WorldWideScience

Sample records for syndrome cutis verticis

  1. Antenatal imaging of cutis verticis gyrata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kennedy, Ana; Perry, David; Battin, Malcolm

    2008-01-01

    Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a skin condition characterized by thick folds and deep furrows, resembling a cortical gyral pattern. There is a recognized but rare association with Noonan syndrome. We report the antenatal imaging, including three-dimensional surface-rendered sonography and MRI, of a fetus with CVG who was subsequently diagnosed with Noonan syndrome. The case illustrates the antenatal appearances of congenital CVG and the potential yield of antenatal imaging in excluding a major central nervous system anomaly. This is important because without prior knowledge of this condition and its imaging characteristics, it is possible to get a false impression of an underlying skull defect on mid-trimester imaging. (orig.)

  2. Antenatal imaging of cutis verticis gyrata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, Ana [Starship Hospital, Department of Paediatric Cardiology, Auckland (New Zealand); Perry, David [Starship Children' s Hospital, Radiology Department, Auckland (New Zealand); Battin, Malcolm [Auckland City Hospital, Newborn Services, National Women' s Health, Auckland (New Zealand); University of Auckland, Department of Paediatrics, Auckland (New Zealand)

    2008-05-15

    Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a skin condition characterized by thick folds and deep furrows, resembling a cortical gyral pattern. There is a recognized but rare association with Noonan syndrome. We report the antenatal imaging, including three-dimensional surface-rendered sonography and MRI, of a fetus with CVG who was subsequently diagnosed with Noonan syndrome. The case illustrates the antenatal appearances of congenital CVG and the potential yield of antenatal imaging in excluding a major central nervous system anomaly. This is important because without prior knowledge of this condition and its imaging characteristics, it is possible to get a false impression of an underlying skull defect on mid-trimester imaging. (orig.)

  3. CUTIS VERTICIS GYRATA – A RARE CASE REPORT

    OpenAIRE

    Gopal; Meena; Sharath Kumar; Ramesh; Nandini

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Cutis verticis gyrata (CVG) is a skin deformity characterised by excessive growth of skin of the scalp, resulting in furrows and folds which are simila r to gyri of the brain cortex. A 25 year old male presented to the Dermatology department, Kempegowda institute of medical sciences with increased skin folds over scalp, forehead and face, increased oiliness of face, increased sweating, swelling of hands a nd feet and pain in limbs since 4 years. Routine blood in...

  4. Cutis verticis gyrata primária essencial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schenato Letícia K.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: relatar um caso raro de uma criança portadora da forma primária essencial de Cutis verticis gyrata.Descrição: menino de 9 anos, apresenta importante hipertrofia da pele do couro cabeludo, com dobras que se assemelham aos giros cerebrais. Não apresenta retardo mental, nem alterações oftalmológicas e não há relatos semelhantes na família.Comentários: o diagnóstico de Cutis verticis gyrata primária essencial foi estabelecido pela presença de redundância da pele do couro cabeludo e ausência de alterações neurológicas e oftalmológicas, tendo-se feito o diagnóstico diferencial com as formas secundárias que incluem: nevo intradérmico cerebriforme, paquidermoperiostose, acromegalia e doenças inflamatórias do couro cabeludo. Trata-se do único relato na literatura de uma criança com esta forma de Cutis verticis gyrata.

  5. Cerebriform intradermal nevus presenting as cutis verticis gyrata with multiple cellular blue nevus over the body: A rare occurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somenath Sarkar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutis verticis gyrata is a rare skin condition characterized by swelling of scalp resembling the surface of the brain. Various conditions, like cerebriform intradermal nevus (CIN, may give rise to this clinical entity. Moreover, its association with cellular blue nevus is extremely rare and has not been reported so far. Here, we report a 28-year-old male with a huge cerebriform swelling covering the occipital lobe along with multiple nodules all over the body. Histology of the scalp swelling showed solitary or clusters of nevus cells in the dermis and from the body lesions showed features of cellular blue nevus. The diagnosis of CIN with cellular blue nevus was confirmed

  6. Cutis laxa and fatal pulmonary hypertension: a newly recognized syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti-Pierri, Nicola; Piccolo, Pasquale; Morava, Eva; Wevers, Ron A.; McGuirk, Megan; Johnson, Yvette R.; Urban, Zsolt; Dishop, Megan K.; Potocki, Lorraine

    2015-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a connective tissue disorder with distinctive lax, redundant, and inelastic skin. It is a genetically heterogenous disorder with autosomal dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance. We report a patient with cutis laxa supported by clinical, microscopic, and ultrastructural findings. Molecular analysis of fibulin-4 and -5, of the α2 subunit of the V-type H+ ATPase, and of the component of the oligomeric Golgi complex 7 (COG7) genes excluded the type I and type II autosomal recessive forms of cutis laxa, and congenital disorders of glycosylation associated with cutis laxa. Remarkably, our patient also presented severe and lethal pulmonary hypertension as a newborn. This case with cutis laxa, severe pulmonary hypertension, and no detectable mutations in fibulin-4 and -5 genes may represent a previously unrecognized syndrome. PMID:21285876

  7. Pyloric atresia epidermolysis bullosa aplasia cutis syndrome: a case ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pyloric atresia epidermolysis bullosa aplasia cutis syndrome: a case report and literature ... skin over the right leg from the knee joint up to the middle of the right foot. ... Examination indicated no signs of child abuse; the parents refused an ...

  8. Milia-like idiopathic calcinosis cutis in a child with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Piyush; Savant, Sushil S; Nimisha, Esther; Das, Anupam; Debbarman, Panchami

    2016-05-15

    Idiopathic calcinosis cutis refers to progressive deposition of crystals of calcium phosphate in the skin and other areas of the body, in the absence of any inciting factor. Idiopathic calcinosis cutis may sometimes take the form of small, milia-like lesions. Most commonly, such milia like lesions are seen in the setting of Down syndrome. Herein, we report a 5-year-old girl with multiple asymptomatic discrete milia-like firm papules distributed over the face and extremities. A diagnosis of milia-like idiopathic calcinosis cutis associated with Down Syndrome was provisionally made and was confirmed by histopathology and karyotyping.

  9. Cutis laxa and fatal pulmonary hypertension: a newly recognized syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Brunetti-Pierri, N; Piccolo, P; Morava, Eva; Wevers, RA; McGuirk, M; Johnson, YR; Urban, Z; Dishop, MK; Potocki, L

    2011-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a connective tissue disorder with distinctive lax, redundant, and inelastic skin. It is a genetically heterogenous disorder with autosomal dominant and recessive patterns of inheritance. We report a patient with cutis laxa supported by clinical, microscopic, and ultrastructural findings. Molecular analysis of fibulin-4 and -5, of the α2 subunit of the V-type H+ ATPase, and of the component of the oligomeric Golgi complex 7 (COG7) genes excluded the type I and type II autosomal r...

  10. Adams-Oliver syndrome associated with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and congenital cataract: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayol, Laurence; Garcia, Patricia; Denis, Danièle; Philip, Nicole; Simeoni, Umberto

    2006-04-01

    A female infant presented with Adams-Oliver syndrome (AOS), intrauterine growth retardation, severe cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, bilateral congenital cataract, and periventricular lesions. The here-reported association of bilateral congenital cataract with AOS is original. Adams-Oliver syndrome is a genetic defect that causes a vasculopathy and leads to a variety of phenotypes. This observation further supports the current understanding of the physiopathology of AOS.

  11. Like Father, Like Daughter-inherited cutis aplasia occurring in a family with Marfan syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Yasmin Florence Khodeja; Williams, Charles A; Schoch, Jennifer Jane; Andrews, Israel David

    2017-01-01

    We present the case of a newborn with co-occurrence of Marfan syndrome and aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) and a family history significant for Marfan syndrome and ACC in the father. This case details a previously unreported mutation in Marfan syndrome and describes a novel coinheritance of Marfan syndrome and ACC.

  12. Disproportionately severe calcinosis cutis in an 88-year-old patient with CREST syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchowski, J.M.; Ahn, N.U.; Ahn, U.M. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); McCarthy, E.F. [Dept. of Orthopaedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Dept. of Pathology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (United States); Mehta, M.B. [Clinical Associates, Good Samaritan Hospital, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    2001-08-01

    An 88-year-old woman with CREST syndrome (calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal dysmotility, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias) presented with hyperglycemia, intravascular depletion, and atrial fibrillation. The patient was found to have unusually severe calcinosis cutis in both legs extending from the knees to the ankles bilaterally, as well as Raynaud's phenomenon, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasias. The patient was normocalcemic and normophosphatemic. Although subcutaneous calcification is often seen with CREST syndrome, this case is unusual in that the area of involvement was much larger than previously described. Furthermore, the amount of calcinosis was disproportionately severe and was the major cause of symptoms and disability compared with the other components of the syndrome. (orig.)

  13. Touraine Solente Gole syndrome: The elephant skin disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sheeja Rajan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Touraine Solente Gole syndrome is a rare hereditary syndrome of primary pachydermoperiostosis, with the characteristic triad of pachydermia (or elephant like skin, periostosis and acropachia. A 27-year-old patient presented with aesthetic deformity of forehead due to deep skin folds and coarsening of facial features due to progressive thickening of skin. Associated palmoplantar hyperkeratosis with broadened of finger and toe tips and digital clubbing were noticed. Dermatologic evaluation revealed cutis verticis gyrata of scalp, seborrhoeic hyperplasia of face and hyperhidrosis. Natural history of the disease and aetiopathogenesis were reviewed. Aesthetic correction of forehead through frontal rhytidectomy was attempted.

  14. A Case of Congenital Cutis Laxa (Generalized Elastolysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Champion

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutis laxa (generalized elastolysis is characterized by sagging folds of loose skin on the face and trunk. Although grouped with hyperelastic skin conditions such as Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, cutis laxa shows an almost total lack of skin elasticity. Because it is a generalized state, it may present as an abnormality in the connective tissue of more than one organ system. The authors report a patient who had end-stage renal failure related to heavy chain disease, a recognized association of cutis laxa. Although the patient’s vascular abnormalities were significant, she died of respiratory failure at 41 years of age from cutis laxa-induced emphysema.

  15. Post-injection embolia cutis medicamentosa – Nicolau Syndrome: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Alberto Araujo Chagas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We report on the case of a 40-year-old male who was admitted to the clinic with a large ulcer on his left buttock, 3 days after an intramuscular benzathine penicillin injection. The patient was diagnosed with Nicolau syndrome, a rare vascular complication in which a lesion develops after intramuscular injection. Symptoms are intense pain at the injection site, erythema, and livedoid dermatitis, which leads to necrosis of skin, subcutaneous tissue and muscle tissue. It was described by Nicolau after intramuscular injections of bismuth salt for syphillis therapy. Nicolau syndrome is rare, but its symptoms are devastating and healthcare professionals must be aware of this clinical entity, since intramuscular injections are common procedures for administration of drugs.

  16. Segmental tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanumanthappa H

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of segmental Tuberculosis Verrucosa Cutis is reported in 10 year old boy. The condition was resembling the ascending lymphangitic type of sporotrichosis. The lesions cleared on treatment with INH 150 mg daily for 6 months.

  17. The diagnostic dilemma of cutis laxa: A report of two cases with genotypic dissimilarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Goyal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutis laxa is a heterogeneous group of diseases, with loose, wrinkled skin folds and hyperelasticity of the skin. There are overlapping of clinical features of the group of syndrome associated with cutis laxa, including congenital cutis laxa, wrinkly skin syndrome and gerodermia osteodysplastica. All these conditions present a challenge to the clinician. Thus, molecular diagnosis is the only way to resolve these phenotypically similar conditions. We hereby describe two Indian patients with wrinkled skin and mild craniofacial dysmorphic features who had molecular confirmation of autosomal recessive cutis laxa.

  18. ARL6IP6, a susceptibility locus for ischemic stroke, is mutated in a patient with syndromic Cutis Marmorata Telangiectatica Congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abumansour, Iman S; Hijazi, Hadia; Alazmi, Anas; Alzahrani, Fatma; Bashiri, Fahad A; Hassan, Hamdy; Alhaddab, Mohammed; Alkuraya, Fowzan S

    2015-08-01

    Cutis Marmorata Telangiectatica Congenita (CMTC) is a congenital localized or generalized vascular anomaly, usually sporadic in occurrence. It can be associated with other cutaneous or systemic manifestations. About 300 cases have been reported. The molecular etiology remains largely unknown. The main purpose of this study is to delineate the molecular basis for a syndromic CMTC phenotype in a consanguineous Saudi family. Clinical phenotyping including detailed neurological imaging, followed by autozygosity mapping and trio whole exome sequencing (WES) are also studied. We have identified a homozygous truncating mutation in ARL6IP6 as the likely cause of a syndromic form of CMTC associated with major dysmorphism, developmental delay, transient ischemic attacks and cerebral vascular malformations. This gene was previously implicated by genome wide association study (GWAS) as a susceptibility locus to ischemic stroke in young adults. We identify ARL6IP6 as a novel candidate gene for a syndromic form of CMTC. This suggests that ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attacks (TIA) may represent, at least in some cases, the mild end of a phenotypic spectrum that has at its severe end autosomal recessive CMTC. This finding contributes to a growing appreciation of the continuum of Mendelian and common complex diseases.

  19. ATP6V0A2 mutations present in two Mexican Mestizo children with an autosomal recessive cutis laxa syndrome type IIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Bahena-Bahena

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with ARCL-IIA harbor mutations in ATP6V0A2 that codes for an organelle proton pump. The ARCL-IIA syndrome characteristically presents a combined glycosylation defect affecting N-linked and O-linked glycosylations, differentiating it from other cutis laxa syndromes and classifying it as a Congenital Disorder of Glycosylation (ATP6V0A2-CDG. We studied two Mexican Mestizo patients with a clinical phenotype corresponding to an ARCL-IIA syndrome. Both patients presented abnormal transferrin (N-linked glycosylation but Patient 1 had a normal ApoCIII (O-linked glycosylation profile. Mutational screening of ATP6V0A2 using cDNA and genomic DNA revealed in Patient 1 a previously reported homozygous nonsense mutation c.187C>T (p.R63X associated with a novel clinical finding of a VSD. In Patient 2 we found a homozygous c.2293C>T (p.Q765X mutation that had been previously reported but found that it also altered RNA processing generating a novel transcript not previously identified (r.2176_2293del; p.F726Sfs*10. This is the first report to describe Mestizo patients with molecular diagnosis of ARCL-IIA/ATP6V0A2-CDG and to establish that their mutations are the first to be found in patients from different regions of the world and with different genetic backgrounds.

  20. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnabharath S

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 23-year-old male patient with tuberculosis verrucous cutis on the foot for a duration of six months without responding to routine treatment. Tuberculosis is a common disease worldwide. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis contributes to 10% of cases. Cutaneous tuberculosis occupies a small spectrum of extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Tuberculosis verrucosa cutis is an exogenous infection occurring in a previously sensitized patient by direct inoculation of the organism. It occurs in sensitized patients with a moderate to high immune response. The diagnosis in our patient was confirmed by history, clinical examination, histopathological examination and the patient’s response to anti-tuberculous therapy.

  1. Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuflik, Julianne H; Schwartz, Robert A; Becker, Kenneth A; Lambert, W Clark

    2005-10-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare disease characterized by spontaneously formed facial scars in young adults. Its etiology is unknown; there may be an underlying defect of dermal elastin. We discuss a patient with this unusual disorder and review its literature.

  2. The role of diclofenack on inducing of aplasia cutis congenita: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Pajaziti, Laura; Rexhepi, Syzana; Shatri-Mu?a, Ylfete; Ferizi, Mybera

    2009-01-01

    Background Aplasia cutis congenita is a disorder where e newborn child is missing skin from certain areas. It is a rare condition with no particular race or sex more at risk. May occur by itself or be associated with other physical syndromes or disorders. A classification system exists for aplasia cutis congenital consisting of 9 groups, based on the number and location of the skin defects and the presence or absence of other malformations. Causes of aplasia congenital could be heredity, tera...

  3. Embolis cutis medicamentosa, a rare preventable iatrogenic complication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manjunath Kavya,

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Embolis cutis medicamentosa is an uncommon iatrogenic complication characterised by variable degree of skin and tissue necrosis, likely to follow intramuscular injection. Intense pain and purplish discoloration of overlying skin, with or without reticulate pattern subsequently followed by tissue necrosis and scarring is highly specific for this syndrome. It has also been reported following intravenous, intra-articular and subcutaneous injections. Herein we are reporting two cases of this rare preventable entity.

  4. Dermatomyositis with Calcinosis Cutis Universalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S L Wadhwa

    1981-01-01

    Full Text Available An eleven year old child with dermatomyositis and calcinosis cutis universalis is presented. She showed heliotrope bloating of eyelids, Gottrons sign, proximal muscle wasting with contractures and extensive areas of calcification over the shoulder, pelvic girdles and proximal extremities. The dignosis was confirmed by biochemical and histopatholo "cal studies as 91 well as electromyography. High doses of steroids and supportive measures made the patient ambulatory.

  5. A Case of Atrophia Maculosa Varioliformis Cutis

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, En Hyung; Kang, Hee Young

    2008-01-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AMVC) is a type of idiopathic noninflammatory macular atrophy that occurs in young individuals. It is clinically characterized by shallow, sharply demaracated depressions of various shapes. Considering that atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis can be mistaken as scarring and artifact dermatitis, it is important for physicians to distinguish this condition and to diagnose it correctly.

  6. Leukemia Cutis: A Report of 17 Cases and a Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Leboráns, L; Victoria-Martínez, A M; Torregrosa-Calatayud, J L; Alegre de Miquel, V

    2016-11-01

    Dermatologic manifestations of leukemia can be both specific and nonspecific (e.g., opportunistic infections, purpura and ecchymosis, Sweet syndrome). Leukemia cutis refers to the infiltration of the skin with neoplastic leukocytes and its early diagnosis has important prognostic implications. We report on 17 cases of leukemia cutis seen in our department between 1994 and 2014 and describe the characteristics of the patients (age, sex, medical history), the morphology of the lesions, and associations with systemic disease. Most of the patients were male and the most common associated malignancy was acute myeloid leukemia. The most frequent dermatologic manifestations were nodules or erythematous papules on the limbs. We describe our experience with the diagnosis and management of leukemia cutis over a period of 20 years and emphasize the importance of clinical signs in the early diagnosis of this condition. Copyright © 2016 AEDV. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. A Case of Atrophia Maculosa Varioliformis Cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Lee, Seung Min; Kim, Tae Yoon; Yoon, Moon Soo

    2008-12-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare disease that was first described by Heidingsfeld in 1918. It is characterized by an idiopathic, non-inflammatory macular atrophy that typically occurs on the face in young individuals. Despite its association with some diseases, the etiopathogenesis of this entity remains unknown. After consideration of the differential diagnosis criteria for idiopathic atrophic conditions, we report a case for a 40-year-old Korean male whose past medical history was suggestive of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.

  8. Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: a pediatric case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradisi, M; Angelo, C; Conti, G; Palermi, G; Provini, A

    2001-01-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis was described in 1918 by Heidingsfeld as a type of idiopathic noninflammatory macular atrophy typically occurring in young individuals. Only 13 cases have been reported since the first description. Considering that atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis can be mistaken for a scarring and artifact dermatitis, it is important for physicians to distinguish this condition. We report a new case in a 5-year-old boy.

  9. Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalayciyan, Aylin; Kotogyan, Agop; Demirkesen, Cuyan; Tüzün, Yalçin

    2003-07-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AVMC) was first described by Heidingsfeld in 1918, as a rarely reported form of idiopathic macular atrophy on the cheek (1). It is characterized, clinically, by shallow, sharply demarcated depressions in various shapes. Extrahepatic biliary atresia (2) and pachydermodactyly (3) have been the only conditions associated with AMVC reported in the past 80 years. Although keratosis pilaris is a common skin disorder, it is related to other idiopathic atrophic conditions considered in the differential diagnosis of AMVC, namely keratosis pilaris atrophicans (4). However, the two associations may be coincidental. We observed a patient with keratosis pilaris, and her brother and an unrelated young man, whose findings led to a diagnosis of AMVC.

  10. Aplasia cutis congenita, skull defect, brain heterotopia, and intestinal lymphangiectasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bonioli, Eugenio; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Spena, Gianantonio; Morcaldi, Guido; Di Stefano, Antonio; Serra, Giovanni; Bellini, Carlo

    2005-01-01

    We describe a female infant with a previously unreported combination of manifestations characterized by aplasia cutis, skull defect, brain heterotopia, mild congenital lymphedema, and intestinal lymphangiectasia. The association of intestinal lymphangiectasia and aplasia cutis, and the association

  11. Incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in aplasia cutis congenita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Katharine; Zedek, Daniel; Sayed, Christopher

    2016-07-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both rare congenital conditions that most commonly occur on the scalp and may appear clinically and histologically similar. A subtype of aplasia cutis congenita, membranous aplasia cutis congenita, and cutaneous meningeal heterotopia are both proposed to result from neural tube closure errors. However, neither non-membranous nor membranous aplasia cutis congenita are known to occur together with cutaneous meningeal heterotopia in the same lesion. We report the incidental finding of cutaneous meningeal heterotopia within a lesion of aplasia cutis congenita. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Severe calcinosis cutis in an infant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puvabanditsin, Surasak; Patel, Jigneshkumar B.; Garrow, Eugene; Titapiwatanakun, Ruetima; Getachew, Rahel

    2005-01-01

    We report on an infant with severe asphyxia and persistent pulmonary hypertension as a newborn. The baby received prolonged intravenous calcium gluconate therapy for hypocalcemia. At 5 weeks of age, multiple firm, indurated areas (armor-like lesions) were palpable in the subcutaneous tissues of the trunk, arms, legs, and face, particularly in skin folds. Roentgenographic study showed generalized soft-tissue calcifications throughout the body, extremities, and face. Calcinosis cutis occurs through a variety of pathogenetic mechanisms. Case reports on calcinosis cutis in infants are uncommon, and the calcifications are mostly localized. In our patient, they are generalized. (orig.)

  13. Mutations in PYCR1 cause cutis laxa with progeroid features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reversade, Bruno; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Dimopoulou, Aikaterini; Fischer, Björn; Chng, Serene C; Li, Yun; Shboul, Mohammad; Tham, Puay-Yoke; Kayserili, Hülya; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Shahwan, Monzer; Brancati, Francesco; Lee, Hane; O'Connor, Brian D; Schmidt-von Kegler, Mareen; Merriman, Barry; Nelson, Stanley F; Masri, Amira; Alkazaleh, Fawaz; Guerra, Deanna; Ferrari, Paola; Nanda, Arti; Rajab, Anna; Markie, David; Gray, Mary; Nelson, John; Grix, Arthur; Sommer, Annemarie; Savarirayan, Ravi; Janecke, Andreas R; Steichen, Elisabeth; Sillence, David; Hausser, Ingrid; Budde, Birgit; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Nürnberg, Peter; Seemann, Petra; Kunkel, Désirée; Zambruno, Giovanna; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Schuelke, Markus; Robertson, Stephen; Hamamy, Hanan; Wollnik, Bernd; Van Maldergem, Lionel; Mundlos, Stefan; Kornak, Uwe

    2009-09-01

    Autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) describes a group of syndromal disorders that are often associated with a progeroid appearance, lax and wrinkled skin, osteopenia and mental retardation. Homozygosity mapping in several kindreds with ARCL identified a candidate region on chromosome 17q25. By high-throughput sequencing of the entire candidate region, we detected disease-causing mutations in the gene PYCR1. We found that the gene product, an enzyme involved in proline metabolism, localizes to mitochondria. Altered mitochondrial morphology, membrane potential and increased apoptosis rate upon oxidative stress were evident in fibroblasts from affected individuals. Knockdown of the orthologous genes in Xenopus and zebrafish led to epidermal hypoplasia and blistering that was accompanied by a massive increase of apoptosis. Our findings link mutations in PYCR1 to altered mitochondrial function and progeroid changes in connective tissues.

  14. Multiple myeloma associated with acquired cutis laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, S Y; Maguire, R F

    1980-08-01

    Acquired cutis laxa is a rare disorder characterized by diffuse laxity of the skin and loss of connective tissue support with involvement of the lungs, gastrointestinal tract, pelvic organs, and aorta. The case report presented herein describes a forty-six year old woman with multiple myeloma and cutis laxa. Her history included several severe allergic reactions and the gradual development of lax skin, loss of connective tissue support throughout the body, and emphysema. At autopsy, multiple myeloma, diffuse laxity of the skin, and panacinar emphysema were found. The amount of elastic fiber in the skin, lungs, and aorta was decreased and showed abnormal fragmentation. Results of direct immunofluorescence study demonstrated IgG bound to dermal elastic fibers. Speculation regarding an immunologic etiology of the elastic tissue abnormality is presented herein.

  15. Pachydermodactyly and atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callot, V; Wechsler, J; Hovnanian, A; Revuz, J

    1995-01-01

    Pachydermodactyly is a rare form of superficial digital fibromatosis characterized by progressive asymptomatic thickening of the back and sides of the proximal interphalangeal joints of the fingers. Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is an acquired dermal atrophy, localized on the cheeks. Only a few cases of each pathology have been published. We find it interesting to report the case of a patient with both conditions as these two connective-tissue diseases are very rare. The association is probably fortuitous.

  16. Costello syndrome: An overview

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, Raoul C. M.

    2003-01-01

    Costello syndrome is characterized by prenatally increased growth, postnatal growth retardation, coarse face, loose skin resembling cutis laxa, nonprogressive cardiomyopathy, developmental delay, and a outgoing, friendly behavior. Patients can develop papillomata, especially around the mouth, and

  17. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg1 38 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E.; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L.; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D.; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K.; Choudhri, Asim F.; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N.; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E.; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P.; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively,

  18. Autosomal dominant cutis laxa with progeroid features due to a novel, de novo mutation in ALDH18A1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhola, Priya T; Hartley, Taila; Bareke, Eric; Boycott, Kym M; Nikkel, Sarah M; Dyment, David A

    2017-06-01

    De novo dominant mutations in the aldehyde dehydrogenase 18 family member A1 (ALDH18A1) gene have recently been shown to cause autosomal dominant cutis laxa with progeroid features (MIM 616603). To date, all de novo dominant mutations have been found in a single highly conserved amino acid residue at position p.Arg138. We report an 8-year-old male with a clinical diagnosis of autosomal dominant cutis laxa (ADCL) with progeroid features and a novel de novo missense mutation in ALDH18A1 (NM_002860.3: c.377G>A (p.Arg126His)). This is the first report of an individual with ALDH18A1-ADCL due to a substitution at a residue other than p.Arg138. Knowledge of the complete spectrum of dominant-acting mutations that cause this rare syndrome will have implications for molecular diagnosis and genetic counselling of these families.

  19. Diffusion characteristics in the Cu-Ti system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laik, Arijit; Kale, Gajanan Balaji [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Centre, Mumbai (India). Materials Science Div.; Bhanumurthy, Karanam [Bhabha Atomic Reseach Centre, Mumbai (India). Scientific Information Resource Div.; Kashyap, Bhagwati Prasad [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India). Dept. of Metallurgical Engineering

    2012-06-15

    The formation and growth of intermetallic compounds by diffusion reaction of Cu and Ti were investigated in the temperature range 720 - 860 C using bulk diffusion couples. Only four, out of the seven stable intermediate compounds of the Cu-Ti system, were formed in the diffusion reaction zone in the sequence CuTi, Cu{sub 4}Ti, Cu{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} and CuTi{sub 2}. The activation energies required for the growth of these compounds were determined. The diffusion characteristics of Cu{sub 4}Ti, CuTi and Cu{sub 4}Ti{sub 3} and Cu(Ti) solid solution were evaluated. The activation energies for diffusion in these compounds were 192.2, 187.7 and 209.2 kJ mol{sup -1} respectively, while in Cu(Ti), the activation energy increased linearly from 201.0 kJ mol{sup -1} to 247.5 kJ mol{sup -1} with increasing concentration of Ti, in the range 0.5 - 4.0 at.%. The impurity diffusion coefficient of Ti in Cu and its temperature dependence were also estimated. A correlation between the impurity diffusion parameters for several elements in Cu matrix has been established. (orig.)

  20. ''Cutie Pie,'' A portable radiation instrument

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ballou, C.O.

    1947-01-01

    A portable beta and gamma radiation meter of exceedingly small dimensions and weight has been developed. User acceptance has been more enthusiastic than any previous instrument of its type. The circuit, using one Victoreen V-32 tube, is the simplest electronic circuit possible for radiation work and gives high sensitivity. Stability exceeds anything of comparable sensitivity which has come to our attention. The short term stability is due to a circuit which prevents emission before the cathode reaches operating temperature. Long term stability has been improved by evacuating the tube enclosure and switch. The complete, one unit instrument, weighs four pounds two ounces, and is carried with a pistol grip. Exclusive of chamber and handle, its dimensions are 3'' wide, 6 1/2'' long, and 5'' high. The case is formed of aluminum and is designed to give excellent visibility of the meter. Three ranges of approximately 50, 500 and 5000 mr/hr have been incorporated in the instruments. The instrument has been named ''Cutie Pie'' due to its diminutive size

  1. [Aplasia cutis congenita associated with epidermolysis bullosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Guerrero, Félix; Muñoz-Solís, Adrián Antonio; Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel

    2017-12-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a skin condition of rare presentation, this disease is characterized by absence of skin at birth and associated with facial, skin and bone skull deformities. The diagnosis is mainly clinical. Male 5 days after birth, unique product of primigravida mother and no family history of relevance. Physical examination revealed bilateral and symmetrical skin defects of both lower extremities, the disease is characterized by skin fragility, scabs, and coated pseudomembrane ulcers, decreased interdigital space between toes of the left foot, retraction of the foot and genu varum. It was handled with allograft of epidermis cultured in vitro, general wound care and clinical follow-up. ACC associated with epidermolysis bullosa is one of the rarer forms of presentation. It is necessary to rule out other skin diseases. Clinical management is recommended with biological or synthetic skin cover, infection prevention, early treatment of complications and clinical follow. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  2. The role of diclofenack on inducing of aplasia cutis congenita: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaziti, Laura; Rexhepi, Syzana; Shatri-Muça, Ylfete; Ferizi, Mybera

    2009-10-12

    Aplasia cutis congenita is a disorder where e newborn child is missing skin from certain areas. It is a rare condition with no particular race or sex more at risk. May occur by itself or be associated with other physical syndromes or disorders. A classification system exists for aplasia cutis congenital consisting of 9 groups, based on the number and location of the skin defects and the presence or absence of other malformations. Causes of aplasia congenital could be heredity, teratogenic substances, placental infarcts, intrauterine infections, ectodermal dysplasias etc. Diagnosis is made based on the clinical findings. Prognosis depends of the other organs malfunction level and lesions size. Our case was an 22 months old Albanian girl, who was recommended to dermatology for a consultation by a pediatric surgeon because of the changes she had on her parietal part of the scalp with missing hair areas. The child has stenosis congenita ani and to her was installed stoma. In order to investigate other accompanied anomalies of the disease, there are made specific consults by neurologist, orthopedist, cardiologist, nephrologists and citogenetics. It was found out a minor visual discoordination, Sy Floppy, Digiti V superductus pedis bill. Laxitas articularum generalisata. It was a great challenge for us to find out that during the first trimester of the pregnancy (unplanned pregnancy), her mother used Diclofenac. Since there is limited information regarding to teratogenic effects of diclofenac, we considered it interesting to present this case.

  3. Leucemia Cutis de presentación atípica An atypical presentation of Leukemia Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Pulgar Martín

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available El trabajo aporta un nuevo caso de leucemia cutis, raro en frecuencia, que presenta un comienzo clínico muy poco habitual, a tener en cuenta. Fueron necesarias varias biopsias para llegar al diagnóstico de la paciente. La supervivencia de la paciente está por encima de la media en estos casos.The work presents a new case of leukemia cutis, rare in frequency, which has a very unusual clinical onset to take into account. It took several biopsies for the diagnosis of the patient. The survival of the patient is above average in these cases.

  4. Tissue expansion for correction of baldness in aplasia cutis congenita

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beekmans, S.J.A.; Don Griot, J.P.W.; Niessen, F.B.; Mulder, J.W.

    2009-01-01

    Aplasia cutis is a congenital absence of the skin, usually presenting on the scalp. In 20% of all cases, part of the skull is also absent. A residual area of baldness may still be present some years after surgical or conservative treatment. It is possible to excise the scarred hairless region and

  5. Calcinosis cutis behandlet med ekstrakorporal shockbølgeterapi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Sune Møller; Yderstræde, Knud Bonnet; Lund, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Calcinosis cutis is a rare disease entity characterized by deposits of calcium in the skin and subcutaneous tissue causing hard-to-heal ulcers. This is a case report on a patient with femoral ulcers in connection with densely mineralized skin caused by ketobemidon injections. Next to surgical...

  6. Embolia cutis medicamentosa: an unusual adverse reaction to terlipressin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatos-Gatopoulos, Polychronis; Kostantoudakis, Stephanos; Panayiotides, Ioannis G.; Dimitriadis, George D.; Triantafyllou, Konstantinos

    2017-01-01

    Terlipressin is a synthetic long-acting analog of vasopressin widely used to control variceal bleeding by lowering portal venous pressure. We report an unusual adverse reaction to terlipressin in a 78-year-old patient with esophageal variceal bleeding who developed skin necrosis soon after treatment initiation. Skin biopsy revealed embolia cutis medicamentosa. PMID:29118569

  7. Acquired Localized Cutis Laxa due to Increased Elastin Turnover

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Rie Harboe; Maynard, Scott; Schjerling, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cutis laxa is a rare disease characterized by abnormal skin wrinkling and laxity, due to decreased elastin synthesis or structural extracellular matrix defects. We have explored elastin metabolism in a case of adult onset cutis laxa localized to the upper body of a woman. For this purpose, we...... obtained skin biopsies from affected and unaffected skin areas of the patient and analyzed these with microscopy, polymerase chain reaction, western blotting and cell culture experiments. Skin from the affected area lacked elastin fibers in electron microscopy but had higher mRNA expression of elastin...... and total RNA. Levels of an apparent tropoelastin degradation product were higher in the affected area. Fibroblast cultures from the affected area were able to produce elastin and showed higher proliferation and survival after oxidative and UVB stress compared to fibroblasts from the unaffected area...

  8. Amyloidosis cutis dyschromica: A rare reticulate pigmentary dermatosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyam Verma

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We are reporting a rare case of amyloidosis cutis dyschromica in a 41-year-old man. This is a rare form of primary cutaneous amyloidosis characterized by reticulate pigmentation with hypopigmented and hyperpigmented macules, onset in childhood, familial tendency in some, occasional mild itching and deposition of amyloid in the papillary dermis. Our case also had multiple bilaterally symmetrical hyperpigmented keratotic papules abutting the axillary vault resembling those seen in Dowling-Deogs disease. The other unusual feature in this patient was the strong family history of vitiligo, which we are unable to explain. We have also tried to explain the mechanism leading to the hyperpigmentation and hypopigmentation in amyloidosis cutis dyschromica.

  9. Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: case report and pedigree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, T; Wang, B; Fang, K

    2005-10-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis (AVMC) was first described in 1918, as a rarely reported form of idiopathic macular atrophy on the cheeks. Nineteen patients have been reported in the past 86 years. Recently we diagnosed a 25-year-old woman as AMVC and investigated her family history. We collected the clinical data of the pedigree and presumed that AVMV is in a autosomal dominant inheritance.

  10. RETINAL NEOVASCULARIZATION FROM A PATIENT WITH CUTIS MARMORATA TELANGIECTATICA CONGENITA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassalos, Thérèse M; Fields, Taylor S; Levine, Robert; Gao, Hua

    2018-03-14

    To report a rare case of peripheral retinal neovascularization in a patient diagnosed with cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita (CMTC). Observational case report. A 16-year-old girl was referred to clinic for retinal evaluation. The patient had a clinical diagnosis of CMTC later confirmed by skin biopsy. Examination revealed temporal peripheral retinal sheathing, as well as lattice degeneration in both eyes. Wide-field fluorescein angiogram showed substantive peripheral retinal nonperfusion with evidence of vascular leakage from areas of presumed retinal neovascularization. The patient subsequently had pan retinal photocoagulation laser treatment to each eye without complication. Cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita is a rare vascular condition known to affect multiple organ systems including the eyes. Although ocular manifestations of CMTC are rare, instances of congenital glaucoma, suprachoroidal hemorrhage, and bilateral total retinal detachments resulting in secondary neovascular glaucoma have been reported. Our patient demonstrates the first reported findings of peripheral nonperfusion and retinal neovascularization related to CMTC in a 16-year-old girl. We propose early retinal examination, wide-field fluorescein angiogram, and early pan retinal photocoagulation laser treatment in patients with peripheral nonperfusion and retinal neovascularization from CMTC.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  11. Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis. Report of two cases and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolenik, S A; Perez, M I; Davidson, D M; Morganroth, G S; Kohn, S R; Bolognia, J L

    1994-05-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis was initially described in 1918 as an entity in which both linear and punctate scars appeared spontaneously on normal facial skin. To the best of our knowledge, only five additional cases have been described. We describe two patients, 14 and 20 years of age, whose histories and clinical lesions fit the description of atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis. The histologic findings are also described, and the literature to date is reviewed.

  12. Recurrent De Novo Mutations Affecting Residue Arg138 of Pyrroline-5-Carboxylate Synthase Cause a Progeroid Form of Autosomal-Dominant Cutis Laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Escande-Beillard, Nathalie; Ganesh, Jaya; Tan, Yu Xuan; Al Bughaili, Mohammed; Lin, Angela E; Sahai, Inderneel; Bahena, Paulina; Reichert, Sara L; Loh, Abigail; Wright, Graham D; Liu, Jaron; Rahikkala, Elisa; Pivnick, Eniko K; Choudhri, Asim F; Krüger, Ulrike; Zemojtel, Tomasz; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, Conny; Mostafavi, Roya; Stolte-Dijkstra, Irene; Symoens, Sofie; Pajunen, Leila; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Meierhofer, David; Robinson, Peter N; Mundlos, Stefan; Villarroel, Camilo E; Byers, Peter; Masri, Amira; Robertson, Stephen P; Schwarze, Ulrike; Callewaert, Bert; Reversade, Bruno; Kornak, Uwe

    2015-09-03

    Progeroid disorders overlapping with De Barsy syndrome (DBS) are collectively denoted as autosomal-recessive cutis laxa type 3 (ARCL3). They are caused by biallelic mutations in PYCR1 or ALDH18A1, encoding pyrroline-5-carboxylate reductase 1 and pyrroline-5-carboxylate synthase (P5CS), respectively, which both operate in the mitochondrial proline cycle. We report here on eight unrelated individuals born to non-consanguineous families clinically diagnosed with DBS or wrinkly skin syndrome. We found three heterozygous mutations in ALDH18A1 leading to amino acid substitutions of the same highly conserved residue, Arg138 in P5CS. A de novo origin was confirmed in all six probands for whom parental DNA was available. Using fibroblasts from affected individuals and heterologous overexpression, we found that the P5CS-p.Arg138Trp protein was stable and able to interact with wild-type P5CS but showed an altered sub-mitochondrial distribution. A reduced size upon native gel electrophoresis indicated an alteration of the structure or composition of P5CS mutant complex. Furthermore, we found that the mutant cells had a reduced P5CS enzymatic activity leading to a delayed proline accumulation. In summary, recurrent de novo mutations, affecting the highly conserved residue Arg138 of P5CS, cause an autosomal-dominant form of cutis laxa with progeroid features. Our data provide insights into the etiology of cutis laxa diseases and will have immediate impact on diagnostics and genetic counseling. Copyright © 2015 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Oglio, F; Nasca, M R; Taparelli, F; Bacchelli, B; Micali, G

    2001-01-01

    Atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a rare and distinctive form of idiopathic facial macular noninflammatory atrophy that may rarely be observed in members of the same family. We describe two brothers, ages 14 and 16 years, with spontaneously appearing, asymptomatic, varioliform and linear atrophic lesions. Their past medical history was positive for varicella occurring in childhood without residual facial scarring. Routine laboratory investigations and screening for circulating autoantibodies were negative. Both patients were concordant for HLA A2 and DQ4.1. Routine and ultrastructural histologic examination of a punch biopsy specimen showed the presence of scarce, small, fragmented elastic fibers and compact collagen bundles associated with hypertrophic fibroblasts in the dermis. Our patients remained clinically stable, untreated, over a 2-year follow-up period. No long-term follow-up data have previously been reported.

  14. Case Descriptions and Observations About Cutis Marmorata From Hypobaric Decompressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Webb, James T.

    2002-01-01

    There is disagreement about the pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of cutis marmorata (CM), so there is disagreement about the disposition and medical status of a person that had CM. CM is rare, associated with stressful decompressions, and may be associated with serious signs and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). CM presents as purple or bluish-red skin mottling, often in the pectoral region, shoulders, chest, or upper abdomen. It is unethical to induce CM in humans so all information comes from retrospective analysis of case reports, or from animal models. A literature search, seven recent case reports from the Johnson Space Center and Brooks Air Force Base Hypobaric DCS Databases, interviews with DCS treatment experts, and responses to surveys provided the factual information used to arrive at our conclusions and recommendations. The "weight of evidence" indicates that CM is a local, not centrally mediated or systemic response to bubbles. It is unclear whether obstruction of arterial or venous blood flow is the primary insult since the lesion is reported under either condition. Any neurological or cardiovascular involvements are coincidental, developing along the same time course. The skin could be the source of the bubbles due to its mass, the associated layer of fat, and the variable nature of skin blood flow. CM should not be categorized as Type II DCS, should be included with other skin manifestations in a category called cutaneous DCS, and hyperbaric treatment is only needed if ground level oxygen is ineffective in the case of altitude-induced CM.

  15. Dermatitis herpetiformis misdiagnosed and treated as tinea cutis glabrae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Stawczyk-Macieja

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction . Dermatitis herpetiformis is a rare bullous disorder. Autoimmunological disturbances associated with hypersensitivity to gluten play the main role in the etiopathogenesis of the disease. Clinical manifestations include polymorphic skin lesions which may cause diagnostic difficulties. Objective. To present a case of dermatitis herpetiformis diagnosed and treated without any clinical improvement as tinea cutis glabrae. Case report . A 20-year-old male patient was admitted for the evaluation of polymorphic skin lesions of 7-month duration distributed symmetrically on the skin of elbows, knees, face and the gluteal and sacral region. The patient was previously treated with systemic and topical antimycotic drugs. Due to a typical distribution of skin lesions as well as symptoms reported by the patient, we started to suspect Duhring’s disease. The diagnosis was confirmed by direct immunofluorescence of skin biopsy and serological tests. Systemic treatment with dapsone and a gluten-free diet led to clinical improvement. Conclusions . The morphology and localization of skin lesions in Duhring’s disease may be similar to the clinical presentation of fungal infection of the skin, which in equivocal cases should be excluded by a mycological test.

  16. Leukemia cutis in three children: clinical and immunohistochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, M; Furukawa, S

    1996-01-01

    We report 3 children with leukemia cutis observed at the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia. Leukemia subtypes in the three children were congenital monocytic, acute undifferentiated, and acute monocytic, respectively. The patients were girls age 10 days, 14 years, and 11 months, respectively, at diagnosis. We describe the clinical features of the cases and the results of immunohistochemical studies on paraffin-embedded skin biopsy specimens. The skin lesions were tumors and areas of reddish purple erythema in the first child, pigmented erythema in the second, and bright red erythema in the first child, pigmented erythema in the second, and bright red erythema in the third. In the first two patients skin lesion biopsy specimens had dense leukemic infiltrates in the dermis with reactive T lymphocytes scattered among them. In the third patient, the infiltrating cells were almost all reactive T lymphocytes, with a few leukemic cells. A relationship between the leukemic-reactive cell ratio and the prognosis was suggested; dense leukemic cell infiltrates may be associated with a poor prognosis.

  17. Surface tension of liquid Cu-Ti binary alloys measured by electromagnetic levitation and thermodynamic modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amore, S.; Brillo, J.; Egry, I.; Novakovic, R.

    2011-01-01

    The surface tension of liquid Cu-Ti alloys has been measured by using the containerless technique of electromagnetic levitation and theoretically calculated in the framework of the compound formation model. Measurements have been carried out on alloys covering the entire range of composition and over the temperature range 1275-2050 K. For all investigated alloys the surface tension can be described by a linear function of the temperature with negative slope. Due to the presence of different intermetallic compounds in the solid state the surface properties of liquid Cu-Ti alloys are satisfactory described by the compound formation model.

  18. ‘Bacteroides cutis,’ a new bacterial species isolated from human skin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Belkacemi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We report the main characteristics of ‘Bacteroides cutis’ sp. nov., strain Marseille-P4118T (= CSUR P4118, a new species within the genus Bacteroides. This strain was isolated from a skin sample of a 75-year-old man from Marseille. Keywords: Bacteroides cutis, culturomics, intensive care unit patient, skin microbiota, taxonogenomics

  19. Neonatal Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia Presenting with Leukemia Cutis and Multiple Intracranial Lesions Successfully Treated with Unrelated Cord Blood Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tsujimoto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL without Down syndrome (DS is an extremely rare disorder. We report of a one-day-old male infant without DS who developed AMKL with leukemia cutis and right facial nerve palsy. Magnetic resonance imaging of the patient’s brain revealed multiple intracranial tumors. A biopsy specimen of the skin lesion was suggestive of AMKL, but the bone marrow leukemic cells were less than 5% of the marrow nucleated cells. The skin and intracranial lesions had spontaneously regressed within one and a half months, but the patient’s anemia and thrombocytopenia gradually worsened and the leukemic cells in the bone marrow gradually increased to more than 20% of the nucleated cells. In addition, multiple intracranial lesions reappeared at 72 days of life. We diagnosed the patient with AMKL, and chemotherapy followed by unrelated cord blood transplantation after a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen resulted in sustained complete remission. At present, the patient is well, and he has demonstrated normal development for five years.

  20. Aplasia Cutis Congénita: Presentación de un caso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa María Alonso Uría

    1998-06-01

    Full Text Available Se reportó el caso de un recién nacido, hijo de madre secundigesta, con una malformación congénita del cuero cabelludo, del tipo aplasia cutis congénita. Se describieron las características clínicas de ésta, su evolución, pronóstico y tratamiento. Se hizo énfasis en el cuidado y la prevención de las complicaciones, fundamentalmente infecciosas, en este tipo de neonatosThe case of a newborn, son of a secundigravida, with a congenital malformation of the scalp denominated aplasia cutis congenita is reported. Its clinical characteristics, evolutions, prognosis and treatment are described. Emphasis is made on the care and prevention of the complications, mainly infectious, in this type of neonates

  1. Calculation of diffraction patterns associated with electron irradiation induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devanathan, R.; Meshii, M.; Sabochik, M.J.

    1990-11-01

    A new approach that uses the multislice method in conjunction with molecular dynamics simulations to study electron irradiation induced amorphisation is presented. Diffraction patterns were calculated for CuTi and found to be more sensitive than the pair correlation function to the structural changes preceding amorphisation. The results from this approach and from a study of long range order are presented. 16 refs., 8 figs

  2. Surface Modification of C17200 Copper-Beryllium Alloy by Plasma Nitriding of Cu-Ti Gradient Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y. D.; Yan, M. F.; Zhang, Y. X.; Zhang, C. S.

    2018-03-01

    In the present work, a copper-titanium film of gradient composition was firstly fabricated by the dual magnetron sputtering through power control and plasma nitriding of the film was then conducted to modify C17200 Cu alloy. The results showed that the prepared gradient Cu-Ti film by magnetron sputtering was amorphous. After plasma nitriding at 650 °C, crystalline Cu-Ti intermetallics appeared in the multi-phase coating, including CuTi2, Cu3Ti, Cu3Ti2 and CuTi. Moreover, even though the plasma nitriding duration of the gradient Cu-Ti film was only 0.5 h, the mechanical properties of the modified Cu surface were obviously improved, with the surface hardness enhanced to be 417 HV0.01, the wear rate to be 0.32 × 10-14 m3/Nm and the friction coefficient to be 0.075 at the load of 10 N, which are all more excellent than the C17200 Cu alloy. In addition, the wear mechanism also changed from adhesion wear for C17200 Cu substrate to abrasive wear for the modified surface.

  3. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok

    2010-01-01

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  4. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok [Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  5. APLASIA CUTIS CONGÉNITA – UM CASO CLÍNICO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Costeira

    2016-07-01

    Comentários: A aplasia cutis congénita é uma lesão que pode ser causadora de grande ansiedade parental, pelo que é importante ao Pediatra o seu reconhecimento e devido esclarecimento. Apesar de se tratar, na maioria das vezes, de um defeito benigno, é importante o conhecimento da sua relação com outras anomalias e síndromes de forma a otimizar a sua orientação precoce e adequada. Da mesma forma, é importante o aconselhamento genético, nos casos que assim o justifiquem.

  6. Acquired cutis laxa associated with light and heavy chain deposition disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reena A Majithia

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Acquired cutis laxa (ACL is a rare connective tissue disorder characterized by pendulous and coarsely wrinkled skin. There have been few cases of its association to monoclonal immunoglobulin deposition disease (MIDD, which constitutes the light chain (LCDD, heavy chain (HCDD, and light and heavy chain (LHCDD deposition disease. MIDD predominantly involves the kidney. Skin is the next common organ to be affected by HCDD, which presents as ACL. We report the case of a 40-year-old male who presented with ACL associated with LHCDD. The clinical features of ACL in the present case appeared prior to the development of clinical features related to LHCDD.

  7. Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: first case report from the Indian subcontinent with pedigree analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Tarang; Varshney, Anupam; Bakshi, S K

    2012-01-01

    Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a very rare disorder with less than 28 cases being reported in the literature worldwide and remains a mystery both as far as genetics and the virtue of its pathogenesis is concerned. We present a case of mother and son, both having this disorder with presentations unique in terms of sites involved and try to draw a five generations pedigree chart for the same. We further support its inheritance pattern as autosomal dominant. Also, we propose oral isotretinoin as an effective treatment modality for the same.

  8. Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis: First case report from the Indian subcontinent with pedigree analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarang Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Familial atrophia maculosa varioliformis cutis is a very rare disorder with less than 28 cases being reported in the literature worldwide and remains a mystery both as far as genetics and the virtue of its pathogenesis is concerned. We present a case of mother and son, both having this disorder with presentations unique in terms of sites involved and try to draw a five generations pedigree chart for the same. We further support its inheritance pattern as autosomal dominant. Also, we propose oral isotretinoin as an effective treatment modality for the same.

  9. The effect of simultaneous electron and Kr+ irradiation on amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, J.; Okamoto, P.R.; Rehn, L.E.; Meshii, M.

    1989-01-01

    CuTi was irradiated with 1-MeV electrons and Kr + ions simultaneously at temperatures from 10 to 423 K. Retardation of Kr + -induced amorphization was observed with simultaneous electron irradiation at 295 and 423 K. The retardation effect increased with increasing irradiation temperature and relative electron-to-Kr dose rate. In contrast, simultaneous irradiation below 100 K showed an additive effect of electron- and Kr + -induced amorphization. The results can be explained by the mobility point defects introduced by electron irradiation interacting with Kr + -induced displacement cascades. 6 refs., 6 figs

  10. Cu-Ti Formation in Nb-Ti/Cu Superconducting Strand Monitored by in situ Techniques

    CERN Document Server

    Pong, I; Pong, Ian; Gerardin, Alexandre; Scheuerlein, Christian; Bottura, Luca

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the high temperature exposure effect on Nb-Ti/Cu superconducting strands, as might be encountered in joining by soldering and in cabling annealing, X-ray diffraction and resistometry measurements were performed in situ during heat treatment, and complemented by conventional metallography, mechanical tests and superconducting properties measurements. Changes of the Nb-Ti nanostructure at temperatures above 300 degrees C are manifested in the degradation of critical current in an applied external magnetic field, although degradation at self field was insignificant up to 400 degrees C for several minutes. Above 500 degrees C, the formation of various Cu-Ti intermetallic compounds, due to Ti diffusion from Nb-Ti into Cu, is detected by in situ XRD albeit not resolvable by SEM-EDS. There is a ductile to brittle transition near 600 degrees C, and liquid formation is observed below 900 degrees C. The formation of Cu-Ti causes a delayed reduction of the residual resistivity ratio (RRR) and adv...

  11. Modeling autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C in mice reveals distinct functions for Ltbp-4 isoforms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bultmann-Mellin, Insa; Conradi, Anne; Maul, Alexandra C

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed an important role for LTBP-4 in elastogenesis. Its mutational inactivation in humans causes autosomal recessive cutis laxa type 1C (ARCL1C), which is a severe disorder caused by defects of the elastic fiber network. Although the human gene involved in ARCL1C has been ...

  12. Cutis laxa: reduced elastin gene expression in skin fibroblast cultures as determined by hybridizations with a homologous cDNA and an exon 1-specific oligonucleotide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olsen, D.R.; Fazio, M.J.; Shamban, A.T.; Rosenbloom, J.; Uitto, J.

    1988-01-01

    Fibroblast cultures were established from six patients with cutis laxa, and elastin gene expression was analyzed by RNA hybridizations with a 2.5-kilobase human elastin cDNA or an exon 1-specific 35-base oligomer. Northern analyses using either probe detected mRNA transcripts of ∼ 3.5 kilobases, and no qualitative difference between the control and cutis laxa mRNAs was detected. However, quantitation of the elastin mRNA abundance by slot blot hybridizations revealed markedly reduced levels in all cutis laxa cell strains. Assuming equal translational activity of the control and cutix laxa mRNAs, the reduced mRNA levels could result in diminished elastin production, providing an explanation for the paucity of elastic fibers in the skin and other tissues in cutis laxa

  13. Acquired cutis laxa following urticarial vasculitis associated with IgA myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Ryan B; Haynes, Harley A; Granter, Scott R; Miller, Danielle M

    2009-06-01

    Cutis laxa (CL) is an inherited or acquired connective tissue disorder characterized clinically by loosely hanging skin folds. There is often preceding cutaneous inflammatory eruption (ie, urticaria, eczema, erythema multiforme), and there is frequently internal organ involvement of the gastrointestinal, urogenital, pulmonary, and cardiovascular systems. Histologically, there are degenerative changes in the dermal elastic fibers. Of the few reports on this rare disorder, authors have speculated about an immune-mediated destruction of elastic fibers, and monoclonal gammopathies, such as multiple myeloma or heavy chain deposition disease, have a recognized association with CL. We report an unusual case of rapidly progressing acquired CL associated with leukocytoclastic vasculitis, IgA myeloma, and an immune complex-mediated glomerulonephritis. Light microscopy of the lax skin revealed complete absence of elastic fibers in areas of vasculitis.

  14. High myopia and congenital myopathy with partial pachygyria in cutis laxa syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Willemsen, M.A.A.P.; Wopereis, S.; Laak, H.J. ter; Lefeber, D.J.; Wevers, R.A.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: Several types of inborn errors of the O-glycan biosynthesis are known, leading to clinically very distinct phenotypes. Children with O-mannosyl glycan biosynthesis defects commonly present as a severe form of congenital muscular dystrophy with decreased alpha-dystroglycan staining,

  15. Cutis Laxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information Drug Information, Search Drug Names, Generic and Brand Natural Products, Search Drug Interactions Pill Identifier News & Commentary ALL NEWS > Resources First Aid Videos Figures 3D Models Images Infographics Audio Pronunciations The One-Page Manual of ...

  16. Oxygen pumping characteristics of Cu-Ti double substituted bismuth vanadate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paydar, M.H. [Shiraz Univ. (Iran). Dept. of Metallurgy and Material Sciences; Hadian, A.M. [Teheran Univ. (Iran). Dept. of Metallurgy and Material Sciences; Fafilek, G. [Technische Univ., Vienna (Austria). Inst. fuer Technische Elektrochemie

    2002-07-01

    In the present paper, we are going to report on a detailed study of the characteristics of an electrochemical oxygen pump for an open system using Cu-Ti double substituted bismuth vanadate as the electrolyte. The major objectives are to show a correlation between oxygen pumping current, cell voltage, Faradic efficiency and oxygen production rate. The maximum current density that can be applied without significant structural modification has been determined and the effect of working temperature on the mentioned parameters have been investigated. The results show that there is an Ohmic relationship between current and voltage at low current densities and a deviation towards lower voltages than expected from Ohm's law with increasing current density. The oxygen production rate increased in a linear fashion by increasing the current density while at high current densities, corresponding to the non linear current voltage section, its gradient decline. Under constant current load, at very high current density (I > 800 mAcm{sup -2}), instability in cell potential was observed, which was reversible and supposed to be the effect of electronic percolation. (orig.)

  17. Crystal structures of wild-type and mutated cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in the American quarter horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boudko Sergei P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hyperelastosis cutis is an inherited autosomal recessive connective tissue disorder. Affected horses are characterized by hyperextensible skin, scarring, and severe lesions along the back. The disorder is caused by a mutation in cyclophilin B. Results The crystal structures of both wild-type and mutated (Gly6->Arg horse cyclophilin B are presented. The mutation neither affects the overall fold of the enzyme nor impairs the catalytic site structure. Instead, it locally rearranges the flexible N-terminal end of the polypeptide chain and also makes it more rigid. Conclusions Interactions of the mutated cyclophilin B with a set of endoplasmic reticulum-resident proteins must be affected.

  18. Intralesional Infiltration with Meglumine Antimoniate for the Treatment of Leishmaniasis Recidiva Cutis in Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvopiña, Manuel; Cevallos, William; Paredes, Yolanda; Puebla, Edison; Flores, Jessica; Loor, Richard; Padilla, José

    2017-11-01

    Meglumine Antimoniate (MA), administered intramuscularly for 21 continuous days is the recommended treatment of leishmaniases in Ecuador. However, because of its toxicity and requirement for intramuscular injections, treatment is frequently abandoned before completion. In addition, therapeutic failure and reactivation are not uncommon. Here we evaluate the efficacy and safety of MA administered intralesionally (IL) in leishmaniasis recidiva cutis (LRC). LRC is a special clinical variant of cutaneous leishmaniasis, characterized by reactivation at the edges of a primary cured lesion, presenting with active papules around the scar. Twenty-one patients were included in the study. All were diagnosed parasitologically by one of three diagnostic methods (smear, culture, and Leishmanin skin test). Each patient received MA intralesionally weekly for 4 weeks. Each papule was infiltrated until complete saturation. On average, patients received 1 mL of MA per administration. The criterion of cure was the complete resolution of the papules. Follow up was performed at 30, 90, and 180 days after treatment. At day 30 after treatment, 19 (90.5%) of 21 patients were clinically cured. The two patients, who did not heal by the fourth application, were cured on the seventh and eighth dose, achieving a clinical cure of 100% without subsequent reactivation. Mild to moderate local pain during infiltration was the only adverse reaction experienced by 81% of patients. In one case, subsequent infiltrations were discontinued because of a local allergic reaction. Complete compliance of patients to treatment and the small volume of drug administered make this method of administering MA an effective, safe, and inexpensive alternative. Consequently, IL could replace intramuscular administration in the treatment of LRC in Ecuador.

  19. Seudolinfoma cutáneo “B”, variedad Linfocitoma cutis: A propósito de un caso CutaneousB-cell pseudolymphoma, Lymphocytoma cutis variety: Apropos of a case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Díaz Fernández

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta el caso de una paciente con un seudolinfoma cutáneo de células “B” variedad Linfocitoma cutis, entidad caracterizada por procesos reactivos de la piel que pueden confundirse clínica e histopatológicamente con linfomas malignos auténticos. El mayor reto que se presenta en estos casos espoder diferenciar estas 2 entidades entre sí, pues ambas se consideran el espectro de una misma entidad, lo cual le confiere varias implicaciones diagnósticas, terapéuticas y patogénicas, por lo que los pacientes se deben mantener bajo vigilancia estrecha. Se revisan aspectos inmunopatológicos, histológicos y terapéuticos. Esta es la primera observación de presentación faciales nuestro medio.The case of a patient with a cutaneous B-cell pseudolymphoma, Lymphocytoma cutis variety, an entity characterized by reactive processes of the skin that may be clinical and histopathologically mistaken for authentic malignant lymphomas. The greatest challenge for these cases is to be able to differentiate these 2 entities between themselves, since both are considered as the spectrum of a same entity, which confers various diagnostic, therapeutic and pathogenic implications. That's why, the patients should be under close surveillance. Immunopathological, histological and therapeutic aspects are reviewed. This is the first observation of facial manifestations of these entities in our environment.

  20. A boy with developmental delay, malformations, and evidence of a connective tissue disorder: possibly a new type of cutis laxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Linlea; Jimenez, Carmencita; Hunter, Alasdair G W

    2003-05-15

    We report a 7.5-year-old boy with loose translucent skin, aortic dilatation, hyperextensible veins, recurrent respiratory problems, pectus excavatum, arthralgias, lax joints, mild epiphyseal dysplasia, and umbilical and inguinal hernias. He also has developmental delay, progressive bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, an unusual facial appearance, terminal digit hypoplasia with unusual radiographic changes in some of the phalanges, glandular hypospadias, shawl scrotum, and undescended testes. Biochemical investigations, including electrophoresis of Types 1 and 3 procollagens and collagens, and quantification of serum copper and ceruloplasmin, are normal. Relative to age-matched control patients the electron micrographs of the boy's dermis show elastin fibers to be decreased in number, and abnormal in appearance, with a low matrix to microfibril ratio. The organ distribution of abnormalities and the nature of the findings suggest a connective tissue disorder. We contrast and compare this boy's phenotype to those of the classic connective tissue disorders. We conclude that he has cutis laxa with features that distinguish him from previously described types of cutis laxa. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  1. Interface interaction and wetting of Sc2O3 exposed to Cu-Al and Cu-Ti melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barzilai, S.; Nagar, H.; Froumin, N.; Frage, N.; Aizenshtein, M.

    2009-01-01

    Scandia is a thermodynamically stable oxide and could be used as a structural material for a crucible in order to avoid a melt contamination. In the present study wetting experiments of Cu-Al and Cu-Ti melts on Scandia substrate were preformed at 1423 K by a sessile drop method. It was established that Al and Ti additions lead to the improved wetting and that the final contact angle decreases with increasing the additives concentration. For Al containing melts, the contact angle changes gradually with time, and a relatively thick interaction layer, which consists of Al 2 O 3 , Sc 2 O 3 , and metallic channels, was formed at the Sc 2 O 3 /Cu-Al interface. For Ti containing melts, the final contact angle is achieved already during heating, and an extremely thin layer based on a Ti-Sc-O compound was detected by AES at the Sc 2 O 3 /Cu-Ti interface. The results of a thermodynamic analysis, which takes into account the formation free energy of the oxides, involved in the systems, and the thermodynamic properties of the liquid solutions are in a good agreement with the experimental observations. (orig.)

  2. Calcinose cútis distrófica universal associada a lúpus eritematoso sistêmico: um caso exuberante Calcinosis cutis universalis associated with systemic lupus erythematosus: an exuberant case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Paula Gonçalves Carocha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Calcinose cutânea é uma doença incomum, de fisiopatologia incerta e, muitas vezes, incapacitante. Caracteriza-se pela deposição de sais de cálcio na pele ou tecido subcutâneo. É classificada em quatro subtipos: metastática, distrófica, idiopática e iatrogênica. Pode ser vista em várias doenças sistêmicas como hiperparatireoidismo e hipervitaminose D, ocorrendo com maior frequência na dermatomiosite, esclerodermia e síndromes overlap, sendo uma complicação infrequente no lúpus eritematoso sistêmico. O manejo das complicações secundárias, assim como o sucesso terapêutico, constituem desafios constantes no seguimento destes casos.Calcinosis cutis is an uncommon disease of unclear pathophysiology that is often disabling. It is characterized by the formation of calcium deposits in the skin or subcutaneous tissue. It is classified into four subtypes: dystrophic, metastatic, idiopathic or iatrogenic. It may be seen in a variety of systemic diseases such as hyperparathyroidism and hypervitaminosis D, but is most commonly found in dermatomyositis, scleroderma and overlap syndromes and is a rare complication of systemic lupus erythematosus. The management of secondary complications and the success of therapy are constant challenges in the follow-up of these cases.

  3. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani, Hassan; Babazadeh, Kazem; Fattahi, Saeid; Mokhtari-Esbuie, Farzad

    2012-01-01

    Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD), skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6) in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2) (ELN X1) (7q22 X2) ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  4. Williams-Beuren's Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Zamani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Williams-Beuren syndrome is a rare familial multisystem disorder occurring in 1 per 20,000 live births. It is characterized by congenital heart defects (CHD, skeletal and renal anomalies, cognitive disorder, social personality disorder and dysmorphic facies. We present a case of Williams syndrome that presented to us with heart murmur and cognitive problem. A 5-year-old girl referred to pediatric cardiologist because of heart murmurs. She had a systolic murmur (2-3/6 in right upper sternal border with radiation to right cervical region. She also had a bulge forehead. Angiography showed mild supra valvular aortic stenosis and mild multiple peripheral pulmonary stenosis. Fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH was performed and the result was: 46.XX, ish del (7q11.2 (ELN X1 (7q22 X2 ELN deletion compatible with Williams syndrome. Peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis is associated with Noonan syndrome, Alagille syndrome, Cutis laxa, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and Silver-Russel syndrome. The patient had peripheral pulmonary artery stenosis, but no other signs of these syndromes were present, and also she had a supravalvular aortic stenosis which was not seen in other syndromes except Williams syndrome. Conclusion. According to primary symptoms, paraclinical and clinical finding such as dysmorphic facies, cognitive disorder and congenital heart defect, Williams syndrome was the first diagnosis. We suggest a more attention for evaluating heart murmur in childhood period, especially when the patient has abnormal facial features or mental problem.

  5. Structural analysis of a coating of TiN over a Cu-Ti-Cr alloy: Study of the Cu-Ti interphase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villegas Vejar, C; Suazo, A; Radtk, H; Carrasco, C

    2004-01-01

    The crystalline structure of a thin film of TiN deposited by DC planar magnetron sputtering over a ternary copper alloy was studied. A fine film of titanium was deposited between the coating and the substrate for better adherence. The samples were analyzed with a transmission electron microscope to determine the structure of each of the components as well as the network distortion in the Cu-Ti interphase. The results were complemented with previous X-ray diffraction analyses to identify the network parameter for each of the study components and the respective residual tensions. This study shows the agreement between the network distortion and the residual tensions that were measured, and also relates the theory of crystalline coherence with the experimentally calculated break down by electron diffraction in the Cu-Ti interphase (CW)

  6. Synergetic Effect of Graphene and MWCNTs on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of Cu/Ti3SiC2/C Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiaosong; Song, Tingfeng; Shao, Zhenyi; Liu, Wanxia; Zhu, Degui; Zhu, Minhao

    2017-11-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphenes have been taken for novel reinforcements due to their unique structure and performance. However, MWCNTs or graphenes reinforced copper matrix composites could not catch up with ideal value due to reinforcement dispersion in metal matrix, wettability to metal matrix, and composite material interface. Taking advantage of the superior properties of one-dimensional MWCNTs and two-dimensional graphenes, complementary performance and structure are constructed to create a high contact area between MWCNTs and graphenes to the Cu matrix. Mechanical alloying, hot pressing, and hot isostatic pressing techniques are used to fabricate Cu matrix self-lubricating nanocomposites. Effects of MWCNTs and graphenes on mechanical properties and microstructures of Cu/Ti3SiC2/C nanocomposites are studied. The fracture and strengthening mechanisms of Cu/Ti3SiC2/C nanocomposites are explored on the basis of structure and composition of Cu/Ti3SiC2/C nanocomposites with formation and function of interface.

  7. The dose, temperature, and projectile-mass dependence for irradiation-induced amorphization of CuTi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koike, J.; Okamoto, P.R.; Rehn, L.E.; Meshii, M.

    1989-01-01

    CuTi was irradiated with 1-MeV Ne + , Kr + , and Xe + in the temperature range from 150 to 563 K. The volume fraction of the amorphous phase produced during room temperature irradiation with Ne + and Kr + ions was determined as a function of ion dose from measurements of the integrated intensity of the diffuse ring in electron diffraction patterns. The results, analyzed by Gibbons' model, indicate that direct amorphization occurs along a single ion track with Kr + , but the overlapping of three ion tracks is necessary for amorphization with Ne + . The critical temperature for amorphization increases with increasing projectile mass from electron to Ne + to Kr + . However, the critical temperatures for Kr + and Xe + irradiations were found to be identical, and very close to the thermal crystallization temperature of an amorphous zone embedded in the crystalline matrix. Using the present observations, relationships between the amorphization kinetics and the displacement density along the ion track, and between the critical temperature and the stability of the irradiation-induced damage, are discussed

  8. Vascular complications (splenic and hepatic artery aneurysms) in the occipital horn syndrome: report of a patient and review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mentzel, H.-J.; Seidel, J.; Vogt, L.; Vogt, S.; Kaiser, W.A.

    1999-01-01

    We report an 18-year-old boy with occipital horn syndrome who developed aneurysms of the splenic and hepatic arteries. Occipital horn syndrome, also called X-linked cutis laxa or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IX, is characterised by a skeletal dysplasia which includes occipital horns, broad clavicles, deformed radii, ulnae and humeri, narrow rib cage, undercalcified long bones and coxa valga. Distinctive features common to all patients are unusual facial appearance, hypermobility of finger joints, limitation of extension of elbows, chronic diarrhoea and genitourinary abnormalities. In this case report we describe the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic management of patients with EDS-related vascular lesions. (orig.)

  9. Radiation-induced amorphization of intermetallic compounds: A molecular-dynamics study of CuTi and Cu4Ti3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lam, N.Q.; Okamoto, P.R.; Sabochick, M.J.

    1991-06-01

    In the present paper, important results of our recent computer simulation of radiation-induced amorphization in the ordered compounds CuTi and Cu 4 Ti 3 are summarized. The energetic, structural, thermodynamic and mechanical responses of these intermetallics during chemical disordering, point-defect production and heating were simulated, using molecular dynamics and embedded-atom potentials. From the atomistic details obtained, the critical role of radiation-induced structural disorder in driving the crystalline-to-amorphous phase transformation is discussed. 25 refs., 4 figs

  10. Alternative Splicing and Tissue-specific Elastin Misassembly Act as Biological Modifiers of Human Elastin Gene Frameshift Mutations Associated with Dominant Cutis Laxa*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugitani, Hideki; Hirano, Eiichi; Knutsen, Russell H.; Shifren, Adrian; Wagenseil, Jessica E.; Ciliberto, Christopher; Kozel, Beth A.; Urban, Zsolt; Davis, Elaine C.; Broekelmann, Thomas J.; Mecham, Robert P.

    2012-01-01

    Elastin is the extracellular matrix protein in vertebrates that provides elastic recoil to blood vessels, the lung, and skin. Because the elastin gene has undergone significant changes in the primate lineage, modeling elastin diseases in non-human animals can be problematic. To investigate the pathophysiology underlying a class of elastin gene mutations leading to autosomal dominant cutis laxa, we engineered a cutis laxa mutation (single base deletion) into the human elastin gene contained in a bacterial artificial chromosome. When expressed as a transgene in mice, mutant elastin was incorporated into elastic fibers in the skin and lung with adverse effects on tissue function. In contrast, only low levels of mutant protein incorporated into aortic elastin, which explains why the vasculature is relatively unaffected in this disease. RNA stability studies found that alternative exon splicing acts as a modifier of disease severity by influencing the spectrum of mutant transcripts that survive nonsense-mediated decay. Our results confirm the critical role of the C-terminal region of tropoelastin in elastic fiber assembly and suggest tissue-specific differences in the elastin assembly pathway. PMID:22573328

  11. Tuberculosis Lymphoedema Cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangopadhyay Asok Kumar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymphoedema following cutaneous tuberculosis is a rare occurrence. A case of elephantiasis of leg following lupus vulgaris is presented. It can still be seen in rural India in untreated advanced cutaneous tuberculosis.

  12. Transforming n=1 members of the Ruddlesden-Popper phases to a n=3 member through metathesis: synthesis of a new layered perovskite, Ca2La2CuTi2O10

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivakumar, T.; Lofland, S.E.; Ramanujachary, K.V.; Ramesha, K.; Subbanna, G.N.; Gopalakrishnan, J.

    2004-01-01

    We report the formation of a new n=3 Ruddlesden-Popper (R-P) layered perovskite oxide, Ca 2 La 2 CuTi 2 O 10 (I), in the metathesis reaction between NaLaTiO 4 and Ca 2 CuO 2 Cl 2 (n=1 R-P phases) at 700 deg. C in air. Rietveld refinement of powder XRD data shows that I is isostructural with Sr 4 Ti 3 O 10 (space group I4/mmm; a=3.8837(5), c=27.727(6) A), consisting of triple perovskite CuTi 2 O 10 sheets wherein Cu and Ti are ordered at the central and terminal octahedral sites, respectively. Magnetization data provide support for the presence of strong antiferromagnetically coupled CuO 2 sheets in the structure. I is metastable decomposing at higher temperatures (∼950 deg. C) to a mixture of perovskite-like CaLa 2 CuTi 2 O 9 and CaO. Interestingly, the reaction between NaLaTiO 4 and Sr 2 CuO 2 Cl 2 follows a different metathesis route, 2NaLaTiO 4 +Sr 2 CuO 2 Cl 2 →La 2 CuO 4 +2SrTiO 3 +2NaCl, revealing multiplicity of reaction pathways for solid-state metathesis reactions

  13. Clinicopathologic, Immunohistochemical, and Molecular Features of Histiocytoid Sweet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alegría-Landa, Victoria; Rodríguez-Pinilla, Socorro María; Santos-Briz, Angel; Rodríguez-Peralto, José Luis; Alegre, Victor; Cerroni, Lorenzo; Kutzner, Heinz; Requena, Luis

    2017-07-01

    Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is a rare histopathologic variant of Sweet syndrome. The nature of the histiocytoid infiltrate has generated considerable controversy in the literature. The main goal of this study was to conduct a comprehensive overview of the immunohistochemical phenotype of the infiltrate in histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. We also analyze whether this variant of Sweet syndrome is more frequently associated with hematologic malignancies than classic Sweet syndrome. This is a retrospective case series study of the clinicopathologic, immunohistochemical, and molecular features of 33 patients with a clinicopathologic diagnosis of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was conducted in the dermatology departments of 5 university hospitals and a private laboratory of dermatopathology. The clinical, histopathological, immunohistochemical, and follow-up features of 33 patients with histiocytoid Sweet syndrome were analyzed. In some cases, cytogenetic studies of the dermal infiltrate were also performed. We compare our findings with those of the literature. The dermal infiltrate from the 33 study patients (20 female; median age, 49 years; age range, 5-93 years; and 13 male; median age, 42 years; age range, 4-76 years) was mainly composed of myeloperoxidase-positive immature myelomonocytic cells with histiocytoid morphology. No cytogenetic anomalies were found in the infiltrate except in 1 case in which neoplastic cells of chronic myelogenous leukemia were intermingled with the cells of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome. Authentic histiocytes were also found in most cases, with a mature immunoprofile, but they appeared to be a minor component of the infiltrate. Histiocytoid Sweet syndrome was not more frequently related with hematologic malignancies than classic neutrophilic Sweet syndrome. The dermal infiltrate of cutaneous lesions of histiocytoid Sweet syndrome is composed mostly of immature cells of myeloid lineage. This infiltrate should not be interpreted as leukemia cutis.

  14. Vascular complications (splenic and hepatic artery aneurysms) in the occipital horn syndrome: report of a patient and review of the literature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mentzel, H.-J. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany)]|[Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Bachstrasse 18, D-07 740 Jena (Germany); Seidel, J.; Vogt, L. [Department of Paediatrics, University of Jena, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Jena/Thueringen (Germany); Vogt, S.; Kaiser, W.A. [Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Jena (Germany)

    1999-01-01

    We report an 18-year-old boy with occipital horn syndrome who developed aneurysms of the splenic and hepatic arteries. Occipital horn syndrome, also called X-linked cutis laxa or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IX, is characterised by a skeletal dysplasia which includes occipital horns, broad clavicles, deformed radii, ulnae and humeri, narrow rib cage, undercalcified long bones and coxa valga. Distinctive features common to all patients are unusual facial appearance, hypermobility of finger joints, limitation of extension of elbows, chronic diarrhoea and genitourinary abnormalities. In this case report we describe the difficulties encountered in the diagnostic management of patients with EDS-related vascular lesions. (orig.) With 5 figs., 2 tabs., 12 refs.

  15. Serotonin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyperserotonemia; Serotonergic syndrome; Serotonin toxicity; SSRI - serotonin syndrome; MAO - serotonin syndrome ... brain area. For example, you can develop this syndrome if you take migraine medicines called triptans together ...

  16. CALCINOSIS CUTIS METASTÁSICA: CALCIFILAXIS (ARTERIOLOPATÍA URÉMICA CALCIFICADA. A PROPÓSITO DE UN CASO. [METASTATIC CALCINOSIS CUTIS: CALCIPHYLAXIS (CALCIFIED UREMIC ARTERIOLOPATHY. A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lourdes Bolla de Lezcano

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Resumen La calcifilaxis es un síndrome clínico caracterizado por una calcificación vascular progresiva que ocasiona la aparición de lesiones violáceas, frecuentemente dolorosas, en la piel de pacientes con insuficiencia renal crónica, diálisis o trasplante renal, asociado usualmente a niveles elevados de hormona paratiroidea. Se presenta el caso clínico de una mujer de 44 años, diabética con insuficiencia renal crónica, en hemodiálisis desde hace 2 años, que fue diagnosticada de calcifilaxis tras sospecha clínica y biopsia de lesiones cutáneas. Abstract Calciphylaxis is a clinical syndrome characterized by progressive vascular calcification that causes the appearance of purplish lesions, often painful, in the skin of patients with chronic renal failure, dialysis or kidney transplantation, usually associated with elevated levels of parathyroid hormone. We report a case of a 44-year-old diabetic woman with chronic renal failure on hemodialysis for 2 years. She was diagnosed with calciphylaxis after clinical suspicion and biopsy of skin lesions.

  17. Beals Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the syndrome. How does Beals syndrome compare with Marfan syndrome? People with Beals syndrome have many of the ... bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments for these problems are the same. ...

  18. Você conhece esta síndrome? Do you know this syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thais Jerez Jaime

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Tumor benigno de tecido muscular, o piloleiomioma tem origem no músculo eretor do pelo, atingindo ambos os sexos geralmente na terceira década de vida. Apresenta-se como nódulo-pápulas assimétricas nas extremidades, de cor eritêmato-acastanhada e de consistência firme. As lesões, quando múltiplas, podem ser sensíveis ou dolorosas. Sua associação com miomas uterinos, denominada de síndrome de Reed ou leiomiomatose cutis et uteri, é apresentação rara, podendo estar associada a carcinoma de células renais. A abordagem é cirúrgica em casos isolados e medicamentosa se houver sintomas. Relatamos um caso de síndrome de Reed em que se optou por acompanhamento pela ausência de sintomatologia.Piloleiomyoma, a benign smooth-muscle tumor arising from the arrectores pilorum muscles of the skin, affects males and females in the third decade of life. It presents as asymmetrical, reddish-brown nodules or papules with a firm consistency, predominantly located on the limbs. When multiple lesions are present, they may be tender or painful. Their association with uterine fibroids, referred to as Reed syndrome or familial leiomyomatosis cutis et uteri, is rare and may be associated with renal cell carcinoma. The approach consists of surgical excision in cases presenting few lesions and pharmacological treatment if symptomatic. The present paper describes a case of Reed syndrome in which a decision was made to monitor the patient in view of the absence of symptoms.

  19. Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hypercortisolism; Cortisol excess; Glucocorticoid excess - Cushing syndrome ... The most common cause of Cushing syndrome is taking too much ... Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone ...

  20. LEOPARD syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Multiple lentigines syndrome; Noonan syndrome with multiple lentigines ... Genetics Home Reference -- ghr.nlm.nih.gov/condition/noonan-syndrome-with-multiple-lentigines National Organization for Rare Disorders -- ...

  1. Fanconi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Toni-Fanconi syndrome ... Fanconi syndrome can be caused by faulty genes, or it may result later in life due to kidney damage. Sometimes the cause of Fanconi syndrome is unknown. Common causes of Fanconi syndrome in ...

  2. Duane Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Duane Syndrome En Español Read in Chinese What is Duane Syndrome? Duane syndrome, also called Duane retraction syndrome (DRS), ...

  3. Hamartomatous polyposis syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsig, Anne Marie; Qvist, Niels; Brusgaard, Klaus

    2014-01-01

    Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes such as ......Hamartomatous Polyposis Syndromes (HPS) are genetic syndromes, which include Peutz-Jeghers syndrome, Juvenile polyposis syndrome, PTEN hamartoma tumour syndrome (Cowden Syndrom, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba and Proteus Syndrome) as well as hereditary mixed polyposis syndrome. Other syndromes...

  4. Genetics Home Reference: cutis laxa

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 9 [updated 2016 Aug 18]. In: Pagon RA, Adam MP, Ardinger HH, Wallace SE, Amemiya A, Bean LJH, Bird TD, Ledbetter N, Mefford HC, Smith RJH, Stephens K, editors. GeneReviews® [Internet]. Seattle (WA): ...

  5. Cutaneous tuberculosis, tuberculosis verrucosa cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilamani Mohanty

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous tuberculosis because of its variability in presentation, wider differential diagnosis, and difficulty in obtaining microbiological confirmation continues to be the most challenging to diagnose for dermatologists in developing countries. Despite the evolution of sophisticated techniques such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR and enzyme-linked-immunosorbent serologic assay (ELISA, the sensitivity of new methods are not better than the isolation of Mycobacterium tuberculosum in culture. Even in the 21 st century, we rely on methods as old as the intradermal reaction purified protein derivative standard test and therapeutic trials, as diagnostic tools. We describe a case which has been diagnosed and treated as eczema by renowned physicians for 2 years. Incisional biopsy showed the presence of well-defined granulomas and ZN staining of the biopsy specimen showed the presence of acid fast bacilli; a trial of ATT (antitubercular therapy for 6 months lead to permanent cure of the lesion.

  6. Lesões múltiplas de osteoma cutis na face: terapêutica minimamente invasiva em pacientes com sequela de acne - relato de casos Multiple injuries of osteoma skin in the face: therapeutical least invasive in patients with acne sequela - case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Göedert Leite Duarte

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Osteoma cutis é a formação óssea no interior da pele, podendo ser primária ou secundária. Única ou múltipla, de tamanhos variados e acometendo ambos os sexos, é uma lesão cutânea rara, de etiopatogenia e classificação ainda discutidas. Nosso objetivo foi relatar o diagnóstico e a terapêutica minimamente invasiva de lesões múltiplas de osteoma cutis na face em pacientes com sequelas de acne. Fizemos a retirada dos osteomas com agulhas BD 0,70 x 25 22G1, sem anestésicos tópicos ou injetáveis no local. As pequenas incisões foram deixadas expostas, com pomada cicatrizante. Obteve-se um excelente resultado estético em 15 dias.Osteoma cutis is a bone formation in the dermis can to be primary or secondary forms. Only, multiples, many forms, occurring on either sex, they are a rare cutaneous disease. The pathogenesis and classification remains unclear. Our objective was the diagnostic and small invasive surgery treatment of the osteoma cutis multiple of the face, in patients as a sequel of acne. To remove the osteoma we used needle BD 0,70x25 22G1, without anesthetic topic or inject able site. The small wounds were exposed with scarring balsam. We got an excellent esthetic result after 15 days.

  7. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, ... A problem with the fibrillin gene causes Marfan syndrome. Marfan syndrome can be mild to severe, and ...

  8. Aarskog syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarskog disease; Aarskog-Scott syndrome; AAS; Faciodigitogenital syndrome; Gaciogenital dysplasia ... Aarskog syndrome is a genetic disorder that is linked to the X chromosome. It affects mainly males, but females ...

  9. Williams syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is caused by not having a copy of several genes. It may be passed down in families. ... history of the condition. However, people with Williams syndrome have a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  10. Cushing's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    宗, 友厚; 伊藤, 勇; 諏訪, 哲也; 武田, 純; MUNE, Tomoatsu

    2003-01-01

    Sixteen cases of verified Cushing's syndrome, and twelve cases of probable Cushing's syndrome were reviewed and data on them were compared with various reports on Cushing's syndrome in the literature.

  11. Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilles de la Tourette syndrome; Tic disorders - Tourette syndrome ... Tourette syndrome is named for Georges Gilles de la Tourette, who first described this disorder in 1885. The disorder is likely passed down through families. ...

  12. The 7q11.23 Microduplication Syndrome: A Clinical Report with Review of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Elham; Cox, Devin M.; Smith, Teri; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a 14-year-old adolescent girl with selective mutism (SM) and a 7q11.23 microduplication detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis and reviewed the literature from 18 published clinical reports. Our patient had specific phobias, SM, extreme anxiety, obesity, cutis marmorata, and a round appearing face with a short neck and over folded ears. We reviewed the published clinical, cognitive, behavioral, and cytogenetic findings grouped by speech and language delay, growth and development, craniofacial, clinical, and behavior and cognitive features due to the 7q11.23 microduplication. This microduplication syndrome is characterized by speech delay (91%), social anxiety (42%), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD, 37%), autism spectrum disorder (29%), and separation anxiety (13%). Other findings include abnormal brain imaging (80%), congenital heart and vascular defects (54%), and mild intellectual disability (38%). We then compared the phenotype with Williams–Beuren syndrome (WBS) which is due to a deletion of the same chromosome region. Both syndromes have abnormal brain imaging, hypotonia, delayed motor development, joint laxity, mild intellectual disability, ADHD, autism, and poor visuospatial skills but opposite or dissimilar findings regarding speech and behavioral patterns, cardiovascular problems, and social interaction. Those with WBS are prone to have hyperverbal speech, lack of stranger anxiety, and supravalvular aortic stenosis while those with the 7q11.23 microduplication have speech delay, SM, social anxiety, and are prone to aortic dilatation. PMID:27617154

  13. Hepatorenal syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016:chap 153. Nevah MI, Fallon MB. Hepatic encephalopathy, hepatorenal syndrome, hepatopulmonary syndrome, and other systemic complications of liver disease. In: Feldman M, Friedman LS, Brandt LJ, ...

  14. Mutation in cyclophilin B that causes hyperelastosis cutis in American Quarter Horse does not affect peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity but shows altered cyclophilin B-protein interactions and affects collagen folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A; Boudko, Sergei P; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-06-22

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum.

  15. Mutation in Cyclophilin B That Causes Hyperelastosis Cutis in American Quarter Horse Does Not Affect Peptidylprolyl cis-trans Isomerase Activity but Shows Altered Cyclophilin B-Protein Interactions and Affects Collagen Folding*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Yoshihiro; Vranka, Janice A.; Boudko, Sergei P.; Pokidysheva, Elena; Mizuno, Kazunori; Zientek, Keith; Keene, Douglas R.; Rashmir-Raven, Ann M.; Nagata, Kazuhiro; Winand, Nena J.; Bächinger, Hans Peter

    2012-01-01

    The rate-limiting step of folding of the collagen triple helix is catalyzed by cyclophilin B (CypB). The G6R mutation in cyclophilin B found in the American Quarter Horse leads to autosomal recessive hyperelastosis cutis, also known as hereditary equine regional dermal asthenia. The mutant protein shows small structural changes in the region of the mutation at the side opposite the catalytic domain of CypB. The peptidylprolyl cis-trans isomerase activity of the mutant CypB is normal when analyzed in vitro. However, the biosynthesis of type I collagen in affected horse fibroblasts shows a delay in folding and secretion and a decrease in hydroxylysine and glucosyl-galactosyl hydroxylysine. This leads to changes in the structure of collagen fibrils in tendon, similar to those observed in P3H1 null mice. In contrast to cyclophilin B null mice, where little 3-hydroxylation was found in type I collagen, 3-hydroxylation of type I collagen in affected horses is normal. The mutation disrupts the interaction of cyclophilin B with the P-domain of calreticulin, with lysyl hydroxylase 1, and probably other proteins, such as the formation of the P3H1·CypB·cartilage-associated protein complex, resulting in less effective catalysis of the rate-limiting step in collagen folding in the rough endoplasmic reticulum. PMID:22556420

  16. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing's syndrome is a hormonal disorder. The cause is long-term exposure to too much cortisol, a hormone that ... your body to make too much cortisol. Cushing's syndrome is rare. Some symptoms are Upper body obesity ...

  17. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder that causes ... and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from birth ...

  18. Metabolic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metabolic syndrome is a group of conditions that put you at risk for heart disease and diabetes. These conditions ... agree on the definition or cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is ...

  19. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reye syndrome is a rare illness that can affect the blood, liver, and brain of someone who has recently ... a viral illness, seek medical attention immediately. Reye syndrome can lead to a coma and brain death, ...

  20. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  1. Caplan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... enable JavaScript. Rheumatoid pneumoconiosis (RP; also known as Caplan syndrome) is swelling (inflammation) and scarring of the ... avoid exposure to inorganic dust. Alternative Names RP; Caplan syndrome; Pneumoconiosis - rheumatoid; Silicosis - rheumatoid pneumoconiosis; Coal worker's ...

  2. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or incomplete ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of skin ...

  3. Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sobrado Junior, C.W.; Bresser, A.; Cerri, G.G.; Habr-Gama, A.; Pinotti, H.W.; Magalhaes, A.

    1988-01-01

    A case of familiar poliposis of colon related to a right mandibular osteoma is reported (this association is usually called Gardner's syndrome). Radiologic pictures ae shown and some commentaries about this syndrome concerning the treatment are made. (author) [pt

  4. Sotos Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ... have also been reported. × Definition Sotos syndrome (cerebral gigantism) is a rare genetic disorder caused by mutation ...

  5. Felty syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seropositive rheumatoid arthritis (RA); Felty's syndrome ... The cause of Felty syndrome is unknown. It is more common in people who have had rheumatoid arthritis (RA) for a long time. People with ...

  6. Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000308.htm Bartter syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Bartter syndrome is a group of rare conditions that affect ...

  7. Pendred Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other possible long-term consequences of the syndrome. Children with Pendred syndrome should start early treatment to gain communication skills, such as learning sign language or cued speech or learning to ...

  8. Dravet Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on all types of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome. Study of the genetic defects responsible for Dravet syndrome and related ... Publications Definition Dravet ...

  9. Fibulin-4 E57K Knock-in Mice Recapitulate Cutaneous, Vascular and Skeletal Defects of Recessive Cutis Laxa 1B with both Elastic Fiber and Collagen Fibril Abnormalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igoucheva, Olga; Alexeev, Vitali; Halabi, Carmen M; Adams, Sheila M; Stoilov, Ivan; Sasaki, Takako; Arita, Machiko; Donahue, Adele; Mecham, Robert P; Birk, David E; Chu, Mon-Li

    2015-08-28

    Fibulin-4 is an extracellular matrix protein essential for elastic fiber formation. Frameshift and missense mutations in the fibulin-4 gene (EFEMP2/FBLN4) cause autosomal recessive cutis laxa (ARCL) 1B, characterized by loose skin, aortic aneurysm, arterial tortuosity, lung emphysema, and skeletal abnormalities. Homozygous missense mutations in FBLN4 are a prevalent cause of ARCL 1B. Here we generated a knock-in mouse strain bearing a recurrent fibulin-4 E57K homozygous missense mutation. The mutant mice survived into adulthood and displayed abnormalities in multiple organ systems, including loose skin, bent forelimb, aortic aneurysm, tortuous artery, and pulmonary emphysema. Biochemical studies of dermal fibroblasts showed that fibulin-4 E57K mutant protein was produced but was prone to dimer formation and inefficiently secreted, thereby triggering an endoplasmic reticulum stress response. Immunohistochemistry detected a low level of fibulin-4 E57K protein in the knock-in skin along with altered expression of selected elastic fiber components. Processing of a precursor to mature lysyl oxidase, an enzyme involved in cross-linking of elastin and collagen, was compromised. The knock-in skin had a reduced level of desmosine, an elastin-specific cross-link compound, and ultrastructurally abnormal elastic fibers. Surprisingly, structurally aberrant collagen fibrils and altered organization into fibers were characteristics of the knock-in dermis and forelimb tendons. Type I collagen extracted from the knock-in skin had decreased amounts of covalent intermolecular cross-links, which could contribute to the collagen fibril abnormalities. Our studies provide the first evidence that fibulin-4 plays a role in regulating collagen fibril assembly and offer a preclinical platform for developing treatments for ARCL 1B. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Down syndrome increases as a woman gets older. Down syndrome cannot be cured. Early treatment programs can help improve skills. They may include ... occupational, and/or educational therapy. With support and treatment, many ... Down syndrome live happy, productive lives. NIH: National Institute of ...

  11. Rowell syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh Y Bhat

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rowell syndrome is a rare disease consisting of erythema multiforme-like lesions associated with lupus erythematosus. The syndrome occurs mostly in middle-aged women. The authors describe the syndrome in a 15-year-old boy who responded well to systemic steroids and hydroxychloroquine.

  12. Aicardi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) × Definition Aicardi syndrome is a rare genetic ... from Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome, which is an inherited encephalopathy that affects newborn infants.) View Full Definition Treatment There is no ...

  13. Dravets syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy and early childhood. Most cases of Dravet syndrome seem to be due to a genetic defect causing the sodium channel to malfunction. We describe the main features of the syndrome. This epilepsy is medically intractable, but we call attention...... to the fact that some medications are of benefit and some could exacerbate the condition. Early recognition of the syndrome including by genetic testing could possibly improve outcome and reduce the need for other specialized investigations. Udgivelsesdato: 2010-Feb-22...

  14. Urofacial syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamal F Akl

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The urofacial syndrome is characterized by functional obstructive uropathy asso-ciated with an inverted smile. The importance of the subject is that it sheds light, not only on the muscles of facial expression, but also on the inheritance of voiding disorders and lower urinary tract malformations. We report a 10-year-old-male patient who had the urofacial syndrome. Early diagnosis of the urofacial syndrome is important to avoid upper urinary tract damage and renal failure.

  15. Refeeding syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Tripathy, Swagata; Mishra, Padmini; Dash, S. C.

    2008-01-01

    Refeeding syndrome is a potentially fatal medical condition that may affect malnourished patients in response to an inappropriately rapid overfeeding. This commonly occurs following the institution of nutritional support, especially parenteral or enteral nutrition. The most characteristic pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome relates to the rapid consumption of phosphate after glucose intake and subsequent hypophosphatemia. Refeeding syndrome can manifest as either metabolic changes (hypokala...

  16. Revesz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayane Cristine Issaho

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Revesz syndrome is a rare variant of dyskeratosis congenita and is characterized by bilateral exudative retinopathy, alterations in the anterior ocular segment, intrauterine growth retardation, fine sparse hair, reticulate skin pigmentation, bone marrow failure, cerebral calcification, cerebellar hypoplasia and psychomotor retardation. Few patients with this syndrome have been reported, and significant clinical variations exist among patients. This report describes the first Brazilian case of Revesz syndrome and its ocular and clinical features.

  17. Reye's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... that contain aspirin. Some hospitals and medical facilities conduct newborn screenings for fatty acid oxidation disorders to determine which children are at greater risk of developing Reye's syndrome. ...

  18. Marfan Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genetic disorder called Marfan syndrome. What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is named after Antoine Marfan, the French ... immediately. What's Life Like for Teens With Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome affects people differently, so life is not ...

  19. Learning about Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Additional Resources for Marfan Syndrome What is Marfan syndrome? Marfan syndrome is one of the most common inherited ... FAQ Top of page Additional Resources For Marfan Syndrome Marfan syndrome [nlm.nih.gov] From Medline Plus Marfan ...

  20. Russell-Silver syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver-Russell syndrome; Silver syndrome; RSS; Russell-Silver syndrome ... One in 10 children with this syndrome has a problem involving chromosome 7. In other people with the syndrome, it may affect chromosome 11. Most of the time, it ...

  1. What Is Usher Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Action You are here Home › Retinal Diseases Listen Usher Syndrome What is Usher syndrome? How is Usher syndrome ... available? Are there any related diseases? What is Usher Syndrome? Usher syndrome is an inherited condition characterized by ...

  2. Seckel syndrome: an overdiagnosed syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, E; Pembrey, M

    1985-01-01

    Five children in whom a diagnosis of Seckel syndrome had previously been made were re-examined in the genetic unit. One child had classical Seckel syndrome, a sib pair had the features of the syndrome with less severe short stature, and in two children the diagnosis was not confirmed. Seckel syndrome is only one of a group of low birth weight microcephalic dwarfism and careful attention should be paid to fulfillment of the major criteria defined by Seckel before the diagnosis is made. There r...

  3. Burnout Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Panova, Gordana; Panov, Nenad; Stojanov, H; Sumanov, Gorgi; Panova, Blagica; Stojanovski, Angel; Nikolovska, Lence; Jovevska, Svetlana; Trajanovski, D; Asanova, D

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Increasing work responsibilities, allocation of duties, loss of energy and motivation in everyday activities, emotional exhaustion, lack of time for themselves, insuffi cient time for rest and recreation, dissatisfaction in private life. All these symptoms can be cause of Burnout Syndrome. Aim: To see the importance of this syndrome, the consequences of job dissatisfaction, the environment, family and expression in drastic chan...

  4. Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    If you have Tourette syndrome, you make unusual movements or sounds, called tics. You have little or no control over them. Common tics are throat- ... spin, or, rarely, blurt out swear words. Tourette syndrome is a disorder of the nervous system. It ...

  5. Fahr's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. × Definition Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, inherited ... or 50s, although it can occur at any time in childhood or adolescence. View Full Definition Treatment There is no cure for Fahr's Syndrome, ...

  6. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine; Bødtger, Uffe; Heltberg, Ole

    2014-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is an often un-diagnosed disease seen in previously healthy young subjects, presenting with symptoms of pharyngitis, fever and elevated markers of inflammation. The syndrome is characterised by infectious thrombosis of the jugular vein due to infection with Fusobacteria, causing...

  7. Ambras syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Malwade

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ambras syndrome, a form of congenital hypertrichosis lanuginosa, is extremely rare in neonates. It is characterized by typical pattern of hair distribution, dysmorphic facial features and a familial pattern of inheritance. We report a case of Ambras syndrome in a preterm neonate with history of consanguinity and positive family history.

  8. Antiphospholipid syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cervera, Ricard; Piette, Jean-Charles; Font, Josep

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression.......To analyze the clinical and immunologic manifestations of antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) in a large cohort of patients and to define patterns of disease expression....

  9. Noonan syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2013-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid ris...

  10. TAFRO Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Igawa, Takuro; Sato, Yasuharu

    2018-02-01

    TAFRO syndrome is a newly recognized variant of idiopathic multicentric Castleman disease (iMCD) that involves a constellation of syndromes: thrombocytopenia (T), anasarca (A), fever (F), reticulin fibrosis (R), and organomegaly (O). Thrombocytopenia and severe anasarca accompanied by relatively low serum immunoglobulin levels are characteristic clinical findings of TAFRO syndrome that are not present in iMCD-not otherwise specified (iMCD-NOS). Lymph node biopsy is recommended to exclude other diseases and to diagnose TAFRO syndrome, which reveals characteristic histopathological findings similar to hyaline vascular-type CD. TAFRO syndrome follows a more aggressive course, compared with iMCD-NOS, and there is no standard treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Goldenhar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Sharma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome is a syndrome of complex structures developing from first and second branchial arches during blastogenesis. The etiology of this rare disease is not fully understood, as it has shown itself variable genetically and of unclear causes. The disorder is characterized by a wide spectrum of symptoms and physical features that may vary greatly in range and severity from case to case. Here we present a unique case of Goldenhar syndrome with absence of left condyle, hypoplasia of the zygomatic bone, no pneumatization of the mastoid process, underdeveloped mandible, bifid tongue and the skin tags in the preauricular area.

  12. Cowden syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi Prakash S

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Cowden syndrome or multiple hamartoma syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition with variable expressions that result mainly from mutation in the PTEN gene on arm 10q. It is characterized by multiple hamartomatous neoplasms of the skin, oral mucosa, gastrointestinal tract, bones, CNS, eyes, and genitourinary tract. Mucocutaneous features include trichilemmomas, oral mucosal papillomatosis, acral keratosis, and palmoplantar keratosis. Here we present a case of Cowden syndrome in a 14-year-old female patient with the chief complaint of multiple oral papillomatous lesions.

  13. Costello syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhukara J

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Costello syndrome is a rare, distinctive, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome, characterized by soft, loose skin with deep palmar and plantar creases, loose joints, distinctive coarse facial features and skeletal and cardiac abnormalities. The affected patients have a predisposition to develop malignancy, developmental delays and mental retardation. Recently, a 7-year-old male child born to normal nonconsanguineous parents presented to us with abnormal facial features, arrhythmia, mitral valve dysfunction and growth retardation. His cutaneous examination revealed lax and pigmented skin over hands and feet with deep creases, acanthosis nigricans and short curly hairs. Its differentiation from other syndromes with similar clinical features is discussed in this article.

  14. Crystal structure and phase transition studies in perovskite-type oxides using powder-diffraction techniques and symmetry-mode analysis : SrLnMRuO6 (Ln=La,Pr,Nd; M=Zn,Co,Mg,Ni,Fe) and ALn2CuTi2O9 (A=Ca,Ba; Ln=La,Pr,Nd,Sm)

    OpenAIRE

    Iturbe Zabalo, Edurne

    2013-01-01

    La tesis se ha centrado en la síntesis y caracterización estructural de materiales tipo perovskita: SrLnMRuO6 (Ln=La,Pr,Nd; M=Zn,Co,Mg,Ni,Fe) y ALn2CuTi2O9 (A=Ca,Ba; Ln=La,Pr,Nd,Sm). El estudio de las estructuras de los materiales se ha realizado mediante el análisis de los patrones de difracción en polvo de rayos-X, sincrotrón y/o neutrones. En el refinamiento por el método de Rietveld de las estructuras se han sustituido las coordenadas atómicas (el método más común), por coordenadas colect...

  15. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now What Is Reye’s Syndrome? ...

  16. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Legacy Society Make Gifts of Stock Donate Your Car Personal Fundraising Partnership & Support Share Your Story Spread the Word Give While You Shop Contact Us Donate Now Alagille Syndrome Back Alagille ...

  17. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Failure to begin sexual changes expected during puberty Sexual development that "stalls" during teenage years Early end to menstrual cycles not due to pregnancy For most women with Turner syndrome, inability to ...

  18. [Refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it.

  19. Cockayne syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karikkineth, Ajoy C; Scheibye-Knudsen, Morten; Fivenson, Elayne

    2017-01-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a disorder characterized by a variety of clinical features including cachectic dwarfism, severe neurological manifestations including microcephaly and cognitive deficits, pigmentary retinopathy, cataracts, sensorineural deafness, and ambulatory and feeding difficulties...

  20. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  1. Reye Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Liver Function Tests Clinical Trials Liver Transplant FAQs Medical Terminology Diseases of the Liver Alagille Syndrome Alcohol-Related ... the Liver The Progression of Liver Disease FAQs Medical Terminology HOW YOU CAN HELP Sponsorship Ways to Give ...

  2. Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... crowding, and osteoporosis (brittle bones). Because of their physical conditions, health concerns, and infertility, some girls and women with TS may have low self- esteem, anxiety, or depression. How is Turner syndrome diagnosed? Physical features may ...

  3. Cushing's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... person cured of Cushing’s syndrome might have some memory loss and slight mental decline. But the change is ... Categories: Family Health, Infants and Toddlers, Kids and Teens, Men, Seniors, WomenTags: acth, adenomas, hormone, sickness September ...

  4. Levator Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Abscess Anorectal Fistula Foreign Objects in the Rectum Hemorrhoids Levator Syndrome Pilonidal Disease Proctitis Rectal Prolapse (See ... out other painful rectal conditions (such as thrombosed hemorrhoids , fissures , or abscesses ). The physical examination is often ...

  5. Alport Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... signs and symptoms may differ, based on age, gender and inherited type of Alport syndrome. For example, ... prevention and treatment of kidney disease. The Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance Charity Seal provides the ...

  6. Gilbert's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... not know you have the condition until it's discovered by accident, such as when a blood test ... chemotherapy drug Some protease inhibitors used to treat HIV If you have Gilbert's syndrome, talk to your ...

  7. Potter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter phenotype ... In Potter syndrome, the primary problem is kidney failure. The kidneys fail to develop properly as the baby is ... kidneys normally produce the amniotic fluid (as urine). Potter phenotype refers to a typical facial appearance that ...

  8. Moebius Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... delays; high or cleft palate; hearing problems and speech difficulties. Children with Moebius syndrome are unable to move their eyes back and forth. Decreased numbers of muscle fibers have been reported. Deformities of the tongue, jaw, and limbs, such ...

  9. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network of...

  10. Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... therapy for seizures is usually necessary. Physical and occupational therapies, communication therapy, and behavioral therapies are important in allowing individuals with Angelman syndrome to reach their maximum developmental potential. × Treatment There ...

  11. Joubert Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... CEP290 . View Full Definition Treatment Treatment for Joubert syndrome is symptomatic and supportive. Infant stimulation and physical, occupational, and speech therapy may benefit some children. Infants with abnormal breathing ...

  12. Zellweger Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... swallow. Some babies will be born with glaucoma, retinal degeneration, and impaired hearing. Jaundice and gastrointestinal bleeding also may occur. Treatment There is no cure for Zellweger syndrome, nor ...

  13. Nephrotic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your blood — typically with an artificial kidney machine (dialyzer). Chronic kidney disease. Nephrotic syndrome may cause your ... opportunities Reprint Permissions A single copy of these materials may be reprinted for noncommercial personal use only. " ...

  14. Ohtahara Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... are more often affected than girls. View Full Definition Treatment Antiepileptic drugs are used to control seizures, but are unfortunately ... Other therapies are symptomatic and supportive. × ... Definition Ohtahara syndrome is a neurological disorder characterized by ...

  15. Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  16. Eagle's Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Pinheiro,Thaís Gonçalves; Soares,Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira,Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo,Igor Teixeira; Nascimento,Luiz Augusto; Oliveira,Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction:?Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is diffic...

  17. Barth Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saric, Ana; Andreau, Karine; Armand, Anne-Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the gene encoding the enzyme tafazzin, TAZ, cause Barth syndrome (BTHS). Individuals with this X-linked multisystem disorder present cardiomyopathy (CM) (often dilated), skeletal muscle weakness, neutropenia, growth retardation, and 3-methylglutaconic aciduria. Biopsies of the heart......, liver and skeletal muscle of patients have revealed mitochondrial malformations and dysfunctions. It is the purpose of this review to summarize recent results of studies on various animal or cell models of Barth syndrome, which have characterized biochemically the strong cellular defects associated...

  18. Pendred's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashmi, M.I.; Cheema, I.A.; Qasim, G.

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Pendred's syndrome in three siblings of a consanguineous marriage, belonging to Rahimyar Khan. The children presented with deafmutism and goiters. The investigations included scintigram, perchlorate discharge test and audiometery. The perchlorate discharge was positive in index case. Bilateral sensorineural hearing defect was detected on Pure Tone Average (PTA) audiometry. Meticulous clinical and laboratory evaluation is mandatory for the detection of rare disorders like Pendred's syndrome. (author)

  19. [Poland's syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, R; Sasiadek, M

    2000-08-01

    Poland's syndrome consists of the variable clinical features, but always includes unilateral aplasia of the chest wall muscles and ipsilateral anomalies of upper extremity. The incidence of Poland's syndrome, reported by different authors ranges from 1:10,000 to 1:100,000 and is observed more frequently in males than in females with the right side of the body affected more often than the left. The etiology of this syndrome is still discussed. However most of described cases were sporadic, rare familial incidence of Poland's syndrome were also presented. Therefore different etiologic factors of the Poland's syndrome are taken into account: genetic, vascular compromise during early stages of embriogenesis but also teratogenic effect of environmental xenobiotics (e.g. cigarette smoking by pregnant women). The authors present also the case of 20-years old man with inherited bilateral syndactyly with the right side aplasia of major pectoralis muscle and face asymmetry. The familial history was negative in respect to the features, associated with Poland's syndrome.

  20. Síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos: Uma causa rara de pneumotórax espontâneo Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: A rare cause of spontaneous pneumothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Lopes

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos (cutis hyperelastica, constitui uma patologia do tecido conjuntivo caracterizada por alterações da pele, ligamentos e órgãos internos. Apresenta transmissão hereditária, em geral autossómica dominante. Afecta primordialmente a síntese do colagéneo, pelo que a pele e os vasos sanguíneos se tornam extremamente elásticos e frágeis. A pele é macia, com consistência de borracha, e as equimoses surgem facilmente. As articulações são hiperextensíveis e têm mobilidade aumentada. Os autores apresentam o caso clínico de um doente de dezasseis anos, com história de hipermobilidade articular desde a infância e fractura esplénica, a quem foi feito o diagnóstico de síndroma de Ehlers-Danlos na sequência de pneumotórax espontâneo recidivante. Apresentam-se as complicações pulmonares mais frequentes desta síndroma e discute-se a importância de não esquecer as etiologias menos comuns, perante casos de pneumotórax espontâneo.Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (cutis hyperelastica, is a group of connective tissue disorders characterized by abnormalities of the skin, ligaments and internal organs. It is a hereditary syndrome, usually with autossomal dominant inheritance; that primarily affects the collagen synthesis. The skin and blood vessels are extremely fragile and elastic. The skin is soft with rubber consistency and easily bruising. There are hypermobile joints with increased extensibility. We summarize the case of a sixteen year old boy with a history of joint hypermobility since childhood and splenic fracture that was diagnosed with Ehlers-Danlos syndrome after the occurrence of recidivant spontaneous pneumothorax. We present the most common pulmonary complications of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and discuss the importance of not forgetting the least commons etiologies of pneumothorax, in cases of spontaneous pneumothorax.

  1. What is Metabolic Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Metabolic Syndrome Metabolic Syndrome Also known as What Is Metabolic syndrome ... metabolic risk factors to be diagnosed with metabolic syndrome. Metabolic Risk Factors A Large Waistline Having a large ...

  2. Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to the signs and symptoms of Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Marfan syndrome is different from Loeys-Dietz syndrome in that the gene mutation which causes Marfan syndrome is in fibrillin-1 (FBN-1), a protein ...

  3. Milk-alkali syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcium-alkali syndrome; Cope syndrome; Burnett syndrome; Hypercalcemia; Calcium metabolism disorder ... Milk-alkali syndrome is almost always caused by taking too many calcium supplements, usually in the form of calcium carbonate. Calcium ...

  4. Exogenous Cushing syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cushing syndrome - corticosteroid induced; Corticosteroid-induced Cushing syndrome; Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the hormone ...

  5. Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other FAQs Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Turner Syndrome: Other FAQs Basic information for topics, such as " ... been diagnosed with Turner syndrome. Now what? Is Turner syndrome inherited? Turner syndrome is usually not inherited, but ...

  6. Clinical Transcriptomics in Systemic Vasculitis (CUTIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-10

    Cryoglobulinemic Vasculitis (CV); Drug-induced Vasculitis; Eosinophilic Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (EGPA); IgA Vasculitis; Isolated Cutaneous Vasculitis; Granulomatosis With Polyangiitis (GPA); Microscopic Polyangiitis (MPA); Polyarteritis Nodosa (PAN); Urticarial Vasculitis; Vasculitis

  7. Calcinosis Cutis Long after Rhinoplasty with Silicone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Honda

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Rhinoplasty is a plastic surgery procedure to reconstruct the nose. Silicone alloplastic materials are most widely used as implants for rhinoplasty, but calcification on the surface occurs with long-term usage. Herein, we report a case of gruel-like calcification approximately 50 years after silicone implant rhinoplasty. In this case, calcification on the silicone surface might have transformed into gruel-like deposits, which presented as a subcutaneous mass at the dorsal area of the nose. The precise mechanism is unclear; a pH change in the tissue might have occurred during the process of inflammation, leading to the dissolution of calcified deposits.

  8. Bilateral eyelid edema : Cutis laxa or blepharochalasis?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakenburg, A; Nicolai, JPA

    A 59-year-old woman with massive bilateral edema of the upper and lower eyelids is presented. The edema occurred suddenly and without provocation. No cause could be identified despite a multitude of examinations. Initially the patient was diagnosed as having blepharochalasis, but later skin biopsy

  9. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  10. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    NBCC syndrome; Gorlin-Goltz syndrome; Basal cell nevus syndrome; BCNS; Basal cell cancer - nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome ... Nevoid basal cell carcinoma nevus syndrome is a rare genetic ... syndrome is known as PTCH ("patched"). The gene is passed down ...

  11. Nutcracker syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jolley, Ingrid

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this case study is to highlight the symptoms of the Nutcracker Syndrome (NCS), the methods of clinical investigations and the importance of differential diagnosis. Introduction: The NCS refers to left renal vein entrapment caused by abnormal branching patterns of the superior mesenteric artery from the aorta. 1,2 Clinical case presentation: A 27 years old female presented to the emergency department with complaints of abdominal discomfort, bloating, loose bowel motions and irregular micro-haematuria. The radiologist's report indicated the findings from computed tomography examination to be consistent with anterior NCS. Discussion: In most of the NCS cases the clinical symptoms are non-specific. 3 The syndrome is caused by a vascular disorder, but its clinical manifestation can relate to a wide range of abdominal, urological, endovascular or gynaecological pathologies. 4 Conclusion: Nutcracker Syndrome is a relatively rare disease and underdiagnosed may lead to left renal vein thrombosis

  12. Compartment syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  13. Usher Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Fakin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Usher syndrome is an autosomal recessive disease with prevalence of 3–6/100.000 and is the most common syndrome that affects vision and hearing. Three subtypes are distinguished on the basis of different degree of hearing loss. All patients develop retinitis pigmentosa with night vision difficulties and constriction of visual field, and ultimately a decline in visual acuity and color vision. Future holds promise for gene therapy. We present a patient with typical clinical picture of Usher syndrome, who started noticing night vision problems at age 13. At age 25 he was operated on for posterior cortical cataracts. At age 34 he has only 5–10° of visual field remaining with 1.0 visual acuity in both eyes. Fundus autofluorescence imaging revealed a typical hyperautofluorescent ring on the border between normal and affected retina.

  14. Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil Ikinci

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic Syndrome is a combination of risk factors including common etiopathogenesis. These risk factors play different roles in occurence of atherosclerotic diseases, type 2 diabetes, and cancers. Although a compromise can not be achieved on differential diagnosis for MS, the existence of any three criterias enable to diagnose MS. These are abdominal obesity, dislipidemia (hypertrigliceridemia, hypercholesterolemia, and reduced high density lipoprotein hypertension, and elevated fasting blood glucose. According to the results of Metabolic Syndrome Research (METSAR, the overall prevalence of MS in Turkey is 34%; in females 40%, and in males it is 28%. As a result of “Western” diet, and increased frequency of obesity, MS is observed in children and in adolescents both in the world and in Turkey. Resulting in chronic diseases, it is thought that the syndrome can be prevented by healthy lifestyle behaviours. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 535-540

  15. Eagle's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves; Soares, Vítor Yamashiro Rocha; Ferreira, Denise Bastos Lage; Raymundo, Igor Teixeira; Nascimento, Luiz Augusto; Oliveira, Carlos Augusto Costa Pires de

    2013-01-01

    Summary Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT) of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical. PMID:25992033

  16. Eagle's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinheiro, Thaís Gonçalves

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Eagle's syndrome is characterized by cervicopharyngeal signs and symptoms associated with elongation of the styloid apophysis. This elongation may occur through ossification of the stylohyoid ligament, or through growth of the apophysis due to osteogenesis triggered by a factor such as trauma. Elongation of the styloid apophysis may give rise to intense facial pain, headache, dysphagia, otalgia, buzzing sensations, and trismus. Precise diagnosis of the syndrome is difficult, and it is generally confounded by other manifestations of cervicopharyngeal pain. Objective: To describe a case of Eagle's syndrome. Case Report: A 53-year-old man reported lateral pain in his neck that had been present for 30 years. Computed tomography (CT of the neck showed elongation and ossification of the styloid processes of the temporal bone, which was compatible with Eagle's syndrome. Surgery was performed for bilateral resection of the stylohyoid ligament by using a transoral and endoscopic access route. The patient continued to present pain laterally in the neck, predominantly on his left side. CT was performed again, which showed elongation of the styloid processes. The patient then underwent lateral cervicotomy with resection of the stylohyoid process, which partially resolved his painful condition. Final Comments: Patients with Eagle's syndrome generally have a history of chronic pain. Appropriate knowledge of this disease is necessary for adequate treatment to be provided. The importance of diagnosing this uncommon and often unsuspected disease should be emphasized, given that correct clinical-surgical treatment is frequently delayed. The diagnosis of Eagle's syndrome is clinical and radiographic, and the definitive treatment in cases of difficult-to-control pain is surgical.

  17. Brain Malformations Associated with Knobloch Syndrome – Review of Literature, Expanding Clinical Spectrum and Identification of Novel Mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Baranoski, Jacob F.; Aktar, Fesih; Han, Wengi; Tuysuz, Beyhan; Guzel, Aslan; Guclu, Bulent; Kaymakcalan, Hande; Aktekin, Berrin; Akgumus, Gozde Tugce; Murray, Phillip B.; Omay, E. Zeynep Erson; Caglar, Caner; Bakircioglu, Mehmet; Sakalar, Yildirim Bayezit; Guzel, Ebru; Demir, Nihat; Tuncer, Oguz; Senturk, Senem; Ekici, Baris; Minja, Frank J.; Šestan, Nenad; Yasuno, Katsuhito; Bilguvar, Kaya; Caksen, Huseyin; Gunel, Murat

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Knobloch syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive, developmental disorder characterized by stereotyped ocular abnormalities with or without occipital skull deformities (encephalocele, bone defects, cutis aplasia). Although there is clear heterogeneity in clinical presentation, central nervous system malformations, aside from the characteristic encephalocele, have not typically been considered a component of the disease phenotype. METHODS Four patients originally presented for genetic evaluation of symptomatic structural brain malformations. Whole-genome genotyping, whole-exome sequencing, and confirmatory Sanger sequencing were performed. Using immunohistochemical analysis, we investigated the protein expression pattern of COL18A1 in the mid-fetal and adult human cerebral cortex and then analyzed the spatial and temporal changes in the expression pattern of COL18A1 during human cortical development using the Human Brain Transcriptome database. RESULTS We identified two novel homozygous deleterious frame-shift mutations in the COL18A1 gene. Upon further investigation of these patients and their families, we found that many exhibited certain characteristics of Knobloch syndrome, including pronounced ocular defects. Our data strongly support an important role for COL18A1 in brain development and this report contributes to an enhanced characterization of the brain malformations that can result from deficiencies of collagen XVIII. CONCLUSIONS This case series highlights the diagnostic power and clinical utility of whole-exome sequencing technology – allowing clinicians and physician scientists to better understand the pathophysiology and presentations of rare diseases. We suggest that patients who are clinically diagnosed with Knobloch syndrome and/or found to have COL18A1 mutations via genetic screening should be investigated for potential structural brain abnormalities even in the absence of encephaloceles. PMID:25456301

  18. De Novo Mutations in SLC25A24 Cause a Craniosynostosis Syndrome with Hypertrichosis, Progeroid Appearance, and Mitochondrial Dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehmke, Nadja; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Smorag, Lukasz; Koenig, Rainer; Segebrecht, Lara; Magoulas, Pilar; Scaglia, Fernando; Kilic, Esra; Hennig, Anna F; Adolphs, Nicolai; Saha, Namrata; Fauler, Beatrix; Kalscheuer, Vera M; Hennig, Friederike; Altmüller, Janine; Netzer, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Nürnberg, Peter; Yigit, Gökhan; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krüger, Ulrike; Mielke, Thorsten; Krawitz, Peter M; Horn, Denise; Schuelke, Markus; Mundlos, Stefan; Bacino, Carlos A; Bonnen, Penelope E; Wollnik, Bernd; Fischer-Zirnsak, Björn; Kornak, Uwe

    2017-11-02

    Gorlin-Chaudhry-Moss syndrome (GCMS) is a dysmorphic syndrome characterized by coronal craniosynostosis and severe midface hypoplasia, body and facial hypertrichosis, microphthalmia, short stature, and short distal phalanges. Variable lipoatrophy and cutis laxa are the basis for a progeroid appearance. Using exome and genome sequencing, we identified the recurrent de novo mutations c.650G>A (p.Arg217His) and c.649C>T (p.Arg217Cys) in SLC25A24 in five unrelated girls diagnosed with GCMS. Two of the girls had pronounced neonatal progeroid features and were initially diagnosed with Wiedemann-Rautenstrauch syndrome. SLC25A24 encodes a mitochondrial inner membrane ATP-Mg/P i carrier. In fibroblasts from affected individuals, the mutated SLC25A24 showed normal stability. In contrast to control cells, the probands' cells showed mitochondrial swelling, which was exacerbated upon treatment with hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ). The same effect was observed after overexpression of the mutant cDNA. Under normal culture conditions, the mitochondrial membrane potential of the probands' fibroblasts was intact, whereas ATP content in the mitochondrial matrix was lower than that in control cells. However, upon H 2 O 2 exposure, the membrane potential was significantly elevated in cells harboring the mutated SLC25A24. No reduction of mitochondrial DNA copy number was observed. These findings demonstrate that mitochondrial dysfunction with increased sensitivity to oxidative stress is due to the SLC25A24 mutations. Our results suggest that the SLC25A24 mutations induce a gain of pathological function and link mitochondrial ATP-Mg/P i transport to the development of skeletal and connective tissue. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  19. Rapunzel syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wadan, Ali H.; Al-Saai, Azan S.; Abdoulgafour, Mohamed; Al-Absi, Mohamed

    2006-01-01

    An 18-year-old single female patient, presented with non specific gastrointestinal symptoms of anorexia, abdominal pain, and change in bowel habit. Clinically she was anemic, cachectic, and depressed. Abdominal examination revealed mobile epigastric mass. The scalp alopecia and endoscopy coupled by computed tomography scan, confirmed the diagnoses of trichobezoar, but it was not diagnosed as Rapunzel syndrome except after laparotomy, gastrotomy, and enterotomy. There are less than 16 cases of Rapunzel syndrome described worldwide, and this is the first case to be described in the middle east. (author)

  20. Waardenburg syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tagra Sunita

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Waardenburg syndrome is a rare inherited and genetically heterogenous disorder of neural crest cell development. Four distinct subtypes showing marked interfamilial and intrafamilial variability have been described. We report a girl showing constellation of congenital hearing impairment with 110 dB and 105 dB loss in right and left ear respectively, hypoplastic blue iridis, white forelock, dystopia canthorum and broad nasal root. Other affected relatives of the family, with variable features of the syndrome, have been depicted in the pedigree.

  1. Olmsted syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Pramod

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Olmsted syndrome is a rare disorder characterized by the combination of periorificial, keratotic plaques and bilateral palmoplantar keratoderma. New associated features are being reported. Olmsted syndrome is particularly rare in a female patient, and we report such a case in a six year-old Indian girl, who presented with keratoderma of her soles since birth and on her palms since the age of two years along with perioral and perinasal hyperkeratosis. She had sparse, light brown, thin hair. Although the psychomotor development of the child was normal until 18 months of age, the keratoderma plaques had restricted the child′s mobility after that stage.

  2. Eagle syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raina, Deepika; Gothi, Rajesh; Rajan, Sriram

    2009-01-01

    Eagle syndrome occurs due to elongation of the styloid process or calcification of the stylohyoid ligament, which then may produce a pain sensation due the pressure exerted on various structures in the head and neck. When suspected, imaging helps in identifying the abnormally elongated styloid process or the calcified ligament. In recent years, three-dimensional CT (3DCT) has proved to be valuable in these cases. We report the case of a 62-year-old man with this syndrome in whom imaging with 3DCT conclusively established the diagnosis

  3. Turner Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramachandran Sudarshan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects mostly females. Affected females have characteristic features such as short stature, premature ovarian failure, and several other features. Oral manifestations of this condition are not much discussed in the literature. But reported literature includes teeth, palate, periodontal and salivary changes. So the aim of this review is to illustrate the general manifestations, and especially the oral manifestations of Turner syndrome and evaluate their possible management. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2012; 21(4.000: 246-252

  4. Fenton's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rimondi, E.; Albasini, V.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report two recent cases of Fenton's syndrome, a very rare carpal fracture-dislocation. After some anatomophysiopathological considerations and a review of the literature, a wider nosographic frame is proposed in which the entity of the dislocation of the head of capitate bone is not essential. According to both the literature and personal findings, the authors remark that this syndrome is always found in the presence of two morphological variants of the distal radioulnar joint. Finally, the authors stress the importance of a corect diagnosis of this lesion to avoid unnecessary attempts of reduction

  5. Reiter's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savant, S S; Fernandez, J C; Dhurandhar, M W; Fernandez, R J

    1979-01-01

    A case of Reiter's syndrome occurring in a young mate aged 20 years having extensive skin lesions of keratoderina blenoffhagica is presented along with a review of literature. Although urethritis was absent, other clinical and histopathological features of the cutaneous lesions led us to the diagnosis. The-possible relationship of postural psoriasis to Reiter's syndrome is discussed. Failure of the patient to respond satisfactorily to steroids, antibiotics etc, prompted the use of rnethotrexate in the case. The result was dramatic, as the patient completely recovered within ten days of starting treatment.

  6. Larsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Mahbubul Islam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Larsen syndrome is a rare inherited disorder characterized by congenital dislocation of multiple joints along with other anomalies of heart, face, hands and bones. Larsen syndrome was first described in 1950 by Larsen, Schottstaedt and Bost. In the present report, we describe a 10 year old girl who presented with mid facial hypoplasia with depressed nasal bridge, high arched palate, bilateral talipes equinovarus and high arched feet. On examination, she had short stature (HAZ -3.5 SD with hyperextension of knee joint, fixed flexion of elbow joint. Awareness of this condition and associated complications may help in management and follow up of these patients. 

  7. Joubert syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Villanua, J.A.; Lopez, J.M.; Recondo, J.A.; Garcia, J.M.; Gaztanaga, R.

    1998-01-01

    Joubert syndrome is a rare malformation of the posterior fossa, mainly affecting the cerebellar vermis, which generally appears as a dysplastic lesion. Other structures of the cervico medullary junction may be involved, with accompanying brainstem hypoplasia according to neuroimaging studies. The diagnosis is usually reached during, childhood, based on a constellation of changes in the child's neurological development that are supported by the results of imaging studied. Respiratory problems are the most common signs in newborns,leading to the suspicion of the presence of this syndrome. (Author) 11 refs

  8. Lemierre's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, D N

    2012-02-01

    Lemierre\\'s syndrome is a rare disease that results in an oropharyngeal infection, which precipitates an internal jugular vein thrombosis and metastatic infection. Fusobacterium necrophorum is an anaerobic Gram-negative bacillus and has been identified as the causative agent. We describe the case of a young girl whose presentation and diagnosis were confounded by a history of valvular heart disease. Infection of heart valves can produce many of the signs and symptoms associated with Lemierre\\'s syndrome. We describe the diagnosis, investigation and optimal management of this rare disorder.

  9. Meigs' Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baloch, S.; Khaskheli, M.; Farooq, S.

    2006-01-01

    Meigs' syndrome is a rare clinical condition commonly considered to be associated with malignant ovarian tumour. A case of unmarried female is presented who came with a slowly increasing abdominal mass. Clinical and ultrasonic investigations revealed a mobile, solid right adenexal tumour in the lower abdomen, along with ascites and pleural effusion of the right lung. The level of CA 125 was also raised. Diagnosis of Meigs' syndrome was confirmed after surgical intervention. The tumour was successfully removed and pleural effusion disappeared 15 days after the intervention. Cytomorphologic study of both the tumour and ascitic fluid was negative for malignancy. (author)

  10. [Elsberg syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Kristine Esbjerg; Knudsen, Troels Bygum

    2013-12-16

    A syndrome involving acute urinary retention in combination with sacral radiculitis and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis was first described by the American neurosurgeon Charles Elsberg in 1931. In many instances the aetiology is herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) reactivation from sensory neurons. In this case report we present a 34-year-old pregnant woman with previous undiagnosed sensory lumbosacral symptoms. She was hospitalized with HSV-2 meningitis and lumbosacral radiculitis but no genital rash. A week after the onset of symptoms she developed acute urinary retention, thus indicating Elsberg syndrome.

  11. Marfan syndrome masked by Down syndrome?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vis, J.C.; Engelen, K. van; Timmermans, J.; Hamel, B.C.J.; Mulder, B.J.

    2009-01-01

    Down syndrome is the most common chromosomal abnormality. A simultaneous occurrence with Marfan syndrome is extremely rare. We present a case of a 28-year-old female with Down syndrome and a mutation in the fibrillin-1 gene. The patient showed strikingly few manifestations of Marfan syndrome.

  12. Lemierre's syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Katrine M; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and/or ...... LS in this day and age appears to be low, however the syndrome is difficult to recognize, and still requires the full attention of the clinician.......This is a systematic review of cases with Lemierre's syndrome (LS) in the past 5 years. LS is characterized by sepsis often evolving after a sore throat or tonsillitis and then complicated by various septic emboli and thrombosis of the internal jugular vein. Symptoms include sepsis, pain, and....../or swelling in the throat or neck, as well as respiratory symptoms. Laboratory findings show elevated infectious parameters and radiological findings show thrombosis of the internal jugular vein and emboli in the lungs or other organs. The syndrome is often associated with an infection with Fusobacterium...

  13. Sjogren syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brito-Zeron, Pilar; Baldini, Chiara; Bootsma, Hendrika; Bowman, Simon J.; Jonsson, Roland; Mariette, Xavier; Sivils, Kathy; Theander, Elke; Tzioufas, Athanasios; Ramos-Casals, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Sjogren syndrome (SjS) is a systemic autoimmune disease that primarily affects the exocrine glands (mainly the salivary and lacrimal glands) and results in the severe dryness of mucosal surfaces, principally in the mouth and eyes. This disease predominantly affects middle-aged women, but can also be

  14. Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... loss of interest in normal play Delayed speech development or loss of previously acquired speech abilities Problem behavior or marked mood swings Any clear loss of previously gained milestones in gross motor or fine motor skills Causes Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disorder. ...

  15. Nodding Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2013-12-19

    Dr. Scott Dowell, a CDC director, discusses the rare illness, nodding syndrome, in children in Africa.  Created: 12/19/2013 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 1/27/2014.

  16. Piriformis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can usually resume their normal activities. In some cases, exercise regimens may need to be modified in order to reduce the likelihood of recurrence or worsening. Clinical Trials Throughout the U.S. ... Definition Piriformis syndrome is a rare neuromuscular disorder that ...

  17. Hellp syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhry, A.A.

    2002-01-01

    A 24 years old female presented with hypertension, haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia in an unconscious state after undergoing an emergency caesarian section. A diagnosis of HELLP syndrome was made on the above findings. Patient made an uneventful recovery with conservative management. A brief review of the literature is included along with the case report. (author)

  18. Kartagener's Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhar, D K; Ganguly, K C; Alam, S; Hossain, A; Sarker, U K; Das, B K; Haque, M J

    2009-01-01

    Kartagener's Syndrome or Immotile Cilia Syndrome, a variant of Primary Ciliary Dyskinesia (PCD), is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disorder caused by defect in the tiny hair like structure, the cilia lining the respiratory tract (upper and lower), sinuses, eustachian tubes, middle ear and fallopian tubes. Here electron microscopy shows abnormal arrangement of ciliary tubules and patients with Kartagener's syndrome has an absence of dynein arms at the base of the cilia. The inability of cilia to move results in inadequate clearance of bacteria from the air passages, resulting in an increased risk of infection and causing bronchiectasis. Another result of ciliary immobility is infertility. A 60 years old lady was diagnosed as a case of Kartagener's syndrome. She had history of chronic cough for 20 years, irregular fever for 20 years and occasional shortness of breath for 5 years. Relevant investigations revealed dextrocardia, situs inversus, bilateral maxillary sinusitis with non pneumatised frontal sinus and bronchiectasis. She was treated with low concentration oxygen inhalation, antibiotic, bronchodilator, chest physiotherapy including postural drainage, vitamins and other supportive treatment.

  19. Carraro syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wendler, H.; Schwarz, R.

    1980-07-01

    The report concerns a girl aged 9 1/2 years who was deaf and dumb and had marked shortening of the calves with deformities of the feet and bilateral, congenital hypoplasia of the tibiae. This syndrome was first described by Carraro in 1931, but there have been no further reports since then.

  20. Rett Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  1. Alagille Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 3] Kamath BM, Loomes KM, Piccoli DA. Medical management of Alagille syndrome. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition. 2010;50(6): ... 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. eastern time, M-F Follow Us NIH… Turning Discovery Into ... Disease Urologic Diseases Endocrine Diseases Diet & Nutrition ...

  2. Kounis syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    neoplastic agents), exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome com prises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital ...

  3. Proteus syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debi Basanti

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteus syndrome is a variable and complex disorder characterized by multifocal overgrowths affecting any tissue or structure of the body. We present a girl aged 3 years and 8 months with an epidermal nevus, port-wine stain, macrodactyly with gigantism of the feet, lymphohemagiomas and multiple lipomas.

  4. Crest syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, B.; Roedl, W.

    1988-01-01

    If a patient has peri- and intra-articular calcinosis, as well as acro-osteolysis and esophageal hypomotility, and rheumatic symptoms, Crest syndrome should be considered as a manifestation of progressive systemic sclerosis. In connection with relevant symptoms on the skin and visceral involvement, radiological studies offer the possibility of classifying progressive systemic sclerosis more accurately. (orig.) [de

  5. Gitelman syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Levtchenko, E.N.

    2008-01-01

    Gitelman syndrome (GS), also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can treat many of its symptoms. Thanks to new research and treatments, people with Marfan syndrome who are diagnosed early ... This helps doctors stay on top of any new problems. Doctors might also ... or kids with amblyopia or strabismus will probably need to wear glasses. ...

  7. Kartagener's Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    presenting with recurrent upper and lower respiratory tract infections, sinusitis or bronchiectasis. Inability to diagnose this condition may subject the patient to unnecessary and repeated hospital admissions, investigations and treatment failure. KEY WORDS: Kartagener's syndrome, primary cilliary dyskinesia, situs inversus, ...

  8. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebru Yilmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is functional renal failure that occurs with advanced liver failure. HRS is considered the most severe complication of cirrhosis. Type 1 HRS develops due to severe reduction of effective circulating volume results in hemodynamic dysfunction. Type 1 HRS is characterized by acute renal failure and rapid deterioration in the function of other organs. It can ocur spontaneously or in the setting of a precipitating event. Type 2 hepatorenal syndrome (HRS, which is characterized by slowly progressive renal failure and refractory ascites. Liver transplantation is the only definitive treatment for both type. The most suitable and ldquo;bridge treatments and rdquo; or treatment for patients ineligible for a liver transplant include terlipressin plus albumin. [J Contemp Med 2014; 4(2.000: 106-113

  9. Dravet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Incorpora Gemma

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract "Dravet syndrome" (DS previously named severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI, or epilepsy with polymorphic seizures, is a rare disorder characterized by an early, severe, generalized, epileptic encephalopathy. DS is characterized by febrile and afebrile seizures beginning in the 1st year of life followed by different types of seizures (either focal or generalized, which are typically resistant to antiepileptic drugs. A developmental delay from the 2nd to 3rd year of life becomes evident, together with motor disturbances and personality disorders. Beside the classic syndrome, there are milder cases which have been called severe myoclonic epilepsy borderline (SMEB. DS is caused by a mutation in the neuronal sodium channel gene, SCN1A , that is also mutated in generalized epilepsy with FS+ (GEFS+.

  10. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  11. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  12. Paraneoplastiske syndromer

    OpenAIRE

    Røsbekk, Stein Helge

    2007-01-01

    During the last 50 years it has become clear that malignant tumours can induce symptoms unrelated to the mechanical effects of the primary tumour itself or its metastasis. Today, the name Paraneoplastic syndrome is given to those symptom complexes that may affect the blood cells, electrolytes, coagulation system, muscle, skin, nerve and the endocrine system. Endocrine symptoms were first recognised, and different hormones were isolated from the tumour tissue. However, tumour derived hormones ...

  13. Caroli's syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numan, F; Cokyueksel, O; Camuscu, S; Demir, K; Dueren, M

    1986-07-01

    In 1958 Caroli described the syndrome of congenital, either segmental or involving the entire bile duct system, saccular extensions of the intrahepatic bile ducts. He differentiated between two types of this disease pattern. The first form concerns pure cystic dilatations of the intrahepatic bile ducts, whereas the second one is combined with hepatic fibrosis and portal hypertension. Both types are characterised by cystic dilatations in the kidneys and in the extrahepatic bile ducts, pancreas and spleen.

  14. Griscelli syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar T

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Partial albinism with immunodeficiency is a rare and fatal immunologic disorder characterized by pigmentary dilution and variable cellular immunodeficiency. It was initially described in 1978. Primary abnormalities included silvery grayish sheen to the hair, large pigment agglomerations in hair shafts and an abundance of mature melanosomes in melanocytes, with reduced pigmentation of adjacent keratinocytes. We describe a child with Griscelli syndrome who presented with hepatitis, pancytopenia and silvery hair. The diagnosis was confirmed by microscopic skin and hair examination.

  15. Waardenburg syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, Manish; Kavadu, Paresh; Chougule, Sachin

    2004-01-01

    We report a case of Waardenburg syndrome in a female child aged 2yrs. Petrus Johannes Waardenburg(1) , a Dutch Ophthalmologist in 1951 described individuals with retinal pigmentary differences who had varying degrees of hearing loss and dystopia canthorum (i.e., latral displacement of inner canthi of eyes). The disease runs in families with a dominant inheritance pattern with varying degree of clinical presentation. Patient usually present with heterochromic iris, pigmentary abnormalities of ...

  16. [PHACES syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morcillo Azcárate, J; Bernabeu-Wittel, J; Fernández-Pineda, I; Conejo-Mir, M D; Tuduri Limousin, I; Aspiazu Salinas, D A; de Agustín Asensio, J C

    2010-04-01

    PHACES syndrome associates a segmental facial hemangioma with cerebral malformations, aortic branches/cranial arteries anomalies, cardiac defects, eye anomalies or ventral wall defects. The aim of this study is to analyze our experience with this syndrome. Retrospective study of the cases seen at our unit in the last year. We treat 4 cases; 3 girls and 1 child. Besides the segmental hemangioma they presented: 3 vascular cerebral malformations; 2 structural cardiopathies; 2 cerebral malformations, 1 microftalmia. We did not find ventral wall defects. A case received treatment with two cycles of metilprednisolone i.v. and oral prednisone, with favourable course; two cases received initial treatment with oral prednisone continued of oral propanolol in rising pattern up to 2 mg/kg/day, Obtaining both the detention of the tumour growth and regression of the lesion, with very good tolerance. A 7-year-old patient has been treated with colouring pulse laser for her residual lesions. When we see a segmental facial hemangioma we must perform a wide diagnostic study in order to discard a PHACES syndrome. Multidisciplinar approach to the patient by a wide expert's group gets an earlier diagnose and improves the outcome. Propranolol is a promising therapeutic alternative.

  17. Anserine syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helfenstein, Milton; Kuromoto, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Knee pain is a common complaint in clinical practice, and pes anserinus tendino-bursitis syndrome (PATB) has been frequently diagnosed based only on clinical features that may cause equivocal interpretations. Patients complain of characteristic spontaneous medial knee pain with tenderness in the inferomedial aspect of the joint. Studies with different imaging modalities have been undertaken during the last years to identify whether these patients suffer from bursitis, tendinitis, or both. Nevertheless, little is known regarding the structural defect responsible for this disturbance. Due to these problems and some controversies, we suggest the term "anserine syndrome" for this condition. Diabetes Mellitus is a known predisposing factor for this syndrome. Overweight and osteoarthritis seem to represent additional risk factors; however, their role in the pathophysiology of the disease is not yet understood. Treatment includes non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, physiotherapy, and injections of corticosteroid, with highly variable responses, from 10 days to 36 months to achieve recovery. The lack of knowledge about its epidemiological, etiological, and pathophysiological aspects requires future studies for this common and intriguing disorder.

  18. Neonatal respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyaline membrane disease (HMD); Infant respiratory distress syndrome; Respiratory distress syndrome in infants; RDS - infants ... improves slowly after that. Some infants with severe respiratory distress syndrome will die. This most often occurs ...

  19. Toxic shock syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome; Toxic shock-like syndrome; TSLS ... Toxic shock syndrome is caused by a toxin produced by some types of staphylococcus bacteria. A similar problem, called toxic shock- ...

  20. Prune belly syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eagle-Barrett syndrome; Triad syndrome ... The exact causes of prune belly syndrome are unknown. The condition affects mostly boys. While in the womb, the developing baby's abdomen swells with fluid. Often, the cause is ...

  1. What Causes Cushing's Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print What causes Cushing syndrome? Cushing syndrome can develop for two reasons: Medication ... uhs ), thyroid, or thymus How Tumors Can Cause Cushing Syndrome Normally, the pituitary gland in the brain controls ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: antiphospholipid syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Antiphospholipid syndrome Antiphospholipid syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable ... area? Other Names for This Condition anti-phospholipid syndrome antiphospholipid antibody syndrome Hughes syndrome Related Information How are ...

  3. Genetics Home Reference: Costello syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other genetic conditions, cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC syndrome) and Noonan syndrome . In affected infants, it can be difficult to ... These individuals may actually have CFC syndrome or Noonan syndrome , which are caused by mutations in related genes. ...

  4. Acute nephritic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes in children ...

  5. Morvan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  6. Jacobsen syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grossfeld Paul

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Jacobsen syndrome is a MCA/MR contiguous gene syndrome caused by partial deletion of the long arm of chromosome 11. To date, over 200 cases have been reported. The prevalence has been estimated at 1/100,000 births, with a female/male ratio 2:1. The most common clinical features include pre- and postnatal physical growth retardation, psychomotor retardation, and characteristic facial dysmorphism (skull deformities, hypertelorism, ptosis, coloboma, downslanting palpebral fissures, epicanthal folds, broad nasal bridge, short nose, v-shaped mouth, small ears, low set posteriorly rotated ears. Abnormal platelet function, thrombocytopenia or pancytopenia are usually present at birth. Patients commonly have malformations of the heart, kidney, gastrointestinal tract, genitalia, central nervous system and skeleton. Ocular, hearing, immunological and hormonal problems may be also present. The deletion size ranges from ~7 to 20 Mb, with the proximal breakpoint within or telomeric to subband 11q23.3 and the deletion extending usually to the telomere. The deletion is de novo in 85% of reported cases, and in 15% of cases it results from an unbalanced segregation of a familial balanced translocation or from other chromosome rearrangements. In a minority of cases the breakpoint is at the FRA11B fragile site. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings (intellectual deficit, facial dysmorphic features and thrombocytopenia and confirmed by cytogenetics analysis. Differential diagnoses include Turner and Noonan syndromes, and acquired thrombocytopenia due to sepsis. Prenatal diagnosis of 11q deletion is possible by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling and cytogenetic analysis. Management is multi-disciplinary and requires evaluation by general pediatrician, pediatric cardiologist, neurologist, ophthalmologist. Auditory tests, blood tests, endocrine and immunological assessment and follow-up should be offered to all patients. Cardiac malformations can be

  7. Robinow syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suresh S

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Robinow syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive mesomelic dwarfism with just more than 100 cases reported in the literature so far. The lower extremity is spared with skeletal deformity usually confined to the forearm, hand, and the dorsal spine. Diagnosis is made easily in the early childhood by the typical "fetal facies" appearance, which disappears to a certain extent as the patient grows. The author reports two cases of this entity with vertebral segmentation defects, rib fusion, and typical severe brachymelia and facial features.

  8. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuzovic, S.; Fiebach, B.J.O.; Magnus, L.; Sauerbrei, H.U.

    1982-11-01

    This article reports on 14 cases of a trichorhinophalangeal syndrome in five successive generations. Besides the well-known characteristics of the TRPS the following symptoms observed in this family are new: Teething was considerably delayed, intelligence was reduced, and there were skin manifestations resembling eczema. Besides, struma colli and colitis ulcerosa were also observed. Subsequent observations have to clarify whether these symptoms are a facultative part of the TRPS pattern. The constant appearance of carriers of these characteristics during five generation points to dominant heredity.

  9. Olmsted Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sirka C

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-year-old Sikh man had palmoplantar keratoderma, flexion deformity of digits, universal alopecia, keratotic plaques at the angles of mouth, gluteal cleft, knees and dorsal aspects of the metacarpophalangeal joints of the hand; features of Olmsted syndrome. He had normal nails, teeth, oral mucosa and normal joint movements. Treatment with acitretin, 25mg/day for three and a half months, followed by 25mg once daily alternating with 50mg once daily for 3 months resulted in significant improvement.

  10. OCULO-CEREBRO-RENAL SYNDROME (LOWE'S SYNDROME)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    Oculo-cerebro-renal syndrome (Lowe's syndrome) is characterized by mental and motor retardation, cataract, glaucoma and renal abnormalities. It is an X-linked recessive metabolic disease. Two brothers suffering from Lowe's syndrome are reported. Their mother with lenticular opacities and peculiar facial appearance is in concordance with the obligate carrier. The ocular changes and heridity are discussed.

  11. Cardiorenal syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabry Omar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in patients with chronic kidney disease.  Heart failure may lead to acute kidney injury and vice versa. Chronic kidney disease may affect the clinical outcomes in patients with cardiovascular disorders. Renal impairment with any degree of albuminuria has been increasingly recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular events and heart failure hospitalizations, while chronic heart failure may cause chronic kidney disease. The bidirectional nature of these disorders contributes to the complexity and the composite definitions of cardiorenal syndromes. However, the most important clinical trials in heart failure tend to exclude patients with significant renal dysfunction. The mechanisms whereby renal insufficiency worsens the outcome in heart failure are not known, and several pathways could contribute to the ‘‘vicious heart/kidney circle.’’ Traditionally, renal impairment has been attributed to the renal hypoperfusion due to reduced cardiac output and decreased systemic pressure. The hypovolemia leads to sympathetic activity, increased renin-angiotensin aldosterone pathway, and arginine-vasopressin release. These mechanisms cause fluid and sodium retention, peripheral vasoconstriction, and volume overload. Therapy to improve renal dysfunction, reduce neurohormonal activation and ameliorate renal blood flow could lead to a reduction in mortality and hospitalization in patients with cardiorenal syndrome.

  12. Lowe syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loi Mario

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Lowe syndrome (the oculocerebrorenal syndrome of Lowe, OCRL is a multisystem disorder characterised by anomalies affecting the eye, the nervous system and the kidney. It is a uncommon, panethnic, X-linked disease, with estimated prevalence in the general population of approximately 1 in 500,000. Bilateral cataract and severe hypotonia are present at birth. In the subsequent weeks or months, a proximal renal tubulopathy (Fanconi-type becomes evident and the ocular picture may be complicated by glaucoma and cheloids. Psychomotor retardation is evident in childhood, while behavioural problems prevail and renal complications arise in adolescence. The mutation of the gene OCRL1 localized at Xq26.1, coding for the enzyme phosphatidylinositol (4,5 bisphosphate 5 phosphatase, PtdIns (4,5P2, in the trans-Golgi network is responsible for the disease. Both enzymatic and molecular testing are available for confirmation of the diagnosis and for prenatal detection of the disease. The treatment includes: cataract extraction, glaucoma control, physical and speech therapy, use of drugs to address behavioural problems, and correction of the tubular acidosis and the bone disease with the use of bicarbonate, phosphate, potassium and water. Life span rarely exceeds 40 years.

  13. Cotard Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieguez, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Cotard's syndrome is often described as the delusional belief that one is dead or non-existent. However, Jules Cotard's initial description (1880) of the "delusion of negations" was much richer and also involved delusions and claims of immortality and enormity, feelings of damnation, and illusions of bodily dissolution and transformation. Alternatively conceived as an extreme case of depression, hypochondria, or psychosis, the condition is considered rare and remains poorly understood. Cotard himself provided a taxonomy and several explanations for the condition, focusing on its distinction from classical persecutory delusions and suggesting that it could be a kind of reversed grandiosity. He proposed a psychosensory basis in the dissolution of mental imagery, which he then extended to a more general psychomotor impairment of volition. Other early authors highlighted a disorder of the bodily self, and more recent theories postulated an impairment of right hemispheric functions, leading to perceptual and somatosensory feelings of unreality, which coupled with reasoning impairments and an internalized attributional style led in turn to beliefs of non-existence. However, despite its striking presentation and its relevance to our understanding of self-awareness, Cotard's syndrome remains an elusive condition, rarely reported and poorly researched. © 2018 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  15. Elsberg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savoldi, Filippo; Kaufmann, Timothy J.; Flanagan, Eoin P.; Toledano, Michel

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Elsberg syndrome (ES) is an established but often unrecognized cause of acute lumbosacral radiculitis with myelitis related to recent herpes virus infection. We defined ES, determined its frequency in patients with cauda equina syndrome (CES) with myelitis, and evaluated its clinical, radiologic, and microbiologic features and outcomes. Methods: We searched the Mayo Clinic medical records for ES and subsequently for combinations of index terms to identify patients with suspected CES and myelitis. Results: Our search yielded 30 patients, 2 diagnosed with ES and an additional 28 with clinical or radiologic evidence of CES retrospectively suspected of having ES. We classified patients in 5 groups according to diagnostic certainty. MRI and EMG confirmed that 2 had only myelitis, 5 only radiculitis, and 16 both. Two had preceding sacral herpes infection and 1 oral herpes simplex. Spinal cord lesions were commonly multiple, discontinuous, not expansile, and centrally or ventrally positioned. Lesions generally spared the distal conus. Nerve root enhancement was occasionally prominent and was smooth rather than nodular. Lymphocytic CSF pleocytosis was common. Thirteen patients (43%) had viral isolation studies, which were commonly delayed; the delay may have accounted for the low rate of viral detection. Acyclovir was administered to 6 patients. Most patients recovered with sequelae; 1 patient experienced encephalomyelitis and died. Conclusion: ES is a definable condition likely responsible for 10% of patients with combined CES and myelitis. Radiologic findings are not entirely specific but may help in differentiating ES from some competing diagnostic considerations. We propose criteria to facilitate diagnosis. PMID:28534040

  16. Sotos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cormier-Daire Valérie

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC, advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (

  17. Marfan Syndrome (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... en español Síndrome de Marfan What Is Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of the body's ... bones , blood vessels, and organs. What Causes Marfan Syndrome? Marfan syndrome happens because of an abnormality in one ...

  18. Burnout Syndrome of Teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Semrádová, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    The bachelor's thesis covers burnout syndrome of teachers. Defines burnout syndrome, describes its causes and symptoms. Describes teaching as helping profession and focousing on stressful situations at school. In the last chapter described different prevention strategies burnout syndrome. Key words: burnout syndrome, teaching, teacher, helping professions, beginning teacher, stress

  19. Turner Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Turner Syndrome KidsHealth / For Teens / Turner Syndrome What's in this ... en español El síndrome de Turner What Is Turner Syndrome? Turner syndrome (TS) is a genetic condition found ...

  20. Understanding Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fremont, Oliver T; Chan, James C M

    2012-02-01

    We aim to review the clinical features of two renal tubular disorders characterized by sodium and potassium wasting: Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome. Selected key references concerning these syndromes were analyzed, together with a PubMed search of the literature from 2000 to 2011. The clinical features common to both conditions and those which are distinct to each syndrome were presented. The new findings on the genetics of the five types of Bartter syndrome and the discrete mutations in Gitelman syndrome were reviewed, together with the diagnostic workup and treatment for each condition. Patients with Bartter syndrome types 1, 2 and 4 present at a younger age than classic Bartter syndrome type 3. They present with symptoms, often quite severe in the neonatal period. Patients with classic Bartter syndrome type 3 present later in life and may be sporadically asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic. The severe, steady-state hypokalemia in Bartter syndrome and Gitelman syndrome may abruptly become life-threatening under certain aggravating conditions. Clinicians need to be cognizant of such renal tubular disorders, and promptly treat at-risk patients.

  1. Superior Mesenteric Artery Syndrome or Wilkie Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castano Llano, Rodrigo; Chams Anturi, Abraham; Arango Vargas, Paula

    2009-01-01

    We described three cases of superior mesenteric artery (SMA) syndrome, also known as Wilkie's syndrome, chronic duodenal ileus, or cast syndrome. This syndrome occurs when the third portion of the duodenum is compressed between the SMA and the aorta. The major risk factors for development of SMA syndrome are rapid weight loss and surgical correction of spinal deformities. The clinical presentation of SMA syndrome is variable and nonspecific, including nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and weight loss. The diagnosis is based on endoscopic, radiographic and tomographic findings of duodenal compression by the SMA. The treatment of SMA syndrome is aimed at the precipitating factor, which usually is related to weight loss. Therefore, conservative therapy with nutritional supplementation is the initial approach, and surgery is reserved for those who do not respond to nutritional therapy.

  2. [Syndrome X vs metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Villegas, Enrique

    2006-01-01

    Himsworth in 1939 postulated that Diabetes Mellitus type 2 (DM2) was not only an insulin deficiency state but also a cellular insulin insensitivity disease. Thirty years later, DeFronzo and Reaven demonstrated that insulin resistance (IR) preceded and predisposed for DM2 and atherosclerotic-cardiovascular-disease (ACVD). Reaven was the first to point out the relationship between IR and with hyperglycemia, dyslipidosis, and hypertension as mediators for ACVD, creating the concept of Syndrome X (SX) in 1988. WHO and, thereafter, other medical societies and medical groups, mainly ATP-III, in 2002, based on the difficulty of diagnosing IR in a simple, reliable, and inexpensive way, proposed and published the Metabolic Syndrome (MS) concept, as a group of five variables, i.e., obesity, hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia, low HDL, and hypertension, as an easy clinical approximation to suspect and treat an increased cardiometabolic risk. Nowadays, there are deep and extensive controversies on this issue; however, these controversies do not really exist since all discordant points of view are rather quantitative and not qualitative in nature. This article is aimed at differentiating and harmonizing the complementary concepts of SX and MS, at analyzing why MS is a good "clinical window" to look for IR and its underlying manifestations, and finally to accept that the MS concept complements, but does not substitute or antagonize, traditional scales used to asses cardiovascular risk, such as the Framingham scale.

  3. Metabolic Syndrome: Polycystic Ovary Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortada, Rami; Williams, Tracy

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous condition characterized by androgen excess, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. It is the most common endocrinopathy among women of reproductive age, affecting between 6.5% and 8% of women, and is the most common cause of infertility. Insulin resistance is almost always present in women with PCOS, regardless of weight, and they often develop diabetes and metabolic syndrome. The Rotterdam criteria are widely used for diagnosis. These criteria require that patients have at least two of the following conditions: hyperandrogenism, ovulatory dysfunction, and polycystic ovaries. The diagnosis of PCOS also requires exclusion of other potential etiologies of hyperandrogenism and ovulatory dysfunction. The approach to PCOS management differs according to the presenting symptoms and treatment goals, particularly the patient's desire for pregnancy. Weight loss through dietary modifications and exercise is recommended for patients with PCOS who are overweight. Oral contraceptives are the first-line treatment for regulating menstrual cycles and reducing manifestations of hyperandrogenism, such as acne and hirsutism. Clomiphene is the first-line drug for management of anovulatory infertility. Metformin is recommended for metabolic abnormalities such as prediabetes, and a statin should be prescribed for cardioprotection if the patient meets standard criteria for statin therapy. Written permission from the American Academy of Family Physicians is required for reproduction of this material in whole or in part in any form or medium.

  4. Syndromes with supernumerary teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubinsky, Mark; Kantaputra, Piranit Nik

    2016-10-01

    While most supernumerary teeth are idiopathic, they can be associated with a number of Mendelian syndromes. However, this can also be a coincidental finding, since supernumerary teeth occur in 6% or more of the normal population. To better define this relationship, we analyzed the evidence for specific associations. We excluded conditions with a single affected patient reported, supernumerary teeth adjacent to clefts or other forms of alveolar disruption (as secondary rather than primary findings), and natal teeth, which can involve premature eruption of a normal tooth. Since, the cause of supernumerary teeth shows considerable heterogeneity, certain findings are less likely to be coincidental, such as five or more supernumerary teeth in a single patient, or locations outside of the premaxilla. We found only eight genetic syndromes with strong evidence for an association: cleidocranial dysplasia; familial adenomatous polyposis; trichorhinophalangeal syndrome, type I; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; Nance-Horan syndrome; Opitz BBB/G syndrome; oculofaciocardiodental syndrome; and autosomal dominant Robinow syndrome. There is also suggestive evidence of an association with two uncommon disorders, Kreiborg-Pakistani syndrome (craniosynostosis and dental anomalies), and insulin-resistant diabetes mellitus with acanthosisnigricans. An association of a Mendelian disorder with a low frequency manifestation of supernumerary teeth is difficult to exclude without large numbers, but several commonly cited syndromes lacked evidence for clear association, including Hallermann-Streiff syndrome, Fabry disease, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Apert and Crouzon syndromes, Zimmermann-Laband syndrome, and Ellis-van Creveld syndrome. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Gorlin's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsden, R T; Barrett, A

    1975-06-01

    The uncommon familial syndrome of multiple odontogenic keratocysts, basal cell naevi and skeletal anomalies is reviewed, and seven cases are described, including one patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma in a previous odontogenic keratocyst of the maxilla. We wish to thank Consultants from the Royal National Throat, Nose and Ear Hospital, The Middlesex Hospital and the Eastman Dental Hospital, who allowed us access to their patients; Mr. D. Garfield Davies, Dr. M. F. Spittle, Mr. D. Winstock, Mr. H. P. Cook, Professor H. C. Killey and Mr. L. W. Kay. We are grateful to Professor L. Michaels and Mr. D. J. Connolly for preparation of the illustrations and to Mrs. A. Matthews for the typescript.

  6. HEPATORENAL SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Hafner

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is acommon complication of advanced hepatic disease characterizedby marked abnormalities in arterial circulation and byrenal failure. An extreme arteriolar vasodilatation located inthe splanchnic circulation results in a reduction of total systemicvascular resistence and arterial hypotension. Vasoconstrictionoccurs in the renal circulation as in all other extrasplanchnicvascular territories. In the kidney, marked renalvasoconstriction results in a low glomerular filtration rate.Conclusions. The diagnosis of HRS is currently based on exclusionof other causes of renal failure. Prognosis of patientswith HRS is very poor. Liver transplantation is the best therapeuticoption, but it is seldom applicable due to the short survivalexpectancy of most patients with HRS, particularly thosewith the rapidly progressive type of HRS. New therapies developedduring the last few years, such as the use of systemicvasoconstrictors or transjugular intrahepatic portosystemicshunts (TIPS appear promising. Such treatments are of interestnot only as a bridge to liver transplantation but also as atherapy for patients who are not candidates for transplantation.

  7. Noonan syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Burgt Ineke

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Noonan Syndrome (NS is characterised by short stature, typical facial dysmorphology and congenital heart defects. The incidence of NS is estimated to be between 1:1000 and 1:2500 live births. The main facial features of NS are hypertelorism with down-slanting palpebral fissures, ptosis and low-set posteriorly rotated ears with a thickened helix. The cardiovascular defects most commonly associated with this condition are pulmonary stenosis and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Other associated features are webbed neck, chest deformity, mild intellectual deficit, cryptorchidism, poor feeding in infancy, bleeding tendency and lymphatic dysplasias. The syndrome is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. In approximately 50% of cases, the disease is caused by missense mutations in the PTPN11 gene on chromosome 12, resulting in a gain of function of the non-receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase SHP-2 protein. Recently, mutations in the KRAS gene have been identified in a small proportion of patients with NS. A DNA test for mutation analysis can be carried out on blood, chorionic villi and amniotic fluid samples. NS should be considered in all foetuses with polyhydramnion, pleural effusions, oedema and increased nuchal fluid with a normal karyotype. With special care and counselling, the majority of children with NS will grow up and function normally in the adult world. Management should address feeding problems in early childhood, evaluation of cardiac function and assessment of growth and motor development. Physiotherapy and/or speech therapy should be offered if indicated. A complete eye examination and hearing evaluation should be performed during the first few years of schooling. Preoperative coagulation studies are indicated. Signs and symptoms lessen with age and most adults with NS do not require special medical care.

  8. Pachydermoperiostosis in a Patient with Crohn’s Disease: Treatment and Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Maryam; Akha, Ozra; Fakheri, Hafez; Majidi, Hadi; Fattahi, Sanam

    2018-01-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis (PDP) is a rare disorder characterized by pachydermia, digital clubbing, periostitis, and an excess of affected males. It is the primary form of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) and there are some rare associations of PDP with other disorders. Here we describe a patient with Crohn’s disease associated with PDP. A 26-year-old man, who was a known case of Crohn’s disease, referred with diffuse swelling in the upper and lower limbs and cutis verticis gyrata since 7 years ago. PDP was suspected and endocrinological and radiological studies were conducted for the evaluation of underlying disease. He was prescribed celecoxib, low-dose prednisolone, and pamidronate to control the swelling, periostitis, azathiopurine, and mesalazine according to gastrointestinal involvement. In conclusion, it is important to identify this condition since a misdiagnosis might subject the patient to unnecessary investigations. PMID:29398756

  9. Pachydermoperiostosis in a Patient with Crohn's Disease: Treatment and Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mobini, Maryam; Akha, Ozra; Fakheri, Hafez; Majidi, Hadi; Fattahi, Sanam

    2018-01-01

    Pachydermoperiostosis (PDP) is a rare disorder characterized by pachydermia, digital clubbing, periostitis, and an excess of affected males. It is the primary form of hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HOA) and there are some rare associations of PDP with other disorders. Here we describe a patient with Crohn's disease associated with PDP. A 26-year-old man, who was a known case of Crohn's disease, referred with diffuse swelling in the upper and lower limbs and cutis verticis gyrata since 7 years ago. PDP was suspected and endocrinological and radiological studies were conducted for the evaluation of underlying disease. He was prescribed celecoxib, low-dose prednisolone, and pamidronate to control the swelling, periostitis, azathiopurine, and mesalazine according to gastrointestinal involvement. In conclusion, it is important to identify this condition since a misdiagnosis might subject the patient to unnecessary investigations.

  10. Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Duane Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U D Shrestha

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Goldenhar syndrome (GHS is also known as Oculo-Auriculo-Vertebral (OAV syndrome or Branchial arch syndrome. Duane retraction syndrome (DRS is a congenital disorder of ocular motility characterized by limited abduction, adduction or both. It is unilateral in 80% of cases. The important and interesting part of this eight months old child is presence of GHS with DRS. She has bilateral invol-vement, which is seen in only 5-8% of GHS, as compared to high incidence of unilateral involve-ment. This child also had refractive error of + 6.00/ - 1.5 * 180. At four year of age her vision with glass was 6/9. Children with GHS and DRS should have early eye examination done to treat the problem of refractive error. Keywords: Duane retraction syndrome; goldenhar syndrome, refractive error.

  11. Gitelman syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Levtchenko Elena N

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gitelman syndrome (GS, also referred to as familial hypokalemia-hypomagnesemia, is characterized by hypokalemic metabolic alkalosis in combination with significant hypomagnesemia and low urinary calcium excretion. The prevalence is estimated at approximately 1:40,000 and accordingly, the prevalence of heterozygotes is approximately 1% in Caucasian populations, making it one of the most frequent inherited renal tubular disorders. In the majority of cases, symptoms do not appear before the age of six years and the disease is usually diagnosed during adolescence or adulthood. Transient periods of muscle weakness and tetany, sometimes accompanied by abdominal pain, vomiting and fever are often seen in GS patients. Paresthesias, especially in the face, frequently occur. Remarkably, some patients are completely asymptomatic except for the appearance at adult age of chondrocalcinosis that causes swelling, local heat, and tenderness over the affected joints. Blood pressure is lower than that in the general population. Sudden cardiac arrest has been reported occasionally. In general, growth is normal but can be delayed in those GS patients with severe hypokalemia and hypomagnesemia. GS is transmitted as an autosomal recessive trait. Mutations in the solute carrier family12, member 3 gene, SLC12A3, which encodes the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter (NCC, are found in the majority of GS patients. At present, more than 140 different NCC mutations throughout the whole protein have been identified. In a small minority of GS patients, mutations in the CLCNKB gene, encoding the chloride channel ClC-Kb have been identified. Diagnosis is based on the clinical symptoms and biochemical abnormalities (hypokalemia, metabolic alkalosis, hypomagnesemia and hypocalciuria. Bartter syndrome (especially type III is the most important genetic disorder to consider in the differential diagnosis of GS. Genetic counseling is important. Antenatal diagnosis for GS

  12. Burning Mouth Syndrome and "Burning Mouth Syndrome".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rifkind, Jacob Bernard

    2016-03-01

    Burning mouth syndrome is distressing to both the patient and practitioner unable to determine the cause of the patient's symptoms. Burning mouth syndrome is a diagnosis of exclusion, which is used only after nutritional deficiencies, mucosal disease, fungal infections, hormonal disturbances and contact stomatitis have been ruled out. This article will explore the many causes and treatment of patients who present with a chief complaint of "my mouth burns," including symptomatic treatment for those with burning mouth syndrome.

  13. Hepatorenal Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Renal failure is a common major complication in patients with advanced cirrhosis and generally indicates a poor prognosis when combined with liver failure. Hepatorenal syndrome (HRS is characterised by a combination of disturbances in circulatory and kidney function. Arterial pressure is decreased in the systemic circulation due to reduced total systemic vascular resistance. Kidney dysfunction is caused by reduction in renal blood flow. The diagnosis of HRS is based on exclusion of other disorders that cause acute kidney injury in cirrhosis as there are no specific tests. There are two types of HRS with different characteristics and prognostics. Liver transplantation is the treatment of choice for all patients without contraindication. The best approach to the pharmacologic management is the administration vasoconstrictor drugs based on the pathogenesis. Many vasoconstrictors including vasopressin analogues (terlipressin, ornipressin and vasopressin, somatostatin analogues (octreotide and alpha-adrenergic analogues (midodrine and norepinephrine have been studied. In most of the studies intravenous albumin therapy was coadministered with vasoconstrictor drugs and suggested that albumin should be considered as the component of pharmacologic intervention in patients with HRS. Renal replacement therapy in the form of hemodialysis or continuous venovenous hemofiltration has been used in the management of HRS patients awaiting transplantation or in those with acute potentially reversible conditions. The artificial hepatic support systems require further investigation. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2012; 10: 37-44

  14. Pseudohypopituitary syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heinze, E; Holl, R W

    1992-07-01

    In a child with short stature, the finding of normal or elevated GH levels in the presence of low concentrations of IGF-I raises the following possibilities. (1) A modification of the GH molecule, which is still detected by RIA, but inactive biologically. Therefore, an RRA or bioassay for hGH should result in considerably lower GH measurements compared with RIA determinations in the same sample. As both bioassays as well as RRAs are not widely available and are hampered by several difficulties, few children with this presumptive diagnosis have been described. So far, it has not been possible to define a specific molecular defect in one of these patients. (2) Abnormalities of the GH receptor or postreceptor mechanisms lead to a GH insensitivity syndrome. Laron-type dwarfism is usually due to a deletion in the gene for hepatic GH receptors: the serum binding protein for GH is absent. In three additional populations, the Pygmies of Zaire, the little women of Loja in Ecuador and the Mountain Ok people in Papua New Guinea, alterations of GH receptor function have been described. Finally, some reports describe patients with normal or elevated serum levels of both growth hormone and IGF-I in whom resistance to IGF has been implied in the pathogenesis of small stature.

  15. Hepatorenal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papper, S

    1980-01-01

    Renal failure without apparent cause (the hepatorenal syndrome) may develop in the course of cirrhosis of the liver. While the development of renal failure bears a poor prognosis, spontaneous recovery can occur. The data suggest that for the most part patients die in rather than of renal failure. The latter seems to be only part of a broader more fundamental disturbance. The pathogenesis of HRS is unknown, but the evidence supports an impairment of effective renal perfusion. The two major hypotheses concerning the nature of the impaired perfusion are that it is a physiologic response to alterations in the extrarenal circulation, and that there is an unidentified humoral agent(s) produced by or inadequately inactivated by or bypassing the diseased liver and causing circulatory changes in the kidney as well as in other organs. It is possible that both mechanisms are operative. Treatment is unsatisfactory and emphasis is presently best placed upon searching for more treatable causes of renal functional impairment in individual patients.

  16. Terlipressin for hepatorenal syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise Lotte; Christensen, Kurt; Christensen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal.......Clinical trials suggest that terlipressin improves renal function in hepatorenal syndrome, but the evidence concerning mortality is equivocal....

  17. Chinese restaurant syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinese restaurant syndrome is a set of symptoms that some people have after eating Chinese food. A food additive ... Chinese restaurant syndrome is most often diagnosed based on the symptoms. The health care provider may ask the following ...

  18. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000085.htm Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Obesity hypoventilation syndrome (OHS) is a condition in some ...

  19. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preena A

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive multisystem disease, with oculocutneous albinism, pulmonary fibrosis and bleeding diathesis. Here we report a case of Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome who presented with dyspnea, oculocutaneous albinism and nystagmus.

  20. Marfan syndrome (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder of connective tissue which causes skeletal defects typically recognized in a tall, lanky person. A person with Marfan syndrome may exhibit long limbs and spider-like fingers, ...

  1. Acute respiratory distress syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000103.htm Acute respiratory distress syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a life-threatening lung ...

  2. Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia (Goldenhar's syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkrumah, F K

    1971-03-01

    A case of Goldenhar's Syndrome or Oculoauriculovertebral dysplasia in a Ghanaian infant is described. Significant were the additional findings of congenital esophageal atresia and arthrogryposis which have so far not been reported in association with the syndrome.

  3. Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillain-Barre syndrome is a rare disorder that causes your immune system to attack your peripheral nervous system (PNS). The PNS ... your brain. No one knows what causes the syndrome. Sometimes it is triggered by an infection, surgery, ...

  4. Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a passing cramp? It could be carpal tunnel syndrome. The carpal tunnel is a narrow passageway of ... three times more likely to have carpal tunnel syndrome than men. Early diagnosis and treatment are important ...

  5. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) happens when a woman's ovaries or adrenal glands produce more male hormones than normal. PCOS causes cysts ( ... PCOS are at higher risk of diabetes, metabolic syndrome, heart disease, and high blood pressure. PCOS is ...

  6. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001311.htm Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes ...

  7. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine. It is most often seen in ... other diseases of the nervous system, such as Sjogren’s syndrome or migraine. It is most often seen in ...

  8. The obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, R. H. W. M.; de Grootb, Ph. G.

    The association of persistent presence of circulating antiphospholipid antibodies and thromboembolic events, (recurrent) pregnancy loss or both is termed antiphospholipid syndrome. Pregnancies in women with the syndrome should be regarded as at high-risk for complications. Optimal management

  9. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Nausea and Vomiting Home Diseases and Conditions Tics and Tourette Syndrome Condition Tics and Tourette Syndrome Share Print Table of Contents1. ... little or no control over. These are called tics. Several different tics can happen at the same ...

  10. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Changed What's Life Like for Kids With Down Syndrome? Print en español El síndrome de Down You have probably seen people who have Down syndrome. They have certain physical features, such as a ...

  11. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Yosemite FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite History of HPS Related Links Prevent Rodent Infestations Cleaning Up After Rodents Diseases From Rodent Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is ...

  12. Ramsay Hunt syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt syndrome; Herpes zoster oticus; Geniculate ganglion zoster; Geniculate herpes; Herpetic geniculate ganglionitis ... The varicella-zoster virus that causes Ramsay Hunt syndrome is the same virus that causes chickenpox and ...

  13. Moebius Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... craniofacial/neurological disorder. Individuals with Moebius syndrome cannot smile or frown, and do not have lateral eye ... the organization to ensure that they are in line with the mission of the Moebius Syndrome Foundation. ...

  14. Burning Mouth Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Care Home Health Info Health Topics Burning Mouth Burning Mouth Syndrome (BMS) is a painful, complex condition often described ... or other symptoms. Read More Publications Cover image Burning Mouth Syndrome Publication files Download Language English PDF — Number of ...

  15. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as neuroleptic malignant syndrome. Much of this research focuses on finding ways to prevent and treat the disorder. Show More Show Less Search Disorders SEARCH SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Neuroleptic malignant syndrome is ...

  16. Skin Peeling Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma Rajeev

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Peeling of the skin is an uncommonly encountered disorder. Occurrence of vesicles and bullae in peeling skin syndrome is very rare. We report a case of idiopathic peeling skin syndrome with vesicular lesions.

  17. Pathogenetic Basis of Aortopathy and Aortic Valve Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-02-19

    Aortopathies; Thoracic Aortic Aneurysm; Aortic Valve Disease; Thoracic Aortic Disease; Thoracic Aortic Dissection; Thoracic Aortic Rupture; Ascending Aortic Disease; Descending Aortic Disease; Ascending Aortic Aneurysm; Descending Aortic Aneurysm; Marfan Syndrome; Loeys-Dietz Syndrome; Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome; Shprintzen-Goldberg Syndrome; Turner Syndrome; PHACE Syndrome; Autosomal Recessive Cutis Laxa; Congenital Contractural Arachnodactyly; Arterial Tortuosity Syndrome

  18. [The Capgras syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikina, M A; Levin, O S

    2013-01-01

    The Capgras syndrome is one of delusional-like misidentification syndrome in which a person holds a delusion that one or several his/her friends or relatives have been replaced by an identical-looking impostor. As any other delusional disorder, the Capgras syndrome is characterized by stability despite the indisputable arguments against fault views. Initially, this syndrome was considered as a presentation of schizophrenia but later it has been described in brain organic disorders, primarily in elderly patients with dementia.

  19. The wellness syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mik-Meyer, Nanna

    2015-01-01

    Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.).......Klumme. Wellness er blevet et syndrom, og dets symptomer er angst, selvbebrejdelser og skyldfølelse. Kommentar med udgangspunkt i: Carl Cederström & Andre Spicer, "The Wellness Syndrome" (Polity Books, 2015. 200 p.)....

  20. PRES syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Georgiev, R.; Novakova, M.; Balev, B.; Baleva, D.; Nedelchev, K.

    2010-01-01

    Posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES) is a clinicoradiological entity characterized by headache, confusion, visual disturbances, seizures and posterior transient changes on neuroimaging. PRES has been described in several conditions including hypertensive encephalopathy, preeclampsia, eclampsia, infections, electrolyte imbalance, hypercalcaemia and use of several drugs. It occurs due to elevated blood pressure which exceeds the autoregulatory capacity of brain vasculature. The posterior circulation supplied by vertibro-basilar system has poor sympathetic innervation and, therefore, is frequently involved. The role of neuroimaging is to establish the initial diagnosis and to exclude other causes of neurological symptoms and signs. NCCT is sufficient to make the diagnosis in a proper clinical setting. MRI features are characteristic and has diagnostic and prognostic value. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) can differentiate this condition from ischemia/cytotoxic edema. Differential diagnosis of PRES includes PCA territory infarcts, venous thrombosis, demyelinating disorders, vasculitis and encephalitis. The diagnosis has important implications because the reversibility of the clinico-radiological abnormalities is contingent on the prompt control of blood pressure and/or withdrawing of the offending drug. We describe here a case of PRES in a 12 years old girl with acute lymphoblasts leukaemia, treated with cytostatics-vincristine, pharmorubycin and methotrexate. After 39 days from the beginning of the treatment there are good results in the myelogram and the flowcytometric examination, but the patient made two tonic-clonic seizures. CT and MRI were made and signs of leucoencephalopathy were diagnosed. Several control MRI examinations after cessation of the therapy and disappearance of the neurologic symptoms were made. The normal findings and the clinical course were the reasons for the PRES diagnosis

  1. Postthrombotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesavento, Raffaele; Bernardi, Enrico; Concolato, Alessia; Dalla Valle, Fabio; Pagnan, Antonio; Prandoni, Paolo

    2006-10-01

    Despite considerable progress in the diagnosis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremities, one of every three patients will develop postthrombotic sequelae within 2 years; these sequelae are severe in approximately 20% of cases and produce considerable socioeconomic consequences. Among factors potentially related to the development of the postthrombotic syndrome (PTS) are older age, obesity, insufficient oral anticoagulant therapy, and recurrent ipsilateral thrombosis. Whether the extent and location of the initial thrombosis are associated with the development of PTS is controversial. Based on recent findings, the lack of vein recanalization within the first 6 months appears to be an important predictor of PTS, whereas the development of transpopliteal venous reflux is not. The diagnosis of PTS can be made on clinical grounds for patients with a history of DVT. The combination of a standardized clinical evaluation with the results of compression ultrasonography and Doppler ultrasound helps diagnose or exclude a previous proximal vein thrombosis. According to the results of recent clinical studies, the prompt administration of adequate compression elastic stockings in patients with symptomatic DVT has the potential to reduce the frequency of late PTS development by half. The management of this condition is demanding and often frustrating. However, when carefully supervised and instructed to wear proper elastic stockings, more than 50% of patients will either remain stable or improve during long-term follow-up. Clinical presentation helps predict the prognosis; the outcome of patients who refer with initially severe manifestations is more favorable than that of patients whose symptoms deteriorate progressively over time.

  2. Cardio-renal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Gnanaraj, Joseph; Radhakrishnan, Jai

    2016-01-01

    Cardio-renal syndrome is a commonly encountered problem in clinical practice. Its pathogenesis is not fully understood. The purpose of this article is to highlight the interaction between the cardiovascular system and the renal system and how their interaction results in the complex syndrome of cardio-renal dysfunction. Additionally, we outline the available therapeutic strategies to manage this complex syndrome.

  3. Facts about Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... monitor children with Down syndrome for these conditions. Treatments Down syndrome is a lifelong condition. Services early in life ... of these services focus on helping children with Down syndrome develop to their ... therapy, and they are typically offered through early intervention ...

  4. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, N.; Salman, M.; Mansoor, M.A.

    2007-01-01

    Multiple jaw cysts are a characteristic manifestation of basal cell nevus (Gorlin) syndrome. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is characterized by symptoms primarily involving the skin, central nervous system, and skeletal system. In 90% of the patients, nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome is associated with recurring odontogenic keratocysts. This patient showed recurrent jaw and maxillary cysts, for which he was followed for 2 years. (author)

  5. Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Or In Memory Of Obituaries Contact Us Donate Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome What causes SLS? SLS is caused by mutations ... methods of diagnosing SLS. Other Clinical Names for Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome Other clinical names of Sjogren-Larsson Syndrome include: ...

  6. Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, W. J.; Berghout, A.; Wiersinga, W. M.

    1990-01-01

    Two cases of Cushing's syndrome during pregnancy are reported, both due to an adrenal adenoma. The association of pregnancy and Cushing's syndrome has up to now been described in 48 patients (including our two cases); Cushing's syndrome was ACTH-independent in 59%, ACTH-dependent in 33%, and of

  7. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Ovary Syndrome (PCOS) • What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? • What causes PCOS? • What is insulin resistance? • ... with PCOS? •Glossary What are common signs and symptoms of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)? Common PCOS signs and symptoms include the ...

  8. Diagnostik af Dravet syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Rasmussen, Niels Henrik; Ousager, Lilian Bomme

    2010-01-01

    Dravet syndrome is an epileptic syndrome of infancy. We describe the features of two cases with genetically verified SCNA1 mutations. The diagnosis was established rather late in one case. The epilepsies were medically intractable and the symptoms characteristic of Dravet syndrome. The children...

  9. The acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souhami Filho, L.

    1985-01-01

    Symptoms and signs from medical aspects resulting from whole body exposure, or in the main part, to ionizing radiation are described. The dose-response relationship is studied and the exposure is divided in three parts: central nervous system syndrome, gastrointestinal syndrome and hematopoietic syndrome. Brief comments about the treatment are reported. (M.A.C.) [pt

  10. DIDMOAD (Wolfram Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud Nashibi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wolfram syndrome was first described by physician D J Wolfram and Wagener in 1938. This autosomal recessive syndrome is also referred to as DIDMOAD syndrome which stands for Diabetes Insipidus, Insulin Dependent Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness

  11. Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (Gorlin Syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresler, Scott C; Padwa, Bonnie L; Granter, Scott R

    2016-06-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome, or basal cell nevus syndrome (Gorlin syndrome), is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that is characterized by development of basal cell carcinomas from a young age. Other distinguishing clinical features are seen in a majority of patients, and include keratocystic odontogenic tumors (formerly odontogenic keratocysts) as well as dyskeratotic palmar and plantar pitting. A range of skeletal and other developmental abnormalities are also often seen. The disorder is caused by defects in hedgehog signaling which result in constitutive pathway activity and tumor cell proliferation. As sporadic basal cell carcinomas also commonly harbor hedgehog pathway aberrations, therapeutic agents targeting key signaling constituents have been developed and tested against advanced sporadically occurring tumors or syndromic disease, leading in 2013 to FDA approval of the first hedgehog pathway-targeted small molecule, vismodegib. The elucidation of the molecular pathogenesis of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome has resulted in further understanding of the most common human malignancy.

  12. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Padma Pandeshwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gorlin-Goltz syndrome (GGS (the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome—NBCCS is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome caused due to mutations in the PTCH (patched gene found on chromosome arm 9q. The syndrome, characterized by increased predisposition to develop basal cell carcinoma and associated multiorgan anomalies, has a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. GGS is a multidisciplinary problem, early diagnosis of which allows introduction of secondary prophylaxis and following an appropriate treatment to delay the progress of the syndrome. The following report emphasizes the need for awareness of the diagnostic criteria of this syndrome in cases with no typical skin lesions.

  13. Barth syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke Sarah LN

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract First described in 1983, Barth syndrome (BTHS is widely regarded as a rare X-linked genetic disease characterised by cardiomyopathy (CM, skeletal myopathy, growth delay, neutropenia and increased urinary excretion of 3-methylglutaconic acid (3-MGCA. Fewer than 200 living males are known worldwide, but evidence is accumulating that the disorder is substantially under-diagnosed. Clinical features include variable combinations of the following wide spectrum: dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM, endocardial fibroelastosis (EFE, left ventricular non-compaction (LVNC, ventricular arrhythmia, sudden cardiac death, prolonged QTc interval, delayed motor milestones, proximal myopathy, lethargy and fatigue, neutropenia (absent to severe; persistent, intermittent or perfectly cyclical, compensatory monocytosis, recurrent bacterial infection, hypoglycaemia, lactic acidosis, growth and pubertal delay, feeding problems, failure to thrive, episodic diarrhoea, characteristic facies, and X-linked family history. Historically regarded as a cardiac disease, BTHS is now considered a multi-system disorder which may be first seen by many different specialists or generalists. Phenotypic breadth and variability present a major challenge to the diagnostician: some children with BTHS have never been neutropenic, whereas others lack increased 3-MGCA and a minority has occult or absent CM. Furthermore, BTHS was first described in 2010 as an unrecognised cause of fetal death. Disabling mutations or deletions of the tafazzin (TAZ gene, located at Xq28, cause the disorder by reducing remodeling of cardiolipin, a principal phospholipid of the inner mitochondrial membrane. A definitive biochemical test, based on detecting abnormal ratios of different cardiolipin species, was first described in 2008. Key areas of differential diagnosis include metabolic and viral cardiomyopathies, mitochondrial diseases, and many causes of neutropenia and

  14. Abdominal compartment syndrome with acute reperfusion syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maleeva, A.

    2017-01-01

    Abdominal compartment syndrome was recognized clinically in the 19th century when Marey and Burt observed its association with declines in respiratory function. Abdominal compartment syndrome is first used as a medical terminology from Fietsman in a case of ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm. A condition caused by abnormally increased pressure within the abdomen. Causes of abdominal compartment syndrome include trauma, surgery, or infection. Common symptoms: abdominal distension, fast heart rate, insufficient urine production, or low blood pressure Medical procedure: nasogastric intubation Surgery: laparotomy Specialists: radiologist, primary care provider (PCP), surgeon, and emergency medicine doctor [6, 10]. Keywords: Stomach. Gastroparesis . Diabetes Mellitus [bg

  15. Cardiorenal Syndrome in Acute Heart Failure Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Sarraf

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Impaired cardiac function leads to activation of the neurohumoral axis, sodium and water retention, congestion and ultimately impaired kidney function. This sequence of events has been termed the Cardiorenal Syndrome. This is different from the increase in cardiovascular complications which occur with primary kidney disease, that is, the so-called Renocardiac Syndrome. The present review discusses the pathogenesis of the Cardiorenal Syndrome followed by the benefits and potential deleterious effects of pharmacological agents that have been used in this setting. The agents discussed are diuretics, aquaretics, natriuretic peptides, vasodilators, inotropes and adenosine α1 receptor antagonists. The potential role of ultrafiltration is also briefly discussed.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: Marfan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Share: Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Marfan syndrome Marfan syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... Marfan syndrome KidsHealth from Nemours Foundation MalaCards: marfan syndrome Orphanet: Marfan syndrome Your Genes Your Health from Cold Spring ...

  17. Gorlin-goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B V Shobha

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome also known as nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is an infrequent multisystemic disease inherited in a dominant autosomal way, which shows a high level of penetrance and variable expressiveness. It is characterized by keratocystic odontogenic tumors (KCOT in the jaw, multiple basal cell carcinomas and skeletal abnormalities. This syndrome may be diagnosed early by a dentist by routine radiographic examination in the first decade of life, as KCOTs are usually one of the first manifestations of the NBCCS syndrome. This article reports the case of a 12-year-old girl with Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, emphasizing its clinical and radiographic manifestation. This study highlights the importance of health professionals in the early diagnosis of this syndrome and a multidisciplinary approach to provide a better diagnosis and prognosis.

  18. Mobius syndrome: MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markarian, Maria F.; Villarroel, Gonzalo M.; Nagel, Jorge R.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: Mobius Syndrome or congenital facial diplegia is associated with paralysis of the lateral gaze movements. This syndrome may include other cranial nerve palsies and be associated to musculoskeletal anomalies. Our objective is to show the MRI findings in Mobius Syndrome. Material and methods: MRI study was performed in 3 patients with clinic diagnosis of Mobius Syndrome. RMI (1.5T); exams included axial FSE (T1 and T2), FLAIR, SE/EPI, GRE/20, sagittal FSE T2 , coronal T1, diffusion, angio MRI and Spectroscopy sequences. Results: The common features of this syndrome found in MRI were: depression or straightening of the floor of the fourth ventricle, brainstem anteroposterior diameter diminution, morphologic alteration of the pons and medulla oblongata and of the hypoglossal nuclei as well as severe micrognathia. Conclusion: The morphologic alterations of Mobius Syndrome can be clearly identified by MRI; this method has proved to be a useful diagnostic examination. (author)

  19. [Menopause and metabolic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meirelles, Ricardo M R

    2014-03-01

    The incidence of cardiovascular disease increases considerably after the menopause. One reason for the increased cardiovascular risk seems to be determined by metabolic syndrome, in which all components (visceral obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and glucose metabolism disorder) are associated with higher incidence of coronary artery disease. After menopause, metabolic syndrome is more prevalent than in premenopausal women, and may plays an important role in the occurrence of myocardial infarction and other atherosclerotic and cardiovascular morbidities. Obesity, an essential component of the metabolic syndrome, is also associated with increased incidence of breast, endometrial, bowel, esophagus, and kidney cancer. The treatment of metabolic syndrome is based on the change in lifestyle and, when necessary, the use of medication directed to its components. In the presence of symptoms of the climacteric syndrome, hormonal therapy, when indicated, will also contribute to the improvement of the metabolic syndrome.

  20. Orofacial syndromes: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Shyam Sunder

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A syndrome is a set of signs and symptoms that tend to occur together and reflect the presence of a particular disease or an increased chance of developing to a particular disease. There are numerous orofacial syndromes and a thorough knowledge of their manifestations and implications is pertinent in good oral health care delivery. The aim of this review is to describe collective esoteric knowledge, about various malformations and syndromes associated with orofacial region.

  1. Steele Richardson Olszewski syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijayashree S Gokhale

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson′s disease and its plus syndromes are an important cause of morbidity in the geriatric age group. Its plus syndromes show a myriad of clinical features characterized by progressive symptoms. Here we present a 65-year-old woman with progressive "Parkinsonian-like features," i.e., mask-like face, slowness of all movements and tendency to fall, and difficulty in eye movements, leading to the diagnosis of Steele Richardson Olszewski Syndrome or progressive supranuclear palsy.

  2. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    OpenAIRE

    Jouyandeh, Zahra; Nayebzadeh, Farnaz; Qorbani, Mostafa; Asadi, Mojgan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3) criteria t...

  3. Post cardiac injury syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, S L; Nielsen, F E

    1991-01-01

    The post-pericardiotomy syndrome is a symptom complex which is similar in many respects to the post-myocardial infarction syndrome and these are summarized under the diagnosis of the Post Cardiac Injury Syndrome (PCIS). This condition, which is observed most frequently after open heart surgery, i...... on the coronary vessels, with cardiac tamponade and chronic pericardial exudate. In the lighter cases, PCIS may be treated with NSAID and, in the more severe cases, with systemic glucocorticoid which has a prompt effect....

  4. A seizuring alagille syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jomon Mathew John

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Alagille syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant inherited disorder with incidence of one in 100,000 live births. This syndrome with seizure as a presentation has been rarely reported in Indian studies. We present a 3-month-old infant who presented to us with seizures was found to have a dysmorphic face, jaundice, hepatomegaly, and soft systolic murmur. Infant was stabilized and remained seizure free. A detailed clinical evaluation of a common presentation may reveal a rare syndrome.

  5. Genetics Home Reference: Waardenburg syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Waardenburg syndrome Waardenburg syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Waardenburg syndrome is a group of genetic conditions that can ...

  6. What Is Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Antiphospholipid Antibody Syndrome Also known as What Is Antiphospholipid (AN-te-fos-fo-LIP-id) antibody syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disorder. Autoimmune disorders ...

  7. What Is Respiratory Distress Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Respiratory Distress Syndrome Respiratory Distress Syndrome Also known as What Is Respiratory ... This condition is called apnea (AP-ne-ah). Respiratory Distress Syndrome Complications Depending on the severity of ...

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Turner syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Turner syndrome Turner syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Turner syndrome is a chromosomal condition that affects development in ...

  9. Guide to Understanding Pfeiffer Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome occurs more often in children with older fathers. if I have pfeiffer syndrome what are the odds of passing it to my children? p feiffer syndrome is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder, meaning it requires only one parent to ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Cockayne syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cockayne syndrome type II is also known as cerebro-oculo-facio-skeletal (COFS) syndrome, and while some ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Cerebro-Oculo-Facio-Skeletal Syndrome Educational Resources (8 links) ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: MEGDEL syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leigh-like syndrome 3-methylglutaconic aciduria with deafness, encephalopathy, and Leigh-like syndrome MEGDHEL syndrome SERAC1 ... Topic: Newborn Screening Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 ...

  12. Genetics Home Reference: Usher syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Usher syndrome Usher syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Usher syndrome is a condition characterized by partial or total ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Bartter syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Email Facebook Twitter Home Health Conditions Bartter syndrome Bartter syndrome Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Bartter syndrome is a group of very similar kidney disorders ...

  14. Lesch-Nyhan Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD) Purine Research Society See all related organizations Publications Order NINDS Publications Definition Lesch-Nyhan syndrome (LNS) is a rare, inherited ...

  15. SNEDDON’S SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentin Valtchev

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Sneddon’s syndrome is usually characterized by the association of an ischemic cerebrovascular disease and a widespread livedo reticularis. The incidence of Sneddon syndrome is 4/1000 000. We present 42-year-old woman with livedo reticularis, recurrence ischaemic cerebrovascular accidents, two repetitive miscarriages and positive anti-2GPi antibodies. Skin biopsy specimens reveal inflammatory changes of small- to medium-sized arteries and subendothelial proliferation and fibrosis. The diagnosis Sneddon syndrome is confirmed by skin biopsy, and MR evidence. We suggest that anti-2GPi antibodies may be pathophysiologically related to the clinical manifestation observed in some patients with Sneddon syndrome.

  16. Fragile X syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems, or intellectual disability may not be present. Symptoms Behavior problems associated with fragile X syndrome include: Autism spectrum disorder Delay in crawling, walking, or twisting Hand flapping ...

  17. [Neurobiology of Tourette Syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünal, Dilek; Akdemir, Devrim

    2016-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by chronic motor and vocal tics. Although it is a common disorder in childhood, the etiology of Tourette Syndrome has not been fully elucidated yet. Studies, -conducted so far- have revealed differences in neurobiological structures of individuals who suffer from Tourette Syndrome. The objective of this review is to assess etiological and pathophysiological studies in the Tourette Syndrome literature. An electronical search was conducted in PubMed database using the keywords tic disorders, Tourette Syndrome, neurobiology, genetics, neuroimaging and animal models. Research and review studies published between 1985 and 2015, with a selection preference towards recent publications, were reviewed. According to the studies, genetic predisposition hypothesis is considered as a priority. However, a precise genetic disorder associated with Tourette Syndrome has not been found. The evidence from postmortem and neuroimaging studies in heterogenous patient groups and animal studies supports the pathological involvement of cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical (CSTC) circuits in Tourette Syndrome. Consequently, the most emphasized hypothesis in the pathophysiology is the dopaminergic dysfunction in these circuits. Furthermore, these findings of the animal, postmortem and neuroimaging studies have confirmed the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of Tourette Syndrome. In conclusion, more studies are needed to understand the etiology of the disorder. The data obtained from neurobiological studies of the disorder will not only shed light on the way of Tourette Syndrome, but also guide studies on its treatment options.

  18. Cushing's syndrome in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Rossella; Ladu, Cristina; Vezzosi, Chiara; Mannelli, Massimo

    2015-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a rare condition in the general population and is even less common during pregnancy with only a few cases reported in literature. The diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome may be difficult during pregnancy because the typical features of the disorder and pregnancy may overlap. However, Cushing's syndrome results in increased fetal and maternal complications, and diagnosis and treatment are critical. This report describes a case of 26-year-old female at the 19th week of pregnancy with symptoms and signs of hypercortisolism, where ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed and treated by robotic laparoscopic adrenalectomy at the 21th week of gestation.

  19. Central Pain Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as neurontin (gabapentin) can be useful. Lowering stress levels appears to reduce pain. View Full Treatment Information Definition Central pain syndrome is a neurological condition caused ...

  20. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalli, M.A.; Aamir, M.; Mustafa, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  1. Metabolic syndrome in acute coronary syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhalli, M A; Aamir, M; Mustafa, G [Combined Military Hospital, Abbottabad (Pakistan)

    2011-06-15

    Objective: To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome in male patients presenting with acute coronary syndrome Study design: A Descriptive study Place and duration of study: Armed Forces Institute of Cardiology and National Institute of Heart Diseases, Rawalpindi, from October 2007 to September 2008 Patients and Methods: Male patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) were included. Patients having angioplasty (PCI), coronary artery bypass surgery in the past and other co-morbid diseases were excluded. All patients were assessed for the presence of five components of metabolic syndrome including hypertension, HDL-Cholesterol and triglycerides, glucose intolerance and abdominal obesity. Systolic, diastolic blood pressures, waist circumference (WC) and body mass index (BMI) were measured. ECG, cardiac enzymes, fasting glucose and lipid profile were also done. Results: A total of 135 male patients of ACS were studied with a mean age of 54.26 +- 11 years. Metabolic syndrome (MS) was present in 55 (40.7%) patients. MS with all five components was documented in 4 (7.27%) while MS with four and three components was seen in 23 (41.81%) and 28 (50.90%) patients respectively. Only 24 (43.63%) patients with MS had diabetes mellitus, remaining 31(56.36%) were non diabetic. Frequencies of diabetes, hypertension and family history of CAD were significantly higher (p<0.05) in patients with metabolic syndrome as compared to patients with normal metabolic status. Conclusion: Metabolic syndrome is fairly common and important risk factor in patients of IHD. Other risk factors like smoking, dyslipidemia, hypertension and diabetes were also frequently found. Public awareness to control the risk factors can reduce the prevalence of CAD in our country. (author)

  2. Hernier som medicinsk sygdom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, J.; Rosenberg, J.

    2008-01-01

    include patients with Ehlers-Danlos, Marfans syndrome, osteogenesis imperfecta, cutis laxa, and patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms, colonic diverticula or stress urinary incontinence. Looking ahead, the perspective may be individualization of the operative technique for patients with a hernia...

  3. Polycystic ovary syndrome and metabolic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Aus Tariq

    2015-08-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a heterogeneous disorder, where the main clinical features include menstrual irregularities, sub-fertility, hyperandrogenism, and hirsutism. The prevalence of PCOS depends on ethnicity, environmental and genetic factors, as well as the criteria used to define it. On the other hand, metabolic syndrome is a constellation of metabolic disorders which include mainly abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, impaired glucose metabolism, hypertension and dyslipidaemia. These associated disorders directly increase the risk of Type 2 diabetes mellitus (DMT2), coronary heart disease (CHD), cardiovascular diseases (CVD) and endometrial cancer. Many patients with PCOS have features of metabolic syndrome such as visceral obesity, hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. These place patients with PCOS under high risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD), Type 2 diabetes (DMT2) and gynecological cancer, in particular, endometrial cancer. Metabolic syndrome is also increased in infertile women with PCOS. The aim of this review is to provide clear and up to date information about PCOS and its relationship with metabolic syndrome, and the possible interaction between different metabolic disorders.

  4. Wolfram syndrome 1 and Wolfram syndrome 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigoli, Luciana; Di Bella, Chiara

    2012-08-01

    Wolfram syndrome 1 (WS1) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness (DI DM OA D syndrome) associated with other variable clinical manifestations. The causative gene for WS1 (WFS1) encoding wolframin maps to chromosome 4p16.1. Wolframin has an important function in maintaining the homeostasis of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in pancreatic β cells. Recently, another causative gene, CISD2, has been identified in patients with a type of Wolfram syndrome (WS2) resulting in early optic atrophy, diabetes mellitus, deafness, decreased lifespan, but not diabetes insipidus. The CISD2-encoded protein ERIS (endoplasmic reticulum intermembrane small protein) also localizes to ER, but does not interact directly with wolframin. ERIS maps to chromosome 4q22. Numerous studies have shown an interesting similarity between WFS1 and CISD2 genes. Experimental studies demonstrated that the Cisd2 knockout (Cisd2) mouse shows premature aging and typical symptoms of Wolfram syndrome. These researches provide interesting insight into the relation of neurodegenerative diseases, mitochondrial disorders, and autophagy and are useful for the pathophysiological understanding of both Wolfram syndrome and mitochondrial-mediated premature aging. The knowledge of WS1 and WS2 pathogenesis, and of the interactions between WFS1 and CISD2 genes, is useful for accurate diagnostic classification and for diagnosis of presymptomatic individuals.

  5. Bardet-Biedl syndrome and Usher syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Rainer

    2003-01-01

    Bardet-Biedl syndrome (BBS) and Usher syndrome (USH) are the most prevalent syndromic forms of retinitis pigmentosa (RP), together they make up almost a quarter of the patients with RP. BBS is defined by the association of retinopathy, obesity, hypogonadism, renal dysfunction, postaxial polydactyly and mental retardation. This clinically complex syndrome is genetically heterogeneous with linkage to more than 6 loci, and 4 genes have been cloned so far. Recent molecular data present evidence that, in some instances, the clinical manifestation of BBS requires recessive mutations in 1 of the 6 BBS loci plus one or two additional mutations in a second BBS locus (tri- or tetra-allelic inheritance). USH is characterized by the combination of congenital or early-onset sensorineural deafness, RP, and variable degrees of vestibular dysfunction. Each of the three clinical types is genetically heterogeneous: 7 loci have been mapped for type 1, three loci for type 2, and two loci for type 3. Currently, 6 USH genes (MYO7A, USH1C, CDH23, PCDH15, USH2A, USH3) have been identified. Pathogenetically, mutations of the USH1 genes seem to result in defects of auditory and retinal sensory cells, the USH 2 phenotype is caused by defects of extracellular matrix or cell surface receptor proteins, and USH3 may be due to synaptic disturbances. The considerable contribution of syndromic forms of RP requires interdisciplinary approaches to the clinical and diagnostic management of RP patients.

  6. Alport Syndrome Diagnosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 4 months later, my father walked me down the aisle. We danced to a Beatles song & then to j… Connect on Instagram Email: info@alportsyndrome.org Phone: (480) 800-3510 Mailing Address: Alport syndrome Foundation P.O. Box 4130 ... 5, 2017 Cecil Alport: Naming the Syndrome November 26, 2016 The Renal Diet: Potassium ...

  7. Adult onset Leigh syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandit Lekha

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Leigh syndrome is a rare progressive mitochondrial disorder of oxidative metabolism. Though it has been reported in infancy and childhood, it is rarely described in adults. The authors describe a patient who had clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features diagnostic of Leigh syndrome, with supportive biochemical and muscle histochemistry evidence.

  8. Post-Polio Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... You are here Home » Disorders » All Disorders Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page Post-Polio Syndrome Information Page What research is being done? ... behavior of motor neurons many years after a polio attack. Others are looking at the mechanisms of ...

  9. Klippel-Feil Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... proteins that are involved in bone development and segmentation of the vertebrae. × Definition Klippel-Feil Syndrome is a rare disorder characterized ... proteins that are involved in bone development and segmentation of the vertebrae. View Full Definition ... Treatment Treatment for Klippel-Feil Syndrome is symptomatic ...

  10. Redefining syndromic surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebecca Katz

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available With growing concerns about international spread of disease and expanding use of early disease detection surveillance methods, the field of syndromic surveillance has received increased attention over the last decade. The purpose of this article is to clarify the various meanings that have been assigned to the term syndromic surveillance and to propose a refined categorization of the characteristics of these systems. Existing literature and conference proceedings were examined on syndromic surveillance from 1998 to 2010, focusing on low- and middle-income settings. Based on the 36 unique definitions of syndromic surveillance found in the literature, five commonly accepted principles of syndromic surveillance systems were identified, as well as two fundamental categories: specific and non-specific disease detection. Ultimately, the proposed categorization of syndromic surveillance distinguishes between systems that focus on detecting defined syndromes or outcomes of interest and those that aim to uncover non-specific trends that suggest an outbreak may be occurring. By providing an accurate and comprehensive picture of this field’s capabilities, and differentiating among system types, a unified understanding of the syndromic surveillance field can be developed, encouraging the adoption, investment in, and implementation of these systems in settings that need bolstered surveillance capacity, particularly low- and middle-income countries.

  11. Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... most common tumors in children with this syndrome. Causes Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome is caused by a defect ... Fanaroff AA, Walsh MC, eds. Fanaroff and Martin's Neonatal-Perinatal Medicine . 10th ed. ... MA. Hypoglycemia. In: Kliegman RM, Stanton BF, St. Geme JW, ...

  12. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-07-07

    This podcast discusses Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS, a viral respiratory illness caused by Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus—MERS-CoV.  Created: 7/7/2014 by National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (NCIRD).   Date Released: 7/7/2014.

  13. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... state Rett Syndrome Handbook Called the “Rett Syndrome Bible”, all the information you need for your journey- available in PDF version. Purchase a hard copy Get 1:1 Support Connect with our Family Empowerment Team , join a special interest network More forms of support Find your Family Empowerment ...

  14. Churg Strauss syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Rengifo, Diana Milena; Contreras Zuniga, Eduardo; Osio, Luis Fernando

    2007-01-01

    The Churg-Strauss syndrome, also called allergic granulomatosis and angiitis, is a multisystem disorder characterized by allergic rhinitis, asthma, and prominent peripheral blood eosinophilia. The most common organ involved is the lung, followed by the skin. The Churg-Strauss syndrome, however, can affect any organ system, including the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, renal, and central nervous systems

  15. Churg-strauss syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brar B

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of 29-year-old man who presented with cutaneous vasculitis and was subsequently diagnosed as a case of Churg-Strauss syndrome. The patient fulfilled five out of the six criteria of the syndrome developed by American College of Rheumatology.

  16. ACUTE COMPARTMENT SYNDROME

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    muscle destruction, muscle fibrosis, contractures and permanent disability and at worst case scenario of amputation (3,4). As reported by Frink et al (3) on their study on acute compartment syndrome it can occur even when there is no fracture. Also general surgeons have reported acute compartment syndrome.

  17. Metabolic syndrome and menopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouyandeh Zahra

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The metabolic syndrome is defined as an assemblage of risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, and menopause is associated with an increase in metabolic syndrome prevalence. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its components among postmenopausal women in Tehran, Iran. Methods In this cross-sectional study in menopause clinic in Tehran, 118 postmenopausal women were investigated. We used the adult treatment panel 3 (ATP3 criteria to classify subjects as having metabolic syndrome. Results Total prevalence of metabolic syndrome among our subjects was 30.1%. Waist circumference, HDL-cholesterol, fasting blood glucose, diastolic blood pressure ,Systolic blood pressure, and triglyceride were significantly higher among women with metabolic syndrome (P-value Conclusions Our study shows that postmenopausal status is associated with an increased risk of metabolic syndrome. Therefore, to prevent cardiovascular disease there is a need to evaluate metabolic syndrome and its components from the time of the menopause.

  18. Shaken Baby Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... baby syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Child Abuse × What research is being done? The National ... baby syndrome. Information from the National Library of Medicine’s MedlinePlus Child Abuse See More About Research The National Institute ...

  19. Korsakoff's syndrome is preventable

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oudman, Erik; Wijnia, Jan W.

    2014-01-01

    Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome (WKS) is a life-threatening neuropsychiatric disorder caused by thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency. Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome is associated with mammillary body edema and small vessel ischemia. Many patients who develop WKS have a history of serious alcoholism and

  20. Foix-Chavany syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, G.; Boninsegna, C.; Beltramello, A.

    1979-01-01

    The Foix-Chavany syndrome is a neurological entity characterized by linguo-bucco-facial apraxia almost always caused by disturbed cerebral circulation. Three typical cases of this syndrome are described and the role of the CT scan to obtain a definite diagnosis is emphasized. (orig.) [de

  1. Usher syndrome in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shzeena, Dad; Rendtorff, Nanna Dahl; Tranebjærg, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Usher syndrome (USH) is a genetically heterogeneous deafness-blindness syndrome, divided into three clinical subtypes: USH1, USH2 and USH3. METHODS: Mutations in 21 out of 26 investigated Danish unrelated individuals with USH were identified, using a combination of molecular diagnostic...

  2. Proteus syndrome in adulthood

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, E; Lichtendahl, DHE; Hofer, SOP

    Proteus syndrome is a very rare congenital condition comprising malformations and overgrowth of multiple sorts of tissue. It was described for the first time in 1979 and was termed Proteus syndrome in 1983. The authors describe a 37-year-old patient who was diagnosed initially as having

  3. The stress ulcer syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.A. van Essen

    1986-01-01

    textabstractThe stress ulcer syndrome is described in this thesis. This syndrome is seen in patients admitted to intensive care departments or being treated in field hospitals, in disaster areas, or battle fields. Acute mucosal lesions associated with burns (Curling's ulcers) and central nervous

  4. Plummer-Vinson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novacek Gottfried

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plummer-Vinson or Paterson-Kelly syndrome presents as a classical triad of dysphagia, iron-deficiency anemia and esophageal webs. Exact data about epidemiology of the syndrome are not available; the syndrome is extremely rare. Most of the patients are white middle-aged women, in the fourth to seventh decade of life but the syndrome has also been described in children and adolescents. The dysphagia is usually painless and intermittent or progressive over years, limited to solids and sometimes associated with weight loss. Symptoms resulting from anemia (weakness, pallor, fatigue, tachycardia may dominate the clinical picture. Additional features are glossitis, angular cheilitis and koilonychia. Enlargement of the spleen and thyroid may also be observed. One of the most important clinical aspects of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is the association with upper alimentary tract cancers. Etiopathogenesis of Plummer-Vinson syndrome is unknown. The most important possible etiological factor is iron deficiency. Other possible factors include malnutrition, genetic predisposition or autoimmune processes. Plummer-Vinson syndrome can be treated effectively with iron supplementation and mechanical dilation. In case of significant obstruction of the esophageal lumen by esophageal web and persistent dysphagia despite iron supplementation, rupture and dilation of the web are necessary. Since Plummer-Vinson syndrome is associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma of the pharynx and the esophagus, the patients should be followed closely.

  5. Colitis of Behcet's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connell, D.J.; Courtney, J.V.; Riddell, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Three patients with Behcet's syndrome and colitis are described. The radiologic and histologic appearances of the colitis are discussed. The similarities of Behcet's colitis to Crohn's disease are outlined. The cases demonstrate the necessity to consider Behcet's syndrome in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory bowel disease. (orig.) [de

  6. Trigeminalt trofisk syndrom--

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaerskov, Mette Wanscher; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    Trigeminal trophic syndrome (TTS) is a rare but well-described syndrome consisting of the triad: paraesthesia, anaesthesia and crescent-shaped ulceration of the ala nasi. We report a case of a 62-year-old woman presenting with TTS after operative excision of an acusticus neurinoma. She attended s...

  7. Polycystic ovarian syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Nina Madnani; Kaleem Khan; Phulrenu Chauhan; Girish Parmar

    2013-01-01

    Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) is a "multispeciality" disorder suspected in patients with irregular menses and clinical signs of hyperandrogenism such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism, irregular menses, infertility, and alopecia. Recently, PCOS has been associated with the metabolic syndrome. Patients may develop obesity, insulin resistance, acanthosis nigricans, Type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemias, hypertension, non-alcoholic liver disease, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Good clinical examinatio...

  8. Rothmund - Thomson Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma N. L

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Rothmund-Thomson syndrome is a rare geno-photodermatosis of children. Poikilodermatous cutaneous changes, growth retardation, juvenile cataract and high incidence of malignancy are its classical features. A Thomson type of Rothmund-Thomson syndrome with characteristic poikiloderma congenitale, growth retardation, absence of juvenile cataract and parental non-consanguinity is described in an 8 year old Indian girl.

  9. Yellow nail syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dixit Ramakant

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of yellow nail syndrome is described in a forty year old male patient who presented with classical triad of this syndrome i.e. deformed yellow nails, lymph-edema and chronic recurrent pleural effusion. The practical problems in the di-agnosis are also briefly discussed with emphasis on awareness of this rare clinical entity.

  10. [The refeeding syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambers, Wietske M; Kraaijenbrink, Bastiaan; Siegert, Carl E H

    2015-01-01

    The refeeding syndrome may occur during reintroduction of carbohydrates in malnourished patients. This syndrome is characterized by reduced plasma electrolyte levels, hypophosphataemia being most prevalent. The symptoms can vary from minor symptoms to severe neurological or cardiac symptoms. The pathophysiological mechanism comprises an increase in insulin levels, resulting in shifts of phosphate, potassium and magnesium into the intracellular environment, as well as fluid retention and relative deficiency of vitamin B1. There is growing interest in the screening and treatment of patients with malnutrition, due to which the incidence of refeeding syndrome is probably increasing. Currently, there is no single definition of this syndrome and therefore there is no solid scientific basis for screening and treatment. In this article we describe the rationale for screening and additional laboratory investigations. A prospective, controlled trial is important to define the clinical relevance of the refeeding syndrome and optimize its treatment.

  11. Lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogduk, N

    1980-11-15

    Low back pain, referred pain in the lower limbs, and spasm of the back, gluteal, and hamstring muscles are clinical features which can be induced in normal volunteers by stimulating structures which are innervated by the lumbar dorsal rami. Conversely, they can be relieved in certain patients by selective interruption of conduction along dorsal rami. These facts permit the definition of a lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome, which can be distinguished from the intervertebral disc syndrome and other forms of low back pain. The distinguishing feature is that, in lumbar dorsal ramus syndrome, all the clinical features are exclusively mediated by dorsal rami and do not arise from nerve-root compression. The pathophysiology, pathology, and treatment of this syndrome are described. Recognition of this syndrome, and its treatment with relatively minor procedures, can obviate the need for major surgery which might otherwise be undertaken.

  12. Heterogeneity in Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hageman, M J; Delleman, J W

    1977-01-01

    Heterogeneity of Waardenburg syndrome is demonstrated in a review of 1,285 patients from the literature and 34 previously unreported patients in five families in the Netherlands. The syndrome seems to consist of two genetically distinct entities that can be differentiated clinically: type I, Waardenburg syndrome with dystopia canthorum; and type II, Waardenburg syndrome without dystopia canthorum. Both types have an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance. The incidence of bilateral deafness in the two types of the syndrome was found in one-fourth with type I and about half of the patients with type II. This difference has important consequences for genetic counseling. Images Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:331943

  13. Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome is named for the French physician, Eugen Apert who was, in 1906. described anomalous shape of the skull with coronary suture synostosis and hypoplasia sphenoethmoidmaxillary part of the face and fingers syndactyly of hands and feet. Apert syndrome accounts for about 4,5% of all craniosynostosis. With the prevalence of 1:160 000-200 000, inherited in an autosomal domi­nant, and in 25% of cases are fresh mutations in the gene. This syndrome has no predilection by gender and race, varies in severity form in witch it is manifested. Anomality of internal organs are very rare, but half of the patients with this syndrome have mental retardation. Apert syndrome has no cure, but surgery can help to correct some of the problems.

  14. Neonatal bartter syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parkash, J.; Salat, S. M.; Khan, I.A.

    2006-01-01

    A pre-term baby girl was born following a pregnancy complicated by severe polyhydramnios at a gestational age of 36 weeks. She was initially suffering from respiratory distress consistent with idiopathic respiratory distress syndrome, and altered electrolyte imbalance with hyponatremia, hypokalemia and hypochloremic metabolic alkalosis. However, during the third week of life when she had dehydration along with significant electrolyte imbalance, Bartter's syndrome was considered which was supported by findings of high renin and aldosterone levels. Treatment was done by correction of electrolytes and dehydration along with indomethacin. The drug was well tolerated. The infant showed correction of electrolyte imbalance. The features of this case suggest an extreme form of Bartter's syndrome presenting from the early days of life. The syndrome is reported because of it's rarity and alerts pediatricians to the antenatal and neonatal variant of Bartter's syndrome. (author)

  15. Syndrome in question: Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Pauline Lyrio; Souza, João Basílio de; Abreu, Karina Demoner de; Brezinscki, Marisa Simon; Pignaton, Christine Chambo

    2016-01-01

    The Nevoid Basal Cell Carcinoma Syndrome (NBCCS) is an uncommon disorder caused by a mutation in Patched, tumor suppressor gene. It is mainly characterized by numerous early onset basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic cysts of jaw and skeletal abnormalities. Due to the wide clinical spectrum, treatment and management of its modalities are not standardized and should be individualized and monitored by a multidisciplinary team. We report a typical case in a 30-year-old man with multiple basal cell carcinomas, keratotic pits of palmar creases and bifid ribs, with a history of several corrective surgeries for keratocystic odontogenic tumors, among other lesions characteristic of the syndrome.

  16. [Asthenic syndrome in patients with burnout syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chutko, L S; Surushkina, S Iu; Rozhkova, A V; Nikishena, I S; Iakovenko, E A

    2013-01-01

    The authors present the results of a survey of 103 patients aged 25 to 45 years with burnout syndrom. The results showed that most patients with the syndrome of burnout have clinical manifestations of asthenia, varying degrees of severity. According to psychological and psychophysiological examination in this group of patients were found attention and memory dysfunction. This study evaluated the efficacy of memoplant in the treatment of this pathology. The high efficiency of memoplant (improvement in 69.7% of cases) was detected, confirmed by the data of the clinical, psychological and neuropsychological research.

  17. [Association Budd Chiari syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouelhi, Leila; Chaieb, Mouna; Debbeche, Radhouane; Salem, Mohamed; Sfar, Imene; Trabelsi, Sinda; Gorgi, Yosr; Najjar, Taoufik

    2009-02-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome in 5% of the cases. Antiphospholipid syndrome is characterized by venous or arterial thrombosis, foetal loss and positivity of antiphospholipid antibodies, namely lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies and anti-beta2-glycoprotein I. Anticardiolipin antibodies was reported in auto-immune thyroid disorders, particularly in Grave's disease. Antiphospholipid syndrome associated to Grave's disease was reported in only three cases. To describe a case report of association of Grave's disease and antiphospholipid syndrome. We report the first case of Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome, revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. Our observation is particular by the fact that it is about a patient presenting a Grave's disease associated with antiphospholipid syndrome revealed by Budd Chiari syndrome. This triple association has never been reported in literature. Although association between antiphospholipid syndrome and Grave's disease was previously described, further studies evaluating the coexistence of these two affections in the same patient would be useful.

  18. Coexistence of Reverse Capgras Syndrome, Subjective Double and Cotard Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azadeh Mashayekhi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Misidentification syndrome is a condition in which the person thinks that familiar persons have been replaced with other one. Coexistence of some types of this syndrome has been reported with other psychiatric syndromes. In this report, we present a 47-year-old married man with coexistence of reverse Capgras and subjective double syndromes with Cotard syndrome. There is no previous report of coexistence of these three forms of delusions in a single case.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: Gorlin syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for This Condition basal cell nevus syndrome BCNS Gorlin-Goltz syndrome NBCCS nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome Related Information ... named? Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Basal Cell Nevus Syndrome Health Topic: Skin Cancer Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  20. Sjögren syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xerostomia - Sjögren syndrome; Keratoconjunctivitis sicca - Sjögren; Sicca syndrome ... The cause of Sjögren syndrome is unknown. It is an autoimmune disorder. This means the body attacks healthy tissue by mistake. The syndrome occurs most ...

  1. Genetics Home Reference: Tourette syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Vocal Tic Disorder Gilles de la Tourette Syndrome Gilles de la Tourette's syndrome GTS TD Tourette Disorder Tourette's Disease TS Related ... Additional Information & Resources MedlinePlus (2 links) Encyclopedia: Gilles de la Tourette syndrome Health Topic: Tourette Syndrome Genetic and Rare Diseases ...

  2. Genetics Home Reference: Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Genetic Testing Registry: Rett syndrome Other Diagnosis and Management Resources (4 links) Boston Children's Hospital GeneReview: MECP2-Related Disorders MedlinePlus Encyclopedia: Rett Syndrome RettSyndrome.org: Rett Syndrome Clinics General Information from MedlinePlus (5 links) Diagnostic Tests ...

  3. The Marfan syndrome genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina Pungerčič

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of connective tissue. It is caused by mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene encoding glycoprotein fibrillin-1, a component of microfibrils of extracellular matrix. Patients with Marfan syndrome show wide spectra of clinical signs, primarily on skeletal, cardiovascular and ocular organ systems. Cardiovascular complications (especially aortic aneurysm and aortic dissection are the most common cause of mortality of Marfan syndrome patients. Discovering genotype-phenotype correlations is complicated because of the large number of mutations reported as well as clinical heterogeneity among individuals with the same mutation. Despite the progress in the knowledge of the molecular nature of Marfan syndrome the diagnosis is still based mainly on the clinical features in the different body systems.Conclusions: Early identification of patient with Marfan syndrome is of considerable importance because of appropriate treatment that can greatly improve life expectancy. Unfortunately, despite the improvement of diagnostic methods, medical and surgical therapy, the mortality due to undiagnosed Marfan syndrome is still high. The present article reviews the molecular genetic studies of Marfan syndrome since the discovery of the mutations in the fibrillin-1 gene.

  4. Loin pain hematuria syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taba Taba Vakili, Sahar; Alam, Tausif; Sollinger, Hans

    2014-09-01

    Loin pain hematuria syndrome is a rare disease with a prevalence of ∼0.012%. The most prominent clinical features include periods of severe intermittent or persistent unilateral or bilateral loin pain accompanied by either microscopic or gross hematuria. Patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome initially present with hematuria, flank pain, or most often both hematuria and flank pain. Kidney biopsies from patients with loin pain hematuria typically reveal only minor pathologic abnormalities. Further, loin pain hematuria syndrome is not associated with loss of kidney function or urinary tract infections. Loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated hematuria and pain are postulated to be linked to vascular disease of the kidney, coagulopathy, renal vasospasm with microinfarction, hypersensitivity, complement activation on arterioles, venocalyceal fistula, abnormal ureteral peristalsis, and intratubular deposition of calcium or uric acid microcrystals. Many patients with loin pain hematuria syndrome also meet criteria for a somatoform disorder, and analgesic medications, including narcotics, commonly are used to treat loin pain hematuria syndrome-associated pain. Interventional treatments include renal denervation, kidney autotransplantation, and nephrectomy; however, these methods should be used only as a last resort when less invasive measures have been tried unsuccessfully. In this review article, we discuss and critique current clinical practices related to loin pain hematuria syndrome pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Rare case of nephrotic syndrome: Schimke syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrosa, Anna Kelly Krislane de Vasconcelos; Torres, Luiz Fernando Oliveira; Silva, Ana Corina Brainer Amorim da; Dantas, Adrianna Barros Leal; Zuntini, Káthia Liliane da Cunha Ribeiro; Aguiar, Lia Cordeiro Bastos

    2016-01-01

    Schimke syndrome corresponds to dysplasia of bone and immunity, associated with progressive renal disease secondary to nephrotic syndrome cortico-resistant, with possible other abnormalities such as hypothyroidism and blond marrow aplasia. It is a rare genetic disorder, with few reports in the literature. The most frequent renal involvement is nephrotic syndrome with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis and progressive renal failure. The objective of this study was to report a case of Schimke syndrome, diagnostic investigation and management of the case. Resumo A síndrome Schimke corresponde à displasia imuno-óssea, associada à doença renal progressiva secundária à síndrome nefrótica córtico-resistente, podendo haver outras anormalidades como hipotireoidismo e aplasia de medula óssea. Trata-se de uma patologia genética rara, com poucos relatos na literatura. O acometimento renal mais frequente é uma síndrome nefrótica por glomeruloesclerose segmentar e focal e falência renal progressiva. O objetivo deste estudo foi relatar um caso de síndrome de Schimke, investigação diagnóstica e condução do caso.

  6. Pediatric Toxic Shock Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Yee

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: This scenario was developed to educate emergency medicine residents on the diagnosis and management of a pediatric patient with toxic shock syndrome. The case is also appropriate for teaching of medical students and advanced practice providers, as well as a review of the principles of crisis resource management, teamwork, and communication. Introduction: Toxic shock syndrome is a low-frequency, high-acuity scenario requiring timely identification and aggressive management. If patients suffering from this condition are managed incorrectly, they may progress into multi-organ dysfunction and potentially death. Toxic shock syndrome has been associated with Streptococcus and Staphylococcus aureus (Staph. Approximately half of Staph cases are associated with menstruation, which was first described in the 1970s-1980s and was associated with the use of absorbent tampons.1 Group A Streptococcus may cause complications such as necrotizing fasciitis and gangrenous myositis.2 Pediatric patients may present critically ill from toxic shock syndrome. Providers need to perform a thorough history and physical exam to discern the source of infection. Management requires aggressive care with antibiotics and IV fluids. Objectives: By the end of this simulation session, the learner will be able to: 1 Recognize toxic shock syndrome. 2 Review the importance of a thorough physical exam. 3 Discuss management of toxic shock syndrome, including supportive care and the difference in antibiotic choices for streptococcal and staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome. 4 Appropriately disposition a patient suffering from toxic shock syndrome. 5 Communicate effectively with team members and nursing staff during a resuscitation of a critically ill patient. Method: This session was conducted using high-fidelity simulation, followed by a debriefing session and lecture on toxic shock syndrome.

  7. [Norrie syndrome (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitz-Valckenberg, P; Scholz, W

    1977-10-01

    The Norrie syndrome, an x-chromosomal linked, recessive genetic disease, is described using ophthalmologic and genetic examinations of a family in three generations. The main symptom of this syndrome is retinal detachment with hemorrhages, which generally leads to blindness in early childhood. In addition to this, in 25--35% of the cases mental retardation and hearing problems are found. Special significance is to be attached to the differential diagnosis of this syndrome because the vascular proliferation on the retina is a non-specific, secondary reaction in children, which also occurs symptomatically in several other diseases.

  8. Mobious syndrome: MR findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maskal Revanna Srinivas

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Möbius syndrome is an extremely rare congenital disorder. We report a case of Möbius syndrome in a 2-year-old girl with bilateral convergent squint and left-sided facial weakness. The characteristic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI findings of Möbius syndrome, which include absent bilateral abducens nerves and absent left facial nerve, were noted. In addition, there was absence of left anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA and absence of bilateral facial colliculi. Clinical features, etiology, and imaging findings are discussed.

  9. Noonan′s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yesudian P Devakar

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Noonan’s syndrome is characterized by hypertelorism, webbed neck, curly or wooly hair, congenital heart defects, micrognathia and low set ears. A 15 year old male presented with features of Noonan’s syndrome with hypertelorism, cryptorchidism, low hairline, large and low set ears, curly hair, pulmonary stenosis and lentigenes. This case is presented to alert the physicians towards the occurrence of lentigenes, characteristic facies and pulmonary stenosis in the syndrome. A few hitherto unreported associations like macrothelia and high arched palate were also seen.

  10. [Refeeding syndrome: practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, M; Limonta, A; Pichard, C; Stirnemann, J

    2015-10-14

    The refeeding syndrome is frequent and potentially deadly, still it is underdiagnosed. It is defined by clinical and biological manifestations that are seen upon refeeding of malnourished patients. It is the consequence of the transition from catabolism to anabolism. Ions intracellular shift caused by insulin and B1 vitamin deficiency are fundamental in the development of this syndrome. Riskconditions are well summarized by the NICE criteria. To avoid refeeding syndrome, it is fundamental to find and correct any electrolytic deficiency and to give thiamine before starting a slow and progressive oral, enteral or parenteral refeeding.

  11. Gorlin-Goltz Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M K Sunil

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome, also known as basal cell nevus syndrome, is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder characterized by numerous basal cell carcinomas, odontogenic keratocysts, and musculoskeletal malformation. It is occasionally associated with aggressive basal cell carcinoma and internal malignancies. It is about a muttisystemic process characterized by the presence of multiple pigmented basocellular carcinomas, keratocysts in the jaws, palmar and/or plantar pits and calcification of the falxcerebri. Hence, present a case report and a review of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome.

  12. Bouveret's Syndrome: diagnostic considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooper, S.G.; Sherman, S.B.; Steinhardt, J.E.; Wilson, J.M. Jr.; Richman, A.H.

    1987-01-01

    Bouveret's syndrome is a rare disease entity manifested by the formation of a cholecystoduodenal or choledochoduodenal fistula with passage of a gallstone into the duodenal bulb and subsequent obstruction of the gastric outlet. To date, no report of this entity using computed tomographic (CT) imaging is available. This article presents a case of Bouveret's syndrome with the classic findings on upper gastrointestinal (GI) tract series and a description of the CT manifestations. The literature is reviewed with discussion of the diagnostic approach to patients with Bouveret's syndrome

  13. Dostoevsky and Stendhal's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amâncio, Edson José

    2005-12-01

    Stendhal's syndrome occurs among travelers when they encounter a work of art of great beauty. It is characterized by an altered perception of reality, emotional disturbances, and crises of panic and anxiety with somatization. The patient profile described originally for this syndrome was of particularly sensitive individuals who were admirers of works or art: artists, poets, writers and art students, among others. The Russian writer Fyodor Mikhailovich Dostoevsky suffered from epilepsy and there is evidence that he presented the symptoms of Stendahl's syndrome while contemplating some works of art, particularly when viewing Hans Holbein's masterpiece, Dead Christ, during a visit to the museum in Basle.

  14. Lance-adams syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jun-Hwa; Park, Jong Moon; Kim, A Ram; Shin, Hee Suk; Lee, Eun Shin; Oh, Min-Kyun; Yoon, Chul Ho

    2012-08-01

    It is not common for a patient who survives cardiac arrest to experience significant neurologic impairment such as acute and chronic post-hypoxic myoclonus, known as Lance-Adams syndrome. This syndrome is predominantly characterized by myoclonus that starts days to weeks after cardiopulmonary resuscitation in patients who regained consciousness. Although several cases of LAS were reported, the decisive treatment method has not been established. We report a 43 year old man with Lance-Adams syndrome who showed long-term improvement through treatment with anti-myoclonic agents and participation in a rehabilitation program.

  15. Radiology of syndromes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taybi, H.

    1982-01-01

    In the course of 20 years, the author has investigated the radiological aspects of many different syndromes. 541 of them are listed in this book, together with their typical X-ray pictures. Congenital deformities, genetic diseases, and acquired diseases with typical combinations of sigs and symptoms are presented with information on how to identify them. Clinical manifestations are briefly characterized, and hereditary aspects are mentioned. Pathological characteristics and names of the syndromes are presented. A bibliography is given for every syndrome for those who intend to deepen their knowledge. (orig./MG) [de

  16. Bullous Wells’ syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bengu Cevirgen Cemil

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Wells’ syndrome (WS is an uncommon inflammatory skin disease which typically presents single or multiple erythematous and edematous urticarial plaques similar to cellulitis. The lesions may evolve into blue-grey morphea-like lesions and may persist for weeks or months. They ultimately heal without scar. Other clinical presentations reported in literature include papular and nodular and, rarely, bullous eruptions. Previously, bullous Wells’ syndrome was rarely reported in the literature. Herein, we describe a case of a female patient with bullous Wells’ syndrome localized to the upper limbs without any associated disorders.

  17. Acute heart failure syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and the classical syndrome of chronic persistent heart failure develops. The vast ... Flash pulmonary oedema: This is a severely elevated blood pressure with an .... (CPAP or bilevelNPPV) for cardiogenic pulmonary edema (review). Cochrane.

  18. Ellis Von Creveld Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshar H

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available One patient with Ellis Von Creveld syndrome contains: dwarfism, congenital heart"ndisease, ectodermal dysplasia, polyductyly, an abnormally wide labial frenum and maxillary"nmolars with single root.

  19. What Causes Down Syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Division Offices, Branches & Programs Research Areas Training and Recruitment Division of Intramural Research (DIR) Office of the ... launched DS-Connect® as a safe and secure online registry for people with Down syndrome, their families, ...

  20. Ehlers-Danlos' Syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leganger, Julie; Søborg, Marie-Louise Kulas; Farholt, Stense

    2016-01-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) comprises a group of diseases characterized by connective tissue fragility. The clinical symptoms primarily involve the skin, joints, blood vessels and internal organs. Diagnosing EDS is complicated because of the clinical variability, imprecise diagnostic criteria...

  1. Tropical Diabetic Hand Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015 Annals of Medical and Health Sciences Research | Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow. 473. Introduction ... diabetes.[2,3] Tropical diabetic hand syndrome is a terminology .... the importance of seeking medical attention immediately.

  2. LEOPARD-syndrom

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars Kjaersgård; Risby, Kirsten; Bygum, Anette

    2009-01-01

    We describe a 12-year-old boy with a typical phenotype of the LEOPARD syndrome (LS). The diagnosis was confirmed in the boy and his mother, who both had a mutation in the PTPN11 gene at Thr468Met (c.1403C > T). Several other members of the maternal family are suspected also to have the LEOPARD sy...... syndrome. We discuss the clinical characteristics of LS, the need for follow-up and genetic counselling, and the molecular-genetic background as well as the relationship to the allelic disease Noonan syndrome. Udgivelsesdato: 2009-Jan-26......We describe a 12-year-old boy with a typical phenotype of the LEOPARD syndrome (LS). The diagnosis was confirmed in the boy and his mother, who both had a mutation in the PTPN11 gene at Thr468Met (c.1403C > T). Several other members of the maternal family are suspected also to have the LEOPARD...

  3. Acute Coronary Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart cells are dying. An electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) can diagnose an acute coronary syndrome by measuring ... Privacy Policy Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Heart Attack Symptoms ...

  4. Narcolepsy and ROHHAD Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, and Sleep Medicine Centre, Heeze, Netherlands, report a 7-year-old girl with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD syndrome.

  5. Narcolepsy and ROHHAD Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-01-01

    Investigators at Ghent University Hospital, Belgium; Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre, and Sleep Medicine Centre, Heeze, Netherlands, report a 7-year-old girl with rapid-onset obesity, hypothalamic dysfunction, hypoventilation, and autonomic dysregulation (ROHHAD syndrome).

  6. Ehlers- Danlos Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasanta Basak

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available A female patient had Ehlers-Danlos syndrome type II since infancy, manifesting with hyperextensible skin and ciagarette paper scars at the sites of trauma. Treatment with vitamin C 1 gm a day seemed to be useful.

  7. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wakhloo Tulika

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a group of clinically and genetically heterogeneous inherited connective tissue disorders with widespread manifestations. The prevalence of this syndrome is 1:5000 worldwide without gender, racial or ethnic associations. This syndrome is characterized by joint hypermobility, dermal hyperelasticity and tissue fragility caused by mutations in genes encoding collagen type I, III, V and enzymes involved in the posttranslational modifications of collagen. The oral manifestations include increased mucosal fragility, delayed wound healing, early onset generalized periodontitis and temporomandibular joint hypermobility. Children presenting with this syndrome are often misdiagnosed for hematological problem as they present with bruising, malignancy and/or child abuse. A thorough assessment of the patient is, therefore, essential for early diagnosis and patient referral. This paper reviews current literature, oral manifestations, diagnostic investigations and effective dental management.

  8. Dandy-Walker Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... treatment options. Other research indicates that mothers with diabetes and those with rubella (German measles) during pregnancy are more likely to have a child with Dandy-Walker syndrome. × What research is being ...

  9. Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults Teachers Speech-Language Pathologists Physicians Employers Tweet Stuttering and Tourette's Syndrome Parents of Preschoolers Parents of ... to 3 people in 1000. Just as in stuttering, TS is more common in males than females ( ...

  10. Klinefelter Syndrome (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... role in who we are — including deciding our gender, how we look, and how we grow. Doctors ... boys with Klinefelter syndrome are less interested in sports or physical activities. Since high-school life often ...

  11. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priya Shirish Joshi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an uncommon autosomal dominant inherited disorder, which is characterized by multiple odontogenic Keratocysts and basal cell carcinomas, skeletal, dental, ophthalmic, and neurological abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri, and facial dysmorphism. Pathogenesis of the syndrome is attributed to abnormalities in the long arm of chromosome 9 (q22.3-q31 and loss or mutations of human patched gene (PTCH1 gene. Diagnosis is based upon established major and minor clinical and radiological criteria and ideally confirmed by deoxyribo nucleic acid analysis. We report a case of a 9-year-old girl presenting with three major and one minor feature of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome. Radiologic findings of the syndrome are easily identifiable on Orthopantomogram, chest X-ray, and Computed tomography scans. These investigations prompt an early verification of the disease, which is very important to prevent recurrence and better survival rates from the coexistent diseases.

  12. Exploding head syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpless, Brian A

    2014-12-01

    Exploding head syndrome is characterized by the perception of abrupt, loud noises when going to sleep or waking up. They are usually painless, but associated with fear and distress. In spite of the fact that its characteristic symptomatology was first described approximately 150 y ago, exploding head syndrome has received relatively little empirical and clinical attention. Therefore, a comprehensive review of the scientific literature using Medline, PsycINFO, Google Scholar, and PubMed was undertaken. After first discussing the history, prevalence, and associated features, the available polysomnography data and five main etiological theories for exploding head syndrome are summarized. None of these theories has yet reached dominance in the field. Next, the various methods used to assess and treat exploding head syndrome are discussed, as well as the limited outcome data. Finally, recommendations for future measure construction, treatment options, and differential diagnosis are provided. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cardiopulmonary Syndrome Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Data Conducting Clinical Trials Statistical Tools and Data Terminology Resources NCI Data Catalog Cryo-EM NCI's Role ... cava syndrome in a child is a serious medical emergency because the child's windpipe can become blocked. ...

  14. Proteus Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria & FAQs Medical Research Glossary Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift Matching Gift Stock Gift ... data It’s easy to join There is no cost to you: the costs are supported by the ...

  15. Cri du chat syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the ear Slow or incomplete development of motor skills Small head ( microcephaly ) Small jaw ( micrognathia ) Wide-set ... of children with this syndrome learn enough verbal skills to communicate. The cat-like cry becomes less ...

  16. Stevens-Johnson Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... after blisters form If you have Stevens-Johnson syndrome, several days before the rash develops you may experience: Fever Sore mouth and throat Fatigue Cough Burning eyes When to see a doctor Stevens-Johnson ...

  17. Congenital Constriction Band Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Rajesh Gupta, Fareed Malik, Rishabh Gupta, M.A.Basit, Dara Singh

    2008-01-01

    Congenital constriction bands are anomalous bands that encircle a digit or an extremity. Congenitalconstriction band syndrome is rare condition and is mostly associated with other musculoskeletaldisorders.We report such a rare experience.

  18. Computer Vision Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randolph, Susan A

    2017-07-01

    With the increased use of electronic devices with visual displays, computer vision syndrome is becoming a major public health issue. Improving the visual status of workers using computers results in greater productivity in the workplace and improved visual comfort.

  19. Esthesioneuroblastoma in Maffucci's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurian, Sobha; Crowell, Edward B.; Ertan, Esmer; Rassekh, Christopher; Ducatman, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Maffucci's syndrome consists of multiple cutaneous hemangiomas, dyschondroplasia, and enchondromas with potential for malignant change. We report a case of a 33-year-old man with Maffucci's syndrome who presented with a several month history of nasal congestion, facial pain, and diminished vision in his left eye. Radiological studies showed a large soft tissue mass centered in the sinonasal area, extending bilaterally into maxillary sinuses and orbits with compression of left optic nerve. Biopsy of the mass showed esthesioneuroblastoma (olfactory neuroblastoma). Chemotherapy resulted in initial improvement, but the tumor recurred and did not respond to further treatment, resulting in his death. Sarcomatous tumors are reported in Maffucci's syndrome, but this is a rare case of a neuroendocrine tumor in a patient with Maffucci's syndrome. (orig.)

  20. Blind loop syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001146.htm Blind loop syndrome To use the sharing features on ... Clinical Professor of Medicine, The George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC. Also reviewed by David ...

  1. 47,XXY Klinefelter syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aksglaede, Lise; Link, Katarina; Giwercman, Aleksander

    2013-01-01

    47,XXY (Klinefelter syndrome) is the most frequent sex chromosomal disorder and affects approximately one in 660 newborn boys. The syndrome is characterized by varying degrees of cognitive, social, behavioral, and learning difficulties and in adulthood additionally primary testicular failure...... with small testes, hypergonadotropic hypogonadism, tall stature, and eunuchoid body proportions. The phenotype is variable ranging from "near-normal" to a significantly affected individual. In addition, newborns with Klinefelter syndrome generally present with a normal male phenotype and the only consistent...... clinical finding in KS is small testes, that are most often not identified until after puberty. Decreased awareness of this syndrome among health professionals and a general perception that all patients with 47,XXY exhibit the classic textbook phenotype results in a highly under-diagnosed condition with up...

  2. Catastrophic Antiphospholipid Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rawhya R. El-Shereef

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports one case of successfully treated patients suffering from a rare entity, the catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS. Management of this patient is discussed in detail.

  3. Meier-Gorlin syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munnik, S.A. de; Hoefsloot, E.H.; Roukema, J.; Schoots, J.; Knoers, N.V.A.M.; Brunner, H.G.; Jackson, A.P.; Bongers, E.M.H.F.

    2015-01-01

    Meier-Gorlin syndrome (MGS) is a rare autosomal recessive primordial dwarfism disorder, characterized by microtia, patellar applasia/hypoplasia, and a proportionate short stature. Associated clinical features encompass feeding problems, congenital pulmonary emphysema, mammary hypoplasia in females

  4. Parental Alienation Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuat Torun

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Children who have been programmed by one parent to be alienated from the other parent are commonly seen in the context of child-custody disputes. Its primary manifestation is the child’s campaign of denigration against a parent, a campaign that has no justification. It is said to result from a combination of a programming (brainwashing parent’s indoctrinations and the child’s own contributions to the vilification of the targeted parent. Many evaluators use the term parental alienation syndrome to refer to the disorder engendered in such children. However, there is significant controversy going on about the validity of parental alienation syndrome. The purpose of this article has been to describe and help to differentiate parental alienation syndrome and abuse for mental health professionals working in the field, and discuss the arguments about the validity of this syndrome.

  5. Sun and Sjogren's Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patient Education Sheet The Sun and Sjögren’s Syndrome The SSF thanks Mona Z. Mofid, MD, FAAD, Diplomate, American Board of Dermatology, and Medical Director, American Melanoma Foundation, San Diego, California, ...

  6. Learning about Klinefelter Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Klinefelter Syndrome Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research ...

  7. Learning about Turner Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skip to main content Learning About Turner Syndrome Enter Search Term(s): Español Research Funding An Overview Bioinformatics Current Grants Education and Training Funding Extramural Research News Features Funding Divisions Funding ...

  8. Children with Usher syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dammeyer, Jesper Herup

    2012-01-01

    Background: Mental and behavioral disorders among adults with Usher syndrome have been discussed and reported in some case studies but no research has been reported on children with Usher syndrome. Methods: This article investigates the prevalence and characteristics of mental and behavioral...... disorders among 26 children, 3-17 years of age, with Usher syndrome. Results: Six of the 26 children were diagnosed with a mental or behavioral disorder (1 with schizophrenia and mild mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and severe mental retardation, 1 with atypical autism and mild mental retardation......, 1 with mild mental retardation, and 2 with conduct disorder). Another 3 children had had a mental or behavioral disorder previously in their childhood. Conclusion: Even though vision impairment first manifests in late childhood, some children with Usher syndrome seem to develop mental and behavioral...

  9. Joubert Syndrome, A Ciliopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gordon Millichap

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Investigators at Neurogenetics Unit, Mendel Laboratory, Rome, and University of Salerno, Italy, review the clinical features and genetic basis of Joubert syndrome, overlap with other ciliopathies, and the multifaceted roles of primary cilia in CNS development.

  10. Organic brain syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DRUG AND ALCOHOL-RELATED CONDITIONS Alcohol withdrawal state Intoxication from drug or alcohol use Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome ( ... Late-stage syphilis Complications of cancer can also lead to neurocognitive disorder. Other conditions that may mimic ...

  11. Aging and Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to be aw are of the connec tion bet ween Down syndrome and Alzheimer ’s disea se so ... albeing cared for. Make aneffor tto be proactive, thinking ahead to anticipate needs and concerns. x x ...

  12. Empty Sella Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Publications Definition Empty Sella Syndrome (ESS) is a disorder that involves the sella turcica , a bony structure at the base of the brain that surrounds and protects the pituitary gland. ESS is often discovered during radiological imaging tests ...

  13. Prader-Willi Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... syndrome can be helpful in genetic counseling. Complications Obesity-related complications In addition to having constant hunger, ... with this disorder are unable to have children. Osteoporosis. Osteoporosis causes bones to become weak and brittle, ...

  14. Vogt koyanagi harada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin S

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of Vogt Koyanagi Harada syndrome is reported. The depigmented macules appeared initially over eyebrows and around both eyes after an episode of fever and then rapidly involved almost the entire body within 6 months.

  15. Wolf-Hirschhorn Syndrome

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extract Studio

    she had the distinctive facial features of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome that included hyperteleorism, ... The PDA noted at birth had closed by 3 months and there was no other cardiac .... followed by pulmonary stenosis, ventricular septal defects,.

  16. Det hepatopulmonale syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eibye, Simone; Christensen, Erik

    2016-01-01

    The hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) - a complication of liver disease - seems to be underdiagnosed, probably because of decreased awareness. HPS consists of the triade liver disease, intrapulmonary vascular dilatation and as a consequence arterial hypoxaemia. No medical therapy has proven effective...

  17. Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and supports a broad program of basic and clinical research on epilepsy including Lennox-Gastaut syndrome. These studies are aimed at finding the causes of these disorders, improving ... Publications Definition Lennox- ...

  18. RESTLESS LEGS SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Valer'evich Artem'ev

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the epidemiology, etiology, pathogenesis, clinical picture, diagnosis, differential diagnosis, and treatment of restless legs syndrome. Recommendations are given how to choose therapeutic modalities and drugs in relation to different factors.

  19. Facts About Usher Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to abnormal development of the vestibular hair cells, sensory cells that detect gravity and head movement. RP ... 3 Ben-Rebeh, I., et al. (2016). Genetic analysis of Tunisian families with Usher syndrome type 1: ...

  20. Garcin syndrome with hypopituitarism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abe, K.; Mezaki, T.; Hirono, N.; Udaka, F.; Kameyama, M.

    1988-01-01

    We report a Garcin syndrome due to nasopharyngeal carcinoma invading the skull base. MR imaging of this patient shows the position of the tumour and reveals how to the tumor invaded the skull and the effect of treatment. (orig.)

  1. Bardet-Biedl Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Linked Retinoschisis (XLRS) X-Linked Retinitis Pigmentosa (XLRP) Usher Syndrome Other Retinal Diseases Glossary News & Research News & Research ... the autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. In this type of inheritance both parents, called carriers, have one ...

  2. Abdominal Compartment Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Zeyneloğlu

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome are causes of morbidity and mortality in critical care patients. Timely diagnosis and treatment may improve organ functions. Intra-abdominal pressure monitoring is vital during evaluation of the patients and in the management algorithms. The incidence, definition and risk factors, clinical presentation, diagnosis and management of intraabdominal hypertension and Abdominal compartment syndrome were reviewed here.

  3. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. Methods: We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male...

  4. Shah-Waardenburg syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudi, Abdelhalim; Rami, Mohamed; Khattala, Khalid; Elmadi, Aziz; Afifi, My Abderrahmane; Youssef, Bouabdallah

    2013-01-01

    Shah-Waardenburg syndrome (SWS) is a neurocristopathy and is characterized by Hirschsprung's disease (HD), deafness, and depigmentation of hairs, skin, and iris. Is a very rare congenital disorder with variable clinical expression. This report describes a 4-day-old male newborn with Waardenburg's syndrome associated with aganglionosis of the colon and terminal ileum, and review the relevant literature for draws attention to the causal relationship between these two entities.

  5. Hennekam lymphangiectasia syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshminarayana, G.; Mathew, A.; Rajesh, R.; Kurien, G.; Unni, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Hennekam lymphangiectasia syndrome is a rare disorder comprising of intestinal and renal lymphangiectasia, dysmorphic facial appearance and mental retardation. The facial features include hypertelorism with a wide, flat nasal bridge, epicanthic folds, small mouth and small ears. We describe a case of a multigravida with bad obstetric history and characteristic facial and dental anomalies and bilateral renal lymphangiectasia. To our knowledge this is the first case of Hennekam lymphangiectasia syndrome with anodontia to be reported from India. PMID:22022089

  6. Ellis Van Creveld syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shilpy S

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ellis Van Creveld syndrome is a rare disorder and is a form of short-limbed dwarfism. It is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by tetrad of disproportionate dwarfism, post-axial polydactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and heart defects. This case report presents a classical case of a seven-year-old boy with Ellis Van Creveld syndrome presented with discrete clinical findings.

  7. Gorlin-Goltz syndrome:

    OpenAIRE

    Binić, Ivana; Jovanović, Dragan L.; Ljubenović, Dragiša; Ljubenović, Milanka; Stanojević, Milenko

    2007-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome is an inherited autosomal dominant disorder with complete penetrance and extreme variable expressivity. The authors present a case of an 11-year-old girl with typical features of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome with special respect to medical and dental problems which include multiple bony cage deformities like spina bifida with scoliosis having convexity to the left side, presence of an infantile uterus and multiple odonogenic keratocysts in the maxillofacial region.

  8. [The exploding head syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongers, K M; ter Bruggen, J P; Franke, C L

    1991-04-06

    The case is reported of a 47-year old female suffering from the exploding head syndrome. This syndrome consists of a sudden awakening due to a loud noise shortly after falling asleep, sometimes accompanied by a flash of light. The patient is anxious and experiences palpitations and excessive sweating. Most patients are more than fifty years of age. Further investigations do not reveal any abnormality. The pathogenesis is unknown, and no therapy other than reassurance is necessary.

  9. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  10. CT of Mirizzi syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Shinichiro; Fukushima, Keisuke; Ishihara, Kenji; Hirano, Yutaka; Sano, Kaizo

    1983-01-01

    PTC or ERCP findings of four cases of Mirizzi syndrome were demonstrated. They consisted of a smooth stricture of the common hepatic duct, curved impressions of the duct and dilatation of proximal biliary radicles. CT could visualize the impacted stone in the neck of the gallbladder, dilatation of proximal common hepatic and intrahepatic duct. Absence of the dilatation of distal common bile duct could also be confirmed by CT, thus the diagnosis of Mirizzi syndrome might be possible by CT. (author)

  11. Cardiorenal syndrome: therapeutical challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Lopes, Sara Cristina Cerqueira

    2016-01-01

    Cardiorenal syndrome is described by the coexistence of cardiac and renal disease on the same individual, and it can affect both dogs and cats. The most consensual definition describes it as a “pathophysiologic disorder of the heart and kidneys whereby acute or chronic dysfunction of one of the organs causes acute or chronic dysfunction of the other”. The interest, recognition of the importance and prevailing of this syndrome in veterinary medicine has grown and, recently, a committee of ...

  12. Michelin tire baby syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita V Vora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Michelin tire baby syndrome (MTBS, is a rare genodermatosis, characterized by generalized folding of excess skin and may be associated with various phenotypic abnormalities. The pathogenesis of this condition is unclear. Various congenital anomalies can be associated with it. It may be a clinical finding associated with various syndromes. Diagnosis is mainly clinical, and skin folds gradually diminish and disappear with age without any intervention. Here, we report a case of MTBS associated with convergent squint and hydrocephaly.

  13. Mills’ syndrome: case report

    OpenAIRE

    Henrique de Gobbi Porto, Fábio; Orsini, Marco; Antônio Araújo Leite, Marco; Moreira dos Santos, José; Pulier, Soraia; Mello, Mariana; Nascimento, Osvaldo J.M.

    2009-01-01

    The syndrome of progressive, ascending or descending hemiplegia, with no significant sensory impairment was first describes by Mills in 1900, which several cases were reported later. However after diagnostic tests and image improvements, the number of reports has shortened. A possible explanation for this shortage is the identification of other diseases that could mimic the clinical picture. Currently, the syndrome has an uncertain nosological status, since it was described based on clinical ...

  14. Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    McCartney, Christopher R.; Marshall, John C.

    2016-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition in which a woman has an imbalance of female sex hormones. This may lead to menstrual cycle changes, cysts in the ovaries, trouble getting pregnant, and other health changes. In PCOS, mature eggs are not released from the ovaries. Instead, they can form very small cysts in the ovary. These changes can contribute to infertility. Common symptoms of PCOS include Menstrual disorders, Infertility, High levels of testosterone and Metabolic syndrome. Obesity, ...

  15. Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Leary, D P

    2010-01-01

    Popliteal artery entrapment syndrome is a rare abnormality of the anatomical relationship between the popliteal artery and adjacent muscles or fibrous bands in the popliteal fossa. The following is a case report of a 19 year old female, in whom popliteal artery entrapment syndrome was diagnosed, and successfully treated surgically. A review of literature is also presented and provides details on how PAES is classified, diagnosed both clinically and radiologically, and treated surgically.

  16. Unmasking diogenes syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kashinath Nayak

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diogenes syndrome is characterized by extreme self-neglect, social withdrawal, and poor personal and domestic hygiene. We report a case of Diogenes syndrome presenting with dermatitis passivata. An unusual "mask" of dirt resembling a carapace, onset of neglect after awareness of a breast lump and resumption of personal grooming and social activities after removal of the lump and counseling were seen.

  17. Ketonuria and HELLP syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubbala, Phanendra Kumar; Karoshi, Mahantesh; Zakaria, Faris

    2009-01-01

    We recently managed a patient with the HELLP syndrome (Haemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes and Low Platelet count) where there was a delay in diagnosis due to gastroenteritis. This case also reiterates the varied or lack of symptomatology in patients developing HELLP and obscuring the initial diagnosis. Patients with HELLP syndrome have significant maternal morbidity and mortality, hence clinical vigilance and high suspicion play a key role in the diagnosis and subsequent management.

  18. Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome or LEOPARD Syndrome? A clinical dilemma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurofibromatosis (NF, Noonan syndrome (NS, and LEOPARD syndrome are all autosomal dominant conditions, each being a distinct clinical entity by itself. Rarely, one encounters cases with features of NF and NS and is termed as the ′Neurofibromatosis-Noonan syndrome′ (NF-NS. The authors report a clinical dilemma with major clinical features of the NF-NS syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome co-existing in the same patient. Also, features of Noonan syndrome and LEOPARD syndrome are compared with the case reported.

  19. Unusual headache syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Luiz P

    2013-01-01

    Some headache syndromes have few cases reported in the literature. Their clinical characteristics, pathogenesis, and treatment may have not been completely defined. They may not actually be uncommon but rather under-recognized and/or underreported. A literature review of unusual headache syndromes, searching PubMed and ISI Web of Knowledge, was performed. After deciding which disorders to study, relevant publications in scientific journals, including original articles, reviews, meeting abstracts, and letters or correspondences to the editors were searched. This paper reviewed the clinical characteristics, the pathogenesis, the diagnosis, and the treatment of five interesting and unusual headache syndromes: exploding head syndrome, red ear syndrome, neck-tongue syndrome, nummular headache, and cardiac cephalgia. Recognizing some unusual headaches, either primary or secondary, may be a challenge for many non-headache specialist physicians. It is important to study them because the correct diagnosis may result in specific treatments that may improve the quality of life of these patients, and this can even be life saving. © 2013 American Headache Society.

  20. Sleep overlap syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fariba Rezaeetalab

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Overlap syndrome, which is known as the coexistence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA, was first defined by Flenley. Although it can refer to concomitant occurrence of any of the pulmonary diseases and OSA, overlap syndrome is commonly considered as the coexistence of OSA and COPD. This disease has unique adverse health consequences distinct from either condition alone. Given the high prevalence of each solitary disease, overlap syndrome is also likely to be common and clinically relevant. Despite the fact that overlap syndrome has been described in the literature for nearly 30 years, paucity of evaluations and studies limited the discussion on diagnosis, prevalence, pathophysiology, treatment, and outcomes of this disease. This review article addresses these issues by reviewing several recent studies conducted in Iran or other countries. This review suggests that overlap syndrome has worse outcomes than either disease alone. Our findings accentuated the urgent need for further studies on overlap syndrome and all overlaps between OSA and chronic pulmonary disease to provide a deeper insight into diagnosis and non-invasive treatments of this disease.

  1. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D'Ippolito, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  2. Abdominal vascular syndromes: characteristic imaging findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardarelli-Leite, Leandro; Velloni, Fernanda Garozzo; Salvadori, Priscila Silveira; Lemos, Marcelo Delboni; D' Ippolito, Giuseppe, E-mail: leandrocleite@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (EPM/UNIFESP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Escola Paulista de Mediciana. Departmento de Diagnostico por Imagem

    2016-07-15

    Abdominal vascular syndromes are rare diseases. Although such syndromes vary widely in terms of symptoms and etiologies, certain imaging findings are characteristic. Depending on their etiology, they can be categorized as congenital - including blue rubber bleb nevus syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, and hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome) - compressive - including 'nutcracker' syndrome, median arcuate ligament syndrome, Cockett syndrome (also known as May-Thurner syndrome), and superior mesenteric artery syndrome. In this article, we aimed to illustrate imaging findings that are characteristic of these syndromes, through studies conducted at our institution, as well as to perform a brief review of the literature on this topic. (author)

  3. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  4. The 7q11.23 Microduplication Syndrome: A Clinical Report with Review of Literature

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas, Elham; Cox, Devin M.; Smith, Teri; Butler, Merlin G.

    2016-01-01

    We report a 14-year-old adolescent girl with selective mutism (SM) and a 7q11.23 microduplication detected by chromosomal microarray (CMA) analysis and reviewed the literature from 18 published clinical reports. Our patient had specific phobias, SM, extreme anxiety, obesity, cutis marmorata, and a round appearing face with a short neck and over folded ears. We reviewed the published clinical, cognitive, behavioral, and cytogenetic findings grouped by speech and language delay, growth and deve...

  5. Conservative Treatment of a Patient with Epidermolysis Bullosa Presenting as Bart Syndrome: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samet Vasfi Kuvat

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We presented a case of a newborn male with aplasia cutis congenita on the lower limb. The case was treated with conservative method. As for the conservative treatment, daily hydrodebridement with 1/200 diluted povidone-iodine and serum physiologic was performed, followed by closure of the wound with a dexpanthenol + chlorhexidine + fusidic acid-impregnated sterile gauze bandage. the followup that occured after three weeks, the wound was completely epithelialized, but a hypopigmented scar remained in the limb.

  6. Mobius syndrome redefined: a syndrome of rhombencephalic maldevelopment.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verzijl, H.T.F.M.; Zwaag, A. van der; Cruysberg, J.R.M.; Padberg, G.W.A.M.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the variable clinical picture of Mobius syndrome (MIM no. 157900) and to further understand the pathogenesis of the disorder. METHODS: A standardized questionnaire was submitted to 37 Dutch patients with Mobius syndrome. All underwent standardized neurologic examination

  7. Hypokalaemia: Bartter's syndrome or pseudo-Bartter's syndrome?

    OpenAIRE

    Robb, J D; Delargy, M A; Nolan, M; Tomkin, G H

    1984-01-01

    The difficulties in the diagnosis of hypokalaemia are often considerable. This paper reports three patients who presented with hypokalaemia. Investigations are described which may help to distinguish Bartter's syndrome from pseudo-Bartter's syndrome.

  8. Dysmobility syndrome: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill KD

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Keith D Hill,1 Kaela Farrier,1 Melissa Russell,2 Elissa Burton1 1School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia Background: A new term, dysmobility syndrome, has recently been described as a new approach to identify older people at risk of poor health outcomes. The aim was to undertake a systematic review of the existing research literature on dysmobility syndrome.Method: All articles reporting dysmobility syndrome were identified in a systematic review of Medline (Proquest, CINAHL, PubMed, PsycInfo, EMBASE, and Scopus databases. Key characteristics of identified studies were extracted and summarized.Results: The systematic review identified five papers (three cross-sectional, one case control, and one longitudinal study. No intervention studies were identified. Prevalence of dysmobility syndrome varied between studies (22%–34% in three of the studies. Dysmobility syndrome was shown to be associated with reduced function, increased falls and fractures, and a longitudinal study showed its significant association with mortality.Conclusion: Early research on dysmobility syndrome indicates that it may be a useful classification approach to identify older people at risk of adverse health outcomes and to target for early interventions. Future research needs to standardize the optimal mix of measures and cut points, and investigate whether balance performance may be a more useful factor than history of falls for dysmobility syndrome. Keywords: mobility, elderly, functional decline

  9. Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (Gorlin syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lo Muzio Lorenzo

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS, also known as Gorlin syndrome, is a hereditary condition characterized by a wide range of developmental abnormalities and a predisposition to neoplasms. The estimated prevalence varies from 1/57,000 to 1/256,000, with a male-to-female ratio of 1:1. Main clinical manifestations include multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts of the jaws, hyperkeratosis of palms and soles, skeletal abnormalities, intracranial ectopic calcifications, and facial dysmorphism (macrocephaly, cleft lip/palate and severe eye anomalies. Intellectual deficit is present in up to 5% of cases. BCCs (varying clinically from flesh-colored papules to ulcerating plaques and in diameter from 1 to 10 mm are most commonly located on the face, back and chest. The number of BBCs varies from a few to several thousand. Recurrent jaw cysts occur in 90% of patients. Skeletal abnormalities (affecting the shape of the ribs, vertebral column bones, and the skull are frequent. Ocular, genitourinary and cardiovascular disorders may occur. About 5–10% of NBCCS patients develop the brain malignancy medulloblastoma, which may be a potential cause of early death. NBCCS is caused by mutations in the PTCH1 gene and is transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait with complete penetrance and variable expressivity. Clinical diagnosis relies on specific criteria. Gene mutation analysis confirms the diagnosis. Genetic counseling is mandatory. Antenatal diagnosis is feasible by means of ultrasound scans and analysis of DNA extracted from fetal cells (obtained by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Main differential diagnoses include Bazex syndrome, trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex and Torre's syndrome (Muir-Torre's syndrome. Management requires a multidisciplinary approach. Keratocysts are treated by surgical removal. Surgery for BBCs is indicated when the number of lesions is limited; other treatments include laser

  10. Las hematodermias la luz de un caso de leucemia cutis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Carrizosa Argáez

    1951-08-01

    años de edad, procedente de Funes (Nariño cuyos padres nos informan que hace más o menos un año se inició la enfermedad con la aparición de un tumor en la región malar izquierda, tumor que fue aumentando de volumen hasta cubrir el ojo izquierdo; que entonces se practicó la extirpación quirúrgica del tumor; pero que, al cabo de poco tiempo, aquél reapareció, y que simultáneamente comenzaron a formarse tumores semejantes en el resto de la cara así como también en las extremidades y en la región pectoral.

  11. Aplasia cutis congenita in a Nigerian child: A case report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-10-01

    Oct 1, 2015 ... or circular ulcers or scars.1 It could be in a localized area or widespread at birth. The condition is most commonly seen on the scalp in 90% of cases,2 but ACC can affect any part of the body.2, ... trauma, vascular compromise, maternal infections and ... and 9% on both the right and left leg respectively (see.

  12. CALCINOSIS CUTIS – A SERIES OF 59 CONSECUTIVE CASES ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-04

    Apr 4, 2013 ... EAsT AFRICAN MEDICAL JOURNAL. April 2013 ... 12 Hospital, Reconstructive Surgeon, A. Sabir, General Surgeon, Head of Department of Surgery, Attat Hospital, P. O. ... Clinical chemistry investigations were made among.

  13. Aerosol deposition of (Cu,Ti) substituted bismuth vanadate films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Exner, Jörg, E-mail: Functional.Materials@Uni-Bayreuth.de [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Fuierer, Paul [Materials and Metallurgical Engineering Department, New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Moos, Ralf [University of Bayreuth, Department of Functional Materials, Universitätsstraße 30, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-12-31

    Bismuth vanadate, Bi{sub 4}V{sub 2}O{sub 11}, and related compounds with various metal (Me) substitutions, Bi{sub 4}(Me{sub x}V{sub 1−x}){sub 2}O{sub 11−δ}, show some of the highest ionic conductivities among the known solid oxide electrolytes. Films of Cu and Ti substituted bismuth vanadate were prepared by an aerosol deposition method, a spray coating process also described as room temperature impact consolidation. Resultant films, several microns in thickness, were dense with good adhesion to the substrate. Scanning electron microscopy and high temperature X-ray diffraction were used to monitor the effects of temperature on the structure and microstructure of the film. The particle size remained nano-scale while microstrain decreased rapidly up to 500 °C, above which coarsening and texturing increased rapidly. Impedance measurements of films deposited on inter-digital electrodes revealed an annealing effect on the ionic conductivity, with the conductivity exceeding that of a screen printed film, and approaching that of bulk ceramic. - Highlights: • Cu and Ti doped bismuth vanadate films were prepared by aerosol deposition (AD). • Dense 3–5 μm thick films were deposited on alumina, silicon and gold electrodes. • Annealing of the AD-layer increases the conductivity by 1.5 orders of magnitude. • Effect of temperature on structure and microstructure was investigated.

  14. Penerapan Hak Cuti Melahirkan Bagi Pekerja Perempuan di Sektor Formal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VG. Tinuk Istiarti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background:The Policy for Women Labors in the Act No. 1 1951 states that women are not allowed to work 1,5 months before and after bearing a child. However, up to the present time, its implementation is not effective. Objective:This explorative research uses quantitative and qualitative approach which objective is to observe the knowledge, attitude and behavior of the woman labourers towards their right of child birth leave. Method of his research is also aimed at observing the employers in imlementing the child birth leave right of the woman labourers and the ralated constraints of the practices. The qualitiative samples consist of 300 respondens of the woman labourers and the qualitative samples consist of 18 employers “Depnaker” staff, 18 SPSI members and 15 woman labourers. Instruments for collecting data are questionaire and interviewguides. Qualitative data are analysed by using frequency distribution while qualitative data are analysed by using content analysis. Result:The research results shows that the knowledge and attitude of the woman labourers towards the rights of child birth leave are good enough. However in practice it is not well implemented as that in the regulation, because employers never give additional wages, such as pregnancy and childbirth allowances despite their agreement to implement it. Conclusion:Most employers are not consistent in implementing the right of child birth leave. It can be seen from the fact that the implementation is met only to each own company’s condition. Those who have had or are in the process of having PKB for example are more consistent than those who have not. Contraints of the implementation of childbirth leave are as follows: 1. Not all employers well comprehend the right of child births leave, 2. The surveillance and empowerment of Disnaker is not effective, 3 The law enforcement to the employers who break the rules is very weak, and 4. The role of SPSI in giving supervision is not yet significant. Key words: Child birth leave, woman labourers, formal sector

  15. CASE REPORT Calcinosis cutis universalis – a rare manifestation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    F E Suleman, MB ChB, FC Rad (Diag), M Med Rad (Diag). Department of Radiology ... palpable hard deposits in the soft tissue. She was pale, had ... may occur, leading to ulceration and extrusion of calcified material.2,4. Our patient had ...

  16. Aplasia cutis congenita reminiscent of the lines of Blaschko

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hennekam, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    A male newborn showing congenital symmetrical abdominal skin defects and an alopecia on the scalp following a spiral pattern is described. The pattern of distribution of both skin anomalies was reminiscent of the lines of Blaschko, indicating that somatic mosaicism is the most probable cause for the

  17. Congenital Heart Diseases associated with Identified Syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Recognised syndromes were seen in 69(68%) cases. Down syndrome with 54 children contributed 78.3% of those with known syndromes. Other identified syndromes and associations were Marfan's, Noonan's, Edwards, Prune Belly, Apert, Ellis-van creveld syndrome and congenital rubella syndrome. Congenital heart ...

  18. Enamel renal syndrome: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S V Kala Vani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Enamel renal syndrome is a very rare disorder associating amelogenesis imperfecta with nephrocalcinosis. It is known by various synonyms such as amelogenesis imperfecta nephrocalcinosis syndrome, MacGibbon syndrome, Lubinsky syndrome, and Lubinsky-MacGibbon syndrome. It is characterized by enamel agenesis and medullary nephrocalcinosis. This paper describes enamel renal syndrome in a female patient born in a consanguineous family.

  19. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  20. Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia clefting syndrome (EEC syndrome)

    OpenAIRE

    Koul, Monika; Dwivedi, Rahul; Upadhyay, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia- clefting syndrome (also k/a. split hand- split foot malformation /split hand-split foot ectodermal dysplasia- cleft syndrome/ectodermal dysplasia cleft lip/cleft palate syndrome) a rare form of ectodermal dysplasia, is an autosomal dominant disorder inherited as a genetic trait and characterized by a triad of (i) ectrodactyly, (ii) ectodermal dysplasia and, (iii) & facial clefts.

  1. Pre-Menstrual Syndrome in Women with Down Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Linda; Cunningham, Cliff

    2009-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of pre-menstrual syndrome (PMS) may be higher in women with Down syndrome due to syndrome specific characteristics in biochemistry, psychopathology and lifestyle. Recognition of PMS may be difficult for women with intellectual disabilities and their carers. Method: A daily diary, used to diagnose PMS with typical women, was…

  2. Wells syndrome and its relationship to Churg-Strauss syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratzinger, Gudrun; Zankl, Julia; Zelger, Bernhard

    2013-08-01

      Wells syndrome has been described as an inflammatory disorder based on typical clinical appearance combined with the histopathological presence of eosinophilic infiltrates and flame figures in the absence of vasculitis. Churg-Strauss syndrome, on the other hand, is primarily a diffuse, necrotizing vasculitis but is also typically displaying eosinophils and flame figures. Despite several parallels, the present understanding of these two diseases excludes any pathogenetic relationship.   We describe the clinical course and histopathological appearance of three patients who had initially been diagnosed with Wells syndrome that developed into Churg-Strauss syndrome during the course of their disease.   The clinical presentation of all three patients led to the diagnosis of Wells syndrome by independent specialists. Histopathology showed an eosinophilic infiltrate and flame figures next to features of leukocytoclastic vasculitis. Detailed examination revealed asthma bronchiale and additional symptoms indicating Churg-Strauss syndrome. The initial diagnosis of Wells syndrome had to be revised to Churg-Strauss syndrome.   We conclude that Wells syndrome could be the starting point of a pathogenetic process that might reach its maximum in Churg-Strauss syndrome. As a clinical consequence, patients with Wells syndrome should be evaluated and followed for Churg-Strauss syndrome. © 2013 The International Society of Dermatology.

  3. Hypothyroidism in metabolic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Kumar Kota

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Metabolic syndrome (MetS and hypothyroidism are well established forerunners of atherogenic cardiovascular disease. Considerable overlap occurs in the pathogenic mechanisms of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease by metabolic syndrome and hypothyroidism. Insulin resistance has been studied as the basic pathogenic mechanism in metabolic syndrome. [1] This cross sectional study intended to assess thyroid function in patients with metabolic syndrome and to investigate the association between hypothyroidism and metabolic syndrome. Materials and Methods: One hundred patients with metabolic syndrome who fulfilled the National Cholesterol Education Program- Adult Treatment Panel (NCEP-ATP III criteria [ 3 out of 5 criteria positive namely blood pressure ≥ 130/85 mm hg or on antihypertensive medications, fasting plasma glucose > 100 mg/dl or on anti-diabetic medications, fasting triglycerides > 150 mg/dl, high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C 102 cms in men and 88 cms in women] were included in the study group. [2] Fifty patients who had no features of metabolic syndrome (0 out of 5 criteria for metabolic syndrome were included in the control group. Patients with liver disorders, renal disorders, congestive cardiac failure, pregnant women, patients on oral contraceptive pills, statins and other medications that alter thyroid functions and lipid levels and those who are under treatment for any thyroid related disorder were excluded from the study. Acutely ill patients were excluded taking into account sick euthyroid syndrome. Patients were subjected to anthropometry, evaluation of vital parameters, lipid and thyroid profile along with other routine laboratory parameters. Students t-test, Chi square test and linear regression, multiple logistic regression models were used for statistical analysis. P value < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Of the 100 patients in study group, 55 were females (55% and 45 were males (45%. Of the 50

  4. Juvenile polyposis syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Yi-Han; Wei, Chin-Hung; Chang, Szu-Wen; Chang, Lung; Fu, Yu-Wei; Lee, Hung-Chang; Liu, Hsuan-Liang; Yeung, Chun-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Juvenile polyposis syndrome, a rare disorder in children, is characterized with multiple hamartomatous polyps in alimentary tract. A variety of manifestations include bleeding, intussusception, or polyp prolapse. In this study, we present an 8-month-old male infant of juvenile polyposis syndrome initially presenting with chronic anemia. To the best of our knowledge, this is the youngest case reported in the literature. Methods: We report a rare case of an 8-month-old male infant who presented with chronic anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding initially. Panendoscopy and abdominal computed tomography showed multiple polyposis throughout the entire alimentary tract leading to intussusception. Technetium-99m-labeled red blood cell (RBC) bleeding scan revealed the possibility of gastrointestinal tract bleeding in the jejunum. Histopathological examination on biopsy samples showed Peutz-Jeghers syndrome was excluded, whereas the diagnosis of juvenile polyposis syndrome was established. Results: Enteroscopic polypectomy is the mainstay of the treatment. However, polyps recurred and occupied the majority of the gastrointestinal tract in 6 months. Supportive management was given. The patient expired for severe sepsis at the age of 18 months. Conclusion: Juvenile polyposis syndrome is an inherited disease, so it is not possible to prevent it. Concerning of its poor outcome and high mortality rate, it is important that we should increase awareness and education of the parents at its earliest stages. PMID:27631205

  5. Congenital nephrotic syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Fanni

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available CNS (Congenital nephrotic syndrome is a disorder characterized by the presence of a nephrotic syndrome in the first three months of life. Different pathologies can cause this syndrome. In general, we can distinguish primary forms (sporadic and hereditary and secondary forms (acquired and associated with other syndromes. The most common form is the Finnish CNS (CNF, congenital nephrotic syndrome of the Finnish type, a hereditary form whose name derives from the fact that the highest incidence is described in that country (1.2:10,000. The pathogenesis, the clinical picture, the diagnostic criteria, the therapy and the outcome are described in details.  Proceedings of the International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 10th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 22nd-25th, 2014 · Cagliari (Italy · October 25th, 2014 · The role of the clinical pathological dialogue in problem solving Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Peter Van Eyken

  6. Progestogens and Cushing's syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Harte, C

    2012-02-03

    We report 3 patients where Medroxyprogesterone Acetate (MPA = Provera) and Megestrol Acetate (Megace) in doses used for therapy of breast cancer, caused clinical hypercortisolism and Cushing\\'s syndrome. Studies of the toxicity of Medroxyprogesterone Acetate list the commonest adverse events at 500 mg\\/day as weight gain, water retention, increased blood pressure, tremor, moon face, sweating, muscle cramps, vaginal bleeding and increased appetite. Glucocorticoid-like effects are seen in up to 30% of patients treated for longer than 6 weeks with mostly large doses of the order of 1500 mg\\/day but Cushing\\'s syndrome has been reported in patients taking 400 mg\\/day. Neither the glucocorticoid-like effects or Cushing\\'s syndrome have been previously observed with Megestrol Acetate. In the elderly female population receiving progestogens for neoplastic disease the progestogen itself could be an appreciable cause of morbidity both by causing glucocorticoid-like effects and Cushing\\'s syndrome but also by lack of awareness of the danger of sudden withdrawal of these compounds when the hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is suppressed. The signs and symptoms could be easily overlooked unless appropriate testing for Cushing\\'s syndrome is carried out. While the progestogen may have to be continued indefinitely a dose decrease may be feasible with reduction of morbidity.

  7. Facet joint syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zigrai, M.; Zakovic, J.; Brezinova, M.; Pavlovicova, M.

    2002-01-01

    It is the purpose of the study to demonstrate the clinical relevance of degenerative changes in the facet joint of patients with low back pain irradiating to the lower extremities, and discuss some problems relating to diagnosis and different diagnosis. 119 patients presenting the listed bellow syndromes are covered by the study: scoliosis, polytopic pain vertebral syndrome, paresis and history of trauma. all patients undergo comprehensive neurological examination with special attention focused on the spine: CT and plain x-rays are taken of the lumbosacral segment to assess the condition of the facet joints. The neurological examination demonstrates in all cases pain syndrome in the lumbar spine referred to one or both lower extremities. In 56% it is a matter of persisting pain, and in 44% - recurrent. More than half of the patients complain of sacroiliac (SI) dislocation and palpatory pain. Unilateral or bilateral degenerative changes are documented by imaging studies in all patients, including: subchondral thickening, osteopathy narrowing the lateral or central part of the spinal canal with ensuing nerve root compression. The lumbosacral zygoapophyseal joints are source of pseudoradicular pain. A correlation between clinical picture and GT changes is noted in all patients with facet joint syndrome. CT is an indispensable method in diagnosing facet joint syndrome. (authors)

  8. Genetics Home Reference: Noonan syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growth spurt that results in shortened stature. Most males with Noonan syndrome have undescended testes (cryptorchidism), which may contribute to infertility (inability to father a child) later in life. Females with Noonan syndrome can experience delayed puberty but ...

  9. POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME IN ADOLESCENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Baptista

    2017-02-01

    Conclusion: Identification of adolescents at risk for Polycystic Ovary Syndrome is critical, not only for an appropriate therapeutic approach, but also to prevent co-morbidities associated with the syndrome, including obesity, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and infertility.

  10. Genetics Home Reference: Tietz syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... represent a severe form of a disorder called Waardenburg syndrome , which can also be caused by MITF gene ... MITF basic domain: genotypic and phenotypic variations in Waardenburg and Tietz syndromes. Eur J Hum Genet. 2012 May;20(5): ...

  11. Genetics Home Reference: Roberts syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... feet are located very close to the body (phocomelia). People with Roberts syndrome may also have abnormal ... may live into adulthood. A condition called SC phocomelia syndrome was originally thought to be distinct from ...

  12. Bacterial tracheitis in Down's syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Cant, A J; Gibson, P J; West, R J

    1987-01-01

    Four children with Down's syndrome and bacterial tracheitis are described. In three the infection was due to Haemophilus influenza. In patients with Down's syndrome presenting with stridor tracheitis should be considered and appropriate treatment started.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: Sotos syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene are the primary cause of Sotos syndrome , accounting for up to 90 percent of cases. Other ... Sotos syndrome cases occur in people with no history of the disorder in their family. Most of ...

  14. Genetics Home Reference: Fraser syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FRAS1 gene mutations are the most common cause, accounting for about half of cases of Fraser syndrome . ... Fras1/Frem family of extracellular matrix proteins: structure, function, and association with Fraser syndrome and the mouse ...

  15. Genetics Home Reference: Jacobsen syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... compulsive behavior (such as shredding paper), a short attention span, and easy distractibility. Many people with Jacobsen syndrome have been diagnosed with attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Jacobsen syndrome is also ...

  16. Refeeding syndrome: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ormerod, Clare; Farrer, Kirstine; Harper, Lindsay; Lal, Simon

    2010-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome can result in a wide variety of complications and may be life threatening. Although well described in hospital practice, refeeding syndrome is often under-recognized and inadequately treated.

  17. Review of the refeeding syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Michael D; Btaiche, Imad F; Sacks, Gordon S

    2005-12-01

    Refeeding syndrome describes a constellation of metabolic disturbances that occur as a result of reinstitution of nutrition to patients who are starved or severely malnourished. Patients can develop fluid and electrolyte disorders, especially hypophosphatemia, along with neurologic, pulmonary, cardiac, neuromuscular, and hematologic complications. We reviewed literature on refeeding syndrome and the associated electrolyte abnormalities, fluid disturbances, and associated complications. In addition to assessing scientific literature, we also considered clinical experience and judgment in developing recommendations for prevention and treatment of refeeding syndrome. The most important steps are to identify patients at risk for developing refeeding syndrome, institute nutrition support cautiously, and correct and supplement electrolyte and vitamin deficiencies to avoid refeeding syndrome. We provide suggestions for the prevention of refeeding syndrome and suggestions for treatment of electrolyte disturbances and complications in patients who develop refeeding syndrome, according to evidence in the literature, the pathophysiology of refeeding syndrome, and clinical experience and judgment.

  18. ARDS (Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Also known as What Is ARDS, or acute respiratory distress syndrome, is a lung condition that leads ... treat ARDS. Other Names Acute lung injury Adult respiratory distress syndrome Increased-permeability pulmonary edema Noncardiac pulmonary ...

  19. Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    SARS; Respiratory failure - SARS ... Complications may include: Respiratory failure Liver failure Heart failure ... 366. McIntosh K, Perlman S. Coronaviruses, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS). ...

  20. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus; MERS-CoV; Novel coronavirus; nCoV ... for Disease Control and Prevention website. Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS): Frequently asked questions and answers. www. ...