WorldWideScience

Sample records for syndrome clinical issues

  1. The HELLP syndrome: Clinical issues and management. A Review

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    Svendsen Einar

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HELLP syndrome is a serious complication in pregnancy characterized by haemolysis, elevated liver enzymes and low platelet count occurring in 0.5 to 0.9% of all pregnancies and in 10–20% of cases with severe preeclampsia. The present review highlights occurrence, diagnosis, complications, surveillance, corticosteroid treatment, mode of delivery and risk of recurrence. Methods Clinical reports and reviews published between 2000 and 2008 were screened using Pub Med and Cochrane databases. Results and conclusion About 70% of the cases develop before delivery, the majority between the 27th and 37th gestational weeks; the remainder within 48 hours after delivery. The HELLP syndrome may be complete or incomplete. In the Tennessee Classification System diagnostic criteria for HELLP are haemolysis with increased LDH (> 600 U/L, AST (≥ 70 U/L, and platelets 9/L. The Mississippi Triple-class HELLP System further classifies the disorder by the nadir platelet counts. The syndrome is a progressive condition and serious complications are frequent. Conservative treatment (≥ 48 hours is controversial but may be considered in selected cases

  2. [Neuropsychological, clinical and social issues in two patients with Capgras Syndrome].

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    Gallego, Lucía; Vázquez, Susana; Peláez, José C; López-Ibor, Juan J

    2011-01-01

    Two patients suffering Capgras Syndrome (CS) were evaluated with neuroimaging and neuropsychological tests, the results of which are compared with the existing etiopathogenic theories. To date, the etiopathogeny of the CS continues to lack satisfactory explanation. However, several holistic models have been proposed to better understand the many different theoretical proposals circulating for CS. These theories are discussed and the psychosocial consequences of aggressiveness, an aspect not frequently commented in the literature, are analyzed. Risk for aggressiveness and its negative consequences should be taken into consideration upon diagnosis of CS in order to design effective preventive measures.

  3. Clinical update on metabolic syndrome

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    Juan Diego Hernández-Camacho

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome has been defined as a global issue since it affects a lot of people. Numerous factors are involved in metabolic syndrome development. It has been described that metabolic syndrome has negative consequences on health. Consequently, a lot of treatments have been proposed to palliate it such as drugs, surgery or life style changes where nutritional habits have shown to be an important point in its management. The current study reviews the literature existing about the actual epidemiology of metabolic syndrome, the components involucrate in its appearance and progression, the clinical consequences of metabolic syndrome and the nutritional strategies reported in its remission. A bibliographic search in PubMed and Medline was performed to identify eligible studies. Authors obtained that metabolic syndrome is present in population from developed and undeveloped areas in a huge scale. Environmental and genetic elements are involucrate in metabolic syndrome development. Metabolic syndrome exponentially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, some types of cancers, diabetes mellitus type 2, sleep disturbances, etc. Nutritional treatments play a crucial role in metabolic syndrome prevention, treatment and recovery.

  4. Horner syndrome: clinical perspectives

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    Kanagalingam, Sivashakthi; Miller, Neil R

    2015-01-01

    Horner syndrome consists of unilateral ptosis, an ipsilateral miotic but normally reactive pupil, and in some cases, ipsilateral facial anhidrosis, all resulting from damage to the ipsilateral oculosympathetic pathway. Herein, we review the clinical signs and symptoms that can aid in the diagnosis and localization of a Horner syndrome as well as the causes of the condition. We emphasize that pharmacologic testing can confirm its presence and direct further testing and management. PMID:28539793

  5. [Diagnosis and Clinical Examination of Autoinflammatory Syndrome].

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    Ida, Hiroaki

    2015-05-01

    Autoinflammatory syndrome is characterized by: 1) episodes of seemingly unprovoked inflammation, 2) the absence of a high titer of autoantibodies or auto-reactive T cells, and 3) an inborn error of innate immunity. In this decade, many autoinflammatory syndromes have been reported in Japan, and so many Japanese physicians have become aware of this syndrome. Monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes present with excessive systemic inflammation including fever, rashes, arthritis, and organ-specific inflammation and are caused by defects in single genes encoding proteins that regulate innate inflammatory pathways. The main monogenic autoinflammatory syndromes are familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), TNF receptor-associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS), mevalonate kinase deficiency (MKD), cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS), Blau syndrome, and pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne (PAPA) syndrome. We diagnosed these syndromes as clinical manifestations and performed genetic screening. Many serum cytokines are elevated in patients with autoinflammatory syndrome, but this is not disease-specific. The pathogeneses of many autoinflammatory syndromes are known to be related to inflammasomes, which are multiprotein complexes that serve as a platform for caspase 1 activation and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and IL-18 muturation. Especially, NLRP3 inflammasomes may play a crucial role in the intiation and progression of FMF and CAPS. In the future, we hope to discover new clinical examinations which can provide evidence of inflammasome activation independent of genetic screening. In this issue, I introduce autoinflammatory syndromes and discuss the diagnosis and clinical examination of these syndromes.

  6. Women's Issues in Antiphospholipid Syndrome.

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    Papadakis, Emmanouil; Banti, Anastasia; Kioumi, Anna

    2016-09-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune systemic disease characterized by vascular thrombosis (arterial or venous) and/or pregnancy complications associated with the occurrence of autoantibodies, specifically lupus anticoagulant, anticardiolipin antibodies, and/or anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies confirmed at least twice over a 12 week period according to the 2006 Sydney criteria. Antiphospholipid antibodies are encountered  in the general population with a reported prevalence of 1% to 5%  However, APS is far more infrequent with a prevalence of 40-50/100,000 persons and an incidence of about 5 new patients/100,000 persons. APS can be diagnosed in patients with no apparent clinical or laboratory pathology (primary APS) or it may be related to numerous other conditions, autoimmune diseases (usually systemic lupus erythematosus), malignancies, infections and drugs (secondary APS). Women are at risk for APS since the disease is encountered in both the primary and the secondary state in females more often than in men. In addition, women in their reproductive years can develop APS (either classical or obstetric), and special attention is warranted in pregnant women with a diagnosis of APS. The benefits of hormonal therapy in the form of contraception or hormone replacement treatment should be carefully weighed against the increased risk for vascular complications in women with APS.

  7. Reproductive Issues in Women with Turner Syndrome.

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    Folsom, Lisal J; Fuqua, John S

    2015-12-01

    Turner syndrome is one of the most common chromosomal abnormalities affecting female infants. The severity of clinical manifestations varies and it affects multiple organ systems. Women with Turner syndrome have a 3-fold increase in mortality, which becomes even more pronounced in pregnancy. Reproductive options include adoption or surrogacy, assisted reproductive techniques, and in rare cases spontaneous pregnancy. Risks for women with Turner syndrome during pregnancy include aortic disorders, hepatic disease, thyroid disease, type 2 diabetes, and cesarean section delivery. Providers must be familiar with the risks and recommendations in caring for women with Turner syndrome of reproductive age. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Population issues in clinical trials.

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    Mosenifar, Zab

    2007-05-01

    Inclusion of underrepresented groups in clinical trials is important for several reasons. Age, sex, race, genetic factors, concomitant use of other medications, and comorbid conditions all may play pivotal roles in response to a drug or intervention. Despite the legislation for broader inclusion of underrepresented groups in clinical trials (via the National Institutes of Health [NIH] Revitalization Act of 1993), underrepresentation of particular populations, particularly minorities, continues to be a problem. Studies of predictors of clinical trial enrollment suggest that most people participate in clinical research to find relief from a disease, not for financial remuneration. Yet, men and whites are more likely to enroll in studies and some data indicate that certain patient populations are preferentially (albeit sometimes inadvertently) chosen for study enrollment. This tendency toward inclusion stems from human nature-the natural tendency for an investigator to relate to a particular investigative topic due to a special connection based on a cultural, socioeconomic, age, ethnicity, or gender level. This article reviews the most common population issues for clinical studies: age, gender, race, socioeconomic status, comorbidities, and disease severity, with examples of each from published studies. Recommendations are also offered to overcome these barriers.

  9. Non-cardiac issues in patients with heterotaxy syndrome

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    Shyam S Kothari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of complex congenital heart disease in patients with Heterotaxy syndrome (HS has steadily improved. However, there is an insufficient appreciation of various non-cardiac issues that might impact the overall status of these patients. This article briefly reviews the implications of gastrointestinal, immunologic, genitourinary, respiratory, and central nervous system involvement in HS patients with a view to aid in their comprehensive clinical management.

  10. Marfan Syndrome: A Clinical Update.

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    Bitterman, Adam D; Sponseller, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a connective tissue disorder that can affect many organ systems. Affected patients present with orthopaedic manifestations of the syndrome during all phases of life. Pain caused by musculoskeletal abnormalities often requires definitive orthopaedic treatment. Orthopaedic surgeons must understand the phenotypes of Marfan syndrome so they can recognize when screening is warranted and can appropriately address the skeletal manifestations. Through medical advancements, patients with Marfan syndrome are living longer and more active lives. Knowledge of the latest diagnostic criteria for the disorder, as well as of advances in understanding the skeletal phenotype, clinical trials of medication therapy, and lifestyle considerations is important for orthopaedic surgeons who treat these patients because these clinicians often are the first to suspect Marfan syndrome and recommend screening.

  11. Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome: management issues.

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    Bourke, Julius

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome represent two of the most commonly encountered functional somatic syndromes in clinical practice. Both have been contentious diagnoses in the past, and this diagnostic dispute has resulted in a therapeutic nihilism that has been of great detriment to their management and to alleviation of the intense suffering and disability that they have caused their innumerable sufferers. A new age has dawned in terms of a better understanding of these syndromes' physiology and improved approaches to their management. Here, the diagnosis and management of these closely related disorders are discussed, with particular reference to the recent empirical evidence that has come to light as a consequence of neurophysiological insights and robustly designed randomised clinical trials. Much work remains to be done in this vein, but we are better placed to facilitate recovery from these disorders than we have been previously. Whilst remission should always be a goal, complete symptom resolution is not the norm, but 'moderate' improvements are certainly attainable with appropriate management. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Clinical biomarkers in metabolic syndrome.

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    Barazzoni, Rocco; Silva, Veronica; Singer, Pierre

    2014-04-01

    A biomarker can be defined as a measurable variable that may be used as an indicator of a given biological state or condition. Biomarkers have been used in health and disease for diagnostic purposes, as tools to assess effectiveness of nutritional or drug intervention, or as risk markers to predict the development of certain diseases. In nutrition studies, selecting appropriate biomarkers is important to assess compliance, or incidence of a particular dietary component in the biochemistry of the organism, and in the diagnosis and prognosis of nutrition-related diseases. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiovascular risk factors that occur simultaneously in the same individual, and it is associated with systemic alterations that may involve several organs and tissues. Given its close association with obesity and the increasing prevalence of obesity worldwide, identifying obese individuals at risk for metabolic syndrome is a major clinical priority. Biomarkers for metabolic syndrome are therefore potential important tools to maximize the effectiveness of treatment in subjects who would likely benefit the most. Choice of biomarkers may be challenging due to the complexity of the syndrome, and this article will mainly focus on nutrition biomarkers related to the diagnosis and prognosis of the metabolic syndrome.

  13. Neurobehavioral and Psychosocial Issues in Klinefelter Syndrome

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    Geschwind, Daniel H.; Dykens, Elisabeth

    2004-01-01

    Klinefelter Syndrome (KS) is a relatively common (1/500 to 1/1,000) genetic syndrome caused by an extra X chromosome in males, leading to an XXY karyotype. In most cases, the physical and neurobehavioral characteristics of KS are relatively mild, and KS is not usually associated with moderate or severe mental retardation. However, KS is often…

  14. Treatment of Bartter syndrome. Unsolved issue.

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    Nascimento, Carla Lessa Pena; Garcia, Cecilia Lopes; Schvartsman, Benita Galassi Soares; Vaisbich, Maria Helena

    2014-01-01

    To describe the results of a long-term follow-up of Bartter syndrome patients treated with different drugs. Patients were diagnosed according to clinical and laboratory data. Treatment protocol was potassium supplementation, sodium, spironolactone, and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug. Patients who developed proteinuria were converted to angiotensin conversion enzyme inhibitor. The variables evaluated for each drug were Z-score for weight and stature, proteinuria, creatinine clearance, gastrointestinal complaints, amount of potassium supplementation, serum potassium and bicarbonate levels, and findings of upper digestive endoscopy. 20 patients were included. Follow-up was 10.1 ± 5.2 years. 17 patients received indomethacin for 5.9 ± 5.3 years; 19 received celecoxib, median of 35 months; and five received enalapril, median of 23 months. During indomethacin, a statistically significant increase was observed in the Z-score for stature and weight, without a change in the creatinine clearance. Seven of 17 patients had gastrointestinal symptoms, and upper digestive endoscopy evidenced gastritis in three patients and gastric ulcer in four patients. During celecoxib use, a significant increase was detected in the Z-score for stature and weight and a reduction of hyperfiltration; seven patients presented gastrointestinal symptoms, and upper digestive endoscopy evidenced mild gastritis in three. During enalapril use, no significant changes were observed in the Z-score for stature, weight and creatinine clearance. The conversion to enalapril resulted in a significant reduction in proteinuria. The authors suggest starting the treatment with celecoxib, and replacing by ACEi if necessary, monitoring the renal function. The safety and efficacy of celecoxib need to be assessed in larger controlled studies. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  15. Olfactory reference syndrome: issues for DSM-V.

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    Feusner, Jamie D; Phillips, Katharine A; Stein, Dan J

    2010-06-01

    The published literature on olfactory reference syndrome (ORS) spans more than a century and provides consistent descriptions of its clinical features. The core symptom is preoccupation with the belief that one emits a foul or offensive body odor, which is not perceived by others. This syndrome is associated with substantial distress and disability. DSM-IV and ICD-10 do not explicitly mention ORS, but note convictions about emitting a foul body odor in their description of delusional disorder, somatic type. However, the fact that such symptoms can be nondelusional poses a diagnostic conundrum. Indeed, DSM-IV also mentions fears about the offensiveness of one's body odor in the social phobia text (as a symptom of taijin kyofusho). There also seems to be phenomenological overlap with body dysmorphic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and hypochondriasis. This article provides a focused review of the literature to address issues for DSM-V, including whether ORS should continue to be mentioned as an example of another disorder or should be included as a separate diagnosis. We present a number of options and preliminary recommendations for consideration for DSM-V. Because research is still very limited, it is unclear how ORS should best be classified. Nonetheless, classifying ORS as a type of delusional disorder seems problematic. Given this syndrome's consistent clinical description across cultures for more than a century, substantial morbidity and a small but growing research literature, we make the preliminary recommendation that ORS be included in DSM-Vs Appendix of Criteria Sets Provided for Further Study, and we suggest diagnostic criteria. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Multilingual Children Who Stutter: Clinical Issues

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    Shenker, Rosalee C.

    2011-01-01

    Stuttering occurs across all languages and cultures. However, the impact of speaking more than one language on assessment and treatment of young children who stutter is not well documented. This paper discusses some of the challenges related to clinical issues pertaining to this population including (a) identifying stuttering in an unfamiliar…

  17. Medicolegal issues of Mermaid syndrome (Sirenomelia

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    M Vidanapathirana

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Sirenomelia is a rare congenital deformity in which the legs are fused together giving them the appearance of a mermaid’s tail. It is usually fatal within a day or two of birth. We describe a mermaid syndrome in a baby born to a 38 year old mother by lower segment cesarean section. This is her second pregnancy and first child died with meconium aspiration. Antenatal diagnosis of this condition has failed in this case in spite of routine Ultra Sound scan. However, because of her advance age anomaly scan could have done. There is an obvious chance of missing the diagnosis of mermaid syndrome during the routine examinations. Even it was diagnosed early; there are no legal provisions for a legal abortion unless the mother’s life is in danger. Amendments to the existing laws of legal abortion by including at least fatal congenital anomalies as an indication and making the anomaly scan more regular are suggested to uphold the rights of mothers.

  18. Unique topics and issues in rheumatology and clinical immunology.

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    Selmi, Carlo

    2014-08-01

    Clinicians are facing unexpected issues in everyday practice, and these may become counterintuitive or challenging. Illustrative examples are provided by the hypersensitivity to universally used immunosuppressants such as corticosteroids or antibiotics such as beta-lactam. Secondly, additional issues are represented by the discovery of new pathogenetic mechanisms involved in rheumatoid and psoriatic arthritis or other chronic inflammatory diseases, genomic susceptibility to enigmatic diseases such as giant cell arteritis, or the shared role of specific mediators such as semaphorins. Third, the therapeutic armamentarium has dramatically changed over the past decade following the introduction of biotechnological drugs, and new mechanisms are being proposed to reduce adverse events or increase the drug effectiveness, particularly on cardiovascular comorbidities. Finally, rare diseases continue to represent difficult cases, as for Cogan's syndrome, with limited literature available for clinical recommendations. For these reason, the present issue of Clinical Reviews in Allergy and Immunology is timely and dedicated to these and other unique topics in clinical immunology and allergy. The aim of this issue is thus to help clinicians involved in internal medicine as well as allergists and clinical immunologists while discussing new pathways that will prove important in the near future.

  19. Clinical course of Tourette syndrome.

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    Bloch, Michael H; Leckman, James F

    2009-12-01

    Tourette syndrome (TS) is a childhood-onset neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by multiple motor and vocal tics lasting at least a year in duration. Children with TS often experience comorbid conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and attention-deficit disorder. The goal of this article was to review the long-term clinical course of tics and comorbid conditions in children with TS. We conducted a traditional literature search to locate relevant articles regarding long-term outcome and prognosis in TS and tic disorders. Tics typically have an onset between the ages of 4 and 6 years and reach their worst-ever severity between the ages of 10 and 12 years. On average, tic severity declines during adolescence. By early adulthood, roughly three-quarters of children with TS will have greatly diminished tic symptoms and over one-third will be tic free. Comorbid conditions, such as OCD and other anxiety and depressive disorders, are more common during the adolescence and early adulthood of individuals with TS than in the general population. Although tics are the sine qua non of TS, they are often not the most enduring or impairing symptoms in children with TS. Measures used to enhance self-esteem, such as encouraging strong friendships and the exploration of interests, are crucial to ensuring positive adulthood outcome in TS.

  20. CLINICAL AND IMAGING FEATURES OF OTHELLO'S SYNDROME

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    Graff-Radford, Jonathan; Whitwell, Jennifer L.; Geda, Yonas E.; Josephs, Keith A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Our objective was to document the clinical and imaging features of Othello's syndrome (delusional jealousy). Methods The study design was a retrospective case series of 105 patients with Othello's syndrome that were identified by using the Electronic Medical Record system of Mayo Clinic. Results The average age at onset of Othello's syndrome was 68 (25–94) years with 61.9% of patients being male. Othello's syndrome was most commonly associated with a neurological disorder (73/105) compared with psychiatric disorders (32/105). Of the patients with a neurological disorder, 76.7% had a neurodegenerative disorder. Seven of eight patients with a structural lesion associated with Othello's syndrome had right frontal lobe pathology. Voxel-based morphometry showed greater grey matter loss predominantly in the dorsolateral frontal lobes in the neurodegenerative patients with Othello's compared to matched patients with neurodegenerative disorders without Othello's syndrome. Treatment success was notable for patients with dopamine agonist induced Othello's syndrome in which all six patients had improvement in symptoms following decrease in medication. Conclusions This study demonstrates that Othello's syndrome occurs most frequently with neurological disorders. This delusion appears to be associated with dysfunction of the frontal lobes, especially right frontal lobe. PMID:21518145

  1. Antiphospholipid Syndrome Clinical Research Task Force Report

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    Erkan, D.; Derksen, R.; Levy, R.; Machin, S.; Ortel, T.; Pierangeli, S.; Roubey, R.; Lockshin, M.

    The Antiphospholipid Syndrome (APS) Clinical Research Task Force (CRTF) was one of six Task Forces developed by the 13(th) International Congress on Antiphospholipid Antibodies (aPL) organization committee with the purpose of: a) evaluating the limitations of APS clinical research and developing

  2. Molecular and Clinical Aspects of Angelman Syndrome

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    Dagli, A.; Buiting, K.; Williams, C.A.

    2012-01-01

    The Angelman syndrome is caused by disruption of the UBE3A gene and is clinically delineated by the combination of severe mental disability, seizures, absent speech, hypermotoric and ataxic movements, and certain remarkable behaviors. Those with the syndrome have a predisposition toward apparent happiness and paroxysms of laughter, and this finding helps distinguish Angelman syndrome from other conditions involving severe developmental handicap. Accurate diagnosis rests on a combination of clinical criteria and molecular and/or cytogenetic testing. Analysis of parent-specific DNA methylation imprints in the critical 15q11.2–q13 genomic region identifies 75–80% of all individuals with the syndrome, including those with cytogenetic deletions, imprinting center defects and paternal uniparental disomy. In the remaining group, UBE3A sequence analysis identifies an additional percentage of patients, but 5–10% will remain who appear to have the major clinical phenotypic features but do not have any identifiable genetic abnormalities. Genetic counseling for recurrence risk is complicated because multiple genetic mechanisms can disrupt the UBE3A gene, and there is also a unique inheritance pattern associated with UBE3A imprinting. Angelman syndrome is a prototypical developmental syndrome due to its remarkable behavioral phenotype and because UBE3A is so crucial to normal synaptic function and neural plasticity. PMID:22670133

  3. Statistical Issues in TBI Clinical Studies

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    Paul eRapp

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The identification and longitudinal assessment of traumatic brain injury presents several challenges. Because these injuries can have subtle effects, efforts to find quantitative physiological measures that can be used to characterize traumatic brain injury are receiving increased attention. The results of this research must be considered with care. Six reasons for cautious assessment are outlined in this paper. None of the issues raised here are new. They are standard elements in the technical literature that describes the mathematical analysis of clinical data. The purpose of this paper is to draw attention to these issues because they need to be considered when clinicians evaluate the usefulness of this research. In some instances these points are demonstrated by simulation studies of diagnostic processes. We take as an additional objective the explicit presentation of the mathematical methods used to reach these conclusions. This material is in the appendices. The following points are made:1. A statistically significant separation of a clinical population from a control population does not ensure a successful diagnostic procedure.2. Adding more variables to a diagnostic discrimination can, in some instances, actually reduce classification accuracy.3. A high sensitivity and specificity in a TBI versus control population classification does not ensure diagnostic successes when the method is applied in a more general neuropsychiatric population. 4. Evaluation of treatment effectiveness must recognize that high variability is a pronounced characteristic of an injured central nervous system and that results can be confounded by either disease progression or spontaneous recovery. A large pre-treatment versus post-treatment effect size does not, of itself, establish a successful treatment.5. A procedure for discriminating between treatment responders and nonresponders requires, minimally, a two phase investigation. This procedure must include a

  4. Clinical issues of mucus accumulation in COPD

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    Osadnik CR

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Christian R Osadnik,1,2 Christine F McDonald,2,3 Anne E Holland2,4,51Department of Physiotherapy, Monash University, 2Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, 3Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, 4Department of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, 5Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, VIC, AustraliaWe wish to thank Ramos et al for presenting a succinct and up-to-date synthesis of the evidence relating to the important issue of mucus hypersecretion in COPD.1 The authors highlight the association of mucus hypersecretion with poor outcomes, including increased risk of exacerbations, hospitalization and mortality. These associations have led to interest in the potential benefits of mucus clearance techniques in COPD. As Ramos et al1 point out, although the physiological rationale for airway clearance techniques (ACTs in COPD is strong, clinical efficacy has historically been difficult to establish, perhaps due to the variety of techniques and outcomes that have been employed in small studies. We have recently synthesized this body of evidence in a Cochrane systematic review of ACTs for individuals with COPD. The review demonstrated ACTs are safe and meta-analysis showed they confer small beneficial effects on a limited range of important clinical outcomes, such as the need for and duration of ventilatory assistance during an acute exacerbation of COPD (AECOPD.2View original paper by Ramos and colleagues.

  5. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas: clinical governance issues.

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    Fields, P A; Goldstone, A H

    2002-09-01

    Every patient in every part of the world has the right to expect the best possible quality of care from health care providers. Non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) are an extremely heterogeneous group of conditions which require important decisions to be taken at many points along the treatment pathway. To get this right every time requires that high-quality standards are instituted and adhered to, so that the best possible outcome is achieved. In the past this has not always been the case because of the failure of clinicians sometimes to adhere to an optimal management plan. In 1995, the UK government commissioned an inquiry into the running of cancer services in the United Kingdom, which culminated in a series of recommendations to improve them. Subsequently, these recommendations were implemented as objectives of the NHS Cancer Plan which is the framework by which the UK government wishes to improve cancer services. Concurrently another general concept has emerged which is designed to ensure that the highest quality standards may be achieved for all patients across the whole National Health Service (NHS). This concept, termed 'clinical governance', brings together a corporate responsibility of all health care workers to deliver high quality standards, in the hope that this will translate into better long-term survival of patients with malignant disease. This chapter focuses on the issues surrounding clinical governance and how the principles of this concept relate to non-Hodgkin's lymphomas.

  6. Marfan Syndrome: Clinical, Surgical, and Anesthetic Considerations.

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    Castellano, José M; Silvay, George; Castillo, Javier G

    2014-09-01

    Marfan syndrome is a multisystem connective tissue disorder, with primary involvement of the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. This autosomal heritable disease is mainly attributable to a defect in the FBN1 gene. Clinical diagnosis of Marfan syndrome has been based on the Ghent criteria since 1996. In 2010, these criteria were updated, and the revised guidelines place more emphasis on aortic root dilation, ectopia lentis, and FBN1 mutation testing in the diagnostic assessment of Marfan syndrome. Among its many different clinical manifestations, cardiovascular involvement deserves special consideration, owing to its impact on prognosis. Recent molecular, surgical, and clinical research has yielded profound new insights into the pathological mechanisms that ultimately lead to tissue degradation and weakening of the aortic wall, which has led to exciting new treatment strategies. Furthermore, with the increasing life expectancy of patients with Marfan syndrome, there has been a subtle shift in the spectrum of medical problems. Consequently, this article focuses on recent advances to highlight their potential impact on future concepts of patient care from a clinical, surgical, and anesthetic perspective. © The Author(s) 2013.

  7. Transsexualism: Clinical Features and Legal Issues

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    Necla Keskin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Although the epidemiological data is generally obtained from the patients that applied for gender reassignment surgery, it is known that transsexualism is not seen as rarely as it was estimated in the past and should be evaluated in detail because of its psychological and social consequences. Etiology remains to be unclear and biological and psychosocial factors are thought to be responsible for its development. Gender identity stabilizes approximately in 3-4 ages and it is impossible to change it after these ages. For this reason the aim of treatment approaches is to improve the conformity of individuals to their identity and life, but not to change the gender identity. The World Professional Association for Transgender Health [WPATH] published a guideline including standards of care [SOC] and SOC provide clinical guidance in follow-up and treatment of transsexual individuals. There is a detailed code in civil law about gender reassignment but when this code implemented strictly, the use of it is very limited and it is clear that a new arrangement is needed in this issue.

  8. Clinical Manifestations of the Opiate Withdrawal Syndrome

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    Faniya Shigakova

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Currently, substance abuse is one of the most serious problems facing our society. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical manifestations of the opiate withdrawal syndrome (OWS. The study included 112 patients (57 women and 55 men aged from 18 to 64 years with opium addiction according to the DSM-IV. To study the clinical manifestation of OWS, the special 25-score scale with four sections to assess severity of sleep disorders, pain syndrome, autonomic disorders, and affective symptoms was used. Given the diversity of the OWS symptoms, attention was focused on three clinical variants, affective, algic and mixed. The OWS affective variant was registered more frequently in women, while the mixed type of OWS was more typical of men.

  9. Clinical implications of de Barsy syndrome.

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    Warner, Lindsay L; Olsen, David A; Smith, Hugh M

    2018-01-01

    De Barsy syndrome is a rare, autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by cutis laxa, progeroid appearance, ophthalmic opacification, skeletal malformations, growth delays, and intellectual disability. The aim of this case series is to identify the anesthetic considerations in the clinical management of patients with de Barsy syndrome. A retrospective case review from 1968 to 2016 was performed at a single tertiary medical center to identify patients with de Barsy syndrome who underwent anesthesia for diagnostic and surgical procedures. We collected and analyzed the perioperative records and following data: age, sex, American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status, relevant comorbidities, surgical procedures, anesthesia management, and observed complications. Three patients underwent 64 unique anesthetics for a diverse collection of diagnostic and surgical procedures. An array of anesthetics and techniques were successfully used. Observations of the perioperative period found 7 episodes of intraoperative hyperthermia (>38.3°), a single difficult airway requiring fiberoptic bronchoscopic-guided intubation, and repeatedly difficult intravenous access. This expanded case series suggests that providers caring for patients with de Barsy syndrome should be aware of potential challenges with airway management, vascular access, and temperature monitoring. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Vascular vertigo: epidemiology and clinical syndromes.

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    Karatas, Mehmet

    2011-01-01

    vertigo is a common complaint in medicine. The most common causes of vertigo are benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular neuritis, Meniere's syndrome, and vascular disorders. Vertigo of vascular origin is usually limited to migraine, transient ischemic attacks, and ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke. Vascular causes lead to various central or peripheral vestibular syndromes with vertigo. This study provides an overview of epidemiology and clinical syndromes of vascular vertigo. vertigo is an illusion of movement caused by asymmetrical involvement of the vestibular system by various causes. Migraine is the most frequent vascular disorder that causes vertigo in all age groups. Vertigo may occur in up to 25% of patients with migraine. The lifetime prevalence of migrainous vertigo is almost 1%. Cerebrovascular disorders are estimated to account for 3% to 7% of patients with vertigo. Vestibular paroxysmia has been diagnosed in 1.8% to 4% of cases in various dizziness units. Vasculitic disorders are rare in the general population, but vertigo may be seen in almost up to 50% of patients with different vasculitic syndromes. migraine, cerebrovascular disorders especially involving the vertebrobasilar territory, cardiocirculatory diseases, neurovascular compression of the eighth nerve, and vasculitis are vascular causes of vertigo syndromes.

  11. Current HIV clinical trial design issues

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    Lange, J. M.

    1995-01-01

    Aids-free time and survival time of people with HIV infection has gradually increased since the first clinical trial of zidovudine(AZT) in 1987. This change in pattern of disease course has, however, made it difficult for current clinical trials to rely on "hard" clinical end points, such as

  12. Stendhal syndrome: a clinical and historical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios-Sánchez, Leonardo; Botero-Meneses, Juan Sebastián; Pachón, Rocío Plazas; Hernández, Laura Bibiana Pineros; Triana-Melo, Juanita Del Pilar; Ramírez-Rodríguez, Santiago

    2018-02-01

    It could be argued that one of the few unifying qualities all human beings share is the ability to appreciate beauty. While the object of beauty may change from one person to another, the awe and the thrill experienced by an enthralled beholder remains the same. Sometimes, this experience can be so overwhelming it can bring someone to the edge of existence. A very rare condition, known as aesthetic syndrome and, more commonly, Stendhal syndrome, entails a clinical phenomenon in which the presence of a beautiful piece of work or architecture causes dysautonomic symptoms such as tachycardia, diaphoresis, chest pains and loss of consciousness. We present an historical and clinical review of this condition.

  13. Cugini's syndrome: its clinical history and diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Gasbarrone

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: This article deals with the description and diagnosis of a new nosographic syndrome, which received the eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" by the name of the Author who discovered its clinical picture. This syndrome is characterized by the binomial: "minimal target organ damage associated to monitoring prehypertension". CLINICAL HISTORY AND DIAGNOSIS: Between the years 1997 and 2002, the Author published a series of investigations regarding some office normotensives who inexplicably showed incipient signs of target organ damage (TOD. Investigated via ambulatory (A blood (B pressure (P monitoring (M, these subjects were surprisingly found not to be hypertensive. Neverthless, the office normotensives with TOD exibited the daily mean level of their systolic (S and diastolic (D BP (DML SBP/DBP significantly more elevated as compared to true normotensives. Because of these ABPM findings, the Author realized that the investigated subjects were false normotensives whose TOD was associated with a monitoring prehypertension (ABPM-diagnosable prehypertension alias monitoring prehypertension alias masked prehypertension. The year after the last Cugini's investigation, the INC-7 Reports introduced the term: "prehypertension" in its classification of arterial hypertension, as an office sphygmomanometric condition in between office normotension and office hypertension. The ABPM cut-off upper limits for a differential diagnosis between monitoring normotension, prehypertension and hypertension are reported, as calculated by the Author in its collection of ABPMs. The eponym of "Cugini's syndrome" was assigned in 2007 and confirmed in 2009. CONCLUSIVE REMARKS: The monitoring prehypertension is a further condition of discrepancy between office sphygmomanometry and ABPM, as per a masked prehypertension, whose diagnosis has to be immediately diagnosed, for preventing the onset of a TOD. There are reported the present investigations dealing with the possible

  14. Clinical spectrum of Treacher Collins syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrotra, Divya; Hasan, Mahdi; Pandey, Rahul; Kumar, Sumit

    2011-01-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS) is the most common of the human mandibulofacial dysostosis disorders. It is an autosomal-dominant disorder of the craniofacial development occurring between the fifth and the eighth weeks of embryonic development with an incidence of 1/50,000 live births, range between 1-40,000 and 1-70,000. We present here the various clinical, radiographical and other diagnostic findings of the TCS to correlate the clinical assessment with the diagnostic imaging and review the various investigations and management options being carried out to improve their facial deformity.

  15. [Richter syndrome: clinical characteristics and treatment experiences].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zeng-jun; Xu, Yan; Zhang, Pei-hong; Liu, Wei; Yi, Shu-hua; Zou, De-hui; Qi, Jun-yuan; Zhao, Yao-zhong; Qiu, Lu-gui

    2012-12-11

    To summarize the clinical characteristics of Richter syndrome and explore the methods of successful treatment and timely diagnosis. Five patients with Richter syndrome in the last three years (from January 2009 to December 2011) were analyzed retrospectively at our hospital, including their clinical features and therapy before and after transformation. There were 4 males and 1 female with a median age on a diagnosis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) at 47 (44 - 68) years. The median duration from a diagnosis of CLL to transformation was 52 (5 - 90) months. As for cytogenetic abnormalities, 3/4 patients had 17p deletion by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The clinical manifestations on transformation included regional enlargement of lymph node (n = 2) and systemic enlargement of lymph nodes (n = 3). All diagnoses were confirmed by lymph node biopsy and all transformed into diffuse large B cell lymphoma (classical transformation). The subgroups were germinal center B-cell like (GCB) (n = 3) and non-GCB (n = 1). After transformation, one patient underwent sibling allo-stem cell transplantation and survived 24 months until April 2012. Another patient with auto-stem cell transplantation relapsed and died 12 months later. One patient lost the treatment opportunity due to worsening condition. Another 2 patients gained partial remission after therapy and survived 20 and 8 months respectively. Richter syndrome may occur during a late stage of CLL. Such a high-risk cytogenetic abnormality as del17p may be correlated with transformation. Early identification and optimal therapy may extend the survival of Richter syndrome. Allo-stem cell transplantation remains a curable option.

  16. Metabolic syndrome in youth: current issues and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Terry T-K; Ball, Geoff D C; Franks, Paul W

    2007-02-01

    The current paper reviews the important issues and challenges facing children and adolescents with the metabolic syndrome (MetS). Studies suggest that the MetS and its risk components may be on the rise in children along with rising rates of obesity; however, further study remains warranted. The topics reviewed encompass the definition of the syndrome, its prevalence, clustering and tracking of metabolic risk factors, the role of physical activity and diet in the development of the MetS, criticisms and utility of the MetS definition, and special considerations needed in the pediatric population. Physical activity and diet may play important roles in the MetS; however, research with precise measurements of activity, diet, and metabolic outcomes is needed. The paper concludes by emphasizing that regardless of one's position in the ongoing debate about the MetS, the long-term risks attributable to each individual risk component are real. The abnormality of one component should automatically prompt the screening of other components. Among children and adolescents, lifestyle modification should always serve as the frontline strategy. Prevention during childhood is key to the largest possible impact on adult health at the population level.

  17. Polycystic ovary syndrome: clinical implication in perimenopause

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Lenart-Lipińska

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS, a hyperandrogenic disorder, is the commonest endocrinopathy in premenopausal women. This syndrome is associated with fertility problems, clinical manifestations of hyperandrogenism and metabolic disturbances, particularly insulin resistance and obesity. There is a great body of evidence that patients with PCOS present multiple cardiovascular risk factors and cluster components of metabolic syndrome from early ages. The presence of comorbidities such as abdominal obesity, insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension places these females at an increased risk of future cardiovascular events. However, the extent to which PCOS components are present in perimenopausal women and the degree to which PCOS increases various risk factors in addition to the known risk of the perimenopausal period have not been fully determined. The perimenopausal period per se is associated with weight gain and an increased cardiovascular risk, which may be additionally aggravated by the presence of metabolic disturbances connected with PCOS. The phenotype of PCOS may improve with aging and it is still uncertain whether the presence of PCOS significantly increases the cardiovascular risk later in women’s life. Most recent data suggest that the prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and the related long-term consequences in females with PCOS seem to be lower than expected. This manuscript reviews long-term consequences of PCOS and considers their clinical implications in perimenopause.

  18. Clinical and Biological Markers in Hypereosinophilic Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paneez Khoury

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HES are rare, heterogeneous syndromes characterized by markedly elevated eosinophil counts in the blood and/or tissue and evidence of eosinophil-associated pathology. Although parasitic infections, drug hypersensitivity, and other disorders of defined etiology can present as HES (associated HES, treatment is directed at the underlying cause rather than the eosinophilia itself. A number of additional subtypes of HES have been described, based on clinical and laboratory features. These include (1 myeloid HES—a primary disorder of the myeloid lineage, (2 lymphocytic variant HES—eosinophilia driven by aberrant or clonal lymphocytes secreting eosinophil-promoting cytokines, (3 overlap HES—eosinophilia restricted to a single organ or organ system, (4 familial eosinophilia—a rare inherited form of HES, and (5 idiopathic HES. Since clinical manifestations, response to therapy, and prognosis all differ between HES subtypes, this review will focus on clinical and biological markers that serve as markers of disease activity in HES (excluding associated HES, including those that are likely to be useful only in specific clinical subtypes.

  19. Clinical and epidemiologic characteristics of nodding syndrome in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nodding syndrome (repetitive nodding and progressive generalized seizures) is assuming epidemic proportions in South Sudan, Tanzania and Uganda. Objective: To describe clinical and epidemiological features of nodding syndrome in southern Sudan based on preliminary investigations conducted in 2001 ...

  20. Clinical Features of Chinese of Chinese Patients with Fuchs' Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peizeng Yang,; Haoli Jin,; Bing Li,; Xuan Chen,; Kijlstra, A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To characterize the clinical features of Chinese patients with Fuchs' syndrome. Design: Retrospective noncomparative case series. Participants: One hundred eighteen eyes of 104 consecutive patients with Fuchs' syndrome initially examined between January 1999 and March 2005. Methods: The

  1. Research Issues in Clinical Data Warehousing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Torben Bach; Jensen, Christian Søndergaard

    1998-01-01

    to data warehousing technologies, over those posed by conventional data warehouse applications. This article presents a number of exciting new research challenges posed by clinical applications, to be met by the database research community. These include the need for complex-data modeling features......Medical informatics has been an important area for the application of computing and database technology for at least four decades. This area may benefit from the functionality offered by data warehousing. However, the special nature of clinical applications poses different and new requirements......, advanced temporal support, advanced classification structures, continuously valued data, dimensionally reduced data, and the integration of very complex data. In addition, the support for clinical treatment protocols and medical research are interesting areas for research....

  2. Clinical Issues in Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadow, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Notes that psychopharmacologists have made considerable strides in establishing safety and efficacy of psychotropic drug therapy for childhood behavior disorders. Discusses controversy pertaining to appropriateness of medication or inadequacies of clinical management. Presents brief overview of the safety and efficacy of psychotropic drugs and the…

  3. Current educational issues in the clinical neurosciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desbiens, R; Elleker, M G; Goldsand, G; Hugenholtz, H; Puddester, D; Toyota, B; Findlay, J M

    2001-11-01

    Canadian training in the clinical neurosciences, neurology and neurosurgery, faces significant challenges. New balances are being set by residents, their associations and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada between clinical service, education and personal time. The nature of hospital-provided medical service has changed significantly over the past decade, impacting importantly on resident training. Finally, future manpower needs are of concern, especially in the field of neurosurgery, where it appears that soon more specialists will be trained than can be absorbed into the Canadian health care system. A special symposium on current challenges in clinical neuroscience training was held at the Canadian Congress of Neurological Sciences in June 2000. Representatives from the Canadian Association of Interns and Residents, the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada and English and French neurology and neurosurgery training programs made presentations, which are summarized in this report. Residency training has become less service-oriented, and this trend will continue. In order to manage the increasingly sophisticated hospital services of neurology and neurosurgery, resident-alternatives in the form of physician "moonlighters" or more permanent hospital-based clinicians or "hospitalists" will be necessary in order to operate major neuroclinical units. Health authorities and hospitals will need to recognize and assume this responsibility. As clinical experience diminishes during residency training, inevitably so will the concept of the fully competent "generalist" at the end of specialty training. Additional subspecialty training is being increasingly sought by graduates, particularly in neurosurgery. Training in neurology and neurosurgery, as in all medical specialties, has changed significantly in recent years and continues to change. Programs and hospitals need to adapt to these changes in order to ensure the production of fully

  4. [Clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of Jeavons syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Zhi-xian; Liu, Xiao-yan; Qin, Jiong; Zhang, Yue-hua

    2012-06-01

    The study was designed to examine the clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics of children with Jeavons syndrome. Video-electroencephalography (VEEG) monitoring was carried out in 9 patients with Jeavons syndrome. The clinical and electroencephalographic characteristics, treatment and prognoses were analyzed. Of the 9 patients, 8 were female, and 1 was male. The onset age of children with eyelid myoclonia (EM) was from 3 to 9 years old. It was obtained through the chief complaint, prosecution or VEEG monitoring. Three cases were misdiagnosed and 2 cases were overlooked initially. Seven out of 9 patients had generalized tonic clonic seizures (GTCS) during the course of disease, of whom 5 experienced only one episode. GTCS was the cause for the first visits to hospital in 5 patients. Since the clinical manifestations of EM with or without absence were often slight, VEEG monitoring with eye closure and intermittent photic stimulation tests helped to induce discharges and seizures. Eye closure was more potent than intermittent photic stimulation as a triggering factor. Ictal EEG showed 3 - 6 Hz generalized spike and waves and polyspikes burst. The main treatment option was valproate monotherapy (6 cases) or combined with other antiepileptic drugs (1 case). Levetiracetam, lamotrigine and topiramate were also used in patients and effective to some degree. Two patients lost follow up. The age of 7 patients at follow-up ranged from 9 y to 15 y. Seizures were controlled in 1 case, suspiciously controlled in 1 case, decreased in frequency in 4 cases and were still frequent in 1 case. During follow-up, normal intelligence was found in the former 2 cases, difficult learning in 2 cases, and slightly intellectual impairment in 2 cases. Jeavons syndrome is one of the idiopathic generalized epilepsies characterized by EM with or without absence. The age of seizure onset might be difficult to be exactly established, as EM was often misinterpreted and overlooked

  5. Catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome and pregnancy. Clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khizroeva, J; Bitsadze, V; Makatsariya, A

    2018-01-08

    We have observed the development of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS) in a pregnant woman hospitalized at 28 weeks of gestation with a severe preeclampsia. On the same day, an eclampsia attack developed, and an emergency surgical delivery was performed. On the third day, multiorgan failure developed. Examination showed a persistent circulation of lupus anticoagulant, high level of antibodies to cardiolipin, b2-glycoprotein I, and prothrombin. The usual diagnosis of the severe preeclampsia masked a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome, exacerbated by the coincident presence of several types of antiphospholipid antibodies. The first pregnancy resulted in a premature birth at 25 weeks, possibly also due to the circulation of antiphospholipid antibodies. The trigger of the catastrophic form development was the pregnancy itself, surgical intervention, and hyperhomocysteinemia. CAPS is the most severe form of antiphospholipid syndrome, manifested in multiple microthrombosis of microcirculation of vital organs and in the development of multiorgan failure against the background of the high level of antiphospholipid antibodies. CAPS is characterized by renal, cerebral, gastrointestinal, adrenal, ovarian, skin, and other forms of microthrombosis. Thrombosis recurrence is typical. Thrombotic microvasculopathy lies at the heart of multiorgan failure and manifests clinically in central nervous system lesions, adrenal insufficiency, and ARDS development. CAPS is a life-threatening condition, therefore, requires an urgent treatment. Optimal treatment of CAPS is not developed. CAPS represent a general medical multidisciplinary problem.

  6. Refeeding syndrome: clinical and nutritional relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana, Larissa de Andrade; Burgos, Maria Goretti Pessoa de Araújo; Silva, Rafaella de Andrade

    2012-01-01

    Feedback syndrome is characterized clinically by neurological alterations, respiratory symptoms, arrhythmias and heart failure few days after refeeding. It happens due to severe electrolyte changes, such as hypophosphatemia, hypomagnesemia and hypokalemia associated with metabolic abnormalities that may occur as a result of nutritional support (oral, enteral or parenteral) in severely malnourished patients. To evaluate its causes and the preventive dietary measures aiming to reduce the morbimortality. Was conducted literature review in SciELO, LILACS, Medline / PUBMED, Cochrane Library and government websites in Portuguese, English and Spanish. The survey was about the last 15 years, selecting the headings: refeeding syndrome, malnutrition, hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, hypomagnesemia. The monitoring of metabolic parameters and electrolyte levels before starting nutritional support and periodically during feeding should be based on protocols and the duration of therapy. Patients at high risk and other metabolic complications should be followed closely, and depletion of minerals and electrolytes should be replaced before starting the diet. A multidisciplinary team of nutrition therapy can guide and educate other health professionals in prevention, diagnosis and treatment of the syndrome.

  7. Contemporary issues in clinical trials for medulloblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kun, Larry E.

    1996-01-01

    Medulloblastoma is the seminal pediatric brain tumor providing opportunities for clinical investigation to define improved treatment strategies for both disease control and ultimate functional integrity. Recent studies addressing neuraxis radiation dose provide a 'standard' for conventional therapy while establishing 5-year disease control rates for 'favorable' or 'low risk' presentations approximating 60% following surgery and irradiation. A highly visible recent report of combined post-operative irradiation and chemotherapy incorporating a platinum- and alkylator-based regimen indicates 5-year disease control approaching 90% in localized medulloblastoma. Despite unfavorable outcome with reduced-dose neuraxis irradiation in earlier trials, further data from recent studies suggest the addition of post-operative chemotherapy to similarly reduced-dose neuraxis irradiation (23.4 Gy) in 'favorable' presentations may result in progression-free survival rates at least equivalent to those achieved with full-dose neuraxis irradiation (36 Gy) absent chemotherapy. The panel will (1) provide updated information regarding the major clinical trials that form the basis for current and planned protocols and (2) debate the therapeutic modifications appropriate for contemporary clinical investigations. Critical in planning future studies in the analysis of risk factors that may identify 'favorable' patients versus 'high risk' patients. Risk-related studies appropriately address maintaining or improving current disease control rates in the context of diminishing late treatment sequelae for 'favorable' presentations. For those identified as 'high risk' (e.g., patients with disease beyond the primary site), studies are in development that increase the intensity of chemotherapy and explore modifications of radiation delivery. Study designs that permit assessment of innovations in surgical, radiotherapeutic, and chemotherapeutic approaches will be presented and debated by the panelists

  8. Feeding issues and interventions in infants and children with clefts and craniofacial syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Claire K

    2011-05-01

    Problems with oral feeding occur in varying degrees in infants born with cleft lip/palate and/or craniofacial syndromes. The extent of clefting is associated with the severity of feeding problems, and if cleft lip/palate occurs in conjunction with a craniofacial syndrome, additional structural, airway, and neuromotor issues may be present. The infant's feeding and swallowing skills may be significantly impaired, characterized by inefficient oral feeding skills coupled with poor airway protection ability during swallowing. Inadequate airway protection during swallowing has serious implications for the infant's respiratory health as sequelae of chronic aspiration during feeding may include recurrent respiratory illness, pneumonia, and lung damage. Feeding difficulty in nonsyndromic and syndromic cleft lip/palate infants has been documented as source of considerable stress for parents and can have a potential negative effect on the parent-infant bonding process. Therefore, timely identification of feeding problems by the speech pathologist with subsequent intervention and modification in the feeding method is essential, along with provision of early feeding instruction to families. The objective of this article is to review expert opinion and available evidence regarding factors that influence feeding success and efficiency in infants with nonsyndromic and syndromic cleft lip/palate. The types of compensatory strategies or interventions that are effective in alleviation of feeding and swallowing difficulties will be described. Descriptive reports, expert opinion, and available evidence from clinical trials to support the use of feeding interventions in treatment are reviewed. © Thieme Medical Publishers.

  9. METABOLIC SYNDROME IN PATIENTS WITH PSYCHOTIC DISORDERS: diagnostic issues, comorbidity and side effects of antipsychotics

    OpenAIRE

    Kozumplik, Oliver; Uzun, Suzana; Jakovljević, Miro

    2010-01-01

    Background: Metabolic syndrome and other cardiovascular risk factors are highly prevalent in people with schizophrenia. Metabolic syndrome can contribute to significant morbidity and premature mortality and should be accounted for in the treatment of mental disorders. Along with results of numerous investigations regarding metabolic syndrome, different issues have occurred. The aim of this article is to review literature regarding diagnostic and treatment of metabolic syndrome and po...

  10. [Cushing's syndrome: clinical study of fifteen cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Romero, J M; Morales Pérez, F; Alvarez Barreiro, J A; Diaz Pérez de Madrid, J

    1998-05-01

    To study the epidemiological and clinical features and diagnostic tests of Cushing's syndrome (CS) of non-iatrogenic etiology, because of there are few similar studies in the last ten years. Fifteen cases of CS were diagnosed from 1992 to 1997 at our hospital. We describe the epidemiological, clinical, biochemical, radiologic, therapeutic and evolutive characteristics. Both diabetes mellitus and hypertension were observed in 40% of patients. The frequency of etiologies was: Cushing's disease, 66.6%; ectopic ACTH syndrome, 13.3%; adrenal adenoma, 6.6%; adrenal carcinoma, 6.6%; and undiagnosed, 6.6%. The 24-hour urine free cortisol (UFC) and the overnight 1 mg oral dexamethasone suppression test yielded 93.3 and 100% diagnostic sensitivity for CS, respectively. The overnight 8 mg oral dexamethasone suppression test, the metyrapone test and the 7 mg intravenous dexmethasone test had 75, 50 and 60% diagnostic sensitivity for Cushing's disease, respectively. Ketoconazole treatment had success in to normalize the 24-hour UFC in all patients, except for the case of adrenal carcinoma. The Cushing's disease was the most common form of CS. The 24-hour UFC and overnight 1 mg oral dexamethasone suppression test were good screening studies. Ketoconazole was successful in normalizing the adrenal cortex function.

  11. A clinical study of Noonan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharland, M; Burch, M; McKenna, W M; Paton, M A

    1992-01-01

    Clinical details are presented on 151 individuals with Noonan syndrome (83 males and 68 females, mean age 12.6 years). Polyhydramnios complicated 33% of affected pregnancies. The commonest cardiac lesions were pulmonary stenosis (62%), and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (20%), with a normal echocardiogram present in only 12.5% of all cases. Significant feeding difficulties during infancy were present in 76% of the group. Although the children were short (50% with a height less than 3rd centile), and underweight (43% with a weight less than 3rd centile), the mean head circumference of the group was on the 50th centile. Motor milestone delay was usual, the cohort having a mean age of sitting unsupported of 10 months and walking of 21 months. Abnormal vision (94%) and hearing (40%) were frequent findings, but 89% of the group were attending normal primary or secondary schools. Other associations included undescended testicles (77%), hepatosplenomegaly (50%), and evidence of abnormal bleeding (56%). The mean age at diagnosis of Noonan syndrome in this group was 9.0 years. Earlier diagnosis of this common condition would aid both clinical management and genetic counselling. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:1543375

  12. Symptom Severity of Restless Legs Syndrome Predicts Its Clinical Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung Suk; Kim, Tae; Lee, Sumin; Jeon, Hong Jun; Bang, Young Rong; Yoon, In-Young

    2016-04-01

    This study examines the clinical course of restless legs syndrome according to its severity and factors associated with the remission of restless legs syndrome symptoms. The remission or persistence of restless legs syndrome symptoms was investigated by considering patients with restless legs syndrome at the sleep clinic of Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. All subjects were observed for at least 18 months, and an incidence of remission was defined as having no restless legs syndrome symptoms for at least 1 year. Restless legs syndrome severity was evaluated by the International Restless Legs Syndrome Study Group Rating Scale. A total of 306 patients participated in this study. Over the observation periods of 4.1 ± 1.6 years, the cumulative incidence of remission is 32.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 27.0-38.0) and decreased with baseline restless legs syndrome severity (P restless legs syndrome cases, respectively. Most cases of remission (82/96) were observed within 1 year, and the remission occurred sooner for mild restless legs syndrome. The hazard ratios of remission by Cox proportional hazards model were lower for moderate (0.556; 95% CI, 0.340-0.909) and severe to very severe (0.193; 95% CI, 0.108-0.343) restless legs syndrome than for mild restless legs syndrome. The remission incidence was lower for those patients who had a family history of restless legs syndrome and were older at restless legs syndrome diagnosis. Mild restless legs syndrome severity, no family history, and young age at restless legs syndrome diagnosis were significant predictors of restless legs syndrome remission. More than 80% of patients with severe restless legs syndrome showed a chronic clinical course. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. [Irritable bowel syndrome: New pathophysiological hypotheses and practical issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duboc, H; Dior, M; Coffin, B

    2016-08-01

    In 2015, besides the fact that it still fills the gastroenterologists' offices and impairs patient's quality of life, the irritable bowel syndrome has considerably evolved on several points. The pathophysiology is now organized around a consensual hypothesis called the "brain-gut axis", which gather all the influences of peripheral factors as gut microbiota or local serotonin secretion, on the central pain perception, contributing to visceral hypersensitivity and transit modifications. About the diagnosis, the key message is "avoid over-prescription" of additional tests, and reminds that a positive clinical diagnosis based on Rome III criteria is possible after the elimination of simple clinical warning signs. Finally, the food component, a neglected and historical claim of patients, finally finds a strong scientific rational, with a diet low in fermentable sugar and polyols, that gives positive and reproducible results. Copyright © 2016 Société Nationale Française de Médecine Interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Metapsychological and clinical issues in psychosomatics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Press, Jacques

    2016-02-01

    The author starts by treating the general epistemological problems inherent to research and emphasizes that all investigation takes place between two poles: a creative pole and one that is defensive in relation to the unknown and formlessness. In the psychosomatic field, an additional difficulty resides in the western dualistic vision of the relationship between psyche and soma which influences our way of thinking about the body as well as about otherness. The author continues by exploring Pierre Marty's psychosomatic model. Its psychosomatic monism is revolutionary but incomplete and creates a distance with the other, the somatizing patient, resulting in a medically oriented nosology symptomatic of the impossibility to think about some of the most important aspects of counter-transference. With the help of clinical material, the author considers these unthought aspects and some of their theoretical implications, particularly the way of understanding the negative often so prevalent with these patients. Based on these reflections as well as Freud's on beyond the pleasure principle and Winnicott's theorization on the fear of breakdown, the author suggests some directions for research. Somatic illness might occur when the attempts at filling the cracks created by a breakdown are unsuccessful. Copyright © 2015 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  15. [Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome--clinical presentation and genetics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodwall, Kristoffer M; Júlíusson, Pétur B; Bjerknes, Robert; Hovland, Randi; Fiskerstrand, Torunn

    2011-08-09

    The trichorhinophalangeal syndrome (TRPS) is a hereditary, skeletal dysplasia which has a characteristic clinical presentation and is classified in types 1, 2 and 3, based on phenotype and genotype. Typical findings may be mild and many patients probably remain undiagnosed. The paper is based on four case reports and provides a short review of the condition. Our four patients all have typical facial features, such as a large nose and thin upper lip, thin hair and short curved fingers with characteristic radiological findings. The condition is autosomal dominant and caused by a mutation in the TRPS1 gene, which codes a gene-regulating protein involved in development of hair and modulation of chondrocytes. The diagnosis can be based on clinical findings, but DNA-analysis can be of help in unclear situations. Two of our patients were diagnosed from clinical and radiological findings, but for the two others genetic examinations were done as well. There is no causal treatment, but the diagnosis can give patients an explanation of their problems, and genetic counseling for the patient and family can be offered. Orthopedic surgery and cosmetic aids are valuable for many. In an increasingly technified medical daily life, the clinical view is still the most important tool in diagnosing patients with this condition.

  16. Growing teratoma syndrome: clinical and radiographic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dennis J; Djaladat, Hooman; Tadros, Nicholas N; Movassaghi, Mehran; Tejura, Tapas; Duddalwar, Vinay; Daneshmand, Siamak

    2014-09-01

    To present an overview of our surgical experience in the management of growing teratoma syndrome. A retrospective analysis of all patients undergoing post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy between November 2005 and February 2012 revealed 15 patients who met the criteria for growing teratoma syndrome. Their clinical data, imaging characteristics, and surgical and oncological outcomes were reviewed. The median age at diagnosis was 23 years. Primary testis tumors included non-seminomatous germ cell tumor in 12 of 15 patients, seminoma in two of 15 patients and hemorrhagic mass in one patient. Mature teratoma was present in just six (40%) of the orchiectomy specimens. All patients received preoperative chemotherapy. On imaging, the median size of the largest retroperitoneal mass was 7 cm (range 3.9-24.5 cm). The median rate of linear growth was 0.5 cm/month (range 0.03-2.9), and the increase in volume was 9.2 cm(3) /month. All tumors were found to have cystic and necrotic components. Median operative time was 6.2 h (range 4.2-15.2 h). Estimated blood loss was 600 mL (range 100-7000 mL), and median length of stay was 5 days (range 3-19 days). Four patients required resection of non-retroperitoneal growing teratoma masses after post-chemotherapy retroperitoneal lymphadenectomy to achieve tumor-free status. There were two minor (Clavien I-II) and two major postoperative complications (Clavien ≥III). All patients are alive and disease free with a median duration of follow-up of 8 months (range 1-64 months). Growing teratoma syndrome tumors vary in their growth rate, but they all appear to have cystic features with necrosis elements on radiographic evaluation. Aggressive surgical excision is associated with excellent outcomes. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  17. Prader-Willi Syndrome: Clinical Aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grechi Elena

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS is a complex multisystem genetic disorder that shows great variability, with changing clinical features during a patient’s life. The syndrome is due to the loss of expression of several genes encoded on the proximal long arm of chromosome 15 (15q11.2–q13. The complex phenotype is most probably caused by a hypothalamic dysfunction that is responsible for hormonal dysfunctions and for absence of the sense of satiety. For this reason a Prader-Willi (PW child develops hyperphagia during the initial stage of infancy that can lead to obesity and its complications. During infancy many PW child display a range of behavioural problems that become more noticeable in adolescence and adulthood and interfere mostly with quality of life. Early diagnosis of PWS is important for effective long-term management, and a precocious multidisciplinary approach is fundamental to improve quality of life, prevent complications, and prolong life expectancy.

  18. Clinical management of the hypereosinophilic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cogan, Elie; Roufosse, Florence

    2012-06-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndromes (HESs) are rare disorders characterized by marked hypereosinophilia that is directly responsible for organ damage or dysfunction. Different pathogenic mechanisms have been discovered in patient subgroups leading to the characterization of myeloproliferative and lymphocytic disease variants. In the updated terminology, idiopathic HES is now restricted to patients with HES of undetermined etiology. The practical clinical approach of patients with the different HES variants is reviewed herein, focusing on specific diagnostic tools and therapeutic options. Corticosteroids, hydroxyurea and IFN-α remain the classical agents for treatment of most patients with HESs. The specific role of therapeutic compounds that have become available more recently, namely, tyrosine kinase inhibitors and IL-5 antagonists, is discussed.

  19. Clinical Observation of a Child with Down Syndrome and Glucose and Galactose Malapsorbtion Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.I. Kozhemiaka

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with a clinical case of primary glucose and galactose malabsorption syndrome in a child with Down syndrome. Difficulty in diagnosis of glucose and galactose malabsorption syndrome in this observation is due to a combination of this disease with other genetic pathology. The article introduces pediatricians and family doctors to the possible comorbidities of various congenital nosological forms.

  20. Early clinical manifestations of Sézary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mangold, Aaron R; Thompson, Agnieszka K; Davis, Mark D

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Classic Sézary syndrome (SS) is defined by erythroderma, generalized lymphadenopathy, and leukemic blood involvement. Clinical observations suggest that SS begins as a nonerythrodermic disease. OBJECTIVE: To describe the early clinical characteristics of patients with SS. METHODS...

  1. Perinatal clinical and imaging features of CLOVES syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel [Virgen del Rocio Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Seville (Spain); Fajardo, Manuel [Virgen del Rocio Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Seville (Spain); Chaudry, Gulraiz; Alomari, Ahmad I. [Children' s Hospital Boston and Harvard Medical School, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2010-08-15

    We report a neonate with antenatal imaging features suggestive of CLOVES syndrome. Postnatal clinical and imaging findings confirmed the diagnosis, with the constellation of truncal overgrowth, cutaneous capillary malformation, lymphatic and musculoskeletal anomalies. The clinical, radiological and histopathological findings noted in this particular phenotype help differentiate it from other overgrowth syndromes with complex vascular anomalies. (orig.)

  2. Clinical features of Chinese patients with Fuchs' syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, Peizeng; Fang, Wang; Jin, Haoli; Li, Bing; Chen, Xuan; Kijlstra, Aize

    2006-01-01

    To characterize the clinical features of Chinese patients with Fuchs' syndrome. Retrospective noncomparative case series. One hundred eighteen eyes of 104 consecutive patients with Fuchs' syndrome initially examined between January 1999 and March 2005. The history and clinical findings of all

  3. Clinical Characteristics of Fuchs’ Uveitis Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pınar Çakar Özdal

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and demographic properties of Fuchs’ uveitis syndrome (FUS in Turkish patients. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 161 patients with FUS followed in the Uveitis Division of Ulucanlar Eye Hospital between 1996 and 2014 were respectively reviewed. The mean age at diagnosis, sex, the number of affected eyes, follow-up period, clinical findings at presentation, complications during the follow-up period, medical and surgical treatments, and best corrected visual acuity at the initial and final visits were recorded. Results: The study included 171 eyes of 161 patients diagnosed with FUS. Of the patients, 94 (58.4% were female and 67 (41.6% were male. The mean age at presentation was 35.2±11.0 (11-65 years. The mean follow-up period was 23.5±32.8 (2-216 months. Ten (6.2% patients had bilateral involvement. The most common symptoms at presentation were decreased visual acuity or blurred vision in 63 (39.1% and floaters in 19 (11.8% patients. Clinical findings at presentation included diffuse small, round, white keratic precipitates in 128 (74.8% eyes, anterior chamber reaction in 82 (47.9%, vitreous cells in 122 (71.3%, heterochromia in 47 (27.4% and iris nodules in 32 (18.7% eyes. During the follow-up period, elevated intraocular pressure occured in 31 (18.1% eyes and the most common complication was cataract development (89 eyes, 52.0%. Conclusion: Heterochromia was observed in 27.4% of patients in our study. However, the diffuse small, round keratic precipitates, low-grade anterior chamber reaction and varying degrees of vitreous reaction are more common clinical characteristics that are helpful in making the diagnosis.

  4. Clinical Characteristics of Fuchs’ Uveitis Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalçacıoğlu, Pınar; Çakar Özdal, Pınar; Şimşek, Mert

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the clinical and demographic properties of Fuchs’ uveitis syndrome (FUS) in Turkish patients. Materials and Methods: The medical records of 161 patients with FUS followed in the Uveitis Division of Ulucanlar Eye Hospital between 1996 and 2014 were respectively reviewed. The mean age at diagnosis, sex, the number of affected eyes, follow-up period, clinical findings at presentation, complications during the follow-up period, medical and surgical treatments, and best corrected visual acuity at the initial and final visits were recorded. Results: The study included 171 eyes of 161 patients diagnosed with FUS. Of the patients, 94 (58.4%) were female and 67 (41.6%) were male. The mean age at presentation was 35.2±11.0 (11-65) years. The mean follow-up period was 23.5±32.8 (2-216) months. Ten (6.2%) patients had bilateral involvement. The most common symptoms at presentation were decreased visual acuity or blurred vision in 63 (39.1%) and floaters in 19 (11.8%) patients. Clinical findings at presentation included diffuse small, round, white keratic precipitates in 128 (74.8%) eyes, anterior chamber reaction in 82 (47.9%), vitreous cells in 122 (71.3%), heterochromia in 47 (27.4%) and iris nodules in 32 (18.7%) eyes. During the follow-up period, elevated intraocular pressure occured in 31 (18.1%) eyes and the most common complication was cataract development (89 eyes, 52.0%). Conclusion: Heterochromia was observed in 27.4% of patients in our study. However, the diffuse small, round keratic precipitates, low-grade anterior chamber reaction and varying degrees of vitreous reaction are more common clinical characteristics that are helpful in making the diagnosis. PMID:27800260

  5. Clinical Characteristics of Fuchs' Uveitis Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalçacıoğlu, Pınar; Çakar Özdal, Pınar; Şimşek, Mert

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate the clinical and demographic properties of Fuchs' uveitis syndrome (FUS) in Turkish patients. The medical records of 161 patients with FUS followed in the Uveitis Division of Ulucanlar Eye Hospital between 1996 and 2014 were respectively reviewed. The mean age at diagnosis, sex, the number of affected eyes, follow-up period, clinical findings at presentation, complications during the follow-up period, medical and surgical treatments, and best corrected visual acuity at the initial and final visits were recorded. The study included 171 eyes of 161 patients diagnosed with FUS. Of the patients, 94 (58.4%) were female and 67 (41.6%) were male. The mean age at presentation was 35.2±11.0 (11-65) years. The mean follow-up period was 23.5±32.8 (2-216) months. Ten (6.2%) patients had bilateral involvement. The most common symptoms at presentation were decreased visual acuity or blurred vision in 63 (39.1%) and floaters in 19 (11.8%) patients. Clinical findings at presentation included diffuse small, round, white keratic precipitates in 128 (74.8%) eyes, anterior chamber reaction in 82 (47.9%), vitreous cells in 122 (71.3%), heterochromia in 47 (27.4%) and iris nodules in 32 (18.7%) eyes. During the follow-up period, elevated intraocular pressure occured in 31 (18.1%) eyes and the most common complication was cataract development (89 eyes, 52.0%). Heterochromia was observed in 27.4% of patients in our study. However, the diffuse small, round keratic precipitates, low-grade anterior chamber reaction and varying degrees of vitreous reaction are more common clinical characteristics that are helpful in making the diagnosis.

  6. [Myelodysplastic syndromes: pathophysiology, clinical and biological features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becha, Mohamed; Braham Jmili, Néjia

    2015-01-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are hemopathies very common in geriatric practice. They are characterized by qualitative morphological abnormalities of one or more myeloid lineages responsible for an ineffective hematopoiesis, and therefore cytopenias of central origin contrasting with a usually rich bone marrow wealth. The MDS are asymptomatic in half of the cases and their discovery is a result of systematic blood analysis or tests to explore another disease. The evolution is marked by worsening cytopenias, and the risk of acute myeloid leukemia transformation with poor prognosis because frequently chemoresistant. The diagnosis of MDS is pronounced after a clinico-biological confrontation to discuss the differential diagnosis taking into account all clinical and cytological data, results of conventional cytogenetics and evolution after vitamin therapy. Knowledge more depth on MDS refine MDS classification criteria by developing successive classifications (FAB 1982, WHO 2001 and 2008) which aim the identification of MDS groups with clinical, biological and common prognostic. The treatment of MDS is essentially symptomatic. The development of new targeted therapeutic strategies enables high hopes in a context where treatment options are a difficult choice, because the advanced age of most patients. Finally, detailed knowledge of risk factors and prognostic scores are very useful to make the best treatment decisions.

  7. Unresolved Issues for Utilization of Atypical Antipsychotics in Schizophrenia: Antipsychotic Polypharmacy and Metabolic Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang Won Jeon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atypical antipsychotics (AAP are the prevailing form of schizophrenia treatment today due to their low side effects and superior efficacy. Nevertheless, some issues still need to be addressed. First, there are still a large number of patients with treatment-resistant schizophrenia (TRS, which has led to a growing trend to resort to AAP polypharmacy with few side effects. Most clinical treatment guidelines recommend clozapine monotherapy in TRS, but around one third of schizophrenic patients fail to respond to clozapine. For these patients, with clozapine-resistant schizophrenia AAP polypharmacy is a common strategy with a continually growing evidence base. Second, AAP generally have great risks for developing metabolic syndrome, such as weight gain, abnormality in glucose, and lipid metabolism. These metabolic side effects have become huge stumbling blocks in today’s schizophrenia treatment that aims to improve patients’ quality of life as well as symptoms. The exact reasons why this particular syndrome occurs in patients treated with AAP is as yet unclear though factors such as interaction of AAP with neurotransmitter receptors, genetic pholymorphisms, type of AAPs, length of AAP use, and life style of schizophrenic patients that may contribute to its development. The present article aimed to review the evidence underlying these key issues and provide the most reasonable interpretations to expand the overall scope of antipsychotics usage.

  8. Gastrointestinal and nutritional issues in joint hypermobility syndrome/Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, hypermobility type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco; Morlino, Silvia; Pascolini, Giulia; Blundo, Carlo; Grammatico, Paola

    2015-03-01

    Gastrointestinal involvement is a well known complication of Ehlers-Danlos syndromes (EDSs), mainly in form of abdominal emergencies due to intestinal/abdominal vessels rupture in vascular EDS. In the last decade, a growing number of works investigated the relationship between a wide spectrum of chronic gastrointestinal complaints and various EDS forms, among which the hypermobility type (a.k.a. joint hypermobility syndrome; JHS/EDS-HT) was the most studied. The emerging findings depict a major role for gastrointestinal involvement in the health status and, consequently, management of JHS/EDS-HT patients. Nevertheless, fragmentation of knowledge limits its impact on practice within the boundaries of highly specialized clinics. In this paper, literature review on gastrointestinal manifestations in JHS/EDS-HT was carried out and identified papers categorized as (i) case-control/cohort studies associating (apparently non-syndromic) joint hypermobility and gastrointestinal involvement, (ii) case-control/cohort studies associating JHS/EDS-HT and gastrointestinal involvement, (iii) case reports/series on various gastrointestinal complications in (presumed) JHS/EDS-HT, and (iv) studies reporting gastrointestinal features in heterogeneous EDS patients' cohorts. Gastrointestinal manifestations of JHS/EDS-HT were organized and discussed in two categories, including structural anomalies (i.e., abdominal/diaphragmatic hernias, internal organ/pelvic prolapses, intestinal intussusceptions) and functional features (i.e., dysphagia, gastro-esophageal reflux, dyspepsia, recurrent abdominal pain, constipation/diarrhea), with emphasis on practice and future implications. In the second part of this paper, a summary of possible nutritional interventions in JHS/EDS-HT was presented. Supplementation strategies were borrowed from data available for general population with minor modifications in the light of recent discoveries in the pathogenesis of selected JHS/EDS-HT features. © 2015

  9. [Asperger syndrome: evolution of the concept and current clinical data].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aussilloux, C; Baghdadli, A

    2008-05-01

    Although Asperger syndrome is described by international classifications as a category of pervasive developmental disorder (PDD), its validity as a specific entity distinct from autistic disorders remains controversial. The syndrome, first described by Hans Asperger, could not be distinguished from high functioning autism (onset, symptoms, outcome...). However, international classifications propose a distinction between the two syndromes based on a delayed onset, the absence of speech delay, the presence of motor disorders and a better outcome in Asperger syndrome. This categorical differentiation is not confirmed by current studies and in the absence of biological markers, no clinical, neuropsychological or epidemiological criteria makes it possible to distinguish high functioning autism from Asperger syndrome. From a clinical perspective, it is nevertheless of interest to isolate Asperger syndrome from other autistic disorders to propose specific assessment and therapy.

  10. [Ogilvie syndrome. 2 clinical case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terzi, A; Menghini, I; Manzi, A; Bonini, C A

    1991-05-31

    Acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon is an uncommon syndrome usually related to other diseases. Two patients with this syndrome are described. It is stressed that it is of paramount importance to recognize this syndrome as a high mortality is present in these patients if they are not treated in a right fashion. The treatment doesn't require surgery unless a complication, like cecum perforation, doesn't appear.

  11. Clinical correlates of the restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Fabiano Marin

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine the clinical correlates of the restless legs syndrome (RLS in a Brazilian sleep disorders center. METHODS: We retrospectively studied 118 patients with RLS from January, 2004, to December, 2010. The analyzed variables were: age at disease onset, gender, race, years of school instruction, primary and secondary RLS, and treatment options. RESULTS: Among the studied patients, 83.9% were women with a female/male sex ratio of 5:1. Mean age of the patients at symptom onset ± standard deviation was 41.7±17.9 years-old. The primary RLS was found in 85% of patients. The other 15% remainders consisted of secondary forms, and they were associated with neuropathy, iron deficiency anemia, end-stage renal disease, or Parkinson's disease. Drug therapy for RLS was introduced in 67% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: Most patients presented primary RLS with an early disease onset. Further epidemiological studies are welcomed to provide better information on secondary RLS in Brazil.

  12. Frey's syndrome - unusually long delayed clinical onset ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frey's syndrome is a complication of parotidectomy that is thought to occur as a result of aberrant regeneration of the postganglionic parasympathetic nerve fibres supplying the parotid gland to severed ostganglionic sympathetic fibres which innervate the sweat glands of the face. Frey's syndrome is difficult to treat but is a ...

  13. Clinical Characteristics of Dry Eye Patients With Chronic Pain Syndromes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vehof, Jelle; Smitt-Kamminga, Nicole Sillevis; Kozareva, Diana; Nibourg, Simone A.; Hammond, Christopher J.

    PURPOSE: To investigate clinical characteristics of dry eye disease (DED) patients with a chronic pain syndrome. DESIGN: Cross-sectional. study. METHODS: Four hundred twenty-five patients of a tertiary care DED patient cohort in the Netherlands were included. Chronic pain syndromes irritable bowel

  14. Smith-Magenis Syndrome: Genetic Basis and Clinical Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finucane, Brenda; Haas-Givler, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a neurobehavioral disorder associated with deletions and mutations of the "RAI1" gene on chromosome 17p11.2. Clinical features of the syndrome include intellectual disability, sleep disturbance, craniofacial differences, and a distinctive profile of stereotypic and self-injurious behaviors. Although the functional…

  15. [Ogilvie syndrome after cesarean section. A clinical contribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, G; Mancuso, P; Linciano, M; Binotto, F; Tinti, S; Torresin, L; Ferrari, P

    1990-03-01

    Following the observation of a case of acute pseudo-obstruction of the colon (Ogilvie's syndrome) after cesarean section, the Authors describe their clinical experience in relation to recently published reports. While discussing other features of the syndrome, the importance of radiological monitoring of the colonic stasis and the validity of perendoscopic decompression of the colon as an efficacious therapy are underlined.

  16. [SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome): clinical entity, definitions, and the significance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushimoto, S; Yamamoto, Y

    1999-01-01

    The clinical entity, definitions, and the significance of SIRS (systemic inflammatory response syndrome) were reviewed. The term, SIRS was proposed to define sepsis and its sequelae clearly in 1991, in order to make early detection of the disease possible, and to improve the ability to compare innovative potential diagnostic and therapeutic modalities by standardizing terms. Although the criteria of SIRS is not strict and too sensitive, SIRS has been shown to be useful as a warning sign of severe condition in clinical setting. We also discussed about a new concept, CARS (compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome), which was characterized as anti-inflammatory mediators-dominant condition, in this issue.

  17. Ethical Issues in Mentoring Doctoral Students in Clinical Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Anna; Heimberg, Richard G.

    2009-01-01

    Ethical issues abound in any relationship that is defined by differences between the parties in rank, status, and power. Such is the case in the relationship between a doctoral student in clinical psychology and his or her mentor. In this article, we examine several potential areas of ethical concern within the mentor-student relationship. We…

  18. Informed Consent: Ethical Issues and Future Challenges in Clinical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angaran, David M.

    1989-01-01

    A look at pharmaceutical care needs in the future is the basis for discussion of the educational needs of clinical pharmacists. Issues discussed include the appropriate degree (bachelor's vs. doctoral), costs of instruction, faculty/student ratios, the pharmacy practice faculty as role models, and computer-assisted instruction. (MSE)

  19. Human computer interaction issues in Clinical Trials Management Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starren, Justin B; Payne, Philip R O; Kaufman, David R

    2006-01-01

    Clinical trials increasingly rely upon web-based Clinical Trials Management Systems (CTMS). As with clinical care systems, Human Computer Interaction (HCI) issues can greatly affect the usefulness of such systems. Evaluation of the user interface of one web-based CTMS revealed a number of potential human-computer interaction problems, in particular, increased workflow complexity associated with a web application delivery model and potential usability problems resulting from the use of ambiguous icons. Because these design features are shared by a large fraction of current CTMS, the implications extend beyond this individual system.

  20. MECONIUM ASPIRATION SYNDROME : A CLINICAL STUDY

    OpenAIRE

    BEHERA, MK; KULKARNI, SD; GUPTA, RK

    1998-01-01

    Forty two babies with Meconium aspiration syndrome managed in neonatal intensive care unit of a service hospital were analysed. Incidence was 1.7 per cent. Twelve babies were delivered by caserean section and 30 babies by vaginal route. Seventeen deliveries were conducted by team of gynaecologists, pediatrician and nursing staff whereas 25 deliveries were conducted by nursing staff alone. Out of total babies with meconium aspiration syndrome, thin meconium detected in 9 and thick meconium det...

  1. Swallowing in Parkinson's disease: clinical issues and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Nick

    2017-06-01

    Changes to swallowing affect most people with Parkinson's disease (PD). Changes may not initially exercise a decisive impact, but can later pose significant threats to nutritional, hydration and respiratory health and psychosocial quality of life. This review, from a largely clinical viewpoint, outlines the nature of changes in PD and considers the issue of how many people are affected and in what ways. It outlines main approaches to assessment and management, with an emphasis on aspects relevant to PD. Dysphagia contributes to drooling in PD. The review therefore also touches on the nature and management of this condition that has its own set of health and psychosocial quality-of-life issues.

  2. COMPLEX REGIONAL PAIN SYNDROMECLINIC, DIAGNOSTICS, TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The problem of pain today remains one of the fundamental issues of medical care. It is known that the pain is the leading cause of treatmentto the doctor. Among pain syndromes, a special place belongs to the complex regional pain syndromes. They are distinguished by the multidisciplinary problem, the presence of explicit nature of the pain, difficulty of diagnosis and nature of the treatment. The article presentsmodern data on the diagnosis and treatment of the complex regional pain syndromes.

  3. Current Therapeutic Cannabis Controversies and Clinical Trial Design Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B

    2016-01-01

    This overview covers a wide range of cannabis topics, initially examining issues in dispensaries and self-administration, plus regulatory requirements for production of cannabis-based medicines, particularly the Food and Drug Administration "Botanical Guidance." The remainder pertains to various cannabis controversies that certainly require closer examination if the scientific, consumer, and governmental stakeholders are ever to reach consensus on safety issues, specifically: whether botanical cannabis displays herbal synergy of its components, pharmacokinetics of cannabis and dose titration, whether cannabis medicines produce cyclo-oxygenase inhibition, cannabis-drug interactions, and cytochrome P450 issues, whether cannabis randomized clinical trials are properly blinded, combatting the placebo effect in those trials via new approaches, the drug abuse liability (DAL) of cannabis-based medicines and their regulatory scheduling, their effects on cognitive function and psychiatric sequelae, immunological effects, cannabis and driving safety, youth usage, issues related to cannabis smoking and vaporization, cannabis concentrates and vape-pens, and laboratory analysis for contamination with bacteria and heavy metals. Finally, the issue of pesticide usage on cannabis crops is addressed. New and disturbing data on pesticide residues in legal cannabis products in Washington State are presented with the observation of an 84.6% contamination rate including potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents. With ongoing developments in legalization of cannabis in medical and recreational settings, numerous scientific, safety, and public health issues remain.

  4. Current Therapeutic Cannabis Controversies and Clinical Trial Design Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Ethan B.

    2016-01-01

    This overview covers a wide range of cannabis topics, initially examining issues in dispensaries and self-administration, plus regulatory requirements for production of cannabis-based medicines, particularly the Food and Drug Administration “Botanical Guidance.” The remainder pertains to various cannabis controversies that certainly require closer examination if the scientific, consumer, and governmental stakeholders are ever to reach consensus on safety issues, specifically: whether botanical cannabis displays herbal synergy of its components, pharmacokinetics of cannabis and dose titration, whether cannabis medicines produce cyclo-oxygenase inhibition, cannabis-drug interactions, and cytochrome P450 issues, whether cannabis randomized clinical trials are properly blinded, combatting the placebo effect in those trials via new approaches, the drug abuse liability (DAL) of cannabis-based medicines and their regulatory scheduling, their effects on cognitive function and psychiatric sequelae, immunological effects, cannabis and driving safety, youth usage, issues related to cannabis smoking and vaporization, cannabis concentrates and vape-pens, and laboratory analysis for contamination with bacteria and heavy metals. Finally, the issue of pesticide usage on cannabis crops is addressed. New and disturbing data on pesticide residues in legal cannabis products in Washington State are presented with the observation of an 84.6% contamination rate including potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents. With ongoing developments in legalization of cannabis in medical and recreational settings, numerous scientific, safety, and public health issues remain. PMID:27683558

  5. Current Therapeutic Cannabis Controversies and Clinical Trial Design Issues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan Budd Russo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This overview covers a wide range of cannabis topics, initially examining issue in dispensaries and self-administration, plus regulatory requirement for production of cannabis-based medicines, particularly the Food and Drug Administration Botanical Guidance. The remainder pertains to various cannabis controversies that certainly require closer examination if the scientific, consumer and governmental stakeholders are ever to reach consensus on safety issues, specifically: whether botanical cannabis displays herbal synergy of its components, pharmacokinetics of cannabis and dose titration, whether cannabis medicines produce cyclo-oxygenase inhibition, cannabis-drug interactions and cytochrome P450 issues, whether cannabis randomized clinical trials are properly blinded, combatting the placebo effect in those trials via new approaches, the drug abuse liability of cannabis-based medicines and their regulatory scheduling, their effects on cognitive function and psychiatric sequelae, immunological effects, cannabis and driving safety, youth usage, issues related to cannabis smoking and vaporization, cannabis concentrates and vape-pens, and laboratory analysis for contamination with bacteria and heavy metals. Finally, the issue of pesticide usage on cannabis crops is addressed. New and disturbing data on pesticide residues in legal cannabis products in Washington State are presented with the observation of an 84.6% contamination rate including potentially neurotoxic and carcinogenic agents. With ongoing developments in legalization of cannabis in medical and recreational settings, numerous scientific, safety and public health issues remain.

  6. Psychiatric and neuropsychological issues in Marfan syndrome: A critical review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gritti, Antonella; Pisano, Simone; Catone, Gennaro; Iuliano, Raffaella; Salvati, Tiziana; Gritti, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The cooccurrence of Marfan syndrome and psychiatric disorders has been reported for many years. Furthermore, neuropsychological deficits have been shown to be associated with Marfan syndrome. The aim of the present article is to summarize findings from the sparse studies and case reports available. The results hold clinical and therapeutic implications and suggest that psychological and neuropsychological domains in Marfan syndrome patients should be carefully assessed. In particular, some patients may require specific rehabilitation programs. On this basis, a multidisciplinary approach to Marfan syndrome treatment seems mandatory. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. Savant Syndrome: Clinical and Neuropsychological Features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Durukan

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Savant syndrome defines the people who have severe developmental and mental disabilities but also have extraordinary mental skills which are missing in many people. Although general mental capacity is under average mental level, savant has excessive knowledge about one or more domains. It is accepted that as many as one in 10 persons with autistic disorder have such remarkable abilities in varying degrees, although savant syndrome occurs in other developmental disabilities or in other types of central nervous system injury or disease as well. Males outnumber females by an approximate 6 : 1 ratio in savant syndrome. Savant skills are limited to five general categories. These are music, art, calender calculating, mathematics and mechanical or spatial skills. Savant skills can also be divided into three as savants who have splinter skills, talented savants and prodigious savants. A remarkable memory welds to the special abilities determined in savant syndrome. Savant syndrome can be congenital or it can be acquired. Most often savant skills emerge in childhood, superimposed on some underlying developmental disability present at birth. However, acquired savant skills can also appear, when none were previously present, in neurotypical individuals following brain injury or disease later in infancy, childhood or adult life. Savant skills don’t depend on only rote memory. It is approved that an enhanced or spared ability to represent and manipulate highly organised domain-specific information. Various theoretic models were defined to explain the neuropsychological profile in savant syndrome. Interest in savants has a long history, stretching back to the early 18th century; nevertheless, the savant syndrome remains as much a mystery now as it did when it was first described. Given that many questions about the existence and nature of savant talent remain unanswered, it seems likely that research efforts will continue unabated.

  8. [Clinical and pathological features of Alport syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Chun-Hua; Huang, Song-Ming; Wu, Hong-Mei; Bao, Hua-Ying; Chen, Ying; Han, Yuan; Zhao, Fei; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Zhen

    2010-03-01

    To study the clinical and pathological features of Alport syndrome in children. The clinical and histopathological data of 10 hospitalized children with Alport syndrome from February 2007 to February 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. There were 7 males and 3 females, with the age ranging from 2 years to 6 years and 7 months (mean 3 years and 2 months). Five of 10 cases had positive family history. X-linked dominant inheritance Alport syndrome was diagnosed in 8 cases, and autosomal recessive inheritance Alport syndrome in 2 cases. Recurrent gross hematuria was found in 5 cases, hematuria and proteinuria in 3 cases, massive proteinuria in 1 case, and nephritic syndrome in 1 case. Under the light microscope, 8 cases presented with mesangial proliferation glomerulonephritis, and 2 cases with focal segmental glomerulosclerosis. Immunofluorescence assay showed that all cases had IgM deposition in glomerulus. Only 1 case showed typical glomerular basement membrane (GBM) pathological changes. All cases showed abnormal alpha-chain distribution in renal collagen IV. The children with Alport syndrome have diverse clinical manifestations. Characteristic histopathological presentations could not be found under a light microscope, mesangial proliferation glomerulonephritis is the dominant pathological change, and IgM deposition in glomerulus is common. The GBM pathological change in children is not common. Immunofluorescence assay of alpha-chain in collagen IV is needed for the diagnosis of Alport syndrome.

  9. Mallory-Weiss syndrome: clinical and endoscopic characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Anning; Li, Yi; Jiang, Yingan; Liu, Jun; Luo, Hesheng

    2012-06-01

    Mallory-Weiss syndrome is defined by upper gastrointestinal bleeding from vomiting-induced mucosal lacerations at the esophago-gastric junction. This study was purposed to investigate the incidence, location, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and effectiveness of treatment (including endoscopic treatment and conservative medical treatment) of Mallory-Weiss syndrome in China. All patients who received emergency upper gastrointestinal endoscopy due to Mallory-Weiss syndrome from September 2007 to August 2011 at gastrointestinal endoscopy center of Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University were included in this study. The clinical presentation, medical history, location and characteristics of Mallory-Weiss syndrome methods and effectiveness of therapy of patients with Mallory-Weiss syndrome were retrospectively analyzed by chart reviews. Long-term follow-up data were collected at outpatient clinics or telephone interviews. Sixteen patients were diagnosed with Mallory-Weiss syndrome, which account for 3.08% of 519 patients with acute non-variceal upper gastrointestinal bleeding. Common comorbidities were found in one patient with hepatic cirrhosis. Conservative medical treatment, local injection, hemoclipping, or multipolar electrocoagulation produced primary hemostasis in 87.5% (14/16) of patients. Mallory-Weiss syndrome is uncommon in China in comparison with reported experience in the west when the same group of patients is selected. Different approaches to treatment are to be recommended depending on whether or not active hemorrhage is present. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Exploring the ethical and regulatory issues in pragmatic clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Califf, Robert M; Sugarman, Jeremy

    2015-10-01

    The need for high-quality evidence to support decision making about health and health care by patients, physicians, care providers, and policy-makers is well documented. However, serious shortcomings in evidence persist. Pragmatic clinical trials that use novel techniques including emerging information and communication technologies to explore important research questions rapidly and at a fraction of the cost incurred by more "traditional" research methods promise to help close this gap. Nevertheless, while pragmatic clinical trials can bridge clinical practice and research, they may also raise difficult ethical and regulatory challenges. In this article, the authors briefly survey the current state of evidence that is available to inform clinical care and other health-related decisions and discuss the potential for pragmatic clinical trials to improve this state of affairs. They then propose a new working definition for pragmatic research that centers upon fitness for informing decisions about health and health care. Finally, they introduce a project, jointly undertaken by the National Institutes of Health Health Care Systems Research Collaboratory and the National Patient-Centered Clinical Research Network (PCORnet), which addresses 11 key aspects of current systems for regulatory and ethical oversight of clinical research that pose challenges to conducting pragmatic clinical trials. In the series of articles commissioned on this topic published in this issue of Clinical Trials, each of these aspects is addressed in a dedicated article, with a special focus on the interplay between ethical and regulatory considerations and pragmatic clinical research aimed at informing "real-world" choices about health and health care. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Paraneoplastic Neurological Syndromes: Clinical And Serological Studies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.G. Shamsili (Setareh)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThe term “paraneoplastic syndromes” refers to symptoms or signs resulting from damage to organs or tissues that are remote from the site of a malignant neoplasm or its metastases. Paraneoplastic syndromes can affect most organs and tissues including the nervous system. Since the fi rst

  12. Myelodysplastic syndromes: clinical and biological advances

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Greenberg, Peter L

    2006-01-01

    ..., to a review of recent molecular and cytogenetic discoveries and insights. This book will be a valuable resource for clinicians and researchers who wish to learn more about myelodysplastic syndromes. Peter L. Greenberg is Professor of Medicine at Stanford University Cancer Center, Stanford, and Chief, Hematology Section, VA Palo Alto Health Care Sy...

  13. Trichorhinophalangeal syndrome II, expanding the clinical spectrum

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2014-06-17

    Jun 17, 2014 ... an autosomal dominant fashion, most cases of TRPS II are sporadic [1]. TRPS III, is a form of brachydactyly due to short metacarpals and severe .... and broad on both sides (black asterisk), the fifth metacarpal bone has similar yet less pronounced appearance (white asterisk). Langer–Giedion syndrome. 91 ...

  14. Clinical and Molecular Genetic Features of Autoinflammatory Syndromes in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Е. I. Alexeeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was to study the prevalence and clinical features of autoinflammatory syndromes among patients with systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis. Methods: A prospective nonrandomized study was conducted. All its members have been studied for mutations in TNFRSF1A and NLRP3 genes by the sequencing method. Results: 90 children (27 boys, 63 girls aged from 1 to 17 (average age 8.2 years, with a guide diagnosis: «Systemic juvenile idiopathic arthritis», were examined. As a result, 10 (14% patients showed mutations in TNFRSF1A gene, leading to the development of TRAPS-syndrome (8 had the most common mutation of R92Q; 3 — not previously described mutations in NLRP3 gene. 2 patients had the diagnosis of CINCA/NOMID Syndrome, 1 — Muckle–Wells Syndrome. In three cases, mutations leading to the development of TRAPS-syndromethe were identified in the first line of descent. Classical examples of autoinflammatory syndromes such as cryopyrin-associated periodic syndrome (CAPS, and tumor necrosis factor receptor associated periodic syndrome (TRAPS. The data about their pathogenesis, clinical features, diagnosis and treatment is presented. Conclusion: It is shown that early detection and adequate treatment of patients with autoinflammatory syndromes, characterized by severe disease and serious prognosis, is difficult due to lack of awareness of pediatricians and unavailability of genetic diagnosis of these syndromes. The necessity of the development of a universal model of the diagnostic algorithm for identification of autoinflammatory syndromes using next-generation sequencing technologies is grounded. 

  15. Spontaneous esophageal rupture - Boerhaave's syndrome: Clinical symptoms and radiographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaa, J.; Deininger, H.K.

    1989-01-01

    Spontaneous transmural rupture of the esophagus (Boerhaave's syndrome) is a life-threatening emergency. Prompt diagnosis is essential to a better prognosis, successful operative outcome and patient survival. The chest roentgenogram and the contrast esophagograms to follow are the most helpful diagnostic tests. The clinical manifestations are variable and may be misleading and thus delay accurate recognition. In our case report the major clinical features and radiological signs of Boerhaave's syndrome are described. The pathogenesis, characteristic clinical symptoms and the signs and radiological evaluation are reviewed. (orig.) [de

  16. Li-Fraumeni syndrome: report of a clinical research workshop and creation of a research consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mai, Phuong L; Malkin, David; Garber, Judy E; Schiffman, Joshua D; Weitzel, Jeffrey N; Strong, Louise C; Wyss, Oliver; Locke, Luana; Means, Von; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Hainaut, Pierre; Frebourg, Thierry; Evans, D Gareth; Bleiker, Eveline; Patenaude, Andrea; Schneider, Katherine; Wilfond, Benjamin; Peters, June A; Hwang, Paul M; Ford, James; Tabori, Uri; Ognjanovic, Simona; Dennis, Phillip A; Wentzensen, Ingrid M; Greene, Mark H; Fraumeni, Joseph F; Savage, Sharon A

    2012-10-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome that was first described in 1969. In most families, it is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is characterized by early onset of multiple specific cancers and very high lifetime cumulative cancer risk. Despite significant progress in understanding the molecular biology of TP53, the optimal clinical management of this syndrome is poorly defined. We convened a workshop on November 2, 2010, at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland, bringing together clinicians and scientists, as well as individuals from families with LFS, to review the state of the science, address clinical management issues, stimulate collaborative research, and engage the LFS family community. This workshop also led to the creation of the Li-Fraumeni Exploration (LiFE) Research Consortium. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Personality Disorders and Clinical Syndromes in ADHD Prisoners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudjonsson, Gisli H.; Wells, June; Young, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The main objective of this article is to investigate the type of personality disorders and clinical syndromes (CSs) that were best related to ADHD symptoms among prisoners. Method: The authors screened for childhood and adult ADHD symptoms and administered the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) to 196 serving prisoners.…

  18. Mounier-Kuhn syndrome: radiological findings and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastos, Andrea de Lima [Hospital Julia Kubitschek-FHEMIG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Diagnostico por Imagem; Brito, Isabela Lage Alves, E-mail: andblima@yahoo.com.b [Hospital Julia Kubitschek-FHEMIG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Pneumologia

    2011-05-15

    Mounier-Kuhn syndrome is a rare disease clinically characterized by recurrent respiratory infections. The present report describes a case of this disease with analysis of chest radiography and high resolution computed tomography showing increased caliber of the trachea, main bronchi and central bronchiectasis. Such changes, in association with clinical data, suggest the diagnosis. (author)

  19. Three cases of Wolfram syndrome with different clinical aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çamtosun, Emine; Şıklar, Zeynep; Kocaay, Pınar; Ceylaner, Serdar; Flanagan, Sarah E; Ellard, Sian; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2015-03-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by mutations in the WFS1 gene. Clinical heterogeneity has been reported both within and between families with WFS1 mutations. The first case was diagnosed with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with positive for pancreatic autoantibodies and had a ketoacidotic attack in the follow-up period. The second case presented initially with optic atrophy and was diagnosed with behavioral and psychiatric problems at an early age. The third case had early onset insulin-dependent diabetes with multiple anomalies and congenital hypothyroidism. Many of these features have not been reported previously in patients with Wolfram syndrome. In all three patients homozygous mutations in WFS1 were identified. Wolfram syndrome is a disease where the characteristic features may present at different times. A diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome should therefore be considered even in the absence of the full spectrum of clinical features.

  20. METHODOLOGICAL ISSUES OF CLINICAL TRIALS IN THE PEDIATRIC POPULATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Topolyanskaya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Conducting clinical trials on children population is a challenge both for organizers and pediatricians involved in trials. Difficulties in recruiting patients, a significant heterogenecity of the population, specific side reactions, difficulties in identifying the objective final points warrant the specific nature of designing clinical trials in pediatrics. The article illustrates key issues and methodology aspects: planning, design, control groups, patient recruitment. It stresses the need to carefully consider specific characteristics of a child’s system and multi-disciplinary approach involving a pediatrician at the early stages of planning, preliminary consultations with parent organizations, children and regulators.Key words: clinical trials, methodology, planning, design, patient recruitment, children. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(5:6-10

  1. BETA-THALASSEMIA SYNDROMES, CLINICAL AND LABORATORY APPROACH

    OpenAIRE

    Türkkan, Emine; Berrak, Su Gülsün; Canpolat, Cengiz

    2016-01-01

    The Beta ((3) thalassemia syndromes are a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders. The frequency of thalassemia is dependent on the ethnic origins of the patient population. Turkey is located in a geographic area of the world where thalassemia syndromes are common. The incidence rate of (3-thalassemia carriers was stated to be 2 per cent in Turkey. Clinical manifestations are diverse and range from asymptomatic hypochromia and microcytosis to profound anemia leading to death in early childho...

  2. Early Onset Marfan Syndrome: Atypical Clinical Presentation of Two Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozyurt Abdullah

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Early onset Marfan Syndrome (eoMFS is a rare, severe form of Marfan Syndrome (MFS. The disease has a poor prognosis and most patients present with resistance to heart failure treatment during the newborn period. This report presents two cases of eoMFS with similar clinical features diagnosed in the newborn period and who died at an early age due to the complications related to the involvement of the cardiovascular system.

  3. Clinical Syndromes Associated with Cardiovascular Diseases: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xing Sheng Yang, MD, PhD, FACC, FAHA

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, a variety of syndromes are associated with cardiovascular disease and have characteristic findings. Most of them are an autosomal dominant genetic disorder and have different types of cardiovascular abnormalities, including electrocardiographic conduction defects, arrhythmias, cardiomyopathy, vascular and valvular diseases, cardiac septal defects, and pulmonary problems. There is a growing need for physicians to pay more attention to these syndromes.

  4. Parkinsonian syndroms: Clinical phenotype, differential diagnosis and disease progression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Storch, A.

    2002-01-01

    Parkinsonian syndromes include idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD), other neurodegenerative diseases with parkinsonism, the so-called atypical parkinsonian syndromes, and symptomatic parkinsonian syndromes, such as Wilson's disease. IPD is the most frequent disease with parkinsonism as the main clinical feature and is responsible for approx. 80% of all parkinsonian syndromes. Atypical parkinsonian syndromes are the most important differential diagnoses of IPD. The two most frequent types are multiple system atrophy (MSA) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP). For clinical diagnosis it is essential to take a careful medical history and to examine the patients physically in regular intervals. However, various clinico-pathological studies have shown that approx. 25% of patients with clinical diagnosis of IPD may have other causes of parkinsonism. Selected technical investigations, in particular functional imaging of the central dopaminergic system using PET or SPECT, may help to make clinical diagnosis more secure. This paper reviews the clinical features and diagnostic findings in diseases with parkinsonism and summarises the difficulties in establishing early and differential diagnoses. (orig.) [de

  5. Clinical care of adult Turner syndrome--new aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Christian; Mortensen, Kristian Havmand; Hjerrild, Britta Eilersen

    2012-01-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is characterized by numerous medical challenges during adolescence and adulthood. Puberty has to be induced in most cases, and female sex hormone replacement therapy (HRT) should continue during adult years. These issues are normally dealt with by the paediatrician, but once...

  6. Reclassification of clinical sleep disorders using traditional models of syndromic, neuroanatomic, pathophysiological and etiological diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, A Robert

    2014-09-01

    Existing classifications of central nervous system sleep disorders do not often provide tools to diagnose the majority of patients complaining of sleep-related symptoms, nor always guide effective treatment. I present a novel classification system that completely separates clinical syndromes from anatomical localization, pathophysiology, and etiology. The clinical syndrome I present can describe the majority of patients, but can be fractionated into individual subgroups for further study. By then separating the anatomy and physiology from the symptoms, an avenue of research becomes available to study the different possible structures that regulate sleep, that may be damaged and cause syndromes of sleep dysfunction. Some of these may produce symptoms that overlap with narcolepsy and some may be distinct. Because the clinical syndrome should be distinguished from anatomy or physiology, I have proposed the term narcoleptiform syndrome for the clinical syndrome. The model also clearly separates etiology from anatomy in a classical neurological manner. This allows etiology, localization and symptoms to be studied separately. It is likely that different etiologies may produce damage in areas that produce similar syndromes. For example, in this model, different causes of damage to the orexin nucleus would result in the same clinical syndrome. This reinforces the concept of studying anatomy, symptoms and etiology separately. By studying the relationship of syndromes or symptoms to anatomic localization and pathophysiology, it should be possible to test novel approaches to treatment based on different underlying structure or function. For example, patients with lesions in the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus or the thalamic intralaminar nuclei may both present with insomnia symptoms but need different treatment; or they might present with symptoms overlapping narcolepsy (a narcoleptiform syndrome) yet need different treatment. In some cases, a single treatment may cross over

  7. Cross-cultural and psychological issues in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Padhy, Susanta Kumar

    2017-10-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common functional gastrointestinal disorders encountered by gastroenterologists worldwide. Of all the etiological factors that had been postulated to explain the pathophysiology of IBS, cultural and psychological factors are unique and difficult to understand. Culture plays an important role in coloring the presentation of IBS, and many a times, it has a significant role in several treatment aspects too. Psychological aspects like personality profiles, family relationships, societal myths, and abuse in any form are equally important in the management perspectives of IBS. In this brief review, we had tried to specifically focus on these aspects in IBS and have explained the evidences in favor of these factors. Knowledge about various cross-cultural aspects and psychological factors in patients with IBS is essential for taking an appropriate history and for undertaking a holistic approach for the management of the same. A collaborative team effort by psychiatrists and gastroenterologists could help in reducing the burden of this difficult to treat functional bowel disorder. © 2017 Journal of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Foundation and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. Turner syndrome--issues to consider for transition to adulthood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucaccioni, Laura; Wong, Sze Choong; Smyth, Arlene; Lyall, Helen; Dominiczak, Anna; Ahmed, S Faisal; Mason, Avril

    2015-03-01

    Turner syndrome (TS) is associated with a spectrum of health problems across the age span, which requires particular attention during the transition period in these adolescents. The majority of girls with TS require oestrogen replacement from puberty onwards, which is important for adequate feminization, uterine development and maintenance of bone health. There is a lifetime increased risk from autoimmune conditions like hypothyroidism, coeliac disease, hearing loss and aortic dilatation with the potential to lead to aortic dissection. A systematic and holistic approach to provision of health care in TS is needed. Several unanswered questions remain, including the choice of hormone replacement therapy in the young person with TS and in adulthood; the optimal mode of cardiovascular assessment; the best management and assessment prior to and during pregnancy. The optimal model of care and transition to adult services in TS requires attention. Further research is needed in relation to cardiovascular risk assessment, pregnancy management and hormone replacement therapy in TS. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. A clinical approach to complex regional pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, R N

    2000-06-01

    The clinical approach to complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is complicated by a lack of precision diagnostically, and a lack of evidence-based information for treatment. The vagaries of diagnosis were somewhat improved by the Orlando Conference (1993), where a consensus panel of experts developed a new taxonomy and criteria. Unfortunately the criteria can be based entirely on subjective grounds (patient history), and as such provides a very sensitive but not very specific device. There is some effort in the research community to amend these criteria to make them more specific. We encourage the practicing physician to include as much objective data along with the quasi-objective and subjective information currently used in formulating the diagnosis. This imprecision in diagnostic issues has significantly hampered treatment because it has not led to solid, generalizable, randomized controlled trials. To date there are no substantial scientific trials of any particular therapy or medication in the specific diagnosis of CRPS. Much can be inferred from the work with peripheral neuropathy and central pain. However, it is unlikely that this will be a perfect concordance with best therapy for CRPS. It remains our responsibility to diagnose each patient as best we can, supported by the best possible objective signs and testing. Once the diagnosis is made it is necessary to proceed in a pragmatic empirical way, following the best guidelines available. The guidelines should be considered a "rough sketch" and the key to clinical success will be flexibility, a vast fund of the available knowledge, patience, and compassion. To allow the deficiencies in the science to paralyze the clinical process is therapeutic nihilism, and not acceptable.

  10. Metabolic syndrome: clinical concept and molecular basis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funahashi, Tohru; Matsuzawa, Yuji

    2007-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of insulin resistance, elevated blood pressure, and atherogenic dyslipidemia and is a common basis of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Although the precise mechanism remains to be elucidated, a practical definition is needed. A worldwide definition that considers increased waist circumference as an essential component has been settled. Visceral fat locates upstream of the liver. Free fatty acids and glycerol derived from visceral fat reach the liver and stimulate lipoprotein synthesis and gluconeogenesis, respectively. The adipose tissue produces a variety of bioactive substances conceptualized as 'adipocytokines'. Overproduction of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and tumor necrosis factor- seems to relate to the thrombotic and inflammatory tendency. On the other hand, adiponectin, which has antiatherogenic and antidiabetic activities, is reduced in subjects with metabolic syndrome. In Japan, the waist circumference criterion based on visceral fat accumulation has been adopted. The concept of this syndrome has been widely publicized, and health promotion programs based on the concept have commenced in various areas of the country. Such 'Adipo-Do-It' movement is an incentive to encourage physical exercise to reduce visceral fat and is a big challenge to prevent life-style-related diseases and CVD.

  11. Developing core outcome sets for clinical trials: issues to consider

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williamson Paula R

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The selection of appropriate outcomes or domains is crucial when designing clinical trials in order to compare directly the effects of different interventions in ways that minimize bias. If the findings are to influence policy and practice then the chosen outcomes need to be relevant and important to key stakeholders including patients and the public, health care professionals and others making decisions about health care. There is a growing recognition that insufficient attention has been paid to the outcomes measured in clinical trials. These issues could be addressed through the development and use of an agreed standardized collection of outcomes, known as a core outcome set, which should be measured and reported, as a minimum, in all trials for a specific clinical area. Accumulating work in this area has identified the need for general guidance on the development of core outcome sets. Key issues to consider in the development of a core outcome set include its scope, the stakeholder groups to involve, choice of consensus method and the achievement of a consensus.

  12. Clinical predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Comes Emili

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Background Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct is poorly characterised. This single centre, retrospective study was conducted to describe the clinical characteristics of patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct and to identify clinical predictors of this variant of lacunar stroke. Methods A total of 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarction were included in the "Sagrat Cor Hospital of Barcelona Stroke Registry" during a period of 19 years (1986-2004. Data from stroke patients are entered in the stroke registry following a standardized protocol with 161 items regarding demographics, risk factors, clinical features, laboratory and neuroimaging data, complications and outcome. The characteristics of these 146 patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct were compared with those of the 733 patients with lacunar infarction. Results Lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct accounted for 16.6% (146/879 of all cases of lacunar stroke. Subtypes of lacunar syndromes included pure motor stroke in 63 patients, sensorimotor stroke in 51, pure sensory stroke in 14, atypical lacunar syndrome in 9, ataxic hemiparesis in 5 and dysarthria-clumsy hand in 4. Valvular heart disease, atrial fibrillation, sudden onset, limb weakness and sensory symptoms were significantly more frequent among patients with lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct than in those with lacunar infarction, whereas diabetes was less frequent. In the multivariate analysis, atrial fibrillation (OR = 4.62, sensorimotor stroke (OR = 4.05, limb weakness (OR = 2.09, sudden onset (OR = 2.06 and age (OR = 0.96 were independent predictors of lacunar syndrome not due to lacunar infarct. Conclusions Although lacunar syndromes are highly suggestive of small deep cerebral infarctions, lacunar syndromes not due to lacunar infarcts are found in 16.6% of cases. The presence of sensorimotor stroke, limb weakness and sudden onset in a patient

  13. Methodological issues in clinical drug development for essential tremor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carranza, Michael A; Snyder, Madeline R; Elble, Rodger J; Boutzoukas, Angelique E; Zesiewicz, Theresa A

    2012-01-01

    Essential tremor (ET) is one of the most common tremor disorders in the world. Despite this, only two medications have received Level A recommendations from the American Academy of Neurology to treat it (primidone and propranolol). Even though these medications provide relief to a large group of ET patients, up to 50% of patients are non-responders. Additional medications to treat ET are needed. This review discusses some of the methodological issues that should be addressed for quality clinical drug development in ET.

  14. Panic disorder and addiction: the clinical issues of comorbidity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuPont, R L

    1997-01-01

    Panic disorder and addiction are occasionally comorbid--4.5% of addicted patients have panic disorder, and 16% of panic disorder patients are comorbid for addiction to alcohol and other drugs. Despite these relatively low rates of comorbidity, the treatment of these two disorders is commonly confounded by issues of comorbidity, as many physicians avoid using benzodiazepines to treat panic disorder out of inappropriate fear of addiction, and not a few physicians treat panic disorder thinking that they will thereby end comorbid addiction. Sound clinical practice calls for clear identification of both panic disorder and addiction and fully effective treatments of the diseases from which the patients suffer.

  15. Joubert syndrome: Clinical manifestations and magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, In One; Yoon, Yong Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Kim, Woo Sun; Song, Jong Gi; Hwang, Yong Seung

    1994-01-01

    Joubert syndrome presents neonatal respiratory abnormalities and other clinical manifestations. Pathologically the patients show hypoplasia or agenesis of cerebellar vermis and other intracranial anomalies. Our purpose is to evaluate the clinical manifestations and MR findings of Joubert syndrome. Among the patient presenting with clinical stigmata of Joubert syndrome and agenesis of vermis on MR imaging, eight patients who did not satisfied the criteria of Dandy-Walker malformation, tectocerebellar dysraphia and rhombencephalosynapsis were selected. MR findings and clinical manifestation were analyzed. On MR imaging, agenesis of the cerebellar vermis (all cases), hypoplasia of the cerebellar peduncle (6 cases), fourth ventricular contour deformity (6 cases), tentorial elevation (4 caes), deformity of the lateral ventricles (4 cases), dysgenesis of the straight sinus (3 cases) were demonstrated. Other findings were abnormalities of corpus callosum (3 cases), falx anomalies (3 case), occipital encephalomeningocele (2 cases) and fluid collection in posterior cranial fossa (2 cases). Clinical manifestations were developmental delay (5 cases), abnormal eyeball movement (3 cases), hypotonia (2 cases), neonatal respiratory abnormality (2 cases), etc. Joubert syndrome showed various clinical manifestations and intracranial anomalies. MR imaging is an useful modality in detection of the cerebellar vermian agenesis and other anomalies of the patients

  16. Frank-ter Haar syndrome with unusual clinical features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dundar, Munis; Saatci, Cetin; Tasdemir, Sener; Akcakus, Mustafa; Caglayan, Ahmet Okay; Ozkul, Yusuf

    2009-01-01

    Frank-ter Haar syndrome first recognized by Frank et al. [Y. Frank, M. Ziprkowski, A. Romano, R. Stein, M.B. Katznelson, B. Cohen, R.M. Goodman, Megalocornea associated with multiple skeletal anomalies: a new genetic syndrome?, J. Genet. Hum. 21 (1973) 67-72.] and subsequently confirmed by ter Haar et al. [B. Ter Haar, B. Hamel, J. Hendriks, J. de Jager, Melnick-Needles syndrome: indication for an autosomal recessive form, Am. J. Med. Genet. 13 (1982) 469-477.]. The main clinical features of the syndrome are brachycephaly, wide fontanels, prominent forehead, hypertelorism, prominent eyes, macro cornea with or without glaucoma, full cheeks, small chin, bowing of the long bones, and flexion deformity of the fingers [S.M. Maas, H. Kayserili, J. Lam, M.Y. Apak, R.C. Hennekam, Further delineation of Frank-ter Haar syndrome, Am. J. Med. Genet. 131 (2004) 127-133.]. We report a child with Frank-ter Haar syndrome presenting unusual clinical features. Hypopigmented areas in hair, bilateral adducted thumb, bilateral contractures in elbows and pelvic limb, atrial septal defect have not been described previously in the literature. Our patient also had double-outlet right ventricle.

  17. Mallory-Weiss syndrome. A changing clinical picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, G J; Zikria, B A

    1977-01-01

    A retrospective study of 18 episodes of upper gastrointestinal (UGI) bleeding secondary to Mallory-Weiss syndrome occuring in 16 patients is presented. Reported cases published since 1969 have been summarized and compared with earlier collected series. It is evident that the clinical spectrum, prognosis, and opinion regarding etiology and treatment of the syndrome have changed in the last decade. Increased awareness of gastroesophageal lacerations secondary to emesis as well as other causes of significantly increased intraesophagogastric pressures, and widespread utilization of fiberoptic endoscopy have resulted in identification of Mallory-Weiss syndrome with increasing frequency. Less severe lacerations which are healing with medical therapy are being recognized. It is recommended that endoscopy by performed in all cases of UGI hemorrhage and that patients with Mallory-Weiss syndrome be managed medically unless hemorrhage is massive or persistent since nearly three of four patients can be successfully treated without operation. PMID:302109

  18. Atypical presentation of HELLP syndrome: clinical case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Manuel Tobar Parra

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe a case of HELLP syndrome with atypical presentation form. Background: HELLP syndrome is a complication of preeclampsia, characterized by: haemolysis, elevation of liver enzymes and thrombocytopenia; Can present atypical, without hypertension or proteinuria, 10-20% of the cases. Case report: 38 year old female patient, with a pregnancy of 38.5 weeks of gestation, treated at the Hospital Universitario San José de Popayán (Colombia. Atypical HELLP syndrome is diagnosed in a pregnant woman with thrombocytopenia, impaired liver enzymes, but no evidence of proteinuria or hypertension. Gestation is terminated by cesarean section and magnesium sulfate is given for 24 hours, with adequate post-surgical evolution, clinical improvement of the symptomatology presented, normalization of liver enzymes and platelet elevation. Conclusion: Knowledge of this syndrome, although of rare occurrence, allows a fast action, an effective diagnosis and treatment, to avoid morbidity and greater maternal fetal mortality.

  19. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical features, molecular genetics of WFS1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Katsuya; Matsunaga, Kimie; Hatanaka, Masayuki; Akiyama, Masaru; Tanizawa, Yukio

    2015-02-01

    Wolfram syndrome(WFS: OMIM 222300) is a rare recessive neuro-endocrine degenerative disorder, known as DIDMOAD(Diabetes Insipidus, early-onset Diabetes Mellitus, Optic Atrophy and Deafness) syndrome. Most affected individuals carry recessive mutations in the Wolfram syndrome 1 gene(WFS1). The WFS1 protein is an endoplasmic reticulum(ER) embedded protein, which functions in ER calcium homeostasis and unfolded protein responses. Dysregulation of these cellular processes results in the development of ER stress, leading to apoptosis. In addition, abundantly present WFS1 protein in insulin secretory granules plays a role in the intra-granular acidification. However, the phenotypic pleiomorphism and molecular complexity of this disease limit the understanding of WFS. Here we review clinical features, molecular mechanisms and mutations of WFS1 gene that relate to this syndrome.

  20. Clinical manifestations and management of four children with Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumino, Manuela; Meli, Concetta; Farruggia, Piero; La Spina, Milena; Faraci, Maura; Castana, Cinzia; Di Raimondo, Vincenzo; Alfano, Marivana; Pittalà, Annarita; Lo Nigro, Luca; Russo, Giovanna; Di Cataldo, Andrea

    2011-12-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a fatal disorder mostly diagnosed during infancy and caused by mutations of mitochondrial DNA. We hereby report on four children affected by Pearson syndrome with hematological disorders at onset. The disease was fatal to three of them and the fourth one, who received hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, died of secondary malignancy. In this latter patient transplantation corrected hematological and non-hematological issues like metabolic acidosis, and we therefore argue that it could be considered as a useful option in an early stage of the disease. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Associations Among the MCMI-II Clinical Syndrome Scales and the MMPI-2 Clinical Scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blais, Mark A.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The relationship among the nine clinical syndrome scales of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II (MCMI-II) and clinical scales of the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 (MMPI-2) was studied with 108 psychiatric inpatients. Results indicate convergent validity of only the MCMI-II Axis I scales. (SLD)

  2. Endocrinological issues and hormonal manipulation in children and men with Klinefelter syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wosnitzer, Matthew S; Paduch, Darius A

    2013-02-15

    47, XXY or Klinefelter syndrome (KS), the most common chromosomal aberration in males, is characterized by either absolute or relative hypogonadism with frequent decline in serum testosterone (T) following the onset of puberty. Decreased T levels are the result of testicular dysfunction with decrease in size of Leydig cells, and loss of germs and Sertoli cells leading to tubular hyalinization. Increase in estradiol results from over-expression of aromatase CYP19. Deficient androgen production and observed varied response of end-organs to T leads to delayed progression of puberty with decreased facial/body hair, poor muscle development, osteoporosis, and gynecomastia. It is possible that hypogonadism and excessive estradiol production contribute to emotional and social immaturity, and specific learning disabilities in KS. Based on the authors' experience and literature review, early fertility preservation and hormonal supplementation may normalize pubertal development, prevent metabolic sequelae of hypogonadism, and have a positive effect on academic and social development. No randomized clinical trials are available studying the effects of T supplementation on reproductive or cognitive issues in KS. Aggressive T supplementation (topical gel) and selective use of aromatase inhibitors may be considered at the onset of puberty with careful follow-up and titration to reach age-specific high-normal physiologic serum values. The decision to institute hormonal therapy should be part of a multidisciplinary approach including physical, speech, behavioral, and occupational therapy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. A new course in the clinical pathways for metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kageyama, Shoko; Wada, Yumi; Nakamura, Rie

    2006-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is consisted with multiple risk factors such as diabetes, dyslipidemia, and hypertension based on visceral fat accumulation, for the development of arteriosclerosis. We present, here, a clinical pathway for education of patients with metabolic syndrome. The program contains an adequate explanation of the high risk for arteriosclerosis to the patients, the measurement of visceral fat content by computed tomography, and several clinical examinations for the evaluation of arteriosclerotic lesions. We have presented this program on the ward of diabetes center in our hospital for patients diagnosed as having metabolic syndrome. Because the focus of education is to clarify understanding of the harmful effects of visceral fat and the benefits of its reduction, it might be a valuable tool to motivate and empower the patient and improve the patient's lifestyle. (author)

  4. [Miller Fisher's syndrome. Clinical and experimental contribution].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trebini, F; Appiotti, A; Scarzella, G

    1991-01-01

    A 19-year-old patient with acute idiopathic polyneuritis is described. Clinically, apart from ophthalmoplegia, areflexia and ataxia, the patient presented a serious bilateral and symmetrical deficiency of the VII-IX-X cranial nerve and hypanapallesthesia of trunk and extremities. Liquor examination showed albumino-cytological dissociation with an increase in liquor IgG; encephalic CT and encephalo-medullary NMR were normal; a neurophysiological study (EMG, PEV, BAER) was indicative of the PNS problems. Combined corticosteroid and plasmaferesis treatment produced complete clinical remission after about 3 months. The primary role of PNS involvement in this clinical entity is discussed.

  5. Chronic Fatigue Syndrome in Adolescents: treatment, clinical features and epidemiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijhof, S.L.

    2013-01-01

    This thesis describes the treatment, epidemiology and clinical features of the adolescent chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Fatigue is a common complaint among adolescents, with a reported incidence of up to 20% in girls. This fatigue however is not chronic, does not debilitate and has an identifiable

  6. Clinical aspects and prognosis of Brugada syndrome in children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Probst, Vincent; Denjoy, Isabelle; Meregalli, Paola G.; Amirault, Jean-Christophe; Sacher, Frederic; Mansourati, Jacques; Babuty, Dominique; Villain, Elisabeth; Victor, Jacques; Schott, Jean-Jacques; Lupoglazoff, Jean-Marc; Mabo, Philippe; Veltmann, Christian; Jesel, Laurence; Chevalier, Philippe; Clur, Sally-Ann B.; Haissaguerre, Michel; Wolpert, Christian; Le Marec, Herve; Wilde, Arthur A. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Brugada syndrome is an arrhythmogenic disease characterized by an ECG pattern of ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads and augmented risk of sudden cardiac death. Little is known about the clinical presentation and prognosis of this disease in children. METHODS AND RESULTS:

  7. Clinical symptoms of sleep apnea syndrome and automobile accidents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haraldsson, P O; Carenfelt, C; Diderichsen, Finn

    1990-01-01

    Patients with clinical features of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) and self-reported sleep spells at the wheel do poorly in simulated monotonous driving. To evaluate whether drivers with defined symptoms of SAS (heavy snoring, sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness) compensate in real traffic by ca...

  8. Expanded clinical spectrum of enhanced S-cone syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yzer, Suzanne; Barbazetto, Irene; Allikmets, Rando; van Schooneveld, Mary J.; Bergen, Arthur; Tsang, Stephen H.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Yannuzzi, Lawrence A.

    2013-01-01

    New funduscopic findings in patients with enhanced S-cone syndrome (ESCS) may help clinicians in diagnosing this rare autosomal recessive retinal dystrophy. To expand the clinical spectrum of ESCS due to mutations in the NR2E3 gene. Retrospective, noncomparative case series of 31 patients examined

  9. Clinical Aspects of Type 3 Long-QT Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilde, Arthur A M; Moss, Arthur J; Kaufman, Elizabeth S

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: -Risk stratification in patients with type 3 long QT syndrome (LQT3) by clinical and genetic characteristics and effectiveness of ß-blocker therapy have not been studied previously in a large LQT3 population. METHODS: -The study population included 406 LQT3 patients with 51 different...

  10. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha; Taylor, Claire F.; Aeby, Alec; Aicardi, Jean; Artuch, Rafael; Montalto, Simon Attard; Bacino, Carlos A.; Barroso, Bruno; Baxter, Peter; Benko, Willam S.; Bergmann, Carsten; Bertini, Enrico; Biancheri, Roberta; Blair, Edward M.; Blau, Nenad; Bonthron, David T.; Briggs, Tracy; Brueton, Louise A.; Brunner, Han G.; Burke, Christopher J.; Carr, Ian M.; Carvalho, Daniel R.; Chandler, Kate E.; Christen, Hans-Jurgen; Corry, Peter C.; Cowan, Frances M.; Cox, Helen; D'Arrigo, Stefano; Dean, John; de Laet, Corinne; de Praeter, Claudine; Dery, Catherine; Ferrie, Colin D.; Flintoff, Kim; Frints, Suzanna G. M.; Garcia-Cazorla, Angels; Gener, Blanca; Goizet, Cyril; Goutieres, Francoise; Green, Andrew J.; Guet, Agnes; Hamel, Ben C. J.; Hayward, Bruce E.; Heiberg, Arvid; Hennekam, Raoul C.; Husson, Marie; Jackson, Andrew P.; Jayatunga, Rasieka; Jiang, Yong-Hui; Kant, Sarina G.; Kao, Amy; King, Mary D.; Kingston, Helen M.; Klepper, Joerg; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Kornberg, Andrew J.; Kotzot, Dieter; Kratzer, Wilfried; Lacombe, Didier; Lagae, Lieven; Landrieu, Pierre Georges; Lanzi, Giovanni; Leitch, Andrea; Lim, Ming J.; Livingston, John H.; Lourenco, Charles M.; Lyall, E. G. Hermione; Lynch, Sally A.; Lyons, Michael J.; Marom, Daphna; McClure, John P.; McWilliam, Robert; Melancon, Serge B.; Mewasingh, Leena D.; Moutard, Marie-Laure; Nischal, Ken K.; Ostergaard, John R.; Prendiville, Julie; Rasmussen, Magnhild; Rogers, R. Curtis; Roland, Dominique; Rosser, Elisabeth M.; Rostasy, Kevin; Roubertie, Agathe; Sanchis, Amparo; Schiffmann, Raphael; Scholl-Burgi, Sabine; Seal, Sunita; Shalev, Stavit A.; Corcoles, C. Sierra; Sinha, Gyan P.; Soler, Doriette; Spiegel, Ronen; Stephenson, John B. P.; Tacke, Uta; Tan, Tiong Yang; Till, Marianne; Tolmie, John L.; Tomlin, Pam; Vagnarelli, Federica; Valente, Enza Maria; van Coster, Rudy N. A.; van der Aa, Nathalie; Vanderver, Adeline; Vles, Johannes S. H.; Voit, Thomas; Wassmer, Evangeline; Weschke, Bernhard; Whiteford, Margo L.; Willemsen, Michel A. A.; Zankl, Andreas; Zuberi, Sameer M.; Orcesi, Simona; Fazzi, Elisa; Lebon, Pierre; Crow, Yanick J.

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease

  11. Metabolic Syndrome in Patients attending the Staff Clinic of a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/objective: Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is characterised by a clustering of cardiometabolic risk factors. It contributes to morbidity and mortality in adults. The objective of the study was to identify new cases and associated factors of MetS in patients attending a tertiary hospital staff clinic. Materials and methods: The ...

  12. Silent angels the genetic and clinical aspects of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dziwota Ewelina

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental genetic disorder and, because of some behavioral characteristics, individuals affected by the disease are known as silent angels. Girls with Rett syndrome perform stereotyped movements, they have learning difficulties, their reaction time is prolonged, and they seem alienated in the environment. These children require constant pediatric, neurological and orthopedic care. In the treatment of Rett syndrome physical therapy, music therapy, hydrotherapy, hippotherapy, behavioral methods, speech therapy and diet, are also used. In turn, psychological therapy of the syndrome is based on the sensory integration method, using two or more senses simultaneously. In 80% of cases, the syndrome is related to mutations of the MECP2 gene, located on chromosome X. The pathogenesis of Rett syndrome is caused by the occurrence of a non-functional MeCP2 protein, which is a transcription factor of many genes, i.e. Bdnf, mef2c, Sgk1, Uqcrc1. Abnormal expression of these genes reveals a characteristic disease phenotype. Clinical symptoms relate mainly to the nervous, respiratory, skeletal and gastrointestinal systems. Currently causal treatment is not possible. However, researchers are developing methods by which, perhaps in the near future, it will be possible to eliminate the mutations in the MECP2 gene, and this will give a chance to the patient for normal functioning.

  13. Conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuhle, J; Disanto, G; Dobson, R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We explored which clinical and biochemical variables predict conversion from clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) to clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in a large international cohort. METHODS: Thirty-three centres provided serum samples from 1047 CIS cases...... with at least two years' follow-up. Age, sex, clinical presentation, T2-hyperintense lesions, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) oligoclonal bands (OCBs), CSF IgG index, CSF cell count, serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25-OH-D), cotinine and IgG titres against Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) and cytomegalovirus were...

  14. Pathophysiology and Japanese clinical characteristics in Marfan syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Daishi; Takeda, Norifumi; Imai, Yasushi; Inuzuka, Ryo; Komuro, Issei; Hirata, Yasunobu

    2014-08-01

    Marfan syndrome is an autosomal dominant heritable disorder of the connective tissue, caused by mutations of the gene FBN1, which encodes fibrillin-1, a major component of the microfibrils of the extracellular matrix. Fibrillin-1 interacts with transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), and dysregulated TGF-β signaling plays a major role in the development of connective tissue disease and familial aortic aneurysm and dissection, including Marfan syndrome. Losartan, an angiotensin II blocker, has the potential to reduce TGF-β signaling and is expected to be an additional therapeutic option. Clinical diagnosis is made using the Ghent nosology, which requires comprehensive patient assessment and has been proven to work well, but evaluation of some of the diagnostic criteria by a single physician is difficult and time-consuming. A Marfan clinic was established at the University of Tokyo Hospital in 2005, together with cardiologists, cardiac surgeons, pediatricians, orthopedists, and ophthalmologists in one place, for the purpose of speedy and accurate evaluation and diagnosis of Marfan syndrome. In this review, we discuss the recent progress in diagnosis and treatment of Marfan syndrome, and the characteristics of Japanese patients with Marfan syndrome. © 2014 Japan Pediatric Society.

  15. Thromboembolic complications in childhood nephrotic syndrome: a clinical profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suri, Deepti; Ahluwalia, Jasmina; Saxena, Akshay K; Sodhi, Kushaljit S; Singh, Paramjeet; Mittal, Bhagwant R; Das, Reena; Rawat, Amit; Singh, Surjit

    2014-10-01

    Thromboembolism is a rare life-threatening complication of childhood nephrotic syndrome. We present the clinical profile and outcome of 34 children with 35 events of thromboembolic complications with nephrotic syndrome. Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) was the commonest complication seen in 11 (31.4 %) children followed by pulmonary thromboembolism and deep venous thrombosis in 9 (25.7 %) and 6 (16.6 %) children, respectively. Arterial thrombosis resulting in central nervous system infarcts was observed in 7 (20 %) children and 2 children had thrombosis of the peripheral arteries. Episodes were equal in steroid-resistant nephrotic syndrome and steroid-dependent nephrotic syndrome groups. Most of the thromboembolic complications occurred with relapse but 11.4 % of children developed intracranial thrombosis during remission. The most sensitive symptom of CVT was persistent headache while unexplained respiratory distress and hypoxemia pointed towards pulmonary thromboembolism. Hypoalbuminemia was seen in 82.8 % of children, while concurrent infection was seen in 31.4 %. Coexistence of genetic prothrombotic condition was identified and merits evaluation. Early heparin therapy followed by oral anticoagulants resulted in complete recovery in 91.1 % of children. Death occurred in 3 (8.5 %) children and autopsy revealed pulmonary thromboembolism in 2 children. Venous and arterial thrombotic complications can occur in children with nephrotic syndrome. A high index of suspicion is required as the clinical features may be subtle. Neuroimaging and angiographic techniques help in confirming diagnosis. Early aggressive heparin therapy followed by oral anticoagulants is necessary for a favorable outcome.

  16. Breast cancer and depression: issues in clinical care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thingbaijam B. Singh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Many of breast-cancer patients experience distress and most of them experience depression which may lead to amplification of physical symptoms, increased functional impairment, and poor treatment adherence. We did a review on available literature from PubMed about prevalence, distress magnitudes, coping styles, and treatment methods of major depression in women with breast cancer from 1978 to 2010. Diagnosis and treatment of depressive episodes in women with breast cancer is challenging because of overlapping symptoms and co-morbid conditions. Major depression is often under-recognized and undertreated among breast cancer patients. This review highlighted the issues on identifying and managing depression in breast cancer patients in clinical settings. (Med J Indones. 2012;21:240-6Keywords: Breast cancer, coping, depression, distress

  17. Shame, honor and responsibility in clinical dialog about lifestyle issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guassora, A.D.; Reventlow, S.; Malterud, K.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To explore how patients enact presentations of self in consultations dealing with lifestyle in general practice. METHODS: We conducted a qualitative observational study with thematic, cross-case analysis of video-recorded consultations inspired by discourse analysis. RESULTS: Patients...... presented themselves with an orientation toward responsibility in dialog about lifestyle. They described how they were taking care of themselves and doing their best. In this respect, they demonstrated their achievements as matters of honor. If one lifestyle issue was considered problematic, in some cases......: Negotiations of shame and honor, revolving around personal responsibility, are embedded in clinical discourse about lifestyle. Patients take a proactive role in presenting and defending the self against shame. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: GPs should pay more attention to the tacit role of shame in consultations...

  18. Automated syndrome detection in a set of clinical facial photographs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehringer, Stefan; Guenther, Manuel; Sinigerova, Stella; Wurtz, Rolf P; Horsthemke, Bernhard; Wieczorek, Dagmar

    2011-09-01

    Computer systems play an important role in clinical genetics and are a routine part of finding clinical diagnoses but make it difficult to fully exploit information derived from facial appearance. So far, automated syndrome diagnosis based on digital, facial photographs has been demonstrated under study conditions but has not been applied in clinical practice. We have therefore investigated how well statistical classifiers trained on study data comprising 202 individuals affected by one of 14 syndromes could classify a set of 91 patients for whom pictures were taken under regular, less controlled conditions in clinical practice. We found a classification accuracy of 21% percent in the clinical sample representing a ratio of 3.0 over a random choice. This contrasts with a 60% accuracy or 8.5 ratio in the training data. Producing average images in both groups from sets of pictures for each syndrome demonstrates that the groups exhibit large phenotypic differences explaining discrepancies in accuracy. A broadening of the data set is suggested in order to improve accuracy in clinical practice. In order to further this goal, a software package is made available that allows application of the procedures and contributions toward an improved data set. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Drug-induced Brugada syndrome: Clinical characteristics and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konigstein, Maayan; Rosso, Raphael; Topaz, Guy; Postema, Pieter G; Friedensohn, Limor; Heller, Karin; Zeltser, David; Belhassen, Bernard; Adler, Arnon; Viskin, Sami

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac arrest may result from seemingly innocuous medications that do not necessarily have cardiac indications. The best-known example is the drug-induced long QT syndrome. A less known but not necessarily less important form of drug-induced proarrhythmia is the drug-induced Brugada syndrome. The purpose of this study was to identify clinical and ECG risk markers for drug-induced Brugada syndrome. Reports of drug-induced Brugada syndrome recounted by an international database (http://www.brugadadrugs.org) were reviewed to define characteristics that identify patients prone to developing this complication. For each patient with drug-induced Brugada syndrome who had an ECG recorded in the absence of drugs, we included 5 healthy controls matched by gender and age. All ECGs were evaluated for Brugada-like abnormalities. Seventy-four cases of drug-induced Brugada syndrome from noncardiac medications were identified: 77% were male, and drug toxicity was involved in 46%. Drug-induced Brugada syndrome from oral medications generally occurred weeks after the initiation of therapy. Mortality was 13%. By definition, all cases had a type I Brugada pattern during drug therapy. Nevertheless, their ECG in the absence of drugs was more frequently abnormal than the ECG of controls (56% vs 33%, P = .04). Drug-induced Brugada syndrome from noncardiac drugs occurs predominantly in adult males, is frequently due to drug toxicity, and occurs late after the onset of therapy. Minor changes are frequently noticeable on baseline ECG, but screening is impractical because of a prohibitive false-positive rate. Copyright © 2016 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cochlear implantation in Pendred syndrome and non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct - clinical challenges, surgical results, and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Kristianna; Bille, Michael; Cayé-Thomasen, Per

    2016-10-01

    To explore specific clinical issues, surgical results, and complications of 80 cochlear implantations (CI) in 55 patients with Pendred syndrome (PS) or non-syndromic enlarged vestibular aqueduct (NSEVA). Previous studies have focused either on unselected case series or on populations with mixed cochlear malformations. PS/NSEVA accounts for up to 10% of congenital SNHL, rendering this a large group of cochlear implant candidates. The abnormal inner ear anatomy of these patients may be associated with a lower surgical success rate and a higher rate of complications. Retrospective review of patients' medical records and CT/MRI. Tertiary referral center. The medical records and CT/MRI images of 55 PS/NSEVA patients receiving 80 cochlear implantations from 1982-2014 were reviewed. Demographic data, surgical results, intra-operative incidents, and post-operative complications were retrieved. Complications occurred in 36% of implantations; 5% hereof major complications. Gushing/oozing from the cochleostoma occurred in 10% of implantations and was related to transient, but not prolonged post-operative vertigo. Intra-operative risks of gushing/oozing and post-operative vertigo are the primary clinical issues in PS/NSEVA patients regarding CI. Nonetheless, the surgical success rate is high and the major complication rate is low; similar to studies of unselected series of CI recipients.

  1. Clinical, radiological and imunogenectical study in patients with Reiter's Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Meirelles, E. de.

    1987-01-01

    This study puspose was to investigate the clinical, radiological and immunogenetical parameters from a brazilian Reiter's Syndrome population. Twenty Reiter's Syndrome patients from ''Hospital das Clinicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo'' were prospectivelly studied in their demographical (sex, race, age at study, age at disease onset and disease duration), epidemiological (family history), clinical (general, articular, mucocutaneous, genitourinary, ocular and intestinal manifestations besides functional capacity at study), radiological (sacro-iliitis, spondylitis and calcaneal spur) and immunogenetical (HLA loci A, B and DR typing). The technique employed in the 61 aloantigens from loci HLA A (17), B (34) and DR (10) typing was Terasaki microlymphocitotoxicity modified by Danilovs, had being performed in the ''Laboratorio de Imunogenetica da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de Sao Paulo''. We concluded that the clinical, radiological and immunogenetical Reiter's Syndrome expression in the brazilian population is similar to the others north american or european already studied populations and that the probability of one brazilian HLA B27 positie individual to develop Reiter's Syndrome is 19 fold larger when compared to one brazilian HLA B27 negative individual. (author) [pt

  2. Internet Addiction in adolescence: Neurobiological, psychosocial and clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerniglia, L; Zoratto, F; Cimino, S; Laviola, G; Ammaniti, M; Adriani, W

    2017-05-01

    Despite it has not been formally included in DSM-5 as a disorder, 'Internet addiction (IA)' has become a worldwide issue. It can be broadly defined as a non-chemical, behavioral addiction, which involves human-machine interaction. We pinpoint it as an "instrumental" form of social interaction (i.e. mediated by machines), a notion that appears useful for the sake of possible preclinical modeling. The features of Internet use reveals as addictive when this comes at the expense of genuine real-life sociability, with an overlap towards the hikikomori phenomenon (i.e., extreme retreat to one's own room). Due to the specific neuro-developmental plasticity in adolescence, IA poses risks to youths' mental health, and may likely produce negative consequences in everyday life. The thwarted development of adolescents' identity, self-image and adaptive social relationships is discussed: the IA adolescents often suffer loss of control, feelings of anger, symptoms of distress, social withdrawal, and familial conflicts. Further, more severe clinical conditions are also associated to IA, such as dysthymic, bipolar, affective, social-anxiety disorders, as well as major depression. This paper overviews the literature on IA, from neuro-biological, psycho-social and clinical standpoints, taking into account recent debates on diagnostic criteria, nosographic label and assessment tools. Neuroimaging data and neurochemical regulations are illustrated with links to pathogenetic hypotheses, which are amenable to validation through innovative preclinical modeling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical manifestations and clinical syndromes of Filipino patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villamin, Charles A C; Navarra, Sandra V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the presenting clinical manifestations and syndromes of Filipino patients on diagnosis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). We performed a retrospective review of medical records of Filipino SLE patients included in the lupus database of the University of Santo Tomas (UST) in Manila, Philippines. All patients fulfilled the American College of Rheumatology criteria for SLE. The following data were recorded: (1) demographic profile, (2) clinical manifestations on SLE diagnosis, and (3) clinical syndromes prior to and during fulfillment of diagnostic criteria for SLE and disease interval from diagnosis of a clinical syndrome to SLE diagnosis. Clinical data of 1,070 patients entered into the UST lupus database as of October 2005 were analyzed. The average age at SLE diagnosis was 28.5 +/- 11.5 (range 5-71) years, with 1,025 female and 45 male subjects. The most common presenting manifestation was arthritis (68%), followed by malar rash (49%), renal involvement (47%), photosensitivity (33%), and oral ulcers (33%). The following clinical syndromes were recorded prior to or during SLE diagnosis: nephrotic syndrome (30%), undifferentiated connective tissue disease (UCTD) (22%), autoimmune hemolytic anemia (AIHA) (6%), and idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) (6%). Among these, AIHA preceded the diagnosis of SLE at the longest interval (20.3 +/- 30.6, range 1-194 months). In this large database of Filipino patients with SLE, the most common presenting manifestation was arthritis, with renal involvement occurring in almost 50%. Among the clinical syndromes, nephrotic syndrome was the most common, whereas AIHA recorded the longest interval preceding SLE diagnosis, at an average of 20.3 months. Our findings are similar to data from other countries and emphasize the broad range of manifestations of SLE. The findings also reinforce the need to establish and maintain SLE databases to enhance awareness, early diagnosis, and more

  4. Physician participation in clinical research and trials: issues and approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sami F Shaban

    2011-03-01

    research culture’. This article examines the barriers to and benefits of physician participation in clinical research as well as interventions needed to increase their participation, including the specific role of undergraduate medical education. The main challenge is the unwillingness of many physicians and patients to participate in clinical trials. Barriers to participation include lack of time, lack of resources, trial-specific issues, communication difficulties, conflicts between the role of clinician and scientist, inadequate research experience and training for physicians, lack of rewards and recognition for physicians, and sometimes a scientifically uninteresting research question, among others. Strategies to encourage physician participation in clinical research include financial and nonfinancial incentives, adequate training, research questions that are in line with physician interests and have clear potential to improve patient care, and regular feedback. Finally, encouraging research culture and fostering the development of inquiry and research-based learning among medical students is now a high priority in order to develop more and better clinician-researchers.Keywords: physician, clinical research, clinical trial, medical education

  5. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome: prevalence, clinical characteristics, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Eric; Ho, Ngoc J

    2012-02-01

    Population-based data on the demographics and clinical characteristics of patients with multiple unrelated drug class intolerances noted in their medical records are lacking. To provide population-based drug "allergy" incidence rates and prevalence, and to identify individuals with multiple drug intolerance syndrome (MDIS) defined by 3 or more unrelated drug class "allergies," and to provide demographic and clinical information on MDIS cases. Electronic medical record data from 2,375,424 Kaiser Permanente Southern California health plan members who had a health care visit and at least 11 months of health care coverage during 2009 were reviewed. Population-based drug "allergy" incidence rates and prevalence were determined for 23 unrelated medication classes. On January 1, 2009, 478,283 (20.1%) health plan members had at least one reported "allergy." Individuals with a history of at least 1 "allergy" and females, in general, reported higher population-based new "allergy" incidence rates. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome was present in 49,582 (2.1%). The MDIS cases were significantly older, 62.4 ± 16.1 years; heavier, body mass index 29.3 ± 7.1; and likely to be female, 84.9%, compared with average health plan members. They had high rates of health care utilization, medication usage, and new drug "allergy" incidence. They sought medical attention for common nonmorbid conditions. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome is in part iatrogenic. It is associated with overweight elderly women who have high rates of health care and medication usage. Urticarial syndromes only explain a small fraction of MDIS cases. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome is associated with anxiety, but not predominately with immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated allergy or life-threatening illness. Multiple drug intolerance syndrome can be managed by medication avoidance and judicious rechallenge. Copyright © 2012 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  6. Restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome: a series of 10 patients with demographic, clinical and laboratorial findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Luis F; Carvalho, Luciane B C; Prado, Lucila B F; Quadros, Abrahao A J; Oliveira, Acary S; Prado, Gilmar F

    2011-08-01

    Few studies have described the occurrence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome. We studied 10 consecutive patients with post-polio syndrome and symptoms of restless legs syndrome. We look at demographic, clinical and laboratorial data. A remarkable finding was the concomitant onset of symptoms of both diseases, suggesting a possible underlying mechanism. Severity of restless legs symptoms was moderate to very severe. Epidemiological studies with larger samples are needed to better establish the relationship and the incidence of restless legs syndrome in post-polio syndrome. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Clinical profile of patients with fibromyalgia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrei Pereira Pernambuco

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction: The new diagnostic criteria for fibromyalgia (FM include the presence of chronic, widespread pain associated with other symptoms such as fatigue, sleep disturbance, anxiety and depression. All these symptoms should be considered when thinking and clinical decision making of physiotherapists dealing with FM. However, it is clear that the other symptoms that accompany the pain are often neglected. Objective: To measure the levels of fatigue, sleep disturbances, anxiety and depression in patients with FM and compare them to levels found in healthy controls. Methods: Forty-six women diagnosed with FM and 30 healthy controls participated in the study. The levels of each of the symptoms were assessed by four validated questionnaires in Brazil (Piper Fatigue Scale - Revised, Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, Beck Anxiety Inventory and the Beck Depression Inventory. Statistical analysis was performed using GraphPad Prism software and all tests used a significance level of 5% (α = 0.05. Results: FM patients had significantly elevated levels of fatigue (p = 0.0005, sleep disturbances (p = 0.003, anxiety (p = 0.0012 and depression (p = 0.0003 compared to healthy controls. Symptoms fatigue and depression correlated strongly and positively with one another and with other symptoms evaluated. Conclusion: The other symptoms that comprise the clinical picture of FM need be considered not only in order to recover the health of patients, but above all in an attempt to preserve it and promote it.

  8. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of Reiter's syndrome in Jordanian patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Mrayat, Z.; Abdallat, S.; Marabha, T.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the epidemiological and clinical features of Reiter's syndrome in patients who visited the rheumatology clinic in King Hussein Medical Centre (KHMC), Jordan. Methods: A prospective study, including 43 patients with the diagnosis of Reiter's syndrome was done. Patients were assessed by taking complete history, physical examination and appropriate investigations including urinalysis and culture, stool examination and culture, synovial fluid analysis, complement fixation test for Chlamydia trachomatis, complete blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, rheumatoid factor, antinuclear antibodies. HLA-B27 and radiological study. Results: All patients in this study were white men, with mean age of 26.3 years. HLA-B27 was positive in 37 patients (86%). Most cases were post venereal (32 patients, 74%) while the rest were dysenteric. The clinical manifestations were arthritis in all patients (100%), urethritis in 21 patients (48%), ocular involvement in 20 patients (46%), diarrhea in 12 patients (28%), painless oral ulcers in 11 patients (26%), skin lesions in 5 patients (12%) and constitutional symptoms in 7 patients (16%). Arthritis was mostly oligoarticular (25 patients, 58%) with asymmetrical pattern in 34 patients (78%). Large joints of lower extremity were most involved (29 patients, 68%). Rheumatoid factor and antinuclear antibodies were negative in all patients. Relapses occurred in 7 patients (16%) after a mean period of 6.2 months. Conclusion: It is concluded that the epidemiological and clinical features of Reiter's syndrome in Jordan are not different from those in the literature. (author)

  9. Clinical characteristics of childhood guillain-barré syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Roshan; Al-Futaisi, Amna; Chacko, Alexander; Fazalullah, Mohammed; Nabhani, Susan Al; Al-Awaidy, Salah; Al-Busaidy, Suleiman; Al-Mahrooqi, Salim

    2008-07-01

    To find the incidence, clinical pattern and outcome of Guillain-Barre syndrome in the Sultanate of Oman in children less than 15 years of age. All children under fifteen years with acute flaccid paralysis were admitted to identify the underlying cause. The diagnosis of Gullain Barre syndrome was made by clinical criteria, cerebrospinal fluid findings and nerve conduction studies. Intravenous immunoglobulins were given to all and two needed plasmapharesis. Sixty-one children were diagnosed as Guillan-Barré syndrome and constituted 20% of cases of acute flaccid paralysis. Males 39 (63.9%) outnumbered females (36.1%).The annual incidence below 15 years was 0.45/100,000. Cranial nerves were involved in 31 (50.8%) children. Albumino-cytological dissociation in cerebrospinal fluid was seen in 42/45(93.3%) cases. Acute relapse was seen in six (9.8%) cases. Eleven children (18.3%) needed ventilation. Complete recovery was seen in 45 to 310 days (mean 69.1 days). Three children (4.9%) were left with minimal residual deficit. There was no mortality. Guillain Barre syndrome is a serious disease, although recovery is the rule in children. The disease is associated with very low mortality and long term morbidity. Immunoglobulins have reduced the duration of hospital stay and the total time needed for recovery.

  10. Clinical Features of Miller-Fisher Syndrome in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Ono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Miller-Fisher syndrome (MFS is recognized as a variant of Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS. MFS is a rare disorder that is characterized by the acute onset of ophthalmoplegia, ataxia, and areflexia/hyporeflexia. MFS has a higher incidence in Asia, where the incidence is estimated to be 18%–26% of GBS compared with 3%–5% in the West. The differential diagnosis of MFS includes Wernicke’s encephalopathy (WE which is characterized by a clinical triad (nystagmus and ophthalmoplegia, mental status changes, and ataxia, myasthenia gravis, and brainstem stroke. The association between MFS and pregnancy has not been reported previously. Here, we describe the clinical features of a pregnant woman in early pregnancy with MFS. This case highlights the fact that it is necessary to establish an accurate diagnosis based on the details from the patient’s history on appropriate complementary testing in a pregnant patient with MFS.

  11. Genetic, Clinical, and Laboratory Markers for DOCK8 Immunodeficiency Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah C. Davis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available DOCK8 immunodeficiency syndrome (DIDS is a combined immunodeficiency characterized by recurrent viral infections, severe atopy, and early onset malignancy. Genetic studies revealed large, unique deletions in patients from different families and ethnic backgrounds. Clinical markers of DIDS include atopic dermatitis, allergies, cutaneous viral infections, recurrent respiratory tract infections, and malignancy. Immune assessments showed T cell lymphopenia, hyper-IgE, hypo-IgM, and eosinophilia. The impaired lymphocyte functions in DIDS patients appear central for disease pathogenesis.

  12. The Korsakoff syndrome: clinical aspects, psychology and treatment.

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    Kopelman, Michael D; Thomson, Allan D; Guerrini, Irene; Marshall, E Jane

    2009-01-01

    The Korsakoff syndrome is a preventable memory disorder that usually emerges (although not always) in the aftermath of an episode of Wernicke's encephalopathy. The present paper reviews the clinical and scientific literature on this disorder. A systematic review of the clinical and scientific literature on Wernicke's encephalopathy and the alcoholic Korsakoff syndrome. The Korsakoff syndrome is most commonly associated with chronic alcohol misuse, and some heavy drinkers may have a genetic predisposition to developing the syndrome. The characteristic neuropathology includes neuronal loss, micro-haemorrhages and gliosis in the paraventricular and peri-aqueductal grey matter. Lesions in the mammillary bodies, the mammillo-thalamic tract and the anterior thalamus may be more important to memory dysfunction than lesions in the medial dorsal nucleus of the thalamus. Episodic memory is severely affected in the Korsakoff syndrome, and the learning of new semantic memories is variably affected. 'Implicit' aspects of memory are preserved. These patients are often first encountered in general hospital settings where they can occupy acute medical beds for lengthy periods. Abstinence is the cornerstone of any rehabilitation programme. Korsakoff patients are capable of new learning, particularly if they live in a calm and well-structured environment and if new information is cued. There are few long-term follow-up studies, but these patients are reported to have a normal life expectancy if they remain abstinent from alcohol. Although we now have substantial knowledge about the nature of this disorder, scientific questions (e.g. regarding the underlying genetics) remain. More particularly, there is a dearth of appropriate long-term care facilities for these patients, given that empirical research has shown that good practice has beneficial effects.

  13. Susac syndrome: clinical characteristics, clinical classification, and long-term prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vishnevskia-Dai, Vicktoria; Chapman, Joav; Sheinfeld, Roee; Sharon, Tal; Huna-Baron, Ruth; Manor, Riri S; Shoenfeld, Yehuda; Zloto, Ofira

    2016-10-01

    Susac syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the clinical triad of central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, sensorineural hearing impairment, and branch retinal artery occlusion (BRAO). The purpose of this study is to examine the demographics, clinical characteristics, treatment, and long-term prognosis of Susac syndrome. The data recorded for all Susac syndrome patients treated at the Sheba Medical Center between 1998 and 2014 included demographics, clinical signs at presentation and during the disease course, imaging findings, treatment, and prognosis.Susac syndrome was diagnosed in 10 patients (age range 30-45 years). Only 2 patients presented with the full triad and 7 patients developed the full triad during mean follow-up period of 35 months. The average time to full triad was 7 months. Based on our observations at presentation, we divided the disease course into suspected, incomplete, and complete Susac syndrome. All 10 patients were treated at diagnosis with a pulse of high-dose intravenous methylprednisolone. There was improvement in visual acuity and visual field at the end of follow-up compared to baseline, but it was not statistically significant (P = 0.479 and P = 0.053, respectively). Five patients remained with neurological damage, and 5 patients had no improvement of their hearing loss at study closure. In conclusion, Susac syndrome is a rare condition that can mimic other disorders. The diagnosis is challenging because most patients do not initially present with the definitive triad. We suggest a clinical classification for the syndrome that may assist in early diagnosis.

  14. Clinical neurogenetics: fragile x-associated tremor/ataxia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Deborah A; O'Keefe, Joan A

    2013-11-01

    This article summarizes the clinical findings, genetics, pathophysiology, and treatment of fragile X-associated tremor ataxia syndrome. The disorder occurs from a CGG repeat (55-200) expansion in the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene. It manifests clinically in kinetic tremor, gait ataxia, and executive dysfunction, usually in older men who carry the genetic abnormality. The disorder has distinct radiographic and pathologic findings. Symptomatic treatment is beneficial in some patients. The inheritance is X-linked and family members may be at risk for other fragile X-associated disorders. This information is useful to neurologists, general practitioners, and geneticists. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. [Current issues on irritable bowel syndrome: diet and irritable bowel syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong Hwan; Sung, In-Kyung

    2014-09-25

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most prevalent functional gastrointestinal disorders. It is a multifactorial disorder with its pathogenesis attributed to abnormal gastrointestinal motility, low-grade inflammation, visceral hypersensitivity, communication in the gut-brain axis, and so on. Traditionally, IBS has been treated with diet and lifestyle modification, fiber supplementation, psychological therapy, and pharmacological treatment. Carbohydrates are intermingled with a wide range of regularly consumed food including grains such as rye and wheat, vegetables, fruits, and legumes. Short-chain carbohydrates that are poorly absorbed exert osmotic effects in the intestinal lumen increasing its water volume, and are rapidly fermented by bacteria with consequent gas production. These effects may be the basis for the induction of most of the gastrointestinal symptoms. This has led to the use of lactose-free diets in those with lactose intolerance and of fructose-reduced diets for fructose malabsorption. As all poorly absorbed short-chain carbohydrates have similar and additive effects in the intestine, a concept has been developed to regard them collectively as FODMAPs (fermentable oligosaccharides, disaccharides, monosaccharides and polyols) and to evaluate a dietary approach that restricts them all. Based on the observational and comparative studies, and randomized-controlled trials, FODMAPs have been shown to trigger gastrointestinal symptoms in patients with IBS. Food choice via the low FODMAPs and potentially other dietary strategies is now a realistic and efficacious therapeutic approach for managing symptoms of IBS.

  16. [Mental issues of clinical research interviews in an intercultural context].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M-S; Derivois, D

    2013-10-01

    39-year-old Korean woman living in Paris illustrates this intersubjective dimension. The analysis of the relationship between the researcher and his object of research will argue the projective dimension. In the quoted research, the researcher is facing a situation in which the participant's problems remind him of his own questionings. The work of analysis, with hindsight and in the after fact, on the position of the researcher and his subjective implication, is necessary to avoid the possible risk of subjectivation. The group dimension has several levels: institutional, national, international or even worldwide. Thus, the intercultural aspect is particularly highlighted in an attempt to present the complexity of the process. The idea of the interculturality awareness at several levels was highlighted in particular by taking the institutional transference/counter-transference movement into consideration. The transfer mezo level revealed itself as one of the analyzers of the group dimension, such as the motivation for accepting the participation in our investigation. In other words, it requires understanding both the relationship conducted by each individual with the institution, and that conducted by two subjects met within the institution. In the current world marked by globalization, "the geohistory of the clinical encounter" (Derivois, 2010) becomes an interesting tool to understand the complexity of the encounter issues arising from the clinical consultation. Copyright © 2012 L’Encéphale, Paris. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Clinical presentation & management of glomerular diseases: hematuria, nephritic & nephrotic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Ramesh

    2011-01-01

    Because the differential diagnosis for glomerulonephritis (GN) is broad, using a classification schema is helpful to narrow the causes of GN in a systematic manner. The etiology of glomerulonephritis can be classified by their clinical presentation (nephrotic, nephritic, rapidly progressive GN, chronic GN) or by histopathology. GN may be restricted to the kidney (primary glomerulonephritis) or be a secondary to a systemic disease (secondary glomerulonephritis). The nephrotic syndrome is defined by the presence of heavy proteinuria (protein excretion greater than 3.0 g/24 hours), hypoalbuminemia (less than 3.0 g/dL), and peripheral edema. Hyperlipidemia and thrombotic disease may be present. The nephritic syndrome is associated with hematuria and proteinuria and abnormal kidney function and carries poorer prognosis and is typically associated with hypertension. The predominant cause of the nephrotic syndrome in children is minimal change disease. The most common causes of nephritic syndrome are post infectious GN, IgA nephropathy and lupus nephritis. Chronic GN is slowly progressive and is associated with hypertension and gradual loss of kidney function. Treatment includes non-specific measure aimed at controlling hypertension, edema, proteinuria and disease modifying immunosuppression.

  18. [Carpal tunnel syndrome in children. About 10 clinical cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leduc, A; Perrot, P; Truffandier, M V; Bellier-Waast, F; Duteille, F

    2014-06-01

    The carpal tunnel syndrome is a common peripheral neuropathy in adults but is rare in children. We report a series of 10 carpal tunnel syndromes in children. We have supported five children, two males and three females, with a bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome. We studied the clinical history (history, symptoms, stage of disease), therapeutic management and remote development. Three children were diagnosed with a mucopolysaccharidosis, the fourth with VATER association. For the last child, it was a form considered idiopathic. Two children were referred for night pains, the others for under-utilization of their first three fingers, two of which had a thenar atrophy. Four children underwent an electromyogram for diagnostic confirmation. We realized open surgical treatment at one time, by section of the carpal ligament. The average age of our patients was 4years. The average decline in the surgical study was 19 months. Postoperatively, we noted, in all patients, complete regression of the painful symptoms, a sensory improvement and recovery of the opposition of the thumb. The scarcity of carpal tunnel syndrome in children and the atypical symptoms may cause diagnostic delay, with serious consequences. We keep vigilant and ready to access to additional tests (electromyogram). For our team, the therapeutic approach is a systematic open surgical treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. SARCOPENIA AND OVERLAPPING SYNDROMES: THEIR VALUE IN CLINICAL PRACTICE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Shostak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sarcopenia and overlapping syndromes, such as decrepitude and cachexia, are important medical and social problems due to their high prevalence and association with unfavorable outcomes. The article describes some issues of terminology, classification and differentiation of sarcopenia, decrepitude and cachexia, main diagnostic principles as well as different sarcopenia phenotypes (like sarco-osteoporosis sarcopenic and osteosarcopenic obesity. Identification of sarcopenia secondary forms associated with low physical activity, eating disorders or chronic illnesses (including inflammatory ones was an important achievement for better understanding of the disease. Studying of sarcopenia in people with rheumatoid arthritis is a matter of particular interest.

  20. Clinical characteristics and treatment of Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinhui; Zhu, Lan; Lang, Jinghe; Liu, Zhufeng; Sun, Dawei; Leng, Jinhua; Fan, Qingbo

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the clinical characteristics and treatment of the Herlyn-Werner-Wunderlich syndrome (HWWS). Sixty-one patients diagnosed with HWWS were retrospectively analyzed. HWWS is categorized into three types in China. Age at presentation of all the cases was after menarche. The most common clinical presentations were dysmenorrhea for type I and vaginal discharge for types II and III. Clinical presentations of types II and III may not occur until reproductive age. HWWS occurred on the right in 39/61. Excision of the obstructed vaginal septum was the treatment utilized in this cohort. After surgery, subsequent pregnancies were ipsilateral in 52.9 %. Clinical presentation in untreated HWWS suggests the anatomic anomaly. Early recognition and treatment can reduce symptoms. Pregnancies occur in both the affected and unaffected uterus.

  1. Further delineation of cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome: clinical features of 38 individuals with proven mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armour, C M; Allanson, J E

    2008-04-01

    Cardio-facio-cutaneous syndrome (CFC) is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome named because of a characteristic facies, cardiac anomalies, and ectodermal abnormalities. While considerable literature describes the main features, few studies have documented the frequencies of less common features allowing a greater appreciation of the full phenotype. We have analysed clinical data on 38 individuals with CFC and a confirmed mutation in one of the genes known to cause the condition. We provide data on well-established features, and those that are less often described. Polyhydramnios (77%) and prematurity (49%) were common perinatal issues. 71% of individuals had a cardiac anomaly, the most common being pulmonary valve stenosis (42%), hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (39%), and atrial septal defect (28%). Hair anomalies were also typical: 92% had curly hair, 84% sparse hair, and 86% absent or sparse eyebrows. The most frequent cutaneous features were keratosis pilaris (73%), hyperkeratosis (61%) and nevi (76%). Significant and long lived gastrointestinal dysmotility (71%), seizures (49%), optic nerve hypoplasia (30%) and renal anomalies, chiefly hydronephrosis (20%), were among the less well known issues reported. This study reports a broad range of clinical issues in a large cohort of individuals with molecular confirmation of CFC.

  2. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities: review of clinical and ethical issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gekas J

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Jean Gekas,1,2 Sylvie Langlois,3 Vardit Ravitsky,4 François Audibert,5 David Gradus van den Berg,6 Hazar Haidar,4 François Rousseau2,7 1Prenatal Diagnosis Unit, Department of Medical Genetics and Pediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec City, QC, Canada; 2Department of Medical Biology, CHU de Québec, Québec City, QC, Canada; 3Department of Medical Genetics, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 4Bioethics Program, Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, School of Public Health, University of Montreal, Montreal, QC, Canada; 5Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Hospital Sainte-Justine, Montreal, QC, Canada; 6Department of Social and Preventive Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec City, QC, Canada; 7Department of Molecular Biology, Medical Biochemistry and Pathology, Faculty of Medicine, Université Laval, Québec City, QC, Canada Abstract: Genomics-based non-invasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA screening was proposed to reduce the number of invasive procedures in current prenatal diagnosis for fetal aneuploidies. We review here the clinical and ethical issues of cfDNA screening. To date, it is not clear how cfDNA screening is going to impact the performances of clinical prenatal diagnosis and how it could be incorporated in real life. The direct marketing to users may have facilitated the early introduction of cfDNA screening into clinical practice despite limited evidence-based independent research data supporting this rapid shift. There is a need to address the most important ethical, legal, and social issues before its implementation in a mass setting. Its introduction might worsen current tendencies to neglect the reproductive autonomy of pregnant women. Keywords: prenatal diagnosis, Down syndrome, non-invasive prenatal testing, cell-free fetal DNA, informed consent, reproductive autonomy

  3. Clinical outcome and risk stratification in Brugada syndrome

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    Tadashi Wada, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the first report on Brugada syndrome, various risk markers for the prediction of ventricular fibrillation (VF in patients with Brugada syndrome have been reported. Multicenter trials reported spontaneous type 1 electrocardiogram (ECG and disease symptoms as prognostic predictors. VF induction by programmed electrical stimulation is still controversial, and most of the studies have failed to prove its significance for the prediction of spontaneous VF episodes. In Japan, although most multicenter studies have shown that patients with type 1 ECG were at high risk, it is difficult to determine the indication for implantation of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator only based on the ECG type. Recent studies have added new risk markers, such as inferolateral early repolarization, fragmented QRS, and shorter effective refractory periods of the ventricle, in addition to type 1 ECG and symptoms. Here, we review the clinical outcome and indices reported as reliable prognostic factors of Brugada syndrome with a focus on the clinical and ECG markers for risk stratification.

  4. Clinical and histological characteristics of canine ocular gliovascular syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Amy; Naranjo, Carolina; Blocker, Tiffany; Zarfoss, Mitzi; Dubielzig, Richard R

    2015-09-01

    To characterize the clinical, diagnostic, and histopathologic findings in dogs with canine ocular gliovascular syndrome (COGS). The archives at the Comparative Ocular Pathology Laboratory of Wisconsin (COPLOW) were used to identify eyes with COGS. Histopathological inclusion criteria included: a neovascular membrane extending from the optic nerve head or retina, clusters of spindle cells lacking vascularization within the vitreous, and histological signs of glaucoma. Special and immunohistochemical (IHC) staining techniques were performed. Clinical data, treatments, and outcomes were obtained from case records and information provided by submitting veterinarians. Thirty-seven eyes of 36 dogs were identified with COGS. The average age at diagnosis was 8.8 years (±2.2). The relative risk for a Labrador retriever affected by COGS was significantly greater (9.3 times) (P syndrome associated with vitreal glial cell aggregates and neovascular proliferation from the optic nerve or retina, which leads to neovascular glaucoma. The inflammation and secondary glaucoma resulting from this syndrome appear poorly responsive to conventional medical therapies. The exact etiology of COGS remains undetermined, but a systemic etiology is unlikely. © 2014 American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists.

  5. Anatomical, Clinical and Electrical Observations in Piriformis Syndrome

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    Assoum Hani A

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We provided clinical and electrical descriptions of the piriformis syndrome, contributing to better understanding of the pathogenesis and further diagnostic criteria. Methods Between 3550 patients complaining of sciatica, we concluded 26 cases of piriformis syndrome, 15 females, 11 males, mean age 35.37 year-old. We operated 9 patients, 2 to 19 years after the onset of symptoms, 5 had piriformis steroids injection. A dorsolumbar MRI were performed in all cases and a pelvic MRI in 7 patients. The electro-diagnostic test was performed in 13 cases, between them the H reflex of the peroneal nerve was tested 7 times. Results After a followup 1 to 11 years, for the 17 non operated patients, 3 patients responded to conservative treatment. 6 of the operated had an excellent result, 2 residual minor pain and one failed. 3 new anatomical observations were described with atypical compression of the sciatic nerve by the piriformis muscle. Conclusion While the H reflex test of the tibial nerve did not give common satisfaction in the literature for diagnosis, the H reflex of the peroneal nerve should be given more importance, because it demonstrated in our study more specific sign, with six clinical criteria it contributed to improve the method of diagnosis. The cause of this particular syndrome does not only depend on the relation sciatic nerve-piriformis muscle, but the environmental conditions should be considered with the series of the anatomical anomalies to explain the real cause of this pain.

  6. The Borderline Syndrome Index. Clinical validity and utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edell, W S

    1984-05-01

    Recently, a 52-item self-report questionnaire, called the Borderline Syndrome Index (BSI), was developed to provide a rapid clinical assessment of the borderline syndrome (Conte, H. R., Plutchik, R., Karasu, T. B., and Jerrett, I. A self-report borderline scale: Discriminative validity and preliminary norms. J. Nerv. Ment. Dis., 168: 428-435, 1980). The present investigation addresses the question of the applicability of this test instrument over the full range of borderline syndrome psychopathology, as defined by DSM-III diagnostic criteria, as well as the relationship of various demographic, treatment, and personality variables to total scale scores. The final sample consisted of 51 patients meeting DSM-III diagnostic criteria for borderline personality disorder, 14 patients with DSM-III defined schizotypal personality disorder, 17 patients meeting DSM-III diagnostic criteria for borderline and schizotypal personality disorder, 30 CATEGO-defined early schizophrenics (first psychotic episode within the past 2 years), and 20 normal control subjects. All patient groups scored significantly higher than the normal group on the BSI, and each borderline syndrome group was discriminable from the early schizophrenic group but not from each other. None of the demographic variables correlated significantly with BSI total scores. Treatment variables were somewhat related to total scores, and it is suggested that chronicity rather than severity of disturbance may strongly affect performance on the BSI. Principal component analysis of BSI items, as well as high correlations between scores on the BSI and almost every scale on the MMPI, suggests that the BSI may be tapping a general, rather than specific, dimension of psychopathology. This dimension might best be described as a generalized deficiency in coping with life, with resultant feelings of hopelessness and worthlessness. While the present study provides some support for the discriminative validity of the measure, further

  7. A case of clinical Reye syndrome presenting characteristic CT changes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hino, Tamaki; Sai, Hoshun; Morikawa, Yuji; Mizuta, Ryuzo; Okuno, Takehiko.

    1984-01-01

    A 9-month-old male infant was admitted to our hospital on the second day of cold like syndrome because of high fever, convulsion, coma, and decerebrate rigidity. Serum GOT, GPT, LDH, and CPK were markedly elevated. Serum ammonia was slightly increased, and hypoglycemia was present. The cerebrospinal fluid showed no pleocytosis, normal sugar content, but increased protein. Thus we made a diagnosis of clinical Reye syndrome according to the criteria by Yamashita, et al. A CT on the day of admission showed symmetrical low-density areas in the posterior fossa and the regions of thalamus. Ringed enhancements were seen around the areas of low density in the thalamus on the twenty-second hospital day. We consider that these lesions may represent the infarction due to obstruction of the thalamoperforant arteries caused by cerebral edema in the early stage of the disease. (author)

  8. [Clinical and neuropathological aspects of Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubaran, C; Fernandes, J; Martins, F; Souza, J; Machado, R; Cadore, M

    1996-12-01

    Alcohol abuse is one of most serious problems in public health and the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome one of the gravest consequences of alcoholism. The pathology is often undiagnosed in its less evident presentations, therefore an accurate diagnostic approach is a critical step in planning treatment. Besides new pharmacological proposals, treatment is based on the restoration of thiamine, although this is insufficient to prevent the psychological decline of a great number of patients. The cognitive impact of the pathology is derived from the interaction of alcoholic neurotoxicity, thiamine deficiency and personal susceptibility. In this article the history, epidemiology, clinical and neuropathological features of the Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, as well as some aspects of its treatment and prognosis, are described.

  9. Cushing's syndrome and chronic venous ulceration--a clinical challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Moushmi; Gibby, Owain; Ivanova-Stoilova, Tzvetanka; Harding, Keith

    2011-02-01

    Cushing's syndrome is a condition caused by high levels of glucocorticoids, or most commonly as a result of prolonged exposure to exogenous steroids. Clinical features include diabetes, hypertension, obesity, skin atrophy, immune suppression and delayed wound healing. We report a patient with iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, in whom long-term topical steroid therapy was used to treat varicose eczema, which contributed to the development of type 2 diabetes, morbid obesity, sleep apnoea and chronic wound sepsis. In this case, repeated hospital admissions and systemic antibiotics were associated with considerable comorbidity. Aggressive local treatment, consisting of potassium permanganate soaks and irrigating gels, was highly effective in reducing the amount of exudate, pain and preventing from further deterioration of the patient's legs. © 2010 The Authors. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and Medicalhelplines.com Inc.

  10. Clinical and genetic aspects of Marfan syndrome and familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hilhorst-Hofstee, Yvonne

    2013-01-01

    This thesis concerns the clinical and genetic aspects of familial thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections, in particular in Marfan syndrome. It includes the Dutch multidisciplinary guidelines for diagnosis and management of Marfan syndrome. These guidelines contain practical directions for

  11. Clinical utility of lenalidomide in the treatment of myelodysplastic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abou Zahr A

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Abdallah Abou Zahr,1 Ehab Saad Aldin,2 Rami S Komrokji,3 Amer M Zeidan4 1Section of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Internal Medicine, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, New York City, New York, NY, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Medstar Good Samaritan Hospital, Baltimore, MD, 3Department of Malignant Hematology, H Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, FL, 4Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS represent a heterogeneous group of acquired clonal hematopoietic disorders characterized by peripheral blood cytopenias, paradoxical BM hypercellularity, ineffective hematopoiesis, and increased risk of leukemic transformation. Risk stratification, using different prognostic scores and markers, is at the core of MDS management. Deletion 5q [del(5q] MDS is a distinct class of MDS characterized by the haploinsufficiency of specific genes, microRNAs, and proteins, which has been linked to increased sensitivity to the drug lenalidomide. Phase II and III clinical trials have demonstrated the efficacy of lenalidomide in improving clinical outcomes of patients with del(5q MDS, including reduction in red blood cell transfusion requirements and improvements in quality of life. Lenalidomide has also demonstrated some activity in non-del(5q lower-risk MDS as well as higher-risk MDS, especially in combination with other agents. In this paper, we review the pathogenesis of del(5q MDS, the proposed mechanisms of action of lenalidomide, the major clinical trials that documented the activity of lenalidomide in different MDS populations, potential predictors of benefit from the drug and suggested mechanisms of resistance, and the use of combination strategies to expand the clinical utility of lenalidomide in MDS. Keywords: deletion 5q, lenalidomide, myelodysplastic syndromes, 5q-syndrome

  12. Predicting outcome in clinically isolated syndrome using machine learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wottschel, V.; Alexander, D.C.; Kwok, P.P.; Chard, D.T.; Stromillo, M.L.; De Stefano, N.; Thompson, A.J.; Miller, D.H.; Ciccarelli, O.

    2014-01-01

    We aim to determine if machine learning techniques, such as support vector machines (SVMs), can predict the occurrence of a second clinical attack, which leads to the diagnosis of clinically-definite Multiple Sclerosis (CDMS) in patients with a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS), on the basis of single patient's lesion features and clinical/demographic characteristics. Seventy-four patients at onset of CIS were scanned and clinically reviewed after one and three years. CDMS was used as the gold standard against which SVM classification accuracy was tested. Radiological features related to lesional characteristics on conventional MRI were defined a priori and used in combination with clinical/demographic features in an SVM. Forward recursive feature elimination with 100 bootstraps and a leave-one-out cross-validation was used to find the most predictive feature combinations. 30 % and 44 % of patients developed CDMS within one and three years, respectively. The SVMs correctly predicted the presence (or the absence) of CDMS in 71.4 % of patients (sensitivity/specificity: 77 %/66 %) at 1 year, and in 68 % (60 %/76 %) at 3 years on average over all bootstraps. Combinations of features consistently gave a higher accuracy in predicting outcome than any single feature. Machine-learning-based classifications can be used to provide an “individualised” prediction of conversion to MS from subjects' baseline scans and clinical characteristics, with potential to be incorporated into routine clinical practice. PMID:25610791

  13. Clinical gait analysis in a rehabilitation context : some controversial issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, T; Nienhuis, B; Pauwels, J

    Objective: To determine the focus of clinical gait analysis in order to explain the observed mismatch between the available technology for movement analysis and the aims of clinical rehabilitation medicine. Design: Literature search using two different interactive computerized search systems.

  14. Clinical and inheritance profiles of Kallmann syndrome in Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shegem Nadima S

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper management of patients with Kallmann syndrome (KS allows them to attain a normal reproductive health. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the presentation modalities, phenotypes and the modes of inheritance among 32 patients with Kallmann syndrome in Jordan. Recognition of the syndrome allows for prompt proper management and provision of genetic counselling. Subjects Over a period of five years (1999–2004, the clinical and inheritance profiles of 26 male and 6 female patients with Kallmann syndrome from 12 families were evaluated at the National Center for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Genetics in Jordan. Results The patients belonged to twelve Jordanian and Palestinian families and their age at presentation ranged from 4 – 46 years. Nine boys aged 4–14 years presented with cryptorchidism and microphallus, all other males presented with delayed puberty, hypogonadism and/or infertility. The main presentation among six female patients was primary amenorrhea. Intrafamilial variability in clinical phenotype was specifically evident for renal abnormalities and sensorineural hearing impairment. Familial KS was diagnosed in 27 patients belonging to five families with the X-linked mode of inheritance and two families with the autosomal recessive mode of inheritance. Conclusions (1 the majority of cases in this study represented the X-linked form of KS, which might point to a high prevalence of Kal 1 gene in the population. (2 Genetic counselling helps these families to reach a diagnosis at an early age and to decide about their reproductive options. (3 Children presenting with cryptorchidism and microphallus in our population should be investigated for KS.

  15. Chiasmal syndrome: Clinical characteristics in patients attending an ophthalmological center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astorga-Carballo, Aline; Serna-Ojeda, Juan Carlos; Camargo-Suarez, Mayra Fabiola

    2017-01-01

    To present the clinical characteristics of a group of patients with the diagnosis of chiasmal syndrome who attended a large ophthalmological institute. Retrospective, observational clinical study with the review of medical records of patients with a diagnosis of chiasmal syndrome. The following variables were assessed: demographic characteristics, chief complaint upon presentation, best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), presence or absence of diplopia, pupillary responses, optic nerve head morphology, etiology, and results from the ancillary tests including Ishihara test, Goldmann visual field (GVF) perimetry and neuroimaging. A total of 104 met the inclusion criteria, with a median age of 52 years (range 4-86 years). Fifty-four patients (51.9%) were referred to our institution with a diagnosis of a causative etiology for chiasmal syndrome, while in 50 (48.1%) the diagnosis was performed at our center. The most common presenting symptom was low visual acuity in 57 patients (54.8%), and the most common GVF defect was bitemporal hemianopsia in 39 patients (78 eyes, 39.8%). Pupillary abnormalities were present in 58 patients (55.7%), the optic nerve revealed pallor at any degree in 67 patients (64.4%) and the Ishihara test was affected in 65 patients (62.5%). The most common diagnosis was pituitary macroadenoma. The ophthalmologist participates in the diagnosis and rehabilitation of patients with chiasmal syndrome. Low visual acuity is the most common symptom at presentation, and bitemporal hemianopia the most frequent GVF defect. Examination of the optic nerve head and pupillary responses, and ancillary tests including Ishihara test and neuroimaging are relevant for diagnosis.

  16. Current Therapeutic Cannabis Controversies and Clinical Trial Design Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Russo, Ethan B.

    2016-01-01

    This overview covers a wide range of cannabis topics, initially examining issues in dispensaries and self-administration, plus regulatory requirements for production of cannabis-based medicines, particularly the Food and Drug Administration “Botanical Guidance.” The remainder pertains to various cannabis controversies that certainly require closer examination if the scientific, consumer, and governmental stakeholders are ever to reach consensus on safety issues, specifically: whether botanica...

  17. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David M; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J; Menon, Debashish U; Philpot, Benjamin D; Tarquinio, Daniel C

    2016-02-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Rett Syndrome: Crossing the Threshold to Clinical Translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, David M.; Bird, Adrian; Coenraads, Monica; Gray, Steven J.; Menon, Debashish U.; Philpot, Benjamin D.; Tarquinio, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Lying at the intersection between neurobiology and epigenetics, Rett syndrome (RTT) has garnered intense interest in recent years, not only from a broad range of academic scientists, but also from the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries. In addition to the critical need for treatments for this devastating disorder, optimism for developing RTT treatments derives from a unique convergence of factors, including a known monogenic cause, reversibility of symptoms in preclinical models, a strong clinical research infrastructure highlighted by an NIH-funded natural history study and well-established clinics with significant patient populations. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the biology of RTT, particularly promising preclinical findings, lessons from past clinical trials, and critical elements of trial design for rare disorders. PMID:26830113

  19. Overlap of PIV syndrome, VACTERL and Pallister-Hall syndrome: clinical and molecular analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killoran, C E; Abbott, M; McKusick, V A; Biesecker, L G

    2000-07-01

    The polydactyly, imperforate anus, vertebral anomalies syndrome (PIV, OMIM 174100) was determined as a distinct syndrome by Say and Gerald in 1968 (Say B, Gerald PS. Lancet 1968: 2: 688). We noted that the features of PIV overlap with the VATER association and Pallister-Hall syndrome (PHS, OMIM 146510), which includes polydactyly, (central or postaxial), shortened fingers, hypoplastic nails, renal anomalies, imperforate anus, and hypothalamic hamartoma. Truncation mutations in GL13, a zinc finger transcription factor gene, have been shown to cause PHS. We performed a molecular evaluation on a patient diagnosed with PIV, whose mother, grandfather, and maternal aunt had similar malformations. We sequenced the GLI3 gene in the patient to determine if she had a mutation. The patient was found to have a deletion in nucleotides 2188-2207 causing a frameshift mutation that predicts a truncated protein product of the gene. Later clinical studies demonstrated that the patient also has a hypothalamic hamartoma, a finding in PHS. We concluded that this family had atypical PHS and not PIV. This result has prompted us to re-evaluate the PIV literature to see if PIV is a valid entity. Based on these data and our examination of the literature, we conclude that PIV is not a valid diagnostic entity. We conclude that patients diagnosed with PIV should be reclassified as having VACTERL, or PHS, or another syndrome with overlapping malformations.

  20. Convergent validity of MCMI-III clinical syndrome scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hesse, Morten; Guldager, Steen; Linneberg, Inger Holm

    2012-06-01

    This study tested the convergent validity of the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-III (MCMI-III) clinical syndrome scales. Cross-sectional survey. Using a sample of 186 substance abusers from one single town referred for assessment, convergent and discriminant validity of the MCMI-III and Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI) diagnoses was conducted. Additional measures included the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale and the Beck Anxiety Inventory. A single Axis I factor based on the raw scores correlated adequately with the factor based on the other scales (r= .85), whereas the correlation between the factor based on the MCMI-III baserate scores was somewhat lower (r= .74), but still indicated substantial convergent validity. For individual disorders, area under the curve (AUC) analyses suggested that the convergent validity of the MCMI-III and the MINI was adequate. The raw score scales were superior to the baserate adjusted scores in all but one case. Discriminant validity was good for alcohol and drug dependence, moderate for major depression and delusion, and poor for thought disorder and anxiety. The MCMI-III clinical syndrome scales generally measure the constructs they were intended for. The data did not support that the adjustments used in calculating the baserate scores improved validity. ©2011 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Clinical phenomenology and mortality in Charles Bonnet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapid, Maria I; Burton, M Caroline; Chang, Megan T; Rummans, Teresa A; Cha, Stephen S; Leavitt, Jacqueline A; Boeve, Bradley F

    2013-03-01

    Despite existing diagnostic criteria for Charles Bonnet syndrome (CBS), clinical manifestations vary greatly. We examined the clinical course and mortality of patients diagnosed with CBS. We conducted a retrospective chart review of patients with CBS. We collected demographic and clinical information and medical burden scores. Kaplan-Meier mortality curves were compared using log-rank test. Cox proportional hazard model was used for multivariate analysis and hazard ratio (HR). Mortality was compared to expected mortality from Minnesota population. Seventy-seven patients with CBS had a mean age of 79.5 (standard deviation ± 13.0) and were predominantly Caucasian (97%) and female (73%). In all, 20 (26%) subsequently developed a dementia syndrome, most often Lewy body. A total of 46 (60%) deaths occurred with an average follow-up time of 33.0 months. Characteristics associated with mortality included older age (75-84 [HR 3.34, P = .029], >85 [HR 4.58, P = .007]) and renal disease (HR 3.39 with 95% confidence interval 1.31-8.80, P = .012). Medical burden scores were not associated with overall mortality. Mortality was high compared to Minnesota population (P < .0001). A large proportion of patients with CBS developed dementia, and there was a high mortality rate associated with older age and renal disease. Medical burden was not associated with mortality.

  2. Joubert syndrome: Clinical and radiological characteristics of nine patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Farag Elhassanien

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Joubert Syndrome (JS is a rare genetic developmental disorder, first identified in 1969. In patients with JS, certain regions of the brain (mainly cerebellar vermis and brainstem are underdeveloped or malformed. This can lead to impaired attention, visual, spatial, motor, language and social functional skills. JS is characterized by a host of features, many of which do not occur in every patient. Aim of the Study: To spotlight and increase awareness of clinical profile and neuroimaging findings of children with Joubert syndrome. Methods: This is a retrospective case series study of patients with JS who attended the Pediatric Neurology Clinic in Aladan and Alfarawanya Hospitals in Kuwait, from September 2007 to September 2012. Clinical and radiological data were obtained from the patient medical records. Results: Cerebellar vermis hypoplasia/aplasia and apnea were present in all patients, polydactly in 3 of 16, renal problems with cysts in 5 patients and 11 of 16 had abnormal electroretinograms (ERGs. Blood investigations of organic acids, amino acids and very-long-chain fatty acid, were normal in the all the nine patients. Conclusion: JS is a rare genetic brain malformation with association of retinal dystrophy and renal abnormalities. The retinal dystrophy may be progressive. The prognosis of patients depends mainly on the degree of brain malformation.

  3. The Natural History and Clinical Syndromes of Degenerative Cervical Spondylosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy

  4. The natural history and clinical syndromes of degenerative cervical spondylosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kelly, John C

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy.

  5. Clinical characterisation of the multiple maternal hypomethylation syndrome in siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boonen, Susanne E; Pörksen, Sven; Mackay, Deborah Jg

    2008-01-01

    We present the first clinical report of sibs with the multiple maternal hypomethylation syndrome. Both sisters presented with transient neonatal diabetes mellitus (TNDM). By methylation-specific PCR of bisulphite-treated DNA, we found a mosaic spectrum of hypomethylation at the following maternal...... imprinting. The recurrence with affected sibs as reported in this family has implications for genetic counselling....... manifestations of both TNDM and BWS in common. The family is highly consanguineous, and the parents are first cousins. We suggest that the genetic defect in this family is a novel, most likely autosomal recessive defect of methylation mechanisms, either in the sisters or in their mother, affecting her oocyte...

  6. Clinical and molecular phenotype of Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rice, Gillian; Patrick, Teresa; Parmar, Rekha

    2007-01-01

    Aicardi-Goutieres syndrome (AGS) is a genetic encephalopathy whose clinical features mimic those of acquired in utero viral infection. AGS exhibits locus heterogeneity, with mutations identified in genes encoding the 3'-->5' exonuclease TREX1 and the three subunits of the RNASEH2 endonuclease...... identified an RNASEH2A or RNASEH2B mutation on one allele only. In one child, the disease occurred because of a de novo heterozygous TREX1 mutation. In 22 families, no mutations were found. Null mutations were common in TREX1, although a specific missense mutation was observed frequently in patients from...

  7. Revised guidelines for the clinical management of Lynch syndrome (HNPCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasen, Hans F A; Blanco, Ignacio; Aktan-Collan, Katja

    2013-01-01

    Lynch syndrome (LS) is characterised by the development of colorectal cancer, endometrial cancer and various other cancers, and is caused by a mutation in one of the mismatch repair genes: MLH1, MSH2, MSH6 or PMS2. In 2007, a group of European experts (the Mallorca group) published guidelines...... for the clinical management of LS. Since then substantial new information has become available necessitating an update of the guidelines. In 2011 and 2012 workshops were organised in Palma de Mallorca. A total of 35 specialists from 13 countries participated in the meetings. The first step was to formulate...

  8. Network analysis reveals distinct clinical syndromes underlying acute mountain sickness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David P Hall

    Full Text Available Acute mountain sickness (AMS is a common problem among visitors at high altitude, and may progress to life-threatening pulmonary and cerebral oedema in a minority of cases. International consensus defines AMS as a constellation of subjective, non-specific symptoms. Specifically, headache, sleep disturbance, fatigue and dizziness are given equal diagnostic weighting. Different pathophysiological mechanisms are now thought to underlie headache and sleep disturbance during acute exposure to high altitude. Hence, these symptoms may not belong together as a single syndrome. Using a novel visual analogue scale (VAS, we sought to undertake a systematic exploration of the symptomatology of AMS using an unbiased, data-driven approach originally designed for analysis of gene expression. Symptom scores were collected from 292 subjects during 1110 subject-days at altitudes between 3650 m and 5200 m on Apex expeditions to Bolivia and Kilimanjaro. Three distinct patterns of symptoms were consistently identified. Although fatigue is a ubiquitous finding, sleep disturbance and headache are each commonly reported without the other. The commonest pattern of symptoms was sleep disturbance and fatigue, with little or no headache. In subjects reporting severe headache, 40% did not report sleep disturbance. Sleep disturbance correlates poorly with other symptoms of AMS (Mean Spearman correlation 0.25. These results challenge the accepted paradigm that AMS is a single disease process and describe at least two distinct syndromes following acute ascent to high altitude. This approach to analysing symptom patterns has potential utility in other clinical syndromes.

  9. [Syndrome X and surgical stress. A clinical case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlapiano, C; Barletta, C; Cervellini, P; D'Angelo, P; Baccarini, S; Scavo, D

    1993-02-01

    The syndrome X is a clinical disease characterised by anginous pain with the absence of significant and angiographically visible stenosis of the coronary tree. D. P. M., a 61-year-old woman suffering from biliary lithiasis, underwent cholecystectomy. During the immediate postoperative period, the patient showed difficulty in regaining consciousness and there were electrocardiographic signs of extensive anterior ischemia; prior to the operation only a 1st degree atrio-ventricular block and a positive history of occasional precordial pain had been reported. On the 2nd postoperative day the patient complained of violent retrosternal pain irradiated to the left shoulder. Given that the signs of ischemia had regressed, various instrumental tests were performed: echocardiogram, cycloergometric test, dipyridamole test, cold pressure test, Holter's dynamic ECG, all of which were within the normal; moreover, selective coronarography did not reveal significant stenosis of the coronary tree. The patient was therefore diagnosed as suffering from syndrome X. In the light of the present case, the authors conclusion may be summarised as follows: the diagnosis of syndrome X, which is by definition not easy, may sometimes become critical, as in the present case, since rapid intervention would have enabled prophylactic therapy to be performed to combat surgical stress.

  10. [Constitutional syndrome: clinical entity or a mixed bag].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Ortega, Saturnino; Puente-Fernández, Alicia; Santana-Baez, Sergio; Godoy-Díaz, Davinia; Serrano-Fuentes, Miriam; Sanz-Peláez, Oscar

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue, anorexia and involuntary weight loss have been included under the term constitutional syndrome. These manifestations accompany many diseases in which the diagnosis is made by specific symptoms and signs. However, these events are generally the main reason for consultation and the patient does not report other specific data. This forces us to rigorously investigate the possible causes of the disorder. Usually, three manifestations coexist: asthenia, anorexia and weight loss, but sometimes the patient has only one or two of them. The causes of constitutional symptoms are varied and can be divided into three groups: psychiatric diseases, neoplasms and non-neoplastic diseases. The etiological identification is usually done with a simple protocol, which rules out malignancy; the rest of the cases of uncertain etiology are subject to evolution. The constitutional syndrome correlates well with good prognosis or medical functional processes. Although no clinical guidelines have been developed, score scales may help for the etiological assessment. Given the myriad of different causes of the constitutional syndrome, the treatment of this illness depends primarily on the etiology.

  11. Frequency and clinical, hormonal and ultrasonographic characteristics suggestive of polycystic ovarian syndrome in a group of females with metabolic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovies Carballo, Gisel; Dominguez Alonso, Emma; Verdeja Varela, Olga L; Zamora Recinos, Hugo

    2008-01-01

    The polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most frequent endocrine affection in females at reproductive age. Nowadays, it is known that insulin resistance and consequent hyperinsulinism seem to be the basis of the disorders characterizing it. That's why, it is not erroneous to think that in females with metabolic syndrome, whose physiopathological bases are insulin resistance and hyperinsulinism, there may appear clinical, humoral and ultrasonographic elements of the polycystic ovarian syndrome

  12. Practitioner-Raised Issues and End-of-Life Care for Adults with Down Syndrome and Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watchman, Karen

    2005-01-01

    The author interviewed a small group of practitioners working in intellectual disability and palliative care settings about their perceptions of a number of end-of-life issues related to people with Down syndrome who were affected by dementia. The study, which took place in Scotland, identified a number of issues and perceptions expressed by the…

  13. CLINICAL AND ENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHANGES AT LENNOX–GASTAUT SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The Lennox–Gastaut syndrome (LGS is an epileptic encephalopathy, starting in childhood and showing in often polymorphic seizures (including tonic axial ones, severe cognitive deficite, slow activity of the acute–slow wave in the interictal period at the electroencephalography (EEG, runs of fast activity of 10–20 Hz, often associated with tonic seizures, as well as with the resistance to therapy. According ILAE Classification of epilepsy syndromes and epilepsies 1989 LGS was referred to generalized cryptogenic or symptomatic forms of the epilepsy. According to Proposed Diagnostic Scheme for People with Epileptic Seizures and with Epilepsy (2001 LGS is a classic representative of the group of childhood epileptic encephalopathies. LGS is a rather rare form of the epilepsy. The syndrome frequency makes from 1–4 to 6.6 % among all forms of the childhood epilepsy. LGS is subdivided into the cryptogenic and the symptomatic variants. From our point of view the latter it will be more correct to refer to the symptomatic focal epilepsy with the secondary bilateral synchrony phenomena at EEG. The LGS can be caused by cortical development defects, by perinatal encephalopathies, by brain tumors, by inherited metabolism diseases, by chromosomal anomalies, as well as by other factors. In case of the classic cryptogenic variant the ethiology of the LGS remains unknown. The disease onset is at the age of 2–8 y. o. In 20–40 % of cases LGS is transformed from the West syndrome. The LGS attribute is the polymorphism of seizures. The syndrome structure can combine tonic seizures, epileptic drop seizures, atypical absences, generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Focal seizures at LGS are a matter of argument. The article gives details on the clinical EEG criteria of LGS, the semiology of epileptic seizures in the syndrome structure, diagnostic and treatment approaches. The main accent is made on EEG peculiarities of the disease. The author presents the

  14. Current Issues and Challenges in the Use of Aerosolized Surfactant for Respiratory Distress Syndrome in the Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dion Darius Samsudin

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Surfactant replacement therapy is a recognized treatment for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS in the newborns. Over the past 30 years, human and animal trials have been performed regarding administration of aerosolized surfactant to the injured lung, however the result has been unsatisfactory when compared with instilled surfactant delivery via endotracheal tube (ETT. This review aims to investigate the current issues, challenges and future recommendation of aerosolized surfactant therapy. CONTENT: Five randomized clinical trials in humans and 13 animal trials met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed. Most animal trials agree that this method of treatment is feasible. However, human trials presented conflicting results, and generally showed it to be ineffective. When compared with surfactant delivery via ETT, aerosolized surfactant is less effective in improving respiratory function. SUMMARY: The current data from human trials does not support the implementation of aerosolized surfactant therapy to treat newborns with RDS. Further research is necessary to improve nebulization, delivery, distribution and deposition in the lung, to investigate aerosolized surfactant delivery via ETT and to determine the appropriate dose. KEYWORDS: surfactant, aerosol, prematurity, respiratory distress syndrome.

  15. Compartment syndrome after total knee arthroplasty: regarding a clinical case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Alexandra da Costa Pinheiro

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Although compartment syndrome is a rare complication of total knee arthroplasty, it is one of the most devastating complications. It is defined as a situation of increased pressure within a closed osteofascial space that impairs the circulation and the functioning of the tissues inside this space, thereby leading to ischemia and tissue dysfunction. Here, a clinical case of a patient who was followed up in orthopedic outpatient consultations due to right gonarthrosis is presented. The patient had a history of arthroscopic meniscectomy and presented knee flexion of 10° before the operation, which consisted of total arthroplasty of the right knee. The operation seemed to be free from intercurrences, but the patient evolved with compartment syndrome of the ipsilateral leg after the operation. Since compartment syndrome is a true surgical emergency, early recognition and treatment of this condition through fasciotomy is crucial in order to avoid amputation, limb dysfunction, kidney failure and death. However, it may be difficult to make the diagnosis and cases may not be recognized if the cause of compartment syndrome is unusual or if the patient is under epidural analgesia and/or peripheral nerve block, which thus camouflages the main warning sign, i.e. disproportional pain. In addition, edema of the limb that underwent the intervention is common after total knee arthroplasty operations. This study presents a review of the literature and signals that the possible rarity of cases is probably due to failure to recognize this condition in a timely manner and to placing these patients in other diagnostic groups that are less likely, such as neuropraxia caused by using a tourniquet or peripheral nerve injury.

  16. More Clinical Overlap between 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and CHARGE Syndrome than Often Anticipated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corsten-Janssen, N; Saitta, S C; Hoefsloot, L H; McDonald-McGinn, D M; Driscoll, D A; Derks, R; Dickinson, K A; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W S; Emanuel, B S; Zackai, E H; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C M A

    CHARGE (coloboma, heart defects, atresia of choanae, retardation of growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear abnormalities) and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes are variable, congenital malformation syndromes that show considerable phenotypic overlap. We further explored this clinical overlap

  17. Clinical and radiological manifestations of paraneoplastic syndrome of bronchogenic carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goldner Branislav

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to present some clinical and radiological manifestations of PNS in relation to bronchogenic carcinoma (BC and to evaluate the usefulness of imaging findings in the diagnosis of asymptomatic BC. In the study group of 204 patients (146 male and 58 female with proven bronchogenic carcinoma, PNS was present in 18 (8.62% patients. The patients with PNS were divided into two groups. The first one consisted of 13 (72.2% patients with symptoms related to primary tumours while the second one consisted of 5 (27.7% patients with symptoms, at initial appearance, indicative of disorders of other organs and systems. The predominant disorder was Lambert-Eaton Syndrome, associated with small-cell carcinoma. Endocrine manifestations included: inappropriate antidiuretic hormone production syndrome (small-cell carcinoma, a gonadotropin effect with gynaecomastia and testicular atrophy (planocellular carcinoma, small-cell carcinoma, a case of Cushing Syndrome (small-cell carcinoma, and hyper-calcaemia, due to the production of the parathyroid hormone-related peptide, which was associated with planocellular carcinoma. A rare case of bilateral exophthalmos was found as PNS at adenocarcinoma. Digital clubbing and hypertrophic osteoarthropathy (HO were associated with planocellular and adenocarcinoma, while clubbing was much more common than HO, especially among women. The differences between the two groups were related to the time of PNS appearance. In the first group, PNS occurred late on in the illness, while in the second group, PNS preceded the diagnosis of BC. Alternatively, the disappearance of a clinical or a radiological manifestation of PNS after surgery or chemotherapy may be an indicator of an improvement in health or PNS may be the first sign of illness recurrence. Radiological manifestations of PNS in asymptomatic patients may serve as a useful screen for identifying primary BC. In symptomatic patients, it may be an

  18. Neuroretinitis: a clinical syndrome of cat-scratch disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rost Monahan S

    2000-12-01

    Cat-scratch disease is usually a benign self-limited illness, characterized by regional lymphadenopathy lasting between 3 and 6 weeks. The causative organism is Bartonella henselae, a small gram-negative rod. Between 1 and 2% of patients who contract the illness experience blurred vision, metamorphopsia and scotomas as a result of neuroretinitis, an associated clinical syndrome. The classical clinical findings in cat-scratch neuroretinitis include disc edema and a stellate pattern of exudates in the macula. However, a myriad of other signs has been documented, suggesting a much wider spectrum of intra-ocular disease. The following case report presents a young patient with neuroretinitis, and a history of lymphadenopathy secondary to cat-scratch disease.

  19. APECED syndrome in childhood: clinical spectrum is enlarging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzise, Mariella; Alessi, Luca; Bruno, Enrico; Cama, Valeria; Costanzo, Daria; Genovese, Cristina; Mignosa, Cristina; Scuderi, Veronica; DE Luca, Filippo

    2016-06-01

    Autoimmune polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal-distrophy (APECED) is a rare autosomal recessive disease, which is mainly characterized by the association of many autoimmune diseases, with a classic triad including chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis, hypoparathyroidism and adrenocortical failure. Its clinical spectrum has significantly enlarged in the last years and other non-classic components have been recently described. Aim of this review was to alert pediatricians to these novel clinical aspects of this syndrome, that have been recently included among the autoimmune APECED manifestations: a) chronic lung disease, that may evolve to cor pulmonale and terminal respiratory failure; b) chronic inflammatory demyelinating polineuropathy, with progressive muscular weakness of both arms and legs and sensory loss; c) gastrointestinal dysfunction, with recurrent diarrhea, malabsorption and steatorrhea or chronic constipation. For each of these novel components of APECED, specific autoantibodies against either lung autoantigens or peripheral nerves or tryptophan hydroxylase have been just recently identified.

  20. Locus heterogeneity for Waardenburg syndrome is predictive of clinical subtypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farrer, L.A.; Hoth, C. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, MA (United States); Arnos, K.S. [Galludet Univ., Washington, DC (United States); Asher, J.H. Jr.; Friedman, T.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States); Grundfast, K.M.; Lalwani, A.K. [National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States); Greenberg, J. [Univ. of Cape Town (South Africa); Diehl, S.R. [and others

    1994-10-01

    Waardenburg syndrome (WS) is a dominantly inherited and clinically variable syndrome of deafness, pigmentary changes, and distinctive facial features. Clinically, WS type I (WS1) is differentiated from WS type II (WS2) by the high frequency of dystopia canthorum in the family. In some families, WS is caused by mutations in the PAX3 gene on chromosome 2q. We have typed microsatellite markers within and flanking PAX3 in 41 WS1 kindreds and 26 WS2 kindreds in order to estimate the proportion of families with probable mutations in PAX3 and to study the relationship between phenotypic and genotypic heterogeneity. Evaluation of heterogeneity in location scores obtained by multilocus analysis indicated that WS is linked to PAX3 in 60% of all WS families and in 100% of WS1 families. None of the WS2 families were linked. In those families in which equivocal lod scores (between -2 and +1) were found, PAX3 mutations have been identified in 5 of the 15 WS1 families but in none of the 4 WS2 families. Although preliminary studies do not suggest any association between the phenotype and the molecular pathology in 20 families with known PAX3 mutations and in four patients with chromosomal abnormalities in the vicinity of PAX3, the presence of dystopia in multiple family members is a reliable indicator for identifying families likely to have a defect in PAX3. 59 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  1. Neurophysiology versus clinical genetics in Rett syndrome: A multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbach, Nicky; Julu, Peter; Witt‐Engerström, Ingegerd; Pini, Giorgio; Bigoni, Stefania; Hansen, Stig; Apartopoulos, Flora; Delamont, Robert; van Roozendaal, Kees; Scusa, Maria F.; Borelli, Paolo; Candel, Math; Curfs, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    Many studies have attempted to establish the genotype–phenotype correlation in Rett syndrome (RTT). Cardiorespiratory measurements provide robust objective data, to correlate with each of the different clinical phenotypes. It has important implications for the management and treatment of this syndrome. The aim of this study was to correlate the genotype with the quantitative cardiorespiratory data obtained by neurophysiological measurement combined with a clinical severity score. This international multicenter study was conducted in four European countries from 1999 to 2012. The study cohort consisted of a group of 132 well‐defined RTT females aged between 2 and 43 years with extended clinical, molecular, and neurophysiological assessments. Diagnosis of RTT was based on the consensus criteria for RTT and molecular confirmation. Genotype–phenotype analyses of clinical features and cardiorespiratory data were performed after grouping mutations by the same type and localization or having the same putative biological effect on the MeCP2 protein, and subsequently on eight single recurrent mutations. A less severe phenotype was seen in females with CTS, p.R133C, and p.R294X mutations. Autonomic disturbances were present in all females, and not restricted to nor influenced by one specific group or any single recurrent mutation. The objective information from non‐invasive neurophysiological evaluation of the disturbed central autonomic control is of great importance in helping to organize the lifelong care for females with RTT. Further research is needed to provide insights into the pathogenesis of autonomic dysfunction, and to develop evidence‐based management in RTT. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part A published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27354166

  2. Therapy in virtual environments--clinical and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yellowlees, Peter M; Holloway, Kevin M; Parish, Michelle Burke

    2012-09-01

    As virtual reality and computer-assisted therapy strategies are increasingly implemented for the treatment of psychological disorders, ethical standards and guidelines must be considered. This study determined a set of ethical and legal guidelines for treatment of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)/traumatic brain injury (TBI) in a virtual environment incorporating the rights of an individual who is represented by an avatar. A comprehensive literature review was undertaken. An example of a case study of therapy in Second Life (a popular online virtual world developed by Linden Labs) was described. Ethical and legal considerations regarding psychiatric treatment of PTSD/TBI in a virtual environment were examined. The following issues were described and discussed: authentication of providers and patients, informed consent, patient confidentiality, patient well-being, clinician competence (licensing and credentialing), training of providers, insurance for providers, the therapeutic environment, and emergencies. Ethical and legal guidelines relevant to these issues in a virtual environment were proposed. Ethical and legal issues in virtual environments are similar to those that occur in the in-person world. Individuals represented by an avatar have the rights equivalent to the individual and should be treated as such.

  3. [Clinical features and comorbidities of Asperger syndrome in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiao-Yan; Xie, Xiao-Tian; Mei, Zhu; Cheng, Wen-Hong

    2013-09-01

    To investigate and summarize the clinical features and comorbidities of Asperger syndrome (AS) in children and to provide a theoretical basis for improving the understanding and diagnosis of AS. Inquiry of medical history, physical examination, behavioral observation, psychiatric examination, questionnaire survey, and the Wechsler Intelligence Scale were used to summarize and analyse the clinical data of 95 children with AS, including chief complaint, symptoms, perinatal and familial conditions, family genetic history, and common comorbidities. AS was more common in male children, with hyperactivity, inattention, and social withdrawal as frequent chief complaints. The main clinical manifestations included poor communication skills (95%), restricted interest (82%), repetitive and stereotyped patterns of behavior (77%), semantic comprehension deficit (74%), and indiscipline (68%). Verbal IQ was higher than performance IQ in most patients. The comorbidities of AS included attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) (39%), emotional disorder (18%), and schizophrenia (2%); emotional disorder was more common in patients aged 13-16 years, while ADHD was more common in patients aged 7-16 years. Among these patients, 61% had fathers with introverted personality, 43% had mothers with introverted personality, and 19% had a family history of mental illness. AS has specific clinical manifestations. It is essential to know more about the clinical features and comorbidities of AS, which is helpful for early identification and diagnosis of AS.

  4. Proteus syndrome review: molecular, clinical, and pathologic features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, M Michael

    2014-02-01

    Proteus syndrome is caused by an activating AKT1 mutation (c.49G>A, p.Glu17Lys). Many variable features are possible in this mosaic disorder, including: (i) disproportionate, asymmetric, and distorting overgrowth; (ii) bone abnormalities different from those observed in other disorders; (iii) a characteristic cerebriform connective tissue nevus made up of highly collagenized connective tissue; (iv) epidermal nevi in early life, consisting of acanthosis and hyperkeratosis; (v) vascular malformations of the capillary, venous, or lymphatic types; (vi) dysregulated adipose tissue including lipomas, lipohypoplasia, fatty overgrowth, and localized fat deposits; (vii) other unusual features, including bullous lung alterations; specific neoplasms; a facial phenotype associated with intellectual disability and/or seizures, and/or brain malformations; and (viii) deep vein thrombosis, resulting in premature death. Concluding remarks address diagnostic criteria, natural history, management, psychosocial issues, and differential diagnosis. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Moyamoya disease and syndromes: from genetics to clinical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guey S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Stéphanie Guey,1,3 Elisabeth Tournier-Lasserve,1,2 Dominique Hervé,1,3 Manoelle Kossorotoff4 1Inserm UMR-S1161, Université Paris 7 Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, Paris, France; 2AP-HP, Groupe hospitalier Lariboisière-Saint-Louis, Service de génétique neurovasculaire, Paris, France; 3Service de Neurologie, Centre de Référence des maladies Vasculaires Rares du Cerveau et de l'Œil (CERVCO, Groupe Hospitalier Saint-Louis Lariboisière-Fernand Widal, Assistance Publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France; 4Pediatric Neurology Department, French Center for Pediatric Stroke, University Hospital Necker-Enfants Malades, AP-HP Assistance publique-Hôpitaux de Paris, Paris, France Abstract: Moyamoya angiopathy is characterized by a progressive stenosis of the terminal portion of the internal carotid arteries and the development of a network of abnormal collateral vessels. This chronic cerebral angiopathy is observed in children and adults. It mainly leads to brain ischemic events in children, and to ischemic and hemorrhagic events in adults. This is a rare condition, with a marked prevalence gradient between Asian countries and Western countries. Two main nosological entities are identified. On the one hand, moyamoya disease corresponds to isolated moyamoya angiopathy, defined as being “idiopathic” according to the Guidelines of the Research Committee on the Pathology and Treatment of Spontaneous Occlusion of the Circle of Willis. This entity is probably multifactorial and polygenic in most patients. On the other hand, moyamoya syndrome is a moyamoya angiopathy associated with an underlying condition and forms a very heterogeneous group with various clinical presentations, various modes of inheritance, and a variable penetrance of the cerebrovascular phenotype. Diagnostic and evaluation techniques rely on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, magnetic resonance angiography (MRA conventional angiography, and cerebral hemodynamics measurements

  6. The diversity issue revisited: international students in clinical environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitkäjärvi, Marianne; Eriksson, Elina; Pitkälä, Kaisu

    2012-01-01

    Background. Globalization within higher education leads to an increase in cultural and linguistic diversity in student populations. The purpose of this study was to explore culturally diverse health care students' experiences in clinical environment in Finland, and to compare them with those of native Finnish students' participating in the same program. Method. A cross-sectional survey was performed at 10 polytechnic faculties of health care in Finland. 283 respondents (148 international and 95 Finnish students) responded to items concerning clinical rotation. The survey included items grouped as dimensions: (1) welcoming clinical environment, (2) unsupportive clinical environment, (3) approach to cultural diversity, (4) communication, and (5) structural arrangements. Results. International students felt as welcome on their placements as Finnish students. Concerning structural arrangements set up to facilitate preceptorship and approach to cultural diversity in the learning environment, the two groups' opinions were similar. However, international students were more likely than Finnish students to experience their clinical learning environment as unsupportive (P < 0.001). In addition, their experiences of communication with the staff was poorer than that of their Finnish peers' (P = 0.04). Conclusions. Awareness of strategies that enhance understanding, acceptance, and appreciation of cultural and linguistic diversity in any health care setting are needed.

  7. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-01-01

    Contents The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors. PMID:26382024

  8. Endocrine Disruptors in Domestic Animal Reproduction: A Clinical Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Ulf; Persson, Sara

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this review was to discuss whether endocrine disruption is a clinical concern in domestic animal reproduction. To that end, we firstly summarize the phenomenon of endocrine disruption, giving examples of the agents of concern and their effects on the mammalian reproductive system. Then there is a brief overview of the literature on endocrine disruptors and domestic animal reproduction. Finally, the clinical implications of endocrine disruptors on the reproductive system of farm animals as well as in dogs and cats are discussed. It is concluded that the evidence for clinical cases of endocrine disruption by chemical pollutants is weak, whereas for phytooestrogens, it is well established. However, there is concern that particular dogs and cats may be exposed to man-made endocrine disruptors. © 2015 The Authors. Reproduction in Domestic Animals Published by Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  9. Clinical, social and ethical issues associated with non-invasive prenatal testing for aneuploidy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Blanche; Edwards, Samantha; Chitty, Lyn S; Lewis, Celine

    2018-03-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT), based on analysis of cell-free foetal DNA, is rapidly becoming a preferred method to screen for chromosomal aneuploidy with the technology now available in over 90 countries. This review provides an up-to-date discussion of the key clinical, social and ethical implications associated with this revolutionary technology. Stakeholders are positive about a test that is highly accurate, safe, can be perfomed early in pregnancy, identifies affected pregnancies that might otherwise have been missed and reduces the need for invasive testing. Nevertheless, professional societies currently recommend it as an advanced screening test due to the low false positive rate (FPR). Despite the practical and psychological benefits, a number of concerns have been raised which warrant attention. These include the potential for routinisation of testing and subsequent impact on informed decision-making, an "easy" blood test inadvertently contributing to women feeling pressured to take the test, fears NIPT will lead to less tolerance and support for those living with Down syndrome and the heightened expectation of having "perfect babies". These issues can be addressed to some extent through clinician education, patient information and establishing national and international consensus in the development of comprehensive and regularly updated guidelines. As the number of conditions we are able to test for non-invasively expands it will be increasingly important to ensure pre-test counselling can be delivered effectively supported by knowledgeable healthcare professionals.

  10. Clinical update: communication issues and advance care planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Crystal Dea; Reynolds, Ashley M

    2013-11-01

    To provide a clinical update on practical strategies to enhance the quality of communication in the palliative and end-of-life medical care settings. Published articles, textbooks, reports, and clinical experience. The components of effective and compassionate care throughout the advanced illness trajectory require thoughtful and strategic communication with patients, families, and members of the health care team. Unfortunately, few health care professionals are formally trained in communication skills. Nurses who possess self-awareness and are skilled in effective communication practices are integral to the provision of high-quality palliative care for patients and families coping with advanced malignancies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Editorial review: an update on central sensitivity syndromes and the issues of nosology and psychobiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Muhammad B

    2015-01-01

    Central sensitization (CS), simply defined as an amplified response of the central nervous system to peripheral input, is a concept of great importance in clinical medicine. It has helped to explain aspects of the pathophysiology of common diseases, e.g. fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS), irritable bowel syndrome, vulvodynia, headaches, chronic pelvic pain and other overlapping conditions (collectively called central sensitivity syndromes, or CSS). It also applies to pain of complex regional pain syndrome, osteoarthritis (OA), rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and post-operative pain. The pathology-pain gap in CSS is readily explained by CS. Many FMS and other CSS patients have peripheral pathology, e.g. nociceptive areas in the muscles, arthritis, small fiber neuropathy and inflammation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in some patients. Identification of CS in patients with structural pathology, e.g. OA and RA, has helped to explain why not all patients benefit from nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or joint replacement surgery, and require therapy directed at CS. Glial cells are important in pain processing. Remarkable advances have been achieved in neuroimaging, including visualization of grey matter and white matter, not only during provoked pain but also pain at rest. Based on CS mechanisms, targeted individual therapy may now be possible. Appropriate nosology is important particularly for effective patient care. Dichotomy of neurochemical-structural ("functional") and structural ("organic") pathology should be abandoned; many patients have both. Psychobiology is also biology. Patient-blaming terms like somatization, somatizer and catastrophizing should be avoided. For therapy, both pharmacological and non- pharmacological approaches are important, including recognition of subgroups and person/patient-centered care.

  12. Authorship issues in multi-centre clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenberg, Jacob; Burcharth, Jakob; Pommergaard, Hans-Christian

    2015-01-01

    Discussions about authorship often arise in multi-centre clinical trials. Such trials may involve up to hundreds of contributors of whom some will eventually co-author the final publication. It is, however, often impossible to involve all contributors in the manuscript process sufficiently for th...... to the original source....

  13. The placebo response: neurobiological and clinical issues of neurological relevance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollo, Antonella; Benedetti, Fabrizio

    2009-01-01

    The recent upsurge in placebo research has demonstrated the sound neurobiological substrate of a phenomenon once believed to be only patient mystification, or at best a variable to control in clinical trials, bringing about a new awareness of its potential exploitation to the patient's benefit and framing it as a positive context effect, with the power to influence the therapy outcome. Placebo effects have been described both in the experimental setting and in different clinical conditions, many of which are of neurological interest. Multiple mechanisms have been described, namely conditioning and cognitive factors like expectation, desire, and reward. A body of evidence from neurochemical, pharmacological, and neuroimaging studies points to the involvement of neural pathways specific to single conditions, such as the activation of the endogenous antinociceptive system during placebo analgesia or the release of dopamine in the striatum of parkinsonian patients experiencing placebo reduction of motor impairment. The possible clinical applications of placebo studies range from the design of clinical trials incorporating specific recommendations and minimizing the use of placebo arms to the optimization of the context surrounding the patient, in order to maximize the placebo component present in any treatment.

  14. The pediatric nephrotic syndrome spectrum: Clinical homogeneity and molecular heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Schachter, Asher D.

    2004-01-01

    Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome is the most common glomerular disorder of childhood. Recurrence of nephrotic syndrome immediately following renal transplantation is rapid, results in a high rate of graft loss, and represents the most severe form of nephrotic syndrome. This review discusses the molecular heterogeneity of pediatric nephrotic syndrome across the spectrum of disease activity. A schema is offered for a molecular approach to pediatric nephrotic syndrome, including immune-mediated and...

  15. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological panorama

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbasi, A.; Bhutto, K. A.R.; Baloch, A.

    2015-01-01

    To assess the demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological spectrum of Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS). Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Medical Unit-III, Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK) and Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi, from January 2009 to June 2012. Methodology: Patients with SRUS, based on characteristic endoscopic and histological findings, were enrolled. Patients were excluded if they had other causes of the rectal lesions (neoplasm, infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and trauma). Endoscopically, lesions were divided on the basis of number (solitary or multiple) and appearance (ulcerative, polypoidal/nodular or erythematous mucosa). Demographic, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of subjects were evaluated. Results: Forty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 21 (47.7%) were females and 23 (52.3%) were males with overall mean age of 33.73 ±13.28 years. Symptom-wise 41 (93.2%) had bleeding per rectum, 39 (88.6%) had mucous discharge, 34 (77.3%) had straining, 34 (77.3%) had constipation, 32 (72.7%) had tenesmus, 5 (11.4%) had rectal prolapse and 2 (4.5%) had fecal incontinence. Twelve (27.27%) patients presented with hemoglobin less 10 gm/dl, 27 (61.36%) with 10 - 12 gm/dl and 05 (11.36%) subjects had hemoglobin more than 12 gm/dl. Endoscopically, 26 (59.1%) patients had mucosal ulceration, 11 (25.0%) had mucosal ulceration with polypoid characteristics; while only polypoid features were found in 7 (15.9%) subjects. Conclusion: Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome affects adults of both genders with diverse clinical presentation and nonspecific endoscopic features. (author)

  16. Fragile X syndrome: a review of clinical and molecular diagnoses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciaccio, Claudia; Fontana, Laura; Milani, Donatella; Tabano, Silvia; Miozzo, Monica; Esposito, Susanna

    2017-04-19

    Fragile X Syndrome (FXS) is the second cause of intellectual disability after Down syndrome and the most prevalent cause of intellectual disability in males, affecting 1:5000-7000 men and 1:4000-6000 women. It is caused by an alteration of the FMR1 gene, which maps at the Xq27.3 band: more than 99% of individuals have a CGG expansion (>200 triplets) in the 5' UTR of the gene, and FMR1 mutations and duplication/deletion are responsible for the remaining (<1%) molecular diagnoses of FXS. The aim of this review was to gather the current clinical and molecular knowledge about FXS to provide clinicians with a tool to guide the initial assessment and follow-up of FXS and to offer to laboratory workers and researchers an update about the current diagnostic procedures. FXS is a well-known condition; however, most of the studies thus far have focused on neuropsychiatric features. Unfortunately, some of the available studies have limitations, such as the paucity of patients enrolled or bias due to the collection of the data in a single-country population, which may be not representative of the average global FXS population. In recent years, insight into the adult presentation of the disease has progressively increased. Pharmacological treatment of FXS is essentially symptom based, but the growing understanding of the molecular and biological mechanisms of the disease are paving the way to targeted therapy, which may reverse the effects of FMRP deficiency and be a real cure for the disease itself, not just its symptoms. The clinical spectrum of FXS is wide, presenting not only as an isolated intellectual disability but as a multi-systemic condition, involving predominantly the central nervous system but potentially affecting any apparatus. Given the relative high frequency of the condition and its complex clinical management, FXS appears to have an important economic and social burden.

  17. Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome: Demographic, Clinical, Endoscopic and Histological Panorama.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Amanullah; Bhutto, Abdul Rabb; Taj, Ali; Aurangzaib; Baloch, Akhtar; Masroor, Muhammad; Munir, S M

    2015-12-01

    To assess the demographic, clinical, endoscopic and histological spectrum of Solitary Rectal Ulcer Syndrome (SRUS). Cross-sectional observational study. Medical Unit-III, Civil Hospital Karachi (CHK) and Ward 7, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre (JPMC), Karachi, from January 2009 to June 2012. Patients with SRUS, based on characteristic endoscopic and histological findings, were enrolled. Patients were excluded if they had other causes of the rectal lesions (neoplasm, infection, inflammatory bowel disease, and trauma). Endoscopically, lesions were divided on the basis of number (solitary or multiple) and appearance (ulcerative, polypoidal/nodular or erythematous mucosa). Demographic, clinical and endoscopic characteristics of subjects were evaluated. Forty-four patients met the inclusion criteria; 21 (47.7%) were females and 23 (52.3%) were males with overall mean age of 33.73 ±13.28 years. Symptom-wise 41 (93.2%) had bleeding per rectum, 39 (88.6%) had mucous discharge, 34 (77.3%) had straining, 34 (77.3%) had constipation, 32 (72.7%) had tenesmus, 5 (11.4%) had rectal prolapse and 2 (4.5%) had fecal incontinence. Twelve (27.27%) patients presented with hemoglobin less 10 gm/dl, 27 (61.36%) with 10 - 12 gm/dl and 05 (11.36%) subjects had hemoglobin more than 12 gm/dl. Endoscopically, 26 (59.1%) patients had mucosal ulceration, 11 (25.0%) had mucosal ulceration with polypoid characteristics; while only polypoid features were found in 7 (15.9%) subjects. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome affects adults of both genders with diverse clinical presentation and nonspecific endoscopic features.

  18. Recent Clinical Drug Trials Evidence in Marfan Syndrome and Clinical Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Michael N; Lacro, Ronald V

    2016-01-01

    Marfan syndrome is a genetic disorder of connective tissue with principal manifestations in the cardiovascular, ocular, and skeletal systems. Cardiovascular disease, mainly progressive aortic root dilation and aortic dissection, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The primary aims of this report were to examine the evidence related to medical therapy for Marfan syndrome, including recently completed randomized clinical trials on the efficacy of β-blockers and angiotensin II receptor blockers for the prophylactic treatment of aortic enlargement in Marfan syndrome, and to provide recommendations for medical therapy on the basis of available evidence. Medical therapy for Marfan syndrome should be individualized according to patient tolerance and risk factors such as age, aortic size, and family history of aortic dissection. The Pediatric Heart Network trial showed that atenolol and losartan each reduced the rate of aortic dilation. All patients with known or suspected Marfan syndrome and aortic root dilation should receive medical therapy with adequate doses of either β-blocker or angiotensin receptor blocker. The Pediatric Heart Network trial also showed that atenolol and losartan are more effective at reduction of aortic root z score in younger subjects, which suggests that medical therapy should be prescribed even in the youngest children with aortic dilation. For patients with Marfan syndrome without aortic dilation, the available evidence is less clear. If aortic dilation is severe and/or progressive, therapy with a combination of β-blocker and angiotensin receptor blocker should be considered, although trial results are mixed with respect to the efficacy of combination therapy vs monotherapy. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Cardiovascular Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Sleep Health Issues for Children with FASD: Clinical Considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Jan, James E.; Asante, Kwadwo O.; Conry, Julianne L.; Fast, Diane K.; Bax, Martin C. O.; Ipsiroglu, Osman S.; Bredberg, Elizabeth; Loock, Christine A.; Wasdell, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the combined clinical experience of a multidisciplinary group of professionals on the sleep disturbances of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) focusing on sleep hygiene interventions. Such practical and comprehensive information is not available in the literature. Severe, persistent sleep difficulties are frequently associated with this condition but few health professionals are familiar with both FASD and sleep disorders. The sleep promotion techniqu...

  20. Clinical issues in analyses over the telephone and the internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scharff, Jill Savege

    2012-02-01

    There is professional consensus that teleanalysis, the practice of psychoanalysis conducted remotely using the telephone and the Internet, is increasing in response to more mobility in the population. But there is controversy as to whether the use of technology leads to a dilution of analysis or to adaptive innovation that is clinically effective and true to the tenets of psychoanalysis. The author reviews the psychoanalytic literature and shows the development of analytic thinking about this technology-assisted practice of psychoanalysis. She summarizes analysts' perceptions and experiences of the advantages and disadvantages, and considers the indications and contra-indications. She focuses on the clinical concerns that arise in terms of the frame, resistance, and the development of analytic process through the unconscious communication of internal objects, unconscious fantasy, transference and countertransference. She gives vignettes from the analysis of a man with trauma-related depression to address the concerns raised and to support her argument that analysis using the telephone and the Internet is a viable, clinically effective alternative to traditional analysis where necessary. Copyright © 2012 Institute of Psychoanalysis.

  1. Behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology: introduction to the special issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Alan J; Nezu, Arthur M

    2013-04-01

    This issue represents the 4th Journal of Consulting and Clinical Psychology special issue on behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology over the past 4 decades. Recent developments in health care policy, as well as in the maturation of the science, make a special issue in this area particularly timely. This collection includes state of the clinical science reviews, reports of clinical trials, and articles addressing theory and methods in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology. A multilevel, ecological perspective that considers multiple levels of influences (e.g., cultural influences on behavior-health linkages, individual differences) is salient throughout many of the articles. Our hope is that this sampling of this broad field, and coverage of some key issues and areas, will play a role in stimulating the next 10 years of research, practice, and policy implementation in behavioral medicine and clinical health psychology.

  2. Clinical utility of metabolic syndrome severity scores: considerations for practitioners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DeBoer MD

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Mark D DeBoer,1,2 Matthew J Gurka2 11Division of Pediatric Endocrinology, Department of Pediatrics, University of Virginia School of Medicine, Charlottesville, VA, 2Department of Health Outcomes and Policy, College of Medicine, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA Abstract: The metabolic syndrome (MetS is marked by abnormalities in central obesity, high blood pressure, high triglycerides, low high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol, and high fasting glucose and appears to be produced by underlying processes of inflammation, oxidative stress, and adipocyte dysfunction. MetS has traditionally been classified based on dichotomous criteria that deny that MetS-related risk likely exists as a spectrum. Continuous MetS scores provide a way to track MetS-related risk over time. We generated MetS severity scores that are sex- and race/ethnicity-specific, acknowledging that the way MetS is manifested may be different by sex and racial/ethnic subgroup. These scores are correlated with long-term risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease. Clinical use of scores like these provide a potential opportunity to identify patients at highest risk, motivate patients toward lifestyle change, and follow treatment progress over time. Keywords: metabolic syndrome, insulin resistance, cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, risk prediction

  3. Clinical findings in obligate carriers of type I Usher syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenaar, M.; Rahe, B. ter; Aarem, A. van; Huygen, P.; Admiraal, R. [University Hospital Nijmegen (Netherlands)] [and others

    1995-11-20

    Seventeen obligate carriers from nine families with autosomal recessive Usher syndrome type I underwent otological, audiological, vestibular, and ophthalmological examination in order to identify possible manifestations of heterozygosity. Linkage studies were performed and six families showed linkage to chromosome region 11q13.5 while 3 families have so far failed to show linkage to the candidate regions. Eight obligate carriers had an abnormal puretone audiogram. Two different audiometric patterns could be distinguished when hearing loss was corrected for age and sex. Four carriers (24%) had significant sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) which increased at higher frequencies. The other 13 carriers had SNHL of about 10 dB at 0.25 and 0.5 kHz, but less at higher frequencies. Vestibular findings were generally normal. Electrooculography demonstrated a significant lower mean light peak/dark trough ratio in Usher type I carriers compared to normal control individuals. The methods used in this study were found not to be specific enough to clinically identify carriers of Usher type I syndrome. Nevertheless it is remarkable that a number of obligate carriers showed significant audiological and ophthalmological abnormalities. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Gabapentin enacarbil – clinical efficacy in restless legs syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinky Agarwal

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Pinky Agarwal1, Alida Griffith1, Henry R Costantino2, Narendra Vaish31Booth Gardner Parkinson’s Center, Kirkland, WA, USA; 2Costantino Consulting, Woodinville, WA, USA; 3Kirkland, WA, USAAbstract: Restless legs syndrome (RLS is a sleep-related movement disorder commonly involving an unpleasant urge to move the limbs, typically the legs. Dopaminergic agents represent the first-line therapy for RLS; however, long-term use of such drugs results in worsening symptoms due to “augmentation” or other adverse events. Gabapentin, an analog of the inhibitory neurotransmitter gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA, is an anticonvulsant/analgesic agent. Gabapentin is only mildly effective in relieving RLS symptoms, perhaps a result of its poor absorption from the gastrointestinal (GI tract. Gabapentin enacarbil is a prodrug of gabapentin specifically designed to enhance absorption via the GI tract, and hence provide improved circulating levels of gabapentin on metabolism. Clinical trials to date have demonstrated favorable safety and (compared to traditional gabapentin improved pharmacokinetics and efficacy in treating RLS symptoms. Thus, gabapentin enacarbil may prove to be a useful drug in treating RLS. An application of gabapentin enacarbil for treatment of RLS is currently pending with FDA for approval.Keywords: restless legs syndrome, gabapentin enacarbil, movement disorder

  5. PSEUDO-LENNOX SYNDROME: CLINICAL AND ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Yu. Mukhin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pseudo-Lennox syndrome (PLS, or atypical benign partial epilepsy of childhood, is a disease from a group of age-related epileptic encephalopathies with a phenomenon of continuous spike-wave activity during slow sleep, which manifests itself as frequent polymorphic focal motor and pseudogeneralized seizures, cognitive impairments, as well as regional and diffuse epileptiform activity on electroencephalogram (EEG by the morphology identical to that of benign epileptiform patterns of childhood. The disease was first described by J. Aicardi and J. J. Chevrie in 1982, based on a study of 7 cases. Its diagnostic complexity is the polymorphism of both epileptic seizures and EEG data, as well as low awareness of the syndrome among physicians and its absence in the international classification of epilepsies. The typical triad of seizures, which occurs in nearly 100 % of patients, encompasses focal motor paroxysms (identical to those as observed in Rolandic epilepsy, atypical absences, and atonic seizures. Seizures in PLS in its active period (generally up to 7–8 years are highly resistant to antiepileptic drugs. Only a few agents have been proven to be effective in PLS; these include valproates, succinimides, benzodiazepines, topiramate, and sulthiame. The frequency of seizures are noted to increase in patients with PLS treated with drugs, such as vigabatrin, gabapentin, lamotrigine, phenobarbital, or phenytoin. The author considers in detail the history of studies of the disease, clinical manifestations, diagnostic criteria, therapeutic approaches, and prognosis.

  6. Clinical association: Lyme disease and Guillain-Barre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Kinner; Shah, Siddharth; Subedi, Dinesh

    2017-10-01

    Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is a life-threatening condition in which patients may present to the Emergency Department in respiratory distress leading to death. The early identification and treatment of such a condition is paramount in preventing mortality. While there are many infections associated with GBS, the association with Lyme disease is uncommon. Through our case we aim to highlight Borrelia burgdorferi as an important antecedent infection associated with the development of GBS. In this case we report a 31-year-old male who was diagnosed with Lyme disease and GBS with relevant clinical presentation including progressive numbness and weakness in bilateral hands and feet for the past 1week along with areflexia. Initiation of medical therapy with intravenous immunoglobulin and parenteral ceftriaxone resulted in resolution of his symptoms. The treatment of both diseases early can help prevent further central nervous complications leading to high morbidity and mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. RETT SYNDROME: DIFFICULTIES OF DIAGNOSTICS (CLINICAL AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGICAL ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Malinina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Showed a rare case of atypical forms of Rett syndrome in girl adolescent. The peculiarity of the disease was in the late manifestation of clinical symptoms (6 years old, when there was autistic behavior and regression in development, as well as rare stereotypical hand movements, with characteristic changes in the EEG as benign epileptiform patterns of childhood. In adolescence (12 years there were episodes of hyperventilation and arrest breathing, deformation of the back, inappropriate laughter and screams. Was found mutation in the heterozygous state (s.674>G / N in the gene MECP2 (exons 1–4 by the method of direct automatic sequencing.

  8. Clinical presentation and management of neonatal abstinence syndrome: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ordean A

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Alice Ordean,1 Brian C Chisamore21Department of Family Medicine, 2Department of Pediatrics, St Joseph's Health Centre, and University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, CanadaAbstract: Exposure to prescription medications and illicit drug use during pregnancy has been associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome. The clinical presentation consists of neurological respiratory, gastrointestinal, and vasomotor disturbances. All infants require observation and supportive care to ensure appropriate adaptation and growth in the newborn period. A smaller percentage may also require additional pharmacotherapy, depending on the specific gestational substance exposure. Women should be counseled antenatally about the possible neonatal effects, and mother–baby dyad care should be implemented for this particular patient population.Keywords: neonatal withdrawal, opioids, marijuana, cocaine, benzodiazepines, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors

  9. Overlapping Clinical Features Between NAFLD and Metabolic Syndrome in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Alisi

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is a cluster of pathological liver conditions of emerging importance in overweight and obese children. NAFLD is associated with central obesity, insulin resistance, and dyslipidaemia, which are considered to be the main features of metabolic syndrome (MetS. Prevention of the adverse outcomes of NAFLD, as well as the risk of MetS, depends on the identification of genetic background and environmental factors that modulate susceptibility to these diseases. However, several lines of evidence highlight the strong correlation and co-currency of these two chronic diseases, both in children and in adults. In the present review, we provide an overview of the current clinical proofs on the link between NAFLD and MetS in children, with particular focus on all the possible overlapping features that connect them at paediatric age.

  10. Diagnosis and clinical genetics of Cushing syndrome in pediatrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stratakis, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Endogenous Cushing syndrome (CS) in pediatrics is rare; it may be caused by tumors that produce corticotropin (ACTH) in the pituitary gland (this form of CS is called Cushing disease) or elsewhere (ectopic CS), tumors that produce corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) anywhere (mostly neuroendocrine tissues), and finally adrenocortical masses that produce cortisol, such as adrenocortical cancer (ACC) or adenomas, and bilateral adrenocortical hypeprlasia (BAHs). ACC is a very rare cause of CS in children but should be excluded first, especially among younger patients. CS in children is often caused by germline or somatic mutations in an expanding list of genes with implications for the prognosis of the patients and for their families. CS should be early recognized in children; otherwise, it can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. All patients with suspected CS should be referred to specialized clinical centers for work-up; these centers should have access to experienced endocrine and neurological surgeons. PMID:27241967

  11. Cognitive impairment in patients with clinically isolated syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Fiorin Anhoque

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cognitive abnormalities have been extensively studied in Multiple Sclerosis (MS. However, little is known about the cognitive involvement in patients with Clinically Isolated Syndrome (CIS. Objective: This study aimed to investigate cognitive impairment in patients with CIS compared with healthy subjects. Methods: 18 CIS patients and 18 controls were subjected to the Wechsler memory scale, Rey Auditory Verbal Learning, Rey Complex Figure, Paced Auditory Serial Addition, Digit Span, verbal fluency, Stroop color card test, D2, and Digit Symbol tests. Results: CIS patients had significantly worse performance on the Paced Auditory Serial Addition Test (PASAT 2 seconds (P=0.009 and on verbal fluency tests (P=0.0038 than controls. Conclusion: CIS patients had worse cognitive performance than controls on neuropsychological tests evaluating executive functioning.

  12. Clinical implications of duplicated mtDNA in Pearson syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraki, K; Sakura, N; Ueda, H; Kihara, H; Goto, Y

    2001-01-22

    We report on a seven-year-old Japanese boy with Pearson syndrome, which is characterized by refractory sideroblastic anemia with vacuolization of marrow precursors and dysfunction of the exocrine pancreas, and caused by mitochondrial (mt) DNA deletions and duplications. Although analysis with Southern hybridization on his bone marrow cells at age one year or on the muscle at age five years did not detect any duplications of mtDNA, an analysis after death at age seven years detected them in the kidney, heart, and even in the bone marrow. Using long PCR to specifically amplify duplicated mtDNA, we found duplications in all biopsy and postmortem samples, indicating that duplications had been present in the patient since his early life, and that the number of duplications increased with age. The results indicate some dynamism in the mtDNA duplication and that the dynamism may imply clinical importance.

  13. Free amino acids in fibromyalgia syndrome: relationship with clinical picture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruggiero, Valeria; Mura, Massimiliano; Cacace, Enrico; Era, Benedetta; Peri, Marcella; Sanna, Giuseppina; Fais, Antonella

    2017-04-01

    The objectives of our study were to evaluate free amino acid (FAA) concentrations in the serum of patients affected by fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and to determine the relationships between FAA levels and FMS clinical parameters. Thus, serum amino acid concentrations were quantified (HPLC analysis) in 23 females with fibromyalgia (according to the American College of Rheumatology classification criteria) and 20 healthy females. The results showed significantly higher serum concentrations of aspartate, cysteine, glutamate, glycine, isoleucine, leucine, methionine, ornithine, phenylalanine, sarcosine, serine, taurine, tyrosine and valine in FMS patients vs. healthy controls. Patients with higher Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) scores showed increased levels of alanine, glutamine, isoleucine, leucine, phenylalanine, proline and valine. In conclusion, our results indicate an imbalance in some FAAs in FMS patients. Increased Glu is particularly interesting, as it could explain the deficit in monoaminergic transmission involved in pain.

  14. Paracoccidioidomycosis: eco-epidemiology, taxonomy and clinical and therapeutic issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocca, Anamelia Lorenzetti; Amaral, André Corrêa; Teixeira, Marcus Melo; Sato, Paula Keiko; Sato, Paula; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Soares Felipe, Maria Sueli

    2013-09-01

    Acquired by inhalation of the thermal dimorphic fungi Paracoccidioides spp. conidia, paracoccidioidomycosis ranges from symptomatic to severe and potentially fatal disseminated disease. The main focus of this review is to highlight clinical aspects of paracoccidioidomycosis and, its pathogens' diversity ecology and particularities. In addition, we present strategies for therapy, including DNA vaccines and nanostructured drugs. Molecular and morphological data supported the split of the Paracoccidioides genus into two species, Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii. An acute form of the disease affects approximately 5% of cases and involves the phagocytic mononuclear system, resulting in progressive lymphadenopathy. The chronic form affects adult men and frequently involves lungs, skin and mucous membranes, lymph nodes, and adrenal glands. The clinical manifestations depend on the ability of the host to control the fungal multiplication and dissemination. The long survival time of the fungus in the host tissues allows it to evade immune responses; therefore, successful treatment often requires long-time therapy. The consensus for treatment must consider the severity of the disease and includes sulfone derivatives, amphotericin B and azoles. Novel strategies for therapy, based on DNA vaccines and nanostructured drugs are also presented and discussed in this review.

  15. Distribution of Clinical Symptoms in Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouq, F. A.; Ahmed, T. S.; Meo, I. M. U.; Al-Dress, A. M.; Meo, S. A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To determine the distribution of clinical symptoms based on the gender and age of patients with Carpel Tunnel Syndrome (CTS). Study Design: A cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Physiology, College of Medicine, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, from April 2009 to June 2011. Methodology: Two hundred and twenty seven subjects with carpal tunnel syndrome symptom were recruited. CTS was diagnosed based on the clinical history and examination. For further confirmation of CTS symptoms, nerve conduction studies (NCS) were conducted. Results: There were 67 (29.5%) males and 160 (70.5%) females with mean age of 47.79 A +- 5.53 years. Distributions of symptoms were 34.3% at the level of whole three lateral fingers, 14.9% were at the level of hand and forearm, was common in males compared to females. However, 48.8% symptoms at the level of whole hand, and 11.3% at the tips of the three lateral fingers were common in females compared to males. Distribution of symptoms in the whole three lateral fingers (41.6%) were significantly higher (p = 0.0001) in patients who were more than 50 years of age and symptoms at the level of wrist region (12.7%) were significantly higher (p = 0.001) in patients with age group less than 50 years. Conclusion: The distribution of CTS symptoms at the level of whole of three lateral fingers, hand and forearm were higher in males compared to females, and symptoms at the lateral three tips of the fingers and whole hand were common in females compared to males. Furthermore, the symptoms in whole three lateral fingers were higher in patients with more than 50 years of age and at the level of wrist region were higher in patients with age less than 50 years. (author)

  16. [Serial clinical and echocardiographic evaluation in children with Marfan syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Victor Manuel Oporto; Perez, Ana Beatriz Alvarez; Moisés, Valdir Ambrósio; Gomes, Lourdes; Pedreira, Patricia da Silveira; Silva, Célia C; Campos Filho, Orlando; Carvalho, Antônio Carlos C

    2005-11-01

    To describe the clinical cardiac manifestations and temporal evolution of Marfan syndrome in children; to estimate the incidence of annuloaortic ectasia and mitral valve prolapse; and to evaluate tolerability and efficacy of beta-blockers in these patients. During one year, 21 children with Marfan syndrome underwent serial clinical and echocardiographic examinations. Echocardiograms assessed: the presence of mitral valve prolapse, aortic root diameter, mitral and aortic valves regurgitation, and aortic enlargement during beta-blocker therapy. Eleven patients had two measurements of the aortic root taken one year apart. The children were asymptomatic throughout the study. Mitral prolapse was found in 11 (52%) children. Annuloaortic ectasia occurred in 16 (76%) patients and found to be mild in 42.8%, moderate in 9.5%, and severe in 23.8%. One of these patients underwent aortic valve replacement and repair of the ascending aorta by the Bentall-De Bono technique, with good results. Heart rate decreased by 13.6% (from 85 to 73 bpm; p < 0.009) with the use of beta-blockers; however, aortic root diameter increased by 1.4 mm/year (p < 0.02). One child could not be given beta-blockers due to bronchial asthma, and no significant side effects were observed in the remaining children, including one who also had bronchial asthma. The children remained asymptomatic throughout the study, the use of beta-blockers led to a significant decrease in heart rate, and no significant adverse effects were observed. Contrary to the literature, incidence of annuloaortic ectasia was high among the study population, greater than that of mitral valve prolapse, even during beta-blocker therapy.

  17. Evans syndrome and systemic lupus erythematosus: clinical presentation and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costallat, Guilherme Lavras; Appenzeller, Simone; Costallat, Lilian Tereza Lavras

    2012-07-01

    To review the clinical, laboratory and outcome features of Evans syndrome (ES) in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients. We reviewed the charts of 953 SLE patients followed up regularly at our service. ES was defined as the presence of hemolytic anemia and thrombocytopenia concomitantly or sequentially. Clinical and laboratory manifestations occurring during the disease course, as well as concomitant diseases and survival was carefully reviewed. We identified ES in 26 of 953 (2.7%) SLE patients. Twenty-three were women with mean age at SLE diagnosis of 25.7 years. Four (15%) patients had disease onset before the age of 16. In the majority of patients (92%), immune thrombocytopenia and AIHA appeared simultaneously at the beginning of SLE. Active features of SLE were a frequent finding concomitant to ES, especially arthritis (77%), malar rash (61.5%), photosensitivity (57.6%), oral ulcers (34.6%), nephritis (73%), serositis (54%), neuropsychiatric (19%) and pulmonary (15%) manifestations. In addition to this multisystemic disease, 34.6% of our patients had an association with another autoimmune disease such as antiphospholipid syndrome. Recurrence of ES was observed in only four (15%) patients. After follow-up time of 8.72 years, 19 patients (73%) were in remission and seven (27%) patients died. ES is a rare manifestation in SLE, occurring in patients with severe multisystemic SLE manifestations. Treatment strategies frequently used in SLE contribute to longer disease remission and less frequent exacerbation than observed in the general population with ES. Copyright © 2011 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Preventing medico-legal issues in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bevinahalli N Raveesh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The medical profession is considered to be one of the noblest professions in the world. The practice of medicine is capable of rendering noble service to humanity provided due care, sincerity, efficiency, and professional skill is observed by the doctors. However, today, the patient–doctor relationship has almost diminished its fiduciary character and has become more formal and structured. Doctors are no longer regarded as infallible and beyond questioning. Corporatization of health care has made it like any other business, and the medical profession is increasingly being guided by the profit motive rather than that of service. On the other hand, a well-publicized malpractice case can ruin the doctor's career and practice. The law, like medicine, is an inexact science. One cannot predict with certainty an outcome of cases many a time. It depends on the particular facts and circumstances of the case, and also the personal notions of the judge concerned who is hearing the case. The axiom “you learn from your mistakes” is too little honored in healthcare. The best way to handle medico-legal issues is by preventing them, and this article tries to enumerate the preventive measures in safeguarding the doctor against negligence suit.

  19. Clinical and biological implications of driver mutations in myelodysplastic syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papaemmanuil, Elli; Gerstung, Moritz; Malcovati, Luca; Tauro, Sudhir; Gundem, Gunes; Van Loo, Peter; Yoon, Chris J; Ellis, Peter; Wedge, David C; Pellagatti, Andrea; Shlien, Adam; Groves, Michael John; Forbes, Simon A; Raine, Keiran; Hinton, Jon; Mudie, Laura J; McLaren, Stuart; Hardy, Claire; Latimer, Calli; Della Porta, Matteo G; O'Meara, Sarah; Ambaglio, Ilaria; Galli, Anna; Butler, Adam P; Walldin, Gunilla; Teague, Jon W; Quek, Lynn; Sternberg, Alex; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Cross, Nicholas C P; Green, Anthony R; Boultwood, Jacqueline; Vyas, Paresh; Hellstrom-Lindberg, Eva; Bowen, David; Cazzola, Mario; Stratton, Michael R; Campbell, Peter J

    2013-11-21

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are a heterogeneous group of chronic hematological malignancies characterized by dysplasia, ineffective hematopoiesis and a variable risk of progression to acute myeloid leukemia. Sequencing of MDS genomes has identified mutations in genes implicated in RNA splicing, DNA modification, chromatin regulation, and cell signaling. We sequenced 111 genes across 738 patients with MDS or closely related neoplasms (including chronic myelomonocytic leukemia and MDS-myeloproliferative neoplasms) to explore the role of acquired mutations in MDS biology and clinical phenotype. Seventy-eight percent of patients had 1 or more oncogenic mutations. We identify complex patterns of pairwise association between genes, indicative of epistatic interactions involving components of the spliceosome machinery and epigenetic modifiers. Coupled with inferences on subclonal mutations, these data suggest a hypothesis of genetic "predestination," in which early driver mutations, typically affecting genes involved in RNA splicing, dictate future trajectories of disease evolution with distinct clinical phenotypes. Driver mutations had equivalent prognostic significance, whether clonal or subclonal, and leukemia-free survival deteriorated steadily as numbers of driver mutations increased. Thus, analysis of oncogenic mutations in large, well-characterized cohorts of patients illustrates the interconnections between the cancer genome and disease biology, with considerable potential for clinical application.

  20. Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome: clinical findings, surgical treatment, and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Carlos; Khaikin, Marat; Bracho, Jorge; Luo, Cheng Hua; Weiss, Eric G; Sands, Dana R; Cera, Susan; Nogueras, Juan J; Wexner, Steven D

    2007-11-01

    Solitary rectal ulcer syndrome (SRUS) is a rare disorder often misdiagnosed as a malignant ulcer. Histopathological features of SRUS are characteristic and pathognomonic; nevertheless, the endoscopic and clinical presentations may be confusing. The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical findings, surgical treatment, and outcomes in patients who suffer from SRUS. A retrospective chart review was undertaken, from January 1989 to May 2005 for all patients who were diagnosed with SRUS. Data recorded included: patient's age, gender, clinical presentation, past surgical history, diagnostic and preoperative workup, operative procedure, complications, and outcomes. During the study period, 23 patients were diagnosed with SRUS. Seven patients received only medical treatment, and in three patients, the ulcer healed after medical treatment. Sixteen patients underwent surgical treatment. In four patients, the symptoms persisted after surgery. Two patients presented with postoperative rectal bleeding requiring surgical intervention. Three patients developed late postoperative sexual dysfunction. One patient continued suffering from rectal pain after a colostomy was constructed. Median follow-up was 14 (range 2-84) months. The results of this study show clearly that every patient with SRUS must be assessed individually. Initial treatment should include conservative measures. In patients with refractory symptoms, surgical treatment should be considered. Results of anterior resection and protocolectomy are satisfactory for solitary rectal ulcer.

  1. Progress in Rett Syndrome: from discovery to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Percy, Alan K

    2016-09-01

    Fifty years ago, Andreas Rett described a disorder in 22 females featuring prominent regression of fine motor and communication skills, cognitive impairment, stereotypic movements, periodic breathing, and gait abnormalities. This disorder became known as Rett syndrome (RTT) following the report of Hagberg et al. in 1983. Although RTT was scarcely recognized at that time in the United States, here the efforts of Rett and Hagberg led to rapid progress in recognition and diagnosis, a clearer understanding of its clinical and pathological underpinnings, and, ultimately, identification of mutations in the methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2) gene as the primary cause of this unique and challenging neurodevelopmental disorder. Thereafter, a natural history study and critical translational research in animal models paved the way for potential disease-modifying agents to be assessed in human clinical trials. To be successful, the energies of the international community at all levels, including researchers in clinical and basic science, funding agencies, pharmaceutical companies, patient advocates, and, above all, parents and their children are essential. Otherwise, hopes for effective treatment, if not, a cure, will remain unfulfilled.

  2. Treatment of equine metabolic syndrome: A clinical case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, R A; Keen, J A; McGowan, C M

    2016-07-01

    Treatment of equine metabolic syndrome (EMS) is essential to improve insulin sensitivity and reduce the risk of laminitis. Calorie restriction and increased exercise are the mainstays of treatment but there is potential for poor owner compliance. To determine whether significant weight loss accompanied by improvements in measures of insulin sensitivity can be achieved in horses and ponies with EMS managed by their owners in their normal environment under veterinary guidance. Retrospective clinical case series. Horses and ponies attending 2 university hospitals for investigation and treatment of suspected EMS were eligible for inclusion in the study. Animals underwent a clinical examination, basal and dynamic endocrine testing; those with pituitary pars intermedia dysfunction (PPID) were excluded. Owners were given individually tailored diet and exercise programmes to follow for between 3 and 6 months. After the treatment period, clinical examination and endocrine tests were repeated and results compared to the initial assessment. Nineteen animals were recruited to the study, 17 with a history of laminitis. All animals showed a reduction in body condition score (Passessments. There were significant (P<0.05) reductions in basal insulin, insulin at 45 min during a combined glucose insulin tolerance test (CGIT), time for blood glucose concentration to return to baseline during a CGIT and mean area under the glucose curve. A diet and exercise programme tailored to the needs of the individual animal and implemented by the owner results in weight loss accompanied by improvements in insulin sensitivity. © 2015 EVJ Ltd.

  3. Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome: cause, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutetakis, Antonis; Sertedaki, Amalia; Dacou-Voutetakis, Catherine

    2016-08-01

    Pituitary stalk interruption syndrome (PSIS) is characterized by a thin or absent pituitary stalk, hypoplasia of the adenohypophysis, and ectopic neurohypophysis. PSIS manifestations include a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes and pituitary hormone deficiencies of variable degree and timing of onset. In this review, recent advances with respect to the cause of PSIS, clinical characteristics leading to earlier diagnosis, and management are outlined. Diagnosis of PSIS is often delayed probably because clinical findings such as neonatal hypoglycemia, cholestasis, and/or micropenis as well as decreasing growth velocity are not appropriately and timely validated. Recently, molecular defects in various genes have been associated with PSIS albeit in a small number of cases. These findings suggest that PSIS belongs to the spectrum of holoprosencephaly-related defects. Phenotype-genotype discordance and the existence of asymptomatic carriers of a given molecular aberration indicate that penetrance may be modified favorably or unfavorably by the presence of other genetic and/or environmental factors. PSIS constitutes an antenatal anatomical defect. Neonatal hypoglycemia, cholestasis, and/or micropenis with or without growth deficit should raise the possibility of combined pituitary hormone deficiency, a life-threatening condition in cases of coexisting cortisol deficiency. It is important to search for molecular defects in all PSIS cases, as precise identification of the cause is a prerequisite for genetic counseling.

  4. [Female intimate partner homicide: clinical and criminological issues].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechova-Vayleux, E; Leveillee, S; Lhuillier, J-P; Garre, J-B; Senon, J-L; Richard-Devantoy, S

    2013-12-01

    Female intimate partner homicide (FIPH) is a fatal complication of domestic violence. The aim of this study was to describe the socio-demographic, clinical and criminological characteristics of male perpetrators of FIPH and to compare them to the perpetrators of extrafamilial homicide and the perpetrators of intrafamilial homicide other than FIPH. Between 1975 and 2005, 32 FIPH were perpetrated in the region of Angers (France), and these were compared to 26 intrafamilial homicides other than FIPH and to 97 extrafamilial homicides perpetrated in the same period, in the same region. The socio-demographic, clinical and criminological data were collected from psychiatric expert reports and medical files. The mean age of the FIPH perpetrators was 37.8years. They were professionally active, in majority as manual workers. They had a psychiatric record (69%), a previous criminal record (31%), and a history of violence against others (47%). Half of these perpetrators also had experienced a traumatic event before the age of 18. Compared to extrafamilial homicide perpetrators, FIPH perpetrators occupied more frequently a manual job and had prior criminal records less frequently. In the majority of cases of FIPH and intrafamilial homicide, the murder occurred in the evening, at the victim's home, and while the perpetrator was intoxicated. FIPH was mostly premeditated and was accompanied four times less frequently by another criminal behaviour compared to extrafamilial homicide. The FIPH perpetrators had more depressive symptoms and suicidal ideations when committing the crime and remained on the crime scene more often than extrafamilial homicide perpetrators who mostly attempted to flee the crime scene. FIPH perpetrators and extra- and intrafamilial homicide perpetrators were found criminally responsible in half of the cases. The socio-demographic, clinical and criminological characteristics of FIPH perpetrators were not statistically different from those of perpetrators of

  5. Diagnostic Issues, Clinical Characteristics, and Outcomes for Patients with Fungemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Sulim, Sofia; Holm, Anette

    2011-01-01

    . Blood culture positivity varied by system, species, and procedure. Thus, cases with concomitant bacteremia were reported less commonly by BacT/Alert than by the Bactec system (9% [11/124 cases] versus 28% [53/192 cases]; P Candida glabrata or those drawn via arterial lines....... Mortality increased by age (P = 0.009) and varied by species (36% for C. krusei, 25% for C. parapsilosis, and 14% for other Candida species), severity of underlying disease (47% for ICU patients versus 24% for others; P = 0.0001), and choice but not timing of initial therapy (12% versus 48% for patients...... needed longer incubation. Species distribution varied by age, prior antifungal treatment (57% occurrence of C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or C. krusei in patients with prior antifungal treatment versus 28% occurrence in those without it; P = 0.007), and clinical specialty (61% occurrence of C...

  6. Diagnostic issues, clinical characteristics, and outcomes for patients with fungemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arendrup, Maiken Cavling; Sulim, Sofia; Holm, Anette

    2011-01-01

    . Blood culture positivity varied by system, species, and procedure. Thus, cases with concomitant bacteremia were reported less commonly by BacT/Alert than by the Bactec system (9% [11/124 cases] versus 28% [53/192 cases]; P Candida glabrata or those drawn via arterial lines....... Mortality increased by age (P = 0.009) and varied by species (36% for C. krusei, 25% for C. parapsilosis, and 14% for other Candida species), severity of underlying disease (47% for ICU patients versus 24% for others; P = 0.0001), and choice but not timing of initial therapy (12% versus 48% for patients...... needed longer incubation. Species distribution varied by age, prior antifungal treatment (57% occurrence of C. glabrata, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, or C. krusei in patients with prior antifungal treatment versus 28% occurrence in those without it; P = 0.007), and clinical specialty (61% occurrence of C...

  7. Sleep Health Issues for Children with FASD: Clinical Considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jan, James E; Asante, Kwadwo O; Conry, Julianne L; Fast, Diane K; Bax, Martin C O; Ipsiroglu, Osman S; Bredberg, Elizabeth; Loock, Christine A; Wasdell, Michael B

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the combined clinical experience of a multidisciplinary group of professionals on the sleep disturbances of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) focusing on sleep hygiene interventions. Such practical and comprehensive information is not available in the literature. Severe, persistent sleep difficulties are frequently associated with this condition but few health professionals are familiar with both FASD and sleep disorders. The sleep promotion techniques used for typical children are less suitable for children with FASD who need individually designed interventions. The types, causes, and adverse effects of sleep disorders, the modification of environment, scheduling and preparation for sleep, and sleep health for their caregivers are discussed. It is our hope that parents and also researchers, who are interested in the sleep disorders of children with FASD, will benefit from this presentation and that this discussion will stimulate much needed evidence-based research.

  8. Sleep Health Issues for Children with FASD: Clinical Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James E. Jan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the combined clinical experience of a multidisciplinary group of professionals on the sleep disturbances of children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD focusing on sleep hygiene interventions. Such practical and comprehensive information is not available in the literature. Severe, persistent sleep difficulties are frequently associated with this condition but few health professionals are familiar with both FASD and sleep disorders. The sleep promotion techniques used for typical children are less suitable for children with FASD who need individually designed interventions. The types, causes, and adverse effects of sleep disorders, the modification of environment, scheduling and preparation for sleep, and sleep health for their caregivers are discussed. It is our hope that parents and also researchers, who are interested in the sleep disorders of children with FASD, will benefit from this presentation and that this discussion will stimulate much needed evidence-based research.

  9. Access and care issues in urban urgent care clinic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adams Jill C

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although primary care should be the cornerstone of medical practice, inappropriate use of urgent care for non-urgent patients is a growing problem that has significant economic and healthcare consequences. The characteristics of patients who choose the urgent care setting, as well as the reasoning behind their decisions, is not well established. The purpose of this study was to determine the motivation behind, and characteristics of, adult patients who choose to access health care in our urgent care clinic. The relevance of understanding the motivation driving this patient population is especially pertinent given recent trends towards universal healthcare and the unclear impact it may have on the demands of urgent care. Methods We conducted a cross-sectional survey of patients seeking care at an urgent care clinic (UCC within a large acute care safety-net urban hospital over a six-week period. Survey data included demographics, social and economic information, reasons that patients chose a UCC, previous primary care exposure, reasons for delaying care, and preventive care needs. Results A total of 1, 006 patients were randomly surveyed. Twenty-five percent of patients identified Spanish as their preferred language. Fifty-four percent of patients reported choosing the UCC due to not having to make an appointment, 51.2% because it was convenient, 43.9% because of same day test results, 42.7% because of ability to get same-day medications and 15.1% because co-payment was not mandatory. Lack of a regular physician was reported by 67.9% of patients and 57.2% lacked a regular source of care. Patients reported delaying access to care for a variety of reasons. Conclusion Despite a common belief that patients seek care in the urgent care setting primarily for economic reasons, this study suggests that patients choose the urgent care setting based largely on convenience and more timely care. This information is especially applicable to

  10. Female sexuality after female cancer treatment: a clinical issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidakis, D; Panoskaltsis, T; Poulakaki, N; Kouloura, A; Kassanos, D; Papadimitriou, G; Salamalekis, E

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to record how the treatment of female cancer may affect sexuality and interpersonal relations in the couple. From September 2008 until February 2012, the authors prospectively studied 67 patients with breast cancer (Group A) and 43 with gynecological cancers (Group B). As control groups 33 patients with benign breast and 30 patients with benign gynecological lesions (group 0a and 0b respectively) were used. Sexuality and interpersonal relations were evaluated by a questionnaire. The authors also evaluated interpersonal relations focusing on sexual function at the time of diagnosis and a year after the initial treatment for cancer. A significant reduction of the "sexual desire", "sexual Arousal", and "orgasm" dimension was found in both cancer groups, in contrast to the control group, revealing no significant change. The "sexual enjoyment" scale was significantly decreased in gynecological cancer group but not in breast cancer group. While the score on the "relationship quality" dimension significantly increased in both cancer groups. In all groups, there was a significantly positive correlation between sexual function and enjoyment; on the contrary, there was a significantly negative correlation between relationship quality and sexual function and enjoyment. Sexual dysfunctions is a clinical problem which should be evidenced at the beginning of therapy, from the oncologists in order to provide integrated treatment to their patients.

  11. Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone; 'meow meow'): chemical, pharmacological and clinical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schifano, Fabrizio; Albanese, Antonio; Fergus, Suzanne; Stair, Jackie L; Deluca, Paolo; Corazza, Ornella; Davey, Zoe; Corkery, John; Siemann, Holger; Scherbaum, Norbert; Farre', Magi'; Torrens, Marta; Demetrovics, Zsolt; Ghodse, A Hamid

    2011-04-01

    Recently, those substances deriving from the active ingredient of the Khat plant, cathinone, have been rising in popularity. Indeed, 4-methylmethcathinone (mephedrone; 'meow meow' and others) has been seen by some as a cheaper alternative to other classified recreational drugs. We aimed here at providing a state-of-the-art review on mephedrone history and prevalence of misuse, chemistry, pharmacology, legal status, product market appearance, clinical/management and related fatalities. Because of the limited evidence, some of the information here presented has been obtained from user reports/drug user-orientated web sites. The most common routes for mephedrone recreational use include insufflation and oral ingestion. It elicits stimulant and empathogenic effects similar to amphetamine, methylamphetamine, cocaine and MDMA. Due to its sympathomimetic actions, mephedrone may be associated with a number of both physical and psychopathological side effects. Recent preliminary analysis of recent UK data carried out in 48 related cases have provided positive results for the presence of mephedrone at postmortem. Within the UK, diffusion of mephedrone may have been associated with an unprecedented combination of a particularly aggressive online marketing policy and a decreasing availability/purity of both ecstasy and cocaine. Mephedrone has been recently classified in both the UK and in a number of other countries as a measure to control its availability. Following this, a few other research psychoactives have recently entered the online market as yet unregulated substances that may substitute for mephedrone. Only international collaborative efforts may be able to tackle the phenomenon of the regular offer of novel psychoactive drugs.

  12. Clinical spectrum of pseudoexfoliation syndrome-An electronic records audit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aparna Rao

    Full Text Available To evaluate different clinical variants of pseudoexfoliation syndrome and their risk of developing ocular hypertension (OHT or glaucoma (PXG.Cross sectional hospital based study.All patients seen at glaucoma services of a tertiary eye care center in east India.Electronic medical records search of hospital database including consecutive new and old cases seen during April 2013 to March 2015 was done to retrieve case sensitive words including pseudoexfoliation, PXF, PEX, PXG and pseudoexfoliative glaucoma over any part of the clinical electronic sheet of the patient. All demographic and clinical details including laterality, the pattern of deposits, need for medicines and disc damage at presentation was compared in eyes with radial pigmentary, classical or combined forms of PXF phenotypes.Of 110313 PXF patients seen during the period of 2013-2015, a total of 2297 eyes of 1150 PXF patients were identified including 525 unilateral PXF (meaning a total of 1775 PXF eyes with 625 patients having bilateral disease, n = 1250 eyes, other clinically normal eye, n = 522 at presentation. Of 525 unilateral PXF eyes, 105 had OHT and 131 had glaucoma while bilateral cases had more >50% (675 eyes of 1250 eyes with glaucoma. Glaucoma with significant changes in IOP with or without disc damage was seen in 32% of pigmentary and 39% of classical PXF forms with eyes with combined forms of PXF having around 50% with glaucoma at presentation compared to other forms, p<0.001.Different phenotypic variants of PXF in this Indian cohort was associated with 30-50% risk of OHT or glaucoma respectively. Adequate care is required while examining the pattern of PXF in each case to prognosticate each patient/eye.

  13. More Clinical Overlap between 22q11.2 Deletion Syndrome and CHARGE Syndrome than Often Anticipated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corsten-Janssen, N.; Saitta, S.C.; Hoefsloot, L.H.; McDonald-McGinn, D.M.; Driscoll, D.A.; Derks, R.; Dickinson, K.A.; Kerstjens-Frederikse, W.S.; Emanuel, B.S.; Zackai, E.H.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C.M.A.

    2013-01-01

    CHARGE (coloboma, heart defects, atresia of choanae, retardation of growth and development, genital hypoplasia, and ear abnormalities) and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes are variable, congenital malformation syndromes that show considerable phenotypic overlap. We further explored this clinical overlap and proposed recommendations for the genetic diagnosis of both syndromes. We described 2 patients clinically diagnosed with CHARGE syndrome, who were found to carry a 22q11.2 deletion, and searched the literature for more cases. In addition, we screened our cohort of CHD7 mutation carriers (n = 802) for typical 22q11.2 deletion features and studied CHD7 in 20 patients with phenotypically 22q11.2 deletion syndrome but without haploinsufficiency of TBX1. In total, we identified 5 patients with a clinical diagnosis of CHARGE syndrome and a proven 22q11.2 deletion. Typical 22q11.2 deletion features were found in 30 patients (30/802, 3.7%) of our CHD7 mutation-positive cohort. We found truncating CHD7 mutations in 5/20 patients with phenotypically 22q11.2 deletion syndrome. Differentiating between CHARGE and 22q11.2 deletion syndromes can be challenging. CHD7 and TBX1 probably share a molecular pathway or have common target genes in affected organs. We strongly recommend performing CHD7 analysis in patients with a 22q11.2 deletion phenotype without TBX1 haploinsufficiency and conversely, performing a genome-wide array in CHARGE syndrome patients without a CHD7 mutation. PMID:23885230

  14. ONE-AND-A-HALF SYNDROME. CLINICAL CLASSIFICATION.

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    Ibanez-Valdes LdeF

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied 19 patients fulfilling clinical diagnostic criteria of One-and-a-half syndrome (OAHS and all of them were grouped in three different types according to their neuro-ophthalmological disturbances. A novel clinical classification is suggested. Patients presenting OAHS secondary to racemose neurocysticercosis were reported for the first time to the medical literature. RESUMEN: Sindrome del Uno y Medio. Clasificación clínica. Se estudiaron 19 pacientes que presentaron clinicamente un "Síndrome del Uno y Medio" en diferentes variantes y de causas diversas. Se agruparon los pacientes en 3 grupos diferentes de acuerdo a sus características neuro-oftalmológicas evitando añadir nuevos eponimos a la ya existente lista de trastornos de la motilidad ocular. Proponemos una clasificacion clínica no reportada con anterioridad y se reporta como causa novedosa la forma racemosa de la neurocisticercosis para una de las variantes clínicas.

  15. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shiyi; Huang, Jinsha; Jiang, Haiyang; Han, Chao; Li, Jie; Xu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Guoxin; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS), a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs) in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA) system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered. PMID:28626420

  16. Restless Legs Syndrome: From Pathophysiology to Clinical Diagnosis and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiyi Guo

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Restless legs syndrome (RLS, a common neurological sensorimotor disorder in western countries, has gained more and more attention in Asian countries. The prevalence of RLS is higher in older people and females. RLS is most commonly related to iron deficiency, pregnancy and uremia. The RLS symptoms show a significant circadian rhythm and a close relationship to periodic limb movements (PLMs in clinical observations, while the pathophysiological pathways are still unknown. The diagnostic criteria have been revised in 2012 to improve the validity of RLS diagnosis. Recent studies have suggested an important role of iron decrease of brain in RLS pathophysiology. Dopaminergic (DA system dysfunction in A11 cell groups has been recognized long ago from clinical treatment and autopsy. Nowadays, it is believed that iron dysfunction can affect DA system from different pathways and opioids have a protective effect on DA system. Several susceptible single nucleotide polymorphisms such as BTBD9 and MEIS1, which are thought to be involved in embryonic neuronal development, have been reported to be associated with RLS. Several pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment are discussed in this review. First-line treatments of RLS include DA agents and α2δ agonists. Augmentation is very common in long-term treatment of RLS which makes prevention and management of augmentation very important for RLS patients. A combination of different types of medication is effective in preventing and treating augmentation. The knowledge on RLS is still limited, the pathophysiology and better management of RLS remain to be discovered.

  17. Smith-Magenis syndrome: clinical evaluation in seven Brazilian patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamba, B F; Vieira, G H; Souza, D H; Monteiro, F F; Lorenzini, J J; Carvalho, D R; Morreti-Ferreira, D

    2011-10-31

    Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS) is a complex congenital anomaly characterized by craniofacial anomalies, neurological and behavioral disorders. SMS is caused by a deletion in region 17p11.2, which includes the RAI1 gene (90% of cases), or by point mutation in the RAI1 gene (10% of cases). Laboratory diagnosis is through cytogenetic analysis by GTG banding and molecular cytogenetic analysis by FISH. We carried out an active search for patients in Associations of Parents and Friends of Exceptional Children (APAE) of São Paulo and genetic centers in Brazil. Forty-eight patients were screened for mental retardation, craniofacial abnormalities and stereotyped behavior with a diagnosis of SMS. In seven of them, chromosome banding at high resolution demonstrated chromosome 17p11.2 deletions, confirmed by FISH. We also made a meta-analysis of 165 cases reported between 1982 and 2010 to compare with the clinical data of our sample. We demonstrated differences between the frequencies of clinical signs among the cases reported and seven Brazilian cases of this study, such as dental anomalies, strabismus, ear infections, deep hoarse voice, hearing loss, and cardiac defects. Although the gold standard for diagnosis of SMS is FISH, we found that the GTG banding technique developed to evaluate chromosome 17 can be used for the SMS diagnosis in areas where the FISH technique is not available.

  18. Clinical and MR findings of tethered cord syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Ho In; Kim, Hyae Young; Chung, Eun Chul; Suh, Jeong Soo; Lim, Hyo Keun; Lee, Seoung Ro; Lee, Young Seok

    1994-01-01

    Tethered cord syndrome(TCS)is defined as low position of the conus medullaris by the abnormally fixed spinal cord with progressive neurologic deficit. To evaluate the findings of TCS at MRI and its diagnostic value, we performed a retrospective analysis of MRI of 30 patients with emphasis on clinical manifestation, level of conus medullaris, cause of tethering, and associated findings. Clinical presentation included back mass(26 cases), neurogenic bladder(5 cases), urinary incontinences(5 cases), progressive constipation(2 cases), skin dimpling(1 case), gait disturbance(1 case) and club foot (1 case). Neurologic deficit was developed 11 cases(40%) and mean age of these patients at the time of diagnosis was 8.6 years. The most common cause of tethering was lipoma(63%). The tips of conus medullaris were below the level of the second lumbar spine ia all patients. The causes of tethering were lipomatous components(spinal lipoma and lipomyelomenigocele) in 67% myelomeningocele in 20%, presacral mass in 7%, thickened filum terminale in 3% and postoperative change in 3%. Associated anomalies included syringomyelia(20%) and hydrocephalus was associated in 3 out 5 patients who underwent brain MRI. MRI clearly delineated the location of conus, tethering of the filum terminate with their causes and associated abnormalities. MRI examination is a very useful diagnostic tool for the early evaluation of TCS and the postoperative follow up

  19. Recommendations for pharmacological clinical trials in children with irritable bowel syndrome: the Rome foundation pediatric subcommittee on clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saps, M; van Tilburg, M A L; Lavigne, J V; Miranda, A; Benninga, M A; Taminiau, J A; Di Lorenzo, C

    2016-11-01

    There is little published evidence of efficacy for the most commonly used treatments. Thus, there is an urgent need to conduct clinical trials on existing and novel therapies. In order to address these issues the Rome Foundation and members of the Pediatric Committee of the European Medicines Agency formed a subcommittee on clinical trials to develop guidelines for the design of clinical trials in children with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The following recommendations are based on evidence from published data when available and expert opinion. The subcommittee recommends randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, clinical trials to assess the efficacy of new drugs. The combined endpoints for abdominal pain are a decrease in intensity of at least 30% compared with baseline and to meet or exceed the Reliable Change Index (RCI) for the sample. Stool consistency is measured with the Bristol Stool Scale Form (BSFS). The subcommittee recommends as entry criteria for abdominal pain a weekly average of worst abdominal pain in past 24 h of at least 3.0 on a 0-10 point scale or at least 30 mm in 100 mm Visual Analog Scale. For stool endpoints the committee recommends an average stool consistency lower than 3 in the BSFS during the run-in period for clinical trials on IBS-C and an average stool consistency greater than 5 in the BSFS during the run-in period for clinical trials on IBS-D. Changes in stool consistency are the primary endpoints for both IBS with diarrhea (IBS-D) and IBS with constipation (IBS-C). © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Facial Surgery and an Active Modification Approach for Children with Down Syndrome: Some Psychological and Ethical Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1985-01-01

    The article summarizes some major issues involved including social acceptance of and expectations for individuals with Down syndrome; valuing of physical appearance; relevance of intellectual functioning; infliction of avoidable pain or trauma; origins and import of medical professionals' opinions; and the individual's desire for and reactions to…

  1. [Neonatal atrial tachycardia: suggestive clinical sign of Costello syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laux, D; Bajolle, F; Maltret, A; Bonnet, D

    2011-10-01

    Costello syndrome is a rare association of symptoms caused by de novo germline mutations of the HRAS oncogene interfering in the RAS/mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signal transduction pathway. Mutations in this pathway are also responsible for Noonan syndrome and the related cardiofaciocutaneous syndrome (CFC) as well as LEOPARD syndrome. The 4 syndromes share phenotypic resemblances concerning patients' morphology but also regarding associated cardiac disease, namely hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, pulmonary stenosis, and atrial septal defect. The electrocardiogram often shows an upper deviation of the QRS axis. Arrhythmias are rare but, if present, are particularly typical of CS. We describe herein two newborn infants with Costello syndrome revealed by atrial tachycardia associated with characteristic morphological and cardiac features of syndromes related to mutations in the RAS/MAPK pathway. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical Presentation of Klinefelter's Syndrome: Differences According to Age

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    Néstor Pacenza

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to establish the characteristics of presentation of 94 patients with Kinelfelter's syndrome (KS referred to the endocrinologist at different ages. The diagnosis of KS was more frequent in the age group between 11 and 20 years (46.8%. Most of the patients (83.7% showed the classic 47,XXY karyotype and 7.1% showed a 47,XXY/46,XY mosaicism. Half of the patients younger than 18 years presented mild neurodevelopmental disorders. The most frequent clinical findings were cryptorchidism in prepubertal patients, and small testes, cryptorchidism, and gynecomastia in pubertal patients. FSH, LH, AMH, and inhibin B levels were normal in prepubertal patients and became abnormal from midpuberty. Most adults were referred for small testes, infertility, and gynecomastia; 43.6% had sexual dysfunction. Testosterone levels were low in 45%. Mean stature was above the 50th percentile, and 62.5% had BMI ≥25.0 kg/m2. In conclusion, the diagnosis of Klinefelter syndrome seems to be made earlier nowadays probably because pediatricians are more aware that boys and adolescents with neuro-developmental disorders and cryptorchidism are at increased risk. The increasing use of prenatal diagnosis has also decreased the mean age at diagnosis and allowed to get insight into the evolution of previously undiagnosed cases, which probably represent the mildest forms. In adults average height and weight are slightly higher than those in the normal population. Bone mineral density is mildly affected, more at the spine than at the femoral neck level, in less than half of cases.

  3. Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Manifestations, Dietary Influences, and Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald Ikechi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS is a functional gastrointestinal disorder that is characterized by symptoms of chronic abdominal pain and altered bowel habits in the absence of an overtly identifiable cause. It is the most commonly diagnosed functional gastrointestinal disorder, accounting for about one third of gastroenterology visits. It generally presents as a complex of symptoms, including psychological dysfunction. Hypersensitivity to certain foods, especially foods that contain high amounts of fructose, plays a role in the pathophysiology of IBS. Elevated consumption of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS has been discussed in this aspect. The treatment options for IBS are challenging and varied. In addition to dietary restrictions for HFCS-induced IBS, such as low-FODMAP (Fermentable Oligosaccharides, Disaccharide, Monosaccharides, and Polyols diets, existing drug therapies are administered based on the predominant symptoms and IBS-subtype. Patients with IBS are likely to suffer from issues, such as anxiety, depression, and post-traumatic-stress disorder. Biopsychosocial factors particularly socioeconomic status, sex, and race should, thus, be considered for diagnostic evaluation of patients with IBS.

  4. THE PREVALENCE AND CLINICAL CHARACTERISTICS OF PRIMARY HEADACHE IN IRRITABLE BOWEL SYNDROME: a subgroup of the functional somatic syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa LS SOARES

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Context The irritable bowel syndrome and primary headache are two chronic diseases characterized by symptoms of recurring pain and affect approximately 10%-20% of the general population. Objectives To study the prevalence of primary headache in volunteers with irritable bowel syndrome in a Brazilian urban community. Methods It was evaluated the prevalence of primary headache associated with irritable bowel syndrome in adult volunteers 330 no patients.The protocol included the Rome III criteria, international classification of Headaches, later divided into four groups: I- Irritable bowel syndrome (n = 52, II- Primary headache (n = 45, III-Irritable bowel syndrome (n = 26 and headache, and IV- Controls (207. Results We not found significant difference in the average age of the four groups and the diagnosis of irritable bowel syndrome, primary headache and their association was more frequent in females. The frequent use of analgesics was greater in groups II and III. Conclusion Our results suggest that irritable bowel syndrome and primary headache are also common in third world countries. The frequency in use of analgesics in association between the two entities was relevant. The identification of irritable bowel syndrome patients with different clinical sub-types could improve the therapeutics options and the prevention strategies.

  5. Clinical picture and treatment implication in a child with Capgras syndrome: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzone, Luigi; Armando, Marco; De Crescenzo, Franco; Demaria, Francesco; Valeri, Giovanni; Vicari, Stefano

    2012-11-27

    Capgras syndrome is a delusional misidentification syndrome characterized by the patient's belief that his or her relatives have been replaced by impostors. Here we describe the clinical picture and the therapeutic approach to an 11-year-old Caucasian girl with Capgras syndrome. A complete psychopathological assessment was conducted during the acute phase, at one month, two months and six months since diagnosis. Subsequent follow-up evaluations in this patient allowed us to detect improvements in the psychotic symptoms following treatment with risperidone and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, suggesting that this combined therapy may significantly improve the clinical outcome in patients who have Capgras syndrome.

  6. The Effect of Menstrual Issues on Young Women with Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskowitz, Alexa P.; Dendrinos, Melina; Murray, Pamela J.; Quint, Elisabeth H.; Ernst, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective To characterize menstrual health issues and their effect in young women with Angelman syndrome (AS). Our secondary objective was to compare them with young women with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Design Cross-sectional convenience sample survey. Setting An institutional review board–approved Web-based survey of young female members of the Angelman Syndrome Foundation. Participants Caregivers of young women with AS, aged 12–25 years. Interventions None. Main Outcome Measures Symptom characterization and effect of menses on young women with AS. Results Menstrual and premenstrual symptoms were common among young women with AS, but infrequently caused problems at home or school. Less than half of the subjects used hormones to control their flow. Of those who used hormones, 75% used them continuously. Caregivers were satisfied with their method to control periods. Girls with seizures were more likely to use hormonal methods to control menses than those without seizures. Menstrual-associated morbidity in young women with ASD and AS was fairly similar, but with greater morbidity in the ASD group than in the AS group. However, girls with AS had more problems with menstrual hygiene with almost all of them requiring full assistance for managing hygiene. Conclusion In this group of young women with AS, who have moderate to severe neurodevelopmental disabilities and cannot manage their own hygiene, menstruation is not associated with significant problems. Menstrual management by hormones is used by less than half. When hormonal therapy is used, it is most commonly used continuously to suppress menses. PMID:26718530

  7. The Effect of Menstrual Issues on Young Women with Angelman Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskowitz, Alexa P; Dendrinos, Melina; Murray, Pamela J; Quint, Elisabeth H; Ernst, Susan

    2016-08-01

    To characterize menstrual health issues and their effect in young women with Angelman syndrome (AS). Our secondary objective was to compare them with young women with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). Cross-sectional convenience sample survey. An institutional review board-approved Web-based survey of young female members of the Angelman Syndrome Foundation. Caregivers of young women with AS, aged 12-25 years. None. Symptom characterization and effect of menses on young women with AS. Menstrual and premenstrual symptoms were common among young women with AS, but infrequently caused problems at home or school. Less than half of the subjects used hormones to control their flow. Of those who used hormones, 75% used them continuously. Caregivers were satisfied with their method to control periods. Girls with seizures were more likely to use hormonal methods to control menses than those without seizures. Menstrual-associated morbidity in young women with ASD and AS was fairly similar, but with greater morbidity in the ASD group than in the AS group. However, girls with AS had more problems with menstrual hygiene with almost all of them requiring full assistance for managing hygiene. In this group of young women with AS, who have moderate to severe neurodevelopmental disabilities and cannot manage their own hygiene, menstruation is not associated with significant problems. Menstrual management by hormones is used by less than half. When hormonal therapy is used, it is most commonly used continuously to suppress menses. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis of antiphospholipid syndrome in routine clinical practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, J; Machin, SJ; Cohen, H

    2013-01-01

    The updated international consensus criteria for definite antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) are useful for scientific clinical studies. However, there remains a need for diagnostic criteria for routine clinical use. We audited the results of routine antiphospholipid antibodies (aPLs) in a cohort of 193 consecutive patients with aPL positivity-based testing for lupus anticoagulant (LA), IgG and IgM anticardiolipin (aCL) and anti-ß2glycoprotein-1 antibodies (aß2GPI). Medium/high-titre aCL/aβ2GPI was defined as >99th percentile. Low-titre aCL/aβ2GPI positivity (>95th < 99th percentile) was considered positive for obstetric but not for thrombotic APS. One hundred of the 145 patients fulfilled both clinical and laboratory criteria for definite APS. Twenty-six women with purely obstetric APS had persistent low-titre aCL and/or aβ2GPI. With the inclusion of these patients, 126 of the 145 patients were considered to have APS. Sixty-seven out of 126 patients were LA-negative, of whom 12 had aCL only, 37 had aβ2GPI only and 18 positive were for both. The omission of aCL or aβ2GPI testing from investigation of APS would have led to a failure to diagnose APS in 9.5% and 29.4% of patients, respectively. Our data suggest that LA, aCL and aβ2GPI testing are all required for the accurate diagnosis of APS and that low-titre antibodies should be included in the diagnosis of obstetric APS. PMID:22988029

  9. Clinical profile of PiB-positive corticobasal syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrell, James R; Hornberger, Michael; Villemagne, Victor L; Rowe, Christopher C; Hodges, John R

    2013-01-01

    Corticobasal syndrome (CBS) is a multifaceted neurodegenerative disorder characterized by a combination of motor and cognitive deficits. Several different pathological entities, including Alzheimer's pathology, have been described in association with CBS. The present study aimed to establish clinical, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging features that could be useful in the distinction of CBS due to AD pathology from other CBS cases in life based on [(11)C] Pittsburgh Compound B positron emission tomography (PiB-PET) status. Patients with CBS were prospectively recruited from a specialized cognitive disorders clinic. All patients underwent detailed clinical and neuropsychological assessment, with structural imaging using voxel-based analysis of magnetic resonance imaging. Alzheimer's pathology was detected using PiB-PET imaging, and PiB-positive and PiB-negative groups were compared. Fourteen CBS patients meeting defined criteria were included (7 male, 7 female; mean age 66.1+/-6.9 years; median symptom duration was 35.5+/-22.6 months) and compared to 20 matched control subjects. Of the 14 patients, 4 were PiB-positive and 10 PiB-negative. There were no significant differences between PiB-positive and PiB-negative CBS patients in age, gender, education, symptom duration, or motor features. PiB-positive patients had greater visuospatial deficits, a higher rate of sentence repetition impairment, and more functional decline. Voxel-based morphometry analyses demonstrated extensive peri-insular and post-central atrophy in both groups, but PiB-positive patients had atrophy that extended to include the posterior part of the left superior temporal gyrus. Visuospatial function, aspects of language, and the pattern of cerebral atrophy may be useful in distinguishing patients with CBS due to underlying AD pathology.

  10. Clinical features and differential diagnosis of flail arm syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübers, Annemarie; Hildebrandt, Viviane; Petri, Susanne; Kollewe, Katja; Hermann, Andreas; Storch, Alexander; Hanisch, Frank; Zierz, Stephan; Rosenbohm, Angela; Ludolph, Albert C; Dorst, Johannes

    2016-02-01

    Flail arm syndrome (FAS) is a variant of motor neuron disease which is characterized by progressive, predominantly proximal weakness and atrophy of the upper limbs (UL). Because of its heterogeneous presentation and its relatively slow progression, differential diagnosis may be difficult particularly in the early stages of the disease. The aim of this study was to investigate typical clinical features of FAS with special regard to initial symptoms and differences to classical Charcot type amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). We retrospectively evaluated the clinical features of 42 FAS patients who were seen in the outpatient clinics of 4 German centers between 2000 and 2010 and compared them to 146 sex-matched control patients with classical spinal-onset ALS. FAS patients were younger (54.7 ± 9.3 versus 59.4 ± 12.2 years), male patients were predominantly affected (3.8:1 versus 1.9:1), and FAS patients showed a prolonged survival (53 versus 33 months) compared to classical ALS patients. The share of patients with initial misdiagnoses was 54.8% and led to ineffective therapy with immunoglobulins in 26%. Initial symptoms were most frequently present either in distal muscles only or in both proximal and distal muscle groups combined (76%) and showed an asymmetric distribution pattern in the majority of cases (76%). Although all patients developed symmetric and predominantly proximal UL weakness and atrophy during the course of their disease, we found that most patients initially showed asymmetric and predominantly distal distribution of symptoms. This may contribute to difficulties in differential diagnosis and to ineffective treatment regimes.

  11. Irritable bowel syndrome: diagnostic approaches in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene J Burbige

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Eugene J BurbigeDivision of Gastroenterology, Gastrointestinal and Liver Research, John Muir Medical Center, Concord, CA, USABackground: Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, a functional gastrointestinal disorder long considered a diagnosis of exclusion, has chronic symptoms that vary over time and overlap with those of non-IBS disorders. Traditional symptom-based criteria effectively identify IBS patients but are not easily applied in clinical practice, leaving >40% of patients to experience symptoms up to 5 years before diagnosis.Objective: To review the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected IBS, strengths and weaknesses of current methodologies, and newer diagnostic tools that can augment current symptom-based criteria.Methods: The peer-reviewed literature (PubMed was searched for primary reports and reviews using the limiters of date (1999–2009 and English language and the search terms irritable bowel syndrome, diagnosis, gastrointestinal disease, symptom-based criteria, outcome, serology, and fecal markers. Abstracts from Digestive Disease Week 2008–2009 and reference lists of identified articles were reviewed.Results: A disconnect is apparent between practice guidelines and clinical practice. The American Gastroenterological Association and American College of Gastroenterology recommend diagnosing IBS in patients without alarm features of organic disease using symptom-based criteria (eg, Rome. However, physicians report confidence in a symptom-based diagnosis without further testing only up to 42% of the time; many order laboratory tests and perform sigmoidoscopies or colonoscopies despite good evidence showing no utility for this work-up in uncomplicated cases. In the absence of diagnostic criteria easily usable in a busy practice, newer diagnostic methods, such as stool-form examination, fecal inflammatory markers, and serum biomarkers, have been proposed as adjunctive tools to aid in an IBS diagnosis by increasing physicians

  12. CHD7 mutations in patients initially diagnosed with Kallmann syndrome - the clinical overlap with CHARGE syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jongmans, M. C. J.; van Ravenswaaij-Arts, C. M. A.; Pitteloud, N.; Ogata, T.; Sato, N.; Claahsen-van der Grinten, H. L.; van der Donk, K.; Seminara, S.; Bergman, J. E. H.; Brunner, H. G.; Crowley, W. F.; Hoefsloot, L. H.

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is the combination of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism and anosmia or hyposmia, two features that are also frequently present in CHARGE syndrome. CHARGE syndrome is caused by mutations in the CHD7 gene. We performed analysis of CHD7 in 36 patients with KS and 20 patients with

  13. Idiopathic Inflammatory Myopathies; Association with Overlap Myositis and Syndromes: Classification, Clinical Characteristics, and Associated Autoantibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pari Basharat

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic inflammatory myopathies (IIM are traditionally identified as a group of disorders that target skeletal muscle due to autoimmune dysfunction. The IIM can be divided into subtypes based on certain clinical characteristics, and several classification schemes have been proposed. The predominant diagnostic criteria for IIM is the Bohan and Peter criteria, which subdivides IIM into primary polymyositis (PM, primary dermatomyositis (DM, myositis with another connective tissue disease, and myositis associated with cancer. However, this measure has been criticised for several reasons including lack of specific criteria to help distinguish between muscle biopsy findings of PM, DM, and immune-mediated necrotising myopathy, as well as the lack of identification of cases of overlap myositis (OM. Because of this issue, other classification criteria for IIM have been proposed, which include utilising myositis-associated antibodies and myositis-specific antibodies, as well as overlap features such as Raynaud’s phenomenon, polyarthritis, oesophageal abnormalities, interstitial lung disease, small bowel abnormalities such as hypomotility and malabsorption, and renal crises, amongst others. Indeed, the identification of autoantibodies associated with certain clinical phenotypes of myositis, in particular connective tissue disease-myositis overlap, has further helped divide IIM into distinct clinical subsets, which include OM and overlap syndromes (OS. This paper reviews the concepts of OM and OS as they pertain to IIM, including definitions in the literature, clinical characteristics, and overlap autoantibodies.

  14. [Clinical study of area of Jiangsu province of polycystic ovarian syndrome correlation distribution of traditional Chinese medicine syndrome type and improper diet].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yu; Gao, Yue-Ping

    2014-05-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is one of the most popular diseases in obstetrics and gynecology research at internal and abroad at present, traditional Chinese medicine(TCM)in the clinical treatment of the disease have the advantage. Clinical epidemiological study of descriptive research method this research adopts investigation, observation of TCM syndromes and improper diet through 401 cases in Jiangsu Province confirmed PCOS patients, to explore the relationship between TCM syndrome type distribution and improper diet factors, and to provide the clinical basis for further etiology of this disease research. TCM syndrome type distribution of the disease is kidney deficiency, phlegm stagnation syndrome, qi stagnation and blood stasis syndrome, syndrome of dampness heat of liver channel and is composed of 4 basic syndromes and formed complex syndrome, and the composite and syndrome type (60.85%); combined with the analysis of traditional Chinese medicine dialectical, Pure empirical syndrome this disease (46.88%), followed by the actual card (45.39%), pure deficiency is rare. Improper diet factors associated with the disease, in which improper diet with different TCM syndrome type distribution significantly related. Stagnation of phlegm dampness syndrome is the main syndrome of the disease type, improper diet factors and every syndrome PCOS type distribution is as follows: the partial eclipse fatness greasy with basic syndromes of phlegm dampness stagnation of kidney deficiency syndrome, the nephrasthenia syndrome is less; eating spicy stimulation by basic syndromes of stagnation of Qi and blood stasis; eating cold people the basic certificate type of qi stagnation and blood stasis; The diet of patients are more prone to stagnation of phlegm dampness syndrome.

  15. Cowden Syndrome Presenting as Breast Cancer: Imaging and Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Mirinae [Dept. of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyung Hee University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Nariya; Moon, Hyeong Gon [Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Hye Shin [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    Cowden syndrome is an uncommon, autosomal dominant disease which is characterized by multiple hamartomas of the skin, mucous membrane, brain, breast, thyroid, and gastrointestinal tract. The diagnosis of Cowden syndrome implicates an increased risk of developing breast cancer. We report a case of a 22-year-old woman with Cowden syndrome that presented as breast cancer with concomitant bilateral exuberant benign masses in both breasts.

  16. Sheehan's syndrome presenting as psychosis: a rare clinical presentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dar, Mohamand Maqbool; Arif, Tasleem; Bashir, Haamid; Bhat, Mohammad Hayat; Ahmed, Javid

    2013-01-01

    Sheehan's syndrome (SS) refers to the occurrence of varying degree of hypopituitarism after parturition (1). It is a rare cause of hypopituitarism in developed countries owing to advances in obstetric care and its frequency is decreasing worldwide. However, it is still frequent in underdeveloped and developing countries. Sheehan's syndrome is often diagnosed late as it evolves slowly (2,3). Reports of psychoses in patients with Sheehan's syndrome are rare. Herein, a case report of psychosis in a 31 year old woman who developed Sheehan's syndrome preceded by postpartum haemorrhage is presented. Treatment with thyroxine and glucocorticoids resulted in complete remission after attaining euthyroid and eucortisolemic state. PMID:23483784

  17. Mosaic 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: diagnosis and clinical manifestations of two cases

    OpenAIRE

    Kabra Madhulika; Jain Manish; Halder Ashutosh; Gupta Neerja

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is due to microdeletion of 22q11.2 region of chromosome 22. It is a common microdeletion syndrome however mosaic cases are very rare and reported only few previous occasions. In this report we describe two unrelated male children with clinical features consistent with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome characterized by cardiac defect, facial dysmorphism and developmental deficiency. One of the cases also had trigonocephaly. Interphase & metaphase...

  18. Li-Fraumeni syndrome: report of a clinical research workshop and creation of a research consortium

    OpenAIRE

    Mai, Phuong L.; Malkin, David; Garber, Judy E.; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Weitzel, Jeffrey N.; Strong, Louise C.; Wyss, Oliver; Locke, Luana; Means, Von; Achatz, Maria Isabel; Hainaut, Pierre; Frebourg, Thierry; Evans, D. Gareth; Bleiker, Eveline; Patenaude, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS) is a rare dominantly inherited cancer predisposition syndrome that was first described in 1969. In most families, it is caused by germline mutations in the TP53 gene and is characterized by early onset of multiple specific cancers and very high lifetime cumulative cancer risk. Despite significant progress in understanding the molecular biology of TP53, the optimal clinical management of this syndrome is poorly defined. We convened a workshop on November 2, 2010, at ...

  19. Risk Factors and Clinical Follow-Up Features of Meconium Aspiration Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Anuk İnce, Deniz; Takcı, Şahin; Altıntaş, Buket

    2015-01-01

    AbstractAim: Meconium aspiration syndrome is usually seen in full-term and post-term infants and may cause complications including respiratory failure, pulmonary air leaks, and persistent pulmonary hypertension. The aim of this study was to determine risk factors of meconium aspiration syndrome and assess the clinical course of the disease.Material and Methods: Fourteen of 508 infants diagnosed with meconium aspiration syndrome between January 2013 and April 2014 were retrospectively analyzed...

  20. [Cat-eye syndrome. Clinical and cytogenetical differentialdiagnosis (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, J; Tolksdorf, M; Wiedemann, H R

    1975-01-01

    We report a 5 1/2-year-old girl whose clinical symptoms are consistent with diagnosis of the cat-eye syndrome. The prominent symptoms are: anal stenosis, preauricular tags and pits, coloboma of the iris, doubling of the pelvis and ureter on both sides, vesicourethral reflux on the right side and normal mental development. Leucocyte alkaline phosphatase is normal. Chromosomal analysis shows a supernumerary submetacentric chromosome. This extra chromosome is smaller than the G-group chromosomes and has satellites on the short and long arms. Autoradiography after 3H-thymidine incorporation shows a late-labeling marker chromosome. After using the Giemsa-banding technique, the chromatides demonstrate dark bandings with only soft, unstained satellites. With the fluorescence method, one can see spotlike fluorescence of the satellites on both arms and diffuse fluorescence of the hetero-chromatic segments. In addition, the C-bandings demonstrate a homogeneous dark staining of the chromatids, but we did not find stained satellites. Using the Giemsa-11 technique one can see the 47th chromosome with predominantly heterochromatic parts, but small euchromatic segments are visible between them. Satellites are unstained. Using currently accepted cytogenetical methods, it is not possible to identify the origin of this supernumerary marker chromosome.

  1. Neonatal staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome: clinical and outbreak containment review.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Neylon, Orla

    2012-01-31

    Staphylococcal scalded skin syndrome (SSSS) is a toxin-mediated exfoliating skin condition predominated by desquamation and blistering. Neonatal outbreaks have already been reported; however, our outbreak highlights the potential for SSSS following neonatal health promotion measures such as intra-muscular vitamin K administration and metabolic screening (heel prick) as well as effective case containment measures and the value of staff screening. Between February and June 2007, five confirmed cases of neonatal SSSS were identified in full-term neonates born in an Irish regional maternity hospital. All infants were treated successfully. Analysis of contact and environmental screening was undertaken, including family members and healthcare workers. Molecular typing on isolates was carried out. An outbreak control team (OCT) was assembled and took successful prospective steps to prevent further cases. All five Staphylococcus aureus isolates tested positive for exfoliative toxin A, of which two distinct strains were identified on pulsed-field gel electrophoresis analysis. Two cases followed staphylococcal inoculation during preventive measures such as intra-muscular vitamin K administration and metabolic screening (heel prick). None of the neonatal isolates were methicillin resistant. Of 259 hospital staff (70% of staff) screened, 30% were colonised with S. aureus, and 6% were positive for MRSA carriage. This is the first reported outbreak of neonatal SSSS in Ireland. Effective case containment measures and clinical value of OCT is demonstrated. Results of staff screening underlines the need for vigilance and compliance in hand disinfection strategies in maternity hospitals especially during neonatal screening and preventive procedures.

  2. [Fibromyalgia syndrome. Definition, classification, clinical diagnosis and prognosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eich, W; Häuser, W; Arnold, B; Jäckel, W; Offenbächer, M; Petzke, F; Schiltenwolf, M; Settan, M; Sommer, C; Tölle, T; Uçeyler, N; Henningsen, P

    2012-06-01

    The scheduled update to the German S3 guidelines on fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) by the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies ("Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften", AWMF; registration number 041/004) was planned starting in March 2011. The development of the guidelines was coordinated by the German Interdisciplinary Association for Pain Therapy ("Deutsche Interdisziplinären Vereinigung für Schmerztherapie", DIVS), 9 scientific medical societies and 2 patient self-help organizations. Eight working groups with a total of 50 members were evenly balanced in terms of gender, medical field, potential conflicts of interest and hierarchical position in the medical and scientific fields. Literature searches were performed using the Medline, PsycInfo, Scopus and Cochrane Library databases (until December 2010). The grading of the strength of the evidence followed the scheme of the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine. The formulation and grading of recommendations was accomplished using a multi-step, formal consensus process. The guidelines were reviewed by the boards of the participating scientific medical societies. The clinical diagnosis of FMS can be established by the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) 1990 classification criteria (with tender point examination), by the modified preliminary diagnostic ACR 2010 criteria or by the diagnostic criteria of the German interdisciplinary guideline (AWMF) on FMS. The English full-text version of this article is available at SpringerLink (under "Supplemental").

  3. Clinical correlates of insomnia in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coryell, Virginia T; Ziegelstein, Roy C; Hirt, Kellie; Quain, Angela; Marine, Joseph E; Smith, Michael T

    2013-01-01

    This study sought to examine the prevalence of insomnia and its association with depression, anxiety, and medical comorbidities in patients after an acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Insomnia increases risk of recurrent cardiac events in ACS patients, but little is known about the prevalence and clinical correlates of insomnia in this setting. Patients (n = 102, 58.3 ± 10.6 years-old) admitted for ACS to a cardiology service at an urban academic medical center completed the Insomnia Severity Index, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, and measures of depression and anxiety. A subset (n = 20) completed ambulatory polysomnography (PSG) in their homes several weeks after discharge. Moderate or severe insomnia was reported by 37% of patients during hospitalization and was associated with 76 minutes more wake after sleep onset measured by home PSG. Although depression and insomnia were strongly associated, about 1 in 4 patients with insomnia did not report significant depressive symptoms. Sleep apnea was documented in 80% of patients on PSG, but insomnia was not associated with sleep apnea, periodic limb movements, demographic factors, or medical conditions other than liver disease. Insomnia is present in over one-third of ACS patients during hospitalization, but at-risk patients could not be readily identified by demographic or medical factors or by depression symptoms.

  4. Clinical disease characteristics according to karyotype in Turner syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chae Young Yeo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : Turner syndrome (TS is a disorder in which various anomalies can be accompanied, especially cardiovascular, renal, thyroid and auditory problems. The aim of this study is to identify the incidence of these disorders in patients with TS according to karyotype. Methods : We reviewed medical records of 90 patients with TS diagnosed by chromosomal analysis in 4 hospitals from Jan 1998 to Dec 2007. We evaluated these cases by prepared protocol of 4 medical problems. Results : The distribution of karyotype was 45,X (47.8%, mosaic pattern (34.4% and structural aberration group (17.8 %. Renal anomalies, cardiovascular anomalies, thyroid disorders and auditory problems are accompanied in 4.4%, 10.0 %, 11.1% and 5.6%, respectively. 45,X group had renal anomalies (7.0%, cardiovascular anomalies (18.6%, thyroid disorders (9.3% and auditory problems (11.6%. Mosaic group had renal anomalies (3.2%, thyroid disorders (12.9%, no cardiovascular anomalies and auditory problems. Structural aberration group had cardiovascular anomalies (6.3%, thyroid disorders (12.5% and no other 2 problems. Patients with 45,X group had a significant higher incidence of cardiovascular anomalies (P=0.025. Conclusion : Our results indicate that there are differences clinically according to karyotype of TS, especially in incidence of cardiovascular anomalies.

  5. The unseen and untold issues of clinical trials and research ethics in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    McRoy

    The unseen and untold issues of clinical trials and research ethics in Pakistan. Waheed S*, Siddiqui E. Department of Emergency ... attention, as the pharmaceutical companies has to enroll patients for their clinical trials; they visit ... collaborations and for obtaining funding. However, there are some impurities mixing in it as.

  6. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  7. Moebius syndrome: clinical features, diagnosis, management and early intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picciolini, Odoardo; Porro, Matteo; Cattaneo, Elisa; Castelletti, Silvia; Masera, Giuseppe; Mosca, Fabio; Bedeschi, Maria Francesca

    2016-06-03

    Moebius syndrome (MBS) is rare disease characterized by nonprogressive congenital uni- or bi-lateral facial (i. e. VII cranial nerve) and abducens (i. e. VI cranial nerve) palsy. Although the neurological and ophthalmological findings are quite well-known, data concerning the attendant functional difficulties and their changes over time are seldom addressed. In this study we attempt to estimate the prevalence of clinical and functional data in an Italian cohort affected by MBS. The study included 50 children, 21 males and 29 females, aged 1 month to 14 years. The patients entered into a multidisciplinary diagnostic and follow-up protocol that had the specific purpose of detecting clinical and developmental deficits related to MBS. Involvement of the VII cranial nerve (total/partial, bilateral or unilateral) was present in 96 % of patients, and of the VI nerve in 85 %. Two patients were without impairment of the VII nerve and seven patients had no involvement of the VI nerve and were thus classified as Moebius-like because of the involvement of other CNs. Additional affected CNs were numbers III-IV in 16 %, V in 11 %, VIII and X each in 8 %, the XI in 6 %, the IX, most often partially, in 22 %, and the XII in 48 % of cases. Their development was characterized by global delay at one year of age, motor, emotional and speech difficulties at two years of age, a trend toward normalization at three years of age but with weakness in hand-eye coordination, and achieving average results at five years of age. Overall 90 % of children had a normal developmental quotient whereas only 10 % manifested cognitive deficits. Early rehabilitation may enhance the recovery of normal function, particularly in vulnerable areas of development. It is possible that early intervention that integrates sensory and visual information with emotional difficulties can improve the prognosis of the child with MBS.

  8. [Clinical characteristics of children with an initial onset of IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liang; Li, Zhi-Hui; Yin, Yan; Duan, Cui-Rong; Xun, Mai; Wu, Tian-Hui; Zhang, Yi; Ding, Yun-Feng

    2015-08-01

    To study the clinical characteristics of children with an initial onset of IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome and compare them with children with primary nephrotic syndrome, in order to provide a theoretical basis for the differential diagnosis of the two diseases. Fifty children diagnosed with an initial onset of IgA nephropathy with nephrotic syndrome were included in this study. Seventy-two children diagnosed with an initial onset of primary nephrotic syndrome served as the control group. The clinical and laboratory examination characteristics were compared between the two groups. The IgA nephropathy group had significantly higher incidence rates of gross haematuria, microscopic haematuria, hypertension, acute kidney injury, low serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, anemia, low serum complement C4, steroid resistance, and nephritis-type nephrotic syndrome and a significantly lower incidence of elevated serum IgE compared with the control group (Psyndrome and primary nephrotic syndrome. Children with IgA nephropathy presenting nephrotic syndrome manifest mainly as nephritis type and steroid-resistant type in the clinical classification. Cinical manifestations accompanied by serum levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and IgE are helpful for differential diagnosis of IgA nephropathy presenting nephrotic syndrome and primary nephrotic syndrome.

  9. Video Game Vision Syndrome: A New Clinical Picture in Children?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechichi, Caterina; De Mojà, Gilda; Aragona, Pasquale

    2017-11-01

    To examine a possible relationship between exposure to video games/electronic screens and visual issues in children between 3 and 10 years of age. An observational, cross-sectional study of a population of children using video games was employed. All patients between 3 and 10 years of age were recruited at an outpatient unit accredited by the Italian Regional Health Service. Three hundred twenty children (159 boys and 161 girls; mean age = 6.9 ± 2 years) were observed. Ophthalmological examination included assessment of stereoscopic vision on Lang-Stereotests I and II (LANG-STEREOTEST AG, Küsnacht, Switzerland) and identification of the dominant eye using the Dolman method. Furthermore, a questionnaire was used to record asthenopic symptoms and daily exposure to video games and electronic screens. Two groups of children were examined according to the average amount of time spent playing video games daily: children who played video games for less than 30 minutes per day and not every day (control group) and children who played video games for 30 minutes or more every day (video game group). Both groups were then divided into two subgroups: children using other types of electronic screens (eg, televisions, computers, tablets, and smartphones) for less than 3 hours daily (low electronic use subgroup) and children using other types of electronic screens for 3 hours or more per day (high electronic use subgroup). Asthenopia (especially headache, eyelid tic, transient diplopia, and dizziness), absence of fine stereopsis, and refractive errors were statistically more frequent (mainly in the dominant eye) in children in the video game group. These symptoms were frequent and peculiar in the video game group and might be part of a video game vision syndrome that has not been defined yet. It is important to recognize these signs as possible functional disorders to avoid erroneous diagnostic and therapeutic interventions. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2017

  10. Weaver syndrome and EZH2 mutations: Clarifying the clinical phenotype

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Tatton-Brown (Katrina); A. Murray (Anna); S. Hanks (Sandra); J. Douglas (Jenny); R. Armstrong (Ruth); S. Banka (Siddharth); L.M. Bird (Lynne); C.L. Clericuzio (Carol); V. Cormier-Daire (Valerie); T. Cushing (Tom); F. Flinter (Frances); S. Jacquemont (Sébastien); S. Joss (Shelagh); E. Kinning (Esther); S.A. Lynch; A. Magee (Alex); V. Mcconnell (Vivienne); A. Medeira (Ana); K. Ozono (Keiichi); M. Patton (Michael); J. Rankin (Julia); D.J. Shears (Deborah); M.E.H. Simon (Marleen); M. Splitt (M.); V. Strenger (Volker); K.E. Stuurman (Kyra); C. Taylor (Clare); H. Titheradge (Hannah); L. van Maldergem (Lionel); I.K. Temple; T.J. Cole (Trevor); S. Seal (Sheila); N. Rahman (Nazneen)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractWeaver syndrome, first described in 1974, is characterized by tall stature, a typical facial appearance, and variable intellectual disability. In 2011, mutations in the histone methyltransferase, EZH2, were shown to cause Weaver syndrome. To date, we have identified 48 individuals with

  11. Drug-induced Brugada syndrome: Clinical characteristics and risk factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konigstein, Maayan; Rosso, Raphael; Topaz, Guy; Postema, Pieter G.; Friedensohn, Limor; Heller, Karin; Zeltser, David; Belhassen, Bernard; Adler, Arnon; Viskin, Sami

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac arrest may result from seemingly innocuous medications that do not necessarily have cardiac indications. The best-known example is the drug-induced long QT syndrome. A less known but not necessarily less important form of drug-induced proarrhythmia is the drug-induced Brugada syndrome. The

  12. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome: a clinical genetic study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenhalgh, K.L.; Howell, R.; Bottani, A.; Ancliff, P.J.; Brunner, H.G.; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, C.C.; Vernon, E.; Brown, K.W.; Newbury-Ecob, R.

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to

  13. Thrombocytopenia-absent radius syndrome : a clinical genetic study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greenhalgh, KL; Howell, RT; Bottani, A; Ancliff, PJ; Brunner, HG; Verschuuren-Bemelmans, CC; Vernon, E; Brown, KW; Newbury-Ecob, RA

    2002-01-01

    The thrombocytopenia-absent radius (TAR) syndrome is a congenital malformation syndrome characterised by bilateral absence of the radii and a thrombocytopenia. The lower limbs, gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, and other systems may also be involved. Shaw and Oliver in 1959 were the first to

  14. Clinical presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents : Is there an age effect?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ribolsi, Michele; Lin, Ashleigh; Wardenaar, Klaas J.; Pontillo, Maria; Mazzone, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Armando, Marco

    There is limited research on clinical features related to age of presentation of the Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents (CAD). Based on findings in CAD with psychosis, we hypothesized that an older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome would be associated with

  15. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndrom...

  16. Correlation between clinical features and MECP2 gene mutations in patients with Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hisham Megahed

    2015-03-01

    Conclusions: Mutation screening for MECP2 is a fast and reliable method to diagnose patients clinically suspected to suffer from Rett syndrome or female patients with atypical Rett syndrome features, mental retardation, developmental delay and other neurological abnormalities who do not fit any specific diagnosis. Also, patients with MECP2 mutation presented with a more severe phenotype.

  17. Clinical presentation and management of arterial thoracic outlet syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemuri, Chandu; McLaughlin, Lauren N; Abuirqeba, Ahmmad A; Thompson, Robert W

    2017-05-01

    Arterial thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) is a rare condition characterized by subclavian artery pathology associated with a bony abnormality. This study assessed contemporary clinical management of arterial TOS at a high-volume referral center. A prospectively maintained database was used to conduct a retrospective review of patients undergoing primary or reoperative treatment for arterial TOS during an 8-year period (2008 to 2016). Presenting characteristics, operative findings, and clinical and functional outcomes were evaluated. Forty patients underwent surgical treatment for arterial TOS, representing 3% of 1401 patients undergoing operations for all forms of TOS during the same interval. Patients were a mean age of 40.3 ± 2.2 years (range, 13-68 years), and 72% were women. More than half presented with upper extremity ischemia/emboli (n = 21) or posterior stroke (n = 2), including eight that had required urgent brachial artery thromboembolectomy. The presentation in 17 (42%) was nonvascular, with 11 having symptoms of neurogenic TOS and six having an asymptomatic neck mass or incidentally discovered subclavian artery dilatation. All patients underwent thoracic outlet decompression (25 supraclavicular, 15 paraclavicular), of which there were 30 (75%) with a cervical rib (24 complete, 6 partial), 5 with a first rib abnormality, 4 with a clavicle fracture, and 1 (reoperation) with no remaining bone abnormality. Subclavian artery reconstruction was performed in 70% (26 bypass grafts, 1 patch, 1 suture repair), and 30% had mild subclavian artery dilatation (<100%) requiring no arterial reconstruction. Mean postoperative length of stay was 5.4 ± 0.6 days. During a mean follow-up of 4.5 ± 0.4 years (range, 0.9-8.1 years), subclavian artery patency was 92%, none had further dilatation or embolism, and chronic symptoms were present in six (4 postischemic/vasospasm, 2 neurogenic). Functional outcomes measured by scores on the 11-item version of the

  18. Linking restless legs syndrome with Parkinson's disease: clinical, imaging and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peeraully Tasneem

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Restless legs syndrome (RLS and Parkinson's disease (PD are both common neurological disorders. There has been much debate over whether an etiological link between these two diseases exists and whether they share a common pathophysiology. Evidence pointing towards a link includes response to dopaminergic agents in PD and RLS, suggestive of underlying dopamine dysfunction in both conditions. The extrastriatal dopaminergic system, in particular altered spinal dopaminergic modulation, may be variably involved in PD patients with RLS symptoms. In addition, there is now evidence that the nigrostriatal system, primarily involved in PD, is also affected in RLS. Furthermore, an association of RLS with the parkin mutation has been suggested. The prevalence of RLS has also been reported to be increased in other disorders of dopamine regulation. However, clinical association studies and functional imaging have produced mixed findings. Conflicting accounts of emergence of RLS and improvement in RLS symptoms after deep brain stimulation (DBS also contribute to the uncertainty surrounding the issue. Among the strongest arguments against a common pathophysiology is the role of iron in RLS and PD. While elevated iron levels in the substantia nigra contribute to oxidative stress in PD, RLS is a disorder of relative iron deficiency, with symptoms responding to replacement therapy. Recent ultrasonography studies have suggested that, despite overlapping clinical features, the mechanisms underlying idiopathic RLS and RLS associated with PD may differ. In this review, we provide a concise summary of the clinical, imaging and genetic evidence exploring the link between RLS and PD.

  19. Clinical Observation of a Child with KID (Keratitis-Ichthyosis-Deafness Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.A. Klymenko

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A clinical case of keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness (KID syndrome in an infant is described. The article familia-rizes pediatricians and family doctors with difficulties in the diagnosis of this rare genetic disease in infants.

  20. Are personality patterns and clinical syndromes associated with patients' motives and percieved outcome of othognathic surgery?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper Øland; Jensen, J.; Melsen, Birte

    2010-01-01

    A study of surgical-orthodontic patients was performed to assess whether signs of personality patterns and psychologically defined clinical syndromes influenced patients' motives for treatment, perceived oral function, self-concept, social interaction, and overall satisfaction with treatment....

  1. Refining the clinical phenotype of Okur–Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akahira-Azuma, Moe; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Enomoto, Yumi; Mitsui, Jun; Kurosawa, Kenji

    2018-01-01

    We describe an 8-year-old Japanese boy with a de novo recurrent missense mutation in CSNK2A1, c.593A>G, that is causative of Okur–Chung neurodevelopmental syndrome. He exhibited distinctive facial features, severe growth retardation with relative macrocephaly, and friendly, hyperactive behavior. His dysmorphic features might suggest a congenital histone modification defect syndrome, such as Kleefstra, Coffin–Siris, or Rubinstein–Taybi syndromes, which are indicative of functional interactions between the casein kinase II, alpha 1 gene and histone modification factors. PMID:29619237

  2. EEC syndrome sans clefting: Variable clinical presentations in a family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thakkar Sejal

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia and cleft palate/lip syndrome (EEC is a rare autosomal dominant syndrome with varied presentation and is actually a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome leading to intra- and interfamilial differences in severity because of its variable expression and reduced penetrance. The cardinal features include ectrodactyly, sparse, wiry, hypopigmented hair, peg-shaped teeth with defective enamel and cleft palate/lip. A family comprising father, daughter and son presented to us with split hand-split foot deformity (ectrodactyly, epiphora, hair changes and deafness with variable involvement in each family member.

  3. [Wolfram syndrome: clinical and genetic analysis in two sisters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conart, J-B; Maalouf, T; Jonveaux, P; Guerci, B; Angioi, K

    2011-10-01

    Wolfram syndrome is a severe genetic disorder defined by the association of diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, deafness, and diabetes insipidus. Two sisters complained of progressive visual loss. Fundus examination evidenced optic atrophy. Their past medical history revealed diabetes mellitus and deafness since childhood. The association of these symptoms made the diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome possible. It was confirmed by molecular analysis, which evidenced composite WFS1 heterozygous mutations inherited from both their mother and father. Ophthalmologists should be aware of the possibility of Wolfram syndrome when diagnosing optic atrophy in diabetic children. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. A severe form of Crouzon's Syndrome: clinical and radiological correlation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, Ahmad M.

    2003-01-01

    Craniofacial dysostosis (Crouzon's syndrome) is a well defined, dominantly inherited disorder, described by Crouzon in 1912. It is characterized by several deformities involving the skull,face and eyes. This case report details a rare form of Crouzon's syndrome in which proptosis was so severe that globes were completely proptotic outside the patient's extremely shallow orbits, and the eyelids were undeveloped bilaterally and replaced by small folds of skin. It appears that this is the first report of such a severe form of Crouzon's syndrome. (author)

  5. [Clinical analysis of metabolic syndrome in vertiginous diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamanaka, Toshiaki; Fukuda, Takehiko; Sawai, Yachiyo; Shirota, Shiho; Shimizu, Naoki; Murai, Takayuki; Okamoto, Hideyuki; Fujita, Nobuya; Hosoi, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    To explore the relationship between metabolic syndrome and vertigo, we measured waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides and blood pressure in 333 subjects aged 20-79 years with vertigo. We found overall metabolic syndrome prevalence defined by Japanese diagnostic criteria to be 13.2%, similar to that in other national surveys by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The 6-fold higher prevalence in men over women exceeded that of other reports, however. The highest frequency was in vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) disorders, suggesting that conditions such as VBI in men with vertigo could involve metabolic syndrome as a risk factor for vertigo incidence.

  6. Fatigue and fibromyalgia syndrome: clinical and neurophysiologic pattern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casale, Roberto; Rainoldi, Alberto

    2011-04-01

    The concept of 'fatigue' is strictly related to parameters of the setting in which fatigue is measured. Therefore, it is mandatory to provide a definition of fatigue and the modalities of its use. This is of pivotal importance with regard to the fibromyalgia (FM) syndrome, where fatigue is the most invalidating symptom and where, paradoxically, no clear and widely accepted definition of fatigue is available in the literature as yet. In the clinical setting, fatigue can be measured by different methods of various complexity. The simplest technique to assess fatigue involves the use of a visual analogue scale (VAS); however, a number of scales with differing levels of complexity are available for use. It is, often, difficult to detach the term 'fatigue' from tiredness and task failure, which correspond to two completely distinguished forms of fatigue: one with central origin (tiredness) and another which is localised within the muscle (peripheral muscle fatigue). The former is related to changes in motor-unit-recruitment strategies, whereas the latter is attributed to changes in membrane properties. To extensively assess fatigue and, partially, to avoid confusion among the types of fatigue described above, a number of laboratory tests have been developed; among these, there are multichannel surface electromyography (EMG) recordings. Using this type of an approach, it is possible the estimation of motor unit location within the muscle, the decomposition of the surface EMG (sEMG) interference signal into constituent trains of motor unit action potentials (MUAPs) and the analysis of single unit properties. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Molecular and clinical study of 61 Angelman syndrome patients

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    Saitoh, Shinji; Harada, Naoki; Jinno, Yoshihiro; Niikawa, Norio [Nagasaki Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Imaizumi, Kiyoshi; Kuroki, Yoshikazu; Fukushima; Yoshimitsu; Sugimoto, Tateo; Renedo, Monica

    1994-08-15

    We analyzed 61 Angelman syndrome (AS) patients by cytogenetic and molecular techniques. On the basis of molecular findings, the patients were classified into the following 4 groups: familial cases without deletion, familial cases with submicroscopic deletion, sporadic cases with deletion, and sporadic cases without deletion. Among 53 sporadic cases, 37 (70%) had molecular deletion, which commonly extended from D15S9 to D15S12, although not all deletions were identical. Of 8 familial cases, 3 sibs from one family had a molecular deletion involving only 2 loci, D15S10 and GABRB3, which define the critical region for AS phenotypes. The parental origin of deletion, both in sporadic and familial cases, was exclusively maternal and consistent with a genomic imprinting hypothesis. Among sporadic and familial cases without deletion, no uniparental disomy was found and most of them were shown to inherit chromosomes 15 from both parents (biparental inheritance). A discrepancy between cytogenetic and molecular deletion was observed in 14 (26%) of 53 patients in whom cytogenetic analysis could be performed. Ten (43%) of 23 patients with a normal karyotype showed a molecular deletion, and 4 (13%) of 30 patients with cytogenetic deletion, del(15) (q11q13), showed no molecular deletion. Most clinical manifestations, including neurological signs and facial characteristics, were not distinct in each group except for hypopigmentation of skin or hair. Familial cases with submicroscopic deletion were not associated with hypopigmentation. These findings suggested that a gene for hypopigmentation is located outside the critical region of AS and is not imprinted. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome: clinical manifestations and radiologic correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saliba, Issam; Maniakas, Anastasios; Benamira, Lina Zahra; Nehme, Jade; Benoit, Mélanie; Montreuil-Jacques, Véronique

    2014-11-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the superior canal dehiscence syndrome (SCDS) and its vestibule-cochlear manifestations, while analyzing dehiscence size, audiogram and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) changes following dehiscence obliteration. We conducted a prospective study in a tertiary referral center. All Patients diagnosed and surgically treated for SCDS were operated through a middle fossa craniotomy (MFC). Clinical and radiological data were collected. The main outcome measures were Air-bone gaps, Pure-tone average (PTA), speech discrimination scores (SDS) and VEMP thresholds and were correlated to dehiscence size. 28 patients were included in this study with a mean dehiscence size of 4.68 mm. Phonophobia and imbalance were the most debilitating cochlear and vestibular symptoms, respectively. At 2 months postoperatively, low-frequency air-bone gaps showed a statistically significant improvement (p < 0.001). SDS and PTA did not show any statistically significant changes 2 months postoperatively (p = 0.282 and p = 0.295, respectively). VEMP threshold differences between operated and contralateral ears were statistically significant preoperatively (p < 0.001) and non-significant 2 months postoperatively (p = 0.173). Dehiscence size only showed a statistically significant correlation with preoperative total cochlear symptoms, while remaining insignificant with all other variables measured. Air-bone gaps, VEMP and computerized tomography remain essential tools in diagnosing and following SCDS. Dehiscence size is an independent factor in the analysis of SCDS, with cochlear symptomatology being associated to dehiscence sizes. Finally, it is shown that overall symptomatology, audiometric results and VEMP thresholds return to normal values post-obliteration, confirming the continuing success of the MFC approach for SCDS obliteration.

  9. Molecular and clinical characterization of Angelman syndrome in Chinese patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, J-L; Qu, Y-J; Jin, Y-W; Wang, H; Yang, Y-L; Jiang, Y-W; Yang, X-Y; Zou, L-P; Song, F

    2014-03-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurobehavioral disorder caused by lack of function of the maternal copy of the ubiquitin-protein ligase E3A (UBE3A) gene. In our study, 49 unrelated patients with classic AS phenotypes were confirmed by methylation-specific PCR (MS-PCR) analysis, short tandem repeat linkage analysis, and mutation screening of the UBE3A gene. Among the Chinese AS patients, 83.7% (41/49) had deletions on maternal chromosome 15q11.2-13. Paternal uniparental disomy, imprinting defects, and UBE3A gene mutations each accounted for 4.1% (2/49). Two AS patients were confirmed by MS-PCR analysis, but the pathogenic mechanism was unknown because their parents' samples were unavailable. Of the two described UBE3A gene mutations, that is, p.Pro400His (c.1199C>A) and p.Asp563Gly (c.1688A>G), the latter has not been reported previously. Mutation transmission analysis showed that the p.Pro400His and p.Asp563Gly mutations originated from asymptomatic mothers. The patients with the maternal deletion showed AS clinical manifestations that were consistent with other studies. However, the incidence of microcephaly (36.7%, 11/30) was lower than that in the Caucasian population (approximately 80%), but similar to that of the Japanese population (34.5%). Our study demonstrated that the occurrence of microcephaly in AS may vary among different populations. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. INHERITED PATHOLOGY OF β2-LAMININ (PIERSON SYNDROME: CLINICAL AND GENETIC ASPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Yu. Kagan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available For the last decade a great successes were attained in the study of molecular bases of glomerular diseases. It was certain that the most frequent reasons of congenital and infantile nephrotic syndrome are mutations in the genes of NPHS1, NPHS2, and WT1. Nevertheless, until now, a number of patients, having combination of early nephrotic syndrome with inherent pathology of other organs, which etiology remains un known. These cases continue to be intensively probed. One of the most important recent achievements in understanding of molecular mechanisms of early nephrotic syndrome is the discovery of mutations of gene of LAMB2, encoding β2 laminin, as the cause of Pearson syndrome (OMIM#609049. In this article the author presents the basic genetic and clinical descriptions of this recently identified pathology. Key words: Pearson syndrome, congenital nephrotic syndrome, β2 laminin, malformation of organ of vision. (Pediatric Pharmacology. – 2010; 7(3:114-117

  11. The Diagnostic Accuracy of Clinical Diagnostic Tests for Thoracic Outlet Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hixson, Krista M; Horris, Hannah B; McLeod, Tamara C Valovich; Bacon, Cailee E Welch

    2017-09-01

    Clinical Scenario: Thoracic outlet syndrome is quite challenging to diagnose. Currently, there are myriad diagnostic procedures used in the diagnosis of all types of thoracic outlet syndrome. However, controversy exists over which diagnostic procedures produce accurate findings. Can clinical diagnostic tests accurately diagnose patients presenting with symptoms of thoracic outlet syndrome? Summary of Key Findings: A thorough literature search returned 6 possible studies; 3 studies met the inclusion criteria and were included. Two studies supported the use of clinical diagnostic tests for the diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome. One study reported high false-positive rates among clinical diagnostic tests for thoracic outlet syndrome. One study reported that clinical diagnostic test findings correlate to provocative positioned magnetic resonance imaging findings. Clinical Bottom Line: There is moderate evidence to support the use of the Halstead maneuver (also known as the costoclavicular maneuver or exaggerated military brace test), Wright's test, Cyriax Release test, and supraclavicular pressure test to have good diagnostic accuracy for the provocation of symptoms in patients presenting with upper extremity pathology. However, these clinical diagnostic tests do not appear to allow for the differential diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome exclusively. The use of the Adson's test and Roos test should be discontinued for the differential diagnosis of thoracic outlet syndrome. Strength of Recommendation: Grade B evidence exists to support the accuracy of the Halstead maneuver, Wright's test, Cyriax Release test, and supraclavicular pressure test for the diagnosis of upper extremity pathology in general. Grade C evidence exists for the use of these clinical diagnostic tests to exclusively diagnose thoracic outlet syndrome.

  12. Screening for Asperger Syndrome in School-Age Children: Issues and Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Colin; Campbell, Audrey; Keran, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Many children with Asperger syndrome are not identified prior to school entry, and difficulties associated with the condition may only become evident when a child enters school. Failure to identify children with the syndrome may lead to increased risk for psychopathology, and lack of understanding of the reasons for social and communicative…

  13. Clinical characteristics of mirror syndrome: a comparison of 10 cases of mirror syndrome with non-mirror syndrome fetal hydrops cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirata, Go; Aoki, Shigeru; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Takahashi, Tsuneo; Hirahara, Fumiki; Ishikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    To investigate clinical features of mirror syndrome. We retrospectively reviewed 71 cases of fetal hydrops with or without mirror syndrome, and compared with respect to maternal age, the body mass index, the primipara rate, the gestational age at delivery, the timing of fetal hydrops onset, the severity of fetal edema, placental swelling, the laboratory data and the fetal mortality. The data are expressed as the medians. Mirror syndrome developed in 29% (10/35) of the cases with fetal hydrops. In mirror group, the onset time of fetal hydrops was significantly earlier (29 weeks versus 31 weeks, p = 0.011), and the severity of fetal hydrops (fetal edema/biparietal diameter) was significantly higher than non-mirror group (0.23 versus 0.16, p syndrome is occurred frequently in early and severe fetal hydrops and cause hemodilution and elevation of serum hCG.

  14. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome(s) mimicking child abuse: Is there an impact on clinical practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castori, Marco

    2015-12-01

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is a heterogeneous group of heritable connective tissue disorders characterized by increased fragility of various non-ossified tissues. It is usually ascertained due to abnormal skin texture, scarring complications, vascular fragility, or chronic symptoms, such as fatigue and musculoskeletal pain. Sometimes, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome remains undetected until the patient, usually in the pediatric age, shows extensive or severe mucocutaneous injuries after only minor traumas. In this scenario, the misdiagnosis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome with child abuse is a possibility, as occasionally reported in the literature. Recently, more attention was posed by lay people between the possible association of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome and bone fragility. Literature and personal experience show a strong association between Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, generalized joint hypermobility and reduced bone mass density in older children and adults, especially fertile women. The existence of a true increased risk of fracture in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is still a matter of debate in children and adults with little and conflicting evidence. In case of suspected child abuse, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome is certainly on the differential for bruising, especially in EDS types with marked cutaneous and capillary involvement. In suspected child abuse cases, careful examination of the index case and her/his extended family is routine, as well as exclusion of other disorders such as osteogenesis imperfecta. The hypothesis of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome as an alternative explanation for infantile fractures remains speculative. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The Rare Painful Phenomena - Chronic Paroxysmal Hemicrania-tic Syndrome as a Clinically Isolated Syndrome of the Central Nervous System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubisavljevic, Srdjan; Prazic, Ana; Lazarevic, Miodrag; Stojanov, Dragan; Savic, Dejan; Vojinovic, Slobadan

    2017-02-01

    The association of paroxysmal hemicrania with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) has been described and called paroxysmal hemicrania-tic syndrome (PH-tic). We report the case of a patient diagnosed as having chronic PH-tic (CPH-tic) syndrome as a clinically isolated syndrome of the central nervous system (CNS) (CIS).A forty year old woman was admitted to our hospital suffering from right facial pain for the last 2 years. The attacks were paroxysmal, neuralgiform, consisting of throb-like sensations, which developed spontaneously or were triggered by different stimuli in right facial (maxilar and mandibular) areas. Parallel with those, she felt a throbbing orbital and frontal pain with homolateral autonomic symptoms such as conjunctival injection, lacrimation, and the feeling that the ear on the same side was full. This pain lasted most often between 15 and 20 minutes. Beyond hemifacial hypoesthesia in the region of right maxilar and mandibular nerve, the other neurological finding was normal. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study showed a T2-weighted multiple hyperintense paraventricular lesion and hyperintense lesion in the right trigeminal main sensory nucleus and root inlet, all of them being hypointense on T1-weighted image. All of these lesions were hypointense in gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. Neurophysiological studies of trigeminal nerve (somatosensory evoked potentials and blink reflex) correlated with MRI described lesions. The patient's pain bouts were improved immediately after treatment with indomethacin, and were completely relieved with lamotrigine for a longer period. According to the actual McDonald's criteria, clinical state was defined as CIS which was clinically presented by CPH-tic syndrome.Even though it is a clinical rarity and its etiology is usually idiopathic, CPH-tic syndrome can also be symptomatic. When dealing with symptomatic cases, like the one described here, when causal therapy is not possible due to the nature of the primary

  16. International Rett Syndrome Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ... Newsletters & Reports About Rett Syndrome What is Rett Syndrome? Rett Syndrome Diagnosis Boys with MECP2 Clinics FAQs Glossary ...

  17. CLINICAL AND ELECTROCARDIOGRAPHIC SYNDROMES ASSOCIATED WITH THE RISKOF SUDDENCARDIAC DEATH: PATHOGENESIS, CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS, DIAGNOSTIC CRITERIA, INDICATIONS FORGENETIC RESEARCHAND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Rezvan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE. The problem of sudden cardiac death (SCD is the most relevant in the modern cardiology , and if organic heart diseases exist, treatment strategy and prevention of SCD is developed , this problem is not solved in the patients without organic changes. Currently, a group of diseases, clinical and electrocardiographic syndromes, has emerged, that are closely associated with the formation of fatal arrhythmias. Special hazard of the course of these pathological conditions is due to the high risk of SCD, especially in young people. These diseases are not accompanied by structural changes in the myocardium and manifest themselves mainly by electrophysiological abnormalities in cardiomyocytes. Mutations in genes encoding ion channel proteins expressed in the myocardium, and their modulators, is the basis of these diseases. This fact is accounted for the unification of these diseases in the group of «channelopathies». The article presents the current diagnostic criteria for these diseases and treatments. In 2011 Guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology for genetic research in channelopathies and cardiomyopathies that have defined the indications for genetic research in this pathology, were issued

  18. A clinical perspective of obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thang S Han

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The metabolic syndrome is a condition characterized by a special constellation of reversible major risk factors for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. The main, diagnostic, components are reduced HDL-cholesterol, raised triglycerides, blood pressure and fasting plasma glucose, all of which are related to weight gain, specifically intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation and a large waist circumference. Using internationally adopted arbitrary cut-off values for waist circumference, having metabolic syndrome doubles the risk of cardiovascular disease, but offers an effective treatment approach through weight management. Metabolic syndrome now affects 30–40% of people by age 65, driven mainly by adult weight gain, and by a genetic or epigenetic predisposition to intra-abdominal/ectopic fat accumulation related to poor intra-uterine growth. Metabolic syndrome is also promoted by a lack of subcutaneous adipose tissue, low skeletal muscle mass and anti-retroviral drugs. Reducing weight by 5–10%, by diet and exercise, with or without, anti-obesity drugs, substantially lowers all metabolic syndrome components, and risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Other cardiovascular disease risk factors such as smoking should be corrected as a priority. Anti-diabetic agents which improve insulin resistance and reduce blood pressure, lipids and weight should be preferred for diabetic patients with metabolic syndrome. Bariatric surgery offers an alternative treatment for those with BMI ≥ 40 or 35–40 kg/m 2 with other significant co-morbidity. The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease is expected to rise along with the global obesity epidemic: greater emphasis should be given to effective early weight-management to reduce risk in pre-symptomatic individuals with large waists.

  19. Hypermobile Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (a.k.a. Ehlers-Danlos syndrome Type III and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome hypermobility type): Clinical description and natural history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkle, Brad; Castori, Marco; Berglund, Britta; Cohen, Helen; Grahame, Rodney; Kazkaz, Hanadi; Levy, Howard

    2017-03-01

    The hypermobile type of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (hEDS) is likely the most common hereditary disorder of connective tissue. It has been described largely in those with musculoskeletal complaints including joint hypermobility, joint subluxations/dislocations, as well as skin and soft tissue manifestations. Many patients report activity-related pain and some go on to have daily pain. Two undifferentiated syndromes have been used to describe these manifestations-joint hypermobility syndrome and hEDS. Both are clinical diagnoses in the absence of other causation. Current medical literature further complicates differentiation and describes multiple associated symptoms and disorders. The current EDS nosology combines these two entities into the hypermobile type of EDS. Herein, we review and summarize the literature as a better clinical description of this type of connective tissue disorder. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Presentation and clinical course of Wolfram (DIDMOAD) syndrome from North India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganie, M A; Laway, B A; Nisar, S; Wani, M M; Khurana, M L; Ahmad, F; Ahmed, S; Gupta, P; Ali, I; Shabir, I; Shadan, A; Ahmed, A; Tufail, S

    2011-11-01

    Wolfram syndrome, also known as DIDMOAD, is a relatively rare inherited neurodegenerative disorder, first evident in childhood as an association of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus and optic atrophy, followed by diabetes insipidus and deafness. The aim of the study was to examine the clinical profile of patients with DIDMOAD syndrome presenting to a tertiary care hospital in north India. Clinical presentation of juvenile-onset diabetes mellitus fulfilling the diagnosis of Wolfram syndrome was studied using a prepared standardized form. Subjects with juvenile-onset non-autoimmune diabetes mellitus attending the diabetic clinic at a tertiary care centre in north India were followed for 10 years and a diagnosis of fully developed Wolfram syndrome was confirmed in seven individuals. The series consisted of five male and two female patients with a mean age of 17.5 ±7.34 years. Two subjects had consanguinity and none had any other family member affected. Optic atrophy was present in all, sensorineural hearing loss in 4/7, central diabetes insipidus in 4/7 and nephrogenic diabetes insipidus in 2/7 subjects. The new associations found were: spastic myoclonus, short stature with pancreatic malabsorption, nephrogenic diabetes insipidus, cyanotic heart disease and choledocholithiasis with cholangitis. Genetic analysis revealed mutation in exon 8 of the WFS1 gene in all the cases studied. The present clinical series of Wolfram syndrome reveals a varied clinical presentation of the syndrome and some new associations. © 2011 The Authors. Diabetic Medicine © 2011 Diabetes UK.

  1. A Clinical Pharmacist's Role in Screening for Metabolic Syndrome in a Rural Pediatric Ambulatory Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Sandra; Kohler, Lisa A.; Souffrant, Garry

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The prevalence of metabolic syndrome in the pediatric population is increasing. Barriers, including the lack of consensus of a definition for metabolic syndrome and time constraints for the pediatrician, may limit the identification and diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in children. The objective of this pilot study was to evaluate the role…

  2. The clinical significance of pregnancy in Brugada syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Casado-Arroyo, Rubén; Sarkozy, Andrea; Leysen, Eva; Sieira, Juan Antonio; Namdar, Mehdi; Conte, Gulio; Levinstein, Moisés; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; de Asmundis, Carlo; Brugada, Pedro

    2014-03-01

    Little is known about the risks and outcomes of pregnancy in women with Brugada syndrome. We therefore evaluated pregnancy outcomes and the influence of pregnancy in patients with Brugada syndrome. A retrospective analysis was performed in all pregnant women with Brugada syndrome. We included 104 women with a total of 219 deliveries. There were 15 spontaneous abortions. One infant died suddenly during the night 3 months after birth. Six pregnant women reported they had experienced at least 1 syncope during the pregnancy. Of the 3 women who received an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator before the pregnancy, none received arrhythmia episodes. There were no events during the pregnancy in 4 patients with a previously aborted sudden cardiac death. Of 24 patients with syncope when not pregnant, 18 were asymptomatic and 6 experienced a recurrent syncope during the pregnancy. During the follow-up (mean follow-up 298.9 days; 95% confidence interval, 289.6-308.2), 2 women received appropriate shocks. In this retrospective, single-center study, serious events were not more frequent during pregnancy and the peripartum period in women with Brugada syndrome. The occurrence of syncope during pregnancy was not associated with a worst outcome in the peri- and postpartum periods or during follow-up. The reported rate of miscarriage and sudden infant death will require further studies to confirm or rule out its association with Brugada syndrome. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Financial conflict-of-interest policies in clinical research: issues for clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Elizabeth A; Cho, Mildred K; Bero, Lisa A

    2003-08-01

    As industry sponsorship of clinical research grows, investigators' personal financial relationships with those sponsors are under increasing scrutiny. The federal government, some states, and many universities have enacted conflict-of-interest policies to monitor and regulate investigators' financial relationships. Little is known, however, about investigators' awareness of or support for these policies or their attitudes toward regulatory efforts. To explore the possible implications of conflict-of-interest policies for clinical researchers, the authors interviewed active clinical investigators at two institutions where the conflict-of-interest policies differ. The most striking feature of the interviews was the range of perceptions and attitudes expressed by clinical investigators and their implications for administrators, professional societies, and policymakers concerned with conflicts of interest. Fewer than half of the interviewed investigators could accurately describe their campus' conflict-of-interest policy. Many investigators felt that professional societies, the public, and individual investigators were appropriate monitors of conflicts of interest. Many investigators recognized the general risks associated with conflicts of interest, but felt that they personally were not at risk. A fundamental challenge facing administrators and policymakers is to demonstrate to all investigators, both clinical and nonclinical, that the potential for bias, pressure and conflict is relevant to all investigators with industry relationships.

  4. Ethical issues in presymptomatic genetic testing for minors: a dilemma in Li-Fraumeni syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresneau, Brice; Brugières, Laurence; Caron, Olivier; Moutel, Grégoire

    2013-06-01

    In 2001, a French expert panel recommended that presymptomatic tests should not be carried out on minors in families affected by Li-Fraumeni syndrome (LFS), flying in the face of possible parental demands for such testing. We decided to investigate the legitimacy of such a recommendation. We conducted a national multicenter survey using self-administered questionnaires mailed to French oncogeneticists in 33 regional centers in France. We aimed to (1) determine the extent to which these doctors were confronted with parental requests for TP53 testing, (2) study how they responded to these requests and the arguments used and (3) assess the attitude of oncogeneticists concerning the normative framework regulating the prescription of tests for minors. Twenty oncogeneticists stated that they had managed at least one LFS family. Eleven of these doctors had been confronted with parental requests for testing and three had prescribed such tests on at least one occasion. The oncogeneticists gave balanced medical, psychological and ethical arguments, highlighting the dilemma they face in the decision-making process. This dilemma is due to the lack of a consensus concerning this recommendation, which aims to protect the minor by limiting presymptomatic tests to cases in which a clear medical benefit can be demonstrated but which prevents the unique situation of particular families from being taken into account. In conclusion, the recommendation has a normative status but first, from a clinical stance, it is difficult to dissociate it from the evaluation of individual family situations, and second, the benefit of a specific medical follow-up for TP53 mutation carriers is currently being investigated.

  5. Down syndrome and moyamoya: clinical presentation and surgical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    See, Alfred P; Ropper, Alexander E; Underberg, Daniel L; Robertson, Richard L; Scott, R Michael; Smith, Edward R

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT Moyamoya can cause cerebral ischemia and stroke in Down syndrome (DS) patients. In this study, the authors defined a surgically treated population of patients with DS and moyamoya and compared their clinical presentation, response to surgical treatment, and long-term prognosis with those of the general population of patients with moyamoya but without DS. METHODS This study was a retrospective review of a consecutive operative series of moyamoya patients with DS treated at Boston Children's Hospital from 1985 through 2012. RESULTS Thirty-two patients, average age 9.7 years (range 1.8-29.3 years), underwent surgery for moyamoya in association with DS. The majority presented with ischemic symptoms (87% stroke, 42% transient ischemic attacks). Twenty-four patients (75%) had congenital heart disease. Nineteen patients (59%) had bilateral moyamoya on presentation, and 13 presented with unilateral disease, of which 2 progressed to surgery on the opposite side at a later date. Patients were followed for a median of 7.5 years (1-20.2 years) after surgery, with no patients lost to follow-up. Follow-up arteriography demonstrated Matsushima Grade A collaterals in 29 of 39 (74%) hemispheres, Grade B in 5 (13%), and Grade C in 5 (13%). Complications included postoperative strokes in 2 patients, which occurred within 48 hours of surgery in both; one of these patients had arm weakness and the other confusion (both had recovered completely at follow-up). Seizures occurred in 5 patients perioperatively, including one who had a new seizure disorder related to hypocalcemia. CONCLUSIONS Moyamoya disease is a cause of stroke in patients with DS. Both the incidence of preoperative stroke (87% vs 67%) and the average age at diagnosis for children under age 21 (8.4 vs 6.5 years) were greater in patients with DS and moyamoya than in the general moyamoya surgical population, suggesting a possible delay in reaching a correct diagnosis of the cause of cerebral ischemia in the DS patient

  6. Molecular Characterization of Peripheral Extracellular Vesicles in Clinically Isolated Syndrome: Preliminary Suggestions from a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Nuzziello

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs, nanoparticles originated from different cell types, seem to be implicated in several cellular activities. In the Central Nervous System (CNS, glia and neurons secrete EVs and recent studies have demonstrated that the intercellular communication mediated by EVs has versatile functional impact in the cerebral homeostasis. This essential role may be due to their proteins and RNAs cargo that possibly modify the phenotypes of the targeted cells. Despite the increasing importance of EVs, little is known about their fluctuations in physiological as well as in pathological conditions. Furthermore, only few studies have investigated the contents of contemporary EVs subgroups (microvesicles, MVs and exosomes, EXOs with the purpose of discriminating between their features and functional roles. In order to possibly shed light on these issues, we performed a pilot study in which MVs and EXOs extracted from serum samples of a little cohort of subjects (patients with the first clinical evidence of CNS demyelination, also known as Clinically Isolated Syndrome and Healthy Controls were submitted to deep small-RNA sequencing. Data were analysed by an in-home bioinformatics platform. In line with previous reports, distinct classes of non-coding RNAs have been detected in both the EVs subsets, offering interesting suggestions on their origins and functions. We also verified the feasibility of this extensive molecular approach, thus supporting its valuable use for the analysis of circulating biomarkers (e.g., microRNAs in order to investigate and monitor specific diseases.

  7. The clinical aspects of the acute facet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hestbaek, Lise; Kongsted, Alice; Jensen, Tue Secher

    2009-01-01

    to agree on the number, frequency and duration of chiropractic treatment. RESULTS: Thirty-four chiropractors from nine European countries participated. They described the characteristics of an acute, uncomplicated facet syndrome as follows: local, ipsilateral pain, occasionally extending into the thigh...... that there would be no signs of neurologic involvement or antalgic posture and no aggravation of pain from sitting, flexion or coughing/sneezing. CONCLUSION: The chiropractors attending the workshop described the characteristics of an acute, uncomplicated lumbar facet syndrome in much the same way as chronic pain......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The term 'acute facet syndrome' is widely used and accepted amongst chiropractors, but poorly described in the literature, as most of the present literature relates to chronic facet joint pain. Therefore, research into the degree of consensus on the subject amongst a large...

  8. The Clinical Differentiation of Cerebellar Infarction from Common Vertigo Syndromes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson, James A

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This article summarizes the emergency department approach to diagnosing cerebellar infarction in the patient presenting with vertigo. Vertigo is defined and identification of a vertigo syndrome is discussed. The differentiation of common vertigo syndromes such as benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, Meniere’s disease, migrainous vertigo, and vestibular neuritis is summarized. Confirmation of a peripheral vertigo syndrome substantially lowers the likelihood of cerebellar infarction, as do indicators of a peripheral disorder such as an abnormal head impulse test. Approximately 10% of patients with cerebellar infarction present with vertigo and no localizing neurologic deficits. The majority of these may have other signs of central vertigo, specifically direction-changing nystagmus and severe ataxia.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:273-277.

  9. Clinical radiation diagnostics of shoulder joint impingement syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvin, Yu.P.; Logvinenko, V.V.

    2014-01-01

    46 patients about an impingement are investigated by a syndrome of a humeral joint. Among them men was 28 (60,9 %) the person, women 18 (39,1 %). Middle age of the surveyed has made 52,6 ± 2,0 year. The traditional roentgenography is executed to all patients, a spiral computer tomography - 5 (10,9 %), an ultrasonography - 44 (95,7 %), a magnetic resonance imaging - 11 (23,9 %). Operative treatment is spent 16 (34,8 %) by the patient. Direct radial symptoms are what specify an impingement of a syndrome of a humeral joint in the reasons, indirect - symptoms of an inflammation both degenerate and dystrophic changes of structures of area of a humeral joint which are involved in pathological process. The best results are given by complex radial research at which it is possible to find out direct and indirect symptoms a syndrome impingement

  10. The radiological and clinical features of Gardner's syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peters, P.E.; Gaebler, J.; Lingemann, B.; Ritter, W.; Muenster Univ.; Muenster Univ.

    1982-01-01

    Gardner's syndrome, completely expressed, consists of a trio of familial polyposis of the colon, osteomas and mesenchymal tumours of the skin. Inheritence is autosomal dominant. In many patients with familial polyposis of the colon, only mesenchymal skin tumours or osteomas can be demonstrated. It is therefore possible that Gardner's syndrome and familial polyposis represent two extremities of a single disease which is characterised by marked variability in the expressivity of the gene. Gardner's syndrome has been considered a rare condition occurring in only about 8% of patients with familial polyposis. Amongst the 20 patients with colonic polyposis from eleven families, mesenchymal and/or osseous lesions were found in seventeen (85%). Osteomas of the mandible were shown particularly frequently by orthopantomography. Since polyposis of the colon tends to remain symptomless for many years, the finding of oesteomas in the facial skeleton, or recurrent skin tumours in young patients, should lead to further investigation. (orig.) [de

  11. Impact of Parental Severe Mental Illness: Ethical and Clinical Issues for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegelhoff, Sarah F.; Ahia, C. Emmanuel

    2011-01-01

    This article draws attention to the issue of parental severe mental illness and the ethical and clinical implications for counselors who work with this population. Parents with mental illness face a multitude of life challenges including, but not limited to, parenting difficulties, medication and hospitalization, custody and placement of their…

  12. Feature Issue Introduction: Bio-Optics in Clinical Applications, Nanotechnology, and Drug Discovery

    OpenAIRE

    Nordstrom, Robert J.; Almutairi, Adah; Hillman, Elizabeth M.C.

    2010-01-01

    The editors introduce the Biomedical Optics Express feature issue, “Bio-Optics in Clinical Applications, Nanotechnology, and Drug Discovery,” which combines three technical areas from the 2010 Optical Society of America (OSA), Biomedical Optics (BIOMED) Topical Meeting held on 11–14 April in Miami, FL and includes contributions from conference attendees.

  13. Mazabraud's syndrome. New clinical case and review of findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramírez Mejía, Alex Roberto; Moreno Casado, María José; Ahumada Pavez, Nicolás Rodrigo; Rojas Soldado, María Ángeles

    Intramuscular myxomas are benign and rare tumors that affects predominantly the lower limbs. The association of myxomas and fibrous dysplasia, usually polyostotic, is rarer. This association is known as Mazabraud's syndrome, of which about 81 cases have been described in the literature. We present a new case of this uncommon association to emphasise the importance of recognizing this syndrome in the diagnosis and appropriate management of the patient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  14. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin–Siris-like syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-01-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin–Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted. PMID:28250421

  15. ANKRD11 variants cause variable clinical features associated with KBG syndrome and Coffin-Siris-like syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyatake, Satoko; Okamoto, Nobuhiko; Stark, Zornitza; Nabetani, Makoto; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Nakashima, Mitsuko; Miyake, Noriko; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Ohtake, Akira; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2017-08-01

    KBG syndrome (KBGS) is an autosomal dominant multiple congenital anomaly-intellectual disability syndrome, characterized by developmental delay with neurological involvements, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, characteristic facial dysmorphism and skeletal anomalies. Variants in ANKRD11 cause KBGS. We present five individuals from four families with ANKRD11 variants identified by whole-exome sequencing. Four of the five were clinically affected, and their diagnoses were varied. One was typical KBGS, two were Coffin-Siris syndrome-like (CSS), and one was intellectual disability with infantile spasms. One individual showed extremely mild phenotype. All individuals fulfilled the proposed diagnostic criteria for KBGS. Phenotypic features overlap between KBGS and CSS to some extent, and characteristic dental and fifth finger/toe findings can indicate differential diagnosis. These findings indicate that patients with ANKRD11 variants occupy a wide spectrum of intellectual disability, including clinically normal individuals. This is the first report highlighting the clinical overlap between KBGS and CSS and supporting the recently proposed clinical concept, in which transcriptional machineries are disrupted.

  16. Griscelli syndrome type 2 – A case report and clinical approach to silver blonde hair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sana Durrani

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Griscelli syndrome type 2 is a rare autosomal recessive disease caused by mutations in the RAB27A gene. It is characterized by pigmentary dilution of the skin and hair causing silvery gray hair, hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis and characteristic light microscopy findings in scalp hair shaft seen as large irregular clumps of pigment as opposed to the evenly distributed pigment along the hair shaft without any clumps. We describe a boy with classic features of Griscelli syndrome type 2 from Pakistan in whom a homozygous mutation in the RAB27A gene was identified that showed a single base substitution (c.598C>T predicted to cause premature protein termination (p.Arg200∗. We also present a clinical approach to silver blonde hair differentiating between the Griscelli syndrome types 1, 2 and 3, Chediak Hegashi Syndrome and Elejalde Syndrome.

  17. Practical issues regarding implementing a randomized clinical trial in a homeless population: strategies and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo-Fati, Olamide; Joseph, Anne M; Ig-Izevbekhai, Jed; Thomas, Janet L; Everson-Rose, Susan A; Pratt, Rebekah; Raymond, Nancy; Cooney, Ned L; Luo, Xianghua; Okuyemi, Kolawole S

    2017-07-05

    There is a critical need for objective data to guide effective health promotion and care for homeless populations. However, many investigators exclude homeless populations from clinical trials due to practical concerns about conducting research with this population. This report is based on our experience and lessons learned while conducting two large NIH-funded randomized controlled trials targeting smoking cessation among persons who are homeless. The current report also addresses challenges when conducting clinical trials among homeless populations and offers potential solutions. Homeless individuals face several challenges including the need to negotiate daily access to food, clothing, and shelter. Some of the critical issues investigators encounter include recruitment and retention obstacles; cognitive impairment, mental health and substance abuse disorders; transportation and scheduling challenges; issues pertaining to adequate study compensation; the need for safety protocols for study staff; and issues related to protecting the wellbeing of these potentially vulnerable adults. Anticipating realistic conditions in which to conduct studies with participants who are homeless will help investigators to design efficient protocols and may improve the feasibility of conducting clinical trials involving homeless populations and the quality of the data collected by the researchers. ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT00786149 . Registered on 5 November 2008; ClinicalTrials.gov, ID: NCT01932996 . Registered on 20 November 2014.

  18. Epidemiological and clinical aspects of the Guillain-Barre Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. van Koningsveld (Rinske)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractThe Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS) is an acute immune-mediated disorder of the peripheral nerves. The essential features are a rapidly progressive, more or less symmetrical weakness of the limbs and decreased or absent tendon reflexes. The weakness reaches its nadir (maximum severity) by

  19. Gut fermentation syndrome | Fayemiwo | African Journal of Clinical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It has been documented among few individuals who became intoxicated after consuming carbohydrates, which became fermented in the gastrointestinal tract. These claims of intoxication without drinking alcohol, and the findings on endogenous alcohol fermentation are now called Gut Fermentation Syndrome. This review ...

  20. Shaken baby syndrome: pathogenetic mechanism, clinical features and preventive aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, A; Vicedomini, D; Vega, G R; Greco, N; Messi, G

    2012-12-01

    The shaken baby syndrome (SBS) is an extremely serious form of child abuse and a leading cause of death and disability in childhood. The syndrome usually occurs in infants younger than 1 year when a parent or a care-giver tries to stop the baby from crying by vigorous manual shaking. The repetitive oscillations with rotational acceleration of the head can result in injuries of both vascular and neuronal structures. The most frequent injuries associated with SBS include encephalopathy, retinal hemorrhages, and subdural hemorrhage. Fractures of the vertebrae, long bones, and ribs may also be associated with the syndrome. Victims of abuse have various presenting signs and symptoms ranging from irritability, decreased responsiveness and lethargy to convulsions, and death. Diagnosis is often difficult because usually parents or caregivers not tell the truth about what has happened to their child and because usually there is no external evidence of trauma. However, the syndrome might be suspected if the information provided are vague or changing and when the child presents with retinal hemorrhages, subdural hematoma, or fractures that cannot be explained by accidental trauma or other medical conditions. Of infants who are victims of SBS, approximately 15% to 38% die and 30% are at risk of long-term neurologic sequelae, including cognitive and behavioural disturbances, motor and visual deficits, learning deficits and epilepsy. Parents and caregivers must be warned about the dangers of shaking infants.

  1. Exophthalmos: A Forgotten Clinical Sign of Cushing's Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Schenone Giugni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Exophthalmos is typically associated with Graves' ophthalmopathy. Although originally described by Harvey Cushing, exophthalmos is an underappreciated sign of Cushing's syndrome. We present a case of a 38-year-old female who presented with severe bilateral proptosis and was subsequently diagnosed with Cushings disease. We discuss the possible mechanisms causing exophthalmos in patients with either endogenous or exogenous hypercortisolemia.

  2. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome: Genetics, immunopathogenesis, clinical findings, and treatment modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hashemi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The hyperimmunoglobulin E syndromes (HIESs are very rare immunodeficiency syndromes with multisystem involvement, including immune system, skeleton, connective tissue, and dentition. HIES are characterized by the classic triad of high serum levels of immunoglobulin E (IgE, recurrent staphylococcal cold skin abscess, and recurrent pneumonia with pneumatocele formation. Most cases of HIES are sporadic although can be inherited as autosomal dominant and autosomal recessive traits. A fundamental immunologic defect in HIES is not clearly elucidated but abnormal neutrophil chemotaxis due to decreased production or secretion of interferon γ has main role in the immunopathogenesis of syndrome, also distorted Th1/Th2 cytokine profile toward a Th2 bias contributes to the impaired cellular immunity and a specific pattern of infection susceptibility as well as atopic-allergic constitution of syndrome. The ophthalmic manifestations of this disorder include conjunctivitis, keratitis, spontaneous corneal perforation, recurrent giant chalazia, extensive xanthelasma, tumors of the eyelid, strabismus, and bilateral keratoconus. The diagnosis of HIES is inconclusive, dependent on the evolution of a constellation of complex multisystemic symptoms and signs which develop over the years. Until time, no treatment modality is curative for basic defect in HIES, in terms of cytokines/chemokines derangement. Of note, bone marrow transplant and a monoclonal anti-IgE (omalizumab are hoped to be successful treatment in future.

  3. Clinical, paraclinical and serological findings in Susac syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jarius, Sven; Kleffner, Ilka; Dörr, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Susac syndrome (SuS) is a rare disorder thought to be caused by autoimmune-mediated occlusions of microvessels in the brain, retina and inner ear leading to central nervous system (CNS) dysfunction, visual disturbances due to branch retinal artery occlusions (BRAO), and hearing defici...

  4. The patterns of clinical presentations of cerebellar syndromes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gait-ataxia was the most common sign (83%). Cerebrovascular disease was the most common aetiology (25%). Conclusion: Cerebellar syndromes are not rare in Sudan. However, they were diagnosed more commonly at the central regions of the country probably because of more awareness of patients and better facilities

  5. Frey's syndrome - unusually long delayed clinical onset post ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cqq1a

    2010-04-07

    Apr 7, 2010 ... In this regard, e-polytetraflouroethylene (PTFE) implants represent the ideal solution because of their good biocompatibility, low tissue reactivity and their lack of resorption. The incidence of Frey's syndrome is also related to skin flap thickness in parotidectomy, with thin flaps developing significant ...

  6. Propofol Infusion Syndrome in Adults: A Clinical Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aibek E. Mirrakhimov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Propofol infusion syndrome is a rare but extremely dangerous complication of propofol administration. Certain risk factors for the development of propofol infusion syndrome are described, such as appropriate propofol doses and durations of administration, carbohydrate depletion, severe illness, and concomitant administration of catecholamines and glucocorticosteroids. The pathophysiology of this condition includes impairment of mitochondrial beta-oxidation of fatty acids, disruption of the electron transport chain, and blockage of beta-adrenoreceptors and cardiac calcium channels. The disease commonly presents as an otherwise unexplained high anion gap metabolic acidosis, rhabdomyolysis, hyperkalemia, acute kidney injury, elevated liver enzymes, and cardiac dysfunction. Management of overt propofol infusion syndrome requires immediate discontinuation of propofol infusion and supportive management, including hemodialysis, hemodynamic support, and extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in refractory cases. However, we must emphasize that given the high mortality of propofol infusion syndrome, the best management is prevention. Clinicians should consider alternative sedative regimes to prolonged propofol infusions and remain within recommended maximal dose limits.

  7. Non-invasive prenatal testing for fetal chromosome abnormalities: review of clinical and ethical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gekas, Jean; Langlois, Sylvie; Ravitsky, Vardit; Audibert, François; van den Berg, David Gradus; Haidar, Hazar; Rousseau, François

    2016-01-01

    Genomics-based non-invasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA (cfDNA screening) was proposed to reduce the number of invasive procedures in current prenatal diagnosis for fetal aneuploidies. We review here the clinical and ethical issues of cfDNA screening. To date, it is not clear how cfDNA screening is going to impact the performances of clinical prenatal diagnosis and how it could be incorporated in real life. The direct marketing to users may have facilitated the early introduction of cfDNA screening into clinical practice despite limited evidence-based independent research data supporting this rapid shift. There is a need to address the most important ethical, legal, and social issues before its implementation in a mass setting. Its introduction might worsen current tendencies to neglect the reproductive autonomy of pregnant women.

  8. Do we have to Include HCI Issues in Clinical Trials of Medical Devices?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene; Christensen, Lars Rune; Sabers, Anne

    2017-01-01

    Digital devices play an important role in medical treatment and will in the future play a larger role in connection to cures of health-related issues. Traditionally medicine has been tested by clinical double blind, randomized trials to document the efficacy and safety profile. When it comes...... to the use of digital devices in treatments the protocols from the field of medicine is adopted. The question is whether or not this evidence based approach is useful when dealing with digital devices and whether the understanding of the efficiency of a treatment can be obtained without also looking...... at usability and lifestyle issues. Based on a case study of epilepsy, a literature study of protocols for investigating treatments using digital medical devices, the set-up of studies, the design of a current protocol for clinical trials, and finally preliminary results, we discuss if clinical trials have...

  9. Genomic findings in patients with clinical suspicion of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koczkowska, Magdalena; Wierzba, Jolanta; Śmigiel, Robert; Sąsiadek, Maria; Cabała, Magdalena; Ślężak, Ryszard; Iliszko, Mariola; Kardaś, Iwona; Limon, Janusz; Lipska-Ziętkiewicz, Beata S

    2017-02-01

    Chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome, one of the most common human genomic syndromes, has highly heterogeneous clinical presentation. Patients usually harbor a 1.5 to 3 Mb hemizygous deletion at chromosome 22q11.2, resulting in pathognomic TBX1, CRKL and/or MAPK1 haploinsufficiency. However, there are some individuals with clinical features resembling the syndrome who are eventually diagnosed with genomic disorders affecting other chromosomal regions. The objective of this study was to evaluate the additive value of high-resolution array-CGH testing in the cohort of 41 patients with clinical features of 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and negative results of standard cytogenetic diagnostic testing (karyotype and FISH for 22q11.2 locus). Array-CGH analysis revealed no aberrations at chromosomes 22 or 10 allegedly related to the syndrome. Five (12.2 %) patients were found to have other genomic imbalances, namely 17q21.31 microdeletion syndrome (MIM#610443), 1p36 deletion syndrome (MIM#607872), NF1 microduplication syndrome (MIM#613675), chromosome 6pter-p24 deletion syndrome (MIM#612582) and a novel interstitial deletion at 3q26.31 of 0.65 Mb encompassing a dosage-dependent gene NAALADL2. Our study demonstrates that the implementation of array-CGH into the panel of classic diagnostic procedures adds significantly to their efficacy. It allows for detection of constitutional genomic imbalances in 12 % of subjects with negative result of karyotype and FISH targeted for 22q11.2 region. Moreover, if used as first-tier genetic test, the method would provide immediate diagnosis in ∼40 % phenotypic 22q11.2 deletion subjects.

  10. Ocular Manifestations of Noonan Syndrome: A Prospective Clinical and Genetic Study of 25 Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trier, D.C. van; Vos, A.M. de; Draaijer, R.W.; Burgt, I. van der; Draaisma, J.M.T.; Cruysberg, J.R.M.

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the full spectrum of ocular manifestations in patients with Noonan syndrome (NS). DESIGN: Prospective cross-sectional clinical and genetic study in a tertiary referral center. PARTICIPANTS: Twenty-five patients with NS (mean age, 14 years; range, 8 months-25 years) clinically

  11. Review Article: Practical Aspects of Testosterone Deficiency Syndrome in Clinical Urology

    OpenAIRE

    Hisham A. Mosli

    2012-01-01

    In this review we describe the clinical manifestations associated with testosterone deficiency in aging men, termed the testosterone deficiency syndrome (TDS). Since aging men suffer from multiple urological and andrological symptoms, TDS is an important medical condition to be suspected, recognized, clinically and biochemically diagnosed and therefore effectively and successfully treated.

  12. Location of brain lesions predicts conversion of clinically isolated syndromes to multiple sclerosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Giorgio, A.; Battaglini, M.; Rocca, M.A.; De Leucio, A.; Absinta, M.; van Schijndel, R.A.; Rovira, A.; Tintore, M.; Chard, D.; Ciccarelli, O.; Enzinger, C.; Gasperini, C.; Frederiksen, J.; Filippi, M.; Barkhof, F.; De Stefano, N.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To assess in a large population of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) the relevance of brain lesion location and frequency in predicting 1-year conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods: In thismulticenter, retrospective study, clinical andMRI data at onset and

  13. Effects of early treatment with glatiramer acetate in patients with clinically isolated syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Comi, G.; Martinelli, V.; Rodegher, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The placebo-controlled phase of the PreCISe study showed that glatiramer acetate delayed onset of clinically definite multiple sclerosis (CDMS) in patients with clinically isolated syndrome and brain lesions on MRI. Objective: To compare the effects of early versus delayed glatiramer ...

  14. "Electro-clinical syndromes" with onset in paediatric age: the highlights of the clinical-EEG, genetic and therapeutic advances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisi Pasquale

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The genetic causes underlying epilepsy remain largely unknown, and the impact of available genetic data on the nosology of epilepsy is still limited. Thus, at present, classification of epileptic disorders should be mainly based on electroclinical features. Electro-clinical syndrome is a term used to identify a group of clinical entities showing a cluster of electro-clinical characteristics, with signs and symptoms that together define a distinctive, recognizable, clinical disorder. These often become the focus of treatment trials as well as of genetic, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging investigations. They are distinctive disorders identifiable on the basis of a typical age onset, specific EEG characteristics, seizure types, and often other features which, when taken together, permit a specific diagnosis which, in turn, often has implications for treatment, management, and prognosis. Each electro-clinical syndrome can be classified according to age at onset, cognitive and developmental antecedents and consequences, motor and sensory examinations, EEG features, provoking or triggering factors, and patterns of seizure occurrence with respect to sleep. Therefore, according to the age at onset, here we review the more frequently observed paediatric electro-clinical syndrome from their clinical-EEG, genetic and therapeutic point of views.

  15. Cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature of medulloblastoma: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Otaibi Faisal

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Medulloblastoma is one of the most common pediatric brain malignancies. The usual presenting clinical features are related to posterior fossa syndrome or/and hydrocephalus. Cauda equina syndrome is a very rare presentation for this disease. Case presentation We describe the case of a three-year-old boy with cauda equina syndrome as the initial presenting clinical feature for medulloblastoma. He was initially diagnosed as having a spinal tumor by magnetic resonance imaging scan. Subsequently, a cranial magnetic resonance imaging scan revealed a posterior fossa tumor with features of dissemination. He had substantial improvement after treatment. This case report is complemented by a literature review related to this unusual presentation. Conclusions Medulloblastoma primarily presenting with cauda equina syndrome is very rare. However, spinal drop metastasis should be considered in the pediatric age group to avoid suboptimal management.

  16. Clinical presentation and treatment of bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Nagendra Nath

    2015-10-01

    Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is a chronic disease characterized by pelvic pain urgency and frequency. Patients with severe symptoms lead a very miserable life. North American, European and Asian guidelines have been recently promulgated but they differ on many important issues. There is no consensus on its name, definition, investigations and management. Indian guidelines have also been developed and they give more importance to the symptoms in relation to micturition. Though initially believed to be rare or non-existent in India the situation has changed. In Indian patients the presentation is more or less same as the rest of the world but a large percentage have obstructive symptoms and unusual urinary symptoms. Anal discomfort is also common. In India the commonest investigation in all cases of lower urinary tract (LUT) dysfunction is ultrasonography of kidney ureter and bladder with measurement of the post void residual urine volume. Cystoscopy is also done in all the cases to rule out presence of tuberculosis or carcinoma in situ. Bladder pain syndrome/interstitial cystitis (BPS/IC) is not considered to be a clinical disease as it is difficult to rule out all differential diagnosis only from history. Hunner's lesion is very rare. Cystoscopy with hydro distension, oral therapy, intravesical therapy and surgical therapy form the back bone of management. It is difficult to know which treatment is best for a given patient. A staged protocol is followed and all the treatment modalities are applied to the patients in a sequential fashion-starting from the non-invasive to more invasive. Intravesical botox has not been found to be effective and there is no experience with interstim neuromodulation.

  17. Methodological issues in the study of intestinal microbiota in irritable bowel syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taverniti, Valentina; Guglielmetti, Simone

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is an intestinal functional disorder with the highest prevalence in the industrialized world. The intestinal microbiota (IM) plays a role in the pathogenesis of IBS and is not merely a consequence of this disorder. Previous research efforts have not revealed unequivocal microbiological signatures of IBS, and the experimental results are contradictory. The experimental methodologies adopted to investigate the complex intestinal ecosystem drastically impact the quality and significance of the results. Therefore, to consider the methodological aspects of the research on IM in IBS, we reviewed 29 relevant original research articles identified through a PubMed search using three combinations of keywords: "irritable bowel syndrome + microflora", "irritable bowel syndrome + microbiota" and "irritable bowel syndrome + microbiome". For each study, we reviewed the quality and significance of the scientific evidence obtained with respect to the experimental method adopted. The data obtained from each study were compared with all considered publications to identify potential inconsistencies and explain contradictory results. The analytical revision of the studies referenced in the present review has contributed to the identification of microbial groups whose relative abundance significantly alters IBS, suggesting that these microbial groups could be IM signatures for this syndrome. The identification of microbial biomarkers in the IM can be advantageous for the development of new diagnostic tools and novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of different subtypes of IBS.

  18. Beals syndrome (congenital contractural arachnodactyly in children: Clinical symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Semyachkina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a rare monogenic connective tissue disease from a group of fibrillinopathies with autosomal dominant inheritance — Beals syndrome caused by a mutation in the FBN2 gene. Attention is drawn to the high phenotypic similarity of this disease and Marfan syndrome (FBN1 gene mutation, which is associated with the almost complete identity of two proteins: fibrillin 1 and fibrillin 2.The paper describes a clinical case of a child with Beals syndrome and the typical manifestations of the disease: asthenic constitution, arachnodactyly of the hands and feet, congenital contractures of the large and small joints, chest deformity, kyphoscoliosis, talpes, and crushed ears. The investigators made a differential diagnosis with other connective tissue diseases, such as Marfan syndrome, Stickler syndrome, Ehlers–Danlos syndrome, homocystenuria, and arthrogryposis. DNA diagnosis verified the Beals syndrome in the proband. Exon 28 in the FBN2 gene showed the previously undescribed missense mutation of c.3719G>A, resulting in the amino acid substitution of cysteine for tyrosine (p.Cys1240Tyr in the structure of the protein fibrillin 2. A de novo mutation occurred. There is evidence for its pathogenicity in the development of the clinical symptoms of the disease. The problems of effective medical genetic counseling in this family are discussed. 

  19. MR diagnosis and clinical management of whiplash injury syndrome of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Shixu; Lin Daiying; Wu Xianheng; Zeng Xianting

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To study the MR manifestations of whiplash injury syndrome of spinal cord. Methods: MR images of 21 cases diagnosed as whiplash injury syndrome were retrospectively studied. Those images included transverse and sagittal views and coronal scan had been performed in some cases. Results: MRI inspection safely and objectively reveals the extent of the spinal injury, and helps the anticipation of the prognosis. Conclusion: MRI is the first choice of the imaging modalities assessing the whiplash injury syndrome of the spinal cord. An early diagnosis is valuable to clinical management and rehabilitation

  20. Ellis-van Creveld syndrome in adulthood: extending the clinical spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Andreu, Joaquín; Ray, Victor Glenn; Arribas, José María; Sánchez, Sergio Juan

    2015-06-01

    Ellis-van Creveld (EvC) syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive malformation disorder. Cardiac defects are observed in about 50% of EvC cases. Surgical data is lacking on the prognosis and life expectancy of EvC patients. Herein, we report the case of a 38-year-old man with EvC syndrome who underwent two surgical corrections for cardiac anomalies. This report supplements the available information on the clinical course of EvC syndrome in older patients.

  1. Evaluation of signalment, clinical, and laboratory variables as prognostic indicators in dogs with acute abdominal syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    SIMEONOVA, Galina; DINEV, Dinko; CHAPRAZOV, Tzvetan; ROYDEV, Rumen

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to identify predictors of mortality and to propose a new severity scoring system in dogs with acute abdominal syndrome. A retrospective study was carried out on 58 dogs presented with acute abdominal syndrome with American Society of Anesthesiologists grades III-IV and treated surgically by exploratory laparotomy. Medical records were reviewed and information regarding dog signalment, history, clinical, and laboratory data; surgical findings; and outcome was collected...

  2. Serologic features of primary Sjögren’s syndrome: clinical and prognostic correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Carrasco, Mario; Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Jiménez-Hernández, César; Jiménez-Hernández, Mario; Nava-Zavala, Arnulfo; Riebeling, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome (SS) is a chronic inflammatory systemic autoimmune disease. The disease spectrum extends from sicca syndrome to systemic involvement and extraglandular manifestations, and SS may be associated with malignancies, especially non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Patients with SS present a broad spectrum of serologic features. Certain serological findings are highly correlated with specific clinical features, and can be used as prognostic markers. PMID:23525186

  3. Clinical variables determining the success of adenotonsillectomy in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, Maíra; Ferraz, Renata Caroline Mendonça; Guo Chen, Vitor; Antonio Moreira, Gustavo; Raimundo Fujita, Reginaldo

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the evolution of polysomnographic parameters of children with Down syndrome and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome submitted to adenotonsillectomy and the interaction of comorbidities on therapeutic outcome. Ninety patients with Down syndrome and habitual snoring were identified between 2005 and 2015 in a Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology Clinic. Parent's complaints were evaluated by the test of equality of two proportions. Wilcoxon test was used to examine pre- and post-operative polysomnographic differences. Mann-Whitney test evaluated the influence of comorbidities. A p syndrome in 29.6% of children with Down syndrome. Nineteen patients (70.4%) remained with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and 44.4% showed a reduction of at least 50% of obstructive apnea-hypopnea index. Central apnea index post-adenotonsillectomy was worse in patients with heart disease (p = 0.022). Sleep efficiency (p = 0.031), N1 sleep stage (p = 0.001), apnea-hypopnea index (p = 0.023), and central apnea index (p = 0.008) were worse after surgery in patients with hypothyroidism. Patients with severe OSAS showed significant improvement in polysomnographic parameters after surgery. Although adenotonsillectomy improved symptoms and objective sleep data in children with Down syndrome, it was not able to resolve obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in most patients. Congenital heart diseases and hypothyroidism may affect the outcome. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Reward circuitry dysfunction in psychiatric and neurodevelopmental disorders and genetic syndromes: animal models and clinical findings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dichter Gabriel S

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review summarizes evidence of dysregulated reward circuitry function in a range of neurodevelopmental and psychiatric disorders and genetic syndromes. First, the contribution of identifying a core mechanistic process across disparate disorders to disease classification is discussed, followed by a review of the neurobiology of reward circuitry. We next consider preclinical animal models and clinical evidence of reward-pathway dysfunction in a range of disorders, including psychiatric disorders (i.e., substance-use disorders, affective disorders, eating disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorders, neurodevelopmental disorders (i.e., schizophrenia, attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, autism spectrum disorders, Tourette’s syndrome, conduct disorder/oppositional defiant disorder, and genetic syndromes (i.e., Fragile X syndrome, Prader–Willi syndrome, Williams syndrome, Angelman syndrome, and Rett syndrome. We also provide brief overviews of effective psychopharmacologic agents that have an effect on the dopamine system in these disorders. This review concludes with methodological considerations for future research designed to more clearly probe reward-circuitry dysfunction, with the ultimate goal of improved intervention strategies.

  5. Clinical presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents: Is there an age effect?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribolsi, Michele; Lin, Ashleigh; Wardenaar, Klaas J; Pontillo, Maria; Mazzone, Luigi; Vicari, Stefano; Armando, Marco

    2017-06-01

    There is limited research on clinical features related to age of presentation of the Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome in children and adolescents (CAD). Based on findings in CAD with psychosis, we hypothesized that an older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome would be associated with less severe symptoms and better psychosocial functioning than presentation in childhood or younger adolescence. Ninety-four CAD (age 9-18) meeting Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome criteria participated in the study. The sample was divided and compared according to the age of presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome (9-14 vs 15-18 years). The predictive value of age of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome presentation was investigated using receiver operating characteristic (ROC)-curve calculations. The two Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome groups were homogeneous in terms of gender distribution, IQ scores and comorbid diagnoses. Older Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome patients showed better functioning and lower depressive scores. ROC curves revealed that severity of functional impairment was best predicted using an age of presentation cut-off of 14.9 years for social functioning and 15.9 years for role functioning. This study partially confirmed our hypothesis; older age at presentation of Attenuated Psychosis Syndrome was associated with less functional impairment, but age was not associated with psychotic symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Klinefelter syndrome, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and diabetes: review of literature and clinical perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salzano, Andrea; D'Assante, Roberta; Heaney, Liam M; Monaco, Federica; Rengo, Giuseppe; Valente, Pietro; Pasquali, Daniela; Bossone, Eduardo; Gianfrilli, Daniele; Lenzi, Andrea; Cittadini, Antonio; Marra, Alberto M; Napoli, Raffaele

    2018-03-23

    Klinefelter syndrome (KS), the most frequent chromosomic abnormality in males, is associated with hypergonadotropic hypogonadism and an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The mechanisms involved in increasing risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality are not completely understood. This review summarises the current understandings of the complex relationship between KS, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular risk in order to plan future studies and improve current strategies to reduce mortality in this high-risk population. We searched PubMed, Web of Science, and Scopus for manuscripts published prior to November 2017 using key words "Klinefelter syndrome" AND "insulin resistance" OR "metabolic syndrome" OR "diabetes mellitus" OR "cardiovascular disease" OR "testosterone". Manuscripts were collated, studied and carried forward for discussion where appropriate. Insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes are more frequently diagnosed in KS than in the general population; however, the contribution of hypogonadism to metabolic derangement is highly controversial. Whether this dangerous combination of risk factors fully explains the CVD burden of KS patients remains unclear. In addition, testosterone replacement therapy only exerts a marginal action on the CVD system. Since fat accumulation and distribution seem to play a relevant role in triggering metabolic abnormalities, an early diagnosis and a tailored intervention strategy with drugs aimed at targeting excessive visceral fat deposition appear necessary in patients with KS.

  7. [About History of Scientific Clinical Schools in Russia: Certain Disputable Issues of Methodology of Studying Problem].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borodulin, V I; Gliantsev, S P

    2017-07-01

    The article considers particular key methodological aspects of problem of scientific clinical school in national medicine. These aspects have to do with notion of school, its profile, issues of pedagogues, teachings and followers, subsidiary schools and issue of ethical component of scientific school. The article is a polemic one hence one will find no definite answers to specified questions. The reader is proposed to ponder over answers independently adducing examples of pro and contra. The conclusion is made about necessity of studying scientific schools in other areas of medicine and further elaboration of problem.

  8. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Metabolic Syndrome: Current Understanding and Potential Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenichi Matsushita

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic syndrome is an obesity-based, complicated clinical condition that has become a global epidemic problem with a high associated risk for cardiovascular disease and mortality. Dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes or glucose dysmetabolism are the major factors constituting metabolic syndrome, and these factors are interrelated and share underlying pathophysiological mechanisms. Severe obesity predisposes individuals to metabolic syndrome, and recent data suggest that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs contribute significantly to adipocyte generation by increasing the number of adipocytes. Accordingly, an increasing number of studies have examined the potential roles of MSCs in managing obesity and metabolic syndrome. However, despite the growing bank of experimental and clinical data, the efficacy and the safety of MSCs in the clinical setting are still to be optimized. It is thus hoped that ongoing and future studies can elucidate the roles of MSCs in metabolic syndrome and lead to MSC-based therapeutic options for affected patients. This review discusses current understanding of the relationship between MSCs and metabolic syndrome and its potential implications for patient management.

  9. General anaesthesia in an adult patient with Morquio syndrome with emphasis on airway issues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lajla Kadić

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Patients with Morquio syndrome possess a number of characteristics which may complicate an anaesthetic procedure. The most important is that a deposition of mucopolysaccharides in the soft tissues of the oro-pharynx distorts the airway, making the airway management difficult, while the atlanto-axial instability puts these patients at risk of subluxation and quadriparesis.As the endotracheal intubation in Morquio syndrome patients may be difficult or even impossible, we recommend the technique of awake fiberoptic intubation to be considered.Our approach to awake fiberoptic intubation in an adult patient is described in this case report.

  10. Normal-weight obesity syndrome: diagnosis, prevalence, and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Lana P; Morais, Carla C; Cominetti, Cristiane

    2016-09-01

    The growing concern about the impact of overweight on health has led to studies that shed light on types of obesity other than the classic model based on body mass index. Normal-weight obesity syndrome is characterized by excess body fat in individuals with adequate body mass index (18.5-24.9 kg/m(2)). This condition increases the risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality and other conditions associated with chronic diseases, such as insulin resistance, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The aims of this review are to define the diagnostic criteria for normal-weight obesity syndrome and to examine the risks associated with this condition in order to promote preventive measures and early treatment for affected individuals. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. [Adipocytokines and metabolic syndrome--molecular mechanism and clinical implication].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, Morihiro; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2004-06-01

    Recent progress in adipocyte-biology shows that adipocytes are not merely fat-storing cells but that they secrete a variety of hormones, cytekines, growth factors and other bioactive substabces, conceptualized as adipocytokines. These include plasminogen activator inhibitor 1(PAI-1), tumor necrosis factor(TNF-alpha), leptin and adiponectin. Dysregulated productions of these adipocytekines participate in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated metabolic syndrome such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and vascular diseases. Increased productions of PAI-1 and TNF-alpha from accumulated fat contribute to the formation of thrombosis and insulin resistance in obesity, respectively. Lack of leptin causes metabolic syndrome. Adiponectin exerts insulin-sensitizing and anti-atherogenic effects, hence decrease of plasma adiponectin is causative for insulin resistance and atherosclerosis in obesity.

  12. Pearson marrow pancreas syndrome: a molecular study and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seneca, S; De Meirleir, L; De Schepper, J; Balduck, N; Jochmans, K; Liebaers, I; Lissens, W

    1997-05-01

    Human mitochondrial DNA (mt DNA) lesions can cause a heterogeneous group of mitochondrial degenerative disorders. We report on a 5-year-old patient suffering from the full-blown picture of Pearson syndrome. His symptoms started in the first year of life with failure to thrive, followed by chronic diarrhoea and lactic acidosis at 18 months of age. Analysis of mitochondrial DNA revealed large amounts of mt DNA molecules with a 2.7 kb deletion in all tissues examined. The diagnosis of Pearson syndrome was made initially in the absence of haematological disturbances. In the following months neutropenia, sideroblastic anaemia and hypoparathyroidism developed. Daily administration of dichloroacetate (DCA) and bicarbonate controls the lactic acidosis, while episodic treatments with filgastrim (Neupogen) reverse episodes of severe neutropenia. Calcium and vitamin D supplementation compensate for the hypoparathyroidism. Chronic administration of DCA and supportive treatment for a long period help to stabilize patients with multiorgan dysfunction.

  13. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: clinical, radiological and sonographic findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berrocal, T. [Servicio de Radiologia Pediatrica, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain); Simon, M.J. [Servicio de Radiologia Pediatrica, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain); Al-Assir, I. [Servicio de Radiologia Pediatrica, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain); Prieto, C. [Servicio de Radiologia Pediatrica, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain); Pastor, I. [Servicio de Radiologia Pediatrica, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain); Pablo, L. de [Servicio de Radiologia Pediatrica, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain); Lama, R. [Servicio de Gastroenterologia, Hospital Infantil `La Paz`, Madrid (Spain)

    1995-07-01

    Six children with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome have been diagnosed and treated in our hospital since 1986. We describe the radiological and sonographic findings of this rare disease, which is characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, neutropenia and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. It presents with varying extremity shortening, ``cup`` deformation of the ribs, metaphyseal widening and hypoplasia of the iliac bones, as well as increased echogenicity of the normal-sized pancreas. We discuss the differential diagnosis and review the literature. (orig.)

  14. Barber-Say syndrome: further delineation of the clinical spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cortés Fanny M.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available We report on a 14-year-old girl who presented a multiple congenital anomaly pattern: ablepharon, hypertelorism, telecanthus, macrostomia, helix agenesis of both ears, redundant thick skin and severe hirsutism, the 5th reported case of Barber-Say syndrome. Our patient had almost the same phenotype as that of the patient cited by Martínez Santana et al. (Am. J. Med. Genet. 47: 20-23, 1993 including the same until then undescribed dermatoglyphic pattern.

  15. Shwachman-Diamond syndrome: clinical, radiological and sonographic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berrocal, T.; Simon, M.J.; Al-Assir, I.; Prieto, C.; Pastor, I.; Pablo, L. de; Lama, R.

    1995-01-01

    Six children with Shwachman-Diamond syndrome have been diagnosed and treated in our hospital since 1986. We describe the radiological and sonographic findings of this rare disease, which is characterized by metaphyseal chondrodysplasia, neutropenia and exocrine pancreatic insufficiency. It presents with varying extremity shortening, ''cup'' deformation of the ribs, metaphyseal widening and hypoplasia of the iliac bones, as well as increased echogenicity of the normal-sized pancreas. We discuss the differential diagnosis and review the literature. (orig.)

  16. Rett Syndrome and the Ongoing Legacy of Close Clinical Observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoghbi, Huda Y

    2016-10-06

    This year marks the 50 th anniversary of the publication of Andreas Rett's report on 22 girls who developed a peculiar and devastating neurological disorder that later came to bear his name. On this occasion, we reflect on the progress that has occurred in understanding Rett Syndrome, development of potential treatments, and the ramifications that Rett research has had on the fields of neurobiology and genetics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cracked tooth syndrome--incidence, clinical findings and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homewood, C I

    1998-08-01

    Cracked tooth syndrome (CTS) is a common occurrence in modern general practice. This article reviews the forces placed on the human dentition and the effect restorative dentistry has on the strength of tooth structure. The study reports on the incidence of CTS in a general practice, finding a far higher incidence in teeth which have had the marginal ridge restored than those which have not. The various types of treatment modalities advocated and their relative merits are discussed.

  18. The entry-level occupational therapy clinical doctorate: advantages, challenges, and international issues to consider.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Ted; Crabtree, Jeffrey L; Mu, Keli; Wells, Joe

    2015-04-01

    Internationally, occupational therapy education has gone through several paradigm shifts during the last few decades, moving from certificate to diploma to bachelors to masters and now in some instances to clinical doctorate as the entry-level professional credential to practice. In the United States there is a recommendation under consideration by the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) that by 2025, all occupational therapy university programs will move to the clinical doctorate level. It should be noted, however, that the AOTA Board can only make recommendations and it is the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) who has regulatory authority to approve such a change. What are the potential implications for the profession, our clients, and funders of occupational therapy services? What are the primary drivers for the move towards the clinical doctorate being the educational entry point? Is the next step in the evolution of occupational therapy education globally a shift to the entry-level clinical doctorate? This article reviews current literature and discusses issues about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate. The published evidence available about the occupational therapy entry-level clinical doctorate is summarized and the perceived or frequently cited pros and cons of moving to the clinical doctorate as the singular entry point to occupational therapy practice are considered. The potential impacts of the introduction of the clinical doctorate as the entry-to-practice qualification across the United States on the occupational therapy community internationally will be briefly discussed. If the United States moves toward the entry-level clinical doctorate as the only educational starting point for the profession, will other jurisdictions follow suit? Further discourse and investigation of this issue both inside and outside of the United States is needed so that informed decisions can be made.

  19. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: Clinical and molecular aspects of recently identified kidney cancer syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasumi, Hisashi; Baba, Masaya; Hasumi, Yukiko; Furuya, Mitsuko; Yao, Masahiro

    2016-03-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is an autosomal dominantly inherited disease that predisposes patients to develop fibrofolliculoma, lung cysts and bilateral multifocal renal tumors, histologically hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma, oncocytoma, papillary renal cell carcinoma and clear cell renal cell carcinoma. The predominant forms of Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome-associated renal tumors, hybrid oncocytic/chromophobe tumors and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma are typically less aggressive, and a therapeutic principle for these tumors is a surgical removal with nephron-sparing. The timing of surgery is the most critical element for postoperative renal function, which is one of the important prognostic factors for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome patients. The folliculin gene (FLCN) that is responsible for Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome was isolated as a novel tumor suppressor for kidney cancer. Recent studies using murine models for FLCN, a protein encoded by the FLCN gene, and its two binding partners, folliculin-interacting protein 1 (FNIP1) and folliculin-interacting protein 2 (FNIP2), have uncovered important roles for FLCN, FNIP1 and FNIP2 in cell metabolism, which include AMP-activated protein kinase-mediated energy sensing, Ppargc1a-driven mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and mTORC1-dependent cell proliferation. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome is a hereditary hamartoma syndrome, which is triggered by metabolic alterations under a functional loss of FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 complex, a critical regulator of kidney cell proliferation rate; a mechanistic insight into the FLCN/FNIP1/FNIP2 pathway could provide us a basis for developing new therapeutics for kidney cancer. © 2015 The Japanese Urological Association.

  20. Long-term clinical course of Glut1 deficiency syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alter, Aliza S; Engelstad, Kristin; Hinton, Veronica J; Montes, Jacqueline; Pearson, Toni S; Akman, Cigdem I; De Vivo, Darryl C

    2015-02-01

    Our objective is to characterize the long-term course of Glut1 deficiency syndrome. Longitudinal outcome measures, including Columbia Neurological Scores, neuropsychological tests, and adaptive behavior reports, were collected for 13 participants with Glut1 deficiency syndrome who had been followed for an average of 14.2 (range = 8.9-23.6) years. A parent questionnaire assessed manifestations throughout development. The 6-Minute Walk Test captured gait disturbances and triggered paroxysmal exertional dyskinesia. All longitudinal outcomes remained stable over time. Epilepsy dominated infancy and improved during childhood. Dystonia emerged during childhood or adolescence. Earlier introduction of the ketogenic diet correlated with better long-term outcomes on some measures. Percent-predicted 6-Minute Walk Test distance correlated significantly with Columbia Neurological Scores. We conclude that Glut1 deficiency syndrome is a chronic condition, dominated by epilepsy in infancy and by movement disorders thereafter. Dietary treatment in the first postnatal months may effect improved outcomes, emphasizing the importance of early diagnosis and treatment. © The Author(s) 2014.

  1. Cushing's syndrome: from physiological principles to diagnosis and clinical care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel; Carroll, Ty

    2015-01-01

    The physiological control of cortisol synthesis in the adrenal cortex involves stimulation of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) by hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and then stimulation of the adrenal by ACTH. The control loop of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis is closed by negative feedback of cortisol on the hypothalamus and pituitary. Understanding this system is required to master the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of endogenous hypercortisolism – Cushing's syndrome. Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is caused either by excess ACTH secretion or by autonomous cortisol release from the adrenal cortex. Diagnosis of cortisol excess exploits three physiological principles: failure to achieve the normal nadir in the cortisol diurnal rhythm, loss of sensitivity of ACTH-secreting tumours to cortisol negative feedback, and increased excretion of free cortisol in the urine. Differentiating a pituitary source of excess ACTH (Cushing's disease) from an ectopic source is accomplished by imaging the pituitary and sampling for ACTH in the venous drainage of the pituitary. With surgical removal of ACTH or cortisol-secreting tumours, secondary adrenal insufficiency ensues because of the prior suppression of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid negative feedback. Medical therapy is targeted to the anatomical location of the dysregulated component of the HPA axis. Future research will focus on new diagnostics and treatments of Cushing's syndrome. These are elegant examples of translational research: understanding basic physiology informs the development of new approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Appreciating pathophysiology generates new areas for inquiry of basic physiological and biochemical mechanisms. PMID:25480800

  2. Association of glucocorticoid receptor polymorphisms with clinical and metabolic profiles in polycystic ovary syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo A.Rosa Maciel

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: We aimed to investigate whether glucocorticoid receptor gene polymorphisms are associated with clinical and metabolic profiles in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. Polycystic ovary syndrome is a complex endocrine disease that affects 5-8% of women and may be associated with metabolic syndrome, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Cortisol action and dysregulation account for metabolic syndrome development in the general population. As glucocorticoid receptor gene (NR3C1 polymorphisms regulate cortisol sensitivity, we hypothesized that variants of this gene may be involved in the adverse metabolic profiles of patients with polycystic ovary syndrome. METHOD: Clinical, metabolic and hormonal profiles were evaluated in 97 patients with polycystic ovary syndrome who were diagnosed according to the Rotterdam criteria. The alleles of the glucocorticoid gene were genotyped. Association analyses were performed using the appropriate statistical tests. RESULTS: Obesity and metabolic syndrome were observed in 42.3% and 26.8% of patients, respectively. Body mass index was positively correlated with blood pressure, triglyceride, LDL-c, total cholesterol, glucose and insulin levels as well as HOMA-IR values and inversely correlated with HDL-c and SHBG levels. The BclI and A3669G variants were found in 24.7% and 13.4% of alleles, respectively. BclI carriers presented a lower frequency of insulin resistance compared with wild-type subjects. CONCLUSION: The BclI variant is associated with a lower frequency of insulin resistance in women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Glucocorticoid gene polymorphism screening during treatment of the syndrome may be useful for identifying subgroups of at-risk patients who would benefit the most from personalized treatment.

  3. Clinical Education, the lessons learned from practical applications - Albanian issues, East Europe and the advanced international practices on Clinical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alban Koci

    2015-01-01

    In legal clinics, students perform various tasks just as an attorney would do in the same job position, such as doing legal research, drafting briefs and other legal documents, and interviewing clients. Many jurisdictions even allow students to appear in court on behalf of clients, even in criminal defense. Legal clinics is part of the academic law program in the most of the law faculties all over the world and it has a great impact in the community’s life. Throughout legal clinics students not only get the opportunity to be part of an important experience, but also they can be effective and help the people in need with their work. This paper aims to bring attention to the importance of clinical education in the formation of young lawyers and how one can learn from experience. There will be discussed important issues about legal clinic, the objectives and its mission, how to apply it and the benefits legal clinic brings not only for the academic area but also for the society.

  4. Predicting outcome in clinically isolated syndrome using machine learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Wottschel

    2015-01-01

    Machine-learning-based classifications can be used to provide an “individualised” prediction of conversion to MS from subjects' baseline scans and clinical characteristics, with potential to be incorporated into routine clinical practice.

  5. First-trimester Screening for Down Syndrome and Other Aneuploidies : Methodological Issues

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.N.A.C.M. Heesch van (Peter)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Down syndrome, which is synonymous with trisomy 21 (47, +21), is the most common chromosomal anomaly in live born children. In 1866 John Langdon Down first described children with common phenotypically features distinct from other children with mental retardation .

  6. Ethical and Legal Issues Regarding Selective Abortion of Fetuses with Down Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glover, Noreen M.; Glover, Samuel J.

    1996-01-01

    Selective abortion of fetuses with Down syndrome is discussed in terms of abortion perspectives, genetic testing, legislation, and ethical principles. The ethical principles of autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, fidelity, and justice are offered as guidelines for the examination of legal standards imposed by legislation. (Author/PB)

  7. Clinical characteristics and outcome of the capsular warning syndrome: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camps-Renom, Pol; Delgado-Mederos, Raquel; Martínez-Domeño, Alejandro; Prats-Sánchez, Luís; Cortés-Vicente, Elena; Simón-Talero, Manuel; Arboix, Adrià; Ois, Ángel; Purroy, Francisco; Martí-Fàbregas, Joan

    2015-06-01

    The capsular warning syndrome is defined as recurrent transient lacunar syndromes that usually precede a capsular infarction. Several aspects regarding the clinical management are controversial. We report the clinical and radiological characteristics of a multicenter series of patients with capsular warning syndrome, as well as their functional outcome during the follow-up. We sought to describe the clinico-radiological spectrum of the capsular warning syndrome and to report the functional outcomes and recurrences of these patients during the follow-up. We conducted a multicenter study that collected clinical and radiological data from patients with capsular warning syndrome during 2003-2013. Capsular warning syndrome was defined as the succession of three or more motor or sensory-motor lacunar syndromes within a period of 72 h, with complete recovery between them. We recorded the functional outcome (favorable when Rankin scale score ≤2) and recurrences during follow-up. Our study included 42 patients whose mean age was 66.4 ± 10 years; 71.4% of them were men. The mean number of episodes before a permanent neurological impairment occurred or before a complete recovery of symptoms was 5.1 ± 2.3. Up to 30 patients (71.2%) had an acute infarct visible on the neuroimaging (computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging). The internal capsule was the most frequent infarct location (50%), but other locations were noted. Twelve patients (28.6%) received thrombolysis in the acute phase. A favorable outcome was observed in 39 patients (92.9%). After a mean follow-up of 35 ± 29 months, only one patient suffered a recurrent ischemic stroke. Capsular warning syndrome preceded an ischemic infarction in 71.2% of patients. In addition to the internal capsule, other locations were noted. The most effective treatment remains unclear. The functional prognosis is favorable in most patients and recurrences are rare. © 2014 World Stroke Organization.

  8. Clinical characteristics of two probable cases of Angelman syndrome in the Hospital Nacional de Ninos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Midence-Cerda, Marvin; Brian-Gago, Roberto

    2004-01-01

    Angelman Syndrome is a severe neurological disorder. No other case has been reported in our country until now. There are two children reported with the clinical suspicion of Angelman Syndrome. They were treated at the Departamento de Neurologia del Hospital Nacional de Ninos. The information was taken from their medical records. The two patients present the four cardinal clinical features, including severe developmental delay, profound speech impairment, ataxia and a happy, sociable disposition. In addition, the patients displayed other characteristics: seizures associated with a typical spike and slow wave activity on EEG an love for water. The clinical diagnosis is difficult because other disorders can mimic the features of Angelman Syndrome. Nonetheless, at an early age, the behavioral phenotype of happy disposition and hyperexcitability is the most important manifestation and appears to be decisive in the differential diagnosis of patients with psychomotor and language delay. (author) [es

  9. T4 syndrome - A distinct theoretical concept or elusive clinical entity? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirai, Patricia Miyuki; Thomson, Oliver P

    2016-10-01

    T4 syndrome has existed as a clinical concept for more than three decades and it has been identified as a source of upper extremity (UE) symptoms. This case report explores the clinical reasoning in the diagnoses and management of a patient with symptoms consistent with T4-type syndrome and critically discusses the concept of T4 syndrome using recent research to help explain the clinical presentation. Manual therapy treatment focused on stimulation of the sympathetic ganglia, decreasing local upper thoracic pain and UE referral pattern noted during passive examination. The successful outcomes included immediate and lasting symptom relief after upper thoracic spinal manipulation. Although treatment has been based on the theory that mechanical thoracic dysfunction can produce sympathetic nervous system (SNS) referred pain, the role the sympathetic reflexes potentially plays on the referral symptoms to the UE presently remains unclear. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Seizure treatment in Angelman syndrome: A case series from the Angelman Syndrome Clinic at Massachusetts General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaaya, Elias A; Grocott, Olivia R; Laing, Olivia; Thibert, Ronald L

    2016-07-01

    Epilepsy is a common feature of Angelman syndrome (~80-90%), with the most common seizure types including myoclonic, atonic, atypical absence, focal, and generalized tonic-clonic. Seizure types are similar among the various genetic subtypes, but epilepsy in those with maternal deletions is more frequent and more refractory to medication. Treatment with older antiepileptic drugs such as valproic acid and clonazepam is effective, but these medications tend to have less favorable side effect profiles in Angelman syndrome compared with those in newer medications. This study aimed to assess the use of newer antiepileptic drug therapies in individuals with Angelman syndrome followed at the Angelman Syndrome Clinic at the Massachusetts General Hospital. Many of the subjects in this study were on valproic acid therapy prior to their initial evaluation and exhibited increased tremor, decreased balance, and/or regression of motor skills, which resolved after tapering off of this medication. Newer antiepileptic drugs such as levetiracetam, lamotrigine, and clobazam, and to a lesser extent topiramate, appeared to be as effective - if not more so - as valproic acid and clonazepam while offering more favorable side effect profiles. The low glycemic index treatment also provided effective seizure control with minimal side effects. The majority of subjects remained on combination therapy with levetiracetam, lamotrigine, and clobazam being the most commonly used medications, indicating a changing trend when compared with prior studies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Current issues in medically assisted reproduction and genetics in Europe: research, clinical practice, ethics, legal issues and policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, Joyce; Geraedts, Joep; Borry, Pascal; Cornel, Martina C; Dondorp, Wybo J; Gianaroli, Luca; Harton, Gary; Milachich, Tanya; Kääriäinen, Helena; Liebaers, Inge; Morris, Michael; Sequeiros, Jorge; Sermon, Karen; Shenfield, Françoise; Skirton, Heather; Soini, Sirpa; Spits, Claudia; Veiga, Anna; Vermeesch, Joris Robert; Viville, Stéphane; de Wert, Guido; Macek, Milan

    2014-08-01

    How has the interface between genetics and assisted reproduction technology (ART) evolved since 2005? The interface between ART and genetics has become more entwined as we increase our understanding about the genetics of infertility and we are able to perform more comprehensive genetic testing. In March 2005, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics and European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology met to discuss the interface between genetics and ART and published an extended background paper, recommendations and two Editorials. An interdisciplinary workshop was held, involving representatives of both professional societies and experts from the European Union Eurogentest2 Coordination Action Project. In March 2012, a group of experts from the European Society of Human Genetics, the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology and the EuroGentest2 Coordination Action Project met to discuss developments at the interface between clinical genetics and ART. As more genetic causes of reproductive failure are now recognized and an increasing number of patients undergo testing of their genome prior to conception, either in regular health care or in the context of direct-to-consumer testing, the need for genetic counselling and PGD may increase. Preimplantation genetic screening (PGS) thus far does not have evidence from RCTs to substantiate that the technique is both effective and efficient. Whole genome sequencing may create greater challenges both in the technological and interpretational domains, and requires further reflection about the ethics of genetic testing in ART and PGD/PGS. Diagnostic laboratories should be reporting their results according to internationally accepted accreditation standards (ISO 15189). Further studies are needed in order to address issues related to the impact of ART on epigenetic reprogramming of the early embryo. The legal landscape regarding assisted reproduction is evolving, but still remains very

  12. Clinical Significance of Arterial Stiffness and Metabolic Syndrome Scores in Vestibular Neuritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Jae Ho; Lee, Seung Hwan; Park, Chul Won; Jeong, Jin Hyeok; Shin, Jeong-Hun

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of cardiovascular factors, including arterial stiffness and metabolic syndrome scores, in the development of vestibular neuritis. A prospective, case-control study. Tertiary referral center. Fifty-eight adult patients with vestibular neuritis (VN) and 58 age- and sex-matched controls were evaluated between January 2015 and January 2016. Measurement of arterial stiffness. Arterial stiffness was assessed from brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV), and cardiovascular markers including blood pressure, body mass index and lipid profiles, and metabolic syndrome scores were determined. The dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) and vestibular function tests, including the caloric test and video head impulse test were evaluated. The correlations between cardiovascular factors and clinical parameters of VN were assessed. Blood pressure, baPWV, and metabolic syndrome scores were higher in the VN group than in the control group (p = 0.002, p = 0.001, and p = 0.001, respectively), whereas comorbidity, anthropometric characteristics, and lipid profiles did not differ significantly. baPWV and metabolic syndrome scores were not correlated with the clinical parameters of the DHI scores, canal paresis, and spontaneous nystagmus duration. In addition, cardiovascular factors did not associate with the vestibular compensation. Higher baPWV, representative of arterial stiffness, and higher metabolic syndrome scores, are associated with the development of VN. This supports the hypothesis of a vascular etiology of the disease. However, cardiovascular risk factors had limited value in predicting the clinical course of VN.

  13. Prevalence, clinical investigation, and management of gallbladder disease in Rett syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freilinger, Michael; Böhm, Michael; Lanator, Ines; Vergesslich-Rothschild, Klara; Huber, Wolf-Dietrich; Anderson, Alison; Wong, Kingsley; Baikie, Gordon; Ravikumara, Madhur; Downs, Jenny; Leonard, Helen

    2014-08-01

    This study determined the prevalence of cholelithiasis and/or cholecystectomy in Rett syndrome, described gallbladder function in a clinical cohort, and identified recommendations for assessment and management of gallbladder disease. The incidence of cholelithiasis/cholecystectomy was estimated from data describing 270 and 681 individuals with a pathogenic MECP2 mutation in the Australian Rett Syndrome Database and the International Rett Syndrome Phenotype Database respectively. Gallbladder function in 25 females (mean age 16y 5mo, SD 20y 7mo, range 3y 5mo-47y 10mo) with Rett syndrome (RTT) was evaluated with clinical assessment and ultrasound of the gallbladder. The Delphi technique was used to develop assessment and treatment recommendations. The incidence rate for cholelithiasis and/or cholecystectomy was 2.3 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.2) and 1.8 (95% CI 1.0-3.0) per 1000 person-years in the Australian and International Databases respectively. The mean contractility index of the gallbladder for the clinical sample was 46.5% (SD 38.3%), smaller than for healthy individuals but similar to children with Down syndrome, despite no clinical symptoms. After excluding gastroesophageal reflux, gallbladder disease should be considered as a cause of abdominal pain in RTT and cholecystectomy recommended if symptomatic. Gallbladder disease is relatively common in RTT and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of abdominal pain in RTT. © 2014 Mac Keith Press.

  14. Clinical supervision of psychotherapy: essential ethics issues for supervisors and supervisees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Jeffrey E; Molzon, Corey H

    2014-11-01

    Clinical supervision is an essential aspect of every mental health professional's training. The importance of ensuring that supervision is provided competently, ethically, and legally is explained. The elements of the ethical practice of supervision are described and explained. Specific issues addressed include informed consent and the supervision contract, supervisor and supervisee competence, attention to issues of diversity and multicultural competence, boundaries and multiple relationships in the supervision relationship, documentation and record keeping by both supervisor and supervisee, evaluation and feedback, self-care and the ongoing promotion of wellness, emergency coverage, and the ending of the supervision relationship. Additionally, the role of clinical supervisor as mentor, professional role model, and gatekeeper for the profession are discussed. Specific recommendations are provided for ethically and effectively conducting the supervision relationship and for addressing commonly arising dilemmas that supervisors and supervisees may confront. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. [Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease concurrent with metabolic syndrome: Pathophysiological and clinical features].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budnevsky, A V; Ovsyannikov, E S; Labzhania, N B

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) still remains a serious public health problem, which is a common cause of disability and death in the able-bodied population. Furthermore, the number of patients with metabolic syndrome (MS) is steadily increasing worldwide. Recently, there is also an increase in the number of patients with COPD concurrent with MS, which is a mutually confounding risk factor for concomitant cardiovascular disease and adversely affects prognosis in these patients. Systemic subclinical inflammation is a common link between COPD and the components of MS. Systemic inflammation in patients with comorbidity is complemented by an inflammatory process in the abdominal visceral adipose tissue that serves as a source of proinflammatory adipokines (leptin, resistin, and tumor necrosis factor-α). Patients with COPD in the presence of MS components have in general higher ventilation needs, more obvious clinical manifestations of bronchopulmonary diseases, and more frequent COPD exacerbations and frequently require higher doses of inhaled glucocorticosteroids. As compared with normal-weight patients with COPD, obese patients with this condition have more limited physical activity and much more exercise intolerance. There are currently no practical recommendations for the management of patients with comorbidity; patients with COPD concurrent with MS need an individual therapeutic approach. It is important to elaborate a package of preventive measures to improve quality of life in patients, to reduce the incidence of systemic complications, and to achieve symptomatic improvements. Thus, to develop and implement practical guidelines for physicians and patients are an urgent issue.

  16. The irritable bowel syndrome: clinical review | Watermeyer | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Gastroenterology Review. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 1, No 1 (2003) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Clinical drug trials in general practice: how well are external validity issues reported?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brænd, Anja Maria; Straand, Jørund; Klovning, Atle

    2017-12-29

    When reading a report of a clinical trial, it should be possible to judge whether the results are relevant for your patients. Issues affecting the external validity or generalizability of a trial should therefore be reported. Our aim was to determine whether articles with published results from a complete cohort of drug trials conducted entirely or partly in general practice reported sufficient information about the trials to consider the external validity. A cohort of 196 drug trials in Norwegian general practice was previously identified from the Norwegian Medicines Agency archive with year of application for approval 1998-2007. After comprehensive literature searches, 134 journal articles reporting results published from 2000 to 2015 were identified. In these articles, we considered the reporting of the following issues relevant for external validity: reporting of the clinical setting; selection of patients before inclusion in a trial; reporting of patients' co-morbidity, co-medication or ethnicity; choice of primary outcome; and reporting of adverse events. Of these 134 articles, only 30 (22%) reported the clinical setting of the trial. The number of patients screened before enrolment was reported in 61 articles (46%). The primary outcome of the trial was a surrogate outcome for 60 trials (45%), a clinical outcome for 39 (29%) and a patient-reported outcome for 25 (19%). Clinical details of adverse events were reported in 124 (93%) articles. Co-morbidity of included participants was reported in 54 trials (40%), co-medication in 27 (20%) and race/ethnicity in 78 (58%). The clinical setting of the trials, the selection of patients before enrolment, and co-morbidity or co-medication of participants was most commonly not reported, limiting the possibility to consider the generalizability of a trial. It may therefore be difficult for readers to judge whether drug trial results are applicable to clinical decision-making in general practice or when developing clinical

  18. Skin signs in Ehlers-Danlos syndrome: clinical tests and para-clinical methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Remvig, L; Duhn, Ph; Ullman, S

    2010-01-01

    The criteria for Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) and the hypermobility syndrome (HMS) should be reliable. Examination for general joint hypermobility has high reliability but there is only sparse information on the reliability of skin tests, and no information on the level of normal skin extensibility...

  19. Clinical psychologists' experiences of addressing spiritual issues in supervision: an interpretative phenomenological analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Malins, Samuel

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Psychological therapists have found spirituality a complex and confusing subject to work with in therapy and research (e.g. Jackson & Coyle, 2009). However, little is known about the role supervision may play in maintaining or resolving this situation (Miller, Korinek & Ivey, 2006). Aim To explore how clinical psychologists address spiritual issues in supervision, using the qualitative methodology of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA, Smith, 1996). ...

  20. Cushing's syndrome: from physiological principles to diagnosis and clinical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raff, Hershel; Carroll, Ty

    2015-02-01

    The physiological control of cortisol synthesis in the adrenal cortex involves stimulation of adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) by hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and then stimulation of the adrenal by ACTH. The control loop of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is closed by negative feedback of cortisol on the hypothalamus and pituitary. Understanding this system is required to master the diagnosis, differential diagnosis and treatment of endogenous hypercortisolism--Cushing's syndrome. Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is caused either by excess ACTH secretion or by autonomous cortisol release from the adrenal cortex. Diagnosis of cortisol excess exploits three physiological principles: failure to achieve the normal nadir in the cortisol diurnal rhythm, loss of sensitivity of ACTH-secreting tumours to cortisol negative feedback, and increased excretion of free cortisol in the urine. Differentiating a pituitary source of excess ACTH (Cushing's disease) from an ectopic source is accomplished by imaging the pituitary and sampling for ACTH in the venous drainage of the pituitary. With surgical removal of ACTH or cortisol-secreting tumours, secondary adrenal insufficiency ensues because of the prior suppression of the HPA axis by glucocorticoid negative feedback. Medical therapy is targeted to the anatomical location of the dysregulated component of the HPA axis. Future research will focus on new diagnostics and treatments of Cushing's syndrome. These are elegant examples of translational research: understanding basic physiology informs the development of new approaches to diagnosis and treatment. Appreciating pathophysiology generates new areas for inquiry of basic physiological and biochemical mechanisms. © 2014 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2014 The Physiological Society.

  1. Еctopic ACTH syndrome: clinical picture, diagnosis, treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Kuznetsov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Diagnosis and treatment of ectopic ACTH-syndrome currently is one of the most challenging problems among other forms of endogenous hypercorticism. This syndrome is associated with presence of extrapituitary tumors characterized with different histogenesis and localization, which produce adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH, or – rarely – corticotrophin-releasing hormone. In most cases the ectopic synthesis of ACTH is performed in bronchial carcinoid tumors (36–46%, oat cell cancer (18–20%, medullary thyroid cancer (3–7%, pheochromocytoma (9–23%, other sites are infrequent (pancreas, thymus, parotid gland, ovaries, uterus, prostate, colon, stomach, esophagus, etc.. Much of these tumors are aggressive and are characterized with propensity to metastasize and relapse. Currently there are few contradictory data on the comparative evaluation of the effectiveness of methods of topical diagnosis of the source of ectopic ACTH-secretion, and therefore there is an urgent need to develop an optimal and most efficient algorithm for diagnostic procedures to determine the extent of the tumor in patients with ectopic ACTH-syndrome. Indications for surgery, timing and extent of surgical intervention, the effectiveness of the operation, the causes and frequency of relapses are still discussed.The present difficulties of diagnosis, as well as the lack of a unified approach to the treatment of this disease in the complex, often lead to the progression and development of a large number of serious complications functions of up to disability, which in turn does not lead to significant improvement of quality of life. Thus further research is necessary to study of this disease

  2. Leg orientation as a clinical sign for pusher syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannsen Leif

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective control of (upright body posture requires a proper representation of body orientation. Stroke patients with pusher syndrome were shown to suffer from severely disturbed perception of own body orientation. They experience their body as oriented 'upright' when actually tilted by nearly 20° to the ipsilesional side. Thus, it can be expected that postural control mechanisms are impaired accordingly in these patients. Our aim was to investigate pusher patients' spontaneous postural responses of the non-paretic leg and of the head during passive body tilt. Methods A sideways tilting motion was applied to the trunk of the subject in the roll plane. Stroke patients with pusher syndrome were compared to stroke patients not showing pushing behaviour, patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss, and non brain damaged subjects. Results Compared to all groups without pushing behaviour, the non-paretic leg of the pusher patients showed a constant ipsiversive tilt across the whole tilt range for an amount which was observed in the non-pusher subjects when they were tilted for about 15° into the ipsiversive direction. Conclusion The observation that patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss showed no alterations of leg posture indicates that disturbed vestibular afferences alone are not responsible for the disordered leg responses seen in pusher patients. Our results may suggest that in pusher patients a representation of body orientation is disturbed that drives both conscious perception of body orientation and spontaneous postural adjustment of the non-paretic leg in the roll plane. The investigation of the pusher patients' leg-to-trunk orientation thus could serve as an additional bedside tool to detect pusher syndrome in acute stroke patients.

  3. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leao, Emilia Katiane Embirucu; Lima, Marcilia Martyn; Kok, Fernando; Parizotto, Juliana [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Clinical Hospital. Dept. of Child Neurology; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira [University of Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Clinical Hospital. Dept. of Child Ophthalmology

    2010-04-15

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g. pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus), renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnoea and hyperpnoea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise. (author)

  4. Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome: A Case Aimed at Raising Clinical Awareness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jad Al Danaf

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year-old man with a history of bipolar disorder on risperidone, bupropion, and escitalopram was admitted for community acquired streptococcal pneumonia. Four days later, he developed persistent hyperthermia, dysautonomia, rigidity, hyporeflexia, and marked elevation of serum creatine phosphokinase. He was diagnosed with neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS and improved with dantrolene, bromocriptine, and supportive therapy. This case emphasizes the importance of considering a broad differential diagnosis for fever in the ICU, carefully reviewing the medication list for all patients, and considering NMS in patients with fever and rigidity.

  5. Clinical manifestations of Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay C

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ellis-van Creveld syndrome (EVC is a chondro-ectodermal dysplasia characterized by short ribs, polydactyly, growth retardation and ectodermal and heart defects. It is a rare disease complex and very few cases have been reported in dental literature. This condition is inherited as an autosomal recessive trait with variable expression. The present case report describes EVC in a 7-year-old girl, with all the tetrad of cardinal features. We found a rare dental aberration in form; appearance of single conical roots in primary molars. The management of children with EVC is multidisciplinary, with consideration for the high incidence of cardiac defects in these patients.

  6. Cri-du-chat syndrome: clinical profile and prenatal diagnosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Prenatal diagnosis of cri-du-chat syndrome is described in 2 pregnancies. In Case 1, the mother was a balanced translocation carrier and had 2 previously affected off springs. Prenatal diagnosis by chorion villus sampling and cordocentesis was successful in diagnosing an affected conceptus and the pregnancy was electively terminated. Case 2 was referred for nonimmune foetal hydrops and cordocentesis revealed deletion 5p. This second case was noteworthy for the fact that deletion 5p has not been reported to cause foetal hydrops.

  7. Joubert syndrome: large clinical variability and a unique neuroimaging aspect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leao, Emilia Katiane Embirucu; Lima, Marcilia Martyn; Kok, Fernando; Parizotto, Juliana; Maia Junior, Otacilio de Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Joubert syndrome (JS) is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder characterized by hypotonia, cerebellar vermis hypoplasia, ocular abnormalities (e.g. pigmentary retinopathy, oculomotor apraxia and nystagmus), renal cysts and hepatic fibrosis. Respiratory abnormalities, as apnoea and hyperpnoea, may be present, as well as mental retardation. At least seven JS loci have been determined and five genes identified. Herein, we report five children, belonging to independent families, with JS: they shared the same typical MRI abnormality, known as molar tooth sign, but had an otherwise quite variable phenotype, regarding mostly their cognitive performance, visual abilities and extra-neurological compromise. (author)

  8. Carpal tunnel syndrome: An evaluation clinical and sociodemographic characteristics of 350 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Tanık

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study aimed to define the sociodemographic and clinical characteristics of patients with carpaltunnel syndrome. Methods: The study comprised 350 patients diagnosed with carpal tunnel syndrome. Exclusion criteria were cervical radiculopathy, brachial plexopathy, thoracic outlet syndrome, polyneuropathy, pregnancy and a history of upper extremity trauma. The sociodemographic characteristics of the patients and the clinical characteristics of the carpal tunnel syndrome were recorded. Results: Of the total 350 patients, 86.2% were female, mean age was 52.5 years, 69.7% were obese, bilateral involvement was determined in 72.9% and the duration of symptoms was 3.0±0.9 years. 98.3% of the patients were married, 79.1% were housewives, 80.6% had a moderate income level, 59.6% were educated to primary school level and the most common ccompanying disease was diabetes at a rate of 26.9%. Conclusion: The study results showed that in Central Anatolia, carpal tunnel syndrome was seen in middleaged, obese, married housewives of moderate income and a low educational level. Generally, there was no accompanying disease, bilateral involvement was high and the disease was determined to have become chronic. With the detailed examination of the ociodemographic data of carpal tunnel syndrome patients, a good definition of a profile specific to this society will contribute to the treatment process.

  9. Clinical characteristics of three patients with UVs syndrome, a photosensitive disorder with defective DNA repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, T.; Yamaizumi, M.; Hiro-oka, M.; Matsui, T.; Matsuno, M.; Ono, T.; Ichihashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    Recently, we established a new category of photosensitive disorder termed UVsup(s) syndrome. Cells from patients with UVsup(s) syndrome have a similar UV sensitivity as xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells, but have a normal level of unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) unlike XP. UVsup(s) syndrome is distinct from Cockayne syndrome (CS) or XP including XP variant (XP-V) as determined by studies of genetic factors using cell fusion, microinjection, and postreplication repair assays. In this study, we identified three japanese patients with UVsup(s) syndrome: an 11-year-old girl, a 17 year old male, and an 8-year-old boy. The first two patients were siblings, while the third was a case from a different family. All of these patients exhibited acute recurrent sunburn. Common clinical manifestations of the patients were slight erythema and dryness, a number of freckles on sun-exposed areas, and slight telangiectasia only seen on the cheek and nose. Patient 3 showed a lowered minimal erythema dose between 280 and 300 nm. The patients' fibroblasts showed similar characteristics to those in CS, such as UV sensitivity, and a failure of RNA synthesis (RRS) after UV irradiation, despite a normal level of UDS. Thus, UVsup(s) syndrome is a new hereditary photosensitive disorder with clinical manifestations similar to a mild form of Xp but showing the cellular characteristics of CS. (Author)

  10. Hemizygosity at the elastin locus and clinical features of Williams syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Y; Kuwano, A. [Ehime Univ. School of Medicine (Japan); Kuwajima, K. [Ibaraki Perfectural Handicap Children`s Hopsital (Japan)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Williams syndrome is a recognizable syndrome characterized by distinctive facial appearance, gregarious personality, mental retardation, congenital heart defect, particularly supravalvular aortic stenosis (SVAS), and joint limitation. SVAS is an autosomal vascular disorder and the elastin gene was disrupted in patients with SVAS. Ewat et al. reported that hemizygosity at the elastin locus was detected in four familial and five sporadic cases of Williams syndrome. However, three patients did not have SVAS. We reconfirmed hemizygosity at the elastin locus in five patients with typical clinical features of Williams syndrome. Hemizygosity was detected in four cases with SVAS. However, one patient with distinctive facial appearance and typical Williams syndrome personality had two alleles of the elastin gene, but he did not have the congenital heart anomaly. Williams syndrome is thought to be a contiguous gene disorder. Thus, our data suggest that the elastin gene is responsible for the vascular defect in patients with Williams syndrome, and flanking genes are responsible for characteristic facial appearance and personality.

  11. Assessment of positive functioning in clinical psychology: theoretical and practical issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Stephen; Wood, Alex

    2010-11-01

    Positive psychology has led to an increasing emphasis on the promotion of positive functioning in clinical psychology research and practice, raising issues of how to assess the positive in clinical setting. Three key considerations are presented. First, existing clinical measures may already be assessing positive functioning, if positive and negative functioning exist on a single continuum (such as on bipolar dimensions from happiness to depression, and from anxiety to relaxation). Second, specific measures of positive functioning (e.g., eudemonic well-being) could be used in conjunction with existing clinical scales. Third, completely different measures would be needed depending on whether well-being is defined as emotional or medical functioning, or as humanistically orientated growth (e.g., authenticity). It is important that clinical psychologists introduce positive functioning into their research and practice in order to widen their armoury of therapeutic interventions, but in doing so researchers and practitioners need also to be aware that they are shifting the agenda of clinical psychology. As such, progress in clinical psychology moving toward the adoption of positive functioning requires reflection on epistemological foundations. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Clinical Study on 1 Case of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Kil, Yoo

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective : This study was performed to evaluate the treatment of Acupuncture therapy including Herbal Acupuncture theraphy and Korean Bee Venom Theraphy in Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome. Methods : We treated 1 case of Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome patient with mainly Korean Bee Venom Theraphy, and herbal Acupuncture, acupuncture theraphy from 27th August, 2001 to February, 2003. Results : After 3 weeks of Korean Bee Venom Theraphy, and herbal Acupuncture, acupuncture theraphy, a remarkable improvement was made for Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome. Conclusions : Korean Bee Venom Theraphy and other acupuncture therapies were effective in reducing the symptoms. We think that it need the further study and clinical trial for Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber Syndrome.

  13. Mosaic 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: diagnosis and clinical manifestations of two cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabra Madhulika

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is due to microdeletion of 22q11.2 region of chromosome 22. It is a common microdeletion syndrome however mosaic cases are very rare and reported only few previous occasions. In this report we describe two unrelated male children with clinical features consistent with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome characterized by cardiac defect, facial dysmorphism and developmental deficiency. One of the cases also had trigonocephaly. Interphase & metaphase FISH with 22q11.2 probe demonstrated mosaicism for hemizygous deletion of 22q11.2 region. Mosaicism is also observed in buccal cells as well as urine cells. Parents were without any deletion. These two cases represent rare cases of mosaic 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome.

  14. Mosaic 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome: diagnosis and clinical manifestations of two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Ashutosh; Jain, Manish; Kabra, Madhulika; Gupta, Neerja

    2008-08-10

    Chromosome 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome is due to microdeletion of 22q11.2 region of chromosome 22. It is a common microdeletion syndrome however mosaic cases are very rare and reported only few previous occasions. In this report we describe two unrelated male children with clinical features consistent with 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome characterized by cardiac defect, facial dysmorphism and developmental deficiency. One of the cases also had trigonocephaly. Interphase & metaphase FISH with 22q11.2 probe demonstrated mosaicism for hemizygous deletion of 22q11.2 region. Mosaicism is also observed in buccal cells as well as urine cells. Parents were without any deletion. These two cases represent rare cases of mosaic 22q11.2 microdeletion syndrome.

  15. Wolfram syndrome (diabetes insipidus, diabetes, optic atrophy, and deafness): clinical and genetic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Annunzio, Giuseppe; Minuto, Nicola; D'Amato, Elena; de Toni, Teresa; Lombardo, Fortunato; Pasquali, Lorenzo; Lorini, Renata

    2008-09-01

    Wolfram syndrome is an autosomal recessive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by diabetes insipidus, diabetes (nonautoimmune), optic atrophy, and deafness (a set of conditions referred to as DIDMOAD). The WFS1 gene is located on the short arm of chromosome 4. Wolfram syndrome prevalence is 1 in 770,000 live births, with a 1 in 354 carrier frequency. We evaluated six Italian children from five unrelated families. Genetic analysis for Wolfram syndrome was performed by PCR amplification and direct sequencing. Mutation screening revealed five distinct variants, one novel mutation (c.1346C>T; p.T449I) and four previously described, all located in exon 8. Phenotype-genotype correlation is difficult, and the same mutation gives very different phenotypes. Severely inactivating mutations result in a more severe phenotype than mildly inactivating ones. Clinical follow-up showed the progressive syndrome's seriousness.

  16. Clinical and ultrasound features in patients with intersection syndrome or de Quervain's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, J; Ishii, Y; Noguchi, H

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the demographic characteristics of patients who were diagnosed with intersection syndrome and also investigated the dominance of the affected hand, duration of symptoms and any precipitating factor for pain of the wrist. These features were compared with patients who had de Quervain's disease. Ultrasonography was used to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Intersection syndrome occurred more frequently in men and in the dominant hand than de Quervain's disease when all the patients were compared and when peripartum women were excluded. It occurred at a younger age than de Quervain's disease only when the comparison excluded peripartum women. Patients with intersection syndrome presented with a much shorter duration of symptoms. These results were consistent with previous reports about occupational factors in intersection syndrome, and might be helpful in the understanding of epidemiological difference between the two conditions. Level 3. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Clinically isolated syndrome manifested as acute vestibular syndrome: bedside neuro-otological examination and suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions in the differential diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veros, Konstantinos; Blioskas, Sarantis; Karapanayiotides, Theodoros; Psillas, Georgios; Markou, Konstantinos; Tsaligopoulos, Miltiadis

    2014-01-01

    A case of a 34-year old woman with acute vestibular syndrome caused by a demyelinating lesion in the root entry zone of the 8th cranial nerve is presented. Neuro-otological bedside examination and suppression of transient evoked otoacoustic emissions provided objective clinical evidence of a retrolabyrinthine lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and the presence of oligoclonal IgG bands in cerebrospinal fluid analysis established the diagnosis of clinically isolated syndrome. This case report highlights the clinical information provided by the neuro-otologist in the differential diagnosis of the acute vestibular syndrome and the diagnosis of possible multiple sclerosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical management of behavioral characteristics of Prader–Willi syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Y Ho

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Alan Y Ho, Anastasia DimitropoulosDepartment of Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, USAAbstract: Prader–Willi syndrome (PWS is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder caused by an abnormality on the long arm of chromosome 15 (q11–q13 that results in a host of phenotypic characteristics, dominated primarily by hyperphagia and insatiable appetite. Characteristic behavioral disturbances in PWS include excessive interest in food, skin picking, difficulty with a change in routine, temper tantrums, obsessive and compulsive behaviors, and mood fluctuations. Individuals with PWS typically have intellectual disabilities (borderline to mild/moderate mental retardation and exhibit a higher overall behavior disturbance compared to individuals with similar intellectual disability. Due to its multisystem disorder, family members, caregivers, physicians, dieticians, and speech-language pathologists all play an important role in the management and treatment of symptoms in an individual with PWS. This article reviews current research on behavior and cognition in PWS and discusses management guidelines for this disorder.Keywords: Prader–Willi syndrome; neurodevelopment, hyperphagia, disability

  19. Clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type in human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome patients: A cross-sectional investigation in Xinjiang, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peierdun, Mi-ji-ti; Liu, Wen-xian; Renaguli, Ai-ze-zi; Nurmuhammat, Amat; Li, Xiao-chun; Gulibaier, Ka-ha-er; Ainivaer, Wu-la-mu; Halmurat, Upur

    2015-12-01

    To investigate the distribution of abnormal hilit syndromes in traditional Uighur medicine (TUM) among human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) patients, and to find out the clinical characteristics of abnormal savda syndrome type HIV/AIDS patients. Between June and July in 2012, 307 eligible HIV/AIDS patients from in-patient department and out-patient clinics of Xinjiang Uighur Autonomous Region the Sixth People's Hospital in Urumqi were investigated. TUM syndrome differentiation was performed by a senior TUM physician. Each participant completed a Sign and Symptom Check-List for Persons Living with HIV/AIDS (SSC-HIV) questionnaire. Depression was evaluated by using Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression Questionnaire. Blood specimen was collected from each participant to test the levels of blood chemicals. Of 307 HIV/AIDS patients, 189 (61.6%) were abnormal savda syndrome type, 118 (38.4%) were non-abnormal-savda syndrome type. Mean CD4 counts of abnormal savda syndrome type patients was (227.61±192.93) cells/µL, and the prevalence of anemia, thrombocytopenia, and elevated cystatin C were 49.7%, 28.6%, and 44.7%, which were significantly higher than those in the non-abnormal-savda syndrome type patients (26.3%, 16.0% and 25.0%,Psyndrome patients (Psyndrome is the dominant syndrome among HIV/AIDS patients, and they present a more sever clinical manifestation.

  20. Guillain?Barre Syndrome in Postpartum Period: Rehabilitation Issues and Outcome ? Three Case Reports

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Anupam; Patil, Maitreyi; Khanna, Meeka; Krishnan, Rashmi; Taly, Arun B.

    2017-01-01

    We report three females who developed Guillain–Barre Syndrome in postpartum period (within 6 weeks of delivery) and were admitted in the Neurological Rehabilitation Department for rehabilitation after the initial diagnosis and treatment in the Department of Neurology. The first case, axonal variant (acute motor axonal neuropathy [AMAN]) had worst presentation at the time of admission, recovered well by the time of discharge. The second case, acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy variant and t...

  1. Down syndrome: issues to consider in a national registry, research database and biobank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Linda L; McCabe, Edward R B

    2011-01-01

    As the quality of life for individuals with Down syndrome continues to improve due to anticipatory healthcare, early intervention, mainstreaming in schools, and increased expectations, the lack of basic information regarding individuals with Down syndrome is being recognized, and the need to facilitate research through a national registry, research database and biobank is being discussed. We believe that there should not be ownership of the samples and information, but instead prefer stewardship of the samples and information to benefit the participants who provided them. We endorse a model with data and sample managers and a research review board to interface between the investigators and participants. Information and samples would be coded, and only a few data managers would know the relationship between the codes and identifying information. Research results once published should be included in an online newsletter. If appropriate, individual results should be shared with participants. A Down syndrome registry, research database and biobank should be accountable to participants, families, medical care providers, government, and funding sources. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Clinical and molecular characteristics of East Asian patients with von Hippel-Lindau syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Meihua; Chu, Ying-Hsia; Tan, Hwei Ling; Bessho, Hideharu; Ngeow, Joanne; Tang, Tiffany; Tan, Min-Han

    2016-08-15

    Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) syndrome is a dominantly inherited multisystem cancer syndrome caused by a heterozygous mutation in the VHL tumor suppressor gene. Previous studies suggested that similar populations of Caucasian and Japanese patients have similar genotype or phenotype characteristics. In this comprehensive study of East Asian patients, we investigated the genetic and clinical characteristics of patients with VHL syndrome. To create a registry of clinical characteristics and mutations reported in East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, we conducted a comprehensive review of English language and non-English language articles identified through a literature search. Publications in Japanese or Chinese language were read by native speakers of the language, who then performed the data extraction. Of 237 East Asian patients with VHL syndrome, 154 unique kindreds were identified for analysis. Analyzed by kindred, missense mutations were the most common (40.9%, 63/154), followed by large/complete deletions (32.5%, 50/154) and nonsense mutations (11.7%, 18/154). Compared with a previously reported study of both East Asian and non-East Asian patients, we found several key differences. First, missense and frameshift mutations in the VHL gene occurred less commonly in our population of East Asian patients (40.9% vs. 52.0%; P = 0.012 and 8.4% vs. 13.0%; P syndrome, the incidence of retinal capillary hemangioblastoma was lower, whereas the incidence of renal cell carcinoma was higher. Evidence suggests that the genotypic and phenotypic characteristics of East Asian patients with VHL syndrome differ from other populations. This should be considered when making screening recommendations for VHL syndrome in Asia.

  3. SOX2 nonsense mutation in a patient clinically diagnosed with non-syndromic hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shima, Hirohito; Ishii, Akira; Wada, Yasunori; Kizawa, Junya; Yokoi, Tadashi; Azuma, Noriyuki; Matsubara, Yoichi; Suzuki, Erina; Nakamura, Akie; Narumi, Satoshi; Fukami, Maki

    2017-08-30

    Hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH) is a genetically heterogeneous condition that occurs either as an isolated disorder or as a component of congenital malformation syndromes. SOX2 is a causative gene of syndromic HH characterized by anophthalmia, microphthalmia, or coloboma and other neurological defects such as epilepsy. To date, the causal relationship between SOX2 abnormalities and non-syndromic HH remains speculative. Here, we identified a nonsense mutation of SOX2 in a male patient clinically diagnosed with non-syndromic HH. The patient had epilepsy but no additional clinical features. Ophthalmological examination revealed no abnormalities except for decreased thickness of the retinal nerve fiber layer. Audiometry showed mild sensorineural hearing impairment of both ears. Hormonal evaluation suggested isolated gonadotropin deficiency. Next-generation sequencing-based mutation screening of 13 major causative genes for HH identified a p.Lys35 ∗ mutation in SOX2 and excluded pathogenic mutations in other tested genes. The p.Lys35 ∗ mutation appeared to encode a non-functioning SOX2 protein that lacks 283 of 317 amino acids. The SOX2 mutation was absent in the maternal DNA sample, while a paternal sample was unavailable for sequence analysis. These results expand the clinical consequences of SOX2 haploinsufficiency to include non-syndromic HH. Systematic mutation screening using a next-generation sequencer and detailed evaluation of nonspecific ocular/neurological features may help identify SOX2 mutation-positive individuals among HH patients.

  4. How can clinical ethics guide the management of comorbidities in the child with Rett syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, Jenny; Forbes, David; Johnson, Michael; Leonard, Helen

    2016-08-01

    Rett syndrome is a rare disorder caused by a mutation in the MECP2 gene. Those affected generally have severe functional impairments, and medical comorbidities such as scoliosis and poor growth are common. There is a paucity of information on the natural history of many rare disorders and an even greater deficit of evidence to guide best practice. The population-based and longitudinal Australian Rett Syndrome Database established in 1993 has supported investigations of the natural history of Rett syndrome and effectiveness of treatments. This paper reviews the disorder Rett syndrome and evidence for the management of scoliosis and poor growth within a clinical ethics framework. Compared with conservative management, we have shown that spinal fusion is associated with reduced mortality and better respiratory health. We have also shown that gastrostomy insertion is associated with subsequent weight gain. Family counselling for both procedures necessarily must include family perspectives and careful clinical attention to their needs and wishes. Vignettes describing family decision-making and experiences are presented to illustrate the principals of beneficence and autonomy in determining the best interests of the child and family. A blend of evidence-based practice with a strong clinical ethics framework has capacity to build existing strengths in families and reduce the negative impacts of disability and in so doing, optimise the health and wellbeing of those with Rett syndrome. © 2016 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (The Royal Australasian College of Physicians).

  5. [Network clusters of symptoms as elementary syndromes of psychopathology: implications for clinical practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goekoop, R; Goekoop, J G

    2016-01-01

    In a recent publication we reported the existence of around 11 (to 15) 'elementary syndromes' that may combine in various ways, rather like 'building blocks', to explain the wide range of psychiatric symptoms. 'Bridge symptoms' seem to be responsible both for combining large sets of symptoms into elementary syndromes and for combining the various elementary syndromes to form one globally connected network structure. To discuss the implication of these findings for clinical practice. We performed a network analysis of symptom scores. Elementary syndromes provide a massive simplification of the description of psychiatric disease. Instead of the more than 300 categories in DSM-5, we now need to consider only a handful of elementary syndromes and personality domains. This modular representation of psychiatric illnesses allows us to make a complete, systematic and efficient assessment of patients and a systematic review of treatment options. Clinicians, patients, managerial staff and insurance companies can verify whether symptom reduction is taking place in the most important domains of psychopathology. Unlike classic multidimensional methods of disease description, network models of psychopathology can be used to explain comorbidity patterns, predict the clinical course of psychopathology and to designate primary targets for therapeutic interventions. A network view on psychopathology could significantly improve everyday clinical practice.

  6. Metabolic syndrome: frequency and gender differences at an out-patient clinic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahan, F.; Qureshi, R.; Borhany, T.; Hamza, H.B.

    2007-01-01

    To determine the frequency of metabolic syndrome among patients attending an out-patient clinic of a teaching hospital and to compare the clinical features regarding metabolic syndrome among males and females. All adults, above 25 years, attending the clinics for an executive check-up and giving informed consent were included in the study. Data was collected through a structured questionnaire administered to those eligible to participate. Metabolic syndrome was defined according to ATP-III guidelines. There were 250 participants in this study. Mean age of study participants was 48.94 (SD10.62) years, while approximately two-thirds, 157 (62.8%), were male. Metabolic syndrome (those who had 3 or more risk factors) was present in 35.2% of adults. Fasting blood sugar level was raised in 36.4% of study participants while significant number of participants (78.8%) had a Body Mass Index (BMI) Z 25 (p = 0.02). Frequency of metabolic syndrome was significantly high in this study with preponderance of males and prevalence similar to that observed in developed countries. Majority of patients had obesity and high fasting blood sugar levels. Males demonstrated higher levels of triglycerides and low levels of High-density lipoprotein (HDL) compared to females while blood pressure reading was observed to be the same in both males and females. (author)

  7. Ectopic ACTH syndrome: a clinical challenge | Tsabedze | Journal of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Journal of Endocrinology, Metabolism and Diabetes of South Africa. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 16, No 2 (2011) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. An assessment of issues related to clinical skill remediation in dental hygiene education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Branson, B G; Toevs, S E

    1999-01-01

    Within the confines of a lock-step dental hygiene education curriculum, the remediation of clinical skills poses a challenge for both the faculty responsible for assuring clinical competence and for the students expected to meet the stringent clinical performance criteria. To gain an understanding of how dental hygiene programs meet remediation challenges, a survey of U.S. dental hygiene programs was conducted. A questionnaire designed to elicit information on specific remediation protocols, the type of instructional methods used in clinical remediation, and the management of faculty work load and compensation when the need for remediation was identified was developed. The questionnaire was pretested by dental hygiene program administrators and then distributed to 227 U.S. dental hygiene programs via mail and Internet services with a follow-up mailing to non-respondents. Data were analyzed and reported as descriptive statistics using the Statistical Package for Social Science (SPSS). An 80 percent (n = 181) response rate was obtained. A chi-square analysis of goodness of fit demonstrated no statistically significant difference between the respondents and the survey population in relationship to type of degree granted, educational setting, or geographic location. Results revealed an average student to clinical faculty ratio of five to one regardless of year of curriculum, educational setting, or geographic location. Just over half (53.6%, n = 97), reported having a written policy on clinical remediation with a clinical course syllabus being the most frequently cited mode of distribution. Ninety-eight percent (n = 177) indicated that clinical faculty met regularly to discuss student clinical progress. Issuing an incomplete grade, requiring the student to attend additional clinical sessions, and allowing the student to continue with his or her peers was the most frequent action taken when clinical remediation was needed at the end of the academic term (32.6%, n = 59

  9. Creating and sharing clinical decision support content with Web 2.0: Issues and examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Adam; Bates, David W; Middleton, Blackford; Hongsermeier, Tonya; Kashyap, Vipul; Thomas, Sean M; Sittig, Dean F

    2009-04-01

    Clinical decision support is a powerful tool for improving healthcare quality and patient safety. However, developing a comprehensive package of decision support interventions is costly and difficult. If used well, Web 2.0 methods may make it easier and less costly to develop decision support. Web 2.0 is characterized by online communities, open sharing, interactivity and collaboration. Although most previous attempts at sharing clinical decision support content have worked outside of the Web 2.0 framework, several initiatives are beginning to use Web 2.0 to share and collaborate on decision support content. We present case studies of three efforts: the Clinfowiki, a world-accessible wiki for developing decision support content; Partners Healthcare eRooms, web-based tools for developing decision support within a single organization; and Epic Systems Corporation's Community Library, a repository for sharing decision support content for customers of a single clinical system vendor. We evaluate the potential of Web 2.0 technologies to enable collaborative development and sharing of clinical decision support systems through the lens of three case studies; analyzing technical, legal and organizational issues for developers, consumers and organizers of clinical decision support content in Web 2.0. We believe the case for Web 2.0 as a tool for collaborating on clinical decision support content appears strong, particularly for collaborative content development within an organization.

  10. [Professor ZHENG Kuishan's experience in the clinical treatment of bi syndrome with acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baohu; Zheng, Jiatai; Guo, Yongming

    2015-06-01

    Professor ZHENG Kuishan has been engaged in the education and clinical practice of acupuncture and moxibustion for over 60 years. Professor ZHENG is strict in scholarly research and exquisite in medical techniques and he is good at treatment of bi syndrome induced by invasion of wind, cold and damp with warming and, promoting therapy. He emphasizes on syndrome differentiation and acupoint combination and selects the accurate manipulations. Not only are the symptoms relieved apparently, but also the body state is improved. As a result, the primary and secondary are treated simultaneously. In the paper, professor ZHENG's experience is introduced in the treatment of bi syndrome in the aspects of theory, method, formula, acupoint and technique. And his clinical therapeutic approaches have been deeply analyzed.

  11. The clinical value of pulmonary perfusion imaging complicated with pulmonary embolism in children of nephrotic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Jun; Chen Ning; Miao Weibing; Peng Jiequan; Jiang Zhihong; Wu Jing

    2001-01-01

    To investigate the clinical features of complicated with pulmonary embolism nephrotic syndrome in children. 99m Tc-MAA pulmonary perfusion imaging was performed on 30 nephrotic syndrome in children with elevated plasma D-dimer. Results shown that 14 of 30 patients were found to have pulmonary embolism (46.7%). Pulmonary perfusion imaging showed an involvement of 1 pulmonary segment in 3 cases, 2 segments in 2 cases and over 3 segments in other 9 cases. Among them, there were 7 segments involved in one case. After two weeks of heparin anti-coagulative therapy, most cases showed a recovery. The result of this study suggested that pulmonary embolism is a common complication of nephrotic syndrome. Pulmonary perfusion imaging is simple, effective and accurate method for the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism, and it also can help to assess the value of clinical therapy

  12. Clinical and radiological findings in a case of non-syndromic oligodontia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez Carrillo, Francisco J.

    2002-01-01

    A case of congenital absence of eleven dental pieces without association to syndromes is presented. An integral clinical examination of the patient's dental pieces has determined a case of oligodontia. Congenital absence of all permanent teeth described in the clinical examination are presented by orthopantomography radiography. Impressions with irreversible hydrocolloid are realized to complete the diagnostic. The case described of oligodontia has developed without presenting relation to some syndrome as Down syndrome or ectodermal dysplasia. Genes have played a very important role in the etiology of dental anomalies, according to the existing evidence. Mutation has been identified as the cause of dental defects in some of the genes in humans. The maxillary teeth developed in the marginal areas of the dental lamina have pretended to be the dental pieces more susceptible to be without form [es

  13. Overtraining syndrome in the athlete: current clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carfagno, David G; Hendrix, Joshua C

    2014-01-01

    Competitive athletes are pushed routinely to the limits of their physical abilities. When tempered with periods of rest and recovery, a highly demanding training schedule can have tremendous benefits. However when an athlete is pushed too far, overtraining syndrome (OTS) can develop and result in career-ending damage. Overreaching and overtraining are part of the same spectrum that can lead to OTS. The pressure to perform placed on elite athletes is a real danger. Athletes and coaches understand the importance of rest days, but the insidious onset of OTS slowly saps the efficacy of recovery times so the athlete is no longer able to reach previously attainable goals. Identifying markers that correlate with overreaching and overtraining can arrest progression of a potentially negative cycle. We will examine the current literature and discuss possible screening tests and red flags that will assist in preventing OTS from occurring.

  14. MRI criteria for MS in patients with clinically isolated syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montalban, X.; Tintore, M.; Swanton, J.

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, criteria for the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) have changed, mainly due to the incorporation of new MRI criteria. While the new criteria are a logical step forward, they are complex and-not surprisingly-a good working knowledge of them is not always evident among neurologi...... false positive diagnoses. New data that are now published were reviewed and discussed and together with a new proposal are integrated in this position paper. Neurology(R) 2010;74:427-434...... isolated syndrome. Within the European multicenter collaborative research network that studies MRI in MS (MAGNIMS), a workshop was held in London in November 2007 to review information that may simplify the existing MS diagnostic criteria, while maintaining a high specificity that is essential to minimize...

  15. Kearns-Sayre syndrome "plus": classical clinical findings and dystonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARIE SUELY K.NAGAHASHI

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a boy of eight years of age with symptoms of Kearns-Sayre syndrome (KSS characterised by ophthalmoparesis, palpebral ptosis, mitochondrial myopathy, pigmentous retinitis, associated to short stature, cerebellar signs, cardiac blockade, diabetes mellitus, elevated cerebrospinal fluid protein concentration, and focal hand and foot dystonia. The skeletal muscle biopsy demonstrated ragged red fibers, cytochrome C oxidase-negative and succinate dehydrogenase-positive fibers. The magnetic resonance imaging showed symmetrical signal alteration in tegmentum of brain stem, pallidum and thalamus. Mitochondrial DNA analysis from skeletal muscle showed a deletion in heteroplasmic condition. The association of dystonia to KSS, confirmed by molecular analysis, is first described in this case, and the importance of oxidative phosphorylation defects in the physiopathogenesis of this type of movement disorder is stressed.

  16. CLINICAL AND RADIOGRAPHIC FEATURES OF PARRY-ROMBERG SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mithula NAIR

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Parry-Romberg syndrome or progressive hemifacial atrophy is a craniofacial disorder characterized by slow and progressive atrophy, generally unilateral, of facial tissues including muscles, bones and skin. The coup de sabre is a clear line of demarcation seen between the normal and abnormal structures. The severity of the facial deformity is dependent on the age of onset of the disease. Cosmetic management is the only available treatment and has to be delayed until facial growth is completed. The present case report deals with a 43-year-old woman with progressive hemifacial atrophy which started from the age of 10 months. Despite almost complete involvement of the right paramedian area and the early age of onset, she had neither eye changes nor any dental malformations.

  17. Fragile X syndrome: A review of clinical management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Reymundo; Azarang, Atoosa; Wilaisakditipakorn, Tanaporn; Hagerman, Randi J

    2016-01-01

    Summary The fragile X mental retardation 1 gene, which codes for the fragile X mental retardation 1 protein, usually has 5 to 40 CGG repeats in the 5′ untranslated promoter. The full mutation is the almost always the cause of fragile X syndrome (FXS). The prevalence of FXS is about 1 in 4,000 to 1 in 7,000 in the general population although the prevalence varies in different regions of the world. FXS is the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. The understanding of the neurobiology of FXS has led to many targeted treatments, but none have cured this disorder. The treatment of the medical problems and associated behaviors remain the most useful intervention for children with FXS. In this review, we focus on the non-pharmacological and pharmacological management of medical and behavioral problems associated with FXS as well as current recommendations for follow-up and surveillance. PMID:27672537

  18. Remote clinical prognosis in patients with coronary X syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebov D.M.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The article analyzes data of 3234 coronary angiographies with established coronary X syndrome (CXS in 217 cases, herewith expressed tortuosity of coronary arteries (ETCA was found out in 148 (more than 2/3 of cases. A 5-years’ analysis of cardio-vascular events (CVE in patients with CXS in comparison with the group of IHD patients and initial atherosclerosis of coronary arteries was made. Absence of reliable difference of developing severe cardio-vascular events (SCVE bet¬ween patients with initial atherosclerosis and CXS was proved. Risk of CVE development was significantey higher in patients with ETCA, OR=4,93; 95% (0,62; 3929. Patients with CXS had higher risk of severe arrhythmias development as compared with IHD patients with initial atherosclerosis: OR=2,36 (1,01; 5,56. There was no reliable difference between lethality of any causes and number of coronary interventions in all groups.

  19. Management of the clinical issue of constipation with abdominal complaints in adults: a national survey of Primary Care physicians and gastroenterologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Rey

    Full Text Available Irritable bowel syndrome and functional constipation represent a relevant and common health issue. However, real-world clinical practice includes patients with constipation who may or may not have other abdominal complaints (pain, bloating, abdominal discomfort with variable frequency. The goal of the present study was to obtain information on the workload entailed by patients with constipation and associated abdominal complaints, predominant clinical behaviors, education needs, and potential daily practice aids both in Primary Care and gastroenterology settings. The clinical behavior of doctors is generally similar at both levels, despite differences in healthcare approach: use of empiric therapies and clinically guided diagnostic tests, with some differences in colonoscopy use (not always directly accessible from Primary Care. Regarding perceptions, general support and osmotic laxatives are most valued by PC doctors, whereas osmotic laxatives, combined laxatives, and linaclotide are most valued by GE specialists. Furthermore, over half of respondents considered differentiating both diagnoses as challenging. Finally, considerable education needs are self-acknowledged at both levels, as is a demand for guidelines and protocols to help in managing this issue in clinical practice. A strength of this study is its providing a joint photograph of the medical approach and the perceptions of constipation with abdominal discomfort from a medical standpoint. Weaknesses include self-declaration (no formal validation and a response rate potentially biased by professional motivation.

  20. Risk factors for treatment related clinical fluctuations in Guillain-Barré syndrome. Dutch Guillain-Barré study group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.H. Visser (Leendert); F.G.A. van der Meché (Frans); J. Meulstee (Jan); P.A. van Doorn (Pieter)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractThe risk factors for treatment related clinical fluctuations, relapses occurring after initial therapeutic induced stabilisation or improvement, were evaluated in a group of 172 patients with Guillain-Barre syndrome. Clinical, laboratory, and electrodiagnostic features

  1. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andy eHill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8 experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with

  2. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andy; MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave; Rodgers, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development (TID) become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8) experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with coaches

  3. Examining the Role of Mental Health and Clinical Issues within Talent Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Andy; MacNamara, Áine; Collins, Dave; Rodgers, Sheelagh

    2015-01-01

    Although significant research supports the association between physical activity and mental wellbeing, current literature acknowledges that athletes are no less susceptible to mental illness than the general population. Despite welcomed initiatives aimed at improving mental health within elite sport, these programs often fail to target young athletes; an important concern given that the genesis of many mental illnesses are recognized to occur during this critical period. Given the importance of early intervention and effective treatment, and the potentially devastating consequences of clinical issues going undiagnosed, the implications for talent identification and development (TID) become obvious. With this in mind, this study sought to examine the range of mental health issues that may impact upon developing athletes and potential consequences for the development process, specific risk and protective factors associated with talent development, along with an examination of current practices concerning the identification of mental health issues in such environments. Qualitative interviews were conducted with purposively sampled clinicians (n = 8) experienced in working with adolescents and/or young athletes. Inductive content analysis was undertaken, identifying four main themes: key behavioral indicators; associated risk factors; associated protective factors; and issues around identification and diagnosis. Key behavioral indicators included behavioral change, along with behaviors associated with eating disorders, anxiety and depression. Risk factors centered on family background, the performance environment, and issues surrounding adolescence. Protective factors were primarily social in nature. Finally, a lack of awareness and understanding of clinical issues, multiple causes of symptoms, non-disclosure and the need for triangulation of assessment were identified. The need for improved identification and intervention strategies was apparent, with coaches

  4. Clinical Management of a Child with Prader-Willi Syndrome from Maternal Uniparental Disomy (UPD) Genetic Inheritance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.

    2005-01-01

    Prader-Willi Syndrome (PWS) is reported in 1 in 10,000-15,000 individuals. Unfortunately, many cases are missed due to clinicians' lack of familiarity with the syndrome as well as clinical and laboratory diagnostic criteria. Although common clinical characteristics are reported, variety exists in the nature and severity of dysfunction associated…

  5. Improving Treatment Trial Outcomes for Rett Syndrome: the development of Rett-specific anchors for the Clinical Global Impression Scale

    OpenAIRE

    Neul, Jeff; Glaze, Daniel; Percy, Alan; Feyma, Tim; Beisang, Arthur; Dinh, Thuy; Suter, Bernhard; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Snape, Mike; Horrigan, Joseph; Jones, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Rett syndrome is a genetically based neurodevelopmental disorder. While the clinical consequences of Rett syndrome are profound and life-long, currently no approved drug treatments are available specifically targeted to Rett symptoms. High quality outcome measures, specific to the core symptoms of a disorder are a critical component to well-designed clinical trials for individuals with neurodevelopmental disorders. The Clinical Global Impression Scale is a measure of global clinical change wi...

  6. Patients Reporting Ritual Abuse in Childhood: A Clinical Syndrome. Report of 37 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Walter C.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty-seven adult dissociative disorder patients who reported ritual abuse in childhood by satanic cults are described. A clinical syndrome is presented that includes dissociative states with satanic overtones, posttraumatic stress disorder, survivor guilt, unusual fears, and substance abuse. Questions concerning reliability, credibility, and…

  7. Clinical features and pathophysiology of Complex Regional Pain Syndrome ? current state of the art

    OpenAIRE

    Marinus, Johan; Moseley, G. Lorimer; Birklein, Frank; Baron, Ralf; Maih?fner, Christian; Kingery, Wade S.; van Hilten, Jacobus J.

    2011-01-01

    That a minor injury can trigger a complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) - multiple system dysfunction, severe and often chronic pain and disability - has fascinated scientists and perplexed clinicians for decades. However, substantial advances across several medical disciplines have recently increased our understanding of CRPS. Compelling evidence implicates biological pathways that underlie aberrant inflammation, vasomotor dysfunction, and maladaptive neuroplasticity in the clinical features...

  8. [Post-polio syndrome: a review of its clinical characteristics and treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, C; Amate, J M

    Post-polio syndrome (PPS) is recognised as a clinical syndrome that causes the late, progressive functional impairment suffered by survivors of an acute episode of poliomyelitis. The importance of PPS is acknowledged by increasingly wider sectors of the population and health care sectors; nevertheless, few reports have been published about its epidemiology or its clinical characteristics and treatment. To review the current scientific evidence available on the clinical manifestations, risk factors, prevalence, diagnosis and recommendations for treatment of PPS. We conducted a review of the medical literature in the MEDLINE database. The search was restricted to studies conducted in humans that had been published as complete works in English and/or Spanish up to December 2004. PPS is recognised as being a specific neurological syndrome that appears several decades after the acute episode of polio; it exacerbates the motor sequelae already present in these patients and reduces their functional capacity to a point where it affects their activities of daily living. Its causation has still not been clearly identified and it constitutes a process that is difficult to diagnose and manage. In addition, no specific treatment has been developed for this condition to date. Nevertheless, the psychological and functional impact it has on its victims and the possibility of bringing about a significant improvement in the symptoms call for a greater effort by professionals to identify the clinical needs imposed by the syndrome and to break down some of the health care barriers that currently exist.

  9. Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome: clinical and genetic studies of 20 families

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leter, Edward M.; Koopmans, A. Karijn; Gille, Johan J. P.; van Os, Theo A. M.; Vittoz, Gabriëlle G.; David, Eric F. L.; Jaspars, Elisabeth H.; Postmus, Pieter E.; van Moorselaar, R. Jeroen A.; Craanen, Mikael E.; Starink, Theo M.; Menko, Fred H.

    2008-01-01

    Birt-Hogg-Dubé syndrome (BHD) is an autosomal-dominant genodermatosis characterized by skin fibrofolliculomas and an increased risk of spontaneous pneumothorax, renal and possibly other tumors. A causative gene (FLCN) on chromosome 17p has recently been identified. We here report clinical and

  10. Consistency between Research and Clinical Diagnoses of Autism among Boys and Girls with Fragile X Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klusek, J.; Martin, G. E.; Losh, M.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prior research suggests that 60-74% of males and 16-45% of females with fragile X syndrome (FXS) meet criteria for autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in research settings. However, relatively little is known about the rates of clinical diagnoses in FXS and whether such diagnoses are consistent with those performed in a research setting…

  11. Treatment of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue Lymphoma in Sjogren's Syndrome : A Retrospective Clinical Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pollard, Rodney P. E.; Pijpe, Justin; Bootsma, Hendrika; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.; Kluin, Philip M.; Roodenburg, Jan L. N.; Kallenberg, Cees G. M.; Vissink, Arjan; van Imhoff, Gustaaf W.

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To retrospectively analyze the clinical course of patients with mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT)-type lymphoma of the parotid gland and associated Sjogren's syndrome (SS). Methods. All consecutive patients with SS and MALT lymphoma (MALT-SS) diagnosed in the University Medical

  12. The Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome 1988-2008: a clinical picture in 97 patients.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titulaer, M.J.; Wirtz, P.W.; Kuks, J.B.M.; Schelhaas, H.J.; Kooi, A.J. van der; Faber, C.G.; Pol, W.L. van der; Visser, M. de; Sillevis-Smitt, P.A.; Verschuuren, J.J.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Neuromuscular symptoms in patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) develop more rapidly than in LEMS patients without a SCLC. We studied how this clinical information, which is readily available at the first consultation, can be used to

  13. The Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome 1988-2008: A clinical picture in 97 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titulaer, M. J.; Wirtz, P. W.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Schelhaas, H. J.; van der Kooi, A. J.; Faber, C. G.; van der Pol, W. L.; de Visser, M.; Sillevis Smitt, P. A. E.; Verschuuren, J. J. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular symptoms in patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) develop more rapidly than in LEMS patients without a SCLC. We studied how this clinical information, which is readily available at the first consultation, can be used to

  14. Mechanistic insights and clinical relevance of the interaction between acute coronary syndromes and lipid metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Correia, Luis C. L.; Twickler, Marcel Th B.; Sposito, Andrei C.

    2004-01-01

    As part of the acute phase reaction, lipid metabolism is significantly altered in patients with unstable coronary syndromes. The clinical relevance and the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are discussed in this article. Cholesterol reduction takes place in the first hours of an acute coronary

  15. Clinical outcome after unilateral oophorectomy in patients with polycystic ovary syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaaijk, E. M.; Hamerlynck, J. V.; Beek, J. F.; van der Veen, F.

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study is to report retrospectively on the clinical outcome of unilateral oophorectomy in 14 women with polycystic ovary syndrome who had undergone this treatment 14-18 years ago in our hospital for clomiphene citrate-resistant anovulation and long standing infertility or for

  16. Clinical and genetic features of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Down syndrome in the Nordic countries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundin, Catarina; Forestier, Erik; Klarskov Andersen, Mette

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Children with Down syndrome (DS) have an increased risk for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although previous studies have shown that DS-ALL differs clinically and genetically from non-DS-ALL, much remains to be elucidated as regards genetic and prognostic factors in DS-ALL. METHODS...

  17. "Klebsiella Pneumonia" Liver Abscess Syndrome: Case Presentation to a College Student Health Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woll, Christopher; Spotts, P. Hunter

    2016-01-01

    The authors describe a case of "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess (KPLA) in a student presenting to a university student health center. The authors also provide a review of KPLA and invasive "Klebsiella pneumoniae" liver abscess syndrome (IKPLAS), including epidemiology, common clinical manifestations, standard diagnostic…

  18. Down Syndrome in the Neurology Clinic: Too Much? Too Little? Too Late?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larner, Andrew J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a review of all patients with Down syndrome seen over a 5-year period by one consultant neurologist in general outpatient and specialist cognitive function clinics. It revealed only 7 cases in greater than 4500 general referrals (= 0.2%), all referred with suspected seizure disorders. The diagnosis of epilepsy was confirmed in…

  19. Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) with special reference to clinical aspects and diagnosis: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nodelijk, G.

    2002-01-01

    After a short introduction on Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome (PRRS) regarding the history, the first occurrence in several countries, and the causal virus, designated Lelystad virus, a description is given of the clinical aspects and several diagnostic methods. After some general

  20. European clinical guidelines for Tourette Syndrome and other tic disorders. Part III : behavioural and psychosocial interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verdellen, Cara; van de Griendt, Jolande; Hartmann, Andreas; Murphy, Tara

    This clinical guideline provides recommendations for the behavioural and psychosocial interventions (BPI) of children and adolescents with tic disorders prepared by a working group of the European Society for the Study of Tourette Syndrome (ESSTS). A systematic literature search was conducted to

  1. The Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome 1988-2008 : A clinical picture in 97 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Titulaer, M. J.; Wirtz, P. W.; Kuks, J. B. M.; Schelhaas, H. J.; van der Kooi, A. J.; Faber, C. G.; van der Pol, W. L.; de Visser, M.; Smitt, P. A. E. Sillevis; Verschuuren, J. J. G. M.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Neuromuscular symptoms in patients with Lambert-Eaton myasthenic syndrome (LEMS) and a small cell lung cancer (SCLC) develop more rapidly than in LEMS patients without a SCLC. We studied how this clinical information, which is readily available at the first consultation, can be used to

  2. Clinical, Etiologic, and Histopathologic Features of Stevens-Johnson Syndrome During an 8-Year Period at Mayo Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetter, David A.; Camilleri, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine clinical, etiologic, and histologic features of Stevens-Johnson syndrome and to identify possible correlates of clinical disease severity related to etiologic and histopathologic findings. PATIENTS AND METHODS: This is a retrospective review of patients seen at Mayo Clinic between January 1, 2000, and December 31, 2007. RESULTS: Of 27 patients (mean age, 28.1 years), 22 (81%) had involvement of 2 or more mucous membranes, and 19 (70%) had ocular involvement. Medications, most commonly antibiotics and anticonvulsants, were causative in 20 patients. Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection caused 6 of the 27 cases. Corticosteroids were the most common systemic therapy. No patients with mycoplasma-induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome had internal organ involvement or required treatment in the intensive care unit, in contrast to 4 patients each in the drug-induced group. Three patients had chronic ocular sequelae, and 1 died of complications. Biopsy specimens from 13 patients (48%) showed epidermal necrosis (8 patients), basal vacuolar change (10 patients), and subepidermal bullae (10 patients). Biopsy specimens from 11 patients displayed moderate or dense dermal infiltrate. Histologic features in drug-induced cases included individual necrotic keratinocytes, dense dermal infiltrate, red blood cell extravasation, pigment incontinence, parakeratosis, and substantial eosinophils or neutrophils. CONCLUSION: Our clinical and etiologic findings corroborate those in previous reports. M pneumoniae—induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome manifested less severely than its drug-induced counterpart. The limited number of biopsies precludes unequivocal demonstration of histopathologic differences between drug-induced and M pneumoniae—induced Stevens-Johnson syndrome. PMID:20118388

  3. The diagnostic efficacy of clinical findings and electrophysiological studies in carpal tunnel syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Buyukkoyuncu Pekel, Nilufer; Nar Senol, Pelin; Yildiz, Demet; Kilic, Ahmet Kasim; Kamaci Sener, Deniz; Seferoglu, Meral; Gunes, Aygul

    2017-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the study was to examine the relation between clinical findings, neurological examination and electrophysiological studies in diagnosing carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) and share our institutional experience in patients with CTS. Methods. Patients presenting with complaints of pain, paresthesia, and weakness in hands who diagnosed CTS between 2014 and 2015 were examined retrospectively. Demographic characteristics, clinical and neurological examination findings and electrod...

  4. Clinical and Demographic Data in Guııllaın Barre Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    TERZİ, Murat; TÜRKER, Hande; ONAR, Musa

    2007-01-01

    Objectives: Local literature still lacks epidemiological studies about Guillain Barre syndrome (GBS), whereas the foreign literature has more examples of such studies focused on clinical properties, responses to therapy and prognostic factors based on case series and population. Material and Methods: Our main concern for construction of this study was to add new data to local literature on the clinical and epidemiological properties of Turkish GBS patients. Results: In this study we reeva...

  5. [Enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome: etiology, clinical features, diagnostics, and rehabilitation of the patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelikovich, E I; Tropchina, L V; Kurilenkov, G V

    2015-01-01

    This publication was designed to describe the clinical manifestations of the enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome (EVAS), the currently employed methods for its diagnostics, and the strategy for the rehabilitation of the patients presenting with this pathological condition. In addition, the article provides information about the topographic anatomy and X-ray anatomy of the vestibular aqueduct, the specific clinical features of EVAS, the modern algorithm of its diagnostics, and the facilities for hearing rehabilitation in this group of patients.

  6. A Clinical Study of Hemorrhagic Fever with Renal Syndrome Caused by Seoul Virus Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Seung Chull; Pyo, Heui Jung; Soe, Jae Bung; Lee, Myung Seok; Kim, Young Hoon; Byun, Kwan Soo; Kang, Kyung Ho; Kim, Min Ja; Kim, Jun Suck; Lee, Ho Wang; Lee, Yong Ju; Lee, Pyung Woo; Seong, In Wha; Baek, Luck Ju

    1989-01-01

    The clinical findings of 29 patients with hemorrhagic fever with renal syndrome (HFRS) caused by Seoul virus were evaluated and compared with the previously reported clinical findings of classic Korean hemorrhagic fever (KHF). The diagnoses of these patients were made by hemagglutination inhibition test. The results were as follows: The disease occurred predominantly in males with a high incidence in the third and fourth decades of life. The highest incidence of the disease occurred in Octobe...

  7. Location of brain lesions predicts conversion of clinically isolated syndromes to multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giorgio, Antonio; Battaglini, Marco; Rocca, Maria Assunta

    2013-01-01

    : In CIS patients with hemispheric, multifocal, and brainstem/cerebellar onset, lesion probability map clusters were seen in clinically eloquent brain regions. Significant lesion clusters were not found in CIS patients with optic nerve and spinal cord onset. At 1 year, clinically definite MS developed......OBJECTIVES: To assess in a large population of patients with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) the relevance of brain lesion location and frequency in predicting 1-year conversion to multiple sclerosis (MS). METHODS: In this multicenter, retrospective study, clinical and MRI data at onset...

  8. Clinical characteristics of a sample of patients with cat eye syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Rafael Fabiano Machado; Mombach, Rômulo; Zen, Paulo Ricardo Gazzola; Graziadio, Carla; Paskulin, Giorgio Adriano

    2010-01-01

    Cat eye syndrome is considered a rare chromosome disease with a highly variable phenotype. The objective of this paper was to describe the clinical characteristics of a sample of patients with cat eye syndrome who were seen at our service. This is a retrospective analysis of a sample of six patients with diagnoses of cat eye syndrome. All of these patients’ karyotypes exhibited the presence of an additional marker chromosome, inv dup(22)(pter->q11.2::q11.2->pter). One patient also exhibited mosaicism with a lineage that had a normal chromosomal constitution. Clinical and follow-up data were collected from the patients’ medical records. Fisher’s exact test was used to compare the frequencies observed in our study with figures given in the literature (Psyndrome, was observed in two cases (33%). Congenital heart disease was detected in four patients (67%) and the main defect found was interatrial communication (75%). Uncommon findings included hemifacial microsomia combined with unilateral microtia and biliary atresia. Just one of these patients died, from chylothorax and sepsis. The phenotype observed in cat eye syndrome is highly variable and may be superimposed on the phenotype of the oculo-auriculo-vertebral spectrum. Although these patients usually have good prognosis, including from a neurological point of view, we believe that all patients with the syndrome should be assessed very early on for the presence of cardiac, biliary and anorectal malformations, which may avoid possible complications in the future, including patient deaths.

  9. [Gene mutation and clinical phenotype analysis of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X H; Ding, W W; Han, L; Liu, X R; Xiao, Y Y; Yang, J; Mo, Y

    2017-10-02

    Objective: To analyze the gene mutations and clinical features of patients with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Method: Determined the mutation domain in five cases diagnosed with Noonan syndrome and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and identified the relationship between the mutant domain and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy by searching relevant articles in pubmed database. Result: Three mutant genes (PTPN11 gene in chromosome 12, RIT1 gene in chromosome 1 and RAF1 gene in chromosome 3) in five cases all had been reported to be related to hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. The reported hypertrophic cardiomyopathy relevant genes MYPN, MYH6 and MYBP3 had also been found in case 1 and 2. Patients with same gene mutation had different clinical manifestations. Both case 4 and 5 had RAF1 mutation (c.770C>T). However, case 4 had special face, low IQ, mild pulmonary artery stenosis, and only mild ventricular hypertrophy. Conclusion: Noonan syndrome is a genetic heterogeneity disease. Our study identified specific gene mutations that could result in Noonan syndrome with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy through molecular biology methods. The results emphasize the importance of gene detection in the management of Noonan syndrome.

  10. PHACE syndrome: MRI of intracerebral vascular anomalies and clinical findings in a series of 12 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bracken, Jennifer; Robinson, Ian; Snow, Aisling; Rea, David; Phelan, Ethna [Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Dublin (Ireland); Watson, Rosemarie; Irvine, Alan D. [Our Lady' s Children' s Hospital, Department of Dermatology, Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-09-15

    PHACE (posterior fossa defects, haemangioma, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, eye abnormalities) syndrome describes a constellation of abnormalities that can occur in association with segmental craniofacial infantile haemangioma. To report the spectrum of clinical and imaging abnormalities seen in a cohort of children. A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of all patients diagnosed with PHACE syndrome between 1998 and 2009 was performed. Information sought included patient demographics, craniofacial segments involved, imaging findings and other extracutaneous abnormalities. Twelve patients were diagnosed with PHACE syndrome over 11 years. All patients had a segmental craniofacial haemangioma. Involved facial segments, in order of frequency, were frontotemporal (12), maxillary (8), mandibular (5) and frontonasal (1). The most common extracutaneous abnormalities were neurovascular anomalies (10), with many patients having multiple anomalies. The spectrum of arterial anomalies ranged from hypoplasia (9) to ectasia (3), anomalous origin/course (2) and persistent fetal anastomosis (2). Other anomalies found included cardiac anomalies (3), coarctation of the aorta (2), posterior fossa malformations (1) and sternal region anomalies (1). Intracranial anomalies are the most common extracutaneous feature of PHACE syndrome. The contribution of the radiologist in the recognition of such anomalies is important for the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome. (orig.)

  11. PHACE syndrome: MRI of intracerebral vascular anomalies and clinical findings in a series of 12 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracken, Jennifer; Robinson, Ian; Snow, Aisling; Rea, David; Phelan, Ethna; Watson, Rosemarie; Irvine, Alan D.

    2011-01-01

    PHACE (posterior fossa defects, haemangioma, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, eye abnormalities) syndrome describes a constellation of abnormalities that can occur in association with segmental craniofacial infantile haemangioma. To report the spectrum of clinical and imaging abnormalities seen in a cohort of children. A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of all patients diagnosed with PHACE syndrome between 1998 and 2009 was performed. Information sought included patient demographics, craniofacial segments involved, imaging findings and other extracutaneous abnormalities. Twelve patients were diagnosed with PHACE syndrome over 11 years. All patients had a segmental craniofacial haemangioma. Involved facial segments, in order of frequency, were frontotemporal (12), maxillary (8), mandibular (5) and frontonasal (1). The most common extracutaneous abnormalities were neurovascular anomalies (10), with many patients having multiple anomalies. The spectrum of arterial anomalies ranged from hypoplasia (9) to ectasia (3), anomalous origin/course (2) and persistent fetal anastomosis (2). Other anomalies found included cardiac anomalies (3), coarctation of the aorta (2), posterior fossa malformations (1) and sternal region anomalies (1). Intracranial anomalies are the most common extracutaneous feature of PHACE syndrome. The contribution of the radiologist in the recognition of such anomalies is important for the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome. (orig.)

  12. PHACE syndrome: MRI of intracerebral vascular anomalies and clinical findings in a series of 12 patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bracken, Jennifer

    2012-02-01

    BACKGROUND: PHACE (posterior fossa defects, haemangioma, arterial anomalies, coarctation of the aorta and cardiac defects, eye abnormalities) syndrome describes a constellation of abnormalities that can occur in association with segmental craniofacial infantile haemangioma. OBJECTIVE: To report the spectrum of clinical and imaging abnormalities seen in a cohort of children. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A retrospective review of the clinical and imaging records of all patients diagnosed with PHACE syndrome between 1998 and 2009 was performed. Information sought included patient demographics, craniofacial segments involved, imaging findings and other extracutaneous abnormalities. RESULTS: Twelve patients were diagnosed with PHACE syndrome over 11 years. All patients had a segmental craniofacial haemangioma. Involved facial segments, in order of frequency, were frontotemporal (12), maxillary (8), mandibular (5) and frontonasal (1). The most common extracutaneous abnormalities were neurovascular anomalies (10), with many patients having multiple anomalies. The spectrum of arterial anomalies ranged from hypoplasia (9) to ectasia (3), anomalous origin\\/course (2) and persistent fetal anastomosis (2). Other anomalies found included cardiac anomalies (3), coarctation of the aorta (2), posterior fossa malformations (1) and sternal region anomalies (1). CONCLUSION: Intracranial anomalies are the most common extracutaneous feature of PHACE syndrome. The contribution of the radiologist in the recognition of such anomalies is important for the diagnosis of PHACE syndrome.

  13. Currents issues in cardiorespiratory care of patients with post-polio syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Orsini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Post-polio syndrome (PPS is a condition that affects polio survivors years after recovery from an initial acute attack of the poliomyelitis virus. Most often, polio survivors experience a gradual new weakening in muscles that were previously affected by the polio infection. The actual incidence of cardiovascular diseases (CVDs in individuals suffering from PPS is not known. However, there is a reason to suspect that individuals with PPS might be at increased risk. Method A search for papers was made in the databases Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed with the following keywords: post polio syndrome, cardiorespiratory and rehabilitation in English, French and Spanish languages. Although we targeted only seek current studies on the topic in question, only the relevant (double-blind, randomized-controlled and consensus articles were considered. Results and Discussion Certain features of PPS such as generalized fatigue, generalized and specific muscle weakness, joint and/or muscle pain may result in physical inactivity deconditioning obesity and dyslipidemia. Respiratory difficulties are common and may result in hypoxemia. Conclusion Only when evaluated and treated promptly, somE patients can obtain the full benefits of the use of respiratory muscles aids as far as quality of life is concerned.

  14. Agenesis of the Corpus Callosum and Aicardi Syndrome: A Neuroimaging and Clinical Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govil-Dalela, T; Kumar, A; Agarwal, R; Chugani, H T

    2017-03-01

    Agenesis of the corpus callosum can occur in individuals with epilepsy, either in isolation or as part of various neurological conditions, such as Aicardi syndrome. In this study, we evaluated the clinical and neuroradiological differences between children with nonsyndromic agenesis of the corpus callosum and those with Aicardi syndrome. We evaluated 31 children with epilepsy and agenesis of the corpus callosum (11 males, 20 females), 14 of whom had Aicardi syndrome (all females). We compared their clinical evaluations, radiological and electrophysiological findings, treatments, and their outcome. Median age at seizure onset was lower in the Aicardi syndrome group compared with nonsyndromic agenesis of the corpus callosum (two versus five months, P = 0.006). The developmental impairment in terms of verbalization and ambulation was significantly worse in patients with Aicardi syndrome. The severity of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and glucose metabolism positron emission tomography (PET) involvement was more extensive in children with Aicardi syndrome than in nonsyndromic agenesis of the corpus callosum. In both groups, the PET scan showed a much more extensive area of involvement than suggested by the MRI scan. Four children underwent epilepsy surgery with significant improvement, but were not seizure free. Outcome was worse in those with PET showing abnormalities in the nonsurgical hemisphere despite normal appearance on MRI. All children who did not undergo surgery also continued to have seizures at last follow-up. Children with Aicardi syndrome have earlier seizure onset, worse developmental outcome, and larger areas of brain abnormalities on neuroimaging compared with nonsyndromic agenesis of the corpus callosum patients. PET reveals larger area of abnormalities, compared with MRI. Although epilepsy surgery in agenesis of the corpus callosum may offer some palliative benefit in seizure frequency, none of our patients became seizure free. Copyright

  15. Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases: From the Bench to the Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendrick, Donna L; Diehl, Anna Mae; Topor, Lisa S; Dietert, Rodney R; Will, Yvonne; La Merrill, Michele A; Bouret, Sebastien; Varma, Vijayalaskshmi; Hastings, Kenneth L; Schug, Thaddeus T; Emeigh Hart, Susan G; Burleson, Florence G

    2017-11-02

    Metabolic Syndrome and Associated Diseases: From the Bench to the Clinic, a Society of Toxicology Contemporary Concepts in Toxicology (CCT) workshop was held on March 11, 2017. The meeting was convened to raise awareness of metabolic syndrome and its associated diseases and serve as a melting pot with scientists of multiple disciplines (e.g., toxicologists, clinicians, regulators) so as to spur research and understanding of this condition. The criteria for metabolic syndrome include obesity, dyslipidemia (low HDL and/or elevated triglycerides), elevated blood pressure, and alterations in glucose metabolism. It can lead to a greater potential of type 2 diabetes, lipid disorders, cardiovascular disease, hepatic steatosis and other circulatory disorders. While there are no approved drugs specifically for this syndrome, many drugs target diseases associated with this syndrome thus potentially increasing the likelihood of drug-drug interactions. There is currently significant research focusing on understanding the key pathways that control metabolism, which would be likely targets of risk factors (e.g., exposure to xenobiotics, genetics) and lifestyle factors (e.g., microbiome, nutrition, and exercise) that contribute to metabolic syndrome. Understanding these pathways could also lead to the development of pharmaceutical interventions. As individuals with metabolic syndrome have signs similar to that of toxic responses (e.g., oxidative stress and inflammation) and organ dysfunction, these alterations should be taken into account in drug development. With the increasing frequency of metabolic syndrome in the general population, the idea of a "normal" individual may need to be redefined. This paper reports on the substance and outcomes of this workshop. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Toxicology 2017. This work is written by US Government employees and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. [Clinical manifestation and cytogenetic analysis of 607 patients with Turner syndrome].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jiemei; Liu, Zhiying; Xia, Pei; Lai, Yi; Wei, Yangjun; Liu, Yanyan; Chen, Jiurong; Qin, Li; Xie, Liangyu; Wang, He

    2017-02-10

    To explore the correlation between cytogenetic findings and clinical manifestations of Turner syndrome. 607 cases of cytogenetically diagnosed Turner syndrome, including those with a major manifestation of Turner syndrome, were analyzed with conventional G-banding. Correlation between the karyotypes and clinical features were analyzed. Among the 607 cases, there were 154 cases with monosomy X (25.37%). Mosaicism monosomy X was found in 240 patients (39.54%), which included 194 (80.83%) with a low proportion of 45,X (3 ≤ the number of 45, X ≤5, while the normal cells ≥ 30). Structural X chromosome abnormalities were found in 173 patients (28.50%). A supernumerary marker chromosome was found in 40 cases (6.59%). Most patients with typical manifestations of Turner syndrome were under 11 years of age and whose karyotypes were mainly 45,X. The karyotype of patients between 11 and 18 years old was mainly 45,X, 46,X,i(X)(q10) and mos45,X/46,X,i(X)(q10), which all had primary amenorrhea in addition to the typical clinical manifestations. The karyotype of patients over 18 years of age were mainly mosaicism with a low proportion of 45,X, whom all had primary infertility. 53 patients had a history of pregnancy, which included 48 with non-structural abnormalities of X chromosome and 5 with abnormal structure of X chromosome. Generally, the higher proportion of cells with an abnormal karyotype, the more severe were the clinical symptoms and the earlier clinical recognition. Karyotyping analysis can provide guidance for the early diagnosis of Turner syndrome, especially those with a low proportion of 45,X.

  17. Sleep disorders and their clinical significance in children with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stores, Gregory; Stores, Rebecca

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to review basic aspects of sleep disorders in children with Down syndrome in the light of present-day findings of such disorders in children in general, including other groups of children with developmental disabilities. A literature search of adverse developmental effects of sleep disturbance, types of sleep disturbance in children with Down syndrome, their aetiology, including possible contributions of physical and psychiatric comorbidities and medication effects, principles of assessment and diagnosis, and treatment issues, was carried out. Sleep disturbance is particularly common in children with developmental disorders including Down syndrome. Although there are just three basic sleep problems (sleeplessness or insomnia, excessive daytime sleepiness, and parasomnias) there are many possible underlying causes (sleep disorders), the nature of which dictates the particular treatment required. In children with Down syndrome, in addition to the same influences in other children, various comorbid physical and psychiatric conditions are capable of disturbing sleep. Possible adverse medication effects also need to be considered. Screening for sleep disorders and their causes should be routine; positive findings call for detailed diagnosis. Management should acknowledge the likely multifactorial aetiology of the sleep disorders in Down syndrome. Successful treatment can be expected to alleviate significantly the difficulties of both child and family. © The Authors. Developmental Medicine & Child Neurology © 2012 Mac Keith Press.

  18. Current trends in research and clinical issues in the study of personality and its disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Erik; Sørensen, Per; Pedersen, Liselotte

    2014-01-01

    The International Society for the Study of Personality Disorders (ISSPD) celebrated its 25th anniversary in September 2013 in Copenhagen and commemorated the First International Congress at the same site. The overall theme of the congress was "Bridging Personality and Psychopathology: The Person...... Behind the Illness." More than 400 abstracts were submitted, and the program included 8 keynote presentations, 18 invited symposia, a debate on current controversial issues in the classification of personality disorders (Fossati, Tyrer, Livesley, and Krueger), an ISSPD award lecture (Silk), a jubilee...... trends in research and clinical interests in personality disorders. The keynote video presentations, invited symposia, and slide presentations are freely available at www.isspd2013.com....

  19. Clinically relevant safety issues associated with St. John's wort product labels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutledge Jennifer C

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background St. John's wort (SJW, used to treat depression, is popular in the USA, Canada, and parts of Europe. However, there are documented interactions between SJW and prescription medications including warfarin, cyclosporine, indinavir, and oral contraceptives. One source of information about these safety considerations is the product label. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinically relevant safety information included on labeling in a nationally representative sample of SJW products from the USA. Methods Eight clinically relevant safety issues were identified: drug interactions (SJW-HIV medications, SJW-immunosupressants, SJW-oral contraceptives, and SJW-warfarin, contraindications (bipolar disorder, therapeutic duplication (antidepressants, and general considerations (phototoxicity and advice to consult a healthcare professional (HCP. A list of SJW products was identified to assess their labels. Percentages and totals were used to present findings. Results Of the seventy-four products evaluated, no product label provided information for all 8 evaluation criteria. Three products (4.1% provided information on 7 of the 8 criteria. Four products provided no safety information whatsoever. Percentage of products with label information was: SJW-HIV (8.1%, SJW-immunosupressants (5.4%, SJW-OCPs (8.1%, SJW-warfarin (5.4%, bipolar (1.4%, antidepressants (23.0%, phototoxicity (51.4%, and consult HCP (87.8%. Other safety-related information on labels included warnings about pregnancy (74.3%, lactation (64.9%, discontinue if adverse reaction (23.0%, and not for use in patients under 18 years old (13.5%. The average number of a priori safety issues included on a product label was 1.91 (range 0–8 for 23.9% completeness. Conclusion The vast majority of SJW products fail to adequately address clinically relevant safety issues on their labeling. A few products do provide an acceptable amount of information on clinically relevant safety

  20. Clinical Assessment of Tourette Syndrome and Tic Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Stephanie; Leckman, James F.; Bloch, Michael H.

    2013-01-01

    Tourette Syndrome (TS) is a neuropsychiatric disorder involving multiple motor and phonic tics. Tics, which usually begin between the ages of 6 and 8, are sudden, rapid, stereotyped, and apparently purposeless movements or sounds that involve discrete muscle groups. Individuals with TS experience a variety of different sensory phenomena, including premonitory urges prior to tics and somatic hypersensitivity due to impaired sensorimotor gating. In addition to other conditions, stress, anxiety, fatigue, or other heightened emotional states tend to exacerbate tics, while relaxation, playing sports, and focused concentration on a specific task tend to alleviate tic symptoms. Ninety percent of children with TS also have comorbid conditions, such as Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD), or an impulse control disorder. These disorders often cause more problems for the child both at home and at school than tics do alone. Proper diagnosis and treatment of TS involves appropriate evaluation and recognition, not only of tics, but also of these associated conditions. PMID:23206664

  1. Clinical Report: Germline Mosaicism in Cornelia de Lange Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Thomas P.; Lazebnik, Noam; Clark, Dinah M.; Vengoechea, Jaime; Cohen, Leslie; Kaur, Maninder; Konczal, Laura; Crowe, Carol A.; Corteville, Jane E.; Nowaczyk, Malgorzata J.; Byrne, Janice L.; Jackson, Laird G.; Krantz, Ian D.

    2012-01-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a genetic disorder associated with delayed growth, intellectual disability, limb reduction defects and characteristic facial features. Germline mosaicism has been a described mechanism for CdLS when there are several affected offspring of apparently unaffected parents. Presently, the recurrence risk for CdLS has been estimated to be as high as 1.5%; however, this figure may be an underrepresentation. We report on the molecularly defined germline mosaicism cases from a large CdLS database, representing the first large case series on germline mosaicism in CdLS. Of the 12 families, eight have been previously described; however, four have not. No one specific gene mutation, either in the NIPBL or the SMC1A gene, was associated with an increased risk for germline mosaicism. Suspected or confirmed cases of germline mosaicism in our database range from a conservative 3.4% up to 5.4% of our total cohort. In conclusion, the potential reproductive recurrence risk due to germline mosiacism should be addressed in prenatal counseling for all families who have had a previously affected pregnancy or child with CdLS. PMID:22581668

  2. [Prune Belly syndrome: epidemiologic, clinic and therapeutic aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diao, B; Diallo, Y; Fall, P A; Ngom, G; Fall, B; Ndoye, A K; Fall, I; Ba, M; Ndoye, M; Diagne, B A

    2008-07-01

    Prune Belly syndrome (PBS) is a rare complex malformation with male predominance. His pathogeny is not yet completely elucidated. The goal of this work is to analyze the epidemiological, anatomoclinical and treatment aspects of a retrospective trial in Aristide-Le-Dantec Hospital. We carried out a retrospective study about 22 cases collected in the departments of urology-andrology and pediatric surgery in Aristide-Le-Dantec Hospital between April 1995 and November 2004. The mean age of the patients was 15 months with extremes of one day and 10 years. The somatic examination revealed 20 cases of complete abdominal muscle aplasia, one right partial form and the last case had a left partial form. Nineteen patients were managed with conservative treatment and three patients benefited a surgical act for urinary abnormalities. The Montfort intervention was performed in two patients respectively aged eight and 10 years. The orchidopexy, stage 1, by Fowler-Stephens technique was performed in 13 cases. Five cases of death and nine cases of testicular atrophy after orchidopexy occurred. The followings were satisfactory in the three operated patients for urinary abnormalities. The renal failure is the main cause of death. The management of the urinary tract abnormalities must be performed individually. The testis descending should be performed in newborn period to enhance the fertility chances. The abdominoplasty also should be done early for aesthetic reason and to improve pulmonary, defecation, and voiding functions.

  3. Tics and Tourette syndrome: clinical evaluation of 44 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teive Hélio A.G.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated 44 patients with tics and Tourette's syndrome (TS emphasising the age of onset of symptoms, sex, classification and localization of tics, associated symptoms and signs and comorbidities. Thirty-three patients (75.2% had TS defined criteria whereas 10 (22.7% had chronic motor and/or vocal tics. Simple motor tics were found in 43 cases (97.7%, mainly affecting the eyes (43.2%, mouth (43.2%, face (34.1%. Simple vocal tics occurred in 33 (75%. Coprolalia was found in just 6 cases (13.6% and copropraxia in just 2 (4.5%. Obsessive compulsive disorder and/or symptoms were found in 26 cases (59.1% and attention deficit in 17 (38.6%. Eighteen patients (40.9% had other disorders, such as alcoholism, tabagism, drug abuse, affective disorders, anxiety, sleep and learning disorders. The data obtained are similar to those found by other authors. We highlight the low frequency of coprolalia, as well as the associated neuropsychiatric disorders.

  4. The clinical and molecular spectrum of androgen insensitivity syndromes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiort, O.; Sinnecker, G.H.G.; Holterhus, P.M.; Nitsche, E.M.; Kruse, K. [Medical Univ. of Luebeck (Germany)

    1996-05-03

    Androgen insensitivity syndromes (AIS) are due to end-organ resistance to androgenic steroids in males leading to defective virilization of the external genitalia. The phenotype encompasses a wide array of genital ambiguity and may range from completely female to undervirilized but unequivocally male with infertility. This disorder is caused by mutations of the androgen receptor and is an X-linked recessive trait. We have studied 47 patients with AIS and have characterized the underlying molecular abnormality in the androgen receptor gene. Twenty patients had complete AIS and twenty-seven had partial AIS. Of the latter, 11 were of predominantly female phenotypic appearance and gender was assigned accordingly, while 16 were raised as males. Within the group of complete AIS, two patients had gross deletions within the gene, one had a small deletion, and one had an insertion. In the other patients with complete AIS, as well as all individuals with partial AIS, single nucleotide substitutions within the coding region were detected, each leading to an amino acid alteration. Seven codons were involved in more than one mutation in different cases. In addition, in one patient with spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy, an elongation of a glutamine-repeat was characterized. We conclude that mutations in the androgen receptor gene may be present throughout the whole coding region. However, our study provides evidence that several mutational hot spots exist. 18 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Clinical Practice Guideline of Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Jae Cho

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available There is no well-stated practical guideline for mechanically ventilated patients with or without acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS. We generate strong (1 and weak (2 grade of recommendations based on high (A, moderate (B and low (C grade in the quality of evidence. In patients with ARDS, we recommend low tidal volume ventilation (1A and prone position if it is not contraindicated (1B to reduce their mortality. However, we did not support high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (1B and inhaled nitric oxide (1A as a standard treatment. We also suggest high positive end-expiratory pressure (2B, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation as a rescue therapy (2C, and neuromuscular blockage for 48 hours after starting mechanical ventilation (2B. The application of recruitment maneuver may reduce mortality (2B, however, the use of systemic steroids cannot reduce mortality (2B. In mechanically ventilated patients, we recommend light sedation (1B and low tidal volume even without ARDS (1B and suggest lung protective ventilation strategy during the operation to lower the incidence of lung complications including ARDS (2B. Early tracheostomy in mechanically ventilated patients can be performed only in limited patients (2A. In conclusion, of 12 recommendations, nine were in the management of ARDS, and three for mechanically ventilated patients.

  6. Angelman syndrome: review of clinical and molecular aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bird LM

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Lynne M Bird1Department of Pediatrics, University of California, Division of Genetics, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, California, USAAbstract: “Angelman syndrome” (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder whose main features are intellectual disability, lack of speech, seizures, and a characteristic behavioral profile. The behavioral features of AS include a happy demeanor, easily provoked laughter, short attention span, hypermotoric behavior, mouthing of objects, sleep disturbance, and an affinity for water. Microcephaly and subtle dysmorphic features, as well as ataxia and other movement disturbances, are additional features seen in most affected individuals. AS is due to deficient expression of the ubiquitin protein ligase E3A (UBE3A gene, which displays paternal imprinting. There are four molecular classes of AS, and some genotype–phenotype correlations have emerged. Much remains to be understood regarding how insufficiency of E6-AP, the protein product of UBE3A, results in the observed neurodevelopmental deficits. Studies of mouse models of AS have implicated UBE3A in experience-dependent synaptic remodeling.Keywords: Angelman syndrome, chromosome 15q11-13, UBE3A, imprinting

  7. Cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome: Clinical, radiological, and genetic findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tooley, Madeleine; Lynch, Danielle; Bernier, Francois; Parboosingh, Jillian; Bhoj, Elizabeth; Zackai, Elaine; Calder, Alistair; Itasaki, Nobue; Wakeling, Emma; Scott, Richard; Lees, Melissa; Clayton-Smith, Jill; Blyth, Moira; Morton, Jenny; Shears, Debbie; Kini, Usha; Homfray, Tessa; Clarke, Angus; Barnicoat, Angela; Wallis, Colin; Hewitson, Rebecca; Offiah, Amaka; Saunders, Michael; Langton-Hewer, Simon; Hilliard, Tom; Davis, Peter; Smithson, Sarah

    2016-05-01

    Cerebro-Costo-Mandibular syndrome (CCMS) is a rare autosomal dominant condition comprising branchial arch-derivative malformations with striking rib-gaps. Affected patients often have respiratory difficulties, associated with upper airway obstruction, reduced thoracic capacity, and scoliosis. We describe a series of 12 sporadic and 4 familial patients including 13 infants/children and 3 adults. Severe micrognathia and reduced numbers of ribs with gaps are consistent findings. Cleft palate, feeding difficulties, respiratory distress, tracheostomy requirement, and scoliosis are common. Additional malformations such as horseshoe kidney, hypospadias, and septal heart defect may occur. Microcephaly and significant developmental delay are present in a small minority of patients. Key radiological findings are of a narrow thorax, multiple posterior rib gaps and abnormal costo-transverse articulation. A novel finding in 2 patients is bilateral accessory ossicles arising from the hyoid bone. Recently, specific mutations in SNRPB, which encodes components of the major spliceosome, have been found to cause CCMS. These mutations cluster in an alternatively spliced regulatory exon and result in altered SNRPB expression. DNA was available from 14 patients and SNRPB mutations were identified in 12 (4 previously reported). Eleven had recurrent mutations previously described in patients with CCMS and one had a novel mutation in the alternative exon. These results confirm the specificity of SNRPB mutations in CCMS and provide further evidence for the role of spliceosomal proteins in craniofacial and thoracic development. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Status quo, issues, and challenges for acupuncture research evidence: an overview of clinical and fundamental studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yujia; Shen, Jiantong; Zhong, Dake; Li, Youping; Wu, Taixiang

    2012-02-01

    To systematically review the status quo, issues, and challenges from home and abroad for acupuncture research evidence, in order to identify global acupuncture research datum lines and policy-making evidence for future research direction. To carry out computed searching through the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, CNKI, SCI, WHO-ICTRP, and Chinese Clinical Trials Registry (ChiCTR) (up to January, 2010) for acupuncture-related secondary studies (systematic reviews and meta-analysis), animal randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published human RCTs (fundamental research with the human body or human body specimens as subjects), and registered on-going clinical trials (regardless of subject recruiting), and to analyze yearly publishing trends and research hotspots on subject headings for secondary studies and published and registered RCTs. (1) 63.7% of acupuncture clinical RCTs were published in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), while RCTs published in MEDLINE, SCI, and CNKI each accounted for a third of all acupuncture fundamental RCTs. Publishing trends of acupuncture clinical RCTs indicated three periods - a period of slow growth before 1998, a period of gradual growth between 1999 and 2005, and a period of rapid growth after 2005. While few fundamental acupuncture RCTs were published before 2004, the period after 2005 demonstrated an increasing trend, but did not exhibit the same rapid growth as with clinical RCTs. Publication of Cochrane systematic reviews (CSRs) exhibited a time-dependent effect with acupuncture clinical RCTs, a trend that became more pronounced as time passed, while time intervals between CSR and acupuncture clinical RCT publications decreased. (2) Nine SRs were published in China, accounting for 30% of the global total of 29, while China's 68 RCTs accounted for 21% of global RCTs. Among five CSRs affirming the effects of acupuncture, only one contained four RCTs from China, which accounted for 10% of all RCTs included in

  9. The concept of incomplete fibromyalgia syndrome: comparison of incomplete fibromyalgia syndrome with fibromyalgia syndrome by 1990 ACR classification criteria and its implications for newer criteria and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Muhammad B; Aldag, Jean C

    2012-03-01

    The 1990 American College of Rheumatology (ACR) classification criteria for fibromyalgia/fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) has 2 components: (a) widespread pain (WSP) and (b) presence of 11 or more tender points (TP) among possible 18 sites. Some clinic patients fulfill 1 component but not the other. We have considered these patients to have incomplete FMS (IFMS). The purpose of this study was to examine the clinical and psychological differences between IFMS and FMS (by 1990 ACR criteria) because such comparison may be helpful to diagnose patients in the clinic. Six hundred consecutive patients referred to our rheumatology clinic with a diagnosis of FMS were examined by a standard protocol to determine whether they fulfilled the 1990 criteria for FMS. Both IFMS and FMS groups were compared in demographic, clinical, and psychological variables using appropriate statistical methods. One hundred twelve (18.7%) patients did not satisfy the 1990 ACR criteria and were classified as IFMS. Symptoms in IFMS and FMS were similar, generally with less frequent and less severe symptoms in the IFMS group. In IFMS, no significant difference was found among the WSP and TP component subgroups. Both TP and WSP were correlated with important features of FMS. Fulfillment of the ACR 1990 criteria is not necessary for a diagnosis of FMS in the clinic. For diagnosis and management of FMS in the clinical setting, IFMS patients, along with consideration of the total clinical picture, may be considered to have FMS, albeit generally mild.

  10. Issues and promise in clinical studies of botanicals with anticonvulsant potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstein, Dana

    2015-11-01

    Botanicals are increasingly used by people with epilepsy worldwide. However, despite abundant preclinical data on the anticonvulsant properties of many herbal remedies, there are very few human studies assessing safety and efficacy of these products in epilepsy. Additionally, the methodology of most of these studies only marginally meets the requirements of evidence-based medicine. Although the currently available evidence for the use of cannabinoids in epilepsy is similarly lacking, several carefully designed and well controlled industry-sponsored clinical trials of cannabis derivatives are planned to be completed in the next couple of years, providing the needed reliable data for the use of these products. The choice of the best botanical candidates with anticonvulsant properties and their assessment in well-designed clinical trials may significantly improve our ability to effectively and safely treat patients with epilepsy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled "Botanicals for Epilepsy". Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Update on Clinical Features and Brain Abnormalities in Neurogenetics Syndromes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackowski, Andrea Parolin; Laureano, Maura Regina; Del'Aquilla, Marco Antonio; de Moura, Luciana Monteiro; Assuncao, Idaiane; Silva, Ivaldo; Schwartzman, Jose Salomao

    2011-01-01

    Neuroimaging methods represent a critical tool in efforts to join the study of the neurobiology of genes with the neurobiology of behaviour, and to understand the neurodevelopmental pathways that give rise to cognitive and behavioural impairments. This article reviews the clinical features and highlights studies with a focus on the relevant…

  12. Clinical presentation of Griscelli syndrome type 2 and spectrum of RAB27A mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meeths, Marie; Bryceson, Yenan T; Rudd, Eva

    2010-01-01

    Griscelli syndrome type 2 (GS2) is an autosomal-recessive immunodeficiency caused by mutations in RAB27A, clinically characterized by partial albinism and haemophagocytic lymphohistocytosis (HLH). We evaluated the frequency of RAB27A mutations in 21 unrelated patients with haemophagocytic syndromes...... without mutations in familial HLH (FHL) causing genes or an established diagnosis of GS2. In addition, we report three patients with known GS2. Moreover, neurological involvement and RAB27A mutations in previously published patients with genetically verified GS2 are reviewed....

  13. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  14. Positron emission tomography in the Rett syndrome; Clinical, biochemical and pathologicl correlates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, S. (Kennedy Institute, Baltimore, MD (United States)); Wong, D.F.; Kitt, C.; Wenk, G.; Moser, H.W.

    1992-05-01

    A consistent constellation of clinical signs and symptoms define the Rett syndrome, the most prominent of which are disorders of movement and tone. Preliminary pathologic and neurochemical data indicate predominant involvement of the nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways and the cholinergic system of the basal forebrain region. The age of onset differentiates the Rett syndrome from Alzheimer and Parkinson disease with similar lesions. PET scanning makes it possible to relate the chemistry of the brain to function by measuring the number and affinity of neuroreceptors, metabolism in specific brain regions, and provide important determinants of the underlying mechanisms in disease states. (author).

  15. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: Median arcuate ligament syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kiyasrttin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Ayhan, Lacin Tatli [Dept. of Radiology, Sakarya University Medical Faculty, Sakarya (Turkmenistan)

    2014-08-15

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  16. Clinical and radiologic review of uncommon cause of profound iron deficiency anemia: median arcuate ligament syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunduz, Yasemin; Asil, Kıyasettin; Aksoy, Yakup Ersel; Tatlı Ayhan, Laçin

    2014-01-01

    Median arcuate ligament syndrome is an anatomic and clinical entity characterized by dynamic compression of the proximal celiac artery by the median arcuate ligament, which leads to postprandial epigastric pain, vomiting, and weight loss. These symptoms are usually nonspecific and are easily misdiagnosed as functional dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease, or gastropathy. In this report, we presented a 72-year-old male patient with celiac artery compression syndrome causing recurrent abdominal pain associated with gastric ulcer and iron deficiency anemia. This association is relatively uncommon and therefore not well determined. In addition, we reported the CT angiography findings and three-dimensional reconstructions of this rare case.

  17. Currents issues in cardiorespiratory care of patients with post-polio syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Marco; Lopes, Agnaldo J; Guimarães, Fernando S; Freitas, Marcos R G; Nascimento, Osvaldo J M; Anna, Mauricio de Sant'; Moreira, Pedro; Fiorelli, Stenio; Ferreira, Ana Carolina A F; Pupe, Camila; Bastos, Victor H V; Pessoa, Bruno; Nogueira, Carlos B; Schmidt, Beny; Souza, Olivia G; Davidovich, Eduardo R; Oliveira, Acary S B; Ribeiro, Pedro

    2016-07-01

    A search for papers was made in the databases Bireme, Scielo and Pubmed with the following keywords: post polio syndrome, cardiorespiratory and rehabilitation in English, French and Spanish languages. Although we targeted only seek current studies on the topic in question, only the relevant (double-blind, randomized-controlled and consensus articles) were considered. Certain features of PPS such as generalized fatigue, generalized and specific muscle weakness, joint and/or muscle pain may result in physical inactivity deconditioning obesity and dyslipidemia. Respiratory difficulties are common and may result in hypoxemia. Only when evaluated and treated promptly, somE patients can obtain the full benefits of the use of respiratory muscles aids as far as quality of life is concerned.

  18. Guillain-Barre Syndrome in Postpartum Period: Rehabilitation Issues and Outcome - Three Case Reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anupam; Patil, Maitreyi; Khanna, Meeka; Krishnan, Rashmi; Taly, Arun B

    2017-01-01

    We report three females who developed Guillain-Barre Syndrome in postpartum period (within 6 weeks of delivery) and were admitted in the Neurological Rehabilitation Department for rehabilitation after the initial diagnosis and treatment in the Department of Neurology. The first case, axonal variant (acute motor axonal neuropathy [AMAN]) had worst presentation at the time of admission, recovered well by the time of discharge. The second case, acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy variant and the third case, AMAN variant presented at the late postpartum period. Medical treatment was sought much later due to various reasons and both the patients had an incomplete recovery at discharge. Apart from their presentations, rehabilitation management is also discussed in some detail.

  19. Guillain–Barre Syndrome in Postpartum Period: Rehabilitation Issues and Outcome – Three Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anupam; Patil, Maitreyi; Khanna, Meeka; Krishnan, Rashmi; Taly, Arun B.

    2017-01-01

    We report three females who developed Guillain–Barre Syndrome in postpartum period (within 6 weeks of delivery) and were admitted in the Neurological Rehabilitation Department for rehabilitation after the initial diagnosis and treatment in the Department of Neurology. The first case, axonal variant (acute motor axonal neuropathy [AMAN]) had worst presentation at the time of admission, recovered well by the time of discharge. The second case, acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy variant and the third case, AMAN variant presented at the late postpartum period. Medical treatment was sought much later due to various reasons and both the patients had an incomplete recovery at discharge. Apart from their presentations, rehabilitation management is also discussed in some detail. PMID:28694640

  20. Guillain–Barre syndrome in postpartum period: Rehabilitation issues and outcome – Three case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupam Gupta

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We report three females who developed Guillain–Barre Syndrome in postpartum period (within 6 weeks of delivery and were admitted in the Neurological Rehabilitation Department for rehabilitation after the initial diagnosis and treatment in the Department of Neurology. The first case, axonal variant (acute motor axonal neuropathy [AMAN] had worst presentation at the time of admission, recovered well by the time of discharge. The second case, acute motor sensory axonal neuropathy variant and the third case, AMAN variant presented at the late postpartum period. Medical treatment was sought much later due to various reasons and both the patients had an incomplete recovery at discharge. Apart from their presentations, rehabilitation management is also discussed in some detail.