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Sample records for syndactyly

  1. Management of complicated syndactyly in Apert's syndrome: our ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Management of hand deformities in Apert's acro-cephalo-syndactyly usually poses a great challenge to the reconstructive hand surgeon due to grossly abnormal anatomy of skeletal and soft tissue structures associated with a progressive disease process. Patients and methods: We retrospectively reviewed all ...

  2. Article Syndactyly in Bufo maculatus Hallowell (Amphibia: Anura ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syndactyly in five specimens of Bufo maculatus, all from a small area 25 km west of Harare, Zimbabwe, is described. In three cases only one pair of digits was involved (two of the hand, one of the foot); in a fourth, two pairs of digits on one foot were involved; and in the fifth case, all digits of one hand were involved together ...

  3. Syndactyly type IV/hexadactyly of feet associated with unilateral absence of the tibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rambaud-Cousson, A; Dudin, A A; Zuaiter, A S; Thalji, A

    1991-08-01

    We report on a newborn girl with syndactyly type IV, hexadactyly of feet, and right tibial hemimelia. She has 5 other relatives with identical anomalies of the hands and feet transmitted as an autosomal dominant trait. Syndactyly type IV is rare as is absence of the tibia. We suggest the possibility that syndactyly type IV may be a more complex entity, including lower limb malformations, and transmitted as autosomal dominant with variable expressivity.

  4. Bilateral tibial agenesis and syndactyly in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Dona, Francesco; Murino, Carla; Della Valle, Giovanni; Fatone, Gerardo

    2016-07-19

    A three-year-old cat was referred to the Veterinary Teaching Hospital, University of Naples, Italy. The cat had severe pelvic limb deformity, and abnormal development of all four paws. Radiographs revealed bilateral tibial agenesis, syndactyly, and digital hypoplasia. No treatment was instituted because of the severity of the injury, the adaptation of the cat to the abnormal condition, and the owner's refusal to permit any treatment. Congenital limb deformities are rarely reported in the cat and tibial agenesis is considered a very rare disease. This congenital anomaly is well documented and classified in man, and it has been associated with other abnormalities in more complex syndromes. This paper reports clinical and radiographic findings in a cat affected by bilateral complete tibial agenesis associated with other congenital anomalies.

  5. Diandric triploidy in a liveborn infant with 3-4 syndactyly and a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diandric triploidy in a liveborn infant with 3-4 syndactyly and a neural tube defect. C.E. Spencer, B Mofokeng, A Turner, F Nakwa, A Krause. Abstract. Triploidy is a chromosomal abnormality caused by an additional set of haploid chromosomes. It is a common cause of early first-trimester miscarriages. Only very rarely are ...

  6. Differential effects of FGFR2 mutations on syndactyly and cleft palate in Apert syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slaney, S.F.; Oldridge, M.; Wilkie, A.O.M. [Univ. of Oxford (United Kingdom)] [and others

    1996-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a distinctive human malformation characterized by craniosynostosis and severe syndactyly of the hands and feet. It is caused by specific missense substitutions involving adjacent amino acids (Ser252Trp or Pro253Arg) in the linker between the second and third extracellular immunoglobulin domains of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2). We have developed a simple PCR assay for these mutations in genomic DNA, based on the creation of novel SfiI and BstUI restriction sites. Analysis of DNA from 70 unrelated patients with Apert syndrome showed that 45 had the Ser252Trp mutation and 25 had the Pro253Arg mutation. Phenotypic differences between these two groups of patients were investigated. Significant differences were found for severity of syndactyly and presence of cleft palate. The syndactyly was more severe with the Pro253Arg mutation, for both the hands and the feet. In contrast, cleft palate was significantly more common in the Ser252Trp patients. No convincing differences were found in the prevalence of other malformations associated with Apert syndrome. We conclude that, although the phenotype attributable to the two mutations is very similar, there are subtle differences. The opposite trends for severity of syndactyly and cleft palate in relation to the two mutations may relate to the varying patterns of temporal and tissue-specific expression of different fibroblast growth factors, the ligands for FGFR2. 54 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Autosomal dominant stapes fixation, syndactyly, and symphalangism in a family with NOG mutation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard-Nielsen, Marie; Amstrup, Tine; Wanscher, Jens Højberg

    2018-01-01

    bilateral conductive hearing loss. Three patients were treated with stapedectomy, on one or both ears, due to fixation of stapes. All the affected members had syndactyly and symphalangism. A not previously reported mutation in the NOG gene (c.688_699del, p.Cys230_Cys232delins11) was found to segregate...

  8. Poly-syndactyly of hands and feet with talipes equino-varus. An unusual combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadegone, W M; Kumar, K

    1984-06-01

    A case of a fifteen year old male with unusual congenital anomalies of hands and feet (Poly-syndactyly) is presented. There was associated talipes equino-varus deformity of the left foot with bilateral duplication of great toes. Both hands appeared like a cup but the patient was able to carry out his routine activities. The purpose of this report is to document a unique 'isolated' congenital anomaly.

  9. Gene dosage of the transcription factor Fingerin (bHLHA9) affects digit development and links syndactyly to ectrodactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schatz, Omri; Langer, Erez; Ben-Arie, Nissim

    2014-10-15

    Distal limb deformities are congenital malformations with phenotypic variability, genetic heterogeneity and complex inheritance. Among these, split-hand/foot malformation is an ectrodactyly with missing central fingers, yielding a lobster claw-like hand, which when combined with long-bone deficiency is defined as split-hand/foot malformation and long-bone deficiency (SHFLD) that is genetically heterogeneous. Copy number variation (CNV) consisting of 17p13.3 duplication was identified in unrelated pedigrees, underlying SHFLD3 (OMIM 612576). Although the transcription factor Fingerin (bHLHA9) is the only complete gene in the critical region, its biological role is not yet known and there are no data supporting its involvement in mammalian limb development. We have generated knockout mice in which only the entire coding region of Fingerin was deleted, and indeed found that most null mice display some limb defects. These include various levels of simple asymmetrical syndactyly, characterized by webbed fingers, generated by incomplete separation of soft, but not skeletal, tissues between forelimb digits 2 and 3. As expected, hand pads of Fingerin null embryos exhibited reduced apoptosis between digital rays 2 and 3. This defect was shown to cause syndactyly when the same limbs were grown ex vivo following the apoptosis assay. Extrapolating from mouse data, we suggest that Fingerin loss-of-function in humans may underlie MSSD syndactyly (OMIM 609432), which was mapped to the same locus. Taken together, Fingerin gene dosage links two different congenital limb malformations, syndactyly and ectrodactyly, which were previously postulated to share a common etiology. These results add limb disorders to the growing list of diseases resulting from CNV. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Interdisciplinary approach for somatoprosthetic rehabilitation of a patient with clino-syndactyly and unusual dermatoglyphics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Himanshi; Singh, Saumyendra Vikram; Singh, Arun K; Kumar, Pradeep; Singh, Balendra P

    2016-12-01

    Traumatic injuries are the most common cause of finger amputations. Therapeutic amputations are less common but may be essential in some patients with congenital malformations of digits. A 21-year-old female patient reported for esthetic management of malformed middle and ring finger of right hand. Examination revealed clino-syndactyly with unusual dermatoglyphics. She was successfully rehabilitated by collaborative efforts of plastic surgeon and prosthodontist, by therapeutic amputation with surgical recontouring and fabrication of somatoprosthesis. The patient was satisfied with esthetics of the prosthesis and somatoprosthesis improved function. At 6-month recall, no alterations or repair of prosthesis was required. Individualized treatment planning with integration of modifications involving a multidisciplinary approach is required to meet needs of patients with congenital digital malformations. The duplication of unusual dermatoglyphics made the prosthesis more realistic. An individualized treatment plan with modifications to conventional techniques is required to cater to rehabilitative needs of patients with congenital digital malformations. © The International Society for Prosthetics and Orthotics 2016.

  11. The use of a dorsal double-wing flap without skin grafts for congenital syndactyly treatment: A STROBE compliant study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yanzhao; Wang, Yisheng

    2017-07-01

    Numerous techniques have been developed that use various flaps to treat syndactyly. Skin grafts have often been used to cover remaining surgical defects. The long-term aim of surgery is to find new methods of separating the digits without using skin grafts. This paper describes a new surgical technique for the correction of simple, incomplete, and complete syndactyly. The technique consists of a dorsal double-wing flap to cover the newly created web space and zigzag incisions in the fingers, thus avoiding the use of skin grafts in this space. Overall, 35 web spaces in 24 patients were treated using this technique. Patient follow-up ranged from 6 months to nearly 5 years. There were no complications such as hematoma, infection or flap necrosis, and no fingers needed skin grafts after separation. The average operative time for each web space was approximately 45 minutes. Ninety-seven percent of patients treated with the dorsal double-wing flap procedure achieved good function, and superior cosmetic results following a single surgery. The technique is simple, rapid, safe, and easily performed and does not require the use of skin grafts.

  12. Surgical Treatment Outcomes in Patients With Syndactyly in Imam Khomeini Hospital in Tehran, Iran During 1996-2011: A Breif Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazoochy H

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Syndactyly is the most common congenital malformation of the hand, with an incidence of 1 in 2000-2500 live births. In this study we evaluated the surgical outcomes and complications of patients with syndactyly.Methods : The surgical outcomes and complications of 42 patients, 27 male and 15, female, undergoing surgery for syndactyly were evaluated. The study took place in Imam Khomeini Hospital, in Tehran, Iran during 1996 to 2011. Having had the inclusion criteria, the patients were assessed for function, cosmetic outcome, sensation and occurrence of complications. The patients were followed-up for at least 3 years.Results : The mean age of patients was 4.4 years. There was a positive familial history for the disease in 8 patients. 71.4%, 90.4% and 73.8% of the participants had good results regarding cosmetic outcome, sensation and function, respectively.Conclusion: The overall results of surgery for syndactyly in this study were interpreted as good in 78.5%, moderate in 12.5% and fair in 8.4% of the patients. This study confirmed better surgical outcomes in patients older than 18 months.

  13. Incidence of Acute Complications Following Surgery for Syndactyly and Polydactyly: An Analysis of the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program Database from 2012 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Thomas J; Hawkins, Jessica E; Ladd, Amy L

    2017-09-01

    Congenital hand differences are infrequent phenomena, and their treatment represents a relatively small fraction of cases performed by hand surgeons. Little is known about the incidence of wound complications and acute postoperative problems given the relative rarity of these procedures. This study sought to characterize the incidence of complications within 30 days of surgery for congenital hand differences. The National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) contains prospective data regarding 30-day morbidity from 64 pediatric centers across the United States. Data from all available years (2012-2014) were queried for Current Procedural Terminology (CPT) codes pertinent to the treatment of congenital hand differences. Bivariate statistics, Fisher exact tests and Poisson 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were used to assess the incidence of complications and examine risk factors for these outcomes. We identified a total of 1,656 congenital hand cases that represented 4 different CPT codes, including surgery for simple syndactyly, complex syndactyly, and polydactyly. The overall incidence of complications was 2.2% (95% CI, 1.6%-3.1%; n = 37) with the most common complication being superficial surgical site infection (1.7%; 95% CI, 1.1%-2.4%) followed by related readmission (0.3%; 95% CI, 0.1%-0.7%). There was a higher incidence of complications observed in patients undergoing complex syndactyly repair (5.2% for complex syndactyly repair vs 2.3% for all others). The rate of acute complications following procedures to correct syndactyly and polydactyly is low, the most common of which is superficial surgical site infection. The incidence of acute complications may be helpful in counseling patients and families. We suggest that further research must prioritize collecting data on long-term functional outcomes. Therapeutic II. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Prevalence of polydactyly, syndactyly, amniotic band syndrome, cleft lip, cleft palate and talipes equinovarus in Bayelsa State, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyinbo, Charles A.

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Studies on incidence of birth anomalies are abundant world wide, but literatures on general population prevalence of anomalies are scanty, despite the fact that structural anomaly is the 5th leading cause of years of potential life lost prior to age 65 and a major contributor to disabilities. The purpose of this study is to estimate the general population prevalence of polydactyly, syndactyly, amniotic band syndrome, cleft lip, cleft palate, and talipes equinovarus in Bayelsa State, Nigeria. Two thousand (2000 subjects domicile in Bayelsa State were randomly selected for this study. Subjects were physically screened for musculoskeletal anomalies. Individuals with genetic syndromes were excluded. Study did not discriminate between types or sub- types of any anomaly. Results show that the overall population prevalence of musculoskeletal anomalies is 13%; with a high proportion (67% of minor anomalies. The general population prevalence of these anomalies is comparable with known birth prevalence world wide. Thus suggestive that a general population prevalence estimate of an anomaly could be a useful estimate of congenital anomaly in developing countries were record keeping are largely poor.

  15. A de novo 2q35-q36.1 deletion incorporating IHH in a Chinese boy (47,XYY) with syndactyly, type III Waardenburg syndrome, and congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D; Ren, G F; Zhang, H Z; Yi, C Y; Peng, Z J

    2016-12-02

    Reports of terminal and interstitial deletions of the long arm of chromosome 2 are rare in the literature. Here, we present a case report concerning a Chinese boy with a 47,XYY karyotype and a de novo deletion comprising approximately 5 Mb between 2q35 and q36.1, along with syndactyly, type III Waardenburg syndrome, and congenital heart disease. High-resolution chromosome analysis to detect copy number variations was carried out using an Affymetrix microarray platform, and the genes affected by the patient's deletion, including IHH, were determined. However, no copy number changes were observed in his healthy parents. The present case exhibited novel syndactyly features, broadening the spectrum of clinical findings observed in individuals with 2q interstitial deletions. Our data, together with previous observations, suggest that IHH haploinsufficiency is the principal pathogenic factor in the syndactyly phenotype in this study, and that different types of variations at the IHH locus may cause divergent disease phenotypes. This is the first report of the involvement of IHH haploinsufficiency in syndactyly phenotype.

  16. Severe intellectual disability, West syndrome, Dandy-Walker malformation, and syndactyly in a patient with partial tetrasomy 17q25.3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackmann, Karl; Stadler, Anja; Schallner, Jens; Franke, Kathlen; Gerlach, Eva-Maria; Schrock, Evelin; Rump, Andreas; Fauth, Christine; Tinschert, Sigrid; Oexle, Konrad

    2013-12-01

    We report on a de novo 0.5 Mb triplication (partial tetrasomy) of chromosome 17q25.3 in a 10-year-old girl with severe intellectual disability, infantile seizures (West syndrome), moderate hearing loss, Dandy-Walker malformation, microcephaly, craniofacial dysmorphism, striking cutaneous syndactyly (hands 3-4, feet 2-3), joint laxity, and short stature. The triplication resulted from the unusual combination of a terminal duplication at 17qter and a cryptic translocation of an extra copy of the same segment onto chromosome 10qter. The breakpoint at 17q25.3 was located within the FOXK2 gene. SNP chip analysis suggested that the rearrangement occurred during paternal meiosis involving both paternal chromosomes 17. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Bilateral macrodystrophia lipomatosa of the upper extremities with syndactyly and multiple lipomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, Saskia; Nicolai, Jean-Philippe A.; Schut, Simone M.; Meek, Marcel F.

    2011-01-01

    Macrodystrophia lipomatosa is a rare disease that causes congenital local gigantism of part of an extremity, which is characterised by an increase in all mesenchymal elements, particularly fibroadipose tissue. This is the first report to our knowledge of a case of histologically confirmed bilateral

  18. Diandric triploidy in a liveborn infant with 3-4 syndactyly and a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the Witwatersrand Human Research ethics committee (ref. no. M1604107). The patient was the only child to his non-consanguineous parents. He had three maternal half-siblings, the eldest of whom has an intellectual disability and a clubfoot of unknown cause. There is no further family history of physical disability, neural ...

  19. Genetics Home Reference: popliteal pterygium syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... removed. Affected individuals may also have webbing or fusion of the fingers or toes ( syndactyly ), characteristic triangular ... gov/books/NBK1407/ Citation on PubMed More from Genetics Home Reference Bulletins March is Trisomy Awareness Month ...

  20. Apert Syndrome: Molecularly Confirmed C.758C>G (P.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha Gon, Lee, E-mail: leechagon@eulji.ac.kr [Department of Pediatrics, Eulji General Hospital, College of Medicine, Eulji University, 68 Hangeulbiseok-ro, Nowon-gu, Seoul 139-711 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-21

    A 5-day-old girl was referred to our clinic for evaluation of congenital malformations. She was identified with a pathogenic mutation c.758C>G (p.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2 gene using targeted exome sequencing. The de novo mutation was confirmed with Sanger sequencing in the patient and her parents. She showed occipital plagiocephaly with frontal bossing (Figure A and B). Skull frontal and lateral radiography revealed fusion of most of the sutures except coronal suture, with convolutional markings (Figure D and E). She had complete cleft palate (Figure C). Her fused bilateral hands showed type II syndactyly with complete syndactyly between the ring and the little fingers (Figure F1-F3). Both toes were simple syndactyly with side-to-side fusion of skin (Figure G1-)

  1. Apert Syndrome: Molecularly Confirmed C.758C>G (P.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha Gon, Lee

    2016-01-01

    A 5-day-old girl was referred to our clinic for evaluation of congenital malformations. She was identified with a pathogenic mutation c.758C>G (p.Pro253Arg) in FGFR2 gene using targeted exome sequencing. The de novo mutation was confirmed with Sanger sequencing in the patient and her parents. She showed occipital plagiocephaly with frontal bossing (Figure A and B). Skull frontal and lateral radiography revealed fusion of most of the sutures except coronal suture, with convolutional markings (Figure D and E). She had complete cleft palate (Figure C). Her fused bilateral hands showed type II syndactyly with complete syndactyly between the ring and the little fingers (Figure F1-F3). Both toes were simple syndactyly with side-to-side fusion of skin (Figure G1-)

  2. Congenital deformity of the distal extremities in three dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Di Dona

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Congenital limb deformities are very rare conditions and the knowledge about etiology, pathogenesis, clinical presentation and treatment is still poor. Moreover, many defects are still not reported in veterinary literature. This report documents clinical and radiographic findings in three dogs with congenital deformity involving the distal extremities. Case 1 was affected with bilateral aphalangia of the pedes, case 2 presented a combination of brachydactyly and syndactyly, whereas in case 3 a unilateral ectrodactyly was observed. To the authors’ knowledge, brachydactyly, as well as aphalangia, are very uncommon anomalies and have been rarely documented. Moreover, association between syndactyly and brachydactyly has still not been reported.

  3. Pattern of Congenital Musculoskeletal Abnormalities in South West ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Eighty one were males while 42 were females with a M:F= 2:1 Congenital talipes equinovarus(CTEV) deformity was the most common congenital musculoskeletal anomaly in 64(52.0%) patients. Others were Polydactyly 16 (13.0%) and syndactyly 11(8.9%). Other common congenital orthopaedic anomalies encountered ...

  4. Apert Syndrome in Lagos – a Case Report and Literature Review ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Apert Syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by premature fusion of sutures of bones of the skull (Craniosynostosis), fingers and toes (Syndactyly) to different degree. Though it is rare, it is pertinent for clinicians to know about this condition so as to improve their ability to manage it and to note that ...

  5. Images in medicine

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ebutamanya

    2015-06-05

    Jun 5, 2015 ... was 31 cm). Pregnancy was uneventful. Prenatal ultrasonography follow-up showed no abnormalities. Postnatal examination showed signs consistent with the diagnosis of amniotic bands syndrome at the newborn's left limbs. The newborn presented syndactyly, lymphedema, with distal agenesis of the 2nd ...

  6. Fraser syndrome: Phenotypic variability and unusual findings in four ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ebtesam M. Abdalla

    2015-11-25

    Nov 25, 2015 ... All patients satisfied the diagnostic criteria for FS. Results: Cryptophthalmos and ambiguous genitalia were each present in 5/6 of the studied cases, while syndactyly and urinary tract abnormalities were found in 4/6 of them. Nasal anomalies, scle- rocornea and abnormal hair growth pattern were constant ...

  7. South African Journal of Child Health - Vol 11, No 4 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diandric triploidy in a liveborn infant with 3-4 syndactyly and a neural tube defect · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. C.E. Spencer, B Mofokeng, A Turner, F Nakwa, A Krause, 198-200 ...

  8. Syndrome de Smith-Lemli-Opitz

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pelluard-Nehmé, Fanny; Carles, Dominique; Alberti, Eve Marie

    2005-01-01

    SLO syndrome is an autosomal recessive condition with multiple malformations. This syndrome is ascribed to deficiency of 7 dehydrocholesterol reductase, an enzyme in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. The characteristics of this syndrome are facial anomalies, syndactyly of the second and third...

  9. Congenital constriction ring syndrome of the limbs: A prospective ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the upper limb malformations involved 42 digits; in the lower limb malformations involved 33 toes, one foot and fi ve legs. Four main types of lesions were found: constriction rings, intrauterine amputations, acrosyndactyly, and simple syndactyly. Conclusion: Congenital constriction ring syndrome is of uncertain aetiology ...

  10. Meier–Gorlin syndrome: An additional Egyptian patient with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She had small triangular face, long peaked nose, high nasal bridge, bilateral low set very small ears (microtia), retromicrognathia, high arched palate, maxillary hypoplasia, decayed teeth, and bilateral partial syndactyly between 2nd and 3rd toes. Our patient had a gastroesophageal reflux, renal stones, hydronephrosis and ...

  11. Les encephaloceles au Chu Tokoin de Lome | Gnassingbe | Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The sex ratio was 0.8. The folic acid consumption was not efficient at the mothers of the patients. Seven of the patients had occipital encephalocele. The associated malformations were: spina bifida (1 case), rounded forehead associated with a polydactyly (1 case) and microcephaly associated with a syndactyly (1 case).

  12. MURCS Association: a Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    rme

    infancy, the child presented with the skeletal deformities, recurrent urinary tract infections ... features of this syndrome in association with right deviation of anorectal canal, subglottic stenosis and unilateral oblique inguinal hernia. ... syndactyly between index and middle fingers. Both lower limbs showed talipus and club ...

  13. Manifestations of Gorlin-Goltz syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anne Kristine; Mikkelsen, Dorthe; Hertz, Jens Michael

    2014-01-01

    , kyphoscoliosis, rib anomalies, coalitio, cleft lip/palate, eye anomalies, milia and syndactyly. In one family, medulloblastoma and astrocytoma occurred. Traditional treatment principles of basal cell carcinomas were used including radiotherapy performed in six patients. PTCH1 mutations were identified in five...

  14. Auralcephalosyndactyly: a new hereditary craniosynostosis syndrome.

    OpenAIRE

    Kurczynski, T W; Casperson, S M

    1988-01-01

    A family is described in which craniosynostosis is associated with characteristic pinnae, a short columella, and symmetrical syndactyly of the fourth and fifth toes, inherited as an autosomal dominant condition. Various dominantly inherited syndromes involving craniosynostosis have been identified, but the constellation of findings in this family suggests a new syndrome different from those previously described.

  15. Miconazole/Clotrimazole and Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 198:191- 193. Czeizel AE, et al. 2004. Population-based case-control teratologic study of topical miconazole. Congenit Anom 44: ... vaginal metronidazole and miconazole treatment and poly-syndactyly population-based case-control teratologic study. Reprod Toxicol 20:89-94. Mendling ...

  16. Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Premalatha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly is a rare developmental malformation characterized by craniosynostosis, mid-face hypoplasia, symmetrical syndactyly of hands and feet. The prodromal characteristics for the typical cranio-facial appearance are early craniosynostosis of the coronal suture, cranial base and agenesis of the sagittal suture. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of Apert syndrome with emphasis on craniofacial and oral features in an eighteen-month-old male child. The patient presented with several craniofacial deformities, including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia, flat face, hypertelorism, ocular proptosis, downslanting palpebral fissures. Syndactylies with osseous fusion of the hands and feet were also observed. Intraoral findings included delayed eruption of teeth, high arched palate with pseudo cleft in the posterior one third.

  17. Poland syndrome (anomaly with congenital hemangioma: A new association

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    Riyaz Najeeba

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Unilateral defect of pectoral muscle and ipsilateral syndactyly constitute Poland syndrome. Absence or hypoplasia of the breast and nipple, axillary hair loss and dermatoglyphic abnormalities have also been reported in this syndrome. The primary defect could be in the development of the proximal subclavian artery with early deficit of blood flow to the distal limb and the pectoral region, resulting in partial loss of tissue in those regions. However, the association of congenital hemangioma with Poland sequence has not been observed so far. Such an association is being reported here in a 1-year-old infant, second-born of nonconsanguineous parents, who also had polydactyly instead of the documented syndactyly.

  18. [Macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, C; Bessis, D; Guillot, B

    2006-04-01

    Macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita is a multiple congenital anomaly/mental retardation syndrome described in 1997 in children with macrocephaly, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and several other abnormalities. A six month-old boy was seen for hyperplasia of the right side of the body. Clinical examination disclosed overgrowth, macrocephaly, a generalized reticulated, blue-violet vascular network, partial bilateral syndactyly between the 2nd and 3rd toes, and several superficial capillary malformations. Psychomotor development was normal. Brain MRI showed enlargement of the right lateral ventricle and hemisphere in relation to the left side but without malformation. Radiological examination of the skeleton showed asymmetry of the limbs. The patient reported herein presented macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita syndrome characterized by macrocephaly and more than two of the main reported findings comprising cutis marmorata, superficial vascular anomaly, syndactyly and asymmetry. We set out the major components of this polymalformative syndrome that are rarely reported in the dermatologic literature.

  19. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, cleft lip, and palate (EEC syndrome

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    Mohita Marwaha

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The ectodermal dysplasias (EDs are a large and complex group of diseases. More than 170 different clinical conditions have been recognized and defined as ectodermal dysplasias. Commonly involved ectodermal-derived structures are hair, teeth, nails, and sweat glands. In some conditions, it may be associated with mental retardation. We report a case of 10-year-old male child with ectrodactyly, syndactyly, ED, cleft lip/palate, hearing loss, and mental retardation.

  20. ORAL FINDINGS IN PATIENTS WITH APERT SYNDROME

    OpenAIRE

    Dalben, Gisele da Silva; Neves, Lucimara Teixeira das; Gomide, Marcia Ribeiro

    2006-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The Apert syndrome is a rare disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance caused by mutations in the FGFR2 gene at locus 10q26; patients with this syndrome present severe syndactyly, exophthalmia, ocular hypertelorism and hypoplastic midface with Class III malocclusion, besides systemic alterations. Most investigations available on the Apert syndrome address the genetic aspect or surgical management, with little emphasis on the oral aspects. OBJECTIVE: to investigate the oral find...

  1. Poland-Mobius syndrome in an infant girl

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Mazrou, Khalid A.; Al-Ghonaim, Yazeed A.; Al-Fayez, Abdulrhman I.

    2009-01-01

    Mobius syndrome is a rare condition of unclear origin, characterized by a unilateral or bilateral congenital facial weakness with impairment of ocular abduction, which is frequently associated with limb anomalies. Poland described a condition in which there was unilateral absence of pectoralis major muscle and ipsilateral syndactyly. The combination of Poland-Mobius syndrome is rare, with an estimated prevalence 1:500 000. We describe a case of Poland-Mobius syndrome in association with conge...

  2. Megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria syndrome: the first case report in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Yeon-Chul; Yum, Mi-Sun; Kim, Min-Jee; Lee, Yun-Jung; Ko, Tae-Sung

    2016-01-01

    Megalencephaly-capillary malformation-polymicrogyria syndrome (MCAP), previously known as macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita and macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome, is a rare multiple-malformation syndrome that is characterized by progressive megalencephaly, capillary malformations of the midline face and body, or distal limb anomalies such as syndactyly. Herein, we report a female infant case that satisfies the recently proposed criteria of MCAP and describe the...

  3. Radiologic investigation of apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly type 1) -a case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yeon Hee; Cho, Whi Youl; Kim, Myung Soon; Hong, In Soo; Sung, Ki Joon; Yang, Jae Seung

    1991-01-01

    Apert syndrome (Acrocephalosyndactyly type 1) is a rare congenital anomaly characterized by craniosynosis and symmetric-syndactyly of both extremities. Radiological examination of the skull shows hydrocephalus due to aqueductal stenosis. In the facial bones, the hypoplastic maxilla and relatively prominent mandible are observed associated with other anomalies such as cleft palate. Radiologic examination of both hands and feet show bony or subcutaneous syndactylism and typical mitten hands and webbed toes

  4. Radiological imaging of congenital hand anomalies - a 6-year single-centre experience and what the hand surgeons want to know

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerety, E.L.; Hopper, M.A. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Radiology, Cambridge (United Kingdom); Grant, I. [Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Plastic Surgery, Cambridge (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-19

    Congenital hand anomalies present a rare but important physical and emotional challenge for children and parents. Radiological imaging is important for accurate diagnosis, to aid decision making and to monitor changes in the growing hand. The goal of any treatment is to help the child achieve his/her maximum potential, to provide a useful hand with attention to cosmesis. We investigated the range of congenital hand anomalies imaged in a tertiary referral centre. We examined the timing of imaging and the key clinical questions. The radiology imaging system was searched retrospectively for radiographs of congenital hand anomalies over a 6-year period. The images were reviewed and patient demographics, diagnosis and other imaging recorded. Over 6 years, 85 patients had imaging. Twenty-three patients had bilateral problems and 11 had recognised syndromes. The most common abnormalities imaged were duplicated thumbs (28 %), followed by syndactyly (18 %). Children were first imaged as early as 1 day old, with the median age of initial imaging 12 months. Thumb duplication and syndactyly are the most common conditions for which radiographs are requested at our hospital, although overall syndactyly is considered the most common congenital hand anomaly. For a variety of reasons, children are often imaged very early, before review by the Specialist in Children's Hand Surgery (despite surgery being unlikely before 1 year of age.) We discuss the classification systems and specific issues that hand surgeons want to know from the radiologists. (orig.)

  5. First report of distal obstructive uropathy and prune-belly syndrome in an infant with amniotic band syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, C P; Liu, F F; Jan, S W; Wang, K G; Lan, C C

    1997-01-01

    We describe the first report of distal obstructive uropathy and prune-belly syndrome in an infant with amniotic band syndrome. Prenatal ultrasonographic examination in the third trimester revealed intermittent oligohydramnios, bilateral hydronephrosis, and megacystis. Postnatally, the infant was found to have a scalp defect, a skin pedicle, pseudosyndactyly and constriction rings on the hands, marked distention of the abdomen, a fibrous band attached to the proximal urethra causing urethral stricture, a swollen penile shaft, bilateral talipes equinovarus, and syndactyly of the feet. Multiple fibrous amniotic bands could be identified in the placenta. Our case shows that fetal distal obstructive uropathy can be associated with the congenital constriction band syndrome.

  6. Oculodentodigital syndrome: report of a case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheutzel, P

    1991-08-01

    The clinical and radiographic changes in a case of oculodentodigital syndrome are presented. The characteristic features of this rare developmental disorder, microphthalmus with microcornea and iris anomalies, hypertelorism, thin nose with hypoplastic alae and anteverted nostrils, syndactyly with camptodactyly and clinodactyly of the fourth and fifth fingers associated with bony anomalies of the middle phalanges of the fifth fingers and toes, were all present. In addition, histological examination of a lateral incisor showed the enamel dysplasia to be due to enamel hypoplasia; the dentine also showed marked hypocalcification. There were widespread pulp denticles and hypercementosis throughout the dentition. Both the patient and his mother had coronoid hypoplasia.

  7. Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate syndrome: A case report of "Incomplete syndrome"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P K Shivaprakash

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate (EEC is a rare syndrome having ectrodactyly, ectodermal dysplasia, and cleft lip/palate. So far, very few cases have been reported in literature. However, we report a case of incomplete EEC syndrome having ectrodactyly and cleft lip and palate with absence of signs of ectodermal dysplasia with no other systemic anomalies. Other feature noted is the syndactyly of toes which is reported rarely in this syndrome. A multidisciplinary approach for treatment is needed which is co-ordinated by pedodontist or pediatrician.

  8. Cryptophthalmos and Bilateral Renal Agenesis with Cleft Lip and Palate: Fraser Syndrome: Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Pabuçcu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder consisting of multiple anomalies including variable expression of cryptophthalmos, syndactyly, abnormal genitalia, malformations of the nose, ear and larynx, renal agenesis, oro-facial clefts, skeletal defects, umbilical hernia and mental retardation. Antenatally detected multiple congenital fetal anomalies during 22nd week of gestation is reported in this paper. Fraser Syndrome was diagnosed according to major and minor criteria. Early antenatal detection is mandatory and clinician should be awere of the high recurrence rates of this syndrome among siblings threatening subsequent pregnancies and should inform affected families.

  9. Bilateral congenital lacrimal fistulas in an adult as part of ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia-clefting syndrome: A rare anomaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debangshu Ghosh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly-ectodermal dysplasia and clefting syndrome or "Lobster claw" deformity is a rare congenital anomaly that affects tissues of ectodermal and mesodermal origin. Nasolacrimal duct (NLD obstruction with or without atresia of lacrimal passage is a common finding of such a syndrome. The authors report here even a rarer presentation of the syndrome which manifested as bilateral NLD obstruction and lacrimal fistula along with cleft lip and palate, syndactyly affecting all four limbs, mild mental retardation, otitis media, and sinusitis. Lacrimal duct obstruction and fistula were managed successfully with endoscopic dacryocystorhinostomy (DCR which is a good alternative to lacrimal probing or open DCR in such a case.

  10. Poland syndrome: rare presentation in two cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gocmen, Hayrettin; Akkas, Yucel; Doganay, Selim

    2010-08-27

    Poland syndrome was first described in 1840 by Alfred Poland while still a medical student and the other components of the syndrome were described at London Guy's Hospital following the dissection of a cadaver's hand, which had hypoplasia and syndactyly. The incidence of Poland syndrome has been reported to be 1 in 30,000 live births. In the present case report, two Poland syndrome patients with ipsilateral hypomastia and a reduction in the axillary/pectoral hairs diagnosed during adulthood are presented; one patient was affected on the left side and had widespread cafe au lait spots, and the other patient had respiratory dysfunction due to multiple rib anomalies.

  11. Poland-Mobius syndrome in an infant girl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mazrou, Khalid A; Al-Ghonaim, Yazeed A; Al-Fayez, Abdulrhman I

    2009-01-01

    Mobius syndrome is a rare condition of unclear origin, characterized by a unilateral or bilateral congenital facial weakness with impairment of ocular abduction, which is frequently associated with limb anomalies . Poland described a condition in which there was unilateral absence of pectoralis major muscle and ipsilateral syndactyly. The combination of Poland-Mobius syndrome is rare, with an estimated prevalence 1:500 000. We describe a case of Poland-Mobius syndrome in association with congenital bilateral vocal fold immobility. To our knowldge, this is the first report of such an association between Poland-Mobius syndrome and congenital bilateral vocal fold immobility.

  12. Aplasia Cutis Congenita Association with Fetus Papyraceus

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmet Özdemir; Osman Baştuğ; Serra Alçı

    2015-01-01

    Aplasia cutis congenita (ACC) is a rare malformation characterized by localized or a wide area absence of tissue. The disease may involve any site of the body, although usually seen on the scalp. Observed one in 10.000 births, it can occur as the ACC as an isolated lesion and may be associated with cleft palate/lip, syndactyly, absence of fingers, eye abnormalities and congenital heart disease. ACC’s a rare form due to intrauterine twin, which is a form of ex. Large lesions tha...

  13. Meier–Gorlin syndrome: An additional Egyptian patient with gastroesophageal reflux, hydronephrosis, renal stones and hypoplastic labia majora and minora with clitromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabah M. Shawky

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a 4.5 year old female child with the classical triad of Meier–Gorlin syndrome (microtia, absent patella and short stature with normal mentality. She had small triangular face, long peaked nose, high nasal bridge, bilateral low set very small ears (microtia, retromicrognathia, high arched palate, maxillary hypoplasia, decayed teeth, and bilateral partial syndactyly between 2nd and 3rd toes. Our patient had a gastroesophageal reflux, renal stones, hydronephrosis and hypoplastic labia majora and minora with clitromegaly.

  14. Clinical spectrum and outcomes in families with coronal synostosis and TCF12 mutations

    Science.gov (United States)

    di Rocco, Federico; Baujat, Geneviève; Arnaud, Eric; Rénier, Dominique; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Daire, Valérie Cormier; Collet, Corinne

    2014-01-01

    TCF12 mutations have been reported very recently in coronal synostosis. We report several cases of familial coronal synostosis among four families harbouring novel TCF12 mutations. We observed a broad interfamilial phenotypic spectrum with features overlapping with the Saethre–Chotzen syndrome. TCF12 molecular testing should be considered in patients with unilateral- or bilateral-coronal synostosis associated or not with syndactyly, after having excluded mutations in the TWIST1 gene and the p.Pro250Arg mutation in FGFR3. PMID:24736737

  15. Non-syndromic bilateral ulnar aplasia with humero-radial synostosis and oligo-ectro-dactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Terri P; Soye, Jonathan A; Gordon, Emma; Lynch, Sally A

    2018-02-10

    Congenital anomalies of the upper limbs are rare and etiologically heterogeneous. Herein, we report a male infant with non-syndromic bilateral Type Vb ulnar longitudinal dysplasia with radiohumeral synostosis (apparent humeral bifurcation), and bilateral oligo-ectro-syndactyly who was born following an uncomplicated pregnancy, with no maternal use of prescription or illicit medication. Array CGH (60,000 probes) and chromosomal breakage analysis (DEB) were normal. Similar appearances have been reported in children exposed to thalidomide or cocaine, but sporadic patients have also been reported without a prior history of exposure to known teratogens. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun [Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-12-15

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review.

  17. Prenatal sonographic diagnosis of focal musculoskeletal anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jung-Kyu; Cho, Jeong-Yeon; Choi, Jong-Sun

    2003-01-01

    Focal musculoskeletal anomalies vary, and can manifest as part of a syndrome or be accompanied by numerous other conditions such as genetic disorders, karyotype abnormalities, central nervous system anomalies and other skeletal anomalies, lsolated focal musculoskeletal anomaly does, however, also occur; its early prenatal diagnosis is important in deciding prenatal care, and also helps in counseling parents about the postnatal effects of numerous possible associated anomalies. We have encountered 50 cases involving focal musculoskeletal anomalies, including total limb dysplasia [radial ray abnormality (n=3), mesomelic dysplasia (n=1)]; anomalies of the hand [polydactyly (n=8), syndactyly (n=3), ectrodactyly (n=1), clinodactyly (n=6), clenched hand (n=5)]; anomalies of the foot [clubfoot (n=10), rockerbottom foot (n=5), sandal gap deformity (n=1), curly toe (n=2)]; amniotic band syndrome (n=3); and anomalies of the focal spine [block vertebra (n=1), hemivertebra (n=1)]. Among these 50 cases, five [polydactyly (n=1), syndactyly (n=2) and curly toe (n=2) were confirmed by postnatal physical evaluation, two (focal spine anomalies) were diagnosed after postnatal radiologic examination, and the remaining 43 were proven at autopsy. For each condition, we describe the prenatal sonographic findings, and include a brief review

  18. Emergent spatial patterns of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic strengths drive somatotopic representational discontinuities and their plasticity in a computational model of primary sensory cortical area 3b

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil A. Grajski

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Mechanisms underlying the emergence and plasticity of representational discontinuities in the mammalian primary somatosensory cortical representation of the hand are investigated in a computational model. The model consists of an input lattice organized as a three-digit hand forward-connected to a lattice of cortical columns each of which contains a paired excitatory and inhibitory cell. Excitatory and inhibitory synaptic plasticity of feedforward and lateral connection weights is implemented as a simple covariance rule and competitive normalization. Receptive field properties are computed independently for excitatory and inhibitory cells and compared within and across columns. Within digit representational zones intracolumnar excitatory and inhibitory receptive field extents are concentric, single-digit, small, and unimodal. Exclusively in representational boundary-adjacent zones, intracolumnar excitatory and inhibitory receptive field properties diverge: excitatory cell receptive fields are single-digit, small, and unimodal; and the paired inhibitory cell receptive fields are bimodal, double-digit, and large. In simulated syndactyly (webbed fingers, boundary-adjacent intracolumnar receptive field properties reorganize to within-representation type; divergent properties are reacquired following syndactyly release. This study generates testable hypotheses for assessment of cortical laminar-dependent receptive field properties and plasticity within and between cortical representational zones. For computational studies, present results suggest that concurrent excitatory and inhibitory plasticity may underlie novel emergent properties.

  19. SMOC1 is essential for ocular and limb development in humans and mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ippei; Hamanoue, Haruka; Terada, Koji; Tohma, Takaya; Megarbane, Andre; Chouery, Eliane; Abou-Ghoch, Joelle; Jalkh, Nadine; Cogulu, Ozgur; Ozkinay, Ferda; Horie, Kyoji; Takeda, Junji; Furuichi, Tatsuya; Ikegawa, Shiro; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Miyatake, Satoko; Nishimura, Akira; Mizuguchi, Takeshi; Niikawa, Norio; Hirahara, Fumiki; Kaname, Tadashi; Yoshiura, Koh-Ichiro; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Furukawa, Takahisa; Matsumoto, Naomichi; Saitsu, Hirotomo

    2011-01-07

    Microphthalmia with limb anomalies (MLA) is a rare autosomal-recessive disorder, presenting with anophthalmia or microphthalmia and hand and/or foot malformation. We mapped the MLA locus to 14q24 and successfully identified three homozygous (one nonsense and two splice site) mutations in the SPARC (secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine)-related modular calcium binding 1 (SMOC1) in three families. Smoc1 is expressed in the developing optic stalk, ventral optic cup, and limbs of mouse embryos. Smoc1 null mice recapitulated MLA phenotypes, including aplasia or hypoplasia of optic nerves, hypoplastic fibula and bowed tibia, and syndactyly in limbs. A thinned and irregular ganglion cell layer and atrophy of the anteroventral part of the retina were also observed. Soft tissue syndactyly, resulting from inhibited apoptosis, was related to disturbed expression of genes involved in BMP signaling in the interdigital mesenchyme. Our findings indicate that SMOC1/Smoc1 is essential for ocular and limb development in both humans and mice.

  20. The pattern of skeletal anomalies in the cervical spine, hands and feet in patients with Saethre-Chotzen syndrome and Muenke-type mutation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trusen, Andreas; Beissert, Matthias; Darge, Kassa; Collmann, Hartmut

    2003-01-01

    Saethre-Chotzen syndrome (SCS) and Muenke-type mutation (MTM) are complex syndromes with craniosynostosis and skeletal anomalies including syndactyly, carpal and tarsal fusions, and cervical spine abnormalities. In this study, we analysed radiographs of the cervical spine, hands and feet of a large patient population with genetically proven SCS and MTM. The aim was to describe the pattern of skeletal anomalies and to determine whether specific features are present that could help differentiate between the two entities. Radiographs of 43 patients (23 males, 20 females) with SCS (n=35) or MTM (n=8) were evaluated. The median age was 8 years (range 1 month-36 years). All radiographs were reviewed by two radiologists. In the hands and feet, a variety of anomalies such as brachyphalangy, clinodactyly, partial syndactyly, partial carpal or tarsal fusion, and cone-shaped epiphyses were noted. Duplicated distal phalanx of the hallux (n=12/35) and triangular deformity of the epiphysis of the distal phalanx of the hallux (n=10/35) were detected in SCS only; calcaneo-cuboid fusion (n=2/35) was detected in MTM only. In the cervical spine, fusion of vertebral bodies and/or the posterior elements occurred only in patients with SCS. Pathognomonic signs for SCS are the triangular shape of the epiphysis and duplicated distal phalanx of the hallux. Calcaneo-cuboid fusion was detected in MTM only. These signs may be helpful in the differentiation of SCS from MTM. (orig.)

  1. A family of oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) with a novel BCOR mutation and genomic rearrangements involving NHS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Yukiko; Saitsu, Hirotomo; Miyamoto, Toshinobu; Nishiyama, Kiyomi; Tsurusaki, Yoshinori; Doi, Hiroshi; Miyake, Noriko; Ryoo, Na-Kyung; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk; Matsumoto, Naomichi

    2012-03-01

    Oculofaciocardiodental syndrome (OFCD) is an X-linked dominant disorder associated with male lethality, presenting with congenital cataract, dysmorphic face, dental abnormalities and septal heart defects. Mutations in BCOR (encoding BCL-6-interacting corepressor) cause OFCD. Here, we report on a Korean family with common features of OFCD including bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects in three affected females (mother and two daughters). Through the mutation screening and copy number analysis using genomic microarray, we identified a novel heterozygous mutation, c.888delG, in the BCOR gene and two interstitial microduplications at Xp22.2-22.13 and Xp21.3 in all the three affected females. The BCOR mutation may lead to a premature stop codon (p.N297IfsX80). The duplication at Xp22.2-22.13 involved the NHS gene causative for Nance-Horan syndrome, which is an X-linked disorder showing similar clinical features with OFCD in affected males, and in carrier females with milder presentation. Considering the presence of bilateral 2nd-3rd toe syndactyly and septal heart defects, which is unique to OFCD, the mutation in BCOR is likely to be the major determinant for the phenotypes in this family.

  2. A novel autosomal recessive GJA1 missense mutation linked to Craniometaphyseal dysplasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Hu

    Full Text Available Craniometaphyseal dysplasia (CMD is a rare sclerosing skeletal disorder with progressive hyperostosis of craniofacial bones. CMD can be inherited in an autosomal dominant (AD trait or occur after de novo mutations in the pyrophosphate transporter ANKH. Although the autosomal recessive (AR form of CMD had been mapped to 6q21-22 the mutation has been elusive. In this study, we performed whole-exome sequencing for one subject with AR CMD and identified a novel missense mutation (c.716G>A, p.Arg239Gln in the C-terminus of the gap junction protein alpha-1 (GJA1 coding for connexin 43 (Cx43. We confirmed this mutation in 6 individuals from 3 additional families. The homozygous mutation cosegregated only with affected family members. Connexin 43 is a major component of gap junctions in osteoblasts, osteocytes, osteoclasts and chondrocytes. Gap junctions are responsible for the diffusion of low molecular weight molecules between cells. Mutations in Cx43 cause several dominant and recessive disorders involving developmental abnormalities of bone such as dominant and recessive oculodentodigital dysplasia (ODDD; MIM #164200, 257850 and isolated syndactyly type III (MIM #186100, the characteristic digital anomaly in ODDD. However, characteristic ocular and dental features of ODDD as well as syndactyly are absent in patients with the recessive Arg239Gln Cx43 mutation. Bone remodeling mechanisms disrupted by this novel Cx43 mutation remain to be elucidated.

  3. [Macrocephaly-capillary malformation. A neonatal case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coste, K; Sarret, C; Cisse, A; Delabaere, A; Francannet, C; Vanlieferinghen, P

    2012-09-01

    Macrocephaly-cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita is a multiple congenital anomaly syndrome first described in 1997 in children with macrocephaly, cutis marmorata telangiectatica congenita, and several other abnormalities. Since 2007, this syndrome has been renamed macrocephaly-capillary malformation. The pregnancy was marked by polyhydramnios associated with fetal macrosomia and macrocephaly. Clinical examination of the newborn confirmed overgrowth, macrocephaly, and found skin abnormalities with diffuse marbled skin, filtrum and upper lip vascular anomaly, and several superficial capillary malformations on the chest and abdomen, partial bilateral syndactyly between the 2nd and 3rd toes, and right hemi-hypertrophy of the body. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed moderate right hemimegalencephaly. Radiological examination of the skeleton showed asymmetry of the limbs. At 8 months, the medical follow-up confirmed the diagnosis and its neurosurgical treatment of hydrocephalus secondary to an Arnold Chiari malformation. The patient reported herein presented macrocephaly-capillary malformation syndrome characterized by macrocephaly and more than two of the main reported findings comprising cutis marmorata, superficial vascular anomaly, syndactyly, and body asymmetry. We describe the major components of this multiple malformative syndrome that is rarely reported in the pediatric literature, especially in newborns. This syndrome should be detected early because medical multidisciplinary follow-up is necessary to prevent different complications (neurological, orthopedic, or oncologic). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Occipital meningoencephalocele with Cleft Lip, Cleft Palate and Limb Abnormalities- A Case Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganapathy, Arthi; T, Sadeesh; Swer, Mary Hydrina; Rao, Sudha

    2014-12-01

    A 21-week-old still born female fetus with occipital encepholocele, cleft lip and cleft palate was received from the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Mahatma Gandhi Medical College and Research Institute, Pondicherry and was studied in detail. It was born to Primigravida, of a second degree consanguineous marriage, with unremarkable family history. The biometric measurements were noted which corresponded to the age of the fetus. Further the fetus was embalmed and dissected. On examination an encephalocele of 2.7×1.5 cm was seen in the occipital region with a midline defect in the occipital bone and herniated brain tissue. Other anomalies observed were right unilateral cleft lip, right cleft palate, and bilateral syndactyly of the lower limbs and associated Congenital Talipus Equino Varus of the right foot. Other internal organs were developed appropriate for the age of the fetus.

  5. Craniofacial, limb, and abdominal anomalies in a distinct syndrome: relation to the spectrum of Pfeiffer syndrome type 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, C M; Marion, R; Shanske, A; Argamaso, R V; Shprintzen, R J

    1993-03-15

    Presented are 2 patients with abnormal craniofacial region, limbs, and abdomen, features that may be consistent with Pfeiffer syndrome, type 3. Both patients had bicoronal and bisphenoidal synostosis, extreme exophthalmic midface hypoplasia, and hydrocephalus. The limbs had a fixed flexion deformity of the elbows with broad thumbs which were radiopalmarly deviated; the toes were broad with a varus deformity and syndactyly toes 2-5. Both patients developed bowel obstruction secondary to midgut malrotation, and one of the patients had prune belly syndrome. Review of the literature disclosed an additional patient who, in retrospect, had Pfeiffer syndrome type 3 and midgut malrotation. These patients suggest that intestinal malrotation with or without prune belly syndrome may be a common component of this entity.

  6. Case Report: Gollop-Wolfgang Complex in a 5 month old baby [v3; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/53y

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihtesham A. Qureshi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Skeletal dysplasias are disorders associated with a generalized abnormality in the skeleton. The Gollop-Wolfgang complex (GWC is a limb deficiency disorder and an unusual limb malformation with highly variable manifestations. Here we report an interesting case of a 5-month old male baby from India with Gollop-Wolfgang Complex showing bifurcation of the right femur, ectrodactyly of both feet, ectrodactyly of left hand, syndactyly of right hand and unusual presentation of bilateral fibular agenesis and caudal (Sacrococcygeal agenesis. The etiology of GWC in this 5 month old male baby could possibly be attributed to spontaneous gene mutation. The clinical, radiographic findings and the unusual presentation are presented in detail.

  7. An unusual complication after craniofacial surgery for Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhay A Lune

    2014-01-01

    A case of Apert syndrome who had undergone craniofacial surgery elsewhere 4 years back presented to us with purulent discharge near the lateral orbital margin of right orbit, watering and redness of the right eye. He had telltale signs of this syndrome in the form of skull deformities such as brachycephaly, frontal bony prominence, mid-face hypoplasia, proptosis and syndactyly of both hands and feet. There was a surgical scar of previous craniofacial surgery over the bi-coronal region. He had a discharging granuloma over the lateral orbital margin and the adjacent lower eyelid had developed cicatricial ectropion. X-ray and computed tomography scan orbit confirmed the clinical suspicion of osteomyelitis of the underlying zygomatic bone at the site of miniplate and screw fixation of the earlier surgery. He was treated with excision of granuloma and extraction of loose screw and infected miniplate while ectropion was corrected by rotation advancement of temporal skin flap.

  8. The acrocallosal syndrome in first cousins: widening of the spectrum of clinical features and further support for autosomal recessive inheritance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzel, A

    1988-01-01

    First cousins, related through their mothers, showed a pattern of craniofacial, brain, and limb anomalies consistent with the acrocallosal syndrome. Both patients had a defect of the corpus callosum, macrocephaly with a protruding forehead and occiput, hypertelorism, non-horizontal palpebral fissures, a small nose, notched ear lobes, and postaxial polydactyly of the hands. The boy, in addition, had hypospadias, cryptorchidism, inguinal hernias, duplication with syndactyly of the phalanges of the big toe, and a bipartite right clavicle. The girl had an arachnoidal cyst, a calvarian defect, and digitalisation of the thumbs. Motor and mental development was retarded in both patients. This observation provides further evidence of probable autosomal recessive inheritance of the acrocallosal syndrome and widens the spectrum of clinical findings and the variability of features in this rare malformation syndrome. Images PMID:3385741

  9. Appearance of the delta phalanx (longitudinally bracketed epiphysis) with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, Jason M.; Higgins, Timothy J.; Lemos, Diego

    2011-01-01

    The delta phalanx is an unusual condition occurring in the hand or the foot that can be distinguished from a secondary ossification center on radiographic evaluation based on the well-defined phalangeal epiphyses typically evident by 24-30 months of age. MR imaging of the delta phalanx offers the advantage of visualizing sites of unossified bone before the age these findings are typically visible with radiography. We describe the case of a 15-month-old boy who presented with soft-tissue fusion of the third and fourth digits of the right hand. Radiograph and MR evaluation revealed soft-tissue intra-axial syndactyly of the third and fourth digits and a delta phalanx involving the proximal phalanx of the involved fourth digit. (orig.)

  10. Intellectual disability, unusual facial morphology and hand anomalies in sibs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Sérgio B; Venâncio, Margarida; Chanudet, Estelle; Palmer, Rodger; Ramos, Lina; Beales, Philip L; Moore, Gudrun E; Saraiva, Jorge M; Hennekam, Raoul C

    2013-10-01

    Here we report on a Portuguese family with three sisters who shared moderate intellectual disability, unusual facial morphology (short palpebral fissures; broad nasal tip; thin upper and lower vermillion; broad and pointed chin) and hand anomalies in two of them (short left third and fifth right metacarpals in one case; marked syndactyly between the third and fourth fingers in another). One of the sisters had microcephaly and short stature, and the other two were obese. Obesity and somewhat similar facial features were also present in the otherwise healthy mother. Despite the overlap with several known syndromes (Albright osteodystrophy; Filippi syndrome; Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome; microdeletion 2q37), we suggest this condition is previously unreported, and most likely displays an autosomal recessive pattern of inheritance. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Familial occurrence of ptosis, nasal speech, prominent ears, hand anomalies and learning problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belligni, Elga F; Hennekam, Raoul C M

    2010-01-01

    We describe a four-generation family in whom 5 members show the combination of a large head, ptosis, nasal speech that sometimes goes along with a cleft palate, full cheeks, small mouth, and prominent ears, and who also have learning problems. We evaluated three affected members in detail and found them to have in addition a partial cutaneous syndactyly between the third and fourth fingers, an increased distance between second and third finger, and a decreased smell. We have not been unable to find other patients described in literature with the same combination of features, and suggest this to represent a hitherto unrecognizable entity. Pattern of inheritance is likely to be autosomal dominant. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. The incidence of congenital malformations and variations in Göttingen minipigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellemann-Laursen, S; Marsden, E; Peter, B; Downes, N; Coulby, D; Grossi, A B

    2016-09-01

    Knowledge of the incidence of spontaneous congenital abnormalities is critical for the accurate interpretation of findings in teratogenicity studies in any species. In this paper, results of the examination of 1739 neonatal Göttingen Minipigs are presented. Over the 2-year period under consideration, the incidence of external and visceral malformations was less than 0.2 and 0.1%, respectively. The most common external malformations were syndactyly, limb hyperflexion, domed head and scoliosis. The most common internal malformations were undescended testes, ventricular septal defect, diaphragmatic hernia and atrial septal defects. Pentadactyly and variation in the aortic arch's bifurcation (absent truncus bicaroticus) were the most common variations. These data will help support the use of the Göttingen Minipig as a non-rodent species in embryofetal development studies where concerns persist about the availability of background data. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Fraser syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barisic, Ingeborg; Odak, Ljubica; Loane, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Fraser syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmos, cutaneous syndactyly, laryngeal, and urogenital malformations. We present a population-based epidemiological study using data provided by the European Surveillance of Congenital Anomalies (EUROCAT) network...... of birth defect registries. Between January 1990 and December 2008, we identified 26 cases of Fraser syndrome in the monitored population of 12,886,464 births (minimal estimated prevalence of 0.20 per 100,000 or 1:495,633 births). Most cases (18/26; 69%) were registered in the western part of Europe, where...... was particularly high (42%). Most cases of Fraser syndrome (85%) are suspected prenatally, often due to the presence of the association of renal agenesis and cryptophthalmos. In the European population, a high proportion (82%) of pregnancies is terminated, thus reducing the live birth prevalence to a third...

  14. CDH3-Related Syndromes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Basel-Vanagaite, L; Pasmanik-Chor, M; Lurie, R

    2010-01-01

    Hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD) and ectodermal dysplasia, ectrodactyly and macular dystrophy (EEM) are both caused by mutations in the CDH3 gene. In this report, we describe a family with EEM syndrome caused by a novel CDH3 gene mutation and review the mutation spectrum...... and limb abnormalities in both EEM and HJMD. A protein structure model showing the localization of different mutations causing both syndromes is presented. The CDH3 gene was sequenced and investigation of the mutations performed using a protein structure model. The conservation score was calculated by Con......Surf. We identified a novel CDH3 gene mutation, p.G277V, which resides in a conserved residue located on a ß-strand in the second cadherin domain. Review of the data on previously published mutations showed intra-familial and inter-familial variations in the severity of the limb abnormalities. Syndactyly...

  15. Triploidy mosaicism (45,X/68,XX) in an infant presenting with failure to thrive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posey, Jennifer E; Mohrbacher, Nikki; Smith, Janice L; Patel, Ankita; Potocki, Lorraine; Breman, Amy M

    2016-03-01

    Triploid mosaicism is a rare aneuploidy syndrome characterized by growth retardation, developmental delay, 3-4 syndactyly, microphthalmia, coloboma, cleft lip and/or palate, genitourinary anomalies, and facial or body asymmetry. In the present report, we describe a 3-month-old female presenting with failure to thrive, growth retardation, and developmental delay. A chromosomal microarray demonstrated monosomy X, but her atypical phenotype prompted further evaluation with a chromosome analysis, which demonstrated 45,X/68,XX mixoploidy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a patient with this chromosome complement. Mosaicism in chromosomal aneuploidies is likely under-recognized and may obscure the clinical diagnosis. At a time when comparative genomic hybridization and genome sequencing are increasingly used as diagnostic tools, this report highlights the clinical utility of chromosome analysis when a molecular diagnosis is not consistent with the observed phenotype. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Apert syndrome (acrocephalosyndactyly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milovanović J.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome is named for the French physician, Eugen Apert who was, in 1906. described anomalous shape of the skull with coronary suture synostosis and hypoplasia sphenoethmoidmaxillary part of the face and fingers syndactyly of hands and feet. Apert syndrome accounts for about 4,5% of all craniosynostosis. With the prevalence of 1:160 000-200 000, inherited in an autosomal domi­nant, and in 25% of cases are fresh mutations in the gene. This syndrome has no predilection by gender and race, varies in severity form in witch it is manifested. Anomality of internal organs are very rare, but half of the patients with this syndrome have mental retardation. Apert syndrome has no cure, but surgery can help to correct some of the problems.

  17. Microduplications encompassing the Sonic Hedgehog Limb Enhancer ZRS are Associated with Haas Type Polysyndactyly and Laurin-Sandrow Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohan, Silke; Spielmann, Malte; Doelken, Sandra C

    2014-01-01

    Laurin-Sandrow syndrome (LSS) is a rare autosomal dominant disorder characterized by polysyndactyly of hands and/or feet, mirror image duplication of the feet, nasal defects, and loss of identity between fibula and tibia. The genetic basis of LSS is currently unknown. LSS shows phenotypic overlap...... limb malformations ranging from syndactyly to mirror image polydactyly with duplications of the fibulae. We show that larger duplications of the ZRS region (> 80 kb) are associated with HTS, whereas smaller duplications (... distinguished from HTS by the presence of mirror image polysyndactyly of the feet with duplication of the fibula. Our results expand the clinical phenotype of the ZRS-associated syndromes and suggest that smaller duplications (associated with a more severe phenotype. In addition, we show...

  18. Leiomyoma of uterus in a patient with ring chromosome 12: Case presentation and literature review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hajianpour, M.J.; Habibian, R.; Hajianpour, A.K. [Children`s Hospital, Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-05-17

    We report on a 30-year-old woman with de novo ring chromosome 12 mosaicism, 46,XX,r(12)(p13.3q24.3)/46,XX. In addition to the clinical manifestations generally observed in {open_quotes}ring syndrome{close_quotes} cases such as growth retardation, short stature, microcephaly, and mental deficiency, she had a broad nasal bridge, micrognathia with overbite, underdeveloped breasts, mild dorsal scoliosis, clinodactyly of the fifth fingers with a single interdigital crease, symphalangism of thumbs, tapering fingers, mild cutaneous syndactyly between the second and third toes, multiple cafe-au-lait spots, sebaceous acne on the face and back, and mild dystrophic toenails. She developed a large, pedunculated uterine leiomyoma at age 28 years. To our knowledge, uterine leiomyoma in association with r(12) has not been reported previously. However, a gain of chromosome 12 and translocations involving 12q14-15 have been described. 12 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Preaxial Polydactyly in Sost/Sostdc1 Double Knockouts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yee, C M; Collette, N M; Loots, G G

    2011-07-29

    In the United States, {approx}5% are born with congenital birth defects due to abnormal function of cellular processes and interactions. Sclerosteosis, a rare autosomal recessive disease, causes hyperostosis of the axial and appendicular skeleton, and patients present radial deviation, digit syndactyly, nail dysplasia, and overall high bone mineral density. Sclerosteosis is due to a loss of function of sclerostin (Sost). Sost is a Wnt (abbrev.) antagonist; when mutated, nonfunctional Sost results in hyperactive osteoblast activity which leads to abnormal high bone mass. Previous studies have shown that Sost overexpression in transgenic mice causes reduced bone mineral density and a variety of limb phenotypes ranging from lost, fused, and split phalanges. Consistent with clinical manifestations of Sclerosteosis, Sost knockout mice exhibit increased generalized bone mineral density and syndactyly of the digits. Sostdc1 is a paralog of Sost that has also been described as an antagonist of Wnt signaling, in developing tooth buds. Unlike Sost knockouts, Sostdc1 null mice do not display any limb abnormalities. To determine if Sost and Sostdc1 have redundant functions during limb patterning, we examined Sost; Sostdc1 mice determined that they exhibit a novel preaxial polydactyly phenotype with a low penetrance. LacZ staining, skeletal preparations, and in situ hybridization experiments were used to help characterize this novel phenotype and understand how this phenotype develops. We find Sost and Sostdc1 to have complementary expression patterns during limb development, and the loss of their expression alters the transcription of several key limb regulators, such as Fgf8, Shh and Grem.

  20. Genetic aspects of polydactyly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zguricas, J; Heutink, P; Heredero, L; Deurloo, J; Oostra, B A; Snijders, P J; Lindhout, D; Hovius, S E

    1996-07-01

    The early limb development follows the similar pattern in all vertebrates since different species develop using the same regulatory genes in the formation of the body plan. Some of these genes remained well conserved during evolution and can be traced back as far as Drosophila--while some others changed their structure or developed new functions. This is why the limbs from different animals still look different from one another. However, all existing tetrapods have, like Homo Sapiens, limbs with five, or fewer digits. It has been argued that the interplay of the factors controlling the patterning and differentiation during the embryonal limb development can provide five distinct "genotypes" allowing development of only five different digits. This would imply that the Greek definition of polydactyly, namely "duplication of the finger or a part of it", is correct, not only in morphological but also in a genetical sense. Genes involved in the determination of the outline of the limb are candidates for disorders like polydactyly and syndactyly. Recently, we have localised the gene for triphalangeal thumb (TPT) on chromosome 7q. As almost 50% of our patient population also had rudimentary postaxial polydactyly and/or syndactyly, the interesting question arose whether the TPT gene also was responsible for isolated post-axial polydactyly. Our preliminary evidence suggests, however, that different gene(s) are involved in the pathomorphogenesis of postaxial polydactyly. Studies of human congenital hand malformations--combined with genetic studies in lower vertebrates--will help us to understand not only the molecular basis of these disorders, but also to get insight into the fascinating mechanisms involved in the normal development of the human hand.

  1. [Epidemiological analysis of selected congenital limb malformations in Hengyang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Na-Na; Yuan, Yu-Mei; Liu, Yong; Dai, Li; Deng, Chang-Fei; Nie, Xing-Hui; Zheng, Xiang-Chi; Hu, Yan-Zhen; Liu, Yun-Rong

    2013-07-01

    To describe the epidemiological characteristics of selected congenital limb malformations (CLM) in newborns of Hengyang. During the period of 2008-2010, cluster sampling survey was adopted to investigate the congenital limb malformations of neonates born to women resident in Hengyang, including Nanyue District, Zhuhui District, Changning City and Hengshan County. Each newborn was examined for the screening of CLM after birth. Limb malformations were grouped into the isolated (ILM) and the syndromic (SLM) form, depending on associated malformations of the affected. Prevalence rates, CLM spectrum and clinical manifestations were analyzed. A total of 170 CLM cases were identified among 52,307 newborns during the study period, resulting overall rate of 32.50/10(4). The rates for isolated and syndromic CLM were 28.29 and 4.21 per 10 000 births respectively. The rates for polydactyly, congenital talipes equinovarus, syndactyly and limb reduction defects were 13.00/10(4), 9.56/10(4), 5.16/10(4) and 3.63/10(4), respectively. No significant difference in rates of overall CLM or specified CLM was observed across urban-rural, gender and maternal age groups. Of the cases affected by polydactyly, syndactyly and limb reduction defects, malformation involved upper limbs, lower limbs and the both accounted for 68.14%, 14.16% and 17.70%. Preterm birth, low birth-weight, still birth and neonatal death were observed more frequently in syndromic cases than in isolated patients. The high CLM prevalence rate and fatality rate in Hengyang suggest that effective measures should be taken to prevent malformations and to improve survival of the affected.

  2. Rapid detection of de novo P253R mutation in FGFR2 using uncultured amniocytes in a pregnancy affected by polyhydramnios, Blake's pouch cyst, and Apert syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Ping; Su, Yi-Ning; Chang, Tung-Yao; Chern, Schu-Rern; Chen, Chen-Yu; Su, Jun-Wei; Wang, Wayseen

    2013-06-01

    To present prenatal ultrasound and molecular genetic diagnosis of Apert syndrome. A 30-year-old, gravida 3, para 2 woman was referred for genetic counseling at 32 weeks of gestation because of polyhydramnios and craniofacial and digital abnormalities in the fetus. She had undergone amniocentesis at 18 weeks of gestation because of maternal anxiety. Results of amniocentesis revealed a karyotype of 46,XX. A prenatal ultrasound at 32 weeks of gestation revealed a female fetus with a fetal biometry equivalent to 32 weeks, polyhydramnios with an increased amniotic fluid index of 26.1 cm, frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, hypertelorism, Blake's pouch cyst with an apparent posterior fossa cyst in communication with the fourth ventricle on axial images, digital fusion, and bilateral syndactyly of the hands and feet. A DNA testing for the FGFR2 gene was immediately performed using uncultured amniocytes obtained by repeated amniocentesis, which revealed a heterozygous c.758C>G, CCT>CGT transversion leading to a p.Pro253Arg (P253R) mutation in the FGFR2 gene. Subsequently, a diagnosis of Apert syndrome was made. Molecular analysis of the FGFR2 gene in the parents did not reveal such a mutation. The fetus postnatally manifested frontal bossing, midface hypoplasia, and bilateral syndactyly of the hands (mitten hands) and feet. Prenatal diagnosis of polyhydramnios, frontal bossing, and midface hypoplasia associated with brain and digital abnormalities should include a differential diagnosis of Apert syndrome. A molecular analysis of FGFR2 using uncultured amniocytes is useful for rapid confirmation of Apert syndrome at prenatal diagnosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. ENU mutagenesis reveals a novel phenotype of reduced limb strength in mice lacking fibrillin 2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaynor Miller

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Fibrillins 1 (FBN1 and 2 (FBN2 are components of microfibrils, microfilaments that are present in many connective tissues, either alone or in association with elastin. Marfan's syndrome and congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA result from dominant mutations in the genes FBN1 and FBN2 respectively. Patients with both conditions often present with specific muscle atrophy or weakness, yet this has not been reported in the mouse models. In the case of Fbn1, this is due to perinatal lethality of the homozygous null mice making measurements of strength difficult. In the case of Fbn2, four different mutant alleles have been described in the mouse and in all cases syndactyly was reported as the defining phenotypic feature of homozygotes.As part of a large-scale N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU mutagenesis screen, we identified a mouse mutant, Mariusz, which exhibited muscle weakness along with hindlimb syndactyly. We identified an amber nonsense mutation in Fbn2 in this mouse mutant. Examination of a previously characterised Fbn2-null mutant, Fbn2(fp, identified a similar muscle weakness phenotype. The two Fbn2 mutant alleles complement each other confirming that the weakness is the result of a lack of Fbn2 activity. Skeletal muscle from mutants proved to be abnormal with higher than average numbers of fibres with centrally placed nuclei, an indicator that there are some regenerating muscle fibres. Physiological tests indicated that the mutant muscle produces significantly less maximal force, possibly as a result of the muscles being relatively smaller in Mariusz mice.These findings indicate that Fbn2 is involved in integrity of structures required for strength in limb movement. As human patients with mutations in the fibrillin genes FBN1 and FBN2 often present with muscle weakness and atrophy as a symptom, Fbn2-null mice will be a useful model for examining this aspect of the disease process further.

  4. Radiography of syndactylous limbs of cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taura, Y.; Takeuchi, A.; Uchino, T.

    1985-01-01

    Fore and hind limbs of 4-month-old Holstein-Friesian cattle ♀ (No.I) and those of 1-month-old Holstein-Friesian×Japanese Black cattle ♀ (No.II) suffering from syndactyly were dissected by means of radiographic examinations. The details were reported as follows. 1. The phalanges of both fore and left hind limbs of No.II cattle were completely fused. But, all the phalanges of left fore limb and proximal phalanges of right fore limb in No.I and the distal phalanges of right hind limb in No.II were normal, the others being of partial synostosis. 2. The distal parforating canal was absent in the metacarpus and the right metatarsus in No.II cattle. Also, in No.II on the distal part of the metacarpal or metatarsal, bone vestiges were noted, not only of the fifth and second metacarpus or metatarsus, but also the mutually jointed phalanges. 3. In No.I cattle, the left fore limb and 4 proximal sesamoid bones and 2 distal sesamoid bones, but the right limb had 4 sesamoid bones and 0 distal one. In No.II cattle, the fore limbs had 2 proximal and 0 distal sesamoid bones, left hind limb had 3 proximal and 0 distal ones, right hind limb had 3 proximal and 1 distal ones. 4. The arteries accommodated the syndactylous deformities. The median and radial arteries were fixed to be descended on to the palmar side of the metacarpus and mutually anastomosed to form a deep palmar arch. arising from the deep palmar arch, two branches (palmar proper digital aa. III and IV) were terminated by the lateral and medial palmar surfaces of the digit, where some anastomosing arches were formed by them. The arteries of the hind limbs were also similar to those of the fore limbs. 5. In radiographic examinations of syndactyly (in No.II) after 7-month feeding, hoof and digital bones were noted to have been developed, but distal phalanges were destructed and left in suspicion of bad prognosis

  5. The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biesecker Leslie G

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Greig cephalopolysyndactyly syndrome (GCPS is a pleiotropic, multiple congenital anomaly syndrome. It is rare, but precise estimates of incidence are difficult to determine, as ascertainment is erratic (estimated range 1–9/1,000,000. The primary findings include hypertelorism, macrocephaly with frontal bossing, and polysyndactyly. The polydactyly is most commonly preaxial of the feet and postaxial in the hands, with variable cutaneous syndactyly, but the limb findings vary significantly. Other low frequency findings include central nervous system (CNS anomalies, hernias, and cognitive impairment. GCPS is caused by loss of function mutations in the GLI3 transcription factor gene and is inherited in an autosomal dominant pattern. The disorder is allelic to the Pallister-Hall syndrome and one form of the acrocallosal syndrome. Clinical diagnosis is challenging because the findings of GCPS are relatively non-specific, and no specific and sensitive clinical have been delineated. For this reason, we have proposed a combined clinical-molecular definition for the syndrome. A presumptive diagnosis of GCPS can be made if the patient has the classic triad of preaxial polydactyly with cutaneous syndactyly of at least one limb, hypertelorism, and macrocephaly. Patients with a phenotype consistent with GCPS (but which may not manifest all three attributes listed above and a GLI3 mutation may be diagnosed definitively with GCPS. In addition, persons with a GCPS-consistent phenotype who are related to a definitively diagnosed family member in a pattern consistent with autosomal dominant inheritance may be diagnosed definitively as well. Antenatal molecular diagnosis is technically straightforward to perform. Differential diagnoses include preaxial polydactyly type 4, the GCPS contiguous gene syndrome, acrocallosal syndrome, Gorlin syndrome, Carpenter syndrome, and Teebi syndrome. Treatment of the disorder is symptomatic, with plastic or

  6. Hand/foot splitting and the 're-evolution' of mesopodial skeletal elements during the evolution and radiation of chameleons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Raul E; Trainor, Paul A

    2015-09-18

    One of the most distinctive traits found within Chamaeleonidae is their split/cleft autopodia and the simplified and divergent morphology of the mesopodial skeleton. These anatomical characteristics have facilitated the adaptive radiation of chameleons to arboreal niches. To better understand the homology of chameleon carpal and tarsal elements, the process of syndactyly, cleft formation, and how modification of the mesopodial skeleton has played a role in the evolution and diversification of chameleons, we have studied the Veiled Chameleon (Chamaeleo calyptratus). We analysed limb patterning and morphogenesis through in situ hybridization, in vitro whole embryo culture and pharmacological perturbation, scoring for apoptosis, clefting, and skeletogenesis. Furthermore, we framed our data within a phylogenetic context by performing comparative skeletal analyses in 8 of the 12 currently recognized genera of extant chameleons. Our study uncovered a previously underappreciated degree of mesopodial skeletal diversity in chameleons. Phylogenetically derived chameleons exhibit a 'typical' outgroup complement of mesopodial elements (with the exception of centralia), with twice the number of currently recognized carpal and tarsal elements considered for this clade. In contrast to avians and rodents, mesenchymal clefting in chameleons commences in spite of the maintenance of a robust apical ectodermal ridge (AER). Furthermore, Bmp signaling appears to be important for cleft initiation but not for maintenance of apoptosis. Interdigital cell death therefore may be an ancestral characteristic of the autopodium, however syndactyly is an evolutionary novelty. In addition, we find that the pisiform segments from the ulnare and that chameleons lack an astragalus-calcaneum complex typical of amniotes and have evolved an ankle architecture convergent with amphibians in phylogenetically higher chameleons. Our data underscores the importance of comparative and phylogenetic approaches

  7. Dental agenesis in Kallmann syndrome individuals with FGFR1 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Gros, Catherine; Zenaty, Delphine; Bennaceur, Sélim; Leger, Juliane; de Roux, Nicolas

    2010-07-01

    Kallmann syndrome (KS) is a rare genetic disorder characterised by central hypogonadism with a lack of sense of smell and in some cases renal aplasia, deafness, syndactyly, cleft lip/palate, and dental agenesis. To date, five genes for KS have been identified: KAL1, located on the X chromosome, and FGFR1, PROKR2, PROK2 and FGF8, which are involved in autosomally transmitted forms of KS. The study characterised the dental ageneses of individuals with KS associated with mutations in the FGFR1 gene. Six individuals displaying dental agenesis were included. Clinical and radiological dental evaluations as well as medical anamneses were carried out. Microdontia, screwdriver-shaped mandibular incisors, thin molar roots, and patterns of dental agenesis in both dentitions were observed. One to nine teeth were missing, most frequently, in descending order, lateral mandibular incisors, second premolars of upper and lower jaws, and lateral maxillary incisors. The pattern of dental agenesis is associated with four new mutations in the FGFR1 gene. Dental agenesis may be a clinical feature of Kallmann syndrome caused by a mutation in the FGFR1 gene. These findings highlight the role that odontologists can play in the early diagnosis and treatment of gonadotropic deficiency.

  8. Pfeiffer syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fryns Jean-Pierre

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominantly inherited disorder that associates craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly on hands and feet. Hydrocephaly may be found occasionally, along with severe ocular proptosis, ankylosed elbows, abnormal viscera, and slow development. Based on the severity of the phenotype, Pfeiffer syndrome is divided into three clinical subtypes. Type 1 "classic" Pfeiffer syndrome involves individuals with mild manifestations including brachycephaly, midface hypoplasia and finger and toe abnormalities; it is associated with normal intelligence and generally good outcome. Type 2 consists of cloverleaf skull, extreme proptosis, finger and toe abnormalities, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, developmental delay and neurological complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without a cloverleaf skull. Clinical overlap between the three types may occur. Pfeiffer syndrome affects about 1 in 100,000 individuals. The disorder can be caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR-1 or FGFR-2. Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography showing craniosynostosis, hypertelorism with proptosis, and broad thumb, or molecularly if it concerns a recurrence and the causative mutation was found. Molecular genetic testing is important to confirm the diagnosis. Management includes multiple-staged surgery of craniosynostosis. Midfacial surgery is performed to reduce the exophthalmos and the midfacial hypoplasia.

  9. Identification of Critical Region Responsible for Split Hand/Foot Malformation Type 3 (SHFM3 Phenotype through Systematic Review of Literature and Mapping of Breakpoints Using Microarray Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine F. Li

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Split hand/foot malformation (SHFM is a limb malformation with underdeveloped or absent central digital rays, clefts of hands and feet, and variable syndactyly of the remaining digits. There are six types of SHFM. Here, we report a boy with SHFM type 3 having normal 4th and 5th digits, absent 2nd and 3rd digits, and a 4th finger flexion deformity, as well as absent 2nd, 3rd and 4th toes bilaterally. His father, two paternal uncles, and two paternal first cousins have similar phenotype. Chromosome analysis showed a normal male karyotype. A 514 kb gain at 10q24.31–q24.32 (chr10:102,962,134–103,476,346, hg19 was identified using 6.0 Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP microarray, resulting in the duplication of nine genes, including BTRC and FBXW4. A detailed systematic review of literature and mapping of breakpoints using microarray data from all reported cases in PubMed and DECIPHER were conducted, and exon 1 of BTRC gene was identified as the critical region responsible for the SHFM3 phenotype. The potential mechanism and future studies of this critical region causing the SHFM3 phenotype are discussed.

  10. Type 2 Pfeiffer syndrome. Report of a case and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roldán Arce Jorge

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Pfeiffer syndrome is a rare autosomal dominant disease that affects almost 1 out of every 100,000 live newborns, and it is associated with craniosynostosis, broad and deviated thumbs and big toes, and partial syndactyly in hands and feet. Three types of this syndrome have been described based on the presence of other abnormalities and the severity of the condition. “Classic” type 1 consists of mild severity with normal to near-normal intelligence and generally a good prognosis. Type 2 is characterized by a cloverleaf skull, severe proptosis, elbow ankylosis or synostosis, growth retardation and life-threatening neurological and respiratory complications. Type 3 is similar to type 2 but without the cloverleaf cranium. This syndrome is genetically heterogeneous, it is caused by mutations in the fibroblast growth factor receptor genes FGFR- 1 or FGFR-2. Occasionally Pfeiffer syndrome can be diagnosed prenatally by sonography or molecularly if the causative mutation is known. Management must be multidisciplinary and it includes multiple-staged surgery. In this report we present the clinical and radiographic findings in female newborn, whose clinical features were consistent with Pfeiffer syndrome type 2. A brief updated review of the literature is included.

  11. KBG syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brancati Francesco

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract KBG syndrome is a rare condition characterised by a typical facial dysmorphism, macrodontia of the upper central incisors, skeletal (mainly costovertebral anomalies and developmental delay. To date, KBG syndrome has been reported in 45 patients. Clinical features observed in more than half of patients that may support the diagnosis are short stature, electroencephalogram (EEG anomalies (with or without seizures and abnormal hair implantation. Cutaneous syndactyly, webbed short neck, cryptorchidism, hearing loss, palatal defects, strabismus and congenital heart defects are less common findings. Autosomal dominant transmission has been observed in some families, and it is predominantly the mother, often showing a milder clinical picture, that transmits the disease. The diagnosis is currently based solely on clinical findings as the aetiology is unknown. The final diagnosis is generally achieved after the eruption of upper permanent central incisors at 7–8 years of age when the management of possible congenital anomalies should have been already planned. A full developmental assessment should be done at diagnosis and, if delays are noted, an infant stimulation program should be initiated. Subsequent management and follow-up should include an EEG, complete orthodontic evaluation, skeletal investigation with particular regard to spine curvatures and limb asymmetry, hearing testing and ophthalmologic assessment.

  12. Oculodentodigital dysplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dharmil C Doshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Oculodentodigital dysplasia is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder with high penetrance and variable expressivity, caused by mutations in the connexin 43 or gap junction protein alpha-1 gene. It has been diagnosed in fewer than 300 people worldwide with an incidence of around 1 in 10 million. It affects many parts of the body, particularly eyes (oculo, teeth (dento, and fingers and/or toes (digital. The common clinical features include facial dysmorphism with thin nose, microphthalmia, syndactyly, tooth anomalies such as enamel hypoplasia, anodontia, microdontia, early tooth loss and conductive deafness. Other less common features are abnormalities of the skin and its appendages, such as brittle nails, sparse hair, and neurological abnormalities. To prevent this syndrome from being overlooked, awareness of possible symptoms is necessary. Early recognition can prevent blindness, dental problems and learning disabilities. Described here is the case of a 21-year-old male who presented to the ophthalmology outpatient department with a complaint of bilateral progressive loss of vision since childhood.

  13. Severe growth deficiency, microcephaly, intellectual disability, and characteristic facial features are due to a homozygous QARS mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshinsky-Silver, Esther; Ling, Jiqiang; Wu, Jiang; Vinkler, Chana; Yosovich, Keren; Bahar, Sarit; Yanoov-Sharav, Miri; Lerman-Sagie, Tally; Lev, Dorit

    2017-07-01

    Glutaminyl tRNA synthase is highly expressed in the developing fetal human brain. Mutations in the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase (QARS) gene have been reported in patients with progressive microcephaly, cerebral-cerebellar atrophy, and intractable seizures. We have previously reported a new recessive syndrome of severe linear growth retardation, poor weight gain, microcephaly, characteristic facial features, cutaneous syndactyly of the toes, high myopia, and intellectual disability in two sisters of Ashkenazi-Jewish origin (Eur J Med Genet 2014;57(6):288-92). Homozygosity mapping and whole exome sequencing revealed a homozygous missense (V476I) mutation in the QARS gene, located in the catalytic domain. The patient's fibroblasts demonstrated markedly reduced QARS amino acylation activity in vitro. Furthermore, the same homozygous mutation was found in an unrelated girl of Ashkenazi origin with the same phenotype. The clinical presentation of our patients differs from the original QARS-associated syndrome in the severe postnatal growth failure, absence of epilepsy, and minor MRI findings, thus further expanding the phenotypic spectrum of the glutaminyl-tRNA synthetase deficiency syndromes.

  14. Prenatal Diagnosis of Bilateral Ectrodactyly and Radial Agenesis Associated with Trisomy 10 Mosaicism

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    Jonathan Lévy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly or split hand and foot malformations (SHFMs are rare malformations of the limbs, characterized by median clefts of the hands and feet, syndactyly, and aplasia and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges. They represent a clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorder, with both sporadic and familial cases. Most of the genomic rearrangements identified to date in some forms of SHFM are autosomal dominant traits, involving various chromosome regions. Bilateral radial ray defects comprise also a large heterogenous group of disorders, including trisomy 18, Fanconi anemia, and thrombocytopenia-absent-radius syndrome, not commonly associated with ectrodactyly. The present paper describes a case of ectrodactyly associated with bilateral radial ray defects, diagnosed in the first trimester of pregnancy, in a fetus affected by trisomy 10. Only four cases of sporadic and isolated ectrodactyly, diagnosed by ultrasonography between 14 and 22 weeks’ gestation, have been reported. To our knowledge, the present case is the first report of mosaic trisomy 10 associated with SHFM and radial aplasia. Trisomy 10 is a rare lethal chromosomal abnormality, most frequently found in abortion products. Only six liveborn mosaic trisomy 10 infants, with severe malformations, dead in early infancy, have been reported. A severe clinical syndrome can be defined, comprising ear abnormalities, cleft lip/palate, malformations of eyes, heart, and kidneys, and deformity of hands and feet and most often associated with death neonatally or in early infancy.

  15. Discordance of oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 in monozygotic twin girls.

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    Shotelersuk, V; Tifft, C J; Vacha, S; Peters, K F; Biesecker, L G

    1999-09-17

    The oral-facial-digital syndrome type 1 (OFD1) includes limb, facial, intraoral malformations and the gene for the disorder was recently mapped to Xp22.3-p22.2. We report on monozygotic twin girls discordant for OFD1. Monozygosity is supported by placental pathology (monochorionic diamniotic) and molecular studies with probability of dizygosity twin has oral cavity abnormalities including median cleft lip, cleft palate, lobulated hamartomatous tongue, aberrant hyperplastic oral frenula, alveolar notches, and absent lateral incisors. Facial manifestations include telecanthus, hypoplastic alae nasi, and transient neonatal facial milia. The patient also has short and deviated fingers with partial cutaneous syndactyly. At 10 years, she has not had central nervous system or kidney problems. X-inactivation study revealed similar X-inactivation patterns in the lymphoblasts of both twins. We conclude that skewed X-inactivation is an unlikely cause for the discordance, which is more likely due to a postzygotic mutation in the affected twin. Copyright 1999 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  16. Nubp1 is required for lung branching morphogenesis and distal progenitor cell survival in mice.

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    Carsten Schnatwinkel

    Full Text Available The lung is a complex system in biology and medicine alike. Whereas there is a good understanding of the anatomy and histology of the embryonic and adult lung, less is known about the molecular details and the cellular pathways that ultimately orchestrate lung formation and affect its health. From a forward genetic approach to identify novel genes involved in lung formation, we identified a mutated Nubp1 gene, which leads to syndactyly, eye cataract and lung hypoplasia. In the lung, Nubp1 is expressed in progenitor cells of the distal epithelium. Nubp1(m1Nisw mutants show increased apoptosis accompanied by a loss of the distal progenitor markers Sftpc, Sox9 and Foxp2. In addition, Nubp1 mutation disrupts localization of the polarity protein Par3 and the mitosis relevant protein Numb. Using knock-down studies in lung epithelial cells, we also demonstrate a function of Nubp1 in regulating centrosome dynamics and microtubule organization. Together, Nubp1 represents an essential protein for lung progenitor survival by coordinating vital cellular processes including cell polarity and centrosomal dynamics.

  17. AMACO is a novel component of the basement membrane associated Fraser complex

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    Richardson, Rebecca J.; Gebauer, Jan M.; Zhang, Jin-Li; Kobbe, Birgit; Keene, Douglas R.; Karlsen, Kristina Røkenes; Richetti, Stefânia; Wohl, Alexander P.; Sengle, Gerhard; Neiss, Wolfram F.; Paulsson, Mats; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2015-01-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a phenotypically variable, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly and other malformations resulting from mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 and GRIP1. Transient embryonic epidermal blistering causes the characteristic defects of the disorder. Fras1, Frem1 and Frem2 form the extracellular Fraser complex, which is believed to stabilize the basement membrane (BM). However, several cases of FS could not be attributed to mutations in FRAS1, FREM2 or GRIP1, while Fraser syndrome displays high clinical variability, suggesting there is an additional genetic, possibly modifying contribution to this disorder. AMACO, encoded by the VWA2 gene, has a very similar tissue distribution to the Fraser complex proteins in both mouse and zebrafish. Here, we show that AMACO deposition is lost in Fras1 deficient zebrafish and mice and that Fras1 and AMACO interact directly via their CSPG and P2 domains. Knockdown of vwa2, which alone causes no phenotype, enhances the phenotype of hypomorphic Fras1 mutant zebrafish. Together, our data suggest that AMACO represents a novel member of the Fraser complex. PMID:24232570

  18. AMACO is a component of the basement membrane-associated Fraser complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rebecca J; Gebauer, Jan M; Zhang, Jin-Li; Kobbe, Birgit; Keene, Douglas R; Karlsen, Kristina Røkenes; Richetti, Stefânia; Wohl, Alexander P; Sengle, Gerhard; Neiss, Wolfram F; Paulsson, Mats; Hammerschmidt, Matthias; Wagener, Raimund

    2014-05-01

    Fraser syndrome (FS) is a phenotypically variable, autosomal recessive disorder characterized by cryptophthalmus, cutaneous syndactyly, and other malformations resulting from mutations in FRAS1, FREM2, and GRIP1. Transient embryonic epidermal blistering causes the characteristic defects of the disorder. Fras1, Frem1, and Frem2 form the extracellular Fraser complex, which is believed to stabilize the basement membrane. However, several cases of FS could not be attributed to mutations in FRAS1, FREM2, or GRIP1, and FS displays high clinical variability, suggesting that there is an additional genetic, possibly modifying contribution to this disorder. An extracellular matrix protein containing VWA-like domains related to those in matrilins and collagens (AMACO), encoded by the VWA2 gene, has a very similar tissue distribution to the Fraser complex proteins in both mouse and zebrafish. Here, we show that AMACO deposition is lost in Fras1-deficient zebrafish and mice and that Fras1 and AMACO interact directly via their chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan (CSPG) and P2 domains. Knockdown of vwa2, which alone causes no phenotype, enhances the phenotype of hypomorphic Fras1 mutant zebrafish. Together, our data suggest that AMACO represents a member of the Fraser complex.

  19. Distinct phenotype of PHF6 deletions in females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Donato, N; Isidor, B; Lopez Cazaux, S; Le Caignec, C; Klink, B; Kraus, C; Schrock, E; Hackmann, K

    2014-02-01

    We report on two female patients carrying small overlapping Xq26.2 deletions of 100 kb and 270 kb involving the PHF6 gene. Mutations in PHF6 have been reported in individuals with Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome, a condition present almost exclusively in males. Two very recent papers revealed de novo PHF6 defects in seven female patients with intellectual disability and a phenotype resembling Coffin-Siris syndrome (sparse hair, bitemporal narrowing, arched eyebrows, synophrys, high nasal root, bulbous nasal tip, marked clinodactyly with the hypoplastic terminal phalanges of the fifth fingers and cutaneous syndactyly of the toes, Blaschkoid linear skin hyperpigmentation, dental anomalies and occasional major malformations). The clinical presentation of these patients overlaps completely with our first patient, who carries a germline deletion involving PHF6. The second patient has a mosaic deletion and presented with a very mild phenotype of PHF6 loss in females. Our report confirms that PHF6 loss in females results in a recognizable phenotype overlapping with Coffin-Siris syndrome and distinct from Borjeson-Forssman-Lehmann syndrome. We expand the clinical spectrum and provide the first summary of the recommended medical evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. A rare case of ectrodactyly in a child in India

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    Mishil S Parikh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Ectrodactyly, termed split-hand/split-foot malformation (SHFM, is a rare genetic condition characterized by defects of the central elements of the autopod (hand/foot. Clinical presentation is with the absence of one or more median rays or digits creating cone-shaped clefts of the hands and/or feet. The present case of severe bilateral SHFM was presented in an 8-year-old girl in India. This case of SHFM involves the complete absence of the central rays of the autopod in which each of the hands and feet is divided into two parts by a cone-shaped cleft tapering proximally, resembling a "lobster claw." SHFM is often associated with other limb anomalies, including monodactyly, syndactyly and aplasia, and/or hypoplasia of the phalanges, metacarpals, and metatarsals. Most cases are sporadic; however, familial forms do exist with predominantly autosomal dominant inheritance. This case is an example of the non-syndromic form of SHFM expressed with isolated involvement of the limbs, while the syndromic form is associated with anomalies such as intellectual disability, ectodermal and craniofacial findings, and hearing loss. Non-syndromic isolated ectrodactyly does not usually require surgical intervention. We recommended against surgical reconstruction due to lack of evidence of functional disability.

  1. A novel mutation in SMOC1 and variable phenotypic expression in two patients with Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamshidi, Javad; Abdollahi, Shokoufeh; Ghaedi, Hamid; Alehabib, Elham; Tafakhori, Abbas; Alinaghi, Somayeh; Chapi, Marjan; Johari, Amir Hossein; Darvish, Hossein

    2017-11-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS) is a rare disorder that mostly affects the eyes and distal limbs. In the current study we reported two Iranian patients with WAS. The first case was a 26-year-old girl with unilateral anophthalmia, bilateral camptodactyly and clinodactyly in her hands, oligodactly in her left foot and syndactyly of the second to fifth toes in her right foot. She also had severe hearing loss in both ears. The second case was a 12-year-old boy with bilateral anophthalmia, camptodactyly in his right hand, oligodactyly in his foot, clubfoot, and cryptorchidism. Both patients were mentally normal. To detect the causative mutation all exons and exon-intron boundaries of SMOC1 gene were sequenced in patients and other normal family members. We found a homozygous missense mutation (NM_001034852.2(SMOC1):c.367T > C) in exon 3 of SMOC1 gene in both patients. As the mutation segregated with the disease in the family, it should be the causative mutation. Our study extended the mutation spectrum of SMOC1 gene related to WAS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. A novel homozygous variant in the SMOC1 gene underlying Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome.

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    Ullah, Asmat; Umair, Muhammad; Ahmad, Farooq; Muhammad, Dost; Basit, Sulman; Ahmad, Wasim

    2017-01-01

    Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome (WAS), also known as ophthalmo-acromelic syndrome or anophthalmia-syndactyly, is a rare congenital disorder that segregates in an autosomal recessive pattern. Clinical features of the syndrome include malformation of the eyes and the skeleton. Mostly, WAS is caused by mutations in the SMOC-1 gene. The present report describes a large consanguineous family of Pakistani origin segregating Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome in an autosomal recessive pattern. Genotyping followed by Sanger sequencing was performed to search for a candidate gene. SNP genotyping using AffymetrixGeneChip Human Mapping 250K Nsp array established a single homozygous region among affected members on chromosome 14q23.1-q24.3 harboring the SMOC1 gene. Sequencing of the gene revealed a novel homozygous missense mutation (c.812G>A; p.Cys271Tyr) in the family. This is the first report of Waardenburg anophthalmia syndrome caused by a SMOC1 variant in a Pakistani population. The mutation identified in the present investigation extends the body of evidence implicating the gene SMOC-1 in causing WAS.

  3. Multigenerational pedigree with STAR syndrome: A novel FAM58A variant and expansion of the phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boczek, Nicole J; Kruisselbrink, Teresa; Cousin, Margot A; Blackburn, Patrick R; Klee, Eric W; Gavrilova, Ralitza H; Lanpher, Brendan C

    2017-05-01

    STAR syndrome is a rare X-linked dominant disorder characterized by toe Syndactyly, Telecanthus, Anogenital malformations, and Renal malformations, and is caused by loss-of-function variants in FAM58A. Our proband presented with the hallmark features of STAR syndrome, as well as some additional less typical features including tethered cord and hearing loss. The proband's mother and maternal half-sister had similar clinical histories, but had variability in phenotypic severity. Clinical whole exome sequencing revealed a novel pathogenic nonsense variant, c.651G>A (p.Trp217X; NM_152274), in FAM58A in the proband, mother, and maternal half-sister. This pedigree represents the 11-13th patients described with STAR syndrome and the third instance of familial inheritance. To our knowledge, this is the first occurrence of a nonsense variant in FAM58A described in individuals with STAR syndrome and the phenotype in this pedigree suggests that tethered cord and hearing loss are features of STAR syndrome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Popliteal pterygium syndrome: Orofacial and general features

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    S K Bahetwar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This report describes the case of a 13-year-old Indian boy with popliteal pterygium syndrome. The popliteal pterygium syndrome is an extremely rare hereditary disorder thought to occur with an incidence of approximately 1 in 300000 live births. It is a congenital malformation syndrome affecting the face, limbs, and genitalia with highly characteristic features, including popliteal webbing, cleft palate (with or without cleft lip, lower lip pits, syndactyly, and genital and nail anomalies. This patient was referred to our department because of complaints of pain in the mouth and poor oral health. The orofacial findings included cleft lip, cleft palate, lower lip pits, a few missing teeth, and severely decayed teeth. In this syndrome, the orodental problems are overshadowed by the major syndromic manifestations but nevertheless need appropriate management. These patients have special dental needs and early diagnosis of the affected children is therefore important in order to initiate preventive dental care and carry out appropriate dental treatment at the optimal time.

  5. Focal dermal hypoplasia (Goltz's syndrome).

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    Gündüz, K; Günalp, I; Erden, I

    1997-09-01

    A 17-year-old female with Goltz's syndrome was examined because of visual acuity loss in her right eye. Ocular examination revealed microcornea, iris, choroid and optic disc coloboma in the right eye. There were several erthematous and hyperpigmented areas on the body. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the orbits and brain demonstrated right optic nerve hypoplasia and diffuse cortical and cerebellar atrophy. Skeletal manifestations were short stature, scoliosis, syndactyly, clinodactyly, and osteopathia striata. Dental defects included hypodontia, developmental defects, and malocclusion. There were multiple papillomatous lesions on the lids and perioral skin and the nose was asymmetric. Her mental development was apparently normal. She had left bifid ureter and renal pelvis, scant hair on the pubic and genital region, and poor breast development. Histopathologic examination of the biopsy taken from a characteristic skin lesion revealed attenuated epidermis, hypoplastic dermis, and subcutaneous fat close to epidermis. Immunofluorescence staining was negative for IgG, IgM, IgA, C3, C4, fibrin, and albumin. Ultrastructural examination showed that no viral particles were present. Prometaphase chromosome analysis revealed a normal 46, XX female karyotype. Cortical and cerebellar atrophy can occur in a patient with Goltz's syndrome.

  6. Hypoventilation in REM sleep in a case of 17p11.2 deletion (Smith-Magenis syndrome).

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    Leoni, Chiara; Cesarini, Laura; Dittoni, Serena; Battaglia, Domenica; Novelli, Antonio; Bernardini, Laura; Losurdo, Anna; Vollono, Catello; Testani, Elisa; Della Marca, Giacomo; Zampino, Giuseppe

    2010-03-01

    We describe a 2-year-old baby affected by Smith-Magenis syndrome (SMS), due to 17p11.2 deletion, who presented repeated episodes of hemoglobin desaturation during REM sleep. The boy, aged 14 months, presented a phenotype characterized by psychomotor delay, right posterior plagiocephaly, telecanthus, strabismus, upslanting palpebral fissures, broad hypoplastic nasal bridge, short philtrum, deep ring shaped skin creases around the limbs, proximal syndactyly, bilateral hypoacusia. Polysomnographic (PSG) recording showed episodes of REM-related hypoventilation (hemoglobin desaturations without apneas or hypopneas). Sleep disorders are present in almost all the cases of SMS, but very few reports describe the sleep-related respiratory patterns. The finding of REM hypoventilation in SMS does not allow an unequivocal interpretation. It could reflect a subclinical restrictive respiratory impairment or, alternatively, an impairment of central respiratory control during REM sleep. In SMS children, respiratory abnormalities during sleep, and in particular during REM sleep, may cause sleep disruption, reduction of time spent in REM sleep, and daytime sleepiness. We therefore suggest that some sleep abnormalities described in SMS could be consequent to Sleep Disordered Breathing, and in particular to REM hypoventilation. Sleep studies in SMS should include the recording of respiratory parameters. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. A Turner Syndrome Patient Carrying a Mosaic Distal X Chromosome Marker

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    Roberto L. P. Mazzaschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A skin sample from a 17-year-old female was received for routine karyotyping with a set of clinical features including clonic seizures, cardiomyopathy, hepatic adenomas, and skeletal dysplasia. Conventional karyotyping revealed a mosaic Turner syndrome karyotype with a cell line containing a small marker of X chromosome origin. This was later confirmed on peripheral blood cultures by conventional G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridisation and microarray analysis. Similar Turner mosaic marker chromosome cases have been previously reported in the literature, with a variable phenotype ranging from the mild “classic” Turner syndrome to anencephaly, agenesis of the corpus callosum, complex heart malformation, and syndactyly of the fingers and toes. This case report has a phenotype that is largely discordant with previously published cases as it lies at the severe end of the Turner variant phenotype scale. The observed cytogenetic abnormalities in this study may represent a coincidental finding, but we cannot exclude the possibility that the marker has a nonfunctioning X chromosome inactivation locus, leading to functional disomy of those genes carried by the marker.

  8. Characterization of limb differences in children with Cornelia de Lange Syndrome.

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    Mehta, Devanshi; Vergano, Samantha A Schrier; Deardorff, Matthew; Aggarwal, Sarika; Barot, Akash; Johnson, Drew M; Miller, Nathan F; Noon, Sarah E; Kaur, Maninder; Jackson, Laird; Krantz, Ian D

    2016-06-01

    Cornelia de Lange syndrome (CdLS) is a well-described multisystem developmental disorder characterized by dysmorphic facial features, growth and behavioral deficits, and cardiac, gastrointestinal, and limb anomalies. The limb defects seen in CdLS can be mild, with small feet or hands only, or can be severe, with variable deficiency defects involving primarily the ulnar structures and ranging from mild hypoplasia of the fifth digit to complete absence of the forearm. Interestingly, the upper limbs are typically much more involved than the lower extremities that generally manifest with small feet and 2-3 syndactyly of the toes and shortened fourth metatarsal. The upper limbs often manifest asymmetric involvement. The limb findings in our cohort of 378 individuals with CdLS demonstrate a consistent pattern of laterality and symmetry involvement (with increased severity of right-sided limb in individuals with asymmetric limb defects) and a correlation of more significant limb defects with an increased risk of other structural anomalies, and more severe behavioral outcomes. Additionally, we found that individuals with mutations in NIPBL were most likely to have limb defects compared to mutations in other genes with nonsense, exonic deletion, and frameshift mutations being most prevalent in those with limb defects. Characterization of the limb differences in children with CdLS may provide a tool to assist in genetic counseling and determining prognosis. This paper will review the limb involvement in a large cohort of individuals with CdLS assessing the correlation with molecular etiologies, symmetry, additional structural birth defects, and cognitive outcomes. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Sp6 and Sp8 Transcription Factors Control AER Formation and Dorsal-Ventral Patterning in Limb Development

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    Haro, Endika; Delgado, Irene; Junco, Marisa; Yamada, Yoshihiko; Mansouri, Ahmed; Oberg, Kerby C.; Ros, Marian A.

    2014-01-01

    The formation and maintenance of the apical ectodermal ridge (AER) is critical for the outgrowth and patterning of the vertebrate limb. The induction of the AER is a complex process that relies on integrated interactions among the Fgf, Wnt, and Bmp signaling pathways that operate within the ectoderm and between the ectoderm and the mesoderm of the early limb bud. The transcription factors Sp6 and Sp8 are expressed in the limb ectoderm and AER during limb development. Sp6 mutant mice display a mild syndactyly phenotype while Sp8 mutants exhibit severe limb truncations. Both mutants show defects in AER maturation and in dorsal-ventral patterning. To gain further insights into the role Sp6 and Sp8 play in limb development, we have produced mice lacking both Sp6 and Sp8 activity in the limb ectoderm. Remarkably, the elimination or significant reduction in Sp6;Sp8 gene dosage leads to tetra-amelia; initial budding occurs, but neither Fgf8 nor En1 are activated. Mutants bearing a single functional allele of Sp8 (Sp6−/−;Sp8+/−) exhibit a split-hand/foot malformation phenotype with double dorsal digit tips probably due to an irregular and immature AER that is not maintained in the center of the bud and on the abnormal expansion of Wnt7a expression to the ventral ectoderm. Our data are compatible with Sp6 and Sp8 working together and in a dose-dependent manner as indispensable mediators of Wnt/βcatenin and Bmp signaling in the limb ectoderm. We suggest that the function of these factors links proximal-distal and dorsal-ventral patterning. PMID:25166858

  10. Maternofetal consequences of Coxiella burnetii infection in pregnancy: a case series of two outbreaks

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    Boden Katharina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A high complication rate of Q fever in pregnancy is described on the basis of a limited number of cases. All pregnant women with proven Q fever regardless of clinical symptoms should therefore receive long-term cotrimoxazole therapy. But cotrimoxazole as a folic acid antagonist may cause harm to the fetus. We therefore investigated the Q fever outbreaks, Soest in 2003 and Jena in 2005, to determine the maternofetal consequences of Coxiella burnetii infection contracted during pregnancy. Methods Different outbreak investigation strategies were employed at the two sides. Antibody screening was performed with an indirect immunofluorescence test. Medical history and clinical data were obtained and serological follow up performed at delivery. Available placental tissue, amniotic fluid and colostrum/milk were further investigated by polymerase chain reaction and by culture. Results 11 pregnant women from Soest (screening rate: 49% and 82 pregnant women from Jena (screening rate: 27% participated in the outbreak investigation. 11 pregnant women with an acute C. burnetii infection were diagnosed. Three women had symptomatic disease. Three women, who were infected in the first trimester, were put on long-term therapy. The remaining women received cotrimoxazole to a lesser extent (n=3, were treated with macrolides for three weeks (n=1 or after delivery (n=1, were given no treatment at all (n=2 or received antibiotics ineffective for Q fever (n=1. One woman and her foetus died of an underlying disease not related to Q fever. One woman delivered prematurely (35th week and one child was born with syndactyly. We found no obvious association between C. burnetii infection and negative pregnancy outcome. Conclusions Our data do not support the general recommendation of long-term cotrimoxazole treatment for Q fever infection in pregnancy. Pregnant women with symptomatic C. burnetii infections and with chronic Q fever should be treated. The

  11. NOSOLOGY OF HAND DISEASES IN CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS OPERATED IN PROVISIONAL FACILITIES IN A MODEL HOSPITAL - PERNAMBUCO STATE, BRAZIL.

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    Cortez, Mauri; Silva, Rui Ferreira da; Gilbert, Alain; Brandt, Carlos Teixeira; Valenti, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    To report the frequencies of congenital hand diseases in patients who underwent surgery on a collective mobilization basis at SOS Hand, Recife, Pernambuco, between 2005 and 2009. Information was collected from 833 children and adolescents who were examined in eight missions. Among the patients, 306 (36.7%) underwent surgery: 240 (78.4%) because of congenital malformation and 66 (21.6%) because of acquired lesions. The most frequent congenital malformations were: syndactyly, 72 cases (30.0%); polydactyly, 30 cases (12.5%); bifid thumb, 19 cases (7.9%); complex hand malformation, 14 cases (5.8%); cleft hand, 13 cases (5.4%); trigger finger, 12 cases (5.0%); camptodactyly, 11 cases (4.6%); and brachysyndactyly, 9 cases (3.7%). The most frequently acquired injuries were: obstetric traumatic lesions, 26 cases (39.4%); hand trauma sequelae, 18 cases (27.3%); cerebral paralysis sequelae, 7 cases (10.6%); electric shock sequelae, 5 cases (7.6%); and burn sequelae, 4 cases (6.1%). The nosology of hand diseases is similar to that of large series of elective surgery, especially regarding congenital deformities. The frequency of acquired hand lesions seems to be higher than the frequency in international series. The collective mobilization system for hand surgery is important for decreasing the need for this activity in public institutions, and it has been shown to be very efficient. The success of the project may provide support for the Brazilian National Health System to enroll hand surgeons in the on-call system, in emergency units.

  12. Cri du Chat syndrome

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    Cerruti Mainardi Paola

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The Cri du Chat syndrome (CdCS is a genetic disease resulting from a deletion of variable size occurring on the short arm of chromosome 5 (5p-. The incidence ranges from 1:15,000 to 1:50,000 live-born infants. The main clinical features are a high-pitched monochromatic cry, microcephaly, broad nasal bridge, epicanthal folds, micrognathia, abnormal dermatoglyphics, and severe psychomotor and mental retardation. Malformations, although not very frequent, may be present: cardiac, neurological and renal abnormalities, preauricular tags, syndactyly, hypospadias, and cryptorchidism. Molecular cytogenetic analysis has allowed a cytogenetic and phenotypic map of 5p to be defined, even if results from the studies reported up to now are not completely in agreement. Genotype-phenotype correlation studies showed a clinical and cytogenetic variability. The identification of phenotypic subsets associated with a specific size and type of deletion is of diagnostic and prognostic relevance. Specific growth and psychomotor development charts have been established. Two genes, Semaphorin F (SEMAF and δ-catenin (CTNND2, which have been mapped to the "critical regions", are potentially involved in cerebral development and their deletion may be associated with mental retardation in CdCS patients. Deletion of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene, localised to 5p15.33, could contribute to the phenotypic changes in CdCS. The critical regions were recently refined by using array comparative genomic hybridisation. The cat-like cry critical region was further narrowed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR and three candidate genes were characterised in this region. The diagnosis is based on typical clinical manifestations. Karyotype analysis and, in doubtful cases, FISH analysis will confirm the diagnosis. There is no specific therapy for CdCS but early rehabilitative and educational interventions improve the prognosis and considerable

  13. Teratogenic Effects of Sulfur Mustard on Mice Fetuses

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    Sanjarmoosavi, Nasrin; Sanjarmoosavi, Naser; Shahsavan, Marziyeh; Hassanzadeh-Nazarabadi, Mohammad

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Sulfur Mustard (SM) has been used as a chemical warfare agent, in the World War I and more recently during Iraq-Iran war in early 1980s’. Its biological poisoning effect could be local or systemic and its effect depends on environmental conditions, exposed organs, and the extent and duration of exposure. It is considered as a strong alkylating agent with known mutagenic, carcinogenic effects; although a few studies have been performed on its teratogenicity so far. Materials and Methods Mice were administered with SM intraperitoneally with a dose of 0.75 and 1.5 mg/kg in different periods of their gestation (gestational age of 11, 13 and 14 weeks). Control mice groups were included. Between 5 and 9 mice were used in each group. Dams underwent cesarean section on day 19 of their gestation. External examination was performed on the animals investigating craniofacial and septal defects and limb malformations such as adactyly and syndactyly. All data were analyzed by Chi-Square test and Fisher's exact test. The P- value less than 0.05 was considered significant. Results Craniofacial and septal defects as well as the limb malformations were the most common types of birth defects, displaying an extremely complex biomedical problem. Conclusion This study confirms a significant correlation between SM exposure and its teratogenic effect. We postulated that the malformations could be caused by an uncontrolled migration of neural crest cells, causing developmental disorders. In addition to environmental factors, modifying genes could play an important role in the pathogenesis of the defects. PMID:23493485

  14. Brachydactyly

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    Aglan Mona S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Brachydactyly ("short digits" is a general term that refers to disproportionately short fingers and toes, and forms part of the group of limb malformations characterized by bone dysostosis. The various types of isolated brachydactyly are rare, except for types A3 and D. Brachydactyly can occur either as an isolated malformation or as a part of a complex malformation syndrome. To date, many different forms of brachydactyly have been identified. Some forms also result in short stature. In isolated brachydactyly, subtle changes elsewhere may be present. Brachydactyly may also be accompanied by other hand malformations, such as syndactyly, polydactyly, reduction defects, or symphalangism. For the majority of isolated brachydactylies and some syndromic forms of brachydactyly, the causative gene defect has been identified. In isolated brachydactyly, the inheritance is mostly autosomal dominant with variable expressivity and penetrtance. Diagnosis is clinical, anthropometric and radiological. Prenatal diagnosis is usually not indicated for isolated forms of brachydactyly, but may be appropriate in syndromic forms. Molecular studies of chorionic villus samples at 11 weeks of gestation and by amniocentesis after the 14th week of gestation can provide antenatal diagnosis if the causative mutation in the family is known. The nature of genetic counseling depends both on the pattern of inheritance of the type of brachydactyly present in the family and on the presence or absence of accompanying symptoms. There is no specific management or treatment that is applicable to all forms of brachydactyly. Plastic surgery is only indicated if the brachydactyly affects hand function or for cosmetic reasons, but is typically not needed. Physical therapy and ergotherapy may ameliorate hand function. Prognosis for the brachydactylies is strongly dependent on the nature of the brachydactyly, and may vary from excellent to severely influencing hand function. If

  15. Trends in congenital anomalies in Europe from 1980 to 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Springett, Anna L.; Greenlees, Ruth; Loane, Maria; Addor, Marie-Claude; Arriola, Larraitz; Barisic, Ingeborg; Bergman, Jorieke E. H.; Csaky-Szunyogh, Melinda; Dias, Carlos; Draper, Elizabeth S.; Garne, Ester; Gatt, Miriam; Khoshnood, Babak; Klungsoyr, Kari; Lynch, Catherine; McDonnell, Robert; Nelen, Vera; Neville, Amanda J.; O'Mahony, Mary; Pierini, Anna; Queisser-Luft, Annette; Randrianaivo, Hanitra; Rankin, Judith; Rissmann, Anke; Kurinczuk, Jennifer; Tucker, David; Verellen-Dumoulin, Christine; Wellesley, Diana; Dolk, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Background Surveillance of congenital anomalies is important to identify potential teratogens. Methods This study analysed the prevalence of 61 congenital anomaly subgroups (excluding chromosomal) in 25 population-based EUROCAT registries (1980–2012). Live births, fetal deaths and terminations of pregnancy for fetal anomaly were analysed with multilevel random-effects Poisson regression models. Results Seventeen anomaly subgroups had statistically significant trends from 2003–2012; 12 increasing and 5 decreasing. Conclusions The annual increasing prevalence of severe congenital heart defects, single ventricle, atrioventricular septal defects and tetralogy of Fallot of 1.4% (95% CI: 0.7% to 2.0%), 4.6% (1.0% to 8.2%), 3.4% (1.3% to 5.5%) and 4.1% (2.4% to 5.7%) respectively may reflect increases in maternal obesity and diabetes (known risk factors). The increased prevalence of cystic adenomatous malformation of the lung [6.5% (3.5% to 9.4%)] and decreased prevalence of limb reduction defects [-2.8% (-4.2% to -1.5%)] are unexplained. For renal dysplasia and maternal infections, increasing trends may be explained by increased screening, and deceases in patent ductus arteriosus at term and increases in craniosynostosis, by improved follow up period after birth and improved diagnosis. For oesophageal atresia, duodenal atresia/stenosis and ano-rectal atresia/stenosis recent changes in prevalence appeared incidental when compared with larger long term fluctuations. For microcephaly and congenital hydronephrosis trends could not be interpreted due to discrepancies in diagnostic criteria. The trends for club foot and syndactyly disappeared once registries with disparate results were excluded. No decrease in neural tube defects was detected, despite efforts at prevention through folic acid supplementation. PMID:29621304

  16. Genome-wide association studies in dogs and humans identify ADAMTS20 as a risk variant for cleft lip and palate.

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    Zena T Wolf

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cleft lip with or without cleft palate (CL/P is the most commonly occurring craniofacial birth defect. We provide insight into the genetic etiology of this birth defect by performing genome-wide association studies in two species: dogs and humans. In the dog, a genome-wide association study of 7 CL/P cases and 112 controls from the Nova Scotia Duck Tolling Retriever (NSDTR breed identified a significantly associated region on canine chromosome 27 (unadjusted p=1.1 x 10(-13; adjusted p= 2.2 x 10(-3. Further analysis in NSDTR families and additional full sibling cases identified a 1.44 Mb homozygous haplotype (chromosome 27: 9.29 - 10.73 Mb segregating with a more complex phenotype of cleft lip, cleft palate, and syndactyly (CLPS in 13 cases. Whole-genome sequencing of 3 CLPS cases and 4 controls at 15X coverage led to the discovery of a frameshift mutation within ADAMTS20 (c.1360_1361delAA (p.Lys453Ilefs*3, which segregated concordant with the phenotype. In a parallel study in humans, a family-based association analysis (DFAM of 125 CL/P cases, 420 unaffected relatives, and 392 controls from a Guatemalan cohort, identified a suggestive association (rs10785430; p =2.67 x 10-6 with the same gene, ADAMTS20. Sequencing of cases from the Guatemalan cohort was unable to identify a causative mutation within the coding region of ADAMTS20, but four coding variants were found in additional cases of CL/P. In summary, this study provides genetic evidence for a role of ADAMTS20 in CL/P development in dogs and as a candidate gene for CL/P development in humans.

  17. Radiographic features of the skeleton in disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Edery, Patrick [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Genetic Department, Referral Centre for Developmental Abnormalities, Femme-Mere-Enfant Hospital, Bron (France); INSERM U1028 UMR CNRS 5,292, UCBL, CRNL TIGER Team, CH le Vinater, Bron (France); Hall, Christine M. [Retired from Department of Radiology, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London (United Kingdom); Bouvier, Raymonde; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, CBPE, Bron (France); Le Breton, Frederique [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Pathology, Croix-Rousse Hospital, Lyon (France); Bucourt, Martine [AP-HP, Foetopathology Unit, Jean Verdier Hospital, Bondy (France); Cordier, Marie Pierre [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Genetic Department, Referral Centre for Developmental Abnormalities, Femme-Mere-Enfant Hospital, Bron (France); Vianey-Saban, Christine [Hospices Civils de Lyon, Department of Inborn Errors of Metabolism and Neonatal Screening, CBPE, Bron (France); Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso [Federico II University, Department of Translational Medical Sciences, Section of Pediatrics, Naples (Italy); Le Merrer, Martine [AP-HP, Genetic Department, Referal Centre for Skeletal Dysplasias, Institut Imagine, Necker-Enfants Malades Hospital, Paris (United Kingdom); Offiah, Amaka C. [Stephenson Wing Sheffield Children' s NHS Foundation Trust Western Bank, Radiology Department, Children' s Hospital, Academic Unit of Child Health Room C4, Sheffield (United Kingdom)

    2015-07-15

    Disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis are inborn errors of metabolism characterised by multiple congenital abnormalities, including significant skeletal involvement. The most frequent and best-characterised example is the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Nine other disorders are known, namely autosomal-recessive Antley-Bixler syndrome, Greenberg dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, X-linked recessive male emopamil-binding protein deficiency, CHILD syndrome, CK syndrome, sterol C4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, desmosterolosis and lathosterolosis. This study provides an overview of the radiologic features observed in these diseases. A common pattern of limb abnormalities is recognisable, including polydactyly, which is typically post-axial and rarely interdigital and can involve all four limbs, and syndactyly of the toes. Chondrodysplasia punctata is specifically associated with a subgroup of disorders of cholesterol biosynthesis (Greenberg dysplasia, CHILD syndrome, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, male emopamil-binding protein deficiency). The possible occurrence of epiphyseal stippling in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, initially reported, does not appear to be confirmed. Stippling is also associated with other congenital disorders such as chromosomal abnormalities, brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, disruptions of vitamin K metabolism, maternal autoimmune diseases), rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (peroxisomal disorders) and lysosomal storage disorders. In the differential diagnosis of epiphyseal stippling, a moth-eaten appearance of bones, asymmetry, or presence of a common pattern of limb abnormalities indicate inborn errors of cholesterol biosynthesis. We highlight the specific differentiating radiologic features of disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis. (orig.)

  18. Radiographic features of the skeleton in disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossi, Massimiliano; Edery, Patrick; Hall, Christine M.; Bouvier, Raymonde; Collardeau-Frachon, Sophie; Le Breton, Frederique; Bucourt, Martine; Cordier, Marie Pierre; Vianey-Saban, Christine; Parenti, Giancarlo; Andria, Generoso; Le Merrer, Martine; Offiah, Amaka C.

    2015-01-01

    Disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis are inborn errors of metabolism characterised by multiple congenital abnormalities, including significant skeletal involvement. The most frequent and best-characterised example is the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome. Nine other disorders are known, namely autosomal-recessive Antley-Bixler syndrome, Greenberg dysplasia, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, X-linked recessive male emopamil-binding protein deficiency, CHILD syndrome, CK syndrome, sterol C4 methyloxidase-like deficiency, desmosterolosis and lathosterolosis. This study provides an overview of the radiologic features observed in these diseases. A common pattern of limb abnormalities is recognisable, including polydactyly, which is typically post-axial and rarely interdigital and can involve all four limbs, and syndactyly of the toes. Chondrodysplasia punctata is specifically associated with a subgroup of disorders of cholesterol biosynthesis (Greenberg dysplasia, CHILD syndrome, X-linked dominant chondrodysplasia punctata, male emopamil-binding protein deficiency). The possible occurrence of epiphyseal stippling in the Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome, initially reported, does not appear to be confirmed. Stippling is also associated with other congenital disorders such as chromosomal abnormalities, brachytelephalangic chondrodysplasia punctata (X-linked recessive chondrodysplasia punctata, disruptions of vitamin K metabolism, maternal autoimmune diseases), rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata (peroxisomal disorders) and lysosomal storage disorders. In the differential diagnosis of epiphyseal stippling, a moth-eaten appearance of bones, asymmetry, or presence of a common pattern of limb abnormalities indicate inborn errors of cholesterol biosynthesis. We highlight the specific differentiating radiologic features of disorders of post-squalene cholesterol biosynthesis. (orig.)

  19. Misoprostol exposure during the first trimester of pregnancy: Is the malformation risk varying depending on the indication?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auffret, Marine; Bernard-Phalippon, Nathalie; Dekemp, Joëlle; Carlier, Patrick; Gervoise Boyer, Marie; Vial, Thierry; Gautier, Sophie

    2016-12-01

    To report the prospective follow-up of pregnancies exposed to misoprostol during the first trimester and analyse the teratogenic risk depending on the indication for use. Prospective observational study of 265 women exposed to misoprostol during the first 12 weeks of pregnancy and followed until the delivery. Women were included if they or their physician had contacted a French pharmacovigilance centre before 22 weeks of gestation (WG) to obtain information on the risk of misoprostol exposure, and if there had been misoprostol exposure before 13 WG. Data were collected at the time of the first contact, and the pregnancy outcome was recorded at follow-up. Women were prospectively enrolled from January 1988 to December 2013. The main indication for misoprostol was voluntary abortion (60.9%). Ten major malformations (5.5%) (95% CI 2.65-9.82%) were reported and five of them were consistent with the pattern of malformations attributed to misoprostol: Möbius sequence, hydrocephalus, terminal transverse limb reduction associated with a clubfoot, syndactyly, and complete posterior encephalocele. The rate of malformations was higher, but not significantly, in women exposed to misoprostol for voluntary abortion (7.9%) compared with women exposed to misoprostol for other or unknown indications (3.2%). Our results confirmed a specific pattern of malformations due to misoprostol use in early pregnancy, even with low dose of misoprostol. Despite the small number of cases, we observed a higher proportion of major malformations in fetuses born to women who continued their pregnancy after a failed voluntary abortion with misoprostol. Further studies should be conducted to evaluate other potential factors, such as combination treatment with mifepristone and the socio-environmental characteristics in this group of women. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Type 1 diabetes in a patient with Ellis-van Creveld syndrome

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    Carla Graziadio

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Ellis-van Creveld (EVC syndrome is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by disproportionate short stature, narrow thorax, postaxial polydactyly, nail and tooth abnormalities and congenital heart disease. CASE REPORT: The patient was a 22-year-old Caucasian man, the third child of consanguineous parents. He received the diagnosis of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (DM at 16 years of age, and around one year later, he underwent surgery to correct a partial atrioventricular septal defect. Upon physical examination, at 22 years of age, he presented stature of 145.5 cm (P3, weight of 49 kg (P3, head circumference of 54 cm (P2-50, high palate, absence of one of the lower lateral incisor teeth, narrow shoulders, narrowing of the upper thorax, scoliosis, rhizomelic shortening of the upper limbs, brachydactyly, postaxial polydactyly and clinodactyly of the second and third fingers. The lower limbs showed rhizomelic shortening with significant genu valgum (knock-knee deformity, small feet with postaxial polydactyly, syndactyly between the second and third toes and hallux valgus. Multiple melanocytic nevi were evident on the face, thorax and limbs. At that time, he was using neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH insulin, with poorly controlled DM. The clinical findings presented led to the diagnosis of EVC syndrome. Only one case of this syndrome has been described with DM so far. Attention is drawn to the fact that the genes associated with this syndrome are located close to those of the Wolfram syndrome, a condition that leads to early-onset diabetes.

  1. Homozygous indel mutation in CDH11 as the probable cause of Elsahy-Waters syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taskiran, Ekim Z; Karaosmanoglu, Beren; Koşukcu, Can; Doğan, Özlem A; Taylan-Şekeroğlu, Hande; Şimşek-Kiper, Pelin Ö; Utine, Eda G; Boduroğlu, Koray; Alikaşifoğlu, Mehmet

    2017-12-01

    Two sisters from a consanguineous couple were seen in genetics department for facial dysmorphic features and glaucoma. They both had broad foreheads, hypertelorism, megalocorneas, thick eyebrows with synophrys, flat malar regions, broad and bulbous noses, and mild prognathism. Both had glaucoma, younger one also had cataracts and phthisis bulbi. Other findings included bilateral partial cutaneous syndactyly of 2nd and 3rd fingers, history of impacted teeth with dentigerous cyst in the elder one, and intellectual disability (mild and borderline). The sisters were considered to have Elsahy-Waters syndrome. In order to elucidate the underlying molecular cause, sisters and their healthy parents were genotyped by SNP arrays, followed by homozygosity mapping. Homozygous regions were further analyzed by exome sequencing in one affected individual. A homozygous indel variant segregating with the condition was detected in CDH11 (c.1116_1117delinsGATCATCAG, p.(Ile372MetfsTer9)), which was then validated by using Sanger sequencing. CDH11 encodes cadherin 11 (osteo-cadherin) that regulates cell-cell adhesion, cell polarization and migration, as well as osteogenic differentiation. Further experiments revealed that CDH11 expression was decreased in patient-derived fibroblasts as compared to the heterozygous parent and another healthy donor. Immunostaining showed absence of the protein expression in patient fibroblasts. In addition, cell proliferation rate was slow and osteogenic differentiation potential was delayed. We consider that this study reveals loss-of-function mutations in CDH11 as a probable cause of this phenotype. Next generation sequencing in further patients would both prove this gene as causative, and finely delineate this clinical spectrum further contributing in identification of other possibly involved gene(s). © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. The developmental spectrum of proximal radioulnar synostosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elliott, Alison M.; Kibria, Lisa; Reed, Martin H.

    2010-01-01

    Proximal radioulnar synostosis is a rare upper limb malformation. The elbow is first identifiable at 35 days (after conception), at which stage the cartilaginous anlagen of the humerus, radius and ulna are continuous. Subsequently, longitudinal segmentation produces separation of the distal radius and ulna. However, temporarily, the proximal ends are united and continue to share a common perichondrium. We investigated the hypothesis that posterior congenital dislocation of the radial head and proximal radioulnar fusion are different clinical manifestations of the same primary developmental abnormality. Records were searched for ''proximal radioulnar fusion/posterior radial head dislocation'' in patients followed at the local Children's Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre for Children. Relevant radiographic, demographic and clinical data were recorded. Ethics approval was obtained through the University Research Ethics Board. In total, 28 patients met the inclusion criteria. The majority of patients (16) had bilateral involvement; eight with posterior dislocation of the radial head only; five had posterior radial head dislocation with radioulnar fusion and two had radioulnar fusion without dislocation. One patient had bilateral proximal radioulnar fusion and posterior dislocation of the left radial head. Nine patients had only left-sided involvement, and three had only right-sided involvement.The degree of proximal fusion varied, with some patients showing 'complete' proximal fusion and others showing fusion that occurred slightly distal to the radial head: 'partially separated.' Associated disorders in our cohort included Poland syndrome (two patients), Cornelia de Lange syndrome, chromosome anomalies (including tetrasomy X) and Cenani Lenz syndactyly. The suggestion of a developmental relationship between posterior dislocation of the radial head and proximal radioulnar fusion is supported by the fact that both anomalies can occur in the same patient. Furthermore

  3. A large-scale survey of the novel 15q24 microdeletion syndrome in autism spectrum disorders identifies an atypical deletion that narrows the critical region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McInnes L

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The 15q24 microdeletion syndrome has been recently described as a recurrent, submicroscopic genomic imbalance found in individuals with intellectual disability, typical facial appearance, hypotonia, and digital and genital abnormalities. Gene dosage abnormalities, including copy number variations (CNVs, have been identified in a significant fraction of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs. In this study we surveyed two ASD cohorts for 15q24 abnormalities to assess the frequency of genomic imbalances in this interval. Methods We screened 173 unrelated subjects with ASD from the Central Valley of Costa Rica and 1336 subjects with ASD from 785 independent families registered with the Autism Genetic Resource Exchange (AGRE for CNVs across 15q24 using oligonucleotide arrays. Rearrangements were confirmed by array comparative genomic hybridization and quantitative PCR. Results Among the patients from Costa Rica, an atypical de novo deletion of 3.06 Mb in 15q23-q24.1 was detected in a boy with autism sharing many features with the other 13 subjects with the 15q24 microdeletion syndrome described to date. He exhibited intellectual disability, constant smiling, characteristic facial features (high anterior hairline, broad medial eyebrows, epicanthal folds, hypertelorism, full lower lip and protuberant, posteriorly rotated ears, single palmar crease, toe syndactyly and congenital nystagmus. The deletion breakpoints are atypical and lie outside previously characterized low copy repeats (69,838-72,897 Mb. Genotyping data revealed that the deletion had occurred in the paternal chromosome. Among the AGRE families, no large 15q24 deletions were observed. Conclusions From the current and previous studies, deletions in the 15q24 region represent rare causes of ASDs with an estimated frequency of 0.1 to 0.2% in individuals ascertained for ASDs, although the proportion might be higher in sporadic cases. These rates compare with a

  4. Apert syndrome: factors involved in the cognitive development Síndrome de Apert: fatores relacionados ao desenvolvimento cognitivo destes pacientes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Yacubian-Fernandes

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Apert syndrome is characterized by craniosynostosis, symmetric syndactyly and other systemic malformations, with mental retardation usually present. The objective of this study was to correlate brain malformations and timing for surgery with neuropsychological evaluation. We also tried to determine other relevant aspects involved in cognitive development of these patients such as social classification of families and parents’ education. Eighteen patients with Apert syndrome were studied, whose ages were between 14 and 322 months. Brain abnormalities were observed in 55.6% of them. The intelligence quotient or developmental quotient values observed were between 45 and 108. Mental development was related to the quality of family environment and parents’ education. Mental development was not correlated to brain malformation or age at time of operation. In conclusion, quality of family environment was the most significant factor directly involved in mental development of patients with Apert syndrome.A síndrome de Apert é caracterizada por cranioestenose, sindactilia simétrica e outras malformações sistêmicas. O retardo no desenvolvimento neuropsicomotor é freqüentemente observado. Este trabalho tem como objetivo analisar as malformações do sistema nervoso central, o momento da cirurgia e a classe sócio-econômica associada ao nível educacional dos pais como variáveis que possam influenciar no desenvolvimento cognitivo. Foram estudados 18 pacientes com diagnóstico de síndrome de Apert com idade entre 14 e 322 meses e as alterações encefálicas foram observadas em 55,6%. O quociente de inteligência variou de 45 a 108 e estava correlacionado com a classe sócio-econômica e com o nível de instrução dos pais; não se correlacionou com as alterações encefálicas nem com o momento do tratamento neurocirúrgico. Em conclusão, a condição sócio-econômica e o nível de instrução dos pais foram relevantes na determinação do

  5. Dermatoglyphics in kidney diseases: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijerathne, Buddhika T B; Meier, Robert J; Salgado, Sujatha S; Agampodi, Suneth B

    2016-01-01

    Kidney diseases are becoming a major cause of global burden with high mortality and morbidity. The origins of most kidney diseases are known, but for some the exact aetiology is not yet understood. Dermatoglyphics is the scientific study of epidermal ridge patterns and it has been used as a non-invasive diagnostic tool to detect or predict different medical conditions that have foetal origin. However, there have been a limited number of studies that have evaluated a dermatoglyphic relationship in different kidney diseases. The aim of this review was to systematically identify, review and appraise available literature that evaluated an association of different dermatoglyphic variables with kidney diseases. This review is reported according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses checklist. The PubMed(®) (Medline), POPLINE, Cochrane Library and Trip Database and grey literature sources such as OpenGrey, Google Scholar, and Google were searched to earliest date to 17 April 2014. Of the 36 relevant publications, 15 were included in the review. Of these studies, there are five case reports, seven case series and three comparative studies. Possible association of dermatoglyphics with Wilms tumor (WT) had been evaluated in two comparative studies and one case series that found fewer whorls and a lower mean total ridge count (TRC). Another study evaluated adult polycystic kidney disease (APCD) type III that revealed lower TRC means in all cases. All other case series and case reports describe dermatoglyphics in various kidney disease such as acro-renal-ocular syndrome, potter syndrome, kabuki makeup syndrome, neurofaciodigitorenal syndrome, syndactyly type V, ring chromosome 13 syndrome, trisomy 13 syndrome and sirenomelia. It is evident that whorl pattern frequency and TRC have been used widely to investigate the uncertainty related to the origin of several kidney diseases such as WT and APCD type III. However, small sample sizes

  6. Associated congenital anomalies among cases with Down syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Claude; Dott, Beatrice; Alembik, Yves; Roth, Marie-Paule

    2015-12-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is the most common congenital anomaly widely studied for at least 150 years. However, the type and the frequency of congenital anomalies associated with DS are still controversial. Despite prenatal diagnosis and elective termination of pregnancy for fetal anomalies, in Europe, from 2008 to 2012 the live birth prevalence of DS per 10,000 was 10. 2. The objectives of this study were to examine the major congenital anomalies occurring in infants and fetuses with Down syndrome. The material for this study came from 402,532 consecutive pregnancies of known outcome registered by our registry of congenital anomalies between 1979 and 2008. Four hundred sixty seven (64%) out of the 728 cases with DS registered had at least one major associated congenital anomaly. The most common associated anomalies were cardiac anomalies, 323 cases (44%), followed by digestive system anomalies, 42 cases (6%), musculoskeletal system anomalies, 35 cases (5%), urinary system anomalies, 28 cases (4%), respiratory system anomalies, 13 cases (2%), and other system anomalies, 26 cases (3.6%). Among the cases with DS with congenital heart defects, the most common cardiac anomaly was atrioventricular septal defect (30%) followed by atrial septum defect (25%), ventricular septal defect (22%), patent ductus arteriosus (5%), coarctation of aorta (5%), and tetralogy of Fallot (3%). Among the cases with DS with a digestive system anomaly recorded, duodenal atresia (67%), Hirschsprung disease (14%), and tracheo-esophageal atresia (10%) were the most common. Fourteen (2%) of the cases with DS had an obstructive anomaly of the renal pelvis, including hydronephrosis. The other most common anomalies associated with cases with DS were syndactyly, club foot, polydactyly, limb reduction, cataract, hydrocephaly, cleft palate, hypospadias and diaphragmatic hernia. Many studies to assess the anomalies associated with DS have reported various results. There is no agreement in the literature as to

  7. Phenotypic and genetic effects of recessive haplotypes on yield, longevity, and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J B; Null, D J; VanRaden, P M

    2016-09-01

    Phenotypes from the August 2015 US national genetic evaluation were used to compute phenotypic effects of 18 recessive haplotypes in Ayrshire (n=1), Brown Swiss (n=5), Holstein (n=10), and Jersey (n=2) cattle on milk, fat, and protein yields, somatic cell score (SCS), single-trait productive life (PL), daughter pregnancy rate (DPR), heifer conception rate (HCR), and cow conception rate (CCR). The haplotypes evaluated were Ayrshire haplotype 1, Brown Swiss haplotypes 1 and 2, spinal dysmyelination, spinal muscular atrophy, Weaver Syndrome, brachyspina, Holstein cholesterol deficiency, Holstein haplotypes 1 to 5, bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency, complex vertebral malformation, mulefoot (syndactyly), and Jersey haplotypes 1 and 2. When causal variants are unknown and tests are based only on single nucleotide polymorphism haplotypes, it can sometimes be difficult to accurately determine carrier status. For example, 2 Holstein haplotypes for cholesterol deficiency have the same single nucleotide polymorphism genotype, but only one of them carries the causative mutation. Genotyped daughters of carrier bulls included in the analysis ranged from 8 for Weaver Syndrome to 17,869 for Holstein haplotype 3. Lactation records preadjusted for nongenetic factors and direct genomic values (DGV) were used to estimate phenotypic and genetic effects of recessive haplotypes, respectively. We found no phenotypic or genetic differences between carriers and noncarriers of Ayrshire or Brown Swiss defects. Several associations were noted for Holstein haplotypes, including fat and HCR for Holstein haplotype 0 carriers; milk, protein, SCS, PL, and fertility for Holstein haplotype 1; protein, PL, CCR, and HCR for Holstein haplotype 2; milk, protein, and fertility for Holstein haplotype 4; and protein yield and DPR for Holstein haplotype 5. There were no differences among bovine leukocyte adhesion deficiency carriers, but complex vertebral malformation affected fat yield and mulefoot

  8. The developmental spectrum of proximal radioulnar synostosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Alison M. [University of Manitoba, Winnipeg Regional Health Association Program of Genetics and Metabolism, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, WRHA Program of Genetics and Metabolism, Departments of Paediatrics and Child Health, Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Kibria, Lisa [University of Manitoba, Department of School of Medical Rehabilitation, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); Reed, Martin H. [University of Manitoba, Department of Paediatrics and Child Health, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Biochemistry and Medical Genetics, Winnipeg, MB (Canada); University of Manitoba, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2010-01-15

    Proximal radioulnar synostosis is a rare upper limb malformation. The elbow is first identifiable at 35 days (after conception), at which stage the cartilaginous anlagen of the humerus, radius and ulna are continuous. Subsequently, longitudinal segmentation produces separation of the distal radius and ulna. However, temporarily, the proximal ends are united and continue to share a common perichondrium. We investigated the hypothesis that posterior congenital dislocation of the radial head and proximal radioulnar fusion are different clinical manifestations of the same primary developmental abnormality. Records were searched for ''proximal radioulnar fusion/posterior radial head dislocation'' in patients followed at the local Children's Hospital and Rehabilitation Centre for Children. Relevant radiographic, demographic and clinical data were recorded. Ethics approval was obtained through the University Research Ethics Board. In total, 28 patients met the inclusion criteria. The majority of patients (16) had bilateral involvement; eight with posterior dislocation of the radial head only; five had posterior radial head dislocation with radioulnar fusion and two had radioulnar fusion without dislocation. One patient had bilateral proximal radioulnar fusion and posterior dislocation of the left radial head. Nine patients had only left-sided involvement, and three had only right-sided involvement.The degree of proximal fusion varied, with some patients showing 'complete' proximal fusion and others showing fusion that occurred slightly distal to the radial head: 'partially separated.' Associated disorders in our cohort included Poland syndrome (two patients), Cornelia de Lange syndrome, chromosome anomalies (including tetrasomy X) and Cenani Lenz syndactyly. The suggestion of a developmental relationship between posterior dislocation of the radial head and proximal radioulnar fusion is supported by the fact that both anomalies

  9. The FU gene and its possible protein isoforms

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    Nöthen Markus M

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background FU is the human homologue of the Drosophila gene fused whose product fused is a positive regulator of the transcription factor Cubitus interruptus (Ci. Thus, FU may act as a regulator of the human counterparts of Ci, the GLI transcription factors. Since Ci and GLI are targets of Hedgehog signaling in development and morphogenesis, it is expected that FU plays an important role in Sonic, Desert and/or Indian Hedgehog induced cellular signaling. Results The FU gene was identified on chromosome 2q35 at 217.56 Mb and its exon-intron organization determined. The human developmental disorder Syndactyly type 1 (SD1 maps to this region on chromosome 2 and the FU coding region was sequenced using genomic DNA from an affected individual in a linked family. While no FU mutations were found, three single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified. The expression pattern of FU was thoroughly investigated and all examined tissues express FU. It is also clear that different tissues express transcripts of different sizes and some tissues express more than one transcript. By means of nested PCR of specific regions in RT/PCR generated cDNA, it was possible to verify two alternative splicing events. This also suggests the existence of at least two additional protein isoforms besides the FU protein that has previously been described. This long FU and a much shorter isoform were compared for the ability to regulate GLI1 and GLI2. None of the FU isoforms showed any effects on GLI1 induced transcription but the long form can enhance GLI2 activity. Apparently FU did not have any effect on SUFU induced inhibition of GLI. Conclusions The FU gene and its genomic structure was identified. FU is a candidate gene for SD1, but we have not identified a pathogenic mutation in the FU coding region in a family with SD1. The sequence information and expression analyses show that transcripts of different sizes are expressed and subjected to alternative splicing

  10. Oral findings in patients with Apert Syndrome Achados bucais em pacientes com Síndrome de Apert

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    Gisele da Silva Dalben

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The Apert syndrome is a rare disorder of autosomal dominant inheritance caused by mutations in the FGFR2 gene at locus 10q26; patients with this syndrome present severe syndactyly, exophthalmia, ocular hypertelorism and hypoplastic midface with Class III malocclusion, besides systemic alterations. Most investigations available on the Apert syndrome address the genetic aspect or surgical management, with little emphasis on the oral aspects. OBJECTIVE: to investigate the oral findings, including dental anomalies, ectopic eruption of the maxillary permanent first molars and soft tissue alterations, in subjects with Apert syndrome. MATERIALS AND METHODS: clinical and radiographic examination of nine patients with Apert syndrome, aged 6 to 15 years, not previously submitted to orthodontic or orthognathic treatment. RESULTS: dental anomalies were present in all patients, with one to eight anomalies per individual. The most frequent anomalies were tooth agenesis, mainly affecting maxillary canines, and enamel opacities (44.4% for both. Ectopic eruption of maxillary first molars was found in 33.3% of patients; lateral palatal swellings were observed in 88.8% of patients. CONCLUSIONS: The occurrence of typical lateral palatal swellings agrees with the literature. The high prevalence of dental anomalies and ectopic eruption may suggest a possible etiologic relationship with the syndrome.INTRODUÇÃO: A síndrome de Apert é um distúrbio raro de herança autossômica dominante causado por mutações no lócus 10q26 do gene FGFR2; pacientes com esta síndrome apresentam sindactilia severa, exoftalmia, hiperteleorbitismo e hipoplasia da face média com má oclusão de Classe III, além de alterações sistêmicas. A maior parte dos estudos disponíveis sobre a síndrome de Apert aborda o aspecto genético ou manejo cirúrgico, com pouca ênfase nos aspectos bucais. OBJETIVO: investigar os achados bucais, incluindo anomalias dentárias, irrup