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Sample records for syncope

  1. Syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... unconscious for a minute or two, but will revive and slowly return to normal. Syncope can occur ... unconscious for a minute or two, but will revive and slowly return to normal. Syncope can occur ...

  2. Epidemiological studies on syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin Huth

    2013-01-01

    of the patients play an essential role. In epidemiology these factors have major impact on the outcome of the patients. Until recently, even the definition of syncope differed from one study to another which has made literature reviews difficult. Traditionally the data on epidemiology of syncope has been taken...... from smaller studies from different clinical settings with wide differences in patient morbidity. Through the extensive Danish registries we examined the characteristics and prognosis of the patients hospitalized due to syncope in a nationwide study. The aims of the present thesis were to investigate......, prevalence and cardiovascular factors associated with the risk of syncope, 4) the prognosis in healthy individuals discharged after syncope, and 5) the prognosis of patients after syncope and evaluation of the CHADS2 score as a tool for short- and long-term risk prediction. The first studies of the present...

  3. Recurrent Laughter-induced Syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaitatzis, A.; Petzold, A.F.S.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Syncope is a common presenting complaint in Neurology clinics or Emergency departments, but its causes are sometimes difficult to diagnose. Apart from vasovagal attacks, other benign, neurally mediated syncopes include "situational" syncopes, which occur after urination, coughing,

  4. Defining and classifying syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thijs, Roland D.; Wieling, Wouter; Kaufmann, Horacio; van Dijk, Gert

    2004-01-01

    There is no widely adopted definition or classification of syncope and related disorders. This lack of uniformity harms patient care, research, and medical education. In this article, syncope is defined as a form of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) due to cerebral hypoperfusion. Differences

  5. Laughter-induced syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Alexander J; Frishman, William H

    2012-01-01

    Reported cases of syncope caused directly by laughter are rare. The common scenario described in a few reports involved episodes of fortuitous laughter, sometimes followed by a short prodrome of lightheadedness, facial flushing, and dizziness, followed by an episode of definite syncope. There were no seizure-like movements, automatisms, or bladder or bowel incontinence. After the syncopal episodes that were seconds in length, the patients regained consciousness, and at that point were fully oriented. These episodes could recur in a similar situation with such laughter. Many of these patients subsequently underwent full syncope workups, without elucidating a primary cardiac or neurologic cause. In this review of laughter-induced syncope, we describe a patient of ours who fit these descriptions. This phenomenon is likely a subtype of benign Valsalva-related syncope, with autonomic reflex arcs coming into play that ultimately result in global cerebral hypoperfusion. Besides the Valsalva produced by a great fit of laughter, laughter itself has its own neuroendocrine and vasculature effects that may play a role.

  6. Familial predisposition to vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negrusz-Kawecka, Marta; Bańkowski, Tomasz; Tabin, Mateusz; Paprocka, Magdalena; Mercik, Agnieszka; Misztal, Jowita; Nowak, Piotr; Zysko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek

    2012-06-01

    A handful of studies suggest a familial predisposition to vasovagal syncope (WS) but the scope of information available to date is poor. The aim of our study was to evaluate the prevalence of vasovagal syncope and its familial occurrence in the young. The studied group consisted of 281 women and 111 men, aged 18-32 years. Forty-seven percent of the population had one brother or sister, and the mean number of individuals per family was 4.4 +/- 1.0. The questionnaire consisted of 30 questions regarding syncopal history. Syncope was reported in 32.1% of the patients studied (36.7% in women vs. 20.7% in men; P < 0.05), 29.1% of mothers, 16.8% of fathers, 30.9% of sisters and 14.2% of brothers. Logistic regression analysis revealed that positive history regarding the syncope in the whole group of students was related to the female gender (OR 2.17; CI: 1.28-3.7), the history of a syncope in mother (OR 1.74; CI: 1.09-2.78) and the history of a syncope in father (OR 2.22; CI: 1.28-3.86; P < 0.001). A positive history of syncope in male relatives increases the risk of syncope in men and women, whereas a positive history of syncope in female relatives increases the risk of syncope in women only. Female gender independently of the family history increases the risk of syncope. The genetics of the vasovagal syncope could be polygenic but the mechanisms of a transmission remain unclear to date.

  7. Syncope in Children and Adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejčić Ljiljana

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In the pediatric age group, most cases of syncope represent benign, neutrally-mediated alterations in vasomotor tone. Due to the global cerebral hypoperfusion, syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness followed by spontaneous recovery and/or a state of presyncope, including dizziness, lightheadedness, pallor, diaphoresis and palpitations which may precede the loss of consciousness. These symptoms could be a sign of a life-threatening event in a small subset of patients, even though most causes of syncope in childhood are benign, and life-threatening causes of syncope generally have cardiac etiology. In all these cases, routine evaluation includes history, physical examination and a 12-lead standard electrocardiogram which should be performed. Further investigation is indicated by worrying features which include syncope that occurs without warning, syncope during exercise, history of familial sudden death, and abnormalities on clinical exam or electrocardiography. The fact is that syncope generates great fear of injury or sudden death among parents and doctors, and the main aim of the present paper is to help the physician involved in the care of children to differentiate the life-threatening causes of syncope from the common, more benign neutrally-mediated syncope.

  8. Reflex syncope: Diagnosis and treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sutton

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available For the diagnosis of reflex syncope, diligent history-building with the patient and a witness is required. In the Emergency Department (ED, the assessment of syncope is a challenge which may be addressed by an ED Observation Unit or by a referral to a Syncope Unit. Hospital admission is necessary for those with life-threatening cardiac conditions although risk stratification remains an unsolved problem. Other patients may be investigated with less urgency by carotid sinus massage (>40 years, tilt testing, and electrocardiogram loop recorder insertion resulting in a clear cause for syncope. Management includes, in general terms, patient education, avoidance of circumstances in which syncope is likely, increase in fluid and salt consumption, and physical counter-pressure maneuvers. In older patients, those that will benefit from cardiac pacing are now well defined. In all patients, the benefit of drug therapy is often disappointing and there remains no ideal drug. A role for catheter ablation may emerge for the highly symptomatic reflex syncope patient. Keywords: Cardiac pacing, Catheter ablation, Diagnosis, Drugs, Management, Reflex syncope

  9. Recurrent laughter-induced syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaitatzis, Athanasios; Petzold, Axel

    2012-07-01

    Syncope is a common presenting complaint in Neurology clinics or Emergency departments, but its causes are sometimes difficult to diagnose. Apart from vasovagal attacks, other benign, neurally mediated syncopes include "situational" syncopes, which occur after urination, coughing, swallowing, or defecation. A healthy 42-year-old male patient presented to the neurology clinic with a long history of faints triggered by spontaneous laughter, especially after funny jokes. Physical and neurological examination, and electroencephalography and magnetic resonance imaging were unremarkable. There was no evidence to suggest cardiogenic causes, epilepsy, or cataplexy and a diagnosis of laughing syncope was made. Laughter-induced syncope is usually a single event in the majority of cases, but may present as recurrent attacks as in our case. Some cases occur in association with underlying neurological conditions. Prognosis is good in the case of neurally mediated attacks. Laughter may not be recognized by physicians as a cause of syncope, which may lead to unnecessary investigations or misdiagnosis, and affect patients' quality of life.

  10. Priorities for emergency department syncope research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sun, Benjamin C.; Costantino, Giorgio; Barbic, Franca; Bossi, Ilaria; Casazza, Giovanni; Dipaola, Franca; McDermott, Daniel; Quinn, James; Reed, Matthew; Sheldon, Robert S.; Solbiati, Monica; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh; Krahn, Andrew D.; Beach, Daniel; Bodemer, Nicolai; Brignole, Michele; Casagranda, Ivo; Duca, Piergiorgio; Falavigna, Greta; Ippoliti, Roberto; Montano, Nicola; Olshansky, Brian; Raj, Satish R.; Ruwald, Martin H.; Shen, Win-Kuang; Stiell, Ian; Ungar, Andrea; van Dijk, J. Gert; van Dijk, Nynke; Wieling, Wouter; Furlan, Raffaello

    2014-01-01

    There is limited evidence to guide the emergency department (ED) evaluation and management of syncope. The First International Workshop on Syncope Risk Stratification in the Emergency Department identified key research questions and methodological standards essential to advancing the science of

  11. Syncope and Motor Vehicle Crash Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Numé, Anna-Karin; Gislason, Gunnar; Christiansen, Christine Benn

    2016-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Syncope may have serious consequences for traffic safety. Current clinical guideline recommendations on driving following syncope are primarily based on expert consensus. OBJECTIVE: To identify whether there is excess risk of motor vehicle crashes among patients with syncope compared...... vehicle crashes throughout the follow-up period. This study suggests that syncope should be considered as one of several factors in a broad assessment of fitness to drive....

  12. Reninoma presenting as cardiac syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tak, Shahid I; Wani, Mohd Lateef; Khan, Khursheed A; Alai, Mohd Sultan; Shera, Altaf Hussain; Ahangar, Abdul G; Khan, Yasir Bashir; Nayeem-ul-Hassan; Irshad, Ifat

    2011-01-01

    Reninoma, a renin-secreting tumor of the juxta-glomerular cells of the kidney, is a rare but surgically treatable cause of secondary hypertension in children. We report a case of reninoma presenting as cardiac syncope with long QTc on electrocardiogram due to hypokalemia. PMID:21677812

  13. [Syncope: electrocardiogram and autonomic function tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uribe, William; Baranchuk, Adrián; Botero, Federico

    2016-12-23

    Syncope represents one of the most frequent reasons for consultation in the emergency department. A proper identification will allow a precise etiologic approach and the optimization of delivery of health resources.
Once knowing the classification of syncope; it is the clinical interrogatory what enables to discriminate which of these patients present with a neurogenic mediated syncope or a cardiac mediated syncope. The use of diagnostic methods such as the tilt test, will clarify what type of neurally mediated syncope predominates in the patient.
The electrocardiogram is the cornerstone in the identification of those patients who had a true episode of self-limited or aborted sudden death as the first manifestation of their syncope, a fact which provides prognostic and therapeutic information that will impact the morbidity and mortality.

  14. [Neurohumoral mechanisms for vasovagal syncopes. Part II].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota

    2003-04-01

    Vasovagal syncope is defined as a reflex loss of consciousness related to reaction to various stimuli as orthostatic stress, pain or emotions connected with loss of muscle postural tone. In the second part of the paper the authors describe the possible role of the particular neurohumoral factors and autonomic nervous system in the development of vasovagal syncope. The studies on the involvement of neurohumoral factors in vasovagal syncope can play a key role in a more precise evaluation of affected patients, long term prophylaxis against syncopal events and may contribute to development of more reliable diagnostic tests.

  15. Syncope- a common challenge to medical practitioners ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syncope is a common presentation in medical practice, and is associated with a higher than normal risk of mortality and morbidity in older individuals; It is essential that an accurate clinical history of the episode described as syncope be obtained, including the events preceding, the observations of eye-witnesses, and the ...

  16. Syncope: Evaluation and management | Mohamed | Libyan Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syncope is a sudden transient loss of consciousness and postural tone with spontaneous recovery. Loss of consciousness results from a reduction of blood flow to the reticular activating system located in the brain stem. Syncope is an important clinical problem which accounts for 1% of hospital admissions and 3% of ...

  17. Pacemaker Therapy in Patients With Neurally Mediated Syncope and Documented Asystole Third International Study on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology (ISSUE-3) A Randomized Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brignole, Michele; Menozzi, Carlo; Moya, Angel; Andresen, Dietrich; Blanc, Jean Jacques; Krahn, Andrew D.; Wieling, Wouter; Beiras, Xulio; Deharo, Jean Claude; Russo, Vitantonio; Tomaino, Marco; Sutton, Richard; Tomaino, M.; Pescoller, F.; Donateo, P.; Oddone, D.; Russo, V.; Pierri, F.; Matino, M. G.; Vitale, E.; Massa, R.; Piccinni, G.; Melissano, D.; Menozzi, C.; Lolli, G.; Gulizia, M.; Francese, M.; Iorfida, M.; Golzio, P.; Gaggioli, G.; Laffi, M.; Rabjoli, F.; Cecchinato, C.; Ungar, A.; Rafanelli, M.; Chisciotti, V.; Morrione, A.; del Rosso, A.; Guernaccia, V.; Palella, M.; D'Agostino, C.; Campana, A.; Brigante, M.; Miracapillo, G.; Addonisio, L.; Proclemer, A.; Facchin, D.; Vado, A.; Knops, R. E.; Dekker, L. R. C.

    2012-01-01

    Background-The efficacy of cardiac pacing for prevention of syncopal recurrences in patients with neurally mediated syncope is controversial. We wanted to determine whether pacing therapy reduces syncopal recurrences in patients with severe asystolic neurally mediated syncope. Methods and

  18. Syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Circulation My alerts Sign In Join Sign out Facebook Twitter Home About this Journal Editorial Board General Statistics Circulation Doodle Information for Advertisers Author Reprints Commercial Reprints Customer Service and Ordering ...

  19. Syncope: risk stratification and clinical decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeters, Suzanne Y G; Hoek, Amber E; Mollink, Susan M; Huff, J Stephen

    2014-04-01

    Syncope is a common occurrence in the emergency department, accounting for approximately 1% to 3% of presentations. Syncope is best defined as a brief loss of consciousness and postural tone followed by spontaneous and complete recovery. The spectrum of etiologies ranges from benign to life threatening, and a structured approach to evaluating these patients is key to providing care that is thorough, yet cost-effective. This issue reviews the most relevant evidence for managing and risk stratifying the syncope patient, beginning with a focused history, physical examination, electrocardiogram, and tailored diagnostic testing. Several risk stratification decision rules are compared for performance in various scenarios, including how age and associated comorbidities may predict short-term and long-term adverse events. An algorithm for structured, evidence-based care of the syncope patient is included to ensure that patients requiring hospitalization are managed appropriately and those with benign causes are discharged safely.

  20. [Therapeutic approach to patients with neurocardiogenic syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Halawa, Bogumił

    2004-11-01

    Vasovagal syncopes are the most common cause of loss of consciousness and if they occur frequently they contribute to the marked decrease of the quality of life and need treatment. One of important problems is the possibility of injury during the syncope. In older patients it can lead to the fractures of extremities, complications of which could be life-threatening. Another problem is the reaction of the surrounding people trying to help the unconscious by keeping him in the vertical position. It promotes hypotonia and could cause damage of organs such as brain or heart. The authors review the current literature on the management of patients with vasovagal syncope. It seems that the conservative approaches preferring patient reassurance and training methods are successful in syncope prevention and help avoid the side effects and complications of pharmacological therapy or pacemaker implantation. These last two methods should be reserved for patients with the most severe symptoms of the disease.

  1. Subdural Hematoma Presenting as Recurrent Syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruner, David I; Jamros, Christine; Cogar, William

    2015-09-01

    Syncope is a common emergency department (ED) complaint. Recurrent syncope is less common, but may be concerning for serious underlying pathology. It often requires a broad diagnostic evaluation that may include neurologic imaging. We present the case of a 75-year-old man with non-small-cell carcinoma who presented to the ED for recurrent syncope after coughing spells over the 2 weeks preceding his arrival at the ED. He had a normal cardiac evaluation, however, he had some subacute neurologic changes that prompted obtaining a computed tomography (CT) scan of the head. This led to the diagnosis of atraumatic subdural hematoma that was causing transient transtentorial herniation leading to the recurrent syncope. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Emergency physicians should be aware that recurrent syncope is a possible presentation of increased intracranial pressure that may be due to a mass lesion, particularly if the patient has any acute or subacute neurologic changes. Although this association with a subdual hematoma is rare, other cases of mass lesions leading to syncope after coughing spells have been reported in the literature. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Initial Evaluation of Patients with Presumed Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilknur Can, MD

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a common clinical problem, but nevertheless is but one element of the broader issue of ‘transient loss of consciousness’ (TLOC. The first step is to ascertain whether the patient actually suffered a syncopal episode, and thereafter the goal must be to determine the basis of symptoms with sufficient confidence to assess prognosis and initiate an effective treatment strategy. The initial evaluation of these patients, which usually takes place in an emergency department (ED. or acute care facility, is challenging since patients are usually asymptomatic when they come for medical attention, may have little or no recall of the event, and witnesses, if any, often cannot provide reliable information. Given these circumstances, it is understandable that frontline physicians often tend to take a seemingly ‘safe’ approach, and admit both high-risk and intermediate-risk syncope patients to hospital. This strategy has many implications, including life-style and economic concerns for the patient, and health care management issues for physicians, hospital administrators and the overall health care system. The European Society of Cardiology (ESC. guidelines and several clinical studies provide helpful advice regarding “risk stratification” to help guide physicians in selecting patients for either early hospital admission or later oupatient subspeciality evaluation. The utility of syncope management units in the ED, and a guideline-based approach to the syncope patient, has tended to both diminish the number of undiagnosed cases and reduce the hospital admission rate. In this review, we have attempted to both highlight a cost-effective diagnostic pathway beginning with the initial evaluation of the patient with suspected syncope, and to provide criteria which may help frontline physicians better base their decisions regarding need for in-hospital versus outpatient clinic evaluation of syncope patients.

  3. Driving safety among patients with neurocardiogenic (vasovagal) syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, A; Dhala, A; Blanck, Z; Deshpande, S; Akhtar, M; Sra, A J

    1999-11-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope is one of the most common causes of syncope. However, the important issue of driving related injury due to syncope in this population is not well defined. Risk of injury due to syncope while driving and driving behavior was evaluated in 155 consecutive patients (92 women and 63 men; mean age 49 +/- 19 years) with history of syncope in whom hypotension and syncope or presyncope could be provoked during head-up tilt testing. Patients with syncope and positive head-up tilt table test were treated with pharmacological therapy. All participants were asked to fill out a detailed questionnaire regarding any driving related injuries and their driving behavior before tilt table testing and during follow-up. Prior to head-up tilt testing two patients had syncope while driving, and one of these patients had syncope related injury during driving. The mean duration of syncopal episodes was 50 +/- 14 months (range 12-72 months). Of the 155 patients, 52 (34%) had no warning prior to syncope, while 103 (6%) had warning symptoms such as dizziness prior to their clinical syncope. Following a diagnosis of neurocardiogenic syncope established by head-up tilt testing, six patients stopped driving on their own. During a median follow-up of 22 months recurrent syncope occurred in five (3.2%) patients. No patient had syncope or injury during driving. In conclusion, syncope and injury while driving in patients with neurocardiogenic syncope is rare. The precise mechanism of this is unclear but may be related to posture during driving. Consensus among the medical community will be needed to provide specific guidelines in these patients.

  4. Syncope in children with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Leontyeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Seventy children aged 7 to 17 years with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM were examined; among them there were 11 syncope patients and 5 presyncope patients. The screening program included standard electrocardiography (ECG, Doppler echocardiogra-phy, 24-hour Holter ECG monitoring, and an incremental exercise testing (Bruce treadmill test. The markers of myocardial electrical instability were determined. In the children with HCM, syncope was established to be heterogeneous; it had an arrhythmogenic origin and, in most cases, occurred in the presence of tachyarrhythmia (44% or bradyarrythmia (25%; its vasovagal genesis was probable in one third of the examinees. The children with syncope were typified by the asymmetric, obstructive form of HCM, at the same tone there was most commonly left ventricular hypertrophy concurrent with left atrial enlargement. 24-hour Holter monitoring showed that bradycardia was prevalent in the patients, 3 patients were found to have more than 2-second cardiac rhythm pauses caused by second-degree atrioventricular block in 1 case or by sick sinus syndrome in 2. Nonsustained ventricular tachycardia was noted in two patients. The children with syncope were typified by the signs of myocardial electrical instability as a reduction in the early phase of heart rate turbulence and by impaired QT/RR interval adaptation as hyperadaptation. The paper presents the developed management tactics for children with syncope and indications for the implantation of a cardioverter defibrillator, a pacemaker, or an ECG loop recorder.

  5. Recurrent Syncope due to Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Casini, Alessandro; Tschanz, Elisabeth; Dietrich, Pierre-Yves; Nendaz, Mathieu

    2011-01-01

    Syncope is caused by a wide variety of disorders. Recurrent syncope as a complication of malignancy is uncommon and may be difficult to diagnose and to treat. Primary neck carcinoma or metastases spreading in parapharyngeal and carotid spaces can involve the internal carotid artery and cause neurally mediated syncope with a clinical presentation like carotid sinus syndrome. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who suffered from recurrent syncope due to invasion of the right carotid sinus b...

  6. Syncope: causes, clinical evaluation, and current therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benditt, D G; Remole, S; Milstein, S; Bailin, S

    1992-01-01

    Syncope is a common clinical problem comprising the sudden loss of both consciousness and postural tone, with a subsequent spontaneous and relatively prompt recovery. Often it is difficult to differentiate a true syncopal spell from other conditions, such as seizure disorders, or from some simple accidents. Even more difficult is the identification of the cause of syncopal episodes. Nonetheless, establishing a definitive diagnosis ia an important task given the high risk of recurrent symptoms. Careful use of noninvasive and invasive cardiovascular studies (including electrophysiologic testing and tilt-table testing) along with selected hematologic, biochemical, and neurologic studies provides, in the majority of cases, the most effective strategy for obtaining a specific diagnosis and for directing therapy.

  7. [Clonazepam in therapy of neurogenic syncopal states].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaeva, Z A

    2001-01-01

    27 patients with frequent neurogenic syncopes (NS) resistant to conventional therapy were treated with clonazepam. The average age of the patients was 29.8 +/- 11.6 years. There were 1-2 syncopes in a month. Both before and after the treatment an active orthostatic test was performed with ECG registration and following analysis of variability of the cardiac rhythm. Clonazepam was administered in a dose of 2-2.5 mg/day during 8-9 weeks. Clinical improvement in the form of a lack of syncopes was observed in 20 patients (74%); 3 patients (10%) had isolated lipothymic states; 2 patients discontinued the treatment because of side-effects (dizziness). The results of the examination of 23 patients 6 months after clonazepam therapy testified the stability of the therapeutic effect.

  8. Sleep syncope: Important clinical associations with phobia and vagotonia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Busweiler, L.; Jardine, D. L.; Frampton, C. M.; Wieling, W.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To compare demographic and clinical data from patients with sleep syncope to those of patients with "classical" vasovagal syncope [VVS] collected over the last 8 years. Design: Retrospective case-controlled study. Setting: Syncope unit. Patients and methods: Fifty-four patients with a

  9. Current investigation and management of patients with syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dagres, Nikolaos; Bongiorni, Maria Grazia; Dobreanu, Dan

    2013-01-01

    and indications for tilt table testing in neurally mediated syncope. The majority of centres reported using ECG, echocardiography, and Holter monitoring as their main diagnostic tools in patients with syncope, whereas a smaller proportion of centres applied specific assessment algorithms. Physical manoeuvres were...... almost uniformely reported as the standard treatment for neurally mediated syncope....

  10. Neurally mediated syncope in electroconvulsive therapy maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbaizar, Beatriz; Llorca, Javier

    2012-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is especially necessary to revert some types of depressive disease; nevertheless, it has some widely recognized adverse effects, such as short-term memory loss. Moreover, some articles have reported its potential association with falls; this literature is, however, scanty and mainly consists of case reports. We present the case of a man who has a diagnosis of neurally mediated syncope at the age of 79 years, during the maintenance ECT. The patient had a significant increase in syncope frequency in the period he was treated with ECT, followed by a dramatic decrease when ECT was discontinued.

  11. Laugh syncope as a rare sub-type of the situational syncopes: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nishida Katsufumi

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Laughter is a good medicine; it enhances cardiovascular health and the immune system. What happens, however, if a person laughs too much or the laughter becomes out of control? Laughter-induced syncope is rare and likely goes unrecognized by many health care providers. It is thought to be another form of Valsalva-induced syncope. Case presentation We report the case of a 56-year-old, moderately obese (body mass index of 35 man with a past medical history of sleep apnea, hypertension and hyperlipidemia who suffered from syncope secondary to intense laughter. The patient also had a history of syncope in the distant past when he collapsed on the floor for several seconds. Treadmill stress testing after the incident revealed no arrhythmia or ischemic disease, although he complained of dizziness after the test and a sudden drop in blood pressure was noted. Conclusion Laughter-induced or gelastic syncope is extremely rare. It is thought to be a sub-type of the situational syncopes.

  12. Vasovagal Syncope during Epidural Catheterization before ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The risk factors can be patient related (young, athletics, hypertensive, history of syncope, inferior myocardial infarction and others), anaesthesia related (light anaesthesia, spinal, epidural anaesthesia, airway manipulation, hypercapnia, hypoxia and others) and surgical related (strabismus, anal dilatation, abdominal and ...

  13. Regional cerebral perfusion in cardiovascular reflex syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toeyry, J.P.; Kuikka, J.T.; Laensimies, E.A.

    1997-01-01

    Little is known about the regional cerebral perfusion in subjects with presyncope or syncope, and the impact that autonomic nervous dysfunction has on it. Seven subjects with cardiovascular vasodepressor reflex syncope were studied. A baseline test was performed with the patients standing in the 70 upright position, while the passive head-up tilt table test with and without isoprenaline infusion was employed for provocation. Regional cerebral perfusion was assessed by means of single-photon emission tomography with technetium-99m labelled V-oxo-1,2-N,N 1 -ethylenedylbis-l-cysteine diethylester (baseline, and during blood pressure decline in the provocation test) and the autonomic nervous function by means of spectral analysis of heart rate variability (baseline, and before blood pressure decline in the provocation test). Every subject showed an abrupt decline in blood pressure in the provocation test (five with presyncope and two with syncope). The systolic and diastolic blood pressures decreased significantly (P<0.001) between the baseline and the provocation study time points (radiopharmaceutical injection and lowest systolic blood pressure). Mean cerebral perfusion as average count densities decreased upon provocation as compared with baseline (190±63 vs 307±90 counts/voxel, respectively, P=0.013). Hypoperfusion was most pronounced in the frontal lobe. These results suggest that cerebral perfusion decreases markedly during presyncope or syncope with systemic blood pressure decline in subjects with cardiovascular vasodepressor syncope. Furthermore, the autonomic nervous function remains unchanged before the systemic blood pressure decline. (orig.). With 3 figs., 2 tabs

  14. [Neurohumoral mechanisms for vasovagal syncopes. Part I].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota

    2003-04-01

    Vasovagal syncope is defined as a reflex loss of consciousness related to reaction to various stimuli as orthostatic stress, pain or emotions connected with loss of muscle postural tone. The aetiology of this disorder is still unknown. The imbalance between the parts of autonomic nervous system and other homeostasis-related systems as renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, peptides as endothelin, neuropeptide Y, vasopressin, adrenomedullin and cAMP, adenosine and AMP can play an important role in the development of vasovagal syncope. In the first part of the paper the authors describe the mechanisms involved in the development of vasovagal reaction, pathophysiology of the head-up tilt test and the role of autonomic nervous system.

  15. Recurrent Syncope due to Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Casini

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is caused by a wide variety of disorders. Recurrent syncope as a complication of malignancy is uncommon and may be difficult to diagnose and to treat. Primary neck carcinoma or metastases spreading in parapharyngeal and carotid spaces can involve the internal carotid artery and cause neurally mediated syncope with a clinical presentation like carotid sinus syndrome. We report the case of a 76-year-old man who suffered from recurrent syncope due to invasion of the right carotid sinus by metastases of a carcinoma of the esophagus, successfully treated by radiotherapy. In such cases, surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be performed. Because syncope may be an early sign of neck or cervical cancer, the diagnostic approach of syncope in patients with a past history of cancer should include the possibility of neck tumor recurrence or metastasis and an oncologic workout should be considered.

  16. Prevalence of family history in patients with reflex syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Benn, Marianne; Kaijer, Michelle Nymann

    2013-01-01

    Reflex syncope is defined by a rapid transient loss of consciousness caused by global cerebral hypoperfusion resulting from vasodilatation and/or bradycardia attributable to inappropriate cardiovascular reflexes. A hereditary component has been suggested, but prevalence of family history may differ...... among subtypes of reflex syncope, as these have different autonomic responses and pathogeneses may be diverse. The present study aimed to assess the prevalence of a positive family history of syncope and cardiovascular characteristics in patients with cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor reflex syncope....... Patients (n=74) were classified into subtypes of reflex syncope - cardioinhibition/asystole (Vasovagal Syncope International Study subtypes II-B [VASIS II-B], n=38) or vasodepressor (VASIS III, n=36) - using the head-up tilt test. Family history was obtained by questionnaires supplemented by interview...

  17. Epidemiological studies on syncope--a register based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruwald, Martin Huth

    2013-01-01

    of the patients play an essential role. In epidemiology these factors have major impact on the outcome of the patients. Until recently, even the definition of syncope, differed from one study to another which has made literature reviews difficult. Traditionally the data on epidemiology of syncope has been taken......: 1) the use, validity and accuracy of the ICD-10 diagnosis of syncope R55.9 in the National Patient Registry for the use of this diagnosis in the epidemiology of syncope, 2) diagnostics used and etiology of a random selection of patients who had a discharge diagnosis of R55.9, 3) the incidence...... thesis demonstrated that the ICD-10 discharge diagnosis could reliably identify a cohort of patients admitted for syncope and that the discharge code carried a high number of unexplained cases despite use of numerous tests. The last studies showed that syncope is a common cause for hospital contact...

  18. Syncope and Its Impact on Occupational Accidents and Employment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Numé, Anna Karin; Kragholm, Kristian; Carlson, Nicolas

    2017-01-01

    Background - First-time syncopal episodes usually occur in adults of working age, but their impact on occupational safety and employment remains unknown. We examined the associations of syncope with occupational accidents and termination of employment. Methods and Results - Through linkage...... of the syncope event. Over a median follow-up of 3.2 years (first to third quartiles, 2.0-4.5), 622 people with syncope had an occupational accident requiring hospitalization (2.1/100 person-years). In multiple Poisson regression analysis, the incidence rate ratio in the employed syncope population was higher......, 2.34-2.91). Conclusions - In this nationwide cohort, syncope was associated with a 1.4-fold higher risk of occupational accidents and a 2-fold higher risk of termination of employment compared with the employed general population....

  19. Frequency of Syncope in Patients with Accessory Atrioventricular Connection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Aslani

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Syncope in patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome is related to rapid reciprocating tachycardia or rapid ventricular response over the accessory pathway during atrial fibrillation (AF. The aim of this retrospective study is to evaluate the frequency of syncope in patients with WPW syndrome. Methods: We reviewed the records of 150 consecutive patients with WPW syndrome.Results: There were 20 patients (13.3% who reported at least one episode of syncope and 130 patients (86.7% without such a history.Conclusion: Syncope is relatively frequent in patients with WPW. Patient with WPW syndrome who has experienced this symptom should be thoroughly evaluated.

  20. Syncope management unit: evolution of the concept and practice implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Win K; Traub, Stephen J; Decker, Wyatt W

    2013-01-01

    Syncope, a clinical syndrome, has many potential causes. The prognosis of a patient experiencing syncope varies from benign outcome to increased risk of mortality or sudden death, determined by the etiology of syncope and the presence of underlying disease. Because a definitive diagnosis often cannot be established immediately, hospital admission is frequently recommended as the "default" approach to ensure patient's safety and an expedited evaluation. Hospital care is costly while no studies have shown that clinical outcomes are improved by the in-patient practice approach. The syncope unit is an evolving practice model based on the hypothesis that a multidisciplinary team of physicians and allied staff with expertise in syncope management, working together and equipped with standard clinical tools could improve clinical outcomes. Preliminary data have demonstrated that a specialized syncope unit can improve diagnosis in a timely manner, reduce hospital admission and decrease the use of unnecessary diagnostic tests. In this review, models of syncope units in the emergency department, hospital and outpatient clinics from different practices in different countries are discussed. Similarities and differences of these syncope units are compared. Outcomes and endpoints from these studies are summarized. Developing a syncope unit with a standardized protocol applicable to most practice settings would be an ultimate goal for clinicians and investigators who have interest, expertise, and commitment to improve care for this large patient population. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Worsening of symptoms before presentation with vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheldon, Robert S; Sheldon, Aaron G; Serletis, Anna; Connolly, Stuart J; Morillo, Carlos A; Klingenheben, Thomas; Krahn, Andrew D; Koshman, Mary-Lou; Ritchie, Debbie

    2007-09-01

    Much of the natural history of vasovagal syncope is unknown. We determined whether patients presenting for care have had a recently worsened syncope frequency. We compared 208 subjects in the referral-based Prevention of Syncope Trial (POST) and 122 subjects who fainted > or =1 in a community survey study. Their mean ages and gender proportions were similar. The POST population had a higher median lifetime syncope frequency (1.16 vs 0.12 spells/year, P or =35 years (26% vs 6%, P or =35 years old had a shorter history than similar community-survey subjects (2.8 vs 14.9 y, P < 0.0001) and presented earlier after their first syncopal spell than POST subjects with a younger onset of syncope (median 2.8 vs 14.7 y, P < 0.0001), despite having fewer faints (median 6 vs 10, P = 0.0002). Many syncope patients present for care after a recent worsening of their frequency of syncope.

  2. Serum cardiac troponin I in canine syncope and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutton, E; Dukes-McEwan, J; Cripps, P J

    2017-02-01

    To determine if serum cardiac troponin I (cTnI) concentration distinguishes between cardiogenic syncope and collapsing dogs presenting with either generalized epileptic seizures (both with and without cardiac disease) or vasovagal syncope. Seventy-nine prospectively recruited dogs, grouped according to aetiology of collapse: generalized epileptic seizures (group E), cardiogenic syncope (group C), dogs with both epileptic seizures and cardiac disease (group B), vasovagal syncope (group V) or unclassified (group U). Most patients had ECG (n = 78), echocardiography (n = 78) and BP measurement (n = 74) performed. Dogs with a history of intoxications, trauma, evidence of metabolic disorders or renal insufficiency (based on serum creatinine concentrations >150 μmol/L and urine specific gravity disease) or vasovagal syncope. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Syncope as initial symptom for nephrotic syndrome: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xuemei; Wang, Guangliang; Feng, Jiachun

    2015-01-01

    Although syncope and nephrotic syndrome are frequently encountered independently in pediatric practice, syncope as the initial symptom for nephrotic syndrome is rarely observed in the pediatric age group. In this report, we present the case of 3-year-old boy with nephrotic syndrome who presented with a history of three episodes of syncope before admission. The syncope occurred after excessive fluid loss or inadequate intake of fluids and was relieved spontaneously. History taking revealed that the early morning palpebral edema, and laboratory tests showed decreased plasma protein levels and elevated serum lipid levels. Nephrotic syndrome was diagnosed, but could not be confirmed histopathologically because the patient’s parent refused consent for biopsy. The patient was managed with fluid expansion, correction of acidosis, and improvement of microcirculation to prevent recurrence of syncope, and glucocorticoids were administered to prevent disease progression. PMID:26629237

  4. 77-year-old female with syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelsalam, Mahmoud A; Geske, Jeffrey B

    2017-02-15

    A 77-year-old female was referred for evaluation of an episode of syncope while eating breakfast. There was no history of fall, syncope, prodrome, dyspnoea, chest discomfort or palpitations. Medical history was notable for hyperlipidaemia and treated hypertension. Blood pressure was 140/90 mm Hg, pulse 85  beats per minute (BPM). No murmurs were present on cardiac examination. ECG revealed normal sinus rhythm with left ventricular (LV) hypertrophy (see online supplementary figure S1). Holter monitor demonstrated rare premature ventricular complexes (<1% of beats), without heart block or ventricular tachycardia. Transthoracic echocardiogram is shown in figure 1. Which of the following is the explanation for the flow indicated by the yellow arrow? Aortic stenosisCoronary artery flow, indicative of coronary fistulaHypertrophic cardiomyopathy with apical pouchHypertensive heart diseaseMitral stenosis. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. A novel psychophysiological treatment for vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khurana, R K; Lynch, J J; Craig, F W

    1997-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of transactional psychophysiological therapy (TPT) in a patient with recurrent vasovagal syncope (VVS) and to quantify the capacity of human dialogue to effect significant and consistent measurable therapeutic cardiovascular (CV) changes. A 31-year-old nurse with recurrent VVS and a reproducibly abnormal tilt-table test was refractory to pharmacological and conventional psychiatric treatments. She was treated with TPT. Her CV responses during psychotherapy were incorporated into the dialogue as an important source of communicative information, and she was taught psychophysiological techniques to correct exaggerated CV responses. These responses, during 16 weekly and 12 subsequent monthly sessions, were analysed using a one-way multiple analysis of variance. As TPT progressed, the magnitude and lability of CV responses as well as frequency of VVS were reduced. She has been relatively asymptomatic for 14 years posttherapy. In conclusion, (1) TPT may be an effective primary/adjunctive treatment for patients with VVS; (2) TPT may reduce syncopal episodes, perhaps by normalizing limbic input to the brainstem baroreflex system.

  6. Parent and Child Psychological Factors in Pediatric Syncope and Other Somatic Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blount, Ronald L.; Morris, Julie A. B.; Cheng, Patricia S.; Campbell, Robert M.; Brown, Ronald T.

    2004-01-01

    The authors examined associations among parental and child adjustment, child syncope, somatic, and school problems. Participants were children (N = 56) ages 7-18 years with syncope. Measures included syncope severity, parental distress, and children's internalizing symptoms. For children diagnosed negative for neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS), their…

  7. Syncopation, body-movement and pleasure in groove music.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witek, Maria A G; Clarke, Eric F; Wallentin, Mikkel; Kringelbach, Morten L; Vuust, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Moving to music is an essential human pleasure particularly related to musical groove. Structurally, music associated with groove is often characterised by rhythmic complexity in the form of syncopation, frequently observed in musical styles such as funk, hip-hop and electronic dance music. Structural complexity has been related to positive affect in music more broadly, but the function of syncopation in eliciting pleasure and body-movement in groove is unknown. Here we report results from a web-based survey which investigated the relationship between syncopation and ratings of wanting to move and experienced pleasure. Participants heard funk drum-breaks with varying degrees of syncopation and audio entropy, and rated the extent to which the drum-breaks made them want to move and how much pleasure they experienced. While entropy was found to be a poor predictor of wanting to move and pleasure, the results showed that medium degrees of syncopation elicited the most desire to move and the most pleasure, particularly for participants who enjoy dancing to music. Hence, there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between syncopation, body-movement and pleasure, and syncopation seems to be an important structural factor in embodied and affective responses to groove.

  8. Syncopation, body-movement and pleasure in groove music.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A G Witek

    Full Text Available Moving to music is an essential human pleasure particularly related to musical groove. Structurally, music associated with groove is often characterised by rhythmic complexity in the form of syncopation, frequently observed in musical styles such as funk, hip-hop and electronic dance music. Structural complexity has been related to positive affect in music more broadly, but the function of syncopation in eliciting pleasure and body-movement in groove is unknown. Here we report results from a web-based survey which investigated the relationship between syncopation and ratings of wanting to move and experienced pleasure. Participants heard funk drum-breaks with varying degrees of syncopation and audio entropy, and rated the extent to which the drum-breaks made them want to move and how much pleasure they experienced. While entropy was found to be a poor predictor of wanting to move and pleasure, the results showed that medium degrees of syncopation elicited the most desire to move and the most pleasure, particularly for participants who enjoy dancing to music. Hence, there is an inverted U-shaped relationship between syncopation, body-movement and pleasure, and syncopation seems to be an important structural factor in embodied and affective responses to groove.

  9. Syncope cluster in a patient with vasovagal history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Sokalski, Leszek; Gajek, Jacek; Loboz-Grudzień, Krystyna

    2010-10-01

    We report a case of a 55 year-old man with a history of vasovagal syncope who experienced six unexpected syncopal events over the course of two hours. Two of these occurred in the supine position during ECG monitoring, which showed a long-lasting sinus pause. Before the last syncopal episode, the ECG recording was started at the moment when the patient had the recurrence of presyncopal symptoms. Recordings showed sinus rhythm slowing for 12 s and then sinus arrest lasting for 29 s. A thorough clinical examination revealed no relevant abnormalities. The patient was treated with a permanent pacemaker implantation.

  10. Clinical relevance of syncope and presyncope induced by tilt testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Koźluk, Edward; Agrawal, Anil Kumar; Smereka, Jacek; Checiński, Igor

    2009-08-01

    The authors investigated the relation between presyncope and syncope induced by tilt testing (HUTT) and demographics, medical history and HUTT data.The demographics, syncopal burden, data regarding the spontaneous syncope and reproduction of symptoms during HUTT were compared among patients with induced syncope and presyncope. The study group consisted of 574 patients (371 women, 203 men), aged 43.7 +/- 18.5 years. Patients with syncope induced by HUTT (418 patients, 63.9% women) had a higher number of syncopal episodes in their medical history. Stepwise logistic regression revealed that syncope provocation was independently related to the cardiodepressive type of neurocardiogenic reaction (OR 7.8, CI 4.2-14.4, P < 0.001), NTG use (OR 1.7, CI: 1.0-2.7, P < 0.05), the reproduction of the symptoms during HUTT (OR 2.0, CI: 1.3-3.1, P < 0.01) and the higher number of syncopal episodes (OR 2.0, CI: 1.3-3.0, P < 0.01). In patients with positive HUTT during a passive phase it was related to the cardiodepressive type of reaction (OR 26.5, CI: 5.9-118.5, P < 0.001). In the group with positive HUTT after NTG syncope was related to the cardiodepressive type (OR 5.7, CI: 2.9-11.2, P < 0.001), vasovagal history (OR 2.0, CI: 1.2-3.3, P < 0.01), reproduction of the spontaneous symptoms (OR 1.9, CI: 1.1-3.1, P < 0.05) and higher number of syncopal episodes (OR 2.1, CI: 1.3-3.3, P < 0.01). Syncope is more frequently a HUTT outcome than presyncope. The provocation of syncope in the passive phase of HUTT depends only on the cardiodepressive type of neurocardiogenic reaction. The induction of presyncope after nitroglycerin provocation is related to the possibility of a false positive reaction.

  11. Fainting during Urination (Micturition Syncope): What Causes It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... causes this, and what can he do about it? Answers from Phillip A. Low, M.D. Micturition ( ... of micturition syncope isn't fully understood. But it may be related to opening (vasodilation) of the ...

  12. Syncopation, body-movement and pleasure in groove music.

    OpenAIRE

    Witek, MA; Clarke, EF; Wallentin, M; Kringelbach, ML; Vuust, P

    2014-01-01

    Moving to music is an essential human pleasure particularly related to musical groove. Structurally, music associated with groove is often characterised by rhythmic complexity in the form of syncopation, frequently observed in musical styles such as funk, hip-hop and electronic dance music. Structural complexity has been related to positive affect in music more broadly, but the function of syncopation in eliciting pleasure and body-movement in groove is unknown. Here we report results from a ...

  13. A hairy fall: syncope resulting from topical application of minoxidil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubrey, S W; VanGriethuysen, J; Edwards, C M B

    2015-09-07

    We describe the case of a young man who developed syncope after using a high strength formulation of topical minoxidil as a hair growth restorer. Other potential cardiovascular and endocrine causes were excluded, and his symptoms resolved on discontinuation of the product. While syncope is a recognised side effect of using this powerful systemic antihypertensive agent, few cases are documented in the literature, which we illustrate in our discussion. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  14. Swallow syncope caused by third-degree atrioventricular block

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roust Aaberg, Anne Marie; Eriksson, Anna Elin; Madsen, Per Lav

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with more than 30 years of repeated syncopes, always following food intake. The patient was diagnosed with a swallow-related third-degree atrioventricular block and successfully treated with an artificial pacemaker.......We report a case of a patient with more than 30 years of repeated syncopes, always following food intake. The patient was diagnosed with a swallow-related third-degree atrioventricular block and successfully treated with an artificial pacemaker....

  15. Syncopation affects free body-movement in musical groove

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Witek, Maria A. G.; Popescu, Tudor; Clarke, Eric F

    2016-01-01

    One of the most immediate and overt ways in which people respond to music is by moving their bodies to the beat. However, the extent to which the rhythmic complexity of groove-specifically its syncopation-contributes to how people spontaneously move to music is largely unexplored. Here, we measur...... on the body-part. We demonstrate that while people do not move or synchronise much to rhythms with high syncopation when dancing spontaneously to music, the relationship between rhythmic complexity and synchronisation is less linear than in simple finger-tapping studies.......One of the most immediate and overt ways in which people respond to music is by moving their bodies to the beat. However, the extent to which the rhythmic complexity of groove-specifically its syncopation-contributes to how people spontaneously move to music is largely unexplored. Here, we measured...... free movements in hand and torso while participants listened to drum-breaks with various degrees of syncopation. We found that drum-breaks with medium degrees of syncopation were associated with the same amount of acceleration and synchronisation as low degrees of syncopation. Participants who enjoyed...

  16. Diagnostic Dilemma of Cardiac Syncope in Pediatric Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranya A Hegazy

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Aims Syncope is defined as temporary loss of consciousness and postural tone resulting from an abrupt transient decrease in cerebral blood flow. The present work aimed at determining how diagnostic tests are used in the evaluation of pediatric syncope at a tertiary pediatric referral center and to report on the utility and the yield of these tests.Settings and Design Retrospective study conducted at a tertiary referral arrhythmolology serviceMethods and Material The clinical charts of 234 pediatric patients presenting with a primary complaint of syncope with an average age of 7.48 ± 3.82(3.5-16 years were reviewed by the investigators.Statistical analysis used Statistical Package of social science (SPSS version 9,0 was used for analysis of data.Results The commonest trigger for syncope in the study population was early following exercise (n=65 and the commonest prodrome was palpitation, noted in 25 patients. A murmur was present in 19 of our patients (8.3% while 10.7% (n=25 had abnormal ECGs. Of the 106 echocardiograms done, 14 (13.2% were abnormal. Only two of them were missed by ECG. All patients were offered ambulatory 24 hour ECG. One patient with sick sinus syndrome was diagnosed only with Holter.Conclusions Clues to the presence of cardiac syncope may include acute onset of syncope, frequent episodes, low difference between blood pressure readings in supine and erect positions (after standing for 2 minutes and most importantly an abnormal 12 lead ECG. Transthoracic echo and Holter monitoring have low yield in pediatric syncope.

  17. Craniocervical Junction Meningiomas without Hydrocephalus Presenting Solely with Syncope: Report of 2 Cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champagne, Pierre-Olivier; Bojanowski, Michel W

    2018-06-01

    To our knowledge, there have not been any reported cases of a meningioma of the craniocervical region presenting solely with syncope as its initial symptom. Only 1 case of meningioma presenting with syncope has been published, but it was associated with hydrocephalus. We report 2 cases of syncope caused by a craniocervical junction meningioma, with syncope being the sole presenting symptom and without hydrocephalus. We discuss the possible pathophysiology, as well as the clinical relevance of this type of presentation. We reviewed the charts, operative details, and imagery of 2 cases of meningioma in the region of the craniocervical junction, with syncope as their sole presenting feature. We also reviewed the literature. In 1 case the syncope occurred spontaneously. In the other, it occurred during a Valsalva maneuver. Both meningiomas were surgically removed via a retromastoid approach. There was no recurrence of syncope following surgery. Following a literature review, we found 1 case of posterior fossa meningioma presenting with syncope, but hydrocephalus was also present. Syncope can be the sole manifestation of a meningioma of the craniocervical junction. Such syncopes are a consequence of transient dysfunction of the autonomous pathways in the medulla and/or of the medulla's output. In the absence of other causes of syncope, a meningioma in this region, even in the absence of hydrocephalus, should not be considered as fortuitous, but rather as the actual cause of syncope. Recognizing this possibility offers the potential for proper diagnosis and appropriate treatment of the syncope. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Syncope as the Presenting Feature of Splenic Rupture after Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Jamorabo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Splenic rupture is a rare, catastrophic complication of colonoscopy and an exceptional cause of syncope. This injury is believed to be from direct trauma or tension on the splenocolic ligament with subsequent capsule avulsion or else from direct instrument-induced splenic injury. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion that may be absent because presentation can be subtle, nonspecific, and delayed anywhere from hours to days and therefore not easily attributed to a recent endoscopy. We describe a case of syncope as the initial manifestation of splenic rupture after colonoscopy. Our patient’s pain was delayed; his discomfort was mild and not localized to the left upper quadrant. Clinicians should consider syncope, lightheadedness, and drop in hemoglobin in absence of rectal bleeding following a colonoscopy as possible warning signs of imminent or emergent splenic injury.

  19. Cardiovascular causes of syncope. Identifying and controlling trigger mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akhtar, M.; Jazayeri, M.; Sra, J.

    1991-01-01

    Syncope usually has a cardiovascular source, so neurologic evaluation has a low diagnostic yield in these patients. Cardiac arrhythmias in persons with or without structural heart disease can produce syncope. Neurocardiogenic dysfunction that results in diminished venous return and hypercontractility is another frequent cause. Postural hypotension or left ventricular outflow obstruction may also be to blame. Careful history taking and physical examination, head-up tilt testing, echocardiography or radionuclide isotope imaging, and electrophysiologic study are often diagnostic. However, syncope remains undiagnosed in some patients, and they may require periodic reassessment. Treatment options are available for most cardiovascular disorders, among them use of pharmacologic agents; catheter, surgical, or radio-frequency modification of certain tachycardias; and permanent pacing. 33 references

  20. Efficacy of tilt training in patients with vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Mazurek, Walentyna

    2006-06-01

    Besides pharmacological therapy and pacemaker implantation, tilt training is a promising method of treatment in patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS). Tilt training is usually offered to patients with malignant or recurrent VVS which impairs their quality of life and carries a risk of injury. To assess the efficacy of tilt training in patients with VVS. The study group consisted of 40 patients (29 females, 11 males, aged 36.6+/-14 years, range 18-57 years) who underwent tilt training using tilt table testing according to the Westminster protocol. The mean number of syncopal episodes prior to the initiation of tilt training was 6.5+/-4.9 (range 0-20); 3 patients had a history of very frequent faints. According to the VASIS classification, type I VVS (mixed) was diagnosed in 17 patients, type II (cardioinhibitory) in 22 subjects, and type III (vasodepressive) in one patient. Mean follow-up duration was 35.1+/-13.5 months. The control group, which did not undergo the tilt testing programme, consisted of 29 patients with VVS (25 females, 4 males, mean age 44.2+/-15.0 years) who had a mean of 3.3+/-3.2 (range 0-12) syncopal episodes in the past (p <0.05 vs study group); 6 of these patients had only pre-syncopal episodes. Type I VVS was diagnosed in 23 controls and type II VVS in 6 control subjects (syncope occurred during the passive phase of tilt testing in 7 subjects, whereas the remaining 22 fainted during NTG infusion). Of the patients from the study group, 3 underwent pacemaker implantation at the time of the initiation of tilt training. At the end of follow-up, 31 (77.5%) patients remained free from syncope recurrences, 5 had syncopal episodes during the initial phase of tilt training, whereas the remaining 4 continued to suffer from syncopal episodes. Out of 3 patients with presyncope, 2 had no syncope recurrences whereas 1 patient continued to have presyncopal attacks. Out of 3 patients with pacemakers, 1 reported activation of pacing in the interventional mode

  1. Sympatho-vagal responses in patients with sleep and typical vasovagal syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jardine, D. L.; Krediet, C. T. P.; Cortelli, P.; Frampton, C. M.; Wieling, W.

    2009-01-01

    Sleep syncope is a recently described form of vasovagal syncope that interrupts sleep. The pathophysiology of this condition is uncertain but a 'central' non-baroreflex-mediated trigger has been suggested. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that patients with sleep syncope have abnormal

  2. Masquerading bundle branch block as a presenting manifestation of complete atrioventricular block that caused syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Zhenyu; Tian, Ying; Yang, Xinchun; Liu, Xingpeng

    2017-10-01

    A 59-year-old male patient was admitted with the main complaints of stuffiness and shortness of breath. An ECG from precordial leads on admission showed masquerading bundle branch block. Syncope frequently occurred after admission. During syncope episodes, ECG telemetry showed that the syncope was caused by intermittent complete atrioventricular block, with the longest RR interval lasting for 4.36 s. At the gap of syncope, ECG showed complete right bundle branch block accompanied by alternation of left anterior fascicular block and left posterior fascicular block. The patient was implanted with a dual-chamber permanent pacemaker. Follow-up of 9 months showed no reoccurrence of syncope.

  3. Diagnostic yield of device interrogation in the evaluation of syncope in an elderly population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, Robert N; Pickett, Christopher C

    2017-06-01

    Device interrogation has become a standard part of the syncope evaluation for patients admitted with permanent pacemakers (PPM) or implantable cardiac defibrillators (ICD), although few studies have shown interrogation yields clinically useful data. The purpose of this study is to determine the diagnostic yield of device interrogation as well as other commonly performed tests in the workup of unexplained syncope in patients with previously implanted PPMs or ICDs. We retrospectively reviewed records of 88 patients admitted to our medical center for syncope with previously implanted pacemakers between January 1, 2005 and January 1, 2015 using ICD-9 billing data. Pacemaker interrogation demonstrated an arrhythmia as the cause for syncope in 4 patients (4%) and evidence of device failure secondary to perforation in 1 patient (1%). The cause of syncope was unknown in 34 patients (39%). Orthostatic hypotension was the most commonly identified cause of syncope (26%), followed by vasovagal syncope (13%), autonomic dysfunction (5%), ventricular arrhythmia (3%), atrial arrhythmia (2%), congestive heart failure (2%), stroke (2%), and other less common causes (8%). History was the most important determinant of syncope (36%), followed by orthostatic vital signs (14%), device interrogations (4%), head CT (2%), and transthoracic echocardiogram (1%). Device interrogation is rarely useful for elucidating a cause of syncope without concerning physical exam, telemetry, or EKG findings. Interrogation may occasionally yield paroxysmal arrhythmias responsible for syncopal episode, but these rarely alter clinical outcomes. Interrogation appears to be more useful in patients with syncope after recent device placement. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Syncope and the risk of sudden cardiac death: Evaluation, management, and prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan J. Koene, MD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a clinical syndrome defined as a relatively brief self-limited transient loss of consciousness (TLOC caused by a period of inadequate cerebral nutrient flow. Most often the trigger is an abrupt drop of systemic blood pressure. True syncope must be distinguished from other common non-syncope conditions in which real or apparent TLOC may occur such as seizures, concussions, or accidental falls. The causes of syncope are diverse, but in most instances, are relatively benign (e.g., reflex and orthostatic faints with the main risks being accidents and/or injury. However, in some instances, syncope may be due to more worrisome conditions (particularly those associated with cardiac structural disease or channelopathies; in such circumstances, syncope may be an indicator of increased morbidity and mortality risk, including sudden cardiac death (SCD. Establishing an accurate basis for the etiology of syncope is crucial in order to initiate effective therapy. In this review, we focus primarily on the causes of syncope that are associated with increased SCD risk (i.e., sudden arrhythmic cardiac death, and the management of these patients. In addition, we discuss the limitations of our understanding of SCD in relation to syncope, and propose future studies that may ultimately address how to improve outcomes of syncope patients and reduce SCD risk. Keywords: Syncope, Sudden cardiac death, Risk assessment

  5. Treatment of vasovagal syncope: pacemaker or crossing legs?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijk, N.; Harms, M. P.; Linzer, M.; Wieling, W.

    2000-01-01

    A 50-year-old male patient continued to experience syncope after implantation of a pacemaker. During cardiovascular examination, the patient showed a typical vasovagal response, with normal pacemaker function. Leg crossing, which prohibits the pooling of blood in the legs and abdomen, at the onset

  6. Diagnostic value of history taking in reflex syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Colman, N.; Nahm, K.; van Dijk, J. G.; Reitsma, J. B.; Wieling, W.; Kaufmann, H.

    2004-01-01

    The medical history, in combination with the physical examination and a 12-lead electrocardiogram, plays a key role in the diagnosis and risk stratification of patients with syncope. However, diagnostic clinical criteria are not uniformly applied. In older studies, the diagnostic criteria for

  7. Brain Computed Tomography evaluation of patients with syncopal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of our study is to determine the value of using brain computerized tomography as a routine investigation in patients presenting with syncope to the emergency department at King Hussein Medical Center Amman Jordon. Methods: In the time period between March 2006 and April 2008, a total of 254 ...

  8. NMR - finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treig, T.; Huk, W.; Nusslein, B.

    1987-01-01

    Acute or chronic cervical myelopathies are well known neurological complications of mucopolysaccharidoses This paper deals with a case of a mild form of Morquio's disease which appeared with syncope. NMR-imaging of the cranio-spinal region demonstrated a high intensity echo in the medulla oblongata before and after spinal decompression

  9. Corpus-Based Rhythmic Pattern Analysis of Ragtime Syncopation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koops, Hendrik Vincent; Volk, A.; de Haas, W.B.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a corpus-based study on rhythmic patterns in the RAG-collection of approximately 11.000 symbolically encoded ragtime pieces. While characteristic musical features that define ragtime as a genre have been debated since its inception, musicologists argue that specific syncopation

  10. Syncope paradox in the outcome of patients with pulmonary thromboembolism: short-term and midterm outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyyedi, Seyyed-reza; Jenab, Yaser; Tokaldany, Masoumeh Lotfi; Shirani, Shapoor; Sadeghian, Saeed; Jalali, Arash

    2016-01-01

    We compare the early and midterm outcomes of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) in patients with and without syncope in our single-center registry. Between December 2006 and May 2013, 351 consecutive patients (mean age = 60.21 ± 16.91 years, 55.3% male) with confirmed acute symptomatic PTE were divided in with and without syncope groups. Groups were compared in terms of the effect of syncope on 30-day mortality and adverse events, and mortality in a median follow-up time of 16.9 months. From 351 patients, 39 (11.1%) had syncope and 312 (88.9%) did not. Syncope group had less frequently chest pain (30.8% vs 51.4%; P value = 0.015). Also, the rates of 30-day adverse events and mortality were 12.8% and 5.1% for the group with syncope, and 14.4% and 10.3% for the group without syncope, respectively, with no significant difference. At follow up, 65 patients died and mortality was 18.5% for 351 patients (5.1% in the group with syncope and 20.2% for the other group). After adjustment for confounding factors, the effect of syncope on 30-day adverse events and mortality remained non-significant and on the midterm mortality was significant, showing that the presence of syncope was associated with lower midterm mortality (P value = 0.038). Among PTE patients in our registry, 11.1% presented with syncope. Relationship between syncope and 30-day adverse events and mortality remained non-significant after adjustments for other factors. However, in midterm follow up, patients with syncope were significantly at decreased risk of mortality compared to those without syncope. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The changing face of orthostatic and neurocardiogenic syncope with age.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cooke, J

    2012-01-31

    AIM: Reports of the outcomes of syncope assessment across a broad spectrum of ages in a single population are scarce. It is our objective to chart the varying prevalence of orthostatic and neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) as a patient ages. METHODS: This was a retrospective study. All consecutive patients referred to a tertiary referral syncope unit over a decade were included. Patients were referred with recurrent falls or orthostatic intolerance. Tilt tests and carotid sinus massage (CSM) were performed in accordance with best practice guidelines. RESULTS: A total of 3002 patients were included (1451 short tilt, 127 active stand, 1042 CSM and 382 prolonged tilt). Ages ranged from 11 to 91 years with a median (IQR) of 75 (62-81) years. There were 1914 females; 1088 males. Orthostatic hypotension (OH) was the most commonly observed abnormality (test positivity of 60.3%). Those with OH had a median (IQR) age of 78 (71-83) years. Symptomatic patients were significantly younger than asymptomatic (P = 0.03). NCS demonstrated a bimodal age distribution. Of 194 patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity, the median age (IQR) was 77 (68-82) years. Those with vasovagal syncope (n = 80) had a median (IQR) age of 30 (19-44) years. There were 57 patients with isolated postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Of the total patients, 75% were female. They had a median (IQR) age of 23 (17-29) years. CONCLUSION: We have confirmed, in a single population, a changing pattern in the aetiology of syncope as a person ages. The burden of disease is greatest in the elderly.

  12. Diagnostic and prognostic value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T in patients with syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Michael; Geier, Felicitas; Popp, Steffen; Singler, Katrin; Smolarsky, Alexander; Bertsch, Thomas; Müller, Christian; Greve, Yvonne

    2015-02-01

    We examined the diagnostic and predictive value of high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T (cTnThs) in patients with syncope. We performed an analysis of consecutive patients with syncope presenting to the emergency department. The primary end point was the accuracy to diagnose a cardiac syncope. In addition, the study explored the prognostic relevance of cTnThs in patients with cardiac and noncardiac syncope. A total of 360 patients were enrolled (median age, 70.5 years; male, 55.8%; 23.9% aged >80 years). Cardiac syncope was present in 22% of patients, reflex syncope was present in 40% of patients, syncope due to orthostatic hypotension was present in 20% of patients, and unexplained syncope was present in 17.5% of patients. A total of 148 patients (41%) had cTnThs levels above the 99% confidence interval (CI) (cutoff point). The diagnostic accuracy for cTnThs levels to determine the diagnosis of cardiac syncope was quantified by the area under the curve (0.77; CI, 0.72-0.83; P value of cTnThs levels within 30 days: Patients with increased cTnThs levels had a 52% likelihood for adverse events, patients with cTnThs levels below the cutoff point had a low risk (negative predictive value, 83.5%). Increased cTnThs levels indicate adverse prognosis in patients with noncardiac causes of syncope, but not in patients with cardiac syncope being a risk factor for adverse outcome by itself. Patients with syncope presenting to the emergency department have a high proportion of life-threatening conditions. cTnThs levels show a limited diagnostic and predictive accuracy for the identification of patients with syncope at high risk. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. International Study on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology 2: the management of patients with suspected or certain neurally mediated syncope after the initial evaluation Rationale and study design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brignole, M.; Sutton, R.; Menozzi, C.; Moya, A.; Garcia-Civera, R.; Benditt, D.; Vardas, P.; Wieling, W.; Andresen, D.; Migliorini, R.; Hollinworth, D.

    2003-01-01

    Study design Multi-centre, prospective observational study Objectives Main objective is to verify the value of implantable loop recorder (ILR) in assessing the mechanism of syncope and the efficacy of the ILR-guided therapy after syncope recurrence. Inclusion criteria Patients who met the following

  14. How well are European Society of Cardiology (ESC) guidelines adhered to in patients with syncope?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Dwyer, C

    2010-01-01

    The ESC guidelines on syncope were published in 2001 and updated in 2004. Adherence to the recommendations enables early stratification of low and high risk patients and prevents unnecessary investigations and admissions. Vasovagal syncope (VVS) is the commonest cause of syncope in all age groups and a low risk condition. The study objective was to determine whether the ESC guidelines were adhered to prior to referral to a syncope unit; 100 consecutive patients with unexplained syncope (52 +\\/- 23 (15-91) years); 53 female. Sixty-six patients had VVS. Forty nine (75%) of patients with VVS had undergone unnecessary investigations prior to diagnosis and 31 (47%) were admitted to hospital for investigation. Research from other countries confirms that adherence to the ESC guidelines expediates accurate diagnosis, improves resource utilization and reduces health care cost. Greater awareness amongst Irish practitioners of guidelines may improve syncope management and reduce costs.

  15. Intermittent Brugada Syndrome Presenting with Syncope in an Adult Female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Chavez

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Brugada syndrome accounts for 4–12% of all sudden deaths worldwide and at least 20% of sudden deaths in patients with structurally normal hearts. Case Report. A 48-year-old female presented to the emergency department after two witnessed syncopal episodes. While awaiting discharge had a third collapse followed by cardiac arrest with shockable rhythm. Initial electrocardiogram showed wide QRS complex with left axis deviation, ST-segment elevation of 2 mm followed by a negative T wave with no isoelectric separation, suggestive of spontaneous intermittent Brugada type 1 pattern. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated neither structural heart disease nor abnormal myocardium. After placement of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator the patient was discharged. Why should an emergency physician be aware of this? Brugada syndrome is an infrequently encountered clinical entity which may have a fatal outcome. This syndrome primarily presents with syncope. It should be considered as a component of differential diagnosis in patients with family history of syncope and sudden cardiac death.

  16. Epileptic Seizures Versus Syncope: Pathophysiology and Clinical Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marios Charalambous

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Generalised epileptic seizures and syncope are two syndromes with similar clinical manifestation and their differentiation can be quite challenging. The aim of this review is to use an evidence-based approach in differentiating these two syndromes through the comprehension of the pathophysiological mechanisms involved and their clinical signs. Both syndromes affect regions of the forebrain and consciousness level, although, different mechanisms are involved. Syncope is a paroxysmal event secondary to a short-term decrease in cerebral perfusion, oxygenation or essential nutrients delivery. Generalised epileptic seizure activity is defined as the clinical manifestation of transient paroxysmal disturbances in brain function secondary to an imbalance between excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters. Clinical criteria, including precipitating events, clinical signs preceding, during and following the episodes and event duration, can be used to differentiate the two syndromes. Although these criteria might be useful for the practitioner, definite conclusions should be precluded due to the lack of original research articles and weak evidence on this specific field.Application: The review might be a useful tool for the general practitioner and clinical scientist as it will aid towards the differentiation of two syndromes, i.e. generalised epileptic seizures and syncope, with similar clinical presentation.

  17. The risk for syncope and presyncope during surgery in surgeons and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Jerzy; Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Rosińczuk-Tonderys, Joanna; Zielińska, Dominika; Terpiłowski, Łukasz; Agrawal, Anil Kumar

    2011-11-01

    Surgeons and nurses are exposed to orthostatic stress. To assess the lifetime incidence of syncopal and presyncopal events during surgery in operation room staff and reveal the predicting factors. The study included 317 subjects (161 F, 156 M) aged 43.9 ± 9.6; 216 surgeons and 101 instrumenters. The study included filling of an anonymous questionnaire on the syncope and presyncope history. At least one syncopal event during operation was reported by 4.7% and presyncope by 14.8% of the studied population. All but one subject reported prodromal symptoms before syncope. In the medical history, syncope outside the operating room was reported by 11% of the studied group. Syncope and presyncope during operation was related to syncope in the medical history outside the operation room, respectively: odds ratio (OR) 20.2 95% confidence interval (CI): 2.0-70.5 and OR 10.8; CI: 5.0-23.4 and to presyncope in the medical history, respectively: OR 23.5; CI: 7.4-74.4 OR 8.9; CI: 3.6-11.2 (P < 0.001). (1) Syncope and presyncope may occur during surgery in the staff of the operating room. (2) Syncope in the operating room is usually preceded by prodromal symptoms and has vasovagal origin. (3) Both lower then expected occurrence of syncope in the operating room staff and absence of any difference between genders in this regard indicate preselection in the process of choosing profession and specialization. (4) Syncope and presyncope outside the operating room in medical history increases the risk of syncope and presyncope inside the operation room.

  18. Influence of climate on emergency department visits for syncope: role of air temperature variability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Galli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Syncope is a clinical event characterized by a transient loss of consciousness, estimated to affect 6.2/1000 person-years, resulting in remarkable health care and social costs. Human pathophysiology suggests that heat may promote syncope during standing. We tested the hypothesis that the increase of air temperatures from January to July would be accompanied by an increased rate of syncope resulting in a higher frequency of Emergency Department (ED visits. We also evaluated the role of maximal temperature variability in affecting ED visits for syncope. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We included 770 of 2775 consecutive subjects who were seen for syncope at four EDs between January and July 2004. This period was subdivided into three epochs of similar length: 23 January-31 March, 1 April-31 May and 1 June-31 July. Spectral techniques were used to analyze oscillatory components of day by day maximal temperature and syncope variability and assess their linear relationship. There was no correlation between daily maximum temperatures and number of syncope. ED visits for syncope were lower in June and July when maximal temperature variability declined although the maximal temperatures themselves were higher. Frequency analysis of day by day maximal temperature variability showed a major non-random fluctuation characterized by a ∼23-day period and two minor oscillations with ∼3- and ∼7-day periods. This latter oscillation was correlated with a similar ∼7-day fluctuation in ED visits for syncope. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that ED visits for syncope were not predicted by daily maximal temperature but were associated with increased temperature variability. A ∼7-day rhythm characterized both maximal temperatures and ED visits for syncope variability suggesting that climate changes may have a significant effect on the mode of syncope occurrence.

  19. [Treatment of recurrent neurocardiogenic syncope with cardiac inhibitors with ipratropium bromide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, H-C; Michaelsen, J; Hesse, C; Schellberg, D; Schwab, M; Herzog, W

    2004-06-01

    Pharmacological approaches for the treatment of cardioinhibitory vasovagal syncope are controversially discussed in the literature. In acute treatment of neurocardiogenic syncope, anticholinergics (atropine) are used effectively. Randomised and placebo-controlled clinical trials evaluating the preventive significance of anticholinergic agents in the therapy of cardioinhibitory vasovagal syncope are still missing. We report the case of an 18-year-old male patient with recurrent convulsive, cardioinhibitory neurocardiogenic syncope. Vasovagal syncope occurred predominantly as centrally induced syncope triggered by negative emotions such as fear or by seeing blood. Under resting conditions, the patient revealed increased parasympathetic tone with nocturnal bradycardia of 38 beats/min. In the course of head-up tilt table testing a cardioinhibitory syncope with an asystolic pause of 10 seconds occurred without any prodromes after 10 minutes of upright positioning. In order to inhibit parasympathetic tone, medication with ipratropiumbromide was initiated. Time-variant analysis of heart rate variability (autoregressive model) during head-up tilt table testing showed under the medication with ipratropiumbromide a vagal mediated cardioinhibition to 56 beats/min, but no further sinus arrest. Throughout clinical follow-up of 6 months the patient remained syncope-free under the medication. The usefulness of ipratropiumbromide in inhibiting vagal mediated cardioinhibition will be discussed referring to the case report and to studies evaluating anticholinergic agents in the treatment of neurocardiogenic syncope.

  20. A new hypothesis of cause of syncope: trigeminocardiac reflex during extraction of teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arakeri, Gururaj; Arali, Veena

    2010-02-01

    Transient Loss Of Consciousness (TLOC) or vasovagal syncope is well known phenomenon in dental/maxillofacial surgery. Despite considerable study of vasovagal syncope, its pathophysiology remains to be fully elucidated. After having encountered a case of trigeminocardiac reflex after extraction of maxillary first molar we observed and studied 400 extractions under local anesthesia to know the relation between trigeminocardiac reflex and syncope. We make hypothesis that trigeminocardiac reflex which is usually seen under general anesthesia when all sympathetic reflexes are blunted can also occur under local anesthesia during extractions of maxillary molars (dento-cardiac reflex) and mediate syncope.

  1. Use of implantable and external loop recorders in syncope with unknown causes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaoru Tanno

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The gold standard for diagnosing syncope is to elucidate the symptom-electrocardiogram (ECG correlation. The ECG recordings during syncope allow physicians to either confirm or exclude an arrhythmia as the mechanism of syncope. Many studies have investigated the use of internal loop recorder (ILR, while few studies have used external loop recorder (ELR for patients with unexplained syncope. The aim of this review is to clarify the clinical usefulness of ILR and ELR in the diagnosis and management of patients with unexplained syncope. Many observational and four randomized control studies have shown that ILR for patients with unknown syncope is a useful tool for early diagnosis and improving diagnosis rate. ILR also provides important information on the mechanism of syncope and treatment strategy. However, there is no evidence of total mortality or quality of life improvements with ILR. The diagnostic yield of ELR in patients with syncope was similar to that with ILR within the same timeframe. Therefore, ELR could be considered for long-term ECG monitoring before a patient switches to using ILR. A systematic approach and selection of ECG monitoring tools reduces health care costs and improves the selection of patients for optimal treatment possibilities. Keywords: Internal loop recorder, External loop recorder, Unknown Syncope

  2. Is pacemaker therapy the right key to patients with vasovagal syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radovanović, Nikola N; Kirćanski, Bratislav; Raspopović, Srdjan; Pavlović, Siniša U; Jovanović, Velibor; Milašinović, Goran

    2016-01-01

    Vasovagal syncope is the most common type of reflex syncope. Efficacy of cardiac pacing in this indication has not been the subject of many studies and pacemaker therapy in patients with vasovagal syncope is still controversial. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of pacing therapy in treatment of patients with vasovagal syncope, to determine contribution of new therapeutic models in increasing its success, and to identify risk factors associated with a higher rate of symptoms after pacemaker implantation. A retrospective study included 30 patients with pacemaker implanted due to vasovagal syncope in the Pacemaker Center, Clinical Center of Serbia, between November 2003 and June 2014. Head-up tilt test was performed to diagnose vasovagal syncope. Patients with cardioinhibitory and mixed type of disease were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 48.1 ± 11.1 years and 18 (60%) patients were men. Mean follow-up period was 5.9 ± 3.0 years. Primarily, implantable loop recorder was implanted in 10 (33.3%) patients. Twenty (66.7%) patients presented cardioinhibitory and 10 (33.3%) mixed type of vasovagal syncope. After pacemaker implantation, 11 (36.7%) patients had syncope. In multiple logistic regression analysis we showed that syncope is statistically more likely to occur after pacemaker implantation in patients with mixed type of vasovagal syncope (p = 0.018). There were two (6.7%) perioperative surgical complications. Pacemaker therapy is a safe treatment for patients with vasovagal syncope, whose efficacy can be improved by strict selection of patients. We showed that symptoms occur statistically more often in patients with mixed type of disease after pacemaker implantation.

  3. [Vasovagal syncope as a cause of serious body injury - two case reports].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota

    2003-04-01

    Vasovagal syncope is a reflex reaction, leading to marked hypotension and/or bradycardia with transient loss of consciousness and the postural muscle tone. The recovery is spontaneous and usually rapid. Serious body injuries caused by fainting are rare. We present two patients with vasovagal syncope which caused serious injury. Different therapeutic options, including pacemaker implantation, are discussed.

  4. Prevalence and clinical outcomes of patients with multiple potential causes of syncope

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Lin Y.; Gersh, Bernard J.; Hodge, David O.; Wieling, Wouter; Hammill, Stephen C.; Shen, Win-Kuang

    2003-01-01

    Objective: To determine the prevalence, predictors, and prognosis of patients with multiple potential causes of syncope. Patients and Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study with prospective follow-up of consecutive patients with syncope of uncertain cause who were referred to the

  5. The egsys and oesil risk scores for classification of cardiac etiology of syncope: comparison, revaluation, and clinical Implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Plášek, J.; Doupal, V.; Fürstová, Jana; Martínek, A.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 154, č. 2 (2010), s. 169-173 ISSN 1213-8118 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Syncope * Cardiac Syncope * EGSYS * OESIL * Emergency Department * Decision - Making * Syncope Management Unit Subject RIV: IN - Informatics, Computer Science Impact factor: 0.716, year: 2010

  6. The pattern of activation of the sympathetic nervous system during tilt-induced syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Sciborski, Ryszard; Smereka, Jacek; Checiński, Igor; Mazurek, Walentyna

    2007-04-01

    A 49-year-old patient with a history of situational syncope and minimal electrocardiographic signs of accessory pathway is described. The evidence for pre-excitation was present only during the sympathetic activation caused by exercise testing and isoprenaline infusion. This phenomenon served as an indicator of significant adrenergic drive to the heart after the tilt-induced syncope. The meaning of the observed electrocardiographic changes in the course of neurocardiogenic reaction and its contribution to the understanding of the sympatho-vagal balance during vasovagal syncope is discussed. The lack of preexcitation signs during syncope and its appearance several seconds after the syncope-related sinus pause indicates sympathetic withdrawal before and shortly after the asystole. The possible pathophysiological mechanisms are discussed.

  7. Manual compression and reflex syncope in native renal biopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Yoichi; Ojima, Yoshie; Kagaya, Saeko; Aoki, Satoshi; Nagasawa, Tasuku

    2018-03-14

    Complications associated with diagnostic native percutaneous renal biopsy (PRB) must be minimized. While life threatening major complications has been extensively investigated, there is little discussion regarding minor bleeding complications, such as a transient hypotension, which directly affect patients' quality of life. There is also little evidence supporting the need for conventional manual compression following PRB. Therefore, this study evaluated the relationship between minor and major complications incidence in patients following PRB with or without compression. This single-center, retrospective study included 456 patients (compression group: n = 71; observation group: n = 385). The compression group completed 15 min of manual compression and 4 h of subsequent strict bed rest with abdominal bandage. The observation group completed 2 h of strict bed rest only. The primary outcome of interest was transient symptomatic hypotension (minor event). Of the 456 patients, 26 patients encountered intraoperative and postoperative transient hypotension, which were considered reflex syncope without tachycardia. Univariate analysis showed that symptomatic transient hypotension was significantly associated with compression. This association remained significant, even after adjustment of covariates using multivariate logistic regression analysis (adjusted odds ratio 3.27; 95% confidential interval 1.36-7.82; P = 0.0078). Manual compression and abdominal bandage significantly increased the frequency of reflex syncope during native PRB. It is necessary to consider the potential benefit and risk of compression maneuvers for each patient undergoing this procedure.

  8. Perioperative Vasovagal Syncope with Focus on Obstetric Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Shan Tsai

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Vasovagal syncope refers to a reflex cardiovascular depression that gives rise to loss of consciousness with bradycardia and profound vasodilatation. This response commonly occurs during regional anesthesia, hemorrhage or supine inferior vena cava compression in pregnancy. The changes in circulatory response from the normal maintenance of arterial pressure to parasympathetic activation and sympathetic inhibition may cause severe hypotension. This change is triggered by reduced cardiac venous return as well as episodes of emotional stress, excitement or pain. Occasionally, these vasovagal responses may be unpredictable and may dramatically proceed to asystole with circulatory collapse, and may even result in death. In these circumstances, hypotension may be more severe than that caused by bradycardia alone, because of unappreciated vasodilatation. Regional anesthesia, decreased venous return, hemorrhage and abnormal fetal presentation cumulatively increase the risk of vasovagal syncope in cesarean section patients. When a vasovagal response occurs, ephedrine is the drug of first choice because of its combined action on the heart and peripheral blood vessels. Epinephrine must be used early in established cardiac arrest, especially after high regional anesthesia.

  9. The Effects of Parkinson's Disease and Age on Syncopated Finger Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stegemöller, Elizabeth L.; Simuni, Tanya; MacKinnon, Colum

    2009-01-01

    In young healthy adults, syncopated finger movements (movements between consecutive beats) are characterized by a frequency-dependent change in phase at movement rates near 2 Hz. A similar frequency-dependent phase transition is observed during bimanual anti-phase (asymmetric) tasks in healthy young adults, but this transition frequency is significantly lowered in both patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and older adults. To date, no study has examined the transition frequency associated with unimanual syncopated movements in patients with PD or older adults. This study examined the effects of movement frequency on the performance of unconstrained syncopated index finger flexion movements in patients with PD, older adult subjects matched to patients with PD, and young adult subjects. Syncopated movements were paced by an acoustic tone that increased in frequency from 1 to 3 Hz in 0.25 Hz increments. Movement phase was quantified and the movement frequency where subjects transitioned from syncopation to synchronization was compared between groups. The principal finding was a marked impairment in the ability of patients with PD to perform syncopated movements when off medication. Medication did not significantly improve performance. In addition, the transition frequency for older adult subjects was lower than young adult subjects. These findings demonstrate that, similar to bimanual tasks, the coordination dynamics associated with unimanual syncopated finger movements transition from a stable to an unstable pattern at significantly lower frequencies in patients with PD and older adults compared to young adults. PMID:19596277

  10. Vasovagal syncope in medical students and their first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Anna; Rose, Sarah; Sheldon, Aaron G; Sheldon, Robert S

    2006-08-01

    To determine the effect of family history on the likelihood of vasovagal syncope. Sixty-two medical students and 228 first-degree relatives were studied. Vasovagal syncope was ascertained with the Calgary syncope symptom score. The effects of the sex of the subject and parental syncope history on the likelihood of offspring fainting were described using Kaplan-Meier estimates and analysed using proportional hazards regression. The prevalence of vasovagal syncope was 32% and the median age of first faint in those who fainted was 14 years. More females than males fainted [42 vs. 31%; P=0.02; hazard ratio (HR) 1.34 (95% CI 1.07-1.68)]. An individual with two fainting parents was more likely to faint than one with no fainting parents [P<0.0001; HR 3.4 (95% CI 1.7-7.03)]. In the proportional hazards model, offspring of either sex whose mother faints are more likely to faint than those whose mother does not faint [HR 2.86 (95% CI 1.54-5.31)]. Having a father who faints significantly increases the risk of syncope in sons [HR 4.12 (95%CI 1.39-12.31)], but not in daughters [HR 1.18 (95% CI 0.56-3.34)]. Family history and sex of subject are important predictors of vasovagal syncope in offspring.

  11. Mechanisms of lower body negative pressure-induced syncope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davrath, Linda Ruble

    Although extensively investigated, the mechanisms of post-spaceflight orthostatic intolerance have not been elucidated. The working hypothesis was that a markedly reduced left ventricular end-systolic volume (LVESV) would be achieved during progressive, presyncopal-limited LBNP and would cause bradycardia and a fall in blood pressure, thus triggering syncope. Eight healthy men, age 25.1 ± 1.3 years, volunteered for the study. Subjects were exposed to graded levels of LBNP on two separate occasions. Changes in left ventricular end-diastolic volume and LVESV were measured, using two-dimensional echocardiography, at each stage of LBNP from rest to presyncope. Plasma venous blood samples were withdrawn at the end of each stage of the LBNP protocol for the measurement of plasma venous catecholamines and plasma renin activity (PRA). Catecholamines were analyzed by HPLC with electro-chemical detection, and PRA was determined by radioimmunoassay. All subjects reached presyncope during the LBNP. LVESV decreased by 28% at presyncope with no evidence of ventricular cavity obliteration. Norepinephrine (NE) increased by 44% from rest to presyncope, but no epinephrine surge was detected (35% increase from rest to presyncope). These data indicate that it is possible to initiate syncope with only a 28% decrease in LVESV, and that sympatho-inhibition and bradycardia are not required elements for syncope to occur. To investigate the effect of moderate sodium restriction on cardiovascular hemodynamics and orthostatic tolerance, presyncopal LBNP testing was performed. Urinary sodium excretion was significantly higher on the normal-sodium diet when compared with the sodium-restricted diet, but urinary potassium was not different. Cumulative stress index (655 ± 460 on normal-sodium diet vs. 639 ± 388 on sodium-restricted diet) scores were not different. Cardiac volumes, blood pressure and total peripheral resistance were not different at any stage of the LBNP between the diets, nor

  12. Use of Implantable Loop Recorders to Unravel the Cause of Unexplained Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Aniket Puri, DM, FACC, FAPSIC, FSCAI

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a symptom of many underlying disease states, which range from the relatively benign to the life threatening. There are numerous investigations done for patients with recurrent unexplained syncope which may have very low yield when it comes to making a definitive diagnosis. Recently, the implantable loop recorder (ILR for continuous monitoring of the cardiac rhythm has been launched in India. This review will briefly discuss these current availabel strategies and focus on the usefulness of an ILR in the definitive diagnosis and treatment of patients with a recurrent unexplained syncope.

  13. Association Between Baseline Blood Pressures, Heart Rates, and Vasovagal Syncope in Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adlakha, Himanshu; Gupta, Ruchi; Hassan, Romana; Kern, Jeffrey H

    2018-01-28

    Vasovagal syncope is the most common cause of syncope in children and adults, accounting for 50-66% of unexplained syncope. There are no studies establishing the relationship between syncope, baseline heart rate, and blood pressure. To identify a possible association between baseline blood pressure and heart rate with syncope. We conducted a questionnaire-based chart review study. A questionnaire was distributed to the guardian of children between eight and 18 years of age who attended the Pediatric Ambulatory Care Clinic at Flushing Hospital Medical Center. Based on the responses in the questionnaire, subjects were classified either as cases (positive for syncope) or controls (negative for syncope). Children and adolescents with neurological, cardiac, or any medical condition that can cause syncopal episodes were excluded from the study. Data collected from the questionnaire included age, gender, ethnicity, medical history, family history of syncope, and the amount of salt used in food. Anthropometric and vital signs for the current visit (height, weight, BMI, blood pressure, and heart rate) and vital signs from two previous visits were collected from electronic medical records. The data was analyzed using t-test and chi-square test with Microsoft Excel software (Microsoft Office Standard, v. 14, Microsoft; 2010); p<0.05 was considered significant. A total of 197 subjects were included in this study. There were 18 cases and 179 controls. Of the cases, (4/18) 22.2% were more likely to have a systolic blood pressure lower than the 10th percentile for their gender, age, and height as compared with controls (7/179) 3.9%, p = 0.003. The subjects with a history of syncope were more likely to add salt to their food (p = 0.004). There were no significant differences between cases and controls for age, gender, ethnicity between cases and controls for systolic blood pressure. No significant difference was observed between the heart rates of cases and controls. Children

  14. Self-induced stretch syncope of adolescence: a video-EEG documentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuca, Michel; Thomas, Pierre

    2007-12-01

    We present the first video-EEG documentation, with ECG and EMG features, of stretch syncope of adolescence in a young, healthy 16-year-old boy. Stretch syncope of adolescence is a rarely reported, benign cause of fainting in young patients, which can be confused with epileptic seizures. In our patient, syncopes were self-induced to avoid school. Dynamic transcranial Doppler showed evidence of blood flow decrease in both posterior cerebral arteries mimicking effects of a Valsalva manoeuvre. Dynamic angiogram of the vertebral arteries was normal. Hypotheses concerning the physiopathology are discussed. [Published with video sequences].

  15. Role of head-up tilt table testing in patients with syncope or transient loss of consciousness

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    Toshiyuki Furukawa, MD, PhD

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The tilt table test (TTT is a useful method for the management of reflex syncope. However, the TTT is incomplete and has several problems. The indications for this test are established using guidelines. The TTT is not suitable for all syncopal patients. It is currently unclear (1 When should the TTT be used, (2 for which types of patients TTT should be performed, and (3 does the TTT provide useful information to guide indication for pacing therapy for reflex syncope. The answers to these questions appear in recent reports from two guidelines published by the European Society of Cardiology and the Japan Circulation Society. The indications for TTT do not apply to all syncopal patients, but selected patients. For patients with low risks and rare syncopal events, the TTT is not necessary, even when diagnoses are unconfirmed. The TTT is used not only for diagnosis of reflex syncope, but also for many clinical management of several conditions (i.e., exclusion of cardiac syncope. Positive TTT results cannot predict the effects of pacing therapy for reflex syncope. The decision to use pacing therapy should be based on documented electrocardiograms and other findings, including TTT results. Keywords: Tilt table testing, Reflex syncope, Pacemaker, Italian protocol, Management of syncope

  16. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia. An important diagnosis in children with syncope and normal heart

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    Luiz Roberto Leite

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Syncope in children is primarily related to vagal hyperreactivity, but ventricular tachycardia (VT way rarely be seen. Catecholaminergic polymorphic VT is a rare entity that can occur in children without heart disease and with a normal QT interval, which may cause syncope and sudden cardiac death. In this report, we describe the clinical features, treatment, and clinical follow-up of three children with syncope associated with physical effort or emotion and cathecolaminergic polymorphic VT. Symptoms were controlled with beta-blockers, but one patient died suddenly in the fourth year of follow-up. Despite the rare occurrence, catecholaminergic polymorphic VT is an important cause of syncope and sudden death in children with no identified heart disease and normal QT interval.

  17. Role of echocardiography in the evaluation of syncope: a prospective study

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    Sarasin, F P; Junod, A-F; Carballo, D; Slama, S; Unger, P-F; Louis-Simonet, M

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To study the role of echocardiography in the stepwise evaluation of syncope. Design: A prospective observational study with an 18 month follow up. Setting: University teaching hospital providing primary and tertiary care. Subjects: 650 consecutive patients with syncope and clinical suspicion of an obstructive valvar lesion, or with syncope not explained by history, physical examination, or a 12 lead ECG, who underwent bidimensional Doppler transthoracic echocardiography. Main outcome measures: The causes of syncope were assigned using published diagnostic criteria. Echocardiography was considered diagnostic when confirming a suspected diagnosis, or when revealing occult cardiac disease explaining the syncope. Results: A systolic murmur was identified in 61 of the 650 patients (9%). Severe aortic stenosis was suspected in 20 of these and was confirmed by echocardiography in eight. Follow up excluded further cases of aortic stenosis. In patients with unexplained syncope (n = 155), routine echocardiography showed no abnormalities that established the cause of the syncope. Echocardiography was normal or non-relevant in all patients with a negative cardiac history and a normal ECG (n = 67). In patients with a positive cardiac history or an abnormal ECG (n = 88), echocardiography showed systolic dysfunction (left ventricular ejection fraction ≤ 40%) in 24 (27%) and minor non-relevant findings in the remaining 64. Arrhythmias were diagnosed in 12 of the 24 patients with systolic dysfunction (50%), and in 12 of the 64 remaining patients (19%) (p < 0.01). Conclusions: Echocardiography was most useful for assessing the severity of the underlying cardiac disease and for risk stratification in patients with unexplained syncope but with a positive cardiac history or an abnormal ECG. PMID:12231593

  18. A CASE OF THE SELF- HARMING BEHAVIOUR CREATED WITH COMPULSIVE SYNCOPE EPISODES

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    Cetiner OZCAN

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In this case report, self-harming behavioural pattern with recurrent syncope episodes in a 15 years old adolescent has been reviewed. In self-harm behavior, tissue damage can often be seen macroscopically. Whereas in this case, the extraordinary situation is possibility of occurrence of the hypoxic encephalopathyc changes with syncope episodes created by the patient, without macroscopic tissue damage. [J Contemp Med 2011; 1(2.000: 78-80

  19. The choice of surgical specialization by medical students and their syncopal history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudnicki, Jerzy; Zyśko, Dorota; Kozłowski, Dariusz; Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Koźluk, Edward; Lelonek, Małgorzata; Piątkowska, Agnieszka; Gajek, Jacek; Negrusz-Kawecka, Marta; Agrawal, Anil Kumar

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to assess whether medical students' fainting outside the university or while witnessing surgical procedures and/or autopsies influenced their choice of a specialization. The study group consisted of 605 medical students (from fourth to sixth year of study) from five medical universities in Poland (325 women, 212 men and 8 responders of an unspecified gender). The median age of subjects studied was 23 years, and the interquartile range was 23-24 years. The students at each university were chosen randomly by the author who worked there and had contact with them. An anonymous questionnaire was developed to gather information regarding demographics, the specialization which each student wanted to choose, the syncope occurrence in the medical history, the syncope and presyncope occurrence during surgery and autopsy as well as the syncopal events' characteristics. The group of 15% of women and 30% of men declared to have pursued the surgical specialization (P<0.001), 29% of women and 56% of men declared the intention to pursue an invasive specialization (P<0.001). As many as 36.0% of women studied and 13.1% of men studied reported syncopal spells outside university (P<0.001). Only 41 students (6.8%) reported that syncope or presyncope in any studied circumstances had an impact on their specialization choice. The multivariate analysis showed that the choice of surgical specialization is related to the male gender and the absence of syncopal spells outside the university. Syncopal and presyncopal spells may affect the professional choices of the medical students. The male gender and a lack of syncope occurrence outside operating room are related to the choice of surgical specialization.

  20. The choice of surgical specialization by medical students and their syncopal history.

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    Jerzy Rudnicki

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to assess whether medical students' fainting outside the university or while witnessing surgical procedures and/or autopsies influenced their choice of a specialization. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study group consisted of 605 medical students (from fourth to sixth year of study from five medical universities in Poland (325 women, 212 men and 8 responders of an unspecified gender. The median age of subjects studied was 23 years, and the interquartile range was 23-24 years. The students at each university were chosen randomly by the author who worked there and had contact with them. An anonymous questionnaire was developed to gather information regarding demographics, the specialization which each student wanted to choose, the syncope occurrence in the medical history, the syncope and presyncope occurrence during surgery and autopsy as well as the syncopal events' characteristics. RESULTS: The group of 15% of women and 30% of men declared to have pursued the surgical specialization (P<0.001, 29% of women and 56% of men declared the intention to pursue an invasive specialization (P<0.001. As many as 36.0% of women studied and 13.1% of men studied reported syncopal spells outside university (P<0.001. Only 41 students (6.8% reported that syncope or presyncope in any studied circumstances had an impact on their specialization choice. The multivariate analysis showed that the choice of surgical specialization is related to the male gender and the absence of syncopal spells outside the university. CONCLUSIONS: Syncopal and presyncopal spells may affect the professional choices of the medical students. The male gender and a lack of syncope occurrence outside operating room are related to the choice of surgical specialization.

  1. Recurrent Syncope Due to Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity and Sick Sinus Syndrome

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    Feng-Yu Kuo

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a sudden and brief loss of consciousness with postural tone. Its recovery is usually spontaneous. There are various causes of syncope including cardiac, vascular, neurologic, metabolic and miscellaneous origins. The tracing is usually time-consuming and costly. The diagnosis of carotid sinus syncope may sometimes be difficult since the symptoms are nonspecific, especially in older persons. Here, we report the case of a 72-year-old woman who sought medical attention at our hospital due to repeated syncope episodes over the previous 5 years. Neurologic examinations showed negative results (including brain computed tomography. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring showed atrial and ventricular premature contractions only. Electrophysiologic study disclosed prolonged corrected sinus node recovery time (1,737 ms with poor atrioventricular conduction. Drop of blood pressure together with sinus bradycardia developed after left side carotid sinus massage. Both carotid sinus hypersensitivity with sick sinus syndrome contributed to this patient's syncope, and after pacemaker placement together with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment, she was free from syncope thereafter.

  2. [Syncope and work: role of the occupational physician and global risk stratification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbic, F; Angaroni, L; Orlandi, M; Costantino, G; Dipaola, E; Borleri, D; Borchini, R; D'Adda, F; Perego, F; Borella, M; Galli, A; Solbiati, M; Scanella, E; Casazza, G; Seghizzi, P; Furlan, R

    2011-01-01

    Safety risk for subjects suffering from syncope while working has not been as yet addressed by occupational medicine. The present study was aimed at evaluating a new developed methodology for job tasks risk stratification in patients with syncope. During a work-shop on syncope and occupational risk, 149 occupational physicians (OP) with about 10 years of clinical experience were asked to fulfil a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) concerning the doctor's estimated potential damage (D) to the worker and the probability of a damage to occur (P) should syncope take place during the job task. Five job tasks characterized by different risk for safety (1, driving; 2, toxic products handling; 3, job performed closed to hot surfaces o free flames; 4, surgical activity; 5, office job) were identified. OP correctly stratified the risk associated to the different job tasks in patients with syncope. Unexpectedly, task #3 was given a risk similar to that obtained in drivers. This might be of paramount clinical and social importance when patients with syncope have to return to their job tasks.

  3. Neuroautonomic evaluation of patients with unexplained syncope: incidence of complex neurally mediated diagnoses in the elderly

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    Rafanelli M

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Martina Rafanelli, Alessandro Morrione, Annalisa Landi, Emilia Ruffolo, Valentina M Chisciotti, Maria A Brunetti, Niccolò Marchionni, Andrea Ungar Syncope Unit, Cardiology and Geriatric Medicine, University of Florence and Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Careggi, Florence, Italy Background: The incidence of syncope increases in individuals over the age of 70 years, but data about this condition in the elderly are limited. Little is known about tilt testing (TT, carotid sinus massage (CSM, or supine and upright blood pressure measurement related to age or about patients with complex diagnoses, for example, those with a double diagnosis, ie, positivity in two of these three tests. Methods: A total of 873 consecutive patients of mean age 66.5±18 years underwent TT, CSM, and blood pressure measurement in the supine and upright positions according to the European Society of Cardiology guidelines on syncope.1 Neuroautonomic evaluation was performed if the first-line evaluation (clinical history, physical examination, electrocardiogram was suggestive of neurally mediated syncope, or if the first-line evaluation was suggestive of cardiac syncope but this diagnosis was excluded after specific diagnostic tests according to European Society of Cardiology guidelines on syncope, or if certain or suspected diagnostic criteria were not present after the first-line evaluation. Results: A diagnosis was reached in 64.3% of cases. TT was diagnostic in 50.4% of cases, CSM was diagnostic in 11.8% of cases, and orthostatic hypotension was present in 19.9% of cases. Predictors of a positive tilt test were prodromal symptoms and typical situational syncope. Increased age and a pathologic electrocardiogram were predictors of carotid sinus syndrome. Varicose veins and alpha-receptor blockers, nitrates, and benzodiazepines were associated with orthostatic hypotension. Twenty-three percent of the patients had a complex diagnosis. The most frequent association was

  4. Selected problems that may be thecause of cardiogenic syncope in children and adolescents. Useful information for family doctor and paediatrician

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    Aleksandra Morka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Children with syncope are common patients in paediatric and family doctor clinics as well as emergency departments. The current guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology (2009 distinguish between three types of syncope: reflex, orthostatic hypotension and cardiac syncope. The essence of any syncope is the reduction of cerebral blood flow, loss of consciousness and a subsequent fall. The most common and the mildest form of syncope is reflex syncope, usually preceded by prodromal symptoms, while the rarest but also the most dangerous form is cardiac syncope. Cardiac syncopes are generally organic in origin and it is usually possible to determine their cause. In some cases it is possible to treat the cause of cardiac syncopes. They differ from reflex syncopes in the mechanism of origin: they usually do not have prodromal symptoms, and sometimes the first symptom of an ongoing disease can be syncope and even sudden cardiac death. Cardiac syncope affects patients with cardiac arrhythmias – tachy- or bradyarrhythmias, patients who suffer from malfunction of a previously implanted pacemaker, patients with defects that cause disturbed outflow from the right or the left ventricle, patients with defects and diseases of the heart muscle and/or coronary vessels as well as abnormalities causing impediment to the flow of blood within the heart or vessels (e.g. tumours. Some of these diseases such as, for example, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy or long QT syndrome are genetic abnormalities. In cardiac syncope, as in other types of syncope it is important to obtain a detailed family history and perform specialised tests. In recent years tilt tests have been increasingly less used and emphasis has been put on a very detailed diagnosis of cardiac arrhythmias as a potential cause of syncope and sudden cardiac death. Every patient with a suspected cardiac syncope should be referred to a specialist centre for

  5. Diagnostic pathway of syncope and analysis of the impact of guidelines in a district general hospital. The ECSIT study (epidemiology and costs of syncope in Trento).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Greco, Maurizio; Cozzio, Susanna; Scillieri, Marco; Caprari, Francesca; Scivales, Alessandro; Disertori, Marcello

    2003-02-01

    The ECSIT study was aimed at evaluating the hospital management of syncope patients, at comparing the appropriateness and costs of the hospital diagnostic pathway before (phase 1) and after (phase 2) the introduction of new guidelines and at analyzing the physicians' compliance to the guidelines. All syncope patients admitted to the emergency room between August 1 and October 31, 1999 (phase 1) and between March 1 and May 31, 2000 (phase 2) were enrolled and their clinical records were analyzed in a blind fashion. During the study 538 consecutive patients came to the emergency room for syncope with a hospitalization rate of 53% in phase 1 (n = 151) and of 42% in phase 2 (n = 107). The in-hospital stay increased from 9 days in phase 1 to 11.3 days in phase 2 and diagnostic tests from 2.6 per patient (phase 1) to 2.9 per patient (phase 2) with total costs that rose from [symbol: see text] 3,474 to [symbol: see text] 3,647. Patients with no diagnosis decreased from 51 to 45.8% and the principal causes were identified as vascular brain disease (36.1 vs 33.7%) and neurally-mediated mechanisms (35.3 vs 42.2%). Despite the high costs of syncope management, the appropriateness and efficacy of the hospital diagnostic pathway remains far from ideal and simply introducing new guidelines seems unable to modify clinical practice.

  6. Permanent pacemaker implantation in octogenarians with unexplained syncope and positive electrophysiologic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Kossyvakis, Charalampos; Panagopoulou, Vasiliki; Tsiachris, Dimitrios; Doudoumis, Konstantinos; Mavri, Maria; Vrachatis, Dimitrios; Letsas, Konstantinos; Efremidis, Michael; Katsivas, Apostolos; Lekakis, John; Deftereos, Spyridon

    2017-05-01

    Syncope is a common problem in the elderly, and a permanent pacemaker is a therapeutic option when a bradycardic etiology is revealed. However, the benefit of pacing when no association of symptoms to bradycardia has been shown is not clear, especially in the elderly. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pacing on syncope-free mortality in patients aged 80 years or older with unexplained syncope and "positive" invasive electrophysiologic testing (EPT). This was an observational study. A positive EPT for the purposes of this study was defined by at least 1 of the following: a corrected sinus node recovery time of >525 ms, a basic HV interval of >55 ms, detection of infra-Hisian block, or appearance of second-degree atrioventricular block on atrial decremental pacing at a paced cycle length of >400 ms. Among the 2435 screened patients, 228 eligible patients were identified, 145 of whom were implanted with a pacemaker. Kaplan-Meier analysis determined that time to event (syncope or death) was 50.1 months (95% confidence interval 45.4-54.8 months) with a pacemaker vs 37.8 months (95% confidence interval 31.3-44.4 months) without a pacemaker (log-rank test, P = .001). The 4-year time-dependent estimate of the rate of syncope was 12% vs 44% (P pacemaker implantation was independently associated with longer syncope-free survival. Significant differences were also shown in the individual components of the primary outcome measure (syncope and death from any cause). Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Predictors of Hospitalization in Patients with Syncope Assisted in Specialized Cardiology Hospital

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    Fischer, Leonardo Marques; Dutra, João Pedro Passos [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Mantovani, Augusto [UFCSPA - Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Lima, Gustavo Glotz de [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); UFCSPA - Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz, E-mail: drleiria@cardiol.br [Instituto de Cardiologia, Fundação Universitária de Cardiologia do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2013-12-15

    Risk stratification of a syncopal episode is necessary to better differentiate patients needing hospitalization of those who can be safely sent home from the emergency department. Currently there are no strict guidelines from our Brazilian medical societies to guide the cardiologist that evaluate patients in an emergency setting. To analyze the criteria adopted for defining the need for hospitalization and compare them with the predictors of high risk for adverse outcome defined by the OESIL score that is already validated in the medical literature for assessing syncope. A cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with syncope during emergency department evaluation at our institution in the year 2011. Of the 46,476 emergency visits made in that year, 216 were due to syncope. Of the 216 patients analyzed, 39% were hospitalized. The variables associated with the need of hospital admission were - having health care insurance, previous known cardiovascular disease, no history of prior stroke, previous syncope and abnormal electrocardiograms during the presentation. Patients classified in OESIL scores of 0-1 had a greater chance of emergency discharge; 2-3 scores showed greater association with the need of hospitalization. A score ≥ 2 OESIL provided an odds ratio 7.8 times higher for hospitalization compared to score 0 (p <0.001, 95% CI:4,03-15,11). In approximately 39% no etiological cause for syncope was found and in 18% cardiac cause was identified. Factors such as cardiovascular disease, prior history of syncope, health insurance, no previous stroke and abnormal electrocardiograms, were the criteria used by doctors to indicate hospital admission. There was a good correlation between the clinical judgment and the OESIL criteria for high risk described in literature.

  8. Witnessing loss of consciousness during TMS – Syncope in contrast to seizure

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    Philipp Riedel

    Full Text Available Objective: Transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC can occur during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS. T-LOC during TMS can be caused by syncope or seizure. TMS operators explicitly screen participants and are also able to witness clinical manifestations of T-LOC during stimulation. Therefore they have direct access to information necessary to tell the two etiologies apart, if they are well trained on the clinical differences and not only sensitive to the potential risk of seizure induction. We here present a typical case of vasovagal syncope during TMS to contrast its clinical manifestations to that of seizures. Method: We describe an event of T-LOC in a 21 year old healthy woman during single-pulse TMS. Screening, setting, clinical manifestations and advanced diagnostics are reported. Discussion: Based on the detailed description of the case, we discuss why syncope is the most parsimonious etiology for the clinical picture observed in this participant. We provide information on typical clinical features of seizure that were particularly not observed. We also address potential benefits of further diagnostic tools. Additionally, we go into more parameters that can be useful to distinguish syncope from seizure. Conclusion: TMS operators should be well aware of the differentiation of T-LOC in syncopal or ictal in etiology, because they witness T-LOC during TMS. By presenting a typical case of vasovagal syncope during TMS the report in hand provides necessary information and literature to do so. Keywords: TMS, Seizure, Syncope, Adverse-event, T-LOC, Case-report

  9. Syncope in old people. The importance of multiparametric monitor in OBI evaluation

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    Alessandro Riccardi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a common clinical entity, and it causes up to 3% of admission in the Emergency Department. The evaluation of syncope begins with a careful history, physical examination, and electrocardiography, with a correct identification of etiology at the presentation in up to 50% of cases. Moreover, the underlying cause of syncope remains unidentified in a elevated percentage of patients. The application of Standard Guidelines and the institution of the Observation Unit (OBI with continuous monitoring improves patients management, chiefly in the geriatric population (> 65 years old. In older patients the clinical features of syncope are less defined, and the medical history has a limited value. The management in the OBI of this group of patient with continuous monitoring could become the best approach. The ECG monitoring can detect life-threatening arrhythmias in older patients with apparent non cardiac syncope. In the firs six months of 2005 the Emergency Department of the Ospedale San Paolo (Savona evaluated 164 patients > 65 years old with diagnosis of syncope/pre-syncope. During monitoring we detected events of arrhythmia in 12 patients (7,3%, including ventricular tachycardia in 2, atrial fibrillation in 4, paroxysmal atrial flutter in 2, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in 1, asystole in 1 and third-degree atrioventricular block in 2 patients. We briefly describe 2 of this case: in both cases the first suggestion indicates a possible non cardiac etiology, but the subsequent monitoring shows episodes of potentially fatal arrhythmia. Both an early discharge and an in non-monitorized bed admission wouldn’t have preserved the two patient by a sudden cardiac death.

  10. Predictors of Hospitalization in Patients with Syncope Assisted in Specialized Cardiology Hospital

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    Fischer, Leonardo Marques; Dutra, João Pedro Passos; Mantovani, Augusto; Lima, Gustavo Glotz de; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    Risk stratification of a syncopal episode is necessary to better differentiate patients needing hospitalization of those who can be safely sent home from the emergency department. Currently there are no strict guidelines from our Brazilian medical societies to guide the cardiologist that evaluate patients in an emergency setting. To analyze the criteria adopted for defining the need for hospitalization and compare them with the predictors of high risk for adverse outcome defined by the OESIL score that is already validated in the medical literature for assessing syncope. A cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with syncope during emergency department evaluation at our institution in the year 2011. Of the 46,476 emergency visits made in that year, 216 were due to syncope. Of the 216 patients analyzed, 39% were hospitalized. The variables associated with the need of hospital admission were - having health care insurance, previous known cardiovascular disease, no history of prior stroke, previous syncope and abnormal electrocardiograms during the presentation. Patients classified in OESIL scores of 0-1 had a greater chance of emergency discharge; 2-3 scores showed greater association with the need of hospitalization. A score ≥ 2 OESIL provided an odds ratio 7.8 times higher for hospitalization compared to score 0 (p <0.001, 95% CI:4,03-15,11). In approximately 39% no etiological cause for syncope was found and in 18% cardiac cause was identified. Factors such as cardiovascular disease, prior history of syncope, health insurance, no previous stroke and abnormal electrocardiograms, were the criteria used by doctors to indicate hospital admission. There was a good correlation between the clinical judgment and the OESIL criteria for high risk described in literature

  11. Recurrent Syncope Attributed to Left Main Coronary Artery Severe Stenosis

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    Min Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS rarely manifest as recurrent syncope due to malignant ventricular arrhythmia. We report a case of a 56-year-old Chinese male with complaints of paroxysmal chest burning sensation and distress for 2 weeks as well as loss of consciousness for 3 days. The electrocardiogram (ECG revealed paroxysmal multimorphologic ventricular tachycardia during attack and normal heart rhythm during intervals. Coronary angiograph showed 90% stenosis in left main coronary artery and 80% stenosis in anterior descending artery. Two stents sized 4.0*18 mm and 2.75*18 mm were placed at left main coronary artery and anterior descending artery, respectively, during percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI. The patient was discharged and never had ventricular arrhythmia again during a 3-month follow-up since the PCI. This indicated that ventricular tachycardia was correlated with persistent severe myocardial ischemia. Coronary vasospasm was highly suspected to be the reason of the sudden attack and acute exacerbation. PCI is recommended in patients with both severe coronary artery stenosis and ventricular arrhythmia. Removing myocardial ischemia may stop or relieve ventricular arrhythmia and prevent cardiac arrest.

  12. Relationship between 24- hour Holter variables, chest discomfort and syncope: Does age matter?

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    Samir Kanti Saha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and forty four ambulatory, non-emergent human subjects from 20-88 years of age were investigated following routine 24 hour Holter monitoring referred by primary and tertiary care centers primarily for evaluation of palpitations and syncope. The patients were grouped into 3 different age categories: A 20-59 years of age (16%, B 60-69 years of age (26.4% and C > 70 years of age (57.6%. Heart rate profile, RR intervals, symptoms, frequency of premature supra ventricular and ventricular complexes were registered. The data show that though the occurrence and frequency of premature atrial and ventricular contractions over a period of 24 hours did not differ between the groups, the younger subjects documented more subjective discomforts during the Holter monitoring. Extra-systoles in excess of 1000 beats / 24 hour occured incessantly throughout the registration. Patients with syncope and those without did not differ as regards the Holter variables. However, subjects with atrial fibrillation had acceptable rate control and had significantly lower incidence of syncope than those with sinus rhythm. The findings suggest that in a county setting, Holter monitoring for evaluation of syncope may not be the first hand mode of investigation in a non emergent setting. On the contrary, the modality appears to be valuable for monitoring patients with atrial fibrillation. Even mild symptoms in the elderly population may warrant closer clinical follow up to prevent cardiac events and/or syncope leading to serious physical injury.

  13. [The usefullness of implantable loop recorders for evaluation of unexplained syncope and palpitations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristjánsdóttir, Ingibjörg; Reimarsdóttir, Guđrun; Arnar, Davíđ O

    2012-09-01

    Syncope is a common complaint and determining the underlying cause can be difficult despite extensive evaluation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of an implantable loop recorder for patients with unexplained syncope and palpitations. This was a retrospective analysis of 18 patients, five of whom still have the device implanted. All patients had undergone extensive evaluation for their symptoms before getting the loop recorder implanted and this was therefore a highly select group. Of the thirteen patients where use of the device was completed, the mean age was 65±20 years. The loop recorder was in use for a mean time of 20±13 months. Unexplained syncope, eleven of thirteen, was the most common indication. The other two received the loop recorder for unexplained palpitations. Four patients had sick sinus syndrome during monitoring, three had supraventricular tachycardia and one had ventricular tachycardia. Further three had typical symptoms but no arrhythmia was recorded and excluding that as a cause. Two patients had no symptoms the entire time they had the loop recorder. Of the five patients still with the device three had syncope as the indication for monitoring and two have the device as a means of evaluating the results of treatment for arrhythmia. This study on our initial experience with implantable loop recorders shows that these devices can be useful in the investigation of the causes of syncope and palpitations.

  14. An episode of syncope attacks in adolescent schoolgirls: investigations, intervention and outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, P W; Leung, P W; Fung, A S; Low, L C; Tsang, M C; Leung, W C

    1996-09-01

    An increasing number of students in a secondary convent girls school developed syncope attacks over a time course of about two months. Fourteen students who suffered from syncope and 12 other students from the same class with no symptoms were assessed by a team of psychologists and paediatricians with the aim of identifying the cause of the problem and to formulate possible remedial action. Psychological assessments included a mental state examination, developmental, personal and psychological history, state-trait anxiety, self-esteem, hypnotic suggestibility, and students' beliefs about the cause and nature of the syncope attacks. Physical investigations included physical examination, blood pressure and electrocardiogram. The results indicated that most participants and controls had no physical or psychological pathologies. The two groups were not different on the physical and psychological measures. Analyses of the interview data, however, indicated that all the syncope sufferers belonged to a cohesive and exclusive social network. Social psychological circumstances rather than individual psychopathology were noted to be primarily responsible for the spread and maintenance of the mass hysterical influence. Intervention consisted of health education, authoritative reassurance and back-up support. Follow-up assessment after three and 12 months indicated no further syncope episodes.

  15. [Controversies in the conduction and evaluation of clinical trials results for the treatment in vasovagal syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Halawa, Bogumił

    2003-05-01

    The vasovagal syncope is a reflex reaction to various stimuli leading to the marked hypotension with or without bradycardia with loss of consciousness and fall of postural muscle tone. The vast majority of the patients recover spontaneously but if the syncope occurs frequently and causes injury of the patients body it worsens the quality of life and needs appropriate treatment. The injuries requiring hospitalization occur approximately in 10% of the patients with vasovagal syncope. The aim of the therapy of affected patients is to diminish the syncope prevalence, to brake the neurocardiogenic reaction on an early stage or to prolong the duration of the presyncope phase to enable the patient prevention of the injury. The lack of clear diagnostic criteria and difficulties with estimation the efficacy of any particular therapeutic intervention in many clinical studies of different authors, inclusion to the studies patients with different clinical presentation stages of the disease contribute to different conclusions, which automatic use in the clinical practice is inappropriate. There is an urgent need to clear the methodological discrepancies and to conduct good planed, large, randomized, multicentre studies to assess the efficacy of different therapeutic methods in the treatment of vasovagal syncope.

  16. Simulation of Exercise-Induced Syncope in a Heart Model with Severe Aortic Valve Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matjaž Sever

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe aortic valve stenosis (AVS can cause an exercise-induced reflex syncope (RS. The precise mechanism of this syncope is not known. The changes in hemodynamics are variable, including arrhythmias and myocardial ischemia, and one of the few consistent changes is a sudden fall in systemic and pulmonary arterial pressures (suggesting a reduced vascular resistance followed by a decline in heart rate. The contribution of the cardioinhibitory and vasodepressor components of the RS to hemodynamics was evaluated by a computer model. This lumped-parameter computer simulation was based on equivalent electronic circuits (EECs that reflect the hemodynamic conditions of a heart with severe AVS and a concomitantly decreased contractility as a long-term detrimental consequence of compensatory left ventricular hypertrophy. In addition, the EECs model simulated the resetting of the sympathetic nervous tone in the heart and systemic circuit during exercise and exercise-induced syncope, the fluctuating intra-thoracic pressure during respiration, and the passive relaxation of ventricle during diastole. The results of this simulation were consistent with the published case reports of exertional syncope in patients with AVS. The value of the EEC model is its ability to quantify the effect of a selective and gradable change in heart rate, ventricular contractility, or systemic vascular resistance on the hemodynamics during an exertional syncope in patients with severe AVS.

  17. From syncope to ICD: clinical paths of the Brugada syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Comelli

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This review summarizes the evidences in the literature on the management of the Brugada syndrome (BS, an arrhythmogenic disease caused by genetic channelopathies, predisposing to syncope and sudden cardiac death in young, apparently healthy, typically male subjects, in the third and fourth decade of their life. Sudden cardiac death (SCD is defined as natural death from cardiac causes, heralded by abrupt loss of consciousness within one hour of the onset of symptoms. It ranks among the main causes of death in the western world, with an incidence ranging from 0.36 and 1.28‰ inhabitants per year, equal to 300,000 cases a year in the USA. In the majority of the cases it is due to the onset of arrhythmia in subjects with structural cardiac diseases, especially ischemic heart disease. However, in a non-negligible percentage of the cases, about 5-10%, the SCD arises in relatively young individuals in whom cardiac anomalies cannot be detected using traditional diagnostic techniques. About 20% of these cases can be attributed to SB. In spite of the many efforts produced to identify an effective pharmacological treatment, to date the only aid to reduce the mortality rate in subjects with SB is an implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD. Since this approach often entails complications, the efforts of the scientific community is now focused on the assessment of the arrhythmic risk. The identification of high-risk subjects is one of the chief objectives in the therapeutic decision-making process. ABSTRACT clinica e terapia emergency

  18. Usefulness of implantable loop recorder in a patient with syncope during bathing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Motohiro Nakao, MD

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man presented to our hospital with a 1-year-hisory of repeated syncope, which particularly occurred while bathing or on a hot day. The head-up tilt test did not induce arrhythmia; however, blood pressure decreased by 39 mm Hg without any symptoms. Given that no bradycardia/tachycardia was induced on electrophysiological study and carotid sinus massage, an implantable loop recorder (ILR was implanted. After 2 months, syncope again occurred during bathing at midnight. Sinus arrest and a maximum ventricular pause of 10.2 s were documented using the ILR. After pacemaker implantation, the patient had not experienced syncope for 14 months.

  19. Syncope in pediatric patients: a practical approach to differential diagnosis and management in the emergency department [digest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fant, Colleen; Cohen, Ari; Vazquez, Michelle N

    2017-04-22

    Syncope is a condition that is often seen in the emergency department. Most syncope is benign, but it can be a symptom of a life-threatening condition. While syncope often requires an extensive workup in adults, in the pediatric population, critical questioning and simple, noninvasive testing is usually sufficient to exclude significant or life-threatening causes. For low-risk patients, resource-intensive workups are rarely diagnostic, and add significant cost to medical care. This issue will highlight critical diseases that cause syncope, identify high-risk "red flags," and enable the emergency clinician to develop a cost-effective, minimally invasive algorithm for the diagnosis and treatment of pediatric syncope. [Points & Pearls is a digest of Pediatric Emergency Medicine Practice].

  20. 11. Prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among patients with recurrent vasovagal and unexplained syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.W. Al-Johar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is defined as a transient loss of consciousness and absence of postural tone followed by spontaneous recovery. Neurally mediated syncope (vasovagal and idiopathic unexplained syncope (US are the most common causes of syncope. Syncope is a very limiting disease that, if recurrent, affects the patients’ physical and psychological health. Our objective from this study is to measure the prevalence of psychiatric symptoms among patients with US. All patients (>12 years with vasovagal or US who were evaluated in King Khalid University Hospital were identified. Echocardiography and table tilt test reports were reviewed and patients who had cardiac syncope (due to arrhythmia or structural heart disease were excluded (N = 18. Ninety-four patients were included for further psychiatric assessment. The patients were contacted to fill the Symptoms Checklist-90-Revised (SCL-90-R, which is a self-reporting questionnaire used to evaluate traits of depression, anxiety, somatization disorder and phobia. SCL-90-R scale has been translated to Arabic and validated in previous studies. Of the included cohort, 43 responded to fill the assessment scale, and 51 were excluded due to failure of communication (N = 41 or refusal to participate (N = 10. A control group was recruited with a case: control ratio of 1:3 matching for age, gender, and chronic illnesses.There were 43 patients and 129 control subjects, with predominance of females (67.4% and an average age of 33.8 (SD = 16. There was no difference in average scores of depression (13 vs. 14.53, P = 0.31, anxiety (11.3 vs. 10.4, P = 0.51, or phobia (5.4 vs. 5.2, P = 0.88. However, the syncope group had a higher average score for somatization disorder (18.53 vs. 13.66, P = 0.002. Binary logistic regression model was measured after grouping the cohort into above and below median scores. After adjusting for age, gender, and chronic illnesses, the association between syncope and somatization

  1. Ventricular Tachycardia Detected by Implantable Loop Recorder in a Child with Recurrent Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İsa Özyılmaz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we present a 10-year-old boy who was admitted to the hospital with recurrent syncope. There was no remarkable finding in patient’s physical examination, family history, and the diagnostic 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG, chest x-ray, ECG Holter monitoring, event recording, echocardiography, coronary computed tomography (CT angiography, Ajmaline test for the diagnosis of Brugada syndrome, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and sleep/wake electroencephalogram. We started beta-blocker therapy because the patient had exercise-induced syncope. An Implantable loop recorder (ILR was inserted to the patient. Three years later, polymorphic ventricular tachycardia called torsades de pointes was detected by the ILR during syncope occurred with exercise. The patient had been taking high-dose betablocker treatment, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted into the patient. ILR can play an important role in the diagnosis of life-threatening arrhythmia in children with unexplained syncope. (The Me­di­cal Bul­le­tin of Ha­se­ki 2014; 52: 123-5

  2. Syncope Associated with Subthalamic Nucleus Deep Brain Stimulation in a Patient with Parkinson’s Disease

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    Dursun Aygun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In advanced Parkinson's disease (PD, deep brain stimulation (DBS may be an alternative option for the treatment of motor symptoms. Side effects associated with subthalamic nucleus (STN DBS in patients with PD are emerging as the most frequent sensory and motor symptoms. DBS-related syncope is reported as extremely rare. We wanted to discuss the mechanisms of syncope associated with STN DBS in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Case report. Sixty-three-year-old female patient is followed up with diagnosis of idiopathic Parkinson's disease for 6 years in our clinic. The patient has undergone STN DBS due to painful dystonia and drug resistant tremor. During the operation, when the left STN was stimulated at 5 milliampere (mAmp, the patient developed presyncopal symptoms. However, when the stimulation was stopped symptoms improved. During the early period after the operation, when the right STN was stimulated at 1.3 millivolts (mV, she developed the pre-yncopal symptoms and then syncope. Our case shows that STN DBS may lead to directly autonomic symptoms resulting in syncope during stimulation-on (stim-on.

  3. Syncope prevalence in the ED compared to general practice and population: a strong selection process

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olde Nordkamp, Louise R. A.; van Dijk, Nynke; Ganzeboom, Karin S.; Reitsma, Johannes B.; Luitse, Jan S. K.; Dekker, Lukas R. C.; Shen, Win-Kuang; Wieling, Wouter

    2009-01-01

    Objective: We assessed the prevalence and distribution of the different causes of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) in the emergency department (ED) and chest pain unit (CPU) and estimated the proportion of persons with syncope in the general population who seek medical attention from either

  4. On the track of syncope induced by orthostatic stress - feedback mechanisms regulating the cardiovascular system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.

    2009-01-01

    A physiological realistic model of the controlled cardiovascular system is constructed and validated against clinical data. Special attention is paid to the heart rate control. Both sit-to-stand and head-up-tilt experiments are encapsulated by the model. The model may be used in studies of syncop...

  5. Bedside Heart Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein (H-FABP): Is an Early Predictive Marker of Cardiac Syncope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonmez, B. M.; Yilmaz, F.; Durdu, T.; Hakbilir, O.; Ongar, M.; Ozturk, D.; Altinbilek, E.; Kavalci, C.; Turhan, T.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the value of bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein in diagnosis of cardiac syncope in patients presenting with syncope or presyncope. Methods: The prospective study was conducted at Ankara Numune Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey, between September 1, 2010, and January 1, 2011, and comprised patients aged over 18 years who presented with syncope or presyncope. Patients presenting to emergency department within 4 hours of syncope or presyncope underwent a bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein test measurement. SPSS 16 was used for statistical analysis, Results: Of the 100 patients evaluated, 22(22 percent) were diagnosed with cardiac syncope. Of them, 13(59.1 percent) patients had a positive and 9(40.9 percent) had a negative heart-type fatty acid binding protein result. Consequently, the test result was 12.64 times more positive in patients with cardiac syncope compared to those without. Conclusions: Bedside heart-type fatty acid binding protein, particularly at early phase of myocardial injury, reduces diagnostic and therapeutic uncertainity of cardiac origin in syncope patients. (author)

  6. Estimating the Cost of Care for Emergency Department Syncope Patients: Comparison of Three Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc A. Probst

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: We sought to compare three hospital cost-estimation models for patients undergoing evaluation for unexplained syncope using hospital cost data. Developing such a model would allow researchers to assess the value of novel clinical algorithms for syncope management. Methods: We collected complete health services data, including disposition, testing, and length of stay (LOS, on 67 adult patients (age 60 years and older who presented to the emergency department (ED with syncope at a single hospital. Patients were excluded if a serious medical condition was identified. We created three hospital cost-estimation models to estimate facility costs: V1, unadjusted Medicare payments for observation and/or hospital admission; V2: modified Medicare payment, prorated by LOS in calendar days; and V3: modified Medicare payment, prorated by LOS in hours. Total hospital costs included unadjusted Medicare payments for diagnostic testing and estimated facility costs. We plotted these estimates against actual cost data from the hospital finance department, and performed correlation and regression analyses. Results: Of the three models, V3 consistently outperformed the others with regard to correlation and goodness of fit. The Pearson correlation coefficient for V3 was 0.88 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.81, 0.92 with an R-square value of 0.77 and a linear regression coefficient of 0.87 (95% CI 0.76, 0.99. Conclusion: Using basic health services data, it is possible to accurately estimate hospital costs for older adults undergoing a hospital-based evaluation for unexplained syncope. This methodology could help assess the potential economic impact of implementing novel clinical algorithms for ED syncope. [West J Emerg Med. 2017;18(2253-257.

  7. Syncope and sudden death from the emergency physician’s perspective: is there room for new biomarkers?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossella Marino

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a transient loss of consciousness due to temporary global cerebral hypoperfusion characterized by rapid onset, short duration, and spontaneous complete recovery. Syncope represents 1-2% of emergency department (ED visits and is coupled with a high risk for mortality, prolonged hospital admission, and immediate false diagnosis. Many patients who present to the ED with aspecific symptoms are mainly hospitalized because of diagnostic uncertainty. It is always very important to immediately distinguish syncope of cardiac and non-cardiac origins. Cardiac syncope has higher risk for mortality especially for sudden cardiac death, while non-cardiac one shows risk of repeated events of syncope with poor quality of life. Sudden cardiac death is defined as rapid and unexpected natural death due to cardiac etiology. Researchers from the GREAT Network hypothesized to evaluate some novel biomarkers in order to test acute cardiac condition that can suggest the presence of heart structural diseases, heart failure, and electrical disorders. The primary objective of this study is to test the diagnostic performance from patient history, clinical judgment, and novel biomarkers in the diagnosis of cardiac syncope in patients admitted to the ED. The trial is designed as a prospective international multicenter observational study accounting for 730 patients aged over 40 admitted to the ED with syncope within the last 12 h. A multimarker approach combining markers of different origin and mode of relapse, should add diagnostic information to correctly identify the cardiac conditions and to therefore be pertinent in the early diagnosis of cardiac syncope and in the prediction of cardiac events including sudden death. Future data should be needed to confirm the hypothesis presented here.

  8. Progressive central hypovolaemia in man--resulting in a vasovagal syncope?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sander-Jensen, K; Mehlsen, J; Secher, N H

    1987-01-01

    Hypotensive functional haemorrhage induced by venous pooling of blood in the legs has been reported to be characterized by a vasovagal reaction. In the present study these observations were extended by determination of the hormonal profile developed during progressive central hypovolaemia...... and an emotionally induced vasovagal syncope. In six subjects venous pooling resulted in normotensive central hypovolaemia, in one subject hypotensive central hypovolaemia was induced, and one subject experienced an emotionally induced vasovagal syncope. During normotensive central hypovolaemia heart rate increased...... from 58 +/- 4 to 76 +/- 4 beats min-1 (P less than 0.05) and cardiac output fell from 6.1 +/- 0.4 to 4.1 +/- 0.2 1 min-1. Pulse pressure and central venous pressure decreased from 64 +/- 4 to 53 +/- 4 mmHg, and from 8 +/- 2 to 3 +/- 2 mmHg, respectively. Adrenaline and noradrenaline increased from 87...

  9. Neurocardiogenic Syncope and Supraventricular Tachycardia in Association with a Rare Congenital Aortic Valve Abnormality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashwant Agrawal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of a 26-year-old woman who presented with multiple episodes of syncope over a five-months period of time. Transthoracic echocardiogram had shown a normal functioning quadricuspid aortic valve (QAV which was also confirmed on a transesophageal echocardiogram. Computed tomographic angiography of heart and coronary arteries showed the QAV with equal size of all aortic cusps and normal coronary arteries. Intermittent chest pain and palpitations warranted an exercise stress test. The stress test revealed normal aerobic exertion, with achievement of 101% of maximal peak heart rate. However, during peak stress, we noted a drop in her blood pressure significantly resulting in dizziness. No arrhythmias were noted during the stress test. With recurrent syncope episodes and palpitations, Holter monitoring was done, revealing supraventricular tachycardia (SVT. We discuss current available literature and coassociations with QAV. New association of QAV with SVT needs further analysis.

  10. Presentation of a glomus carotid tumor as carotid sinus syndrome with syncopal episodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickschas, A.; Harmann, B.; Herzog, T.; Marienhagen, J.

    1987-01-01

    An 80 year old patient was referred to neurology for clarification of her episodes of syncope. A set of radiological examinations indicated a diagnosis of paraganglion of the left carotid bifurcation. Using this case, an attempt is made to provide recommendations concerning the order of step-wise visualization techniques of clarifying glomus carotid tumors. This unusual case also provides an impetus for considering the physiology and pathogenesis of different forms of carotid sinus syndrome. (orig.) [de

  11. Fluoxetine vs. placebo for the treatment of recurrent vasovagal syncope with anxiety sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flevari, Panayota; Leftheriotis, Dionyssios; Repasos, Evangelos; Katsaras, Dimitrios; Katsimardos, Andreas; Lekakis, John

    2017-01-01

    The optimal medical therapy of patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) remains controversial. Fluoxetine is effective against anxiety and panic disorders, while its use has shown promising results for VVS. Anxiety sensitivity is a personality trait observed in a considerable proportion of patients with VVS, associated with predisposition to anxiety and panic disorders. Our aim was to examine whether fluoxetine exerts beneficial effects regarding VVS prevention in the subset of patients with anxiety sensitivity. We assessed 106 patients with typical history of recurrent VVS, without other comorbidities, and a diagnostic, positive head-up tilt test. A psychiatric examination ruled out clinical psychiatric disease. Their psychological, stress-related profile was assessed by the Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) questionnaire, a 16-item questionnaire, assessing fear of anxiety-related sensations, previously studied in VVS. Patients scoring positive for ASI (n = 60, 57% of the population) were randomized in a 2:1 fashion to receive either 10-40 mg fluoxetine daily (n = 40) or placebo (n = 20), and were followed-up for 1 year. A significant difference was observed between patients receiving fluoxetine and those with placebo, regarding the distribution of syncope-free time during the study (P Fluoxetine is superior to placebo against syncope in these patients. This drug may be a first-line pharmacological treatment for this difficult-to-treat group. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope: A Hidden Case of Obstructive Cardiomyopathy without Severe Septal Hypertrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayuga, Kenneth A; Ho, Natalie; Shields, Robert W; Cremer, Paul; Rodriguez, L Leonardo

    2018-01-01

    A 36-year-old female with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and syncope was diagnosed with vasovagal syncope on a tilt table test and with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS) after a repeat tilt table test. However, an echocardiogram at our institution revealed obstructive cardiomyopathy without severe septal hypertrophy, with a striking increase in left ventricular outflow tract gradient from 7 mmHg at rest to 75 mmHg during Valsalva, with a septal thickness of only 1.3 cm. Cardiac MRI showed an apically displaced multiheaded posteromedial papillary muscle with suggestion of aberrant chordal attachments to the anterior mitral leaflet contributing to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. She underwent surgery with reorientation of the posterior medial papillary muscle head, resection of the tethering secondary chordae to the A1 segment of the mitral valve, chordal shortening and tacking of the chordae to the A1 and A2 segments of the mitral valve, and gentle septal myectomy. After surgery, she had significant improvement in her prior symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of obstructive cardiomyopathy without severe septal hypertrophy with abnormalities in papillary muscle and chordal attachment, in a patient diagnosed with vasovagal syncope and POTS.

  13. Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope: A Hidden Case of Obstructive Cardiomyopathy without Severe Septal Hypertrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth A. Mayuga

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 36-year-old female with symptoms of orthostatic intolerance and syncope was diagnosed with vasovagal syncope on a tilt table test and with postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS after a repeat tilt table test. However, an echocardiogram at our institution revealed obstructive cardiomyopathy without severe septal hypertrophy, with a striking increase in left ventricular outflow tract gradient from 7 mmHg at rest to 75 mmHg during Valsalva, with a septal thickness of only 1.3 cm. Cardiac MRI showed an apically displaced multiheaded posteromedial papillary muscle with suggestion of aberrant chordal attachments to the anterior mitral leaflet contributing to systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. She underwent surgery with reorientation of the posterior medial papillary muscle head, resection of the tethering secondary chordae to the A1 segment of the mitral valve, chordal shortening and tacking of the chordae to the A1 and A2 segments of the mitral valve, and gentle septal myectomy. After surgery, she had significant improvement in her prior symptoms. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of obstructive cardiomyopathy without severe septal hypertrophy with abnormalities in papillary muscle and chordal attachment, in a patient diagnosed with vasovagal syncope and POTS.

  14. Arakeri’s Reflex: an Alternative Pathway for Dento-Cardiac Reflex Mediated Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Arali

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Dentocardiac reflex, a variant of trigeminocardiac reflex elicited specifically during tooth extraction procedures in den-tal/maxillofacial surgery and is believed to cause syncope with an afferent link mediated by posterior superior alveolar nerve. Another variant of trigeminocardiac reflex which is also of interest to the oral and maxillofacial surgeon is oculocardiac reflex which can be triggered by direct or indirect manipulation of eye globe or muscles around it.The hypothesis: Excessive or injudicious pressure or manipulations around the maxillary first molars during extraction procedure are as-sociated with maximum incidence of bradycardia and hypotension than around incisor/ canine/ third molars. This is because; the pressure on eye globe and ophthalmic rectus muscle is maximum during extraction of first molar than incisor/canine and third molars. This observation led us to postulate an alternative pathway for dentocardiac reflex mediated syncope which may possibly justify the maxillary first molar region as a prone factor for the trigger. Evaluation of the hypothesis: Present hypothesis may not confer the specific factor responsible for switch in autonomic response in syncope origin during the tooth extraction procedure, but may provide a clue to where we should be looking.

  15. Head up tilt test in the diagnosis of neurocardiogenic syncope in childhood and adolescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udani, Vrajesh; Bavdekar, Manisha; Karia, Samir

    2004-06-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) is a common paroxysmal disorder that is often misdiagnosed as a seizure disorder. Head up tilt test (HUTT) has been used to confirm this diagnosis. There is no data available of its use in children / adolescents from India. To study the usefulness of the HUTT in children and adolescents with suspected NCS. This was a part retrospective and later prospective study set in a tertiary child neurology outpatient department (OPD). Patients with a strong clinical suspicion of syncope were recruited for the study. Clinical and treatment details were either retrieved from the chart or prospectively recorded in later patients. The HUTT was then carried out at baseline and after provocation and the results correlated with the clinical diagnosis. Eighteen children with a mean age of 10.8 years were studied. Eight had precipitating factors. Thirteen had premonitory symptoms. Pallor, temperature change, diaphoresis, headache, tonic / clonic movements, post-ictal confusion and peri-ictal headache were symptoms noticed. Sixteen had a positive HUTT. Seven were on long-term anti-epileptic drugs (AEDs). Two had epileptiform abnormalities on their electroencephalogram (EEG). The diagnosis of syncope is often confused with epilepsy. Head up tilt test has a high sensitivity in the diagnosis of NCS in children / adolescents. It is fairly safe and easy to perform.

  16. Regional Implementation of a Pediatric Cardiology Syncope Algorithm Using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPS) Methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Yvonne; Toro-Salazar, Olga H; Gauthier, Naomi S; Rotondo, Kathleen M; Arnold, Lucy; Hamershock, Rose; Saudek, David E; Fulton, David R; Renaud, Ashley; Alexander, Mark E

    2016-02-19

    Pediatric syncope is common. Cardiac causes are rarely found. We describe and assess a pragmatic approach to these patients first seen by a pediatric cardiologist in the New England region, using Standardized Clinical Assessment and Management Plans (SCAMPs). Ambulatory patients aged 7 to 21 years initially seen for syncope at participating New England Congenital Cardiology Association practices over a 2.5-year period were evaluated using a SCAMP. Findings were iteratively analyzed and the care pathway was revised. The vast majority (85%) of the 1254 patients had typical syncope. A minority had exercise-related or more problematic symptoms. Guideline-defined testing identified one patient with cardiac syncope. Syncope Severity Scores correlated well between physician and patient perceived symptoms. Orthostatic vital signs were of limited use. Largely incidental findings were seen in 10% of ECGs and 11% of echocardiograms. The 10% returning for follow-up, by design, reported more significant symptoms, but did not have newly recognized cardiac disease. Iterative analysis helped refine the approach. SCAMP methodology confirmed that the vast majority of children referred to the outpatient pediatric cardiology setting had typical low-severity neurally mediated syncope that could be effectively evaluated in a single visit using minimal resources. A simple scoring system can help triage patients into treatment categories. Prespecified criteria permitted the effective diagnosis of the single patient with a clear cardiac etiology. Patients with higher syncope scores still have a very low risk of cardiac disease, but may warrant attention. © 2016 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  17. Blood pressure regulation X: what happens when the muscle pump is lost? Post-exercise hypotension and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwill, John R; Sieck, Dylan C; Romero, Steven A; Buck, Tahisha M; Ely, Matthew R

    2014-03-01

    Syncope which occurs suddenly in the setting of recovery from exercise, known as post-exercise syncope, represents a failure of integrative physiology during recovery from exercise. We estimate that between 50 and 80% of healthy individuals will develop pre-syncopal signs and symptoms if subjected to a 15-min head-up tilt following exercise. Post-exercise syncope is most often neurally mediated syncope during recovery from exercise, with a combination of factors associated with post-exercise hypotension and loss of the muscle pump contributing to the onset of the event. One can consider the initiating reduction in blood pressure as the tip of the proverbial iceberg. What is needed is a clear model of what lies under the surface; a model that puts the observational variations in context and provides a rational framework for developing strategic physical or pharmacological countermeasures to ultimately protect cerebral perfusion and avert loss of consciousness. This review summarizes the current mechanistic understanding of post-exercise syncope and attempts to categorize the variation of the physiological processes that arise in multiple exercise settings. Newer investigations into the basic integrative physiology of recovery from exercise provide insight into the mechanisms and potential interventions that could be developed as countermeasures against post-exercise syncope. While physical counter maneuvers designed to engage the muscle pump and augment venous return are often found to be beneficial in preventing a significant drop in blood pressure after exercise, countermeasures that target the respiratory pump and pharmacological countermeasures based on the involvement of histamine receptors show promise.

  18. Financial impact of adopting implantable loop recorder diagnostic for unexplained syncope compared with conventional diagnostic pathway in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Providência, Rui; Candeias, Rui; Morais, Carlos; Reis, Hipólito; Elvas, Luís; Sanfins, Vitor; Farinha, Sara; Eggington, Simon; Tsintzos, Stelios

    2014-05-06

    To estimate the short- and long-term financial impact of early referral for implantable loop recorder diagnostic (ILR) versus conventional diagnostic pathway (CDP) in the management of unexplained syncope (US) in the Portuguese National Health Service (PNHS). A Markov model was developed to estimate the expected number of hospital admissions due to US and its respective financial impact in patients implanted with ILR versus CDP. The average cost of a syncope episode admission was estimated based on Portuguese cost data and landmark papers. The financial impact of ILR adoption was estimated for a total of 197 patients with US, based on the number of syncope admissions per year in the PNHS. Sensitivity analysis was performed to take into account the effect of uncertainty in the input parameters (hazard ratio of death; number of syncope events per year; probabilities and unit costs of each diagnostic test; probability of trauma and yield of diagnosis) over three-year and lifetime horizons. The average cost of a syncope event was estimated to be between 1,760€ and 2,800€. Over a lifetime horizon, the total discounted costs of hospital admissions and syncope diagnosis for the entire cohort were 23% lower amongst patients in the ILR group compared with the CDP group (1,204,621€ for ILR, versus 1,571,332€ for CDP). The utilization of ILR leads to an earlier diagnosis and lower number of syncope hospital admissions and investigations, thus allowing significant cost offsets in the Portuguese setting. The result is robust to changes in the input parameter values, and cost savings become more pronounced over time.

  19. Alterations of brain network hubs in reflex syncope: Evidence from a graph theoretical analysis based on DTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Bong Soo; Lee, Yoo Jin; Park, Jin-Han; Kim, Il Hwan; Park, Si Hyung; Lee, Ho-Joon; Park, Kang Min

    2018-06-01

    We evaluated global topology and organization of regional hubs in the brain networks and microstructural abnormalities in the white matter of patients with reflex syncope. Twenty patients with reflex syncope and thirty healthy subjects were recruited, and they underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) scans. Graph theory was applied to obtain network measures based on extracted DTI data, using DSI Studio. We then investigated differences in the network measures between the patients with reflex syncope and the healthy subjects. We also analyzed microstructural abnormalities of white matter using tract-based spatial statistics analysis (TBSS). Measures of global topology were not different between patients with reflex syncope and healthy subjects. However, in reflex syncope patients, the strength measures of the right angular, left inferior frontal, left middle orbitofrontal, left superior medial frontal, and left middle temporal gyrus were lower than in healthy subjects. The betweenness centrality measures of the left middle orbitofrontal, left fusiform, and left lingual gyrus in patients were lower than those in healthy subjects. The PageRank centrality measures of the right angular, left middle orbitofrontal, and left superior medial frontal gyrus in patients were lower than those in healthy subjects. Regarding the analysis of the white matter microstructure, there were no differences in the fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity values between the two groups. We have identified a reorganization of network hubs in the brain network of patients with reflex syncope. These alterations in brain network may play a role in the pathophysiologic mechanism underlying reflex syncope. © 2018 The Authors. Brain and Behavior published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Angiotensin-converting enzyme gene polymorphism in arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: is DD genotype helpful in predicting syncope risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozben, Beste; Altun, Ibrahim; Sabri Hancer, Veysel; Bilge, Ahmet Kaya; Tanrikulu, Azra Meryem; Diz-Kucukkaya, Reyhan; Fak, Ali Serdar; Yilmaz, Ercument; Adalet, Kamil

    2008-12-01

    Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is a heritable disorder characterised by fibrofatty replacement of right ventricular myocytes and increased risk of ventricular arrhythmias and sudden cardiac death. Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene insertion/deletion (I/D) polymorphism affects myocardial ACE levels. DD genotype favours myocardial fibrosis and is associated with malignant ventricular tachycardia. The aim of this study was to explore ACE gene polymorphism in ARVD patients. Twenty-nine patients with ARVD and 24 controls were included. All ARVD patients had documented sustained ventricular tachycardia. Thirteen patients had syncopal episodes. Six patients were resuscitated from sudden cardiac death. ACE gene polymorphism was identified by polymerase chain reaction technique. There was no significant difference in DD genotype frequency between ARVD patients and controls (44.8% vs. 45.8%, p=0.94). However, DD genotype frequency was significantly higher in ARVD patients with syncopal episodes compared to those without syncope (69.2% vs. 25.0%, p=0.017, odds ratio:6.750, 95% confidence interval: 1.318-34.565). DD genotype was detected in higher frequency also in patients with a family history of sudden cardiac death (66.7% vs. 39.1%,p=0.36). High prevalence of DD genotype in ARVD patients with syncope suggests that ACE I/D polymorphism might be useful in identifying high-risk patients for syncope.

  1. Syncope: Assessment of risk and an approach to evaluation in the emergency department and urgent care clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baris Akdemir

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is among the most frequent forms of transient loss of consciousness (TLOC, and is characterized by a relatively brief and self-limited loss of consciousness that by definition is triggered by transient cerebral hypoperfusion. Most often, syncope is caused by a temporary drop of systemic arterial pressure below that required to maintain cerebral function, but brief enough not to cause permanent structural brain injury. Currently, approximately one-third of syncope/collapse patients seen in the emergency department (ED or urgent care clinic are admitted to hospital for evaluation. The primary objective of developing syncope/TLOC risk stratification schemes is to provide guidance regarding the immediate prognostic risk of syncope patients presenting to the ED or clinic; thereafter, based on that risk assessment physicians may be better equipped to determine which patients can be safely evaluated as outpatients, and which require hospital care. In general, the need for hospitalization is determined by several key issues: i the patient's immediate (usually considered 1 week to 1 month mortality risk and risk for physical injury (e.g., falls risk, ii the patient's ability to care for him/herself, and iii whether certain treatments inherently require in-hospital initiation (e.g., pacemaker implantation. However, at present no single risk assessment protocol appears to be satisfactory for universal application, and development of a consensus recommendation is an essential next step.

  2. Bimanual tapping of a syncopated rhythm reveals hemispheric preferences for relative movement frequencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflug, Anja; Gompf, Florian; Kell, Christian Alexander

    2017-08-01

    In bimanual multifrequency tapping, right-handers commonly use the right hand to tap the relatively higher rate and the left hand to tap the relatively lower rate. This could be due to hemispheric specializations for the processing of relative frequencies. An extension of the double-filtering-by-frequency theory to motor control proposes a left hemispheric specialization for the control of relatively high and a right hemispheric specialization for the control of relatively low tapping rates. We investigated timing variability and rhythmic accentuation in right handers tapping mono- and multifrequent bimanual rhythms to test the predictions of the double-filtering-by-frequency theory. Yet, hemispheric specializations for the processing of relative tapping rates could be masked by a left hemispheric dominance for the control of known sequences. Tapping was thus either performed in an overlearned quadruple meter (tap of the slow rhythm on the first auditory beat) or in a syncopated quadruple meter (tap of the slow rhythm on the fourth auditory beat). Independent of syncopation, the right hand outperformed the left hand in timing accuracy for fast tapping. A left hand timing benefit for slow tapping rates as predicted by the double-filtering-by-frequency theory was only found in the syncopated tapping group. This suggests a right hemisphere preference for the control of slow tapping rates when rhythms are not overlearned. Error rates indicate that overlearned rhythms represent hierarchically structured meters that are controlled by a single timer that could potentially reside in the left hemisphere. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Management of Wolff-Parkinson-White Tachyarrhythmia Presenting as Syncope with Seizure-like Activity

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    Samuel Kaplan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Audience: Emergency Medicine residents and medical students. Introduction: An estimated 3% of the United States population suffers from recurrent convulsive episodes that are most often attributed to primary epileptic seizures.1 However, recent studies have estimated about 20%-30% of such episodes are associated with occult cardiac etiology,2 which carry one-year mortality rates of up to 30%.3 Cardiogenic cerebral hypoxia has been associated with a wide variety of neurologic disturbances, including dizzy spells, headache, syncope, focal motor deficit, generalized tonic-clonic seizure, confusion, dementia, and psychosis.4 Convulsive activity has tentatively been ascribed to the ensuing activation of the medullary reticular formation.5,6 This scenario is based on a patient that presented to University of California Irvine Medical Center Emergency Department in April 2017 who, following witnessed seizure-like episodes, was diagnosed with underlying Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW disorder. WPW is a congenital condition involving aberrantly conductive cardiac tissue between the atria and the ventricles that provides a pathway for a reentrant tachycardia circuit and ventricular pre-excitation.7 Diagnosis is primarily based on the presence of a short PR interval and delta waves on electrocardiography.8 While definitive treatment is catheter-based radiofrequency ablation of the accessory pathway, the hallmark of acute management is vagal maneuvers and antiarrhythmic drugs in the symptomatic but hemodynamically stable patient, and synchronized cardioversion in the unstable patient.9 WPW is thought to affect between 0.1% and 0.3% of the population, and while the usual clinical course is benign, sudden cardiac death occurs in about 3%-4% of such patients.7,10 One survey found 19% of patients with WPW had a history of syncopal episodes;11 however, precise prevalence surveys of WPW-associated seizure-like episodes are lacking in the current literature. This case

  4. Sincope en la infancia y adolescencia Syncope in infants and adolescents

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    Sergio A. Antoniuk

    2007-01-01

    precoz.Aim: To review the syncope in infants and adolescents as well as its etiology, clinical manifestations, physiopathology, diagnostic methods and treatment. Development: The syncope is a clinical entity characterized by sudden and transient loss of consciousness and postural tone, with a quick and complete recovery. The syncope is frequent in children and adolescents. The most common cause is neurocardiogenic (vasovagal, which has a benign evolution. Other causes may be neurological, cardiac and metabolic diseases, with a variable prognosis, which may come to be severe and potentially lethal. Evaluation of the syncope is mainly based on present clinical history, and on a detailed clinical examination. Basic complementary exams may help on the diagnosis, as a glycemia test, determination of electrolytes (sodium, potassium, magnesium, a hemogram and an electrocardiogram. The Tilt Test is "the" test to confirm the neurocardiogenic syncope. Treatment is indicated in syncopes with recurrent episodes or with risk of physical lesions. Prevention and education are indicated for all patients. Specific treatment should be individually given to each patient. In the case of neurocardiogenic syncope, beta-blockers, alpha-adrenergic stimulants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and fludrocortisone are used. In the frequently recurrent neurocardiogenic syncope, when preventive actions are not enough or there is risk of lesions in consequence of falls, beta-blockers, alpha-adrenergic stimulants, serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and fludrocortisone are used, as well as a pacemaker for severe cases non-responsive to pharmacological treatment. Conclusion: The syncope is a frequent clinical entity in infancy and adolescence, with benign evolution but potentially lethal. Diagnosis and correct etiology are important for the implementation of specific and early treatment.

  5. A syncopated leap-frog algorithm for orbit consistent plasma simulation of materials processing reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cobb, J.W.; Leboeuf, J.N.

    1994-01-01

    The authors present a particle algorithm to extend simulation capabilities for plasma based materials processing reactors. The orbit integrator uses a syncopated leap-frog algorithm in cylindrical coordinates, which maintains second order accuracy, and minimizes computational complexity. Plasma source terms are accumulated orbit consistently directly in the frequency and azimuthal mode domains. Finally they discuss the numerical analysis of this algorithm. Orbit consistency greatly reduces the computational cost for a given level of precision. The computational cost is independent of the degree of time scale separation

  6. Reliability of Left Ventricular Hypertrophy by ECG Criteria in Children with Syncope: Do the Criteria Need to be Revised?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Maalika M; Ramesh Iyer, V; Nandi, Deipanjan; Vetter, Victoria L; Banerjee, Anirban

    2016-04-01

    In the outpatient setting, children who present with syncope routinely undergo electrocardiograms (ECG). Because of concerns for hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, children with syncope meeting ECG criteria for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) will frequently undergo an echocardiogram. Our objectives were to determine whether Davignon criteria for ECG waves overestimate LVH in children presenting with syncope, and to study the usefulness of echocardiography in these children. We hypothesize that the Davignon criteria presently used for interpretation of ECGs overestimate LVH, resulting in unnecessary echocardiography in this clinical setting. The clinical database of The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia was evaluated from 2002 to 2012 to identify children between 9 and 16 years of age, who presented with non-exercise-induced, isolated syncope. From this group of patients, only those with clear-cut evidence of LVH (by Davignon criteria), who also underwent an echocardiogram, were selected. A total of 136 children with syncope were identified as having LVH by Davignon ECG criteria. None of these patients manifested any evidence of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, with normal ventricular septum (average Z-score -0.68 ± 0.84), LV posterior wall (average Z-score -0.66 ± 1.18) and LV mass (average Z-score 0.52 ± 1.29). No significant correlation was found between summed RV6 plus SV1 and LV mass. Correlations between additional ECG parameters and measures of LVH by echocardiography were similarly poor. In children presenting with syncope and LVH by ECG, there was no evidence of true LVH by echocardiography. We propose that the Davignon ECG criteria for interpreting LVH in children overestimate the degree of hypertrophy in these children and the yield of echocardiography is extremely low.

  7. Diagnostic utility of carotid artery duplex ultrasonography in the evaluation of syncope: a good test ordered for the wrong reason.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadian-Dodov, Daniella; Papolos, Alexander; Olin, Jeffrey W

    2015-06-01

    Syncope refers to a transient loss of consciousness and postural tone secondary to cerebral hypoperfusion. Guidelines recommend against neurovascular testing in cases of syncope without neurologic symptoms; however, many pursue carotid artery duplex ultrasonography (CUS) due to the prognostic implications of identified cerebrovascular disease. Our objective was to determine the diagnostic utility of CUS in the evaluation of syncope and the identification of new or severe atherosclerosis with the potential to change patient management. We reviewed records of 569 patients with CUS ordered for the primary indication of syncope through an accredited vascular laboratory at an academic, urban medical centre. Findings on CUS, patient demographic, clinical and laboratory information, and medications within 6 months of the CUS exam were reviewed. Bivariate relationships between key medical history characteristics and atherosclerosis status (known vs. new disease) were examined. Among 495 patients with complete information, cerebrovascular findings could potentially explain syncope in 2% (10 patients). Optimization of cardiovascular risk factors would benefit patients with known (56.6%) and new atherosclerosis (33.5%) with suboptimal lipid control, (LDL > 70 in 42.2 and 34.9% respectively; LDL > 100 in 15.7 and 20.4%), and those not on high-intensity statin therapy (80 and 87.5%) or antiplatelet medications (13.2 and 50.6%). CUS is a low-yield diagnostic test in the evaluation of syncope, but it is useful in the diagnosis of atherosclerosis and identification of subjects who would benefit from optimal medical therapy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. [Adrenomedullin--the link between the sympathetic nervous system activation and peripheral vasodilatation in some patients with vasovagal syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Halawa, Bogumił

    2004-09-01

    Adrenomedullin (ADM) is a potent vasodilator playing role in regulation of central hemodynamic. The concentration of plasma ADM in healthy people increases under the influence of orthostatic stress. In patients with vasovagal syncope (VS) the changes in ADM concentration could be responsible either for syncope provocation or prevention. The aim of the study was to assess the influence of phase of the head-up tilt test (HUTT) in which the syncope occurred on the plasma concentration of ADM. The study was performed in 25 patients (pts) (18 women and 7 men), mean age 45.0+/-16.1 years with cardiodepressive reactions during HUTT according to the Italian protocol with nitroglycerine (NTG) provocation if necessary: Syncope was caused in 23 pts due to vasovagal reaction: in 17 pts syncope occurred after NTG provocation (group 1), and in 6 pts occurred in the passive phase of tilt (group 2a), in 2 pts due to dysautonomic reactions (group 2b). The head-up tilt test was performed according to ESC guidelines. The blood for ADM concentration was drawn after 30 min supine rest (ADM 1) and immediately after syncope (ADM 2). ADM level was measured using radioimmunological method. The results. In group 1 plasma level of ADM significantly decreased after the HUTT (3.2+/-3.4 vs 1.7+/-1,4 pg/0.1 ml; p<0.05) and in group 2a increased significantly (1.3+/-0.8 vs 2.7+/-1.3 pg/0.1 ml; p<0.05) comparing to baseline values. The ADM concentration did not differ between the groups in baseline conditions and was significantly higher after the syncope in group 2a (p<0.05). Conclusions. The excessive increase of ADM concentration during the passive phase of HUTT could play the causative role in pathogenesis of VS occurring early during the HUTT. In patients with VS after NTG provocation the decrease of ADM concentration can be the result of hemodynamic changes in the presence of vasodilating drug and may be the mechanism that could prevent the syncope.

  9. Delta space plot analysis of cardiovascular coupling in vasovagal syncope during orthostatic challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reulecke, S; Charleston-Villalobos, S; Voss, A; Gonzalez-Camarena, R; Gaitan-Gonzalez, M; Gonzalez-Hermosillo, J; Hernandez-Pacheco, G; Aljama-Corrales, T

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a graphical method to study cardiovascular coupling, called delta space plot analysis (DSPA), was introduced. The graphical representation is susceptible to be parameterized in shape and orientation. The usefulness of this technique was studied on cardiovascular data from patients with vasovagal syncope (VVS) and from controls. The study included 15 female patients diagnosed with VVS and 11 age-matched healthy female subjects. All subjects were enrolled in a head-up tilt (HUT) test, breathing normally, including 5 minutes of supine position (baseline) and 18 minutes of 70° orthostatic phase. The DSPA parameters were obtained at different times during the HUT test, i.e., at baseline, early (first 5 min) and late (10-15 min) orthostatic phases. In baseline there were no considerable differences between female controls and female patients. During the late orthostatic phase, parameters from DSPA showed highly significantly (p=0.000003) reduced cardiovascular coupling in patients. Findings indicated a loss of control on cardiovascular coupling in female patients susceptible to vasovagal syncope during orthostatic challenge. In addition, this study provided promising results for a new graphical method to investigate cardiovascular coupling.

  10. Convulsive syncope related to a small dose of quetiapine in an adolescent with bipolar disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai J

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Jianbo Lai,1,2 Qiaoqiao Lu,3 Tingting Huang,3 Shaohua Hu,1,2 Yi Xu1,2 1Department of Psychiatry, First Affiliated Hospital, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, 2Key Laboratory of Mental Disorder Management in Zhejiang Province, 3Department of Internal Medicine, Zhejiang University School of Medicine, Hangzhou, China Abstract: Quetiapine, an atypical antipsychotic, has been extensively used in patients with bipolar disorder. Overdose of quetiapine can result in severe complications, such as coma, seizure, respiratory depression, arrhythmia, and even death. However, the paucity of toxicological evaluation in adolescence causes more potential risks in this population. Herein, we present a case of hypotension and convulsive syncope after exposure to a small dose of quetiapine in a 16-year-old who was diagnosed with bipolar disorder. After cessation of quetiapine, no additional convulsive movements were reported. This case indicates that even in young patients without predisposing factors, close monitoring of adverse effects should be warranted for safety concerns, especially at the initiation of quetiapine treatment. Keywords: quetiapine, bipolar disorder, hypotension, convulsive syncope

  11. Current and Emerging Uses of Insertable Cardiac Monitors: Evaluation of Syncope and Monitoring for Atrial Fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomson, Todd T; Passman, Rod

    Insertable cardiac monitors (ICMs) have provided clinicians with a superb tool for assessing infrequent or potentially asymptomatic arrhythmias. ICMs have shown their usefulness in the evaluation of unexplained syncope, providing high diagnostic yields in a cost-effective manner. While unexplained syncope continues to be the most common reason for their use, ICMs are increasingly being used for the monitoring of atrial fibrillation (AF). Recent trials have demonstrated that a substantial proportion of patients with cryptogenic stroke have AF detected only by the prolonged monitoring provided by ICMs. A particularly promising and emerging use for ICMs is in the management of anticoagulation in patients with known paroxysmal AF. The introduction in recent years of ICMs with automatic AF detection algorithms and continuous remote monitoring in combination with novel oral anticoagulants have opened the door for targeted anticoagulation guided by remote monitoring, a strategy that has recently shown promise in pilot studies of this technique. While further research is needed before official recommendations can be given, this use of ICMs opens exciting new possibilities for personalized medicine that could potentially reduce bleeding risk and improve quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation.

  12. Alteration of gene expression profiling including GPR174 and GNG2 is associated with vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Juan; Zhou, Zai-wei; Xu, Miao; Ma, Qing-wen; Yan, Jing-bin; Wang, Jian-yi; Zhang, Quo-qin; Huang, Min; Bao, Liming

    2015-03-01

    Vasovagal syncope (VVS) causes accidental harm for susceptible patients. However, pathophysiology of this disorder remains largely unknown. In an effort to understanding of molecular mechanism for VVS, genome-wide gene expression profiling analyses were performed on VVS patients at syncope state. A total of 66 Type 1 VVS child patients and the same number healthy controls were enrolled in this study. Peripheral blood RNAs were isolated from all subjects, of which 10 RNA samples were randomly selected from each groups for gene expression profile analysis using Gene ST 1.0 arrays (Affymetrix). The results revealed that 103 genes were differently expressed between the patients and controls. Significantly, two G-proteins related genes, GPR174 and GNG2 that have not been related to VVS were among the differently expressed genes. The microarray results were confirmed by qRT-PCR in all the tested individuals. Ingenuity pathway analysis and gene ontology annotation study showed that the differently expressed genes are associated with stress response and apoptosis, suggesting that the alteration of some gene expression including G-proteins related genes is associated with VVS. This study provides new insight into the molecular mechanism of VVS and would be helpful to further identify new molecular biomarkers for the disease.

  13. Influence of tilt training on activation of the autonomic nervous system in patients with vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Halawa, Bogumił; Mazurek, Walentyna

    2006-04-01

    Tilt training is a new treatment for vasovagal syncope. Its therapeutic efficacy is thought to be the result of the desensitization of cardiopulmonary receptors, but it could be the influence of the tilt training on the activation of the autonomic nervous system as well. The study group consisted of 24 vasovagal patients (17 women and 7 men) aged 32.5 +/- 11.8 years. The diagnostic head-up tilt test was performed according to the Italian protocol with nitroglycerin if necessary. The monitoring head-up tilt test was performed according to the Westminster protocol without provocation, after 1 to 3 months of tilt training. Holter ECG recordings for HRV parameters (time and frequency domain) were obtained from selected 2-min intervals before, during and after the diagnostic and monitoring tilt test. The diagnostic test was positive in the passive phase in 6 and after provocation in 18 patients. During the training period no syncope occurred. Analysing the HRV parameters we demonstrated the following findings: I. mRR decreases immediately after assumption of a vertical position in both tests (diagnostic and monitoring) but in the diagnostic test its further decrease occurs earlier than in the monitoring test; 2. the absolute power of the HF component is greater in the early phase of tilt after tilt training than in the corresponding period in the diagnostic test. After a longer period of tilt training the activation of the sympathetic nervous system in response to the erect position is diminished.

  14. Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura presenting with syncope episodes when coughing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ciulla Michele M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura is a rarely encountered clinical entity which may have different clinical pictures. Although the majority of these neoplasms have a benign course, the malignant form has also been reported. Case presentation We herein describe a case of 72 year-old man with head, facial, and thoracic traumas caused by neurally-mediated situational syncope when coughing. The diagnostic work-up including chest x-ray, CT and PET, revealed a large solitary mass of the left hemithorax. Radical surgical resection of the mass was performed through a left lateral thoracotomy and completed with a wedge resection of the lingula. Hystological examination of the surgical specimen showed an encapsulated mass measuring 12 × 11.5 × 6 cm consistent with a solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura. It's surgical removal definitively resolved the neurologic manifestations. The patient had no postoperative complications. At two years follow-up the patient is free from recurrence and without clinical manifestations. Conclusion In our case its resection definitively resolved the episodes of situational syncope due, in our opinion, to the large thoracic mass compressing the phrenic nerve

  15. Implantable loop recorders for assessment of syncope: increased diagnostic yield and less adverse outcomes with the latest generation devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti, A; Bocconcelli, P; De Santo, T; Ghidini Ottonelli, A; Giuli, S; Massa, R; Svetlich, C; Tarsi, G; Corbucci, G; Tronconi, F; Vitale, E

    2013-08-01

    Aim of the study was to compare the diagnostic yield of implantable loop recorders (ILR) of two successive generations for the assessment of syncope. Data on patients who had undergone ILR implantation for unexplained syncope in four Italian public hospitals were retrospectively acquired from the Medtronic Clinical Service database. After implantation, routine follow-up examinations were performed every 90 days, while urgent examinations were carried out in the event of syncope recurrence. The following findings were regarded as diagnostic: ECG documentation of a syncope recurrence; documentation of any of the arrhythmias listed by the current guidelines as diagnostic findings even if asymptomatic. Between November 2002 and March 2010, 107 patients received an ILR (40 Medtronic Reveal® Plus; 67 Medtronic Reveal® DX/XT) and underwent at least one follow-up examination. Diagnoses were made in 7 (17.5%) and 24 (35.8%) (P=0.043) patients, with a median time of 228 and 65 days, respectively. Three (42.9%) and 21 (87.5%) (P=0.029) diagnoses were based on automatically detected events, while adverse outcomes occurred in 6 and in 1 (P=0.01) patients, respectively. Our results show that the new-generation device offer a higher diagnostic yield, mainly as a result of its improved automatic detection function, and is associated with fewer adverse outcomes.

  16. Case report of precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma presenting as syncope and cardiac mass in a nonimmunocompromised child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Barry; Rao, Sudha; Shah, Binita

    2007-08-01

    We report the case of a previously healthy, 10-year-old boy who presented to the emergency department with a syncopal episode. In the emergency department, the patient was diagnosed with a right atrial mass, later identified as a precursor B-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (LL). Most causes of syncope in children are not life threatening. In most cases, it indicates a predisposition to vasovagal episodes. Lymphomas account for approximately 7% of malignancies among children younger than 20 years, are more common in white males and immunocompromised patients, and are predominantly tumors of T-cell origin. Children with non-Hodgkin lymphoma usually present with extranodal disease, most frequently involving the abdomen (31%), mediastinum (26%), or head and neck (29%). Our patient was unique in that he was a nonimmunocompromised, black boy, presenting with syncope in the setting of a large atrial mass identified as a precursor B-cell LL. To our knowledge, there are no reported cases of precursor B-cell LL presenting as syncope and a cardiac mass.

  17. Clinical differences among the elderly admitted to the emergency department for accidental or unexplained falls and syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasqualetti G

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Pasqualetti,1 Valeria Calsolaro,1 Giacomo Bini,1 Umberto Dell’Agnello,1 Marco Tuccori,2 Alessandra Marino,2 Alice Capogrosso-Sansone,2 Martina Rafanelli,3 Massimo Santini,4 Eugenio Orsitto,4 Andrea Ungar,3 Corrado Blandizzi,2 Fabio Monzani1 On behalf of the ANCESTRAL-ED study group 1Geriatrics Unit, 2Pharmacology Unit, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, 3Syncope Unit, Geriatric and Intensive Care Medicine, AOU Careggi and University of Florence, Florence, 4Emergency Department, University Hospital of Pisa, Pisa, Italy Abstract: It is difficult to distinguish unexplained falls (UFs from accidental falls (AFs or syncope in older people. This study was designed to compare patients referred to the emergency department (ED for AFs, UFs or syncope. Data from a longitudinal study on adverse drug events diagnosed at the ED (ANCESTRAL-ED in older people were analyzed in order to select cases of AF, syncope, or UF. A total of 724 patients (median age: 81.0 [65–105] years, 66.3% female were consecutively admitted to the ED (403 AF, 210 syncope, and 111 UF. The number of psychotropic drugs was the only significant difference in patients with AF versus those with UF (odds ratio [OR] 1.44; 95% confidence interval 1.17–1.77. When comparing AF with syncope, female gender, musculoskeletal diseases, dementia, and systolic blood pressure >110 mmHg emerged as significantly associated with AF (OR 0.40 [0.27–0.58], 0.40 [0.24–0.68], 0.35 [0.14–0.82], and 0.31 [0.20–0.49], respectively, while valvulopathy and the number of antihypertensive drugs were significantly related to syncope (OR 2.51 [1.07–5.90] and 1.24 [1.07–1.44], respectively. Upon comparison of UF and syncope, the number of central nervous system drugs, female gender, musculoskeletal diseases, and SBP >110 mmHg were associated with UF (OR 0.65 [0.50–0.84], 0.52 [0.30–0.89], 0.40 [0.20–0.77], and 0.26 [0.13–0.55], respectively

  18. Syncope (Fainting)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Heart.org CPR & ECC for Heart.org Shop for Heart.org Causes for Heart.org Advocate ... loss of consciousness usually related to insufficient blood flow to the brain. It’s also called fainting or " ...

  19. [Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity during head-up tilt testing in patients with vasovagal syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Mazurek, Walentyna

    2005-08-01

    The stimulation of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone (RAA) system during tilt table test is caused by sympathetic nervous system activation by orthostatic stress and a serotonin release as well. In healthy individuals increase of plasma renin activity during test with maximal values on the peak of the test was described. The aim of the study was to assess the activation of RAAS in patients with neurally mediated syncope during the tilt table test by means of plasma renin activity and serum aldosterone levels. The study was carried out in 31 patients aged 39.4 +/- 15.0 years (18 women and 13 men) with neurally mediated syncope during tilt test. Plasma renin activity was assessed in the baseline conditions, immediately after the test and 10 minutes after the test using radioenzymatic assay. Aldosterone concentrations were measured radioimmunologically, twice: after 30 minutes supine rest and after the syncope. Plasma renin activity during supine rest was 2.2 +/- 2.4 ng/ml/h, rose after the syncope 2.5-fold to 5.2 +/- 4.5 ng/ml/h (p < 0.001 comparing to baseline) stayed on similar level approximately for the next 10 minutes--4.9 +/- 5.5 ng/ml/h (p = n.s.). In 11 patients (35%) 10 minutes after the test even further increase of PRA was observed. Serum aldosterone level increased significantly immediately after tilt test (90.0 +/- 72.9 vs 178.8 +/- 150.1 pg/ml, p < 0.01). Authors showed, that in patients with NMS plasma renin activity increases and this increase lasts for 10 minutes after the syncope and the concentration of aldosterone increases immediately after tilt test.

  20. Outreach syncope clinic managed by a nurse practitioner: Outcome and cost effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Mohamed H; Walsh, Kathleen E; Brignole, Michele; Key, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to assess the clinical and financial outcomes of a novel outreach syncope clinic. Methods We compared the clinical outcome of the Faint and Fall Clinic at the American Center (January-June 2016) with that of the University of Wisconsin Health and Clinics Faint and Fall Clinic (January 2013-December 2014). The American Center-Faint and Fall Clinic is run solely by a nurse practitioner, assisted by online faint-decision software and consultancy of a faint specialist through video-conferencing. Results Five hundred and twenty-eight consecutive patients were seen at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics-Faint and Fall Clinic and 68 patients at the American Center-Faint and Fall Clinic. The patients' clinical characteristics were similar except for a lower age in the American Center patients (45 ± 18 vs 51 ± 22, p = 0.03). Overall, a diagnosis was made within 45 days in 70% (95% confidence interval 66-74%) of the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics patients and 69% (95% confidence interval 58-80%) of the American Center patients, ( p = 0.9). A mean of 3.0 ± 1.6 tests per patient was used in the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics group compared to 1.5 ± 0.8 tests per patient in the American Center group, p = 0.001. Over the six-month study period, the total revenue at the American Center was US$152,597 (contribution margin of US$122,393 plus professional revenue of US$30,204). The total cost of the nurse practitioner including benefits was US$66,662 ((US$98,466 salary/year + 35.4% benefits)/2). Total revenue minus expenses resulted in a net profit of US$85,935. Discussion A nurse practitioner-run outreach syncope-clinic equipped with online faint-decision software and consultancy of a faint specialist through vedio-conferencing is feasible and financially self-sustainable. It allows the dissemination of standardized high-quality syncope care to patients who have

  1. Long-range correlation in synchronization and syncopation tapping: a linear phase correction model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Delignières

    Full Text Available We propose in this paper a model for accounting for the increase in long-range correlations observed in asynchrony series in syncopation tapping, as compared with synchronization tapping. Our model is an extension of the linear phase correction model for synchronization tapping. We suppose that the timekeeper represents a fractal source in the system, and that a process of estimation of the half-period of the metronome, obeying a random-walk dynamics, combines with the linear phase correction process. Comparing experimental and simulated series, we show that our model allows accounting for the experimentally observed pattern of serial dependence. This model complete previous modeling solutions proposed for self-paced and synchronization tapping, for a unifying framework of event-based timing.

  2. [Variability of heart rhythm in dynamic study of the psychovegetative relationship in neurogenic syncope].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaeva, Z A; Khaspekova, N B; Veĭn, A M

    2001-01-01

    Physiological changes accompanying syncopes of neural origin (SNO) in patients with psychovegetative syndrome are still insufficiently studied. The data concerning the role of the autonomic nervous system are discrepant. Heart rate variability was analyzed in 68 patients with SNO in a supine position and during the active 20-min orthostatic test taking into account the heart rate components of very low frequency (VLF, an index of cerebral sympathetic activity) and high frequency (HF, a marker of vagal modulation). Steady growth of the VLF and progressive decrease in the LF within 15-20 min of the orthostasis were observed in all the patients (n = 33), who fainted after this period. The predominance of the VLF in the heart rate power spectra was correlated with a high level of anxiety. It is suggested that this fact indicates the stable cerebral sympathetic activation resulting in a baroreceptor dysfunction, i.e., a failure of vasomotor regulation in patients with SNO.

  3. Syncope During Competitive Events: Interrogating Heart Rate Monitor Watches May Be Useful!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thabouillot, Oscar; Bostanci, Kevin; Bouvier, Francois; Dumitrescu, Nicolae; Stéfuriac, Maria; Paule, Philippe; Roche, Nicolas-Charles

    2017-12-01

    This is a case report of a 45-year-old man who reported complete amnesia during the very first kilometer of a 10-km run. He was wearing a heart rate monitor (HRM). The interrogation of his HRM watch showed 200 bpm tachycardia beginning in the first kilometer and increasing up to 220 bpm during the last kilometer. The patient was asked to wear a Holter-monitor (Holter Research Laboratory; Helena, Montana USA) electrocardiogram (ECG) while practicing a training session. This examination allowed for the diagnosis of an adrenergic paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) with an impressive auriculo-ventricular conduction over 260 bpm. This case highlights that non-medical devices, such as connected watches, can be helpful to diagnose arrhythmias. Thabouillot O , Bostanci K , Bouvier F , Dumitrescu N , Stéfuriac M , Paule P , Roche NC . Syncope during competitive events: interrogating heart rate monitor watches may be useful! Prehosp Disaster Med. 2017;32(6):691-693.

  4. Carotid sinus syndrome and cardiovagal regulation in elderly patients with suspected syncope-related falls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Latif, Tabassam; Pors, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    ) positions. A hypersensitive response was defined by current guidelines. Results: In the supine position, heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased during CSM on the right side by 17.0 +/- 15.2 min-1 and 32.5 +/- 25.5 mmHg, and on the left side by 12.8 +/- 14.3 min-1 and 22.7 +/- 20.7 mm....... Conclusions: The hemodynamic response to CSM has a well-defined pattern and differs both with respect to the stimulus site and patient position. We suggest that CSS is not a distinct pathophysiological process or disease entity but rather an acquired cardiovascular instability due to age-related degeneration......Background: Falls and syncope in the elderly may be caused by hypersensitivity in the high-pressure baroreflex control - carotid sinus syndrome (CSS). The pathophysiological process causing CSS remains poorly understood. Methods: We studied the hemodynamic response to carotid sinus massage (CSM...

  5. Tilt-table testing of patients with pacemaker and recurrent syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Christian E. Haarmark; Kanters, Jørgen K; Mehlsen, Jesper

    2016-01-01

    responses accounting for 72% of patients with a positive test. There were no differences between groups with positive or negative test result regarding age, gender, resting blood pressure and heart rate, daily fluid intake, pacing mode, pacing indication or pacing rhythm at rest. HUT in patients...... protocol with nitroglycerine provocation was used and the test results were classified according to current guidelines. Baseline data were retrieved from the medical records. Overall, 54% of patients had a positive response to HUT. Vasodepressor or orthostatic hypotensive response were the most prevalent...... with pacemakers has a high diagnostic yield. Although, the majority of patients had a vasodepressor or orthostatic hypotensive response, cardioinhibitory response leading to syncope was also seen....

  6. Increased heart rate caused by atrial pacing with the closed-loop stimulation function prevented micturition syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatsuo Haraki, MD,PhD

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old man had been experiencing syncope several times a year. We implanted a DDD pacemaker with closed-loop stimulation (CLS function. When he urinated early in the morning, his increased atrial pacing rates elevated his heart rate (HR during and after micturition. After implantation of the DDD-CLS mode, he did not experience symptoms. In contrast, in the DDD-R mode, his intrinsic HR changed to atrial pacing after micturition but decreased to the basal rate within 2 min, and he experienced a sense of cold perspiration and presyncope. Increased HRs caused by atrial pacing with the CLS function were useful in the prevention of micturition syncope.

  7. Pacing as a Treatment for Reflex-Mediated (Vasovagal, Situational, or Carotid Sinus Hypersensitivity) Syncope: A Systematic Review for the 2017 ACC/AHA/HRS Guideline for the Evaluation and Management of Patients With Syncope: A Report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Clinical Practice Guidelines and the Heart Rhythm Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varosy, Paul D; Chen, Lin Y; Miller, Amy L; Noseworthy, Peter A; Slotwiner, David J; Thiruganasambandamoorthy, Venkatesh

    2017-08-01

    To determine, using systematic review of the biomedical literature, whether pacing reduces risk of recurrent syncope and relevant clinical outcomes among adult patients with reflex-mediated syncope. MEDLINE (through PubMed), EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (through October 7, 2015) were searched for randomized trials and observational studies examining pacing and syncope, and the bibliographies of known systematic reviews were also examined. Studies were rejected for poor-quality study methods and for the lack of the population, intervention, comparator, or outcome(s) of interest. Of 3,188 citations reviewed, 10 studies met the inclusion criteria for systematic review, including a total of 676 patients. These included 9 randomized trials and 1 observational study. Of the 10 studies, 4 addressed patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity, and the remaining 6 addressed vasovagal syncope. Among the 6 open-label (unblinded) studies, we found that pacing was associated with a 70% reduction in recurrent syncope (relative risk [RR]: 0.30; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.15-0.60). When the 2 analyzable studies with double-blinded methodology were considered separately, there was no clear benefit (RR: 0.73; 95% CI: 0.25-2.1), but confidence intervals were wide. The strongest evidence was from the randomized, double-blinded ISSUE-3 (Third International Study on Syncope of Uncertain Etiology) trial, which demonstrated a benefit of pacing among patients with recurrent syncope and asystole documented by implantable loop recorder. There are limited data with substantive evidence of outcome ascertainment bias, and only 2 studies with a double-blinded study design have been conducted. The evidence does not support the use of pacing for reflex-mediated syncope beyond patients with recurrent vasovagal syncope and asystole documented by implantable loop recorder. Copyright © 2017 American College of Cardiology Foundation, American Heart Association

  8. Síncope inducido por el ejercicio: Reporte de un caso Exercise-induced syncope: case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrés Alvarado

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available El síncope asociado con el ejercicio es una condición que debe alertar al médico tratante; en primera instancia, se descartan alteraciones estructurales cardiacas que predispongan a muerte súbita, y en segundo lugar se evalúa la presencia de arritmias que potencialmente causen esta condición. En pacientes mayores de 35 años se descartan la enfermedad coronaria y las valvulopatías como eventuales causas. En sujetos que entrenan de manera frecuente, el tono vagal aumentado es una condición adaptativa común que a veces puede causar síncope cardioinhibitorio asociado con el ejercicio, cuya presentación puede variar desde bradiarritmias hasta asistolia, por lo cual constituye un reto diagnóstico.Exercise-induced syncope is a condition that should alert the treating physician; structural cardiac abnormalities that predispose to sudden death should be discarded, and the presence of arrhythmias that may potentially cause this condition are evaluated. In patients over 35 years, coronary and valvular disease are ruled-out as a possible cause of syncope associated with exercise. In subjects who train frequently, increased vagal tone is a common adaptive condition that may sometimes cause cardio-inhibitory syncope associated with exercise, whose presentation may vary from bradyarrhythmia to asystolia, thereby providing a diagnostic challenge.

  9. Sympathetic dysfunction in vasovagal syncope and the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabeth eLambert

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Orthostatic intolerance is the inability to tolerate the upright posture and is relieved by recumbence. It most commonly affects young women and has a major impact on quality of life and psychosocial well being. Several forms of orthostatic intolerance have been described. The most common one is the recurrent vasovagal syncope (VVS phenotype which presents as a transient and abrupt loss of consciousness and postural tone that is followed by rapid recovery. Another common type of orthostatic intolerance is the postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS which is characterized by an excessive rise in heart rate upon standing and is associated with symptoms of presyncope such as light-headedness, fatigue, palpitations and nausea. Maintenance of arterial pressure under condition of reduced central blood volume during the orthostasis is accomplished in large part through sympathetic efferent nerve traffic to the peripheral vasculature. Therefore sympathetic nervous system (SNS dysfunction is high on the list of possible contributors to the pathophysiology of orthostatic intolerance. Investigations into the role of the SNS in orthostatic intolerance have yielded mixed results. This review outlines the current knowledge of the function of the SNS in both VVS and POTS.

  10. Recurrent syncope, orthostatic hypotension and volatile hypertension: think outside the box

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thein Aung

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The baroreceptors in the neck and aortic arch are important regulators of sudden blood pressure changes. They are innervated by CN IX and X and synapse in the brainstem. Baroreceptor failure is an under-recognized cause of recurrent syncope, orthostatic hypotension, and volatile hypertension, which is refractory to and may in fact worsen with conventional treatments. Baroreflex failure can be the result of neck and chest radiation, head and neck surgery, and cerebrovascular accidents involving the brainstem nuclei. The management of baroreflex failure is a challenge since patient education, lifestyle changes, and family support are extremely important in managing blood pressure. Leg exercises and Thrombo-Embolic Deterrent Stockings (TED stockings are important in treating orthostatic hypotension. Clonidine is the antihypertensive of choice for supine hypertension. Low-dose benzodiazepines are helpful in suppressing sympathetic surges. We have encountered two patients with baroreflex failure after chemotherapy and radiation to the neck or upper chest. Temporal relationship between symptoms onset and the history of head, neck, and upper chest radiation or trauma is important in reaching a diagnosis.

  11. Recurrent syncope, orthostatic hypotension and volatile hypertension: think outside the box.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Thein; Fan, Wuqiang; Krishnamurthy, Mahesh

    2013-01-01

    The baroreceptors in the neck and aortic arch are important regulators of sudden blood pressure changes. They are innervated by CN IX and X and synapse in the brainstem. Baroreceptor failure is an under-recognized cause of recurrent syncope, orthostatic hypotension, and volatile hypertension, which is refractory to and may in fact worsen with conventional treatments. Baroreflex failure can be the result of neck and chest radiation, head and neck surgery, and cerebrovascular accidents involving the brainstem nuclei. The management of baroreflex failure is a challenge since patient education, lifestyle changes, and family support are extremely important in managing blood pressure. Leg exercises and Thrombo-Embolic Deterrent Stockings (TED) stockings are important in treating orthostatic hypotension. Clonidine is the antihypertensive of choice for supine hypertension. Low-dose benzodiazepines are helpful in suppressing sympathetic surges. We have encountered two patients with baroreflex failure after chemotherapy and radiation to the neck or upper chest. Temporal relationship between symptoms onset and the history of head, neck, and upper chest radiation or trauma is important in reaching a diagnosis.

  12. Bleeding from ruptured hepatic metastases as a cause of syncope in an octogenarian: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rizeq Mazen M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Acute hemoperitoneum as a result of hemorrhage from liver metastases is an uncommon but serious condition. The use of appropriate imaging is important in the diagnosis and can have a profound impact on subsequent management. This case is important because the presentation was of recurrent syncopal episodes with an unusual underlying cause. This case highlights the need to consider this diagnosis in the differential in patients presenting with collapse in the acute setting. Case presentation We present the case of an 85-year-old Caucasian man who was admitted following a collapse episode and was found to be persistently hypotensive despite aggressive resuscitation. An acute intra-peritoneal bleed originating from hepatic metastases from an unknown primary was identified promptly with computed tomography imaging and was subsequently managed conservatively. Conclusions This case aims to convey key teaching points: (A the need to consider intra-abdominal hemorrhage in the differential diagnosis when assessing patients with collapse; and (B the use of appropriate imaging such as computed tomography can facilitate a prompt diagnosis and appropriate management steps can then be taken accordingly.

  13. Clinically oriented device programming in bradycardia patients: part 2 (atrioventricular blocks and neurally mediated syncope). Proposals from AIAC (Italian Association of Arrhythmology and Cardiac Pacing).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmisano, Pietro; Ziacchi, Matteo; Biffi, Mauro; Ricci, Renato P; Landolina, Maurizio; Zoni-Berisso, Massimo; Occhetta, Eraldo; Maglia, Giampiero; Botto, Gianluca; Padeletti, Luigi; Boriani, Giuseppe

    2018-04-01

    : The purpose of this two-part consensus document is to provide specific suggestions (based on an extensive literature review) on appropriate pacemaker setting in relation to patients' clinical features. In part 2, criteria for pacemaker choice and programming in atrioventricular blocks and neurally mediate syncope are proposed. The atrioventricular blocks can be paroxysmal or persistent, isolated or associated with sinus node disease. Neurally mediated syncope can be related to carotid sinus syndrome or cardioinhibitory vasovagal syncope. In sinus rhythm, with persistent atrioventricular block, we considered appropriate the activation of mode-switch algorithms, and algorithms for auto-adaptive management of the ventricular pacing output. If the atrioventricular block is paroxysmal, in addition to algorithms mentioned above, algorithms to maximize intrinsic atrioventricular conduction should be activated. When sinus node disease is associated with atrioventricular block, the activation of rate-responsive function in patients with chronotropic incompetence is appropriate. In permanent atrial fibrillation with atrioventricular block, algorithms for auto-adaptive management of the ventricular pacing output should be activated. If the atrioventricular block is persistent, the activation of rate-responsive function is appropriate. In carotid sinus syndrome, adequate rate hysteresis should be programmed. In vasovagal syncope, specialized sensing and pacing algorithms designed for reflex syncope prevention should be activated.

  14. School Nurses on the Front Lines of Medicine: The Approach to a Student After a Syncopal Event: Don't "PASS OUT".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackett, Gretchen; Brady, Jodi; Olympia, Robert P

    2018-03-01

    Students presenting with syncope and/or seizure occur occasionally in the school setting. Several studies have shown that seizures as well as respiratory distress are the most common medical emergencies that prompt school nurses and staff to contact emergency medical services (EMS) to transport students to the closest emergency department (Knight 1999, Olympia 2005). It is important to develop a differential diagnosis for syncope, to initiate stabilization of the student with life-threatening symptoms, and to triage these students to an appropriate level of care (back to the classroom, home with their guardian with follow-up at their primary health care provider's office, or directly to the closest emergency department via EMS). This article describes the initial assessment and management of two students presenting after syncopal events.

  15. Working out the interstitial and syncopic nature of the human psyche: on the analysis of verbal data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Wolff-Michael

    2014-09-01

    Psychology studies the human mind and its development. Although it is often recognized that the human mind needs to be understood as a temporal (developmental) phenomenon between past and future and at the interstices between the idealities of pure Self and Other, the analytic methods interpretive researchers use tend to reify ahistorical and solipsist conceptions of the human being. In this article, I provide examples of an approach to the analysis of verbal data that immediately gets us to the interstitial and syncopic nature of the human psyche.

  16. Transvenous stimulation of the renal sympathetic nerves increases systemic blood pressure: a potential new treatment option for neurocardiogenic syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhavan, Malini; Desimone, Christopher V; Ebrille, Elisa; Mulpuru, Siva K; Mikell, Susan B; Johnson, Susan B; Suddendorf, Scott H; Ladewig, Dorothy J; Gilles, Emily J; Danielsen, Andrew J; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2014-10-01

    Neurocardiogenic syncope (NCS) is a common and sometimes debilitating disorder, with no consistently effective treatment. NCS is due to a combination of bradycardia and vasodilation leading to syncope. Although pacemaker devices have been tried in treating the bradycardic aspect of NCS, no device-based therapy exists to treat the coexistent vasodilation that occurs. The renal sympathetic innervation has been the target of denervation to treat hypertension. We hypothesized that stimulation of the renal sympathetic nerves can increase blood pressure and counteract vasodilation in NCS. High-frequency stimulation (800-900 pps, 10 V, 30-200 seconds) was performed using a quadripolar catheter in the renal vein of 7 dogs and 1 baboon. A significant increase in blood pressure (BP; mean [SD] systolic BP 117 [±28] vs. 128 [±33], diastolic BP 75 [±19] vs. 87 [±29] mmHg) was noted during the stimulation, which returned to baseline after cessation of stimulation. The mean increase in systolic and diastolic BP was 13.0 (±3.3) (P = 0.006) and 10.2 (±4.6) (P = 0.08), respectively. We report the first ever study of feasibility and safety of high-frequency electrical stimulation of the renal sympathetic innervation to increase BP in animal models. This has potential applications in the treatment of hypotensive states such as NCS. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Numerous Brugada syndrome-associated genetic variants have no effect on J-point elevation, syncope susceptibility, malignant cardiac arrhythmia, and all-cause mortality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghouse, Jonas; Have, Christian T; Skov, Morten W

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: We investigated whether Brugada syndrome (BrS)-associated variants identified in the general population have an effect on J-point elevation as well as whether carriers of BrS variants were more prone to experience syncope and malignant ventricular arrhythmia and had increased mortality c...

  18. Syncope in children and adolescents as asudden, transient, short-term and spontaneously reversible loss of consciousness caused by adecrease in cerebral perfusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Nowakowska

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is a common symptom in adolescents who come to the hospital emergency wards. The most common form of syncope is neurogenic type caused by impaired autoregulation of the circulatory system. This syncope is not generally life-threatening condition in a contrast to the less common but most dangerous cardiogenic type (e.g. cardiac arrhythmias due to Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, long QT time interval, atrioventricular blocks, haemodynamic obstructions in the outflow tract of the left or right ventricle, cardiomyopathy or coronary abnormalities. This paper refers to a new term, i.e. transient loss of consciousness. According to the new definition of syncope from 2009, temporary loss of consciousness has four components: a sudden occurrence, transient nature, short duration, and spontaneous regression. Currently, there are three main types of syncope associated with the cardiovascular system: neurogenic, orthostatic hypotension and a cardiac. The most common form in adolescents are neurogenic fainting which are often preceded by prodromal symptoms, i.e. decrease in blood pressure and heart rate. They can also occur in response to the stress or unusual situations. In the orthostatic syncope the loss of consciousness occurs in a very short time after the upright position and unlike neurogenic form, usually there are no prodromal symptoms, but tachycardia is present. The rarest, but also the most dangerous form of syncope is a cardiogenic type caused by arrhythmias or structural heart disease. This form may be the first sign of serious heart disease or even precede sudden cardiac death.

  19. The problem of dizziness and syncope in old age: transient ischemic attacks versus hypersensitive carotid sinus reflex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uesu, C T; Eisenman, J I; Stemmer, E A

    1976-03-01

    In the elderly, a transient ischemic attack (TIA) and a hypersensitive carotid sinus reflex (HCSR) often co-exist and can pose a diagnostic challenge. Seven cases are presented. HCSR is a relative condition; besides increased irritability of the receptor or target organs, susceptibility of the nerve center to ischemia probably is induced by a slow heart rate or low blood pressure in any patient with pre-existing occlusive cerebrovascular disease. Dizziness and syncope of this type represent hemodynamic TIA in contrast to thromboembolic TIA. The carotid sinus massage test is recommended for differentiating the two types of TIA; the treatments differ. At present there is no uniform management that can be applied to either TIA or HCSR routinely. Therefore, treatment should be approached on an individual basis, keeping in mind the different pathophysiologic factors operating in the specific patient.

  20. [Indices of 24-hour monitoring of arterial blood pressure in patients with neurogenic syncope and patients with chronic constitution- dependent hypotension].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaeva, Z A; Khapaev, B A; Fedotova, A V; Oknin, V Iu

    1999-01-01

    Clinical-psychologic study, spectral analysis of heart rate variability, 24-h monitoring of arterial pressure (AP) were performed in 20 patients with chronic constitutional arterial hypotension and in 18 patients with neurogenic syncopal states. Both groups were characterised by considerable manifestations of the syndrome of autonomic dystonia, by emotional-personal disorders that correlated with elevated level of slow-waves of the second order in heart rhythms' spectrum. That testified activation of supersegmental sympathetic-adrenal systems. Disorders in sympathetic-parasympathetic correlations were specific in each group. In patients with arterial hypotension disorder of circadian rhythm was observed in the form of superfluous decrease of diastolic AP during sleep. Circadian rhythms in patients with neurogenic syncopes have parameters characteristic for normals showing a preverved chronobiologic AP regulation. A role of the alterations revealed in pathogenesis of arterial hypotensionis discussed.

  1. [Usefulness of a protocol for carotid sinus massage in supine and erect postures in patients with syncope without other cardiovascular or neurological diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchiardo, M; Alciati, M; Buscemi, A; Cravetto, A; Richiardi, E; Gaita, F

    1995-05-01

    Carotid sinus massage is a first level test when investigating the cause of syncope. It is normally performed in the supine and erect positions. However, there is no standard complete protocol. So we have devised a new protocol to evaluate the utility of carotid sinus massage in different postures and the influence of patients age on the response. Two groups of subjects were selected: a group of 167 patients (mean age 50 ys +/- 18, 105 males, 62 females) with a history of syncope without cardiovascular and neurological disease and 20 asymptomatic control subjects (mean age 52 ys +/- 13, 11 males, 9 females). Carotid sinus massage was performed supine, just after passive tilt, after 5 minutes of tilt and just after passive return to supine. If a pause > 3" was detected, the protocol was repeated after atropine i.v. injection. Borderline vasodepressor: blood pressure reduction > 30 but blood pressure reduction > 50 mm Hg or > 30 mm Hg with symptoms like dizziness, vertigo or syncope; cardioinhibitory: pause > 3"; mixed: cardioinhibitory with blood pressure reduction > 30 mm Hg after atropine. Carotid sinus massage gave all informations in the supine position in 14 (12%) patients, after passive tilt in 67 (57%), after 5 minutes of tilt in 30 (26%), and after return to supine in 6 (5%). The responses were: 13 (8%) borderline vasodepressor, 32 (19%) vasodepressor, 2 (1%) cardioinhibitory, 70 (42%) mixed, 50 (30%) negative. Positive responses were more frequent in patients over 45 years (90% versus 43%). In the control group only 3 (15%) positive responses were elicited (2 borderline vasodepressor, and 1 vasodepressor, all in subjects over 45). This protocol for carotid sinus massage evidenced positive responses in 70% of patients with syncope without cardiovascular and neurological disease; cardioinhibitory responses are rare (2%); positive responses are more frequent in patients over 45 years; the protocol specificity was 85%.

  2. What factors influence parents' perception of the quality of life of children and adolescents with neurocardiogenic syncope?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimaldi Capitello, Teresa; Fiorilli, Caterina; Placidi, Silvia; Vallone, Roberta; Drago, Fabrizio; Gentile, Simonetta

    2016-05-17

    Health-related quality of life, which can be investigated using self-reports or parental reports, could help healthcare providers understand the subjective perception of well-being of children suffering from recurrent syncopal episodes. Quality of life is not only a measure of health but is also a reflection of patients' and parents' perceptions and expectations of health. This study assessed: 1) the consistency and agreement between pediatric patients' self-reports and parents' proxy-reports of their child's quality of life; 2) whether this patient-parent agreement is dependent on additional demographic and clinical or distress factors; 3) whether the parents' psychological distress influences children's and parents' responses to questionnaires on quality of life. One hundred and twenty-five Italian children aged 6-18 years old (Mean age 12.75, SD 2.73, 48 % female) and their parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life inventory with self-reports and parent-proxy reports, the Parenting Stress Index - Short Form questionnaire and the Child Behavior Checklist for ages 6-18. Patients' and parents' scores on quality of life were analyzed via an intra-class correlation coefficient, Spearman's correlation coefficient, Wilcoxon signed-rank test, and Bland-Altman plot. Child-rated quality of life was lower than parent-rated quality of life. However, there were no statistically significant differences between pediatric patients' self-reports and their parents' proxy-reports of on quality of life. Clinically significant patient-parent variation in pediatric health-related quality of life was observed. Differences in patient-parent proxy Pediatric Quality of Life inventory Total Scale Score scores were significantly associated with patient age. Concerning parents' proxy-ratings of their children's quality of life on the Pediatric Quality of Life inventory, parental stress was found to be negatively associated with their perceptions of their child's psychological quality

  3. Reflex syncope, anxiety level, and family history of cardiovascular disease in young women: case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, D; Szewczuk-Bogusławska, M; Kaczmarek, M; Agrawal, A K; Rudnicki, J; Gajek, J; Melander, O; Sutton, R; Fedorowski, A

    2015-02-01

    Anxiety is an emotion, which stimulates sympathetic nervous outflow potentially facilitating vasovagal reflex syncope (VVS) but reports on anxiety levels in patients with VVS are sparse. We studied anxiety levels in young women (21-40 years) referred for unexplained transient loss of consciousness (TLOC), and age-matched female controls with or without past history of TLOC (≈probable VVS). Referred patients underwent head-up tilt (HUT) according to current ESC Guidelines. State and Trait Anxiety Inventory questionnaire evaluated anxiety levels plus a questionnaire explored risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Sixty-five of 91 women were diagnosed with VVS on HUT. Among 549 controls, 223 (40.6%) reported at least one episode of TLOC. State-anxiety level in patients with VVS undergoing HUT (42.4 ± 9.3) was higher compared with both controls with (38.3 ± 10.2; P < 0.01) and without past TLOC history (35.9 ± 9.8; P < 0.001). Trait anxiety in patients with VVS (42.7 ± 8.4), and controls with TLOC history (42.4 ± 8.4) was higher compared with controls without TLOC history (39.7 ± 8.5; P < 0.01). In the logistic regression using controls without TLOC as reference, both VVS diagnosis and past history of TLOC were associated with family history of CVD [odds ratio (OR) 2.4, 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.3-4.4; P = 0.007, and 2.3, 1.4-3.6; P = 0.001, respectively], and this association was independent of anxiety level. Trait anxiety and family history of CVD are increased in both young women with VVS and controls with history of TLOC. However, the height of anxiety level does not explain CVD heredity and other mechanisms may link syncope with CVD. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2014. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Clinical utility of serum lactate levels for differential diagnosis of generalized tonic-clonic seizures from psychogenic nonepileptic seizures and syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doğan, Ebru Apaydın; Ünal, Ali; Ünal, Aslıhan; Erdoğan, Çağla

    2017-10-01

    The differential diagnosis of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS), psychogenic nonepileptic seizures (PNES), and syncope constitutes a major challenge. Misdiagnosis rates up to 20 to 30% are reported in the literature. To assess the clinical utility of serum lactate levels for differentiation of GTCS, PNES, and syncope based on gender differences. Data from 270 patients were evaluated retrospectively. Only patients ≥18 years old with the final diagnosis of GTCS, PNES, or syncope in their chart were recruited. Serum lactate levels were measured in the first 2h of the index event. Serum lactate levels in patients with GTCS (n=157) were significantly higher than in the patients with PNES (n=25) (plactate levels in patients with GTCS were significantly higher in the male subgroup (p=0.004). In male patients the ROC analysis yielded a serum lactate value of 2.43mmol/l with a sensitivity of 0.85 and a specificity of 0.88 as the optimal cut-off value to distinguish GTCS from other events. The ROC analysis for the AUC yielded a high estimate of 0.94 (95% confidence interval: 0.91-0.98). When a cut-off value of 2.43mmol/l was chosen for the females, which was an optimal value for male patients, the specificity was 0.85, however, the sensitivity was 0.64. We propose that serum lactate level when measured in the first 2h after the index event has a high clinical utility in the differential diagnosis of GTCS, PNES, and syncope. With concomitant clinical signs and physical examination findings besides neuroimaging and EEG, elevated levels of lactate should be taken into account when evaluating a patient with impaired consciousness. On the other hand, the suggested cut-off value 2.43mmol/l might not have a discriminative effect between GTCS, PNES, and syncope in female patients. This finding should be verified in a prospectively designed study with a larger patient population. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A Right-sided Aortic Arch with Kommerell's Diverticulum of the Aberrant Left Subclavian Artery Presenting with Syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsun Yang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A right-sided aortic arch with an aneurysm of the aberrant subclavian artery is a rare disease. We report a case of Kommerell's diverticulum of an aberrant left subclavian artery in a patient with a right-sided aortic arch. Fewer than 50 cases have been reported in the literature. A number of operative strategies are described. Right thoracotomy provides good exposure and avoids the morbidity associated with bilateral thoracotomy or sternotomy and thoracotomy. In our patient with symptoms of dysphagia, syncope, and left subclavian steal syndrome, a left thoracotomy was used. The repair was accomplished by division of a left ligamentum arteriosum, obliteration of the Kommerell's aneurysm, and an aorto-subclavian bypass. Postoperative complications included left vocal cord palsy and Horner's syndrome. Hoarseness and left ptosis recovered spontaneously 3 months after surgery, and the patient remained symptom-free at the 1-year follow-up. We believe a left thoracotomy for direct repair of Kommerell's diverticulum is a simple and safe method without the increased morbidity found in other procedures.

  6. [Features of daily rhythm of arterial pressure in patients with primary arterial hypertension and neurogenic syncope conditions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musaeva, Z A; Oknin, V Iu; Khapaev, B A; Fedotova, A V; Veĭn, A M

    2002-01-01

    A comparative analysis of parameters of systemic BP in patients with primary arterial hypotension (PAH) and in patients with neurogenic syncopes (NS) in the cycle sleep-awake. Blood pressure was investigated in 20 patients with PAH aged 16-44 years and 18 patients with NS aged 16-49 years. 24-h ambulatory monitoring of BP was made on the monitor ABPM-02/M (Meditech, Hungary). Rhythm indices of BP in NS patients corresponded to age normal criteria. 24-h arrhythmia of BP in PAH patients manifests with excessive drop of diastolic BP in sleep (55% patients were overdippers). PAH and NS patients differ maximally by hypotonic load in sleep: 1.0 +/- 0.7% in NS vs 15.4 +/- 3.2% in PAH. Hypotonia episodes in awake PAH patients were registered at each 4th-5th measurement of BP, in NS patients--at each 11th-13th. Heart rate in awake PAH patients is higher than in healthy subjects. Hypotonic load in sleep carries the highest differentially-diagnostic importance. This makes more perspective examinations of such patients in the cycle sleep-awake. The changes observed in PAH patients evidence for activation of cerebral sympathico-adrenal systems participating in baroreflex regulation.

  7. The influence of a tilt training programme on the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activity in patients with vasovagal syncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajek, Jacek; Zyśko, Dorota; Krzemińska, Sylwia; Mazurek, Walentyna

    2009-08-01

    We assessed the influence of short-term and long-term tilt training on the activity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) in vasovagal patients. Thirty-nine patients (28 F, 11 M) aged 39.7 +/- 11.2 years with a history of vasovagal syncope and a positive head-up tilt test (HUT) were studied. Blood samples for plasma renin activity (PRA) and aldosterone (ALDO) concentration were drawn at the baseline, immediately after HUT and 10 min after HUT, during the diagnostic, the negative short-term (2-5 days) follow-up HUT and long-term (1-3 months) follow-up HUT. Tilt training was started after diagnostic HUT. In diagnostic HUT, PRA increased significantly immediately after HUT comparing to the baseline, during recovery the values did not change. ALDO concentration increased after HUT comparing to baseline and further increased during recovery. After short-term tilt training, PRA and ALDO concentrations did not significantly change compared to their corresponding values in diagnostic HUT. After long-term tilt training, PRA did not significantly change compared to the values in the diagnostic and short-term follow-up HUT. ALDO concentration also did not change significantly at the baseline and immediately after HUT, and 10 min after HUT ALDO concentration was significantly lower than after diagnostic HUT. Tilt training changes the response of RAAS to the prolonged orthostasis in vasovagal patients. The coupling between PRA and ALDO after diagnostic HUT has been found to be altered and the physiological relationship was restored after long-term tilt training. The beneficial effect of tilt training depends partially on changed RAAS activation.

  8. [Determination of prognostic value of the OESIL risk score at 6 months in a Colombian cohort with syncope evaluated in the emergency department; first Latin American experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Tribaldos, Diana Carolina; Mora, Guillermo; Olaya, Alejandro; Marín, Jorge; Sierra Matamoros, Fabio

    2017-07-14

    To establish the prognostic value, with sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value for the OESIL syncope risk score to predict the presentation of severe outcomes (death, invasive interventions, and readmission) after 6 months of observation in adults who consulted the emergency department due to syncope. Observational, prospective, and multicentre study with enrolment of subjects older than 18 years, who consulted in the emergency department due to syncope. A record was mad of the demographic and clinical information of all patients. The OESIL risk score was calculated, and severe patient outcomes were followed up during a 6 month period using telephone contact. A total of 161 patients met the inclusion criteria and were followed up for 6 months. A score above or equal to 2 in the risk score, classified as high risk, was present in 72% of the patients. The characteristics of the risk score to predict the combined outcome of mortality, invasive interventions, and readmission for a score above or equal to 2 were 75.7, 30.5, 43.1, and 64.4% for sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value, respectively. A score above or equal to 2 in the OESIL risk score applied in Colombian population was of limited use to predict the studied severe outcomes. This score will be unable to discriminate between patients that benefit of early admission and further clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  9. Structured syncope care pathways based on lean six sigma methodology optimises resource use with shorter time to diagnosis and increased diagnostic yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Leon; Goode, Grahame; Wold, Johan F H; Beck, Lionel; Martin, Georgina; Perings, Christian; Stolt, Pelle; Baggerman, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    To conduct a pilot study on the potential to optimise care pathways in syncope/Transient Loss of Consciousness management by using Lean Six Sigma methodology while maintaining compliance with ESC and/or NICE guidelines. Five hospitals in four European countries took part. The Lean Six Sigma methodology consisted of 3 phases: 1) Assessment phase, in which baseline performance was mapped in each centre, processes were evaluated and a new operational model was developed with an improvement plan that included best practices and change management; 2) Improvement phase, in which optimisation pathways and standardised best practice tools and forms were developed and implemented. Staff were trained on new processes and change-management support provided; 3) Sustaining phase, which included support, refinement of tools and metrics. The impact of the implementation of new pathways was evaluated on number of tests performed, diagnostic yield, time to diagnosis and compliance with guidelines. One hospital with focus on geriatric populations was analysed separately from the other four. With the new pathways, there was a 59% reduction in the average time to diagnosis (p = 0.048) and a 75% increase in diagnostic yield (p = 0.007). There was a marked reduction in repetitions of diagnostic tests and improved prioritisation of indicated tests. Applying a structured Lean Six Sigma based methodology to pathways for syncope management has the potential to improve time to diagnosis and diagnostic yield.

  10. Structured syncope care pathways based on lean six sigma methodology optimises resource use with shorter time to diagnosis and increased diagnostic yield.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Martens

    Full Text Available To conduct a pilot study on the potential to optimise care pathways in syncope/Transient Loss of Consciousness management by using Lean Six Sigma methodology while maintaining compliance with ESC and/or NICE guidelines.Five hospitals in four European countries took part. The Lean Six Sigma methodology consisted of 3 phases: 1 Assessment phase, in which baseline performance was mapped in each centre, processes were evaluated and a new operational model was developed with an improvement plan that included best practices and change management; 2 Improvement phase, in which optimisation pathways and standardised best practice tools and forms were developed and implemented. Staff were trained on new processes and change-management support provided; 3 Sustaining phase, which included support, refinement of tools and metrics. The impact of the implementation of new pathways was evaluated on number of tests performed, diagnostic yield, time to diagnosis and compliance with guidelines. One hospital with focus on geriatric populations was analysed separately from the other four.With the new pathways, there was a 59% reduction in the average time to diagnosis (p = 0.048 and a 75% increase in diagnostic yield (p = 0.007. There was a marked reduction in repetitions of diagnostic tests and improved prioritisation of indicated tests.Applying a structured Lean Six Sigma based methodology to pathways for syncope management has the potential to improve time to diagnosis and diagnostic yield.

  11. Prediction of the estimated 5-year risk of sudden cardiac death and syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using late gadolinium enhancement and extracellular volume CMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avanesov, Maxim; Weinrich, Julius; Well, Lennart; Tahir, Enver; Adam, Gerhard; Lund, Gunnar [University Hospital Hamburg Eppendorf, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hamburg (Germany); Muench, Julia; Patten, Monica [University Heart Center Hamburg, Department of General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany); DZHK (German Center for Cardiovascular Research), Partner Site Hamburg/Kiel/Luebeck, Hamburg (Germany); Saering, Dennis [University of Applied Sciences, Information Technology and Image Processing, Wedel (Germany); Stehning, Christian [Philips Research, Hamburg (Germany); Bohnen, Sebastian; Radunski, Ulf K.; Muellerleile, Kai [University Heart Center Hamburg, Department of General and Interventional Cardiology, Hamburg (Germany)

    2017-12-15

    To evaluate the ability of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and mapping cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) including native T1 and global extracellular volume (ECV) to identify hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and to predict syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). A 1.5-T CMR was performed in 73 HCM patients and 16 controls. LGE size was quantified using the 3SD, 5SD and full width at half maximum (FWHM) method. T1 and ECV maps were generated by a 3(3)5 modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. Receiver-operating curve analysis evaluated the best parameter to identify patients with increased SCD risk ≥4% and patients with syncope or non-sustained VT. Global ECV was the best predictor of SCD risk with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.83. LGE size was significantly inferior to global ECV with an AUC of 0.68, 0.70 and 0.70 (all P < 0.05) for 3SD-, 5SD- and FWHM-LGE, respectively. Combined use of the SCD risk score and global ECV significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy to identify HCM patients with syncope or non-sustained VT. Combined use of the SCD risk score and global ECV has the potential to improve HCM patient selection, benefiting most implantable cardioverter defibrillators. (orig.)

  12. Prediction of the estimated 5-year risk of sudden cardiac death and syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy using late gadolinium enhancement and extracellular volume CMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avanesov, Maxim; Weinrich, Julius; Well, Lennart; Tahir, Enver; Adam, Gerhard; Lund, Gunnar; Muench, Julia; Patten, Monica; Saering, Dennis; Stehning, Christian; Bohnen, Sebastian; Radunski, Ulf K.; Muellerleile, Kai

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the ability of late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) and mapping cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) including native T1 and global extracellular volume (ECV) to identify hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients at risk for sudden cardiac death (SCD) and to predict syncope or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia (VT). A 1.5-T CMR was performed in 73 HCM patients and 16 controls. LGE size was quantified using the 3SD, 5SD and full width at half maximum (FWHM) method. T1 and ECV maps were generated by a 3(3)5 modified Look-Locker inversion recovery sequence. Receiver-operating curve analysis evaluated the best parameter to identify patients with increased SCD risk ≥4% and patients with syncope or non-sustained VT. Global ECV was the best predictor of SCD risk with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.83. LGE size was significantly inferior to global ECV with an AUC of 0.68, 0.70 and 0.70 (all P < 0.05) for 3SD-, 5SD- and FWHM-LGE, respectively. Combined use of the SCD risk score and global ECV significantly improved the diagnostic accuracy to identify HCM patients with syncope or non-sustained VT. Combined use of the SCD risk score and global ECV has the potential to improve HCM patient selection, benefiting most implantable cardioverter defibrillators. (orig.)

  13. Glossopharyngeal neuralgia with syncope as a sign of neck cancer recurrence Neuralgia glossofaríngea com síncope como um sinal de recidiva de câncer do pescoço

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinaldo Teixeira Ribeiro

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Glossopharyngeal neuralgia with syncope as a sign of neck cancer is a very rare condition. A review of the literature revealed only 29 cases formerly reported. We present the first Brazilian case of such association. A 68-year-old man presented with paroxysmal excruciating pain over the right side of the neck, sometimes followed by syncope. Given the suspicion of recurrent tumor from a previously treated neck malignancy, a computed tomography scan was performed and a right parapharyngeal tumor was shown. Pain and syncope were successfully controlled with carbamazepine and the patient underwent palliative radiotherapy.Neuralgia glossofaríngea com síncope como um sinal de câncer do pescoço é uma condição muito rara. Uma revisão da literatura revelou apenas 29 casos relatados anteriormente. Apresentamos o primeiro caso brasileiro de tal associação. Um homem de 68 anos se apresentou com dores paroxísticas insuportáveis no lado direito do pescoço, algumas vezes seguidas de síncope. Dada a suspeita de recidiva tumoral derivada de uma malignidade cervical tratada previamente, realizou-se um exame de tomografia computadorizada que evidenciou um tumor parafaríngeo direito. As dores e as síncopes foram controladas satisfatoriamente com carbamazepina e o paciente foi submetido à radioterapia paliativa.

  14. Anomalous origin of left coronary artery arising from the right coronary cusp presenting with chest discomfort and syncope on physical exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ran Baik

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Anomalous origins of coronary arteries are a rare type of disease among children. These anomalies can be categorized into 3 types according to the anatomical relationship of the aorta and pulmonary trunks. Among these types, the interarterial type, as observed in our case, needs early diagnosis and treatment, because it can increase the risk for the patient, causing sudden cardiac death in young individuals. Although there are controversies concerning the management of anomalous origins of the left coronary artery (LCA in children, the result can be very beneficial, if treated accurately. Three well-known methods for correction of anomalous origins of LCA are re-implantation, coronary arterial bypass grafting (CABG, and unroofing. We report on the case of a 12-year-old girl who had chest discomfort and syncope with physical exercise and was later diagnosed with an anomalous origin of LCA by transthoracic echocardiography (TTE and heart computed tomography (CT. She underwent a corrective operation by re-implantation, CABG, and unroofing.

  15. Esclerosis sistémica complicada con síncope y bloqueo AV completo Systemic sclerosis complicated with syncope and complete AV block

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Femenía

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available La esclerosis sistémica es una compleja enfermedad que afecta el tejido conectivo, el sistema vascular y el sistema inmunológico, y se caracteriza por fibrosis cutánea y de órganos viscerales. Los bloqueos de rama y los hemibloqueos se presentan en el 25 a 75% de los casos y constituyen predictores independientes de mortalidad. Los bloqueos auriculoventriculares de segundo o tercer grado son muy raros. Presentamos el caso de una mujer de 47 años de edad, con diagnóstico de esclerosis sistémica, quien presenta episodio sincopal secundario a bloqueo auriculoventricular completo con necesidad de implante de marcapasos definitivo.Systemic sclerosis is a complex disease that affects the connective tissue, the vascular system and the immune system. It typically produces skin and organ fibrosis. Cardiac bundle branch blocks and fascicular blocks occur in 25-75% of the cases and were found to be independent predictors of mortality. Second and third degree atrioventricular block are very rare. We present the case of a 47 year-old female with diagnosis of systemic sclerosis, presented with syncope secondary to complete atrioventricular block requiring permanent pacemaker implantation.

  16. TROMBO GIGANTE DE AURÍCULA DERECHA COMO CAUSA DE ANGINA Y SÍNCOPE / Giant thrombus in right atrium as a cause of angina and syncope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José L. Aparicio Suárez

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available ResumenLas tumoraciones intracardíacas son poco frecuentes, y pueden ser de tipo neoplásicas y no neoplásicas. De estas últimas, los trombos, constituyen las masas más frecuentes. Se presenta un paciente joven, operado en el Cardiocentro "Ernesto Che Guevara" de Villa Clara, Cuba, con antecedentes de trastornos hematológicos desde la infancia, que comienza con episodios de disnea progresiva, angina y síncope; con diagnóstico preoperatorio de tumoración gigante en aurícula derecha que resultó ser un trombo intracardíaco, y se demostró la presencia de un agujero oval permeable. / AbstractIntracardiac tumors are rare, and may be of neoplastic and non-neoplastic types. In the latter, the thrombi are the most frequent masses. This is the case of a young patient operated at the Cardiocentro "Ernesto Che Guevara" of Villa Clara, Cuba, with a history of blood disorders since childhood, starting with episodes of progressive dyspnea, angina and syncope, with pre-operative diagnosis of giant tumor in right atrium which turned out to be an intracardiac thrombus, and the presence of a patent foramen ovale was shown.

  17. Hyperventilation, cerebral perfusion, and syncope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Immink, R V; Pott, F C; Secher, N H

    2014-01-01

    dioxide (PaCO2) and oxygen (PaO2) partial pressures so that hypercapnia/hypoxia increases and hypocapnia/hyperoxia reduces global cerebral blood flow. Cerebral hypoperfusion and TLOC have been associated with hypocapnia related to HV. Notwithstanding pronounced cerebrovascular effects of PaCO2...... the contribution of a low PaCO2 to the early postural reduction in middle cerebral artery blood velocity is transient. HV together with postural stress does not reduce cerebral perfusion to such an extent that TLOC develops. However when HV is combined with cardiovascular stressors like cold immersion or reduced...... cardiac output brain perfusion becomes jeopardized. Whether, in patients with cardiovascular disease and/or defect, cerebral blood flow cerebral control HV-induced hypocapnia elicits cerebral hypoperfusion, leading to TLOC, remains to be established....

  18. Síndrome de Brugada en un paciente con síncope: Presentación de un caso y revisión de la literatura Brugada syndrome in a patient with syncope: A case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos J Jaramillo

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available El síndrome de Brugada es una enfermedad autosómica dominante esporádica que afecta los canales de sodio de los miocardiocitos. Clínicamente se caracteriza por síncopes recurrentes y/o muerte súbita, que en el electrocardiograma simula un bloqueo de rama derecha, acompañado de elevación peculiar del segmento ST en las derivaciones precordiales derechas (V1, V2 y V3 sin alteración cardiaca estructural. Afecta principalmente a hombres en la cuarta década de la vida y tiene mayor prevalencia en el suroeste asiático. El caso que se describe corresponde a un paciente con antecedentes personales de síncopes, a quien se le encuentra un patrón electrocardiográfico tipo-2 de Brugada y quien además tiene un hermano con historia de síncopes. Con una prueba de mesa basculantes positivo para síncope mediado neuralmente se deja este diagnóstico, pero no se descarta la sospecha inicial de síndrome de Brugada.Brugada syndrome is a sporadic autosomal dominant genetic disease that affects cardiac sodium channels. It is clinically characterized by recurrent syncope and/or sudden death with electrocardiographic manifestations that simulate a right bundle branch block accompanied by ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads (V1, V2 and V3 without structural cardiac changes. It mainly affects men in their fourth decade and is most prevalent in southwestern Asia. We present the case of a patient with history of syncope, type-2 Brugada electrocardiographic pattern and who has a brother also with history of syncope. The patient had a positive tilt test for neurocardiogenic syncope. He was diagnosed as neurocardiogenic syndrome, without discarding the initial suspicion of Brugada syndrome.

  19. A memória e o valor da síncope: da diferença do que ensinam os antigos e os modernos Memory and value of syncopation: on the difference between what the old and the modern teach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sérgio Paulo Ribeiro de Freitas

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available A síncope é um tema privilegiado nos estudos da música popular que reaparece aqui em um conjunto de considerações que, marcado pelo viés dos saberes das velhas disciplinas de Contraponto e Harmonia, sublinham a interação e, principalmente, a inseparabilidade entre métrica (divisão, ritmo, acentuação, prosódia, etc. e altura (notas, intervalos, relação dissonância-consonância, acordes, notas auxiliares, etc. na apreciação crítica das figurações sincopadas. Na primeira parte percorre-se uma mínima memória da arte e da teoria da síncope na tradição ocidental culta para, na segunda parte, observar-se que, em medida tácita e sutil, resíduos dessa tradição afetam juízos de valor em alguns dos sincopados cenários da música popular atual.Syncopation is a privileged issue in popular music studies that reappears here in a number of considerations that, marked by the bias of knowledge of the old disciplines of Counterpoint and Harmony, underline the interaction and, especially, the inseparability between metric (division, rhythm, accentuation, prosody, etc. and pitches (notes, intervals, dissonance-consonance relationship, chords, auxiliary notes, etc. in a critical analysis of the figures of syncopation. The first part covers up a minimum memory of the art and theory of syncopation in the Western erudite tradition, so that, in the second part, it can be noted that, in tacit and subtle manner, residues of this tradition can affect the value judgment in some of the syncopated worlds of popular music today.

  20. Síncope cardíaca reflexa por "nevralgia" do glossofaríngeo: rara apresentação dessa doença Cardiac syncope induced by glossopharyngeal "neuralgia": a rare presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helio Korkes

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available A primeira descrição de dor severa no trajeto do nervo glossofaríngeo foi realizada por Weisenberg, em 1910¹, em um paciente com tumor do ângulo ponto cerebelar. Entretanto, coube a Harris, em 1926², nomear como nevralgia do nervo glossofaríngeo esse raro quadro clínico, caracterizado por paroxismos de dor intensa, unilaterais, na região posterior da língua, no palato mole, na garganta e na região lateral e posterior da faringe, irradiando para o ouvido. A dor pode ser desencadeada por deglutição, tosse, bocejo ou mastigação e normalmente dura de segundos a minutos. A associaç��o de nevralgia do glossofaríngeo e síncope é muito rara e se deve a breves períodos de bradicardia, assistolia ou hipotensão, sendo a primeira descrição dessa associação, com essa fisiopatologia, realizada por Riley e cols., em 1942³.The first description of severe pain in the distribution of the glossopharyngeal nerve is credited to Weisenberg, in 1910¹, in a patient with cerebellopontine angle tumor. However, it was Harris, in 1926², who coined the term glossopharyngeal neuralgia to describe this rare condition characterized by paroxysms of excruciating pain located laterally at the back of the tongue, soft palate, throat, and lateral and posterior pharynx, radiating to the ear. Swallowing, coughing, yawning or chewing may trigger pain, which usually lasts from seconds to minutes. The association between glossopharyngeal neuralgia and syncope is very rare, being identified by brief episodes of bradycardia, asystole, and hypotension. Such an association, with this same pathophysiology, was first described by Riley et al³ in 1942.

  1. GUIDELINES FOR THE DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF SYNCOPE (2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angel Moya

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Внешние эксперты: Haruhiko Abe (Япония, David G. Benditt (США, Wyatt W. Decker (США, Blair P. Grubb (США, Horacio Kaufmann9 (США, Carlos Morillo (Канада, Brian Olshansky (США, Steve W. Parry (Великобритания, Robert Sheldon (Канада, Win K. Shen (СШАЧлены Комитета Европейского общества кардиологов по практическим рекомендациям (ESC Committee for Practice Guidelines: CPG: Alec Vahanian (Председатель (Франция, Angelo Auricchio (Швейцария,Jeroen Bax (Нидерланды, Claudio Ceconi (Италия, Veronica Dean (Франция, Gerasimos Filippatos (Греция, Christian Funck-Brentano (Франция, Richard Hobbs (Великобритания, Peter Kearney (Ирландия, Theresa McDonagh (Великобритания, Keith McGregor (Франция, Bogdan A. Popescu (Румыния, Zeljko Reiner (Хорватия, Udo Sechtem (Германия, Per Anton Sirnes (Норвегия, Michal Tendera (Польша, Panos Vardas (Греция, Petr Widimsky (ЧехияРецензенты: Angelo Auricchio (Координатор от CPG (Швейцария, Esmeray Acarturk (Турция, Felicita Andreotti (Италия, Riccardo Asteggiano (Италия, Urs Bauersfeld (Швейцария, Abdelouahab Bellou4 (Франция, Athanase Benetos6 (Франция, Johan Brandt (Швеция, Mina K. Chung3 (США, Pietro Cortelli 8 (Италия, Antoine Da Costa (Франция, Fabrice Extramiana (Франция, Jose´ Ferro7 (Португалия, Bulent Gorenek (Турция, Antti Hedman (Финляндия, Rafael Hirsch (Израиль, Gabriela Kaliska (Словакия, Rose Anne Kenny6 (Ирландия, Keld Per Kjeldsen (Дания, Rachel Lampert 3 (USA, Henning Mølgard (Denmark, Rain Paju (Эстония, Aras Puodziukynas (Литва, Antonio Raviele (Италия, Pilar Roman5 (Испания, Martin Scherer (Германия, Ronald Schondorf 9 (Канада, Rosa Sicari (Италия, Peter Vanbrabant 4 (Бельгия, Christian Wolpert1 (Германия, Jose Luis Zamorano (Испания.

  2. Syncopated Beats and the History of Sadness: The Affective Fusion of Audience and Film through Music

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    Kutter Callaway

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in the disciplines of cinema studies, theology, and religion and film have generated renewed interest in the experiential dimensions of filmgoing. More specifically, those contributing to theological scholarship have begun to explore these cinematic experiences as theologically significant. With these developments in mind, this essay offers a close reading of the principal musical theme in the 2010 film Beginners, noting in particular the ways in which this music is distributed throughout the narrative. In doing so, it suggests that the music in this film expresses in concrete terms one of the key insights from emerging neuropsychological research, namely, that our affective, pre-cognitive, “wordless knowledge” of the world is the foundation upon which human consciousness is constructed. But the essay goes one step further by making an explicitly theological claim. That is, when located within the framework of a lived theology (i.e., a “poetic theology”, the film and its music shed light on the ways in which aesthetic modes of awareness (i.e., intuitive, embodied forms of knowledge open up spaces in the contemporary world where our affections, the goods of late-modern society, and our spiritual longings are able to meet and interact.

  3. Clinical history in management of suspected syncope: A powerful diagnostic tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sutton, Richard; van Dijk, Nynke; Wieling, Wouter

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, the role of history taking as a diagnostic tool in patients with transient loss of consciousness (TLOC) is addressed. From a literature review it can be demonstrated that, if properly performed, the history is a powerful diagnostic tool, which in the majority of cases proves to be the

  4. Carotid sinus syndrome and cardiovagal regulation in elderly patients with suspected syncope-related falls

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise Schouborg; Latif, Tabassam; Pors, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    ) positions. A hypersensitive response was defined by current guidelines. Results: In the supine position, heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) decreased during CSM on the right side by 17.0 +/- 15.2 min-1 and 32.5 +/- 25.5 mmHg, and on the left side by 12.8 +/- 14.3 min-1 and 22.7 +/- 20.7 mm......Hg, respectively. Changes in SBP were greater in the head-up tilted position (right side; p=0.029, left side; p=0.007). Hypersensitive responses were elicited in 45 patients. We found orthostatic hypotension (OH) (r=-0.275, p=0.015), not CSS, to be inversely correlated to low frequency HR variability during HUT....... Conclusions: The hemodynamic response to CSM has a well-defined pattern and differs both with respect to the stimulus site and patient position. We suggest that CSS is not a distinct pathophysiological process or disease entity but rather an acquired cardiovascular instability due to age-related degeneration...

  5. Vasovagal Syncope and Blood Donor Return: Examination of the Role of Experience and Affective Expectancies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olatunji, Bunmi O.; Etzel, Erin N.; Ciesielski, Bethany G.

    2010-01-01

    Vasovagal sensations (e.g., dizziness, nausea, and fainting) are one of the main reasons people find blood donation unpleasant. A better understanding of predictors of vasovagal sensations during blood donation could inform interventions designed to increase donor return rates. The present investigation examined the extent to which experience with…

  6. Syncope during exercise, documented with continuous blood pressure monitoring during ergometer testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krediet, C. T. Paul; Wilde, Arthur A. M.; Halliwill, John R.; Wieling, Wouter

    2005-01-01

    A 27-year old female had one episode of transient loss of consciousness and several of nearunconsciousness during strenuous exercise and sexual activity. Episodes started with abdominal discomfort or nausea and light headedness. Unconsciousness never exceeded one minute. When trying to stand up, she

  7. PECULIARITIES OF AUTONOMOUS REGULATION IN THE PATIENTS WITH SYNCOPE LIVING IN AN INDUSTRIAL CITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Илья Дмитриевич Мартынов

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions. Taking into account the changes in the spectral indices of heart rate variability during an active orthostatic test, a pathogenetic approach to the early detection, treatment and prevention of cardiovascular diseases is possible.

  8. Syncope and QT prolongation among patients treated with methadone for heroin dependence in the city of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanoe, Søren; Hvidt, C; Ege, P

    2007-01-01

    were collected in a population of adult heroin addicts treated with methadone or buprenorphine on a daily basis. Of the patients at the Drug Addiction Service in the municipal of Copenhagen, 450 ( 52%) were included. The QT interval was estimated from 12 lead ECGs. All participants were interviewed...

  9. Syncope and QT prolongation among patients treated with methadone for heroin dependence in the city of Copenhagen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fanoe, Søren; Hvidt, Christian; Ege, Peter Preben

    2007-01-01

    Methadone is prescribed to heroin addicts to decrease illicit opioid use. Prolongation of the QT interval in the ECG of patients with torsade de pointes (TdP) has been reported in methadone users. As heroin addicts sometimes faint while using illicit drugs, doctors might attribute too many episodes...

  10. PROLONGED MULTIPLE SPASMS OF SMOOTH CORONARY ARTERIES PRESENTING AS ACUTE MIOCARDIAL INFARCTION, COMPLETE AV BLOCK AND SYNCOPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franci Cesar

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Background. A variant form of angina pectoris (VAP is caused by coronary vessel spasm and occures in patients with and without varying degrees of obstructive coronary artery disease. Although the prognosis of VAP without significant organic stenosis is generally good, multivessel spasm is associated with a high risk of life-threatening abnormalities of rhythm and conduction.Patient and methods. We describe a patient who presented with prolonged chest pain, associated with hypotension, lost of consciousness, complete AV block and widespread ST segment elevations consistent with inferoanterior acute myocardial infarction. Urgent selective coronary angiography revealed spasms in right coronary artery and in left circumflex artery that were relieved by intracoronary injection of nitroglycerin. All coronary arteries were otherwise patient, without signs of atherosclerosis. The patient was treated with diltiazem and nitrates. She made a complete recovery and resumed her normal activities.Conclusions. Simultaneous multiple spasms of native coronary arteries represent a rare syndrome characterized by significantly higher incidence of potentially life-threatening arrhythmia. Less commonly, prolonged coronary spasm may mimic acute myocardial infarction. Modern management of acute coronary syndromes, including urgent coronarography, enables a prompt differentiation between prolonged coronary spasm and atherosclerotic coronary disease, warranting different treatment strategies. Medical treatment with nitrates and calcium channel blockers in most cases prevents recurrence of vasospasms and arrhythmias.

  11. Atrial flutter with spontaneous 1:1 atrioventricular conduction in adults: an uncommon but frequently missed cause for syncope/presyncope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turitto, Gioia; Akhrass, Philippe; Leonardi, Marino; Saponieri, Cesare; Sette, Antonella; El-Sherif, Nabil

    2009-01-01

    To compare patients with atrial flutter (AFl) and 1:1 atrioventricular conduction (AVC) with patients with AFl and higher AVC. The characteristics of 19 patients with AFl and 1:1 AVC (group A) were compared with those of 116 consecutive patients with AFl and 2:1 AVC or higher degree AV block (group B). Age, gender, and left ventricular function were similar in the two groups. In group A versus group B, more patients had no structural heart disease (42% vs 17%, P AVC or vice versa was associated with small but definite changes in AFl CL, which showed larger variations in response to sympathetic stimulation. In group A patients who were studied off drugs, the atrial-His interval was not different from group B, but maximal atrial pacing rate with 1:1 AVC was faster. In group A, five patients were misdiagnosed as ventricular tachyarrhythmias, and three with a defibrillator received inappropriate shocks. Four patients had ablation of AVC and six had ablation of AFl circuit. The main difference between groups A and B may be an inherent capacity of the AV node for faster conduction, especially in response to increased sympathetic tone. The latter affects not only AVC but also the AFl CL. One should be aware of the different presentations of AFl with 1:1 AVC to avoid misdiagnosis/mismanagement and to consider the diagnosis in patients with narrow or wide QRS tachycardia and rates above 220/min.

  12. Exercise-Stress Echocardiography Reveals Systolic Anterior Motion of the Mitral Valve as a Cause of Syncopes in a Cardiac Amyloidosis Patient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Tor Skibsted; Mølgaard, Henning; Andersen, Niels Frost

    2016-01-01

    increased left ventricular outflow track (LVOT) velocity. However, bicycle exercise-stress test with simultaneous echocardiography revealed a stepwise decrease in blood pressure, a substantial increase in the LVOT velocity, and severe systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve. The patients' symptoms were...

  13. Now you hear it: a predictive coding model for understanding rhythmic incongruity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuust, Peter; Dietz, Martin; Witek, Maria

    2018-01-01

    Rhythmic incongruity in the form of syncopation is a prominent feature of many contemporary musical styles. Syncopations afford incongruity between rhythmic patterns and the meter, giving rise to mental models of differently accented isochronous beats. Syncopations occur either in isolation or as...

  14. Malignant vasovagal syndrome in two patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandhi, N M; Bennett, D H

    2004-01-01

    The presence of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in patients presenting with syncope suggests that tachyarrhythmia may be the cause. However, the symptoms require careful evaluation. Two young patients presented with syncope and were found to have WPW syndrome on their ECG. In both patients symptoms were suggestive of vasovagal syncope. During tilt testing, both the patients developed their typical symptoms with a fall in blood pressure and heart rate confirming the diagnosis of malignant vasovagal syndrome. PMID:15020537

  15. A Survey of Hospitalizations in Cardiology Units in Sub-Saharan Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-24

    Acute Coronary Syndrome; Heart Failure; Syncope; Stroke; Pericarditis; Endocarditis; Conduction Abnormalities; Rhythm; Abnormal; Pulmonary Embolism; Deep Vein Thrombosis; Other Cardiovascular Conditions

  16. The clinical relevance of the duration of loss of consciousness provoked by tilt testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Kozluk, Edward; Agrawal, Anil Kumar; Smereka, Jacek; Checiński, Igor

    2010-04-01

    The authors assessed the relationships between the duration of loss of consciousness (dLOC) during tilt testing-induced syncope (TTS) and demographics, medical history as well as tilt testing results. Previous research focused on the relevance of the type of neurocardiogenic reaction during TTS. The importance of dLOC has not been assessed so far. The study was carried out in 274 patients with suspected neurally mediated syncope and total loss of consciousness during tilt testing. The syncope burden, demographics, and data regarding spontaneous syncope orTTS were compared between group I with dLOC > or =47 seconds and group 2 with dLOC <47 seconds. Medical history revealed that patients in group I had more syncopal spells, more frequent syncope-related traumatic injuries, urine incontinence, jerking movements and typical vasovagal history than in group 2. Moreover, group I patients had more frequently a cardioinhibitory type of reaction and a shorter active phase duration. In addition, they manifested more frequent accompanying cerebral hypoperfusion signs and reproduction of symptoms during TTS than patients in group 2. The loss of consciousness during tilt testing-induced syncope differs in terms of duration among patients with neurally mediated syncope. The dLOC during TTS is associated with medical history and tilt-testing data which confirm the vasovagal aetiology of spontaneous events. The longer dLOC suggests deeper cerebral haemodynamic disturbances during either spontaneous or provoked syncope.

  17. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Velde, Nathalie; Stricker, Bruno H. Ch; Roelandt, Jos R. T. C.; ten Cate, Folkert J.; van der Cammen, Tischa J. M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In

  18. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    N. van der Velde (Nathalie); B.H.Ch. Stricker (Bruno); J.R.T.C. Roelandt (Jos); F.J. ten Cate (Folkert); T.J.M. van der Cammen (Tischa)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractBackground. The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. Method and

  19. Medical Aspects of Harsh Environments. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    dyspnea, dysphagia , syncope, shock, and unconsciousness. Signs include crepitus under the skin, faint heart sounds, paraly- sis of the recurrent...Complete or fixed second-degree heart block Wolf- Parkinson -White syndrome with paroxys- mal atrial tachycardia or syncope Exercise induced

  20. Complete paroxysmal atrioventricular block in a 2-year-old girl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Line Marie; Dixen, Ulrik; Jeppesen, Dorthe L

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of atypical syncope in a 2-year-old, otherwise healthy girl. The patient presented with three episodes of syncope without any precipitating factors and no family history of sudden unexpected death. Holter monitoring revealed 24 events of complete atrioventricular block lasting up...

  1. An approach to the clinical assessment and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syncope, defined as a brief loss of consciousness due to an abrupt fall in cerebral perfusion, remains a frequent reason for medical presentation. The goals of the clinical assessment of a patient with syncope are twofold: (i) to identify the precise cause in order to implement a mechanism-specific and effective therapeutic ...

  2. An approach to the clinical assessment and management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Syncope refers to a brief loss of consciousness. (LOC) due to an abrupt fall in cerebral perfusion. It remains a frequent reason for medical presentation and accounts for a large proportion of emergency department and outpatient clinic visits. While there are no population-based epidemiological studies of syncope in South.

  3. Loss of consciousness and convulsion induced by a ventricular tachycardia mimicking epilepsy in a patient with noncompaction cardiomyopathy : a case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dello, S. A. W. G.; Kievit, C.; Dunselman, P. H.; Alings, M.

    Convulsions and loss of consciousness can be caused by, among other things, arrhythmias, conduction disorders or epilepsy. In clinical practice it can be difficult to distinguish between these causes of syncope, even for well-trained specialists. Patients with cardiac syncope have a substantial risk

  4. 77 FR 20873 - Qualification of Drivers; Application for Exemptions; Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-06

    ..., please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope or postcard or print the acknowledgement page that... variety known to be accompanied by syncope, dyspnea, collapse, or congestive cardiac failure. FMCSA..., collapse or congestive cardiac failure; and/or (2) which is likely to cause syncope, dyspnea, collapse, or...

  5. Battlefield Acquired Immunogenicity to Metals Affects Orthopedic Implant Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    include minor bruising/hematoma (12.3%), diaphoresis with hypotension (2.6%), syncope (ə%), and cellulitis or phlebitis (ə%). Standard aseptic...Diaphoresis with hypotension (2.6%) • Syncope (ə%) • Cellulitis or Phlebitis (ə%) The following information will be collected for all AEs: • Date/time

  6. Tilt table testing in patients with suspected epilepsy1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edfors, R.; Erdal, J.; Rogvi-Hansen, B.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Approximately 20-30% of patients with epilepsy are misdiagnosed and syncope often seems to be the mistaken cause. We re-evaluated patients referred to an epilepsy clinic where suspicion of neurally mediated (reflex) syncope were raised using tilt table testing (HUT). METHODS: HUT...... laboratory results and medical records of 120 consecutive patients were reviewed retrospectively over a period of 27 months. RESULTS: HUT was positive in 59 (49%) patients. Seventeen of 38 (45%) patients previously diagnosed with epilepsy and taking antiepileptic drugs were found to be misdiagnosed. Four...... of 21 patients with epilepsy (19%) had dual diagnoses of reflex syncope and epilepsy. CONCLUSION: HUT is an informative investigation when suspicions of reflex syncope are raised in patients referred to an epilepsy clinic. Reflex syncope is an important and common differential diagnosis of epilepsy...

  7. [Adverse reactions to human papillomavirus vaccine in the Valencian Community (2007-2011)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Galán, M A; Pérez-Vilar, S; Díez-Domingo, J; Tuells, J; Gomar-Fayos, J; Morales-Olivas, F; Pastor-Villalba, E

    2014-11-01

    In 2009, two cases of seizures in adolescents following quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (qHPV) administration, generated important media attention, and adversely affected public trust in this vaccine. Our objectives were to describe suspected adverse reactions (SARs) reported to the Pharmacovigilance Centre in the Valencian Community (PCVC) after administration of HPV vaccine, and to compare reporting rates of syncope and seizures following this vaccine with those of other vaccines administered to girls aged 13-15 years. Descriptive study of SARs reported following this vaccine to the PCVC between 2007 and 2011. The clinical symptoms most frequently reported were dizziness, headache, and syncope. Reporting rates of syncope or loss of consciousness and seizures with qHPV vaccine were 17 and 3.2 per 100,000 doses administered, respectively, and 15 and 1.6 for syncope or loss of consciousness and syncopal seizures occurred on the day of vaccination. The reporting rates of syncope or loss of consciousness and seizures were 6.4 and 0.4, for the other vaccines. Consistent with the media attention generated, and with results from other studies, the reporting rates of syncope or loss of consciousness and seizures were higher for the HPV vaccine than for other vaccines given in adolescence. Nevertheless, the overall information obtained on SARs following the qHPV vaccine suggests a good safety profile. Copyright © 2013 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Tachycardies ventriculaires catécholergiques chez l'enfant

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Denjoy, I.; Postma, A. V.; Lupoglazoff, J. M.; Vaksman, G.; Kamblock, J.; Leenhardt, A.; Wilde, A. A.; Guicheney, P.

    2005-01-01

    Catecholinergic ventricular tachycardia is an adrenergic induced polymorphic ventricular arrhythmia. It occurs in infancy and is responsible for syncope and sudden death in the absence of any morphological cardiac abnormality. Without treatment the mortality in catecholinergic ventricular

  9. Genetics Home Reference: chronic atrial and intestinal dysrhythmia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can include dizziness, light-headedness, fainting (syncope), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), and confusion or memory problems. During exercise, many affected individuals experience chest ...

  10. Genetics Home Reference: sick sinus syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can include dizziness, light-headedness, fainting (syncope), a sensation of fluttering or pounding in the chest (palpitations), and confusion or memory problems. During exercise, many affected individuals experience chest ...

  11. Evaluation of a New Cardiac Pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-25

    Atrial Fibrillation With 2 or 3° AV or Bifascicular Bundle Branch (BBB) Block; Normal Sinus Rhythm With 2 or 3° AV or BBB Block; Sinus Bradycardia With Infrequent Pauses or Unexplained Syncope With EP Findings

  12. Functional assessment of compound mutations in the KCNQ1 and KCNH2 genes associated with long QT syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Behr, Elijah Raphael; Calloe, Kirstine

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiovascular disorder characterized by prolonged QTc time, syncope, or sudden death caused by torsades de pointes and ventricular fibrillation. We investigated the clinical and electrophysiologic phenotype of individual mutations and the compound mutations...

  13. Genetic variation in the inwardly rectifying K channel subunits KCNJ3 (GIRK1) and KCNJ5 (GIRK4) in patients with sinus node dysfunction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmegard, Haya N; Theilade, Juliane; Benn, Marianne

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Sinus node dysfunction (SND) is a heterogeneous disorder of unknown etiology characterized by a variety of supraventricular arrhythmias with symptoms of syncope, palpitations, and dizziness. The mechanism underlying the abnormal rhythm is incompletely understood. OBJECTIVE: Because va...

  14. A NORMAL BRADYSYSTOLIC FORM OF ATRIAL FIBRILLATION (FREDERICQ’S SYNDROME: LATE DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ye. Trekina

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available It is presented a case of delayed diagnosis brad systole against permanent atrial fibrillation (syndrome Frederick which became to syncope patient and to the later implanting of pacemaker.

  15. 起立時のめまい・失神患者における心血管系自律神経機能の検討(神経内科学教室岩田誠教授退任記念特別号)

    OpenAIRE

    飯嶋, 睦; 山口, 晴子; 橋本, しをり; 岩田, 誠; Mutsumi, IIJIMA; Seiko, YAMAGUCHI; Shiori, HASHIMOTO; Makoto, IWATA

    2008-01-01

    Objective: Dizziness is a common symptom in the out-patient neurology clinic. In this study, we investigate the relationship between cardio-vascular autonomic functions and dizziness in patients with orthostatic dizziness and syncope. Methods: Subjects were 100 patients (41 males, 59 females, aged from 17 to 94 years; mean ± SD; 54.6 ± 19.9) that complained "dizziness" or "syncope" without abnormalities such as brain tumor or brain hemorrhage, evaluated between June 2003 and November 2004. Bl...

  16. The effect of exercise on the cardio-postural relationship

    OpenAIRE

    Bruner, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Syncope is common in individuals who experience orthostatic hypotension which is often associated with cardiovascular conditions, brain injuries, and ageing. A bi-directional link between the cardiovascular and postural control systems was recently identified, and may provide insight into syncope and orthostatic hypotension. This thesis examined the inter-dependent relationship between cardiovascular and postural controls before and after light exercise to induce mild orthostatic stress. It w...

  17. Improved Patient Outcomes by Normalizing Sympathovagal Balance: Differentiating Syncope—Precise Subtype Differentiation Leads to Improved Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas L. DePace

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Syncope is difficult to definitively diagnose, even with tilt-table testing and beat-to-beat blood pressure measurements, the gold-standard. Both are qualitative, subjective assessments. There are subtypes of syncope associated with autonomic conditions for which tilt-table testing is not useful. Heart rate variability analyses also include too much ambiguity. Three subtypes of syncope are differentiated: vasovagal syncope (VVS due to parasympathetic excess (VVS-PE, VVS with abnormal heart rate response (VVS-HR, and VVS without PE (VVS-PN. P&S monitoring (ANSAR, Inc., Philadelphia, PA differentiates subtypes in 2727 cardiology patients (50.5% female; average age: 57 years; age range: 12–100 years, serially tested over four years (3.3 tests per patient, average. P&S monitoring noninvasively, independently, and simultaneously measures parasympathetic and sympathetic (P&S activity, including the normal P-decrease followed by an S-increase with head-up postural change (standing. Syncope, as an S-excess (SE with stand, is differentiated from orthostatic dysfunction (e.g., POTS as S-withdrawal with stand. Upon standing, VVS-PE is further differentiated as SE with PE, VVS-HR as SE with abnormal HR, and VVS-PN as SE with normal P- and HR-responses. Improved understanding of the underlying pathophysiology by more accurate subtyping leads to more precise therapy and improved outcomes.

  18. [Laboratory diagnostics in transient loss of consciousness : Serum lactate compared to serum creatine kinase as diagnostic indicator for generalized tonic-clonic seizures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dafotakis, M; Heckelmann, J; Zechbauer, S; Litmathe, J; Brokmann, J; Willmes, K; Surges, R; Matz, O

    2018-03-21

    Laboratory parameters can help in the differential diagnostics of acute episodes of transient loss of consciousness. Especially serum lactate and serum creatine kinase (CK) levels may provide valuable hints to distinguish generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) from syncope. Serum lactate levels at admission and CK levels 10-48 h after the episodes that led to admission were compared between patients with GTCS (n = 30) and those with syncope (n = 15). In addition, sensitivity and specificity of lactate and CK as diagnostic markers for syncope and GTCS were determined. The serum lactate and serum CK levels were significantly increased in patients with GTCS as compared to syncope patients (serum lactate: p lactate as an indicator for GTCS was 0.94 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.88-1.0). For CK the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis produced an AUC of only 0.77 (95% CI: 0.63-0.9). The determination of the lactate value as point-of-care diagnostics appears to be highly relevant in the rapid clarification of unclear episodes with transient loss of consciousness. The CK level at follow-up is also suitable for distinguishing GTCS from syncope but is inferior to the serum lactate value.

  19. Long term effects of cilostazol in a dog with sick sinus syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Nobuyuki; Suzuki, Tomohiro

    2017-06-16

    Sick sinus syndrome (SSS) is a type of bradyarrhythmia that can lead to syncope. Cilostazol has been reported to be an effective treatment for human patients with SSS and other bradyarrhythmias. This report describes the successful long-term treatment with cilostazol in a dog with SSS. A nine-year old intact male Miniature Schnauzer presented with a history of syncopal episodes and unsteady gait. After cilostazol treatment, the total heart rate (HR), mean HR, and frequency of premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) increased, while the maximum HR and maximum pause time decreased. Additionally, the number of syncopal episodes decreased. The dog died suddenly, 1,418 days after the start of cilostazol treatment. Cilostazol may be a useful therapeutic agent in canines with SSS.

  20. Ventricule droit à double chambre (VDDC) isolé: à propos d'un cas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nous rapportons l'observation d'une adolescente de 16 ans, présentant une forme isolée de VDDC révélée par des syncopes à répétition. Le diagnostic est fait par l'échocardiographie Döppler. La résection chirurgicale de la bande musculaire anormale a été faite avec succès. Mots clés: VDDC, adolescente, syncope, ...

  1. [Atypical sinus node dysfunction. Usefulness of implantable Holter. A case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martí Almor, J; Delclòs Urgell, J; Bruguera Cortada, J

    2001-12-01

    We present an 84 year-old female patient with repeated syncopes/presyncopes in the last nine years. All diagnosis tests were negative, including ECG, 24-hour Holter, tilt table test and EP study. Therefore, a subcutaneous insertable loop recorder was implanted (Reveal). The recording of three episodes showed the association of presyncope with the onset of atrial fibrilation and, in two syncopes, with an atrial pause between AF episodes. Probably an abnormal prolonged sinus node recovery time (more than 6 s) allowed AF to restart before the sinus rhythm.

  2. Echocardiography and cardiac MRI in mutation-negative hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in an older patient: a case defining the need for ICD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Fatima; Degnan, Kathleen O; Seidman, Christine E; Mangion, Judy R

    2014-08-01

    We report the case of a 67-year-old man with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy who presented for a second opinion about implantable cardio-defibrillator (ICD) placement after a witnessed syncopal episode. Despite his older age, being mutation-negative, and having a maximal septal thickness of 2.2 cm on echocardiography, he demonstrated rapid progression of myocardial fibrosis on cardiac MRI, correlating to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and syncope. We review the role of echocardiography and cardiac MRI in optimizing medical care for such patients who may not otherwise meet criteria for an ICD placement or further interventions. © 2014, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Rhythmic Patterns in Ragtime and Jazz

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odekerken, Daphne; Volk, A.; Koops, Hendrik Vincent

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a corpus-based study on rhythmic patterns in ragtime and jazz. Ragtime and jazz are related genres, but there are open questions on what specifies the two genres. Earlier studies revealed that variations of a particular syncopation pattern, referred to as 121, are among the most

  4. Vagoglossofaryngeusneuralgi behandlet med mikrovaskulaer dekompression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Munch, Tina Nørregaard; Rochat, Per; Astrup, Jens

    2009-01-01

    recurred, this time accompanied by sinus bradycardia/sinus arrest during attacks causing discomfort and syncopes. An MRI now demonstrated an arterial loop at the site of the vagoglossopharyngeal complex leaving the brainstem. After another microvascular decompression, complete remission of symptoms...

  5. Axillo-axillary Bypass Grafting for Proximal Subclavian Artery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1974-10-26

    Oct 26, 1974 ... 'dizzy spells, with tinnitus, which came on without warning and associated with a feeling of syncope. These episodes were usually transient and on occasions were definitely related to rotaton of her neck. Examination showed a weak left radial pulse with a blood pressure of 105/80 mmHg compared with ...

  6. NJP VOLUME 39 No 4

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof Ezechukwu

    2012-03-29

    Mar 29, 2012 ... Key words: Child, Diagnostic Er- rors, Long QT Syndrome, Seizure. Introduction. Seizures can be caused by primary dysfunction of the .... child with congenital deafness and a history of seizures and recurrent syncope, a QTc interval of 0.72 sec was observed after years of investigation. In evaluating the.

  7. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope...

  8. Bruns Syndrome: a deadly sign | Oudrhiri | Pan African Medical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A 52 years old man was admitted to the intensive care unit for a sudden onset coma. His Glasgow Coma Scale was 4/15 with fixed dilated pupils. He has been experiencing paroxystic episodes of headaches, vomiting and vertigo for 6 months that went undiagnosed.Diagnoses include acute hydrocephalous, syncopes, and ...

  9. Tilt angles and positive response of head-up tilt test in children with orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jing; Wang, Yuli; Ochs, Todd; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at examining three tilt angle-based positive responses and the time to positive response in a head-up tilt test for children with orthostatic intolerance, and the psychological fear experienced at the three angles during head-up tilt test. A total of 174 children, including 76 boys and 98 girls, aged from 4 to 18 years old (mean 11.3±2.8 years old), with unexplained syncope, were randomly divided into three groups, to undergo head-up tilt test at the angles of 60°, 70° and 80°, respectively. The diagnostic rates and times were analysed, and Wong-Baker face pain rating scale was used to access the children's psychological fear. There were no significant differences in diagnostic rates of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome and vasovagal syncope at different tilt angles during the head-up tilt test (p>0.05). There was a significant difference, however, in the psychological fear at different tilt angles utilising the Kruskal-Wallis test (χ2=36.398, ptest (ptest for vasovagal syncope or for postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome. Hence, it is suggested that a tilt angle of 60° and head-up tilt test time of 45 minutes should be suitable for children with vasovagal syncope.

  10. Orthostatic function and the cardiovascular response to early mobilization after breast cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gamborg Müller, Rasmus; Bundgaard-Nielsen, Morten; Kehlet, H

    2010-01-01

    Early postoperative mobilization is essential for an enhanced recovery, but it can be hindered by orthostatic intolerance, characterized by signs of cerebral hypoperfusion, such as dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and ultimately syncope. Orthostatic intolerance is frequent after major surgical...... breast cancer surgery....

  11. Normal electrocardiographic QT interval in race-fit Standardbred horses at rest and its rate dependence during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Philip J; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Buhl, Rikke

    2013-01-01

    Cardiac repolarization, measured as QT and Tpeak to Tend (TpTe) intervals on the ECG, is important, as irregularities caused by diseases, ventricular hypertrophy, drugs and genetic defects can trigger arrhythmias which predispose human patients to syncope and sudden cardiac death. In horses, repo...

  12. Medical Surveillance Monthly Report. Volume 20, Number 11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    335), and open wound of the eyeball or ocular adnexa (n=62). Other relatively common diagnoses during syncope-related medical encounters were...categories include other intracranial injuries (n=5), skull frac- tures (n=2), and open wound of the eyeball or ocular adnexa (n=2). Other conditions that

  13. Combined gating and trafficking defect in Kv11.1 manifests as a malignant long QT syndrome phenotype in a large Danish p.F29L founder family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kanters, Jørgen K.; Skibsbye, Lasse; Hedley, Paula L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Congenital long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a hereditary cardiac channelopathy characterized by delayedventricular repolarization, syncope, torsades de pointes and sudden cardiac death. Thirty-three members of fi ve apparently‘ unrelated ’Danish families carry the KCNH2:c.87C A; p.F29L...

  14. Clinical outcomes according to symptom presentation in patients with acute myocardial infarction: Results from the FAST-MI 2010 registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puymirat, Etienne; Aissaoui, Nadia; Bonello, Laurent; Cayla, Guillaume; Labèque, Jean-Noel; Nallet, Olivier; Motreff, Pascal; Varenne, Olivier; Schiele, François; Ferrières, Jean; Simon, Tabassome; Danchin, Nicolas

    2017-12-01

    Atypical clinical presentation in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients is not uncommon; most studies suggest that it is associated with unfavorable prognosis. Long-term clinical impact differs according to predominant symptom presentation (typical chest pain, atypical chest pain, syncope, cardiac arrest, or dyspnea) in AMI patients. FAST-MI 2010, a nationwide French registry, included 4169 patients with AMI in 213 centers at the end of 2010 (76% of active centers). Demographics, medical history, hospital management, and outcomes were compared according to predominant symptom presentation. Typical chest pain with no other symptom was reported in 3020 patients (68% in STEMI patients, 76% in NSTEMI patients). Atypical chest pain, dyspnea, syncope, and cardiac arrest were reported in 11%, 11%, 5%, and 1%, respectively. Patients with atypical clinical presentation had a higher cardiovascular risk profile and received fewer medications and a less invasive strategy. Using Cox multivariate analysis, atypical chest pain was not associated with higher death rate at 3 years (HR: 0.96, 95% CI: 0.69-1.33, P = 0.78), whereas cardiac arrest (HR: 2.44, 95% CI: 1.00-5.97, P = 0.05), syncope (HR: 1.70, 95% CI: 1.18-2.46, P = 0.005), and dyspnea (HR: 1.66, 95% CI: 1.31-2.10, P clinical presentation is observed in about 20% of AMI patients. Cardiac arrest, dyspnea, and syncope represent independent predictors of long-term mortality in STEMI and NSTEMI populations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Now & Then: Roger Whitmore, Police Officer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Sue; Michalowicz, Karen Dee

    1995-01-01

    Discusses police officers' use of mathematics when reconstructing an accident scene; and the history of algebra, including al-Khwarizmi's works on the theory of equations, the Rhind Papyrus, a Chinese and an Indian manuscript on systems of linear and quadratic equations, and Diophantus'"syncopated algebra." (10 references) (EK)

  16. Classification of the long-QT syndrome based on discriminant analysis of T-wave morphology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Kanters, Jørgen K.; Andersen, M P

    2006-01-01

    The long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a genetic disorder, typically characterized by a prolonged QT interval in the ECG due to abnormal cardiac repolarization. LQTS may lead to syncopal episodes and sudden cardiac death. Various parameters based on T-wave morphology, as well as the QT interval itself ha...

  17. Hypertext and Multimedia for Functional Enhancement of USARIEM Medical Handbooks and Biomedical Simulation Software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-12-01

    complex Internet addresses. Hypertext and hypermedia documents have logical and physical structure (Shneiderman, 1993). The logical structure delineates...Rubra, Miliaria Profunda , Anhidrotic Heat Exhaustion, Heat Syncope, Heat Edema, Sunburn, and Heat Tetany. The user may return to the main document...military or scientific organizations via digital communications networks such as the Internet . Access clearance would first be obtained from the USARIEM

  18. Does KCNE5 play a role in long QT syndrome?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, Jacob; Jespersen, Thomas; Grunnet, Morten

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome [LQTS] is a congenital cardiac disease characterised by prolonged QTC-time, syncopes and sudden cardiac death. LQTS is caused by mutations in genes coding for ion channels involved in the action potential. KCNE5 codes for a novel beta-subunit of the ion channel conduc...

  19. Acute Pancreatitis Associated with Elevated Troponin Levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The chest pain was associated with sweating. There was no history of breathlessness, giddiness, palpitation or syncope. There was no other history of any major medical illness in the past. He had no addictions. He was newly diagnosed to be having diabetes mellitus on admission. On examination, his pulse rate was.

  20. Applying Formal Verification Techniques to Ambient Assisted Living Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benghazi, Kawtar; Visitación Hurtado, María; Rodríguez, María Luisa; Noguera, Manuel

    This paper presents a verification approach based on timed traces semantics and MEDISTAM-RT [1] to check the fulfillment of non-functional requirements, such as timeliness and safety, and assure the correct functioning of the Ambient Assisted Living (AAL) systems. We validate this approach by its application to an Emergency Assistance System for monitoring people suffering from cardiac alteration with syncope.

  1. Akut kulilteforgiftning efter vandpiberygning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Jakob Felbo; Villads, Kasper von Rosen; Sonne, Morten

    2016-01-01

    Carbon monoxide poisoning is potentially lethal, and early recognition and treatment is essential. An 18-year-old man was admitted due to syncope and a carboxyhaemoglobin level of 17% after water pipe tobacco smoking. He received normo- and hyperbaric oxygen as treatment and was discharged after...

  2. Right atrial myxoma as a possible cause of hemorrhagic stroke and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Right atrial myxomas are rare primary tumors of the heart. They may remain asymptomatic or eventually cause constitutional signs and symptoms. Less frequently, obstruction of the tricuspid valve occurs, resulting in exertional dyspnea, syncope, or sudden death. Neurological manifestation as initial presentation of atrial ...

  3. Lipothymia and Syncope—Aetiology and Outcome in a Prehospital Setting: A Retrospective Study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zwisler, Stine Thorhauge; Mikkelsen, Søren

    2012-01-01

    MECU runs registered, 678 were assignments in which the patients were diagnosed with lipothymia or syncope (3.8%). 578 patients (85%) were admitted to hospital. 278 of the patients were discharged directly from the emergency department, while 271 were admitted to a ward. 112 patients refused treatment...

  4. A girl with headache, confusion and green urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hufschmidt, Andreas; Krisch, Alexandra; Peschen, I

    2009-07-01

    The case of a 17-year-old girl with a history of headache, blurred vision, confusion, ataxia and syncope is presented. On admission, she had already recovered except for a slurring of speech. Her urine was found to be green. Screening for illegal drugs was negative, but gas chromatography with subsequent mass spectroscopy (GC-MS) revealed an extremely high concentration of flupirtine.

  5. Teaching as Jazz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Carol Ann; Germundson, Amy

    2007-01-01

    Tomlinson and Germundson compare teaching well to playing jazz well. Excellent teaching involves a blend of techniques and theory; expressiveness; syncopation; call and response, and, frequently, improvisation. Weaving in analogies to jazz, the authors delineate four elements of such teaching: curriculum that helps students connect to big ideas,…

  6. Short-term complications for percutaneous ultrasound-guided biopsy of renal masses in adult outpatients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lars René; Loft, Martina; Nielsen, Tommy Kjaergaard

    2018-01-01

    intervention and two patients with septicemia. Minor complications occurred in 2.8% of cases (eight patients); six patients with self-limiting gross hematuria, one patient with small asymptomatic subcapsular hematoma, and one patient with vasovagal syncope. The timing of both minor and major complication onset...

  7. Pulse Waveform and Transcranial Doppler Analysis during Lower Body Negative Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-04-01

    26, 23]. The application of negative pressure to the body for scientific or medical purposes was first used in 1841 by Junod , who used it to create a...localized hyperemia [26]. Junod also suggested that it could be used prior to invasive surgical procedures, since the syncope it was able to produce

  8. The impact of gravity during head-up tilt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottesen, Johnny T.; Olufsen, Mette; Smith, Brittany

    2011-01-01

    The impact of gravity during head-up tilt, a test often used in the clinic to diagnose patients who suffer from dizziness or frequent episodes of syncope, is not well described. This study uses mathematical modeling to analyze experimental blood pressure data measured at the level of the aorta an...

  9. Aortocavitary fistula as a complication of infective endocarditis and subsequent complete heart block in a patient with severe anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose N. Galeas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis has different presentations depending on the involvement of valvular and perivalvular structures, and it is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Aortocavitary fistula is a rare complication. We introduce the case of a 48-year-old female with native valve endocarditis, complicated by aortocavitary fistula to the right atrium, and consequently presented with syncope.

  10. Paroxysmal atrioventricular block: Electrophysiological mechanism of phase 4 conduction block in the His-Purkinje system: A comparison with phase 3 block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenasa, Mohammad; Josephson, Mark E; Wit, Andrew L

    2017-11-01

    Paroxysmal atrioventricular (A-V) block is relatively rare, and due to its transient nature, it is often under recognized. It is often triggered by atrial, junctional, or ventricular premature beats, and occurs in the presence of a diseased His-Purkinje system (HPS). Here, we present a 45-year-old white male who was admitted for observation due to recurrent syncope and near-syncope, who had paroxysmal A-V block. The likely cellular electrophysiological mechanisms(s) of paroxysmal A-V block and its differential diagnosis and management are discussed. Continuous electrocardiographic monitoring was done while the patient was in the cardiac unit. Multiple episodes of paroxysmal A-V block were documented in this case. All episodes were initiated and terminated with atrial/junctional premature beats. The patient underwent permanent pacemaker implantation and has remained asymptomatic since then. Paroxysmal A-V block is rare and often causes syncope or near-syncope. Permanent pacemaker implantation is indicated according to the current guidelines. Paroxysmal A-V block occurs in the setting of diseased HPS and is bradycardia-dependent. The detailed electrophysiological mechanisms, which involve phase 4 diastolic depolarization, and differential diagnosis are discussed. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Neural underpinnings of music

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vuust, Peter; Gebauer, Line K; Witek, Maria A G

    2014-01-01

    . According to this theory, perception and learning is manifested through the brain’s Bayesian minimization of the error between the input to the brain and the brain’s prior expectations. Fourth, empirical studies of neural and behavioral effects of syncopation, polyrhythm and groove will be reported, and we...

  12. People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths to Rhythms: Hip-Hop's Continuation of the Enduring Tradition of African and African American Rhetorical Forms and Tropes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welbeck, Timothy N.

    2017-01-01

    Hip-hop is an African folk art birthed in America. Whether one simply observes the tonal language that puffs the breath of life into the lyric prose of rap music, the poly-rhythms of the "boom-bap" rhythmic phrasings that became a fixture of New York rap music in the late 1980s, the winding syncopation from the pounding "808"…

  13. The usefulness of carotid sinus massage in different patient groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Narasimhan Pradeep; Thomas, Alan; Mudd, Paul; Morris, Robert O; Masud, Tahir

    2003-11-01

    to determine the positive yield of carotid sinus massage in different patient groups: unexplained syncope, falls, dizziness and controls. observational study. teaching hospital. we studied consecutive patients over the age of 60 years referred to the 'falls clinic' with a history of unexplained syncope, unexplained falls and unexplained dizziness. We also studied asymptomatic control subjects recruited from a general practice register aged 60 years and over. All patients and control subjects underwent a full clinical assessment (comprehensive history and detailed clinical examination including supine and erect blood pressure measurements) and 12-lead electrocardiography. We performed carotid sinus massage in the supine position for 5 seconds separately on both sides followed by repeating the procedure in the upright positions using a motorised tilt table. Heart rate and blood pressure were recorded using a cardiac monitor and digital plethysmography respectively. The test was considered positive if carotid sinus massage produced asystole with more than a 3 second pause (cardioinhibitory type of carotid sinus syndrome), or a fall in systolic blood pressure of more than 50 mmHg in the absence of significant cardioinhibition (vasodepressor type of carotid sinus syndrome) or where there was evidence of both vasodepressor and cardio-inhibition as above (mixed type). we studied 44 asymptomatic control subjects and 221 symptomatic patients (130 with unexplained syncope, 41 with unexplained falls and 50 with unexplained dizziness). In the overall symptomatic patient group, the positive yield (any type of carotid sinus syndrome) was 17.6% (95% CI = 12.7-22.5). The positive yield in men (26.3% (95% CI = 16.4-36.2)) was twice that in women (13.1% (95% CI = 7.6-18.6)) (P = 0.014). Overall any type of carotid sinus syndrome was present in 22.3% (n = 29) of the syncope group, 17.1% (n = 7) in the unexplained fallers group and 6% (n = 3) in the dizziness group. We also found that

  14. Pacemakers in patients with familial dysautonomia--a review of experience with 20 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold-von Simson, Gabrielle; Rutkowski, Monika; Berlin, Dena; Axelrod, Felicia B

    2005-02-01

    Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a genetic disease associated with a high incidence of sudden death. If fatal bradyarrhythmia is an etiological factor then the incidence of sudden death should decrease after pacemaker placement. Retrospective review of 596 registered FD patients revealed that 22 FD patients (3.7%) had pacemakers placed between December 1984 and June 2003. Clinical and electrocardiographic indications for placement and demographic data were assessed for 20 of the 22 patients (10 males, 10 females, ages 4 to 48 years). Two patients were excluded because of insufficient data. Prior to pacemaker placement, presenting symptoms were syncope and cardiac arrest, 16/20 (80%) and 6/20 (30 %), respectively. Asystole was the most frequent electrocardiographic finding and was documented in 17/20 patients (85 %). Other electrocardiographic abnormalities included bradycardia, AV block, prolonged QTc and prolonged JTc. The average duration of pacemaker utilization was 5.7 years (range 5 months to 14.5 years). Complications included infection (1 patient) and wire migration (2 patients). In the one patient with infection, the pacemaker was permanently removed. This patient then experienced multiple syncopal episodes and death. There were 7 other deaths. Three deaths occurred suddenly without preceding events, and 4 patients had non-cardiac causes of death. None of these 7 deceased patients had recurrence of syncope after pacemaker placement. In the 12 surviving patients, 6 had recurrence of syncope but none had cardiac arrest. Pacemaker placement may protect FD patients from fatal bradyarrhythmia and may decrease the incidence of syncope. However, data are limited and prospective analysis is needed.

  15. Drinking Water to Prevent Postvaccination Presyncope in Adolescents: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper, Alex R; Barnett, Elizabeth D; Walter, Emmanuel B; Hornik, Christoph; Pierre-Joseph, Natalie; Broder, Karen R; Silverstein, Michael; Harrington, Theresa

    2017-11-01

    Postvaccination syncope can cause injury. Drinking water prephlebotomy increases peripheral vascular tone, decreasing risk of blood-donation presyncope and syncope. This study evaluated whether drinking water prevaccination reduces postvaccination presyncope, a potential syncope precursor. We conducted a randomized trial of subjects aged 11 to 21 years receiving ≥1 intramuscular vaccine in primary care clinics. Intervention subjects were encouraged to drink 500 mL of water, with vaccination recommended 10 to 60 minutes later. Control subjects received usual care. Presyncope symptoms were assessed with a 12-item survey during the 20-minutes postvaccination. Symptoms were classified with a primary cutoff sensitive for presyncope, and a secondary, more restrictive cutoff requiring greater symptoms. Results were adjusted for clustering by recruitment center. There were 906 subjects randomly assigned to the control group and 901 subjects randomly assigned to the intervention group. None had syncope. Presyncope occurred in 36.2% of subjects by using the primary definition, and in 8.0% of subjects by using the restrictive definition. There were no significant differences in presyncope by intervention group for the primary (1-sided test, P = .24) or restrictive outcome (1-sided test, P = .17). Among intervention subjects vaccinated within 10 to 60 minutes after drinking all 500 mL of water ( n = 519), no reduction in presyncope was observed for the primary or restrictive outcome (1-sided tests, P = .13, P = .17). In multivariable regression analysis, presyncope was associated with younger age, history of passing out or nearly passing out after a shot or blood draw, prevaccination anxiety, receiving >1 injected vaccine, and greater postvaccination pain. Drinking water before vaccination did not prevent postvaccination presyncope. Predictors of postvaccination presyncope suggest opportunities for presyncope and syncope prevention interventions. Copyright © 2017 by the

  16. What Can We Expect from the ISSUE 3 Trial?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sutton, DSc FRCP FACC FESC FAHA FHRS

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The ISSUE 3 Trial is designed to demonstrate which patients with vasovagal syncope over the age of 40 years will benefit from pacing dual chamber with the rate drop response. The trial has completed its recruitment of 521 patients and 78 have now been randomized in Phase 2, which is the Pacing ON versus Pacing OFF comparison. During this Phase the end-points are recurrence of syncope or two years of follow-up without recurrence. It has been calculated that 27 early end-points will be sufficient to determine a significant difference between the groups. The background, details and design of the trial are explained. Some early findings are presented. Definitive results are expected by the end of 2011.

  17. Long QT Syndrome: A Clinical Entity Resembling Epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Güney Şenol

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Scientific BACKGROUND: Long QT Syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization defect, characterized by lengthened QT interval in the ECG. It can cause syncope due to rapid, polimorphic ventricular tachycardia known as Torsades de Pointes (TdP or it may cause sudden cardiac death. This clinical entity is frequently mistaken for epilepsy. CASE: In this report, a 24-year old male patient with congenital LQTS is presented. The patient was originally followed-up for epilepsy. During the evaluation process his loss of consciousness attacks were linked with ventricular tachycardia -TdP- periods and thus a diagnosis of LQTS was reached. When cardiac arrest ocurred in this patient, "stellate ganglion blockage” was performed. CONCLUSION: One must bear LQTS in mind in all patients with suspicious-looking syncope attacks and it must not be forgotten that early diagnosis and timely therapy will save the life of the individual

  18. Myocardial Crypts: An incidental fi nding in a symptomatic patient with raised troponin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab S Ramzy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A 61 year old female of Asian origin presented with a two day history of intermittent sharp central chest pain radiating to the left shoulder, with each episode lasting a few seconds. Associated symptoms included exertional dyspnoea and limited exercise capacity to one fl ight of stairs. She denied any palpitations, pre-syncope or syncope. She had no orthopnoea, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnoea or ankle swelling. She had stable pulmonary sarcoidosis, dual-chamber pacemaker insertion for symptomatic bradycardia 7 years ago, non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, hypertension, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo from the right ear, and hearing diffi culties. Drug history included Metformin 500 mg, Ramipril 10 mg, Bendrofl umethiazide 2.5 mg, Aspirin 75 mg and Simvastatin 20 mg. She had no known drug allergies.

  19. Report of a clinical case of headphone mixoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manzur J, Fernando; Patino N, Gustavo A; Sierra C, Luis E

    2000-01-01

    We describe the case of a patient who presented syncope and repetitive palpitations that had been previously studied by the neurology section with a simple CT scan and a MRI, showing multiples embolic lesions, for that reason she was referred to the service of cardiology. With clinical triad of palpitations, syncope and embolic lesions, an M mode a two-dimensional and a color Doppler Trans-thoracic echocardiography was performed, showing the presence of a mass in the left atrium attached to the posterior wall. The patient underwent a cardio pulmonary bypass surgery and the mass was removed with no complication during the postoperative period. In the histological study the mass appeared to be a typical mixoma. This case has a great interest not only because the presentation of this tumor is unusual, but also because the use of the m mode and two-dimensional echocardiography has a high sensibility in the detection of the tumor

  20. Surgical treatment of 2 cases of irradiation induced constrictive pericarditis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osawa, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Wataru; Yoshii, Shinpei [Yamanashi Medical Univ., Tamaho (Japan)] (and others)

    1999-11-01

    A 72-years-old man underwent radiation therapy (62 Gy) for esophageal carcinoma. Twelve months later, symptoms of heart failure such as syncope, cough and hepatomegaly manifested. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of right ventricular pressure curve was evident. Pericardiectomy without extracorporeal circulation was performed. Operative findings and pathological results were compatible with radiation-induced constrictive pericarditis. He recovered from the heart failure, and has been doing well 3 months after the surgery. A 54-years-old man underwent thymectomy for malignant thymoma. He underwent a radiation therapy (52 Gy) postoperatively. After 12 months from the irradiation, syncope and dyspnea manifested. On catheter study, a dip and plateau pattern of right ventricular pressure curve was observed. Pericardiectomy with extracorporeal circulation was performed. He recovered from the heart failure after pericardiectomy, however he died of radiation-induced pneumonitis 6 months later. (author)

  1. Nursing management of reflex anoxic seizures in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Neal; Kerr-Liddell, Rowan; Challis, Louise; Paul, Siba Prosad

    2017-04-13

    Children who present with transient loss of consciousness (T-LOC) are often first seen in emergency departments (EDs). Reflex anoxic seizure (RAS), vasovagal syncope and prolonged respiratory apnoea are benign, syncopal events that can be generally managed by explanation and reassurance. RAS is a short, paroxysmal, self-reverting episode of asystole that is triggered by pain, fear or anxiety and is caused by increased vagal response. It is an important differential diagnosis in pre-school age children who present with T-LOC, but is often underdiagnosed and can sometimes be misdiagnosed as epilepsy. Nurses working in EDs are among the first healthcare professionals to see children in acute settings and should therefore be aware of RAS, the presenting features and management options. This article discusses the epidemiology, pathophysiology and management of RAS, includes an illustrative case study and discusses the role of ED nurses.

  2. Dance, Music, Meter and Groove: A Forgotten Partnership

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Tecumseh eFitch

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available I argue that core aspects of musical rhythm, especially groove and syncopation, can only be fully understood in the context of their origins in the participatory social experience of dance. Musical meter is first considered in the context of bodily movement. I then offer an interpretation of the pervasive but somewhat puzzling phenomenon of syncopation in terms of acoustic emphasis on certain offbeat components of the accompanying dance style. The reasons for the historical tendency of many musical styles to divorce themselves from their dance-based roots are also briefly considered. To the extent that musical rhythms only make sense in the context of bodily movement, researchers interested in ecologically valid approaches to music cognition should make a more concerted effort to extend their analyses to dance, particularly if we hope to understand the cognitive constraints underlying rhythmic aspects of music like meter and groove.

  3. Dance, Music, Meter and Groove: A Forgotten Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitch, W Tecumseh

    2016-01-01

    I argue that core aspects of musical rhythm, especially "groove" and syncopation, can only be fully understood in the context of their origins in the participatory social experience of dance. Musical meter is first considered in the context of bodily movement. I then offer an interpretation of the pervasive but somewhat puzzling phenomenon of syncopation in terms of acoustic emphasis on certain offbeat components of the accompanying dance style. The reasons for the historical tendency of many musical styles to divorce themselves from their dance-based roots are also briefly considered. To the extent that musical rhythms only make sense in the context of bodily movement, researchers interested in ecologically valid approaches to music cognition should make a more concerted effort to extend their analyses to dance, particularly if we hope to understand the cognitive constraints underlying rhythmic aspects of music like meter and groove.

  4. Bed Rest and Orthostatic-Hypotensive Intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Suzanne M.

    2000-01-01

    Orthostatic tolerance may be defined as the ability of humans to maintain cerebral perfusion and consciousness upon movement from a supine or sitting position to the upright posture; for example, subjects can stand suddenly or be tilted to the head-up body position. Similar but not identical physiological responses can be induced by positive G(sub Z) (head to foot) acceleration or exposure to lower body negative pressure (LBNP). The objective is to suddenly shift blood to the lower body to determine how effectively cardiovascular and neural-hormonal compensatory responses react to maintain blood pressure. In the most precise method for measuring tolerance, individuals would be stressed until they faint (syncope). However, the potential consequences and discomforts of such a test usually prohibit such a procedure so that few investigators actually induce syncope. In a more common approach, subjects are exposed to a given level of stress, for example, head-up tilt for 15 min, and any increases in heart rate or decreases in blood pressure are interpreted as indicators of progress toward syncope. Presumably, the greater the perturbation of heart rate and blood pressure, the closer to "tolerance," i.e., point of unconsciousness. Another more appropriate approach is to induce a progressively increasing hypotensive stress until pre-determined physiological responses or pre-syncopal symptoms appear. The physiological criteria may include a sudden drop in systolic blood pressure (greater than 25 mm/min), a sudden drop in heart rate (greater than 15 beats/min), or a systolic blood pressure less than 70 mmHg. The most common pre-syncopal symptoms include lightheadedness, stomach awareness or distress, feelings of warmth, tingly skin, and light to profuse sweating. Usually a combination of physiological responses and symptoms occurs such that, on different days, the tolerance time to the same orthostatic protocol is reproducible for a given individual. The assumption is that

  5. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery presenting as pulmonary embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Plata, María Camila; Rey, Diana Lucía; Villaquirán, Claudio; Rosselli, Diego

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Pulmonary artery sarcomas are extremely rare; due to their insidious growth, diagnosis occurs late and prognosis is poor. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with a history of dyspnea, chest pain and syncope. An obstructing mass on the right ventricle, main pulmonary artery and right branch were interpreted as a possible pulmonary embolism. RESUMEN Los sarcomas de la arteria pulmonar son extremadamente raros; debido a su crecimiento lento y silencioso, el diagnóstico suele s...

  6. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome with complete auriculoventricular block. A strange association

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Franco J; Montana, Paula A; Vesga, Carlos; Miranda Antonio; Citelli Jose E; Negrete Alberto; Gil, Efrain

    2007-01-01

    A 22 years old male patient is admitted for a syncope episode. An electrocardiogram shows a Wolff-Parkinson-White pattern and signs of auricular overload with left ventricular hypertrophy and complete auriculoventricular block. The transthoracic echocardiogram is compatible with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. An electrophysiological study is carried out, finding pre-excitation through an accessory way and infra-His auriculoventricular block. An ablation is performed and a bicameral pacemaker is implanted

  7. Autonomic Symptoms in Migraineurs: Are They of Clinical Importance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aysel Milanl›o¤lu

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of this study was to evaluate the presence of autonomic symptoms in migraine patients with and without aura and to investigate whether there is an association between expression of autonomic symptoms and disease duration, headache side, attack duration and frequency. Methods: The study sample comprised 82 subjects in headachefree phase including 20 migraine with aura patients and 62 - without aura; 61 were females (74.39% and 21 were males (25.61%. The mean headache frequency was 2.63±1.29 per month and the mean duration of headache occurrence was 10.04±7.26 years from the first episode. The subjects were asked whether or not they had autonomic symptoms like diaphoresis, diarrhea, eyelid oedema, pallor, flushing, syncope or syncope-like episode, constipation, palpitation, diuresis, blurred vision, sensation of chills and coldness during each migraine headache. Results: Of all 82 migraine patients, 50 (60.98% experienced at least one of the autonomic symptoms during the attack periods. The most common symptom was flushing (39.2%. Among the autonomic symptoms, syncope or syncope-like episode was significantly more in patients without aura compared to those with aura (p<0.05. In this study, patients who experienced autonomic symptoms during their headache attack had statistically significantly higher attack frequency (p=0.019. Conclusion: This result indicate that migraine patients with autonomic nervous system involvement have more frequent headaches, therefore these patients should be particularly and cautiously investigated. (The Medical Bulletin of Haseki 2011; 49: 62-6

  8. Seven Cold Cities: The Milonga of Vitor Ramil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan McCann

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes popular composer Vitor Ramil's work in the musical genre of milonga. The article argues that the structural syncopation of the rhythmic cell in milonga brings leveza, or lightness, to the music, one of the qualities Ramil identifies as guiding principles in his "aesthetics of cold." The article places Ramil's exploration of milonga in the context of his long, varied and continuously evolving career.

  9. Reduced cerebral perfusion on sudden immersion in ice water: a possible cause of drowning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Belhage, Bo; Pedersen, Lars M

    2007-01-01

    Near-drowning incidents and drowning deaths after accidental immersion in open waters have been linked to cold shock response. It consists of inspiratory gasps, hyperventilation, tachycardia, and hypertension in the first 2-3 min of cold-water immersion. This study explored the immediate changes...... in cerebral blood flow velocity (Vmean) during cold-water immersion since cold shock induced hyperventilation may diminish Vmean and lead to syncope and drowning....

  10. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES): proposal for informed consent

    OpenAIRE

    Nacci, A; Ursino, F; La Vela, R; Matteucci, F; Mallardi, V; Fattori, B

    2008-01-01

    Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now a first choice method for studying swallowing disorders on account of the various advantages it offers: easy to use, very well tolerated, allows bedside examination and is economic. Nevertheless, this diagnostic procedure is not without risks, the most probable consequences of which include discomfort, gagging and/or vomiting, vasovagal syncope, epistaxis, mucosal perforation, adverse reactions to topical anaesthetics and laryngospa...

  11. Postural blood pressure electrocardiographic changes are associated with falls in older people.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saedon, Nor Izzati; Zainal-Abidin, Imran; Chee, Kok Han; Khor, Hui Min; Tan, Kit Mun; Kamaruzzaman, Shahrul K; Chin, Ai-Vyrn; Poi, Philip J H; Tan, Maw Pin

    2016-02-01

    To determine the magnitude of postural blood pressure change, differences in ECG between fallers and non-fallers were measured. Postural blood pressure change is associated with symptoms of dizziness, presyncope, and syncope. In this cross-sectional study were included participants from The Malaysian Falls Assessment and Intervention Trial: fallers, aged 65 years or older with two or more falls or one injurious fall in 12 months, from a teaching hospital; and non-fallers, aged 65 years and older found through word-of-mouth and advertising. Noninvasive beat-to-beat blood pressure was measured at 10 min supine rest and 3 min standing. The maximal drop in systolic and diastolic pressure was calculated from a 12-lead ECG interpreted by a cardiologist. Basic demographics, medical history, and symptoms of dizziness, presyncope, and syncope were recorded for all patients. We recruited 155 fallers and 112 non-fallers. Fallers had a significantly longer PR interval (179 ± 32 vs. 168 ± 27 ms, p = 0.013) and a longer corrected QT interval (449 ± 41 vs. 443 ± 39 msec, p = 0.008), and larger change in SBP (28 ± 14 vs. 19 ± 9 mmHg, p < 0.001) with posture change. SBP drop of ≥30mmHg associated with recurrent and injurious falls [odds ratio [95 % confidence interval] = 7.61 (3.18-18.21)]. The changes remained significant after adjustment for symptoms of dizziness, presyncope and syncope. Older individuals with recurrent and injurious falls have significantly longer PR and QT intervals and larger SBP reduction with posture change as compared to non-fallers, and these are not explained by the presence of dizziness, presyncope, or syncope. SBP cut-off of ≥30mmHg considered for postural measurements using continuous BP monitors, the significance of this value needs to be evaluated.

  12. Obesity paradox in heart failure patients – Female gender characteristics-KAMC-single center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheeren Khaled

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Our findings showed that heart failure patients with low BMI had poor adverse clinical outcome measures (poor EF, recurrent readmission, mortality and composite rates of CVA, TIA and unexplained syncope which reflect the effect of obesity paradox in those patients with HFrEF. Female patient subgroup showed similar characteristic findings which also might reflect the value of gender-specific BMI related clinical outcomes.

  13. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism with Prothrombin G20210A Gene Mutation

    OpenAIRE

    Dagli, Canan Eren; Koksal, Nurhan; Guler, Selma; Gelen, Mehmet Emin; Atilla, Nurhan; Tuncel, Deniz

    2010-01-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with symptoms of syncope, cough, headache and hemoptysis. Cranial MR and venography showed thrombus formation in the right transverse sinus and superior sagittal sinus. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) showed an embolic thrombus in the right pulmonary truncus and lung abscess. The patient was young, and there were no signs of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis or other major risk factors for pulmonary embolism (PE) including cardiac anomaly. Th...

  14. Anaesthesia management of a case of Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome for minimally invasive bilateral thoracoscopic cervicothoracic sympathectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preety Mittal Roy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is an arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder resulting from the malfunction of cardiac ion channels. Patient with LQTS may present with syncope, seizures or sudden cardiac death secondary to polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (VT or torsades de pointes. Patient may be asymptomatic in the pre-operative period but may develop VT for the first time in operation theatre. We are reporting anaesthetic management of a child with LQTS planned for bilateral thoracoscopic cervicothoracic sympathectomy.

  15. Echocardiographic appearance of a hydatid cyst of the papillary muscle and chordae tendineae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabijanić, Damir; Bulat, Cristijan; Letica, Dalibor; Nenadić, Denis; Pešutić-Pisac, Valdi; Carević, Vedran

    2011-09-01

    A 24-year-old woman with a history of hydatid disease of the lung and brain, which was treated surgically and medically with albendazole, was admitted because of syncope. Echocardiography demonstrated a mass in the anterolateral papillary muscle and chordae tendineae. Despite negative serologic tests for Echinococcus granulosus, cytology and histology of the surgically removed mass confirmed hydatid disease. The patient was discharged and treated further with albendazole and praziquantel. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Orbital Floor Fracture with Atypical Extraocular Muscle Entrapment Pattern and Intraoperative Asystole in an Adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merali, Farhan I.; Grant, Michael P.; Mahoney, Nicholas R.

    2015-01-01

    Extraocular muscle entrapment in a nondisplaced orbital fracture, although a well-known entity in pediatric trauma, is atypical in adults. It can present with a triad of bradycardia, nausea, and in rare cases, syncope, and result in severe fibrosis of damaged and incarcerated muscle. We present a case of muscle entrapment in a partially nondisplaced two-wall orbital fracture with accompanying preoperative bradycardia and intraoperative asystole in an adult PMID:26576246

  17. [Citalopram, escitalopram and prolonged QT: warning or alarm?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, Enric; Vieira, Sara; Garcia-Moll, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    The alerts issued by regulatory agencies on the potential cardiac toxicity of citalopram and escitalopram have caused alarm among clinicians. A review of the data concerning this topic shows that the alarm should be limited to patients with a history of syncope or poisoning. As a precautionary measure, an electrocardiogram should be performed on elderly patients. Copyright © 2013 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  18. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints

  19. Diseases in the cranio-cervical junction: Anatomical and pathological aspects and detailed clinical accounts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voth, D.; Glees, P.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 40 selections. Some of the titles are: Radionuclide imaging of the cranio-cervical region; Magnetic resonance imaging in the cranio-cervical region: Experiences in 194 cases; NMR-finding in a case of Morquio's syndrome with syncope; The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement; and A review of clinical and radiological aspects of rheumatoid arthritis of head joints.

  20. A Case Report and Review of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome in Pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Lide, Brianna; Haeri, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose - Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS) is a form of orthostatic intolerance characterized by an increased heart rate upon transition from supine to standing, and head-up tilt without orthostatic hypotension. Its etiology is multifactorial, and no clear cause has been identified. Common symptoms include light-headedness, blurred vision, weakness, cognitive difficulties, and fatigue and are often accompanied by palpitations, shortness of breath, syncope, or gastrointestinal ...

  1. Modernism as a Misnomer: Godard's Archeology of the Image

    OpenAIRE

    Gabriel Rockhill

    2010-01-01

    "The standard historical image of Jean-Luc Godard is that of a resolute iconoclast breaking with the representational norms and codes of classical cinema in the name of liberating film from the deadening weight of its past. His numerous formal innovations—syncopated montage, unconventional framing, unique experiments with dialogue, etc.—along with his abandonment of traditional narrative and character development, his playful pastiche of genres, his debunking of the representation...

  2. Pegylated interferon de novo-induce autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in chronic hepatitis C patient

    OpenAIRE

    Said, Ashraf; Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Alfiomy, Mohamed; Abdellah, Mohamed; Shahat, Khaled; Salah, Mohamed; Mostafa, Sadek; Elwassief, Ahmed; Aboelfotoh, Attef; Abdelhafeez, Hafez; El-Sherif, Assem

    2011-01-01

    A 55-year-old Egyptian woman with chronic hepatitis C undergoing treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) alfa-2a plus ribavirin was referred to our hospital on November 2010 with prolonged easy fatigability and an attack of syncope; she had no prior history of autoimmune disorders or allergy. Laboratory investigations documented the presence of Peg-IFN induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and autoimmune thyroiditis. Intravenous γ globulin (IVGG) failed to correct the autoimmune process...

  3. Arthur Conan Doyle, Joseph Bell, and Sherlock Holmes. A neurologic connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, B F; Key, J D

    1991-03-01

    Neurologists, like physicians in several other medical specialties, can lay claim to Sherlock Holmes as one of their own. This assertion is validated by the number of neurologic conditions, such as seizures, stroke, syncope, encephalopathies, and head trauma, that are mentioned in the stories and novels. In addition, the article reviews the powers of observation and the deductive approach utilized by Conan Doyle and Joseph Bell, the models for Sherlock Holmes, and how these skills can be applied to medical problems.

  4. Modulation of autonomic activity in neurological conditions: Epilepsy and Tourette syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Yoko eNagai

    2015-01-01

    This manuscript considers the central but neglected role of the autonomic nervous system in the expression and control of seizures in epilepsy (small) and tics in Tourette Syndrome (TS). In epilepsy, consideration of autonomic involvement is typically confined to differential diagnoses (e.g., syncope), or in relation to Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP). Investigation is more limited in Tourette Syndrome. The role of the autonomic nervous system in the generation and prevention of e...

  5. Mitral valve m-mode echo in complete heart block with atrial tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalathingathodika Sajeer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 48-year-old man who presented with history of syncope. Electrocardiogram on admission showed infrahisian complete heart block with a ventricular rate of 36 beats per min with wide QRS junctional escape and atrial rate was 188 beats per min. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed fine vibratory movement of both mitral leaflet tips. M-mode evaluation of mitral leaflets showed multiple ′a′ waves corresponding to atrial tachycardia rate.

  6. Seckel syndrome with severe sinus bradycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramasamy, Chandramohan; Satheesh, Santhosh; Selvaraj, Raja

    2015-03-01

    Seckel syndrome is an uncommon form of microcephalic dwarfism. The authors report a young boy with Seckel syndrome who presented with severe sinus bradycardia with symptoms of syncope and presyncope. Implantation of a permanent pacemaker was necessary in view of the severe symptoms. Although uncommon, cardiac abnormalities have been rarely reported in Seckel syndrome. This is the one of the few reports of rhythm abnormalities in this condition.

  7. Effects of the menstrual cycle phases on the tilt testing results in vasovagal patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Terpiłowski, Lukasz; Agrawal, Anil Kumar; Wróblewski, Paweł; Rudnicki, Jerzy

    2012-08-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the distribution of positive tilt testing (TT) throughout the menstrual cycle and to determine if the phase of menstrual cycle contributes to the duration of the loss of consciousness. TT results of 183 premenopausal women, aged 29.5 ± 9.8 years, were studied. The menstrual cycle was divided into four phases based on the first day of the last menstrual bleeding: perimenstrual (M), preovulatory (F), periovulatory (O) and postovulatory (L). Positive TT results were equally distributed. In patients with TT in O phase, the highest percentage of NTG provocation was needed. Patients in L phase had significantly lower incidence of cardioinhibitory reaction. The longest duration of loss of consciousness was in the M phase. Multiple regression analysis revealed that the duration of loss of consciousness during positive TT was significantly associated with higher number of syncopal events, TT performed in M phase and lower heart rate at TT termination. Cardiodepressive type of neurocardiogenic reaction was more frequent during M and O phase than during L phase. The distribution of positive TT results as well as syncope and presyncope does not differ throughout the menstrual cycle. Diagnostic TT in premenopausal women with unexplained syncope could be performed irrespective of the phase of menstrual cycle. TT has similar sensitivity throughout the menstrual cycle. During the postovulatory phase, cardioinhibitory reaction is less frequent than in M and O phases. The duration of loss of consciousness is longer during the M phase of the menstrual cycle independently of the higher syncope number and lower heart rate at TT termination.

  8. Rhythm in a Sinuous Stanza: The Anatomy and Acoustic Contour of the Latin Alcaic

    OpenAIRE

    Becker, Andrew S.

    2012-01-01

    This essay explores the metrical as well as rhythmical aspects of the acoustic contour of the Latin Alcaic, focusing on patterns of natural, audible, performed word accents in coincidence and syncopation with the fixed pattern of the meter, in both the ancient and modern scansions of the stanza. The meter was measured in antiquity with a learned, latent expectation or undercurrent of regular verse beats to scan aloud, to measure for the ear, the pattern of long and short syllables. Within the...

  9. Ventricular tachycardia induced by weight loss pills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Hansson, Nils Henrik; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2013-01-01

    A previously healthy 29-year-old man was admitted with palpitations, dizziness, and near-syncope after he had recently started taking weight loss pills purchased on the internet. The pills contained caffeine and ephedrine. An electrocardiogram and telemetry revealed multiple episodes of non......-sustained monomorphic ventricular tachycardia, which was successfully treated with amiodarone. In conclusion, unauthorized weight loss pills can be harmful. In particular, ephedrine-containing drugs carry a risk of ventricular tachycardia and should be discouraged....

  10. Influence of norepinephrine transporter inhibition on hemodynamic response to hypergravitation

    OpenAIRE

    Strempel, Sebastian

    2011-01-01

    Background: Sympathetically-mediated tachycardia and vasoconstriction maintain blood pressure during hypergravitational stress, thereby preventing gravitation-induced loss of consciousness (g-LOC). Norepinephrine transporter (NET) inhibition prevents neurally-mediated (pre)syncope during gravitational stress imposed by head-up tilt testing. Thus, it seems reasonable that NET inhibition could increase tolerance to hypergravitational stress. Methods. We performed a double-blind, randomized...

  11. Prevalence and spectrum of large deletions or duplications in the major long QT syndrome-susceptibility genes and implications for long QT syndrome genetic testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tester, David J; Benton, Amber J; Train, Laura; Deal, Barbara; Baudhuin, Linnea M; Ackerman, Michael J

    2010-10-15

    Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a cardiac channelopathy associated with syncope, seizures, and sudden death. Approximately 75% of LQTS is due to mutations in genes encoding for 3 cardiac ion channel α-subunits (LQT1 to LQT3). However, traditional mutational analyses have limited detection capabilities for atypical mutations such as large gene rearrangements. We set out to determine the prevalence and spectrum of large deletions/duplications in the major LQTS-susceptibility genes in unrelated patients who were mutation negative after point mutation analysis of LQT1- to LQT12-susceptibility genes. Forty-two unrelated, clinically strong LQTS patients were analyzed using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification, a quantitative fluorescent technique for detecting multiple exon deletions and duplications. The SALSA multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification LQTS kit from MRC-Holland was used to analyze the 3 major LQTS-associated genes, KCNQ1, KCNH2, and SCN5A, and the 2 minor genes, KCNE1 and KCNE2. Overall, 2 gene rearrangements were found in 2 of 42 unrelated patients (4.8%, confidence interval 1.7 to 11). A deletion of KCNQ1 exon 3 was identified in a 10-year-old Caucasian boy with a corrected QT duration of 660 ms, a personal history of exercise-induced syncope, and a family history of syncope. A deletion of KCNQ1 exon 7 was identified in a 17-year-old Caucasian girl with a corrected QT duration of 480 ms, a personal history of exercise-induced syncope, and a family history of sudden cardiac death. In conclusion, because nearly 5% of patients with genetically elusive LQTS had large genomic rearrangements involving the canonical LQTS-susceptibility genes, reflex genetic testing to investigate genomic rearrangements may be of clinical value. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Subclavian steal syndrome without subclavian stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Cwinn, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Subclavian steal syndrome (SSS has been well described in the setting of subclavian stenosis. We describe an unusual case of SSS caused by a high-flow arteriovenous dialysis fistula in the absence of subclavian stenosis, provide a review of the literature, and propose that arteriovenous fistula-induced SSS is an underdiagnosed cause of syncope in this population of patients.

  13. Fall prevention in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-05-01

    Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a

  14. Autonomic failure mimicing dopamine agonist induced vertigo in a patient with macroprolactinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, L; Braune, S; Borm, K; Magerkurth, C; Talazko, J; Peters, T; Reincke, M

    2002-10-01

    A 68-year-old man presented with general fatigue, increasing adynamia, weakness, vertigo and recurrent syncope. Six weeks earlier the diagnosis of a macroprolactinoma had been established based on a greatly elevated prolactin concentration (161 170 micro U/l) and MR-evidence of a 3.5 cm measuring pituitary mass. The patient had been started on cabergoline (1.5 mg weekly). Orthostatic hypotension due to the dopamine agonist was considered very likely and carbergoline therapy was stopped. However, there was no relief of the symptoms and further syncopes followed. Testing of blood pressure and heart rate regulation, selective testing of postganglionic cardiac neurons with [ 123 J] metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy provided evidence of grossly impaired neurogenic cardiovascular regulation due to failure of postganglionic efferent sympathetic activity. This is characteristic for pure autonomic failure. The patient was treated symptomatically with high fluid intake, compression stockings, fludrohydrocortisone (0.1 mg o.d.s.), piroxicam (20 mg o.d.s.) and etilephrin (10 mg q.d.s.), which enabled him to cope with daily activities without syncope. This case shows that vertigo in a patient with macroprolactinoma is not always related to drug therapy but may be related to other causes.

  15. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome Mimics a Conduction Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Marrakchi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG, as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a “false positive” of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  16. Wolff-Parkinson-white syndrome mimics a conduction disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrakchi, S; Kammoun, I; Kachboura, S

    2014-01-01

    Background. It is important to recognise Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome in electrocardiograms (ECG), as it may mimic ischaemic heart disease, ventricular hypertrophy, and bundle branch block. Recognising WPW syndrome allows for risk stratification, the identification of associated conditions, and the institution of appropriate management. Objective. The present case showed that electrophysiological study is indicated in patients with abnormal ECG and syncope. Case Report. A 40-year-old man with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome was presented to emergency with syncope. A baseline ECG was a complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock. He was admitted to the cardiac care unit for pacemaker implantation. The atypical figure of complete right branch block and posterior left hemiblock was thought to be a "false positive" of conduction abnormality. But the long anterograde refractory period of the both accessory pathway and atrioventricular conduction may cause difficulty in diagnosing Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, Conclusion. A Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome may mimic a conduction disease. No reliable algorithm exists for making an ECG diagnosis of a preexcitation syndrome with conduction disorders. This can lead to diagnostic and therapeutic dilemmas in the context of syncope.

  17. Vertigo/dizziness in pediatric emergency department: Five years' experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucci, Umberto; Vanacore, Nicola; Paolino, Maria Chiara; Silenzi, Romina; Mariani, Rosanna; Urbano, Antonella; Reale, Antonino; Villa, Maria Pia; Parisi, Pasquale

    2016-05-01

    Vertigo/Dizziness in childhood is not a rare cause of visits to the emergency department (ED). We analyzed a selected group with vertigo/dizziness to identify signs and symptoms that may help to guide the diagnostic approach and management. A total of 616 children admitted for vertigo to the ED over a five-year period were retrospectively reviewed. Their medical history, clinical characteristics, laboratory and neuroimaging tests, final diagnoses and management were analyzed. Migraine and syncope were the most frequent causes. Two patients were affected by life-threatening cardiac syncope, while structural life-threatening central nervous system diseases were found in 15 patients, none of whom presented with vertigo as an isolated clinical finding. Most cases of vertigo/dizziness in childhood that consist mainly of migraine and syncope are of benign origin. The prompt identification of neurological or cardiological signs or symptoms associated with vertigo in children is mandatory to rule out life-threatening conditions. © International Headache Society 2015.

  18. Effects of long-term vasodilator therapy in patients with carotid sinus hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brignole, M; Menozzi, C; Gaggioli, G; Musso, G; Foglia-Manzillo, G; Mascioli, G; Fradella, G; Bottoni, N; Mureddu, R

    1998-08-01

    In patients affected by carotid sinus hypersensitivity, long-term vasodilator therapy might increase the risk of syncopal episodes by reducing systolic blood pressure and venous return to the heart. Thirty-two patients (mean age 73 +/- 9 years; 20 men) who met all the following criteria were included: (1) one or more episodes of syncope occurring during long-term (>6 months) treatment with angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, long-acting nitrates, calcium antagonists, or a combination of these; (2) a positive response to carotid sinus massage, defined as the reproduction of spontaneous syncope in the presence of ventricular asystole > or =3 seconds or a fall in systolic blood pressure > or =50 mm Hg; (3) negative workup for other causes of syncope. The patients were randomly assigned to continue or to discontinue use of vasodilators; carotid sinus massage was repeated 2 weeks after randomization. By the end of the study period, the baseline values of systolic blood pressure were significantly different between the 2 groups of patients both in supine (P=.01) and upright (P=.03) positions. Syncope had been induced by carotid sinus massage in 81% of patients in the "on-vasodilator" group and in 62% of patients in the "off-vasodilator" group (P=.21). The cardioinhibitory reflex was of similar magnitude in the 2 groups, being found in 50% of the patients in each group, with a maximum ventricular pause of 7.1 +/- 2.7 and 6.7 +/- 1.8 seconds, respectively. The percentage decrease of blood pressure did not differ between the 2 groups, even if, in absolute values, the baseline difference of blood pressure roughly persisted for the duration of the test. In consequence of that, the rise of blood pressure to similar values was delayed approximately 30 seconds in the "on-vasodilator" group and took more than 2 minutes to return to baseline values. In patients affected by carotid sinus hypersensitivity, chronic vasodilator therapy does not have a direct effect on carotid

  19. [The relevance of junctional rhythm during neurocardiogenic reaction provoked by tilt testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Agrawal, Anil Kumar; Rudnicki, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    During neurocardiogenic reaction provoked by tilt testing (TT), different arrhythmias such as sinus bradycardia, sinus arrest, atrioventricular block or junctional rhythm or beats (JR) may occur. The characteristics of the JR during neurocardiogenic reaction have not yet been systematically assessed. It is not known whether the presence of JR during neurocardiogenic reaction is related to clinical characteristics of syncopal patients or the outcome of TT. To assess whether clinical outcome of TT and clinical data are related to the presence of JR during TT. The study group consisted of 532 patients aged 43.3 ± 18.2 years with positive TT, divided into four groups on the basis of the presence of JR and/or a ventricular pause (VP) during neurocardiogenic reaction: group VP(-)/JR(+) - JR present and VP absent, group VP(+)/JR(+) - both JR and VP present, group VP(+)/JR(-) - JR absent and VP present, and group VP(-)/JR(-) - both JR and VP absent. The control group consisted of 53 patients with no history of syncope or presyncope, including 46 patients with negative TT and seven patients with false positive TT. Total loss of consciousness during TT occurred in group VP(-)/JR(+) less frequently than in groups VP(+)/JR(+) and VP(+)/JR(-), and more frequently than in group VP(-)/JR(-) (80% vs 96% vs 94% vs 62%; p 〈 0.05 for both comparisons). Group VP(-)/JR(+) was significantly younger than group VP(-)/JR(-) (37.3 ± 16.3 years vs 45.8 ± 18.9 years; p 〈 0.05) and had a lower number of syncopal events than group VP(+)/JR(+) and VP(+)/JR(-) (median [IQ]: 2.5 (1-6) vs 4 (2-12) and 4 (2-10), respectively; p 〈 0.05) and lower rate of traumatic injuries than group VP(+)/JR(+) and VP(+)/JR(-) (22% vs 45% and 39%, respectively; p 〈 0.05). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the presence of JR was associated with younger age, male gender, history of blood-instrumentation-injection phobia and higher number of syncopal spells in medical history. The ROC curve analysis

  20. A syndrome of severe idiopathic pulmonary parenchymal disease with pulmonary hypertension in Pekingese

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    Köster LS

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Liza S Köster,1 Robert M Kirberger2 1Section of Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Integrative Mammalian Research (IMR Center, Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine (RUSVM, Basseterre, St Kitts, West Indies; 2Diagnostic Imaging Section, Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, South Africa Abstract: This paper describes 35 Pekingese dogs with a syndrome characterized by dyspnea, cyanosis, episodic syncope, soft pulmonary “Velcro” crackles, pulmonary hypertension (PH, and computed tomography and radiographic changes consistent with pulmonary parenchymal disease. The medical data base was searched with the criteria “Pekingese” and “syncope” or “dyspnea” or “tachypnea” or “pulmonary hypertension”, over a 36-month period. Inclusion criteria were echocardiographic changes consistent with noninvasive diagnosis of PH, either subjectively by B-mode or objectively by Doppler. Dogs were excluded (n=106 if there were insufficient or poor-quality radiographic or echocardiographic records or if diseases other than chronic pulmonary disease were found to be the etiology. The records of 35 dogs met these criteria and presented with a respiratory crises preceded by a history of chronic exercise intolerance and episodic syncope. The average age was 14.5 years (range: 7–19 years, with 21 males and 14 females. Most of the dogs had an interstitial lung pattern with radiographic evidence of right heart enlargement. There was a 77% (n=27 mortality and a median survival of 60 days (interquartile range: 9–210 days. This study highlights a cor pulmonale syndrome from PH due to chronic pulmonary parenchymal disease, with a grave prognosis, in middle-aged to geriatric population of Hong Kong Pekingese. Keywords: computed tomography, interstitial lung disease, dog, syncope

  1. Myocardial perfusion imaging in hyperthrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moorin, B.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: Patients with Hyperthrophic Cardiomyopathy (HCM) frequently suffer from syncope and cardiac arrest which may lead to sudden death. This is most often caused by ventricular arrhythmia's in adults, however in young patients the mechanisms are thought to be different. Ischaemia may play a significant role even in young asymptomatic HCM patients. The mechanisms of ischaemic development in HCM differ from those in the 'normal' myocardium (Due to intramural small vessel abnormalities and abnormal myocellular architecture). In HCM the coronary microcirculation is most often affected and massive hypertrophy means more energy is required to promote contraction thus increasing oxygen demand and compounding the effects of any ischaemic changes. A case of a 12 year old HCM patient is presented who has symptoms of syncope associated with exercise whose mother died suddenly of cardiac arrest developed from HCM. A myocardial perfusion rest/stress study was undertaken to detect any underlying myocardial ischaemia. Myocardial perfusion scintigraphy demonstrates any reduction in the microcirculation in addition to that present in the macrocirculation, unlike angiography which will only detect the latter. In this case the scan clearly showed evidence of ischaemia in the lateral wall and this may be an explanation for her episodes of syncope. We suggest an algorithm or the routine work-up of young patients with HCM which makes aggressive use of myocardial perfusion imaging to detect ischaemic changes. This may identify patients who are at higher risk and will assist with treatment decisions. We feel myocardial perfusion scintigraphy is a sensitive non-invasive accurate method of detecting microcirculatory ischaemia and is thus invaluable in HCM patients

  2. Lateral medullary infarction with cardiovascular autonomic dysfunction: an unusual presentation with review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huynh, Tridu R; Decker, Barbara; Fries, Timothy J; Tunguturi, Ajay

    2018-01-24

    We report an unusual case of lateral medullary infarction presenting with orthostatic hypotension with pre-syncope without vertigo or Horner's syndrome. Case report with review of the literature. A 67-year-old man presented with pre-syncope and ataxia without vertigo. Initial brain CT and MRI were normal. Neurological evaluation revealed right-beating nystagmus with left gaze, vertical binocular diplopia, right upper-extremity dysmetria, truncal ataxia with right axial lateropulsion, and right-facial and lower extremity hypoesthesia. Bedside blood pressure measurements disclosed orthostatic hypotension. He had normal sinus rhythm on telemetry and normal ejection fraction on echocardiogram. A repeat brain MRI disclosed an acute right dorsolateral medullary infarct. Autonomic testing showed reduced heart rate variability during paced deep breathing, attenuated late phase II and phase IV overshoot on Valsalva maneuver, and a fall of 25 mmHg of blood pressure at the end of a 10-min head-up tilt with no significant change in heart rate. These results were consistent with impaired sympathetic and parasympathetic cardiovascular reflexes. He was discharged to acute rehabilitation a week later with residual right dysmetria and ataxia. Lateral medullary infarctions are usually reported as partial presentations of classical lateral medullary syndrome with accompanying unusual symptoms ranging from trigeminal neuralgias to hiccups. Pre-syncope from orthostatic hypotension is a rare presentation. In the first 3-4 days, absence of early DWI MRI findings is possible in small, dorsolateral medullary infarcts with sensory disturbances. Physicians should be aware of this presentation, as early diagnosis and optimal therapy are associated with good prognosis.

  3. Inferences from a community study about non-epileptic events

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    Gomes Marleide da Mota

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To demonstrate the epidemiological importance of the different types of non-epileptic events (NEE in a low-income urban community. METHOD: The patients suspected of having epilepsy, who were detected in the first phase (screening one of this prevalence study, were interviewed by a neurologist in a non-structured neurological interview. These NEE were classified as physiological and psychogenic, subdivided by various types. The psychogenic NEE were classified according to the DSM-IV criteria. RESULTS: We compared the cases suspected of having epilepsy (n=176 with those not suspected (n=806 and discovered that those cases suspected of having epilepsy had a greater median age (<0.01 and female predominance (p<0.01. Among the cases suspected of having epilepsy there were different diagnosis: epileptic events without identifiable cause (n=20 or with identifiable causes (e.g., febrile convulsions and eclampsia. The most prevalent diagnosis for those suspected of having epilepsy was syncope (n=63; 35.8%. In terms of physiological events, the most frequent were: epileptic seizures, paroxysmal toxic phenomena (including alcoholism and brain trauma, besides syncope; in terms of psychogenic events the most frequent were: dissociative and anxiety disorders. Regarding gender differences, paroxysmal toxic problems were significantly more prevalent in men (p= 0.02, and dissociative disorders (p=0.01 in women. CONCLUSION: This survey confirms the epidemiological importance of syncope in a populational sample with NEE. However, among the psychogenic disorders of this NEE sample, the most frequent were dissociative and anxiety phenomena. This finding contrasts with the literature based on samples from tertiary epileptic centers with video-EEG resources, which found somatoform disorders to be more prevalent than dissociative and anxiety phenomena.

  4. Co-morbidities of Interstitial Cystitis

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    Gisela eChelimsky

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This study aimed to estimate the proportion of patients with Interstitial Cystitis/Painful Bladder Syndrome (IC/BPS with systemic dysfunction associated co-morbidities such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS and fibromyalgia (FM. Material and Methods: Two groups of subjects with IC/BPS were included: 1 Physician diagnosed patients with IC/BPS and 2 Subjects meeting NIDDK IC/PBS criteria based on a questionnaire (ODYSA. These groups were compared to healthy controls matched for age and socio-economic status. NIDDK criteria required: pain with bladder filling that improves with emptying, urinary urgency due to discomfort or pain, polyuria > 11 times/24 hrs, and nocturia > 2 times/night. The ODYSA instrument evaluates symptoms pertaining to a range of disorders including chronic fatigue, orthostatic intolerance, syncope, IBS, dyspepsia, cyclic vomiting syndrome, headaches and migraines, sleep, Raynaud’s syndrome and chronic aches and pains. Results: IC/BPS was diagnosed in 26 subjects (mean age 47 +/- 16 yrs, 92% females, 58 had symptoms of IC/BPS by NIDDK criteria, (mean age 40 +/- 17 yrs, 79% females and 48 were healthy controls (mean age 31+/- 14 yrs, mean age 77%. Co-morbid complaints in the IC/BPS groups included gastrointestinal symptoms suggestive of IBS and dyspepsia, sleep abnormalities with delayed onset of sleep, feeling poorly refreshed in the morning, waking up before needed, snoring, severe chronic fatigue and chronic generalized pain, migraines and syncope. Discussion: Patients with IC/BPS had co-morbid central and autonomic nervous system disorders. Our findings mirror those of others in regard to IBS, symptoms suggestive of FM, chronic pain and migraine. High rates of syncope and functional dyspepsia found in the IC/BPS groups merit further study to determine if IC/BPS is part of a diffuse disorder of central, autonomic and sensory processing affecting multiple organs outside the bladder.

  5. A 72-year-old patient with bilateral Maisonneuve fractures

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    Thomas Dienstknecht

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Maisonneuve fractures result from a disruption of the medial ankle structures and a proximal fibular fracture. Patient complaints can be misleading and there is a significant rate of delayed diagnosed injuries. We present a case of bilateral Maisonneuve fractures after a fall due to a syncopal collapse. A precise clinical examination led to this rare diagnosis. The injuries were treated with syndesmotic screw fixation, removal of hardware followed after 6 weeks. The patient was asymptomatic at threemonths follow up. Patients with bilateral injuries undergoing standard surgical treatment can gain full recovery, but high suspicion in clinical examination is needed to detect this uncommon bilateral injury.

  6. Symptoms Before Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glinge, Charlotte; Jabbari, Reza; Risgaard, Bjarke

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: No studies in an unselected and nationwide setting have characterized the symptoms and medical history of patients with sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). The aim of this study was to identify and describe the symptoms and medical history of patients before the presentation......%), palpitations (n = 2, 1%), presyncope/syncope (n = 23, 17%), and aborted SCD (n = 2, 1%). In addition, seizures (n = 25, 18%) were prevalent. In 61 (45%) SADS cases, no previous medical history were recorded. CONCLUSION: In this unselected, nationwide study of 136 young SADS patients, 35% had experienced...

  7. Kyol Goeu (‘Wind Overload’) Part II: Prevalence, Characteristics, and Mechanisms of Kyol Goeu and Near-Kyol Goeu Episodes of Khmer Patients Attending a Psychiatric Clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon; Um, Khin; Ba, Phalnarith

    2009-01-01

    Kyol goeu (literally, ‘wind overload’) is an orthostatically triggered syncopal syndrome often found among Khmer refugees in the US. In the present study, 36 of 100 (36%) Khmer patients attending a psychiatric clinic were found to have suffered a kyol goeu episode in the past, whereas 60 of 100 (60%) patients had experienced a near-kyol goeu event in the last six months. Following a survey-based characterization of kyol goeu, as well as the presentation of case vignettes, the article discusses six mechanisms resulting in the high prevalence of the syndrome. The article concludes by comparing kyol goeu and ataque de nervios. PMID:20808711

  8. Kyol Goeu ('Wind Overload') Part II: Prevalence, Characteristics, and Mechanisms of Kyol Goeu and Near-Kyol Goeu Episodes of Khmer Patients Attending a Psychiatric Clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinton, Devon; Um, Khin; Ba, Phalnarith

    2001-12-01

    Kyol goeu (literally, 'wind overload') is an orthostatically triggered syncopal syndrome often found among Khmer refugees in the US. In the present study, 36 of 100 (36%) Khmer patients attending a psychiatric clinic were found to have suffered a kyol goeu episode in the past, whereas 60 of 100 (60%) patients had experienced a near-kyol goeu event in the last six months. Following a survey-based characterization of kyol goeu, as well as the presentation of case vignettes, the article discusses six mechanisms resulting in the high prevalence of the syndrome. The article concludes by comparing kyol goeu and ataque de nervios.

  9. INFEKSI SALURAN KEMIH PADA GERIATRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kokeela Torayraju

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Jumlah penderita infeksi saluran kemih (ISK pada geriatri di Indonesia akan semakin meningkat dan menjadi penyebab kedua tersering setelah pneumonia. Pendekatan diagnosis dan terapi ISK pada geriatri memiliki kekhususan. Ada tidaknya gejala dan tanda spesifik serta bagaimana cara pengambilan spesimen turut berperan dalam diagnosis ISK pada geriatri. Faktor predisposisi penderita ISK pada geriatri meliputi diabetes melitus, gizi kurang, gangguan faal kognitif, depresi, gangguan status fungsional, prostatitis, riwayat operasi, dan prolaps vagina. Gejala dan tanda yang sering muncul adalah sindrom delirium, inkontinensia urin dan syncope yang diawali oleh penurunan nafsu makan. Strategi penatalaksanaan meliputi modalitas non‐ farmakologik dan farmakologik. Kata Kunci : infeksi saluran kemih (ISK, geriatri.

  10. Atrial and ventricular septal defect with pulmonary and tricuspid valvular anomalies in a dog

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, Y. [Azabu Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan); Wakao, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Minami, T.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, T.; Takahashi, M.; Une, Y.; Nomura, Y.; Ichioka, N.

    1989-12-15

    A 15-month-old male boxer dog weighing 22 kg was referred to Azabu University Animal Hospital for evaluation of the syncopal attack. There was no cardiac murmur, but electrocardiograms revealed an atrial fibrillation. Thoracic radiograph revealed enlargement of the right and left atrial regions. The medical treatment with digitalis and captopril was made for conversion from the atrial fibrillation to the sinus rhythm. By cardiac catheterization, atrial and ventricular septal defect with pulmonary stenosis was demonstrated. The patient died at 20 months from the first medical examination. At autopsy, there were severe enlargement of both atria, atrial defect, and pulmonary and tricuspid valvular anomalies. (author)

  11. Safety of pulmonary function testing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roberts, Cara; Ward, Simon; Walsted, Emil

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary function testing (PFT) is a key investigation in the evaluation of individuals with respiratory symptoms; however, the safety of routine and specialised PFT testing has not been reported in a large data set. Using patient safety incident (PSI) records, we aimed to assess risk...... was rated using the NHS National Patient Safety Agency and any hospital admission reported. RESULTS: There were 119 PSIs reported from 186 000 PFT; that is, 0.6 PSIs per 1000 tests. Cardiopulmonary PSIs were 3.3 times more likely to occur than non-cardiopulmonary (95% CI 2.17 to 5.12). Syncope was the most...

  12. McConnell Sign in a Patient with Massive Acute Pulmonary Embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qaiser Shafiq

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A 48-year-old female was admitted after experiencing a brief syncopal episode. Three weeks ago the patient sustained a right arm humerus bone fracture in a motor vehicle accident. Since the accident, her mobility has been limited. CT angiogram of the chest revealed massive bilateral pulmonary emboli. A 2D echocardiogram was performed, which demonstrated McConnell sign and severe right ventricle dysfunction. Considering potential of hemodynamic instability, the patient received fibrinolytic therapy with Alteplase. A subsequent 2D echocardiogram showed complete resolution of McConnell sign and right ventricle dysfunction.

  13. Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma Presenting as Mitral Valve Obstruction

    OpenAIRE

    Chokesuwattanaskul, Warangkana; Terrell, Jason; Jenkins, Leigh Ann

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 26-year-old man who experienced progressive left-sided chest pain and 2 episodes of near-syncope. Studies revealed a 15-cm mass in the upper left lung, a 10-cm mass in the medial base of the left lung, and a 5-cm left atrial mass that involved the left lung, infiltrated the left pulmonary vein, and prolapsed into the mitral valve, causing intermittent obstruction. The patient underwent surgical excision of the left atrial tumor. Pathologic evaluation confirmed the diag...

  14. Long QTc Syndrome Type 2 Presenting in a Postpartum Patient on Medroxyprogesterone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Kern

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Congenital long QT syndrome type 2 (LQTS2 is a rare inherited cardiac abnormality resulting in increased risk of polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (PVT. Case Description. A 21-year-old postpartum female presented with syncopal episode after phone alarm. She was noted to have PVT on telemetry monitoring in the emergency department. EKG revealed QTc of 530. The patient’s only medication was medroxyprogesterone. She ultimately received a dual chamber pacemaker with ICD. Discussion. LQTS2 is associated with alarm sounds as a precipitating factor. Postpartum hormonal shifts as well as medroxyprogesterone have significant effect on native QTc duration.

  15. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults; Kinderkardiologie. Klinik und Praxis der Herzerkrankungen bei Kindern, Jugendlichen und jungen Erwachsenen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haas, Nikolaus A. [Herz- und Diabeteszentrum NRW, Bad Oeynhausen (Germany). Klinik fuer angeborene Herzfehler; Kleideiter, Ulrich [Klinik fuer Kinder- und Jugendmedizin, Coesfeld (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  16. Atrial and ventricular septal defect with pulmonary and tricuspid valvular anomalies in a dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikawa, Y.; Wakao, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Minami, T.; Muto, M.; Suzuki, T.; Takahashi, M.; Une, Y.; Nomura, Y.; Ichioka, N.

    1989-01-01

    A 15-month-old male boxer dog weighing 22 kg was referred to Azabu University Animal Hospital for evaluation of the syncopal attack. There was no cardiac murmur, but electrocardiograms revealed an atrial fibrillation. Thoracic radiograph revealed enlargement of the right and left atrial regions. The medical treatment with digitalis and captopril was made for conversion from the atrial fibrillation to the sinus rhythm. By cardiac catheterization, atrial and ventricular septal defect with pulmonary stenosis was demonstrated. The patient died at 20 months from the first medical examination. At autopsy, there were severe enlargement of both atria, atrial defect, and pulmonary and tricuspid valvular anomalies. (author)

  17. Clinical and Echocardiographic Evaluation of Regional Systolic Function Detected by Tissue Doppler Imaging in Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Sadeghpour

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM is the most common type of the genetic cardiovasculardiseases. Regarding to tremendous heterogeneity in the phenotypic expression of HCM, which is generally unrelatedto genotype, we aimed to study, clinical and echocardiographic parameters such as Tissue Doppler Imaging(TDI in various subtypes of HCM patients and evaluate the influence of race and gender in Iranian patients.Methods: Patients with HCM underwent a complete clinical and echocardiographic study including TDI toassess regional systolic contraction( in the 12 segments and early diastolic annular velocity (Em from theseptal mitral annulus.Results: The study comprised 41 patients (20 women, mean age = 41 ± 15 years with mean LVEF 55%±4.8%and mean maximal septal thickness 2.07cm. Considering LVOT gradient>30mmHg, hypertrophic obstructivecardiomyopathy (HOCM was found in 18 (45%. Asymmetric septal hypertrophy (ASH existed in 27 patients(67%, systolic anterior motion of anterior mitral leaflet (SAM in 25 persons (64%. Nineteen patients (46.3%were included in NYHA function class (FC II and 6 (14.7% in FC III or higher. We found syncope in 10(24.4%, chest pain in 4 (9.8%, atrial fibrilation in 14.6 % and ventricular arrhythmias in (17.1% of patients.History of ICD was seen in 7 (17.1% and PPM in 9 cases. Mean E’ velocity was 5.44± 1.65 cm/sec and S velocity5.70± 1.49 cm/sec with significant lower S velocity and E’ in syncope patients. Overall, HOCM patients hadgrade II diastolic dysfunction with E/É >15(17.54±7.46. Majority (25 of cases (61% were categorized in typeIII of HCM. RV involvement was observed in 11 patients (28.2%.No significant differences existed betweenprevalence of syncope and dysrhythmia among HCM and HOCM patients.Conclusion: In our study, we found lower detection of latent HOCM, compared to other studies, suggestive ofinadequate use of appropriate provocative maneuvers such as exercise stress echocardiography and amyl

  18. Four year-old girl with having bled intestinal sharp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez Toro, Gerzain

    2001-01-01

    Indigenous girl, natural of Vaupes, Colombia conduction to the Mitu Hospital to present depositions with bleed. Their father says that the girl is sick for two days; she presents anorexia, moderate abdominal pain and vomit scarce postprandial, followed by discreet diarrhea and of two depositions with blood and abundant clots, with posterior syncope. It confirms a bled digestive with sharp anemic syndrome. The possibilities of gastritis sharp erosive, gastric ulcer or duodenal and intestinal poliparasitism are suggested. It is diagnosed abdominal angioestrongilosis, illness produce by helminths that lives inside the blind and the distal ileum

  19. Landiolol suppression of electrical storm of torsades de pointes in patients with congenital long-QT syndrome type 2 and myocardial ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryota Kitajima, MD

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A 76-year-old man who had been diagnosed with long-QT syndrome type 2 had frequent syncopal attacks. The electrocardiogram was monitored, and frequent torsades de pointes (TdP was detected despite administration of conventional medications: oral propranolol, verapamil, intravenous magnesium sulfate, verapamil, and lidocaine. In contrast, 2 μg/kg/min landiolol could completely suppress TdP. Subsequently, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator was placed, and he was diagnosed with silent myocardial ischemia using myocardial perfusion scintigraphy and coronary angiography. This is the first case report wherein landiolol effectively suppressed TdP due to long-QT syndrome with silent myocardial ischemia.

  20. Acquired long QT syndrome and Torsades de Poin

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    Ahmet Seyfeddin Gurbuz

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholinesterase inhibitors are group of drugs commonly used in Alzheimer disease and have beneficial effects on treatment. Although they have many known side effects, cardiovascular side effects are rarely seen. We present a 84 year old female who was admitted to emergency service due to repetitive syncope episodes while taking donepezil. Her electrocardiogram showed QT prolongation and on follow-up a Torsades de Pointes episode occurred. Patient was discharged with normal corrected QT time after removal of donepezil.

  1. Transient complete atrioventricular block with Morgagni—Adams—Stokes attacks in a child after aortic valve replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Sabirova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The diagnosis and treatment of life-threatening arrhythmias after surgical correction of congenital heart diseases is one the urgent problems in pediatrlc cardiology. The paper describes the clinical picture, diagnosis, and therapy in a patent with transient complete atrioventricular block after open heart surgery. A protracted Morgagni—Adams—Stokes attack is one of the causes of sudden cardiac death. The occurrence of even single syncopes in patients after surgery for congenital heart disease requires that the arrhythmogenic nature of the attack should be ruled out for the timely and adequate therapy including the implantation of antiarrhythmic devices.

  2. A danger of induction of Brugada syndrome during pill-in-the-pocket therapy for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyasu Aizawa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiyasu Aizawa, Tomohiro Matsuhashi, Toshiaki Sato, Seiji Takatsuki, Keiichi FukudaDivision of Cardiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanAbstract: Rhythm control therapy by sodium channel blockers is widely performed for the ­treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Here, we present a case of acquired Brugada ­syndrome by pill-in-the-pocket treatment using pilsicainide. It is important that this therapy should be applied only after confirming the drug safety to the patients.Keywords: syncope, sudden death, drug, rhythm control, pilsicainide, atrial flutter

  3. Introducing Standing Weight-bearing MRI in the Di-agnostics of Low Back Pain and Degenerative Spinal Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Bjarke Brandt

    2017-01-01

    (orthostatic syncope) during standing pMRI. In paper 1 we present in an observational study that the risk of fainting (19%) during standing pMRI could almost be eliminated by the use of an external pneumatic compression device (2%). The lumbar lordosis in the standing position is a significant contributor...... to positional changes in the morphology in the lumbar spine. In paper 2, we present in an observational study that changes in lumbar lordosis angle (ΔLA) between the conventional supine and standing position were independent of pain and the degenerative disc score. Before a full introduction of standing p...

  4. [Pannus Formation Two Years after Bioprosthetic Aortic Valve Implantation;Report of a Case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ono, Kimiyo; Kuroda, Hiroaki

    2015-08-01

    We report a case of early deterioration of the bioprosthetic aortic valve 23 months postoperatively. A 77-year-old man who had undergone aortic valve replacement with a 23-mm Epic valve( St. Jude Medical [SJM])presented to us after a syncopal episode. Echocardiography revealed severe aortic stenosis, and redo aortic valve replacement with a 21-mm SJM mechanical valve was performed. All 3 cusps of the tissue valve were thickened by fibrous pannus overgrowth. Neither calcification nor invasion of inflammatory cells was observed. The cause of pannus formation at such an early stage after implantation remains unknown.

  5. [Ventricular tachycardia in a patient with rate-responsive cardiac pacemaker].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Himbert, C; Lascault, G; Tonet, J; Coutte, R; Busquet, P; Frank, R; Grosgogeat, Y

    1992-11-01

    The authors report a case of syncopal ventricular tachycardia in a patient with a respiratory-dependent rate responsive pacemaker, followed-up for valvular heart disease with severe left ventricular dysfunction and sustained atrial and ventricular arrhythmias. The introduction of low dose betablocker therapy with reinforcement of the treatment of cardiac failure controlled the ventricular arrhythmia, after suppression of the data responsive function had been shown to be ineffective. The authors discuss the role of the rate responsive function in the triggering of the ventricular tachycardias.

  6. Combined Angiotensin Receptor Modulation in the Management of Cardio-Metabolic Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulis, Ludovit; Foulquier, Sébastien; Namsolleck, Pawel

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and metabolic disorders, such as hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia or obesity are linked with chronic low-grade inflammation and dysregulation of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS). Consequently, RAS inhibition by ACE inhibitors or angiotensin AT1 receptor (AT1R...... blockade abolishes the AT1R-linked RAS almost completely with subsequent risk of hypotension and hypotension-related events, i.e. syncope or renal dysfunction. Such complications might be especially prominent in patients with renal impairment or patients with isolated systolic hypertension and normal...

  7. Cardiac disorders with psychosomatic background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada Bielejewska

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Psychosomatic disorders can be described as psychosocial-derived organic disorders. The influence of depression, sleep disorders, quality of life, addictions, work environment, family situation, and stress on atrial fibrillation, palpitations, syncope, chest pain, coronary heart disease, and heart failure has been analysed in this paper. The correlation between psychosomatic disorders and the cardiovascular system has been shown. It allows us to conclude that an attending physician, while taking medical history of cardiac patients, should take into consideration factors that may have a negative impact on their mental health, which can be risk factors in the development or aggravation of an already present cardiovascular disease.

  8. Nationwide experience of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia caused by RyR2 mutations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broendberg, Anders Krogh; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis; Bjerre, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    probands, 18 symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic relatives with a RyR2 mutation. Twenty (87%) probands and 10 (36%) relatives had severe presenting symptoms (sudden cardiac death (SCD), aborted SCD (ASCD) or syncope).As compared with symptomatic relatives, probands had lower age at onset of symptoms (16 years...... (IQR, 10-33) vs 43 years (IQR, 25-54), pnear-fatal events (ASCD, SCD) (16vs5, p... events in the majority of probands and also occurred in 36% of relatives identified through family screening. Probands were younger at disease onset and more prone to fatal or near-fatal events than relatives....

  9. Percutaneous aortic valve implantation of the Medtronic CoreValve self-expanding valve prosthesis via left subclavian artery access: the first case report in Greece.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karavolias, George K; Georgiadou, Panagiota; Houri, Mazen; Sbarouni, Eftihia; Thomopoulou, Sofia; Tsiapras, Dimitrios; Smirli, Anna; Balanika, Marina; Voudris, Vassilis

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes a percutaneous aortic valve implantation with the Medtronic CoreValve selfexpanding valve prosthesis in a patient with severe aortic stenosis. The approach was made via the left subclavian artery because of the lack of femoral vessel access. The patient was a 78-year-old female with breathlessness on minimal effort, a recent hospitalisation due to pulmonary oedema, and frequent episodes of pre-syncope; surgical valve replacement had been ruled out. The prosthetic valve was successfully implanted with mild paravalvular aortic regurgitation. At 30 days, the patient's clinical condition had significantly improved, with excellent functioning of the aortic valve prosthesis.

  10. The Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome: laughter-induced pneumothorax - one of the many potentially detrimental consequences of laughter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Dorthe Bach; El Fassi, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    In this article we propose the eponym Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome (named after two Danish revue actors). The syndrome consists of laughter-induced pneumothorax in smoking middle-aged men when exposed to hearty humour. The epidemiology and pathophysiology of spontaneous pneumothorax - in particular...... the Pilgaard-Dahl syndrome - is described. Finally, the occurrence of other detrimental effects of laughter as syncope, extreme bradycardia, asthma bouts, headache, stroke, death, and incontinence are described, as well as initiatives expected to minimise the occurrence of good mood are proposed....

  11. Česká klavírní literatura ovlivněná jazzem a její využití na ZUŠ

    OpenAIRE

    Burdová, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Resumé This work deals with Czech piano literature influenced by jazz music and its application in music schools. In the first part we cover jazz music from the point of view of history and music theory. We discuss the development of jazz music in the Czech Republic and we introduce three significant composers influenced by jazz music - Bohuslav Martinů, Ervín Schulhoff and Jaroslav Ježek. Next, main features of jazz music are described, such as off-beat, syncopation, jazz phrasing or improvi...

  12. The novel C-terminal KCNQ1 mutation M520R alters protein trafficking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Nicole; Calloe, Kirstine; Nielsen, Nathalie Hélix

    2007-01-01

    The long QT-syndrome is characterized by a prolongation of the QT-interval and tachyarrhythmias causing syncopes and sudden death. We identified the missense mutation M520R in the calmodulin binding domain of the Kv7.1 channel from a German family with long QT-syndrome. Heterologous expression...... an immunopositive labeling of the plasma membrane. For M520R no plasma membrane staining was visible, instead a strong signal in the ER was observed. These results indicate that the LQT1 mutation M520R leads to ER-retention and dysfunctional trafficking of the mutant channel resulting in haploinsufficiency...

  13. Voluntary respiratory control and cerebral blood flow velocity upon ice-water immersion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantoni, Teit; Rasmussen, Jakob Højlund; Belhage, Bo

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In non-habituated subjects, cold-shock response to cold-water immersion causes rapid reduction in cerebral blood flow velocity (approximately 50%) due to hyperventilation, increasing risk of syncope, aspiration, and drowning. Adaptation to the response is possible, but requires...... velocity (CBFV) was measured together with ventilatory parameters and heart rate before, during, and after immersion. RESULTS: Within seconds after immersion in ice-water, heart rate increased significantly from 95 +/- 8 to 126 +/- 7 bpm (mean +/- SEM). Immersion was associated with an elevation...

  14. Life-Threatening Contraceptive-Related Pulmonary Embolism in a 14-Year-Old Girl with Hereditary Thrombophilia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellfritzsch, Maja; Grove, Erik Lerkevang

    2015-01-01

    . Based on a case of life-threatening COC-associated pulmonary embolism in a girl heterozygous for the prothrombin G20210A mutation and with a family history of thrombotic disease, we discuss the importance of assessing not just the genotype but also the phenotype when considering initiation of COCs...... in patients with thrombophilia. CASE REPORT: A 14-year-old girl presented with acute onset of chest pain and dyspnea followed by syncope. She was hypoxic and hemodynamically compromised at admission. Computed tomography pulmonary angiography revealed a large central "saddle" pulmonary embolism causing nearly...

  15. Pediatric cardiology. Clinical and practical experiences with heart diseases of children, juveniles and young adults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haas, Nikolaus A.

    2011-01-01

    The book on pediatric cardiology covers the following chapters: (I) Fundamentals and diagnostics: pediatric cardiologic anamnesis, electrocardiograms, thorax X-radiography, MRT and CT of the heart, nuclear medical diagnostics, exercise tests, heart catheter examination, electrophysiological tests. (II) Leading symptoms: Cyanosis, cardiac murmur, thorax pain, palpitation, syncopes. (III) Disease pictures: congenital heart defects, acquired heart defects, cardiomyopathies, heart rhythm disturbances, heart insufficiency, arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension, other heart involving syndromes. (IV) Therapy: Catheter interventional therapy, post-surgical pediatric cardiac therapy, surgery involving the life-support machine, mechanical cardiovascular support systems, initial treatment of newborns with critical heart defects, heart transplantation, vaccination of children with heart diseases, medicinal therapy.

  16. Form of Government and Political System: Conditions of Impossibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan Iancu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Successful constitutions manage to predetermine in juridical frame the political life of a country, by imposing a durable core equilibrium, i.e., a specific political system. The integrative function of the constitution derives from a reflexive political decision, at the constitution-making moment, for a specific form. The current theoretical difficulty in characterizing with precision the political system established by the Constitution of 1991 reflects the syncopated constitutional conflicts of recent years. The instability can be traced back to the continued absence of the preconditions for a genuine constitutional foundation. The initial indecision has been reinforced by later influences, including the EU accession process.

  17. Structural and Functional Coronary Artery Abnormalities in Patients With Vasospastic Angina Pectoris

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ong, Peter; Aziz, Ahmed; Hansen, Henrik Steen

    2015-01-01

    Coronary spasm is involved in many clinical scenarios, such as stable angina, acute coronary syndrome, sudden cardiac death, non-ischemic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmia and syncope. In recent years, imaging tools such as computerized tomographic angiography, intravascular ultrasound or optical...... coherence tomography have been applied to study the coronary pathology in patients with vasospastic angina. Patients with vasospastic angina represent a heterogeneous cohort of patients with regard to the extent of concomitant coronary atherosclerosis. They share the common pathophysiological phenomenon...... of this article is to review structural and functional coronary artery abnormalities in patients with vasospastic angina....

  18. Unusual echocardiographic features seen in a case of giant cell myocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochar, Minisha; López-Candales, Angel; Ramani, Gautam; Rajagopalan, Navin; Edelman, Kathy

    2008-11-01

    The case of an 18-year-old college football player with a recent history of streptococcal pharyngitis who was experiencing progressive disabling dyspnea on exertion with easy fatigability and lack of stamina, and was taken to the hospital after a syncopal episode is described. The patient was initially diagnosed with heart failure and treated accordingly. However, because of a fulminant clinical deterioration, an endomyocardial biopsy was recommended, which showed focal giant cell transformation consistent with giant cell myocarditis. Treatment with methylprednisolone and cyclosporine was promptly initiated. Several apical clots were noted during treatment, but the patient attained full recovery with treatment.

  19. A heavy heart; A massive right atrial myxoma causing fatigue and shortness of breath.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Leonard, S

    2010-03-01

    Cardiac myxomas are rare. The clinical diagnosis of an atrial myxoma may occur in an asymptomatic patient but may also present with cardiac failure, syncope, arrythmias, or with vascular evidence of tumour embolisation. The delay in diagnosis from presentation is approximately ten months. We present the case of a 53-year-old woman who attended our Emergency Department with dyspnoea, fatigue and left sided chest pain. Investigations revealed a massive right atrial myxoma. The tumour was resected successfully. Emergency Physicians should be aware of the subtle ways in which an atrial myxoma can present because of the potential for fatal outcomes.

  20. An Odontoid Fracture Causing Apnea, Cardiac Instability, and Quadriplegia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian A. Bowers

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Odontoid fractures are typically associated with low rates of acute neurologic deficit and morbidity/mortality in nonelderly patients. In the patient in this case, traumatic injury triggered by a syncopal event led to a combined C1-C2 fracture and a fatal spinal cord injury with apnea, quadriplegia, and cardiovascular instability. We briefly review the anatomical basis for the pathophysiology of cardiac dysfunction following high-cervical spine injury and present an example of a worst-case scenario.

  1. Fall prevention in the elderly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-01-01

    Summary Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment

  2. Prosthetic Valve Endocarditis - Successful Management With Antimicrobial Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashokan Nambiar C

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Middle aged male was admitted with high fever, rigor and chills of 2 days duration. He was seen in the clinic two years back for syncope. He gave history of Mitral (Starr-Edward and Aortic (Medtronic valve replacement ten years earlier from another center and was on regular anticoagulation with dose-adjusted acenocoumarol. On evaluation he had normal prosthetic valve function by trans-thoracic echo, but Holter monitoring showed Paroxysmal Atrial Fibrillation. He had mild wall motion abnormalities and left ventricular dysfunction suggestive of coronary artery disease also and was put on additional Metoprolol.

  3. Case Report of a Left Atrial Myxoma Associated with Carney%u2019s Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil Ozen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary cardiac neoplasms are very rare as compared to metastatic tumors. 70% to 80% of them are benign myxomas. Complications of myxomas include cyst and microabscess formation, embolization, syncope and sudden death. Rarely, cardiac myxomas are associated with primary nodular adrenal cortical disease, mammary fibroadenomas, testicular tumors or pitiutary adenomas with gigantism or acromegaly known as Carney%u2019s syndrome. We present a patient with a left atrial myxoma who underwent reoperation associated with Carney%u2019s syndrome.

  4. Takayasu Arteritis of the Coronary Arteries Presenting as Sudden Death in a White Teenager.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavaty, Leigh; Diaz, Francisco; Sung, LokMan

    2015-09-01

    Takayasu arteritis is a rare disease that expresses chronic, large vessel inflammation. The etiology remains unclear and its presentation depends on the affected arteries. With coronary artery involvement, manifestations range from chest pain and shortness of breath to sudden death. We report a case of a 15-year-old white girl who presented with syncope immediately before passing. On autopsy, all 3 major coronary arteries grossly contained multiple proximal lesions that were consistent with Takayasu arteritis, microscopically. Takayasu arteritis solely affecting multiple coronary arteries is exceedingly rare. This report discusses the significance of coronary involvement in Takayasu arteritis at autopsy and sudden death.

  5. [The Brugada Syndrome in a Teenager].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklashevich, I M; Kuleshova, E V; Termosesov, S A; Shkolnikova, M A

    2017-02-01

    The Brugada syndrome (BS) belongs to the group of hereditary channelopathies associated with elevated risk of sudden death (SD) in the absence of structural heart diseases. The disorder phenotypically manifests by specific electrocardiographic pattern, associated with ventricular tachycardia (VT). VT can be accompanied by loss of conscience, and after transformation to ventricular fibrillation result in SD. BS is extremely rare among children and adolescents. We present here a clinical case of teenager (age 17 years) with BS manifested by syncopal state at the background of fever.

  6. The teenager with palpitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedaghat-Yazdi, Farshad; Koenig, Peter R

    2014-02-01

    Palpitations can result from cardiac awareness (increased conscious perception of the heart beating) or from a fast or irregular cardiac rhythm. Most causes for palpitations in the teenager can be diagnosed with minimal testing. Patients with an abnormal ECG, non-sinus tachycardia, abnormal cardiac examination, concerning family history, or palpitations associated with activity or syncope should be referred to a pediatric cardiologist. This article discusses the evaluation, testing, and management of teenagers with palpitations. It also provides a general guideline for referral for subspecialty evaluation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Single coronary artery and right aortic arch].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Quintana, Efrén; Rodríguez-González, Fayna

    2015-01-01

    Coronary anomalies are mostly asymptomatic and diagnosed incidentally during coronary angiography or echocardiography. However, they must be taken into account in the differential diagnosis of angina, dyspnea, syncope, acute myocardial infarction or sudden death in young patients. The case is presented of two rare anomalies, single coronary artery originating from right sinus of Valsalva and right aortic arch, in a 65 year-old patient with atherosclerotic coronary artery disease treated percutaneously. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. INNOVATIVE DEVELOPMENT OF EDUCATIONAL SYSTEMS: CATEGORICAL MEANING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Tretyak

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This article discusses the concept of «development», «innovation» and «innovation development» in relation to the educational systems, as to create a new conceptual framework for quality education. Peculiarities of development of educational systems. Correlation concepts «organization development» and «innovation», defined birth of innovation as syncope in music. On the basis of the study given to the notion of innovation development of educational systems and identified conditions for their successful innovation development.

  9. Simulation training for medical emergencies in the dental setting using an inexpensive software application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, N; Mukai, N; Honda, Y; Hirata, Y; Tanaka, M; Momota, Y

    2017-11-09

    Every dental provider needs to be educated about medical emergencies to provide safe dental care. Simulation training is available with simulators such as advanced life support manikins and robot patients. However, the purchase and development costs of these simulators are high. We have developed a simulation training course on medical emergencies using an inexpensive software application. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the educational effectiveness of this course. Fifty-one dental providers participated in this study from December 2014 to March 2015. Medical simulation software was used to simulate a patient's vital signs. We evaluated participants' ability to diagnose and treat vasovagal syncope or anaphylaxis with an evaluation sheet and conducted a questionnaire before and after the scenario-based simulation training. The median evaluation sheet score for vasovagal syncope increased significantly from 7/9 before to 9/9 after simulation training. The median score for anaphylaxis also increased significantly from 8/12 to 12/12 (P simulation training. This simulation course improved participants' ability to diagnose and treat medical emergencies and improved their confidence. This course can be offered inexpensively using a software application. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Orthostatic intolerance: potential pathophysiology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chih-Cherng; Tseng, Ching-Jiunn; Tang, Hung-Shang; Tung, Che-Se

    2004-09-30

    Orthostatic intolerance affects an estimated 1 in 500 persons and causes a wide range of disabilities. After essential hypertension, it is the most frequently encountered dysautonomia, accounting for the majority of patients referred to centers specializing in autonomic disorders. Patients are typically young females with symptoms such as dizziness, visual changes, head and neck discomfort, poor concentration, fatigue, palpitations, tremulousness, anxiety, and, in some cases, syncope. Syncope is the most hazardous symptom of orthostatic intolerance, presumably occurring because of impaired cerebral perfusion and in part to compensatory autonomic mechanisms. The etiology of this syndrome is still unclear but is heterogeneous. Orthostatic intolerance used to be characterized by an overall enhancement of noradrenergic tone at rest in some patients and by a patchy dysautonomia of postganglionic sympathetic fibers with a compensatory cardiac sympathetic activation in others. However, recent advances in molecular genetics are improving our understanding of orthostatic intolerance, such as several genetic diseases (such as Ehler-Danlos syndrome and norepinephrine transporter deficiency) presenting with symptoms typical of orthostatic intolerance. Future work will include investigation of genetic functional mutations underlying interindividual differences in autonomic cardiovascular control, body fluid regulation, and vascular regulation in orthostatic intolerance patients. The goal of this review article is to describe recent advances in understanding the pathophysiological mechanisms of orthostatic intolerance and their clinical significance.

  11. Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia in an octogenarian.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutwak, Nancy; Dill, Curt

    2012-09-01

    Paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is a common dysrhythmia that occurs at all ages. Its management is determined by presenting symptoms and previous history of the patient. Patients present with a continuum of symptoms ranging from palpitations to syncope. The incidence of supraventricular tachycardia increases with age. To discuss the etiology, precipitating factors, and acute management of supraventricular tachycardia; and to discuss nodal reentry circuits and representative electrocardiographic findings. We present the case of an 84-year-old man with gallstone pancreatitis, choledolcholithiasis, and cholecystitis complicated by paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia. We review this dysrhythmia, emphasizing its significance in elderly patients. Supraventricular tachycardia is a common dysrhythmia that can result in syncope or myocardial infarction. We present a case of an elderly man with new-onset atrioventricular (AV) nodal reentry tachycardia, possibly precipitated by overdrive of his autonomic nervous system due to pain and infection. As the percentage of the elderly in our population is growing rapidly and the incidence of AV nodal reentry tachycardia increases with age, emergency physicians should be familiar with this dysrhythmia-its etiology, precipitating factors, presentations, and treatment. It will present more frequently in the future. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. A Comparison of Dysautonomias Comorbid with Cyclic Vomiting Syndrome and with Migraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Chelimsky

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclic vomiting syndrome (CVS shares many features with migraine headache, including auras, photophobia, and antimigrainous treatment response being traditionally viewed as a migraine variant. Aims. To determine whether CVS is associated with the same disorders as migraine headache, and compare these associations to those in healthy control subjects. Methods. Cross-sectional study of patients utilizing the ODYSA instrument, evaluating the probability of 12 functional/autonomic diagnoses, CVS, migraine, orthostatic intolerance (OI, reflex syncope, interstitial cystitis, Raynaud's syndrome, complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS, irritable bowel syndrome, functional dyspepsia, functional abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, and chronic fatigue syndrome. Control subjects were age-matched gender-matched friends. Patients had to fulfill criteria for CVS or migraine, while control subjects could not. Results. 103 subjects were studied, 21 with CVS, 46 with migraine and 36 healthy controls. CVS and migraine did not differ in the relative frequencies of fibromyalgia, OI, syncope, and functional dyspepsia. However, CVS patients did demonstrate a significantly elevated frequency of CRPS. Conclusions. Although CVS and migraine clearly share many of the same comorbidities, they do differ in one important association, suggesting that they may not be identical in pathophysiology. Since OI is common in CVS, treatment strategies could also target this abnormality.

  13. Ventricular Tachycardia in the Absence of Structural Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis R. P. Scott

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available In up to 10% of patients who present with ventricular tachycardia (VT, obvious structural heart disease is not identified. In such patients, causes of ventricular arrhythmia include right ventricular outflow tract (RVOT VT, extrasystoles, idiopathic left ventricular tachycardia (ILVT, idiopathic propranolol-sensitive VT (IPVT, catecholaminergic polymorphic VT (CPVT, Brugada syndrome, and long QT syndrome (LQTS. RVOT VT, ILVT, and IPVT are referred to as idiopathic VT and generally do not have a familial basis. RVOT VT and ILVT are monomorphic, whereas IPVT may be monomorphic or polymorphic. The idiopathic VTs are classified by the ventricle of origin, the response to pharmacologic agents, catecholamine dependence, and the specific morphologic features of the arrhythmia. CPVT, Brugada syndrome, and LQTS are inherited ion channelopathies. CPVT may present as bidirectional VT, polymorphic VT, or catecholaminergic ventricular fibrillation. Syncope and sudden death in Brugada syndrome are usually due to polymorphic VT. The characteristic arrhythmia of LQTS is torsades de pointes. Overall, patients with idiopathic VT have a better prognosis than do patients with ventricular arrhythmias and structural heart disease. Initial treatment approach is pharmacologic and radiofrequency ablation is curative in most patients. However, radiofrequency ablation is not useful in the management of inherited ion channelopathies. Prognosis for patients with VT secondary to ion channelopathies is variable. High-risk patients (recurrent syncope and sudden cardiac death survivors with inherited ion channelopathies benefit from implantable cardioverter-defibrillator placement. This paper reviews the mechanism, clinical presentation, and management of VT in the absence of structural heart disease.

  14. Clinical characteristics in genetically distinct forms of the congenital long QT syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawahara, Yosuke; Sawayama, Toshitami; Samukawa, Masanobu; Nezuo, Shoso; Tanaka, Junji; Suetsuna, Ryoji; Kamiyama, Norio

    1998-01-01

    The clinical characteristics in genetically distinct forms of the congenital long QT syndrome (LQTs) were examined on the balance of bilateral sympathetic nerves, and ECG findings. The subjects (mean: 19.4 years old) were three genetically distinct forms of LQTs, including 3 patients in A-family (the high risk family with sudden death), 2 patients in B-family and 3 patients in C-family. All patients met the standard diagnostic criteria according to Schwartz. As the index of the balance of bilateral sympathetic nerves, the dissociation of Tl and MIBG uptake (D) was examined and the radioactivity ratio (the A/L ratio) of anteroseptal wall to posterolateral wall was calculated. The T-wave patterns of ECG and the situation at syncope were examined. In A-family, all 3 patients showed the lowered A/L ratio, D(+), and similar T-wave patterns in ECG. The syndrome developed at exercise, and their QTc extended at exercise. In B-family, all 2 patients showed normal A/L ratio and long T-wave at QT onset, and their QTc shortened at exercise. All patients had developed syncope at rest. In C-family, all 3 patients showed a little decrease of A/L ratio and similar T-wave patterns. Their QTc extended at exercise. These results suggest that the characteristics of the sympathetic nerve balance, ECG wave patterns and the syndrome may depend on each family. (K.H.)

  15. Safety of a meningococcal group B vaccine used in response to two university outbreaks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Jonathan; Johnsen, Peter; Ferris, Mary; Miller, Mary; Leighton, Kevin; McGilvray, Mark; McNamara, Lucy; Breakwell, Lucy; Yu, Yon; Bhavsar, Tina; Briere, Elizabeth; Patel, Manisha

    2017-03-31

    To assess the safety of meningococcal group B (MenB)-4C vaccine. Undergraduates, dormitory residents, and persons with high-risk medical conditions received the MenB-4C vaccine two-dose series during mass vaccination clinics from 12/2013 through 11/2014. Adverse events (AEs) were identified by 15 minutes of observation postvaccination, spontaneous reports, surveys, and hospital surveillance. Causality was assessed for serious adverse events (SAEs). 16,974 persons received 31,313 MenB-4C doses. The incidence of syncope during the 15-minutes post-dose 1 was 0.88/1000 persons. 2% of participants spontaneously reported an AE (most common were arm pain and fever). 3 SAEs were suspected of being caused by the vaccine, including one case of anaphylaxis. Most AEs reported were nonserious and consistent with previous clinical trial findings. Measures to prevent injury from syncope and to treat anaphylaxis should be available wherever vaccines are administered. Our safety evaluation supports the use of MenB-4C in response to outbreaks.

  16. Diagnostic Role of ECG Recording Simultaneously With EEG Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendirli, Mustafa Tansel; Aparci, Mustafa; Kendirli, Nurten; Tekeli, Hakan; Karaoglan, Mustafa; Senol, Mehmet Guney; Togrol, Erdem

    2015-07-01

    Arrhythmia is not uncommon in the etiology of syncope which mimics epilepsy. Data about the epilepsy induced vagal tonus abnormalities have being increasingly reported. So we aimed to evaluate what a neurologist may gain by a simultaneous electrocardiogram (ECG) and electroencephalogram (EEG) recording in the patients who underwent EEG testing due to prediagnosis of epilepsy. We retrospectively evaluated and detected ECG abnormalities in 68 (18%) of 376 patients who underwent EEG testing. A minimum of 20 of minutes artifact-free recording were required for each patient. Standard 1-channel ECG was simultaneously recorded in conjunction with the EEG. In all, 28% of females and 14% of males had ECG abnormalities. Females (mean age 49 years, range 18-88 years) were older compared with the male group (mean age 28 years, range 16-83 years). Atrial fibrillation was more frequent in female group whereas bradycardia and respiratory sinus arrhythmia was higher in male group. One case had been detected a critical asystole indicating sick sinus syndrome in the female group and treated with a pacemaker implantation in the following period. Simultaneous ECG recording in conjunction with EEG testing is a clinical prerequisite to detect and to clarify the coexisting ECG and EEG abnormalities and their clinical relevance. Potentially rare lethal causes of syncope that mimic seizure or those that could cause resistance to antiepileptic therapy could effectively be distinguished by detecting ECG abnormalities coinciding with the signs and abnormalities during EEG recording. © EEG and Clinical Neuroscience Society (ECNS) 2014.

  17. 'Cardiogenic vertigo'--true vertigo as the presenting manifestation of primary cardiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman-Toker, David E; Camargo, Carlos A

    2006-03-01

    A 90-year-old woman presented to a hospital emergency department with a brief loss of consciousness that was heralded by spinning vertigo lasting approximately 2 min. She had a long history of intermittent brief episodes of rotatory vertigo, presyncope, and non-vertiginous dizziness, occurring either with or without loss of consciousness. Although initially attributed to symptomatic carotid artery stenosis, these episodes persisted, despite surgical restoration of carotid artery blood flow 1 year after her first syncope. Her medical history was otherwise notable for hypertension, mild depression and a gradual decline in gait and balance function attributed to left hip arthritis and older age. Bedside history and examination, non-contrast head CT scan, electrocardiogram, transthoracic echocardiogram, and bedside cardiac telemetry. Sick sinus syndrome or severe reflex bradycardia with asystole causing recurrent, episodic vertigo, presyncope, non-vertiginous dizziness and syncope (Stokes-Adams attacks). Placement of a temporary pacing wire, followed by surgical implantation of a single-chamber ventricular (VVI) pacemaker.

  18. Carbon monoxide poisoning from waterpipe smoking: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, Lars; Michaelis, Dirk; Kemmerer, Michael; Jüttner, Björn; Tetzlaff, Kay

    2018-04-01

    Waterpipe smoking may increasingly account for unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning, a serious health hazard with high morbidity and mortality. We aimed at identifying waterpipe smoking as a cause for carbon monoxide poisoning in a large critical care database of a specialty care referral center. This retrospective cohort study included patients with a history of exposure to waterpipe smoking and carbon monoxide blood gas levels >10% or presence of clinical symptoms compatible with CO poisoning admitted between January 2013 and December 2016. Patients' initial symptoms and carbon monoxide blood levels were retrieved from records and neurologic status was assessed before and after hyperbaric oxygen treatment. Sixty-one subjects with carbon monoxide poisoning were included [41 males, 20 females; mean age 23 (SD ± 6) years; range 13-45] with an initial mean carboxyhemoglobin of 26.93% (SD ± 9.72). Most common symptoms included syncope, dizziness, headache, and nausea; 75% had temporary syncope. Symptoms were not closely associated with blood COHb levels. CO poisoning after waterpipe smoking may present in young adults with a wide variability of symptoms from none to unconsciousness. Therefore diagnosis should be suspected even in the absence of symptoms.

  19. Premature Coronary Artery Disease due to Homozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia in a 12-Year-Old Girl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filiz Ekici

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia is a rare inherited metabolic disease caused by low-density lipoprotein receptor abnormality. Patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia have an increased risk of cardiovascular complication that usually occurs in the first decade of life. Here, we report a 12-year-old girl with an unpredicted presentation for coronary artery disease and found to have homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Case Report: A 12-year-old girl was admitted to our unit with syncope. Chest X-ray showed bilateral diffuse pneumonic consolidation and mild cardiomegaly. We detected stable ST depression by electrocardiography. Echocardiography showed normal systolic functions. Troponin-1 levels were high (66 mcg/dL, upper limit: 0.04 mcg/dL. Influenza A virus DNA was detected by the respiratory viral panel. After her successful treatment for acute pneumonia and myocarditis due to Influenza A virus, her syncope attacks persisted. Marked ST elevation was observed during exercise electrocardiography. Coronary angiography showed severe occlusions in the coronary arteries. High serum levels of total cholesterol (756 mg/dL and low-density lipoprotein-C (556 mg/dL were noticed. She had no tendon xanthomas. Medical histories revealed that her family members were diagnosed with heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. A coronary bypass surgery was performed. Statin and ezetimibe treatments were started. We also planned lipid apheresis. Conclusion: Children with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia may present with symptoms of premature coronary heart disease requiring a routine lipid test and careful anamnesis.

  20. The repeatability of left ventricular volume assessment by a new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system during head-up tilt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takase, Bonpei; Hosaka, Haruhiko; Kitamura, Katsuhiro

    2001-01-01

    The precise measurement of changes in left ventricular volume is important to elucidate the mechanisms of neurally mediated syncope. This study was conducted to determine whether or not a brand-new ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system (C-VEST system) can be clinically used to easily and precisely measure left ventricular volume and function in tilt testing. To assess the repeatability of the C-VEST system, 12 healthy volunteers (mean age 24±4 years old) underwent 20 minute head-up tilt testing and we measured the temporal changes in left ventricular volume and ejection fraction twice a day (first and second studies). To investigate the changes in the C-VEST measurements and the detector position in the first and second studies, tilt testing was performed with an 80-degree passive tilt, which is the same as the standard procedure used in diagnosing neurally mediated syncope. The coefficient of repeatability for both the C-VEST and detector position was well within the clinical range (coefficient of repeatability in left ventricular volume ranged from 1.7 to 2.8; coefficient of repeatability in the detector position ranged from 2.3 to 3.1). Precise evaluation of the left ventricular volume can be achieved by an ambulatory radionuclide monitoring system in tilt testing. (author)

  1. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  2. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  3. The value of electroencephalography in differential diagnosis of altered mental status in emergency departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, L.; Yardan, T.; Kati, C.; Akdemir, H. U.; Altuntas, M.; Balci, K.; Karadas, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the value of electroencephalography in patients with altered mental status in emergency departments. Methods: Demographical characteristics, types and aetiologies of seizures, and clinical outcomes of the patients were recorded. Patients were divided into 4 groups according to the complaints of admission: findings and symptoms of seizure; stroke and symptoms of stroke-related seizures; syncope; and metabolic abnormalities and other causes of altered mental status. The electroencephalography findings were classified into 3 groups: epileptiform discharges; paroxysmal electroencephalography abnormalities; and background slowing. Electroencephalography abnormalities in each subgroup were evaluated. SPSS 21 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 190 patients in the study, 117(61.6%) had pathological electroencephalography findings. The main reason for electroencephalography in the emergency department was the presence of seizure findings and symptoms in 98(51.6%) patients. The ratio of electroencephalography abnormality was higher in patients who were admitted with complaints of metabolic abnormality-related consciousness disturbances (p<0.001). A total of 124(65.3%) patients had neuroimagings. Electroencephalography abnormalities were found to be significantly higher in patients with neuroimagings compared to those without neuroimagings (p<0.003). Conclusion: Despite advanced neuroimaging techniques, electroencephalography is still an important tool in the differential diagnosis of altered mental status such as epileptic seizures, metabolic abnormalities, pseudo-seizures and syncope. (author)

  4. Dopamine beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senard Jean-Michel

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DβH deficiency is a very rare form of primary autonomic failure characterized by a complete absence of noradrenaline and adrenaline in plasma together with increased dopamine plasma levels. The prevalence of DβH deficiency is unknown. Only a limited number of cases with this disease have been reported. DβH deficiency is mainly characterized by cardiovascular disorders and severe orthostatic hypotension. First symptoms often start during a complicated perinatal period with hypotension, muscle hypotonia, hypothermia and hypoglycemia. Children with DβH deficiency exhibit reduced ability to exercise because of blood pressure inadaptation with exertion and syncope. Symptoms usually worsen progressively during late adolescence and early adulthood with severe orthostatic hypotension, eyelid ptosis, nasal stuffiness and sexual disorders. Limitation in standing tolerance, limited ability to exercise and traumatic morbidity related to falls and syncope may represent later evolution. The syndrome is caused by heterogeneous molecular alterations of the DBH gene and is inherited in an autosomal recessive manner. Restoration of plasma noradrenaline to the normal range can be achieved by therapy with the synthetic precursor of noradrenaline, L-threo-dihydroxyphenylserine (DOPS. Oral administration of 100 to 500 mg DOPS, twice or three times daily, increases blood pressure and reverses the orthostatic intolerance.

  5. EEG use in a tertiary referral centre.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Toole, O

    2011-11-15

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively audit all electroencephalograms (EEGs) done over a 2-month period in 2009 by the Neurophysiology Department at Cork University Hospital. There were 316 EEGs performed in total, of which 176\\/316 (56%) were done within 24 hours of request. Out of 316 EEGs, 208 (66%) were considered \\'appropriate\\' by SIGN and NICE guidelines; 79\\/208 (38%) had abnormal EEGs and 28 of these abnormal EEGs had epileptiform features. There were 108\\/316 (34%) \\'inappropriate\\' requests for EEG; of these 15\\/108 (14%) were abnormal. Of the 67\\/316 (21%) patients who had EEGs requested based on a history of syncope\\/funny turns: none of these patients had epileptiform abnormalities on their EEGs. Our audit demonstrates that EEGs are inappropriately over-requested in our institution in particular for cases with reported \\'funny turns\\' and syncope. The yield from EEGs in this cohort of patients was low as would be expected.

  6. Manejo del síncope vasovagal en la atención médica primaria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Casanova Sotolongo

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años es mayor el interés por el manejo del síncope de diferentes causas debido a su frecuencia, naturaleza incapacitante, su gravedad potencial y a los problemas complejos implicados en su génesis y difíciles de diagnosticar. El síncope se ha definido como la pérdida súbita, breve y transitoria del estado de conciencia, con incapacidad para mantenerse en pie, ausencia del tono postural y recuperación espontánea. El síncope vasovagal es el más común y produce una de las respuestas de vasodilatación más poderosa en los humanos. En su producción se halla implícita una disfunción breve de reflejos cardiovasculares vasodepresores con sisminución del metabolismo cerebral, como consecuencia de la deprivación de sustancias energéticas esenciales. La pérdida de conciencia puede ser causada por muchos trastornos, en su mayoría de origen benigno, tal como la reacción vasopresora, que es la más frecuente y no recurrente; sin embargo en una proporción pequeña de casos, el síncope puede ser causado por un trastorno peligroso para la vida como la taquiarritmia ventricular y ser causa de muerte súbita. Su mecanismo de producción más frecuente es el reflejo bradicárdico. El estudio del síncope es un problema complejo que requiere de una guía clínica que lo racionalice. No hay evidencia de la utilidad diagnóstica de las pruebas de neuroimagen, EEG o estudios vasculares en los pacientes con este trastorno cuando no hay signos de focalidad neurológica. La prueba de mayor rentabilidad diagnóstica en el estudio del síncope de causa no aclarada es la mesa basculante. Se deben remitir estos casos al neurólogo solo cuando existan signos neurológicos de disfunción focal, si hay dudas de que se trate de crisis epilépticas o cuando la valoración por el cardiólogo, incluyendo el estudio con la mesa basculares, es negativa.In the last few years, the interest for the syncope of different causes has grown due to its

  7. Obesity paradox in heart failure patients - Female gender characteristics-KAMC-single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khaled, Sheeren; Matahen, Rajaa

    2017-09-01

    The correlation between low body mass index (BMI) and congestive heart failure (obesity paradox) has been described in the literature; However, the association between BMI and clinical outcome measures is not well characterized. Little is known about CHF in the Middle Eastern female population; most of the gender-specific information on heart failure comes from higher income "Western" countries. We aimed to identify the correlation between heart failure patients especially those with low BMI and clinical/safety outcome measures with focusing on female patients subgroup characteristics. We performed group comparisons of statistically relevant variables using prospectively collected data of HFrEF patients hospitalized over a 12 month period. The 167 patients (Group I) enrolled by this study with mean age of 59.64 ± 12.9 years, an EF score of 23.96 ± 10.14, 62.9% had ischemic etiology, 12.5% were smoker, 18% had AF, 31.1% had received ICD/CRT-D and an estimated 8.85 ± 9.5 days length of stay (LOS). The low BMI group of patients (Group II) had means age of 58.7 ± 14.5 years, a significant lower EF score of 20.32 ± 8.58, significantly higher 30, 90 days readmission rates and in-house mortality (22%, 36.6% and 17.1% vs 10.2%, 20.4% and 6.6% respectively) and higher rates of CVA, TIA and unexplained syncope (19.5% vs 7.2%). Similarly, female patients with low BMI (Group IV) had lower EF score of 22.0 ± 53, higher 30,90 days readmission rates and in-house mortality (34.4%,43.8% and 25% vs 13.5%,21.6% and 5.4% respectively) and higher rates of CVA, TIA and unexplained syncope(10% vs 0%). Our findings showed that heart failure patients with low BMI had poor adverse clinical outcome measures (poor EF, recurrent readmission, mortality and composite rates of CVA, TIA and unexplained syncope) which reflect the effect of obesity paradox in those patients with HFrEF. Female patient subgroup showed similar characteristic findings which also might reflect the

  8. Slower lower limb blood pooling in young women with orthostatic intolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindenberger, Marcus; Länne, Toste

    2015-01-01

    What is the central question of this study? Orthostatic stress is mostly caused by venous blood pooling in the lower limbs. Venous distension elicits sympathetic responses, and increased distension speed enhances the cardiovascular response. We examine whether lower limb blood pooling rate during lower body negative pressure is linked to orthostatic intolerance. What is the main finding and its importance? A similar amount of blood was pooled in the lower limb, but at a slower rate in women who developed signs of orthostatic intolerance. The difference in blood pooling rate increased with orthostatic stress and was most prominent at a presyncope-inducing level of lower body negative pressure. The findings have implications for the pathophysiology as well as treatment of orthostatic intolerance. Vasovagal syncope is common in young women, but its aetiology remains elusive. Orthostatic stress-induced lower limb blood pooling is linked with central hypovolaemia and baroreceptor unloading. Venous distension in the arm elicits a sympathetic response, which is enhanced with more rapid distension. Our aim was to study both the amount and the speed of lower limb pooling during orthostatic stress and its effects on compensatory mechanisms to maintain cardiovascular homeostasis in women with orthostatic intolerance. Twenty-seven healthy women, aged 20-27 years, were subjected to a lower body negative pressure (LBNP) of 11-44 mmHg. Five women developed symptoms of vasovagal syncope (orthostatic intolerant) and were compared with the remaining women, who tolerated LBNP well (orthostatic tolerant). Lower limb blood pooling, blood flow and compensatory mobilization of venous capacitance blood were measured. Lower body negative pressure induced equal lower limb blood pooling in both groups, but at a slower rate in orthostatic intolerant women (e.g. time to 50% of total blood pooling, orthostatic intolerant 44 ± 7 s and orthostatic tolerant 26 ± 2 s; P intolerant women (P = 0

  9. [Management of outpatients with cardiac disease: follow-up timing and modalities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossini, Roberta; Lina, Daniela; Ferlini, Marco; Belotti, Giuseppina; Caico, Salvatore Ivan; Caravati, Fabrizio; Faggiano, Pompilio; Iorio, Annamaria; Lauri, Davide; Lettieri, Corrado; Locati, Emanuela Teresa; Maggi, Antonio; Massari, Ferdinando; Mortara, Andrea; Moschini, Luigi; Musumeci, Giuseppe; Nassiacos, Daniele; Negri, Fabrizio; Pecora, Domenico; Pierini, Simona; Pedretti, Roberto; Ravizza, Pierfranco; Romano, Michele; Oliva, Fabrizio

    2017-06-01

    The increasing rate of cardiovascular diseases, the improved survival after the acute phase, the aging of the population and the implementation of primary prevention caused an exponential increase in outpatient cardiac performance, thereby making it difficult to maintain a balance between the citizen-patient request and the economic sustainability of the healthcare system. On the other side, the prescription of many diagnostic tests with a view to defensive medicine and the related growth of patients' expectations, has led several scientific societies to educational campaigns highlighting the concept that "less is more".The present document is aimed at providing the general practitioner with practical information about a prompt diagnosis of signs/symptoms (angina, dyspnea, palpitations, syncope) of the major cardiovascular diseases. It will also provide an overview about appropriate use of diagnostic exams (echocardiogram, stress test), about the appropriate timing of their execution, in order to ensure effectiveness, efficiency, and equity of the health system.

  10. Feline primary hyperaldosteronism: an emerging endocrine disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Diola Bento

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The primary hyperaldosteronism, an endocrine disease increasingly identified in cats, is characterized by adrenal gland dysfunction that interferes with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, triggering the hypersecretion of aldosterone. Pathophysiological consequences of excessive aldosterone secretion are related to increased sodium and water retention, and increased excretion of potassium, which induce hypertension and severe hypokalemia, respectively. The most common clinical findings in cats include: polydipsia, nocturia, polyuria, generalized weakness, neck ventroflexion, syncope, anorexia, weight loss, pendulous abdomen and blindness. Diagnosis is based on the evidence of hormonal hypersecretion with suppression of renin release, imaging and histopathological evaluation of adrenal glands. Treatment may be curative with adrenalectomy, in cases of unilateral disease, or conservative, through administration of aldosterone antagonists, potassium supplementation and antihypertensives. Prognosis varies from fair to good with the appropriate therapy. This article reviews the main aspects of primary aldosteronism in cats, providing the clinician with important information for the diagnosis of this disease.

  11. Association of a patent foramen ovale with myocardial infarction and pulmonary emboli in a peripartum woman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramineni, Rajesh; Daniel, George K

    2010-10-01

    Peripartum myocardial infarction is uncommon but devastating in young women. Although it is generally associated with arterial dissection, pregnancy-induced hypercoagulable state can also be a major contributor. Association of patent foramen ovale (PFO) adds to this potential risk. A 29-year-old postpartum female presented with worsening chest pressure, shortness of breath and syncope. She was hypotensive and tachycardic. A ventilation perfusion imaging displayed high probability for pulmonary emboli. With elevated cardiac enzymes and echocardiogram showing wall motion abnormalities, patient underwent percutaneous coronary angioplasty for a midvessel thrombus in the left anterior descending artery. Further workup showed a thrombus straddling into the left atrium via a PFO and a deep venous thrombus in the right iliac vein. Hormonal changes in pregnancy are noted to place young women in a hypercoagulable state. Screening for PFO in this group of patients with timely intervention might prevent a major systemic event caused by paradoxical embolus.

  12. Atypical presentation of sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Abdul Aziz

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available A 20 year old female presented with a history of frequent syncopal attack since her childhood. Each episode persisted 5-10 min without having any aggravating factor or prodrome. She had persistent generalized bodyache aggravating during the winter. She had jaundice and episodic abdominal pain. She received 1 unit of blood transfusion 4 months back and improved sympto-matically. Patient was mildly anemic, moderately icteric and had mild splenomegaly. Over these long periods of her illness she was thoroughly evaluated several times. Her biochemical and neurological evaluation revealed no abnormalities. But she was treated with anticonvulsant for long time empirically without significant improvement. Her CBC showed microcytic hypochromic anemia. She was negative for Wilson’s disease. Reticulocyte count was high. Coomb’s test was negative. Osmotic fragility test was positive. Hemoglobin electrophoresis revealed Hb-S 60%. Sickling test was found positive. Finally it was diagnosed as a case of HbS/β+.

  13. Metastases of Hepatocellular Carcinoma Misdiagnosed as Isolated Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Assunta; De Masi, Roberto; Orlando, Stefania; Metrangolo, Antonio; Zecca, Vittorio; Morciano, Giancarlo; De Donno, Antonella; Bagordo, Francesco; Piccinni, Giancarlo

    At present, cardiac metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma is rarely mentioned in the literature. We report a hepatocellular carcinoma patient with cardiac metastasis misdiagnosed as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in 2011. Two years later, on presentation of syncope, an abnormal ventricular septal size was recorded by ultrasound scan, and was subsequently shown by magnetic resonance imaging to be a tumour lesion. A myocardial biopsy confirmed infiltration of hepatocellular carcinoma. This observation underlines the risk of hepatocellular carcinoma cardiac metastasis, manifested in its infiltrative form as hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. In conclusion, we suggest that the ultrasound appearance of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in hepatocellular carcinoma patients should be seen as a "red flag" and recommend the introduction of magnetic resonance imaging assessment of transplant candidates.

  14. Complete Transversal Disc Fracture in a Björk-Shiley Delrin Mitral Valve Prosthesis 43 Years After Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Santos, Jose María; Arnáiz-García, María Elena; Dalmau-Sorlí, María José; Sastre-Rincón, Jose Alfonso; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Pérez-Losada, María Elena; Sagredo-Meneses, Víctor; López-Rodríguez, Javier

    2016-10-01

    A patient who underwent previous implantation of a mitral valve replacement with a Björk-Shiley Delrin (BSD) mitral valve prosthesis during infancy was admitted to our institution 43 years later after an episode of syncope and cardiac arrest. Under extreme hemodynamic instability, a mitral valve prosthetic dysfunction causing massive mitral regurgitation was identified. The patient underwent an emergent cardiac operation, and a complete disc fracture with partial disc migration was found. Exceptional cases of mechanical prosthetic heart valve fracture exist. We report the first case of complete transversal disc rupture of a BSD mitral valve prosthesis after the longest period of implantation ever reported in that position. Copyright © 2016 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monophasic Synovial Sarcoma Presenting as Mitral Valve Obstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chokesuwattanaskul, Warangkana; Terrell, Jason; Jenkins, Leigh Ann

    2010-01-01

    We report the case of a 26-year-old man who experienced progressive left-sided chest pain and 2 episodes of near-syncope. Studies revealed a 15-cm mass in the upper left lung, a 10-cm mass in the medial base of the left lung, and a 5-cm left atrial mass that involved the left lung, infiltrated the left pulmonary vein, and prolapsed into the mitral valve, causing intermittent obstruction. The patient underwent surgical excision of the left atrial tumor. Pathologic evaluation confirmed the diagnosis of monophasic synovial sarcoma. To our knowledge, this is only the 3rd report of left atrial invasion and resultant mitral valve obstruction from a synovial sarcoma that infiltrated the pulmonary vein. We believe that this is the 1st documented case of a metastatic left atrial synovial sarcoma in monophasic form. PMID:20844626

  16. Complex regional pain syndrome type I following pacemaker implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Kamath

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A 70-year-old woman presented with burning pain and swelling over dorsum of right hand and small joints of the fingers, associated with redness, feeling of warmth, and stiffness of the fingers, with inability to bend the fingers since 2 months. The symptoms were progressively increasing in intensity for the past 1 month. There was no history of fever or trauma to the hand. Two months before her symptoms started, she had permanent pacemaker implanted for complete heart block with syncope. She was hypertensive and was on regular medication. Her X-ray of right hand showed decreased bone density (demineralisation, suggestive of osteopenia. A diagnosis of reflex sympathetic dystrophy syndrome or complex regional pain syndrome type I induced by pacemaker insertion was made. She was treated with amitriptyline and steroids, after which her symptoms improved dramatically.

  17. Isotopic cardiac pacemaker during pregnancy. Three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laurens, P.; Gavelle, P.; Maurice, P.; Haiat, R.; Chiche, P.

    1976-01-01

    Three cases of full term pregnancies, without complications, in women with isotopic pacemakers are reported. The newborn infants were normal. In one case, pregnancy occurred in a patient who already had a pacemaker. In two cases, the pacemaker was inserted during pregnancy (at 1 and 1/2 and 5 months respectively), in the treatment of syncopal attacks due to paroxysmal atrioventricular block. This type of pacemaker using a radioactive source (plutonium 238) is, by virtue of the low degree of radiation, harmless and may be used in women of childbearing age. Under the least favourable conditions (pacemaker box in abdominal situation), the dose delivered during pregnancy (57 mrem) is approximately 20 times less than the authorized dose (1125 mrem) [fr

  18. Cardiovascular Side Effects of Atomoxetine and Its Interactions with Inhibitors of the Cytochrome P450 System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashtoon Murtaza Kasi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is one of the most common neurobehavioral disorders of childhood and adolescence. Classically, stimulants have been used in the treatment of this condition. Atomoxetine (Strattera; Eli Lilly and Company is a selective norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor (SNRI, one of the first medications in the nonstimulant class of medications that has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of ADHD. Atomoxetine is a phenoxypropylamine derivative and is structurally related to the antidepressant fluoxetine. The common side effects reported with the use of atomoxetine include mainly GI disturbances. Cardiovascular side effects are less commonly reported. The increase in the noradrenergic tone may explain some of the side effects noted with the use of this medication. Here, we present a case of a patient who presented with syncope, orthostatic hypotension, and tachycardia and discuss the various clinical implications based on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of the drug.

  19. Low disease prevalence and inappropriate implantable cardioverter defibrillator shock rate in Brugada syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Jensen, Henrik Kjærulf; Eschen, Ole

    2012-01-01

    AimsBrugada syndrome (BrS) is an inherited channelopathy that predisposes to malignant ventricular arrhythmias and thereby syncope and sudden cardiac death. Prior studies characterizing BrS patients have used highly selected referral populations from tertiary centres and prevalence estimates have...... been carried out using electrocardiogram (ECG) surveys only. We aimed to identify and characterize all diagnosed BrS patients in Denmark (population 5.4 million).Methods and resultsBrugada syndrome patients were identified using several modalities including identification in all Danish tertiary......%) experienced inappropriate shocks during a median follow-up of 47 months. No patient died or experienced aborted sudden cardiac death during follow-up.ConclusionsWe report the first nationwide study of BrS patients. We found a low incidence of diagnosed definite BrS compared with estimates from ECG surveys...

  20. Epilepsy in fragile-X-syndrome mimicking panayiotopoulos syndrome: Description of three patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Paolo; Casellato, Susanna; Fabbro, Franco; Negrin, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Fragile-X-syndrome is the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability. Epilepsy is reported to occur in 10-20% of individuals with Fragile-X-syndrome. A frequent seizure/electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern resembles that of benign rolandic epilepsy. We describe the clinical features, EEG findings and evolution in three patients affected by Fragile-X-syndrome and epilepsy mimicking Panayiotopoulos syndrome. Age at seizure onset was between 4 and about 7 years. Seizures pattern comprised a constellation of autonomic symptoms with unilateral deviation of the eyes and ictal syncope. Duration of the seizures could be brief or lengthy. Interictal EEGs revealed functional multifocal abnormalities. The evolution was benign in all patients with seizures remission before the age of 14. This observation expands the spectrum of benign epileptic phenotypes present in Fragile-X-syndrome and may be quite helpful in guiding anticonvulsant management and counseling families as to expectations regarding seizure remission. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. [Rabdomiosarcoma primario de corazón como causa de síncope recurrente en el adulto].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz-Pérez, Julio Alexander; Gómez-Arbeláez, Diego; Hurtado-Gomez, Gabriel Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Primary or secondary neoplasms can affect the heart. Secondary are more common. However, primary neoplasms are relevant because is a group with diverse genesis, behavior, treatment and clinical manifestations. We present a case of a 45 year-old woman, with recurrent syncope started 1 year before her first consult. She had palpitations and chest pain. Echocardiography identified a left atrium mass of 2.1x1.8 cm. Endomyocardial biopsy document a primary rhabdomyosarcoma of the heart. The patient dies after a overall-survival of 22 months. This case presented had a good study of its symptoms with an accurate diagnosis and early treatment, which provided prolonged survival of this rare and aggressive neoplasm.

  2. Analysis of intense beam instability in a general quadrupole focusing channel with image charge effect

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goswami, A., E-mail: animesh@vecc.gov.in; Sing Babu, P., E-mail: psb@vecc.gov.in; Pandit, V.S., E-mail: pandit@vecc.gov.in

    2016-02-01

    The stability properties of transverse envelopes of mismatched intense continuous charge particle beam propagating in a general quadrupole focusing channel have been investigated in the presence of image charge effect due to a cylindrical conducting pipe. Phase shifts and growth factors of the envelope oscillations in the case of instability are calculated by numerical evaluation of the eigenvalues of linearly perturbed envelope equations for small deviations from the matched beam conditions. A detailed study on the region of instability and its dependence on the system parameters like occupancy of the quadrupole focusing field, syncopation factor, zero current phase advance, beam intensity etc. have been carried out. It has been found that the strength and regions of envelope instability due to the lattice and confluent resonances in the parametric space are affected by the presence of image charge.

  3. Cerebral Venous Thrombosis and Pulmonary Embolism with Prothrombin G20210A Gene Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagli, Canan Eren; Koksal, Nurhan; Guler, Selma; Gelen, Mehmet Emin; Atilla, Nurhan; Tuncel, Deniz

    2010-04-01

    A 25-year-old man presented with symptoms of syncope, cough, headache and hemoptysis. Cranial MR and venography showed thrombus formation in the right transverse sinus and superior sagittal sinus. Computed tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) showed an embolic thrombus in the right pulmonary truncus and lung abscess. The patient was young, and there were no signs of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis or other major risk factors for pulmonary embolism (PE) including cardiac anomaly. The only risk factor we were able to identify was the presence of the prothrombin G20210A gene mutation. Anticoagulant treatment with oral warfarin (10 mg daily) and imipenem (4X500 mg) was started. The patient was hospitalized for antibiotic and anticoagulation therapies for three weeks and was discharged on lifelong treatment with warfarin (5 mg daily).

  4. QT Prolongation Complicated with Torsades de Pointes in Prosthetic Mitral Valve Endocarditis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tounsi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the case of a 49-year-old male patient with prosthetic mitral valve endocarditis associated with QT prolongation and torsades de pointes. He was asymptomatic until the end of January 2012, when he was admitted to our hospital emergency unit because of syncope, fever, and suspicion of endocarditis. Cardiologic evaluation was requested and the transthoracic (TTE and transesophageal (TEE echocardiograms revealed vegetations on the prosthetic mitral valve. All cultures were positive for methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. The corrected QT (QTc interval was markedly prolonged upon admission (QTc 540 ms. He experienced torsades de pointes (TdP several times and he was recovered after bystander cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The clinical course and the long QTc interval with deep inverted T wave were completely normalized 4 weeks after. He continued on triple antibiotic therapy for 45 days with a good revolution. The clinical features and the possible mechanisms of QT prolongation (inflammation, infection of this patient are discussed.

  5. Life Threatening Severe QTc Prolongation in Patient with Systemic Lupus Erythematosus due to Hydroxychloroquine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John P. O’Laughlin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a syncopal episode resulting from significant QT interval prolongation in a patient on hydroxychloroquine for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus and end stage renal disease. The patient had been treated with hydroxychloroquine for two years prior to presentation. After thorough workup for secondary causes of QT interval prolongation hydroxychloroquine was discontinued and the patient’s QT interval shortened. The patient was treated with mexiletine to prevent sudden ventricular arrhythmias, which was unique compared to other documented cases in which lidocaine was used. The patient was noted to have mild prolongation of the QT interval on electrocardiogram prior to initiation of hydroxychloroquine therapy which was exacerbated by its use and may have been caused due to toxicity from underlying renal failure.

  6. Overlapping LQT1 and LQT2 phenotype in a patient with long QT syndrome associated with loss-of-function variations in KCNQ1 and KCNH2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cordeiro, Jonathan M; Perez, Guillermo J; Schmitt, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    . The proband (MMRL0362), a 32-year-old female, exhibited multiple ventricular extrasystoles and one syncope. Her ECG (QT interval corrected for heart rate (QTc) = 518ms) showed an LQT2 morphology in leads V4-V6 and LQT1 morphology in leads V1-V2. Genomic DNA was isolated from lymphocytes. All exons and intron...... borders of 7 LQTS susceptibility genes were amplified and sequenced. Variations were detected predicting a novel missense mutation (V110I) in KCNQ1, as well as a common polymorphism in KCNH2 (K897T). We expressed wild-type (WT) or V110I Kv7.1 channels in CHO-K1 cells cotransfected with KCNE1 and performed.......15 mV for K897T and WT, respectively; p loss-of-function mutation in KCNQ1 and a loss-of-function polymorphism in KCNH2. Our results suggest...

  7. Pantoprazole-Induced Delirium: Review of a Case and Associated Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razdan, Anupriya; Viswanathan, Ramaswamy; Tusher, Alan

    2018-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are frequently prescribed antiulcer agents in hospitals and are shown to be safer than H-2 blockers. We present a case report of PPI-induced delirium, regarding which not much has been written in the literature. We present a case of a 93-year-old woman with no known past psychiatric history, who was hospitalized for syncope workup and who developed delirium after a double dose of pantoprazole. Very few reports of PPI-induced delirium exist in the literature. In this case report, we attempt to highlight the mechanism of PPI induced delirium which in our case was most likely due to the primary effects of PPI and drug-drug interactions. Given the paucity of literature on this topic, we encourage further research into relationship between PPI and delirium and urge caution while using PPIs in geriatric population.

  8. Cardiology update 2017: The first quarter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sridharan Umapathy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the first quarter of 2017, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9's role got defined further with a number of trials such as FOURIER, ORION-1, and SPIRE 1 and 2. TAVI proves safe in intermediate-risk patients in the Surgical Replacement and Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation study. Newer anticoagulants extended their role to valvular heart disease. Bioabsorbable stent showed problems (ABSORB 2 and 3. New guidelines have been released for syncope and transcatheter aortic valve replacement implantation. Clinical outcome studies involving instantaneous wave-free ratio (IFR showed IFR to be noninferior to fractional flow reserve. Optimal medical therapy proves noninferior to percutaneous coronary intervention in single vessel chronic total occlusion.

  9. Disappearance of electrocardiographic abnormalities associated with the arrhythmic pattern of a Barlow disease after surgical mitral valve repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Augello

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe the case of a 46-year old female with a Barlow’s disease (MVP characterized by systolic curling of posterior left ventricular (LV wall + significant mitral annular disjunction + complex ventricular arrhythmias + syncope + inverted T waves in inferolateral leads in whom a successful surgical mitral valve rapair determined the disappearance not only of the echocardiographic but also the electrocardiographic abnormalities (in particular the inferolateral T waves inversion on basal electrocardiogram and the complex basal arrhythmic pattern. This case demonstrates that electrocardiographic abnormalities may disappear after the surgical correction of the mechanical stretch imposed on the inferior LV free wall by the prolapsing mitral valve leaflets. Electrocardiographic changes remain an important and easy marker to recognize for the identification of a high-risk subgroup of MVP patients.

  10. Anthracyclines and Acquired Long QT Syndrome. A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Rodríguez Armada

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Acquired long QT syndrome results from secondary causes and can be caused by more than 100 non-antiarrhythmic drugs. Cardiac arrest due to Torsades de pointes induced by drugs causing prolonged QT syndrome is a rare but potentially fatal event, even in hospitals. The case of a 47-year-old patient diagnosed with non-Hodgkin lymphoma admitted to the hematology department of the Dr. Gustavo Aldereguía Lima University General Hospital in Cienfuegos is presented. The patient had been previously treated with anthracyclines and developed episodes of palpitations and syncope later. The treatment included monitoring the patient, avoiding other QT prolonging agents and administrating magnesium sulfate and potassium chloride with a proper maintenance of the fluid and acid-base balance. The presentation of this case aims at motivating interest in new reports on the subject and establishing a direct causal relationship through the evidence provided by new experiences.

  11. Jervell and Lange-Nielson Syndrome masquerading as intractable epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jagdish P Goyal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cause of syncope and sudden death. Jervell and Lange-Nielson syndrome (JLNS is an uncommon form of LQTS, having autosomal recessive transmission, and is associated with congenital deafness. We report a case of JLNS in a child who presented to us with refractory epilepsy. The cardiac cause of seizures was suspected as the child was hypotensive and pulseless during the episode of seizures. The child was diagnosed as JLNS based on Schwartz diagnostic criteria for LQTS and congenital sensorineural deafness. The child responded well to β-blocker therapy. Antiepileptic drugs were stopped. The screening of family members with ECG revealed a QT interval more than required for diagnosis of LQTS but they were asymptomatic. All asymptomatic family members were also put on metoprolol. All of them showed great improvement with the reduction of the QT interval on ECG. The patient was doing well on immediate follow-up.

  12. Juvenile ischemic stroke secondary to cardiogenic embolism: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Soleimanpour

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Myxomas, the most common primary cardiac tumors, are known as a source of cardiogenic emboli. The possibility of their early detection has made them of great importance for emergency medicines. Detection of the disease is probable at early stages using echocardiography and associate complications such as syncope, cerebral embolic ischemic strokes, and sudden death. We report experience of a rare case of juvenile acute stroke in a patient with cardiac myxoma affecting all cardiac chambers presenting to the emergency department. In young stroke patients with signs and symptoms compatible with cardiovascular involvement, cardiogenic emboli should be taken into consideration; early echocardiographic studies are highly recommended. Prompt myxoma resection is required in both asymptomatic and stroke patients in whom intravenous thrombolysis course has not been implemented due to any limitations.

  13. The Coexistence of an Intrasellar Adenoma, Lymphocytic Hypophysitis, and Primary Pituitary Lymphoma in a Patient with Acromegaly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Hernan Martinez

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The concomitant presence of three histopathologically different entities in the pituitary gland is a rare occurrence. Most publications identify at least two distinct pathologies, mainly, a pituitary adenoma coexisting with a second intrasellar lesion. We present a case of a 71-year-old female referred for evaluation and treatment of acromegaly. Questioning revealed she was experiencing facial palsy, visual disturbances, and syncopal spells for several weeks. When laboratory evaluation showed elevated somatomedin (IGF-I levels and an oral glucose tolerance test failed to demonstrate any suppression of her growth hormone (GH values, an MRI of the pituitary revealed a sellar mass. A presumptive diagnosis of pituitary adenoma was established. The patient underwent transsphenoidal resection of the sellar mass, which proved to be a large B-cell lymphoma (Stage I-E associated with areas of adenoma and lymphocytic hypophysitis.

  14. Modernism as a Misnomer: Godard's Archeology of the Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Rockhill

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available "The standard historical image of Jean-Luc Godard is that of a resolute iconoclast breaking with the representational norms and codes of classical cinema in the name of liberating film from the deadening weight of its past. His numerous formal innovations—syncopated montage, unconventional framing, unique experiments with dialogue, etc.—along with his abandonment of traditional narrative and character development, his playful pastiche of genres, his debunking of the representational illusions of cinematic realism, his reflexive preoccupation with film itself and the general dissolution of the distinction between high and low art have created a potent new form of cinema that continues to have far-reaching effects. More experimental than Truffaut, more temerarious than Chabrol, but less fastidious than Resnais, less obtuse and prolix than Rivette, Godard is seen as the bumptious enfant terrible of the Cahiers du cinéma who set the agenda for a new era of modernist filmmaking..."

  15. Pegylated interferon de novo-induce autoimmune haemolytic anaemia in chronic hepatitis C patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, Ashraf; Elbahrawy, Ashraf; Alfiomy, Mohamed; Abdellah, Mohamed; Shahat, Khaled; Salah, Mohamed; Mostafa, Sadek; Elwassief, Ahmed; Aboelfotoh, Attef; Abdelhafeez, Hafez; El-Sherif, Assem

    2011-08-11

    A 55-year-old Egyptian woman with chronic hepatitis C undergoing treatment with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN) alfa-2a plus ribavirin was referred to our hospital on November 2010 with prolonged easy fatigability and an attack of syncope; she had no prior history of autoimmune disorders or allergy. Laboratory investigations documented the presence of Peg-IFN induced autoimmune haemolytic anaemia and autoimmune thyroiditis. Intravenous γ globulin (IVGG) failed to correct the autoimmune process; on the other hand steroid therapy dramatically corrected both haematological and thyroid values, and step down the immune process. Our report indicated that Peg-IFN de novo-induce autoimmune haemolysis, documenting a previous report. IVGG failed to step down the immune process in our case.

  16. Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy Mimicking Acute Anterior Myocardial Infarction Associated with Sudden Cardiac Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Daralammouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is the most common genetic disease of the heart. We report a rare case of hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy mimicking an acute anterior myocardial infarction associated with sudden cardiac death. The patient presented with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction and significant elevation of cardiac enzymes. Cardiac catheterization showed some atherosclerotic coronary artery disease, without significant stenosis. Echocardiography showed left ventricular hypertrophy with a left ventricular outflow tract obstruction; the pressure gradient at rest was 20 mmHg and became severe with the Valsalva maneuver (100 mmHg. There was no family history of sudden cardiac death. Six days later, the patient suffered a syncope on his way to magnetic resonance imaging. He was successfully resuscitated by ventricular fibrillation.

  17. Sports-Related Sudden Cardiac Injury or Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Elizabeth Anne; Punnoose, Ann

    2015-12-01

    Symptoms such as syncope and chest pain, especially if they are accompanied by palpitations or occur with exercise in any combination, require cardiac evaluation before adolescent athletes are allowed to return to the sports field. Some life-threatening conditions will likely be associated with a family history of HCM or LQTS, but the family history may not be discovered at the first medical visit. A family history of CPVT, for example, is hard to elicit unless this diagnosis has already been established in an affected family member. The keys will be the timing of symptoms and the documentation of arrhythmia with exercise. The ECG at baseline in CPVT may be deceptively normal. Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is progressive, so evaluation during early childhood may be negative. Long QT syndrome may not always result in an abnormal ECG, even in genetically positive individuals. A high index of suspicion is needed to make these diagnoses, especially if the family history is not available.

  18. Sudden death in young persons with uncontrolled asthma--a nationwide cohort study in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gullach, Anders Juul; Risgaard, Bjarke; Lynge, Thomas Hadberg

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Asthma is a common chronic disease among young adults, and several studies have reported increased mortality rates in patients with asthma. However, no study has described sudden unexpected death in a nationwide setting in patients with uncontrolled asthma. We defined uncontrolled...... in preventing sudden unexpected deaths. We therefore aimed to describe clinical characteristics, symptoms, causes of death, and contact with the healthcare system prior to sudden unexpected death in young persons with uncontrolled asthma. METHODS: Through the review of death certificates, we found 625 sudden...... individuals who suffered from uncontrolled asthma. This corresponds to an incidence rate of 0.32 per 100,000 person-years. The cause of death in 31 cases (63%) was sudden cardiac death, and in 13 cases (27%), it was a fatal asthma attack. Symptoms (chest pain, dyspnea, seizures, general malaise, syncope...

  19. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tessa Negrín Valdés

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia is a heart muscle disease that predominantly affects the right ventricle, bringing about the replacement of normal myocardium with fatty or fibrofatty tissue and causing sudden death in young individuals. Ventricular tachycardia is an important clinical manifestation, although there are reports of right or global heart failure. The diagnosis is confirmed by echocardiography and magnetic resonance imaging. The case of a 65-year-old former smoker, with hypertension and ischemic heart disease, a history of effort syncope symptoms and proven non-sustained ventricular tachycardia, with morphology of left bundle branch block, is reported. Relevant diagnostic studies were performed, and echocardiographic elements which were compatible with arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia were found. Therefore, an implantable cardioverter defibrillator was implanted, after which the patient has had a favorable outcome.

  20. Mutations in calmodulin cause ventricular tachycardia and sudden cardiac death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyegaard, Mette; Overgaard, Michael Toft; Sondergaard, M.T.

    2012-01-01

    a substantial part of sudden cardiac deaths in young individuals. Mutations in RYR2, encoding the cardiac sarcoplasmic calcium channel, have been identified as causative in approximately half of all dominantly inherited CPVT cases. Applying a genome-wide linkage analysis in a large Swedish family with a severe......Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a devastating inherited disorder characterized by episodic syncope and/or sudden cardiac arrest during exercise or acute emotion in individuals without structural cardiac abnormalities. Although rare, CPVT is suspected to cause...... calmodulin-binding-domain peptide at low calcium concentrations. We conclude that calmodulin mutations can cause severe cardiac arrhythmia and that the calmodulin genes are candidates for genetic screening of individual cases and families with idiopathic ventricular tachycardia and unexplained sudden cardiac...

  1. Calls to Poison Centers for hookah smoking exposures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retzky, Sandra S; Spiller, Henry A; Callahan-Lyon, Priscilla

    2018-06-01

    Over the past decade, smoking behaviors have changed in the US. Hookah or waterpipe smoking is increasing, especially among youth and young adults. Social media sites describe the "hookah high" or "buzz", which may be related to nicotine, carbon monoxide, or other inhalants in hookah smoke. Most important is the risk of carbon monoxide poisoning. Case reports include a high number of victims presenting with loss of consciousness from either syncope or seizures. Anaphylaxis and a very rare respiratory hypersensitivity reaction, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, have also been reported from hookah smoking in previously healthy young adults. This article provides background information on hookah smoking, describes hookah-induced acute injuries that could precipitate poison center calls, and offers suggestions for exposure characterization.

  2. Acute Aortic Dissection in a Third Trimester Pregnancy without Risk Factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth L Walters

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous aortic dissection in pregnancy is rare and life threatening for both the mother and the fetus. Most commonly, it is associated with connective tissue disorders, cardiac valve variants, or trauma. We present the case of a 23-year-old previously healthy woman, 36 weeks pregnant with a syncopal episode after dyspnea and vomiting. She subsequently developed cardiac arrest and underwent aggressive resuscitation, emergent thoracotomy, and cesarean delivery without recovery. On autopsy, she was found to have an aortic dissection of the ascending aorta. This case is presented to raise awareness and review the literature and the clinical approach to critical care for pregnant patients. [West J Emerg Med. 2011;12(4:571–574.

  3. Accidental poisoning with Veratrum album mistaken for wild garlic (Allium ursinum).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilotta, Irene; Brvar, Miran

    2010-11-01

    Veratrum album (white or false hellebore) is a poisonous plant containing steroidal alkaloids that cause nausea, vomiting, headache, visual disturbances, paresthesia, dizziness, bradycardia, atrioventricular block, hypotension, and syncope. It is regularly mistaken for Gentiana lutea (yellow gentian). We report accidental poisoning with V. album mistaken for Allium ursinum (wild garlic), a wild plant used in soups and salads in Central Europe. Four adults (24-45 years) accidentally ingested V. album mistaken for A. ursinum in self-prepared salads and soups. Within 15-30 min of ingestion they developed nausea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. At the same time dizziness, tingling, dimmed and jumping vision, transient blindness, and confusion appeared. On arrival at the ED, all patients had sinus bradycardia and hypotension. Following treatment the patients were discharged well 24-48 h after ingestion. In patients presenting with gastrointestinal, neurological, and cardiovascular symptoms a history of wild plant ingestion suggests possible poisoning with V. album mistaken for wild garlic.

  4. Diverse Presentation of Breath Holding Spells: Two Case Reports with Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali Rathore

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Breath holding spells are a common and dramatic form of syncope and anoxic seizure in infancy. They are usually triggered by an emotional stimuli or minor trauma. Based on the color change, they are classified into 3 types, cyanotic, pallid, and mixed. Pallid breath holding spells result from exaggerated, vagally-mediated cardiac inhibition, whereas the more common, cyanotic breathholding spells are of more complex pathogenesis which is not completely understood. A detailed and accurate history is the mainstay of diagnosis. An EKG should be strongly considered to rule out long QT syndrome. Spontaneous resolution of breath-holding spells is usually seen, without any adverse developmental and intellectual sequelae. Rare cases of status epilepticus, prolonged asystole, and sudden death have been reported. Reassurance and education is the mainstay of therapy. Occasionally, pharmacologic intervention with iron, piracetam; atropine may be of benefit. Here we present 2 cases, one of each, pallid and cyanotic breath holding spells.

  5. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Seong Joo; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Dae Ho [Dept. of Radiology, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Eu Gene [Dept. of Internal Medicine, Konyang University College of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-15

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  6. Churg-Strauss Syndrome with Cardiac Involvement: A Case Report with CT and MRI Findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Seong Joo; Cho, Young Jun; Kim, Keum; Hwang, Cheol Mok; Kim, Dae Ho; Choi, Eu Gene

    2012-01-01

    This is a case report of Churg-Strauss Syndrome (CSS) associated with cardiac involvement which is demonstrated in chest CT and cardiac MRI (CMR) without specific cardiac symptoms. A 32-year-old woman had a 3-year history of bronchial asthma, chronic sinusitis, and otitis media. The patient had various typical findings of CSS. The patient had no specific cardiac symptoms or signs such as chest pain, palpitations, syncope, or murmur, but she had diffuse low attenuation lesions in the inner wall of the left ventricle (LV) in contrast-enhanced CT. This corresponded to the area of subendocardial hyperenhancement in delayed contrast-enhanced CMR images. She was treated with steroids for 2 months. Follow-up delayed contrast-enhanced CMR of the LV showed a decrease in the size of the subendocardial enhancement area, and she had no symptoms. Therefore, the radiologist and clinician both should pay careful attention to observe possible cardiac involvement in case of CSS.

  7. Whole-blood donation: blood donor suitability and adverse events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Bruce H

    2004-11-01

    Approximately 3% to 3.5% of the US population donates whole blood each year. Physicians might be approached by a blood donor because of a donor suitability issue, a positive postdonation test, or a donation-related complication. Approximately 83% of blood donors successfully donate; but 13% are rejected because of a donor suitability issue; 1% have a positive test, which is often nonspecific or false-positive; and 2% to 4% of the phlebotomies are not successful. The most common adverse physical events based on donor interviews are bruise (23%), sore arm (10%), fatigue (8%), and vasovagal reaction (7%), while uncommon events include nerve irritation (0.9%), syncope (0.1-0.3%), and arterial puncture (0.01%). One in 3400 donors (0.033%) report seeking outside medical care. Serious injuries occur but are very rare. More often, blood donors do well and feel satisfied with the blood donation experience.

  8. Combined Case of Blood-Injury-Injection Phobia and Social Phobia: Behavior Therapy Management and Effectiveness through Tilt Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fotini Ferenidou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of behavior therapy based mainly on real-life exposure situations as well as applied tension was examined for a combined case of blood-injury-injection (BII phobia and social anxiety disorder. Treatment involved 28 behavior therapy sessions, while applied tension technique was also described and practiced. The specific contribution of social skills techniques, fantasy, and real-life situations exposure was examined in a single case design. The subject was a 39-year-old male with anxiety symptoms when confronting an audience, as well as symptoms of the autonomic nervous system (bradycardia and syncope, which were better explained by BII. All self-report measures regarding fear, social phobia, and anxiety were reduced after behavior therapy and remained maintained at followup, while BII decreased further after applied tension techniques. The contribution of behavior therapy to the overall outcome of the case is considered significant for many reasons that are discussed in the pape.

  9. A review of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carew, Sheila

    2012-01-31

    A 21-year-old female reports an 18-month history of light-headedness on standing. This is often associated with palpitations and a feeling of intense anxiety. She has had two black-outs in the past 12 months. She is not taking any regular medications. Her supine blood pressure was 126\\/84 mmHg with a heart rate of 76 bpm, and her upright blood pressure was 122\\/80 mmHg with a heart rate of 114 bpm. A full system examination was otherwise normal. She had a 12-lead electrocardiogram performed which was unremarkable. She was referred for head-up tilt testing. She was symptomatic during the test and lost consciousness at 16 min. Figure 1 summarizes her blood pressure and heart rate response to tilting. A diagnosis of postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome with overlapping vasovagal syncope was made.

  10. Anomalous origin of right coronary artery from left coronary sinus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamzeh, Gadah; Crespo, Alex; Estarán, Rafael; Rodríguez, Miguel A; Voces, Roberto; Aramendi, José I

    2008-08-01

    Anomalous aortic origin of the coronary arteries is uncommon but clinically significant. Manifestations vary from asymptomatic patients to those who present with angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, heart failure, syncope, arrhythmias, and sudden death. We describe 4 patients, aged 34 to 59 years, who were diagnosed with right coronary artery arising from the left sinus of Valsalva, confirmed by coronary angiography, which was surgically repaired. Three patients presented dyspnea and angina, and one with acute myocardial infarction. At operation, the right coronary artery was dissected at the take-off from the intramural course, and reimplanted into the right sinus of Valsalva. There was no mortality. One patient had associated coronary artery disease that required stent placement postoperatively. This reimplantation technique provides a good physiological and anatomical repair, eliminates a slit-like ostium, avoids compression of the coronary artery between the aorta and the pulmonary artery, and gives superior results to coronary artery bypass grafting or the unroofing technique.

  11. Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Syndrome (POTS) in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinth, Louise; Pors, Kirsten; Spahic, Jasmina Medic

    2018-01-01

    " 1997-2014 was retrieved from PubMed and related to yearly POTS incidence. RESULTS: Eight-hundred-and-seventy-five tests with suspected POTS were thoroughly evaluated. The reclassification of test results yielded 243 POTS diagnoses (age, 27.0 ± 11.8 years). An increase in total number of POTS diagnoses...... was observed but the proportion of POTS-positive tests per year was relatively constant (≈2-3%) except for the period 2013-2014 (≈7%). The increase in POTS diagnoses was preceded by an increase in number of POTS-related papers in PubMed. CONCLUSION: The proportion of POTS diagnoses among patients investigated...... for suspected syncope and/or orthostatic intolerance was relatively constant 1997-2012. The growing number of POTS-related publications in PubMed preceded the steep increase in diagnostic rate of POTS observed after 2012....

  12. A high-risk patient with long-QT syndrome with no response to cardioselective beta-blockers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toyota, Naoki; Miyazaki, Aya; Sakaguchi, Heima; Shimizu, Wataru; Ohuchi, Hideo

    2015-09-01

    We present a case of a high-risk 19-year-old female with long-QT syndrome (LQTS) with compound mutations. She had a history of aborted cardiac arrest and syncope and had received treatment with propranolol for 15 years. However, because she developed adult-onset asthma we tried to switch propranolol, a nonselective beta-blocker, to beta-1-cardioselective agents, bisoprolol and metoprolol. These resulted in both a markedly prolonged corrected QT interval and the development of LQTS-associated arrhythmias. Eventually, propranolol was reinitiated at a higher dose with the addition of verapamil, and she has had no further cardiac or asthmatic events for 5 years.

  13. Atrial fibrillation in a healthy adolescent after heavy smoking of contraband cigarettes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyilmaz, Isa; Ozyilmaz, Sinem; Tosun, Oyku; Tola, Hasan Tahsin; Saygi, Murat; Ergul, Yakup

    2015-08-01

    The use of contraband cigarettes is a serious public health problem. We present a case of atrial fibrillation in a healthy adolescent suspected to be caused by smoking contraband cigarettes. A 15-year-old man was admitted to our emergency department experiencing syncope and palpitations. He was a cigarette smoker, but he had never smoked any illicit tobacco products before. He had finished a pack of counterfeit cigarettes (20 pieces) in 1.5 h. His electrocardiogram showed atrial fibrillation with a rapid ventricular response and irregular RR intervals. The patient had no history of alcohol use, surgery, palpitations, hypertension, chronic bronchitis, or any infectious diseases. His atrial fibrillation was converted to a normal sinus rhythm after the cardioversion treatment. Our patient was discharged from the pediatric cardiology service and advised to quit smoking cigarettes, strictly warning against illicit tobacco products. In conclusion, intensive smoking of counterfeit cigarettes may lead to occurrences of atrial fibrillation.

  14. Acute supraventricular tachycardia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Siba Prosad; Blaikley, Sarah; Peevers, Camilla; Fitz-John, Lin

    2012-10-01

    This article describes the management in emergency departments of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT) in children. Of all forms of symptomatic arrhythmia in infants, children and adolescents, SVT is the most common. Its clinical presentation varies with the child's age, and it can be difficult to diagnose in infants and young children. It is important that the nurses in the emergency department consider a diagnosis of SVT in young children with histories of poor feeding, lethargy, irritability, excessive sweating or pallor (Zeigler 1994) and in older children with histories of palpitations, dizziness, chest pain, syncope or shortness of breath (Uzun 2010). If SVT is suspected, a 12-lead electrocardiogram should be recorded. Vagal manoeuvre may be successful but in some cases intravenous adenosine is necessary. Children with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome are at risk of sudden cardiac death associated with SVT, and should not be treated with calcium channel blockers or digoxin.

  15. Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis in a Saudi patient complicated by life-threatening arrhythmia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aldasouqi, Saleh; Bokhari, Samia A; Khan, Patan M; AlZahrani, Ali S

    2009-01-01

    Thyrotoxic periodic paralysis (TPP) is rare in non-Orientals, and sporadic case reports were reported world-wide. Eight cases were reported in Arabs, including 3 Saudis. We present an additional case of TPP in a 38-year-old Saudi man, and review the literature on TPP in Arabs. Our patient presented with complete flaccid quadriplegia, 5 weeks after he was diagnosed with Graves' disease that was treated with carbimazole and propranolol. He was hyperthyroid, and his potassium was extremely low (1.5 mmol/L). During initial evaluation in the emergency room, he developed transient asystole manifested by syncope. He was resuscitated and his hypokalemia was corrected, and he had a full recovery. This case emphasizes the notion that TPP can occur in patients of any ethnic background. The development of serious cardiac complications in our patient underscores the importance of early and correct diagnosis of this potentially life-threatening complication of hyperthyroidism. (author)

  16. Cutting balloon and high-pressure balloon dilation for palliative treatment of congenital double-chambered right ventricle and primary infundibular stenosis in a Golden retriever dog.

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    Schober, Karsten E; Rhinehart, Jaylyn; Kohnken, Rebecca; Bonagura, John D

    2017-12-01

    Combined cutting balloon and high-pressure balloon dilation was performed in a dog with a double-chambered right ventricle and severe infundibular stenosis of the right ventricular outflow tract. The peak systolic pressure gradient across the stenosis decreased by 65% after dilation (from 187 mmHg before to 66 mmHg after) affirming the intervention as successful. However, early re-stenosis occurred within 3 months leading to exercise intolerance, exercise-induced syncope, and right-sided congestive heart failure. Cutting balloon followed by high-pressure balloon dilation provided temporary but not long-term relief of right ventricular obstruction in this dog. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Malignant ventricular tachycardia in acromegaly: a case report

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    Zhe An

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: In patients with acromegaly, cardiovascular complications are the main cause of death; sudden death has been associated with ventricular tachyarrhythmias. In other patients with life-threatening malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmias, surgical placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD has proved highly effective in reducing sudden death rates. CASE REPORT: The present article reports the case of a 50-year-old male acromegalic patient who presented symptoms of syncope induced by ventricular tachycardia. An ICD was surgically implanted and a pituitary adenoma, which was responsible for the acromegaly, was completely removed in the same procedure. The surgery was successful and the ventricular arrhythmias were effectively terminated. During six months of follow-up, no documented arrhythmic episodes occurred. CONCLUSION: In patients with acromegaly, malignant ventricular tachyarrhythmia might be effectively controlled by implantation of an ICD and surgical removal of the pituitary adenoma.

  18. Clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of three dogs with angiostrongylosis in ireland

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    Brennan Sheila F

    2004-02-01

    Full Text Available Infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum was diagnosed at necropsy on a dog that died from acute pulmonary haemorrhage, and on recovery of L1 larvae by Baermann examination of faeces from two dogs, one of which had abdominal pain and retroperitoneal haemorrhage, while the other had right-sided heart failure due to cor pulmonale. The presenting signs included syncope (one dog, exercise intolerance (two dogs, cough (two dogs, abdominal pain (one dog and depression (one dog. One-stage prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time were prolonged in two dogs, buccal mucosal bleeding time was prolonged in one dog and globulin was elevated in all three dogs. Two dogs were treated with fenbendazole and recovered.

  19. Early and late arrhythmogenic effects of doxorubicin.

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    Kilickap, Saadettin; Barista, Ibrahim; Akgul, Ebru; Aytemir, Kudret; Aksoy, Sercan; Tekuzman, Gulten

    2007-03-01

    To determine the incidence of early and late arrhythmogenic effects of doxorubicin-containing chemotherapy regimens. A prospective study including 29 patients who were treated with doxorubicin-containing regimens. Cardiac evaluation was based on 24-hour electrocardiographic monitorization (Holter), which was performed during the first cycle of doxorubicin-containing regimens, as well as after the last cycle of chemotherapy. The mean age of the patients was 45.8 +/- 15.1 (range 18-69). Holter records obtained during the first cycle of treatment revealed varying arrhythmias in 19 patients (65.5%) and in 18 (62.1%) patients after completion of therapy. One patient presented with syncope and both Mobitz Type 2 atrioventricular block and complete atrioventricular block were demonstrated. The patient subsequently underwent permanent pacemaker implantation. Doxorubicin may result in arrhythmias both in early and late periods of treatment. These arrhythmias are rarely life threatening.

  20. Presyncope – not always an orthostatic problem

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    Ewelina Maria Biskup

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A 41-year-old female was brought to the ER after a presyncope and absence episode while riding a bike. She recalled no prodromi. Her physical and neurological examinations were unremarkable; past medical, family, substance, and travel history bland. She reported a constant tiredness, sporadic slight cephalgia, responsive to acetaminophen, and a recent syncope while jogging, resulting in a fall, circumstances of which she could not recall. Non-compaction cardiomyopathy is a type of cardiomyopathy that was first described 25 years ago. Its molecular genetic basis is not yet fully clear, and the same is true of its diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis. Further study of these matters is needed.

  1. [Long QT syndrome and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia due to hypopituitarism. Report of one case].

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    García-Castro, José Miguel; García-Martín, Antonia; Guirao-Arrabal, Emilio; Carrillo-Alascio, Pedro Luis

    2017-07-01

    Symptoms of hypopituitarism are usually chronic and nonspecific, but rarely the disease can have acute and life threatening manifestations. We report a 53 years old female with a pituitary adenoma that was admitted to our hospital because of syncope. The electrocardiogram showed sinus bradycardia with a prolonged QT interval. Frequent runs of non-sustained polymorphic ventricular tachycardia were noted on telemetry. The patient had a history of severe acute headaches in the previous days and laboratory tests revealed severe secondary hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency and a decrease in pituitary hormones. A magnetic resonance imaging of the head showed changes in the size and contrast enhancement of the adenoma. A diagnosis of hypopituitarism secondary to pituitary apoplexy was made and treatment with hydrocortisone and, subsequently, levothyroxine was started. Hormonal disorders such as hypothyroidism, adrenal insufficiency or hypopituitarism should be considered as unusual causes for reversible cardiomyopathy, long QT syndrome and ventricular arrhythmias.

  2. Temporal artery flow response during the last minute of a head up tilt test, in relation with orthostatic intolerance after a 60 day head-down bedrest.

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    Philippe Arbeille

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Check if the Temporal flow response to Tilt could provide early hemodynamic pattern in the minutes preceding a syncope during the Tilt test performed after a 60-d head down bedrest (HDBR. METHOD: Twenty-one men divided into 3 groups [Control (Con, Resistive Vibration (RVE and Chinese Herb (Herb] underwent a 60 day HDBR. Pre and Post HDBR a 20 min Tilt identified Finishers (F and Non Finishers (NF. Cerebral (MCA, Temporal (TEMP, Femoral (FEM flow velocity, were measured by Doppler during the Tilt. Blood pressure (BP was measured by arm cuff and cardiopress. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: Four of the 21 subjects were NF at the post HDBR Tilt test (Con gr:2, RVE gr: 1, Herb gr: 1. At 1 min and 10 s before end of Tilt in NF gr, FEM flow decreased less and MCA decreased more at post HDBR Tilt compared to pre (p<0.05, while in the F gr they changed similarly as pre. In NF gr: TEMP flow decreased more at post HDBR Tilt compared to pre, but only at 10 s before the end of Tilt (P<0.05. During the last 10 s a negative TEMP diastolic component appeared which induced a drop in mean velocity until Tilt arrest. CONCLUSION: The sudden drop in TEMP flow with onset of a negative diastolic flow preceding the decrease in MCA flow confirm that the TEMP vascular resistance respond more directly than the cerebral one to the cardiac output redistribution and that this response occur several seconds before syncope.

  3. Treating angina pectoris by acupuncture therapy.

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    Xu, Lixian; Xu, Hao; Gao, Wei; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Lu, Dominic P

    2013-01-01

    Acupuncture therapy on PC 6 (Neiguan) has a therapeutic effect on cardiac and chest ailments including angina pectoris. Additional beneficial acupuncture points are PC 4 (Ximen), HT 7 (Shenmen point), PC 7 (Daling point), PC 5 (Jianshi point), PC 3 (Quze point), CV 17 (Danzhong point), CV 6 (Qihai point), BL 15 (Xinshu point), L 20 (Pishu point), BL 17 (Geshu point), BL23 (Shenshu point), BL18 (Ganshu point), HT 5 (Tongli point), and ST36 (Zusanli point). Acupuncture not only quickly relieve the symptoms of acute angina pectoris, but also improve nitroglycerine's therapeutic effects. Therefore, it is an efficient simple therapeutic method used for emergency and for regular angina treatment. Review of studies on acupuncture therapy has shown effectiveness were between 80% to 96.2% that are almost as effective as conventional drug regimen. When compared with conventional medical treatment, the acupuncture therapy shows the obvious advantage of lacking, adverse side effects commonly associated with the Western anti-anginal drugs such as 1) Nitroglycerine (headache--63% with nitroglycerine patch and 50% with spray; syncope--4%; and dizziness--8% with patch; hypotension--4% with patch; and increased angina 2% with patch). 2) Isosorbide mononitrate (dizziness--3 to 5%; nausea/vomiting--2 to 4% and other reactions including hypotension, and syncope even with small doses). 3) Propranolol (bradycardia, chest pain, hypotension, worsening of AV conduction disturbance, Raynaud's syndrome, mental depression, hyperglycemia, etc.). Many conventional anti-anginal medications cause inter-drug reactions with other medications the patients taking for other diseases. Whereas, acupuncture therapy does not pose such an interference with patient's medications. Nevertheless, surgery is still the treatment of choice when acupuncture or conventional drug therapy fails. Combination of conventional drug therapy and acupuncture would considerably decrease the frequency and the required dosage

  4. Neural underpinnings of music: the polyrhythmic brain.

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    Vuust, Peter; Gebauer, Line K; Witek, Maria A G

    2014-01-01

    Musical rhythm, consisting of apparently abstract intervals of accented temporal events, has the remarkable ability to move our minds and bodies. Why do certain rhythms make us want to tap our feet, bop our heads or even get up and dance? And how does the brain process rhythmically complex rhythms during our experiences of music? In this chapter, we describe some common forms of rhythmic complexity in music and propose that the theory of predictive coding can explain how rhythm and rhythmic complexity are processed in the brain. We also consider how this theory may reveal why we feel so compelled by rhythmic tension in music. First, musical-theoretical and neuroscientific frameworks of rhythm are presented, in which rhythm perception is conceptualized as an interaction between what is heard ('rhythm') and the brain's anticipatory structuring of music ('the meter'). Second, three different examples of tension between rhythm and meter in music are described: syncopation, polyrhythm and groove. Third, we present the theory of predictive coding of music, which posits a hierarchical organization of brain responses reflecting fundamental, survival-related mechanisms associated with predicting future events. According to this theory, perception and learning is manifested through the brain's Bayesian minimization of the error between the input to the brain and the brain's prior expectations. Fourth, empirical studies of neural and behavioral effects of syncopation, polyrhythm and groove will be reported, and we propose how these studies can be seen as special cases of the predictive coding theory. Finally, we argue that musical rhythm exploits the brain's general principles of anticipation and propose that pleasure from musical rhythm may be a result of such anticipatory mechanisms.

  5. Autism in the Son of a Woman with Mitochondrial Myopathy and Dysautonomia: A Case Report.

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    Brown, Bradley D; Rais, Theodore

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between autism spectrum disorders and mitochondrial dysfunction, including mitochondrial myopathies and other mitochondrial diseases, is an area of ongoing research. All autism spectrum disorders are known to be heritable, via genetic and/or epigenetic mechanisms, but specific modes of inheritance are not well characterized. Nevertheless, autism spectrum disorders have been linked to many specific genes associated with mitochondrial function, especially to genes involved in mitochondrial tRNA and the electron transport chain, both particularly vulnerable to point mutations, and clinical research also supports a relationship between the two pathologies. Although only a small minority of patients with autism have a mitochondrial disease, many patients with mitochondrial myopathies have autism spectrum disorder symptoms, and these symptoms may be the presenting symptoms, which presents a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. The authors report the case of a 15-year-old boy with a history of autism spectrum disorder and neurocardiogenic syncope, admitted to the inpatient unit for self-injury, whose young mother, age 35, was discovered to suffer from mitochondrial myopathy, dysautonomia, neurocardiogenic syncope, Ehler-Danlos syndrome, and other uncommon multisystem pathologies likely related to mitochondrial dysfunction. This case illustrates the need for a high index of suspicion for mitochondrial disease in patients with autism, as they have two orders of magnitude greater risk for such diseases than the general population. The literature shows that mitochondrial disease is underdiagnosed in autism spectrum disorder patients and should not be viewed as a "zebra" (i.e., an obscure diagnosis that is made when a more common explanation is more likely).

  6. Can echocardiographic findings predict falls in older persons?

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    Nathalie van der Velde

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The European and American guidelines state the need for echocardiography in patients with syncope. 50% of older adults with syncope present with a fall. Nonetheless, up to now no data have been published addressing echocardiographic abnormalities in older fallers. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In order to determine the association between echocardiographic abnormalities and falls in older adults, we performed a prospective cohort study, in which 215 new consecutive referrals (age 77.4, SD 6.0 of a geriatric outpatient clinic of a Dutch university hospital were included. During the previous year, 139 had experienced a fall. At baseline, all patients underwent routine two-dimensional and Doppler echocardiography. Falls were recorded during a three-month follow-up. Multivariate adjustment for confounders was performed with a Cox proportional hazards model. 55 patients (26% fell at least once during follow-up. The adjusted hazard ratio of a fall during follow-up was 1.35 (95% CI, 1.08-1.71 for pulmonary hypertension, 1.66 (95% CI, 1.01 to 2.89 for mitral regurgitation, 2.41 (95% CI, 1.32 to 4.37 for tricuspid regurgitation and 1.76 (95% CI, 1.03 to 3.01 for pulmonary regurgitation. For aortic regurgitation the risk of a fall was also increased, but non-significantly (hazard ratio, 1.57 [95% CI, 0.85 to 2.92]. Trend analysis of the severity of the different regurgitations showed a significant relationship for mitral, tricuspid and pulmonary valve regurgitation and pulmonary hypertension. CONCLUSIONS: Echo (Doppler cardiography can be useful in order to identify risk indicators for falling. Presence of pulmonary hypertension or regurgitation of mitral, tricuspid or pulmonary valves was associated with a higher fall risk. Our study indicates that the diagnostic work-up for falls in older adults might be improved by adding an echo (Doppler cardiogram in selected groups.

  7. Atrial myxoma presenting with orthostatic hypotension in an 84-year-old Hispanic man: a case report

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    Halstead Michael

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Left atrial myxomas remain the most common benign primary cardiac tumors, and these cardiac growths can masquerade as mitral stenosis, infective endocarditis and collagen vascular disease. Atrial myxomas are found in approximately 14-20% of the population and can lead to embolization, intercardiac obstructions, conduction disturbances and lethal valve obstructions. Case presentation An 84-year-old Hispanic man presented with complaints of dizziness upon standing, and with no prior history of heart murmurs, syncope, shortness of breath, or chest pain. Physical examination revealed evidence of orthostatic hypotension and a soft grade 1/6 systolic murmur at the left sternal border. A transthoracic echocardiogram revealed a large atrial myxoma occupying the majority of the left atrium, with the posterior border of the large atrial mass defined by eccentric mitral regurgitation identified during cardiac catheterization. Left atrial myxoma excision was performed, revealing a 7 × 6.5 × 4.5 cm atrial tumor attached to a 4 × 3 × 2 cm stalk of atrial septal tissue. Conclusion This patient didn't present with the common symptoms associated with an atrial myxoma, which may include chest pain, dyspnea, orthopnea, peripheral embolism or syncope. Two-dimensional echocardiography provides substantial advantages in detecting intracardiac tumors. We recommend a two-dimensional echocardiogram in the workup of orthostatic hypotension of unknown etiology after the common causes such as autonomic disorders, dehydration, and vasodilative dysfunctions have been ruled out. By illustrating this correlation between orthostasis and an atrial myxoma, we hope to facilitate earlier identification of these intracardiac growths.

  8. Tricuspid valve dysplasia: A retrospective study of clinical features and outcome in dogs in the UK

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    Xavier Navarro-Cubas

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the demographic, clinical and survival characteristics and to identify risk factors for mortality due to tricuspid valve dysplasia in UK dogs. Records of client-owned dogs diagnosed with tricuspid valve dysplasia at a referral centre were retrospectively reviewed. Only dogs diagnosed with tricuspid valve dysplasia based on the presence of a right-sided heart murmur identified prior to one year of age, and confirmed with Doppler echocardiography, were included. Dogs with concomitant cardiac diseases, pulmonary hypertension and/or trivial tricuspid regurgitation were excluded. Analysed data included signalment, reason for presentation, clinical signs, electrocardiographic and echocardiographic features, survival status and cause of death. Survival times and risk factors for mortality were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier curves and Cox regression. Eighteen dogs met inclusion criteria. Border collies were over-represented (p= 0.014. Dogs were most frequently referred for investigation of heart murmur. The most common arrhythmia was atrial fibrillation (n=3. Median survival time from diagnosis of tricuspid valve dysplasia was 2775 days (range 1-3696 days; 95% CI 1542.41-4007.59 and from onset of right-sided congestive heart failure was 181 days (range 1-2130 days; 95% CI 0-455.59. Syncope was the sole risk factor for cardiac death. In this population of UK dogs, tricuspid valve dysplasia was uncommon but, when severe, frequently led to right-sided congestive heart failure. Prognosis was favourable for mild and moderate tricuspid dysplasia. Survival time was reduced with right-sided congestive heart failure but varied widely. Risk of cardiac death was significantly increased if syncope had occurred.

  9. Impact of programming strategies aimed at reducing nonessential implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapies on mortality: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

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    Tan, Vern Hsen; Wilton, Stephen B; Kuriachan, Vikas; Sumner, Glen L; Exner, Derek V

    2014-02-01

    Patients who receive implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapies are at higher risk of death versus those who do not. Programmed settings to reduce nonessential implantable cardioverter defibrillator therapies (therapy reduction programming) have been developed but may have adverse effects. This systematic review and meta-analysis assessed the relationship between therapy reduction programming with the risks of death from any cause, implantable cardioverter defibrillator shocks, and syncope. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and clinicaltrials.gov databases were searched to identify relevant studies. Those that followed patients for ≥6 months and reported mortality were included. Six met the inclusion criteria; 4 randomized (Comparison of Empiric to Physician-Tailored Programming of ICDs [EMPIRIC], Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial-Reduce Inappropriate Therapy [MADIT-RIT], Avoid Delivering Therapies for Non-sustained Arrhythmias in ICD Patients III [ADVANCE III], and Programming Implantable Cardioverter-Defibrillators in Patients with Primary Prevention Indication to Prolong Time to First Shock [PROVIDE]) and 2 prospective studies (Role of Long Detection Window Programming in Patients With Left Ventricular Dysfunction, Non-ischemic Etiology in Primary Prevention Treated with a Biventricular ICD [RELEVANT] and Primary Prevention Parameters Evaluation [PREPARE]). These 6 studies included 7687 (3598 conventional and 4089 therapy reduction programming) patients. Most (77%) participants were men, had a history of ischemic heart disease (56%), and were prescribed β-blockers (84%). Therapy reduction programming was associated with a 30% relative reduction in mortality (95% confidence interval, 16%-41%; Pprogramming (P=0.5). Therapy reduction programming results in a large, significant, and consistent reduction in mortality, with no apparent increase in the risk of syncope.

  10. Brazilian dentists' attitudes about medical emergencies during dental treatment.

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    Arsati, Franco; Montalli, Victor Angelo; Flório, Flavia Martão; Ramacciato, Juliana Cama; da Cunha, Fernanda Lopes; Cecanho, Rodrigo; de Andrade, Eduardo Dias; Motta, Rogério Heládio Lopes

    2010-06-01

    The main objective of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of emergencies in dental practices and the prepared-ness and the training experience in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) of Brazilian dentists in dealing with emergencies. The volunteer participants in the study were 498 Brazilian dentists who were present at the 27th International Congress of Dentistry in São Paulo. The most prevalent emergency was presyncope (reported by 54.20 percent of respondents), followed by orthostatic hypotension (44.37 percent), moderate allergic reactions (16.86 percent), hypertensive crisis (15.06 percent), asthma (15.06 percent), syncope (12.65 percent), angina (6.82 percent), convulsion (6.22 percent), hypoglycemia (5.62 percent), hyperventilation crisis (5.22 percent), choking (2.20 percent), and cerebrovascular accident (0.8 percent). Anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, and cardiac arrest were the rarest emergencies, reported by only 0.4, 0.2, and 0.2 percent of dentists, respectively. Only 41 percent of the dentists judged themselves capable to diagnose the cause of an emergency during a dental visit. The majority responded that they would be capable of performing initial treatment of presyncope, syncope, orthostatic hypotension, convulsion, and choking. However, most of them felt unable to treat anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, or cardiac arrest. Further, the majority felt unable to perform CPR or undertake an intravenous injection. It was concluded that the most prevalent medical emergencies in dental practice of Brazilian dentists are presyncope and orthostatic hypotension. The occurrence of life-threatening medical emergencies like anaphylaxis, myocardial infarction, cardiac arrest, and cerebrovascular accident is rare. Brazilian dentists are not fully prepared to manage medical emergencies and have insufficient experience training in CPR.

  11. Comparative Clinical Profile of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia Patients With and Without Joint Hypermobility Syndrome

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    Blair P Grubb

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autonomic dysfunction is common in patients with the joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS. However, there is a paucity of reported data on clinical features of Postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome (POTS in patients suffering from JHS.Methods: This retrospective study was approved by our local Institutional Review Board (IRB. Over a period of 10 years, 26 patients of POTS were identified for inclusion in this study. All these patients had features of Joint Hypermobility Syndrome (by Brighton criterion. A comparison group of 39 patients with other forms of POTS were also followed in the autonomic clinic during the same time. We present a descriptive report on the comparative clinical profile of the clinical features of Postural Orthostatic Tachycardia patients with and without Joint Hypermobility syndrome. The data is presented as a mean±SD and percentages wherever applicable.Results: Out of 65 patients, 26 patients (all females, 20 Caucasians had POTS and JHS. The mean age at presentation of POTS was 24±13 (range 10-53 years vs 41±12 (range 19-65 years, P=0.0001, Migraine was a common co morbidity 73 vs 29% p=0,001. In two patients POTS was precipitated by pregnancy, and in three by surgery, urinary tract infection and a viral syndrome respectively. The common clinical features were fatigue (58%, orthostatic palpitations (54%, presyncope (58%, and syncope (62%.Conclusion: Patients with POTS and JHS appear to become symptomatic at an earlier age compared to POTS patients without JHS. In addition patients with JHS had a greater incidence of migraine and syncope than their non JHS counterparts.

  12. Neurovisceral phenotypes in the expression of psychiatric symptoms

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    Jessica Anne Eccles

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review explores the proposal that vulnerability to psychological symptoms, particularly anxiety, originates in constitutional differences in the control of bodily state, exemplified by a set of conditions that include Joint Hypermobility, Postural Tachycardia Syndrome and Vasovagal Syncope. Research is revealing how brain-body mechanisms underlie individual differences in psychophysiological reactivity that can be important s for predicting, stratifying and treating individuals with anxiety disorders and related conditions. One common constitutional difference is Joint Hypermobility, in which there is an increased range of joint movement as a result of a variant of collagen. Joint hypermobility is over-represented in people with anxiety, mood and neurodevelopmental disorders. It is also linked to stress-sensitive medical conditions such as irritable bowel syndrome, chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia. Structural differences in ‘emotional’ brain regions are reported in hypermobile individuals, and many people with joint hypermobility manifest autonomic abnormalities, typically Postural Tachycardia Syndrome. Enhanced heart rate reactivity is characteristic of Postural Tachycardia Syndrome, and there is a phenomenological overlap with anxiety disorders, which may be partially accounted for by exaggerated neural reactivity within ventromedial prefrontal cortex. People who experience Vasovagal Syncope, a heritable tendency to fainting induced by emotional challenges (and needle/ blood phobia, are also more vulnerable to anxiety disorders. Neuroimaging implicates brainstem differences in vulnerability to faints, yet the structural integrity of the caudate nucleus appears important for the control of fainting frequency in relation to parasympathetic tone and anxiety. Together there is clinical and neuroanatomical evidence to show that common constitutional differences affecting autonomic responsivity are linked to psychiatric symptoms

  13. Fatigue as Presenting Symptom and a High Burden of Premature Ventricular Contractions Are Independently Associated With Increased Ventricular Wall Stress in Patients With Normal Left Ventricular Function.

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    van Huls van Taxis, Carine F B; Piers, Sebastiaan R D; de Riva Silva, Marta; Dekkers, Olaf M; Pijnappels, Daniël A; Schalij, Martin J; Wijnmaalen, Adrianus P; Zeppenfeld, Katja

    2015-12-01

    High idiopathic premature ventricular contractions (PVC) burden has been associated with PVC-induced cardiomyopathy. Patients may be symptomatic before left ventricular (LV) dysfunction develops. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and circumferential end-systolic wall stress (cESS) on echocardiography are markers for increased ventricular wall stress. This study aimed to evaluate the relation between presenting symptoms, PVC burden, and increased ventricular wall stress in patients with frequent PVCs and preserved LV function. Eighty-three patients (41 men; 49±15 years) with idiopathic PVCs and normal LV function referred for PVC ablation were included. Type of symptoms (palpitations, fatigue, and [near-]syncope), PVC burden on 24-hour Holter, NT-proBNP levels, and cESS on echocardiography were assessed before and 3 months after ablation. Sustained successful ablation was defined as ≥80% PVC burden reduction during follow-up. Patients were symptomatic for 24 months (Q1-Q3, 16-60); 73% reported palpitations, 47% fatigue, and 30% (near-)syncope. Baseline PVC burden was 23±13%, median NT-proBNP 92 pg/mL (Q1-Q3 50-156), and cESS 143±35 kdyne/cm(2). Fatigue was associated with higher baseline NT-proBNP and cESS (PFatigue was independently associated with a significantly larger reduction in NT-proBNP. In patients with nonsuccessful ablation, NT-proBNP and cESS remained unchanged. In patients with frequent PVCs and preserved LV function, fatigue was associated with higher baseline NT-proBNP and cESS, and with a significantly larger reduction in NT-proBNP after sustained successful ablation. These findings support a link between fatigue and PVC-induced increased ventricular wall stress, despite preserved LV function. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Identification of high risk patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy in a northern Greek population

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    Karvounis Charalambos

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The percentage of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM patients who are in high risk for Sudden Death (SD constitutes only a minority of all HCM population but the incidence of SD in this subset is high (at least 5% annually. The identification of this small but important proportion of high risk HCM patients has been the clue in the clinical evaluation of these patients. Methods Our study cohort consisted from 123 patients with HCM who are currently followed up in our Institution. Five clinical risk factors were assessed: a family history of premature SD, unexplained syncope, Non Sustained Ventricular Tachycardia (NSVT on 24-h ECG monitoring, Abnormal Blood Pressure Response (ABPR during upright exercise testing and Maximum left ventricular Wall Thickness (MWT ≥30 mm. The purpose of our study was the identification of high risk HCM patients coming from Northern Greece. Results Fifteen patients (12.2% of the whole cohort had MWT ≥ 30 mm, 30 patients (24.4% had an ABPR to exercise, 17 patients (13.8% had episodes of NSVT in 24-h Holter monitoring, 17 patients (13.8% suffered from syncope, and 8 patients (6.5% had a positive family history of premature SD. Data analysis revealed that 74 patients (60.1% had none risk factor. Twenty four patients (19.5% had 1 risk factor, 17 patients (13.8% had 2 risk factors, 4 patients (3.25% had 3 risk factors, and 4 patients (3.25% had 4 risk factors, while none patient had 5 risk factors. Twenty five patients (20.3% had 2 or more risk factors. Conclusion This study for the first time confirms that, although a 60% of patients with HCM coming from a regional Greek population are in low risk for SD, a substantial proportion (almost 20% carries a high risk for SD justifying prophylactic therapy with amiodaron or ICD implantation.

  15. Congenital long QT syndrome in children

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    Cerović Ivana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Long QT syndrome (LQTS is a cardiac repolarization disorder characterized by prolonged QT interval on the electrocardiogram (ECG and increased propensity to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and cardiac events. LQTS might be acquired or congenital, which presents a group of channelopathies that occur due to mutation in one of 15 so far identified genes. The most frequent types of congenital LTQS are LQT1, LQT2 and LQT3. Prolonged or delayed repolarization leads to the increase of action potential duration which predisposes early afterdepolarization, as well as the amplification of transmural dispersion of repolarization, both contributing to the development of Torsades de Pointes ventricular tachycardia. Clinical manifestations of LQTS are palpitations, syncope, aborted cardiac arrest or sudden cardiac death, but it can also be asymptomatic. Trigger factors for symptoms are specific for certain genotype. LQTS examination includes thorough clinical and family history focused on distinctive data (repeated syncopes, cases of sudden cardiac death in the family, hereditary arrhythmias, resting ECG, exercise stress testing and genetic analysis, with additional methods (serial ECG records, 24h ECG Holter, epinephrine test. Clinical LQTS diagnosis is based on Schwartz's scoring system, while the criteria for final diagnosis of LQTS depend on Schwartz's score, QT interval duration, presence of pathogenic mutation and clinical symptoms. Treatment approach begins with lifestyle modifications and β-blockers therapy, while other options include implantable cardioverter- defibrillator, permanent pacemaker or surgical sympathectomy. Sudden cardiac death is the reason of 90% of sudden deaths in young athletes, while LQTS is one of its causes. Recommendations for physical activities in children with congenital LQTS arise from the ones for adults and they presume very strict limitations. Further researches are expected to advance the understanding of genotype

  16. Clinical and electrophysiological evaluation of pediatric Wolff-Parkinson-White patients

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    Yıldırım, Işıl; Özer, Sema; Karagöz, Tevfik; Şahin, Murat; Özkutlu, Süheyla; Alehan, Dursun; Çeliker, Alpay

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome presents with paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia and is characterized by electrocardiographic (ECG) findings of a short PR interval and a delta wave. The objective of this study was to evaluate the electrophysiological properties of children with WPW syndrome and to develop an algorithm for the management of these patients with limited access to electrophysiological study. Methods: A retrospective review of all pediatric patients who underwent electrophysiological evaluation for WPW syndrome was performed. Results: One hundred nine patients underwent electrophysiological evaluation at a single tertiary center between 1997 and 2011. The median age of the patients was 11 years (0.1-18). Of the 109 patients, 82 presented with tachycardia (median age 11 (0.1-18) years), and 14 presented with syncope (median age 12 (6-16) years); 13 were asymptomatic (median age 10 (2-13) years). Induced AF degenerated to ventricular fibrillation (VF) in 2 patients. Of the 2 patients with VF, 1 was asymptomatic and the other had syncope; the accessory pathway effective refractory period was ≤180 ms in both. An intracardiac electrophysiological study was performed in 92 patients, and ablation was not attempted for risk of atrioventricular block in 8 (8.6%). The success and recurrence rate of ablation were 90.5% and 23.8% respectively. Conclusion: The induction of VF in 2 of 109 patients in our study suggests that the prognosis of WPW in children is not as benign as once thought. All patients with a WPW pattern on the ECG should be assessed electrophysiologically and risk-stratified. Ablation of patients with risk factors can prevent sudden death in this population. PMID:26006136

  17. Wolff-Parkinson-White Syndrome: Electrocardiogram

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna Miner

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 26-year-old male with no significant past medical history presented to the emergency department with palpitations. The patient experienced these symptoms five times before in his life, but they had self-resolved with squatting or raising his arms. He denied chest pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, syncope, or pre-syncope symptoms. He denied any recent illnesses, cough, chest pain, drug use, or infections. Significant findings: The initial EKG showed wide complex, irregular tachycardia > 200 bpm (EKG 1. Given the possibility of Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW, procainamide was given to the patient. The patient’s heart rate responded and decreased to 120-140 bpm with narrowing of the QRS complex. A repeat EKG showed narrow complex tachycardia without P waves approximately 120 bpm (EKG 2. Once the procainamide infusion was complete, the patient had converted to sinus rhythm with a delta wave now apparent, consistent with WPW (EKG 3. Discussion: Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome is a combination of the presence of a certain congenital accessory pathway (Bundle of Kent and episodes of tachyarrhythmia.1 The incidence is less than one percent of the general population,2 but it is associated with the risk of sudden cardiac death, making the diagnosis imperative. When examining a wide-based tachycardia, it is important to consider WPW when choosing medications for rate control or chemical cardioversion. The first EKG shows an example of atrial fibrillation with WPW. While procainamide blocks the accessory pathway, other drugs such as beta blockers and calcium channel blockers can inhibit the AV node resulting in increased use of the accessory pathway. This can worsen the tachyarrhythmia and potentially lead to ventricular fibrillation, ventricular tachycardia, or asystole.

  18. Symptoms Before Sudden Arrhythmic Death Syndrome: A Nationwide Study Among the Young in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glinge, Charlotte; Jabbari, Reza; Risgaard, Bjarke; Lynge, Thomas Hadberg; Engstrøm, Thomas; Albert, Christine M; Haunsø, Stig; Winkel, Bo Gregers; Tfelt-Hansen, Jacob

    2015-07-01

    No studies in an unselected and nationwide setting have characterized the symptoms and medical history of patients with sudden arrhythmic death syndrome (SADS). The aim of this study was to identify and describe the symptoms and medical history of patients before the presentation of SADS. We have previously identified all of the autopsied sudden cardiac deaths (SCD; n = 314) in Danes aged 1-35 years between 2000 and 2006. After comprehensive pathological and toxicological investigation did not reveal a cause of SCD, 136 of the patients were identified as SADS. The National Patient Registry was utilized to obtain information on all in- and outpatient activity in Danish hospitals. All medical records from hospitals and general practitioners, including death certificates and autopsy reports were reviewed. Before death, 48 (35%) SADS patients had cardiac symptoms; among these, 30 (22%) had contacted the healthcare system. Antecedent symptoms (symptoms >24 hours before death) were present in 34 (25%) patients. Prodromal symptoms (symptoms ≤24 hours before death) were present in 23 (17%) patients. Cardiac symptoms included chest pain (n = 16, 12%), dyspnea (n = 18, 13%), palpitations (n = 2, 1%), presyncope/syncope (n = 23, 17%), and aborted SCD (n = 2, 1%). In addition, seizures (n = 25, 18%) were prevalent. In 61 (45%) SADS cases, no previous medical history were recorded. In this unselected, nationwide study of 136 young SADS patients, 35% had experienced cardiac symptoms before death, most commonly presyncope/syncope, but only one out of five had contacted a healthcare provider with cardiac symptoms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Knowledge, Attitude, and Perceived Confidence in the Management of Medical Emergencies in the Dental Office: A Survey among the Dental Students and Interns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albelaihi, Haifa Fahad; Alweneen, Athar Ibrahim; Ettish, Abeer; Alshahrani, Faleh Ali

    2017-01-01

    Many situations in the dental office can provoke medical emergencies. Lack of training and inability to overcome the medical emergencies can lead to serious consequences and legal actions. The aim of the study is to investigate and assess the knowledge, attitude, and perceived confidence of dental students and interns in the management of medical emergency. A self-administered structured questionnaire was distributed to 153 of the undergraduate dental students and interns in Qassim province. Questionnaire consisted of nineteen questions pertaining to knowledge and awareness regarding syncope, cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), intravenous drugs, measuring vital signs, and handling situation of aspiration of a foreign body, bleeding, and choking. Data were analyzed by Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 21.0. Fifty-seven percent was the response rate received from the questionnaire. Eighty-nine percent and 30% of the participants inquired about the medical history and vital signs before dental treatment, respectively. Only 37% of participants were confident to handle any medical emergency in the dental office. Seventy percent knew the correct location of chest compression and 67% were familiar about the right compression ventilation ratio showing significant difference between academic years and interns ( P = 0.003). Females were significantly more aware about the management of bleeding after extraction than the males (65%, and 47%, respectively; P = 0.035). Thirty-five percent and 53% chose the correct management to relieve choking in responsive and unresponsive adult or child, respectively. A total of 28% of the participants reported syncope as the most common emergency situation. Participants were lacking confidence in handling medical emergencies even though the majority of them inquired the medical history. Most of them have a good knowledge regarding CPR, but regarding airway obstruction, the knowledge was not at an acceptable level

  20. Flight diversions due to onboard medical emergencies on an international commercial airline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valani, Rahim; Cornacchia, Marisa; Kube, Douglas

    2010-11-01

    Each year, close to 2 billion passengers travel on commercial airlines. In-flight medical events result in suboptimal care due to a variety of factors. Flight diversions due to medical emergencies carry a significant financial and legal cost. The purpose of this study was to determine the causes of in-flight medical diversions from Air Canada. This was a review of in-flight medical emergencies from 2004-2008. Both telemedicine and Air Canada databases were crossreferenced to capture all incidents. Presenting complaints were categorized by systems. Descriptive statistics were used to analyze the data. Over the 5 yr, there were 220 diversions, of which 91 (41.4%) of the decisions were made by pilots or onboard medical personnel. During this period there were 5386 telemedicine contacts with ground support providers, who on average recommended 2.4 diversions per 100 calls. The rate for diversions almost doubled from 2006 to 2007, with a sharp drop in telemedicine contacts during the same period. The four most common categories resulting in diversions were cardiac (58 diversions, 26.4%), neurological (43 diversions, 19.5%), gastrointestinal (GI) (25 diversions, 11.4%), and syncope (22 diversions, 10.0%). Only 6.8% of all diversions were due to cardiac arrest. Medical conditions most commonly leading to diversions were cardiac, neurological, gastrointestinal, and syncope. Our study showed that a decrease in telemedicine contact during this period was accompanied by an increase in diversions, while increased pre-screening of passengers did not prove effective in decreasing diversion rates.

  1. Effects of prehospital nitroglycerin on hemodynamics and chest pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelberg, S; Singer, A J; Moldashel, J; Sciammarella, J; Thode, H C; Henry, M

    2000-01-01

    To assess the effects of prehospital nitroglycerin (NTG) on vital signs and chest pain intensity. A retrospective review of advanced life support (ALS) run sheets was performed in a suburban volunteer emergency medical services (EMS) system receiving 8,000 annual ALS calls. All consecutive patients who were administered NTG by EMS were included. Standardized forms were used to collect data on patient demographics, history, and physical exam. Patients assessed their chest pain (CP) before and after NTG on a verbal numeric scale of 0-10 from least to most severe. The presence of syncope, dysrhythmias, or profound hypotension [loss of peripheral pulses, a systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 100 mm Hg in BP] was noted. Results. One thousand six hundred sixty-two patients received NTG over 18 months, their mean age was 66 years, and 48% were female. Indications for NTG included CP (83%), dyspnea (45%), and congestive heart failure (20%). After NTG administration, the CP score decreased from 6.9 to 4.4 (mean difference = 2.6; 95% CI = 2.4 to 2.8). The CP completely resolved in 10% of the patients. Mean decreases in SBPs and diastolic BPs were 11.8 mm Hg (95% CI = 10.7 to 13.0) and 4.0 mm Hg (95% CI = 2.9 to 5.1). The mean pulse rate increased by 2.7 beats/min (95% CI = 0.6 to 4.9). There were 12 patients with adverse events [0.7% (95% CI = 0.4% to 1.3%)], including profound bradycardia and hypotension (1), transient drop in SBP of 100 mm Hg responding to fluids (6), post-NTG SBP <90 mm Hg (4), and syncope (1). There were no deaths in the prehospital setting. Use of prehospital NTG appears safe. While NTG reduces CP, most patients have residual pain.

  2. [Evaluation of psychological fear in children undergoing head-up tilt test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Wei-Hong; Wu, Li-Jia; Wang, Cheng; Lin, Ping; Li, Fang; Zhu, Li-Ping; Ran, Jing; Zou, Run-Mei; Liu, De-Yu

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the effects of different tilt angles of head-up tilt test (HUTT) and different responses to HUTT on the psychological fear in children undergoing the test. HUTT was performed on children with unexplained syncope or pre-syncope (107 cases: 52 males and 55 females), aged 5.5-17.8 years (mean 12.0±2.8 years). All subjects were randomly assigned to undergo HUTT at an angle of 60°, 70° or 80°; the negative cases underwent sublingual nitroglycerin-provocation HUTT at the same tilt angle. The Wong-Baker Faces Pain Rating Scale was used for self-assessment of psychological fear in subjects during HUTT at the end point of the test. The positive rate, hemodynamic changes and distribution of response types showed no significant differences between children at tilt angles of 60°, 70° and 80° (P>0.05). The greater the tilt angle, the higher the degree of psychological fear in children undergoing the test, but there were no significant differences between them (P>0.05). The degree of psychological fear in children who showed a positive response to HUTT (n=76) was significantly higher than that in children who showed a negative response (n=31) (Pfear in children undergoing the test, and the degree of psychological fear increases in children tested at tilt angles from 60° to 80°, but the differences have no statistical significance. A positive response to HUTT can significantly increase the psychological fear in children.

  3. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in a father and daughter from a large highly inbred family: a 16-year follow-up of 59 living members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanyal, Shyamal Kumar; Kaul, Kanwar K; Hussein, Akhtar; Wilroy, Robert S; Agarwal, Kisan; Sohel, Saira

    2013-08-01

    To report the autosomal dominant inheritance of the Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome in a highly inbred family, the initiation of Torsades de Pointes, and the natural history of the syndrome based on a 16-year follow-up of the kindred. A family tree was constructed that included 66 blood relatives from three successive generations. Electrocardiograms were obtained from 59 living members including the proband, four members from a nuclear family, and 54 from the extended family. Evoked response audiometry was recorded for the proband and the nuclear family. All 59 family members were followed up regularly for 16 years. A total of 24 living members were affected--QTc: 480-680 ms. The proband had long QTc, bilateral high-tone sensorineural deafness, recurrent syncope, and Torsades de Pointes. The asymptomatic father had long QTc and unilateral high-tone sensorineural deafness that involved specifically the left ear. One asymptomatic sibling of the proband had long QTc and normal hearing. The mother and another sibling were asymptomatic; QTc and hearing were normal in both. A total of 21 affected members from the extended family had only long QTc, and all were asymptomatic. There were three congenitally deaf first cousins who had recurrent syncope and adrenergic-triggered sudden death. In all, seven of 10 parents had consanguineous marriage to a first cousin. Each affected offspring had at least one affected parent. The severely symptomatic proband who received only β-blocker therapy and the 23 affected members without antiadrenergic therapy, all remained asymptomatic throughout the 16-year follow-up period. Jervell and Lange-Nielsen syndrome was inherited as autosomal dominant in this kindred. The majority of the affected members had a mild phenotype. The severity of auditory and cardiac phenotypes corresponded.

  4. Carbon monoxide poisoning-induced cardiomyopathy from charcoal at a barbecue restaurant: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyun-Jun; Chung, Yun Kyung; Kwak, Kyeong Min; Ahn, Se-Jin; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Ju, Young-Su; Kwon, Young-Jun; Kim, Eun-A

    2015-01-01

    Acute carbon monoxide poisoning has important clinical value because it can cause severe adverse cardiovascular effects and sudden death. Acute carbon monoxide poisoning due to charcoal is well reported worldwide, and increased use of charcoal in the restaurant industry raises concern for an increase in occupational health problems. We present a case of carbon monoxide poisoning induced cardiomyopathy in a 47-year-old restaurant worker. A male patient was brought to the emergency department to syncope and complained of left chest pain. Cardiac angiography and electrocardiography were performed to rule out acute ischemic heart disease, and cardiac markers were checked. After relief of the symptoms and stabilization of the cardiac markers, the patient was discharged without any complications. Electrocardiography was normal, but cardiac angiography showed up to a 40% midsegmental stenosis of the right coronary artery with thrombotic plaque. The level of cardiac markers was elevated at least 5 to 10 times higher than the normal value, and the carboxyhemoglobin concentration was 35% measured at one hour after syncope. Following the diagnosis of acute carbon monoxide poisoning induced cardiomyopathy, the patient's medical history and work exposure history were examined. He was found to have been exposed to burning charcoal constantly during his work hours. Severe exposure to carbon monoxide was evident in the patient because of high carboxyhemoglobin concentration and highly elevated cardiac enzymes. We concluded that this exposure led to subsequent cardiac injury. He was diagnosed with acute carbon monoxide poisoning-induced cardiomyopathy due to an unsafe working environment. According to the results, the risk of exposure to noxious chemicals such as carbon monoxide by workers in the food service industry is potentially high, and workers in this sector should be educated and monitored by the occupational health service to prevent adverse effects.

  5. Vasovagal oscillations and vasovagal responses produced by the Vestibulo-Sympathetic Reflex in the rat

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    Sergei B. Yakushin

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sinusoidal galvanic vestibular stimulation (sGVS induces oscillations in blood pressure (BP and heart rate (HR i.e., vasovagal oscillations, and decreases in BP and HR i.e., vasovagal responses, in isoflurane-anesthetized rats. We determined the characteristics of the vasovagal oscillations, assessed their role in the generation of vasovagal responses and determined whether they could be induced by monaural as well as by binaural sGVS and by oscillation in pitch. Wavelet analyses were used to determine the power distributions of the waveforms. Monaural and binaural sGVS and pitch generated vasovagal oscillations at the frequency and at twice the frequency of stimulation. Vasovagal oscillations and vasovagal responses were maximally induced at low stimulus frequencies (0.025-0.05 Hz. The oscillations were attenuated and the responses were rarely induced at higher stimulus frequencies. Vasovagal oscillations could occur without induction of vasovagal responses, but vasovagal responses were always associated with a vasovagal oscillation. We posit that the vasovagal oscillations originate in a low frequency band that, when appropriately activated by strong sympathetic stimulation, can generate vasovagal oscillations as a precursor for vasovagal responses and syncope. We further suggest that the activity responsible for the vasovagal oscillations arises in low frequency, otolith neurons with orientation vectors close to the vertical axis of the head. These neurons are likely to provide critical input to the Vestibulo-Sympathetic Reflex to increase BP and HR upon changes in head position relative to gravity, and to contribute to the production of vasovagal oscillations and vasovagal responses and syncope when the baroreflex is inactivated.

  6. Prognostic significance of radionuclide-assessed diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikamori, T.; Dickie, S.; Poloniecki, J.D.; Myers, M.J.; Lavender, J.P.; McKenna, W.J.

    1990-01-01

    To evaluate the prognostic significance of diastolic function in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC), technetium-99m gated equilibrium radionuclide angiography, acquired in list mode, was performed in 161 patients. Five diastolic indexes were calculated. During 3.0 +/- 1.9 years, 13 patients had disease-related deaths. With univariate analysis, these patients were younger (29 +/- 20 vs 42 +/- 16 years; p less than 0.05), had a higher incidence of syncope (p less than 0.025), dyspnea (p less than 0.001), reduced peak filling rate (2.9 +/- 0.9 vs 3.4 +/- 1.0 end-diastolic volume/s; p = 0.09) with increased relative filling volume during the rapid filling period (80 +/- 7 vs 75 +/- 12%; p = 0.06) and decreased atrial contribution (17 +/- 7 vs 22 +/- 11%; p = 0.07). Stepwise discriminant analysis revealed that young age at diagnosis, syncope at diagnosis, reduced peak ejection rate, positive family history, reduced peak filling rate, increased relative filling volume by peak filling rate and concentric left ventricular hypertrophy were the most statistically significant (p = 0.0001) predictors of disease-related death (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 77%, positive predictive value 25%). Discriminant analysis excluding the diastolic indexes, however, showed similar predictability (sensitivity 92%, specificity 76%, accuracy 78%, positive predictive value 26%). To obtain more homogeneous groups for analysis, patients were classified as survivors or electrically unstable, including sudden death, out-of-hospital ventricular fibrillation and nonsustained ventricular tachycardia during 48-hour ambulatory electrocardiography, and heart failure death or cardiac transplant

  7. Electrocardiographic characteristics of atrioventricular block induced by tilt testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Gajek, Jacek; Koźluk, Edward; Mazurek, Walentyna

    2009-02-01

    The electrocardiographic (ECG) characteristics of atrioventricular (AV) block during reflex syncope may be unique due to the presence of hypervagotonia. The aim of the present study was to define the ECG characteristics of the AV block induced by neurocardiogenic reflex provoked by tilt testing (TT). A series of 31 patients with presumed vasovagal syncope and AV block provoked by TT was studied. The duration of PP and PR interval, AV block grade and type, concomitant arrhythmias, and timing of the AV block occurrence were assessed. The AV block occurred at TT termination in 26 patients, in the recovery in 4 patients, and in both periods in 1 patient. Atrioventricular block was preceded by sinus slowing, and sinus rhythm during AV block was slow and instable. Mobitz I, 2:1 second-degree AV block, and advanced second-degree AV block were recognized in 35.5, 48.4, and 67.8% of patients, respectively. Third-degree AV block was diagnosed in 41.9% of patients. Twenty-one patients had at least two AV block forms. The most prevalent concomitant arrhythmia was junctional escape rhythm (61.3%). (i) The occurrence of the AV block during neurocardiogenic reaction induced by TT is always preceded by sinus rhythm slowing and usually by PR interval prolongation. (ii) The AV block provoked by TT usually occurs at TT termination, but may occur even in the recovery period in a supine position. Sometimes the AV block may be present both at TT termination and during the recovery period.

  8. Tilt testing results are influenced by tilt protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zyśko, Dorota; Fedorowski, Artur; Nilsson, David; Rudnicki, Jerzy; Gajek, Jacek; Melander, Olle; Sutton, Richard

    2016-07-01

    It is unknown how the return to supine position influences duration of loss of consciousness (LOC) and cardioinhibition during tilt test. Retrospective analysis of two datasets containing records of patients who underwent tilt testing for unexplained syncope in two centres was performed. Patients, totalling 1232, were included in the study: 262 in a Swedish centre and 970 patients in a Polish centre. In Sweden, tilt table with tilt-down time (TDT) of 18 s was used (Group II). In Poland, two different tilt tables were used, one of them with TDT of 10 s (Group I, n = 325), and the other with TDT of 47 s (Group III, n = 645). Cardioinhibitory reflex occurred most frequently in Group III, whereas number of pauses >3 s, frequency of very long asystole ≥30 s, and the total duration of pauses >3 s demonstrated a trend to increase from Group I to III. Duration of LOC in Groups II and III was significantly longer compared with Group I (32.0 and 33.7 s vs. 16.4 s). In the multivariate-adjusted regression model, cardioinhibitory reflex was predicted by tilt-table model (odds ratio per model with increasing TDT: 1.40; 95% confidence interval, 1.19-1.64; P < 0.0001), whereas LOC duration was longer with increasing TDT (P < 0.0001) and age (P < 0.0001). Longer TDT during induced vasovagal syncope increases the prevalence of cardioinhibitory reflex and prolongs the duration of LOC. Tilt-down time does not affect asystolic pause duration but delay may lead to occurrence of multiple pauses, higher frequency of very long asystole, and longer total asystole duration. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2015. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Is there a prognostic relevance of electrophysiological studies in bundle branch block patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogossian, Harilaos; Frommeyer, Gerrit; Göbbert, Kornelius; Hasan, Fuad; Nguyen, Quy Suu; Ninios, Ilias; Mijic, Dejan; Bandorski, Dirk; Hoeltgen, Reinhard; Seyfarth, Melchior; Lemke, Bernd; Eckardt, Lars; Zarse, Markus

    2017-08-01

    The present European guidelines suggest a diagnostic electrophysiological (EP) study to determine indication for cardiac pacing in patients with bundle branch block and unexplained syncope. We evaluated the prognostic relevance of an EP study for mortality and the development of permanent complete atrioventricular (AV) block in patients with symptomatic bifascicular block and first-degree AV block. The HV interval is a poor prognostic marker to predict the development of permanent AV block in patients with symptomatic bifascicular block (BFB) and AV block I°. Thirty consecutive patients (mean age, 74.8 ± 8.6 years; 25 males) with symptomatic BFB and first-degree AV block underwent an EP study before device implantation, according to current guidelines. For 53 ± 31 months, patients underwent yearly follow-up screening for syncope or higher-degree AV block. Thirty patients presented with prolonged HV interval during the EP study (mean, 82.2 ± 20.1 ms; range, 57-142 ms), classified into 3 groups: group 1, 70 to ≤100 ms (mean, 80 ± 8 ms; range, 70-97 ms; n = 18), and group 3, >100 ms (mean, 119 ± 14 ms; range, 107-142 ms; n = 5). According to the guidelines, patients in groups 2 and 3 received a pacemaker. The length of the HV interval was not associated with the later development of third-degree AV block or with increased mortality. Our present study suggests that an indication for pacemaker implantation based solely on a diagnostic EP study with prolongation of the HV interval is not justified. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Equilibrium disorders in elderly: diagnostic classification and differential diagnosis

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    Alessandro Castiglione

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Balance is primarily related to the proper functioning of three sensory input: vestibular, visual and proprioceptive. The integration of these different afferences contributes to the proper attitude of the body in static and dynamic conditions. Equilibrium disorders are common among elderly patients and are responsible for falls and fractures, leading sometimes to catastrophic outcomes, representing a serious health and social problem. Approximately one third of elderly patients at home and about 50% of institutionalized, over 75 year-old, suffer from this particular condition, with at least one fall a year and almost 50% of these with recurrent episodes. Females are more affected than males. Attempts to ascertain the underlying cause of unbalance should be done, leading then to specific treatment. Nevertheless, many elderly patients do not have a single disease but rather a multitude of medical conditions which may cause dizziness, imbalance and vertigo: effects of ageing, drugs, cardiovascular and neurological disorders, ocular and orthopaedic diseases. Aim of the study: A literature review was carried out with the intention to offer practical and useful notions for the management and treatment of equilibrium disorders. Discussion: In clinical practice, the main challenge is to distinguish between peripheral and central imbalance disorders. The data collected from history and clinical exams should be integrated with the intent to include the patient in one of the following clinical conditions: vertiginous syndrome, pre-syncope and/or syncope, neurological diseases, other conditions.Conclusions: Following the differential diagnosis, treatment mainly consists in drug administration (antiemetic and vestibular suppressor drugs and vestibular rehabilitation (physiotherapy and vestibular exercises.

  11. Prevalência e preditores da resposta cardioinibitória à massagem do seio carotídeo em 502 pacientes ambulatoriais Cardioinhibitory carotid sinus hypersensitivity: prevalence and predictors in 502 outpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustavo de Castro Lacerda

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available FUNDAMENTO: A resposta cardioinibitória (RCI caracteriza-se por assistolia > 3 segundos em resposta a 5 a 10 segundos de massagem do seio carotídeo (MSC. O implante de marcapasso é indicado nos pacientes com síncope inexplicada e RCI. OBJETIVO: Determinar a prevalência e os preditores da RCI em pacientes com alta prevalência de doença cardiovascular. Avaliar o significado clínico da RCI em pacientes com história de síncope ou queda. MÉTODOS: Desenho transversal. Casuística: pacientes ambulatoriais, com idade > 50 anos, encaminhados ao Setor de Eletrocardiografia de um hospital terciário. Indivíduos com demência, sopro carotídeo, história de infarto agudo do miocárdio ou acidente vascular cerebral nos últimos três meses foram excluídos. Os pacientes foram submetidos a MSC direito por 10 segundos seguida de MSC esquerdo por 10 segundos. As MSCs foram realizadas na posição supina por um único investigador. RESULTADOS: No total, 502 indivíduos foram submetidos a MSC, dos quais 52 apresentaram RCI (prevalência: 10,4%; intervalo de confiança de 95% [IC95%]: 7,7%-13%. Os preditores independentes da RCI foram: sexo masculino ("odds ratio" [OR]: 2,61; IC95%: 1,3%-5,1%, cardiopatia estrutural (OR: 3,28; IC95%: 1,3%-7,9%, e freqüência cardíaca de base (p 50 anos. Nos homens e nos cardiopatas, a probabilidade de a MSC provocar o aparecimento de RCI foi maior. Nas mulheres e nos pacientes sem cardiopatia estrutural aparente, a RCI mostrou ser achado altamente específico para o diagnóstico etiológico dos episódios de síncope ou queda.BACKGROUND: Cardioinhibitory response (CIR is defined as asystole >3 seconds in response to 5-10 seconds of carotid sinus massage (CSM. Pacemaker implantation is indicated for patients with unexplained syncope episodes and CIR. OBJECTIVE: To determine the prevalence and predictors of CIR in patients with a high prevalence of cardiovascular disease, and assess the clinical significance of CIR in

  12. Constitutive overexpression of muscarinic receptors leads to vagal hyperreactivity.

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    Angelo Livolsi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alterations in muscarinic receptor expression and acetylcholinesterase (AchE activity have been observed in tissues from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS. Vagal overactivity has been proposed as a possible cause of SIDS as well as of vasovagal syncopes. The aim of the present study was to seek whether muscarinic receptor overexpression may be the underlying mechanism of vagal hyperreactivity. Rabbits with marked vagal pauses following injection of phenylephrine were selected and crossed to obtain a vagal hyperreactive strain. The density of cardiac muscarinic receptors and acetylcholinesterase (AchE gene expression were assessed. Blood markers of the observed cardiac abnormalities were also sought. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cardiac muscarinic M(2 and M(3 receptors were overexpressed in hyperreactive rabbits compared to control animals (2.3-fold and 2.5-fold, respectively and the severity of the phenylephrine-induced bradycardia was correlated with their densities. A similar overexpression of M(2 receptors was observed in peripheral mononuclear white blood cells, suggesting that cardiac M(2 receptor expression can be inferred with high confidence from measurements in blood cells. Sequencing of the coding fragment of the M(2 receptor gene revealed a single nucleotide mutation in 83% of hyperreactive animals, possibly contributing for the transcript overexpression. Significant increases in AchE expression and activity were also assessed (AchE mRNA amplification ratio of 3.6 versus normal rabbits. This phenomenon might represent a compensatory consequence of muscarinic receptors overexpression. Alterations in M(2 receptor and AchE expression occurred between the 5th and the 7th week of age, a critical period also characterized by a higher mortality rate of hyperreactive rabbits (52% in H rabbits versus 13% in normal rabbits and preceeded the appearance of functional disorders. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results suggest that

  13. Outcomes of medical emergencies on commercial airline flights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Drew C; Martin-Gill, Christian; Guyette, Francis X; Tobias, Adam Z; McCarthy, Catherine E; Harrington, Scott T; Delbridge, Theodore R; Yealy, Donald M

    2013-05-30

    Worldwide, 2.75 billion passengers fly on commercial airlines annually. When in-flight medical emergencies occur, access to care is limited. We describe in-flight medical emergencies and the outcomes of these events. We reviewed records of in-flight medical emergency calls from five domestic and international airlines to a physician-directed medical communications center from January 1, 2008, through October 31, 2010. We characterized the most common medical problems and the type of on-board assistance rendered. We determined the incidence of and factors associated with unscheduled aircraft diversion, transport to a hospital, and hospital admission, and we determined the incidence of death. There were 11,920 in-flight medical emergencies resulting in calls to the center (1 medical emergency per 604 flights). The most common problems were syncope or presyncope (37.4% of cases), respiratory symptoms (12.1%), and nausea or vomiting (9.5%). Physician passengers provided medical assistance in 48.1% of in-flight medical emergencies, and aircraft diversion occurred in 7.3%. Of 10,914 patients for whom postflight follow-up data were available, 25.8% were transported to a hospital by emergency-medical-service personnel, 8.6% were admitted, and 0.3% died. The most common triggers for admission were possible stroke (odds ratio, 3.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.88 to 6.03), respiratory symptoms (odds ratio, 2.13; 95% CI, 1.48 to 3.06), and cardiac symptoms (odds ratio, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.37 to 2.77). Most in-flight medical emergencies were related to syncope, respiratory symptoms, or gastrointestinal symptoms, and a physician was frequently the responding medical volunteer. Few in-flight medical emergencies resulted in diversion of aircraft or death; one fourth of passengers who had an in-flight medical emergency underwent additional evaluation in a hospital. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.).

  14. Triple synchronous cancers. A medical and ethical problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debevec, L.; Cesar, R.; Kern, I.

    2007-01-01

    In a patient with suspicious synchronous multiple tumours, there are limited possibilities for effective therapy. Therefore, the decision for invasive diagnostics and precise staging of tumours is questionable, especially in elderly patients suitable only for symptomatic therapy. A 78-year-old man with hypertension and angina pectoris was admitted to the hospital due to syncope. Two primary lung tumours and a kidney tumour were detected by imaging investigation. The patient refused invasive diagnostics and left the hospital. After 19 months he was readmitted in an impaired clinical condition and subsequently died of bronchopneumonia. The autopsy revealed squamous cell carcinoma of the right upper lobe with metastases to regional lymph nodes and to the brain, small-cell carcinoma of the left upper lobe with metastases to regional lymph nodes and to the spleen, and clear-cell kidney carcinoma with multiple metastases to the lungs. All tumours were necrotizing, and therefore we assumed that any attempt at specific therapy would have been ineffective. In an elderly patient with advanced lung tumors and suspicious synchronous triple cancers, the ''wait and see'' option can be suitable. (author)

  15. Cardiovascular complications of anorexia nervosa: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachs, Katherine V; Harnke, Ben; Mehler, Philip S; Krantz, Mori J

    2016-03-01

    Anorexia nervosa portends the highest mortality among psychiatric diseases, despite primarily being a disease of adolescents and younger adults. Although some of this mortality risk is attributable to suicide, many deaths are likely cardiovascular in etiology. Recent studies suggest that adverse myocardial structural changes occur in this condition, which could underlie the increased mortality. Given limited prevalence of severe anorexia there is a paucity of clinical and autopsy data to discern an exact cause of death. Given this background we conducted a systematic review of the medical literature to provide a contemporary summary of the pathobiologic sequelae of severe anorexia nervosa on the cardiovascular system. We sought to elucidate the impact of anorexia nervosa in four cardiovascular domains: structural, repolarization/conduction, hemodynamic, and peripheral vascular. A number of cardiac abnormalities associated with anorexia nervosa have been described in the literature, including pericardial and valvular pathology, changes in left ventricular mass and function, conduction abnormalities, bradycardia, hypotension, and dysregulation in peripheral vascular contractility. Despite the prevalent theory that malignant arrhythmias are implicated as a cause of sudden death in this disorder, data to support this causal relationship are lacking. It is reasonable to obtain routine electrocardiography and measurements of orthostatic vital signs in patients presenting with anorexia nervosa. Echocardiography is generally not indicated unless prompted by clinical signs of disease. Admission to an inpatient unit with telemetry monitoring is recommended for patients with severe sinus bradycardia or junction rhythm, marked prolongation of the corrected QT interval, or syncope. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Carotid sinus hypersensitivity: Entity warrants a caution in the critical care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sugata Dasgupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carotid sinus hypersensitivity (CSH syndrome is an entity caused by an overreaction of the carotid sinus baroreceptors to stimulation. Three subtypes of CSH syndrome are recognized according to the response to carotid sinus massage (CSM: Predominantly cardioinhibitory, predominantly vasodepressor and a mixed subtype. We report here the case of a middle-aged female patient admitted in our critical care unit with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. There were episodes of severe bradycardia whenever her head was rotated to any side, relieved on neutralizing head position and administering intravenous atropine. CSM revealed she had predominantly cardioinhibitory type of CSH syndrome. A cardioinhibitory form of hypersensitive carotid sinus reflex, which is idiopathic in causation, probably explains the severe bradycardia on head rotation seen in our patient. A heightened awareness of this syndrome is necessary for timely diagnosis and management. CSH syndrome results from an overreaction of the carotid sinus baroreceptors to stimulation, manifesting commonly as bradycardia, hypotension and syncope. It is an entity, which warrants caution during routine critical care practices.

  17. Awareness, attitudes and practices of first aid among school teachers in Mangalore, south India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Nitin; Narayanan, Thanneermalai; Bin Zakaria, Saifuddin; Nair, Abhishek Venugopal; Belayutham, Lavina; Subramanian, Aathiya Mihiraa; Gopakumar, K G

    2015-12-01

    Circumstances requiring medical attention are common at schools. Teachers are often the first individuals to witness and handle situations requiring first aid and medical emergencies. To determine awareness, attitudes and practices of school teachers and the facilities available at schools with respect to administration of first aid. Data were obtained from 146 teachers in nine schools in Mangalore, India, using a self-administered questionnaire. The schools were also inspected for first aid equipment and facilities. Only 69 (47%) teachers had received first aid training previously. Poor and moderate knowledge of first aid was observed among 19 (13%) and 127 (87%) teachers, respectively. Only eight teachers knew the correct procedure for cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Most teachers 96 (66%) were willing to administer first aid if provided with the required training. A total of 74 teachers reported having practised first aid in response to a situation arising at their school. Wounds (36%) and syncopal attack (23%) were among the commonly encountered situations requiring first aid management at schools. Teachers' confidence level in administering first aid was significantly associated with prior training in first aid (p=0.001). First aid kits were available in only five of the nine schools surveyed. The current competency level among teachers in Mangalore to administer first aid is inadequate. Measures need to be taken at schools to ensure initiation of first aid training followed by periodic training for teachers in first aid.

  18. Ascites with right heart failure in a dog: diagnosis and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlapudi Satish Kumar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A female Labrador dog presented with a history of distended abdomen was subjected for clinical, physical, hemato-biochemical, eletrocardiographic, and ultrasonographic evaluations. Respiratory distress, weakness, fluid thrill on palpation of abdomen, cough, cyanotic tongue, and syncope were the significant manifestations. Elevated levels of creatine kinase, lactate dehydrogenase, alanine amino transferase, and alkaline phosphatase with normal blood urea nitrogen and creatinine were the common serum chemistry findings. Low voltage QRS complexes were the electrocardiographic abnormalities. Classical ground glass appearance of abdomen, and enlarged heart with increased sternal contact were the radiographic findings of abdomen and thorax. Ultrasonography of abdomen revealed floating viscera in the anechoic effusion with engorged and distended hepatic vasculature. 2-dimensional echocardiography revealed dilated right ventricle both on B- and M-mode. Further, insufficiency in mitral and tricuspid valves were recorded on pulsed and color flow Doppler. Hence, right heart failure due to ascites was confirmed, and the condition was successfully managed with losartas, spiranolactone, co-enzyme Q10 and tricholine citrate, and sorbitol.

  19. [Pulmonary hypertension: definition, diagnostic and new classification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seferian, Andrei; Simonneau, Gérald

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH): mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) ≥ 25 mm Hg on right heart catheterization at rest. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH): mPAP ≥ 25 mm Hg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) ≤ 15 mm Hg and pulmonary vascular resistances (PVR) >3 Wood units. Patients with compatible symptoms (exertional dyspnea, syncopes, signes of right heart failure) can show signs of PH on cardiac echography and therefore need to be investigated in search of the cause of PH. After ruling out the frequent causes of PH (left heart and chronic respiratory diseases), the V/Q lung scan is used to screen for patients with post-embolic PH, that need to be further investigated hemodynamically and radiologically in order to decide operability. For the rest of the patients, only right heart catheterization can identify patients with precapillary PH and these patients must be further evaluated (clinically, by blood samples and by imaging techniques) in order to be classified in one the PH groups of the classification. For the future the discovery of novel risk factors and understanding the mechanism involved with the already known ones represent two major points of research. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Individual Risk and Prevention of Complications: Doctors' Advice to Persons Wishing a New Tattoo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serup, Jørgen

    2017-01-01

    Doctors who are consulted about health and tattoo risks have an important role in the prevention of an individual's tattoo complications. Tattooing is a tremendous exposure of the human body to needle operation, particles, and chemicals. The risk is related to a person's health condition, level of insight, decision-making, and to the operation of tattooing, tattoo inks and utensils, tattoo parlour, and the aftercare. Tattooing is painful minor surgery performed without anesthesia. It can be associated with syncope. It is major needle trauma with histamine release and wheal and flare in the operation field. The skin barrier is broken. Bacterial infections come early. Chronically intermittent and mild complaints affect 4/10 of all the tattooed, and 2/10 have sensitivity to sun. Chronic complications with allergy in red tattoos and nodules due to pigment agglomeration and foreign body formation in black tattoos are less common but certainly at the level of cumbersome skin disease. Reactions to black tattoos are strongly associated with sarcoidosis. There are many other distinct entities of tattoo complications. A campaign called 'Tattoo - know your risk' is presented with detailed fact sheets about tattoos, tattoo problems, how to reduce risk, and a checklist for the tattoo customer before decision-making. The sheets with keynote information are useful aids for doctors giving advice to persons curious about acquiring a tattoo. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Imaging spectrum of sudden athlete cardiac death

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arrigan, M.T., E-mail: martinarrigan@gmail.co [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Killeen, R.P. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Dodd, J.D. [Department of Radiology, St Vincent' s University Hospital, Dublin (Ireland); Torreggiani, W.C. [Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospital incorporating the National Children' s Hospital, Dublin (Ireland)

    2011-03-15

    Sudden athlete death (SAD) is a widely publicized and increasingly reported phenomenon. For many, the athlete population epitomize human physical endeavour and achievement and their unexpected death comes with a significant emotional impact on the public. Sudden deaths within this group are often without prior warning. Preceding symptoms of exertional syncope and chest pain do, however, occur and warrant investigation. Similarly, a positive family history of sudden death in a young person or a known family history of a condition associated with SAD necessitates further tests. Screening programmes aimed at detecting those at risk individuals also exist with the aim of reducing fatalities. In this paper we review the topic of SAD and discuss the epidemiology, aetiology, and clinical presentations. We then proceed to discuss each underlying cause, in turn discussing the pathophysiology of each condition. This is followed by a discussion of useful imaging methods with an emphasis on cardiac magnetic resonance and cardiac computed tomography and how these address the various issues raised by the pathophysiology of each entity. We conclude by proposing imaging algorithms for the investigation of patients considered at risk for these conditions and discuss the various issues raised in screening.

  2. Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES): proposal for informed consent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacci, A; Ursino, F; La Vela, R; Matteucci, F; Mallardi, V; Fattori, B

    2008-08-01

    Fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) is now a first choice method for studying swallowing disorders on account of the various advantages it offers: easy to use, very well tolerated, allows bedside examination and is economic. Nevertheless, this diagnostic procedure is not without risks, the most probable consequences of which include discomfort, gagging and/or vomiting, vasovagal syncope, epistaxis, mucosal perforation, adverse reactions to topical anaesthetics and laryngospasm. The risks involved with FEES stress the importance of informing the patient of these; this is an important aspect in medicine that necessarily and immediately implies receiving the patient's so-called "informed consent". Informed consent should be obtained not only by means of specific printed forms but also after the patient has had an interview with the physician who will be performing the procedure and who will offer information according to the personal clinical, psychological, cultural and linguistic situation of the patient and in keeping with the type of procedure proposed. In the case of FEES, as with other invasive or non-invasive diagnostic procedures, therefore, routine written and signed consent, together with a patient/physician interview should fulfil what is known as "complete information". In this report, a specific form for informed consent to FEES procedures, is proposed.

  3. C-Reactive Protein Levels in the Brugada Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aimé Bonny

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Inflammation in the Brugada syndrome (BrS and its clinical implication have been little studied. Aims. To assess the level of inflammation in BrS patients. Methods. All studied BrS patients underwent blood samples drawn for C-reactive protein (CRP levels at admission, prior to any invasive intervention. Patients with a previous ICD placement were controlled to exclude those with a recent (<14 days shock. We divided subjects into symptomatic (syncope or aborted sudden death and asymptomatic groups. In a multivariable analysis, we adjusted for significant variables (age, CRP ≥ 2 mg/L. Results. Fifty-four subjects were studied (mean age 45 ± 13 years, 49 (91% male. Twenty (37% were symptomatic. Baseline characteristics were similar in both groups. Mean CRP level was 1,4 ± 0,9 mg/L in asymptomatic and 2,4 ± 1,4 mg/L in symptomatic groups (P = .003. In the multivariate model, CRP concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L remained an independent marker for being symptomatic (P = .018; 95% CI: 1.3 to 19.3. Conclusion. Inflammation seems to be more active in symptomatic BrS. C-reactive protein concentrations ≥ 2 mg/L might be associated with the previous symptoms in BrS. The value of inflammation as a risk factor of arrhythmic events in BrS needs to be studied.

  4. What is the optimal duration of tilt testing for the assessment of patients with suspected postural tachycardia syndrome?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carew, Sheila

    2012-01-31

    AIMS: The aim of this study is to define the optimal duration of tilt testing for the assessment of patients with suspected postural tachycardia syndrome (POTS). METHODS AND RESULTS: This was a case-control study. Cases were identified retrospectively from a database of patients referred with orthostatic intolerance (OI). All met the diagnostic criteria for POTS. Controls were enrolled prospectively. All subjects underwent tilting to 70 degrees for 40 min if tolerated. Continuous monitoring was provided by a Finometer. Analysis of responses to tilting was performed on 28 cases and 28 controls. The mean age in the case group was 23.6 and in the control group was 26.2. The majority was female in both groups (cases = 4F:3M, controls = 2F:1M). All cases met the criteria for POTS within 7 min of orthostasis. No controls demonstrated a sustained tachycardia. The prevalence of vasovagal syncope (VVS) was 36% in cases vs. 7% in controls (P = 0.02) and 25% in the remaining patients (n = 233) on the OI database (P = 0.259). CONCLUSION: A 10 min tilt will diagnose POTS in the majority of patients. It will not, however, be sufficient to identify the overlap that exists between POTS and VVS. The optimal duration of tilt testing in patients suspected of POTS is 40 min.

  5. Cardiovascular and Postural Control Interactions during Hypergravity: Effects on Cerebral Autoregulation in Males and Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Nandu; Blaber, Andrew; Bareille, Marie-Pierre; Beck, Arnaud; Avan, Paul; Bruner, Michelle; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2012-07-01

    Orthostatic intolerance remains a problem upon return to Earth from the microgravity environment of spaceflight. A variety of conditions including hypovolemia, cerebral vasoconstriction, cerebral or peripheral vascular disease, or cardiac arrhythmias may result in syncope if the person remains upright. Current research indicates that there is a greater dependence on visual and somatosensory information at the beginning of space flight with a decreased otolith gain during prolonged space flight (Herault et al., 2002). The goal of the research is to further our understanding of the fundamental adaptive homeostatic mechanisms involved in gravity related changes in cardiovascular and postural function. Cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and postural sensory motor control systems in male and female participants before, during, and after exposure to graded levels of hyper-G were investigated. Hypotheses: 1) Activation of skeletal muscle pump will be directly related to the degree of orthostatic stress. 2) Simultaneous measurement of heart rate, blood pressure and postural sway will predict cardio-postural stability. Blood pressure and heart rate (means and variability), postural sway, center of pressure (COP), baroreflex function, calf blood flow, middle cerebral artery blood flow, non-invasive intracranial pressure measurements, and two-breath CO2 were measured. Results from the study will be used to provide an integrated insight into mechanisms of cardio-postural control and cerebral autoregulation, which are important aspects of human health in flights to Moon, Mars and distant planets.

  6. Pacemaker lead perforation of the right ventricle associated with Moraxella phenylpyruvica infection in a dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciavarella, A; Nimmo, J; Hambrook, L

    2016-04-01

    A 13-year-old neutered male Border Collie was presented with acute onset syncope, weakness and anorexia 10 months after transvenous pacemaker implantation. The patient was laterally recumbent, bradycardic (36 beats/min) and febrile (40.7°C) on presentation. An electrocardiogram (ECG) revealed recurrence of third-degree atrioventricular block with a ventricular escape rhythm. Fluoroscopy identified migration of the pacemaker tip through the apex of the right ventricle. Echocardiography failed to reveal any evidence of pericardial effusion or cardiac tamponade. Full postmortem was performed after euthanasia. The pacemaker lead had perforated the apex of the right ventricle and lodged in the right pleural space. Culture of blood (taken antemortem), pericardial sac, right ventricular wall (surrounding pacemaker lead), pacemaker lead tip and pericardial fluid revealed a pure growth of Moraxella phenylpyruvica. Bacteraemia associated with M. phenylpyruvica has never been reported in the dog, but sporadic cases are reported in humans. Infection could have resulted from either pre-existing myocarditis or opportunistic infection and bacteraemia post pacemaker implantation. Evaluation of the pacemaker function at regular intervals would allow early detection of poor pacemaker-to-myocardium contact, which would prompt further investigation of pacemaker lead abnormalities such as perforation. © 2016 Australian Veterinary Association.

  7. Ten-year Survival and Its Associated Factors in the Patients Undergoing Pacemaker Implantation in Hospitals Affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences During 2002 - 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaeefard, Abdolreza; Ghorbani, Mohammad; Babaee Baigi, Mohammad Ali; Tabatabae, Hamidreza

    2015-01-01

    Background: Heart failure is a prevalent disease affecting about 4.9 million people in the U.S. and more than 22 million individuals worldwide. Using electric pacemaker is the most common treatment for the patients with heart conduction problems. The present study aimed to determine the factors affecting survival in the patients undergoing pacemaker implantation in the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences. Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify the factors affecting the survival of the patients suffering from arrhythmia. Patients and Methods: This retrospective survival analysis was conducted on all 1207 patients with heart failure who had undergone permanent pacemaker implantation in the hospitals affiliated to Shiraz University of Medical Sciences from 2002 to 2012. The data were analyzed using non-parametric methods such as Kaplan-Meier method, life table, and Cox regression model. The risk factors of mortality were determined using multivariate Cox proportional hazards method. Results: Survival data were available for 1030 (80%) patients (median age = 71 years [5th to 95th percentile range: 26 - 86 years]) and follow-up was completed for 84.28% of them. According to the results, 56% of the patients had received dual-chamber systems, while 44% had been implanted by single-chamber ventricular systems. Moreover, sick sinus syndrome and pacemaker mode were independent predictors of increased mortality. Conclusions: In this study, sick sinus syndrome and pacemaker mode followed by syncope were independently associated with increased mortality. PMID:26734484

  8. Successful management of multiple permanent pacemaker complications – infection, 13 year old silent lead perforation and exteriorisation following failed percutaneous extraction, superior vena cava obstruction, tricuspid valve endocarditis, pulmonary embolism and prosthetic tricuspid valve thrombosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Pankaj; Adluri, Krishna; Javangula, Kalyana; Baig, Wasir

    2009-01-01

    A 59 year old man underwent mechanical tricuspid valve replacement and removal of pacemaker generator along with 4 pacemaker leads for pacemaker endocarditis and superior vena cava obstruction after an earlier percutaneous extraction had to be abandoned, 13 years ago, due to cardiac arrest, accompanied by silent, unsuspected right atrial perforation and exteriorisation of lead. Postoperative course was complicated by tricuspid valve thrombosis and secondary pulmonary embolism requiring TPA thrombolysis which was instantly successful. A review of literature of pacemaker endocarditis and tricuspid thrombosis along with the relevant management strategies is presented. We believe this case report is unusual on account of non operative management of right atrial lead perforation following an unsuccessful attempt at percutaneous removal of right sided infected pacemaker leads and the incidental discovery of the perforated lead 13 years later at sternotomy, presentation of pacemaker endocarditis with a massive load of vegetations along the entire pacemaker lead tract in superior vena cava, right atrial endocardium, tricuspid valve and right ventricular endocardium, leading to a functional and structural SVC obstruction, requirement of an unusually large dose of warfarin postoperatively occasioned, in all probability, by antibiotic drug interactions, presentation of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis uniquely as vasovagal syncope and isolated hypoxia and near instantaneous resolution of tricuspid prosthetic valve thrombosis with Alteplase thrombolysis. PMID:19239701

  9. [TRENDS OF PERMANENT PACEMAKER IMPLANTATION IN A SINGLE CENTER OVER A 20-YEAR PERIOD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Dante; Ilan, Limor Bushar; Freedberg, Nahum A; Feldman, Alexander; Turgeman, Yoav

    2015-05-01

    To review the changes in permanent pacemaker implantation indications, pacing modes and patients' demographics over a 20-year period. We retrospectively retrieved data on patients who underwent first implantation of the pacemaker between 1-1-1991 and 31-12-2010. One thousand and nine (1,009) patients underwent a first pacemaker implantation during that period; 535 were men (53%), their mean age was 74.6±19.5 years; the highest rate of implanted pacemaker was in patients ranging in age from 70-79 years, however there was an increasing number of patients aged over 80 years. The median survival time after initial pacemaker implantation was 8 years. Syncope was the most common symptom (62.5%) and atrioventricular block was the most common electrocardiographic indication (56.4%) leading to pacemaker implantation. There was increased utilization of dual chamber and rate responsive pacemakers over the years. There was no difference regarding mode selection between genders. Pacemaker implantation rates have increased over a 20-year period. Dual chamber replaced most of the single ventricular chamber pacemaker and rate responsive pacemakers became the norm. The data of a small volume center are similar to those reported in pacemaker surveys of high volume pacemaker implantation centers. They confirm adherence to the published guidelines for pacing.

  10. Splenic Rupture Diagnosed with Bedside Ultrasound in a Patient with Shock in the Emergency Department Following Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Mulkerin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A 64-year-old male presented to the emergency department (ED with near syncope and worsening left flank and shoulder pain. He had undergone a difficult colonoscopy two days prior due to a tortuous colon. Initial vital signs were normal. He looked uncomfortable and had significant left upper quadrant abdominal tenderness with guarding. Thirty minutes after ED arrival, his blood pressure dropped to 73/59 mmHg, requiring aggressive fluid resuscitation. Bedside focused assessment with sonography in trauma (FAST exam demonstrated free fluid in the abdomen with mixed echogenicity of the spleen, suggestive of splenic injury. Computed tomography (CT demonstrated a large subcapsular splenic hematoma with active extravasation and surrounding intraperitoneal free fluid (Figure, Video. He was admitted to the surgical intensive care unit. Hemorrhage continued after interventional radiology performed embolization of the splenic artery. He then required laparoscopic splenectomy on hospital day 2 to control bleeding. He subsequently did well and was discharged on hospital day 10.

  11. Antiarrhythmic effect of IKr activation in a cellular model of LQT3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diness, Jonas Goldin; Hansen, Rie Schultz; Nissen, Jakob Dahl

    2008-01-01

    . Application of ATX-II (10 nM) was proarrhythmic, causing a profound increase of APD(90) as well as early afterdepolarizations and increased beat-to-beat variability. Two independent I(Kr) activators attenuated the proarrhythmic effects of ATX-II. NS3623 did not affect the late sodium current (I......BACKGROUND: Long QT syndrome type 3 (LQT3) is an inherited cardiac disorder caused by gain-of-function mutations in the cardiac voltage-gated sodium channel, Na(v)1.5. LQT3 is associated with the polymorphic ventricular tachycardia torsades de pointes (TdP), which can lead to syncope and sudden...... cardiac death. The sea anemone toxin ATX-II has been shown to inhibit the inactivation of Na(v)1.5, thereby closely mimicking the underlying cause of LQT3 in patients. OBJECTIVE: The hypothesis for this study was that activation of the I(Kr) current could counteract the proarrhythmic effects of ATX...

  12. Factitious panniculitis induced by cupping therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Suk-Ho; Han, Hyun-Ho; Rhie, Jong-Won

    2011-11-01

    Cupping therapy is an alternative medical procedure that has been widely performed in Asian countries to relieve pain. It is known that there is no complication to this therapy, so many non-health care professionals have performed this procedure. However, there have been few reports on complications, such as iron deficiency anemia, hemorrhagic bullae, kelloids, vasovagal syncope, and foreign body reactions. Masses associated with panniculitis induced by cupping are extremely rare, and they require a unique approach.A 56-year-old woman presented with a 10-month history of multiple masses in the posterior neck and right shoulder areas. The patient repeatedly attempted cupping therapy by herself, and multiple palpable masses developed in the posterior neck and right shoulder area where cupping therapy had been performed. The masses were enlarged by repeated cupping, and they decreased in size when cupping was stopped. Among all lesions, the 2 masses with tenderness were surgically excised. The remaining masses resolved after cupping therapy was ceased. When a patient with subcutaneous mass has a history of cupping or trace of cupping marks, panniculitis induced by cupping should be suspected. The lesion seems to spontaneously resolve unless they are repeatedly stimulated. However, surgical resection is considered in patients with infections or severe tenderness as a complication.

  13. Clinical significance of fragmented QRS complexes or J waves in patients with idiopathic ventricular arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Choong Sil; Gwag, Hye Bin; Hwang, Jin Kyung; Park, Seung Jung; Park, Kyoung-Min; Kim, June Soo; On, Young Keun

    2018-01-01

    Idiopathic ventricular fibrillation (IVF) can cause sudden cardiac death. Previous studies have reported that J waves and fragmented QRS complexes (f-QRS) are arrhythmogenic markers and predictors of cardiac events. We evaluated the prevalence and clinical significance of J waves and f-QRS in patients with IVF. We studied 81 patients who received an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) due to IVF between October 1999 and June 2015. We assessed the prevalence of J waves and f-QRS using electrocardiograms (ECGs). Patients were classified into three groups: J wave group (n = 35), f-QRS group (n = 20), or normal ECG group (n = 26). The control group included 81 subjects without heart disease who were matched for age, sex, and race. We compared syncope, sudden cardiac arrest, and appropriate ICD shock between the three groups. The follow-up duration was 4.1 years. J waves and f-QRS were more frequent in patients with IVF than in control subjects (43.2%, 21% vs. 24.7%, 19.7%, P J wave and f-QRS versus the normal ECG group revealed that the combined group had a higher frequency of clinical cardiac events than the normal ECG group (47.3% vs. 11.5%, respectively, P = 0.009). Patients with IVF had higher prevalence of f-QRS or J waves. And patients with f-QRS or J waves were at higher risk of recurrent ventricular fibrillation.

  14. Spectral convergence in tapping and physiological fluctuations: Coupling and independence of 1/f noise in the central and autonomic nervous systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lillian M. Rigoli

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available When humans perform a response task or timing task repeatedly, fluctuations in measures of timing from one action to the next exhibit long-range correlations known as 1/f noise. The origins of 1/f noise in timing have been debated for over twenty years, with one common explanation serving as a default: Humans are composed of physiological processes throughout the brain and body that operate over a wide range of timescales, and these processes combine to be expressed as a general source of 1/f noise. To test this explanation, the present study investigated the coupling versus independence of 1/f noise in timing deviations, key-press durations, pupil dilations, and heartbeat intervals while tapping to an audiovisual metronome. All four dependent measures exhibited clear 1/f noise, regardless of whether tapping was synchronized or syncopated. 1/f spectra for timing deviations were found to match those for key-press durations on an individual basis, and 1/f spectra for pupil dilations matched those in heartbeat intervals. Results indicate a complex, multiscale relationship among 1/f noises arising from common sources, such as those arising from timing functions versus those arising from autonomic nervous system functions. Results also provide further evidence against the default hypothesis that 1/f noise in human timing is just the additive combination of processes throughout the brain and body. Our findings are better accommodated by theories of complexity matching that begin to formalize multiscale coordination as a foundation of human behavior.

  15. Benign occipital epilepsy of childhood: Panayiotopoulos syndrome in a 3 year old child

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menon Narayanankutty Sunilkumar , Vadakut Krishnan Parvathy

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Panayiotopoulos syndrome (PS is a relatively frequent and benign epileptic syndrome seen in children in the age group of 3-6 years and is characterised by predominantly autonomic symptoms and/or simple motor focal seizures followed or not by impairment of consciousness. Although multifocal spikes with high amplitude sharp-slow wave complexes at various locations can be present in the EEG, interictal electroencephalogram (EEG in children with this particular type of epilepsy characteristically shows occipital spikes. This syndrome has known to be a masquerader and can imitate gastroenteritis, encephalitis, syncope, migraine, sleep disorders or metabolic diseases. In the absence of thorough knowledge of types of benign epilepsy syndromes and their various clinical presentations, epilepsy such as PS can be easily missed. The peculiar aspects of this type of epilepsy in children should be known not only by paediatricians but also by general doctors because a correct diagnosis would avoid aggressive interventions and concerns on account of its benign outcome. In this case study, we report a case of PS in a 3 year old child.

  16. Delayed-enhancement MRI of apical hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: assessment of the intramural distribution and comparison with clinical symptoms, ventricular arrhythmias, and cine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amano, Yasuo; Fukushima, Yoshimitsu; Kumita, Shinichiro; Takayama, Morimasa; Kitamura, Mitsunobu

    2011-01-01

    Background: Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is reported to show patchy midwall myocardial hyper enhancement on delayed-enhancement magnetic resonance imaging (DE-MRI). The intramural distribution of myocardial hyper enhancement and its correlation with clinical symptoms, ventricular arrhythmias, and cardiac function have not been described for symptomatic apical HCM. Purpose: To evaluate the features and significance of myocardial hyper enhancement on DE-MRI in symptomatic apical HCM. Material and Methods: Thirteen patients with symptomatic apical HCM and their 65 apical segments were investigated. Myocardial hyper enhancement and regional and global functional parameters were determined with MRI. We investigated the intramural distribution and frequencies of this myocardial hyper enhancement and compared them with the patients' clinical symptoms, the presence of ventricular arrhythmias, and cine MRI. Results: Eight (61.5%) patients with symptomatic apical HCM displayed apical myocardial hyper enhancement, and 22 (33.8%) of the 65 apical segments examined showed myocardial hyper enhancement. Of the myocardial hyper enhancement observed, 81.8% showed a subendocardial pattern.The Hyperenhanced apical myocardium had a lower percentage of systolic myocardial thickening, and was associated with serious symptoms (e.g. syncope) and ventricular arrhythmias. Conclusion: Patients with symptomatic apical HCM showed myocardial hyper enhancement involving the subendocardial layer, which might be related to regional systolic dysfunction, serious clinical symptoms, and ventricular arrhythmias

  17. Update for 2014 on clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barón-Esquivias, Gonzalo; Manito, Nicolás; López Díaz, Javier; Martín Santana, Antonio; García Pinilla, José Manuel; Gómez Doblas, Juan José; Gómez Bueno, Manuel; Barrios Alonso, Vivencio; Lambert, José Luis

    2015-04-01

    In the present article, we review publications from the previous year in the following 3 areas: clinical cardiology, geriatric cardiology, and heart failure and transplantation. Among the new developments in clinical cardiology are several contributions from Spanish groups on tricuspid and aortic regurgitation, developments in atrial fibrillation, syncope, and the clinical characteristics of heart disease, as well as various studies on familial heart disease and chronic ischemic heart disease. In geriatric cardiology, the most relevant studies published in 2014 involve heart failure, degenerative aortic stenosis, and data on atrial fibrillation in the geriatric population. In heart failure and transplantation, the most noteworthy developments concern the importance of multidisciplinary units and patients with preserved systolic function. Other notable publications were those related to iron deficiency, new drugs, and new devices and biomarkers. Finally, we review studies on acute heart failure and transplantation, such as inotropic drugs and ventricular assist devices. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. An elderly-onset limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) with pseudo-hypertrophy of paraspinal muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuta, Mitsuru; Sumi-Akamaru, Hisae; Takahashi, Masanori P; Hayashi, Yukiko K; Nishino, Ichizo; Mochizuki, Hideki

    2016-09-01

    Mutations in LMNA, encoding A-type lamins, lead to diverse disorders, collectively called "laminopathies," which affect the striated muscle, cardiac muscle, adipose tissue, skin, peripheral nerve, and premature aging. We describe a patient with limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 1B (LGMD1B) carrying a heterozygous p.Arg377His mutation in LMNA, in whom skeletal muscle symptom onset was at the age of 65 years. Her weakness started at the erector spinae muscles, which showed marked pseudo-hypertrophy even at the age of 72 years. Her first episode of syncope was at 44 years; however, aberrant cardiac conduction was not revealed until 60 years. The p.Arg377His mutation has been previously reported in several familial LMNA-associated myopathies, most of which showed muscle weakness before the 6th decade. This is the first report of pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles in LMNA-associated myopathies. The pseudo-hypertrophy of paravertebral muscles and the elderly-onset of muscle weakness make this case unique and reportable. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Implication of altered autonomic control for orthostatic tolerance in SCI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wecht, Jill Maria; Bauman, William A

    2018-01-01

    Neural output from the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system (ANS) are integrated to appropriately control cardiovascular responses during routine activities of daily living including orthostatic positioning. Sympathetic control of the upper extremity vasculature and the heart arises from the thoracic cord between T1 and T5, whereas splanchnic bed and lower extremity vasculature receive sympathetic neural input from the lower cord between segments T5 and L2. Although the vasculature is not directly innervated by the parasympathetic nervous system, the SA node is innervated by post-ganglionic vagal nerve fibers via cranial nerve X. Segmental differences in sympathetic cardiovascular innervation highlight the effect of lesion level on orthostatic cardiovascular control following spinal cord injury (SCI). Due to impaired sympathetic cardiovascular control, many individuals with SCI, particularly those with lesions above T6, are prone to orthostatic hypotension (OH) and orthostatic intolerance (OI). Symptomatic OH, which may result in OI, is a consequence of episodic reductions in cerebral perfusion pressure and the symptoms may include: dizziness, lightheadedness, nausea, blurred vision, ringing in the ears, headache and syncope. However, many, if not most, individuals with SCI who experience persistent and episodic hypotension and OH do not report symptoms of cerebral hypoperfusion and therefore do not raise clinical concern. This review will discuss the mechanism underlying OH and OI following SCI, and will review our knowledge to date regarding the prevalence, consequences and possible treatment options for these conditions in the SCI population. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Intracerebral evidence of rhythm transform in the human auditory cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozaradan, Sylvie; Mouraux, André; Jonas, Jacques; Colnat-Coulbois, Sophie; Rossion, Bruno; Maillard, Louis

    2017-07-01

    Musical entrainment is shared by all human cultures and the perception of a periodic beat is a cornerstone of this entrainment behavior. Here, we investigated whether beat perception might have its roots in the earliest stages of auditory cortical processing. Local field potentials were recorded from 8 patients implanted with depth-electrodes in Heschl's gyrus and the planum temporale (55 recording sites in total), usually considered as human primary and secondary auditory cortices. Using a frequency-tagging approach, we show that both low-frequency (30 Hz) neural activities in these structures faithfully track auditory rhythms through frequency-locking to the rhythm envelope. A selective gain in amplitude of the response frequency-locked to the beat frequency was observed for the low-frequency activities but not for the high-frequency activities, and was sharper in the planum temporale, especially for the more challenging syncopated rhythm. Hence, this gain process is not systematic in all activities produced in these areas and depends on the complexity of the rhythmic input. Moreover, this gain was disrupted when the rhythm was presented at fast speed, revealing low-pass response properties which could account for the propensity to perceive a beat only within the musical tempo range. Together, these observations show that, even though part of these neural transforms of rhythms could already take place in subcortical auditory processes, the earliest auditory cortical processes shape the neural representation of rhythmic inputs in favor of the emergence of a periodic beat.