennani, Sara; Adrait, Annie; Shaytan, Alexey K; Khochbin, Saadi; Bruley, Christophe; Panchenko, Anna R; Landsman, David; Pflieger, Delphine; Govin, Jérôme

    2017-01-01

    Histones and histone variants are essential components of the nuclear chromatin. While mass spectrometry has opened a large window to their characterization and functional studies, their identification from proteomic data remains challenging. Indeed, the current interpretation of mass spectrometry data relies on public databases which are either not exhaustive (Swiss-Prot) or contain many redundant entries (UniProtKB or NCBI). Currently, no protein database is ideally suited for the analysis of histones and the complex array of mammalian histone variants. We propose two proteomics-oriented manually curated databases for mouse and human histone variants. We manually curated >1700 gene, transcript and protein entries to produce a non-redundant list of 83 mouse and 85 human histones. These entries were annotated in accordance with the current nomenclature and unified with the "HistoneDB2.0 with Variants" database. This resource is provided in a format that can be directly read by programs used for mass spectrometry data interpretation. In addition, it was used to interpret mass spectrometry data acquired on histones extracted from mouse testis. Several histone variants, which had so far only been inferred by homology or detected at the RNA level, were detected by mass spectrometry, confirming the existence of their protein form. Mouse and human histone entries were collected from different databases and subsequently curated to produce a non-redundant protein-centric resource, MS_HistoneDB. It is dedicated to the proteomic study of histones in mouse and human and will hopefully facilitate the identification and functional study of histone variants.

  15. Refining the clinical phenotype of Okur–Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahira-Azuma, Moe; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Enomoto, Yumi; Mitsui, Jun; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    We describe an 8-year-old Japanese boy with a de novo recurrent missense mutation in CSNK2A1, c.593A>G, that is causative of Okur–Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome. He exhibited distinctive facial features, severe growth retardation with relative macrocephaly, and friendly, hyperactive behavior. His dysmorphic features might suggest a congenital histone modification defect syndrome, such as Kleefstra, Coffin–Siris, or Rubinstein–Taybi syndromes, which are indicative of functional interactions between the casein kinase II, alpha 1 gene and histone modification factors. PMID:29619237

  16. A gene signature for post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, John W; Hagan, Suzanne; Herzyk, Pawel; Cannon, Celia; Behan, Peter O; Chaudhuri, Abhijit

    2009-01-01

    Background At present, there are no clinically reliable disease markers for chronic fatigue syndrome. DNA chip microarray technology provides a method for examining the differential expression of mRNA from a large number of genes. Our hypothesis was that a gene expression signature, generated by microarray assays, could help identify genes which are dysregulated in patients with post-infectious CFS and so help identify biomarkers for the condition. Methods Human genome-wide Affymetrix GeneChip arrays (39,000 transcripts derived from 33,000 gene sequences) were used to compare the levels of gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of male patients with post-infectious chronic fatigue (n = 8) and male healthy control subjects (n = 7). Results Patients and healthy subjects differed significantly in the level of expression of 366 genes. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated functional implications in immune modulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Prototype biomarkers were identified on the basis of differential levels of gene expression and possible biological significance Conclusion Differential expression of key genes identified in this study offer an insight into the possible mechanism of chronic fatigue following infection. The representative biomarkers identified in this research appear promising as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment. PMID:19555476

  17. A gene signature for post-infectious chronic fatigue syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cannon Celia

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At present, there are no clinically reliable disease markers for chronic fatigue syndrome. DNA chip microarray technology provides a method for examining the differential expression of mRNA from a large number of genes. Our hypothesis was that a gene expression signature, generated by microarray assays, could help identify genes which are dysregulated in patients with post-infectious CFS and so help identify biomarkers for the condition. Methods Human genome-wide Affymetrix GeneChip arrays (39,000 transcripts derived from 33,000 gene sequences were used to compare the levels of gene expression in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells of male patients with post-infectious chronic fatigue (n = 8 and male healthy control subjects (n = 7. Results Patients and healthy subjects differed significantly in the level of expression of 366 genes. Analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicated functional implications in immune modulation, oxidative stress and apoptosis. Prototype biomarkers were identified on the basis of differential levels of gene expression and possible biological significance Conclusion Differential expression of key genes identified in this study offer an insight into the possible mechanism of chronic fatigue following infection. The representative biomarkers identified in this research appear promising as potential biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment.

  18. Solar-simulated ultraviolet radiation induces histone 3 methylation changes in the gene promoters of matrix metalloproteinases 1 and 3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesumaria, Lisa; Matsui, Mary S; Kluz, Thomas; Costa, Max

    2015-05-01

    Molecular signalling pathways delineating the induction of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) are currently well-defined; however, the effects of UVR on epigenetic mechanisms of MMP induction are not as well understood. In this study, we examined solar-simulated UVR (ssUVR)-induced gene expression changes and alterations to histone methylation in the promoters of MMP1 and MMP3 in primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDF). Gene expression changes, including the increased expression of MMP1 and MMP3, were observed using Affymetrix GeneChip arrays and confirmed by qRT-PCR. Using ChIP-PCR, we showed for the first time that in HDF irradiated with 12 J/cm(2) ssUVR, the H3K4me3 transcriptional activating mark increased and the H3K9me2 transcriptional silencing mark decreased in abundance in promoters, correlating with the observed elevation of MMP1 and MMP3 mRNA levels following ssUVR exposure. Changes in mRNA levels due to a single exposure were transient and decreased 5 days after exposure. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Identification of Gene Mutations and Fusion Genes in Patients with Sézary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Aparna; Rabionet, Raquel; Espinet, Blanca; Zapata, Luis; Puiggros, Anna; Melero, Carme; Puig, Anna; Sarria-Trujillo, Yaris; Ossowski, Stephan; Garcia-Muret, Maria P; Estrach, Teresa; Servitje, Octavio; Lopez-Lerma, Ingrid; Gallardo, Fernando; Pujol, Ramon M; Estivill, Xavier

    2016-07-01

    Sézary syndrome is a leukemic form of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma with an aggressive clinical course. The genetic etiology of the disease is poorly understood, with chromosomal abnormalities and mutations in some genes being involved in the disease. The goal of our study was to understand the genetic basis of the disease by looking for driver gene mutations and fusion genes in 15 erythrodermic patients with circulating Sézary cells, 14 of them fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of Sézary syndrome. We have discovered genes that could be involved in the pathogenesis of Sézary syndrome. Some of the genes that are affected by somatic point mutations include ITPR1, ITPR2, DSC1, RIPK2, IL6, and RAG2, with some of them mutated in more than one patient. We observed several somatic copy number variations shared between patients, including deletions and duplications of large segments of chromosome 17. Genes with potential function in the T-cell receptor signaling pathway and tumorigenesis were disrupted in Sézary syndrome patients, for example, CBLB, RASA2, BCL7C, RAMP3, TBRG4, and DAD1. Furthermore, we discovered several fusion events of interest involving RASA2, NFKB2, BCR, FASN, ZEB1, TYK2, and SGMS1. Our work has implications for the development of potential therapeutic approaches for this aggressive disease. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The histone H3K36 methyltransferase MES-4 acts epigenetically to transmit the memory of germline gene expression to progeny.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Rechtsteiner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Methylation of histone H3K36 in higher eukaryotes is mediated by multiple methyltransferases. Set2-related H3K36 methyltransferases are targeted to genes by association with RNA Polymerase II and are involved in preventing aberrant transcription initiation within the body of genes. The targeting and roles of the NSD family of mammalian H3K36 methyltransferases, known to be involved in human developmental disorders and oncogenesis, are not known. We used genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP to investigate the targeting and roles of the Caenorhabditis elegans NSD homolog MES-4, which is maternally provided to progeny and is required for the survival of nascent germ cells. ChIP analysis in early C. elegans embryos revealed that, consistent with immunostaining results, MES-4 binding sites are concentrated on the autosomes and the leftmost approximately 2% (300 kb of the X chromosome. MES-4 overlies the coding regions of approximately 5,000 genes, with a modest elevation in the 5' regions of gene bodies. Although MES-4 is generally found over Pol II-bound genes, analysis of gene sets with different temporal-spatial patterns of expression revealed that Pol II association with genes is neither necessary nor sufficient to recruit MES-4. In early embryos, MES-4 associates with genes that were previously expressed in the maternal germ line, an interaction that does not require continued association of Pol II with those loci. Conversely, Pol II association with genes newly expressed in embryos does not lead to recruitment of MES-4 to those genes. These and other findings suggest that MES-4, and perhaps the related mammalian NSD proteins, provide an epigenetic function for H3K36 methylation that is novel and likely to be unrelated to ongoing transcription. We propose that MES-4 transmits the memory of gene expression in the parental germ line to offspring and that this memory role is critical for the PGCs to execute a proper germline program.

  1. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    During development, covalent modification of both, histones and DNA contribute to the specification and maintenance of cell identity. Repressive modifications are thought to stabilize cell type specific gene expression patterns, reducing the likelihood of reactivation of lineage-unrelated genes......, transcription factor binding and the antagonizing activities of distinct epigenetic regulators such as histone methyltransferases (HMTs) and histone demethylases (HDMs). Subsequently, we compare chromatin signatures associated with different types of transcriptional outcomes from stable repression to highly...

  2. Histone deacetylase inhibitor MS-275 augments expression of a subset of IFN-γ-regulated genes in Toxoplasma gondii-infected macrophages but does not improve parasite control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumpf, Kristina; Nast, Roswitha; Downie, Bryan; Salinas, Gabriela; Lüder, Carsten G K

    2017-09-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is a ubiquitous apicomplexan parasite of mammals and birds and an important pathogen of humans. IFN-γ is the major mediator of host resistance against T. gondii but intriguingly, parasite-infected host cells including macrophages are severely impaired to respond to IFN-γ due to defective transcriptional activation of target genes. Here, we tested the possibility that the impaired responsiveness of T. gondii-infected macrophages to IFN-γ can be restored by inhibiting histone deacetylases (HDACs) using the class I-specific inhibitor MS-275. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with MS-275 indeed increased MHC class II surface expression in infected and non-infected cells and largely abolished the inhibition of IFN-γ-regulated MHC class II expression exerted by T. gondii. Genome-wide transcriptome profiling revealed that MS-275 increased mean mRNA levels of IFN-γ-regulated genes particularly in non-infected macrophages. Transcript levels of 33% of IFN-γ secondary response genes but only those of a few primary response genes were also increased by MS-275 in T. gondii-infected cells. Importantly, the unresponsiveness of parasite-infected cells to IFN-γ was however not abolished by MS-275. Furthermore, MS-275 also up-regulated several anti-inflammatory cytokines or signaling molecules in T. gondii-infected macrophages. It additionally regulated expression of more than 2500 genes in non-infected macrophages expression of which was surprisingly counteracted by prior infection with T. gondii. FACS analysis and immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that MS-275 did not considerably diminish the number of parasite-positive cells or the intracellular replication in macrophages stimulated or not with IFN-γ. Thus, a supportive therapy using MS-275 appears inappropriate for treatment of toxoplasmosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A patient with Werner syndrome and adiponectin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Naotake; Hatanaka, Sachiko; Yokote, Koutaro; Kurosawa, Hiroko; Yoshida, Tomohiko; Iwai, Rie; Takahashi, Hidenori; Yoshida, Katsuya; Horie, Atsuya; Sakurai, Kenichi; Yagui, Kazuo; Saito, Yasushi; Yoshida, Shouji

    2007-01-01

    Werner syndrome is a premature aging disease characterized by genomic instability and increased cancer risk. Here, we report a 45-year-old diabetic man as the first Werner syndrome patient found to have an adiponectin gene mutation. Showing graying and loss of hair, skin atrophy, and juvenile cataract, he was diagnosed with Werner syndrome type 4 by molecular analysis. His serum adiponectin concentration was low. In the globular domain of the adiponectin gene, I164T in exon 3 was detected. When we examined effects of pioglitazone (15 mg/day) on serum adiponectin multimer and monomer concentrations using selective assays, the patient's relative percentage increased in adiponectin concentration was almost same as that in the 18 diabetic patients without an adiponectin mutation, but the absolute adiponectin concentration was half of those seen in diabetic patients treated with the same pioglitazone dose who had no adiponectin mutation. The response suggested that pioglitazone treatment might help to prevent future Werner syndrome-related acceleration of atherosclerosis. Present and further clinical relevant to atherosclerosis in this patient should be imformative concerning the pathogenesis and treatment of atherosclerosis in the presence of hypoadiponectinemia and insulin resistance.

  4. IFI16 restricts HSV-1 replication by accumulating on the hsv-1 genome, repressing HSV-1 gene expression, and directly or indirectly modulating histone modifications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen E Johnson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Interferon-γ inducible factor 16 (IFI16 is a multifunctional nuclear protein involved in transcriptional regulation, induction of interferon-β (IFN-β, and activation of the inflammasome response. It interacts with the sugar-phosphate backbone of dsDNA and modulates viral and cellular transcription through largely undetermined mechanisms. IFI16 is a restriction factor for human cytomegalovirus (HCMV and herpes simplex virus (HSV-1, though the mechanisms of HSV-1 restriction are not yet understood. Here, we show that IFI16 has a profound effect on HSV-1 replication in human foreskin fibroblasts, osteosarcoma cells, and breast epithelial cancer cells. IFI16 knockdown increased HSV-1 yield 6-fold and IFI16 overexpression reduced viral yield by over 5-fold. Importantly, HSV-1 gene expression, including the immediate early proteins, ICP0 and ICP4, the early proteins, ICP8 and TK, and the late proteins gB and Us11, was reduced in the presence of IFI16. Depletion of the inflammasome adaptor protein, ASC, or the IFN-inducing transcription factor, IRF-3, did not affect viral yield. ChIP studies demonstrated the presence of IFI16 bound to HSV-1 promoters in osteosarcoma (U2OS cells and fibroblasts. Using CRISPR gene editing technology, we generated U2OS cells with permanent deletion of IFI16 protein expression. ChIP analysis of these cells and wild-type (wt U2OS demonstrated increased association of RNA polymerase II, TATA binding protein (TBP and Oct1 transcription factors with viral promoters in the absence of IFI16 at different times post infection. Although IFI16 did not alter the total histone occupancy at viral or cellular promoters, its absence promoted markers of active chromatin and decreased those of repressive chromatin with viral and cellular gene promoters. Collectively, these studies for the first time demonstrate that IFI16 prevents association of important transcriptional activators with wt HSV-1 promoters and suggest potential

  5. Variant of Rett syndrome and CDKL5 gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Engerström, Ingegerd Witt

    2012-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Rett syndrome (RTT) is a severe neurodevelopmental disorder affecting almost exclusively females. The Hanefeld variant, or early-onset seizure variant, has been associated with mutations in CDKL5 gene. AIMS: In recent years more than 60 patients with mutations in the CDKL5 gene have...... been described in the literature, but the cardiorespiratory phenotype has not been reported. Our aim is to describe clinical and autonomic features of these girls. METHODS: 10 girls with CDKL5 mutations and a diagnosis of Hanefeld variant have been evaluated on axiological and clinical aspects. In all...

  6. Gene screening in a Chinese family with Marfan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jiao Xia

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To analyze the causative gene mutation for Marfan syndrome(MFSwith autosomal dominant hereditary in a Chinese family in Liaoning Province,China. METHODS: Venous blood was collected and candidate gene was selected to design primers according to the clinical phenotype. With genomic polymerase chain reaction(PCRperformed, the coding exons and their flanking intron in sequences of candidate gene were sequenced,DNA fragments separated by agarose gel electrophoresis and direct sequencing method was used to determine the pathogenic gene.RESULTS:Phenotype of the proband was presented as ectopic lentis. Sequencing of the coding regions of FBN1 gene showed the presence of a heterozygous A→G transversion at nucleotide 640 in the 7 exon of FBN1 and the missense mutation made for Glycine into Serine(G214S. CONCLUSION:A heterozygous mutation of FBN1 c.A640G(p.G214Sis responsible for the Marfan syndrome in the four generation Chinese pedigree.

  7. Involvement of EARLY BUD-BREAK, an AP2/ERF Transcription Factor Gene, in Bud Break in Japanese Pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) Lateral Flower Buds: Expression, Histone Modifications and Possible Target Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anh Tuan, Pham; Bai, Songling; Saito, Takanori; Imai, Tsuyoshi; Ito, Akiko; Moriguchi, Takaya

    2016-05-01

    In the Japanese pear (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) 'Kosui', three developmental stages of lateral flower buds have been proposed to occur during ecodormancy to the flowering phase, i.e. rapid enlargement, sprouting and flowering. Here, we report an APETALA2/ethylene-responsive factor (AP2/ERF) transcription factor gene, named pear EARLY BUD-BREAK (PpEBB), which was highly expressed during the rapid enlargement stage occurring prior to the onset of bud break in flower buds. Gene expression analysis revealed that PpEBB expression was dramatically increased during the rapid enlargement stage in three successive growing seasons. PpEBB transcript levels peaked 1 week prior to onset of bud break in 'Kosui' potted plants treated with hydrogen cyanamide or water under forcing conditions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation-quantitative PCR showed that higher levels of active histone modifications (trimethylation of the histone H3 tail at Lys4) in the 5'-upstream and start codon regions of the PpEBB gene were associated with the induced expression level of PpEBB during the rapid enlargement stage. In addition, we provide evidence that PpEBB may interact with and regulate pear four D-type cyclin (PpCYCD3) genes during bud break in 'Kosui' lateral flower buds. PpEBB significantly increased the promoter activities of four PpCYCD3 genes in a dual-luciferase assay using tobacco leaves. Taken together, our findings uncovered aspects of the bud break regulatory mechanism in the Japanese pear and provided further evidence that the EBB family plays an important role in bud break in perennial plants. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Linking PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR to Histone Modification in Plant Shade Avoidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Maolin; Li, Zepeng; Zhou, Nana; Ma, Mengmeng; Jiang, Yupei; Dong, Aiwu; Shen, Wen-Hui; Li, Lin

    2018-02-01

    Shade avoidance syndrome (SAS) allows a plant grown in a densely populated environment to maximize opportunities to access to sunlight. Although it is well established that SAS is accompanied by gene expression changes, the underlying molecular mechanism needs to be elucidated. Here, we identify the H3K4me3/H3K36me3-binding proteins, Morf Related Gene (MRG) group proteins MRG1 and MRG2, as positive regulators of shade-induced hypocotyl elongation in Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ). MRG2 binds PHYTOCHROME-INTERACTING FACTOR7 (PIF7) and regulates the expression of several common downstream target genes, including YUCCA8 and IAA19 involved in the auxin biosynthesis or response pathway and PRE1 involved in brassinosteroid regulation of cell elongation. In response to shade, PIF7 and MRG2 are enriched at the promoter and gene-body regions and are necessary for increase of histone H4 and H3 acetylation to promote target gene expression. Our study uncovers a mechanism in which the shade-responsive factor PIF7 recruits MRG1/MRG2 that binds H3K4me3/H3K36me3 and brings histone-acetylases to induce histone acetylations to promote expression of shade responsive genes, providing thus a molecular mechanistic link coupling the environmental light to epigenetic modification in regulation of hypocotyl elongation in plant SAS. © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Responsiveness of genes to manipulation of transcription factors in ES cells is associated with histone modifications and tissue specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Marshall

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In addition to determining static states of gene expression (high vs. low, it is important to characterize their dynamic status. For example, genes with H3K27me3 chromatin marks are not only suppressed but also poised for activation. However, the responsiveness of genes to perturbations has never been studied systematically. To distinguish gene responses to specific factors from responsiveness in general, it is necessary to analyze gene expression profiles of cells responding to a large variety of disturbances, and such databases did not exist before. Results We estimated the responsiveness of all genes in mouse ES cells using our recently published database on expression change after controlled induction of 53 transcription factors (TFs and other genes. Responsive genes (N = 4746, which were readily upregulated or downregulated depending on the kind of perturbation, mostly have regulatory functions and a propensity to become tissue-specific upon differentiation. Tissue-specific expression was evaluated on the basis of published (GNF and our new data for 15 organs and tissues. Non-responsive genes (N = 9562, which did not change their expression much following any perturbation, were enriched in housekeeping functions. We found that TF-responsiveness in ES cells is the best predictor known for tissue-specificity in gene expression. Among genes with CpG islands, high responsiveness is associated with H3K27me3 chromatin marks, and low responsiveness is associated with H3K36me3 chromatin, stronger tri-methylation of H3K4, binding of E2F1, and GABP binding motifs in promoters. Conclusions We thus propose the responsiveness of expression to perturbations as a new way to define the dynamic status of genes, which brings new insights into mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and tissue specificity.

  10. Recent relaxation of purifying selection on the tandem-repetitive early-stage histone H3 gene in brooding sea stars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foltz, David W; Mah, Christopher L

    2009-06-01

    Patterns of nucleotide substitution differ between marine species that have a pelagic feeding (planktotrophic) larval stage and related species that lack such a stage, for both adaptive and non-adaptive reasons. Here, patterns of nucleotide and inferred amino acid substitution are analyzed for the tandem-repetitive early-stage histone H3 gene in 36 sea star species of the order Forcipulatida with documented larval habitat. The relative rate of nonsynonymous substitution (expressed as ω=d(N)/d(S)) was significantly higher in lineages with a brooded non-feeding (lecithotrophic) larval form than in lineages with a planktotrophic larval form. There was also a significant excess of conservative over radical substitutions. The increase in ω for brooders as compared to non-brooders was much greater than for previously analyzed mitochondrial sequences in echinoderms. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that purifying selection on this gene has been relaxed in brooding lineages compared to non-brooding lineages. The hypotheses of adaptive or neutral evolution are less plausible, although recent pseudogenization following a period of relaxed purifying selection could also explain the results.

  11. Histone modifications in response to DNA damage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altaf, Mohammed; Saksouk, Nehme; Cote, Jacques

    2007-01-01

    The packaging of the eukaryotic genome into highly condensed chromatin makes it inaccessible to the factors required for gene transcription, DNA replication, recombination and repair. Eukaryotes have developed intricate mechanisms to overcome this repressive barrier imposed by chromatin. Histone modifying enzymes and ATP-dependent chromatin remodeling complexes play key roles here as they regulate many nuclear processes by altering the chromatin structure. Significantly, these activities are integral to the process of DNA repair where histone modifications act as signals and landing platforms for various repair proteins. This review summarizes the recent developments in our understanding of histone modifications and their role in the maintenance of genome integrity

  12. Dynamics of Histone Tails within Chromatin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernier, Morgan; North, Justin; Page, Michael; Jaroniec, Christopher; Hammel, Christopher; Poirier, Michael

    2012-02-01

    Genetic information in humans is encoded within DNA molecules that is wrapped around histone octamer proteins and compacted into a highly conserved structural polymer, chromatin. The physical and material properties of chromatin appear to influence gene expression by altering the accessibility of proteins to the DNA. The tails of the histones are flexible domains that are thought to play a role in regulating DNA accessibility and compaction; however the molecular mechanisms for these phenomena are not understood. I will present CW-EPR studies on site directed spin labeled nucleosomes that probe the structure and dynamics of these histone tails within nucleosomes.

  13. Allelic variation and differential expression of the mSIN3A histone deacetylase complex gene Arid4b promote mammary tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott F Winter

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence suggests that breast cancer metastatic progression is modified by germline polymorphism, although specific modifier genes have remained largely undefined. In the current study, we employ the MMTV-PyMT transgenic mouse model and the AKXD panel of recombinant inbred mice to identify AT-rich interactive domain 4B (Arid4b; NM_194262 as a breast cancer progression modifier gene. Ectopic expression of Arid4b promoted primary tumor growth in vivo as well as increased migration and invasion in vitro, and the phenotype was associated with polymorphisms identified between the AKR/J and DBA/2J alleles as predicted by our genetic analyses. Stable shRNA-mediated knockdown of Arid4b caused a significant reduction in pulmonary metastases, validating a role for Arid4b as a metastasis modifier gene. ARID4B physically interacts with the breast cancer metastasis suppressor BRMS1, and we detected differential binding of the Arid4b alleles to histone deacetylase complex members mSIN3A and mSDS3, suggesting that the mechanism of Arid4b action likely involves interactions with chromatin modifying complexes. Downregulation of the conserved Tpx2 gene network, which is comprised of many factors regulating cell cycle and mitotic spindle biology, was observed concomitant with loss of metastatic efficiency in Arid4b knockdown cells. Consistent with our genetic analysis and in vivo experiments in our mouse model system, ARID4B expression was also an independent predictor of distant metastasis-free survival in breast cancer patients with ER+ tumors. These studies support a causative role of ARID4B in metastatic progression of breast cancer.

  14. Menin and RNF20 recruitment is associated with dynamic histone modifications that regulate signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1-activated transcription of the interferon regulatory factor 1 gene (IRF1

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    Buro Lauren J

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT activation of gene expression is both rapid and transient, and when properly executed it affects growth, differentiation, homeostasis and the immune response, but when dysregulated it contributes to human disease. Transcriptional activation is regulated by alterations to the chromatin template. However, the role of histone modification at gene loci that are activated for transcription in response to STAT signaling is poorly defined. Results Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we profiled several histone modifications during STAT1 activation of the interferon regulatory factor 1 gene (IRF1. Methylated lysine histone proteins H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K79me3, H3K36me3 and monoubiquitinated histone ubH2B are dynamic and correlate with interferon (IFNγ induction of STAT1 activity. Chemical inhibition of H3K4 methylation downregulates IRF1 transcription and decreases RNA polymerase II (Pol II occupancy at the IRF1 promoter. MEN1, a component of a complex proteins associated with Set1 (COMPASS-like complex and the hBRE1 component, RNF20, are localized to IRF1 in the uninduced state and are further recruited when IRF1 is activated. RNAi-mediated depletion of RNF20 lowers both ubH2B and H3K4me3, but surprisingly, upregulates IFNγ induced IRF1 transcription. The dynamics of phosphorylation in the C-terminal domain (CTD of Pol II are disrupted during gene activation as well. Conclusions H2B monoubiquitination promotes H3K4 methylation, but the E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF20, is repressive of inducible transcription at the IRF1 gene locus, suggesting that ubH2B can, directly or indirectly, affect Pol II CTD phosphorylation cycling to exert control on ongoing transcription.

  15. Replicating chromatin: a tale of histones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Groth, Anja

    2009-01-01

    framework of chromatin and carry information to specify higher-order organization and gene expression. When replication forks traverse the chromosomes, nucleosomes are transiently disrupted, allowing the replication machinery to gain access to DNA. Histone recycling, together with new deposition, ensures...... reassembly on nascent DNA strands. The aim of this review is to discuss how histones - new and old - are handled at the replication fork, highlighting new mechanistic insights and revisiting old paradigms....

  16. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith-Magenis syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falco, Mariateresa; Amabile, Sonia; Acquaviva, Fabio

    2017-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290) is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene ( RAI1 ), or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642) is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models) acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1 , its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path for therapeutic interventions.

  17. Sjogren Syndrome-Gene Therapy and its Prospective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Rahpeyma

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available Sjogren syndrome is one of the autoimmune diseases which is characterized by lymphocytic infiltration to exocrine glands and causes keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. Today, a large population, with a majority of women over 40, suffer from this disease and have several complications regarding oral health and reduced life quality such as severe dental caries, painful eyes, olfactory and gustatory deficiency, speech, mastication and swallowing discomforts. Unfortunately, these patients do not respond to the conventional therapies. Nowadays in medical world, which its target is basic therapy and not symptomatic one, several gene therapy approaches, have gained importance in treatment of this apparently incurable diseases. Due to the facts that this disease is the second prevelant autoimmune disease, after rheumatoid arthritis, and the conventional therapies of the disease are all relative and symptomatic, researchers have insisted on the basic and causative therapy through gene transfer more than before. In the Present article, through reviewing 58 references containing recent scientific and investigatory findings it has been tried, to consider the pathogenesis and conventional therapies of this syndrome. Another purpose of this study was to investigate several and potentially very effective gene transfer systems and different theraputic genes (mainly membrane water channels, ione transporter molecules, transcription factors, antifungal proteins and free radical scavengers.

  18. The evolution of the histone methyltransferase gene Su(var3-9 in metazoans includes a fusion with and a re-fission from a functionally unrelated gene

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    Patties Ina

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotes, histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9 methylation is a common mechanism involved in gene silencing and the establishment of heterochromatin. The loci of the major heterochromatic H3K9 methyltransferase Su(var3-9 and the functionally unrelated γ subunit of the translation initiation factor eIF2 are fused in Drosophila melanogaster. Here we examined the phylogenetic distribution of this unusual gene fusion and the molecular evolution of the H3K9 HMTase Su(var3-9. Results We show that the gene fusion had taken place in the ancestral line of winged insects and silverfishs (Dicondylia about 400 million years ago. We cloned Su(var3-9 genes from a collembolan and a spider where both genes ancestrally exist as independent transcription units. In contrast, we found a Su(var3-9-specific exon inside the conserved intron position 81-1 of the eIF2γ gene structure in species of eight different insect orders. Intriguinly, in the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum, we detected only sequence remains of this Su(var3-9 exon in the eIF2γ intron, along with an eIF2γ-independent Su(var3-9 gene. This reveals an evolutionary re-fission of both genes in aphids. Su(var3-9 chromo domains are similar to HP1 chromo domains, which points to a potential binding activity to methylated K9 of histone H3. SET domain comparisons suggest a weaker methyltransferase activity of Su(var3-9 in comparison to other H3K9 HMTases. Astonishingly, 11 of 19 previously described, deleterious amino acid substitutions found in Drosophila Su(var3-9 are seemingly compensable through accompanying substitutions during evolution. Conclusion Examination of the Su(var3-9 evolution revealed strong evidence for the establishment of the Su(var3-9/eIF2γ gene fusion in an ancestor of dicondylic insects and a re-fission of this fusion during the evolution of aphids. Our comparison of 65 selected chromo domains and 93 selected SET domains from Su(var3-9 and related proteins offers

  19. RAI1 gene mutations: mechanisms of Smith–Magenis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falco M

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mariateresa Falco,1,* Sonia Amabile,1,* Fabio Acquaviva2 1Department of Molecular Medicine and Medical Biotechnology, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy; 2Department of Translational Medical Sciences (DISMET, Section of Pediatric Clinical Genetics, University of Naples “Federico II”, Naples, Italy *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Smith–Magenis syndrome (SMS; OMIM #182290 is a complex genetic disorder characterized by distinctive physical features, developmental delay, cognitive impairment, and a typical behavioral phenotype. SMS is caused by interstitial 17p11.2 deletions, encompassing multiple genes and including the retinoic acid-induced 1 gene (RAI1, or by mutations in RAI1 itself. About 10% of all the SMS patients, in fact, carry an RAI1 mutation responsible for the phenotype. RAI1 (OMIM *607642 is a dosage-sensitive gene expressed in many tissues and highly conserved among species. Over the years, several studies have demonstrated that RAI1 (or its homologs in animal models acts as a transcriptional factor implicated in embryonic neurodevelopment, neuronal differentiation, cell growth and cell cycle regulation, bone and skeletal development, lipid and glucose metabolisms, behavioral functions, and circadian activity. Patients with RAI1 pathogenic variants show some phenotypic differences when compared to those carrying the typical deletion. They usually have lower incidence of hypotonia and less cognitive impairment than those with 17p11.2 deletions but more frequently show the behavioral characteristics of the syndrome and overeating issues. These differences reflect the primary pathogenetic role of RAI1 without the pathogenetic contribution of the other genes included in the typical 17p11.2 deletion. The better comprehension of physiological roles of RAI1, its molecular co-workers and interactors, and its contribution in determining the typical SMS phenotype will certainly open a new path

  20. Marfan Syndrome and Related Disorders: 25 Years of Gene Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Aline; Alaerts, Maaike; Van Laer, Lut; Loeys, Bart

    2016-06-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is a rare, autosomal-dominant, multisystem disorder, presenting with skeletal, ocular, skin, and cardiovascular symptoms. Significant clinical overlap with other systemic connective tissue diseases, including Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS), Shprintzen-Goldberg syndrome (SGS), and the MASS phenotype, has been documented. In MFS and LDS, the cardiovascular manifestations account for the major cause of patient morbidity and mortality, rendering them the main target for therapeutic intervention. Over the past decades, gene identification studies confidently linked the aforementioned syndromes, as well as nonsyndromic aneurysmal disease, to genetic defects in proteins related to the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β pathway, greatly expanding our knowledge on the disease mechanisms and providing us with novel therapeutic targets. As a result, the focus of the developing pharmacological treatment strategies is shifting from hemodynamic stress management to TGF-β antagonism. In this review, we discuss the insights that have been gained in the molecular biology of MFS and related disorders over the past 25 years. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  1. Nalmefene is effective at reducing alcohol seeking, treating alcohol-cocaine interactions and reducing alcohol-induced histone deacetylases gene expression in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calleja-Conde, Javier; Echeverry-Alzate, Victor; Giné, Elena; Bühler, Kora-Mareen; Nadal, Roser; Maldonado, Rafael; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Gual, Antoni; López-Moreno, Jose Antonio

    2016-08-01

    The opioid antagonist nalmefene (selincro®) was approved for alcohol-related disorders by the European Medicines Agency in 2013. However, there have been no studies regarding the effectiveness of nalmefene when alcohol is used in combination with cocaine. Using operant alcohol self-administration in Wistar rats and qRT-PCR, we evaluated (i) the dose-response curve for s.c. and p.o. nalmefene; (ii) the effects of nalmefene with increasing concentrations of alcohol; (iii) the efficacy of nalmefene on cocaine-potentiated alcohol responding; and (iv) the gene expression profiles of histone deacetylases (Hdac1-11) in peripheral blood in vivo and in the prefrontal cortex, heart, liver and kidney post mortem. S.c. (0.01, 0.05, 0.1 mg·kg(-1) ) and p.o. (10, 20, 40 mg·kg(-1) ) nalmefene dose-dependently reduced alcohol-reinforced responding by up to 50.3%. This effect of nalmefene was not dependent on alcohol concentration (10, 15, 20%). Cocaine potentiated alcohol responding by approximately 40% and nalmefene (0.05 mg·kg(-1) ) reversed this effect of cocaine. Alcohol increased Hdac gene expression in blood and nalmefene prevented the increases in Hdacs 3, 8, 5, 7, 9, 6 and 10. In the other tissues, alcohol and nalmefene either did not alter the gene expression of Hdacs, as in the prefrontal cortex, or a tissue-Hdac-specific effect was observed. Nalmefene might be effective as a treatment for alcohol-dependent patients who also use cocaine. Also, the expression of Hdacs in peripheral blood might be useful as a biomarker of alcohol use and drug response. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  2. The decrease in histone methyltransferase EZH2 in response to fluid shear stress alters endothelial gene expression and promotes quiescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleszewska, Monika; Vanchin, Byambasuren; Harmsen, Martin C; Krenning, Guido

    2016-01-01

    High uniform fluid shear stress (FSS) is atheroprotective and preserves the endothelial phenotype and function through activation of downstream mediators such as MAPK7 (Erk5). Endothelial cells respond to FSS thanks to mechanotransduction. However, how the resulting signaling is integrated and resolved at the epigenetic level remains elusive. We hypothesized that Polycomb methyltransferase EZH2 is involved in the effects of FSS in human endothelial cells. We showed that FSS decreases the expression of the Polycomb methyltransferase EZH2. Despite simultaneous activation of MAPK7, MAPK7 pathway does not directly influence the transcription of EZH2. Interestingly though, the knockdown of EZH2 activates the protective MAPK7 signaling in endothelial cells, even in the absence of FSS. To understand the influence of the FSS-decreased expression of EZH2 on endothelial transcriptome, we performed RNA-seq and differential gene expression analysis. We identified candidate groups of genes dependent on both EZH2 and FSS. Among those, Gene Ontology overrepresentation analysis revealed highly significant enrichment of the cell cycle-related genes, suggesting changes in proliferation. Indeed, the depletion of EZH2 strongly inhibited endothelial proliferation, indicating cell cycle arrest. The concomitant decrease in CCNA expression suggests the transition of endothelial cells into a quiescent phenotype. Further bioinformatical analysis suggested TXNIP as a possible mediator between EZH2 and cell cycle-related gene network. Our data show that EZH2 is a FSS-responsive gene. Decreased EZH2 levels enhance the activation of the atheroprotective MAPK7 signaling. Decrease in EZH2 under FSS mediates the decrease in the expression of the network of cell cycle-related genes, which allows the cells to enter quiescence. EZH2 is therefore important for the protective effects of FSS in endothelium.

  3. Triple A syndrome: two novel mutations in the AAAS gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thümmler, Susanne; Huebner, Angela; Baechler-Sadoul, Elisabeth

    2009-01-01

    Triple A syndrome is a rare disease of autosomal recessive inheritance. It was first described in 1978. The typical triad includes adrenocorticotrophic-hormone-resistant glucocorticoid insufficiency, reduced or absent tearing (alacrima) and achalasia. But clinical symptoms can be extremely heterogeneous and of variable clinically expression. This report describes a 7-year-old boy with a 1 year history of fatigue and muscle weakness. Physical examination showed skin and mucosal hyperpigmentation, and hormonal analysis revealed isolated glucocorticoid function. Medical history was marked by megaoesophagus and achalasia. The absence of tears when crying had been noted since birth. In the presence of the classical triad, triple A syndrome was diagnosed. Clinical diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis of the AAAS gene on chromosome 12q13. The novel compound heterozygous mutation c.1304delA and c.1292-1294delTTCinsA was found.

  4. Arabidopsis histone demethylases LDL1 and LDL2 control primary seed dormancy by regulating DELAY OF GERMINATION 1 and ABA signaling-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Minglei; Yang, Songguang; Liu, Xuncheng; Wu, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    Seed dormancy controls germination and plays a critical role in regulating the beginning of the life cycle of plants. Seed dormancy is established and maintained during seed maturation and is gradually broken during dry storage (after-ripening). The plant hormone abscisic acid (ABA) and DELAY OF GERMINATION1 (DOG1) protein are essential regulators of seed dormancy. Recent studies revealed that chromatin modifications are also involved in the transcription regulation of seed dormancy. Here, we showed that two Arabidopsis histone demethylases, LYSINESPECIFIC DEMETHYLASE LIKE 1 and 2 (LDL1 and LDL2) act redundantly in repressing of seed dormancy. LDL1 and LDL2 are highly expressed in the early silique developing stage. The ldl1 ldl2 double mutant displays increased seed dormancy, whereas overexpression of LDL1 or LDL2 in Arabidopsis causes reduced dormancy. Furthermore, we showed that LDL1 and LDL2 repress the expression of seed dormancy-related genes, including DOG1, ABA2 and ABI3 during seed dormancy establishment. Furthermore, genetic analysis revealed that the repression of seed dormancy by LDL1 and LDL2 requires DOG1, ABA2, and ABI3. Taken together, our findings revealed that LDL1 and LDL2 play an essential role in seed dormancy.

  5. USP44 Is an Integral Component of N-CoR that Contributes to Gene Repression by Deubiquitinating Histone H2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Xianjiang; Atanassov, Boyko S; Li, Wenqian; Zhang, Ying; Florens, Laurence; Mohan, Ryan D; Galardy, Paul J; Washburn, Michael P; Workman, Jerry L; Dent, Sharon Y R

    2016-11-22

    Decreased expression of the USP44 deubiquitinase has been associated with global increases in H2Bub1 levels during mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation. However, whether USP44 directly deubiquitinates histone H2B or how its activity is targeted to chromatin is not known. We identified USP44 as an integral subunit of the nuclear receptor co-repressor (N-CoR) complex. USP44 within N-CoR deubiquitinates H2B in vitro and in vivo, and ablation of USP44 impairs the repressive activity of the N-CoR complex. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments confirmed that USP44 recruitment reduces H2Bub1 levels at N-CoR target loci. Furthermore, high expression of USP44 correlates with reduced levels of H2Bub1 in the breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Depletion of either USP44 or TBL1XR1 impairs the invasiveness of MDA-MB-231 cells in vitro and causes an increase of global H2Bub1 levels. Our findings indicate that USP44 contributes to N-CoR functions in regulating gene expression and is required for efficient invasiveness of triple-negative breast cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Open and closed: the roles of linker histones in plants and animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Over, Ryan S; Michaels, Scott D

    2014-03-01

    Histones package DNA in all eukaryotes and play key roles in regulating gene expression. Approximately 150 base pairs of DNA wraps around an octamer of core histones to form the nucleosome, the basic unit of chromatin. Linker histones compact chromatin further by binding to and neutralizing the charge of the DNA between nucleosomes. It is well established that chromatin packing is regulated by a complex pattern of posttranslational modifications (PTMs) to core histones, but linker histone function is less well understood. In this review, we describe the current understanding of the many roles that linker histones play in cellular processes, including gene regulation, cell division, and development, while putting the linker histone in the context of other nuclear proteins. Although intriguing roles for plant linker histones are beginning to emerge, much of our current understanding comes from work in animal systems. Many unanswered questions remain and additional work is required to fully elucidate the complex processes mediated by linker histones in plants.

  7. The histone methyltransferases Set5 and Set1 have overlapping functions in gene silencing and telomere maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jezek, Meagan; Gast, Alison; Choi, Grace; Kulkarni, Rushmie; Quijote, Jeremiah; Graham-Yooll, Andrew; Park, DoHwan; Green, Erin M

    2017-02-01

    Genes adjacent to telomeres are subject to transcriptional repression mediated by an integrated set of chromatin modifying and remodeling factors. The telomeres of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have served as a model for dissecting the function of diverse chromatin proteins in gene silencing, and their study has revealed overlapping roles for many chromatin proteins in either promoting or antagonizing gene repression. The H3K4 methyltransferase Set1, which is commonly linked to transcriptional activation, has been implicated in telomere silencing. Set5 is an H4 K5, K8, and K12 methyltransferase that functions with Set1 to promote repression at telomeres. Here, we analyzed the combined role for Set1 and Set5 in gene expression control at native yeast telomeres. Our data reveal that Set1 and Set5 promote a Sir protein-independent mechanism of repression that may primarily rely on regulation of H4K5ac and H4K8ac at telomeric regions. Furthermore, cells lacking both Set1 and Set5 have highly correlated transcriptomes to mutants in telomere maintenance pathways and display defects in telomere stability, linking their roles in silencing to protection of telomeres. Our data therefore provide insight into and clarify potential mechanisms by which Set1 contributes to telomere silencing and shed light on the function of Set5 at telomeres.

  8. Atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome associated with a hybrid complement gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian P Venables

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sequence analysis of the regulators of complement activation (RCA cluster of genes at chromosome position 1q32 shows evidence of several large genomic duplications. These duplications have resulted in a high degree of sequence identity between the gene for factor H (CFH and the genes for the five factor H-related proteins (CFHL1-5; aliases CFHR1-5. CFH mutations have been described in association with atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome (aHUS. The majority of the mutations are missense changes that cluster in the C-terminal region and impair the ability of factor H to regulate surface-bound C3b. Some have arisen as a result of gene conversion between CFH and CFHL1. In this study we tested the hypothesis that nonallelic homologous recombination between low-copy repeats in the RCA cluster could result in the formation of a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene that predisposes to the development of aHUS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In a family with many cases of aHUS that segregate with the RCA cluster we used cDNA analysis, gene sequencing, and Southern blotting to show that affected individuals carry a heterozygous CFH/CFHL1 hybrid gene in which exons 1-21 are derived from CFH and exons 22/23 from CFHL1. This hybrid encodes a protein product identical to a functionally significant CFH mutant (c.3572C>T, S1191L and c.3590T>C, V1197A that has been previously described in association with aHUS. CONCLUSIONS: CFH mutation screening is recommended in all aHUS patients prior to renal transplantation because of the high risk of disease recurrence post-transplant in those known to have a CFH mutation. Because of our finding it will be necessary to implement additional screening strategies that will detect a hybrid CFH/CFHL1 gene.

  9. Histone Lysine Methylation in Diabetic Nephropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang-dong Sun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic nephropathy (DN belongs to debilitating microvascular complications of diabetes and is the leading cause of end-stage renal diseases worldwide. Furthermore, outcomes from the DCCT/EDIC study showed that DN often persists and progresses despite intensive glucose control in many diabetes patients, possibly as a result of prior episode of hyperglycemia, which is called “metabolic memory.” The underlying mechanisms responsible for the development and progression of DN remain poorly understood. Activation of multiple signaling pathways and key transcription factors can lead to aberrant expression of DN-related pathologic genes in target renal cells. Increasing evidence suggests that epigenetic mechanisms in chromatin such as DNA methylation, histone acetylation, and methylation can influence the pathophysiology of DN and metabolic memory. Exciting researches from cell culture and experimental animals have shown that key histone methylation patterns and the related histone methyltransferases and histone demethylases can play important roles in the regulation of inflammatory and profibrotic genes in renal cells under diabetic conditions. Because histone methylation is dynamic and potentially reversible, it can provide a window of opportunity for the development of much-needed novel therapeutic potential for DN in the future. In this minireview, we discuss recent advances in the field of histone methylation and its roles in the pathogenesis and progression of DN.

  10. [Antiapoptotic gene bcl-2 prevents cellular senescence program reactivation induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate in E1A and cHa-ras transformed rat fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordeev, S A; Bykova, T V; Zubova, S G; Aksenov, N D; Pospelova, T V

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the role of apoptosis resistance gene bcl-2 in the activation of cellular senescence program induced by histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) sodium butyrate (NaBut) in transformed rat fibroblasts. This study was conducted in a resistant to apoptosis induction cell line of rat embryo fibroblasts transfor- med by oncogenes E1A, cHa-ras and bcl-2 (ERasBcl). The parent cell line transformed with only EJA and cHa-ras (ERas) was used as a control. It has been found that NaBut reduces proliferation rate of ERasBcl cells significantly weaker than of ERas transformed cells, despite the fact that the G1 cell cycle arrest was observed in both cell lines. After NaBut treatment, hypertrophy of the apoptosis resistant transformants ERasBcl also was reduced compared to parent cell line ERas, due to less activation of mTORC1, which is known to control the synthesis of protein and ribosome biogenesis. The degree of mTORC1 activation was as.sessed by its target proteins phosphorylation: the ribosomal S6 protein and 4E-BP1--inhibitor of translation initiation factor eIF4E. Since cell senescence process may be associated with changes in autophagy regulation, we analyzed the dynamics of one of the main autophagosome formation markers--protein LC3. The accumulation of lipid-bound form LC3-II changes significantly in ERasBcl cells after NaBut treatment and has transient nature. The set of analyzed cellular senescence markers suggests that a high level of apoptosis resistance gene bcl-2 expression prevents the realization of tumor-suppressor senescence program induced by HDACi sodium butyrate treatment.

  11. Divergence and population traits in evolution of the genus Pisum L. as reconstructed using genes of two histone H1 subtypes showing different phylogenetic resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaytseva, Olga O; Gunbin, Konstantin V; Mglinets, Anatoliy V; Kosterin, Oleg E

    2015-02-10

    Two histone H1 subtype genes, His7 and His5, were sequenced in a set of 56 pea accessions. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on concatenated His5 and His7 sequences had three main clades. First clade corresponded to Pisum fulvum, the next divergence separated a clade inside Pisum sativum in the broad sense that did not correspond strictly to any proposed taxonomical subdivisions. According to our estimations, the earliest divergence separating P. fulvum occurred 1.7±0.4MYA. The other divergence with high bootstrap support that separated two P. sativum groups took place approximately 1.3±0.3MYA. Thus, the main divergences in the genus took place either in late Pliocene or in early Pleistocene, the time of onset of the profound climate cooling in the northern hemisphere. The ω=K(a)/K(s) ratio was 2.5 times higher for His5 sequences than for His7. Thus, His7 gene, coding for a unique subtype specific for actively growing tissues, might have evolved under stricter evolutionary constraints than His5, that codes for a minor H1 subtype with less specific expression pattern. For this reason phylogenetic reconstructions separately obtained from His5 sequences resolved tree topology much better than those obtained from His7 sequences. Computational estimation of population dynamic parameters in the genus Pisum L. from His5-His7 sequences using IMa2 software revealed a decrease of effective population size on the early stage of Pisum evolution. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The RPMI-1640 vitamin mixture promotes bovine blastocyst development in vitro and downregulates gene expression of TXNIP with epigenetic modification of associated histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S; Sugimoto, M; Kume, S

    2018-02-01

    Diverse environmental conditions surrounding preimplantation embryos, including available nutrients, affect their metabolism and development in both short- and long-term manner. Thioredoxin-interacting protein (TXNIP) is a possible marker for preimplantation stress that is implicated in in vitro fertilization- (IVF) induced long-term DOHaD effects. B vitamins, as participants in one-carbon metabolism, may affect preimplantation embryos by epigenetic alterations of metabolically and developmentally important genes. In vitro-produced bovine embryos were cultured with or without Roswell Park Memorial Institute 1640 vitamin mixture, containing B vitamins and B vitamin-like substances, from day 3 after IVF and we evaluated blastocyst development and TXNIP messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in the blastocysts by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The degree of trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3) at TXNIP promoter was examined semi-quantitatively by chromatin immunoprecipitation polymerase chain reaction. Total H3K27me3 were also compared between the groups by Western blot analysis. The vitamin treatment significantly increased the rates of blastocyst development (Pvitamin-mixture-treated group concomitant with higher (Pvitamin-mixture-treated group was also higher (P<0.01) than that in the control group. The epigenetic control of genes related to important metabolic processes during the periconceptional period by nutritional conditions in utero and/or in vitro may have possible implication for the developmental programming during this period that may impact the welfare and production traits of farm animals.

  13. No germline mutations in the histone acetyltransferase gene EP300 in BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative families with breast cancer and gastric, pancreatic, or colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, Ian G; Choong, David; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in BRCA1, BRCA2, ATM, TP53, CHK2 and PTEN account for many, but not all, multiple-case breast and ovarian cancer families. The histone acetyltransferase gene EP300 may function as a tumour suppressor gene because it is sometimes somatically mutated in breast, colorectal, gastric and pancreatic cancers, and is located on a region of chromosome 22 that frequently undergoes loss of heterozygosity in many cancer types. We hypothesized that germline mutations in EP300 may account for some breast cancer families that include cases of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer. We screened the entire coding region of EP300 for mutations in the youngest affected members of 23 non-BRCA1/BRCA2 breast cancer families with at least one confirmed case of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer. These families were ascertained in Australia through the Kathleen Cuningham Foundation Consortium for Research into Familial Breast Cancer. Denaturing HPLC analysis identified a heterozygous alteration at codon 211, specifically a GGC to AGC (glycine to serine) alteration, in two individuals. This conservative amino acid change was not within any known functional domains of EP300. The frequency of the Ser211 variant did not differ significanlty between a series of 352 breast cancer patients (4.0%) and 254 control individuals (2.8%; P = 0.5). The present study does not support a major role for EP300 mutations in breast and ovarian cancer families with a history of gastric, pancreatic and/or colorectal cancer

  14. Histone deacetylases and their roles in mineralized tissue regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nam Cong-Nhat Huynh

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Histone acetylation is an important epigenetic mechanism that controls expression of certain genes. It includes non-sequence-based changes of chromosomal regional structure that can alter the expression of genes. Acetylation of histones is controlled by the activity of two groups of enzymes: the histone acetyltransferases (HATs and histone deacetylases (HDACs. HDACs remove acetyl groups from the histone tail, which alters its charge and thus promotes compaction of DNA in the nucleosome. HDACs render the chromatin structure into a more compact form of heterochromatin, which makes the genes inaccessible for transcription. By altering the transcriptional activity of bone-associated genes, HDACs control both osteogenesis and osteoclastogenesis. This review presents an overview of the function of HDACs in the modulation of bone formation. Special attention is paid to the use of HDAC inhibitors in mineralized tissue regeneration from cells of dental origin.

  15. Histone variants and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borghesan, Michela; Mazzoccoli, Gianluigi; Sheedfar, Fareeba; Oben, Jude; Pazienza, Valerio; Vinciguerra, Manlio

    2014-01-01

    Within nucleosomes, canonical histones package the genome, but they can be opportunely replaced with histone variants. The incorporation of histone variants into the nucleosome is a chief cellular strategy to regulate transcription and cellular metabolism. In pathological terms, cellular steatosis

  16. Temperature Shift Alters DNA Methylation and Histone Modification Patterns in Gonadal Aromatase (cyp19a1 Gene in Species with Temperature-Dependent Sex Determination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuiko Matsumoto

    Full Text Available The environment surrounding the embryos has a profound impact on the developmental process and phenotypic outcomes of the organism. In species with temperature-dependent sex determination, gonadal sex is determined by the incubation temperature of the eggs. A mechanistic link between temperature and transcriptional regulation of developmental genes, however, remains elusive. In this study, we examine the changes in DNA methylation and histone modification patterns of the aromatase (cyp19a1 gene in embryonic gonads of red-eared slider turtles (Trachemys scripta subjected to a temperature shift during development. Shifting embryos from a male-producing temperature (MPT to a female-producing temperature (FPT at the beginning of the temperature-sensitive period (TSP resulted in an increase in aromatase mRNA expression while a shift from FPT to MPT resulted in decreased expression. DNA methylation levels at CpG sites in the promoter of the aromatase gene were high (70-90% at the beginning of TSP, but decreased in embryos that were incubated at constant FPT and those shifted from MPT to the FPT. This decrease in methylation in the promoter inversely correlated with the expected increase in aromatase expression at the FPT. The active demethylation under the FPT was especially prominent at the CpG site upstream of the gonad-specific TATA box at the beginning of TSP and spread downstream of the gene including exon1 as the gonad development progressed. In embryos incubated at FPT, the promoter region was also labeled by canonical transcriptional activation markers, H3K4me3 and RNA polymerase II. A transcriptional repression marker, H3K27me3, was observed in temperature-shifted gonads of both temperature groups, but was not maintained throughout the development in either group. Our findings suggest that DNA hypomethylation and H3K4me3 modification at the aromatase promoter may be a primary mechanism that releases a transcriptional block of aromatase to

  17. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene polymorphisms in Egyptian Turner Syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Manal F; Zarouk, Waheba A; Ruby, Mona O; Mahmoud, Wael M; Gad, Randa S

    2015-01-01

    Folate metabolism dysfunctions can result in DNA hypomethylation and abnormal chromosome segregation. Two common polymorphisms of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) encoding gene (C677T and A1298C) reduce MTHFR activity, but when associated with aneuploidy, the results are conflicting. Turner Syndrome (TS) is an interesting model for investigating the association between MTHFR gene polymorphisms and nondisjunction because of the high frequency of chromosomal mosaicism in this syndrome. To investigate the association of MTHFR gene C677T and A1298C polymorphisms in TS patients and their mothers and to correlate these polymorphisms with maternal risk of TS offspring. MTHFR C677T and A1298C polymorphisms were genotyped in 33 TS patients, their mothers and 15 healthy females with their mothers as controls using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and sequencing technique. Genotype and allele frequencies of both C677T and A1298C were not significantly different between TS cases and controls. There were no significant differences in C677T genotype distribution between the TS mothers and controls (p=1). The MTHFR 1298AA and 1298AC genotypes were significantly increased in TS mothers Vs. control mothers (p=0.002). The C allele frequency of the A1298C polymorphism was significantly different between the TS mothers and controls (p=0.02). The association of A1298C gene polymorphism in TS patients was found to increase with increasing age of both mothers (p=0.026) and fathers (p=0.044) of TS cases. Our findings suggest a strong association between maternal MTHFR A1298C and risk of TS in Egypt.

  18. Paraoxnase1 Gene Polymorphism in Childhood Idiopathic Nephrotic Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Eisa, Amal A; Sukumaran, Vazhappilly J; Haider, Mohammad Z

    2016-01-01

    Paraoxonase1 (PON1) is a serum enzyme bound to high-density lipoproteins with antioxidant properties. Molecular studies of PON1 revealed 2 polymorphic sites at amino acids 55 and 192 resulting in 2 different allozymes, the L and M-genotype at residue 55 and A and B at site 192, respectively. We have studied the association between PON1 gene polymorphisms and the minimal change nephrotic syndrome/focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (MCNS/FSGS) types of idiopathic nephrotic syndrome (INS) in Kuwaiti Arab children. The PON1 gene, 55 and 192 polymorphisms were analyzed in 50 children with INS (32 MSCN, 18 FSGS) and compared to 50 controls. Serum creatinine, albumin and lipids were measured in all subjects. The LL genotype was detected in 50% of the INS patients compared to 48% of controls (p = 0.84). The heterozygous LM genotype was detected in 42% of INS patients compared 36% of controls (p = 0.68). The MM-genotype was detected in 8% of INS patients and 16% of controls (p = 0.35). The L-allele frequency in its homozygous and heterozygous forms was found in 71% of INS patients compared to 66% controls (p = 0.54). The L-allele frequency (LM and LL) was significantly higher in FSGS compared to MCNS patients (p = 0.0001) and when compared to controls (p = 0.0007). All patients and controls had the AA form of the 192 PON1 gene polymorphism. Our data demonstrate a strong association between the L-allele of PON1 gene 55 polymorphism with FSGS in Kuwaiti Arab children with INS. PON1 genotyping can help in the early prediction of FSGS, which might guide clinicians to a better therapeutic approach. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. A PHD in histone language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrika, Nulu Naga Prafulla; Sundaravelpandian, Kalaipandian; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2013-01-01

    Post-translational modifications of core histones are important for various DNA-templated processes such as transcription and repair. We recently reported that the ALFIN LIKE 6 (AL6) gene, identified in a forward genetic screen, is critical for phosphate deficiency-induced root hair formation and several other processes associated with the regulation of cellular phosphate homeostasis. AL6 contains a Plant Homeo Domain (PHD) finger that can bind to trimethylated lysine 4 of histone H3 (H3K4me3). Homozygous mutants defective in AL6 expression form very short root hairs under phosphate-deficient conditions, presumably caused by altered expression of putative primary and secondary down-stream targets of AL6. In this Addendum, we speculate about possible roles of AL6, H3K4 trimethylation and other chromatin modifications in the adaptation of plants to low phosphate availability. PMID:23531693

  20. Replication-uncoupled histone deposition during adenovirus DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Tetsuro; Nagata, Kyosuke

    2012-06-01

    In infected cells, the chromatin structure of the adenovirus genome DNA plays critical roles in its genome functions. Previously, we reported that in early phases of infection, incoming viral DNA is associated with both viral core protein VII and cellular histones. Here we show that in late phases of infection, newly synthesized viral DNA is also associated with histones. We also found that the knockdown of CAF-1, a histone chaperone that functions in the replication-coupled deposition of histones, does not affect the level of histone H3 bound on viral chromatin, although CAF-1 is accumulated at viral DNA replication foci together with PCNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using epitope-tagged histone H3 demonstrated that histone variant H3.3, which is deposited onto the cellular genome in a replication-independent manner, is selectively associated with both incoming and newly synthesized viral DNAs. Microscopic analyses indicated that histones but not USF1, a transcription factor that regulates viral late gene expression, are excluded from viral DNA replication foci and that this is achieved by the oligomerization of the DNA binding protein (DBP). Taken together, these results suggest that histone deposition onto newly synthesized viral DNA is most likely uncoupled with viral DNA replication, and a possible role of DBP oligomerization in this replication-uncoupled histone deposition is discussed.

  1. Rapid divergence of histones in Hydrozoa (Cnidaria) and evolution of a novel histone involved in DNA damage response in hydra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Puli Chandramouli; Ubhe, Suyog; Sirwani, Neha; Lohokare, Rasika; Galande, Sanjeev

    2017-08-01

    Histones are fundamental components of chromatin in all eukaryotes. Hydra, an emerging model system belonging to the basal metazoan phylum Cnidaria, provides an ideal platform to understand the evolution of core histone components at the base of eumetazoan phyla. Hydra exhibits peculiar properties such as tremendous regenerative capacity, lack of organismal senescence and rarity of malignancy. In light of the role of histone modifications and histone variants in these processes it is important to understand the nature of histones themselves and their variants in hydra. Here, we report identification of the complete repertoire of histone-coding genes in the Hydra magnipapillata genome. Hydra histones were classified based on their copy numbers, gene structure and other characteristic features. Genomic organization of canonical histone genes revealed the presence of H2A-H2B and H3-H4 paired clusters in high frequency and also a cluster with all core histones along with H1. Phylogenetic analysis of identified members of H2A and H2B histones suggested rapid expansion of these groups in Hydrozoa resulting in the appearance of unique subtypes. Amino acid sequence level comparisons of H2A and H2B forms with bilaterian counterparts suggest the possibility of a highly mobile nature of nucleosomes in hydra. Absolute quantitation of transcripts confirmed the high copy number of histones and supported the canonical nature of H2A. Furthermore, functional characterization of H2A.X.1 and a unique variant H2A.X.2 in the gastric region suggest their role in the maintenance of genome integrity and differentiation processes. These findings provide insights into the evolution of histones and their variants in hydra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Recruitment by the Repressor Freud-1 of Histone Deacetylase-Brg1 Chromatin Remodeling Complexes to Strengthen HTR1A Gene Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souslova, Tatiana; Mirédin, Kim; Millar, Anne M; Albert, Paul R

    2017-12-01

    Five-prime repressor element under dual repression binding protein-1 (Freud-1)/CC2D1A is genetically linked to intellectual disability and implicated in neuronal development. Freud-1 represses the serotonin-1A (5-HT1A) receptor gene HTR1A by histone deacetylase (HDAC)-dependent or HDAC-independent mechanisms in 5-HT1A-negative (e.g., HEK-293) or 5-HT1A-expressing cells (SK-N-SH), respectively. To identify the underlying mechanisms, Freud-1-associated proteins were affinity-purified from HEK-293 nuclear extracts and members of the Brg1/SMARCCA chromatin remodeling and Sin3A-HDAC corepressor complexes were identified. Pull-down assays using recombinant proteins showed that Freud-1 interacts directly with the Brg1 carboxyl-terminal domain; interaction with Brg1 required the carboxyl-terminal of Freud-1. Freud-1 complexes in HEK-293 and SK-N-SH cells differed, with low levels of BAF170/SMARCC2 and BAF57/SMARCE1 in HEK-293 cells and low-undetectable BAF155/SMARCC1, Sin3A, and HDAC1/2 in SK-N-SH cells. Similarly, by quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation, Brg1-BAF170/57 and Sin3A-HDAC complexes were observed at the HTR1A promoter in HEK-293 cells, whereas in SK-N-SH cells, Sin3A-HDAC proteins were not detected. Quantifying 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels in cells treated with siRNA to Freud-1, Brg1, or both RNAs addressed the functional role of the Freud-1-Brg1 complex. In HEK-293 cells, 5-HT1A receptor mRNA levels were increased only when both Freud-1 and Brg1 were depleted, but in SK-N-SH cells, depletion of either protein upregulated 5-HT1A receptor RNA. Thus, recruitment by Freud-1 of Brg1, BAF155, and Sin3A-HDAC complexes appears to strengthen repression of the HTR1A gene to prevent its expression inappropriate cell types, while recruitment of the Brg1-BAF170/57 complex is permissive to 5-HT1A receptor expression. Alterations in Freud-1-Brg1 interactions in mutants associated with intellectual disability could impair gene repression leading to altered neuronal

  3. Targeting post-translational modifications of histones for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Y-C; Hsieh, Y-H; Liao, C-C; Chong, L-W; Lee, C-Y; Yu, Y-L; Chou, R-H

    2015-10-30

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) on histones including acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation, citrullination, ubiquitination, ADP ribosylation, and sumoylation, play important roles in different biological events including chromatin dynamics, DNA replication, and transcriptional regulation. Aberrant histones PTMs leads to abnormal gene expression and uncontrolled cell proliferation, followed by development of cancers. Therefore, targeting the enzymes required for specific histone PTMs holds a lot of potential for cancer treatment. In this review article, we retrospect the latest studies in the regulations of acetylation, methylation, and phosphorylation of histones. We also summarize inhibitors/drugs that target these modifications for cancer treatment.

  4. Cardiomyocyte-specific conditional knockout of the histone chaperone HIRA in mice results in hypertrophy, sarcolemmal damage and focal replacement fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Valenzuela

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available HIRA is the histone chaperone responsible for replication-independent incorporation of histone variant H3.3 within gene bodies and regulatory regions of actively transcribed genes, and within the bivalent promoter regions of developmentally regulated genes. The HIRA gene lies within the 22q11.2 deletion syndrome critical region; individuals with this syndrome have multiple congenital heart defects. Because terminally differentiated cardiomyocytes have exited the cell cycle, histone variants should be utilized for the bulk of chromatin remodeling. Thus, HIRA is likely to play an important role in epigenetically defining the cardiac gene expression program. In this study, we determined the consequence of HIRA deficiency in cardiomyocytes in vivo by studying the phenotype of cardiomyocyte-specific Hira conditional-knockout mice. Loss of HIRA did not perturb heart development, but instead resulted in cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and susceptibility to sarcolemmal damage. Cardiomyocyte degeneration gave way to focal replacement fibrosis and impaired cardiac function. Gene expression was widely altered in Hira conditional-knockout hearts. Significantly affected pathways included responses to cellular stress, DNA repair and transcription. Consistent with heart failure, fetal cardiac genes were re-expressed in the Hira conditional knockout. Our results suggest that transcriptional regulation by HIRA is crucial for cardiomyocyte homeostasis.

  5. Evolutionary dynamics of 5S rDNA location in acridid grasshoppers and its relationship with H3 histone gene and 45S rDNA location.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral-de-Mello, Diogo C; Cabrero, Josefa; López-León, María Dolores; Camacho, Juan Pedro M

    2011-07-01

    We analyze the chromosomal location of 5S rDNA clusters in 29 species of grasshoppers belonging to the family Acrididae. There was extensive variation among species for the number and location of 5S rDNA sites. Out of 148 sites detected, 75% were proximally located, 21.6% were interstitial, and only 3.4% were distal. The number of 5S rDNA sites per species varied from a single chromosome pair (in six species) to all chromosome pairs (in five species), with a range of intermediate situations. Thirteen chromosomes from eight species carried two 5S rDNA clusters. At intraspecific level, differences among populations were detected in Eyprepocnemis plorans, and some heteromorphisms have also been observed in some species. Double FISH for 5S rDNA and H3 histone gene DNA, performed on 17 of these 29 species, revealed that both markers are sometimes placed in a same chromosome but at different location, whereas they appeared to co-localize in five species (Calliptamus barbarus, Heteracris adpersa, Aiolopus strepens, Oedipoda charpentieri and O. coerulescens). Double fiber-FISH in A. strepens and O. coerulescens showed that the two DNAs are closely interspersed with variable relative amounts of both classes of DNA. Finally, no correlation was observed between the number of 5S and 45S rDNA clusters in 23 species where this information was available. These results are discussed in the light of possible mechanisms of spread that led to the extensive variation in the number of clusters observed for both rDNA types in acridid grasshoppers.

  6. Amniotic fluid RNA gene expression profiling provides insights into the phenotype of Turner syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massingham, Lauren J; Johnson, Kirby L; Scholl, Thomas M; Slonim, Donna K; Wick, Heather C; Bianchi, Diana W

    2014-09-01

    Turner syndrome is a sex chromosome aneuploidy with characteristic malformations. Amniotic fluid, a complex biological material, could contribute to the understanding of Turner syndrome pathogenesis. In this pilot study, global gene expression analysis of cell-free RNA in amniotic fluid supernatant was utilized to identify specific genes/organ systems that may play a role in Turner syndrome pathophysiology. Cell-free RNA from amniotic fluid of five mid-trimester Turner syndrome fetuses and five euploid female fetuses matched for gestational age was extracted, amplified, and hybridized onto Affymetrix(®) U133 Plus 2.0 arrays. Significantly differentially regulated genes were identified using paired t tests. Biological interpretation was performed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis and BioGPS gene expression atlas. There were 470 statistically significantly differentially expressed genes identified. They were widely distributed across the genome. XIST was significantly down-regulated (p Turner syndrome transcriptome from other aneuploidies we previously studied. Manual curation of the differentially expressed gene list identified genes of possible pathologic significance, including NFATC3, IGFBP5, and LDLR. Transcriptomic differences in the amniotic fluid of Turner syndrome fetuses are due to genome-wide dysregulation. The hematologic/immune system differences may play a role in early-onset autoimmune dysfunction. Other genes identified with possible pathologic significance are associated with cardiac and skeletal systems, which are known to be affected in females with Turner syndrome. The discovery-driven approach described here may be useful in elucidating novel mechanisms of disease in Turner syndrome.

  7. Partial microduplication in the histone acetyltransferase complex member KANSL1 is associated with congenital heart defects in 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León, Luis E; Benavides, Felipe; Espinoza, Karena; Vial, Cecilia; Alvarez, Patricia; Palomares, Mirta; Lay-Son, Guillermo; Miranda, Macarena; Repetto, Gabriela M

    2017-05-11

    22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome (22q11.2DS) is the most common microdeletion disorder in humans, with an incidence of 1/4000 live births. It is caused by a heterozygous deletion of 1.5-3 Mb on chromosome region 22q11.2. Patients with the deletion present features that include neuropsychiatric problems, craniofacial abnormalities and cardiovascular malformations. However, the phenotype is highly variable and the factors related to the clinical heterogeneity are not fully understood. About 65% of patients with 22q11.2DS have congenital heart defects (CHD). The main goal of this study was to identify common CNVs in 22q11.2DS patients that could be associated with the incomplete penetrance of CHD. Analysis of genomic DNA from 253 patients with 22q11.2DS using array technology showed an association between a microduplication located in region 17q21.31 and CHD (p-value = 0.023, OR = 2.75, 95% CI = 1.17-7.03). This region includes the first three exons of KANSL1 gene. Bioinformatic analysis showed that KANSL1 and CRKL, a gene in the commonly deleted region of 22q11.2DS, are part of the same regulatory module in a miRNA-mRNA network. These results show that a KANSL1 microduplication, in combination with the 22q11.2 deletion, is associated with increased risk of CHD in these patients, suggesting that KANSL1 plays a role as a modifier gene in 22q11.2DS patients.

  8. Generative cell-specific activation of the histone gH2A gene promoter of Lilium longiflorum in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Kenji; Ono, Michiyuki; Iwashita, Jun; Wabiko, Hiroetsu; Inoue, Masayasu

    2012-12-01

    The Lilium longiflorum gH2A promoter is active exclusively in the generative cells of mature pollen in transgenic tobacco expressing the gH2A promoter::GUS (β-glucuronidase) construct as a reporter gene. Temporal and spatial aspects of gH2A promoter activity examined during pollen development in transgenic tobacco reveal that GUS reporter activity was not detected until developing pollen entered the early bicellular developmental stage. Activity was first detected in generative cells at early-mid stages and gradually increased to maximum levels at mid-bicellular stages. The patterns of appearance and longevity of GUS activity in tobacco were very similar to those of gH2A mRNA during pollen development in Lilium. Exogenous treatment with colchicine, a well-known microtubule depolymerize, blocked microspore mitosis and inhibited generative cell differentiation. No GUS signal was detected in the resulting anomalous pollen, which lacked generative cell differentiation. These data strongly suggest that normal generative cell development is essential for activation of the gH2A promoter. Furthermore, these results indicate that common transcriptional activator(s) of the gH2A promoter may be present in both Lilium and Nicotiana, and that such putative factor(s) activates the gH2A promoter only when generative cells undergo normal development.

  9. The emerging functions of histone demethylases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Karl; Christensen, Jesper; Cloos, Paul Ac

    2008-01-01

    Epigenetic information refers to heritable changes in gene function that are stable between cell divisions but which is not a result of changes in the DNA sequence. Part of the epigenetic mechanism has been ascribed to modifications of histones or DNA that affects the transcription of specific...... genes. In this context, post-translational modifications of histone tails, in particular methylation of lysines, are regarded as important for the storage of epigenetic information. Regulation of this information plays an important role during cellular differentiation where cells with different...... characteristic features evolve from the same ancestor, despite identical genomic material. The characterization of several enzymes catalyzing histone lysine methylation have supported this concept by showing the requirement of these enzymes for normal development and their involvement in diseases such as cancer...

  10. Biological significance of lysine mono-, di- and trimethylation on histone and non-histone proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perez-Burgos, L.

    2006-01-01

    Histones are the proteins that compact DNA into the repeating unit of chromatin known as the nucleosome. The N-termini of histones are subject to a series of post-translational modifications, one of which is methylation. This modification is termed 'epigenetic' because it extends the information encoded in the genome. Lysines can be mono-, di- or tri-methylated at different positions on histones H1, H3 and H4. In order to study the biological role of histone lysine methylation, antibodies were generated against mono-, di- and trimethylated H3-K9 and H3-27. Indeed, different chromatin domains in the mouse nucleus are enriched in distinct forms of histone lysine methylation, such as pericentric heterochromatin and the inactive X chromosome. Interestingly, heterochromatin in Arabidopsis thaliana is enriched in the mono- and di-, but not the trimethylated form of H3-K9. Furthermore, there exists a hierarchy of epigenetic modifications in which H3-K9 trimethylation is found to be upstream of DNA methylation on mouse major satellites. Histone lysine methylation is also involved in gene regulation upon development. One example is the chicken 61538;-globin locus, a region of facultative chromatin that undergoes a loss of di- and trimethylated H3-K27 in mature red blood cells, concomitant with expression of the 61538;-globin genes. SET-domain proteins are enzymes that methylate histones, but some of them are also able to methylate non-histone substrates. In particular, p53 is methylated by Set9 on lysine 372, G9a and Glp-1 on lysine 373 and by Smyd2 on lysine 370. Smyd2 transcript levels are greatly increased upon irradiation and dimethylated p53-370 specifically binds to 53BP1, a protein involved in recognizing DNA double-stranded breaks upon ionizing radiation. These results argue for a novel role of p53-K370 methylation in the biology of DNA damage. In summary, lysine methylation is a post-translational modification that can occur both on histone and non-histone proteins

  11. Molecular Testing of MECP2 Gene in Rett Syndrome Phenotypes in Indian Girls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lallar, Meenakshi; Rai, Archana; Srivastava, Priyanka; Mandal, Kausik; Gupta, Neerja; Kabra, Madhulika; Phadke, Shubha R

    2018-02-09

    To assess yield of MECP2 gene sequence variations analysis and large deletions in suspected cases of Rett syndrome. Descriptive study. Tertiary-care medical genetics center. Girls with neuroregression, postnatal microcephaly and signs and symptoms suggestive of classical and atypical Rett syndrome were classified into two groups. Group I consisted of girls with Classical and atypical Rett syndrome on basis on the Revised Rett Syndrome diagnostic criteria, 2010. Group II included girls with neuroregression and postnatal microcephaly and other Rett like features but not fulfilling the above criteria. Sanger sequencing of coding regions and large deletional analysis of MECP2 gene. Identification of mutation in MECP2 gene. Mutation in MECP2 gene was identified in 74% (14/19) in group I and none (0/17) in group II. The mutation detection rate was 92% (13/14) in group I classical Rett syndrome girls (2 with large deletions identified with Multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification) and 20% (1/5) in group I atypical Rett syndrome girls. One novel MECP2 sequence variation was identified in group I classical Rett syndrome. The yield of the mutation detection in MECP2 is much higher in classical than in atypical Rett syndrome. In girls with some Rett like features, but not fulfilling revised Rett syndrome diagnostic criteria, mutation testing for MECP2 gene has a low yield.

  12. Genetic analysis of the CHD7 gene in Korean patients with CHARGE syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyun-Ju; Song, Mee Hyun; Choi, Soo-Young; Kim, Jeongho; Lee, Jinwook; Kim, Un-Kyung; Bok, Jinwoong; Choi, Jae Young

    2013-04-01

    CHARGE syndrome is an autosomal dominant congenital disorder known to be caused by the haploinsufficiency of the CHD7 gene. Heterozygous mutations in the CHD7 gene have been identified in approximately 60-70% of patients clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome. Although there have been many reports on the mutational spectrum of the CHD7 gene in patients with CHARGE syndrome worldwide, little is known about this syndrome in the Korean population. In this study, three Korean patients with CHARGE syndrome including one patient with Patau syndrome were evaluated for genetic analysis of the CHD7 gene using direct sequencing of all 38 exons and the flanking intronic regions. One nonsense and two novel missense mutations were identified in the CHD7 gene. Clinical symptoms caused by the missense mutations were much milder compared to the nonsense mutation, confirming the previously determined genotype-phenotype correlation in CHARGE syndrome. Our study demonstrates the importance of mutational screening of CHD7 in patients who have been diagnosed with other syndromes but display clinical features of CHARGE syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis

  14. [From gene to disease; EVC, EVC2, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hagen, J M; Baart, J A; Gille, J J P

    2005-04-23

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder characterised by short stature with short limbs, postaxial polydactyly and congenital cardiac defects. The syndrome can be caused by mutations in the EVC gene or the EVC2 gene. The genes are located close to each other in a head-to-head configuration on chromosome 4p16. Clinical diagnosis can be confirmed by DNA analysis, which is currently offered by two laboratories in Italy.

  15. The Histone H3K27 Demethylase UTX Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Cognitive Behaviors in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang-Bin Tang

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Histone demethylase UTX mediates removal of repressive trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3 to establish a mechanistic switch to activate large sets of genes. Mutation of Utx has recently been shown to be associated with Kabuki syndrome, a rare congenital anomaly syndrome with dementia. However, its biological function in the brain is largely unknown. Here, we observe that deletion of Utx results in increased anxiety-like behaviors and impaired spatial learning and memory in mice. Loss of Utx in the hippocampus leads to reduced long-term potentiation and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic current, aberrant dendrite development and defective synapse formation. Transcriptional profiling reveals that Utx regulates a subset of genes that are involved in the regulation of dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and cognition. Specifically, Utx deletion disrupts expression of neurotransmitter 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 5B (Htr5b. Restoration of Htr5b expression in newborn hippocampal neurons rescues the defects of neuronal morphology by Utx ablation. Therefore, we provide evidence that Utx plays a critical role in modulating synaptic transmission and cognitive behaviors. Utx cKO mouse models like ours provide a valuable means to study the underlying mechanisms of the etiology of Kabuki syndrome.

  16. Stimulation of tissue-type plasminogen activator gene expression by sodium butyrate and trichostatin A in human endothelial cells involves histone acetylation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arts, J.; Lansink, T.; Grimbergen, J.; Toet, K.H.; Kooistra, T.

    1995-01-01

    We have previously shown that the pleiotropic agent sodium butyrate strongly stimulates tissue-type plasminogen activator (t-PA) expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Here we provide the following evidence that the butyrate-induced t-PA expression in HUVEC involves histone H4

  17. Genome-wide analysis of histone H3 acetylation patterns in AML identifies PRDX2 as an epigenetically silenced tumor suppressor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi; Isken, Fabienne; Agelopoulos, Konstantin

    2012-01-01

    With the use of ChIP on microarray assays in primary leukemia samples, we report that acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts exhibit significant alterations in histone H3 acetylation (H3Ac) levels at > 1000 genomic loci compared with CD34+ progenitor cells. Importantly, core promoter regions tended ...

  18. The enhancing effect of genistein on apoptosis induced by trichostatin A in lung cancer cells with wild type p53 genes is associated with upregulation of histone acetyltransferase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Tzu-Chin; Lin, Yi-Chin; Chen, Hsiao-Ling; Huang, Pei-Ru; Liu, Shang-Yu; Yeh, Shu-Lan

    2016-01-01

    Genistein has been shown to enhance the antitumor activity of trichostatin A (TSA) in human lung carcinoma A549 cells. However, whether the combined treatment exerts the same effect in other lung cancer cells is unclear. In the present study we first compared the enhancing effect of genistein on the antitumor effect of TSA in ABC-1, NCI-H460 (H460) and A549 cells. Second, we investigated whether the effects of genistein are associated with increased histone/non-histone protein acetylation. We found that the enhancing effect of genistein on cell-growth-arrest in ABC-1 cells (p53 mutant) was less than in A549 and H460 cells. Genistein enhanced TSA induced apoptosis in A549 and H460 cells rather than in ABC-1 cells. After silencing p53 expression in A549 and H460 cells, the enhancing effect of genistein was diminished. In addition, genistein increased TSA-induced histone H3/H4 acetylation in A549 and H460 cells. Genistein also increased p53 acetylation in H460 cells. The inhibitor of acetyltransferase, anacardic acid, diminished the enhancing effect of genistein on all TSA-induced histone/p53 acetylation and apoptosis. Genistein in combination with TSA increased the expression of p300 protein, an acetyltransferase, in A549 and NCI-H460 cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that genistein also enhanced the antitumor effect of genistein in A549-tumor-bearing mice. Taken together, these results suggest that the enhancing effects of genistein on TSA-induced apoptosis in lung cancer cells were p53-dependent and were associated with histone/non-histone protein acetylation. - Highlights: • Genistein enhances the antitumor effect of TSA through p53-associated pathways. • Genistein enhances TSA-induced histone acetylation commonly. • An acetyltransferase inhibitor diminishes the antitumor effect of genistein + TSA. • TSA in combination with genistein increases the expression of p300. • Genistein given by i.p. injection increases the antitumor effect of TSA in vivo.

  19. Syndromes and Disorders Associated with Omphalocele (III: Single Gene Disorders, Neural Tube Defects, Diaphragmatic Defects and Others

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ping Chen

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Omphalocele can be associated with single gene disorders, neural tube defects, diaphragmatic defects, fetal valproate syndrome, and syndromes of unknown etiology. This article provides a comprehensive review of omphalocele-related disorders: otopalatodigital syndrome type II; Melnick–Needles syndrome; Rieger syndrome; neural tube defects; Meckel syndrome; Shprintzen–Goldberg omphalocele syndrome; lethal omphalocele-cleft palate syndrome; cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome; fetal valproate syndrome; Marshall–Smith syndrome; fibrochondrogenesis; hydrolethalus syndrome; Fryns syndrome; omphalocele, diaphragmatic defects, radial anomalies and various internal malformations; diaphragmatic defects, limb deficiencies and ossification defects of skull; Donnai–Barrow syndrome; CHARGE syndrome; Goltz syndrome; Carpenter syndrome; Toriello–Carey syndrome; familial omphalocele; Cornelia de Lange syndrome; C syndrome; Elejalde syndrome; Malpuech syndrome; cervical ribs, Sprengel anomaly, anal atresia and urethral obstruction; hydrocephalus with associated malformations; Kennerknecht syndrome; lymphedema, atrial septal defect and facial changes; and craniosynostosis- mental retardation syndrome of Lin and Gettig. Perinatal identification of omphalocele should alert one to the possibility of omphalocele-related disorders and familial inheritance and prompt a thorough genetic counseling for these disorders.

  20. Radiation damage to histones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mee, L.K.; Adelstein, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The damage to histones irradiated in isolation is being elaborated to aid the identification of the crosslinking sites in radiation-induced DNA-histone adducts. Histones are being examined by amino acid analysis to determine the destruction of residues and by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to delineate changes in conformation. For the slightly lysine-rich histone, H2A, a specific attack on selective residues has been established, the aromatic residues, tyrosine and phenylalanine, and the heterocyclic residue, histidine, being significantly destroyed. In addition, a significant increase in aspartic acid was found; this may represent a radiation product from scission of the ring in the histidine residues. The similarity of the effects on residues in nitrous oxide-saturated and nitrogen-saturated solutions suggests that OH . and e/sub aq//sup -/ are equally efficient and selective in their attack. On gel electrophoresis degradation of the histone H2A was found to be greatest for irradiations in nitrous oxide-saturated solutions, suggesting CH . is the most effective radical for producing changes in conformation; O/sub 2//sup -/ was essentially ineffective. Other histones are being examined for changes in amino acid composition, conformation, and for the formation of radiation products

  1. PTEN Interacts with Histone H1 and Controls Chromatin Condensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhu Hong; Zhu, Minglu; Yang, Jingyi; Liang, Hui; He, Jinxue; He, Shiming; Wang, Pan; Kang, Xi; McNutt, Michael A.; Yin, Yuxin; Shen, Wen H.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Chromatin organization and dynamics are integral to global gene transcription. Histone modification influences chromatin status and gene expression. PTEN plays multiple roles in tumor suppression, development and metabolism. Here we report on the interplay of PTEN, histone H1 and chromatin. We show that loss of PTEN leads to dissociation of histone H1 from chromatin and decondensation of chromatin. PTEN deletion also results in elevation of histone H4 acetylation at lysine 16, an epigenetic marker for chromatin activation. We found that PTEN and histone H1 physically interact through their C-terminal domains. Disruption of the PTEN C-terminus promotes the chromatin association of MOF acetyltransferase and induces H4K16 acetylation. Hyperacetylation of H4K16 impairs the association of PTEN with histone H1, which constitutes regulatory feedback that may deteriorate chromatin stability. Our results demonstrate that PTEN controls chromatin condensation, thus influencing gene expression. We propose that PTEN regulates global gene transcription profiling through histones and chromatin remodeling. PMID:25199838

  2. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3K9me2 in acute myeloid leukemia reveals large chromosomal domains associated with massive gene silencing and sites of genome instability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna C Salzberg

    Full Text Available A facultative heterochromatin mark, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2, which is mediated by histone methyltransferases G9a/GLP (EHMT2/1, undergoes dramatic rearrangements during myeloid cell differentiation as observed by chromatin imaging. To determine whether these structural transitions also involve genomic repositioning of H3K9me2, we used ChIP-sequencing to map genome-wide topography of H3K9me2 in normal human granulocytes, normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, primary myeloblasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML patients, and a model leukemia cell line K562. We observe that H3K9me2 naturally repositions from the previously designated "repressed" chromatin state in hematopoietic progenitors to predominant association with heterochromatin regions in granulocytes. In contrast, AML cells accumulate H3K9me2 on previously undefined large (> 100 Kb genomic blocks that are enriched with AML-specific single nucleotide variants, sites of chromosomal translocations, and genes downregulated in AML. Specifically, the AML-specific H3K9me2 blocks are enriched with genes regulated by the proto-oncogene ERG that promotes stem cell characteristics. The AML-enriched H3K9me2 blocks (in contrast to the heterochromatin-associated H3K9me2 blocks enriched in granulocytes are reduced by pharmacological inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9a/GLP in K562 cells concomitantly with transcriptional activation of ERG and ETS1 oncogenes. Our data suggest that G9a/GLP mediate formation of transient H3K9me2 blocks that are preserved in AML myeloblasts and may lead to an increased rate of AML-specific mutagenesis and chromosomal translocations.

  3. Genome-wide mapping of histone H3K9me2 in acute myeloid leukemia reveals large chromosomal domains associated with massive gene silencing and sites of genome instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzberg, Anna C; Harris-Becker, Abigail; Popova, Evgenya Y; Keasey, Nikki; Loughran, Thomas P; Claxton, David F; Grigoryev, Sergei A

    2017-01-01

    A facultative heterochromatin mark, histone H3 lysine 9 dimethylation (H3K9me2), which is mediated by histone methyltransferases G9a/GLP (EHMT2/1), undergoes dramatic rearrangements during myeloid cell differentiation as observed by chromatin imaging. To determine whether these structural transitions also involve genomic repositioning of H3K9me2, we used ChIP-sequencing to map genome-wide topography of H3K9me2 in normal human granulocytes, normal CD34+ hematopoietic progenitors, primary myeloblasts from acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients, and a model leukemia cell line K562. We observe that H3K9me2 naturally repositions from the previously designated "repressed" chromatin state in hematopoietic progenitors to predominant association with heterochromatin regions in granulocytes. In contrast, AML cells accumulate H3K9me2 on previously undefined large (> 100 Kb) genomic blocks that are enriched with AML-specific single nucleotide variants, sites of chromosomal translocations, and genes downregulated in AML. Specifically, the AML-specific H3K9me2 blocks are enriched with genes regulated by the proto-oncogene ERG that promotes stem cell characteristics. The AML-enriched H3K9me2 blocks (in contrast to the heterochromatin-associated H3K9me2 blocks enriched in granulocytes) are reduced by pharmacological inhibition of the histone methyltransferase G9a/GLP in K562 cells concomitantly with transcriptional activation of ERG and ETS1 oncogenes. Our data suggest that G9a/GLP mediate formation of transient H3K9me2 blocks that are preserved in AML myeloblasts and may lead to an increased rate of AML-specific mutagenesis and chromosomal translocations.

  4. Genetic Alterations within the DENND1A Gene in Patients with Polycystic Ovary Syndrome (PCOS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Mette B; Nielsen, Michael F B; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), the most common endocrine disease among premenopausal women, is caused by both genes and environment. We and others previously reported association between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the DENND1A gene and PCOS. We therefore sequenced the DENND1A gene...

  5. Histone deacetylases in memory and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penney, Jay; Tsai, Li-Huei

    2014-12-09

    Over the past 30 years, lysine acetylation of histone and nonhistone proteins has become established as a key modulator of gene expression regulating numerous aspects of cell biology. Neuronal growth and plasticity are no exception; roles for lysine acetylation and deacetylation in brain function and dysfunction continue to be uncovered. Transcriptional programs coupling synaptic activity to changes in gene expression are critical to the plasticity mechanisms underlying higher brain functions. These transcriptional programs can be modulated by changes in histone acetylation, and in many cases, transcription factors and histone-modifying enzymes are recruited together to plasticity-associated genes. Lysine acetylation, catalyzed by lysine acetyltransferases (KATs), generally promotes cognitive performance, whereas the opposing process, catalyzed by histone lysine deacetylases (HDACs), appears to negatively regulate cognition in multiple brain regions. Consistently, mutation or deregulation of different KATs or HDACs contributes to neurological dysfunction and neurodegeneration. HDAC inhibitors have shown promise as a treatment to combat the cognitive decline associated with aging and neurodegenerative disease, as well as to ameliorate the symptoms of depression and posttraumatic stress disorder, among others. In this review, we discuss the evidence for the roles of HDACs in cognitive function as well as in neurological disorders and disease. In particular, we focus on HDAC2, which plays a central role in coupling lysine acetylation to synaptic plasticity and mediates many of the effects of HDAC inhibition in cognition and disease. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  7. Investigation of Monnose-Binding Lectin gene Polymorphism in Patients with Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Toka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Monnose-Binding lectin (MBL appears to play an important role in the immune system. The genetic polymorphisms in the MBL2 gene can result in a reduction of serum levels, leading to a predisposition to recurrent infection. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of a polymorphism in codon 54 of the MBL2 gene on the susceptibility to Erythema Multiforme, Stevens-Johnson Syndrome and Stevens-Johnson Syndrome/Toxic Epidermal Necrolysis Overlap Syndrome (EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. Material and Methods: Our study included 64 patients who were clinically and/or histopathologically diagnosed with EM, SJS, and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome and 66 healthy control subjects who were genotyped for the MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism using the PCR-RFLP method. For all statistical analyses, the level of significance was set at p<0.05. Results: The prevalence of the B allele was 18% in the EM, SJS and SJS/TEN patient groups and 13% in the control group. No significant differences in allele frequencies of any polymorphism were observed between the patient and control groups, although the B allele was more frequent in the patient groups (p=0.328.Conclusion: Our results provide no evidence of a relationship between MBL2 gene codon 54 polymorphism and the susceptibility to EM, SJS and SJS/TEN overlap syndrome. However, these findings should be confirmed in studies with a larger sample size.

  8. Genetic basis of prune belly syndrome: screening for HNF1β gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granberg, Candace F; Harrison, Steven M; Dajusta, Daniel; Zhang, Shaohua; Hajarnis, Sachin; Igarashi, Peter; Baker, Linda A

    2012-01-01

    Although the cause of prune belly syndrome is unknown, familial evidence suggests a genetic component. Recently 2 nonfamilial cases of prune belly syndrome with chromosome 17q12 deletions encompassing the HNF1β gene have made this a candidate gene for prune belly syndrome. To date, there has been no large-scale screening of patients with prune belly syndrome for HNF1β mutations. We assessed the role of HNF1β in prune belly syndrome by screening for genomic mutations with functional characterization of any detected mutations. We studied patients with prune belly syndrome who were prospectively enrolled in our Pediatric Genitourinary DNA Repository since 2001. DNA from patient samples was amplified by polymerase chain reaction, sequenced for coding and splice regions of the HNF1β gene, and compared to control databases. We performed functional assay testing of the ability of mutant HNF1β to activate a luciferase construct with an HNF1β DNA binding site. From 32 prune belly syndrome probands (30 males, 2 females) HNF1β sequencing detected a missense mutation (V61G) in 1 child with prune belly syndrome. Absent in control databases, V61G was previously reported in 2 patients without prune belly syndrome who had congenital genitourinary anomalies. Functional testing showed similar luciferase activity compared to wild-type HNF1β, suggesting the V61G substitution does not disturb HNF1β function. One genomic HNF1β mutation was detected in 3% of patients with prune belly syndrome but found to be functionally normal. Thus, functionally significant HNF1β mutations are uncommon in prune belly syndrome, despite case reports of HNF1β deletions. Further genetic study is necessary, as identification of the genetic basis of prune belly syndrome may ultimately lead to prevention and improved treatments for this rare but severe syndrome. Copyright © 2012 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Exon expression and alternatively spliced genes in Tourette Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yingfang; Liao, Isaac H; Zhan, Xinhua; Gunther, Joan R; Ander, Bradley P; Liu, Dazhi; Lit, Lisa; Jickling, Glen C; Corbett, Blythe A; Bos-Veneman, Netty G P; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Sharp, Frank R

    2011-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is diagnosed based upon clinical criteria including motor and vocal tics. We hypothesized that differences in exon expression and splicing might be useful for pathophysiology and diagnosis. To demonstrate exon expression and alternatively spliced gene differences in blood of individuals with TS compared to healthy controls (HC), RNA was isolated from the blood of 26 un-medicated TS subjects and 23 HC. Each sample was run on Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST (HuExon) arrays and on 3' biased U133 Plus 2.0 (HuU133) arrays. To investigate the differentially expressed exons and transcripts, analyses of covariance (ANCOVA) were performed, controlling for age, gender, and batch. Differential alternative splicing patterns between TS and HC were identified using analyses of variance (ANOVA) models in Partek. Three hundred and seventy-six exon probe sets were differentially expressed between TS and HC (raw P |1.2|) that separated TS and HC subjects using hierarchical clustering and Principal Components Analysis. The probe sets predicted TS compared to HC with a >90% sensitivity and specificity using a 10-fold cross-validation. Ninety genes (transcripts) had differential expression of a single exon (raw P < 0.005) and were predicted to be alternatively spliced (raw P < 0.05) in TS compared to HC. These preliminary findings might provide insight into the pathophysiology of TS and potentially provide prognostic and diagnostic biomarkers. However, the findings are tempered by the small sample size and multiple comparisons and require confirmation using PCR or deep RNA sequencing and a much larger patient population. Copyright © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mannens, M.; Alders, M.; Redeker, B.; Bliek, J.; Steenman, M.; Wiesmeyer, C.; de Meulemeester, M.; Ryan, A.; Kalikin, L.; Voûte, T.; de Kraker, J.; Hoovers, J.; Slater, R.; Feinberg, A.; Little, P.; Westerveld, A.

    1996-01-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated

  11. Identification of a novel FBN1 gene mutation in a large Pakistani family with Marfan syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Micheal, S.; Khan, M.I.; Akhtar, F.; Weiss, M.M.; Islam, F.; Ali, M.; Qamar, R.; Maugeri, A.; Hollander, A.I. den

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: To describe a novel mutation in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene in a large Pakistani family with autosomal dominant Marfan syndrome (MFS). METHODS: Blood samples were collected of 11 family members affected with Marfan syndrome, and DNA was isolated by phenol-extraction. The coding exons of

  12. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemaes, C.M.R.; van Tol, M.J.D.; Wang, J.; Dam, M.; van Eggermond, M.C.J.A.; Thijssen, P.E.; Aytekin, C.; Brunetti-Pierri, N.; van der Burg, M.; Graham Davies, E.; Ferster, A.; Furthner, D.; Gimelli, G.; Gennery, A.; Kloeckener-Gruissem, B.; Meyn, S.; Powell, C.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Shugar, A.; van den Elsen, P.J.; van der Maarel, S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF

  13. Heterogeneous clinical presentation in ICF syndrome: correlation with underlying gene defects.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weemaes, C.M.R.; Tol, M.J. van; Wang, J; Ostaijen-ten Dam, M.M. van; Eggermond, M.C. van; Thijssen, P.E.; Aytekin, C.; Brunetti-Pierri, N.; Burg, M. van der; aham Davies, E. Gr; Ferster, A.; Furthner, D.; Gimelli, G.; Gennery, A.; Kloeckener-Gruissem, B.; Meyn, S.; Powell, C.; Reisli, I.; Schuetz, C.; Schulz, A.; Shugar, A.; Elsen, P.J. van den; Maarel, S.M. van der

    2013-01-01

    Immunodeficiency with centromeric instability and facial anomalies (ICF) syndrome is a primary immunodeficiency, predominantly characterized by agammaglobulinemia or hypoimmunoglobulinemia, centromere instability and facial anomalies. Mutations in two genes have been discovered to cause ICF

  14. Enhanced MYC association with the NuA4 histone acetyltransferase complex mediated by the adenovirus E1A N-terminal domain activates a subset of MYC target genes highly expressed in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling-Jun; Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2017-11-01

    The proto-oncogene MYC is a transcription factor over-expressed in many cancers and required for cell survival. Its function is regulated by histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes, such as the GCN5 complex and the NuA4/Tip60 complex. However, the roles of the HAT complexes during MYC function in cancer have not been well characterized. We recently showed that adenovirus E1A and its N-terminal 80 aa region, E1A 1-80, interact with the NuA4 complex, through the E1A TRRAP-targeting (ET) domain, and enhance MYC association with the NuA4 complex. We show here that the ET domain mainly targets the MYC-NuA4 complex. By global gene expression analysis using E1A 1-80 and deletion mutants, we have identified a panel of genes activated by targeting the MYC-NuA4 complex and notably enriched for genes involved in ribosome biogenesis and gene expression. A second panel of genes is activated by E1A 1-80 targeting of both the MYC-NuA4 complex and p300, and is enriched for genes involved in DNA replication and cell cycle processes. Both panels of genes are highly expressed in cancer cells. Since the ET domain is essential for E1A-mediated cellular transformation, our results suggest that MYC and the NuA4 complex function cooperatively in cell transformation and cancer.

  15. Distinct Gene Expression Signatures in Lynch Syndrome and Familial Colorectal Cancer Type X

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valentin, Mev; Therkildsen, Christina; Veerla, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects.......Heredity is estimated to cause at least 20% of colorectal cancer. The hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer subset is divided into Lynch syndrome and familial colorectal cancer type X (FCCTX) based on presence of mismatch repair (MMR) gene defects....

  16. Mutations in epilepsy and intellectual disability genes in patients with features of Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Heather E; Tambunan, Dimira; LaCoursiere, Christopher; Goldenberg, Marti; Pinsky, Rebecca; Martin, Emilie; Ho, Eugenia; Khwaja, Omar; Kaufmann, Walter E; Poduri, Annapurna

    2015-09-01

    Rett syndrome and neurodevelopmental disorders with features overlapping this syndrome frequently remain unexplained in patients without clinically identified MECP2 mutations. We recruited a cohort of 11 patients with features of Rett syndrome and negative initial clinical testing for mutations in MECP2. We analyzed their phenotypes to determine whether patients met formal criteria for Rett syndrome, reviewed repeat clinical genetic testing, and performed exome sequencing of the probands. Using 2010 diagnostic criteria, three patients had classical Rett syndrome, including two for whom repeat MECP2 gene testing had identified mutations. In a patient with neonatal onset epilepsy with atypical Rett syndrome, we identified a frameshift deletion in STXBP1. Among seven patients with features of Rett syndrome not fulfilling formal diagnostic criteria, four had suspected pathogenic mutations, one each in MECP2, FOXG1, SCN8A, and IQSEC2. MECP2 mutations are highly correlated with classical Rett syndrome. Genes associated with atypical Rett syndrome, epilepsy, or intellectual disability should be considered in patients with features overlapping with Rett syndrome and negative MECP2 testing. While most of the identified mutations were apparently de novo, the SCN8A variant was inherited from an unaffected parent mosaic for the mutation, which is important to note for counseling regarding recurrence risks. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian H; Pedersen, Lisbeth N; Berglund, Agnethe; Jensen, Henrik K; Andersen, Niels H; Gravholt, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc) over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype. Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88) were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%), and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc) and Hodges's formula (hQTc). The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms). Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done. The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms) compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms) was prolonged (pTurner syndrome karyotypes (418.2 ± 24.8 vs. 407.6 ± 25.5 ms; p = 0.055). In women with Turner syndrome and a bQTc >432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2) and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2). There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women. NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  18. Biotinylation is a natural, albeit rare, modification of human histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroishi, Toshinobu; Rios-Avila, Luisa; Pestinger, Valerie; Wijeratne, Subhashinee S. K.; Zempleni, Janos

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies suggest that histones H3 and H4 are posttranslationally modified by binding of the vitamin biotin, catalyzed by holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS). Albeit a rare epigenetic mark, biotinylated histones were repeatedly shown to be enriched in repeat regions and repressed loci, participating in the maintenance of genome stability and gene regulation. Recently, a team of investigators failed to detect biotinylated histones and proposed that biotinylation is not a natural modification of histones, but rather an assay artifact. Here, we describe the results of experiments, including the comparison of various analytical protocols, antibodies, cell lines, classes of histones, and radiotracers. These studies provide unambiguous evidence that biotinylation is a natural, albeit rare, histone modification. Less than 0.001% of human histones H3 and H4 are biotinylated, raising concerns that the abundance might too low to elicit biological effects in vivo. We integrated information from this study, previous studies, and ongoing research efforts to present a new working model in which biological effects are caused by a role of HCS in multiprotein complexes in chromatin. In this model, docking of HCS in chromatin causes the occasional binding of biotin to histones as a tracer for HCS binding sites. PMID:21930408

  19. Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the fibrillin-1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elçioglu, N H; Akalin, F; Elçioglu, M; Comeglio, P; Child, A H

    2004-01-01

    Neonatal Marfan syndrome caused by an exon 25 mutation of the Fibrillin-1 gene: We describe a male infant with severe arachnodactyly, hypermobility of the fingers, flexion contractures of elbows, wrists, hips, and knees, microretrognathia, crumpled ears, rockerbottom feet, loose redundant skin, and lens dislocations. Cardiac valve insufficiency and aortic dilatation resulted in cardiac failure, decompensated with digitalisation and death occurred at the age of 4 months. This case represents the severe end of the clinical spectrum of Marfan syndrome, namely neonatal Marfan syndrome. Molecular diagnostic analyses confirmed a de novo exon 25 mutation in the FBN1 gene.

  20. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-02-05

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), and 2 female carriers were heterozygous for the same variant. All 3 affected males presented with typical Nance-Horan syndrome features. One female carrier displayed lens opacities centered on the posterior Y-suture in both eyes, as well as mild dental abnormalities. We recorded the clinical features of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome family and broadened the spectrum of mutations in the NHS gene.

  1. Síndrome de Diógenes Diogenes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bárbara Perdigão Stumpf

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A síndrome de Diógenes (SD caracteriza-se por descuido extremo com a higiene pessoal, negligência com o asseio da própria moradia, isolamento social, suspeição e comportamento paranoico, sendo frequente a ocorrência de colecionismo. A incidência anual é de 5/10.000 entre aqueles acima de 60 anos, e pelo menos a metade é portadora de demência ou algum outro transtorno psiquiátrico. As principais hipóteses etiológicas são: (1 a condição representaria o "estágio final" de um transtorno de personalidade; (2 a síndrome seria uma manifestação de demência do lobo frontal; (3 a SD seria o estágio final do subtipo hoarding do TOC; (4 a SD seria uma via final comum a diferentes transtornos psiquiátricos, especialmente aqueles associados ao colecionismo; (5 a síndrome seria precipitada por estressores biológicos, psicológicos e sociais, associados com a idade, em indivíduos com traços de personalidade predisponentes. É conhecido que existem apenas relatos de casos envolvendo tratamentos específicos para a SD, particularmente a risperidona. Por se tratar de condição grave, com elevada mortalidade por problemas clínicos, estudos se fazem necessários para determinar as melhores estratégias de abordagem desses pacientes. Os autores descrevem o caso de uma paciente com SD e fazem uma breve revisão da literatura.Diogenes syndrome (DSis characterized by extreme self-neglect, domestic squalor, social withdrawal, suspiciousness and paranoid behaviour and is often accompanied by excessive hoarding. The annual incidence is five per ten thousand of the population aged over 60, at least half of whom will have dementia or some other form of mental illness. The main etiological hypotheses are: (1 the condition represents the "end-stage" of a personality disorder; (2 the syndrome is a manifestation of a frontal-lobe dementia; (3 DS may be an end stage of the hoarding subtype of OCD; (4 DS may be a final common pathway of different

  2. Severe visual impairment and retinal changes in a boy with a deletion of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathys, R; Deconinck, H; Keymolen, K; Jansen, A; Van Esch, H

    2007-01-01

    We present the ophthalmologic findings in a boy with a deletion of Xp22 comprising the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome. Different mechanisms underlying the visual impairment in Nance-Horan syndrome are discussed.

  3. Further evidence for poly-ADP-ribosylated histones as DNA suppressors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, F.L.; Geronimo, I.H.; Bender, W.; Meginniss, K.E.

    1986-01-01

    For many years histones have been considered to be the gene suppressors in eukaryotic cells. Recently, the authors have found strong evidence indicating that poly-ADP-ribosylated histones, rather than histones, are the potent inhibitors of DNA-dependent RNA synthesis. They now report additional evidence for this concept: 1) using histone inhibitor isolated directly from nuclei, the authors are able to confirm their earlier findings that the inhibitor substances are sensitive to pronase, snake venom phosphodiesterase digestion and 0.1N KOH hydrolysis, and are resistant to DNase I and RNase A digestion, 2) the O.D. 260/O.D.280 ratio of the histone inhibitor is between pure protein and nuclei acid, suggesting the inhibitor substance is a nucleoprotein hybrid. This result directly supports the fact that the isolated histone inhibitor is radioactive poly (ADP-ribose) labeled, 3) commercial histones show big differences in inhibitor activity. The authors believe this reflects the variation in poly-ADP-ribosylation among commercial histones, and 4) 0.1N KOH hydrolysis eliminates the poly (ADP-ribose) radioactivity from the acceptor proteins as well as histone inhibitor activity. Yet, on gel, the inhibitor shows identical histone bands and stain intensity before and after hydrolysis, indicating the histones per se are qualitatively and quantitatively unaffected by alkaline treatment. This result strongly suggests that histones themselves are not capable of inhibiting DNA-dependent RNA synthesis

  4. Collectrin gene screening in Turner syndrome patients with kidney ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    common to all TS, generally results in the full syndrome phe- ... Keywords. Turner syndrome; collectrin; horseshoe kidney; human genetics. Journal of ..... J. M. and Alessandrini P. 2006 Multicystic dysplastic kidney with ipsilateral abnormalities of genitourinary tract, experience in children. Urology 67, 603–607. O'Brien J.

  5. Structural Basis of Histone Demethylase KDM6B Histone 3 Lysine 27 Specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jones, Sarah E; Olsen, Lars; Gajhede, Michael

    2018-01-01

    KDM subfamily 6 enzymes KDM6A and KDM6B specifically catalyze demethylation of di- and trimethylated lysine on histone 3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3/2) and play an important role in repression of developmental genes. Despite identical amino acid sequence in the immediate surroundings of H3K9me3/2 (ARKS...

  6. Treatment of Chronic Kidney Diseases with Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shougang eZhuang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Histone deacetylases (HDACs induce deacetylation of both histone and non-histone proteins and play a critical role in the modulation of physiological and pathological gene expression. Pharmacological inhibition of HDAC has been reported to attenuate progression of renal fibrogenesis in obstructed kidney and reduce cyst formation in polycystic kidney disease. HDAC inhibitors (HDACis are also able to ameliorate renal lesions in diabetes nephropathy, lupus nephritis, aristolochic acid nephropathy and transplant nephropathy. The beneficial effects of HDACis are associated with their anti-fibrosis, anti-inflammation, and immmunosuppressant effects. In this review, we summarize recent advances on the treatment of various chronic kidney diseases with HDACis in preclinical models.

  7. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to compounds of formula (I) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt, hydrate, solvate, or prodrug thereof, wherein X1, X2, X3, X4, X5, W1, W2, W3, and W4 are as described. The present invention relates generally to inhibitors of histone deacetylase and to methods...

  8. Histone methyltransferases in cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Helin, Kristian

    2009-01-01

    regulators, namely histone methyltransferases (HMTs). Several HMTs have been linked to different types of cancer; however, in most cases we only have limited knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms by which the HMTs contribute to disease development. We summarize the current knowledge regarding some...

  9. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Florijn, Ralph J.; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J. J. M.; Mannens, Marcel M. A. M.; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P.; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Bergen, Arthur A. B.

    2006-01-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the

  10. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  11. A family with Townes-Brocks syndrome with congenital hypothyroidism and a novel mutation of the SALL1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Won Ik; Kim, Ji Hye; Yoo, Han Wook; Oh, Sung Hee

    2010-12-01

    Townes-Brocks syndrome (TBS) is a rare autosomal dominant congenital disorder caused by mutations in the SALL1 gene. Its signs and symptoms overlap with other genetic syndromes, including VACTERL association, Pendred syndrome, Baller-Gerold syndrome, and cat eye syndrome. Structural vertebral abnormalities, hypoplasia of the thumb, and radial bone abnormalities, which are not usually associated with TBS, help in the differential diagnosis of these syndromes. We report the case of a family whose members were diagnosed with TBS with congenital hypothyroidism and had a novel SALL1 gene mutation.

  12. Circulating Histones Are Mediators of Trauma-associated Lung Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrams, Simon T.; Zhang, Nan; Manson, Joanna; Liu, Tingting; Dart, Caroline; Baluwa, Florence; Wang, Susan Siyu; Brohi, Karim; Kipar, Anja; Yu, Weiping

    2013-01-01

    Rationale: Acute lung injury is a common complication after severe trauma, which predisposes patients to multiple organ failure. This syndrome largely accounts for the late mortality that arises and despite many theories, the pathological mechanism is not fully understood. Discovery of histone-induced toxicity in mice presents a new dimension for elucidating the underlying pathophysiology. Objectives: To investigate the pathological roles of circulating histones in trauma-induced lung injury. Methods: Circulating histone levels in patients with severe trauma were determined and correlated with respiratory failure and Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) scores. Their cause–effect relationship was studied using cells and mouse models. Measurements and Main Results: In a cohort of 52 patients with severe nonthoracic blunt trauma, circulating histones surged immediately after trauma to levels that were toxic to cultured endothelial cells. The high levels were significantly associated with the incidence of acute lung injury and SOFA scores, as well as markers of endothelial damage and coagulation activation. In in vitro systems, histones damaged endothelial cells, stimulated cytokine release, and induced neutrophil extracellular trap formation and myeloperoxidase release. Cellular toxicity resulted from their direct membrane interaction and resultant calcium influx. In mouse models, cytokines and markers for endothelial damage and coagulation activation significantly increased immediately after trauma or histone infusion. Pathological examinations showed that lungs were the predominantly affected organ with edema, hemorrhage, microvascular thrombosis, and neutrophil congestion. An anti-histone antibody could reduce these changes and protect mice from histone-induced lethality. Conclusions: This study elucidates a new mechanism for acute lung injury after severe trauma and proposes that circulating histones are viable therapeutic targets for improving survival

  13. Tuberous sclerosis complex and polycystic kidney disease contiguous gene syndrome with Moyamoya disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jonathan; Modi, Lopa; Ramai, Daryl; Tortora, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) are two diseases sharing close genetic loci on chromosome 16. Due to contiguous gene syndrome, also known as contiguous gene deletion syndrome, the proximity of TSC2 and PKD1 genes increases the risk of co-deletion resulting in a shared clinical presentation. Furthermore, Moyamoya disease (MMD) is a rare vaso-occlusive disease in the circle of Willis. We present the first case of TSC2/PKD1 contiguous gene syndrome in a patient with MMD along with detailed histopathologic, radiologic, and cytogenetic analyses. We also highlight the clinical presentation and surgical complications in this case. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid purification of recombinant histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klinker, Henrike; Haas, Caroline; Harrer, Nadine; Becker, Peter B; Mueller-Planitz, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The development of methods to assemble nucleosomes from recombinant histones decades ago has transformed chromatin research. Nevertheless, nucleosome reconstitution remains time consuming to this day, not least because the four individual histones must be purified first. Here, we present a streamlined purification protocol of recombinant histones from bacteria. We termed this method "rapid histone purification" (RHP) as it circumvents isolation of inclusion bodies and thereby cuts out the most time-consuming step of traditional purification protocols. Instead of inclusion body isolation, whole cell extracts are prepared under strongly denaturing conditions that directly solubilize inclusion bodies. By ion exchange chromatography, the histones are purified from the extracts. The protocol has been successfully applied to all four canonical Drosophila and human histones. RHP histones and histones that were purified from isolated inclusion bodies had similar purities. The different purification strategies also did not impact the quality of octamers reconstituted from these histones. We expect that the RHP protocol can be readily applied to the purification of canonical histones from other species as well as the numerous histone variants.

  15. Candidate Tumor-Suppressor Gene DLEC1 Is Frequently Downregulated by Promoter Hypermethylation and Histone Hypoacetylation in Human Epithelial Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Kwong

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Suppression of ovarian tumor growth by chromosome 3p was demonstrated in a previous study. Deleted in Lung and Esophageal Cancer 1 (DLEC1 on 3p22.3 is a candidate tumor suppressor in lung, esophageal, and renal cancers. The potential involvement of DLEC1 in epithelial ovarian cancer remains unknown. In the present study, DLEC1 downregulation was found in ovarian cancer cell lines and primary ovarian tumors. Focus-expressed DLEC1 in two ovarian cancer cell lines resulted in 41% to 52% inhibition of colony formation. No chromosomal loss of chromosome 3p22.3 in any ovarian cancer cell line or tissue was found. Promoter hypermethylation of DLEC1 was detected in ovarian cancer cell lines with reduced DLEC1 transcripts, whereas methylation was not detected in normal ovarian epithelium and DLEC1-expressing ovarian cancer cell lines. Treatment with demethylating agent enhanced DLEC1 expression in 90% (9 of 10 of ovarian cancer cell lines. DLEC1 promoter methylation was examined in 13 high-grade ovarian tumor tissues with DLEC1 downregulation, in which 54% of the tumors showed DLEC1 methylation. In addition, 80% of ovarian cancer cell lines significantly upregulated DLEC1 transcripts after histone deacetylase inhibitor treatment. Therefore, our results suggested that DLEC1 suppressed the growth of ovarian cancer cells and that its downregulation was closely associated with promoter hypermethylation and histone hypoacetylation.

  16. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS genes are silenced by DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetylation and regulate response to radiotherapy in cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moon-Hong Kim

    Full Text Available Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS family is an important negative regulator of cytokine signaling and deregulation of SOCS has been involved in many types of cancer. All cervical cancer cell lines tested showed lower expression of SOCS1, SOCS3, and SOCS5 than normal tissue or cell lines. The immunohistochemistry result for SOCS proteins in human cervical tissue also confirmed that normal tissue expressed higher level of SOCS proteins than neighboring tumor. Similar to the regulation of SOCS in other types of cancer, DNA methylation contributed to SOCS1 downregulation in CaSki, ME-180, and HeLa cells. However, the expression of SOCS3 or SOCS5 was not recovered by the inhibition of DNA methylation. Histone deacetylation may be another regulatory mechanism involved in SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression, however, SOCS5 expression was neither affected by DNA methylation nor histone deacetylation. Ectopic expression of SOCS1 or SOCS3 conferred radioresistance to HeLa cells, which implied SOCS signaling regulates the response to radiation in cervical cancer. In this study, we have shown that SOCS expression repressed by, in part, epigenetically and altered SOCS1 and SOCS3 expression could contribute to the radiosensitive phenotype in cervical cancer.

  17. Long QT interval in Turner syndrome--a high prevalence of LQTS gene mutations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Trolle

    Full Text Available QT-interval prolongation of unknown aetiology is common in Turner syndrome. This study set out to explore the presence of known long QT mutations in Turner syndrome and to examine the corrected QT-interval (QTc over time and relate the findings to the Turner syndrome phenotype.Adult women with Turner syndrome (n = 88 were examined thrice and 68 age-matched healthy controls were examined once. QTc was measured by one blinded reader (intra-reader variability: 0.7%, and adjusted for influence of heart rate by Bazett's (bQTc and Hodges's formula (hQTc. The prevalence of mutations in genes related to Long QT syndrome was determined in women with Turner syndrome and a QTc >432.0 milliseconds (ms. Echocardiographic assessment of aortic valve morphology, 24-hour blood pressures and blood samples were done.The mean hQTc in women with Turner syndrome (414.0 ± 25.5 ms compared to controls (390.4 ± 17.8 ms was prolonged (p432 ms, 7 had mutations in major Long QT syndrome genes (SCN5A and KCNH2 and one in a minor Long QT syndrome gene (KCNE2.There is a high prevalence of mutations in the major LQTS genes in women with TS and prolonged QTc. It remains to be settled, whether these findings are related to the unexplained excess mortality in Turner women.NCT00624949. https://register.clinicaltrials.gov/prs/app/action/SelectProtocol/sid/S0001FLI/selectaction/View/ts/3/uid/U000099E.

  18. Marfan syndrome with a complex chromosomal rearrangement including deletion of the FBN1 gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colovati Mileny ES

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The majority of Marfan syndrome (MFS cases is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene (FBN1, mapped to chromosome 15q21.1. Only few reports on deletions including the whole FBN1 gene, detected by molecular cytogenetic techniques, were found in literature. Results We report here on a female patient with clinical symptoms of the MFS spectrum plus craniostenosis, hypothyroidism and intellectual deficiency who presents a 1.9 Mb deletion, including the FBN1 gene and a complex rearrangement with eight breakpoints involving chromosomes 6, 12 and 15. Discussion This is the first report of MFS with a complex chromosome rearrangement involving a deletion of FBN1 and contiguous genes. In addition to the typical clinical findings of the Marfan syndrome due to FBN1 gene haploinsufficiency, the patient presents features which may be due to the other gene deletions and possibly to the complex chromosome rearrangement.

  19. ERK/MAPK Regulates Hippocampal Histone Phosphorylation Following Contextual Fear Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Jonathan M.; Sweatt, J. David; Chwang, Wilson B.; O'Riordan, Kenneth J.

    2006-01-01

    Long-term memory formation is regulated by many distinct molecular mechanisms that control gene expression. An emerging model for effecting a stable, coordinated pattern of gene transcription involves epigenetic tagging through modifications of histones or DNA. In this study, we investigated the regulation of histone phosphorylation in the…

  20. Progressive methylation of ageing histones by Dot1 functions as a timer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, Dirk; Frederiks, Floor; Terweij, Marit; van Welsem, Tibor; Verzijlbergen, Kitty F.; Iachina, Ekaterina; de Graaf, Erik L.; Altelaar, A. F. Maarten; Oudgenoeg, Gideon; Heck, Albert J. R.; Krijgsveldz, Jeroen; Bakker, Barbara M.; van Leeuwen, Fred

    Post-translational modifications of histone proteins have a crucial role in regulating gene expression. If efficiently re-established after chromosome duplication, histone modifications could help propagate gene expression patterns in dividing cells by epigenetic mechanisms. We used an integrated

  1. A Role for Histone Deacetylases in the Cellular and Behavioral Mechanisms Underlying Learning and Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Melissa; Monteggia, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    Histone deacetylases (HDACs) are a family of chromatin remodeling enzymes that restrict access of transcription factors to the DNA, thereby repressing gene expression. In contrast, histone acetyltransferases (HATs) relax the chromatin structure allowing for an active chromatin state and promoting gene transcription. Accumulating data have…

  2. Muir-Torre Syndrome and founder mismatch repair gene mutations: A long gone historical genetic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G; Manfredini, M; Tomasi, A; Pellacani, G

    2016-09-10

    A "cancer predisposing syndrome" later labeled as Hereditary Non-Polyposis Colorectal Cancer (HNPCC) or Lynch Syndrome, was firstly described by Warthin, about one century ago. An increased predisposition to the development of multiple familial tumors is described as characteristic of this syndrome where visceral and cutaneous malignancies may appear at an early age namely endometrial, gastric, small bowel, ureteral and renal pelvis, ovarian, hepatobiliary tract, pancreatic, brain (Turcot Syndrome) and sebaceous glands (Muir-Torre Syndrome). The latter, a variant of Lynch Syndrome, is characterized by the presence of sebaceous skin adenomas, carcinomas and/or keratoacanthomas associated with visceral malignancies. Both Lynch Syndrome and Muir-Torre Syndrome have been recognized due to germline mutations in mismatch repair genes MLH1, MSH2 and MSH6. To date, 56 Lynch Syndrome founder mutations dependent on MLH1, MSH2 and, although less frequently found, MSH6 and PMS2 are described. Some of these founder mutations, principally of MSH2 gene, have been described to cause Muir-Torre phenotype and have been traced in large and outbreed Muir-Torre Syndrome families living in different US and European territories. Due to the evidences of highly specific Muir-Torre phenotypes related to the presence of widespread MSH2 founder mutations, preliminary search for these MSH2 common mutations in individuals carrying sebaceous tumors and/or keratoacanthomas, at early age or in association to visceral and familial tumors, permits cost-effective and time-saving diagnostic strategies for Lynch/Muir-Torre Syndromes. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. IMPACT OF ANGIOTENSIN-CONVERTING ENZYME GENE POLYMORPHISM ON THE DEVELOPMENT OF INSULIN RESISTANCE SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. E. Roitberg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to analyze the distribution of components of insulin resistance (IR syndrome and to study the frequency of their combinations in relation to the genotypes and allelic variants of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE gene.Subjects and methods. A group of clinically healthy patients (50 women and 42 men with different genotypes of the ACE gene was examined.The distribution of IR syndrome components and the frequency of their combinations were analyzed in relation to the genotypes and allelicvariants of the ACE gene.Results. A group of D allele carriers compared to A allele ones showed a pronounced tendency for the frequency of IR to reduce due to thehigher proportion of patients with complete IR syndrome. This observation becomes statistically significant in the assessment of homozygous variants of the ACE gene. At the same time dyslipidemia and hypertension in the presence of IR significantly more frequently occurred in patients with the DD genotype than in those with genotype II.Conclusion. There was a marked predominance of the manifestations of IR syndrome with a complete set of components in the DD genotypicgroup, which confirms the significant strong association between ACE gene polymorphism and IR syndrome.

  4. EZH2 and histone deacetylase inhibitors induce apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer cells by differentially increasing H3 Lys27 acetylation in the BIM gene promoter and enhancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Julia P; Ling, Kun

    2017-11-01

    Enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), a subunit of polycomb repressive complex 2, is a histone methyl-transferase and is considered to work cooperatively with histone deacetylases (HDACs) in the same protein complex to mediate gene transcription repression by increasing histone H3 Lys 27 trimethylation (H3K27me3), in particular in the nucleosome (s). EZH2 is overexpressed in numerous types of cancer, including triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), a subtype of breast cancer, which there are no effective treatment options for. Thus, inhibition of EZH2 may be harnessed for targeted therapy of this disease. The present study demonstrated that co-treatment with an EZH2 inhibitor and a HDAC inhibitor additively induced apoptosis in two TNBC cell lines, namely MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-436. The increased rate of cell death was associated with an elevation of B cell lymphoma-2 like 11 (BIM) expression level, a pro-apoptotic protein at the protein and mRNA expression levels in these two cell lines. The expression of forkhead box O1 (FOXO1), a known upstream transcriptional activator of BIM , was upregulated in both cell lines by the HDAC inhibitor, and the effect was more pronounced in MDA-MB-436 cells with higher phosphorylation levels of protein kinase B, a negative regulator of FOXO1, compared with MDA-MB-231 cells. Conversely, FOXO1 expression was inhibited following treatment with the EZH2 inhibitor, suggesting that EZH2 and HDAC inhibitors induced BIM expression via a FOXO1-independent mechanism. The present study further revealed that the EZH2 inhibitor, but not the HDAC inhibitor, induced high levels of H3K27 acetylation (H3K27ac) in the BIM promoter. By contrast, compared with the effect of the EZH2 inhibitor, HDAC inhibitor treatment resulted in an increase in H3K27ac at two BIM enhancers. Collectively, the results of the present study indicated that EZH2 and HDACs act differentially on H3K27ac levels in the nucleosome at the promoter and enhancer regions of the BIM

  5. Gene expression signature of cerebellar hypoplasia in a mouse model of Down syndrome during postnatal development

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    Vitalis Tania

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Down syndrome is a chromosomal disorder caused by the presence of three copies of chromosome 21. The mechanisms by which this aneuploidy produces the complex and variable phenotype observed in people with Down syndrome are still under discussion. Recent studies have demonstrated an increased transcript level of the three-copy genes with some dosage compensation or amplification for a subset of them. The impact of this gene dosage effect on the whole transcriptome is still debated and longitudinal studies assessing the variability among samples, tissues and developmental stages are needed. Results We thus designed a large scale gene expression study in mice (the Ts1Cje Down syndrome mouse model in which we could measure the effects of trisomy 21 on a large number of samples (74 in total in a tissue that is affected in Down syndrome (the cerebellum and where we could quantify the defect during postnatal development in order to correlate gene expression changes to the phenotype observed. Statistical analysis of microarray data revealed a major gene dosage effect: for the three-copy genes as well as for a 2 Mb segment from mouse chromosome 12 that we show for the first time as being deleted in the Ts1Cje mice. This gene dosage effect impacts moderately on the expression of euploid genes (2.4 to 7.5% differentially expressed. Only 13 genes were significantly dysregulated in Ts1Cje mice at all four postnatal development stages studied from birth to 10 days after birth, and among them are 6 three-copy genes. The decrease in granule cell proliferation demonstrated in newborn Ts1Cje cerebellum was correlated with a major gene dosage effect on the transcriptome in dissected cerebellar external granule cell layer. Conclusion High throughput gene expression analysis in the cerebellum of a large number of samples of Ts1Cje and euploid mice has revealed a prevailing gene dosage effect on triplicated genes. Moreover using an enriched cell

  6. Toxic effects of extracellular histones and their neutralization by vitreous in retinal detachment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hiroki; Ito, Takashi; Yamada, Shingo; Hashiguchi, Teruto; Maruyama, Ikuro; Hisatomi, Toshio; Nakamura, Makoto; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2014-05-01

    Histones are DNA-binding proteins and are involved in chromatin remodeling and regulation of gene expression. Histones can be released after tissue injuries, and the extracellular histones cause cellular damage and organ dysfunction. Regardless of their clinical significance, the role and relevance of histones in ocular diseases are unknown. We studied the role of histones in eyes with retinal detachment (RD). Vitreous samples were collected during vitrectomy, and the concentration of histone H3 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The location of the histones and related molecules was examined in a rat RD model. The release of histones and their effects on rat retinal progenitor cells R28 and ARPE-19 were evaluated in vitro. In addition, the protective role of the vitreous body against histones was tested. The intravitreal concentration of histones was higher in eyes with RD (mean, 30.9 ± 9.8 ng/ml) than in control eyes (below the limit of detection, Phistone H3 was observed on the outer side of the detached retina and was associated with photoreceptor death. Histone H3 was released from cultured R28 by oxidative stress. Histones at a concentration 10 μg/ml induced the production of interleukin-8 in ARPE-19 cells (2.5-fold increase, PHistones were toxic to cells at concentrations of ≥ 20 μg/ml. Vitreous body or hyaluronan decreased toxicity of histones by inhibiting diffusion of histones. These results indicate that histones are released from retinas with RD and may modulate the subretinal microenvironment by functioning as damage-associated molecular pattern molecules, thereby inducing proinflammatory cytokines or cell toxicity. In addition, the important role of the vitreous body and hyaluronan in protecting the retina from these toxic effects is suggested.

  7. Drosophila Kismet regulates histone H3 lysine 27 methylation and early elongation by RNA polymerase II.

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    Shrividhya Srinivasan

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb and trithorax group proteins regulate cellular pluripotency and differentiation by maintaining hereditable states of transcription. Many Polycomb and trithorax group proteins have been implicated in the covalent modification or remodeling of chromatin, but how they interact with each other and the general transcription machinery to regulate transcription is not well understood. The trithorax group protein Kismet-L (KIS-L is a member of the CHD subfamily of chromatin-remodeling factors that plays a global role in transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II. Mutations in CHD7, the human counterpart of kis, are associated with CHARGE syndrome, a developmental disorder affecting multiple tissues and organs. To clarify how KIS-L activates gene expression and counteracts Polycomb group silencing, we characterized defects resulting from the loss of KIS-L function in Drosophila. These studies revealed that KIS-L acts downstream of P-TEFb recruitment to stimulate elongation by Pol II. The presence of two chromodomains in KIS-L suggested that its recruitment or function might be regulated by the methylation of histone H3 lysine 4 by the trithorax group proteins ASH1 and TRX. Although we observed significant overlap between the distributions of KIS-L, ASH1, and TRX on polytene chromosomes, KIS-L did not bind methylated histone tails in vitro, and loss of TRX or ASH1 function did not alter the association of KIS-L with chromatin. By contrast, loss of kis function led to a dramatic reduction in the levels of TRX and ASH1 associated with chromatin and was accompanied by increased histone H3 lysine 27 methylation-a modification required for Polycomb group repression. A similar increase in H3 lysine 27 methylation was observed in ash1 and trx mutant larvae. Our findings suggest that KIS-L promotes early elongation and counteracts Polycomb group repression by recruiting the ASH1 and TRX histone methyltransferases to chromatin.

  8. Mutations in the DNA methyltransferase gene, DNMT3A, cause an overgrowth syndrome with intellectual disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatton-Brown, Katrina; Seal, Sheila; Ruark, Elise; Harmer, Jenny; Ramsay, Emma; del Vecchio Duarte, Silvana; Zachariou, Anna; Hanks, Sandra; O’Brien, Eleanor; Aksglaede, Lise; Baralle, Diana; Dabir, Tabib; Gener, Blanca; Goudie, David; Homfray, Tessa; Kumar, Ajith; Pilz, Daniela T; Selicorni, Angelo; Temple, I Karen; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Yachelevich, Naomi; van Montfort, Robert; Rahman, Nazneen

    2014-01-01

    Overgrowth disorders are a heterogeneous group of conditions characterised by increased growth parameters and variable other clinical features, such as intellectual disability and facial dysmorphism1. To identify novel causes of human overgrowth we performed exome sequencing in 10 proband-parent trios and detected two de novo DNMT3A mutations. We identified 11 additional de novo mutations through DNMT3A sequencing of a further 142 individuals with overgrowth. The mutations were all located in functional DNMT3A domains and protein modelling suggests they interfere with domain-domain interactions and histone binding. No similar mutations were present in 1000 UK population controls (13/152 vs 0/1000; P<0.0001). Mutation carriers had a distinctive facial appearance, intellectual disability and increased height. DNMT3A encodes a key methyltransferase essential for establishing the methylation imprint in embryogenesis and is commonly somatically mutated in acute myeloid leukaemia2-4. Thus DNMT3A joins an emerging group of epigenetic DNA and histone modifying genes associated with both developmental growth disorders and haematological malignancies5. PMID:24614070

  9. Histone variant innovation in a rapidly evolving chordate lineage

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    Jansen Pascal WTC

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Histone variants alter the composition of nucleosomes and play crucial roles in transcription, chromosome segregation, DNA repair, and sperm compaction. Modification of metazoan histone variant lineages occurs on a background of genome architecture that shows global similarities from sponges to vertebrates, but the urochordate, Oikopleura dioica, a member of the sister group to vertebrates, exhibits profound modification of this ancestral architecture. Results We show that a histone complement of 47 gene loci encodes 31 histone variants, grouped in distinct sets of developmental expression profiles throughout the life cycle. A particularly diverse array of 15 male-specific histone variants was uncovered, including a testes-specific H4t, the first metazoan H4 sequence variant reported. Universal histone variants H3.3, CenH3, and H2A.Z are present but O. dioica lacks homologs of macroH2A and H2AX. The genome encodes many H2A and H2B variants and the repertoire of H2A.Z isoforms is expanded through alternative splicing, incrementally regulating the number of acetylatable lysine residues in the functionally important N-terminal "charge patch". Mass spectrometry identified 40 acetylation, methylation and ubiquitylation posttranslational modifications (PTMs and showed that hallmark PTMs of "active" and "repressive" chromatin were present in O. dioica. No obvious reduction in silent heterochromatic marks was observed despite high gene density in this extraordinarily compacted chordate genome. Conclusions These results show that histone gene complements and their organization differ considerably even over modest phylogenetic distances. Substantial innovation among all core and linker histone variants has evolved in concert with adaptation of specific life history traits in this rapidly evolving chordate lineage.

  10. Muir-Torre Syndrome: A Case Associated with an Infrequent Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grob, Alexandra; Feser, Christina; Grekin, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant genodermatosis characterized by the presence of at least one sebaceous gland neoplasm, associated with an underlying visceral malignancy. Muir-Torre syndrome is believed to be a subtype of Lynch Syndrome. Affected individuals are found to have germline mutations predominantly in DNA mismatch repair gene MSH2, and much less frequently, MLH1. The authors report the case of a 55-year-old woman presenting with multiple cutaneous neoplasms including sebaceoma, basal cell carcinoma, and squamous cell carcinoma; personal history of colorectal and endometrial cancer; and family history of colorectal cancer; found to have a deletion at mismatch repair gene MLH1. It is important to recognize the role of these less common gene deletions in producing the Muir-Torre syndrome phenotype, and consider the correlation of cutaneous manifestations with internal disease. The authors discuss the clinical presentation of Muir-Torre syndrome, methods of diagnosis, and the importance of regular medical surveillance to detect and prevent disease progression in Muir-Torre syndrome patients and their family members.

  11. Mitchell-Riley Syndrome: A Novel Mutation in RFX6 Gene

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    Marta Zegre Amorim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A novel RFX6 homozygous missense mutation was identified in an infant with Mitchell-Riley syndrome. The most common features of Mitchell-Riley syndrome were present, including severe neonatal diabetes associated with annular pancreas, intestinal malrotation, gallbladder agenesis, cholestatic disease, chronic diarrhea, and severe intrauterine growth restriction. Perijejunal tissue similar to pancreatic tissue was found in the submucosa, a finding that has not been previously reported in this syndrome. This case associating RFX6 mutation with structural and functional pancreatic abnormalities reinforces the RFX6 gene role in pancreas development and β-cell function, adding information to the existent mutation databases.

  12. A novel small deletion in the NHS gene associated with Nance-Horan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Huajin; Yang, Lizhu; Sun, Zixi; Yuan, Zhisheng; Wu, Shijing; Sui, Ruifang

    2018-01-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome is a rare X-linked recessive inherited disease with clinical features including severe bilateral congenital cataracts, characteristic facial and dental abnormalities. Data from Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome patients are limited. We assessed the clinical manifestations of a Chinese Nance-Horan syndrome pedigree and identified the genetic defect. Genetic analysis showed that 3 affected males carried a novel small deletion in NHS gene, c.263_266delCGTC (p.Ala89TrpfsTer106), a...

  13. Polymorphisms in genes RFC-1/CBS as maternal risk factors for Down syndrome in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shao-shuai; Wang, Chao; Qiao, Fu-yuan; Lv, Juan-juan; Feng, Ling

    2013-08-01

    To explore the relationship between genetic polymorphisms in reduced folate carrier 1 (RFC-1), cystathionine b-synthase (CBS), two key genes in folate metabolism, and the risk of Down syndrome in China. Genomic DNA was isolated from the peripheral lymphocytes of 104 mothers born children with Down syndrome and 184 age-matched control mothers. Polymerase chain reaction and restriction-fragment length polymorphism were used to examine the polymorphisms of RFC-1 A80G, CBS T833C and the relationship between these genotypes and the risk of Down syndrome was analyzed. We found that there were significant differences between RFC-1 G80G, CBS C833C polymorphisms among mothers of children with Down syndrome than among control mothers, with odds ratio of 1.51 (95 % CI 1.05-2.18), 1.53 (95 % CI 1.07-2.18) respectively. The combined presence of RFC1 mutant alleles and the CBS homozygous mutant allele (15/104) was associated with a 4.81-fold increased risk of having a child with Down syndrome (95 % CI 1.82-12.68, P = 0.0007). We concluded that RFC-1 and CBS gene mutation alleles are related to Down syndrome, and women with mutation RFC-1 G80G, CBS C833C OR combined with RFC-1 A80G and CBS 833TT genotype increase the risk of Down syndrome in China.

  14. A de-novo STXBP1 gene mutation in a patient showing the Rett syndrome phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romaniello, Romina; Saettini, Francesco; Panzeri, Elena; Arrigoni, Filippo; Bassi, Maria T; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-03-25

    This study reports on a 9-year-old girl who developed West syndrome and showed clinical features fulfilling the main revised diagnostic criteria for typical Rett syndrome (hand washing, severe cognitive impairment with absence of language, ataxic gait, progressive scoliosis and autistic features). Mutation analyses for methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2), cyclin-dependent kinase-like 5 (CDKL5/STK9), ARX and Forkhead box G1 (FOXG1) genes were carried out, with negative results. A known de-novo c.1217G>A missense mutation in exon 14 leading to the substitution of a conserved residue, p.R406H in domain3b of the syntaxin-binding protein 1 (STXBP1) gene, was detected. The STXBP1 gene encodes the syntaxin-binding protein 1, a neuron-specific protein involved in synaptic vesicle release at both glutaminergic and GABAergic synapses. This function is also affected by MECP2 gene mutations, which are known to lead to a decrease in glutamate and GABA receptors' density. It is possible to speculate that the impairment in synaptic plasticity represents the pathogenic link between MECP2 and STXBP1 gene mutations. On reviewing the clinical features of the reported patients with the same mutation in the STXBP1 gene, it has been observed that poor eye contact, tremour, dyskinesia, head/hand stereotypies and both cognitive and motor progressive deterioration are common symptoms, although never considered as indicative of a Rett syndrome phenotype. In conclusion, the case described here suggests a relationship between the Rett syndrome and the STXBP1 gene not described so far, making the search for STXBP1 gene mutations advisable in patients with Rett syndrome and early onset of epilepsy. Copyright © 2015 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Gene expression profiling in a mouse model identifies fetal liver- and placenta-derived potential biomarkers for Down syndrome screening

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pennings, J.L.A.; Rodenburg, W.; Imholz, S.; Koster, M.P.H.; van Oostrom, C.T.M.; Breit, T.M.; Schielen, P.C.J.I.; de Vries, A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: As a first step to identify novel potential biomarkers for prenatal Down Syndrome screening, we analyzed gene expression in embryos of wild type mice and the Down Syndrome model Ts1Cje. Since current Down Syndrome screening markers are derived from placenta and fetal liver, these tissues

  16. Functional convergence of histone methyltransferases EHMT1 and KMT2C involved in intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorder.

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    Tom S Koemans

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kleefstra syndrome, caused by haploinsufficiency of euchromatin histone methyltransferase 1 (EHMT1, is characterized by intellectual disability (ID, autism spectrum disorder (ASD, characteristic facial dysmorphisms, and other variable clinical features. In addition to EHMT1 mutations, de novo variants were reported in four additional genes (MBD5, SMARCB1, NR1I3, and KMT2C, in single individuals with clinical characteristics overlapping Kleefstra syndrome. Here, we present a novel cohort of five patients with de novo loss of function mutations affecting the histone methyltransferase KMT2C. Our clinical data delineates the KMT2C phenotypic spectrum and reinforces the phenotypic overlap with Kleefstra syndrome and other related ID disorders. To elucidate the common molecular basis of the neuropathology associated with mutations in KMT2C and EHMT1, we characterized the role of the Drosophila KMT2C ortholog, trithorax related (trr, in the nervous system. Similar to the Drosophila EHMT1 ortholog, G9a, trr is required in the mushroom body for short term memory. Trr ChIP-seq identified 3371 binding sites, mainly in the promoter of genes involved in neuronal processes. Transcriptional profiling of pan-neuronal trr knockdown and G9a null mutant fly heads identified 613 and 1123 misregulated genes, respectively. These gene sets show a significant overlap and are associated with nearly identical gene ontology enrichments. The majority of the observed biological convergence is derived from predicted indirect target genes. However, trr and G9a also have common direct targets, including the Drosophila ortholog of Arc (Arc1, a key regulator of synaptic plasticity. Our data highlight the clinical and molecular convergence between the KMT2 and EHMT protein families, which may contribute to a molecular network underlying a larger group of ID/ASD-related disorders.

  17. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed, Amna; Alsaleem, Badr

    2017-01-01

    Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS) with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. ...

  18. Somatic mutations of the histone H3K27 demethylase, UTX, in human cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Haaften, Gijs; Dalgliesh, Gillian L; Davies, Helen; Chen, Lina; Bignell, Graham; Greenman, Chris; Edkins, Sarah; Hardy, Claire; O’Meara, Sarah; Teague, Jon; Butler, Adam; Hinton, Jonathan; Latimer, Calli; Andrews, Jenny; Barthorpe, Syd; Beare, Dave; Buck, Gemma; Campbell, Peter J; Cole, Jennifer; Dunmore, Rebecca; Forbes, Simon; Jia, Mingming; Jones, David; Kok, Chai Yin; Leroy, Catherine; Lin, Meng-Lay; McBride, David J; Maddison, Mark; Maquire, Simon; McLay, Kirsten; Menzies, Andrew; Mironenko, Tatiana; Lee, Mulderrig; Mudie, Laura; Pleasance, Erin; Shepherd, Rebecca; Smith, Raffaella; Stebbings, Lucy; Stephens, Philip; Tang, Gurpreet; Tarpey, Patrick S; Turner, Rachel; Turrell, Kelly; Varian, Jennifer; West, Sofie; Widaa, Sara; Wray, Paul; Collins, V Peter; Ichimura, Koichi; Law, Simon; Wong, John; Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi; Tonon, Giovanni; DePinho, Ronald A; Tai, Yu-Tzu; Anderson, Kenneth C; Kahnoski, Richard J.; Massie, Aaron; Khoo, Sok Kean; Teh, Bin Tean; Stratton, Michael R; Futreal, P Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Somatically acquired epigenetic changes are present in many cancers. Epigenetic regulation is maintained via post-translational modifications of core histones. Here, we describe inactivating somatic mutations in the histone lysine demethylase, UTX, pointing to histone H3 lysine methylation deregulation in multiple tumour types. UTX reintroduction into cancer cells with inactivating UTX mutations resulted in slowing of proliferation and marked transcriptional changes. These data identify UTX as a new human cancer gene. PMID:19330029

  19. Gene expression analysis of induced pluripotent stem cells from aneuploid chromosomal syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Human aneuploidy is the leading cause of early pregnancy loss, mental retardation, and multiple congenital anomalies. Due to the high mortality associated with aneuploidy, the pathophysiological mechanisms of aneuploidy syndrome remain largely unknown. Previous studies focused mostly on whether dosage compensation occurs, and the next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq is expected to eventually uncover the mechanisms of gene expression regulation and the related pathological phenotypes in human aneuploidy. Results Using next generation transcriptomics sequencing technology RNA-seq, we profiled the transcriptomes of four human aneuploid induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines generated from monosomy × (Turner syndrome), trisomy 8 (Warkany syndrome 2), trisomy 13 (Patau syndrome), and partial trisomy 11:22 (Emanuel syndrome) as well as two umbilical cord matrix iPSC lines as euploid controls to examine how phenotypic abnormalities develop with aberrant karyotype. A total of 466 M (50-bp) reads were obtained from the six iPSC lines, and over 13,000 mRNAs were identified by gene annotation. Global analysis of gene expression profiles and functional analysis of differentially expressed (DE) genes were implemented. Over 5000 DE genes are determined between aneuploidy and euploid iPSCs respectively while 9 KEGG pathways are overlapped enriched in four aneuploidy samples. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that the extra or missing chromosome has extensive effects on the whole transcriptome. Functional analysis of differentially expressed genes reveals that the genes most affected in aneuploid individuals are related to central nervous system development and tumorigenesis. PMID:24564826

  20. Atypical progeroid syndrome: An unknown helicase gene defect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijs, M. W. G.; van Andel, R. N. J.; Oshima, J.; Madan, K.; Nieuwint, A. W. M.; Aalfs, C. M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a boy with chromosomal breakage syndrome, who died of hepatocellular carcinoma at the age of 17 years. Other findings included growth retardation, bilateral cataracts, premature graying of hair and elevated levels of urinary hyaluronic acid. Intellectual functions were normal. Although

  1. Mismatch repair gene mutation spectrum in the Swedish Lynch syndrome population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagerstedt-Robinson, Kristina; Rohlin, Anna; Aravidis, Christos; Melin, Beatrice; Nordling, Margareta; Stenmark-Askmalm, Marie; Lindblom, Annika; Nilbert, Mef

    2016-11-01

    Lynch syndrome caused by constitutional mismatch‑repair defects is one of the most common hereditary cancer syndromes with a high risk for colorectal, endometrial, ovarian and urothelial cancer. Lynch syndrome is caused by mutations in the mismatch repair (MMR) genes i.e., MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 and PMS2. After 20 years of genetic counseling and genetic testing for Lynch syndrome, we have compiled the mutation spectrum in Sweden with the aim to provide a population-based perspective on the contribution from the different MMR genes, the various types of mutations and the influence from founder mutations. Mutation data were collected on a national basis from all laboratories involved in genetic testing. Mutation analyses were performed using mainly Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification. A total of 201 unique disease-predisposing MMR gene mutations were identified in 369 Lynch syndrome families. These mutations affected MLH1 in 40%, MSH2 in 36%, MSH6 in 18% and PMS2 in 6% of the families. A large variety of mutations were identified with splice site mutations being the most common mutation type in MLH1 and frameshift mutations predominating in MSH2 and MSH6. Large deletions of one or several exons accounted for 21% of the mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 and 22% in PMS2, but were rare (4%) in MSH6. In 66% of the Lynch syndrome families the variants identified were private and the effect from founder mutations was limited and predominantly related to a Finnish founder mutation that accounted for 15% of the families with mutations in MLH1. In conclusion, the Swedish Lynch syndrome mutation spectrum is diverse with private MMR gene mutations in two-thirds of the families, has a significant contribution from internationally recognized mutations and a limited effect from founder mutations.

  2. Study on the correlation between KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Fan; Liu, Ning; Chen, Xiao Zhuang; Han, Kun Yuan; Zhu, Cai Zhong

    2017-09-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the correlation between KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome in elderly patients. From January 2014 to January 2015, 54 elderly patients with metabolic syndrome were enrolled in this study as the observation group. During the same period, 46 healthy elderly individuals were enrolled in this study as the control group. KCNJ11 gene polymorphism (rs28502) was analyzed using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The expression levels of mRNA in different genotypes were detected using FQ-PCR. ELISA was used to evaluate the KCNJ11 protein expression in different genotypes. KCNJ11 gene polymorphism and metabolic syndrome was studied by measuring the blood pressure levels in patients with different genotypes. Three genotypes of KCNJ11 gene in rs28502 were CC, CT and TT. The CC, CT and TT genotype frequencies in healthy population were 8.5, 9.2 and 82.2%, respectively, while the genotype frequencies in patients with metabolic syndrome were 42.4, 49.8 and 7.8%, respectively. There were significant differences between groups (P≤0.05). However, the genotype frequencies of C/T in healthy individuals and metabolic syndrome patients were 35.3 and 38.3%, respectively. There were no significant differences between groups (P>0.05). FQ-PCR results showed that the KCNJ11 mRNA expression levels in the control and observation groups had no significant differences (P>0.05). However, the results obtained from ELISA analysis revealed that KCNJ11 protein expression level in the observation group was significantly higher than that in the control group (Pmetabolic syndrome in the elderly. Elderly patients with the CC and TT genotypes are more likely to develop metabolic syndrome.

  3. A novel nonsense mutation in the WFS1 gene causes the Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorian, Shahab; Savad, Shahram; Mohammadi, Davood Shah

    2016-05-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder, which is mostly caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. The WFS1 gene product, which is called wolframin, is thought to regulate the function of endoplasmic reticulum. The endoplasmic reticulum has a critical role in protein folding and material transportation within the cell or to the surface of the cell. Identification of new mutations in WFS1 gene will unravel the molecular pathology of WS. The aim of this case report study is to describe a novel mutation in exon 4 of the WFS1 gene (c.330C>A) in a 9-year-old boy with WS.

  4. Identification of the gene for Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS)

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, S. P.; Ebenezer, N. D.; Poopalasundaram, S.; Lehmann, O. J.; Moore, A. T.; Hardcastle, A. J.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To identify the gene or genes responsible for these diseases. Methods: Families with NHS were ascertained. The refined locus for CXN was used to focus the search for candidate genes, which were screened by polymerase chain reaction and direct sequencing of potential exons and intron-exon splice sites. Genomic structures and homologies were determined using bioinformatics. Expression studies were undertaken using specific exonic primers to amplify human fetal cDNA and mouse RNA....

  5. [Sebaceous gland tumor with a rare gene mutation within a tumor syndrome: Muir-Torre syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voigt, E; Sommer, F; Geiger, K D; Pillunat, L E

    2014-04-01

    Muir-Torre syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant subtype of hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal carcinoma and is characterized by the simultaneous occurrence of sebaceous gland neoplasms with visceral and urogenital malignancies. This article describes the case of a 72-year-old patient who was referred to our clinic for removal of an upper eyelid tumor, showing the course from the clinical findings to the rare diagnosis of Muir-Torre syndrome.

  6. Total levels of hippocampal histone acetylation predict normal variability in mouse behavior.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Addie May I Nesbitt

    Full Text Available Genetic, pharmacological, and environmental interventions that alter total levels of histone acetylation in specific brain regions can modulate behaviors and treatment responses. Efforts have been made to identify specific genes that are affected by alterations in total histone acetylation and to propose that such gene specific modulation could explain the effects of total histone acetylation levels on behavior - the implication being that under naturalistic conditions variability in histone acetylation occurs primarily around the promoters of specific genes.Here we challenge this hypothesis by demonstrating with a novel flow cytometry based technique that normal variability in open field exploration, a hippocampus-related behavior, was associated with total levels of histone acetylation in the hippocampus but not in other brain regions.Results suggest that modulation of total levels of histone acetylation may play a role in regulating biological processes. We speculate in the discussion that endogenous regulation of total levels of histone acetylation may be a mechanism through which organisms regulate cellular plasticity. Flow cytometry provides a useful approach to measure total levels of histone acetylation at the single cell level. Relating such information to behavioral measures and treatment responses could inform drug delivery strategies to target histone deacetylase inhibitors and other chromatin modulators to places where they may be of benefit while avoiding areas where correction is not needed and could be harmful.

  7. Exclusion of RAI2 as the causative gene for Nance-Horan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S M; Ronce, N; Grayson, C; Dessay, B; Yates, J R; Trump, D; Toutain, A

    1999-05-01

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked condition characterised by congenital cataracts, microphthalmia and/or microcornea, unusual dental morphology, dysmorphic facial features, and developmental delay in some cases. Recent linkage studies have mapped the NHS disease gene to a 3.5-cM interval on Xp22.2 between DXS1053 and DXS443. We previously identified a human homologue of a mouse retinoic-acid-induced gene (RAI2) within the NHS critical flanking interval and have tested the gene as a candidate for Nance-Horan syndrome in nine NHS-affected families. Direct sequencing of the RAI2 gene and predicted promoter region has revealed no mutations in the families screened; RAI2 is therefore unlikely to be associated with NHS.

  8. Collectrin gene screening in Turner syndrome patients with kidney ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    immune basis, suggesting that hap- loinsufficiency for X-chromosome gene(s) impairs beta-cell function predisposing to diabetes mellitus in TS (Bakalov et al. 2004). The loss of the short arm of chromosome X (Xp), common to all TS, generally ...

  9. Prospects for Gene Therapy in the Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattazzi, Mario C.; LaFauci, Giuseppe; Brown, W. Ted

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is unarguably the definitive way to treat, and possibly cure, genetic diseases. A straightforward concept in theory, in practice it has proven difficult to realize, even when directed to easily accessed somatic cell systems. Gene therapy for diseases in which the central nervous system (CNS) is the target organ presents even greater…

  10. Mutations du gene de la filamine et syndromes malformatifs | Koffi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Filamin is a cytoskeletal protein that occurs in the control of cytoskeleton structure and activity, the modulation of cell shape and migration as well as in the maintaining of cell shape. Mutations in the genes FLNA and FLNB provoke diverse malformative diseases in human. Mutations in the gene FLNA cause four X-Linked ...

  11. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  12. Impact of gene patents and licensing practices on access to genetic testing for long QT syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angrist, Misha; Chandrasekharan, Subhashini; Heaney, Christopher; Cook-Deegan, Robert

    2010-04-01

    Genetic testing for long QT syndrome exemplifies patenting and exclusive licensing with different outcomes at different times. Exclusive licensing from the University of Utah changed the business model from sole provider to two US providers of long QT syndrome testing. Long QT syndrome is associated with mutations in many genes, 12 of which are now tested by two competing firms in the United States, PGxHealth and GeneDx. Until 2009, PGxHealth was the sole provider, based largely on exclusive rights to patents from the University of Utah and elsewhere. University of Utah patents were initially licensed to DNA Sciences, whose patent rights were acquired by Genaissance, and then by Clinical Data, Inc., which owns PGxHealth. In 2002, DNA Sciences, Inc., "cleared the market" by sending cease-and-desist patent enforcement letters to university and reference laboratories offering long QT syndrome genetic testing. There was no test on the market for a 1- to 2-year period. From 2005-2008, most long QT syndrome-related patents were controlled by Clinical Data, Inc., and its subsidiary PGxHealth. Bio-Reference Laboratories, Inc., secured countervailing exclusive patent rights starting in 2006, also from the University of Utah, and broke the PGxHealth monopoly in early 2009, creating a duopoly for genetic testing in the United States and expanding the number of genes for which commercial testing is available from 5 to 12.

  13. Treacher Collins Syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp Deletion in the TCOF1 Gene

    OpenAIRE

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) w...

  14. Microdeletion syndromes disclose replication timing alterations of genes unrelated to the missing DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freedman Jane

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The temporal order of allelic replication is interrelated to the epigenomic profile. A significant epigenetic marker is the asynchronous replication of monoallelically-expressed genes versus the synchronous replication of biallelically-expressed genes. The present study sought to determine whether a microdeletion in the genome affects epigenetic profiles of genes unrelated to the missing segment. In order to test this hypothesis, we checked the replication patterns of two genes – SNRPN, a normally monoallelically expressed gene (assigned to 15q11.13, and the RB1, an archetypic biallelically expressed gene (assigned to 13.q14 in the genomes of patients carrying the 22q11.2 deletion (DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial syndrome and those carrying the 7q11.23 deletion (Williams syndrome. Results The allelic replication timing was determined by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH technology performed on peripheral blood cells. As expected, in the cells of normal subjects the frequency of cells showing asynchronous replication for SNRPN was significantly (P -12 higher than the corresponding value for RB1. In contrast, cells of the deletion-carrying patients exhibited a reversal in this replication pattern: there was a significantly lower frequency of cells engaging in asynchronous replication for SNRPN than for RB1 (P -4 and P -3 for DiGeorge/Velocardiofacial and Williams syndromes, respectively. Accordingly, the significantly lower frequency of cells showing asynchronous replication for SNRPN than for RB1 is a new epigenetic marker distinguishing these deletion syndrome genotypes from normal ones. Conclusion In cell samples of each deletion-carrying individual, an aberrant, reversed pattern of replication is delineated, namely, where a monoallelic gene replicates more synchronously than a biallelic gene. This inverted pattern, which appears to be non-deletion-specific, clearly distinguishes cells of deletion-carriers from normal

  15. Gene expression alterations at baseline and following moderate exercise in patients with Chronic Fatigue Syndrome and Fibromyalgia Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, A R; Bateman, L; Jo, D; Hughen, R W; Vanhaitsma, T A; White, A T; Light, K C

    2012-01-01

    To determine mRNA expression differences in genes involved in signalling and modulating sensory fatigue, and muscle pain in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) and fibromyalgia syndrome (FM) at baseline, and following moderate exercise. Forty-eight patients with CFS only, or CFS with comorbid FM, 18 patients with FM that did not meet criteria for CFS, and 49 healthy controls underwent moderate exercise (25 min at 70% maximum age-predicted heart rate). Visual-analogue measures of fatigue and pain were taken before, during and after exercise. Blood samples were taken before and 0.5, 8, 24 and 48 h after exercise. Leucocytes were immediately isolated from blood, number coded for blind processing and analyses and flash frozen. Using real-time, quantitative PCR, the amount of mRNA for 13 genes (relative to control genes) involved in sensory, adrenergic and immune functions was compared between groups at baseline and following exercise. Changes in amounts of mRNA were correlated with behavioural measures and functional clinical assessments. No gene expression changes occurred following exercise in controls. In 71% of patients with CFS, moderate exercise increased most sensory and adrenergic receptor's and one cytokine gene's transcription for 48 h. These postexercise increases correlated with behavioural measures of fatigue and pain. In contrast, for the other 29% of patients with CFS, adrenergic α-2A receptor's transcription was decreased at all time-points after exercise; other genes were not altered. History of orthostatic intolerance was significantly more common in the α-2A decrease subgroup. FM-only patients showed no postexercise alterations in gene expression, but their pre-exercise baseline mRNA for two sensory ion channels and one cytokine were significantly higher than controls.   At least two subgroups of patients with CFS can be identified by gene expression changes following exercise. The larger subgroup showed increases in mRNA for

  16. Do the MTHFR gene polymorphism and Down syndrome pregnancy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Srinivasan Muthuswamy

    2015-09-28

    Sep 28, 2015 ... Abstract Background: Down syndrome, the most common trisomy 21 arises from abnormal .... chromosomal segregation, predisposing to trisomy 21 [2]. .... 94. 73 18. 0.49. 51 48. 6. 101. 73. 9. 0.36. Indian studies. Cyril [11]. India. 36/60. 33. 3. 0. 60. 0. 0. 0. 14 19. 3. 26. 21 13. 0.03. Kaur [13]. India. 110/111.

  17. High expression of liver histone deacetylase 3 contributes to high-fat-diet-induced metabolic syndrome by suppressing the PPAR-γ and LXR-α-pathways in E3 rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmin; Wang, Xuan; Ren, Wuchao; Ren, Juan; Lan, Xi; Wang, Feimiao; Li, Hongmin; Zhang, Fujun; Han, Yan; Song, Tianbao; Holmdahl, Rikard; Lu, Shemin

    2011-09-15

    In the previous experiment, we found that there was a different response between E3 rats and DA.1U rats to high-fat-diet-induced metabolic syndrome (HFD-MetS). The aim of this study was to explore the cause and molecular mechanism of the genetic difference in susceptibility to metabolic syndrome in E3 rats as compared with DA.1U rats. Firstly, a 12-week HFD-MetS model in E3 and DA.1U rats was carried out and assessed. Then, the expression of key insulin signaling molecules, metabolic nuclear receptors, metabolic key enzymes and histone deacetylases (Hdacs) was determined by different methods. Finally, the effects of overexpression and disruption of Hdac3 on metabolic nuclear receptors were analyzed in CBRH-7919 cells and primarily-hepatic cells from DA.1U and E3 rats. We found that E3 rats were susceptible, while DA.1U rats were resisted to HFD-MetS. The expression of liver X receptor α,β (LXR-α,β), farnesoid X receptor (FXR), peroxisome proliferator activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) increased markedly in DA.1U rat liver, whereas they decreased significantly in E3 rats. The expression of Hdac3 increased by HFD treatment in both E3 and DA.1U rat livers, but the constitutive Hdac3 expression was lower in DA.IU rat liver than in E3 rat liver. Importantly, overexpression of Hdac3 could downregulate the expression of LXR-α, PPAR-γ and CYP7A1 in both CBRH-7919 cells and primarily cultured hepatic cells from DA.IU rats. On the contrary, disruption of Hdac3 by shRNA upregulated the expression of LXR-α, PPAR-γ and CYP7A1 in both CBRH-7919 cells and primarily cultured hepatic cells from E3 rats. The results suggested that a high constitutive expression of Hdac3 inhibiting the expression of PPAR-γ, LXR-α and CYP7A1 in liver contributes to HFD-MetS in E3 rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Histone deacetylases and atherosclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xia-xia; Zhou, Tian; Wang, Xin-An; Tong, Xiao-hong; Ding, Jia-wang

    2015-06-01

    Atherosclerosis is the most common pathological process that leads to cardiovascular diseases, a disease of large- and medium-sized arteries that is characterized by a formation of atherosclerotic plaques consisting of necrotic cores, calcified regions, accumulated modified lipids, smooth muscle cells (SMCs), endothelial cells, leukocytes, and foam cells. Recently, the question about how to suppress the occurrence of atherosclerosis and alleviate the progress of cardiovascular disease becomes the hot topic. Accumulating evidence suggests that histone deacetylases(HDACs) play crucial roles in arteriosclerosis. This review summarizes the effect of HDACs and HDAC inhibitors(HDACi) on the progress of atherosclerosis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  19. Pearson syndrome in an infant heterozygous for C282Y allele of HFE gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefala-Agoropoulou, Kalomoira; Roilides, Emmanuel; Lazaridou, Anna; Karatza, Eliza; Farmaki, Evangelia; Tsantali, Haido; Augoustides-Savvopoulou, Persephone; Tsiouris, John

    2007-12-01

    Pearson syndrome is a rare mitochondrial disorder characterized by sideroblastic anemia, liver disease, renal tubulopathy and exocrine pancreas deficiency. We describe a female infant suffering from anemia since birth who gradually developed the complete picture of Pearson syndrome by 13 months. Iron overload was disproportionate to blood transfusions. The patient was heterozygous for HFE gene C282Y mutation (type I hemochromatosis). After an initial response to deferoxamine she presented with cutaneous zygomycosis and died after metabolic derangement and Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia. This is the second case of a Pearson syndrome individual who was also heterozygous for HFE gene mutation C282Y published. It is also the second case report of a Pearson patient suffering from severe iron overload and liver disease that responded to therapy with deferoxamine.

  20. Distinct gene expression profiles in ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jönsson, Jenny-Maria; Bartuma, Katarina; Dominguez-Valentin, Mev

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer linked to Lynch syndrome represents a rare subset that typically presents at young age as early-stage tumors with an overrepresentation of endometrioid and clear cell histologies. We investigated the molecular profiles of Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic ovarian cancer...... with the aim to identify key discriminators and central tumorigenic mechanisms in hereditary ovarian cancer. Global gene expression profiling using whole-genome c-DNA-mediated Annealing, Selection, extension, and Ligation was applied to 48 histopathologically matched Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...... for histologic subtype, hierarchical clustering confirmed distinct differences related to heredity in the endometrioid and serous subtypes. Furthermore, separate clustering was achieved in an independent, publically available data set. The distinct genetic signatures in Lynch syndrome-associated and sporadic...

  1. A Novel Fibrillin-1 Gene Mutation Leading to Marfan Syndrome in a Korean Girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nam, Hyo-Kyoung; Nam, Myung-Hyun; Ha, Kee-Soo; Rhie, Young-Jun; Lee, Kee-Hyoung

    2017-03-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder caused by a connective tissue defect. A nine-year-old girl was referred to our pediatric endocrinology clinic for tall stature. Physical examination revealed a lens dislocation with strabismus, high palate, positive wrist and thumb signs, joint hypermobility, and pes planus. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed dilatation of the aortic root. She was diagnosed with Marfan syndrome based on the revised Ghent diagnostic criteria. Molecular investigation identified a heterozygous c.2810G >A variation in the FBN1 gene in the patient, but not in her parents. To our knowledge, this sequence variant has been reported as a polymorphism (rs113602180), but it is the first report identifying it as the genetic cause of Marfan syndrome. We hypothesize that this de novo novel missense FBN1 mutation disrupts fibrillin-1 function and is probably involved in the development of Marfan syndrome in this patient. © 2017 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  2. Association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene polymorphisms with hepatorenal syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.; Luo, X.; Ye, J.; Liu, S.; Miu, L.; Bao, J.; Wang, F.; Yu, Z.

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene single nucleotide polymorphisms with type I hepatorenal syndrome. Methods: The case-control study was conducted at the Hangzhou City Xixi Hospital, Hangzhou, China, from January 2012 to June 2014, and comprised patients with type I hepatorenal syndrome and individuals with cirrhosis who acted as the control group. Arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus single nucleotide polymorphisms were analysed by high-resolution melting methods. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS 17. Results: Of the 60 participants, 28(46.7%) were in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 32(53.3%) were controls. The mean age was 42.21+-11.30years in the hepatorenal syndrome group and 43.69+-12.60 in the control group (p=0.64). Mean total bilirubin, albumin and prothrombin activity levels were 154.76+-51.58, 49.30+-24.67 and 33.42+-3.69 in the hepatorenal syndrome group compared to 181.26+-64.46, 41.78+-17.52 and 32.98+-4.81 among controls (p=0.09, p=0.18 and p=0.70). Statistically significant differences were found in the distributions of arginine vasopressin receptor 1a gene rs113481894 locus T allele between type I hepatorenal syndrome patients and the control group (odds ratio= 2.230; p= 0.040). Conclusion: T allele located at arginine vasopressin receptor 1a receptor promoter rs113481894 locus may be associated with the pathogenesis of type I hepatorenal syndrome. (author)

  3. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-01-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS

  4. The Brugada Syndrome Susceptibility Gene HEY2 Modulates Cardiac Transmural Ion Channel Patterning and Electrical Heterogeneity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veerman, Christiaan C.; Podliesna, Svitlana; Tadros, Rafik; Lodder, Elisabeth M.; Mengarelli, Isabella; de Jonge, Berend; Beekman, Leander; Barc, Julien; Wilders, Ronald; Wilde, Arthur A.; Boukens, Bastiaan J.; Coronel, Ruben; Verkerk, Arie; Remme, Carol Ann; Bezzina, Connie R.

    2017-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies previously identified an association of rs9388451 at chromosome 6q22.3 (near HEY2) with Brugada syndrome. The causal gene and underlying mechanism remain unresolved. We used an integrative approach entailing transcriptomic studies in human hearts and

  5. Fragile X syndrome: An overview and update of the FMR1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mila, M; Alvarez-Mora, M I; Madrigal, I; Rodriguez-Revenga, L

    2018-02-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability and the leading form of the monogenic cause of autism. Fragile X mental retardation type 1 (FMR1) gene premutation is the first single-gene cause of primary ovarian failure (Fragile X-associated primary ovarian insufficiency [FXPOI]) and one of the most common causes of ataxia (fragile X-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome [FXTAS]), multiple additional phenotypes such as fibromyalgia, hypothyroidism, migraine headaches, sleep disturbances, sleep apnea, restless legs syndrome, central pain syndrome, neuropathy and neuropsychiatric alterations has been described. Clinical involvement in men and women carrying the FMR1 premutation currently constitutes a real health problem in the society that should be taken into account. It is important to highlight that while in FXS there is a loss-of-function of the FMR1 gene, in premutation associated disorders there is a gain of FMR1 mRNA function. To date, the tremendous progress achieved in the understanding of the pathophysiology of FXS, has led to the development of several targeted therapies aimed at preventing or improving the neurological manifestations of the disease. This review is an update of the diseases associated with the FMR1 gene. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. [From gene to disease; tumor necrosis factor receptor and a syndrome of familial periodic fever

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simon, A.; Drenth, J.P.H.; Meer, J.W.M. van der

    2001-01-01

    Familial Hibernian fever (FHF) is a rare hereditary syndrome that causes periodic attacks of fever and inflammation. It is an autosomal dominantly inherited disorder. The gene involved in FHF encodes for a receptor for tumour necrosis factor (TNFR1). These mutations are thought to result in impaired

  7. Gene, Brain, and Behavior Relationships in Fragile X Syndrome: Evidence from Neuroimaging Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightbody, Amy A.; Reiss, Allan L.

    2009-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FraX) remains the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and provides a valuable model for studying gene-brain-behavior relationships. Over the past 15 years, structural and functional magnetic resonance imaging studies have emerged with the goal of better understanding the neural pathways contributing to the…

  8. Correlation of gene expression with bladder capacity in interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colaco, Marc; Koslov, David S; Keys, Tristan; Evans, Robert J; Badlani, Gopal H; Andersson, Karl-Erik; Walker, Stephen J

    2014-10-01

    Interstitial cystitis and bladder pain syndrome are terms used to describe a heterogeneous chronic pelvic and bladder pain disorder. Despite its significant prevalence, our understanding of disease etiology is poor. We molecularly characterized interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and determined whether there are clinical factors that correlate with gene expression. Bladder biopsies from female subjects with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and female controls without signs of the disease were collected and divided into those with normal and low anesthetized bladder capacity, respectively. Samples then underwent RNA extraction and microarray assay. Data generated by these assays were analyzed using Omics Explorer (Qlucore, Lund, Sweden), GeneSifter® Analysis Edition 4.0 and Ingenuity® Pathway Analysis to determine similarity among samples within and between groups, and measure differentially expressed transcripts unique to each phenotype. A total of 16 subjects were included in study. Principal component analysis and unsupervised hierarchical clustering showed clear separation between gene expression in tissues from subjects with low compared to normal bladder capacity. Gene expression in tissue from patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome who had normal bladder capacity did not significantly differ from that in controls without interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. Pairwise analysis revealed that pathways related to inflammatory and immune response were most involved. Microarray analysis provides insight into the potential pathological condition underlying interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. This pilot study shows that patients with this disorder who have low compared to normal bladder capacity have significantly different molecular characteristics, which may reflect a difference in disease pathophysiology. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc

  9. Multi-layered mutation in hedgehog-related genes in Gorlin syndrome may affect the phenotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shoko Onodera

    Full Text Available Gorlin syndrome is a genetic disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance that predisposes the affected individual to a variety of disorders that are attributed largely to heterozygous germline patched1 (PTCH1 mutations. PTCH1 is a hedgehog (Hh receptor as well as a repressor, mutation of which leads to constitutive activation of Hh pathway. Hh pathway encompasses a wide variety of cellular signaling cascades, which involve several molecules; however, no associated genotype-phenotype correlations have been reported. Recently, mutations in Suppressor of fused homolog (SUFU or PTCH2 were reported in patients with Gorlin syndrome. These facts suggest that multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may contribute to the development of Gorlin syndrome. We demonstrated multiple mutations of Hh-related genes in addition to PTCH1, which possibly act in an additive or multiplicative manner and lead to Gorlin syndrome. High-throughput sequencing was performed to analyze exome sequences in four unrelated Gorlin syndrome patient genomes. Mutations in PTCH1 gene were detected in all four patients. Specific nucleotide variations or frameshift variations of PTCH1 were identified along with the inferred amino acid changes in all patients. We further filtered 84 different genes which are closely related to Hh signaling. Fifty three of these had enough coverage of over ×30. The sequencing results were filtered and compared to reduce the number of sequence variants identified in each of the affected individuals. We discovered three genes, PTCH2, BOC, and WNT9b, with mutations with a predicted functional impact assessed by MutationTaster2 or PolyPhen-2 (Polymorphism Phenotyping v2 analysis. It is noticeable that PTCH2 and BOC are Hh receptor molecules. No significant mutations were observed in SUFU. Multi-layered mutations in Hh pathway may change the activation level of the Hh signals, which may explain the wide phenotypic variability of Gorlin syndrome.

  10. Pathogenic Variants in Complement Genes and Risk of Atypical Hemolytic Uremic Syndrome Relapse after Eculizumab Discontinuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhouri, Fadi; Fila, Marc; Provôt, François; Delmas, Yahsou; Barbet, Christelle; Châtelet, Valérie; Rafat, Cédric; Cailliez, Mathilde; Hogan, Julien; Servais, Aude; Karras, Alexandre; Makdassi, Raifah; Louillet, Feriell; Coindre, Jean-Philippe; Rondeau, Eric; Loirat, Chantal; Frémeaux-Bacchi, Véronique

    2017-01-06

    The complement inhibitor eculizumab has dramatically improved the outcome of atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. However, the optimal duration of eculizumab treatment in atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome remains debated. We report on the French atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome working group's first 2-year experience with eculizumab discontinuation in patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome. Using the French atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome registry database, we retrospectively identified all dialysis-free patients with atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome who discontinued eculizumab between 2010 and 2014 and reviewed their relevant clinical and biologic data. The decision to discontinue eculizumab was made by the clinician in charge of the patient. All patients were closely monitored by regular urine dipsticks and blood tests. Eculizumab was rapidly (24-48 hours) restarted in case of relapse. Among 108 patients treated with eculizumab, 38 patients (nine children and 29 adults) discontinued eculizumab (median treatment duration of 17.5 months). Twenty-one patients (55%) carried novel or rare complement genes variants. Renal recovery under eculizumab was equally good in patients with and those without complement gene variants detected. After a median follow-up of 22 months, 12 patients (31%) experienced atypical hemolytic uremic syndrome relapse. Eight of 11 patients (72%) with complement factor H variants, four of eight patients (50%) with membrane cofactor protein variants, and zero of 16 patients with no rare variant detected relapsed. In relapsing patients, early reintroduction (≤48 hours) of eculizumab led to rapid (uremic syndrome relapse after eculizumab discontinuation. Prospective studies are needed to identify biomarkers predictive of relapse and determine the best strategy of retreatment in relapsing patients. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  11. Histone turnover within nonproliferating cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Commerford, S.L.; Carsten, A.L.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1982-01-01

    The turnover of DNA and histones in the livers and brains of mice has been determined. These mice had been exposed to constant levels of tritiated water from conception until they were 8 months old. At this point, exposure to tritium was discontinued, and the tritium remaining in DNA and histones was measured at various intervals afterward. The half-lives calculated for these components (with 95% confidence limits given in parentheses) were 117 (85 to 188) days for liver histone, 318 (241 to 466) days for liver DNA, 159 (129 to 208) days for brain histone and 593 (376 to 1406) days for brain DNA. The difference between histone and DNA turnover is statistically significant for both tissues and indicates that histone turnover within tissues cannot be solely accounted for by cell turnover within the tissue but also must include histone turnover within living cells. The half-life of histone within cells is estimated to be 117 (88 to 178) days in liver and 223 (187 to 277) days in brain

  12. Transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue identifies reduced expression of complement complex C1Q Genes in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Peijie; Nicholls, Laura; Assareh, Hassan; Fang, Zhiming; Amos, Timothy G; Edwards, Richard J; Assareh, Amelia A; Voineagu, Irina

    2016-06-06

    MECP2, the gene mutated in the majority of Rett syndrome cases, is a transcriptional regulator that can activate or repress transcription. Although the transcription regulatory function of MECP2 has been known for over a decade, it remains unclear how transcriptional dysregulation leads to the neurodevelopmental disorder. Notably, little convergence was previously observed between the genes abnormally expressed in the brain of Rett syndrome mouse models and those identified in human studies. Here we carried out a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of human brain tissue from Rett syndrome brain using both RNA-seq and microarrays. We identified over two hundred differentially expressed genes, and identified the complement C1Q complex genes (C1QA, C1QB and C1QC) as a point of convergence between gene expression changes in human and mouse Rett syndrome brain. The results of our study support a role for alterations in the expression level of C1Q complex genes in RTT pathogenesis.

  13. O-antigen protects gram-negative bacteria from histone killing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Chaput

    Full Text Available Beyond their traditional role of wrapping DNA, histones display antibacterial activity to Gram-negative and -positive bacteria. To identify bacterial components that allow survival to a histone challenge, we selected resistant bacteria from homologous Escherichia coli libraries that harbor plasmids carrying pieces of the chromosome in different sizes. We identified genes required for exopolysaccharide production and for the synthesis of the polysaccharide domain of the lipopolysaccharide, called O-antigen. Indeed, O-antigen and exopolysaccharide conferred further resistance to histones. Notably, O-antigen also conferred resistance to histones in the pathogens Shigella flexneri and Klebsiella pneumoniae.

  14. Neuronal target genes of the neuron-restrictive silencer factor in neurospheres derived from fetuses with Down's syndrome: a gene expression study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahn, Sabine; Mimmack, Michael; Ryan, Margaret; Caldwell, Maeve A; Jauniaux, Eric; Starkey, Michael; Svendsen, Clive N; Emson, Piers

    2002-01-26

    Identification of genes and characterisation of their function is an essential step towards understanding complex pathophysiological abnormalities in Down's syndrome. We did a study to investigate abnormalities in gene expression in human neuronal stem cells and progenitor cells from Down's syndrome and control post-mortem human fetal tissue. Indexing-based differential display PCR was done on neuronal precursor cells derived from the cortex of a fetus with Down's syndrome, and findings were compared with those of two control samples. Findings were validated against neurosphere preparations from three independent Down's syndrome fetuses and five independent controls by real-time quantitative PCR. Results of differential display PCR analysis showed that SCG10--a neuron--specific growth-associated protein regulated by the neuron-restrictive silencer factor REST-was almost undetectable in the Down's syndrome sample. This finding was validated by real-time PCR. We also found that other genes regulated by the REST transcription factor were selectively repressed, whereas non-REST-regulated genes with similar functions were unaffected. Changes in expression of several key developmental genes in the Down's syndrome stem-cell and progenitor-cell pool correlated with striking changes in neuron morphology after differentiation. Our findings suggest a link between dysregulation of the REST transcription factor and some of the neurological deficits seen in Down's syndrome. Experimental REST downregulation has been shown to trigger apoptosis, which could account for the striking and selective loss of neurons in the differentiated Down's syndrome cell preparations.

  15. Novel polymorphisms and lack of mutations in the ACD gene in patients with ACTH resistance syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keegan, Catherine E; Hutz, Janna E; Krause, Andrea S; Koehler, Katrin; Metherell, Louise A; Boikos, Sosipatros; Stergiopoulos, Sotirios; Clark, Adrian J L; Stratakis, Constantine A; Huebner, Angela; Hammer, Gary D

    2007-08-01

    ACTH resistance is a feature of several human syndromes with known genetic causes, including familial glucocorticoid deficiency (types 1 and 2) and triple A syndrome. However, many patients with ACTH resistance lack an identifiable genetic aetiology. The human homolog of the Acd gene, mutated in a mouse model of adrenal insufficiency, was sequenced in 25 patients with a clinical diagnosis of familial glucocorticoid deficiency or triple A syndrome. A 3.4 kilobase genomic fragment containing the entire ACD gene was analysed for mutations in all 25 patients. Samples were obtained by three investigators from different institutions. The primary cohort consisted of 25 unrelated patients, primarily of European or Middle Eastern descent, with a clinical diagnosis of either familial glucocorticoid deficiency (FGD) or triple A syndrome. Patients lacked mutations in other genes known to cause ACTH resistance, including AAAS for patients diagnosed with triple A syndrome and MC2R and MRAP for patients diagnosed with familial glucocorticoid deficiency. Thirty-five additional patients with adrenal disease phenotypes were added to form an expanded cohort of 60 patients. Identification of DNA sequence changes in the ACD gene in the primary cohort and analysis of putative ACD haplotypes in the expanded cohort. No disease-causing mutations were found, but several novel single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and two putative haplotypes were identified. The overall frequency of SNPs in ACD is low compared to other gene families. No mutations were identified in ACD in this collection of patients with ACTH resistance phenotypes. However, the newly identified SNPs in ACD should be more closely examined for possible links to disease.

  16. GDNF Gene Is Associated With Tourette Syndrome in a Family Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huertas-Fernández, Ismael; Gómez-Garre, Pilar; Madruga-Garrido, Marcos; Bernal-Bernal, Inmaculada; Bonilla-Toribio, Marta; Martín-Rodríguez, Juan Francisco; Cáceres-Redondo, María Teresa; Vargas-González, Laura; Carrillo, Fátima; Pascual, Alberto; Tischfield, Jay A.; King, Robert A.; Heiman, Gary A.; Mir, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Tourette syndrome is a disorder characterized by persistent motor and vocal tics, and frequently accompanied by the comorbidities attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Impaired synaptic neurotransmission has been implicated in its pathogenesis. Our aim was to investigate the association of 28 candidate genes, including genes related to synaptic neurotransmission and neurotrophic factors, with Tourette syndrome. Methods We genotyped 506 polymorphisms in a discovery cohort from the United States composed of 112 families and 47 unrelated singletons with Tourette syndrome (201 cases and 253 controls). Genes containing significant polymorphisms were imputed to fine-map the signal(s) to potential causal variants. Allelic analyses in Tourette syndrome cases were performed to check the role in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder comorbidities. Target polymorphisms were further studied in a replication cohort from southern Spain composed of 37 families and three unrelated singletons (44 cases and 73 controls). Results The polymorphism rs3096140 in glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor gene (GDNF) was significant in the discovery cohort after correction (P = 1.5 × 10−4). No linkage disequilibrium was found between rs3096140 and other functional variants in the gene. We selected rs3096140 as target polymorphism, and the association was confirmed in the replication cohort (P = 0.01). No association with any comorbidity was found. Conclusions As a conclusion, a common genetic variant in GDNF is associated with Tourette syndrome. A defect in the production of GDNF could compromise the survival of parvalbumin interneurons, thus altering the excitatory/inhibitory balance in the corticostriatal circuitry. Validation of this variant in other family cohorts is necessary. PMID:26096985

  17. Post-cardiac arrest level of free-plasma DNA and DNA-histone complexes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, A N; Hvas, A-M; Grejs, A M

    2017-01-01

    Background Plasma DNA-histone complexes and total free-plasma DNA have the potential to quantify the ischaemia-reperfusion damages occurring after cardiac arrest. Furthermore, DNA-histone complexes may have the potential of being a target for future treatment. The aim was to examine if plasma DNA-histone...... after 22, 46 and 70 h. Samples for DNA-histone complexes were quantified by Cell Death Detection ELISAplus. The total free-plasma DNA analyses were quantified with qPCR by analysing the Beta-2 microglobulin gene. The control group comprised 40 healthy individuals. Results We found no difference...... in the level of DNA-histone complexes between the 22-h sample and healthy individuals (P = 0.10). In the 46-h sample, there was an increased level of DNA-histone complexes in non-survivors compared with survivors 30 days after the cardiac arrest (P

  18. The putative oncogene GASC1 demethylates tri- and dimethylated lysine 9 on histone H3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cloos, Paul A C; Christensen, Jesper; Agger, Karl

    2006-01-01

    Methylation of lysine and arginine residues on histone tails affects chromatin structure and gene transcription. Tri- and dimethylation of lysine 9 on histone H3 (H3K9me3/me2) is required for the binding of the repressive protein HP1 and is associated with heterochromatin formation...

  19. The histone deacetylase inhibitor Trichostatin A modulates CD4+ T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Scheipers, Peter; Sørensen, Poul

    2003-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) induce hyperacetylation of core histones modulating chromatin structure and affecting gene expression. These compounds are also able to induce growth arrest, cell differentiation, and apoptotic cell death of tumor cells in vitro as well as in vivo. Even...

  20. Integrative analysis of histone ChIP-seq and transcription data using Bayesian mixture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Schäfer, Martin; Porse, Bo T

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications are a key epigenetic mechanism to activate or repress the transcription of genes. Datasets of matched transcription data and histone modification data obtained by ChIP-seq exist, but methods for integrative analysis of both data types are still rare. Here, we present a novel...

  1. Dissecting the phenotypes of Dravet syndrome by gene deletion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubinstein, Moran; Han, Sung; Tai, Chao; Westenbroek, Ruth E; Hunker, Avery; Scheuer, Todd; Catterall, William A

    2015-08-01

    Neurological and psychiatric syndromes often have multiple disease traits, yet it is unknown how such multi-faceted deficits arise from single mutations. Haploinsufficiency of the voltage-gated sodium channel Nav1.1 causes Dravet syndrome, an intractable childhood-onset epilepsy with hyperactivity, cognitive deficit, autistic-like behaviours, and premature death. Deletion of Nav1.1 channels selectively impairs excitability of GABAergic interneurons. We studied mice having selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons. In brain slices, these deletions cause increased threshold for action potential generation, impaired action potential firing in trains, and reduced amplification of postsynaptic potentials in those interneurons. Selective deletion of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin- or somatostatin-expressing interneurons increases susceptibility to thermally-induced seizures, which are strikingly prolonged when Nav1.1 is deleted in both interneuron types. Mice with global haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 display autistic-like behaviours, hyperactivity and cognitive impairment. Haploinsufficiency of Nav1.1 in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons causes autistic-like behaviours, but not hyperactivity, whereas haploinsufficiency in somatostatin-expressing interneurons causes hyperactivity without autistic-like behaviours. Heterozygous deletion in both interneuron types is required to impair long-term spatial memory in context-dependent fear conditioning, without affecting short-term spatial learning or memory. Thus, the multi-faceted phenotypes of Dravet syndrome can be genetically dissected, revealing synergy in causing epilepsy, premature death and deficits in long-term spatial memory, but interneuron-specific effects on hyperactivity and autistic-like behaviours. These results show that multiple disease traits can arise from similar functional deficits in specific interneuron types. © The Author (2015). Published by Oxford University Press on

  2. Structural Mechanisms of Nucleosome Recognition by Linker Histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Bing-Rui; Jiang, Jiansheng; Feng, Hanqiao; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Xiao, T Sam; Bai, Yawen

    2015-08-20

    Linker histones bind to the nucleosome and regulate the structure of chromatin and gene expression. Despite more than three decades of effort, the structural basis of nucleosome recognition by linker histones remains elusive. Here, we report the crystal structure of the globular domain of chicken linker histone H5 in complex with the nucleosome at 3.5 Å resolution, which is validated using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The globular domain sits on the dyad of the nucleosome and interacts with both DNA linkers. Our structure integrates results from mutation analyses and previous cross-linking and fluorescence recovery after photobleach experiments, and it helps resolve the long debate on structural mechanisms of nucleosome recognition by linker histones. The on-dyad binding mode of the H5 globular domain is different from the recently reported off-dyad binding mode of Drosophila linker histone H1. We demonstrate that linker histones with different binding modes could fold chromatin to form distinct higher-order structures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Histone Demethylase Jarid1b Ensures Faithful Mouse Development by Protecting Developmental Genes from Aberrant H3K4me3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albert, Mareike; Schmitz, Sandra U; Kooistra, Susanne M

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic development is tightly regulated by transcription factors and chromatin-associated proteins. H3K4me3 is associated with active transcription and H3K27me3 with gene repression, while the combination of both keeps genes required for development in a plastic state. Here we show that deleti...

  4. Isolation of a yeast artificial chromosome contig spanning the Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS) gene region

    OpenAIRE

    Vortkamp, Andrea; Gessler, Manfred; Paslier, D. Le; Elaswarapu, R.; Smith, S.; Grzeschik, Karl-Heinz

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the zinc finger gene GLI3 has been shown to be the cause of Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS), at least in some GCPS translocation patients. To characterize this genomic region on human chromosome 7p13, we have isolated a VAC contig of more than 1000 kb including the GLI3 gene. In this contig the gene itself spans at least 200-250 kb. A CpG island is located in the vicinity of the 5' region of the known GLI3 cDNA, implying a potential promoter region.

  5. Treacher Collins Syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp Deletion in the TCOF1 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pen-Hua Su

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  6. Treacher Collins syndrome with a de Novo 5-bp deletion in the TCOF1 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Pen-Hua; Chen, Jia-Yu; Chen, Suh-Jen; Yu, Ju-Shan

    2006-06-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development with features including malar hypoplasia, micrognathia, microtia, downward slanting palpebral fissures, lower eyelid coloboma, conductive hearing loss, and cleft palate. TCS is caused by mutations in the TCOF1 gene, which encodes the nuclear phosphoprotein treacle. Here, we describe a 1-day-old male infant with classical TCS presentation. A 5-bp deletion in exon 22 of the TCOF1 gene (3469del ACTCT) was found to cause a premature stop codon. This is the first report of TCOF1 gene mutation in the Taiwanese population.

  7. Genetic screens to identify pathogenic gene variants in the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drost, Mark; Lützen, Anne; van Hees, Sandrine

    2013-01-01

    In many individuals suspected of the common cancer predisposition Lynch syndrome, variants of unclear significance (VUS), rather than an obviously pathogenic mutations, are identified in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. The uncertainty of whether such VUS inactivate MMR, and therefore...... are pathogenic, precludes targeted healthcare for both carriers and their relatives. To facilitate the identification of pathogenic VUS, we have developed an in cellulo genetic screen-based procedure for the large-scale mutagenization, identification, and cataloging of residues of MMR genes critical for MMR gene...

  8. Genes with high penetrance for syndromic and non-syndromic autism typically function within the nucleus and regulate gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova, Emily L; Sharp, Julia L; Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Sumi, Nahid Sultana; Casanova, Manuel F

    2016-01-01

    Intellectual disability (ID), autism, and epilepsy share frequent yet variable comorbidities with one another. In order to better understand potential genetic divergence underlying this variable risk, we studied genes responsible for monogenic IDs, grouped according to their autism and epilepsy comorbidities. Utilizing 465 different forms of ID with known molecular origins, we accessed available genetic databases in conjunction with gene ontology (GO) to determine whether the genetics underlying ID diverge according to its comorbidities with autism and epilepsy and if genes highly penetrant for autism or epilepsy share distinctive features that set them apart from genes that confer comparatively variable or no apparent risk. The genetics of ID with autism are relatively enriched in terms associated with nervous system-specific processes and structural morphogenesis. In contrast, we find that ID with highly comorbid epilepsy (HCE) is modestly associated with lipid metabolic processes while ID without autism or epilepsy comorbidity (ID only) is enriched at the Golgi membrane. Highly comorbid autism (HCA) genes, on the other hand, are strongly enriched within the nucleus, are typically involved in regulation of gene expression, and, along with IDs with more variable autism, share strong ties with a core protein-protein interaction (PPI) network integral to basic patterning of the CNS. According to GO terminology, autism-related gene products are integral to neural development. While it is difficult to draw firm conclusions regarding IDs unassociated with autism, it is clear that the majority of HCA genes are tightly linked with general dysregulation of gene expression, suggesting that disturbances to the chronology of neural maturation and patterning may be key in conferring susceptibility to autism spectrum conditions.

  9. The gene for the Ellis-van Creveld syndrome is located on chromosome 4p16

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polymeropoulos, M.H.; Ide, S.E. [National Institute of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States); Wright, M. [Univ. of Newcastle Upon Tyne (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-07-01

    Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by disproportionate dwarfism, polydactyly, and congenital heart disease. This rare disorder is found with increased frequency among the Old Order Amish community in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. We have used linkage analysis to localize the gene responsible for the EVC phenotype in nine interrelated Amish pedigrees and three unrelated families from Mexico, Ecuador, and Brazil. We now report the linkage for the Ellisvan Creveld syndrome gene to markers on the distal short arm of human chromosome 4, with Z{sub max} = 6.91 at {theta} = 0.02 for marker HOX7, in a region proximal to the FGFR3 gene responsible for the achondroplasia phenotype. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Genetic characterization of the Drosophila birt-hogg-dubé syndrome gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liu

    Full Text Available Folliculin (FLCN is a conserved tumor suppressor gene whose loss is associated with the human Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD syndrome. However, its molecular functions remain largely unknown. In this work, we generated a Drosophila BHD model through genomic deletion of the FLCN gene (DBHD(- . The DBHD mutant larvae grew slowly and stopped development before pupation, displaying various characteristics of malnutrition. We found the growth delay was sensitive to the nutrient supplies. It became more severe upon restrictions of the dietary yeast; while high levels of yeast significantly restored the normal growth, but not viability. We further demonstrated that leucine was able to substitute for yeast to provide similar rescues. Moreover, the human FLCN could partially rescue the DBHD(- phenotypes, indicating the two genes are involved in certain common mechanisms. Our work provides a new animal model of the BHD syndrome and suggests that modulation of the local nutrient condition might be a potential treatment of the BHD lesions.

  11. Novel E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate histone protein levels in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3

  12. Three cases with L1 syndrome and two novel mutations in the L1CAM gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín, Rosario; Ley-Martos, Miriam; Gutiérrez, Gema; Rodríguez-Sánchez, Felicidad; Arroyo, Diego; Mora-López, Francisco

    2015-11-01

    Mutations in the L1CAM gene have been identified in the following various X-linked neurological disorders: congenital hydrocephalus; mental retardation, aphasia, shuffling gait, and adducted thumbs (MASA) syndrome; spastic paraplegia; and agenesis of the corpus callosum. These conditions are currently considered different phenotypes of a single entity known as L1 syndrome. We present three families with L1 syndrome. Sequencing of the L1CAM gene allowed the identification of the following mutations involved: a known splicing mutation (c.3531-12G>A) and two novel ones: a missense mutation (c.1754A>C; p.Asp585Ala) and a nonsense mutation (c.3478C>T; p.Gln1160Stop). The number of affected males and carrier females identified in a relatively small population suggests that L1 syndrome may be under-diagnosed. L1 syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intellectual disability or mental retardation in children, especially when other signs such as hydrocephalus or adducted thumbs are present.

  13. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors as Anticancer Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Eckschlager

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Carcinogenesis cannot be explained only by genetic alterations, but also involves epigenetic processes. Modification of histones by acetylation plays a key role in epigenetic regulation of gene expression and is controlled by the balance between histone deacetylases (HDAC and histone acetyltransferases (HAT. HDAC inhibitors induce cancer cell cycle arrest, differentiation and cell death, reduce angiogenesis and modulate immune response. Mechanisms of anticancer effects of HDAC inhibitors are not uniform; they may be different and depend on the cancer type, HDAC inhibitors, doses, etc. HDAC inhibitors seem to be promising anti-cancer drugs particularly in the combination with other anti-cancer drugs and/or radiotherapy. HDAC inhibitors vorinostat, romidepsin and belinostat have been approved for some T-cell lymphoma and panobinostat for multiple myeloma. Other HDAC inhibitors are in clinical trials for the treatment of hematological and solid malignancies. The results of such studies are promising but further larger studies are needed. Because of the reversibility of epigenetic changes during cancer development, the potency of epigenetic therapies seems to be of great importance. Here, we summarize the data on different classes of HDAC inhibitors, mechanisms of their actions and discuss novel results of preclinical and clinical studies, including the combination with other therapeutic modalities.

  14. Histone locus regulation by the Drosophila dosage compensation adaptor protein CLAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Leila E; Koreski, Kaitlin P; Boltz, Kara A; Kuzu, Guray; Urban, Jennifer A; Bowman, Sarah K; Zeidman, Anna; Jordan, William T; Tolstorukov, Michael Y; Marzluff, William F; Duronio, Robert J; Larschan, Erica N

    2017-07-15

    The conserved histone locus body (HLB) assembles prior to zygotic gene activation early during development and concentrates factors into a nuclear domain of coordinated histone gene regulation. Although HLBs form specifically at replication-dependent histone loci, the cis and trans factors that target HLB components to histone genes remained unknown. Here we report that conserved GA repeat cis elements within the bidirectional histone3-histone4 promoter direct HLB formation in Drosophila In addition, the CLAMP (chromatin-linked adaptor for male-specific lethal [MSL] proteins) zinc finger protein binds these GA repeat motifs, increases chromatin accessibility, enhances histone gene transcription, and promotes HLB formation. We demonstrated previously that CLAMP also promotes the formation of another domain of coordinated gene regulation: the dosage-compensated male X chromosome. Therefore, CLAMP binding to GA repeat motifs promotes the formation of two distinct domains of coordinated gene activation located at different places in the genome. © 2017 Rieder et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  15. Histone H3 Acetyl K9 and Histone H3 Tri Methyl K4 as Prognostic Markers for Patients with Cervical Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Susanne; Zhu, Junyan; Mayr, Doris; Kuhn, Christina; Schulze, Sandra; Hofmann, Simone; Dannecker, Christian; Jeschke, Udo; Kost, Bernd P

    2017-02-23

    Chromatin remodeling alters gene expression in carcinoma tissue. Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, a systematic study about the prognostic value of specific changes in the chromatin structure, such as histone acetylation or histone methylation, is missing. In this study, the expression of histone H3 acetyl K9, which is known to denote active regions at enhancers and promoters, and histone H3 tri methyl K4, which preferentially identifies active gene promoters, were examined as both show high metastatic potential. A panel of patients with cervical cancer was selected and the importance of the histone modifications concerning survival-time (overall survival and relapse-free survival) was analyzed in 250 cases. Histone H3 acetyl K9 staining was correlated with low grading, low FIGO (TNM classification and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) status, negative N-status and low T-status in cervical cancer, showing a higher expression in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of histone H3 tri methyl K4 in a cervical cancer specimen was correlated with advanced T-status and poor prognosis. While cytoplasmic H3K4me3 expression seemed to be a marker of relapse-free survival, nuclear expression showed a correlation to poor prognosis in overall survival. Within this study, we analyzed the chemical modification of two histone proteins that are connected to active gene expression. Histone H3 acetyl K9 was found to be an independent marker of overall survival. Histone H3 tri methyl K4 was correlated with poor prognosis and it was found to be an independent marker of relapse-free survival. Therefore, we could show that chromatin remodeling plays an important role in cervical cancer biology.

  16. Histone H3 Acetyl K9 and Histone H3 Tri Methyl K4 as Prognostic Markers for Patients with Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanne Beyer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin remodeling alters gene expression in carcinoma tissue. Although cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, a systematic study about the prognostic value of specific changes in the chromatin structure, such as histone acetylation or histone methylation, is missing. In this study, the expression of histone H3 acetyl K9, which is known to denote active regions at enhancers and promoters, and histone H3 tri methyl K4, which preferentially identifies active gene promoters, were examined as both show high metastatic potential. A panel of patients with cervical cancer was selected and the importance of the histone modifications concerning survival-time (overall survival and relapse-free survival was analyzed in 250 cases. Histone H3 acetyl K9 staining was correlated with low grading, low FIGO (TNM classification and the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics status, negative N-status and low T-status in cervical cancer, showing a higher expression in adenocarcinoma than in squamous cell carcinoma. Cytoplasmic expression of histone H3 tri methyl K4 in a cervical cancer specimen was correlated with advanced T-status and poor prognosis. While cytoplasmic H3K4me3 expression seemed to be a marker of relapse-free survival, nuclear expression showed a correlation to poor prognosis in overall survival. Within this study, we analyzed the chemical modification of two histone proteins that are connected to active gene expression. Histone H3 acetyl K9 was found to be an independent marker of overall survival. Histone H3 tri methyl K4 was correlated with poor prognosis and it was found to be an independent marker of relapse-free survival. Therefore, we could show that chromatin remodeling plays an important role in cervical cancer biology.

  17. Hypoparathyroidism in a 3-year-old Korean boy with Sotos syndrome and a novel mutation in NSD1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wejaphikul, Karn; Cho, Sung Yoon; Huh, Rimm; Kwun, Younghee; Lee, Jieun; Ki, Chang-Seok; Jin, Dong-Kyu

    2015-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is a common genetic overgrowth syndrome caused by a mutation of the NSD1 gene, which is located at chromosome 5q35 and normally encodes a histone methyltransferase protein. The general characteristics of this syndrome include a characteristic facial appearance, developmental delay, and overgrowth, resulting in macrocephaly and tall stature. We describe rhabdomyolysis and hypocalcemia due to hypoparathyroidism in a 3-year-old Korean boy with Sotos syndrome. He was diagnosed with Sotos syndrome based on the typical phenotype and has a heterozygous nonsense mutation (c.4710C>A [p.Cys1570*]) of the NSD1 gene, which causes a premature stop codon and a truncating protein mutation. Hypoparathyroidism has never been described in Sotos syndrome. This report may therefore expand the phenotypic spectrum of this syndrome. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  18. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D.; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC. PMID:27698925

  19. Truncation of the Down syndrome candidate gene DYRK1A in two unrelated patients with microcephaly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Rikke S; Kübart, Sabine; Hoeltzenbein, Maria

    2008-01-01

    .2. DYRK1A belongs to the dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation-regulated kinase (DYRK) family, which is highly conserved throughout evolution. Given its localization in both the Down syndrome critical region and in the minimal region for partial monosomy 21, the gene has been studied intensively...... in animals and in humans, and DYRK1A has been proposed to be involved in the neurodevelopmental alterations associated with these syndromes. In the present study, we show that truncating mutations of DYRK1A result in a clinical phenotype including microcephaly....

  20. Numerous BAF complex genes are mutated in Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyake, Noriko; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2014-09-01

    Coffin-Siris syndrome (CSS; OMIM#135900) is a rare congenital anomaly syndrome characterized by intellectual disability, coarse face, hypertrichosis, and absence/hypoplasia of the fifth digits' nails. As the majority of patients are sporadic, an autosomal dominant inheritance model has been postulated. Recently, whole exome sequencing (WES) emerged as a comprehensive analytical method for rare variants. We applied WES on five CSS patients and found two de novo mutations in SMARCB1. SMARCB1 was completely sequenced in 23 CSS patients and the mutations were found in two more patients. As SMARCB1 encodes a subunit of the BAF complex functioning as a chromatin remodeling factor, mutations in 15 other subunit genes may cause CSS and thus were analyzed in 23 CSS patients. We identified heterozygous mutations in either of six genes (SMARCA4, SMARCB1, SMARCA2, SMARCE1, ARID1A, and ARID1B) in 20 out of 23 CSS patients. The patient with a SMARCA2 mutation was re-evaluated and identified as having Nicolaides-Baraitser syndrome (OMIM#601358), which is similar to but different from CSS. Additionally, 49 more CSS patients were analyzed as a second cohort. Together with the first cohort, 37 out of 71 (22 plus 49) patients were found to have a mutation in either one of five BAF complex genes. Furthermore, two CSS patients were reported to have a PHF6 abnormality, which can also cause Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome (OMIM#301900), an X-linked intellectual disability syndrome with epilepsy and endocrine abnormalities. The current list of mutated genes in CSS is far from being complete and analysis of more patients is required. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Large deletions encompassing the TCOF1 and CAMK2A genes are responsible for Treacher Collins syndrome with intellectual disability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Marie; Collet, Corinne; Verloes, Alain; Lambert, Laetitia; Herlin, Christian; Blanchet, Catherine; Sanchez, Elodie; Drunat, Séverine; Vigneron, Jacqueline; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Puechberty, Jacques; Sarda, Pierre; Geneviève, David

    2014-01-01

    Mandibulofacial dysostosis is part of a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of disorders of craniofacial development, which lead to malar and mandibular hypoplasia. Treacher Collins syndrome is the major cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis and is due to mutations in the TCOF1 gene. Usually patients with Treacher Collins syndrome do not present with intellectual disability. Recently, the EFTUD2 gene was identified in patients with mandibulofacial dysostosis associated with microcephaly, intellectual disability and esophageal atresia. We report on two patients presenting with mandibulofacial dysostosis characteristic of Treacher Collins syndrome, but associated with unexpected intellectual disability, due to a large deletion encompassing several genes including the TCOF1 gene. We discuss the involvement of the other deleted genes such as CAMK2A or SLC6A7 in the cognitive development delay of the patients reported, and we propose the systematic investigation for 5q32 deletion when intellectual disability is associated with Treacher Collins syndrome.

  2. De Novo Mutations in CHD4, an ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeler Gene, Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome with Distinctive Dysmorphisms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weiss, Karin; Terhal, Paulien A; Cohen, Lior; Bruccoleri, Michael; Irving, Melita; Martinez, Ariel F; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Machol, Keren; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Pengfei; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Beuten, Joke; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Haude, Katrina; Fong, Chin-To; Enns, Gregory M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fan, Judith; Gotway, Garrett; Ghorbani, Mohammad; van Gassen, Koen; Monroe, Glen R; van Haaften, Gijs; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Campeau, Philippe M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Also known as Mi2β, CHD4 is an integral subunit of a well-characterized histone deacetylase complex. Here we

  3. Severe neonatal marfan syndrome resulting from a De Novo 3-bp insertion into the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milewicz, D.M.; Duvic, M. (Univ. of Texas Medical School, Houston, TX (United States))

    1994-03-01

    Severe neonatal Marfan syndrome has features of the Marfan syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly present at birth, along with unique features such as loose, redundant skin and pulmonary emphysema. Since the Marfan syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly are due to mutations in different genes, it has been uncertain whether neonatal Marfan syndrome is due to mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 or in another gene. The authors studied an infant with severe neonatal Marfan syndrome. Dermal fibroblasts were metabolically labeled and found to secrete fibrillin inefficiently when compared with control cells. Reverse transcription and amplification of the proband's fibroblast RNA was used to identify a 3-bp insertion between nucleotides 480-481 or 481-482 of the fibrillin cDNA. The insertion maintains the reading frame of the protein and inserts a cysteine between amino acids 160 and 161 in an epidermal growth-factor-like motif of fibrillin. This 3-bp insertion was not found in the fibrillin gene in 70 unrelated, unaffected individuals and 11 unrelated individuals with the Maran syndrome. The authors conclude that neonatal Marfan syndrome is the result of mutations in the fibrillin gene on chromosome 15 and is part of the Marfan syndrome spectrum. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  4. The Functional Analysis of Histone Acetyltransferase MOF in Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jiaming; Wang, Fei; Cai, Yong; Jin, Jingji

    2016-01-01

    Changes in chromatin structure and heritably regulating the gene expression by epigenetic mechanisms, such as histone post-translational modification, are involved in most cellular biological processes. Thus, abnormal regulation of epigenetics is implicated in the occurrence of various diseases, including cancer. Human MOF (males absent on the first) is a member of the MYST (Moz-Ybf2/Sas3-Sas2-Tip60) family of histone acetyltransferases (HATs). As a catalytic subunit, MOF can form at least two distinct multiprotein complexes (MSL and NSL) in human cells. Both complexes can acetylate histone H4 at lysine 16 (H4K16); however, the NSL complex possesses broader substrate specificity and can also acetylate histone H4 at lysines 5 and 8 (H4K5 and H4K8), suggesting the complexity of the intracellular functions of MOF. Silencing of MOF in cells leads to genomic instability, inactivation of gene transcription, defective DNA damage repair and early embryonic lethality. Unbalanced MOF expression and its corresponding acetylation of H4K16 have been found in certain primary cancer tissues, including breast cancer, medulloblastoma, ovarian cancer, renal cell carcinoma, colorectal carcinoma, gastric cancer, as well as non-small cell lung cancer. In this review, we provide a brief overview of MOF and its corresponding histone acetylation, introduce recent research findings that link MOF functions to tumorigenesis and speculate on the potential role that may be relevant to tumorigenic pathways. PMID:26784169

  5. The Histone Demethylase Jhdm1a Regulates Hepatic Gluconeogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Tie; Yao, Annie Y.; Cooper, Marcus P.; Boyartchuk, Victor; Wang, Yong-Xu

    2012-01-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is required for maintaining blood glucose homeostasis; yet, in diabetes mellitus, this process is unrestrained and is a major contributor to fasting hyperglycemia. To date, the impacts of chromatin modifying enzymes and chromatin landscape on gluconeogenesis are poorly understood. Through catalyzing the removal of methyl groups from specific lysine residues in the histone tail, histone demethylases modulate chromatin structure and, hence, gene expression. Here we perform an RNA interference screen against the known histone demethylases and identify a histone H3 lysine 36 (H3K36) demethylase, Jhdm1a, as a key negative regulator of gluconeogenic gene expression. In vivo, silencing of Jhdm1a promotes liver glucose synthesis, while its exogenous expression reduces blood glucose level. Importantly, the regulation of gluconeogenesis by Jhdm1a requires its demethylation activity. Mechanistically, we find that Jhdm1a regulates the expression of a major gluconeogenic regulator, C/EBPα. This is achieved, at least in part, by its USF1-dependent association with the C/EBPα promoter and its subsequent demethylation of dimethylated H3K36 on the C/EBPα locus. Our work provides compelling evidence that links histone demethylation to transcriptional regulation of gluconeogenesis and has important implications for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22719268

  6. Neurodevelopmental Disorders Associated with Abnormal Gene Dosage: Smith-Magenis and Potocki-Lupski Syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neira-Fresneda, Juanita; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-09-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) and Potocki-Lupski syndrome (PTLS) are reciprocal contiguous gene syndromes within the well-characterized 17p11.2 region. Approximately 3.6 Mb microduplication of 17p11.2, known as PTLS, represents the mechanistically predicted homologous recombination reciprocal of the SMS microdeletion, both resulting in multiple congenital anomalies. Mouse model studies have revealed that the retinoic acid-inducible 1 gene (RAI1) within the SMS and PTLS critical genomic interval is the dosage-sensitive gene responsible for the major phenotypic features in these disorders. Even though PTLS and SMS share the same genomic region, clinical manifestations and behavioral issues are distinct and in fact some mirror traits may be on opposite ends of a given phenotypic spectrum. We describe the neurobehavioral phenotypes of SMS and PTLS patients during different life phases as well as clinical guidelines for diagnosis and a multidisciplinary approach once diagnosis is confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization or RAI1 gene sequencing. The main goal is to increase awareness of these rare disorders because an earlier diagnosis will lead to more timely developmental intervention and medical management which will improve clinical outcome.

  7. Cytochrome C oxydase deficiency: SURF1 gene investigation in patients with Leigh syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalej, Marwa; Kammoun, Thouraya; Alila-Fersi, Olfa; Kharrat, Marwa; Ammar, Marwa; Felhi, Rahma; Mkaouar-Rebai, Emna; Keskes, Leila; Hachicha, Mongia; Fakhfakh, Faiza

    2018-03-18

    Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy. The most common clinical signs reported in LS are growth retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, dystonia, hypotonia, seizures and respiratory disorders. The paper reported a manifestation of 3 Tunisian patients presented with LS syndrome. The aim of this study is the MT[HYPHEN]ATP6 and SURF1 gene screening in Tunisian patients affected with classical Leigh syndrome and the computational investigation of the effect of detected mutations on its structure and functions by clinical and bioinformatics analyses. After clinical investigations, three Tunisian patients were tested for mutations in both MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes by direct sequencing followed by in silico analyses to predict the effects of sequence variation. The result of mutational analysis revealed the absence of mitochondrial mutations in MT-ATP6 gene and the presence of a known homozygous splice site mutation c.516-517delAG in sibling patients added to the presence of a novel double het mutations in LS patient (c.752-18 A > C/c. c.751 + 16G > A). In silico analyses of theses intronic variations showed that it could alters splicing processes as well as SURF1 protein translation. Leigh syndrome (LS) is a rare progressive neurodegenerative disorder occurring in infancy. The most common clinical signs reported in LS are growth retardation, optic atrophy, ataxia, psychomotor retardation, dystonia, hypotonia, seizures and respiratory disorders. The paper reported a manifestation of 3 Tunisian patients presented with LS syndrome. The aim of this study is MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes screening in Tunisian patients affected with classical Leigh syndrome and the computational investigation of the effect of detected mutations on its structure and functions. After clinical investigations, three Tunisian patients were tested for mutations in both MT-ATP6 and SURF1 genes by direct sequencing followed by in

  8. Microduplication of the ARID1A gene causes intellectual disability with recognizable syndromic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidart, Marie; El Atifi, Michèle; Miladi, Sarra; Rendu, John; Satre, Véronique; Ray, Pierre F; Bosson, Caroline; Devillard, Françoise; Lehalle, Daphné; Malan, Valérie; Amiel, Jeanne; Mencarelli, Maria Antonietta; Baldassarri, Margherita; Renieri, Alessandra; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Vieville, Gaëlle; Thevenon, Julien; Amblard, Florence; Berger, François; Jouk, Pierre-Simon; Coutton, Charles

    2017-06-01

    To determine whether duplication of the ARID1A gene is responsible for a new recognizable syndrome. We describe four patients with a 1p36.11 microduplication involving ARID1A as identified by array-comparative genomic hybridization . We performed comparative transcriptomic analysis of patient-derived fibroblasts using RNA sequencing and evaluated the impact of ARID1A duplication on the cell cycle using fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Functional relationships between differentially expressed genes were investigated with ingenuity pathway analysis (IPA). Combining the genomic data, we defined a small (122 kb), minimally critical region that overlaps the full ARID1A gene. The four patients shared a strikingly similar phenotype that included intellectual disability and microcephaly. Transcriptomic analysis revealed the deregulated expression of several genes previously linked to microcephaly and developmental disorders as well as the involvement of signaling pathways relevant to microcephaly, among which the polo-like kinase (PLK) pathway was especially notable. Cell-cycle analysis of patient-derived fibroblasts showed a significant increase in the proportion of cells in G1 phase at the expense of G2-M cells. Our study reports a new microduplication syndrome involving the ARID1A gene. This work is the first step in clarifying the pathophysiological mechanism that links changes in the gene dosage of ARID1A with intellectual disability and microcephaly.Genet Med advance online publication 01 December 2016.

  9. Identification of gene networks and pathways associated with Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuo-Hsuan Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The underlying change of gene network expression of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS remains elusive. We sought to identify GBS-associated gene networks and signaling pathways by analyzing the transcriptional profile of leukocytes in the patients with GBS. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Quantitative global gene expression microarray analysis of peripheral blood leukocytes was performed on 7 patients with GBS and 7 healthy controls. Gene expression profiles were compared between patients and controls after standardization. The set of genes that significantly correlated with GBS was further analyzed by Ingenuity Pathways Analyses. 256 genes and 18 gene networks were significantly associated with GBS (fold change ≥2, P<0.05. FOS, PTGS2, HMGB2 and MMP9 are the top four of 246 significantly up-regulated genes. The most significant disease and altered biological function genes associated with GBS were those involved in inflammatory response, infectious disease, and respiratory disease. Cell death, cellular development and cellular movement were the top significant molecular and cellular functions involved in GBS. Hematological system development and function, immune cell trafficking and organismal survival were the most significant GBS-associated function in physiological development and system category. Several hub genes, such as MMP9, PTGS2 and CREB1 were identified in the associated gene networks. Canonical pathway analysis showed that GnRH, corticotrophin-releasing hormone and ERK/MAPK signaling were the most significant pathways in the up-regulated gene set in GBS. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals the gene networks and canonical pathways associated with GBS. These data provide not only networks between the genes for understanding the pathogenic properties of GBS but also map significant pathways for the future development of novel therapeutic strategies.

  10. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  11. Syndromic Craniosynostosis Can Define New Candidate Genes for Suture Development or Result from the Non-specifc Effects of Pleiotropic Genes: Rasopathies and Chromatinopathies as Examples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcella Zollino

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Craniosynostosis is a heterogeneous condition caused by the premature fusion of cranial sutures, occurring mostly as an isolated anomaly. Pathogenesis of non-syndromic forms of craniosynostosis is largely unknown. In about 15–30% of cases craniosynostosis occurs in association with other physical anomalies and it is referred to as syndromic craniosynostosis. Syndromic forms of craniosynostosis arise from mutations in genes belonging to the Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor (FGFR family and the interconnected molecular pathways in most cases. However it can occur in association with other gene variants and with a variety of chromosome abnormalities as well, usually in association with intellectual disability (ID and additional physical anomalies. Evaluating the molecular properties of the genes undergoing intragenic mutations or copy number variations (CNVs along with prevalence of craniosynostosis in different conditions and animal models if available, we made an attempt to define two distinct groups of unusual syndromic craniosynostosis, which can reflect direct effects of emerging new candidate genes with roles in suture homeostasis or a non-specific phenotypic manifestation of pleiotropic genes, respectively. RASopathies and 9p23p22.3 deletions are reviewed as examples of conditions in the first group. In particular, we found that craniosynostosis is a relatively common component manifestation of cardio-facio-cutaneous (CFC syndrome. Chromatinopathies and neurocristopathies are presented as examples of conditions in the second group. We observed that craniosynostosis is uncommon on average in these conditions. It was randomly associated with Kabuki, Koolen-de Vries/KANSL1 haploinsufficiency and Mowat–Wilson syndromes and in KAT6B-related disorders. As an exception, trigonocephaly in Bohring-Opitz syndrome reflects specific molecular properties of the chromatin modifier ASXL1 gene. Surveillance for craniosynostosis in syndromic forms of

  12. Chemical Probes of Histone Lysine Methyltransferases

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that histone methyltransferases (HMTs, also known as protein methyltransferases (PMTs)) play an important role in diverse biological processes and human diseases by regulating gene expression and the chromatin state. Therefore, HMTs have been increasingly recognized by the biomedical community as a class of potential therapeutic targets. High quality chemical probes of HMTs, as tools for deciphering their physiological functions and roles in human diseases and testing therapeutic hypotheses, are critical for advancing this promising field. In this review, we focus on the discovery, characterization, and biological applications of chemical probes for HMTs. PMID:25423077

  13. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome in an Indonesian patient with folliculin gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiyono, Wiwien Heru; Nurwidya, Fariz; Baskoro, Hario; Putra, Andika Chandra

    2016-11-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder that affects the skin, kidney, and lungs. Affected individuals have an increased risk of developing multiple cysts in the lungs and a spontaneous pneumothorax. Germline mutations in the folliculin (FLCN) gene have been confirmed as the aetiology of BHD syndrome. A 51-year-old Indonesian female presented with recurrent spontaneous pneumothorax, multiple cysts in both lungs, and a renal cyst on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Blood sampling was performed to extract genomic DNA from peripheral blood leucocytes. We identified an aberrant band in the DNA fragment derived from FLCN exon 6. Moreover, direct sequencing of FLCN exon 6 by denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography (DHPLC) showed a pathogenic mutation, which caused premature termination of folliculin protein translation. This is the first reported case of BHD syndrome in an Indonesian patient confirmed by detection of a FLCN exon 6 mutation.

  14. Chromatin enrichment of histone marks H4Ac and H3K9me3 in TP53 gene domain in breast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Santos G. C. Jr; Goes A. C. S.; de Moura Gallo C. V.

    2014-01-01

    In non-cancerous breast cell lines HB2 and MCF10A the TP53 gene is localized inside a relatively small ~ 50 kb loop domain delimited by two S/MARs. Aim. To analyze the chromatin markers H4Ac and H3K9me3 of these two S/MARs and of the TP53 gene P1 promoter in different breast cells lines. Methods. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) to characterize the chromatin status of these S/MARs elements in breast non-cancerous cell lines HB2 and MCF10A and cancerous MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, BT-474 an...

  15. A case of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type VIA with a novel PLOD1 gene mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Ayşe; Kurtgoz, Serkan; Dursun, Siar; Bozkurt, Gokay

    2014-10-01

    The kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is an autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder characterized by soft extensible skin, laxity of joints, severe muscle hypotonia at birth, and kyphoscoliosis. We describe a 3-year-old girl with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome whose parents were cousins. She was born with breech presentation by vaginal delivery at term after a normal pregnancy. At birth she manifested hypotonia and congenital kyphosis. On the second postnatal day, subdural and intraparenchymal hemorrhages were detected by magnetic resonance imaging. During follow-up at 18 months of age, strabismus, umbilical hernia, kyphoscoliosis, joint laxity, bilateral hip dislocation, muscular hypotonia, and motor developmental delay. The cranial magnetic resonance imaging revealed periventricular leukomalacia and abnormal signal related to previous hemorrhage. Metabolic investigations and neuromuscular evaluation were normal, excluding other possible explanations of hypotonia. An analysis of urinary cross-links demonstrated an increase in the lysyl-pyridinoline to hydroxylysyl-pyridinoline ratio, suggesting the diagnosis of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Molecular analysis of the PLOD1 gene revealed that she had a novel homozygous p.Pro622Argfs*3 (c. 1863_1864dupCG) mutation in exon 17 that is expected to cause complete loss of the enzyme lysyl hydroxylase 1 and to cause kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. We describe a child with the kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with a novel mutation of the PLOD1 gene. Our observations suggest that vascular lesions in the neonatal period may be a rare additional clinical feature of kyphoscoliotic type of the Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Catecholamine-related gene expression in blood correlates with tic severity in tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunther, Joan; Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Lit, Lisa; Corbett, Blythe; Ander, Brad; Zhan, Xinhua; Jickling, Glen; Bos-Veneman, Netty; Liu, Da; Hoekstra, Pieter; Sharp, Frank

    2012-12-30

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a heritable disorder characterized by tics that are decreased in some patients by treatment with alpha adrenergic agonists and dopamine receptor blockers. Thus, this study examines the relationship between catecholamine gene expression in blood and tic severity. TS diagnosis was confirmed using Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-IV criteria and tic severity measured using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale (YGTSS) for 26 un-medicated subjects with TS. Whole blood was collected and Ribonucleic acid (RNA) processed on Affymetrix Human Exon 1.0 ST arrays. An Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA) identified 3627 genes correlated with tic severity (pGene Ontology, Allen Mouse Brain Atlas, and PubMed determined genes associated with catecholamines and located in the basal ganglia. Using GeneCards, PubMed, and manual curation, seven genes associated with TS were further examined: DRD2, HRH3, MAOB, BDNF, SNAP25, SLC6A4, and SLC22A3. These genes are highly associated with TS and have also been implicated in other movement disorders, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Correlation of gene expression in peripheral blood with tic severity may allow inferences about catecholamine pathway dysfunction in TS subjects. Findings built on previous work suggest that at least some genes expressed peripherally are relevant for central nervous system (CNS) pathology in the brain of individuals with TS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. [Study on relationship between constitution and syndrome of MMP-9, IL-6 and MTHFR gene in patients with ischemic stroke].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Shuai-Ling; Xie, Yan-Ming; Zhang, Yin; Wang, Zhi-Fei; Yang, Jing; Wang, Dan-Qiao; Jiao, Yue; Chen, Jun; Tao, Yan-Hui

    2017-09-01

    By studying the relationship between syndromes, physique and MMP-9, IL-6 and MTHFR gene polymorphisms in patients with ischemic stroke,The relationship between MMP-9, IL-6 and MTHFR gene polymorphism was analyzed in patients with ischemic stroke.The data were collected by collecting the data of patients with ischemic stroke, and the statistical analysis was carried out. Syndrome:61 cases of ischemic stroke patients with stroke phlegm stasis syndrome in patients with the highest frequency, a total of 30 cases; Physical constitution: phlegm is ischemic stroke patients prone to physical, a total of 20 cases; The analysis of the relationship between constitution and syndrome shows that the patients with qi deficiency constitution tend to show qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome after onset, The analysis of the relationship between constitution and syndrome shows that the patients with qi deficiency constitution tend to show qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome after onset, Phlegm constitution and physical condition after the onset of symptoms tend to wind phlegm stasis syndrome; Syndrome and MMP-9, IL-6 relationship:The distribution of MMP-9 and IL-6 in patients with qi and phlegm stasis syndrome and qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome was significantly different from that in Z test (Prelationship between syndromes and physique in patients with ischemic stroke,Phlegm and dampness, flat quality patients after the onset of easy to show the wind phlegm stasis syndrome; Qi deficiency after the onset of symptoms in patients with Qi and blood stasis. Suggesting that before the onset of such as for the partial physical conditioning, may be on the prevention of ischemic stroke have a certain effect; Analysis of the relationship between syndromes and MMP-9 and IL-6 in patients with ischemic stroke, Wind phlegm stasis syndrome and IL-6 levels are related, Qi deficiency and blood stasis syndrome and MMP-9 levels are related. Analysis of the relationship between

  18. WS1 gene mutation analysis of Wolfram syndrome in a Chinese patient and a systematic review of literatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Guang; Yu, Man-li; Wang, Jia-feng; Gao, Cong-rong; Chen, Zhong-jin

    2010-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a rare hereditary disease characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. The outcome of this disease is always poor. WFS1 gene mutation is the main cause of this disease. A patient with diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, renal tract disorder, psychiatric abnormality, and cataract was diagnosed with Wolfram syndrome. Mutations in open reading frame (ORF) of WFS1 gene was analyzed by sequencing. Mutations in WFS1 gene was also summarized by a systematic review in Pubmed and Chinese biological and medical database. Sequencing of WFS1 gene in this patient showed a new mutation, 1962G>A, and two other non-sense mutations, 2433A>G and 2565G>A. Systematic review included 219 patients in total and identified 172 WFS1 gene mutations, most of which were located in Exon 8. These mutations in WFS1 gene might be useful in prenatal diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome.

  19. Chromatin replication and histone dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alabert, Constance; Jasencakova, Zuzana; Groth, Anja

    2017-01-01

    organization into chromatin. We reveal how specialized replication-coupled mechanisms rapidly assemble newly synthesized DNA into nucleosomes, while the complete restoration of chromatin organization including histone marks is a continuous process taking place throughout the cell cycle. Because failure...

  20. Wolfram syndrome 1 gene negatively regulates ER stress signaling in rodent and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Sonya G; Ishigaki, Shinsuke; Oslowski, Christine M; Lu, Simin; Lipson, Kathryn L; Ghosh, Rajarshi; Hayashi, Emiko; Ishihara, Hisamitsu; Oka, Yoshitomo; Permutt, M Alan; Urano, Fumihiko

    2010-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal-recessive disorder characterized by insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus, caused by nonautoimmune loss of beta cells, and neurological dysfunctions. We have previously shown that mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 (WFS1) gene cause Wolfram syndrome and that WFS1 has a protective function against ER stress. However, it remained to be determined how WFS1 mitigates ER stress. Here we have shown in rodent and human cell lines that WFS1 negatively regulates a key transcription factor involved in ER stress signaling, activating transcription factor 6alpha (ATF6alpha), through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. WFS1 suppressed expression of ATF6alpha target genes and repressed ATF6alpha-mediated activation of the ER stress response element (ERSE) promoter. Moreover, WFS1 stabilized the E3 ubiquitin ligase HRD1, brought ATF6alpha to the proteasome, and enhanced its ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, leading to suppression of ER stress signaling. Consistent with these data, beta cells from WFS1-deficient mice and lymphocytes from patients with Wolfram syndrome exhibited dysregulated ER stress signaling through upregulation of ATF6alpha and downregulation of HRD1. These results reveal a role for WFS1 in the negative regulation of ER stress signaling and in the pathogenesis of diseases involving chronic, unresolvable ER stress, such as pancreatic beta cell death in diabetes.

  1. c.376G>A mutation in WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome without deafness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarpour Lima, Behnam; Ghaedi, Hamid; Daftarian, Narsis; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Jamshidi, Javad; Khorrami, Mehdi; Noroozi, Rezvan; Sohrabifar, Nasim; Assarzadegan, Farhad; Hesami, Omid; Taghavi, Shaghayegh; Ahmadifard, Azadeh; Atakhorrami, Minoo; Rahimi-Aliabadi, Simin; Shahmohammadibeni, Neda; Alehabib, Elham; Andarva, Monavvar; Darvish, Hossein; Emamalizadeh, Babak

    2016-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome is one of the rare autosomal recessive, progressive, neurodegenerative disorders, characterized by diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy. Several other features are observed in patients including deafness, ataxia, and peripheral neuropathy. A gene called WFS1 is identified on chromosome 4p, responsible for Wolfram syndrome. We investigated a family consisted of parents and 8 children, which 5 of them have been diagnosed for Wolfram syndrome. WFS1 gene in all family members was sequenced for causative mutations. A mutation (c.376G>A, p.A126T) was found in all affected members in homozygous state and in both parents in heterozygous state. The bioinformatics analysis showed the deleterious effects of this nucleotide change on the structure and function of the protein product. As all of the patients in the family showed the homozygote mutation, and parents were both heterozygote, this mutation is probably the cause of the disease. We identified this mutation in homozygous state for the first time as Wolfram syndrome causation. We also showed that this mutation probably doesn't cause deafness in affected individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A single base-pair deletion in the WFS1 gene causes Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Katherine; James, Chela; Kochar, Inderpal S; Kapoor, Akshay; Jain, Shilpi; Hussain, Khalid; Bennett, Kate

    2011-01-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder also known as DIDMOAD (diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy and deafness). The majority of cases are caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. WFS1 is located at 4p16.1 and encodes wolframin, a transmembrane endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein involved in the negative regulation of ER stress signalling. To date, over 120 WFS1 mutations have been described. In this study, we report a consanguineous family with three siblings affected by Wolfram syndrome. A homozygous single base pair deletion (c.877delC, L293fsX303) was found in the WFS1 gene in all three affected siblings.

  3. Nonfamilial Juvenile Polyposis Syndrome with Exon 5 Novel Mutation in SMAD 4 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amna Ahmed

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS is a rare autosomal dominant hereditary disorder, characterized by multiple juvenile polyps in the gastrointestinal tract and an increased risk of colorectal cancer. JPS is most frequently caused by mutations in the SMAD4 or BMPR1A genes. Herein, we report a child with juvenile polyposis syndrome (JPS with a novel mutation in the SMAD4 gene. An 8-year-old boy presented with recurrent rectal bleeding and was found to have multiple polyps in the entire colon. The histology of the resected polyps was consistent with juvenile polyps. Subsequent genetic screening revealed a novel mutation in SMAD4, exon 5 (p.Ser144Stop. To the best of our knowledge, this mutation has not been reported before. Offering genotypic diagnosis for patients with JPS is an important step for strategic plan of management.

  4. Effects of BPA on global DNA methylation and global histone 3 lysine modifications in SH-SY5Y cells: An epigenetic mechanism linking the regulation of chromatin modifiying genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senyildiz, Mine; Karaman, Ecem Fatma; Bas, Serap Sancar; Pirincci, Pelin Arda; Ozden, Sibel

    2017-10-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA), an estrogenic endocrine disruptor, is widely used in the production of polycarbonate plastic and epoxy resins, resulting in high risk on human health. In present study we aimed to investigate the effects of BPA on global and gene specific DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulation of chromatin modifiying enzymes in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y). Cells were treated with BPA at 0.1, 1 and 10μM concentrations for 48 and 96h. IC 50 value of BPA was determined as 183 and 129μM in SH-SY5Y cells after 24h by MTT and NRU tests, respectively. We observed significant alterations on the 5-mC% levels (1.3 fold) and 5-hmC% levels (1.67 fold) after 10μM of BPA for 96h. Significant decrease was identified in H3K9me3 and H3K9ac after 10μM of BPA for 96h while decrease was observed in H3K4me3 at 10μM of BPA for 48h. Alterations were observed in chromatin modifiying genes including G9a, EZH2, SETD8, SETD1A, HAT1, SIRT1, DNMT1, RIZ1 and Suv39h1 after 96h of BPA exposure. Taken together, this study suggests that BPA might modulate the epigenetic regulators which would be key molecular events in the toxicity of endocrine disrupting chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Treacher Collins syndrome may result from insertions, deletions or splicing mutations, which introduce a termination codon into the gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladwin, A. J.; Dixon, J.; Loftus, S. K.; Edwards, S.; Wasmuth, J. J.; Hennekam, R. C.; Dixon, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is an autosomal dominant disorder of craniofacial development the features of which include conductive hearing loss and cleft palate. Recently, the Treacher Collins syndrome gene (TCOF1) has been positionally cloned and a series of five mutations within the coding sequence

  6. Clinical Variability in a Family with an Ectodermal Dysplasia Syndrome and a Nonsense Mutation in the TP63 Gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eisenkraft, A.; Pode-Shakked, B.; Goldstein, N.; Shpirer, Z.; Bokhoven, H. van; Anikster, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the TP63 gene have been associated with a variety of ectodermal dysplasia syndromes, among which the clinically overlapping Ankyloblepharon-Ectodermal defects-Cleft lip/palate (AEC) and the Rapp-Hodgkin syndromes. We report a multiplex nonconsanguineous family of Ashkenazi-Jewish

  7. Correlations of gene expression with ratings of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity in tourette syndrome : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tian, Yingfang; Stamova, Boryana; Ander, Bradley P.; Jickling, Glen C.; Gunther, Joan R.; Corbett, Blythe A.; Bos-Veneman, Netty G. P.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Schweitzer, Julie B.; Sharp, Frank R.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Inattentiveness, impulsivity and hyperactivity are the primary behaviors associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Previous studies showed that peripheral blood gene expression signatures can mirror central nervous system disease. Tourette syndrome (TS) is

  8. Chronic granulomatous disease, the McLeod phenotype and the contiguous gene deletion syndrome-a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkins Casey E

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD, a disorder of the NADPH oxidase system, results in phagocyte functional defects and subsequent infections with bacterial and fungal pathogens (such as Aspergillus species and Candida albicans. Deletions and missense, frameshift, or nonsense mutations in the gp91phox gene (also termed CYBB, located in the Xp21.1 region of the X chromosome, are associated with the most common form of CGD. When larger X-chromosomal deletions occur, including the XK gene deletion, a so-called "Contiguous Gene Deletion Syndrome" may result. The contiguous gene deletion syndrome is known to associate the Kell phenotype/McLeod syndrome with diseases such as X-linked chronic granulomatous disease, Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and X-linked retinitis pigmentosa. These patients are often complicated and management requires special attention to the various facets of the syndrome.

  9. Inactivation of Bardet-Biedl syndrome genes causes kidney defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Deng-Fu; Beyer, Andreas M.; Yang, Baoli; Nishimura, Darryl Y.; Sheffield, Val C.

    2011-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) is a rare hereditary autosomal recessive disease associated with several features including obesity, hypertension, and renal abnormalities. The underlying mechanisms of renal defects associated with BBS remain poorly defined. We examined the histological, molecular, and functional renal changes in BBS mouse models that have features of the human disorder. Interestingly, obese hypertensive Bbs4−/− mice exhibited inflammatory infiltration and renal cysts, whereas the obese normotensive Bbs2−/− mice had only minor inflammatory infiltration. Accordingly, the expression level of inducible nitric oxide synthase was elevated in the kidney of both BBS mice with a more marked increase in Bbs4−/− mice. In contrast, endothelial nitric oxide synthase expression was decreased in Bbs4−/−, but not Bbs2−/−, mice. Similarly, the expression levels of transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 and 4 channels as well as β- and γ-subunits of epithelial Na channel were significantly reduced only in the kidney of Bbs4−/− mice. Metabolic studies revealed changes in urine output and urinary concentrations of creatinine, blood urea nitrogen, sodium, and potassium with a more pronounced effect in Bbs4−/− mice. Finally, we found that calorie restriction which prevented obesity in BBS mice reversed the morphological and molecular changes found in Bbs2−/− and Bbs4−/− mice, indicating the kidney abnormalities associated with BBS are obesity related. These findings extend our understanding of the function of BBS proteins and emphasize the importance of these proteins in renal physiology. PMID:21106857

  10. New mutations in the NHS gene in Nance-Horan Syndrome families from the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florijn, Ralph J; Loves, Willem; Maillette de Buy Wenniger-Prick, Liesbeth J J M; Mannens, Marcel M A M; Tijmes, Nel; Brooks, Simon P; Hardcastle, Alison J; Bergen, Arthur A B

    2006-09-01

    Mutations in the NHS gene cause Nance-Horan Syndrome (NHS), a rare X-chromosomal recessive disorder with variable features, including congenital cataract, microphthalmia, a peculiar form of the ear and dental anomalies. We investigated the NHS gene in four additional families with NHS from the Netherlands, by dHPLC and direct sequencing. We identified an unique mutation in each family. Three out of these four mutations were not reported before. We report here the first splice site sequence alteration mutation and three protein truncating mutations. Our results suggest that X-linked cataract and NHS are allelic disorders.

  11. Stage-specific histone modification profiles reveal global transitions in the Xenopus embryonic epigenome.

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    Tobias D Schneider

    Full Text Available Vertebrate embryos are derived from a transitory pool of pluripotent cells. By the process of embryonic induction, these precursor cells are assigned to specific fates and differentiation programs. Histone post-translational modifications are thought to play a key role in the establishment and maintenance of stable gene expression patterns underlying these processes. While on gene level histone modifications are known to change during differentiation, very little is known about the quantitative fluctuations in bulk histone modifications during development. To investigate this issue we analysed histones isolated from four different developmental stages of Xenopus laevis by mass spectrometry. In toto, we quantified 59 modification states on core histones H3 and H4 from blastula to tadpole stages. During this developmental period, we observed in general an increase in the unmodified states, and a shift from histone modifications associated with transcriptional activity to transcriptionally repressive histone marks. We also compared these naturally occurring patterns with the histone modifications of murine ES cells, detecting large differences in the methylation patterns of histone H3 lysines 27 and 36 between pluripotent ES cells and pluripotent cells from Xenopus blastulae. By combining all detected modification transitions we could cluster their patterns according to their embryonic origin, defining specific histone modification profiles (HMPs for each developmental stage. To our knowledge, this data set represents the first compendium of covalent histone modifications and their quantitative flux during normogenesis in a vertebrate model organism. The HMPs indicate a stepwise maturation of the embryonic epigenome, which may be causal to the progressing restriction of cellular potency during development.

  12. [Clinical and genetic analysis of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome in TCOF1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbo; Zhang, Xu; Li, Zhenyue; Chen, Jing; Lu, Yu; Jia, Jingjie; Yuan, Huijun; Han, Dongyi

    2012-05-01

    To analyze the clinical and genetic features of a patient with Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS), and identify the mutation in TCOF1 gene. The medical history was taken, and general physical examinations and otological examinations were conducted in this patient. Genomic DNA was extracted from this patient and his parents and complete TCOF1 gene coding exons were amplified by specific PCR primers. Direct sequencing was carried out to identify the mutations. The raw data was analyzed with GeneTool software and molecular biological website. We detected a heterozygous c. 1639 delAG mutation in exon 11 of TCOF1, which resulted in a truncated protein lacking normal function. This mutation is a novel mutation and the second case identified in exon 11 of in TCS. TCS patient reported in this study has unique clinical phenotype. TCOF1 gene mutation is the specific risk factor.

  13. An R1632C variant in the SCN5A gene causing Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Molina, Esperanza; Sabater-Molina, María; Muñoz, Carmen; Ruiz-Espejo, Francisco; Gimeno, Juan R

    2016-06-01

    Brugada syndrome (BS) is an electrical disease, inherited in an autosomal dominant manner. BS is caused by mutations in up to 13 different genes. SCN5A is the gene most frequently mutated in BS, although this presents an incomplete penetrance. The present case study investigated the SCN5A gene in a family exhibiting BS. Direct sequencing of the SCN5A gene was performed to identify mutations and a familial investigation was performed. A novel variant was identified in the voltage‑sensing domain of the SCN5A protein. This familial investigation revealed one novel asymptomatic carrier in the family. Genetic investigations are useful to classify individuals who require more frequent clinical monitoring and to stratify the risk of developing the disease.

  14. [Study of gene mutation and pathogenetic mechanism for a family with Waardenburg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hongsheng; Liao, Xinbin; Liu, Yalan; He, Chufeng; Zhang, Hua; Jiang, Lu; Feng, Yong; Mei, Lingyun

    2017-08-10

    To explore the pathogenetic mechanism of a family affected with Waardenburg syndrome. Clinical data of the family was collected. Potential mutation of the MITF, SOX10 and SNAI2 genes were screened. Plasmids for wild type (WT) and mutant MITF proteins were constructed to determine their exogenous expression and subcellular distribution by Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. A heterozygous c.763C>T (p.R255X) mutation was detected in exon 8 of the MITF gene in the proband and all other patients from the family. No pathological mutation of the SOX10 and SNAI2 genes was detected. The DNA sequences of plasmids of MITF wild and mutant MITF R255X were confirmed. Both proteins were detected with the expected size. WT MITF protein only localized in the nucleus, whereas R255X protein showed aberrant localization in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. The c.763C>T mutation of the MITF gene probably underlies the disease in this family. The mutation can affect the subcellular distribution of MITF proteins in vitro, which may shed light on the molecular mechanism of Waardenburg syndrome caused by mutations of the MITF gene.

  15. Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes: Deletion quantitation with bivariate flow karyotyping allows mapping of patient breakpoints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCabe, E.R.B.; Towbin, J.A. (Baylor College of Medicine, Houston, TX (United States)); Engh, G. van den; Trask, B.J. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States))

    1992-12-01

    Bivariate flow karyotyping was used to estimate the deletion sizes for a series of patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes. The deletion estimates were used to develop an approximate scale for the genomic map in Xp21. The bivariate flow karyotype results were compared with clinical and molecular genetic information on the extent of the patients' deletions, and these various types of data were consistent. The resulting map spans >15 Mb, from the telomeric interval between DXS41 (99-6) and DXS68 (1-4) to a position centromeric to the ornithine transcarbamylase locus. The deletion sizing was considered to be accurate to [plus minus]1 Mb. The map provides information on the relative localization of genes and markers within this region. For example, the map suggests that the adrenal hypoplasia congenita and glycerol kinase genes are physically close to each other, are within 1-2 Mb of the telomeric end of the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) gene, and are nearer to the DMD locus than to the more distal marker DXS28 (C7). Information of this type is useful in developing genomic strategies for positional cloning in Xp21. These investigations demonstrate that the DNA from patients with Xp21 contiguous gene syndromes can be valuable reagents, not only for ordering loci and markers but also for providing an approximate scale to the map of the Xp21 region surrounding DMD. 44 refs., 3 figs.

  16. Novel Mutations in MLH1 and MSH2 Genes in Mexican Patients with Lynch Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Miguel Moreno-Ortiz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lynch Syndrome (LS is characterized by germline mutations in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR genes MLH1, MSH2, MSH6, and PMS2. This syndrome is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern and is characterized by early onset colorectal cancer (CRC and extracolonic tumors. The aim of this study was to identify mutations in MMR genes in three Mexican patients with LS. Methods. Immunohistochemical analysis was performed as a prescreening method to identify absent protein expression. PCR, Denaturing High Performance Liquid Chromatography (dHPLC, and Sanger sequencing complemented the analysis. Results. Two samples showed the absence of nuclear staining for MLH1 and one sample showed loss of nuclear staining for MSH2. The mutations found in MLH1 gene were c.2103+1G>C in intron 18 and compound heterozygous mutants c.1852_1854delAAG (p.K618del and c.1852_1853delinsGC (p.K618A in exon 16. In the MSH2 gene, we identified mutation c.638dupT (p.L213fs in exon 3. Conclusions. This is the first report of mutations in MMR genes in Mexican patients with LS and these appear to be novel.

  17. Novel frameshift mutation in the KCNQ1 gene responsible for Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azam Amirian

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s: Jervell and Lange–Nielsen syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in KCNQ1 or KCNE1 genes. The disease is characterized by sensorineural hearing loss and long QT syndrome. Methods: Here we present a 3.5-year-old female patient, an offspring of consanguineous marriage, who had a history of recurrent syncope and congenital sensorineural deafness. The patient and the family members were screened for mutations in KCNQ1 gene by linkage analysis and DNA sequencing. Results: DNA sequencing showed a c.1532_1534delG (p. A512Pfs*81 mutation in the KCNQ1 gene in homozygous form. The results of short tandem repeat (STR markers showed that the disease in the family is linked to the KCNQ1 gene. The mutation was confirmed in the parents in heterozygous form. Conclusion: This is the first report of this variant in KCNQ1 gene in an Iranian family. The data of this study could be used for early diagnosis of the condition in the family and genetic counseling.

  18. Non-syndromic hearing loss gene identification: A brief history and glimpse into the future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vona, Barbara; Nanda, Indrajit; Hofrichter, Michaela A H; Shehata-Dieler, Wafaa; Haaf, Thomas

    2015-10-01

    From the first identified non-syndromic hearing loss gene in 1995, to those discovered in present day, the field of human genetics has witnessed an unparalleled revolution that includes the completion of the Human Genome Project in 2003 to the $1000 genome in 2014. This review highlights the classical and cutting-edge strategies for non-syndromic hearing loss gene identification that have been used throughout the twenty year history with a special emphasis on how the innovative breakthroughs in next generation sequencing technology have forever changed candidate gene approaches. The simplified approach afforded by next generation sequencing technology provides a second chance for the many linked loci in large and well characterized families that have been identified by linkage analysis but have presently failed to identify a causative gene. It also discusses some complexities that may restrict eventual candidate gene discovery and calls for novel approaches to answer some of the questions that make this simple Mendelian disorder so intriguing. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Kallmann syndrome: mutations in the genes encoding prokineticin-2 and prokineticin receptor-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Dodé

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Kallmann syndrome combines anosmia, related to defective olfactory bulb morphogenesis, and hypogonadism due to gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency. Loss-of-function mutations in KAL1 and FGFR1 underlie the X chromosome-linked form and an autosomal dominant form of the disease, respectively. Mutations in these genes, however, only account for approximately 20% of all Kallmann syndrome cases. In a cohort of 192 patients we took a candidate gene strategy and identified ten and four different point mutations in the genes encoding the G protein-coupled prokineticin receptor-2 (PROKR2 and one of its ligands, prokineticin-2 (PROK2, respectively. The mutations in PROK2 were detected in the heterozygous state, whereas PROKR2 mutations were found in the heterozygous, homozygous, or compound heterozygous state. In addition, one of the patients heterozygous for a PROKR2 mutation was also carrying a missense mutation in KAL1, thus indicating a possible digenic inheritance of the disease in this individual. These findings reveal that insufficient prokineticin-signaling through PROKR2 leads to abnormal development of the olfactory system and reproductive axis in man. They also shed new light on the complex genetic transmission of Kallmann syndrome.

  20. A unique mosaic Turner syndrome patient with androgen receptor gene derived marker chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalkan, Rasime; Özdağ, Nermin; Bundak, Rüveyde; Çirakoğlu, Ayşe; Serakinci, Nedime

    2016-01-01

    Patients with Turner syndrome are generally characterized by having short stature with no secondary sexual characteristics. Some abnormalities, such as webbed neck, renal malformations (>50%) and cardiac defects (10%) are less common. The intelligence of these patients is considered normal. Non-mosaic monosomy X is observed in approximately 45% of postnatal patients with Turner syndrome and the rest of the patients have structural abnormalities or mosaicism involving 46,X,i(Xq), 45,X/46,XX, 45,X and other variants. The phenotype of 45,X/46,X,+mar individuals varies by the genetic continent and degree of the mosaicism. The gene content of the marker chromosome is the most important when correlating the phenotype with the genotype. Here we present an 11-year-old female who was referred for evaluation of her short stature and learning disabilities. Conventional cytogenetic investigation showed a mosaic 45,X/46,X,+mar karyotype. Fluorescence in situ hybridization showed that the marker chromosome originated from the X chromosome within the androgen receptor (AR) and X-inactive specific transcript (XIST) genes. Therefore, it is possible that aberrant activation of the marker chromosome, compromising the AR and XIST genes, may modify the Turner syndrome phenotype.

  1. Histone dosage regulates DNA damage sensitivity in a checkpoint-independent manner by the homologous recombination pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Dun; Burkhart, Sarah Lyn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Kabbaj, Marie-Helene Miquel; Gunjan, Akash

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotes, multiple genes encode histone proteins that package genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and regulate its accessibility. Because of their positive charge, ‘free’ (non-chromatin associated) histones can bind non-specifically to the negatively charged DNA and affect its metabolism, including DNA repair. We have investigated the effect of altering histone dosage on DNA repair in budding yeast. An increase in histone gene dosage resulted in enhanced DNA damage sensitivity, whereas deletion of a H3–H4 gene pair resulted in reduced levels of free H3 and H4 concomitant with resistance to DNA damaging agents, even in mutants defective in the DNA damage checkpoint. Studies involving the repair of a HO endonuclease-mediated DNA double-strand break (DSB) at the MAT locus show enhanced repair efficiency by the homologous recombination (HR) pathway on a reduction in histone dosage. Cells with reduced histone dosage experience greater histone loss around a DSB, whereas the recruitment of HR factors is concomitantly enhanced. Further, free histones compete with the HR machinery for binding to DNA and associate with certain HR factors, potentially interfering with HR-mediated repair. Our findings may have important implications for DNA repair, genomic stability, carcinogenesis and aging in human cells that have dozens of histone genes. PMID:22850743

  2. Effects of environmental stressors on histone modifications and their relevance to carcinogenesis: a systematic review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dik, S.; Scheepers, P.T.J.; Godderis, L.

    2012-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a complex process involving both genetic and epigenetic mechanisms. The cellular molecular epigenetic machinery, including histone modifications, is associated with changes in gene expression induced by exposure to environmental agents. In this paper, we systematically reviewed

  3. Mutation spectrum of genes associated with steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome in Chinese children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Dang, Xiqiang; He, Qingnan; Zhen, Yan; He, Xiaoxie; Yi, Zhuwen; Zhu, Kuichun

    2017-08-20

    Approximately 20% of children with idiopathic nephrotic syndrome do not respond to steroid therapy. More than 30 genes have been identified as disease-causing genes for the steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS). Few reports were from the Chinese population. The coding regions of genes commonly associated with SRNS were analyzed to characterize the gene mutation spectrum in children with SRNS in central China. The first phase study involved 38 children with five genes (NPHS1, NPHS2, PLCE1, WT1, and TRPC6) by Sanger sequencing. The second phase study involved 33 children with 17 genes by next generation DNA sequencing (NGS. 22 new patients, and 11 patients from first phase study but without positive findings). Overall deleterious or putatively deleterious gene variants were identified in 19 patients (31.7%), including four NPHS1 variants among five patients and three PLCE1 variants among four other patients. Variants in COL4A3, COL4A4, or COL4A5 were found in six patients. Eight novel variants were identified, including two in NPHS1, two in PLCE1, one in NPHS2, LAMB2, COL4A3, and COL4A4, respectively. 55.6% of the children with variants failed to respond to immunosuppressive agent therapy, while the resistance rate in children without variants was 44.4%. Our results show that screening for deleterious variants in some common genes in children clinically suspected with SRNS might be helpful for disease diagnosis as well as prediction of treatment efficacy and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Mutation analysis of the MKKS gene in McKusick-Kaufman syndrome and selected Bardet-Biedl syndrome patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slavotinek, A. M.; Searby, C.; Al-Gazali, L.; Hennekam, R. C. M.; Schrander-Stumpel, C.; Orcana-Losa, M.; Pardo-Reoyo, S.; Cantani, A.; Kumar, D.; Capellini, Q.; Neri, G.; Zackai, E.; Biesecker, L. G.

    2002-01-01

    McKusick-Kaufman syndrome comprises hydrometrocolpos, polydactyly, and congenital heart defects and overlaps with Bardet-Biedl syndrome, comprising retinitis pigmentosa, polydactyly, obesity, mental retardation, and renal and genital anomalies. Bardet-Biedl syndrome is genetically heterogeneous with

  5. Chromatin enrichment of histone marks H4Ac and H3K9me3 in TP53 gene domain in breast cells

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    Santos G. C. Jr

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In non-cancerous breast cell lines HB2 and MCF10A the TP53 gene is localized inside a relatively small ~ 50 kb loop domain delimited by two S/MARs. Aim. To analyze the chromatin markers H4Ac and H3K9me3 of these two S/MARs and of the TP53 gene P1 promoter in different breast cells lines. Methods. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP to characterize the chromatin status of these S/MARs elements in breast non-cancerous cell lines HB2 and MCF10A and cancerous MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, BT-474 and T47D cell lines, by chromatin enrichment of H4Ac and H3K9me3 epigenetic markers, hallmarks of open and closed chromatin, respectively. Results. We found that these chromatin epigenetic markers are differentially distributed in S/MARs for all analyzed breast cell lines. Conclusions. We found no correlation between S/MARs and chromatin epige- netic status, suggesting that nuclear matrix fixation and chromatin status can be independent. High enrichment of H3K9me3 in the TP53 gene P1 promoter region in MCF-7, could explain lower levels of the TP53 expression, described earlier by our group.

  6. Expression profile of immune response genes in patients with Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai Dessmon

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS emerged in later February 2003, as a new epidemic form of life-threatening infection caused by a novel coronavirus. However, the immune-pathogenesis of SARS is poorly understood. To understand the host response to this pathogen, we investigated the gene expression profiles of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs derived from SARS patients, and compared with healthy controls. Results The number of differentially expressed genes was found to be 186 under stringent filtering criteria of microarray data analysis. Several genes were highly up-regulated in patients with SARS, such as, the genes coding for Lactoferrin, S100A9 and Lipocalin 2. The real-time PCR method verified the results of the gene array analysis and showed that those genes that were up-regulated as determined by microarray analysis were also found to be comparatively up-regulated by real-time PCR analysis. Conclusions This differential gene expression profiling of PBMCs from patients with SARS strongly suggests that the response of SARS affected patients seems to be mainly an innate inflammatory response, rather than a specific immune response against a viral infection, as we observed a complete lack of cytokine genes usually triggered during a viral infection. Our study shows for the first time how the immune system responds to the SARS infection, and opens new possibilities for designing new diagnostics and treatments for this new life-threatening disease.

  7. De Novo Mutations in CHD4, an ATP-Dependent Chromatin Remodeler Gene, Cause an Intellectual Disability Syndrome with Distinctive Dysmorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Karin; Terhal, Paulien A; Cohen, Lior; Bruccoleri, Michael; Irving, Melita; Martinez, Ariel F; Rosenfeld, Jill A; Machol, Keren; Yang, Yaping; Liu, Pengfei; Walkiewicz, Magdalena; Beuten, Joke; Gomez-Ospina, Natalia; Haude, Katrina; Fong, Chin-To; Enns, Gregory M; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Fan, Judith; Gotway, Garrett; Ghorbani, Mohammad; van Gassen, Koen; Monroe, Glen R; van Haaften, Gijs; Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Yang, Xiang-Jiao; Campeau, Philippe M; Muenke, Maximilian

    2016-10-06

    Chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is an ATP-dependent chromatin remodeler involved in epigenetic regulation of gene transcription, DNA repair, and cell cycle progression. Also known as Mi2β, CHD4 is an integral subunit of a well-characterized histone deacetylase complex. Here we report five individuals with de novo missense substitutions in CHD4 identified through whole-exome sequencing and web-based gene matching. These individuals have overlapping phenotypes including developmental delay, intellectual disability, hearing loss, macrocephaly, distinct facial dysmorphisms, palatal abnormalities, ventriculomegaly, and hypogonadism as well as additional findings such as bone fusions. The variants, c.3380G>A (p.Arg1127Gln), c.3443G>T (p.Trp1148Leu), c.3518G>T (p.Arg1173Leu), and c.3008G>A, (p.Gly1003Asp) (GenBank: NM_001273.3), affect evolutionarily highly conserved residues and are predicted to be deleterious. Previous studies in yeast showed the equivalent Arg1127 and Trp1148 residues to be crucial for SNF2 function. Furthermore, mutations in the same positions were reported in malignant tumors, and a de novo missense substitution in an equivalent arginine residue in the C-terminal helicase domain of SMARCA4 is associated with Coffin Siris syndrome. Cell-based studies of the p.Arg1127Gln and p.Arg1173Leu mutants demonstrate normal localization to the nucleus and HDAC1 interaction. Based on these findings, the mutations potentially alter the complex activity but not its formation. This report provides evidence for the role of CHD4 in human development and expands an increasingly recognized group of Mendelian disorders involving chromatin remodeling and modification. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. K4, K9 and K18 in human histone H3 are targets for biotinylation by biotinidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobza, Keyna; Camporeale, Gabriela; Rueckert, Brian; Kueh, Alice; Griffin, Jacob B; Sarath, Gautam; Zempleni, Janos

    2005-08-01

    Histones are modified post-translationally, e.g. by methylation of lysine and arginine residues, and by phosphorylation of serine residues. These modifications regulate processes such as gene expression, DNA repair, and mitosis and meiosis. Recently, evidence has been provided that histones are also modified by covalent binding of the vitamin biotin. The aims of this study were to identify biotinylation sites in histone H3, and to investigate the crosstalk among histone biotinylation, methylation and phosphorylation. Synthetic peptides based on the sequence of human histone H3 were used as substrates for enzymatic biotinylation by biotinidase; biotin in peptides was probed using streptavidin peroxidase. These studies provided evidence that K4, K9 and K18 in histone H3 are good targets for biotinylation; K14 and K23 are relatively poor targets. Antibodies were generated to histone H3, biotinylated either at K4, K9 or K18. These antibodies localized to nuclei in human placental cells in immunocytochemistry and immunoblotting experiments, suggesting that lysines in histone H3 are biotinylated in vivo. Dimethylation of R2, R8 and R17 increased biotinylation of K4, K9 and K18, respectively, by biotinidase; phosphorylation of S10 abolished biotinylation of K9. These observations are consistent with crosstalk between biotinylation of histones and other known modifications of histones. We speculate that this crosstalk provides a link to known roles for biotin in gene expression and cell proliferation.

  9. Inhibition of histone deacetylases prevents cytokine-induced toxicity in beta cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, L; Tonnesen, M; Ronn, S G

    2007-01-01

    B (NFkappaB) is a critical signalling molecule in inflammation and is required for expression of the gene encoding inducible NO synthase (iNOS) and of pro-apoptotic genes. NFkappaB has recently been shown to associate with chromatin-modifying enzymes histone acetyltransferases and histone...... by immunoblotting and by immunoblotting combined with electrophoretic mobility shift assay, respectively. Viability was analysed by 3-(4,5-dimethyldiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide and apoptosis by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and histone...

  10. Lipids Reprogram Metabolism to Become a Major Carbon Source for Histone Acetylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McDonnell, Eoin; Crown, Scott B; Fox, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Cells integrate nutrient sensing and metabolism to coordinate proper cellular responses to a particular nutrient source. For example, glucose drives a gene expression program characterized by activating genes involved in its metabolism, in part by increasing glucose-derived histone acetylation....... Here, we find that lipid-derived acetyl-CoA is a major source of carbon for histone acetylation. Using (13)C-carbon tracing combined with acetyl-proteomics, we show that up to 90% of acetylation on certain histone lysines can be derived from fatty acid carbon, even in the presence of excess glucose...

  11. Global turnover of histone post-translational modifications and variants in human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zee Barry M

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Post-translational modifications (PTMs on the N-terminal tails of histones and histone variants regulate distinct transcriptional states and nuclear events. Whereas the functional effects of specific PTMs are the current subject of intense investigation, most studies characterize histone PTMs/variants in a non-temporal fashion and very few studies have reported kinetic information about these histone forms. Previous studies have used radiolabeling, fluorescence microscopy and chromatin immunoprecipitation to determine rates of histone turnover, and have found interesting correlations between increased turnover and increased gene expression. Therefore, histone turnover is an understudied yet potentially important parameter that may contribute to epigenetic regulation. Understanding turnover in the context of histone modifications and sequence variants could provide valuable additional insight into the function of histone replacement. Results In this study, we measured the metabolic rate of labeled isotope incorporation into the histone proteins of HeLa cells by combining stable isotope labeling of amino acids in cell culture (SILAC pulse experiments with quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. In general, we found that most core histones have similar turnover rates, with the exception of the H2A variants, which exhibit a wider range of rates, potentially consistent with their epigenetic function. In addition, acetylated histones have a significantly faster turnover compared with general histone protein and methylated histones, although these rates vary considerably, depending on the site and overall degree of methylation. Histones containing transcriptionally active marks have been consistently found to have faster turnover rates than histones containing silent marks. Interestingly, the presence of both active and silent marks on the same peptide resulted in a slower turnover rate than either mark alone on that same

  12. Nucleosome structure incorporated histone acetylation site prediction in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Liu, Hui; Li, Jiang; Deng, Youping; Shi, Tieliu

    2010-11-02

    Acetylation is a crucial post-translational modification for histones, and plays a key role in gene expression regulation. Due to limited data and lack of a clear acetylation consensus sequence, a few researches have focused on prediction of lysine acetylation sites. Several systematic prediction studies have been conducted for human and yeast, but less for Arabidopsis thaliana. Concerning the insufficient observation on acetylation site, we analyzed contributions of the peptide-alignment-based distance definition and 3D structure factors in acetylation prediction. We found that traditional structure contributes little to acetylation site prediction. Identified acetylation sites of histones in Arabidopsis thaliana are conserved and cross predictable with that of human by peptide based methods. However, the predicted specificity is overestimated, because of the existence of non-observed acetylable site. Here, by performing a complete exploration on the factors that affect the acetylability of lysines in histones, we focused on the relative position of lysine at nucleosome level, and defined a new structure feature to promote the performance in predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. thaliana. We found a new spacial correlated acetylation factor, and defined a ε-N spacial location based feature, which contains five core spacial ellipsoid wired areas. By incorporating the new feature, the performance of predicting the acetylability of all the histone lysines in A. Thaliana was promoted, in which the previous mispredicted acetylable lysines were corrected by comparing to the peptide-based prediction.

  13. [Change in gene expression of inflammation-related genes induced in multiple organ dysfunction syndrome induced by infection of injuries in rat].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Yu; Shen, Hong; Li, Tan-shi

    2007-03-01

    To study the changes in inflammation-related gene expression in liver tissue during the course of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome (MODS) induced by infection of injuries and its implication. The rats model with MODS following trauma and infection was reproduced in rat. Liver tissue was harvested. The differences of gene expressions between the simple trauma group and MODS group were detected by means of cDNA microarray. Comparison between the two groups, differentially expressed genes included enhanced expression of genes related both of tissue damage and repair. There was also up-regulation of expression of both inflammation-related and anti-inflammation related genes. A few genes appeared down-regulated. The differences of expression extent were significant. There were up-regulation of some genes related to apoptosis and fibrosis. Differential expressions of genes in the liver tissue include both that related to the inflammation and anti-inflammation, with down-regulation and up-regulation at the same time. There is a difference in the intensity. There is also an expression of genes related to intrinsic protection, as manifested by co-existence of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and compensation anti-inflammatory response syndrome (CARS) under the condition of MODS. There is an imbalance in inflammatory reaction. The simultaneous up-regulation of the tissue damage and repair related genes suggests that cellular injury is accompanied by repair in the organs during the course of MODS.

  14. Development of histone deacetylase inhibitor in antitumor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Min; Li Biao; Zhang Yifan

    2007-01-01

    Human genome project has made a great progress, but the study about the gene expression regulation is still at the beginning. It's found that many diseases such as cancer are related to the deactivation of some gene expressions, whose epigenetic mechanisms involve DNA methylation, histone acetylation and other structural changes in chromatin. That disturbs the normal gene expression regulation and cell multiplication, which finally induce the carcinogenesis. So the re-expression of inactive genes may play a part in inhibiting the carcinogenesis. On the basis of the view, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor has a variety of applications in the study of disease and tumor, including the thyroid carcinoma. Furthermore, it comtribute to the mew way of the redifferentication and radioidine therapy against poorly differentiated thyroid carcinoma. (authors)

  15. Brugada syndrome with a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene: A case report from Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Zahidus Sayeed

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Brugada syndrome is an inherited cardiac arrhythmia that follows autosomal dominant transmission and can cause sudden death. We report a case of Brugada syndrome in a 55-year-old male patient presented with recurrent palpitation, atypical chest pain and presyncope. ECG changes were consistent with type 1 Brugada. Gene analysis revealed a novel missense mutation in SCN5A gene with a genetic variation of D785N and a nucleotide change at 2353G-A. One of his children also had the same mutation. To our knowledge this is the first genetically proved case of Brugada syndrome in Bangladesh.

  16. Connected Gene Communities Underlie Transcriptional Changes in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudaoud, Imène; Fournier, Éric; Baguette, Audrey; Vallée, Maxime; Lamaze, Fabien C; Droit, Arnaud; Bilodeau, Steve

    2017-09-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a complex multisystem developmental disorder caused by mutations in cohesin subunits and regulators. While its precise molecular mechanisms are not well defined, they point toward a global deregulation of the transcriptional gene expression program. Cohesin is associated with the boundaries of chromosome domains and with enhancer and promoter regions connecting the three-dimensional genome organization with transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that connected gene communities, structures emerging from the interactions of noncoding regulatory elements and genes in the three-dimensional chromosomal space, provide a molecular explanation for the pathoetiology of CdLS associated with mutations in the cohesin-loading factor NIPBL and the cohesin subunit SMC1A NIPBL and cohesin are important constituents of connected gene communities that are centrally positioned at noncoding regulatory elements. Accordingly, genes deregulated in CdLS are positioned within reach of NIPBL- and cohesin-occupied regions through promoter-promoter interactions. Our findings suggest a dynamic model where NIPBL loads cohesin to connect genes in communities, offering an explanation for the gene expression deregulation in the CdLS. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Understanding the Pathogenicity of Noncoding Mismatch Repair Gene Promoter Variants in Lynch Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Thompson, Bryony A; Ward, Robyn L; Hesson, Luke B; Sloane, Mathew A

    2016-05-01

    Lynch syndrome is the most common familial cancer condition that mainly predisposes to tumors of the colon and endometrium. Cancer susceptibility is caused by the autosomal dominant inheritance of a loss-of-function mutation or epimutation in one of the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) genes. Cancer risk assessment is often possible with nonsynonymous coding region mutations, but in many cases patients present with DNA sequence changes within noncoding regions, including the promoters, of MMR genes. The pathogenic role of promoter variants, and hence clinical significance, is unclear and this hinders the clinical management of carriers. In this review, we provide an overview of the classification of MMR gene variants, outline the laboratory assays and online resources that can be used to assess the causality of promoter variants in Lynch syndrome, and highlight some of the practical challenges of demonstrating the pathogenicity of these variants. In conclusion, we propose a guide that could be integrated into the current InSiGHT classification scheme to help determine if a MMR gene promoter variant is pathogenic. © 2016 WILEY PERIODICALS, INC.

  18. Novel LRP5 gene mutation in a patient with osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques-Pinheiro, Alice; Levasseur, Régis; Cormier, Catherine; Bonneau, Jessica; Boileau, Catherine; Varret, Mathilde; Abifadel, Marianne; Allanore, Yannick

    2010-03-01

    Osteoporosis-pseudoglioma syndrome (OPPG) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterised by severe juvenile-onset osteoporosis and congenital or early-onset blindness. This serious illness is due to mutations in the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) that is a major actor in pathways involved in bone remodelling. Here, we report a novel frameshift mutation identified in a 22 year-old Tunisian boy of a consanguineous family. This patient had low bone mineral density (BMD), experienced multiple fractures during childhood and suffered ocular alterations with blindness. Direct DNA sequencing showed a homozygous 5 base pair insertion in exon 5 of the LRP5 gene. This new mutation is located in the first EGF-like domain and gives rise to a truncated protein of 384 amino acids. The functional significance of this mutation clearly indicates a loss-of-function mutation of the LRP5 gene leading to the observed OPPG phenotype. Rheumatologists must be aware of LRP5 gene that in addition to being a major gene in the mendelian disease that is OPPG syndrome seems to be involved in osteoporosis in the general population through some of its polymorphisms. Copyright 2009 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Pitt-Hopkins syndrome: report of a case with a TCF4 gene mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orsini Alessandro

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aims We will discuss the clinical and genetic diagnosis of a child with severe psychomotor delay, who at 3 years of age presented with paroxysms of hyperpnea-apnea and seizures unrelated to breathing anomalies. Methods The child underwent genetic (karyotype, FISH telomeres and neuroradiological (cranial CT and MRI tests, which proved to be normal. He came under our clinical observation at 3 years and 5 months of age. Due to severe psychomotor delay and facial dysmorphisms we completed the genetic investigations based on his clinical feature and analysis of the available literature. Results The presence of severe mental retardation associated with anomalous breathing pattern may suggest the Joubert and Rett syndrome, however these were excluded on the basis of clinical and genetic examination. Angelman syndrome, suspected for facial dysmorphisms and absent language, was also excluded because of the presence of a normal pattern of methylation at SNRPN locus. Another possible diagnosis was the Pitt-Hopkins Syndrome (PHS, characterized by severe mental retardation, breathing anomalies (paroxisms of hyperpnea-apnea, dysmorphisms and sometimes epilepsy. Haploinsufficiency of TCF4 gene located at 18q21.2 region has been recently identified as causative of this syndrome. In our patient the research of TCF4 mutation by the Institute of Human Genetics, University Hospital Erlangen (Germany, showed a de novo mutation. Conclusions The diagnosis of Pitt-Hopkins syndrome, an underdiagnosed cause of mental retardation, was based on clinical and genetic findings. Searching for TCF4 mutations is highly recommended when others overlapping syndromes was excluded. At our knowledge our patient is the first italian case of PHS diagnosed at molecular level.

  20. Expression profiling of the GBP1 gene as a candidate gene for porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gol, S; Estany, J; Fraile, L J; Pena, R N

    2015-12-01

    A genomic region in pig chromosome 4 has been previously associated with higher viraemia levels and lower weight gain following porcine reproduction and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. The region includes the marker WUR1000125, a G>A polymorphism next to a putative polyadenylation site in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the guanylate-binding protein 1, interferon-induced (GBP1) gene. The protein encoded by GBP1 is a negative regulator of T-cell responses. We show here that GBP1 expression is lower in liver and tonsils of pigs carrying the WUR1000125-G allele due to differential allele expression (allele A expression is 1.9-fold higher than for allele G). We also show that the GBP1 gene has two active polyadenylation signals 421 bp apart and that polyadenylation usage is dependent on the WUR1000125 genotype. The distal site is the most prevalently used in all samples, but the presence of the A allele favours the generation of shorter transcripts from the proximal site. This is confirmed by a differential allele expression study in AG genotype liver and tonsil samples. The interaction between WUR1000125 and other mutations identified in the 5'- and 3'-UTR regions of this gene needs to be studied. In conclusion, our study indicates that the WUR1000125 mutation is associated with changes in the expression of the negative T-cell regulator GBP1 gene. However, the chromosome 4 locus for PRRSV viraemia levels and weight gain contains a cluster of four other GBP genes that remain to be studied as candidate genes for this QTL. © 2015 Stichting International Foundation for Animal Genetics.

  1. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood ... fibrillin. A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  2. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  3. Opioid gene expression changes and post-translational histone modifications at promoter regions in the rat nucleus accumbens after acute and repeated 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine (MDMA) exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caputi, Francesca Felicia; Palmisano, Martina; Carboni, Lucia; Candeletti, Sanzio; Romualdi, Patrizia

    2016-12-01

    The recreational drug of abuse 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) has been shown to produce neurotoxic damage and long-lasting changes in several brain areas. In addition to the involvement of serotoninergic and dopaminergic systems, little information exists about the contribution of nociceptin/orphaninFQ (N/OFQ)-NOP and dynorphin (DYN)-KOP systems in neuronal adaptations evoked by MDMA. Here we investigated the behavioral and molecular effects induced by acute (8mg/kg) or repeated (8mg/kg twice daily for seven days) MDMA exposure. MDMA exposure affected body weight gain and induced hyperlocomotion; this latter effect progressively decreased after repeated administration. Gene expression analysis indicated a down-regulation of the N/OFQ system and an up-regulation of the DYN system in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), highlighting an opposite systems regulation in response to MDMA exposure. Since histone modifications have been strongly associated to the addiction-related maladaptive changes, we examined two permissive (acH3K9 and me3H3K4) and two repressive transcription marks (me3H3K27 and me2H3K9) at the pertinent opioid gene promoter regions. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that acute MDMA increased me3H3K4 at the pN/OFQ, pDYN and NOP promoters. Following acute and repeated treatment a significant decrease of acH3K9 at the pN/OFQ promoter was observed, which correlated with gene expression results. Acute treatment caused an acH3K9 increase and a me2H3K9 decrease at the pDYN promoter which matched its mRNA up-regulation. Our data indicate that the activation of the DYNergic stress system together with the inactivation of the N/OFQergic anti-stress system contribute to the neuroadaptive actions of MDMA and offer novel epigenetic information associated with MDMA abuse. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Age-associated DNA methylation changes in immune genes, histone modifiers and chromatin remodeling factors within 5 years after birth in human blood leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acevedo, Nathalie; Reinius, Lovisa E; Vitezic, Morana

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Age-related changes in DNA methylation occurring in blood leukocytes during early childhood may reflect epigenetic maturation. We hypothesized that some of these changes involve gene networks of critical relevance in leukocyte biology and conducted a prospective study to elucidate...... the dynamics of DNA methylation. Serial blood samples were collected at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 60 months after birth in ten healthy girls born in Finland and participating in the Type 1 Diabetes Prediction and Prevention Study. DNA methylation was measured using the HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. RESULTS......: After filtering for the presence of polymorphisms and cell-lineage-specific signatures, 794 CpG sites showed significant DNA methylation differences as a function of age in all children (41.6% age-methylated and 58.4% age-demethylated, Bonferroni-corrected P value

  5. Altered expression of immune-related genes in children with Down syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruna Lancia Zampieri

    Full Text Available Individuals with Down syndrome (DS have a high incidence of immunological alterations with increased susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections and high frequency of different types of hematologic malignancies and autoimmune disorders. In the current study, we profiled the expression pattern of 92 immune-related genes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs of two different groups, children with DS and control children, to identify differentially expressed genes that might be of pathogenetic importance for the development and phenotype of the immunological alterations observed in individuals with DS. PBMCs samples were obtained from six DS individuals with karyotypically confirmed full trisomy 21 and six healthy control individuals (ages 2-6 years. Gene expression was profiled in duplicate according to the manufacturer's instructions provided by commercially available TaqMan Human Immune Array representing 92 immune function genes and four reference genes on a 96-plex gene card. A set of 17 differentially expressed genes, not located on chromosome 21 (HSA21, involved in immune and inflammatory pathways was identified including 13 genes (BCL2, CCL3, CCR7, CD19, CD28, CD40, CD40LG, CD80, EDN1, IKBKB, IL6, NOS2 and SKI significantly down-regulated and four genes (BCL2L1, CCR2, CCR5 and IL10 significantly up-regulated in children with DS. These findings highlight a list of candidate genes for further investigation into the molecular mechanism underlying DS pathology and reinforce the secondary effects of the presence of a third copy of HSA21.

  6. Class I histone deacetylase-mediated repression of the proximal promoter of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein gene regulates its response to brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuchi, Mamoru; Nakashima, Fukumi; Tabuchi, Akiko; Shimotori, Masataka; Tatsumi, Saori; Okuno, Hiroyuki; Bito, Haruhiko; Tsuda, Masaaki

    2015-03-13

    We examined the transcriptional regulation of the activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein gene (Arc), focusing on BDNF-induced Arc expression in cultured rat cortical cells. Although the synaptic activity-responsive element (SARE), located -7 kbp upstream of the Arc transcription start site, responded to NMDA, BDNF, or FGF2, the proximal region of the promoter (Arc/-1679) was activated by BDNF or FGF2, but not by NMDA, suggesting the presence of at least two distinct Arc promoter regions, distal and proximal, that respond to extracellular stimuli. Specificity protein 4 (SP4) and early growth response 1 (EGR1) controlled Arc/-1679 transcriptional activity via the region encompassing -169 to -37 of the Arc promoter. We found that trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, significantly enhanced the inductive effects of BDNF or FGF2, but not those of NMDA on Arc expression. Inhibitors of class I/IIb HDACs, SAHA, and class I HDACs, MS-275, but not of class II HDACs, MC1568, enhanced BDNF-induced Arc expression. The enhancing effect of TSA was mediated by the region from -1027 to -1000 bp, to which serum response factor (SRF) and HDAC1 bound. The binding of HDAC1 to this region was reduced by TSA. Thus, Arc expression was suppressed by class I HDAC-mediated mechanisms via chromatin modification of the proximal promoter whereas the inhibition of HDAC allowed Arc expression to be markedly enhanced in response to BDNF or FGF2. These results contribute to our understanding of the physiological role of Arc expression in neuronal functions such as memory consolidation. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Histone Modifications, Modifiers and Readers in Melanoma Resistance to Targeted and Immune Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Gallagher

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The treatment of melanoma has been revolutionized by new therapies targeting MAPK signaling or the immune system. Unfortunately these therapies are hindered by either primary resistance or the development of acquired resistance. Resistance mechanisms involving somatic mutations in genes associated with resistance have been identified in some cases of melanoma, however, the cause of resistance remains largely unexplained in other cases. The importance of epigenetic factors targeting histones and histone modifiers in driving the behavior of melanoma is only starting to be unraveled and provides significant opportunity to combat the problems of therapy resistance. There is also an increasing ability to target these epigenetic changes with new drugs that inhibit these modifications to either prevent or overcome resistance to both MAPK inhibitors and immunotherapy. This review focuses on changes in histones, histone reader proteins and histone positioning, which can mediate resistance to new therapeutics and that can be targeted for future therapies.

  8. Characterization of ORF89 - A latency-related gene of white spot syndrome virus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hossain, M.S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kwang, Jimmy

    2004-01-01

    Open reading frame 89 (ORF89) is one of the three genes that are believed to be involved in the latent infection of white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). Here, we report the structure and functional characterization of ORF89. cDNA sequencing, 5' RLM-RACE, and 3' RLM-RACE showed that ORF89 gene is transcribed into an unspliced mRNA of 4436 nucleotides, which is predicted to encode a protein of 1437 amino acids. ORF89 expressed an approximately 165-kDa protein in Sf9 cells that localized in the nucleus. Amino acids 678-683 were found to be essential for nuclear localization. Cotransfection assays demonstrated that ORF89 protein repressed its own promoter as well as those of a protein kinase and the thymidine-thymidylate kinase genes of WSSV. SYBR Green real-time PCR indicated that the repression occurred at the transcriptional level

  9. A Case of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere Syndrome Due To a Novel Mutation in Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatraman Thulasi BA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by motor, sensory, and cranial neuronopathies, associated with mutations in SLC52A2 and SLC52A3 genes that code for human riboflavin transporters RFVT2 and RFVT3, respectively. The authors describe the clinical course of a 6-year-old girl with Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome and a novel homozygous mutation c.1156T>C in the SLC52A3 gene, who presented at the age of 2.5 years with progressive brain stem dysfunction including ptosis, facial weakness, hearing loss, dysphagia, anarthria with bilateral vocal cord paralysis, and ataxic gait. She subsequently developed respiratory failure requiring tracheostomy and worsening dysphagia necessitating a gastrostomy. Following riboflavin supplementation, resolution of facial diplegia and ataxia, improvements in ptosis, and bulbar function including vocalization and respiration were noted. However, her sensorineural hearing loss remained unchanged. Similar to other cases of Brown-Vialetto-Van Laere syndrome, our patient responded favorably to early riboflavin supplementation with significant but not complete neurologic recovery.

  10. Recurrent Stroke in a Child with TRMA Syndrome and SLC19A2 Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Moosavian, Toktam; Moosavian, Hamidreza

    2018-01-01

    Here we report a 5-month-old boy with thiamine Responsive Megaloblastic Anemia syndrome (TRMA syndrome) with several attacks of stroke, admitted to Mofid Children's Hospital, Tehran, Iran, in 2016. In addition to the cardinal clinical manifestations of the syndrome, other manifestations comprise thiamine-responsive megaloblastic anemia, diabetes mellitus, and sensor neural hearing loss. The patient showed the ischemic attack of stroke. Megaloblastic anemia and diabetes were diagnosed at 8 months and was successfully treated with vitamin and insulin prescription. After treatment of thiamine, diabetes was controlled and insulin was discontinued. In spite of the thiamine administration, the second stroke as hemorrhagic stroke occurred in the patient after a few months. TRAMA is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. TRMA was confirmed by mutation in SLC19A2. A homozygous splice site variant was detected in SLC19A2 gene. Stroke was not reported in this syndrome (only in one report about one attack in an adult patient) but in this patient, several attacks of stroke were reported before and after thiamin administration.

  11. Positional cloning of genes involved in the Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome, hemihypertrophy, and associated childhood tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannens, M; Alders, M; Redeker, B; Bliek, J; Steenman, M; Wiesmeyer, C; de Meulemeester, M; Ryan, A; Kalikin, L; Voûte, T; De Kraker, J; Hoovers, J; Slater, R; Feinberg, A; Little, P; Westerveld, A

    1996-11-01

    The Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) is an overgrowth malformation syndrome that occurs with an incidence of 1:13,700 births. There is a striking incidence of childhood tumors found in BWS patients. Various lines of investigation have localized "imprinted" genes involved in BWS and associated childhood tumors to 11p15. High resolution mapping of 8 rare balanced chromosomal BWS rearrangements enabled us to identify three distinct regions on chromosome 11p15 that might harbor genes involved in the above-mentioned disorders. These results suggest genetic heterogeneity that correlates with the clinical heterogeneity seen in the patients studied. Expressed candidate gene sequences from these regions have been cloned and partly sequenced. These transcripts are either disrupted by or are at least within a few kb of these BWS chromosome breakpoints. So far, zinc-finger sequences and one Kruppel-associated box (KRAB) domain were found in independent candidate genes which are compatible with a regulating function of growth promoting genes. The abundance of expression of these genes varies from low abundant in all adult and fetal tissues tested to detectable on Northern blots of adult tissues. In addition to our 11p15 studies we have analyzed additional chromosome regions, in particular 1p. Cytogenetic, loss of heterozygosity (LOH) and comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) studies have identified 1p35 as a region of interest. A positional cloning effort to identify a balanced 1p35 translocation found in a Wilms tumor has led to the isolation of a YAC, crossing this breakpoint.

  12. Mutations in Histone Acetylase Modifier BRPF1 Cause an Autosomal-Dominant Form of Intellectual Disability with Associated Ptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Francesca; Schaefer, Elise; Magee, Alex; Mark, Paul; Mancini, Grazia M; Dieterich, Klaus; Von Allmen, Gretchen; Alders, Marielle; Coutton, Charles; van Slegtenhorst, Marjon; Vieville, Gaëlle; Engelen, Mark; Cobben, Jan Maarten; Juusola, Jane; Pujol, Aurora; Mandel, Jean-Louis; Piton, Amélie

    2017-01-05

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a common neurodevelopmental disorder exhibiting extreme genetic heterogeneity, and more than 500 genes have been implicated in Mendelian forms of ID. We performed exome sequencing in a large family affected by an autosomal-dominant form of mild syndromic ID with ptosis, growth retardation, and hypotonia, and we identified an inherited 2 bp deletion causing a frameshift in BRPF1 (c.1052_1053del) in five affected family members. BRPF1 encodes a protein modifier of two histone acetyltransferases associated with ID: KAT6A (also known as MOZ or MYST3) and KAT6B (MORF or MYST4). The mRNA transcript was not significantly reduced in affected fibroblasts and most likely produces a truncated protein (p.Val351Glyfs ∗ 8). The protein variant shows an aberrant cellular location, loss of certain protein interactions, and decreased histone H3K23 acetylation. We identified BRPF1 deletions or point mutations in six additional individuals with a similar phenotype. Deletions of the 3p25 region, containing BRPF1 and SETD5, cause a defined ID syndrome where most of the clinical features are attributed to SETD5 deficiency. We compared the clinical symptoms of individuals carrying mutations or small deletions of BRPF1 alone or SETD5 alone with those of individuals with deletions encompassing both BRPF1 and SETD5. We conclude that both genes contribute to the phenotypic severity of 3p25 deletion syndrome but that some specific features, such as ptosis and blepharophimosis, are mostly driven by BRPF1 haploinsufficiency. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Sepsis and ARDS: The Dark Side of Histones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhiheng; Huang, Yongbo; Mao, Pu; Zhang, Jianrong; Li, Yimin

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in management over the last several decades, sepsis and acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) still remain major clinical challenges and the leading causes of death for patients in intensive care units (ICUs) due to insufficient understanding of the pathophysiological mechanisms of these diseases. However, recent studies have shown that histones, also known as chromatin-basic structure proteins, could be released into the extracellular space during severe stress and physical challenges to the body (e.g., sepsis and ARDS). Due to their cytotoxic and proinflammatory effects, extracellular histones can lead to excessive and overwhelming cell damage and death, thus contributing to the pathogenesis of both sepsis and ARDS. In addition, antihistone-based treatments (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, activated protein C, and heparin) have shown protective effects and have significantly improved the outcomes of mice suffering from sepsis and ARDS. Here, we review researches related to the pathological role of histone in context of sepsis and ARDS and evaluate the potential value of histones as biomarkers and therapeutic targets of these diseases. PMID:26609197

  14. A 380-kb Duplication in 7p22.3 Encompassing the LFNG Gene in a Boy with Asperger Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vulto-van Silfhout, A.T.; de Brouwer, A.F.; de Leeuw, N.; Obihara, C.C.; Brunner, H.G.; Vries, L.B.A. de

    2012-01-01

    De novo genomic aberrations are considered an important cause of autism spectrum disorders. We describe a de novo 380-kb gain in band p22.3 of chromosome 7 in a patient with Asperger syndrome. This duplicated region contains 9 genes including the LNFG gene that is an important regulator of NOTCH

  15. Symptoms of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder in Down Syndrome: Effects of the Dopamine Receptor D4 Gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Gina Marie; Spanó, Goffredina; Edgin, Jamie

    2015-01-01

    This study examined individual differences in ADHD symptoms and executive function (EF) in children with Down syndrome (DS) in relation to the dopamine receptor D4 (DRD4) gene, a gene often linked to ADHD in people without DS. Participants included 68 individuals with DS (7-21 years), assessed through laboratory tasks, caregiver reports, and…

  16. Polyunsaturated fatty acid regulation of gene transcription: a molecular mechanism to improve the metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, S D

    2001-04-01

    This review addresses the hypothesis that polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), particularly those of the (n-3) family, play pivotal roles as "fuel partitioners" in that they direct fatty acids away from triglyceride storage and toward oxidation, and that they enhance glucose flux to glycogen. In doing this, PUFA may protect against the adverse symptoms of the metabolic syndrome and reduce the risk of heart disease. PUFA exert their beneficial effects by up-regulating the expression of genes encoding proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation while simultaneously down-regulating genes encoding proteins of lipid synthesis. PUFA govern oxidative gene expression by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha. PUFA suppress lipogenic gene expression by reducing the nuclear abundance and DNA-binding affinity of transcription factors responsible for imparting insulin and carbohydrate control to lipogenic and glycolytic genes. In particular, PUFA suppress the nuclear abundance and expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1 and reduce the DNA-binding activities of nuclear factor Y, Sp1 and possibly hepatic nuclear factor-4. Collectively, the studies discussed suggest that the fuel "repartitioning" and gene expression actions of PUFA should be considered among criteria used in defining the dietary needs of (n-6) and (n-3) and in establishing the dietary ratio of (n-6) to (n-3) needed for optimum health benefit.

  17. [PAX3 gene mutation analysis for two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ families and their prenatal diagnosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Y; Liu, N; Kong, X D; Yan, J; Qin, Z B; Wang, B

    2016-12-07

    Objective: To analyze the mutations of PAX3 gene in two Waardenburg syndrome type Ⅰ (WS1) pedigrees and make prenatal diagnosis for the high-risk 18-week-old fetus. Methods: PAX3 gene was first analyzed by Sanger sequencing and multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification(MLPA) for detecting pathogenic mutation of the probands of the two pedigrees. The mutations were confirmed by MLPA and Sanger in parents and unrelated healthy individuals.Prenatal genetic diagnosis for the high-risk fetus was performed by amniotic fluid cell after genotyping. Results: A heterozygous PAX3 gene gross deletion (E7 deletion) was identified in all patients from WS1-01 family, and not found in 20 healthy individuals.Prenatal diagnosis in WS1-01 family indicated that the fetus was normal. Molecular studies identified a novel deletion mutation c. 1385_1386delCT within the PAX3 gene in all affected WS1-02 family members, but in none of the unaffected relatives and 200 healthy individuals. Conclusions: PAX3 gene mutation is etiological for two WS1 families. Sanger sequencing plus MLPA is effective and accurate for making gene diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis.

  18. Bilateral renal tumors in an adult man with Smith-Magenis syndrome: The role of the FLCN gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dardour, Leila; Verleyen, Pieter; Lesage, Karl; Holvoet, Maureen; Devriendt, Koen

    2016-10-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a contiguous-gene disorder most commonly caused by a deletion of chromosome 17p11.2. We report a 57 year-old man with SMS who presents bilateral renal tumors. This is most likely related to haploinsufficiency of FLCN gene, located in the deleted region, and a known tumor suppressor gene. Haploinsufficiency of FLCN causes Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHDS), characterized by pulmonary cysts, renal and skin tumors. The present observation suggests that the follow-up of patients with SMS should also focus on possible manifestations of BHDS. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in Chinese patients with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hang; Luo, Mingyao; Chen, Qianlong; Fu, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Jing; Qian, Xiangyang; Sun, Xiaogang; Fan, Yuxin; Zhou, Zhou; Chang, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Marfan syndrome (MFS) is an autosomal dominant connective tissue disorder typically involving the ocular, skeletal and cardiovascular systems, and aortic aneurysms/dissection mainly contributes to its mortality. Here, we performed genetic testing of the FBN1 gene in 39 Chinese probands with Marfan/Marfan-like syndrome and their related family members by Sanger sequencing. In total, 29 pathogenic/likely pathogenic FBN1 mutations, including 17 novel ones, were identified. In addition, most MFS patients with aortic disease (62%) had a truncating or splicing mutation. These results expand the FBN1 mutation spectrum and enrich our knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations. Genetic testing for MFS and its related aortic diseases is increasingly important for early intervention and treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Altered clock gene expression in obese visceral adipose tissue is associated with metabolic syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine Vieira

    Full Text Available Clock gene expression was associated with different components of metabolic syndrome (MS in human adipose tissue. However, no study has been done to compare the expression of clock genes in visceral adipose tissue (VAT from lean and obese subjects and its clinical implications. Therefore, we studied in lean and obese women the endogenous 24 h expression of clock genes in isolated adipocytes and its association with MS components. VAT was obtained from lean (BMI 21-25 kg/m2; n = 21 and morbidly obese women (BMI >40 kg/m2; n = 28. The 24 h pattern of clock genes was analyzed every 6 hours using RT-PCR. Correlation of clinical data was studied by Spearman analysis. The 24 h pattern of clock genes showed that obesity alters the expression of CLOCK, BMAL1, PER1, CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA in adipocytes with changes found in CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA throughout the 24 h period. The same results were confirmed in VAT and stromal cells (SC showing an upregulation of CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA from obese women. A positive correlation was observed for REV-ERB ALPHA gene expression with BMI and waist circumference in the obese population. Expression of ROR ALPHA was correlated with HDL levels and CLOCK with LDL. Obese subjects with MS exhibited positive correlation in the PER2 gene with LDL cholesterol, whereas REV-ERB ALPHA was correlated with waist circumference. We identified CRY2 and REV-ERB ALPHA as the clock genes upregulated in obesity during the 24 h period and that REV-ERB ALPHA is an important gene associated with MS.

  1. Histone modifications: Cycling with chromosomal replication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thon, Genevieve

    2008-01-01

    Histone modifications tend to be lost during chromosome duplication. Several recent studies suggest that the RNA interference pathway becomes active during the weakened transcriptional repression occurring at centromeres in S phase, resulting in the re-establishment of histone modifications...

  2. Giant readthrough transcription units at the histone loci on lampbrush chromosomes of the newt Notophthalmus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, M O; Gall, J G

    1985-01-01

    We have studied transcription at the histone loci in oocytes of the newt Notophthalmus viridescens, using in situ hybridization of cloned probes to the nascent RNA on lampbrush chromosome loops. Clusters of the five histone coding sequences are separated by long tracts of a simple sequence DNA, satellite 1. We had previously demonstrated coordinate transcription of histone genes and satellite 1 sequences. We postulated that satellite sequences were transcribed by readthrough from histone gene promoters; that is, transcription initiated at any of the five usual promoters, but did not terminate at the 3' end of the gene. Instead transcription proceeded through downstream sequences in the histone cluster (including spacers and downstream histone genes), and then through the satellite 1 region. Our model led to several specific predictions, in particular that some internal spacer regions between the genes should be well represented in the RNA on loops, that certain sequences should be absent from the loops, and that presence or absence of particular sequences should be correlated with morphological polarity of the transcription unit. We have hybridized ten strand-specific probes to the lamp-brush chromosomes and we find that the patterns of hybridization agree with the readthrough model of transcription.

  3. Acetylation-Mediated Proteasomal Degradation of Core Histones during DNA Repair and Spermatogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Min-Xian; Pang, Ye; Liu, Cui Hua; Haratake, Kousuke; Du, Bo-Yu; Ji, Dan-Yang; Wang, Guang-Fei; Zhu, Qian-Qian; Song, Wei; Yu, Yadong; Zhang, Xiao-Xu; Huang, Hai-Tao; Miao, Shiying; Chen, Lian-Bin; Zhang, Zi-Hui; Liang, Ya-Nan; Liu, Shan; Cha, Hwangho; Yang, Dong; Zhai, Yonggong; Komatsu, Takuo; Tsuruta, Fuminori; Li, Haitao; Cao, Cheng; Li, Wei; Li, Guo-Hong; Cheng, Yifan; Chiba, Tomoki; Wang, Linfang; Goldberg, Alfred L.; Shen, Yan; Qiu, Xiao-Bo

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Histone acetylation plays critical roles in chromatin remodeling, DNA repair, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression, but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Proteasomes usually catalyze ATP- and polyubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. Here we show that the proteasomes containing the activator PA200 catalyze the polyubiquitin-independent degradation of histones. Most proteasomes in mammalian testes (“spermatoproteasomes”) contain a spermatid/sperm-specific α-subunit α4s/PSMA8 and/or the catalytic β-subunits of immunoproteasomes in addition to PA200. Deletion of PA200 in mice abolishes acetylation-dependent degradation of somatic core histones during DNA double-strand breaks, and delays core histone disappearance in elongated spermatids. Purified PA200 greatly promotes ATP-independent proteasomal degradation of the acetylated core histones, but not polyubiquitinated proteins. Furthermore, acetylation on histones is required for their binding to the bromodomain-like regions in PA200 and its yeast ortholog, Blm10. Thus, PA200/Blm10 specifically targets the core histones for acetylation-mediated degradation by proteasomes, providing mechanisms by which acetylation regulates histone degradation, DNA repair, and spermatogenesis. PMID:23706739

  4. Paraquat Induces Epigenetic Changes by Promoting Histone Acetylation in Cell Culture Models of Dopaminergic Degeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, C.; Kanthasamy, A.; Jin, H.; Anantharam, V.; Kanthasamy, A. G.

    2012-01-01

    Environmental neurotoxic exposure to agrochemicals has been implicated in the etiopathogenesis of Parkinson’s disease (PD). The widely used herbicide paraquat is among the few environmental chemicals potentially linked with PD. Since epigenetic changes are beginning to emerge as key mechanisms in neurodegenerative diseases, herein we examined the effects of paraquat on histone acetylation, a major epigenetic change in chromatin that can regulate gene expression, chromatin remodeling, cell survival and cell death. Exposure of N27 dopaminergic cells to paraquat induced histone H3 acetylation in a time-dependent manner. However, paraquat did not alter acetylation of another core histone H4. Paraquat-induced histone acetylation was associated with decreased total histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity and HDAC4 and 7 protein expression levels. To determine if histone acetylation plays a role in paraquat-induced apoptosis, the novel HAT inhibitor anacardic acid was used. Anacardic acid treatment significantly attenuated paraquat-induced caspase-3 enzyme activity, suppressed proteolytic activation and kinase activity of protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) and also blocked paraquat-induced cytotoxicity. Together, these results demonstrate that the neurotoxic agent paraquat induced acetylation of core histones in cell culture models of PD and that inhibition of HAT activity by anacardic acid protects against apoptotic cell death, indicating that histone acetylation may represent key epigenetic changes in dopaminergic neuronal cells during neurotoxic insults. PMID:21777615

  5. Identification of novel post-translational modifications in linker histones from chicken erythrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarg, Bettina; Lopez, Rita; Lindner, Herbert; Ponte, Inma; Suau, Pedro; Roque, Alicia

    2015-01-15

    Chicken erythrocyte nuclei were digested with micrococcal nuclease and fractionated by centrifugation in low-salt buffer into soluble and insoluble fractions. Post-translational modifications of the purified linker histones of both fractions were analyzed by LC-ESI-MS/MS. All six histone H1 subtypes (H1.01, H1.02, H1.03, H1.10, H1.1L and H1.1R) and histone H5 were identified. Mass spectrometry analysis enabled the identification of a wide range of PTMs, including N(α)-terminal acetylation, acetylation, formylation, phosphorylation and oxidation. A total of nine new modifications in chicken linker histones were mapped, most of them located in the N-terminal and globular domains. Relative quantification of the modified peptides showed that linker histone PTMs were differentially distributed among both chromatin fractions, suggesting their relevance in the regulation of chromatin structure. The analysis of our results combined with previously reported data for chicken and some mammalian species showed that most of the modified positions were conserved throughout evolution, highlighting their importance in specific linker histone functions and epigenetics. Post-translational modifications of linker histones could have a role in the regulation of gene expression through the modulation of chromatin higher-order structure and chromatin remodeling. Finding new PTMs in linker histones is the first step to elucidate their role in the histone code. In this manuscript we report nine new post-translational modifications of the linker histones from chicken erythrocytes, one in H5 and eight in the H1 subtypes. Chromatin fractionated by centrifugation in low-salt buffer resulted in two fractions with different contents and compositions of linker histones and enriched in specific core histone PTMs. Of particular interest is the fact that linker histone PTMs were differentially distributed in both chromatin fractions, suggesting specific functions. Future studies are needed to

  6. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 16 pseudovirus containing histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kwag, Hye-Lim; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-08-27

    Pseudoviruses (PsVs) that encapsidate a reporter plasmid DNA have been used as surrogates for native human papillomavirus (HPV), whose continuous production is technically difficult. HPV PsVs have been designed to form capsids made up of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid proteins L2. HPV PsVs have been produced in 293TT cells transfected with plasmid expressing L1 and L2 protein and plasmid containing the reporter gene. Several studies have suggested that naturally occurring HPV virions contain cellular histones, and histones have also been identified in mature HPV PsVs. However, the effect of the histones on the properties of the PsVs has not been investigated. Using heparin chromatography, we separated mature HPV type 16 PsVs into three fractions (I, II, and III) according to their heparin-binding affinities. The amounts of cellular histone and cellular nucleotides per PsV were found to increase in the order fraction I, II and III. It appeared that PsVs in fraction I contains just small amount of cellular histone in Western blot analysis. The proportions of the three fractions in PsV preparations were 83.4, 7.5, and 9.1 % for fraction I, II, and III PsVs, respectively. In the electron microscope PsVs in fraction I appeared to have a more condensed structure than those in fractions II and III. Under the electron microscope fraction II and III PsVs appeared to be covered by substantial amounts of cellular histone while there was no visible histone covering PsVs of fraction I. Also the levels of reporter gene expression in infections of fraction II and III PsVs to 293TT cells were significantly lower than those in infections of fraction I PsV, and fraction II and III particles had significantly reduced immunogenicity. Our findings suggest that the involvement of large amounts of cellular histones during PsV formation interferes with the structural integrity of the PsVs and affects their immunogenicity. The fraction I particle therefore has the most

  7. Gene expression analysis of urine sediment: evaluation for potential noninvasive markers of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blalock, Eric M; Korrect, Garrett S; Stromberg, Arnold J; Erickson, Deborah R

    2012-02-01

    We determined whether gene expression profiles in urine sediment could provide noninvasive markers for interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome with and/or without Hunner lesions. Fresh catheterized urine was collected and centrifuged from 5 controls, and 5 Hunner lesion-free and 5 Hunner lesion bearing patients. RNA was extracted from pelleted material and quantified by gene expression microarray using the GeneChip® Human Gene ST Array. Three biologically likely hypotheses were tested, including 1) all 3 groups are distinct from each other, 2) controls are distinct from the 2 types combined of patients with interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome and 3) patients with Hunner lesion-interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome are distinct from controls and patients with nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome combined. For statistical parity an unlikely fourth hypothesis was included, that is patients with nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome are distinct from controls and patients with Hunner lesion-interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome combined. Analysis supported selective up-regulation of genes in the Hunner lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome group (hypothesis 3), which were primarily associated with inflammation. The inflammatory profile was statistically similar to that reported in a prior Hunner lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome bladder biopsy study. Gene expression analysis of urine sediment was feasible in this pilot study. Expression profiles failed to discriminate nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome from controls and they are unlikely to be a noninvasive marker for nonHunner-lesion interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome. In contrast, patients with Hunner lesion had increased proinflammatory gene expression in urine sediment, similar to that in a prior microarray study of bladder biopsies. If these preliminary results are validated in

  8. Association of eNOS gene intron 4 a/b VNTR polymorphisms in children with nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Hasan; Noyan, Aytul; Matyar, Selcuk; Buyukcelik, Mithat; Soran, Mustafa; Cengiz, Nurcan; Bayazit, Aysun K; Seydaoglu, Gulsah; Attila, Gulen; Anarat, Ali

    2013-06-15

    To investigate the association of endothelial nitric oxide synthase gene intron 4 (eNOS4) polymorphisms with nephrotic syndrome, the eNOS4 genotypes were assessed in 161 children with nephrotic syndrome in comparison with 78 healthy subjects. We classified the children with nephritic syndrome into 2 groups: as steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome (SSNS) (n=125) and steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome (SRNS) (n=36). The eNOS4 polymorphisms were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction. The frequencies of eNOS4 aa, ab and bb