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Sample records for synchrotron x-ray diffraction

  1. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cernik, R.J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school

  2. Glancing angle synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cernik, R.J. [Daresbury Lab., Warrington, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    This paper describes in basic detail some of the techniques that can be used to study thin films and surfaces. These are all in the X-ray region and cover reflectivity, diffraction form polycrystalline films, textured films and single crystal films. Other effects such as fluorescence and diffuse scattering are mentioned but not discussed in detail. Two examples of the reflectivity from multilayers and the diffraction from iron oxide films are discussed. The advantages of the synchrotron for these studies is stressed and the experimental geometries that can be employed are described i detail. A brief bibliography is provided at the end to accompany this part of the 1996 Frascati school.

  3. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  4. Oxides neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies

    CERN Document Server

    Sosnowska, I M

    1999-01-01

    We review some results from several areas of oxide science in which neutron scattering and X-ray synchrotron scattering exercise a complementary role to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. The very high-resolution time-of-flight neutron diffraction technique and its role in studies of the magnetic structure of oxides is especially reviewed. The selected topics of structural studies for the chosen oxides are: crystal and magnetic structure of the so-called cellular random systems, magnetic structure and phase transitions in ferrites and the behaviour of water in non-stoichiometric protonic conductors and in the opal silica-water system. (40 refs).

  5. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction using triple-axis spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Als-Nielsen, J.

    1980-12-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction studies of (i) monolayers of the noble gases Kr and Ar physiosorbed on graphite (ii) smectic A fluctuations in the nematic and the smectic A phases of liquid crystals are described. The apparatus used is a triple axis spectrometer situated at the storage ring DORIS at Hasylab, DESY, Hamburg. A monochromatic, well collimated beam is extracted from the synchrotron radiation spectrum by Bragg reflection from perfect Si or Ge crystals. The direction of the beam scattered from the sample is determined by Bragg reflection from a perfect Si or Ge crystal. High intensities even with resolution extending beyond the wavelength of visible light can be obtained. (Auth.)

  6. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction study of liquid surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Pershan, P.S.

    1983-01-01

    A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented.......A spectrometer for X-ray diffraction and refraction studies of horizontal, free surfaces of liquids is described. As an illustration smetic-A layering at the surface of a liquid crystal is presented....

  7. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction techniques applied in hydrogen storage materials - A review

    OpenAIRE

    Honghui Cheng; Chen Lu; Jingjing Liu; Yongke Yan; Xingbo Han; Huiming Jin; Yu Wang; Yi Liu; Changle Wu

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is an advanced collimated light source with high intensity. It has particular advantages in structural characterization of materials on the atomic or molecular scale. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD) has been successfully exploited to various areas of hydrogen storage materials. In the paper, we will give a brief introduction on hydrogen storage materials, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD), and synchrotron radiation light source. The applications of...

  8. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X-ray......The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... diffraction contrast tomography provides access to the 3-D shape, orientation, and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing up to thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities, one obtains a comprehensive description of the materials microstructure...

  9. Characterization of Polycrystalline Materials Using Synchrotron X-ray Imaging and Diffraction Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, Wolfgang; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2010-01-01

    The combination of synchrotron radiation x-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offers new possibilities for in-situ observation of deformation and damage mechanisms in the bulk of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (i.e., cracks, porosities) can be detected using...... propagation based phase contrast imaging, a 3-D imaging mode exploiting the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. Furthermore, for some classes of polycrystalline materials, one may use a 3-D variant of x-ray diffraction imaging, termed x-ray diffraction contrast tomography. X......-ray diffraction contrast tomography provides access to the 3-D shape, orientation, and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing up to thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities, one obtains a comprehensive description of the materials microstructure...

  10. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline has been designed, developed and commissioned at BL-11 bending magnet port of the Indian synchrotron source, Indus-2. The performance of this beamline has been benchmarked by measuring diffraction patterns from var- ious elemental metals and standard ...

  11. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline has been designed, developed and commissioned at BL-11 bending magnet port of the Indian synchrotron source, Indus-2. The performance of this beamline has been benchmarked by measuring diffraction patterns from various elemental metals and standard inorganic ...

  12. Model experiment of in vivo synchrotron X-ray diffraction of human kidney stones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancharov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ancharov@mail.ru; Potapov, S.S. [Institute of Mineralogy UB RAS, Miass (Russian Federation); Moiseenko, T.N. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Feofilov, I.V. [The State Regional Clinical Hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Nizovskii, A.I. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2007-05-21

    The diffraction of synchrotron radiation (SR) was used to explore the phase composition of kidney stones placed into a specific object phantom, which imitated the human body. As an imitation of the patient breath, the kidney stone was moved vertically and rotated to an angle of 15{sup o} during the recording of the X-ray pattern. It was shown that rotation and displacement did not distort the X-ray pattern.

  13. Progress in X-ray synchrotron diffraction studies of muscle contraction. Ch. 19

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, Katsuzo

    1991-01-01

    This chapter provides a review of applications of synchrotron radiation (SR) to X-ray diffraction studies on the dynamic aspects of muscle contraction and is, at the same time, a progress report on the technical developments specifically related to muscle research. The introduction of SR as an intense X-ray source and the development of high ability detectors have led to enormous improvement in the quality of data from time-resolved X-ray diffraction studies of muscle contraction. The X-ray diffraction pattern taken during contraction shows that the force generation of a muscle proceeds upon interaction of the incommensurate structures of the thin and thick filaments. In this framework a distinct intensity change of the weaker reflections from the thin filaments was detected. However, there was still no strong evidence of direct physical attachment of myosin heads to actin during contraction. (author). 170 refs.; 52 figs.; 3 tabs

  14. Synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction studies in solid-state chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheetham, A.K.; Wilkinson, A.P.

    1992-01-01

    Since the scatterers are different - X-rays are scattered by the electrons of an atom, neutrons by the nuclei - the questions addressed by the two diffraction experiments have been complementary. For example, neighboring elements of the periodic table could be distinguished formerly only by neutron diffraction. Now, however, this is also partly possible with high-energy synchrotron radiation. This review describes recent applications of X-ray and neutron diffraction methods in solid-state chemistry and how the maximal information can be extracted by a combination of techniques. (orig.)

  15. High-pressure phases of uranium monophosphide studied by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, J. Staun; Gerward, Leif; Benedict, U.

    1988-01-01

    X-ray diffraction studies have been performed on UP powder for pressures up to 51 GPa using synchrotron radiation and a diamond-anvil cell. At ambient pressure UP has the rocksalt structure. The bulk modulus has been determined to B0=102(4) GPa and its pressure derivative to B0’=4.0(8). The cubic...

  16. A Furnace for Diffraction Studies using Synchrotron X-Ray Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Lebech, Bente; Kofoed, W.

    1984-01-01

    A furnace for diffraction studies using synchrotron X-ray radiation is described. The furnace can be operated between ambient temperature and 1 800 °C with a temperature stability better than 5 °C for temperatures above 300 °C. Kapton windows allow almost 360° access for the X-ray beam in the hor...... in the horizontal scattering plane and the furnace may be used in both conventional monochromatic beam angle-dispersive and white-beam energy-dispersive diffraction experiments. Details of the furnace windows, heating element, thermometry and sample mount are given....

  17. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction techniques applied in hydrogen storage materials - A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Honghui Cheng

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Synchrotron radiation is an advanced collimated light source with high intensity. It has particular advantages in structural characterization of materials on the atomic or molecular scale. Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction (SR-XRPD has been successfully exploited to various areas of hydrogen storage materials. In the paper, we will give a brief introduction on hydrogen storage materials, X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD, and synchrotron radiation light source. The applications of ex situ and in situ time-resolved SR-XRPD in hydrogen storage materials, are reviewed in detail. Future trends and proposals in the applications of the advanced XRPD techniques in hydrogen storage materials are also discussed.

  18. Synchrotron X-Ray Reciprocal Space Mapping, Topography and Diffraction Resolution Studies of Macromolecular Crystal Quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggon, T. J.; Helliwell, J. R.; Judge, Russell A.; Siddons, D. P.; Snell, Edward H.; Stojanoff, V.

    2000-01-01

    A comprehensive study of microgravity and ground grown chicken egg white lysozyme crystals is presented using synchrotron X-ray reciprocal space mapping, topography techniques and diffraction resolution. Microgravity crystals displayed, on average, reduced intrinsic mosaicities but no differences in terms of stress over their earth grown counterparts. Topographic analysis revealed that in the microgravity case the majority of the crystal was contributing to the peak of the reflection at the appropriate Bragg angle. In the earth case at the diffraction peak only a small volume of the crystal contributed to the intensity. The techniques prove to be highly complementary with the reciprocal space mapping providing a quantitative measure of the crystal mosaicity and stress (or variation in lattice spacing) and topography providing a qualitative overall assessment of the crystal in terms of its X-ray diffraction properties. Structural data collection was also carried out both at the synchrotron and in the laboratory.

  19. X-ray detectors for diffraction studies and their use with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Milch, J.

    1976-02-01

    All techniques for X-ray diffraction studies on biological materials exhibit certain limitations. The characteristics of several X-ray detection systems, namely film, multiwire proportional counter and image intensified TV, are discussed and compared for application to specific biological studies. For the high count-rate situation existing at a synchrotron, it is shown that film is a good choice, but that the image intensified TV exhibits significant advantages. The details of such a system now being used at Princeton with a low intensity source are given and current results presented

  20. Characterisation of microfocused beam for synchrotron powder diffraction using a new X-ray camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C; Potter, J; Tang, C C; Lennie, A R

    2012-01-01

    The powder diffraction beamline I11, Diamond Light Source, is being continually upgraded as requirements of the user community evolve. Intensities of X-rays from the I11 in-vacuum electron undulator in the 3 GeV synchrotron fall off at higher energies. By focusing higher energy X-rays, we can overcome flux limitations, and open up new diffraction experiments. Here, we describe characterisation of microfocusing using compound refractive lenses (CRL). For a relatively modest outlay, we have developed an experimental setup and a novel X-ray camera with good sensitivity and a resolution specification suitable for characterising these focusing optics. We show that vertical oscillations in the focused beam compromise resolution of the source imaged by the CRL. Nevertheless, we have measured CRL focusing properties, and demonstrate the use of energy scanning to determine lens alignment. Real benefits of the intensity gain are illustrated.

  1. Apparatus development for high-pressure X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L.G.; Orlando, M.T.D.; Rossi, J.L.; Passamai Junior, J.L.; Melo, F.C.L.; Ferreira, F.F.

    2006-01-01

    Some phenomena in the field of condensed matter physics can be studied when the matter is submitted to extreme conditions of pressure, magnetic fields or temperatures. Once submitted to these conditions it is generally necessary to measure the properties of the matter in situ. The existence of a synchrotron light laboratory in Brazil opens up the chance of studying materials in extreme conditions by techniques like X-ray diffraction and absorption. However, when compared to high-energy synchrotrons accelerators, the Brazilian source offers a narrower energy range and lower flux. These facts impose limitation to perform diffraction experiments by energy dispersion and, consequently, the use of pressure cells with denser anvils like diamond. However, for a lower-pressure range, preliminary studies showed the viability of measurements in an angular dispersion configuration. This allows the use of silicon carbide anvils B 4C . In this work it is described the development of a hydrostatic pressure cell suitable for X-rays diffraction measurements in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory using materials and technologies developed by the institutions and researchers involved in this project (IPEN, UFES, CTA and LNLS). This development can provide the scientific community with the possibility of performing X-ray diffraction measurements under hydrostatic pressure, initially up to 2 GPa, with possibilities of increasing the maximum pressure to higher values, with or without application of magnetic fields and high or low temperatures. (author)

  2. Optimizing Monocapillary Optics for Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction, Fluorescence Imaging, and Spectroscopy Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, Donald H.; Kazimirov, Alexander; Gillilan, Richard; Cornaby, Sterling; Woll, Arthur; Zha, Chang-Sheng; Huang Rong

    2007-01-01

    A number of synchrotron x-ray applications such as powder diffraction in diamond anvil cells, microbeam protein crystallography, x-ray fluorescence imaging, etc. can benefit from using hollow glass monocapillary optics to improve the flux per square micron on a sample. We currently draw glass tubing into the desired elliptical shape so that only one-bounce under total reflection conditions is needed to bring the x-ray beam to a focus at a 25 to 50 mm distance beyond the capillary tip. For modest focal spot sizes of 10 to 20 microns, we can increase the intensity per square micron by factors of 10 to 1000. We show some of the results obtained at CHESS and Hasylab with capillaries focusing 5 to 40 keV radiation, their properties, and how even better the experimental results could be if more ideal capillaries were fabricated in the future

  3. Diffraction measurements of residual macrostress and microstress using x-rays, synchrotron and neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Keisuke; Akiniwa, Yoshiaki

    2004-01-01

    The present paper reviews some recent developments of the measurements of the macrostress and microstress by diffraction using X-rays, synchrotron and neutrons especially in Japan. These three methods are based on the same principle of the diffraction of crystals, and have different advantages. The conventional X-rays detect the stress very near the surface, while the neutron diffraction takes the stress in the interior of the materials. High-energy X-rays from synchrotron sources have the penetration depth in between and are suitable for the measurement of subsurface stresses. After describing the developments of the fundamentals of the methods, the paper covers the recent applications of the diffraction methods to the residual stress analysis in textured thin films, the nondestructive determination of the subsurface distribution of residual stress in shot-peened materials, local stress measurements near the crack tip, the stress measurements of single crystals, macrostress and microstress measurements in composites, and the determination of the internal distribution of the residual stress in welded joints. (author)

  4. ENDIX. A computer program to simulate energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovestreydt, E.; Karlsruhe Univ.; Parthe, E.; Benedict, U.

    1987-01-01

    A Fortran 77 computer program is described which allows the simulation of energy dispersive X-ray and synchrotron powder diffraction diagrams. The input consists of structural data (space group, unit cell dimensions, atomic positional and displacement parameters) and information on the experimental conditions (chosen Bragg angle, type of X-ray tube and applied voltage or operating power of synchrotron radiation source). The output consists of the normalized intensities of the diffraction lines, listed by increasing energy (in keV), and of an optional intensity-energy plot. The intensities are calculated with due consideration of the wave-length dependence of both the anomalous dispersion and the absorption coefficients. For a better agreement between observed and calculated spectra provision is made to optionally superimpose, on the calculated diffraction line spectrum, all additional lines such as fluorescence and emission lines and escape peaks. The different effects which have been considered in the simulation are discussed in some detail. A sample calculation of the energy dispersive powder diffraction pattern of UPt 3 (Ni 3 Sn structure type) is given. Warning: the user of ENDIX should be aware that for a successful application it is necessary to adapt the program to correspond to the actual experimental conditions. Even then, due to the only approximately known values of certain functions, the agreement between observed and calculated intensities will not be as good as for angle dispersive diffraction methods

  5. Source assemblage types for cratonic diamonds from X-ray synchrotron diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nestola, F.; Alvaro, M.; Casati, M. N.; Wilhelm, H.; Kleppe, A. K.; Jephcoat, A. P.; Domeneghetti, M. C.; Harris, J. W.

    2016-11-01

    Three single crystals of clinopyroxene trapped within three different gem-quality diamonds from the Udachnaya kimberlite (Siberia, Russia) were analysed in situ by single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to obtain information on their chemical composition and infer source assemblage type. A non-destructive approach was used with high-energy (≈ 60 keV; λ ≈ 0.206 Å) at I15, the extreme-conditions beamline at Diamond Light Source. A dedicated protocol was used to center the mineral inclusions located deep inside the diamonds in the X-ray beam. Our results reveal that two of the inclusions can be associated with peridotitic paragenesis whereas the third is eclogitic. This study also demonstrates that this non-destructive experimental approach is extremely efficient in evaluating the origin of minerals trapped in their diamond hosts.

  6. Non-destructive synchrotron X-ray diffraction mapping of a Roman painting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dooryhee, E.; Anne, M.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Martinetto, P.; Rondot, S.; Bardies, I.; Salomon, J.; Walter, P.; Vaughan, G.B.M.

    2005-01-01

    The history and the properties of materials are deduced not only from their elemental and molecular signatures, but also from their exact phase compositions, and from the structures and the defects of their constituents. Here we implement a non-destructive synchrotron X-ray based method, which combines both the quantitative structural content of diffraction and the imaging mode. As a demonstration case, the pigments of a Roman wall painting are examined. The joined elemental and mineral maps mimic the major features of the painting. Different structural phases made of common atomic elements are differentiated. Textures and graininess are measured and related to the artist's know-how. (orig.)

  7. Synchrotron Powder X-ray Diffraction Study of the Structure and Dehydration Behavior of Sepiolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, J. E.; Bish, D. L.; Heaney, P. J.

    2006-05-01

    Sepiolite is a hydrous Mg-silicate clay mineral with fibrous morphology that typically occurs as fine-grained, poorly crystalline masses. It occurs in a wide variety of geological environments and has been mined for centuries because of its many uses, e.g. in the pharmaceutical, fertilizer, and pesticide industries. Its versatile functionality derives from the large surface area and microporosity that are characteristic of the material. In recent years, sepiolite has received considerable attention with regard to the adsorption of organics, for use as a support for catalysts, as a molecular sieve, and as an inorganic membrane for ultrafiltration. Because of its fine-grained and poorly crystalline nature, it has not been possible to study sepiolite's crystal structure using single-crystal X-ray diffraction methods, and consequently many details of the structure are still not well known. In this study, Rietveld refinements using synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data were used to investigate the crystal structure and dehydration behavior of sepiolite from Durango, Mexico. The room- temperature (RT) sepiolite structure in air compares well with previous models but reveals an additional zeolitic water site. The RT structure under vacuum retained only ~1/8 of the zeolitic water and the volume decreased 1.3%. Real-time, temperature-resolved synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction data and Rietveld refinements were used to investigate the behavior of the sepiolite structure from 300 to 925 K. Rietveld refinements revealed that most of the zeolitic water is lost by ~390 K, accompanied by a decrease in the a and c unit-cell parameters. Above ~600 K the sepiolite structure folds as one-half of the crystallographically bound water is lost. Rietveld refinements of the "anhydrous" sepiolite structure reveal that, in general, unit-cell parameters a, b, â and volume steadily decrease with increasing temperature; there is an obvious change in slope at ~820 K suggesting a phase

  8. Analysis of synchrotron X-ray diffraction patterns from fluorotic enamel samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson, E-mail: anapaulagalmeida@gmail.co [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear; Colaco, Marcos V.; Barroso, Regina C., E-mail: cely@uerj.b [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica; Porto, Isabel M., E-mail: belporto@ig.com.b [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Gerlach, Raquel F., E-mail: rfgerlach@forp.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia; Droppa Junior, Roosevelt, E-mail: rdroppa@lnls.b [Associacao Brasileira de Tecnologia de Luz Sincrotron (ABTLuS), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    With the introduction of fluoride as the main anticaries agent used in preventive dentistry, and perhaps an increase in fluoride in our food chain, dental fluorosis has become an increasing world-wide problem. Visible signs of fluorosis begin to become obvious on the enamel surface as opacities, implying some porosity in the tissue. The mechanisms that conduct the formation of fluorotic enamel are unknown, but should involve modifications in the basics physical-chemistry reactions of demineralisation and remineralisation of the enamel of the teeth, which is the same reaction of formation of the enamel's hydroxyapatite (HAp) in the maturation phase. The increase of the amount of fluoride inside of the apatite will result in gradual increase of the lattice parameters. The hexagonal symmetry seems to work well with the powder diffraction data, and the crystal structure of HAp is usually described in space group P63/m. The aim of this work is to characterize the healthy and fluorotic enamel in human tooth using technique Synchrotron X-ray diffraction in order to determine the crystal structure and crystallinity of on fluoroapatite (FAp) crystal present in fluoritic enamel. All the scattering profile measurements was carried out at the X-ray diffraction beamline (XRD1) at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory - LNLS, Campinas, Brazil. (author)

  9. Probing deformation substructure by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and dislocation dynamics modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korsunsky, Alexander M; Hofmann, Felix; Song, Xu; Eve, Sophie; Collins, Steve P

    2010-09-01

    Materials characterization at the nano-scale is motivated by the desire to resolve the structural aspects and deformation behavior at length scales relevant to those mechanisms that define the novel and unusual properties of nano-structured materials. A range of novel techniques has recently become accessible with the help of synchrotron X-ray beams that can be focused down to spot sizes of less than a few microns on the sample. The unique combination of tunability (energy selection), parallelism and brightness of synchrotron X-ray beams allows their use for high resolution diffraction (determination of crystal structure and transformations, analysis of dislocation sub-structures, orientation and texture analysis, strain mapping); small angle X-ray scattering (analysis of nano-scale voids and defects; orientation analysis) and imaging (radiography and tomography). After a brief review of the state-of-the-art capabilities for monochromatic and white beam synchrotron diffraction, we consider the usefulness of these techniques for the task of bridging the gap between experiment and modeling. Namely, we discuss how the experiments can be configured to provide information relevant to the validation and improvement of modeling approaches, and also how the results of various simulations can be post-processed to improve the possibility of (more or less) direct comparison with experiments. Using the example of some recent experiments carried out on beamline 116 at Diamond Light Source near Oxford, we discuss how such experimental results can be interpreted in view and in conjunction with numerical deformation models, particularly those incorporating dislocation effects, e.g., finite-element based pseudo-continuum strain gradient formulations, and discrete dislocation simulations. Post-processing of FE and discrete dislocation simulations is described, illustrating the kind of information that can be extracted from comparisons between modeling and experimental data.

  10. X-ray diffraction studies on single and mixed confectionery fats using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacMillan, S.C.; Roberts, K.J.; Wells, M.; Polgreen, M.; Smith, I. [Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh, (United Kingdom). Department of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, Centre for Molecular and Interface Engineering

    1999-12-01

    Full text: Understanding and refining the molecular-scale processes involved in the manufacture of structured materials such as long-chain hydrocarbon compounds is important in many commercial areas such as the petrochemical, biochemical, food, pharmaceutical and soap industries. In such processes crystallisation is an important separation, purification and preparation technique. Despite this our knowledge of the crystallisation process itself is surprisingly limited. In order to improve the crystallisation of confectionery fats, the crystallisation of it`s main component, cocoa butter fat, must be properly understood. Cocoa butter fat can exhibit up to 6 polymorphic forms of different crystallographic structures with melting points varying from 17.3 deg C to 36.3 deg C. During the production of chocolate it is essential to control the polymorphic form of fats present, in order to produce a final product with the correct physical and rheological properties. Both shear rate and temperature are thought to play a crucial role in this process. The most widely used method for studying polymorphism is X-ray diffraction. Typical X-ray diffraction patterns of fats exhibit two groups of diffraction lines corresponding to the long and short spacings. The long spacings correspond to the planes formed by the methyl end groups and are dependent on the chain length and the angle of tilt of the component fatty acids of the glyceride molecules. The short spacings refer to the cross sectional packing of the hydrocarbon chain and are independent of the chain length. The relationship between crystallisation rate, polymorphic form, shear and the fat composition has for the first time been quantified, which will enable more accurate control of the polymorhic form in chocolate production. This has been achieved by developing an improved in-situ cell for X-ray studies. The X-ray studies are necessary for the examination of on-line studies under well controlled conditions of temperature

  11. X-ray diffraction studies on single and mixed confectionery fats using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacMillan, S.C.; Roberts, K.J.; Wells, M.; Polgreen, M.; Smith, I.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Understanding and refining the molecular-scale processes involved in the manufacture of structured materials such as long-chain hydrocarbon compounds is important in many commercial areas such as the petrochemical, biochemical, food, pharmaceutical and soap industries. In such processes crystallisation is an important separation, purification and preparation technique. Despite this our knowledge of the crystallisation process itself is surprisingly limited. In order to improve the crystallisation of confectionery fats, the crystallisation of it's main component, cocoa butter fat, must be properly understood. Cocoa butter fat can exhibit up to 6 polymorphic forms of different crystallographic structures with melting points varying from 17.3 deg C to 36.3 deg C. During the production of chocolate it is essential to control the polymorphic form of fats present, in order to produce a final product with the correct physical and rheological properties. Both shear rate and temperature are thought to play a crucial role in this process. The most widely used method for studying polymorphism is X-ray diffraction. Typical X-ray diffraction patterns of fats exhibit two groups of diffraction lines corresponding to the long and short spacings. The long spacings correspond to the planes formed by the methyl end groups and are dependent on the chain length and the angle of tilt of the component fatty acids of the glyceride molecules. The short spacings refer to the cross sectional packing of the hydrocarbon chain and are independent of the chain length. The relationship between crystallisation rate, polymorphic form, shear and the fat composition has for the first time been quantified, which will enable more accurate control of the polymorhic form in chocolate production. This has been achieved by developing an improved in-situ cell for X-ray studies. The X-ray studies are necessary for the examination of on-line studies under well controlled conditions of temperature

  12. In situ hydration of sulphoaluminate cement mixtures monitored by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turrillas, X. [Institut de Ciencia de Materials de Barcelona (ICMAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Martinez, L.G.; Carvalho, A.M.; Carezzato, G.L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Rossetto, C.M. [Faculdade de Tecnologia de Sao Paulo (FATEC), SP (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    Full text: The hydration of calcium sulpho-aluminate cement mixtures was studied in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction at the XRD1 beamline of the Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS) in Campinas, SP. The powder specimens were introduced in borosilicate glass capillary tubes of 0.7 mm of internal diameter and imbued with deionized water. As the hydration reaction is very fast the capillaries were placed on the goniometer and the data collection was started after two minutes of mixing with water. The X-ray energy chosen to get an adequate flux for these short time acquisitions was 12 keV or more precisely 1.033258 Å, determined with polycrystalline corundum standard. Diffraction patterns were collected sequentially every 35 seconds for several hours at temperatures ranging from 40 degC to 55 degC with an accuracy better than 0.1 degC attained with the help of a hot air blower. The diffracted signal was collected with an array of twenty-four Mythen detectors at 760 mm from the capillary tube. The diffraction patterns had appropriate statistics to determine the kinetics of the reaction either by quantitative Rietveld analysis or by fitting isolated diffraction peaks to Gaussian curves as a function of time. The most important phases involved in the hydration are Klein´s salt, also known as Ye’elimite, Ca4(AlO2)6SO4, and gypsum, CaSO4.2H2O to yield Ettringite, Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12 - 26H2O, phase responsible for the mechanical properties. (author)

  13. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of non-proportional strain-path effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, D.M.; Erinosho, T.; Dunne, F.P.E.; Todd, R.I.; Connolley, T.; Mostafavi, M.; Kupfer, H.; Wilkinson, A.J.

    2017-01-01

    Common alloys used in sheet form can display a significant ductility benefit when they are subjected to certain multiaxial strain paths. This effect has been studied here for a polycrystalline ferritic steel using a combination of Nakajima bulge testing, X-ray diffraction during biaxial testing of cruciform samples and crystal plasticity finite element (CPFE) modelling. Greatest gains in strain to failure were found when subjecting sheets to uniaxial loading followed by balanced biaxial deformation, resulting in a total deformation close to plane-strain. A combined strain of approximately double that of proportional loading was achieved. The evolution of macrostrain, microstrain and texture during non-proportional loading were evaluated by in-situ high energy synchrotron diffraction. The results have demonstrated that the inhomogeneous strain accumulation from non-proportional deformation is strongly dependent on texture and the applied strain-ratio of the first deformation pass. Experimental diffraction evidence is supported by results produced by a novel method of CPFE-derived diffraction simulation. Using constitutive laws selected on the basis of good agreement with measured lattice strain development, the CPFE model demonstrated the capability to replicate ductility gains measured experimentally.

  14. A Spectrometer for X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Diffraction using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staun Olsen, Janus; Buras, B; Gerward, Leif

    1981-01-01

    Describes a white-beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometer built for Hasylab in Hamburg, FRG, using the synchrotron radiation from the electron storage ring DORIS. The following features of the instrument are discussed: horizontal or vertical scattering plane, collimators, sample environment, ...

  15. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Bleuet, P.; Hodeau, J.-L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P.; Menu, M.

    2007-12-01

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Grünewald’s works. Grünewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance.

  16. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Menu, M. [Centre de Recherche et de Restauration des Musees de France - CNRS UMR 171, Paris (France); Bleuet, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, BP 220, Grenoble Cedex (France); Hodeau, J.L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P. [Institut Neel CNRS-UPR 503-1, 25, Av. des Martyrs, BP 166, Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2007-12-15

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance. (orig.)

  17. Crystal structure and charge density analysis of Li2NH by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noritake, T.; Nozaki, H.; Aoki, M.; Towata, S.; Kitahara, G.; Nakamori, Y.; Orimo, S.

    2005-01-01

    Complex hydrides, such as lithium amide (LiNH 2 ) and lithium imide (Li 2 NH), have recently been noticed as one of the most promising materials for reversible hydrogen storage. In this paper, we reveal the bonding nature of hydrogen in Li 2 NH crystal by synchrotron powder X-ray diffraction measurement at room temperature. The crystal structure was refined by Rietveld method and the charge density distribution was analyzed by maximum entropy method (MEM). The Li 2 NH crystal is anti-fluorite type structure (space group Fm3-bar m) consisting of Li and NH. Hydrogen atom occupies randomly the 48h (Wyckoff notation) sites around N atom. The refined lattice constant is a=5.0742(2)A. The charge density distribution around NH anion in Li 2 NH is almost spherical. The number of electrons within the sphere around the Li and NH is estimated from the obtained charge density distribution. As the result, the ionic charge is expressed as [Li 0.99+ ] 2 [NH] 1.21- . Therefore, it is confirmed experimentally that Li 2 NH is ionically bonded

  18. Deformation in Metallic Glasses Studied by Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Egami

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High mechanical strength is one of the superior properties of metallic glasses which render them promising as a structural material. However, understanding the process of mechanical deformation in strongly disordered matter, such as metallic glass, is exceedingly difficult because even an effort to describe the structure qualitatively is hampered by the absence of crystalline periodicity. In spite of such challenges, we demonstrate that high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement under stress, using a two-dimensional detector coupled with the anisotropic pair-density function (PDF analysis, has greatly facilitated the effort of unraveling complex atomic rearrangements involved in the elastic, anelastic, and plastic deformation of metallic glasses. Even though PDF only provides information on the correlation between two atoms and not on many-body correlations, which are often necessary in elucidating various properties, by using stress as means of exciting the system we can garner rich information on the nature of the atomic structure and local atomic rearrangements during deformation in glasses.

  19. Classification of lead white pigments using synchrotron radiation micro X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcomme, E.; Walter, P.; Menu, M.; Bleuet, P.; Hodeau, J.L.; Dooryhee, E.; Martinetto, P.

    2007-01-01

    Lead white pigment was used and synthesised for cosmetic and artistic purposes since the antiquity. Ancient texts describe the various recipes, and preparation processes as well as locations of production. In this study, we describe the results achieved on several paint samples taken from Matthias Gruenewald's works. Gruenewald, who was active between 1503 and 1524, was a major painter at the beginning of the German Renaissance. Thanks to X-ray diffraction analysis using synchrotron radiation, it is possible to associate the composition of the paint samples with the masters ancient recipes. Different approaches were used, in reflection and transmission modes, directly on minute samples or on paint cross-sections embedded in resin. Characterisation of lead white pigments reveals variations in terms of composition, graininess and proportion of mineral phases. The present work enlightens the presence of lead white as differentiable main composition groups, which could be specific of a period, a know-how or a geographical origin. In this way, we aim at understanding the choices and the trading of pigments used to realise paintings during northern European Renaissance. (orig.)

  20. In situ analysis of cracks in structural materials using synchrotron X-ray tomography and diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuwer, A.; Edwards, L.; Pratihar, S.; Ganguly, S.; Peel, M.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.; Marrow, T.J.; Withers, P.J.; Sinclair, I.; Singh, K.D.; Gao, N.; Buslaps, T.; Buffiere, J.-Y.

    2006-01-01

    The structural integrity and performance of many components and structures are dominated by cracks and hence the study of cracked bodies study is of major economical and social importance. Despite nearly 30 years of study, there is still no detailed consensus regarding either the fundamental parameters that drive cracks or the precise mechanisms of their growth in most materials. Thus, virtually all crack life prediction models currently in engineering use are largely phenomenological rather than physically based. Historically, a major hindrance to our understanding of crack initiation and propagation has been the inability to measure either the crack tip stresses or the crack morphology deep within materials. The development of very high-resolution strain and tomography mapping on third generation synchrotron sources such as the ESRF has opened up the possibility of developing complementary techniques to monitor the entire plastic/process zone growth mechanisms and the accompanying crack tip field and crack wake field around growing cracks. If realized, such techniques would produce unique information that would be invaluable both in validating present finite element simulations of fatigue crack growth and in developing the future high accuracy simulations necessary for the development of physically realistic fatigue life-prediction models. Recent technique developments at the ESRF, Grenoble, opens up the possibility of imaging cracks and crack tip stress/strain fields, and the ability to study the extend of crack closure and overload effects, even under in situ loading. In this paper, first results from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomography experiments performed on ID11 and ID19 (respectively) at the ESRF, Grenoble, are presented and discussed in comparison with predictions from finite element modeling

  1. In situ laser heating and radial synchrotron X-ray diffraction ina diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunz, Martin; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Miyagi, Lowell; Wenk,Hans-Rudolf

    2007-06-29

    We report a first combination of diamond anvil cell radialx-ray diffraction with in situ laser heating. The laser-heating setup ofALS beamline 12.2.2 was modified to allow one-sided heating of a samplein a diamond anvil cell with an 80 W yttrium lithium fluoride laser whileprobing the sample with radial x-ray diffraction. The diamond anvil cellis placed with its compressional axis vertical, and perpendicular to thebeam. The laser beam is focused onto the sample from the top while thesample is probed with hard x-rays through an x-ray transparentboron-epoxy gasket. The temperature response of preferred orientation of(Fe,Mg)O is probed as a test experiment. Recrystallization was observedabove 1500 K, accompanied by a decrease in stress.

  2. X-ray diffraction measurement of liquid As2Se3 by using third-generation synchrotron radiation source

    OpenAIRE

    Kajihara, Yukio; Inui, Masanori; Matsuda, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Kozaburo; Hosokawa, Shinya

    2007-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XD) measurements of liquid As2Se3 were carried out in the temperature range up to 1600◦C where the temperature is well beyond the semiconductor to metal (SC-M) transition temperature around 1000◦C . The measurements were done by using third-generation synchrotron radiation source at SPring-8 and the obtained structure factors have much improvements over the previous XD measurements by using in house X-ray sources with regard to the momentum transfer range and the data stati...

  3. Investigations of the phase transition in V3O5 using energy dispersive X-ray diffraction and synchrotron radiation white beam X-ray topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asbrink, S.; Gerward, L.; Staun Olsen, J.

    1985-01-01

    The reversible first order phase transition in V 3 O 5 at T t =155 0 C has been studied using a specially constructed oven, where the temperature can be kept constant within a few hundredths of a degree for several hours. Energy dispersive diffraction measurements have beem made in a temperature region around the phase transition with the fixed crystal method and the θ/2θ scanning method. White beam X-ray topographs have been obtained from the same crystal in the same temperature region using synchrotron radiation. The integrated intensities of the strong h 0 0 reflections show anomalies that are correlated with the corresponding X-ray topographs. Thus, an unexpected increase of crystal perfection is observed a few hundredths of a degree below T t . The energy dependence of the intensity maximum at T t for strong reflections has been determined and semi-quantitatively explained on the basis of extinction theory. (orig.)

  4. Accommodation stresses in hydride precipitates by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santisteban, J R; Vicente, M A; Vizcaino, P; Banchik, A D; Almer, J

    2012-01-01

    Hydride-forming materials (Zr, Ti, Nb, etc) are affected by a sub-critical crack growth mechanism that involves the diffusion of H to the stressed region ahead of a crack, followed by nucleation and fracture of hydrides at the crack tip [1]. The phenomenon is intermittent, with the crack propagating through the hydride and stopping when it reaches the matrix. By repeating these processes, the crack propagates through a component at a rate that is highly dependent on the temperature history of the component. Most research effort to understand this phenomenon has occurred within the nuclear industry, as it affects the safe operation of pressure tubes (Zr2.5%Nb) and the long-term storage of nuclear fuel (Zircaloy cladding). Stress-induced hydride formation is a consequence of the volume dilatation that accompanies hydride formation (of the order of 15%), which is elastoplastically accommodated by the matrix and precipitate. Compressive stresses are expected within hydride precipitates due to the constraint imposed by the matrix. Such 'accommodation' stresses are essential ingredients in all theoretical models developed to assess the crack growth rate dependence on operational variables such as temperature, applied stress intensity factor, or overall H concentration [2]. Yet little experimental information is available about the magnitude and directionality of such accommodation stresses. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction is the only technique capable of quantifying such stresses. Here we briefly describe the fundaments of the technique, when used through an area detector placed in transmission geometry. The results of the experiments have allowed us to produce a comprehensive picture about the magnitude and origin of accommodation stresses in δ zirconium hydride platelets (author)

  5. A flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Nathan A. S.; Madsen, Ian C.; Loan, Melissa J.; Scarlett, Nicola V. Y.; Wallwork, Kia S.

    2009-08-01

    The design, construction, and commissioning of a stainless steel flow cell for in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of scale formation under Bayer processing conditions is described. The use of the cell is demonstrated by a study of Al(OH)3 scale formation on a mild steel substrate from synthetic Bayer liquor at 70 °C. The cell design allows for interchangeable parts and substrates and would be suitable for the study of scale formation in other industrial processes.

  6. Simultaneous structural enhancement of powder diffraction spectra obtained by X-ray, neutron and synchrotron diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maichle, J.K.

    1988-01-01

    The novel method for the enhancement of structural data is explained, and is applied for the first time for a simultaneous analysis and evaluation of neutron and synchrotron diffraction data obtained for the superconductor BaPb 0.75 Bi 0.25 O 3 . This substance can be specified in the measured temperature range between 2 K and 310 K to belong to the monoclinic space group I 2/m, and thus is determined to be in a distorted perovskite cell ahead of (a≅b≅√2 a 0 ; c≅2a 0 ). The oxygen octaeders are for the most part tilted around the (x.1/4.1/4)-axis. The simultaneous evaluation of several X-ray diffraction data sets of the high-T c superconductor YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7±z confirms the orthorhombic symmetry with space group P mmm, YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7±z likewise is in a distorted perovskite cell ahead of (a≅b≅a 0 ; c≅3a 0 ). At low temperatures, however, a saddle-shaped distortion of the oxygen group, hitherto believed to be plane, is found in the plane (x.y.0.37). (orig.) [de

  7. Energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The first two parameters are discussed in the optical design part of ... 2.1.1 Optical design. Low divergence of incident beam is one of the basic character- istics of synchrotron radiation. It is known to vary as 1/γ where γ = (m/m0) = 1/ .... diffraction data of the powdered LaB6 sample were recorded under ambient conditions.

  8. Instability of cyclic superelastic deformation of NiTi investigated by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedmák, P.; Šittner, Petr; Pilch, Jan; Curfs, C.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 94, Aug (2015), s. 257-270 ISSN 1359-6454 R&D Projects: GA ČR GB14-36566G; GA ČR GPP108/12/P111; GA ČR GA14-15264S; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : shape memory alloy * NiTi * superelasticity * cyclic deformation * in situ X-ray diffraction Subject RIV: JG - Metallurgy Impact factor: 5.058, year: 2015

  9. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, J.R.; Wei, C.H.

    1982-01-01

    We have been interested in structural elucidation by x-ray diffraction of compounds of biological interest. Understanding exactly how atoms are arranged in three-dimensional arrays as molecules can help explain the relationship between structure and functions. The species investigated may vary in size and shape; our recent studies included such diverse substances as antischistosomal drugs, a complex of cadmium with nucleic acid base, nitrate salts of adenine, and proteins

  10. Thermal expansion and phase transformations of nitrogen-expanded austenite studied with in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brink, Bastian; Ståhl, Kenny; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2014-01-01

    as a fitting parameter. The stacking fault density is constant for temperatures up to 680 K, whereafter it decreases to nil. Surprisingly, a transition phase with composition M4N (M = Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo) appears for temperatures above 770 K. The linear coefficient of thermal expansion depends on the nitrogen......Nitrogen-expanded austenite, _N, with high and low nitrogen contents was produced from AISI 316 grade stainless steel powder by gaseous nitriding in ammonia/hydrogen gas mixtures. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the thermal expansion and thermal stability...

  11. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigations on strains in the oxide layer of an irradiated Zircaloy fuel cladding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chollet, Mélanie; Valance, Stéphane; Abolhassani, Sousan; Stein, Gene; Grolimund, Daniel; Martin, Matthias; Bertsch, Johannes

    2017-05-01

    For the first time the microstructure of the oxide layer of a Zircaloy-2 cladding after 9 cycles of irradiation in a boiling water reactor has been analyzed with synchrotron micro-X-ray diffraction. Crystallographic strains of the monoclinic and to some extent of the tetragonal ZrO2 are depicted through the thick oxide layer. Thin layers of sub-oxide at the oxide-metal interface as found for autoclave-tested samples and described in the literature, have not been observed in this material maybe resulting from irradiation damage. Shifts of selected diffraction peaks of the monoclinic oxide show that the uniform strain produced during oxidation is orientated in the lattice and displays variations along the oxide layer. Diffraction peaks and their shifts from families of diffracting planes could be translated into a virtual tensor. This virtual tensor exhibits changes through the oxide layer passing by tensile or compressive components.

  12. Synchrotron Radial X-ray Diffraction Studies of Deformation of Polycrystalline MgO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, J.; Tsujino, N.; Mohiuddin, A.; Karato, S. I.

    2016-12-01

    X-ray diffraction analyses have been used for decades to study mechanical properties of polycrystalline samples during in-situ high-pressure deformation. When polycrystalline materials are deformed, stresses develop in grains and lead to lattice distortion. Using X-ray diffraction we can estimate the lattice strain for each (hkl) diffraction plans and calculate the applied stress for each (hkl), using [Singh, 1993] relation. However, this method doesn't take into account plastic anisotropy. As a results of plastic anisotropy present in the material, stress estimated from this method can be largely differ depending on (hkl) diffraction planes [Karato, 2009]. Studying the stress estimate for each (hkl) plane, might help us distinguish dominant deformation mechanisms activated during deformation such as diffusion (we will observe small stress variation as a function of (hkl) diffraction planes) or dislocation creep (we will observe a stress variation as a function of (hkl) diffraction planes that could also give us clues on potential slip system activity). In this study we observed stress evolution in MgO polycrystalline samples deformed under mantle pressure and temperature for (200) and (220) diffraction planes. Using a range MgO grain sizes we were able to control the active deformation mechanism (for e.g. diffusion creep or dislocation creep). For coarse-grained specimens, we observed strong (hkl) dependence of radial strain indicating the operation of dislocation creep. The observed (hkl) dependence changes with pressure suggesting a change in the slip system: at pressures higher than 27 GPa, (200) shows larger stress estimate than (220). In contrast, at lower pressures, (220) shows larger stress estimate than (200). This might indicate a slip system transition in MgO occurring under lower mantle conditions. From {110} plane to {100} plane. This is in good agreement with theoretical predictions and numerical calculation [Amodeo et al., 2012] and has an important

  13. Characterization of actinide bonding in Th(S2PMe2)4 by synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iversen, B.B.; Larsen, F.K.; Pinkerton, A.A.; Martin, A.; Darovsky, A.; Reynolds, P.A.

    1998-01-01

    Extensive synchrotron (28 K) and conventional sealed-tube (9 K) X-ray diffraction data have been collected on Th(S 2 PMe 2 ) 4 . Modeling of the electron density of the complex shows the bonding is quite ionic with little diffuse f or d type bonding density. Furthermore a large polarization of the Th core is observed revealing some 5d-like involvement in the bonding. High-quality ab initio density functional calculations are not able to reproduce these features and instead predict rather covalent bonding with considerable 6d-5f mixing. The study suggests that this theoretical method exaggerates the covalent nature of actinide bonds. It is shown that the most direct measure of covalence -- charge transfer and electron distributions -- can be usefully estimated by X-ray diffraction even in this most unfavorable of cases, where many actinide core electrons are present. The use of very low temperature data is crucial in the study of heavy metal complexes in order to minimize systematic errors such as thermal diffuse scattering and anharmonicity. The fact that accurate synchrotron radiation diffraction data can be measured within days makes studies of compounds beyond the first transition series more frequently within reach

  14. Hydride reorientation in Zircaloy-4 examined by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weekes, H.E. [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Jones, N.G. [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom); Lindley, T.C. [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom); Dye, D., E-mail: david.dye@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Materials, Royal School of Mines, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BP (United Kingdom)

    2016-09-15

    The phenomenon of stress-reorientation has been investigated using in situ X-ray diffraction during the thermomechanical cycling of hydrided Zircaloy-4 tensile specimens. Results have shown that loading along a sample’s transverse direction (TD) leads to a greater degree of hydride reorientation when compared to rolling direction (RD)-aligned samples. The elastic lattice micro-strains associated with radially oriented hydrides have been revealed to be greater than those oriented circumferentially, a consequence of strain accommodation. Evidence of hydride redistribution after cycling, to α-Zr grains oriented in a more favourable orientation when under an applied stress, has also been observed and its behaviour has been found to be highly dependent on the loading axis. Finally, thermomechanical loading across multiple cycles has been shown to reduce the difference in terminal solid solubility of hydrogen during dissolution (TSS{sub D,H}) and precipitation (TSS{sub P,H}).

  15. X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, J.L. de.

    1976-01-01

    The seventh edition of Philips' Review of literature on X-ray diffraction begins with a list of conference proceedings on the subject, organised by the Philips' organisation at regular intervals in various European countries. This is followed by a list of bulletins. The bibliography is divided according to the equipment (cameras, diffractometers, monochromators) and its applications. The applications are subdivided into sections for high/low temperature and pressure, effects due to the equipment, small angle scattering and a part for stress, texture and phase analyses of metals and quantitative analysis of minerals

  16. Techniques for materials research with synchrotron radiation x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, D.K.

    1983-01-01

    A brief introductory survey is presented of the properties and generation of synchrotron radiation and the main techniques developed so far for its application to materials problems. Headings are:synchrotron radiation; X-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation (powder diffraction; X-ray scattering; EXAFS (Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure); X-ray fluorescent analysis; microradiography; white radiation topography; double crystal topography); future developments. (U.K.)

  17. Ice Recrystallization in a Solution of a Cryoprotector and Its Inhibition by a Protein: Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, Boris; Fisyuk, Alexander; Fitch, Andy; Watier, Yves; Kostyuchenko, Anastasia; Varshney, Dushyant; Sztucki, Michael; Boldyreva, Elena; Shalaev, Evgenyi

    2016-07-01

    Ice formation and recrystallization is a key phenomenon in freezing and freeze-drying of pharmaceuticals and biopharmaceuticals. In this investigation, high-resolution synchrotron X-ray diffraction is used to quantify the extent of disorder of ice crystals in binary aqueous solutions of a cryoprotectant (sorbitol) and a protein, bovine serum albumin. Ice crystals in more dilute (10 wt%) solutions have lower level of microstrain and larger crystal domain size than these in more concentrated (40 wt%) solutions. Warming the sorbitol-water mixtures from 100 to 228 K resulted in partial ice melting, with simultaneous reduction in the microstrain and increase in crystallite size, that is, recrystallization. In contrast to sorbitol solutions, ice crystals in the BSA solutions preserved both the microstrain and smaller crystallite size on partial melting, demonstrating that BSA inhibits ice recrystallization. The results are consistent with BSA partitioning into quasi-liquid layer on ice crystals but not with a direct protein-ice interaction and protein sorption on ice surface. The study shows for the first time that a common (i.e., not-antifreeze) protein can have a major impact on ice recrystallization and also presents synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a unique tool for quantification of crystallinity and disorder in frozen aqueous systems. Copyright © 2016 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. In Situ High Resolution Synchrotron X-Ray Powder Diffraction Studies of Lithium Batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amri, Mahrez; Fitch, Andy; Norby, Poul

    2015-01-01

    Lithium ion battery technology is the heart in operating modern technology devices such as mobile phones and laptops. However, as our society is moving towards the utilization of sustainable energy sources, batteries can be foreseen to become an even more important part of the energy infrastructure...... materials [3]. We report results from the first in situ time resolved high resolution powder diffraction experiments at beamline ID22/31 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, ESRF. We follow the structural changes during charge of commercial LiFePO4 based battery materials using the Rietveld...

  19. Spinel materials for Li-ion batteries: new insights obtained by operando neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchini, Matteo; Fauth, François; Suard, Emmanuelle; Leriche, Jean Bernard; Masquelier, Christian; Croguennec, Laurence

    2015-12-01

    In the last few decades Li-ion batteries changed the way we store energy, becoming a key element of our everyday life. Their continuous improvement is tightly bound to the understanding of lithium (de)intercalation phenomena in electrode materials. Here we address the use of operando diffraction techniques to understand these mechanisms. We focus on powerful probes such as neutrons and synchrotron X-ray radiation, which have become increasingly familiar to the electrochemical community. After discussing the general benefits (and drawbacks) of these characterization techniques and the work of customization required to adapt standard electrochemical cells to an operando diffraction experiment, we highlight several very recent results. We concentrate on important electrode materials such as the spinels Li1 + xMn2 - xO4 (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.10) and LiNi0.4Mn1.6O4. Thorough investigations led by operando neutron powder diffraction demonstrated that neutrons are highly sensitive to structural parameters that cannot be captured by other means (for example, atomic Debye-Waller factors and lithium site occupancy). Synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction reveals how LiMn2O4 is subject to irreversibility upon the first electrochemical cycle, resulting in severe Bragg peak broadening. Even more interestingly, we show for the first time an ordering scheme of the elusive composition Li0.5Mn2O4, through the coexistence of Mn(3+):Mn(4+) 1:3 cation ordering and lithium/vacancy ordering. More accurately written as Li0.5Mn(3+)0.5Mn(4+)1.5O4, this intermediate phase loses the Fd\\overline 3m symmetry, to be correctly described in the P213 space group.

  20. Fast in situ phase and stress analysis during laser surface treatment: A synchrotron x-ray diffraction approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostov, V.; Gibmeier, J.; Wilde, F.; Staron, P.; Rössler, R.; Wanner, A.

    2012-11-01

    An in situ stress analysis by means of synchrotron x-ray diffraction was carried out during laser surface hardening of steel. A single exposure set-up that based on a special arrangement of two fast silicon strip line detectors was established, allowing for fast stress analysis according to the sin2ψ x-ray analysis method. For the in situ experiments a process chamber was designed and manufactured, which is described in detail. First measurements were carried out at the HZG undulator imaging beamline (IBL, beamline P05) at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III, DESY, Hamburg (Germany). The laser processing was carried out using a 6 kW high power diode laser system. Two different laser optics were compared, a Gaussian optic with a focus spot of ø 3 mm and a homogenizing optic with a rectangular spot dimension of 8 × 8 mm2. The laser processing was carried out using spot hardening at a heating-/cooling rate of 1000 K/s and was controlled via pyrometric temperature measurement using a control temperature of 1150 °C. The set-up being established during the measuring campaign allowed for this first realization data collection rates of 10Hz. The data evaluation procedure applied enables the separation of thermal from elastic strains and gains unprecedented insight into the laser hardening process.

  1. Determining the Structure of Biomaterials Interfaces using Synchrotron-based X-ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McBride, M

    2002-01-24

    The purpose of this project is to explore the feasibility of using surface X-ray diffraction (SXRD) to determine the structure of biomineral surfaces in electrolyte solutions and of the adsorbed layer of acidic amino acids that are believed to play a central role in the control of biomineral formation and function. The work is a critical component in the development of an integrated picture of the physical and chemical basis for deposition and dissolution at solid-liquid interfaces in biological systems, and brings a new and very powerful surface-sensitive capability to LLNL. We have chosen as our model systems calcium carbonate and calcium phosphate in aspartic and glutamic acid-bearing solutions. The calcium compounds are ubiquitous among biomineral structures, both those that are beneficial such as bones and teeth, and those that are pathological such as kidney stones, while the two acidic amino acids--both as simple and poly-amino acids--are the dominant constituents of protein mixtures implicated in the control of biomineralization. The goals of the work are: (1) to determine the surface structure of pure calcium phosphate and calcium carbonate surfaces in aqueous solution using SXRD; (2) to determine how those surfaces are modified by the presence of aspartic and glutamic acid, both as the simple amino acids and as poly-aspartate and poly-glutamate and (3) to model the interactions of acidic amino acids with calcite.

  2. Structural Investigation of Sodium Layered Oxides Via in Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jung, Young Hwa; Christiansen, Ane Sælland; Johnsen, Rune

    2015-01-01

    Sodium layered oxides with mixed transition metals have received significant attention as positive electrode candidates for sodium-ion batteries due to high reversible capacity. Sodium layered oxides would be more promising candidates than lithium-compounds in terms of high stability of MO2 slabs...... after extraction of Na induced from larger ionic size of Na. In addition, rich crystal chemistry for sodium layered compounds is available since larger Na+ ion is stable in more spacious prismatic site as compared to Li+ ion. In view of this, the phase transformation of layered compounds during......-situ synchrotron XRD experiments. A capillary Na-based cell is designed to minimize interference in other substances such as a separator or external battery parts. This approach could give us to obtain clear diffraction patterns with high intensity during electrochemical reaction in a short period of time without...

  3. A novel technique combining high-resolution synchrotron x-ray microtomography and x-ray diffraction for characterization of micro particulates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merrifield, David R; Ramachandran, Vasuki; Roberts, Kevin J; Armour, Wesley; Axford, Danny; Basham, Mark; Connolley, Thomas; Evans, Gwyndaf; McAuley, Katherine E; Owen, Robin L; Sandy, James

    2011-01-01

    The processing of solids, such as crystals, is strongly influenced by the surface properties of the material. In recent years the pharmaceutical industry has shown great interest in identifying, or chemically speciating, the molecular components of crystal faces. Formerly, characterization of the molecular identity of crystal faces was restricted to the study of large single crystals. This would have been primarily for structure determination as part of the drug registration process. Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire is a new synchrotron facility in the UK, having 18 operational beamlines with 4 more in the construction phase. Beamlines at this medium energy light source enable the study of micron-sized objects in great detail. It is well known that x-ray microtomography (XMT) can be used to investigate the external morphology of a crystal whereas x-ray diffraction (XRD) is used to study the molecular orientation, structure and packing within the crystal. The objective of this research is to assess the feasibility of, and thereby develop a new methodology for, characterizing the molecular identity of a particular face of a crystalline particle at a scale of scrutiny of 20–50 µm by combining these two powerful techniques. This work demonstrates the application of XMT and XRD to investigate respectively the shape and crystalline phase/orientation of relevant test crystals. This research has applications in the pharmaceutical industry in that when the exact molecular nature of a particular face is known, the important physico-pharmaceutical properties stemming from that can be better understood. Some initial data are presented and discussed

  4. Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction studies on the order-disorder phase transition in lithium ferrites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darul, J.; Nowicki, W.; Piszora, P.; Baehtz, C.; Wolska, E.

    2005-01-01

    Investigations on the manganese substituted lithium ferrites reveal the strong influence of manganese ions on the ordering of Li + cations in the spinel-type crystal lattice. We present the effect of Mn 3+ substitution in the LiFe 5-x Mn x O 8 (0 ≤ x ≤ 1) samples on the order-disorder phase transition and on the thermal expansion of their spinel lattices. Synchrotron X-ray measurements have been performed in the temperature range 10-300 K and 300-1173 K. The diffraction experiments were carried out at the DESY-HASYLAB high-resolution powder diffractometer (beamline B2). The transition from ordered (cubic primitive, P4 1 32) to disordered (face centred cubic, Fd3m) structure was observed with the increasing Mn 3+ content

  5. Structure of La2Cu2O5 by high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Placa, S.J.; Bringley, J.F.; Scott, B.A.; Cox, D.E.

    1993-01-01

    Dicopper(II) dilanthanum pentaoxide, La 2 Cu 2 O 5 , M r =484.90, orthorhombic, Pbam. At T=300 K: a=5.5490(1), b=10.4774(2), c=3.8796(1) A, V=225.557(8) A 3 , Z=2, D x =7.139 g cm -3 , λ=1.2000 A. Final R I =6.20, R p =14.6 and R wp =20.61%, 124 independent reflections observed. The structure has been refined from high-resolution synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using the Rietveld method. It is of the oxygen-defect perovskite type and is composed entirely of corner-shared CuO 5 square pyramids, which share oxygen vacancies forming vacancy tunnels along the c axis. The La atoms reside at a perovskite-like A-site and are tenfold coordinated by oxygen. (orig.)

  6. Identification of cellulose fibres belonging to Spanish cultural heritage using synchrotron high resolution X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, L.K.; Justo, A.; Duran, A.; Haro, M.C.J. de; Franquelo, M.L.; Perez Rodriguez, J.L.

    2010-01-01

    A complete characterisation of fibres used in Spanish artwork is necessary to provide a complete knowledge of these natural fibres and their stage of degradation. Textile samples employed as painting supports on canvas and one sample of unprocessed plant material were chosen for this study. All the samples were investigated by synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). Flax and cotton have the Cellulose I structure. The values of the crystalline index (CI) were calculated for both types of fibres. The structure of Cellulose IV was associated with the unprocessed plant material. The information obtained by SR-XRD was confirmed by laboratory techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). (orig.)

  7. X-ray diffraction analysis of rust layer on a weathering steel bridge with surface treatment using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamashita, Masato; Hara, Shuichi; Kamimura, Takayuki; Miyuki, Hideaki; Sato, Masugu

    2007-01-01

    We have examined the structure of rust layer formed on a weathering steel bridge, to which the surface treatment, employing the effect of Cr 2 (SO 4 ) 3 sophisticatedly designed to form the protective goethite (α-FeOOH) rust layer which contains a certain amount of Cr, Cr-goethite, was applied in 1996, using X-ray diffraction at SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility. It was shown that the formation of α-FeOOH was promoted and/or crystal growth of γ-FeOOH was suppressed by the surface treatment. The increase in the protective ability index (PAI) of the rust layer indicates that the protective goethite was predominantly formed under the effect of the surface treatment. In conclusion, it can be said that the surface treatment worked well to promote the formation of the protective goethite rust layer on the weathering steel bridge during the 10-year exposure. (author)

  8. X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raman, S.; Sparks, C.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental set-up for x-ray fluorescence analysis with synchrotron radiation was built and installed at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project. X-ray spectra were taken from numerous and varied samples in order to assess the potential of synchrotron radiation as an excitation source for multielement x-ray fluorescence analysis. For many applications, the synchrotron radiation technique is shown to be superior to other x-ray fluorescence methods, especially those employing electrons and protons as excitation sources

  9. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction investigation of the anomalous behavior of ice during freezing of aqueous systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varshney, Dushyant B; Elliott, James A; Gatlin, Larry A; Kumar, Satyendra; Suryanarayanan, Raj; Shalaev, Evgenyi Y

    2009-05-07

    Simple aqueous systems, i.e., phosphate-glycine buffers and pure water, were studied at subambient temperatures by X-ray difractometry using a high-intensity synchrotron radiation source at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory. Complex X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, with two or more poorly resolved peaks in place of each of the four diagnostic peaks of hexagonal ice, 100, 002, 101, and 102, referred as "splitting", were observed in the majority of cases. The splitting of up to 0.05 A (d-spacing) was detected for 100, 002, and 101 peaks, whereas 102 peak was less affected. Deformation of the lattice of hexagonal ice, probably due to local stress created on the ice/ice or ice/container interface during water-to-ice transformation, is proposed as a possible mechanism for the observed splitting of XRD peaks. Using molecular modeling, it was estimated that the observed shifts in the peak positions are equivalent to applying a hydrostatic pressure of 2-3 kbars. The splitting can be used to quantify stresses during freezing, which could improve our understanding of the role of water-to-ice transformation on the destabilization of proteins and other biological systems.

  10. The ab-initio crystal structure determination of UPd 2Sn by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marezio, M.; Cox, D. E.; Rossel, C.; Maple, M. B.

    1988-09-01

    The structure of the heavy-fermion compound UPd 2Sn has been determined by synchrotron x-ray radiation powder diffraction techniques. It is orthorhombic, space group Pnma [lattice parameters a = 9.9787(1), b = 4.58843(5), c = 6.89166(8) Å at room temperature] and Z = 4. All atoms, one U, one Sn, and two Pd are in 4d special positions at (x {1}/{4} z). The refinements were carried out by the Rietveld method with a pseudo-Voigt peak shape function. The final conventional R factors were: R wp = 21.3% and R E = 14.3%. The U positions in the unit cell were unequivocally located, but because of the similarity in x-ray scattering factors it was not possible to determine whether the Pd atoms and the Sn atoms are ordered or disordered on the other three sites. The structural arrangement of UPd 2Sn is of either MnCu 2Al, or ordered NaTl, or disordered Fe 3Al type, all these structures being cubic and b.c.c. related. The orthorhombic distortion is large and is probably due to a size effect of the U atoms which would be in a mixed ( {3+}/{4+}) valence state.

  11. Hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement within EVA emulsion by SPring-8 synchrotron radiation x-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotera, Masaru; Matsuda, Ikuyo; Miyashita, Keiko; Adachi, Nobuyuki; Tamura, Hisayuki

    2005-01-01

    Polymer-modified mortars which consist of a polymer emulsion and cement materials have been widely developed in the construction materials fields. Forming process of the polymer-modified cement membrane simultaneously involves evaporation of water within the polymer emulsion and hydration of cement. It is important for the polymer-modified cement paste that the hydrate crystal of cement is generating by the hydration during the setting process under existence of the polymer emulsion. In this study, hydration process for calcium-aluminate cement under existence of poly (ethylene-vinyl acetate) (EVA) emulsion (polymer-cement ratio=100%) was investigated by X-ray diffraction method using synchrotron radiation (SPring-8). The diffraction peaks of calcium aluminate (CA) disappeared after the hardening, on the other hand, the peaks of hydrate crystals of calcium-aluminate cement (C 2 AH 8 and C 3 AH 6 ) could be observed. This polymer-modified cement paste hydrated using the water within the polymer emulsion. The hydration of C 2 AH 8 from CA started at around 300 min, and then C 3 AH 6 hydrate crystal increased after 700 min at ambient temperature. This implies that the conversion from C 2 AH 8 to C 3 AH 6 occurred to be more stable phase. The setting temperature affected the reaction rate. In case of hydration at 35degC, the start time of the hydration for calcium-aluminate cement was quicker than that in the ambient temperature four or more times. (author)

  12. In Situ Neutron and Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction Studies of Jarosite at High-Temperature High-Pressure Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, H.; Zhao, Y.; Hickmott, D.; Zhang, J.; Vogel, S.; Daemen, L.; Hartl, M.

    2011-03-01

    Jarosite (KFe 3 (SO4)2 (OH)6) occurs in acid mine drainage and epithermal environments and hot springs associated with volcanic activity. Jarosite is also of industrial interest as an iron-impurity extractor from zinc sulfide ores. In 2004, jarosite was detected by the Mars Exploration Rover Mössbauer spectrometer, which has been interpreted as a strong evidence for the existence of water (and possibly life) on ancient Mars. This discovery has spurred considerable interests in stability and structural behavior of jarosite and related phases at various temperature, pressure, and aqueous conditions. In this work, we have investigated the crystal structure and phase stability of jarosite at temperatures up to 900 K and/or pressures up to 9 GPa using in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. To avoid the large incoherent scattering of neutrons by hydrogen, a deuterated sample was synthesized and characterized. Rietveld analysis of the obtained diffraction data allowed determination of unit-cell parameters, atomic positions and atomic displacement parameters as a function of temperature and pressure. In addition, the coefficients of thermal expansion, bulk moduli and pressure-temperature stability regions of jarosite were determined.

  13. PRELIMINARY RESULTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY DIFFRACTION MEASUREMENTS OF RUBBER COMPOSITES STRUCTURE BEFORE AND AFTER EXPOSURE TO HYDROGEN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cosmi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available In future years, fuel cells are expected to represent a promising technology as a source of heat and electricity in buildings and of electrical power for vehicles, since fossil fuels are exhausting and significantly degrade air quality. It is well known that, when exposed to a hydrogen environment, hydrogen embrittlerment may affect materials such as iron and steel. But these are not the only materials that are used for hydrogen equipment. In particular, the rubber materials used for O–rings that seal high pressure hydrogen gas equipment show problems of internal fracture, called blister fracture, when the gas is rapidly decompressed. As many different kinds of fillers can be used, in this work we started to investigate the influence of the type of filler on the rubber composites structure, by means of X-ray diffraction measurements performed at the Elettra synchrotron radiation facility in Trieste. In this preliminary study, three kinds of samples were analyzed before and after exposure to hydrogen: Sulphur vulcanized EPDM, Peroxide vulcanized EPDM and Sulphur vulcanized NBR. While Peroxide vulcanized samples did not show significant differences in the diffraction pattern, changes could be detected in the cristalline form of Sulfure vulcanized rubber.

  14. Small-angle x-ray scattering/diffraction system for studies of biological and other materials at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (abstract)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakatsuki, S.; Hodgson, K.O.; Eliezer, D.; Rice, M.; Hubbard, S.; Gillis, N.; Doniach, S.; Spann, U.

    1992-01-01

    A versatile small-angle x-ray diffraction/scattering system has been developed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory for studies of biological and other materials. The system includes two sets of collimation slits separated by an ionization chamber, a sample holder cooled by a circulation bath, a vacuum/He scattering path after the sample holder and a detector, either a linear one-dimensional position-sensitive proportional counter or a position-sensitive quadrant detector. Data aquisition is controlled by a VAXstation through a CAMAC interface. Menu-driven data acquisition and on-line analysis software has been developed. The system can be used to collect small- to intermediate-angle x-ray scattering and diffraction data. Monochromatic, anomalous, and time-resolved diffraction/scattering experiments are possible. A time-resolved spectrophotometer using photodiode arrays has also been developed for simultaneous measurements of optical absorption spectra and x-ray scattering/diffraction

  15. Phase transformations in Ni/Ti multilayers investigated by synchrotron radiation-based x-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cavaleiro, A.J., E-mail: andre.cavaleiro@dem.uc.pt [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, R. Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Ramos, A.S. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, R. Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Martins, R.M.S. [CENIMAT/I3N, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); LATR/IST/CTN – Campus Tecnológico e Nuclear, Estrada Nacional 10 ao km 139.7, 2695-066 Bobadela LRS (Portugal); Fernandes, F.M. Braz [CENIMAT/I3N, Department of Materials Science, Faculty of Sciences and Technology, University Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Morgiel, J. [Institute of Metallurgy and Materials Science, Polish Academy of Sciences, Reymonta 25, 30-059 Cracow (Poland); Baehtz, C. [Helmholtz Zentrum Dresden Rossendorf HZDR, Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, D-01314 Dresden (Germany); Vieira, M.T. [CEMUC, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Coimbra, R. Luís Reis Santos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)

    2015-10-15

    X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation was used for real-time investigation of the phase evolution of Ni/Ti multilayer thin films during annealing. These multilayers were deposited onto Ti–6Al–4V substrates by dc magnetron sputtering from pure Ni and Ti targets. The deposition parameters were adjusted in order to obtain a near equiatomic chemical composition and modulation periods (Λ) below 25 nm. Along the entire thickness of the films, well-defined structures with alternate Ni- and Ti-rich layers are observed, even for Λ = 4 nm. In this case, a halo characteristic of an amorphous structure is obtained, while for Λ of 12 and 25 nm the as-deposited thin films are nanocrystalline being possible to identify the (111) Ni and (002) Ti diffraction peaks. The nanolayered structure vanishes during annealing due to interdiffusion followed by reaction. The reaction between Ni and Ti to produce NiTi in the cubic B2 structure occurs in a short delay of time and within a narrow temperature range. For Λ of 25, 12 and 4 nm, the reaction temperature is close to 320, 350 and 385 °C, respectively. For higher temperatures, in addition to the austenitic phase, the NiTi{sub 2} phase is identified. The diffusion of Ti from the substrate and Ni towards the substrate could favour the precipitation of NiTi{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Alternate Ni- and Ti-rich layers are observed, even for short periods. • Phase evolution was studied using synchrotron radiation XRD during annealing. • Ni and Ti reacted at ∼300–400 °C to form B2–NiTi in a single step. • The higher the period the lower the reaction temperature. • At higher temperatures NiTi{sub 2} was detected due to Ni diffusion towards Ti{sub 6}Al{sub 4}V.

  16. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials at high pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prilliman, Stephen Gerald [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nanocrystals under extreme pressure was investigated using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A major part of this investigation was the testing of a prototype synchrotron endstation on a bend magnet beamline at the Advanced Light Source for high pressure work using a diamond anvil cell. The experiments conducted and documented here helped to determine issues of efficiency and accuracy that had to be resolved before the construction of a dedicated ''super-bend'' beamline and endstation. The major conclusions were the need for a cryo-cooled monochromator and a fully remote-controllable pressurization system which would decrease the time to change pressure and greatly reduce the error created by the re-placement of the diamond anvil cell after each pressure change. Two very different types of nanocrystal systems were studied, colloidal iron oxide (Fe2O3) and thin film TiN/BN. Iron oxide nanocrystals were found to have a transition from the γ to the α structure at a pressure strongly dependent on the size of the nanocrystals, ranging from 26 GPa for 7.2 nm nanocrystals to 37 GPa for 3.6 nm nanocrystals. All nanocrystals were found to remain in the α structure even after release of pressure. The transition pressure was also found, for a constant size (5.7 nm) to be strongly dependent on the degree of aggregation of the nanocrystals, increasing from 30 GPa for completely dissolved nanocrystals to 45 GPa for strongly aggregated nanocrystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction pattern of the pressure induced α phase demonstrated a decrease in intensity for certain select peaks. Together, these observations were used to make a complete picture of the phase transition in nanocrystalline systems. The size dependence of the transition was interpreted as resulting from the extremely high surface energy of the α phase which would increase the thermodynamic offset and thereby increase the kinetic barrier to transition

  17. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions and mechanical properties of nanocrystalline materials at high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prilliman, Gerald Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The behavior of nanocrystals under extreme pressure was investigated using synchrotron x-ray diffraction. A major part of this investigation was the testing of a prototype synchrotron endstation on a bend magnet beamline at the Advanced Light Source for high pressure work using a diamond anvil cell. The experiments conducted and documented here helped to determine issues of efficiency and accuracy that had to be resolved before the construction of a dedicated ''super-bend'' beamline and endstation. The major conclusions were the need for a cryo-cooled monochromator and a fully remote-controllable pressurization system which would decrease the time to change pressure and greatly reduce the error created by the re-placement of the diamond anvil cell after each pressure change. Two very different types of nanocrystal systems were studied, colloidal iron oxide (Fe 2 O 3 ) and thin film TiN/BN. Iron oxide nanocrystals were found to have a transition from the γ to the α structure at a pressure strongly dependent on the size of the nanocrystals, ranging from 26 GPa for 7.2 nm nanocrystals to 37 GPa for 3.6 nm nanocrystals. All nanocrystals were found to remain in the α structure even after release of pressure. The transition pressure was also found, for a constant size (5.7 nm) to be strongly dependent on the degree of aggregation of the nanocrystals, increasing from 30 GPa for completely dissolved nanocrystals to 45 GPa for strongly aggregated nanocrystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction pattern of the pressure induced α phase demonstrated a decrease in intensity for certain select peaks. Together, these observations were used to make a complete picture of the phase transition in nanocrystalline systems. The size dependence of the transition was interpreted as resulting from the extremely high surface energy of the α phase which would increase the thermodynamic offset and thereby increase the kinetic barrier to transition that must be overridden with pressure

  18. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of phase transitions in physisorbed monolayers of rare gases on graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohr, J.

    1984-01-01

    This study is an investigation of phase transition in monoatomic layers adsorbed on graphite. Such effects can be considered physical realizations of two-dimensional systems. The experimental technique used is synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Systems which have been investigated include the commensurate-incommensurate phase transition in krypton monolayer. By adjusting the spreading pressure in the krypton layer by means of a coadsorbent deuterium gas it has been unambiguously demonstrated that at low temperatures the phase transition is of first order. A melting study of incommensurate argon monolayers demonstrates an experimental verification of the possibility for having a continuous melting transition in two-dimensions. Mixtures of two-components have been investigated for their phases. No (chemical) order-disorder transition is seen. A discussion is given on this lack of a chemical order. This lack is utilized to study the commensurate-incommensurate phase transition driven by average particle size. Finally, a special low-temperature phase is identified in a xenon monlayer which is diluted with freon. (Auth.)

  19. P3HT/PCBM polymer thin films studied by synchrotron-based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Yingguo; Zhengguan Haojie; Ji Gengwu; Feng Shanglei; Li Xiaolong; Gao Xingyu

    2014-01-01

    Background: The microstructures of P3HT (poly(3-hexyl-thiophene)) in P3HT/PCBM ([6, 6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester) thin films play a key role in governing the performance of organic solar cells (OSCs) based on these films. Purpose: We aim to study the self-organization of P3HT in the P3HT/PCBM thin films annealed at different temperatures. Methods: Using different incidence angles, information about the microstructures of P3HT at different depths in these films was obtained by synchrotron based grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXRD). Results: It is shown that the crystalline structure of P3HT has been substantially improved by thermal annealing. One dimensional GIXRD clearly indicates that P3HT edge-on structures in the inner layers have been improved with their number increased in comparison with those at the surface and the interface layers. In addition, thermal annealing also helps the formation of P3HT face-on structures in the films, as evidenced by 2 dimensional GIXRD. Conclusion: The improved structures in these films lead to more charge transport channels formed to improve the carrier mobility, which in turn helps the improvement of OSCs. Thus, the present GIXRD results will improve the understanding of annealing effects at different depths of the P3HT/PCBM thin films for enhanced OSCs devices. (authors)

  20. Analysis of residual stress in metal-inert-gas-welded Al-2024 using neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganguly, S.; Stelmukh, V.; Edwards, L.; Fitzpatrick, M.E.

    2008-01-01

    A combination of neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to measure and map the full three-dimensional state of residual stress across the cross-section in coupon samples of metal-inert-gas (MIG)-welded 2024 aluminium alloy. Samples were analysed both as-welded and following a post-welding skim which served to remove the weld flash and reduce the plate thickness. The profile of the residual stress and its evolution following skimming has been accurately characterized. The longitudinal direction shows the highest residual stress, approaching 300 MPa in tension. The skimming treatment did not change the peak stress, but the overall profile of stress was altered: this is slightly unexpected as machining away stressed material would generally be expected to reduce the peak residual stress. The results are discussed in terms of the generation of stress during welding and its evolution during skimming. Finally a comparison is made with the stress generated in the as-welded and skimmed conditions of a variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA)-welded specimen of similar dimensions, to show the effects of different weld processes on the residual stress generated. The stress measurement in the VPPA sample was carried out under near identical experimental conditions

  1. Experimental determination of bulk modulus of 14Å tobermorite using high pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2012-02-01

    Using a diamond anvil cell, 14 Å tobermorite, a structural analogue of calcium silicate hydrates (C-S-H), was examined by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction up to 4.8 GPa under hydrostatic conditions. The bulk modulus of 14 Å tobermorite was calculated, K o = 47 GPa. Comparison of the current results with previous high pressure studies on C-S-H(I) indicates that: (1) the compression behavior of the lattice parameters a and b of 14 Å tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are very similar, implying that both materials may have very similar Ca-O layers, and also implying that an introduction of structural defects into the Ca-O layers may not substantially change in-plane incompressibility of the ab plane of 14 Å tobermorite; and (2) the bulk modulus values of 14 Å tobermorite and C-S-H(I) are dominated by the incompressibility of the lattice parameter c, which is directly related to the interlayer spacing composed of dreierketten silicate chains, interlayer Ca, and water molecules. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. In situ synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction studies on molecular aggregation structure of nylon 12 films during bulge testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojio, Ken; Nagano, Chigusa; Fujimoto, Aya; Nozaki, Shuhei; Yokomachi, Kazutoshi; Kamitani, Kazutaka; Watanabe, Hirohmi; Takahara, Atsushi

    2018-02-28

    It is desirable to establish a method for evaluating mechanical properties, such as modulus and strength, of micrometer and sub-micrometer thick polymer films. Bulge tests, where bulge deformation is imposed on films by the pressure of an inert gas, are suitable for satisfying this demand. However, very few studies on polymer films exist in the literature. In this study, bulge testing equipment for in situ synchrotron radiation wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) measurements is designed and used to study the relationship between the molecular aggregation structure and the mechanical properties of a crystalline nylon 12 (Ny12) film during bulge testing. Isothermally crystallized and quenched Ny12 films exhibited stress-strain curves similar to those obtained by conventional uniaxial elongation. In situ WAXD measurements during bulge testing revealed that the lattice extension of the crystallites is clearly dependent on crystallinity. Concretely, crystallites in the isothermally crystallized film show higher elastic properties than those in the quenched one. The results of the molecular aggregation structure, including the crystal structure and the amorphous chain surrounding the crystallites, of the films during bulge deformation firstly obtained in this study must be useful for designing toughened polymer films.

  3. Stress-dependent crystal structure of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite by in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Philipp T.; Khansur, Neamul H.; Riess, Kevin; Martin, Alexander; Hinterstein, Manuel; Webber, Kyle G.

    2018-02-01

    Lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite La1-xSrxCo1-yFeyO3-δ (LSCF) is one of the most studied mixed ionic-electronic conductor materials due to electrical and transport properties, which are attractive for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), oxygen permeation membranes, and catalysis. The integration of such materials, however, depends on the thermal as well as mechanical behavior. LSCF exhibits nonlinear hysteresis during compressive stress-strain measurements, marked by a remanent strain and coercive stress, i.e., ferroelasticity. However, the origin of ferroelastic behavior has not been investigated under high compressive stress. This study, therefore, investigates the microscopic origin of stress-induced mechanical behavior in polycrystalline (La0.6Sr0.4)0.95Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction. The data presented here reveals that the strain response originates from the intrinsic lattice strain as well as the extrinsic domain switching strain without any apparent change in crystallographic symmetry. A comparison of the calculated microscopic strain contribution with that of a macroscopic measurement indicates a significant change in the relative contributions of intrinsic and extrinsic strain depending on the applied stress state, i.e., under maximum stress and after unloading. Direct evidence of the microscopic origin of stress-strain response outlined in this paper may assist in guiding materials design with the improved mechanical reliability of SOFCs.

  4. Use of neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction for evaluation of residual stresses in a 2024-T351 aluminum alloy variable-polarity plasma-arc weld

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguly, S.; Fitzpatrick, M. E.; Edwards, L.

    2006-02-01

    The residual stress fields associated with variable-polarity plasma-arc (VPPA) welds in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy plates have been measured nondestructively using neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Neutron diffraction allows in-depth measurements of the full strain tensor to be made in thick components; synchrotron X-rays allow for rapid measurements of strains inside components, although their penetration is less than that of the neutrons and constraints arising from the diffraction geometry generally lead to only two strain components being easily measurable. Hence, a combination of the two techniques, applied as described herein, is ideal for a detailed nondestructive evaluation of residual stresses in plates. The residual stresses in a 12-mm-thick VPPA-welded aluminum 2024-T351 alloy plate have been measured using neutron diffraction. The stresses were then remeasured by a combination of neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction after the plate had been reduced in thickness (or, skimmed) to 7 mm by machining both sides of the weld, mimicking the likely manufacturing operation, should such welds be used in aerospace structures. A strong tensile residual stress field was measured in the longitudinal direction, parallel to the weld, in both the as-welded and skimmed specimens. There was only a slight modification of the residual stress state on skimming.

  5. Possibilities and limitations of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction with double crystal and double multilayer monochromators for microscopic speciation studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Nolf, Wout [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Antwerpen (Wilrijk) (Belgium)], E-mail: wout.denolf@ua.ac.be; Jaroszewicz, Jakub [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Antwerpen (Wilrijk) (Belgium); Terzano, Roberto [Dipartimento di Biologia e Chimica Agro-forestale ed Ambientale, Via Amendola 165/A, I-70126, University of Bari, Bari (Italy); Lind, Ole Christian; Salbu, Brit [Isotope Laboratory, Norwegian University of Life Sciences, PO Box 5003, N-1432 As (Norway); Vekemans, Bart [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281 S12, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Janssens, Koen [Department of Chemistry, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610, Antwerpen (Wilrijk) (Belgium); Falkenberg, Gerald [HASYLAB at DESY, Beamline L, Notkestraat 85, D-22603, Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-08-15

    The performance of a combined microbeam X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction (XRF/XRPD) measurement station at Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor (HASYLAB) Beamline L is discussed in comparison to that at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) ID18F/ID22. The angular resolution in the X-ray diffractograms is documented when different combinations of X-ray source, optics and X-ray diffraction detectors are employed. Typical angular resolution values in the range 0.3-0.5 deg. are obtained at the bending magnet source when a 'pink' beam form of excitation is employed. A similar setup at European Synchrotron Radiation Facility beamlines ID18F and ID22 allows to reach angular resolution values of 0.1-0.15 deg. In order to document the possibilities and limitations for speciation of metals in environmental materials by means of Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor Beamline L X-ray fluorescence/X-ray powder diffraction setup, two case studies are discussed, one involved in the identification of the crystal phases in which heavy metals such as chromium, iron, barium and lead are present in polluted soils of an industrial site (Val Basento, Italy) and another involved in the speciation of uranium in depleted uranium particles (Ceja Mountains, Kosovo). In the former case, the angular resolution is sufficient to allow identification of most crystalline phases present while in the latter case, it is necessary to dispose of an angular resolution of ca. 0.2 deg. to distinguish between different forms of oxidized uranium.

  6. Kinetic Analyses of Cation Exchange Rates in Synthetic Birnessite Measured by Time- Resolved Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopano, C. L.; Heaney, P. J.; Post, J. E.; Bandstra, J.; Brantley, S. L.

    2006-05-01

    Birnessite is the most abundant and chemically important layer-structure Mn-oxide phase found in soils, desert varnishes, and ocean nodules. It also is industrially important for use in battery technology and octahedral sieves. Due to the poorly crystalline nature of natural birnessite, synthetic analogues typically have been employed in studies that explore the structural response of birnessite to variations in interlayer composition. For this work, we measured changes in unit-cell parameters over time to quantify the degree of cation exchange as a function of concentration. Aqueous K+, Cs+, and Ba2+ cations at varying concentrations at pH 7 were exchanged for interlayer Na+ in synthetic birnessite (Na0.58(Mn4+1.42,Mn3+0.58)O4·1.5H2O) using a simple flow- through cell, and the exchange products were monitored via time-resolved X-ray powder diffraction at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Powder X-ray diffraction patterns were collected every 2-3 minutes. Rietveld analyses of X-ray diffraction patterns for K- and Ba-exchanged birnessite revealed a decrease in unit- cell volume over time. In contrast, Cs+ substitution increased cell volume. For all three cations, the crystallographic data indicate that exchange occurred in two stages. A rapid and dramatic change in unit-cell volume was followed by a modest adjustment over longer timescales. Fourier electron difference syntheses revealed that the rapid, initial stage of exchange was marked by re-configuration of the interlayer species, whereas the second, protracted phase of substitution represented ordering into the newly established interlayer positions. For the first time, we have modeled the kinetics of interlayer substitution in Na-birnessite. For purposes of comparison, we have employed a simple one-stage reaction (i.e., Na-birnessite → K-birnessite) and a two stage reaction (i.e,. Na-birnessite → K-birnessitedisordered → K- birnessiteordered). For exchange with 0.01 M KCl solutions, the single

  7. X-ray diffraction apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padini, F.R.

    1978-01-01

    The invention provides an x-ray diffraction apparatus permitting the rotation of the divergence sit in conjunction with the rotation of the x-ray irradiated specimen, whereby the dimensions of the x-ray irradiated portion of the specimen remain substantially constant during the rotation of the specimen. In a preferred embodiment, the divergence slit is connected to a structural element linked with a second structural element connected to the specimen such that the divergence slit rotates at a lower angular speed than the specimen

  8. Experimental issues in in-situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction at high pressure and temperature by using a laser-heated diamond-anvil cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, C.S.

    1997-01-01

    An integrated technique of diamond-anvil cell, laser-heating and synchrotron x-ray diffraction technologies is capable of structural investigation of condensed matter in an extended region of high pressures and temperatures above 100 GPa and 3000 K. The feasibility of this technique to obtain reliable data, however, strongly depends on several experimental issues, including optical and x-ray setups, thermal gradients, pressure homogeneity, preferred orientation, and chemical reaction. In this paper, we discuss about these experimental issues together with future perspectives of this technique for obtaining accurate data

  9. Instrumentation of x-ray diffraction and materials research on the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedl, G.L.

    1984-11-01

    MATRIX was organized in 1980 to formulate a research team to design and construct a beam line at NSLS for x-ray diffraction studies of materials. A versatile system was designed to allow a full range of experimental capabilities for wide angle x-ray scattering experiments including surface diffraction studies. The design and construction of the system has been completed. Testing of parts of the system was completed at CHESS and with x-ray sources or other equipment at member institutions. Installation of the beam line at NSLS is in progress and will proceed in parallel with the commissioning of the x-ray ring at NSLS. Full operation of the beam line is expected to be ready by December 1, 1984 being limited only by the source power of NSLS at that time. Useful experiments could be started if the power is at least 2 GeV and 100ma. The MATRIX beam line was one of the first x-ray beam lines to see light in the beam line in early spring of 1984. In July of 1984, the MATRIX beam line as the first port at NSLS to have a monochromatic beam and to scan part of the spectrum from the source. As part of this contract, six publications have resulted from the various projects. Three publications are concerned directly with the beam line and/or its operation while the other three publications are the result of research associated with the project

  10. Synchrotron X-Ray Radiation and Deformation Studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster Nielsen, Søren

    In the present thesis two different synchrotron X-ray diffraction techniques capable of producing non-destructive information from the bulk of samples, have been investigated. Traditionally depth resolu-tion in diffraction experiments is obtained by inserting pinholes in both the incoming...... machining. The conical slit has six 25µm thick conically shaped openings matching six of the Debye-Scherrer cones from a fcc powder. By combining the conical slit with a micro-focused incoming beam of hard X-rays an embedded gauge volume is defined. Using a 2D detector, fast and complete information can...... boundary morphology. Another X-ray diffraction technique was applied on the three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope at the ESRF synchrotron. The microscope uses a new technique based on ray tracing of diffracted high energy X-rays, providing a fast and non-destructive scheme for mapping...

  11. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  12. Clinopyroxenes still trapped in diamonds: high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction as a chemical probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casati, Nicola; Nestola, Fabrizio; Alvaro, Matteo; Wilhelm, Heribert; Kleppe, Annette; Nimis, Paolo; Harris, Jeffrey W.

    2014-05-01

    Clinopyroxenes are mainly Ca-Na-Fe-Mg-silicates constituting a significant portion of the Earth's upper mantle up to 20% of such shell of our planet. They could be found as typical mineral inclusions in diamonds being diopsidic and omphacitic in composition and, together with garnets, cover a key role in providing indications concerning the source rock in which the diamond crystallize. In detail, it is well known that eclogitic diamonds are characterized by clinopyroxenes with omphacitic compositions (about Ca0.5Na0.5Mg0.5Al0.5Si2O6) whereas peridotitic diamonds show clinopyroxenes very rich in the diopside end-member (CaMgSi2O6). In order to get direct chemical composition on the inclusions, and therefore on the diamond origin source, it is obviously necessary to extract them breaking and/or polishing the diamond host. However, a non-destructive investigation of an inclusion still trapped in a diamond is useful and important for different reasons: (1) the inclusions could be under pressure and their crystal structure can be modified if the pressure is released by the extraction; (2) the residual pressure on the inclusion can provide information about the formation pressure of the diamond (e.g. Nestola et al. 2011 and references therein); (3) the morphology and growth relationships of the inclusion with the host diamond can provide indications about its protogenetic vs. syngenetic and/or epigenetic nature; and (4) preservation of the diamond surface growth features can maintain crucial information on late oxidation processes (Fedortchouk et al. 2011). However the available methods to measure the composition of the inclusions implies to destroy the sample. The aim of this work is to obtain chemical information on the inclusions still trapped in their diamond host and therefore to indicate the diamond origin without extracting the inclusions. The work was carried out by single crystal X-ray diffraction using a new experimental approach by high energy synchrotron

  13. A crystal structure determination of PbC2O4 from synchrotron X-ray and neutron powder diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noerlund Christensen, A.; Cox, D.E.; Lehmann, M.S.

    1989-01-01

    The crystal structure of lead oxalate, PbC 2 O 4 , was solved ab initio from synchrotron X-ray and neutron diffraction powder patterns. The unit cell was obtained by autoindexing of Guinier film data, the basic features of the structure were solved using direct methods and integrated intensities obtained from high resolution synchrotron X-ray data, and the structure was refined by Rietveld analysis of these and high resolution neutron data. Although there were serious discrepancies in the overall profile fit of the X-ray data because of pronounced anisotropic peak broadening, the two sets of positional coordinates were in good agreement. The unit cell is triclinic, space group P1 (No.2) with lattice parameters from the synchrotron refinement: a = 555.70(1), b = 697.72(1), c = 557.26(1) pm, α = 109.554(1), β = 113.610(1), γ = 88.801(1)deg., Z = 2. The structure has two crystallographically independent oxalate ions stacked in layers alternating with layers of lead ions in the [001] direction. The oxalate ions form channels along the b axis in which the lead ions are situated in highly asymmetric coordination with seven oxygen atoms. Individual peak fits of the synchrotron data revealed all of the reflections to be broadened appreciably by comparison with the instrumental resolution. Those with scattering vectors close to the [001] axis showed an additional systematic broadening consistent with stacking faults in this direction. (author)

  14. Reaction monitoring of cementing materials through multivariate techniques applied to time-resolved synchrotron X-Ray diffraction data

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Taris, A.; Grosso, M.; Viani, Alberto; Brundu, M.; Guida, V.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 43, May (2015), s. 895-900. ISBN 978-88-95608-34-1. ISSN 2283-9216 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1219 Keywords : engineering controlled terms * least squares approximations * magnesium powder * multivariant analysis * potassium * reaction intermediates * X ray powder diffraction Subject RIV: AN - Psychology http://www.aidic.it/cet/15/43/150.pdf

  15. In situ X-ray diffraction of surface oxide on type 430 stainless steel in breakaway condition using synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Isao, E-mail: isaos@mmm.muroran-it.ac.jp [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan); Sugiyama, Yusuke [Graduate School of Engineering, Muroran Institute of Technology, 27-1 Mizumoto, Muroran, Hokkaido 050-8585 (Japan); Hayashi, Shigenari; Yamauchi, Akira [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 006-8628 (Japan); Doi, Takashi; Nishiyama, Yoshitaka [Corporate R and D Laboratories, Sumitomo Metals Industries Ltd., 1-8 Fuso-cho, Amagasaki, Hyogo 660-0891 (Japan); Kyo, Shoji [Power Engineering R and D Centre, Kansai Electric Power Co., Inc., 3-11-20 Wakaoji, Amagasaki, Hyogo 661-0794 (Japan); Suzuki, Shigeru [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan); Sato, Masugu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, 1-1-1 Koto, Sayo-cho, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Fujimoto, Shinji [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Breakaway studied with Synchrotron radiation X-ray. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Local equilibria between phases established during high-temperature oxidation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Chemical failure model well describes the breakaway. - Abstract: Changes in the crystal structure of type 430 stainless steel and the oxides on its surface were studied in situ at 1373 K using a high-intensity synchrotron X-ray source provided by SPring-8 in Japan. The surface of the steel was initially covered with Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which was then converted to FeCr{sub 2}O{sub 4}, and finally Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} formed on it. These results indicated that the reason for the breakaway oxidation in type 430 stainless steel is Cr depletion beneath Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer and the subsequent ionisation of Fe, not the simple mechanical failure of Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  16. Synchrotron radiation microbeam X-ray diffraction for nondestructive assessments of local structural properties of faceted InGaN/GaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaki, Atsushi; Funato, Mitsuru; Kawamura, Tomoaki; Araki, Jun; Kawakami, Yoichi

    2018-03-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray diffraction with a sub-µm spatial resolution is used to nondestructively evaluate the local thickness and alloy composition of three-dimensionally faceted InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs). The (0001) facet QW on a trapezoidal structure composed of (0001), \\{ 11\\bar{2}2\\} , and \\{ 11\\bar{2}0\\} facets is nonuniform, most likely owing to the migration of adatoms between facets. The thickness and composition markedly vary within a short distance for the \\{ 11\\bar{2}2\\} facet QW of another pyramidal structure. The QW parameters acquired by SR microbeam X-ray diffraction reproduce the local emission property assessed by cathodoluminescence, thereby indicating the high reliability of this method.

  17. Diffractive X-ray Telescopes

    OpenAIRE

    Skinner, Gerald K.

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro-arc-seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted space- time in the immediate vicinity of the super...

  18. PHASE ANALYSIS OF NITI WIRE BASED ON SYNCHROTRON 2D X-RAY DIFFRACTION PATTERN IN MATLAB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Dudr

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with simplified phase analysis of 2D diffraction patterns obtained using microfocused X-ray at various places of superelastic NiTi wire under combined load. For this purpose, MATLAB routines and functions were created, which carry out integration of the patterns in various sectors of Debye ring, fitting of the patterns by a mixture of austenite and martensite (having neglected the R-phase and successive evaluation of the quantitative phase content. The most crucial simplificating assumptions were: the neglection of the R-phase and the assumption of a fibre texture or b no texture.

  19. Identification of copper-based green pigments in Jaume Huguet's Gothic altarpieces by Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvadó, N; Pradell, T; Pantos, E; Papiz, M Z; Molera, J; Seco, M; Vendrell-Saz, M

    2002-07-01

    The scientific investigation of ancient paintings gives a unique insight into ancient painting techniques and their evolution through time and geographic location. This study deals with the identification of the green pigments used by one of the most important Catalan masters in Gothic times, Jaume Huguet. Other pigments and materials have also been characterized by means of conventional techniques such as optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction has been used to produce maps of phases at a spatial resolution of 100 microm across chromatic layers.

  20. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of deformation behavior and load transfer in a Ti2Ni-NiTi composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junsong; Liu, Yinong; Ren, Yang; Huan, Yong; Hao, Shijie; Yu, Cun; Shao, Yang; Ru, Yadong; Jiang, Daqiang; Cui, Lishan

    2014-07-01

    The deformation behavior and load transfer of a dual-phase composite composed of martensite NiTi embedded in brittle Ti2Ni matrices were investigated by using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction during compression. The composite exhibits a stage-wise deformation feature and a double-yielding phenomenon, which were caused by the interaction between Ti2Ni and NiTi with alternative microscopic deformation mechanism. No load transfer occurs from the soft NiTi dendrites to the hard Ti2Ni matrices during the pseudoplastic deformation (detwinning) of NiTi, which is significantly different from that previously reported in bulk metallic glasses matrices composites.

  1. Residual stresses and structural integrity in nuclear structural materials: recent developments and results from neutron and synchrotron x-ray diffraction experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steuwer, A.; Daniels, JE

    2008-01-01

    Over the last few years, significant progress has been made in the investigation of residual stresses over a variety of length scales in nuclear structural materials, ranging from stainless steels to hydrided zirconium alloys. In this manuscript we review some of these developments, such as, in-situ characterization of stresses at crack tips in steels and zirconium alloys, residual stresses around welds, and the characterization of hydrided zirconium alloys. Neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction are essential and complementary tools in this approach, and their applicability to structural integrity issues is discussed in view of existing and future large-scale research facilities. (au)

  2. Synchrotron-Based High Angle Resolution and High Lateral Resolution X-ray Diffraction: Revealing Lead White Pigment Qualities in Old Masters Paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, V; Wallez, G; Calligaro, T; Cotte, M; De Nolf, W; Eveno, M; Ravaud, E; Menu, M

    2017-12-19

    Microsamples collected on 27 major paintings by Old European Masters dating from the 14th to the late 19th centuries were analyzed using synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction. Two complementary analytical configurations were used at beamlines ID22 (high angle resolution) and ID21 (high lateral resolution), in order to highlight markers of the different grades of the lead white pigments (mixture of cerussite PbCO 3 and hydrocerussite Pb 3 (CO 3 ) 2 (OH) 2 ). Rietveld analysis and crystalline phases mapping at the microscale revealed the composition and microstructure of the pigments, shedding light on the preparation recipes and pigment choices of the artists through History.

  3. Advances in martensitic transformations in Cu-based shape memory alloys achieved by in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malard, B.; Šittner, Petr; Berveiller, S.; Patoor, E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 13, č. 3 (2012), s. 280-292 ISSN 1631-0705 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP108/10/1296; GA ČR GAP107/12/0800 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 262806 - SmartNets Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : stress induced martensitic transformation * Cu-based shape memory alloys * neutron diffraction * X-ray * synchrotron * in situ * multiscale analysis Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.818, year: 2012

  4. Two strain-hardening mechanisms in nanocrystalline austenitic steel: An in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schloth, P.; Weisser, M.A.; Van Swygenhoven, H.; Van Petegem, S.; Susila, P.; Subramanya Sarma, V.; Murty, B.S.; Lauterbach, S.; Heilmaier, M.

    2012-01-01

    The mechanical behaviour of nanocrystalline austenitic steels with and without yttria particles was investigated using in situ synchrotron diffraction during tensile deformation. Two different strain-hardening regimes were found. The first regime can be assigned predominantly to a martensitic phase transformation, the second to deformation twinning in the fragmented retained austenite. The kinetics of martensitic phase transformation is remarkably enhanced in the nanocrystalline structure.

  5. Submicron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDowell, Alastair; Celestre, Richard; Tamura, Nobumichi; Spolenak, Ralph; Valek, Bryan; Brown, Walter; Bravman, John; Padmore, Howard; Batterman, Boris; Patel, Jamshed

    2000-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley the authors have instrumented a beam line that is devoted exclusively to x-ray micro diffraction problems. By micro diffraction they mean those classes of problems in Physics and Materials Science that require x-ray beam sizes in the sub-micron range. The instrument is for instance, capable of probing a sub-micron size volume inside micron sized aluminum metal grains buried under a silicon dioxide insulating layer. The resulting Laue pattern is collected on a large area CCD detector and automatically indexed to yield the grain orientation and deviatoric (distortional) strain tensor of this sub-micron volume. A four-crystal monochromator is then inserted into the beam, which allows monochromatic light to illuminate the same part of the sample. Measurement of diffracted photon energy allows for the determination of d spacings. The combination of white and monochromatic beam measurements allow for the determination of the total strain/stress tensor (6 components) inside each sub-micron sized illuminated volume of the sample

  6. Static tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel studied by in situ neutron diffraction and synchrotron radiation white x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuchida, Noriyuki; Kawahata, Taiji; Ishimaru, Eiichiro; Takahashi, Akihiko; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shobu, Takahisa

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the tensile deformation behavior of a lean duplex stainless steel (S32101) from the viewpoints of plastic deformability among phases or grains, we performed static tensile tests, in situ neutron diffraction, and white x-ray diffraction experiments at room temperature. In the static tensile tests, the S32101 steel displayed a larger uniform elongation and a better tensile strength-uniform elongation balance than a commercial SUS329J4L duplex stainless steel. A larger uniform elongation of S32101 is associated with the macroscopic work hardening behavior that a work hardening rate higher than the flow stress can maintain up until high true strains. From the experimental results of synchrotron radiation white x-ray diffraction experiments, the hard phase of S32101 was changed from the ferrite (α) phase to austenite (γ) one during tensile deformation. This led to a larger stress partitioning between the phases at the latter stage of deformation. From the experimental results of in situ neutron diffraction, it was found that the stress partitioning of the γ phase in the S32101 was the largest among the present results. Therefore, the larger work hardening rate of S32101 can be explained by the large stress partitioning of the γ phase, that between γ and α phases and γ volume fraction. (author)

  7. Performances of synchrotron X-ray monochromators under heat load. Part 2. Application of the Takagi-Taupin diffraction theory

    CERN Document Server

    Mocella, V; Freund, A K; Hoszowska, J; Zhang, L; Epelboin, Y

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this work is to generate the rocking curves of monochromators exposed to heat load in synchrotron radiation beams with a computer code performing diffraction calculations based on the theory of Takagi and Taupin. The model study starts with the calculation of deformation by finite element analysis and from an accurate characterization of the incident wave and includes the simulation of the wavefront propagation between the first and the second crystal (analyzer) of a double crystal monochromator. A monochromatic plane wave as well as a polychromatic spherical wave approach is described. The theoretical predictions of both methods are compared with experimental data measured in Bragg geometry and critically discussed.

  8. Performances of synchrotron X-ray monochromators under heat load. Part 2. Application of the Takagi-Taupin diffraction theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocella, V.; Ferrero, C. E-mail: ferrero@esrf.fr; Freund, A.K.; Hoszowska, J.; Zhang, L.; Epelboin, Y

    2001-07-21

    The aim of this work is to generate the rocking curves of monochromators exposed to heat load in synchrotron radiation beams with a computer code performing diffraction calculations based on the theory of Takagi and Taupin. The model study starts with the calculation of deformation by finite element analysis and from an accurate characterization of the incident wave and includes the simulation of the wavefront propagation between the first and the second crystal (analyzer) of a double crystal monochromator. A monochromatic plane wave as well as a polychromatic spherical wave approach is described. The theoretical predictions of both methods are compared with experimental data measured in Bragg geometry and critically discussed.

  9. Diffractive X-Ray Telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, G.K.; Skinner, G.K

    2010-01-01

    Diffractive X-ray telescopes using zone plates, phase Fresnel lenses, or related optical elements have the potential to provide astronomers with true imaging capability with resolution several orders of magnitude better than available in any other waveband. Lenses that would be relatively easy to fabricate could have an angular resolution of the order of micro arc seconds or even better, that would allow, for example, imaging of the distorted spacetime in the immediate vicinity of the supermassive black holes in the center of active galaxies What then is precluding their immediate adoption Extremely long focal lengths, very limited bandwidth, and difficulty stabilizing the image are the main problems. The history and status of the development of such lenses is reviewed here and the prospects for managing the challenges that they present are discussed atmospheric absorption

  10. Synchrotron-Radiation Induced X-Ray Emission (SRIXE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, Keith W.

    1999-09-01

    and increase in scientific use can be maintained for the synchrotron x-ray source. A short summary of the present state of the synchrotron radiation-induced x-ray emission (SRIXE) method is presented here. Basically, SRIXE experiments can include any that depend on the detection. of characteristic x-rays produced by the incident x-ray beam born the synchrotron source as they interact with a sample. Thus, experiments done to measure elemental composition, chemical state, crystal, structure, and other sample parameters can be considered in a discussion of SRIXE. It is also clear that the experimentalist may well wish to use a variety of complementary techniques for study of a given sample. For this reason, discussion of computed microtomography (CMT) and x-ray diffraction is included here. It is hoped that this present discussion will serve as a succinct introduction to the basic ideas of SRIXE for those not working in the field and possibly help to stimulate new types of work by those starting in the field as well as by experienced practitioners of the art. The topics covered include short descriptions of (1) the properties of synchrotron radiation, (2) a description of facilities used for its production, (3) collimated microprobe, (4) focused microprobes, (5) continuum and monoenergetic excitation, (6) detection limits, (7) quantitation, (8) applications of SRIXE, (9) computed microtomography (CMT), and (10)chemical speciation using x-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and extended x-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS). An effort has been made to cite a wide variety of work from different laboratories to show the vital nature of the field.

  11. Study of the phase transformations and equation of state of magnesium by synchrotron x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Errandonea, D; Häusermann, D; Uchida, T

    2003-01-01

    We studied the phase behaviour and the P - V - T equation of state of Mg by in situ energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction in a multi-anvil apparatus in the pressure-temperature range up to 18.6 GPa and 1527 K. At high temperatures, an hcp to dhcp transition was found above 9.6 GPa, which differs from the hcp to bcc transformation predicted by theoretical calculations. At room temperature, the hcp phase remains stable within the pressure range of this study with an axial ratio, c/a, close to the ideal. The melting of Mg was determined at 2.2, 10 and 12 GPa; the detected melting temperatures are in good agreement with previous diamond anvil cell results. The P - V - T equation of state determined based on the data of this study gives B sub 0 = (36.8 +- 3) GPa, B sub 0 ' = 4.3 +- 0.4, alpha sub 0 = 25 x 10 sup - sup 6 K sup - sup 1 , partial deriv alpha/partial deriv T = (2.3 +- 0.2) x 10 sup - sup 7 K sup - sup 2 and partial deriv B sub 0 sub , sub T /partial deriv T = (-2.08 +- 0.09) x 10 sup - sup 2 GPa K sup -...

  12. X-ray microimaging by diffractive techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirz, Janos; Jacobsen, Chris

    2001-07-31

    The report summarizes the development of soft x-ray microscopes at the National Synchrotron Light Source X-1A beamline. We have developed a soft x-ray microscopy beamline (X-1A) at the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This beamline has been upgraded recently to provide two endstations dedicated to microscopy experiments. One endstation hosts a brand new copy of the redesigned room temperature scanning x-ray microscope (STXM), and the other end station hosts a cryo STXM and the original redesigned room temperature microscope, which has been commissioned and has started operation. Cryo STXM and the new microscope use the same new software package, running under the LINUX operating system. The new microscope is showing improved image resolution and extends spectromicroscopy to the nitrogen, oxygen and iron edges. These microscopes are used by us, and by users of the facility, to image hydrated specimens at 50 nm or better spatial resolution and with 0.1-0.5 eV energy resolution. This allows us to carry out chemical state mapping in biological, materials science, and environmental and colloidal science specimens. In the cryo microscope, we are able to do chemical state mapping and tomography of frozen hydrated specimens, and this is of special importance for radiation-sensitive biological specimens. for spectromicroscopic analysis, and methods for obtaining real-space images from the soft x-ray diffraction patterns of non-crystalline specimens. The user program provides opportunities for collaborators and other groups to exploit the techniques available and to develop them further. We have also developed new techniques such as an automated method for acquiring ''stacks'' of images.

  13. Synchrotron X-ray magnetic scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Stirling, W G

    2003-01-01

    Research on magnetic materials constitutes an increasingly important part of the programmes of most major synchrotron radiation centres. The extremely high brilliance and small spot size of advanced synchrotron beamlines, combined with element-specific resonant effects at certain absorption edges, provide a powerful probe of magnetic structures and phase transitions, with excellent wavevector resolution. Over the last decade a variety of experimental techniques have been developed, exploiting these effects for the study of thin film, multilayer and bulk magnetic materials. In this paper the basic concepts of X-ray magnetic scattering will be introduced, followed by recent examples taken from work at Daresbury Laboratory (UK), the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (Grenoble, France) and the National Synchrotron Light Source (Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA). Investigations of domain patterns in thin magnetic films employing X-ray resonant magnetic scattering (XRMS) will be described, followed by a se...

  14. Direct Observations of Sigma Phase Formation in Duplex Stainless Steels using In Situ Synchrotron X-Ray Diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, J W; Palmer, T A; Specht, E D

    2006-07-03

    The formation and growth of sigma phase in 2205 duplex stainless steel was observed and measured in real time using synchrotron radiation during 10 hr isothermal heat treatments at temperatures between 700 C and 850 C. Sigma formed in near-equilibrium quantities during the isothermal holds, starting from a microstructure which contained a balanced mixture of metastable ferrite and austenite. In situ synchrotron diffraction continuously monitored the transformation, and these results were compared to those predicted by thermodynamic calculations. Differences between the calculated and measured amounts of sigma, ferrite and austenite suggest that the thermodynamic calculations underpredict the sigma dissolution temperature by approximately 50 C. The data were further analyzed using a modified Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (JMA) approach to determine kinetic parameters for sigma formation over this temperature range. The initial JMA exponent, n, at low fractions of sigma was found to be approximately 7.0, however, towards the end of the transformation, n decreased to values of approximately 0.75. The change in the JMA exponent was attributed to a change in the transformation mechanism from discontinuous precipitation with increasing nucleation rate, to growth of the existing sigma phase after nucleation site saturation occurred. Because of this change in mechanism, it was not possible to determine reliable values for the activation energy and pre-exponential terms for the JMA equation. While cooling back to room temperature, the partial transformation of austenite resulted in a substantial increase in the ferrite content, but sigma retained its high temperature value to room temperature.

  15. Residual stresses analysis by X-ray and neutrons diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lodini, A.; Perrin, M.

    1996-04-01

    This conference is composed of 17 papers grouped in 13 chapters which main themes are: advantages of neutrons and synchrotron radiation for material characterization; residual stress evaluation from micro-deformation measurements in polycrystalline materials; X-ray and neutron diffractometry; residual stress evaluation by X-ray diffraction in extreme surfaces; residual stress diffraction evaluation in monocrystalline nickel base alloys, in polyphasic materials, composite materials, thin films, multilayers and joints; application to thermonuclear reactor components

  16. Characterisation of corrosion deposits induced by carbon dioxide on mild steel using grazing incidence x-ray and synchrotron radiation diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sembiring, S.; O'Connor, B; Li, D.; Buckley, C.; Van Riessen, A.; De Marco, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: Grazing incidence diffraction, using x-rays (GIXRD) and synchrotron radiation (GISRD), is being applied for near-surface characterisation of corrosion deposits formed on the internal surfaces of mild steel pipelines which are used to deliver natural gas from offshore deposits in Western Australia. These techniques are being employed to construct phase composition depth-profiles of corrosion product phases. The GIXRD data are being measured with CuKα radiation using a Siemens D5000 x-ray diffractometer, fitted with a primary beam slit system for incidence angle control and also with a diffracted beam monochromator; and the GISRD data have been acquired with the BIGDIFF instrument on the ANBF beamline in Tsukuba, Japan. The mild steel test samples are prepared with a laboratory reactor in which the corrosion conditions are simulated in a controlled manner. Results obtained to date have shown that two phases are readily observed in addition to the a-Fe phase from the mild steel substrate: (1) FeCO 3 (siderite) induced by CO 2 dissolved in the water flowing through the pipeline, and (2) CaCO 3 (calcite) deposited on the mild steel surface by reaction between the CO 2 and calcium ions which are also present in the water flowing through the pipeline. Supporting measurements from SEM imaging and associated EDS analysis will also be presented

  17. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of deformation behavior and load transfer in a Ti{sub 2}Ni-NiTi composite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Junsong; Hao, Shijie; Yu, Cun; Shao, Yang; Ru, Yadong; Jiang, Daqiang; Cui, Lishan, E-mail: lscui@cup.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, China University of Petroleum-Beijing, Changping, Beijing 102249 (China); Liu, Yinong [School of Mechanical and Chemical Engineering, The University of Western Australia, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ren, Yang [X-ray Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Huan, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics (LNM), Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2014-07-28

    The deformation behavior and load transfer of a dual-phase composite composed of martensite NiTi embedded in brittle Ti{sub 2}Ni matrices were investigated by using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction during compression. The composite exhibits a stage-wise deformation feature and a double-yielding phenomenon, which were caused by the interaction between Ti{sub 2}Ni and NiTi with alternative microscopic deformation mechanism. No load transfer occurs from the soft NiTi dendrites to the hard Ti{sub 2}Ni matrices during the pseudoplastic deformation (detwinning) of NiTi, which is significantly different from that previously reported in bulk metallic glasses matrices composites.

  18. Growth of magnesio-aluminate spinel in thin-film geometry: in situ monitoring using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and thermodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Götze, L. C.; Abart, R.; Milke, R.; Schorr, S.; Zizak, I.; Dohmen, R.; Wirth, R.

    2014-10-01

    Polycrystalline spinel layers were grown experimentally at the contacts between single-crystal corundum substrates and initially amorphous, then polycrystalline MgO thin films. The growth behavior of the spinel layers was monitored in situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The change in the integrated intensity of the 111 spinel Bragg peak was correlated with the thickness of the layer as determined from ex situ TEM characterization of the run products. At a transition from linear growth, corresponding to interface reaction control, to parabolic growth, corresponding to diffusion control, occurred at a layer thickness of less than 10 nm. At 1,000 growth was largely linear up to a layer thickness in excess of 300 nm. A thermodynamic model was applied to extract the kinetic parameters characterizing interface motion and long-range diffusion from this growth behavior.

  19. The equation of state of PbTiO sub 3 up to 37 GPa: a synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction study

    CERN Document Server

    Sani, A; Levy, D

    2002-01-01

    High-pressure synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction patterns were collected using ID09 of ESRF (Grenoble, France) for a powder sample of PbTiO sub 3 , placed in a diamond anvil cell. The patterns were collected at room temperature using nitrogen (up to 37 GPa) and methanol-ethanol solution (up to 7 GPa) as pressure-transmitting media. The bulk moduli were calculated for the first time using the Vinet equation of state and they were compared to those of isostructural compounds. The trend of the spontaneous polarization as a function of pressure confirms that the ferroelectric-paraelectric phase transition at 11.2 GPa possesses a second-order character.

  20. Synchrotron high energy X-ray diffraction study of microstructure evolution of severely cold drawn NiTi wire during annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Cun; Aoun, Bachir; Cui, Lishan; Liu, Yinong; Yang, Hong; Jiang, Xiaohua; Cai, Song; Jiang, Daqiang; Liu, Zunping; Brown, Dennis E.; Ren, Yang

    2016-08-01

    Microstructure evolution of a cold-drawn NiTi shape memory alloy wire was investigated by means of in-situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction during continuous heating. The cold-drawn wire contained amorphous regions and nano-crystalline domains in its microstructure. Pair distribution function analysis revealed that the amorphous regions underwent structural relaxation via atomic rearrangement when heated above 100 °C. The nano-crystalline domains were found to exhibit a strong cold work induced lattice strain anisotropy having a preferential <111> fiber orientation along the wire axial direction. The lattice strain anisotropy systematically decreased upon heating above 200 °C, implying a structural recovery. A broad conical texture was formed in the wire specimen after crystallization similar in detail to the initial <111> texture axial orientation of the nano-crystalline domains produced by the severe cold wire drawing deformation.

  1. X-ray Microprobe for Fluorescence and Diffraction Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ice, G.E.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (see unit 1.1) and x-ray excited fluorescence analysis are powerful techniques for the nondestructive measurement of crystal structure and chemical composition. X-ray fluorescence analysis is inherently nondestructive with orders of magnitude lower power deposited for the same detectable limit as with fluorescence excited by charged particle probes (Sparks, 1980). X-ray diffraction analysis is sensitive to crystal structure with orders-of-magnitude greater sensitivity to crystallographic strain than electron probes (Rebonato, et al. 1989). When a small-area x-ray microbeam is used as the probe, chemical composition (Z>14), crystal structure, crystalline texture, and crystalline strain distributions can be determined. These distributions can be studied both at the surface of the sample and deep within the sample (Fig. 1). Current state-of-the-art can achieve an ∼1 mm-D x-ray microprobe and an ∼0.1 mm-D x-ray microprobe has been demonstrated (Bilderback, et al., 1994). Despite their great chemical and crystallographic sensitivities, x-ray microprobe techniques have until recently been restricted by inefficient x-ray focusing optics and weak x-ray sources; x-ray microbeam analysis was largely superseded by electron techniques in the 50's. However, interest in x-ray microprobe techniques has now been revived (Howells, et al., 1983; Ice and Sparks, 1984; Chevallier, et al., 1997; Riekel 1992; Thompson, el al., 1992; and Making and Using... 1997) by the development of efficient x-ray focusing optics and ultra-high intensity synchrotron x-ray sources (Buras and Tazzari, 1984; Shenoy, et al., 1988). These advances have increased the achievable microbeam flux by more than 11 orders of magnitude (Fig. 2) (Ice, 1997); the flux in a tunable 1 mm-D beam on a 'so called' 3rd-generation synchrotron source such as the APS can exceed the flux in a fixed-energy mm2 beam on a conventional source. These advances make x-ray microfluorescence and x-ray

  2. An in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction study of precipitation kinetics in a severely deformed Cu–Ni–Si alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azzeddine, H.; Mehdi, B. [Faculty of Physics, USTHB, BP 32 El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Algiers (Algeria); Hennet, L. [Conditions Extrêmes et Matériaux: Haute Température et Irradiation, CNRS-CEMHTI, 1D Ave de la Recherche Scientifique, 45071 Orléans Cedex 2 (France); Thiaudière, D. [Synchrotron SOLEIL, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Alili, B. [Faculty of Physics, USTHB, BP 32 El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Algiers (Algeria); Kawasaki, M., E-mail: megumi@hanyang.ac.kr [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Hanyang University, 17 Haengdang-dong, Seongdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea, Republic of); Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Bradai, D. [Faculty of Physics, USTHB, BP 32 El-Alia, Dar El Beida, Algiers (Algeria); Langdon, T.G. [Departments of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-1453 (United States); Materials Research Group, Faculty of Engineering and the Environment, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction was used to study the decomposition kinetics of a metastable Cu–2.5Ni–0.6Si (wt%) alloy after severe plastic deformation by equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) and high-pressure torsion (HPT). The measurements were performed at room temperature and also at high temperatures of 723, 823 and 973 K in order to determine the ageing effect after processing. Two forms of precipitates, namely δ-Ni{sub 2}Si and γ-Ni{sub 5}Si{sub 2}, were identified and the sequence of their appearance was well established for ECAP processing and ageing. There was no detection of either a modulated structure resulting from spinodal decomposition or an ordered structure nucleated from the modulated structure. An X-ray hybrid pixel array detector (XPAD-S140 detector) permitted the detection of the nucleation stages of the δ-Ni{sub 2}Si phase that began soon after 24 s of ageing at 723 K. There was also no trace of any amorphization of the matrix phase.

  3. X-ray topography and multiple diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, S.-L.

    1983-01-01

    A short summary on X-ray topography, which is based on the dynamical theory of X-ray diffraction, is made. The applications and properties related to the use of the multiple diffraction technique are analized and discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  4. Energy dispersive x-ray diffraction from Ge, GaAs, GaP, and AlSb at high pressures using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baublitz, M.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The practicality of energy dispersive X-ray diffraction from high pressure powder specimens using synchrotron radiation has been demonstrated. Reasonable quantitative agreement has been obtained between the experimental diffraction data and the theoretical relative integrated intensities of the diffraction lines for known structures under rather hydrostatic pressure conditions. Pressure-induced structural phase transitions in Ge, GaAs, GaP, and AlSb have been studied in some detail with this energy dispersive diffraction method. Ge transforms to the beta-Sn tetragonal structure as previously observed by Jamieson, but the transition pressure is 80 +- 5 kbars, a somewhat lower value than generally reported. GaAs exhibits an orthorhombic structure above 172 +- 7 kbars, GaP a tetragonal structure above 215 +- 8 kbars, and AlSb an orthorhombic structure above 77 +- 5 kbars. Although the space groups of these latter three high pressure polymorphs have not been determined unequivocally, mainly due to the apparent presence of crystalline defects, some possible models are described for these high pressure structures. Lastly, a comparison of the existing phase transition data with the theoretical diagrams of Zunger, based on pseudopotential length scales, indicates that it may be possible to predict the high pressure polymorphs of crystals with diamond or cubic zincblende structures at ambient conditions

  5. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Masayo; Yamamoto, Masaki; Kumasaka, Takashi; Sato, Kazumichi; Toyokawa, Hidenori; Aries, Ian F.; Jerram, Paul A.; Ueki, Tatzuo

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance

  6. A multiple CCD X-ray detector and its first operation with synchrotron radiation X-ray beam

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M; Kumasaka, T; Sato, K; Toyokawa, H; Aries, I F; Jerram, P A; Ueki, T

    1999-01-01

    A 4x4 array structure of 16 identical CCD X-ray detector modules, called the multiple CCD X-ray detector system (MCCDX), was submitted to its first synchrotron radiation experiment at the protein crystallography station of the RIKEN beamline (BL45XU) at the SPring-8 facility. An X-ray diffraction pattern of cholesterol powder was specifically taken in order to investigate the overall system performance.

  7. Applications of synchrotron X-rays in microelectronics industry research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan-Sweet, Jean L.; Detavernier, Christophe; Lavoie, Christian; Mooney, Patricia M.; Toney, Michael F.

    2005-01-01

    The high flux and density of X-rays produced at synchrotrons provide the microelectronics industry with a powerful probe of the structure and behavior of a wide array of solid materials that are being developed for use in devices of the future. They also are of great use in determining why currently-used materials and processes sometimes fail. This paper describes the X20 X-ray beamline facility operated by IBM at the National Synchrotron Light Source, and presents a series of three industry challenges and results that illustrate the variety of techniques used and problems addressed. The value of this research ranges from solving short-term, technically specific problems to increasing our academic understanding of materials in general. Techniques discussed include high-resolution diffraction, time-resolved diffraction, texture measurements, and grazing-incidence diffraction

  8. Unusual thermal expansion of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4}: A variable temperature synchrotron X-ray diffraction study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ranjbar, Ben; Kennedy, Brendan J.

    2015-12-15

    The structure of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} has been studied between 20 and 1273 K using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} undergoes an apparently continuous transition from I4{sub 1}/acd to I4/mmm near 1123 K. The cooperative tilting of the corner sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra in I4{sub 1}/acd results in highly anisotropic and unusual thermal expansion behavior with negative thermal expansion along the c-axis. - Graphical abstract: The progressive reduction in the magnitude of the tilting of the corner sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra in Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} results in negative thermal expansion along the c-axis before undergoing an apparently continuous transition from I4{sub 1}/acd to I4/mmm near 1123 K. - Highlights: • Thermal expansion of Sr{sub 2}IrO{sub 4} was studied using Synchrotron-XRD. • Unusual negative thermal expansion along c-axis observed. • I4{sub 1}/acd→I4/mmm phase transition detected near 1120 K. • Tilting of the corner sharing IrO{sub 6} octahedra related to the observed NTE.

  9. The T2 phase in the Nb–Si–B system studied by ab initio calculations and synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joubert, J.-M.; Colinet, C.; Rodrigues, G.; Suzuki, P.A.; Nunes, C.A.; Coelho, G.C.; Tedenac, J.-C.

    2012-01-01

    The solid solution based on Nb 5 Si 3 (Cr 5 B 3 structure type, D8 l , tI32, I4/mcm, No140, a=6.5767 Å, c=11.8967 Å) in the Nb–Si–B system was studied from the structural and thermodynamic point of view both experimentally and by ab initio calculations. Rietveld refinement of powder X-ray synchrotron data allowed to determine the boron to silicon substitution mechanism and the structural parameters. Ab initio calculations of different ordered compounds and selected disordered alloys allowed to obtain in addition to the enthalpy of formation of the solution, substitution mechanism and structural parameters which are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The stability of the phase is discussed. - Graphial abstract: Valence-charge electron localization function in the z=0 plane of the D8 l structure for the ordered compound Nb 5 SiB 2 . Highlights: ► Coupling between ab initio data and experimental results from synchrotron powder diffraction. ► Excellent agreement between the two techniques for the site occupancies and internal coordinates. ► Explanation of the phase stability up to Nb 5 SiB 2 .

  10. Interfacial reaction pathways and kinetics during annealing of 111-textured Al/TiN bilayers: A synchrotron x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, J.-S.; Desjardins, P.; Lavoie, C.; Petrov, I.; Cabral, C. Jr.; Greene, J. E.

    2001-01-01

    Growth of TiN layers in most diffusion-barrier applications is limited to deposition temperatures T s s =450 deg. C on SiO 2 by ultrahigh vacuum reactive magnetron sputter deposition in pure N 2 . Al overlayers, 160 nm thick with inherited 111 preferred orientation, were then deposited at T s =100 deg. C without breaking vacuum. The as-deposited TiN layer is underdense due to the low deposition temperature (T s /T m ≅0.23 in which T m is the melting point) resulting in kinetically limited adatom mobilities leading to atomic shadowing which, in turn, results in a columnar microstructure with both inter- and intracolumnar voids. The Al overlayer is fully dense. Synchrotron x-ray diffraction was used to follow interfacial reaction kinetics during postdeposition annealing of the 111-textured Al/TiN bilayers as a function of time (t a =12-1200 s) and temperature (T a =440-550 deg. C). Changes in bilayer microstructure and microchemistry were investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and scanning TEM to obtain compositional maps of plan-view and cross-sectional specimens. Interfacial reaction during annealing is initiated at the Al/TiN interface. Al diffuses rapidly into TiN voids during anneals at temperatures ∼ 3 Ti at the interface. Al 3 Ti exhibits a relatively planar growth front extending toward the Al free surface. Analyses of time-dependent x-ray diffraction peak intensities during isothermal annealing as a function of temperature show that Al 3 Ti growth kinetics are, for the entire temperature range investigated, diffusion limited with an activation energy of 1.5±0.2 eV

  11. X-ray diffraction computed tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harding, G.; Kosanetzky, J.; Neitzel, U.

    1987-01-01

    Coherent scattering of x-ray photons leads to the phenomenon of x-ray diffraction, which is widely used for determining atomic structure in materials science. A technique [x-ray diffraction computed tomography (CT)] is described, analogous to conventional CT, in which the x-ray diffraction properties of a stack of two-dimensional object sections may be imaged. The technique has been investigated using a first generation (single pencil beam) CT scanner to measure small angle coherent scatter, in addition to the customary transmitted radiation. Diffraction data from a standard CT performance phantom obtained with this new technique and with an x-ray diffractometer are compared. The agreement is satisfactory bearing in mind the poor momentum resolution of our apparatus. The dose and sensitivity of x-ray diffraction CT are compared with those of conventional transmission CT. Diffraction patterns of some biological tissues and plastics presented in a companion paper indicate the potential of x-ray diffraction CT for tissue discrimination and material characterization. Finally, possibilities for refinement of the technique by improving the momentum resolution are discussed

  12. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval'chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A.

    2016-09-01

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  13. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koval’chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu.; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  14. X-ray and synchrotron methods in studies of cultural heritage sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koval’chuk, M. V.; Yatsishina, E. B.; Blagov, A. E.; Tereshchenko, E. Yu., E-mail: elenatereschenko@yandex.ru; Prosekov, P. A.; Dyakova, Yu. A. [National Research Centre “Kurchatov Institute” (Russian Federation)

    2016-09-15

    X-ray and synchrotron methods that are most widely used in studies of cultural heritage objects (including archaeological sites)—X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray spectroscopy, and visualization techniques— have been considered. The reported examples show high efficiency and informativeness of natural science studies when solving most diverse problems of archaeology, history, the study of art, museology, etc.

  15. X-Ray Diffractive Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Brian; Li, Mary; Skinner, Gerald

    2013-01-01

    X-ray optics were fabricated with the capability of imaging solar x-ray sources with better than 0.1 arcsecond angular resolution, over an order of magnitude finer than is currently possible. Such images would provide a new window into the little-understood energy release and particle acceleration regions in solar flares. They constitute one of the most promising ways to probe these regions in the solar atmosphere with the sensitivity and angular resolution needed to better understand the physical processes involved. A circular slit structure with widths as fine as 0.85 micron etched in a silicon wafer 8 microns thick forms a phase zone plate version of a Fresnel lens capable of focusing approx. =.6 keV x-rays. The focal length of the 3-cm diameter lenses is 100 microns, and the angular resolution capability is better than 0.1 arcsecond. Such phase zone plates were fabricated in Goddard fs Detector Development Lab. (DDL) and tested at the Goddard 600-microns x-ray test facility. The test data verified that the desired angular resolution and throughput efficiency were achieved.

  16. Two-dimensional x-ray diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    He, Bob B

    2009-01-01

    Written by one of the pioneers of 2D X-Ray Diffraction, this useful guide covers the fundamentals, experimental methods and applications of two-dimensional x-ray diffraction, including geometry convention, x-ray source and optics, two-dimensional detectors, diffraction data interpretation, and configurations for various applications, such as phase identification, texture, stress, microstructure analysis, crystallinity, thin film analysis and combinatorial screening. Experimental examples in materials research, pharmaceuticals, and forensics are also given. This presents a key resource to resea

  17. X-ray diffraction 2 - diffraction principles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, B.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The computation of powder diffraction intensities is based on the principle that the powder pattern comprises the summation of the intensity contributions from each of the crystallites (or single crystals) in the material. Therefore, it is of value for powder diffractionists to appreciate the form of the expression for calculating single crystal diffraction pattern intensities. This knowledge is especially important for Rietveld analysis practitioners in terms of the (i) mathematics of the method and (ii) retrieving single crystal structure data from the literature. We consider the integrated intensity from a small single crystal being rotated at velocity ω through the Bragg angle θ for reflection (hkl).... I(hkl) = [l o /ω]. [e 4 /m 2 c 4 ]. [λ 3 δV F(hkl) 2 /υ 2 ].[(1+cos 2 2θ)/2sin2θ] where e, m and c are the usual fundamental constants; λ is the x-ray wavelength, δV is the crystallite volume; F(hkl) is the structure factor; υ is the unit cell volume; and (1+cos 2 θ)/2sin2θ] is the Lorentz-polarisation factor for an unpolarised incident beam. The expression does not include a contribution for extinction. The influence of factors λ, δV, F(hkl) and υ on the intensities should be appreciated by powder diffractionists, especially the structure factor, F(hkl), which is responsible for the fingerprint nature of diffraction patterns, such as the rise and fall of intensity from peak to peak. The structure factor expression represents the summation of the scattered waves from each of the j scattering centres (i e atoms) in the unit cell: F(hkl) Σ f j exp[2πi (h.x j +k.y i +l. z i )] T j . Symbol f is the scattering factor (representing the atom-type scattering efficiency); (x, y, z) are the fractional position coordinates of atom j within the unit cell; and T is the thermal vibration factor for the atom given by: T j = 8π 2 2 > sin 2 θ/λ 2 with 2 > being the mean-square vibration amplitude of the atom (assumed to be isotropic). The

  18. An attempt of in vivo X-ray diffraction analysis of kidney stones with the use of synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancharov, A.I. [Institute of Solid State Chemistry and Mechanochemistry SB RAS, Kutateladze str.18, Novosibirsk 630218 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ancharov@mail.ru; Nizovskii, A.I. [Boreskov institute of catalysis SB RAS, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Gridnev, S.A. [Central city hospital, Berdsk (Russian Federation); Feofilov, I.V. [State regional clinical hospital, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Vichkanov, A.N. [State regional clinical hospital, Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-05-01

    Estimation of opportunities of the direct analysis of phase structure kidney stones directly in an organism of the patient with the use of synchrotron radiations (SR). Carrying out of experiments on special modelled object 'phantom'. Estimation of the radiation dose.

  19. Stress distribution during cold compression of a quartz aggregate using synchrotron X-ray diffraction: Observed yielding, damage, and grain crushing: STRESS DISTRIBUTION OF QUARTZ AGGREGATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheung, C. S. N. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Geological Engineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison Wisconsin USA; Weidner, D. J. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Li, L. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Meredith, P. G. [Rock and Ice Physics Laboratory, Department of Earth Sciences, University College London, London UK; Chen, H. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Whitaker, M. L. [Mineral Physics Institute, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA; Chen, X. [Chemistry Department, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook New York USA

    2017-04-01

    We report new experimental results that quantify the stress distribution within a quartz aggregate during pore collapse and grain crushing. The samples were probed with synchrotron X-ray diffraction as they were compressed in a multianvil deformation apparatus at room temperature from low pressure (tens of megapascal) to pressures of a few gigapascal. In such a material, stress is likely to concentrate at grain-to-grain contacts and vanish where grains are bounded by open porosity. Therefore, internal stress is likely to vary significantly from point to point in such an aggregate, and hence, it is important to understand both the heterogeneity and anisotropy of such variation with respect to the externally applied stress. In our quartz aggregate (grain size of ~4 μm), the measured diffraction peaks broaden asymmetrically at low pressure (tens of megapascal), suggesting that open pores are still a dominant characteristic of grain boundaries. In contrast, a reference sample of novaculite (a highly dense quartz polycrystal, grain size of ~6–9 μm) showed virtually no peak broadening with increasing pressure. In the quartz aggregate, we observed significant deviation in the pressure-volume curves in the range of P = 400–600 MPa. We suggest that this marks the onset of grain crushing (generally denoted as P* in the rock mechanic literature), which is commonly reported to occur in sandstones at pressures of this order, in general agreement with a Hertzian analysis of fracturing at grain contacts.

  20. A synchrotron X-ray diffraction deconvolution method for the measurement of residual stress in thermal barrier coatings as a function of depth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C; Jacques, S D M; Chen, Y; Daisenberger, D; Xiao, P; Markocsan, N; Nylen, P; Cernik, R J

    2016-12-01

    The average residual stress distribution as a function of depth in an air plasma-sprayed yttria stabilized zirconia top coat used in thermal barrier coating (TBC) systems was measured using synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction in reflection geometry on station I15 at Diamond Light Source, UK, employing a series of incidence angles. The stress values were calculated from data deconvoluted from diffraction patterns collected at increasing depths. The stress was found to be compressive through the thickness of the TBC and a fluctuation in the trend of the stress profile was indicated in some samples. Typically this fluctuation was observed to increase from the surface to the middle of the coating, decrease a little and then increase again towards the interface. The stress at the interface region was observed to be around 300 MPa, which agrees well with the reported values. The trend of the observed residual stress was found to be related to the crack distribution in the samples, in particular a large crack propagating from the middle of the coating. The method shows promise for the development of a nondestructive test for as-manufactured samples.

  1. Chemical crystallography with pulsed neutrons and synchrotron x-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carrondo, M.A.; Jeffrey, G.A.

    1988-01-01

    Solid-state chemists and physicists, crystallographers and molecular biologists who are using or who plan to use the special properties of pulsed neutron spallation and synchrotron X-ray sources will find this book invaluable. Those scientists who have not yet gained experience in working with such sources will find the basic physics of the radiations, their production and their scattering properties explained, together with descriptions of the different types of diffraction experiments which use them

  2. Microstructure evolution in copper under severe plastic deformation detected by in situ X-ray diffraction using monochromatic synchrotron light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kilmametov, A.R. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, K. Marx St. 12, Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation); Vaughan, G. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facilities ESRF, Grenoble (France); Yavari, A.R.; LeMoulec, A. [Euronano, LTPCM-CNRS umr 5614, Institut National Polytechnique de Grenoble, 38402 St-Martin-d' Heres (France); Botta, W.J. [Depto. Engenharia de Materiais, Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP, Brazil. 3UNIVA, Av. Shishima Hifumi, 2911 Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Valiev, R.Z. [Institute of Physics of Advanced Materials, Ufa State Aviation Technical University, K. Marx St. 12, Ufa 450000 (Russian Federation)], E-mail: rzvaliev@mail.rb.ru

    2009-03-15

    Microstructure evolution in severely deformed Cu has been investigated using high-energy synchrotron light during in situ high-pressure torsion (HPT) at room temperature. Relative changes in broadening of Bragg peaks and crystal lattice expansion were studied in the loading-unloading regime of torsion straining. Experimental results revealed fast relaxation (on the order of hundred of seconds) that occurred due to annihilation of HPT-induced crystal lattice defects, which were generated directly during deformation. The kinetics of relaxation is probably diffusion-controlled; therefore, the enhanced diffusivity can be explained by extremely high excess vacancy concentration, which is usually achieved at thermal equilibrium near the melting point.

  3. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging systems with fluorescence techniques was developed for biomedical researches in Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory. An X-ray fluorescence microtomography system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray microfluorescence system was implemented to ...

  4. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging systems with fluorescence techniques was developed for biomedical researches in Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory. An X-ray fluorescence microtomography system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray microfluorescence system was implemented to ...

  5. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction of ferroelastic La0.8Ca0.2CoO3 ceramics during uniaxial compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vullum, Per Erik; Mastin, Johann; Wright, Jonathan; Einarsrud, Mari-Ann; Holmestad, Randi; Grande, Tor

    2006-01-01

    Uniaxial compression of rhombohedral La 0.8 Ca 0.2 CoO 3 ceramics has been studied in situ using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The intensities of Bragg reflections parallel and perpendicular to the stress field were simultaneously detected as a function of the stress. Reorientation of ferroelastic domains due to the uniaxial stress was demonstrated. With increasing stress the volume fraction of domains with the hexagonal c-axis parallel to the stress axis increased at the expense of domains with the c-axis perpendicular to the stress axis. The strain in the polycrystalline materials evolved unevenly with increasing stress due to crystallographic anisotropy. In energetically favourable domains with the c-axis parallel to the stress axis, the rhombohedral distortion from cubic symmetry increased, while the crystal structure became closer to cubic in domains with the c-axis perpendicular to the stress. Successive compression/decompression cycles to higher maximum stress resulted in a higher volume fraction of reoriented domains both at maximum stress and after decompression

  6. In situ electrochemical impedance spectroscopy/synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction-A powerful new technique for the characterization of electrochemical surfaces and interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Marco, Roland; Jiang, Z.-T.; Martizano, Jay; Lowe, Alex; Pejcic, Bobby; Riessen, Arie van

    2006-01-01

    A marriage of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and in situ synchrotron radiation grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (SR-GIXRD) has provided a powerful new technique for the elucidation of the mechanistic chemistry of electrochemical systems. In this study, EIS/SR-GIXRD has been used to investigate the influence of metal ion buffer calibration ligands, along with natural organic ligands in seawater, on the behaviour of the iron chalcogenide glass ion-selective electrode (ISE). The SR-GIXRD data demonstrated that citrate - a previously reported poor iron calibration ligand for the analysis of seawater - induced an instantaneous and total dissolution of crystalline GeSe and Sb 2 Se 3 in the modified surface layer (MSL) of the ISE, while natural organic ligands in seawater and a mixture of ligands in a mimetic seawater ligand system protected the MSL's crystalline inclusions of GeSe and Sb 2 Se 3 from oxidative attack. Expectedly, the EIS data showed that citrate induced a loss in the medium frequency time constant for the MSL of the ISE, while seawater's natural organic ligands and the mimetic ligand system preserved the medium frequency EIS response characteristics of the ISE's MSL. The new EIS/SR-GIXRD technique has provided insights into the suitability of iron calibration ligands for the analysis of iron in seawater

  7. Experimental Charge Density in an Oxidized Trinuclear Iron Complex using 15 K Synchrotron and 100 K Conventional Single-Crystal X-ray Diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overgaard, J.; Larsen, F.; Timco, G.; Iversen, B.

    2009-01-01

    The experimental electron density distribution in a crystal consisting of the simplest conceivable trinuclear carboxylate-bridged iron-μ3-oxo dianion with two α-picolinium cations has been determined using both synchrotron (15 K) and conventional (100 K) X-ray diffraction data. The constituent trinuclear oxo-centered molecule consists of six 2-bridging formate groups between the iron pairs, while the axial ligand for all iron atoms is another formate group. The compound {(Fe3O(HCOO)6(HCOO)3)2-·H2O·2(α-CH3NC5H5)+}, ( 1) crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P21/m with charge assisted hydrogen bonds linking the α-picolinium cations to the trinuclear groups. The chemical bonding in the weakly asymmetric Fe3O-core of 1 has been examined through the use of the quantum theory of atoms in molecules, and in combination with experimental d-orbital populations, a significant electron sharing is observed between the Fe atoms and the central oxygen. The central oxygen exhibits clear sp2 hybridization, and the iron atoms have valence shell charge concentrations in all metal-ligand bond directions. The relative bond strengths are evaluated based upon the charge density distribution and found to be in accordance with the geometrical results. Integrated group charges follow expectations from formal chemical valences.

  8. Trace elements in natural azurite pigments found in illuminated manuscript leaves investigated by synchrotron x-ray fluorescence and diffraction mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smieska, Louisa M.; Woll, Arthur R. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source, Wilson Laboratory, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mullett, Ruth [Cornell University, Medieval Studies Program, Ithaca, NY (United States); Ferri, Laurent [Cornell University, Cornell Library Rare and Manuscript Collections, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2017-07-15

    We present trace-element and composition analysis of azurite pigments in six illuminated manuscript leaves, dating from the thirteenth to sixteenth century, using synchrotron-based, large-area x-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and diffraction (SR-XRD) mapping. SR-XRF mapping reveals several trace elements correlated with azurite, including arsenic, zirconium, antimony, barium, and bismuth, that appear in multiple manuscripts but were not always detected by point XRF. Within some manuscript leaves, variations in the concentration of trace elements associated with azurite coincide with distinct regions of the illuminations, suggesting systematic differences in azurite preparation or purification. Variations of the trace element concentrations in azurite are greater among different manuscript leaves than the variations within each individual leaf, suggesting the possibility that such impurities reflect distinct mineralogical/geologic sources. SR-XRD maps collected simultaneously with the SR-XRF maps confirm the identification of azurite regions and are consistent with impurities found in natural mineral sources of azurite. In general, our results suggest the feasibility of using azurite trace element analysis for provenance studies of illuminated manuscript fragments, and demonstrate the value of XRF mapping in non-destructive determination of trace element concentrations within a single pigment. (orig.)

  9. High-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements of simple bending of pseudoelastic NiTi shape memory alloy wires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Baozhuo; Young, Marcus L.

    2016-05-23

    Many technological applications of austenitic shape memory alloys (SMAs) involve cyclical mechanical loading and unloading in order to take advantage of pseudoelasticity. In this paper, we investigated the effect of mechanical bending of pseudoelastic NiTi SMA wires using high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD). Differential scanning calorimetry was performed to identify the phase transformation temperatures. Scanning electron microscopy images show that micro-cracks in compressive regions of the wire propagate with increasing bend angle, while tensile regions tend not to exhibit crack propagation. SR-XRD patterns were analyzed to study the phase transformation and investigate micromechanical properties. By observing the various diffraction peaks such as the austenite (200) and the martensite (${\\bar 1}12$), (${\\bar 1}03$), (${\\bar 1}11$), and (101) planes, intensities and residual strain values exhibit strong anisotropy, depending upon whether the sample is in compression or tension during bending.

  10. Advances in martensitic transformations in Cu-based shape memory alloys achieved by in situ neutron and synchrotron X-ray diffraction methods

    OpenAIRE

    MALARD , Benoît; Sittner , Petr; Berveiller , Sophie; Patoor , Etienne

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This article deals with the application of several X-ray and neutron diffraction methods to investigate the mechanics of a stress induced martensitic transformation in Cu-based shape memory alloy polycrystals. It puts experimental results obtained by two different research groups on different length scales into context with the mechanics of stress induced martensitic transformation in polycrystalline environment.

  11. Synchrotron x-ray microbeam characteristics for x-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iida, Atsuo; Noma, Takashi

    1995-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using a synchrotron x-ray microprobe has become an indispensable technique for non-destructive micro-analysis. One of the most important parameters that characterize the x-ray microbeam system for x-ray fluorescence analysis is the beam size. For practical analysis, however, the photon flux, the energy resolution and the available energy range are also crucial. Three types of x-ray microbeam systems, including monochromatic and continuum excitation systems, were compared with reference to the sensitivity, the minimum detection limit and the applicability to various types of x-ray spectroscopic analysis. 16 refs., 5 figs

  12. X-ray filter for x-ray powder diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinsheimer, John Jay; Conley, Raymond P.; Bouet, Nathalie C. D.; Dooryhee, Eric; Ghose, Sanjit

    2018-01-23

    Technologies are described for apparatus, methods and systems effective for filtering. The filters may comprise a first plate. The first plate may include an x-ray absorbing material and walls defining first slits. The first slits may include arc shaped openings through the first plate. The walls of the first plate may be configured to absorb at least some of first x-rays when the first x-rays are incident on the x-ray absorbing material, and to output second x-rays. The filters may comprise a second plate spaced from the first plate. The second plate may include the x-ray absorbing material and walls defining second slits. The second slits may include arc shaped openings through the second plate. The walls of the second plate may be configured to absorb at least some of second x-rays and to output third x-rays.

  13. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Antunes, A. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, USP, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: antunes@if.usp.br; Hoennicke, M.G. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil); Safatle, A.M.V. [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, USP, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Cusatis, C. [LORXI, Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba (Brazil); Moraes Barros, P.S. [Faculdade de Medicina Veterinaria e Zootecnia, USP, 05508-900 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Morelhao, S.L. [Departamento de Fisica Aplicada, USP, CP 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2005-08-15

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed.

  14. Diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging of mammals crystalline lens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antunes, A.; Hoennicke, M.G.; Safatle, A.M.V.; Cusatis, C.; Moraes Barros, P.S.; Morelhao, S.L.

    2005-01-01

    Crystalline lenses are transparent biological materials where the organization of the lens fibers can also be affected by changes at molecular level, and therefore the structure and morphology of the tissue can be correlated to the loss of transparency of the lens. In this work, internal structure of mammal lenses regarding the long-range ordering of the fibers are investigated by diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) radiography. Moreover, DEI and absorption X-ray synchrotron radiographs for healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are compared. Significant differences in healthy and cataractous crystalline lenses are observed

  15. Time-resolved materials science opportunities using synchrotron x-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, B.C.; Tischler, J.Z.

    1995-06-01

    The high brightness, high intensity, and pulsed time-structure of synchrotron sources provide new opportunities for time-resolved x-ray diffraction investigations. With third generation synchrotron sources coming on line, high brilliance and high brightness are now available in x-ray beams with the highest flux. In addition to the high average flux, the instantaneous flux available in synchrotron beams is greatly enhanced by the pulsed time structure, which consists of short bursts of x-rays that are separated by ∼tens to hundreds of nanoseconds. Time-resolved one- and two-dimensional position sensitive detection techniques that take advantage of synchrotron radiation for materials science x-ray diffraction investigations are presented, and time resolved materials science applications are discussed in terms of recent diffraction and spectroscopy results and materials research opportunities

  16. Precession X-ray diffraction chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieder, M.

    1978-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction chamber is described whose design allows the tilting of the goniometric head 90deg along the axis normal to the axis of precession. Images may thus be made in the reverse reflexion region and of reciprocal networks in any arbitrary direction with a single adhesion of the crystal. (H.S.)

  17. Determination of organic crystal structures by X ray powder diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    McBride, L

    2000-01-01

    The crystal structure of Ibuprofen has been solved from synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data using a genetic algorithm (GA). The performance of the GA is improved by incorporating prior chemical information in the form of hard limits on the values that can be taken by the flexible torsion angles within the molecule. Powder X-ray diffraction data were collected for the anti-convulsant compounds remacemide, remacemide nitrate and remacemide acetate at 130 K on BM 16 at the X-ray European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble. High quality crystal structures were obtained using data collected to a resolution of typically 1.5 A. The structure determinations were performed using a simulated annealing (SA) method and constrained Rietveld refinements for the structures converged to chi sup 2 values of 1.64, 1.84 and 1.76 for the free base, nitrate and acetate respectively. The previously unknown crystal structure of the drug famotidine Form B has been solved using X-ray powder diffraction data colle...

  18. Diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MEMS-based X-ray optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, Daniel; Shenoy, Gopal; Wang, Jin; Walko, Donald A.; Jung, Il-Woong; Mukhopadhyay, Deepkishore

    2016-08-09

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses using MicroElectroMechanical systems (MEMS) based diffractive optics. An oscillating crystalline MEMS device generates a controllable time-window for diffraction of the incident X-ray radiation. The Bragg-diffraction leveraged modulation of X-ray pulses includes isolating a particular pulse, spatially separating individual pulses, and spreading a single pulse from an X-ray pulse-train.

  19. X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation on the G.I.L.D.A. beam line at the E.S.R.F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balerna, A. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy); Meneghini, C. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)]|[INFM, Genoa (Italy); Bordoni, S. [Rome Univ. `Tor Vergata` (Italy). Dip. di Fisica; Mobilio, S. [Rome Univ. III (Italy). Dip. di Fisica `E. Amaldi`

    1996-09-01

    The aim of this lecture is to make a short introduction on Synchrotron radiation, its history and main properties. The main components of a synchrotron radiation beam line will be described. The Italian beam line, General purpose Italian beam line Line for Diffraction and Absorption (G.I.L.D.A.) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (E.S.R.F.) in Grenoble will be used as an example. The G.I.L.D.A. diffractometer will be described in detail reporting also some experimental results.

  20. X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation on the G.I.L.D.A. beam line at the E.S.R.F

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balerna, A.; Bordoni, S.; Mobilio, S.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this lecture is to make a short introduction on Synchrotron radiation, its history and main properties. The main components of a synchrotron radiation beam line will be described. The Italian beam line, General purpose Italian beam line Line for Diffraction and Absorption (G.I.L.D.A.) at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (E.S.R.F.) in Grenoble will be used as an example. The G.I.L.D.A. diffractometer will be described in detail reporting also some experimental results

  1. Polarisation resonance in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodman, P.; Paterson, D.; Matheson, S.

    1994-01-01

    The study of crystal structures by means of dynamic X-ray diffraction has placed a challenge to theoreticians to revise the X-ray diffraction theory based on Maxwell's equation. In this paper the feasibility of using 'polarisation resonance' as a tool in the determination of absolute configuration for asymmetric structures is investigated. Two (left- and right-handed), σ + and σ- , circular polarization states for 3-beam conditions are considered. Moreover, extending interaction into the 3 rd. dimension (normal to the beam) opens the possibility of absolute configuration determination of asymmetric structures in 3 dimensions. The computational scheme used is shown in terms of scattering diagrams. 7 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  2. Basic of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacovazzo, C.

    1996-01-01

    The basic concepts of X-ray diffraction may be more easily understood if it is made preliminary use of a mathematical background. In these pages the authors will first define the delta function and its use for the representation of a lattice. Then the concepts of Fourier transform and convolution are given. At the end of this talk one should realize that a crystal is the convolution of the lattice with a function representing the content of the unit cell

  3. Basic of X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giacovazzo, C. [Bari Univ. (Italy). Dip. Geomineralogico

    1996-09-01

    The basic concepts of X-ray diffraction may be more easily understood if it is made preliminary use of a mathematical background. In these pages the authors will first define the delta function and its use for the representation of a lattice. Then the concepts of Fourier transform and convolution are given. At the end of this talk one should realize that a crystal is the convolution of the lattice with a function representing the content of the unit cell.

  4. Optoelectronic Picosecond Detection of Synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Durbin, Stephen M. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2017-08-04

    The goal of this research program was to develop a detector that would measure x-ray time profiles with picosecond resolution. This was specifically aimed for use at x-ray synchrotrons, where x-ray pulse profiles have Gaussian time spreads of 50-100 ps (FWHM), so the successful development of such a detector with picosecond resolution would permit x-ray synchrotron studies to break through the pulse width barrier. That is, synchrotron time-resolved studies are currently limited to pump-probe studies that cannot reveal dynamics faster than ~50 ps, whereas the proposed detector would push this into the physically important 1 ps domain. The results of this research effort, described in detail below, are twofold: 1) the original plan to rely on converting electronic signals from a semiconductor sensor into an optical signal proved to be insufficient for generating signals with the necessary time resolution and sensitivity to be widely applicable; and 2) an all-optical method was discovered whereby the x-rays are directly absorbed in an optoelectronic material, lithium tantalate, which can then be probed by laser pulses with the desired picosecond sensitivity for detection of synchrotron x-rays. This research program has also produced new fundamental understanding of the interaction of x-rays and optical lasers in materials that has now created a viable path for true picosecond detection of synchrotron x-rays.

  5. X-ray diffraction and chemical bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bats, J.W.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical bonds are investigated in sulfamic acid (H 3 N-SO 3 ), sodium sulfonlate dihydrate (H 2 NC 6 H 4 SO 3 Na.2H 2 O), 2,5-dimercaptothiadiazole (HS-C 2 N 2 S-SH), sodium cyanide dihydrate (NaCN.2H 2 O), sodium thiocyanate (NaSCN) and ammonium thiocyanate (NH 4 SCN) by X-ray diffraction, and if necessary completed with neutron diffraction. Crystal structures and electron densities are determined together with bond length and angles. Also the effects of thermal motion are discussed

  6. Magnetic X-Ray Scattering with Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moncton, D. E.; Gibbs, D.; Bohr, Jakob

    1986-01-01

    With the availability of high-brilliance synchrotron radiation from multiple wigglers, magnetic X-ray scattering has become a powerful new probe of magnetic structure and phase transitions. Similar to the well-established magnetic neutron scattering technique, magnetic X-ray scattering methods have...

  7. Gas multidetector for neutron and X-ray diffraction studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allemand, R.

    1975-01-01

    In the context of nuclear imagery research the LETI is studying neutron, X-ray and γ-ray localisation detectors, the fields of application being neutron diffraction, X-ray diffraction and nuclear medicine. This report deals only with gas localisation methods, describing the physical results obtained in neutron and X-ray diffraction [fr

  8. High-pressure single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction of kainite (KMg(SO4) Cl 3H2O)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzareni, S.; Comodi, P.; Hanfland, M.

    2018-03-01

    Kainite (KMg(SO4) Cl 3H2O) is a "mixed-salt" sulfate from the group of evaporitic minerals more soluble than Ca-sulfate hydrate and NaCl. The compressibility and structural modifications of monoclinic (sp. gr. C2/m) kainite up to a pressure of 14 GPa were studied by high-pressure single-crystal synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Kainite remains stable over the investigated pressure range and no phase transition was recognised. The bulk modulus is K 0 = 31.6 (1) GPa, with K' fixed to 4, as obtained by fitting the P-volume data with a second-order Birch-Murnaghan EoS (BM2); instead of using a BM3 EoS, we obtained K 0 = 32.2(5) GPa, K' =3.8 (1). The linear moduli calculated for the lattice parameters fitting the data with a BM3 EoS are for a-axis M 0a = 117(4) GPa, Mpa = 11(1), for b-axis M 0b = 113(2) GPa, Mpc = 8.6(5), and c-axis M 0c = 68.2(3) GPa, Mpc = 14(1). Structure refinements showed a strong compression of the K polyhedra and in particular K(1) and K(3) polyhedra have similar polyhedral bulk moduli: K 0K(1) = 20.8(7) GPa, K'=4.8(3); K 0K(2) = 29(1) GPa, K'=8.1(6); K 0K(3) = 26(1) GPa, K'=4.2(4). The most compressible bond distances are K(1)-Cl(2) with a shortening of about 13%, K(1)-Cl(1) with a shortening of about 10%, K(3)-Ow(6) and K(3)-O8(B) both with a shortening of 9%. S-tetrahedra are almost incompressible and Mg-octahedra bulk moduli are K 0Mg(2) = 102(4) GPa, and K 0Mg(4) = 72(1) GPa, K 0Mg(1) = 41(4) GPa K'= 8.9(1.7), and K 0Mg(3) = 65(5) GPa K'= 10(2). The strain tensor analysis indicates that the most compressible direction of the kainite monoclinic structure is oriented 29.7(2)° from the c-axis in the (0 1 0) plane. The shortening of the K(1)-K(2) distance (from 4.219(4) Å at ambient P to 3.521(7) Å at 11.9 GPa) and the different compressibilities of the octahedra/tetrahedra may explain why the stiffer direction of kainite is in the a-c plane approximatively along the direction where K(1)-K(2) and Mg(4)-Mg(3)-Mg(4) polyhedra align. This may

  9. Application of X-rays and Synchrotron X Rays to Residual Stress Evaluation Near Surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pyzalla, Anke

    1999-01-01

    A nondestructive residual stress analysis can be performed using diffraction methods. The easiest accessible radiation is characteristic X radiation that has a penetration depth of ∼10 microm suitable for the determination of the residual stresses in near-surface layers. Special techniques have been developed, e.g., with respect to in situ analyses of the stress state in oxide layers and the residual stress analysis in coarse grained zones of steel welds or annealed Ni-base alloys. Depending on the size of the gauge volume, neutron diffraction can provide information at depths of tens of millimetres of steel and many tens of millimetres of Al. An alternative to the use of the characteristic synchrotron radiation is the use of a high-energy polychromatic beam in an energy dispersive arrangement, which gives access to higher penetration depths at still gauge volumes as small as 100 microm x 100 microm x 1 mm in steel rods of 15-mm diameter. The combination of neutrons with conventional X rays and monochromatic and polychromatic synchrotron radiation allows for a comprehensive investigation of the phase composition, the texture, and the residual stresses

  10. Diffraction anomalous fine structure using X-ray anomalous dispersion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soejima, Yuji; Kuwajima, Shuichiro

    1998-01-01

    A use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effects for structure investigation has recently been developed by using synchrotron radiation. One of the interesting method is the observation of anomalous fine structure which arise on diffraction intensity in energy region of incident X-ray at and higher than absorption edge. The phenomenon is so called Diffraction Anomalous Fine Structure (DAFS). DAFS originates in the same physical process an that of EXAFS: namely photoelectric effect at the corresponding atom and the interaction of photoelectron waves between the atom and neighboring atoms. In contrast with EXAFS, the method is available for only the crystalline materials, but shows effective advantages of the structure investigations by a use of diffraction: one is the site selectivity and the other is space selectivity. In the present study, demonstrations of a use of X-ray anomalous dispersion effect for the superstructure determination will be given for the case of PbZrO 3 , then recent trial investigations of DAFS in particular on the superlattice reflections will be introduced. In addition, we discuss about Forbidden Reflection near Edge Diffraction (FRED) which is more recently investigated as a new method of the structure analysis. (author)

  11. X-ray diffraction imaging of biological cells

    CERN Document Server

    Nakasako, Masayoshi

    2018-01-01

    In this book, the author describes the development of the experimental diffraction setup and structural analysis of non-crystalline particles from material science and biology. Recent advances in X-ray free electron laser (XFEL)-coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI) experiments allow for the structural analysis of non-crystalline particles to a resolution of 7 nm, and to a resolution of 20 nm for biological materials. Now XFEL-CXDI marks the dawn of a new era in structural analys of non-crystalline particles with dimensions larger than 100 nm, which was quite impossible in the 20th century. To conduct CXDI experiments in both synchrotron and XFEL facilities, the author has developed apparatuses, named KOTOBUKI-1 and TAKASAGO-6 for cryogenic diffraction experiments on frozen-hydrated non-crystalline particles at around 66 K. At the synchrotron facility, cryogenic diffraction experiments dramatically reduce radiation damage of specimen particles and allow tomography CXDI experiments. In addition, in XFEL ex...

  12. The measurement of stress and phase fraction distributions in pre and post-transition Zircaloy oxides using nano-beam synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swan, H., E-mail: helen.swan@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Blackmur, M.S., E-mail: matthew.s.blackmur@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Hyde, J.M., E-mail: jonathan.m.hyde@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Laferrere, A., E-mail: alice.laferrere@atkinsglobal.com [W.S.Atkins, The Hub, Aztec West, 500 Park Ave, Almondsbury, Bristol BS32 4RZ (United Kingdom); Ortner, S.R., E-mail: susan.r.ortner@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Styman, P.D., E-mail: paul.d.styman@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Building D5, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxfordshire, OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Staines, C., E-mail: cassie.staines@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, 102B, Stonehouse Park, Stonehouse, Gloucestershire, GL10 3UT (United Kingdom); Gass, M., E-mail: mhairi.gass@amecfw.com [Amec Foster Wheeler Clean Energy Europe, Walton House, Birchwood, WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Hulme, H., E-mail: helen.hulme@amecfw.com [Amec Foster Wheeler Clean Energy Europe, Walton House, Birchwood, WA3 6GA (United Kingdom); Cole-Baker, A., E-mail: aidan.cole-baker@rolls-royce.com [Rolls-Royce plc, PO Box 2000, Derby, DE21 7XX (United Kingdom); Frankel, P., E-mail: philipp.frankel@manchester.ac.uk [Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, The University of Manchester, Manchester, M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-15

    Zircaloy-4 oxide stress profiles and tetragonal:monoclinic oxide phase fraction distributions were studied using nano-beam transmission X-ray diffraction. Continuous stress relief and phase transformation during the first cycle of oxide growth was observed. The in-plane monoclinic stress was shown to relax strongly up to each transition, whereas in-plane tetragonal stress-relief (near the metal-oxide interface) was only observed post transition. The research demonstrates that plasticity in the metal and the development of a band of in-plane cracking both relax the monoclinic in-plane stress. The observations are consistent with a model of transition in which in-plane cracking becomes interlinked prior to transition. These cracks, combined with the development of cracks with a through-thickness component (driven primarily by plasticity in the metal) and/or a porous network of fine cracks (associated with phase transformation), form a percolation path through the oxide layer. The oxidising species can then percolate from the oxide surface to the metal/oxide interface, at which stage transition then ensues. - Highlights: • Measurement of stress in Zr-4 oxides using nano-beam transmission X-ray diffraction. • In-plane monoclinic stress relaxes strongly up to each transition. • In-plane tetragonal stress relaxation is only observed post transition. • Development of band of cracking is related to monoclinic in-plane stress relaxation. • Linking of in-plane cracking with through-plane crack/porosity leads to transition.

  13. Simultaneous probing of phase transformations in Ni-Ti thin film shape memory alloy by synchrotron radiation-based X-ray diffraction and electrical resistivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braz Fernandes, F.M. [CENIMAT/I3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Mahesh, K.K., E-mail: kkmahesh@rediffmail.com [CENIMAT/I3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Martins, R.M.S. [CENIMAT/I3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); IST/Instituto Tecnológico e Nuclear (IST/ITN), Universidade Técnica de Lisboa, EN10, 2696-953 Sacavém (Portugal); Centro de Física Nuclear da Universidade de Lisboa (CFNUL), Av. Prof. Gama Pinto 2, 1649-003 Lisboa (Portugal); Silva, R.J.C. [CENIMAT/I3N, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, 2829-516 Caparica (Portugal); Baehtz, C.; Borany, J. von [Institute of Ion Beam Physics and Materials Research, Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), P.O. Box 510119, 01314 Dresden (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    Nickel–Titanium (Ni–Ti) thin film shape memory alloys (SMAs) have been widely projected as novel materials which can be utilized in microdevices. Characterization of their physical properties and its correlation with phase transformations has been a challenging issue. In the present study, X-ray beam diffraction has been utilized to obtain the structural information at different temperatures while cooling. Simultaneously, electrical resistivity (ER) was measured in the phase transformation temperature range. The variation of ER and integral area of the individual diffraction peaks of the different phases as a function of temperature have been compared. A mismatch between the conventional interpretation of ER variation and the results of the XRD data has been clearly identified. - Highlights: ► Phase transformation characterization of Ni–Ti thin film SMA has been carried out. ► Simultaneous monitoring of the XRD and ER with temperature is performed. ► The variation of ER and integral area of the diffraction peaks have been compared. ► A shift of the transformation temperatures obtained by two techniques is discussed.

  14. A synchrotron radiation facility for x-ray astronomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, C.J.; Lewis, R.A.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    1997-01-01

    A proposal for an x-ray optics test facility based at a synchrotron radiation source is presented. The facility would incorporate a clean preparation area, and a large evacuable test area. The advantages of using a synchrotron as the source of the test radiation are discussed. These include the a...

  15. High-pressure synchrotron Mössbauer and X-ray diffraction studies: Exploring the structure-related valence fluctuation in EuNi{sub 2}P{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chunyu [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Natural Science Research Center, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Yu, Zhenhai, E-mail: yuzh@hpstar.ac.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Natural Science Research Center, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Bi, Wenli [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Department of Geology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Zhao, Jiyong; Hu, Michael Y. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Zhao, Jinggeng [Natural Science Research Center, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China); Wu, Wei [Beijing National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Luo, Jianlin [Beijing National Lab for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Yan, Hao, E-mail: yanhao@hpstar.ac.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Alp, Esen E. [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Liu, Haozhe, E-mail: haozhe.liu@hpstar.ac.cn [Center for High Pressure Science and Technology Advanced Research, Shanghai 201203 (China); Natural Science Research Center, Academy of Fundamental and Interdisciplinary Sciences, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150080 (China)

    2016-11-15

    The high-pressure effect on valence fluctuation of the ThCr{sub 2}Si{sub 2}-type intermetallic compound EuNi{sub 2}P{sub 2} has been investigated using in situ synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS). The isomer shift of {sup 151}Eu in EuNi{sub 2}P{sub 2} increases monotonically with increasing pressure up to 50 GPa, suggesting a valence transition of the Eu from mixed toward trivalent. The synchrotron angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction (AD-XRD) experiment shows that EuNi{sub 2}P{sub 2} remains in the tetragonal structure up to 32.5 GPa at room temperature. We propose that the evolutions of bonding distance with pressure have an obvious effect on the valence fluctuation.

  16. In situ synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction study of the early hydration of α-tricalcium phosphate/tricalcium silicate composite bone cement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morejon-Alonso, Loreley; Correa, Jose Raul, E-mail: lmorejon@fq.uh.cu [Departamento de Quimica General, Facultad de Quimica, Universidad de La Habana, UH (Cuba); Motisuke, Mariana [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (UNIFESP), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Carrodeguas, Raul Garcia [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), Campina Grande, PB (Brazil). Laboratorio de Avaliacao e Desenvolvimento de Biomateriais do Nordeste; Santos, Luis Alberto dos [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia. Departamento de Materiais

    2015-01-15

    Bioactivity, osteogenicity and mechanical properties of α-tricalcium phosphate (α-TCP) based phosphates cements can be improved by adding tricalcium silicate (C{sub 3}S); however, the addition of C{sub 3}S delays the precipitation and growth of calcium deficient hydroxyapatite (CDHA). Thus, the aim of this work was the study of in situ setting reaction of α-TCP/C{sub 3}S composite bone cement under high energy X-ray generated by a synchrotron source within the first 72h. The results showed that the addition of C{sub 3}S induces the precipitation of nanosized CDHA at early times depending on the added content. Calculated crystallite sizes showed that the higher the content of C{sub 3}S, the smaller the crystal size at the beginning of the precipitation. These results are different from those obtained by conventional XRD method, suggesting that the proposed technique is a powerful tool in determining the composition and extent of reaction of CPCs surfaces in real time. (author)

  17. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-15

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  18. Nano structured materials studied by coherent X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gulden, Johannes

    2013-03-01

    Structure determination with X-rays in crystallography is a rapidly evolving field. Crystallographic methods for structure determination are based on the assumptions about the crystallinity of the sample. It is vital to understand the structure of possible defects in the crystal, because they can influence the structure determination. All conventional methods to characterize defects require a modelling through simulated data. No direct methods exist to image the core of defects in crystals. Here a new method is proposed, which will enable to visualize the individual scatterers around and at defects in crystals. The method is based on coherent X-ray scattering. X-rays are perfectly suited since they can penetrate thick samples and buried structures can be investigated Recent developments increased the coherent flux of X-Ray sources such as synchrotrons by orders of magnitude. As a result, the use of the coherent properties of X-rays is emerging as a new aspect of X-ray science. New upcoming and operating X-ray laser sources will accelerate this trend. One new method which has the capacity to recover structural information from the coherently scattered photons is Coherent X-ray Diffraction Imaging (CXDI). The main focus of this thesis is the investigation of the structure and the dynamics of colloidal crystals. Colloidal crystals can be used as a model for atomic crystals in order to understand the growth and defect structure. Despite the large interest in these structures, many details are still unknown.Therefore, it is vital to develop new approaches to measure the core of defects in colloidal crystals. After an introduction into the basics of the field of coherent X-ray scattering, this thesis introduces a novel method, Small Angle Bragg Coherent Diffractive Imaging, (SAB-CDI). This new measurement technique which besides the relevance to colloidal crystals can be applied to a large variety of nano structured materials. To verify the experimental possibilities the

  19. X-ray diffraction imaging of material microstructures

    KAUST Repository

    Varga, Laszlo

    2016-10-20

    Various examples are provided for x-ray imaging of the microstructure of materials. In one example, a system for non-destructive material testing includes an x-ray source configured to generate a beam spot on a test item; a grid detector configured to receive x- rays diffracted from the test object; and a computing device configured to determine a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the test object. In another example, a method for determining a microstructure of a material includes illuminating a beam spot on the material with a beam of incident x-rays; detecting, with a grid detector, x-rays diffracted from the material; and determining, by a computing device, a microstructure image based at least in part upon a diffraction pattern of the x-rays diffracted from the material.

  20. X-ray diffraction of modulated structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsujimoto, T.; Hashimoto, K.; Saito, K.

    1977-01-01

    Modulated structures are regarded as a macrolattice, in which each lattice point is a ''unit region of concentration variation'' (abbreviated to ''unit region'') and an average lattice parameter is Qa 0 . The X-ray intensity diffracted from modulated structures, I/sub m(s) is given by I/sub m(s). I/sub d/(s). I/sub u/(s) is the scattering intensity from the ''unit region'' and I/sub u/(s) is that from the imaginary macrolattice in which each lattice point is the unit scattering factor. A region containing one zone-complex has been chosen as the ''unit region'' and the effects of the lattice spacing of the macrolattice and its disturbance on diffraction patterns have been discussed. When zone-complexes are small, I/sub m(s) is dominated by I/sub d/(s) and peaks of I/sub d/(s) are observed as side-bands or additional diffraction lines. The number of additional diffraction lines increases with an increase in Qa 0 and typical side-bands appear at a stage of this process. When the periodicity of the macrolattice is distrubed deeply or Qa 0 is large, I/sub u/(s) is observed directly as diffraction effects. The present theory explains reasonably the asymmetry of side-bands in position, the movement of main diffraction line with aging and the change of side-bands into diffraction lines of metastable phases during aging

  1. In-Situ Synchrotron X-ray Study of the Phase and Texture Evolution of Ceria and Superconductor Films Deposited by Chemical Solution Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yue, Zhao; Grivel, Jean-Claude; He, Dong

    2012-01-01

    In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry/differential ther......In situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction is used to study the phase and texture formation of ceria based films and superconductor films deposited by the chemical solution method on technical substrates. Combined analysis using in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry...

  2. UV-Visible Absorption Spectroscopy Enhanced X-ray Crystallography at Synchrotron and X-ray Free Electron Laser Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Aina E; Doukov, Tzanko; Soltis, Michael S

    2016-01-01

    This review describes the use of single crystal UV-Visible Absorption micro-Spectrophotometry (UV-Vis AS) to enhance the design and execution of X-ray crystallography experiments for structural investigations of reaction intermediates of redox active and photosensitive proteins. Considerations for UV-Vis AS measurements at the synchrotron and associated instrumentation are described. UV-Vis AS is useful to verify the intermediate state of an enzyme and to monitor the progression of reactions within crystals. Radiation induced redox changes within protein crystals may be monitored to devise effective diffraction data collection strategies. An overview of the specific effects of radiation damage on macromolecular crystals is presented along with data collection strategies that minimize these effects by combining data from multiple crystals used at the synchrotron and with the X-ray free electron laser.

  3. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Powder X-ray diffraction studies were carried out on doped lithium niobate for phase identification. High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique was used to study the crystalline quality through full-width at half-maximum values. The refractive index values are more for doped samples than for pure sample as determined by ...

  4. Synchrotron X-ray induced solution precipitation of nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, H J; Hwu, Y; Tsai, W L

    2003-01-01

    By irradiating a solution in electroless Ni deposition using synchrotron X-rays, Ni composite was found to nucleate homogeneously and eventually precipitate in the form of nanoparticles. The size of the nanoparticles precipitated is rather uniform (100-300 nm depending on the applied temperature). By the addition of an organic acid, well-dispersed nanoparticles could be effectively deposited on glass substrate. The hydrated electrons (e sub a sub q sup -), products of radiolysis of water molecules by synchrotron X-rays, may be responsible for the effective reduction of the metal ions, resulting in homogeneous nucleation and nanoparticle formation. Our results suggest that synchrotron X-ray can be used to induce solution precipitation of nanoparticles and therefore lead to a new method of producing nanostructured particles and coating.

  5. Micromirror-based manipulation of synchrotron x-ray beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walko, D. A.; Chen, Pice; Jung, I. W.; Lopez, D.; Schwartz, C. P.; Shenoy, G. K.; Wang, Jin

    2017-08-01

    Synchrotron beamlines typically use macroscopic, quasi-static optics to manipulate x-ray beams. We present the use of dynamic microelectromechanical systems-based optics (MEMS) to temporally modulate synchrotron x-ray beams. We demonstrate this concept using single-crystal torsional MEMS micromirrors oscillating at frequencies of 75 kHz. Such a MEMS micromirror, with lateral dimensions of a few hundred micrometers, can interact with x rays by operating in grazing-incidence reflection geometry; x rays are deflected only when an x-ray pulse is incident on the rotating micromirror under appropriate conditions, i.e., at an angle less than the critical angle for reflectivity. The time window for such deflections depends on the frequency and amplitude of the MEMS rotation. We demonstrate that reflection geometry can produce a time window of a few microseconds. We further demonstrate that MEMS optics can isolate x rays from a selected synchrotron bunch or group of bunches. With ray-trace simulations we explain the currently achievable time windows and suggest a path toward improvements.

  6. In situ defect annealing of swift heavy ion irradiated CeO2 and ThO2 using synchrotron X-ray diffraction and a hydrothermal diamond anvil cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palomares, Raul I.; Tracy, Cameron L.; Zhang, Fuxiang; Park, Changyong; Popov, Dmitry; Trautmann, Christina; Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2015-04-16

    Hydrothermal diamond anvil cells (HDACs) provide facile means for coupling synchrotron X-ray techniques with pressure up to 10 GPa and temperature up to 1300 K. This manuscript reports on an application of the HDAC as an ambient-pressure sample environment for performingin situdefect annealing and thermal expansion studies of swift heavy ion irradiated CeO2and ThO2using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The advantages of thein situHDAC technique over conventional annealing methods include rapid temperature ramping and quench times, high-resolution measurement capability, simultaneous annealing of multiple samples, and prolonged temperature and apparatus stability at high temperatures. Isochronal annealing between 300 and 1100 K revealed two-stage and one-stage defect recovery processes for irradiated CeO2and ThO2, respectively, indicating that the morphology of the defects produced by swift heavy ion irradiation of these two materials differs significantly. These results suggest that electronic configuration plays a major role in both the radiation-induced defect production and high-temperature defect recovery mechanisms of CeO2and ThO2.

  7. X-ray diffraction measurements on CuGeO3 under high pressures to 81 GPa using synchrotron radiation and imaging plates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ming, L C; Eto, T; Takeda, K; Kobayashi, Y; Suzuki, E; Endo, S; Sharma, S K; Jayaraman, A; Kikegawa, T

    2002-01-01

    Angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements using CuGeO 3 (I) and CuGeO 3 (III) as the starting materials were carried out to 81 and 31 GPa, respectively, at room temperature. Data for phase (I) show that phase transitions occur at ∼7, ∼14, and ∼22 GPa, respectively, corresponding to (I) → (II), (II) → (II'), and (II') → (VI) transitions, as reported previously. The tetragonal phase (VI) was found to be stable up to 81 GPa, the highest pressure determined in this study. The volume changes at the transition pressures are estimated to be of ∼5%, ∼0%, and ∼14% for (I) → (II), (II) → (II'), and (II') → (VI) transitions, respectively. Data from measurements where phase (III) was the starting material show that phase (III) first changes to phase (IV) at ∼7 GPa and then to (IV') at 13.5 GPa, and finally to phase (V) at ∼18 GPa, with volume changes of 1.5%, 0%, and 20%, respectively, at the transition pressure. The volume change of 20% at 18 GPa is consistent with the pyroxene-perovskite transition

  8. Highly efficient Ru/MnO2 nano-catalysts for Li-O2 batteries: Quantitative analysis of catalytic Li2O2 decomposition by operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Ma, Yue; Roberts, Matthew; Gustafsson, Torbjörn; Edström, Kristina; Zhu, Jiefang

    2017-06-01

    In-situ or operando quantitative analysis is very important for Li-O2 batteries, in order to properly, accurately and comprehensively evaluate electrocatalysts and characterize Li-O2 electrochemistry in real-time. Synchrotron XRD can provide much higher X-ray intensity and time resolution than traditional in-house diffractometers, and therefore can contribute to quantitative analysis for Li-O2 batteries. Here, operando synchrotron XRD is further developed to quantitatively study Li-O2 batteries with nano-catalysts, Ru/MnO2. The time-resolved oxygen evolution reaction (OER) kinetics for Li-O2 cells with Ru/MNT was systematically investigated using operando synchrotron radiation powder X-ray diffraction (SR-PXD). Li2O2 decomposition in the electrodes with Ru/MNT catalysts during galvanostatic and potentiostatic charge processes followed pseudo-zero-order kinetics and showed ideal Coulombic efficiency (close to 100%). Furthermore, it was found that the OER kinetics for a cell with 2 wt% Ru/MNT charged at a constant potential of 4.3 V was even faster than that for a cell with the same amount of pure Ru nanoparticles, which have been considered as a highly active catalyst for Li-O2 batteries. These results indicated that Ru/MNT with a special nanostructure represented a very efficient electrocatalyst for promoting the OER in Li-O2 batteries. We also demonstrate that synchrotron radiation XRD can "highlight" a way to quantitative analysis for Li-O2 batteries.

  9. [Clinical applications of synchrotron radiation X-ray].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uyama, C

    1994-09-01

    Synchrotron Radiation X-ray (SR X-ray) is an extremely strong X-ray source with a photon number more than 10(4) compared with that of the current X-ray tube. X-rays obtained by monochromatizing SR X-ray have been applied to new techniques for medical diagnosis. Several studies are now being conducted at the beam site for medical use at the Accumulation Ring of the High Energy Physics Research Institute, Tsukuba. Applications being studied include (1) energy subtraction coronary angiography. (2) microdetection of metas in samples excised from subjects. (3) monochromatic X-ray computed tomography and so on. Energy subtraction coronary angiography might have a safety advantage over the current selective coronary angiography. Microdetection of mandatory metals and poisonous heavy metals in in vivo samples contributes to the development of pathologic knowledge and clinical treatment of cancer and heavy metal toxications. Monochromatic X-ray CT is expected to detect diseases in the early stage due to increased accuracy in CT values.

  10. High-intensity laser synchrotron x-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.

    1995-10-01

    A laser interacting with a relativistic electron beam behaves like a virtual wiggler of an extremely short period equal to half of the laser wavelength. This approach opens a route to relatively compact, high-brightness x-ray sources alternative or complementary to conventional synchrotron light sources. Although not new, the Laser Synchrotron Light Source (LSLS) concept is still waiting for a convincing demonstration. Available at the BNL's Accelerator Test Facility (ATF), a high-brightness electron beam and the high-power C0 2 laser may be used as prototype LSLS brick stones. In a feasible demonstration experiment, 10-GW, 100-ps C0 2 laser beam will be brought to a head-on collision with a 10-ps, 0.5-nC, 70 MeV electron bunch. Flashes of well-collimated, up to 9.36-keV (∼ Angstrom) x-rays of 10-ps pulse duration, with a flux of ∼10 19 photons/sec will be produced via linear Compton backscattering. The x-ray spectrum is tunable proportionally to a variable e-beam energy. A natural short-term extension of the proposed experiment would be further enhancement of the x-ray flux to a 10 21 -10 22 photons/sec level, after the ongoing ATF CO 2 laser upgrade to 1 TW peak power and electron bunch shortening to 3 ps. The ATF LSLS x-ray beamline, exceeding by orders of magnitude the peak fluxes attained at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray storage ring, may become attractive for certain users, e.g., for biological x-ray microscopy. In addition, a terawatt CO 2 laser will enable harmonic multiplication of the x-ray spectrum via nonlinear Compton scattering

  11. A new miniature microchannel plate X-ray detector for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosemeier, R.G.; Green, R.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A state-of-the-art microchannel plate detector has been developed which allows real time X-ray imaging of X-ray diffraction as well as radiographic phenomenon. Advantages of the device include a 50 mm X-ray input, length less than 4'', and a weight of less than 1 lb. Since the use of synchrotron radiation is greatly facilitated by the capability of remote viewing of X-ray diffraction or radiographic images in real time, a prototype electro-optical system has been designed which couples the X-ray microchannel plate detector with a solid state television camera. Advantages of the miniature, lightweight, X-ray synchrotron camera include a large 50 mm X-ray input window, an output signal that is available in both analog format for display on a television monitor and in digital format for computer processing, and a completely modular design which allows all the components to be exchanged for other components optimally suited for the desired applications. (orig.)

  12. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donath, T.

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR μ CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR μ CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR μ CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR μ CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR μ CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  13. Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies on the intensity changes of the 5.9 and 5.1 nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscle during an isometric tetanus using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wakabayashi, K.; Tanaka, H.; Amemiya, Y.; Fujishima, A.; Kobayashi, T.; Hamanaka, T.; Sugi, H.; Mitsui, T.

    1985-01-01

    Time-resolved x-ray diffraction studies have been made on the 5.9- and 5.1-nm actin layer lines from frog skeletal muscles during an isometric tetanus at 6 degrees C, using synchrotron radiation. The integrated intensities of these actin layer lines were found to increase during a tetanus by 30-50% for the 5.9-nm reflection and approximately 70% for the 5.1-nm reflection of the resting values. The intensity increase of both reflections was greater than that taking place in the transition from rest to rigor state. The intensity change of the 5.9-nm reflection preceded those of the myosin 42.9-nm off-meridional reflection and of the equatorial reflections, as well as the isometric tension development. The intensity profile of the 5.9-nm layer line during contraction was found to be different from that observed in the rigor state

  14. X-ray micro diffraction study on mesostructured silica thin films

    CERN Document Server

    Noma, T; Miyata, H; Iida, A

    2001-01-01

    The local structure of highly ordered mesostructured silica films was investigated by using a synchrotron X-ray microbeam and a CCD X-ray detector. Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed the detailed arrangement of the mesostructures, in which the hexagonal mesochannels aligned uniaxially in the mesostructured silica films formed on a silica glass substrate with a rubbing-treated thin polyimide coating. The alignment direction was shown to be perpendicular to the rubbing direction. The grazing incidence condition revealed the structural anisotropy of the mesostructures, while normal incidence X-ray diffraction data indicated the in-plane structural uniformity of the films. Extra spots were observed in the diffraction patterns. This suggested that the X-ray beam reflected at the boundary of the mesostructured silica film and the substrate.

  15. 100 years of discovery of X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Tao

    2012-01-01

    X-ray diffraction was discovered by Max von Laue a hundred years ago. Later, through the work of William H. Bragg and William L. Bragg, an experimental analysis method was developed to solve the structure of molecules at the atomic level. Over the past hundred years, science and technology has been dramatically changed by X-ray diffraction analysis, which has also undergone considerable development. The recent emergence of hard X-ray free electron lasers has provided a new dimension for X-ray diffraction analysis, promising even greater progress in the fields of physics, chemistry and biology. (author)

  16. Hard X-ray Sources for the Mexican Synchrotron Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes-Herrera, Juan

    2016-10-01

    One of the principal tasks for the design of the Mexican synchrotron was to define the storage ring energy. The main criteria for choosing the energy come from studying the electromagnetic spectrum that can be obtained from the synchrotron, because the energy range of the spectrum that can be obtained will determine the applications available to the users of the future light source. Since there is a public demand of hard X-rays for the experiments in the synchrotron community users from Mexico, in this work we studied the emission spectra from some hard X-ray sources which could be the best options for the parameters of the present Mexican synchrotron design. The calculations of the flux and the brightness for one Bending Magnet and four Insertion Devices are presented; specifically, for a Superconducting Bending Magnet (SBM), a Superconducting Wiggler (SCW), an In Vacuum Short Period Undulator (IV-SPU), a Superconducting Undulator (SCU) and for a Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU). Two commonly available synchrotron radiation programs were used for the computation (XOP and SRW). From the results, it can be concluded that the particle beam energy from the current design is enough to have one or more sources of hard X-rays. Furthermore, a wide range of hard X-ray region can be covered by the analyzed sources, and the choice of each type should be based on the specific characteristics of the X-ray beam to perform the experiments at the involved beamline. This work was done within the project Fomix Conacyt-Morelos ”Plan Estrategico para la construccion y operación de un Sincrotron en Morelos” (224392).

  17. High-energy X-ray diffraction studies of disordered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, Shinji; Suzuya, Kentaro

    2003-01-01

    With the arrival of the latest generation of synchrotron sources and the introduction of advanced insertion devices (wigglers and undulators), the high-energy (E≥50 keV) X-ray diffraction technique has become feasible, leading to new approaches in the quantitative study of the structure of disordered materials. High-energy X-ray diffraction has several advantages: higher resolution in real space due to a wide range of scattering vector Q, smaller correction terms (especially the absorption correction), reduction of truncation errors, the feasibility of running under extreme environments, including high-temperatures and high-pressures, and the ability to make direct comparisons between X-ray and neutron diffraction data. Recently, high-energy X-ray diffraction data have been combined with neutron diffraction data from a pulsed source to provide more detailed and reliable structural information than that hitherto available

  18. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.; Fernandez, P.B.

    1992-01-01

    A variable-metric (VM) crystal is one in which the spacing between the crystalline planes changes with position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes of interest and can be produced by either introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal or by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. A series of experiments were performed in the laboratory to demonstrate the principle of the variable-metric crystal and its potential use in synchrotron beam lines. One of the most useful applications of the VM crystal is to increase the number of photons per unit bandwidth in a diffracted beam without losing any of the overall intensity. In a normal synchrotron beam line that uses a two-crystal monochromator, the bandwidth of the diffracted photon beam is determined by the vertical opening angle of the beam which is typically 0.10--0.30 mrad or 20--60 arcsec. When the VM crystal approach is applied, the bandwidth of the beam can be made as narrow as the rocking curve of the diffracting crystal, which is typically 0.005--0.050 mrad or 1--10 arcsec. Thus a very large increase of photons per unit bandwidth (or per unit energy) can be achieved through the use of VM crystals. When the VM principle is used with bent crystals, new kinds of x-ray optical elements can be generated that can focus and defocus x-ray beams much like simple lenses where the focal length of the lens can be changed to match its application. Thus both large magnifications and large demagnifications can be achieved as well as parallel beams with narrow bandwidths

  19. Head-head interactions of resting myosin crossbridges in intact frog skeletal muscles, revealed by synchrotron x-ray fiber diffraction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanji Oshima

    Full Text Available The intensities of the myosin-based layer lines in the x-ray diffraction patterns from live resting frog skeletal muscles with full thick-thin filament overlap from which partial lattice sampling effects had been removed were analyzed to elucidate the configurations of myosin crossbridges around the thick filament backbone to nanometer resolution. The repeat of myosin binding protein C (C-protein molecules on the thick filaments was determined to be 45.33 nm, slightly longer than that of myosin crossbridges. With the inclusion of structural information for C-proteins and a pre-powerstroke head shape, modeling in terms of a mixed population of regular and perturbed regions of myosin crown repeats along the filament revealed that the myosin filament had azimuthal perturbations of crossbridges in addition to axial perturbations in the perturbed region, producing pseudo-six-fold rotational symmetry in the structure projected down the filament axis. Myosin crossbridges had a different organization about the filament axis in each of the regular and perturbed regions. In the regular region that lacks C-proteins, there were inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in axially adjacent crown levels. In the perturbed region that contains C-proteins, in addition to inter-molecular interactions between the myosin heads in the closest adjacent crown levels, there were also intra-molecular interactions between the paired heads on the same crown level. Common features of the interactions in both regions were interactions between a portion of the 50-kDa-domain and part of the converter domain of the myosin heads, similar to those found in the phosphorylation-regulated invertebrate myosin. These interactions are primarily electrostatic and the converter domain is responsible for the head-head interactions. Thus multiple head-head interactions of myosin crossbridges also characterize the switched-off state and have an important role in the regulation

  20. Fracture mechanics by three-dimensional crack-tip synchrotron X-ray microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withers, P J

    2015-03-06

    To better understand the relationship between the nucleation and growth of defects and the local stresses and phase changes that cause them, we need both imaging and stress mapping. Here, we explore how this can be achieved by bringing together synchrotron X-ray diffraction and tomographic imaging. Conventionally, these are undertaken on separate synchrotron beamlines; however, instruments capable of both imaging and diffraction are beginning to emerge, such as ID15 at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility and JEEP at the Diamond Light Source. This review explores the concept of three-dimensional crack-tip X-ray microscopy, bringing them together to probe the crack-tip behaviour under realistic environmental and loading conditions and to extract quantitative fracture mechanics information about the local crack-tip environment. X-ray diffraction provides information about the crack-tip stress field, phase transformations, plastic zone and crack-face tractions and forces. Time-lapse CT, besides providing information about the three-dimensional nature of the crack and its local growth rate, can also provide information as to the activation of extrinsic toughening mechanisms such as crack deflection, crack-tip zone shielding, crack bridging and crack closure. It is shown how crack-tip microscopy allows a quantitative measure of the crack-tip driving force via the stress intensity factor or the crack-tip opening displacement. Finally, further opportunities for synchrotron X-ray microscopy are explored.

  1. CCD [charge-coupled device] sensors in synchrotron x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.; Zaluzec, N.J.

    1987-01-01

    The intense photon flux from advanced synchrotron light sources, such as the 7-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, require integrating-type detectors. Charge-coupled devices (CCDs) are well suited as synchrotron x-ray detectors. When irradiated indirectly via a phosphor followed by reducing optics, diffraction patterns of 100 cm 2 can be imaged on a 2 cm 2 CCD. With a conversion efficiency of ∼1 CCD electron/x-ray photon, a peak saturation capacity of >10 6 x rays can be obtained. A programmable CCD controller operating at a clock frequency of 20 MHz has been developed. The readout rate is 5 x 10 6 pixels/s and the shift rate in the parallel registers is 10 6 lines/s. The test detector was evaluated in two experiments. In protein crystallography diffraction patterns have been obtained from a lysozyme crystal using a conventional rotating anode x-ray generator. Based on these results we expect to obtain at a synchrotron diffraction images at the rate of ∼1 frame/s or a complete 3-dimensional data set from a single crystal in ∼2 min. 16 refs., 16 figs., 2 tabs

  2. X-ray diffraction on solids under pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzapfel, W.B.

    1984-01-01

    In the first part, various techniques and examples for X-ray diffraction on polycrystalline samples under high pressure will be reviewed with special emphasis on a comparison between angular and energy dispersive techniques. The second part reviews X-ray diffraction techniques for single crystals under pressure and demonstrates on few examples typical applications

  3. X-ray Diffraction Study of Arsenopyrite at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D Fan; M Ma; W Zhou; S Wei; Z Chen; H Xie

    2011-12-31

    The high-pressure X-ray diffraction study of a natural arsenopyrite was investigated up to 28.2 GPa using in situ angle-dispersive X-ray diffraction and a diamond anvil cell at National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. The 16:3:1 methanol-ethanol-water mixture was used as a pressure-transmitting medium. Pressures were measured using the ruby-fluorescence method. No phase change has been observed up to 28.2 GPa. The isothermal equation of state (EOS) was determined. The values of K{sub 0}, and K'{sub 0} refined with a third-order Birch-Murnaghan EOS are K{sub 0} = 123(9) GPa, and K'{sub 0} = 5.2(8). Furthermore, we confirm that the linear compressibilities ({beta}) along a, b and c directions of arsenopyrite is elastically isotropic ({beta}{sub a} = 6.82 x 10{sup -4}, {beta}{sub b} = 6.17 x 10{sup -4} and {beta}{sub c} = 6.57 x 10{sup -4} GPa{sup -1}).

  4. In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies of the effect of microstructure on tensile behavior and retained austenite stability of thermo-mechanically processed transformation induced plasticity steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Kun [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Liss, Klaus-Dieter [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Lucas Heights, NSW 2234 (Australia); Timokhina, Ilana B. [Institute for Frontier Materials, Deakin University, Geelong, VIC 3217 (Australia); Pereloma, Elena V., E-mail: elenap@uow.edu.au [School of Mechanical, Materials and Mechatronic Engineering, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia)

    2016-04-26

    Transmission electron microscopy and in situ synchrotron high-energy X-ray diffraction were used to investigate the martensitic transformation and lattice strains under uniaxial tensile loading of Fe-Mn-Si-C-Nb-Mo-Al Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steel subjected to different thermo-mechanical processing schedules. In contrast with most of the diffraction analysis of TRIP steels reported previously, the diffraction peaks from the martensite phase were separated from the peaks of the ferrite-bainite α-matrix. The volume fraction of retained γ-austenite, as well as the lattice strain, were determined from the diffraction patterns recorded during tensile deformation. Although significant austenite to martensite transformation starts around the macroscopic yield stress, some austenite grains had already experienced martensitic transformation. Hooke’s Law was used to calculate the phase stress of each phase from their lattice strain. The ferrite-bainite α-matrix was observed to yield earlier than austenite and martensite. The discrepancy between integrated phase stresses and experimental macroscopic stress is about 300 MPa. A small increase in carbon concentration in retained austenite at the early stage of deformation was detected, but with further straining a continuous slight decrease in carbon content occurred, indicating that mechanical stability factors, such as grain size, morphology and orientation of the retained austenite, played an important role during the retained austenite to martensite transformation.

  5. Geoscience Applications of Synchrotron X-ray Computed Microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, M. L.

    2009-05-01

    Computed microtomography is the extension to micron spatial resolution of the CAT scanning technique developed for medical imaging. Synchrotron sources are ideal for the method, since they provide a monochromatic, parallel beam with high intensity. High energy storage rings such as the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory produce x-rays with high energy, high brilliance, and high coherence. All of these factors combine to produce an extremely powerful imaging tool for earth science research. Techniques that have been developed include: - Absorption and phase contrast computed tomography with spatial resolution approaching one micron - Differential contrast computed tomography, imaging above and below the absorption edge of a particular element - High-pressure tomography, imaging inside a pressure cell at pressures above 10GPa - High speed radiography, with 100 microsecond temporal resolution - Fluorescence tomography, imaging the 3-D distribution of elements present at ppm concentrations. - Radiographic strain measurements during deformation at high confining pressure, combined with precise x- ray diffraction measurements to determine stress. These techniques have been applied to important problems in earth and environmental sciences, including: - The 3-D distribution of aqueous and organic liquids in porous media, with applications in contaminated groundwater and petroleum recovery. - The kinetics of bubble formation in magma chambers, which control explosive volcanism. - Accurate crystal size distributions in volcanic systems, important for understanding the evolution of magma chambers. - The equation-of-state of amorphous materials at high pressure using both direct measurements of volume as a function of pressure and also by measuring the change x-ray absorption coefficient as a function of pressure. - The formation of frost flowers on Arctic sea-ice, which is important in controlling the atmospheric chemistry of mercury. - The distribution of

  6. An X-ray microprobe facility using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Pounds, J.G.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Spanne, P.

    1990-01-01

    An X-ray microprobe for trace elemental analysis at micrometer spatial resolutions, using synchrotron radiation (SR), is under development. The facility consists of two beamlines, one including a 1:1 focusing mirror and the other an 8:1 ellipsoidal mirror. At present, open-quotes white lightclose quotes is used for excitation of the characteristic X-ray fluorescence lines. Sensitivities in thin biological samples are in the range of 2-20 fg in 100 μm 2 areas in 5 min irradiation times. Scanning techniques, as well as microtomography and chemical speciation, are discussed. Application to a specific biomedical study is included

  7. Innovative in Situ Ball Mill for X-ray Diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban, Voraksmy; Sadikin, Yolanda; Lange, Michael; Tumanov, Nikolay; Filinchuk, Yaroslav; Černý, Radovan; Casati, Nicola

    2017-12-19

    The renewed interest of mechanochemistry as an ecofriendly synthetic route has inspired original methodologies to probe reactions, with the aim to rationalize unknown mechanisms. Recently, Friščić et al. ( Nat. Chem. 2013 , 5 , 66 - 73 , DOI: 10.1038/nchem.1505 ) monitored the progress of milling reactions by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction (XRPD). For the first time, it was possible to acquire directly information during a mechanochemical process. This new methodology is still in its early stages, and its development will definitively transform the fundamental understanding of mechanochemistry. A new type of in situ ball mill setup has been developed at the Materials Science beamline (Swiss Light Source, Paul Scherrer Institute, Switzerland). Its particular geometry, described here in detail, results in XRPD data displaying significantly lower background and much sharper Bragg peaks, which in turn allow more sophisticated analysis of mechanochemical processes, extending the limits of the technique.

  8. Diffractive-refractive optics: (+,-,-,+) X-ray crystal monochromator with harmonics separation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Mikulík, P.; Oberta, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 2 (2011), s. 299-301 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : diffractive-refractive optics * x-ray synchrotron radiation monochromator * x-ray crystal monochromator * harmonics separation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.726, year: 2011

  9. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) system, and an X-ray diffraction contrast tomography (DCT) method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    Source: US2012008736A An X-ray diffraction contrast tomography system (DCT) comprising a laboratory X-ray source (2), a staging device (5) rotating a polycrystalline material sample in the direct path of the X-ray beam, a first X-ray detector (6) detecting the direct X-ray beam being transmitted ...... in the polycrystalline sample is determined based on the two-dimensional position of extinction spots and the associated angular position of the sample for a set of extinction spots pertaining to the individual grain....

  10. Thin film characterisation by advanced X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cappuccio, G.; Terranova, M.L.

    1996-09-01

    The Fifth School on X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline materials was devoted to thin film characterization by advanced X-ray diffraction techniques. Twenty contributions are contained in this volume; all twenty are recorded in the INIS Database. X-ray diffraction is known to be a powerful analytical tool for characterizing materials and understanding their structural features. The aim of these articles is to illustrate the fundamental contribution of modern diffraction techniques (grazing incidence, surface analysis, standing waves, etc.) to the characterization of thin and ultra-thin films, which have become important in many advanced technologies

  11. High-energy X-ray diffraction of disordered materials in high-energy X-ray diffraction beamline BL04B2 at SPring-8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohara, Shinji; Suzuya, Kentaro

    2001-01-01

    The high-energy (E≥30 keV) X-ray diffraction with the latest generation synchrotron sources as well as the introduction of advanced insertion devices has created new approaches to the quantitative study of the structure of non-crystalline materials because of several improvements: higher resolution in real space due to a wide range of Q, smaller correction terms (especially for absorption correction), reduction of truncation errors, the feasibility of running under extreme environments, including low- and high-temperatures, and of obtaining a direct comparison between X-ray and neutron diffraction data. Recently, this technique has been combined with neutron diffraction with a pulsed source to provide more detailed and reliable structural information not previously available. This article reviews and summarizes a horizontal two-axis diffractometer for non-crystalline materials, installed at the high-energy X-ray diffraction beamline BL04B2 of SPring-8, and recent results obtained from the high-energy X-ray diffraction on several oxide glasses: SiO 2 and GeO 2 . In particular, it addresses the structural models of oxide glasses obtained by the reverse Monte Carlo (RMC) modelling technique using both the high-energy X-ray and neutron diffraction data. (author)

  12. Synchrotron x-ray reflectivity study of oxidation/passivation of copper and silicon.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Y.; Nagy, Z.; Parkhutik, V.; You, H.

    1999-07-21

    Synchrotron x-ray-scattering technique studies of copper and silicon electrochemical interfaces are reported. These two examples illustrate the application of synchrotron x-ray techniques for oxidation, passivation, and dissolution of metals and semiconductors.

  13. Diamond detectors for synchrotron radiation X-ray applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Sio, A.; Pace, E.; Cinque, G.; Marcelli, A.; Achard, J.; Tallaire, A.

    2007-01-01

    Due to its unique physical properties, diamond is a very appealing material for the development of electronic devices and sensors. Its wide band gap (5.5 eV) endows diamond based devices with low thermal noise, low dark current levels and, in the case of radiation detectors, high visible-to-X-ray signal discrimination (visible blindness) as well as high sensitivity to energies greater than the band gap. Furthermore, due to its radiation hardness diamond is very interesting for applications in extreme environments, or as monitor of high fluency radiation beams. In this work the use of diamond based detectors for X-ray sensing is discussed. On purpose, some photo-conductors based on different diamond types have been tested at the DAFNE-L synchrotron radiation laboratory at Frascati. X-ray sensitivity spectra, linearity and stability of the response of these diamond devices have been measured in order to evidence the promising performance of such devices

  14. Soft X-ray microscopy and lithography with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudat, W.

    1977-12-01

    Considerable progress in the technique microscopy with soft X-ray radiation has been achieved in particular through the application of synchrotron radiation. Various methods which are currently being studied theoretically or already being used practically will be described briefly. Attention is focussed on the method of contact microscopy. Various biological specimens have been investigated by this method with a resolution as good as 100 A. X-ray lithography which in the technical procedure is very similar to contact microscopy gives promise for the fabrication of high quality submicron structures in electronic device production. Important factors limiting the resolution and determining the performance of contact microscopy and X-ray lithography will be discussed. (orig.) [de

  15. Characterization of Metalloproteins and Biomaterials by X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy and X-ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frankær, Christian Grundahl

    by estimation of the water content by thermogravimetric analysis. Bone tissue from dogs treated with strontiummalonate was studied using XAS. A new approach for analysing the X-ray absorption spectra resulted in a compositional model, from which the relative distribution of strontium in the different bone......-ray crystallography and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) applied to studying different hexameric insulin conformations. (iii) The structures of polymorphs of strontium ranelate and the distribution of strontium in bone tissue. A procedure for fast identification and verification of protein powders using XRPD...... and R6) were solved by single crystal X-ray diffraction (XRD) to 1.40 Å, 1.30 Å and 1.80 Å resolution, respectively. The zinc coordination in each conformation was studied by XAS including both extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES...

  16. Quantitative X-ray microtomography with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Donath, T. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Materialforschung

    2007-07-01

    Synchrotron-radiation-based computed microtomography (SR{sub {mu}}CT) is an established method for the examination of volume structures. It allows to measure the x-ray attenuation coefficient of a specimen three-dimensionally with a spatial resolution of about one micrometer. In contrast to conventional x-ray sources (x-ray tubes), the unique properties of synchrotron radiation enable quantitative measurements that do not suffer from beam-hardening artifacts. During this work the capabilities for quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT measurements have been further improved by enhancements that were made to the SR{sub {mu}}CT apparatus and to the reconstruction chain. For high-resolution SR{sub {mu}}CT an x-ray camera consisting of luminescent screen (x-ray phosphor), lens system, and CCD camera was used. A significant suppression of blur that is caused by reflections inside the luminescent screen could be achieved by application of an absorbing optical coating to the screen surface. It is shown that blur and ring artifacts in the tomographic reconstructions are thereby drastically reduced. Furthermore, a robust and objective method for the determination of the center of rotation in projection data (sinograms) is presented that achieves sub-pixel precision. By implementation of this method into the reconstruction chain, complete automation of the reconstruction process has been achieved. Examples of quantitative SR{sub {mu}}CT studies conducted at the Hamburger Synchrotronstrahlungslabor HASYLAB at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY are presented and used for the demonstration of the achieved enhancements. (orig.)

  17. Investigation of the Microstructure Evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C Steel via In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction during a Tensile Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ma

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The quantitative characterization of the microstructure evolution in high-Mn steel during deformation is of great importance to understanding its strain-hardening behavior. In the current study, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was employed to characterize the microstructure evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel during a tensile test. The microstructure at different engineering strain levels—in terms of ε-martensite and α’-martensite volume fractions, the stacking fault probability, and the twin fault probability—was analyzed by the Rietveld refinement method. The Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel exhibits a high ultimate tensile strength with a superior uniform elongation and a high strain-hardening rate. The remaining high strain-hardening rate at the strain level about 0.025 to 0.35 results from ε-martensite dominant transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP effect. The increase in the strain-hardening rate at the strain level around 0.35 to 0.43 is attributed to the synergetic α’-martensite dominant TRIP and twinning-induced-plasticity (TWIP effects. An evaluation of the stacking fault energy (SFE of the Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel by the synchrotron measurements shows good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation of the SFE.

  18. Investigation of the Microstructure Evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C Steel via In Situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction during a Tensile Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yan; Song, Wenwen; Bleck, Wolfgang

    2017-09-25

    The quantitative characterization of the microstructure evolution in high-Mn steel during deformation is of great importance to understanding its strain-hardening behavior. In the current study, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction was employed to characterize the microstructure evolution in a Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel during a tensile test. The microstructure at different engineering strain levels-in terms of ε-martensite and α'-martensite volume fractions, the stacking fault probability, and the twin fault probability-was analyzed by the Rietveld refinement method. The Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel exhibits a high ultimate tensile strength with a superior uniform elongation and a high strain-hardening rate. The remaining high strain-hardening rate at the strain level about 0.025 to 0.35 results from ε-martensite dominant transformation-induced-plasticity (TRIP) effect. The increase in the strain-hardening rate at the strain level around 0.35 to 0.43 is attributed to the synergetic α'-martensite dominant TRIP and twinning-induced-plasticity (TWIP) effects. An evaluation of the stacking fault energy (SFE) of the Fe-17Mn-1.5Al-0.3C steel by the synchrotron measurements shows good agreement with the thermodynamic calculation of the SFE.

  19. Diffraction peaks in x-ray spectroscopy: Friend or foe?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tissot, R.G.; Goehner, R.P.

    1992-01-01

    Diffraction peaks can occur as unidentifiable peaks in the energy spectrum of an x-ray spectrometric analysis. Recently, there has been increased interest in oriented polycrystalline films and epitaxial films on single crystal substrates for electronic applications. Since these materials diffract x-rays more efficiently than randomly oriented polycrystalline materials, diffraction peaks are being observed more frequently in x-ray fluorescent spectra. In addition, micro x-ray spectrometric analysis utilizes a small, intense, collimated x-ray beam that can yield well defined diffraction peaks. In some cases these diffraction peaks can occur at the same position as elemental peaks. These diffraction peaks, although a possible problem in qualitative and quantitative elemental analysis, can give very useful information about the crystallographic structure and orientation of the material being analyzed. The observed diffraction peaks are dependent on the geometry of the x-ray spectrometer, the degree of collimation and the distribution of wavelengths (energies) originating from the x-ray tube and striking the sample

  20. Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gasperini, F. M. [Medical Science Program, Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi (Brazil); Pereira, G. R. [Dept. of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Granjeiro, J. M. [Molecular and Cell Biology Dept., Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Calasans-Maia, M. D. [Oral Surgery Dept., Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Rossi, A. M. [Biomaterials Laboratory, Brazilian Center of Physics Research, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil); Perez, C. A. [Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Laboratory, Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

  1. Calcified-tissue investigations using synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Spanne, P.; Schidlovsky, G.; Dejun, X.; Bockman, R.S.; Hammond, P.B.; Bornschein, R.L.; Hoeltzel, D.A.

    1990-10-01

    Synchrotron x-ray microscopy (SXRM) in both emission and absorption modes has been used to examine elemental distributions in specimens of rat tibia, human deciduous teeth, and an orthopedic implant phantom. The work was performed with a spatial resolution of 8 μm for the emission work and 25 μm for the absorption work. The results illustrate the usefulness of SXRM for measurements of different types of calcified tissue. 3 figs

  2. Preparation of specimens for analysis by: X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banos L, L.

    2004-01-01

    Specimen preparation is one of the most important requirements in the analysis of samples by X-ray Diffraction and X-ray Fluorescence. This statement is especially true for samples containing different types of materials. There are many forms of specimen suitable for X-ray analysis and the type of the sample as received will generally determine the method of pretreatment. It is convenient to refer to the material received for analysis as the sample, and that, which is actually analyzed as the specimen. The powder Diffraction method assumes that the particles in the specimen are ideally random orientation and that there are enough crystallites in the specimen to achieve a representative intensity distribution for these crystallites. X ray Fluorescence is essentially a comparative method of analysis, it is vital that all standards and unknowns be presented to the spectrometer in a reproducible and identical manner. (Author) 3 refs., 6 figs

  3. Diffraction of X-ray beams in capillary waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kukhlevsky, S.V.; Flora, F.; Marinai, A.; Nyitray, G.; Ritucci, A.; Palladino, L.; Reale, A.; Tomassetti, G.

    2000-01-01

    Propagation of the soft X-ray radiation generated by a small-diameter incoherent source through the capillary plane waveguide which satisfies the multimode condition is studied using the Fresnel-Kirchhoff diffraction theory. The diffraction is manifested by appearance of the diffraction fringes, dark and light bands, in the far-field zone of the capillary output. Such a behaviour of the X-ray radiation is confirmed by our experimental data. The results give explanation for the interference effect recently observed in many experiments on the grazing reflections of X-rays in single and multiple capillary optics

  4. Grazing Incidence X-ray Scattering and Diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    tion. In thia article, various aspects of surface X- ray diffraction and scattering are discussed with illustrations of some typical applications of these techniques. 1. ..... ray reflectivity. Here, X-rays are incident on the sample at very small grazing angles to the surface and below the critical angle, αc. As explained earlier, this ...

  5. High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of multilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Finn Erland; Hornstrup, Allan; Schnopper, H. W.

    1988-01-01

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction studies of the perfection of state-of-the-art multilayers are presented. Data were obtained using a triple-axis perfect-crystal X-ray diffractometer. Measurements reveal large-scale figure errors in the substrate. A high-resolution triple-axis set up is required...

  6. Quantitative determination of phases of X-ray reflections from three-beam diffractions. Pt. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Mautsu; Chang Shihlin

    1988-01-01

    The method proposed by Chang and Tang of quantitative determination of X-ray reflection phases from multiple diffraction profiles is applied to nearly perfect crystals of gallium arsenide. The detailed intensity-profile-analysis procedures are given. Multiple diffraction profiles obtained with a conventional X-ray source and synchrotron radiation are subjected to this analysis. It is found that, for this particular diffraction example, errors as small as 15 0 in phase determination are achieved. Errors due to the theoretical approximation, peak position measurement and scaling factor are also discussed. (orig.)

  7. Fabrication of diffraction X-ray elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babin, S.V.; Erko, A.I.

    1989-01-01

    The use of focusing elements in the X-ray range shows promise for nondestructive chemical analysis of samples with spatial resolution up to fractions of a μm. This paper considers the problems of fabricating Fresnel zone plates of different types: Amplitude- and phase-transparent zone plates and reflective zone plates formed on a multilayer mirror, as well as microstructures with a specified zone profile. (orig.)

  8. Electrochemical cell for in situ x-ray diffraction under ultrapure conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koop, T.; Schindler, W.; Kazimirov, A.

    1998-01-01

    of the crystal using a Luggin capillary and a standard reference electrode. We demonstrate the performance of our cell by in situ synchrotron x-ray diffraction measurements on ultrathin Co layers electrodeposited on Cu(001) in an aqueous H(2)SO(4)/CoSO(4) solution. (C) 1998 American Institute of Physics....

  9. Tensile behavior of orthorhombic alpha ''-titanium alloy studied by in situ X-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X.D.; Lou, H.B.; Ståhl, Kenny

    2010-01-01

    The tensile behavior of a Ti-11%Zr-14%Nb-10%Sn alloy with pure orthorhombic alpha '' phase was studied by in situ X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation. It is found that no phase transformation happens during the whole tensile process. The "double-yielding" platforms of this alloy...

  10. Thin film characterisation by advanced X-ray diffraction techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappuccio, G.; Terranova, M.L. [eds.] [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Rome (Italy)

    1996-09-01

    This report described the papers presented at the 5. School on X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline materials held at Frascati (Rome) in 2-5 October 1996. A separate abstract was prepared for each of the papers.

  11. Theory of time-resolved inelastic x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, Ulf; Møller, Klaus Braagaard; Henriksen, Niels Engholm

    2010-01-01

    Starting from a general theory of time-resolved x-ray scattering, we derive a convenient expression for the diffraction signal based on a careful analysis of the relevant inelastic scattering processes. We demonstrate that the resulting inelastic limit applies to a wider variety of experimental...... conditions than similar, previously derived formulas, and it directly allows the application of selection rules when interpreting diffraction signals. Furthermore, we present a simple extension to systems simultaneously illuminated by x rays and a laser beam....

  12. A = Rb, K: Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    X-ray diffraction on structural phase transition. 475. Figure 2. Powder X-ray diffraction pattern of KLHS at 298 and 100 K. 3. Structure determination and refinement. 3.1 Structure of RLHS at 293 K. A crystal of size 0⋅7 × 0⋅3 × 0⋅4 mm was mounted on a BRUKER AXS SMART APEX. CCD9 diffractometer with a crystal to ...

  13. X-ray diffraction identification of clay minerals by microcomputer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, S.; Imasava, F.J.

    1988-01-01

    The identification of clay minerals by X-ray powder diffraction are done by searching an unknown pattern with a file of standard X-ray diffraction patterns. For this searching done by hand is necessary a long time. This paper shows a program in ''Basic'' language to be utilized in microcomputers for the math of the unknown pattern, using the high velocity of comparison of the microcomputer. A few minutes are used for the match. (author) [pt

  14. Advanced Nanoscale Characterization of Cement Based Materials Using X-Ray Synchrotron Radiation: A Review

    KAUST Repository

    Chae, Sejung R.

    2013-05-22

    We report various synchrotron radiation laboratory based techniques used to characterize cement based materials in nanometer scale. High resolution X-ray transmission imaging combined with a rotational axis allows for rendering of samples in three dimensions revealing volumetric details. Scanning transmission X-ray microscope combines high spatial resolution imaging with high spectral resolution of the incident beam to reveal X-ray absorption near edge structure variations in the material nanostructure. Microdiffraction scans the surface of a sample to map its high order reflection or crystallographic variations with a micron-sized incident beam. High pressure X-ray diffraction measures compressibility of pure phase materials. Unique results of studies using the above tools are discussed-a study of pores, connectivity, and morphology of a 2,000 year old concrete using nanotomography; detection of localized and varying silicate chain depolymerization in Al-substituted tobermorite, and quantification of monosulfate distribution in tricalcium aluminate hydration using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy; detection and mapping of hydration products in high volume fly ash paste using microdiffraction; and determination of mechanical properties of various AFm phases using high pressure X-ray diffraction. © 2013 The Author(s).

  15. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Giacomini, J C

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with r...

  16. Microelemental and mineral compositions of pathogenic biomineral concrements: SRXFA, X-ray powder diffraction and vibrational spectroscopy data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moroz, T.N. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Pr. Akad. Koptyuga, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)], E-mail: moroz@uiggm.nsc.ru; Palchik, N.A.; Dar' in, A.V. [Institute of Geology and Mineralogy, SB RAS, Pr. Akad. Koptyuga, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2009-05-11

    X-ray fluorescence analysis using synchrotron radiation (SRXRF), X-ray powder diffraction, infrared and Raman spectroscopy had been applied for determination of microelemental and mineral composition of the kidney stones, gallstones and salivalities from natives of Novosibirsk and Novosibirsk region, Russia. The relationship between mineral, organic and microelemental composition of pathogenic calcilus was shown.

  17. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  18. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  19. Properties of Ti{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} and Ti{sub 3}AlD{sub 6} systems at high pressure studied by synchrotron X-ray diffraction analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, V.; Durygin, A.; Saxena, S. [CeSMEC, Florida International University, Miami, FL 33199 (United States); Antonov, V.E. [Institute of Solid State Physics RAS, Chernogolovka, Moscow District, 2 Academician Ossipyan str., 142432 (Russian Federation); Tkacz, M., E-mail: mtkacz@ichf.edu.pl [Institute of Physical Chemistry, PAS, Kasprzaka 44/52, 01-224 Warsaw (Poland); University of Warmia and Mazury, The Faculty of Environmental Sciences, Oczapowskiego 5, 10-719 Olsztyn (Poland)

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Highly charged titanium aluminum alloy with hydrogen and deuterium has been obtained. • Compressibility have been determined for both compounds up to 40 GPa. • No phase transition has been revealed in pressure range of studies. • Young moduli and mechanical properties of Ti{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} and Ti{sub 3}AlD{sub 6} have been analyzed. • Isotope effect in compressibility has been discussed. - Abstract: Compressibility of the Ti{sub 3}AlH{sub 6} and Ti{sub 3}AlD{sub 6} has been studied by X-ray diffraction method using advanced synchrotron technique up to 38 GPa. Significantly higher values of bulk modulus have been revealed for the hydride and deuteride compounds as compared to the initial pure intermetallic compound. The consequences of this observation have been discussed in terms of ductility and strength of obtained materials. Possible explanation of the peculiarity in the equation of states for both compounds is proposed on the base of the difference in repulsion interactions of hydrogen and deuterium species in the metallic lattice. All advantages of the hydrogenation of titanium aluminum compound have been summarized.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of porcine carboxypeptidase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akparov, V. Kh., E-mail: valery@akparov.ru [Scientific Center of Russian Federation Research Institute for Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Kuranova, I. P., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-15

    Crystals of porcine pancreatic carboxypeptidase B have been grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction study showed that the crystals belong to sp. gr. P4{sub 1}2{sub 1}2 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 79.58 Å, c = 100.51 Å; α = β = γ = 90.00°. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one of the grown crystals at the SPring 8 synchrotron facility to 0.98 Å resolution.

  1. X-ray diffraction and imaging with a coherent beam: application to X-ray optical elements and to crystals exhibiting phase inhomogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masiello, F.

    2011-05-01

    The exceptional properties of synchrotron light sources have been exploited in very different disciplines, from archaeology to chemistry, from material science to biology, from medicine to physics. Among these properties it is important to mention the high brilliance, continuum spectrum, high degree of polarization, time structure, small source size and divergence of the beam, the last resulting in a high transversal coherence of the produced radiation. This high transversal coherence of the synchrotron sources has permitted the development of new techniques, e.g. phase contrast imaging, X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy and coherent X-ray diffraction imaging (CXDI). This thesis work will consist essentially of three parts. In the first part it will be presented the work done as a member of the X-ray Optics Group of ESRF in the characterization of high quality diamond crystals foreseen as X-ray optical elements. The characterization has been done using different complementary X-ray techniques, such as high resolution diffraction, topography, grazing incidence diffraction, reflectivity and measurements of the coherence preservation using the Talbot effect. In the second part, I will show the result obtained in the study of the temperature behaviours of the domain in periodically poled ferroelectrics crystals. This type of measurements, based on Bragg-Fresnel diffraction, are possible only thanks to the high degree of coherence of the beam. In the third part, I will present the results obtained in the characterization of diamonds foreseen for applications other than X-ray optical elements. (author)

  2. Study of moire fringes using synchrotron X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshimura, Jun-ichi

    1992-01-01

    It has recently been shown that X-ray moire fringes are not exactly the projection of the intensity distribution of the wave field on the exit surface of the crystal, but do oscillate along the beam path behind the crystal. Such nonprojectiveness of moire fringes is inexplicable by the conventional understanding of moire fringes, and therefore is of interest from a fundamental viewpoint as well as practical one. In this paper the phenomena of the nonprojectiveness are described on the basis of the latest experimental data obtained by synchrotron radiation. (author)

  3. Determination of the bulk modulus of hydroxycancrinite, a possible zeolitic precursor in geopolymers, by high-pressure synchrotron X-ray diffraction

    KAUST Repository

    Oh, Jae Eun

    2011-11-01

    Crystalline zeolitic materials, such as hydroxycancrinite, hydroxysodalite, herschelite and nepheline, are often synthesized from geopolymerization using fly-ash and solutions of NaOH at high temperatures. Comprised mainly of 6-membered aluminosilicate rings that act as basic building units, their crystal structures may provide insight into the reaction products formed in NaOH-activated fly ash-based geopolymers. Recent research indicates that the hydroxycancrinite and hydroxysodalite may play an important role as possible analogues of zeolitic precursor in geopolymers. Herein is reported a high pressure synchrotron study of the behavior of hydroxycancrinite exposed to pressures up to 6.1 GPa in order to obtain its bulk modulus. A refined equation of state for hydroxycancrinite yielded a bulk modulus of Ko = 46 ± 5 GPa (assuming Ko′ = 4.0) for a broad range of applied pressure. When low pressure values are excluded from the fit and only the range of 2.5 and 6.1 GPa is considered, the bulk modulus of hydroxycancrinite was found to be Ko = 46.9 ± 0.9 GPa (Ko′ = 4.0 ± 0.4, calculated). Comparison with the literature shows that all zeolitic materials possessing single 6-membered rings (i.e., hydroxycancrinite, sodalite and nepheline) have similar bulk moduli. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined in situ Synchrotron X-ray Diffraction and Ultrasonic Interferometry Study of Ε-FeSi at High Pressure and Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, M.; Liu, W.; Liu, Q.; Wang, L.; Li, B.

    2008-01-01

    Ultrasonic interferometry was used in combination with synchrotron X-radiation to determine the compressional and shear wave velocities and unit-cell volumes of Ε-FeSi (cubic B20 structure) at room temperature and pressures up to ∼12 GPa. The data collected during compression are compared with those collected during decompression after heating to release stress within the sample cell. By fitting all of the decompression unit-cell volume and sound velocity data to third-order finite-strain equations, we obtain the adiabatic zero-pressure bulk and shear moduli and their first pressure derivatives: K S0 =169.3 (8) GPa, G 0 =116.3 (4) GPa, K'S0=6.5(3), G'0=3.0(1). The bulk modulus obtained from this study is in good agreement with those of some previous experimental studies, but significantly lower than those obtained by first-principle calculations. This study presents the first direct measurement on the shear properties of this phase.

  5. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, high-resolution X-ray diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    successfully grown by Czochralski technique in the automatic diameter control facility. As-grown crystal boules were oriented into (0 0 1) direction cut and optically polished for all measurements. Influence of Ti-ion incorporation into LiNbO3 was studied by core level. XPS analysis. Powder X-ray diffraction studies were ...

  6. Optical systems for synchrotron radiation: lecture 4. Soft x-ray imaging systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.

    1986-04-01

    The history and present techniques of soft x-ray imaging are reviewed briefly. The physics of x-ray imaging is described, including the temporal and spatial coherence of x-ray sources. Particular technologies described are: contact x-ray microscopy, zone plate imaging, scanned image zone plate microscopy, scanned image reflection microscopy, and soft x-ray holography and diffraction

  7. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons

  8. Spectroscopic imaging, diffraction, and holography with x-ray photoemission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-02-01

    X-ray probes are capable of determining the spatial structure of an atom in a specific chemical state, over length scales from about a micron all the way down to atomic resolution. Examples of these probes include photoemission microscopy, energy-dependent photoemission diffraction, photoelectron holography, and X-ray absorption microspectroscopy. Although the method of image formation, chemical-state sensitivity, and length scales can be very different, these X-ray techniques share a common goal of combining a capability for structure determination with chemical-state specificity. This workshop will address recent advances in holographic, diffraction, and direct imaging techniques using X-ray photoemission on both theoretical and experimental fronts. A particular emphasis will be on novel structure determinations with atomic resolution using photoelectrons.

  9. Diamond monochromator for high heat flux synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Smither, R.K.; Davey, S.; Purohit, A.

    1992-12-01

    Single crystal silicon has been the material of choice for x-ray monochromators for the past several decades. However, the need for suitable monochromators to handle the high heat load of the next generation synchrotron x-ray beams on the one hand and the rapid and on-going advances in synthetic diamond technology on the other make a compelling case for the consideration of a diamond mollochromator system. In this Paper, we consider various aspects, advantage and disadvantages, and promises and pitfalls of such a system and evaluate the comparative an monochromator subjected to the high heat load of the most powerful x-ray beam that will become available in the next few years. The results of experiments performed to evaluate the diffraction properties of a currently available synthetic single crystal diamond are also presented. Fabrication of diamond-based monochromator is within present technical means

  10. Synchrotron-Radiation X-Ray Investigation of Li+/Na+ Intercalation into Prussian Blue Analogues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Moritomo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Prussian blue analogies (PBAs are promising cathode materials for lithium ion (LIB and sodium ion (SIB secondary batteries, reflecting their covalent and nanoporous host structure. With use of synchrotron-radiation (SR X-ray source, we investigated the structural and electronic responses of the host framework of PBAs against Li+ and Na+ intercalation by means of the X-ray powder diffraction (XRD and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS. The structural investigation reveals a robust nature of the host framework against Li+ and Na+ intercalation, which is advantageous for the stability and lifetime of the batteries. The spectroscopic investigation identifies the redox processes in respective plateaus in the discharge curves. We further compare these characteristics with those of the conventional cathode materials, such as, LiCoO2, LiFePO4, and LiMn2O4.

  11. Precise stress measurements with white synchrotron x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weidner, Donald J.; Vaughan, Michael T.; Wang Liping; Long, Hongbo; Li Li; Dixon, Nathaniel A.; Durham, William B.

    2010-01-01

    In situ measurement of stress in polycrystalline samples forms the basis for studies of the mechanical properties of materials with very broad earth science and materials science applications. Synchrotron x rays have been used to define the local elastic strain in these samples, which in turn define stress. Experimental work to date has been carried out on a prototype detection system that provided a strain measurement precision >10 -4 , which corresponds to a stress resolution >50 MPa for silicate minerals. Here we report operation of a new, permanent, energy dispersive detection system for white radiation, which has been developed at the National Synchrotron Light Source. The new system provides differential strain measurements with a precision of 3x10 -5 for volumes that are 50x50x500 μm 3 . This gives a stress precision of about 10 MPa for silicate minerals.

  12. High resolution X-ray diffraction studies on unirradiated

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High-resolution X-ray diffraction technique, employing a three-crystal monochromator–collimator combination is used to study the irradiation induced defects in flux grown Sr-hexaferrite crystals irradiated with 50 MeV Li3+ ion beams at room temperature with a fluence value of 1 × 1014 ions/cm2. The diffraction curves of the ...

  13. Void and Phase Evolution during the Processing of Bi-2212 Superconducting Wires monitored by combined fast Synchrotron Micro-tomography and X-Ray Diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Scheuerlein, C; Scheel, M; Jiang, J; Kametani, F; Malagoli, A; Hellstrom, E E; Larbalestier, D C

    2011-01-01

    Recent study of the current-limiting mechanisms in Bi-2212 round wires has suggested that agglomeration of the residual Bi-2212 powder porosity into bubbles of filament-diameter size occurs on melting the Bi-2212 filaments. These pores introduce a major obstacle to current flow, which greatly reduces the critical current density (Jc). Here we present an in situ non-destructive tomographic and diffraction study of the changes occurring during the heat treatment of wires and starting powder, as well as a room temperature study of ex situ processed wires. The in situ through-process study shows that the agglomeration of residual porosity is more complex than previously seen. Filament changes start with coalescence of the quasi-uniform and finely divided powder porosity into lens-shaped defects at about 850 0C when the Bi-2201 impurity phase decomposes before the Bi-2212 starts to melt. These lens-shaped voids grow to bubbles of a filament diameter on melting of the Bi-2212 and continue to lengthen and then to ag...

  14. Long-Wavelength X-Ray Diffraction and Its Applications in Macromolecular Crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Manfred S

    2017-01-01

    For many years, diffraction experiments in macromolecular crystallography at X-ray wavelengths longer than that of Cu-K α (1.54 Å) have been largely underappreciated. Effects caused by increased X-ray absorption result in the fact that these experiments are more difficult than the standard diffraction experiments at short wavelengths. However, due to the also increased anomalous scattering of many biologically relevant atoms, important additional structural information can be obtained. This information, in turn, can be used for phase determination, for substructure identification, in molecular replacement approaches, as well as in structure refinement. This chapter reviews the possibilities and the difficulties associated with such experiments, and it provides a short description of two macromolecular crystallography synchrotron beam lines dedicated to long-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments.

  15. Note: Application of a pixel-array area detector to simultaneous single crystal x-ray diffraction and x-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, Cheng-Jun; Brewe, Dale L.; Heald, Steve M.; Zhang, Bangmin; Chen, Jing-Sheng; Chow, G. M.; Venkatesan, T.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) are two main x-ray techniques in synchrotron radiation facilities. In this Note, we present an experimental setup capable of performing simultaneous XRD and XAS measurements by the application of a pixel-array area detector. For XRD, the momentum transfer in specular diffraction was measured by scanning the X-ray energy with fixed incoming and outgoing x-ray angles. By selecting a small fixed region of the detector to collect the XRD signal, the rest of the area was available for collecting the x-ray fluorescence for XAS measurements. The simultaneous measurement of XRD and X-ray absorption near edge structure for Pr 0.67 Sr 0.33 MnO 3 film was demonstrated as a proof of principle for future time-resolved pump-probe measurements. A static sample makes it easy to maintain an accurate overlap of the X-ray spot and laser pump beam

  16. Neutron and Synchrotron X-Ray Scattering Studies of Superconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranquada, J.M.

    2008-01-01

    Superconductors hold the promise for a more stable and efficient electrical grid, but new isotropic, high-temperature superconductors are needed in order to reduce cable manufacturing costs. The effort to understand high-temperature superconductivity, especially in the layered cuprates, provides guidance to the search for new superconductors. Neutron scattering has long provided an important probe of the collective excitations that are involved in the pairing mechanism. For the cuprates, neutron and x-ray diffraction techniques also provide information on competing types of order, such as charge and spin stripes, that appear to be closely connected to the superconductivity. Recently, inelastic x-ray scattering has become competitive for studying phonons and may soon provide valuable information on electronic excitations. Examples of how these techniques contribute to our understanding of superconductivity are presented

  17. Coherent X-ray diffraction studies of mesoscopic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shabalin, Anatoly

    2015-12-01

    This thesis is devoted to three separate projects, which can be considered as independent. First, the dynamical scattering effects in the Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging (CXDI) method are discussed. Based on the simulation results, a straightforward method for correction for the refraction and absorption artifacts in the Bragg CXDI reconstruction is suggested. The second part summarizes the results of an Coherent X-ray Diffractive Imaging experiment with a single colloidal crystal grain. A remarkable result is that positions of individual particles in the crystal lattice have been resolved in three dimensions. The third project is devoted to X-ray diffraction experimental studies of structural evolution of colloidal crystalline films upon incremental heating. Based on the results of the analysis a model of structural evolution of a colloidal crystal upon heating on nanoscopic and mesoscopic length scales is suggested.

  18. Performance characteristics needed for protein crystal diffraction x-ray detectors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-09-21

    During the 1990's, macromolecular crystallography became progressively more dependent on synchrotrons X-ray sources for diffraction data collection. Detectors of this diffraction data at synchrotrons beamlines have evolved over the decade, from film to image phosphor plates, and then to CCD systems. These changes have been driven by the data quality and quantity improvements each newer detector technology provided. The improvements have been significant. It is likely that newer detector technologies will be adopted at synchrotron beamlines for crystallographic diffraction data collection in the future, but these technologies will have to compete with existing CCD detector systems which are already excellent and are getting incrementally better in terms of size, speed, efficiency, and resolving power. Detector development for this application at synchrotrons must concentrate on making systems which are bigger and faster than CCDs and which can capture weak data more efficiently. And there is a need for excellent detectors which are less expensive than CCD systems.

  19. Performance characteristics needed for protein crystal diffraction x-ray detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westbrook, E. M.

    1999-01-01

    During the 1990's, macromolecular crystallography became progressively more dependent on synchrotrons X-ray sources for diffraction data collection. Detectors of this diffraction data at synchrotrons beamlines have evolved over the decade, from film to image phosphor plates, and then to CCD systems. These changes have been driven by the data quality and quantity improvements each newer detector technology provided. The improvements have been significant. It is likely that newer detector technologies will be adopted at synchrotron beamlines for crystallographic diffraction data collection in the future, but these technologies will have to compete with existing CCD detector systems which are already excellent and are getting incrementally better in terms of size, speed, efficiency, and resolving power. Detector development for this application at synchrotrons must concentrate on making systems which are bigger and faster than CCDs and which can capture weak data more efficiently. And there is a need for excellent detectors which are less expensive than CCD systems

  20. X-ray diffraction study of directionally grown perylene crystallites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Lemke, H. T.; Hammershøj, P.

    2008-01-01

    Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, perylene crystallites grown on thin highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films on silicon substrates have been investigated. All the perylene crystallites are found to orient with the ab plane of the monoclinic unit cell parallel to the subst......Using grazing incidence X-ray diffraction, perylene crystallites grown on thin highly oriented poly(tetrafluoroethylene) (PTFE) films on silicon substrates have been investigated. All the perylene crystallites are found to orient with the ab plane of the monoclinic unit cell parallel...

  1. Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite studied by in situ X-ray diffraction under autoclave condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuma, Jun; Tsunashima, Masamichi; Ishikawa, Tetsuji; Matsuno, Shin-ya; Ogawa, Akihiro; Matsui, Kunio; Sato, Masugu

    2009-09-01

    Hydrothermal formation of tobermorite from a pre-cured cake has been investigated by transmission X-ray diffraction (XRD) using high-energy X-rays from a synchrotron radiation source in combination with a newly designed autoclave cell. The autoclave cell has a large and thin beryllium window for wide-angle X-ray diffraction; nevertheless, it withstands a steam pressure of more than 1.2 MPa, which enables in situ XRD measurements in a temperature range of 373 to 463 K under a saturated steam pressure. Formation and/or decomposition of several components has been successfully observed during 7.5 h of reaction time. From the intensity changes of the intermediate materials, namely non-crystalline C-S-H and hydroxylellestadite, two pathways for tobermorite formation have been confirmed. Thus, the newly developed autoclave cell can be used for the analyses of reaction mechanisms under specific atmospheres and temperatures.

  2. Synchrotron X-ray tomographic microscopy of fossil embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donoghue, Philip C J; Bengtson, Stefan; Dong, Xi-ping; Gostling, Neil J; Huldtgren, Therese; Cunningham, John A; Yin, Chongyu; Yue, Zhao; Peng, Fan; Stampanoni, Marco

    2006-08-10

    Fossilized embryos from the late Neoproterozoic and earliest Phanerozoic have caused much excitement because they preserve the earliest stages of embryology of animals that represent the initial diversification of metazoans. However, the potential of this material has not been fully realized because of reliance on traditional, non-destructive methods that allow analysis of exposed surfaces only, and destructive methods that preserve only a single two-dimensional view of the interior of the specimen. Here, we have applied synchrotron-radiation X-ray tomographic microscopy (SRXTM), obtaining complete three-dimensional recordings at submicrometre resolution. The embryos are preserved by early diagenetic impregnation and encrustation with calcium phosphate, and differences in X-ray attenuation provide information about the distribution of these two diagenetic phases. Three-dimensional visualization of blastomere arrangement and diagenetic cement in cleavage embryos resolves outstanding questions about their nature, including the identity of the columnar blastomeres. The anterior and posterior anatomy of embryos of the bilaterian worm-like Markuelia confirms its position as a scalidophoran, providing new insights into body-plan assembly among constituent phyla. The structure of the developing germ band in another bilaterian, Pseudooides, indicates a unique mode of germ-band development. SRXTM provides a method of non-invasive analysis that rivals the resolution achieved even by destructive methods, probing the very limits of fossilization and providing insight into embryology during the emergence of metazoan phyla.

  3. X-Ray diffraction Investigation of Electrochemically Deposited Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pantleon, Karen; Jensen, Jens Dahl; Somers, Marcel A.J.

    2004-01-01

    by the determination of X-ray diffraction (XRD) pole figures and the calculation of the orientation distribution functions. XRD results are discussed in relation to the morphologies of the electrodeposits as investigated with light optical microscopy and correlated with the process parameters during electrodeposition....

  4. Oxygen precipitation studied by x-ray diffraction techniques

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Meduňa, M.; Caha, O.; Růžička, J.; Bernatová, S.; Svoboda, Milan; Buršík, Jiří

    178 -179, - (2011), s. 325-330 ISSN 1012-0394 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA202/09/1013 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Czochralski silicon * oxygen precipitates * x-ray Laue diffraction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  5. Fusion bonding of Si wafers investigated by x ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weichel, Steen; Grey, Francois; Rasmussen, Kurt

    2000-01-01

    The interface structure of bonded Si(001) wafers with twist angle 6.5 degrees is studied as a function of annealing temperature. An ordered structure is observed in x-ray diffraction by monitoring a satellite reflection due to the periodic modulation near the interface, which results from...

  6. Diffractive-refractive optics: X-ray collimator

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír; Oberta, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 7 (2008), 073105/1-073105/4 ISSN 0034-6748 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : x-ray collimator * diffractive-refractive optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics , Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.738, year: 2008

  7. X-ray diffraction of iron containing samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, Yvonne M.; Vermeulen, Arnold C.; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Weijma, Jan

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction (XRD) is a commonly used technology to identify crystalline phases. However, care must be taken with the combination of XRD configuration and sample. Copper (most commonly used radiation source) is a poor match with iron containing materials due to induced fluorescence. Magnetite

  8. X-Ray Diffraction of Iron Containing Samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mos, Yvonne M.; Vermeulen, Arnold C.; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Weijma, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In X-ray diffraction, a good combination of configuration and sample is essential. Copper radiation for iron containing materials leads to a high background. Although this has been recognized, many researchers still use this combination. To clearly show the unsuitability of copper radiation for iron

  9. Differential scanning calorimetric and powder X-ray diffraction ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The thermotropic phase transitions and supramolecular structure of NAAEs were investigated by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Results obtained from DSC studies indicate that the transition temperatures (t), enthalpies ( t) and entropies ( t) exhibit odd-even alternation ...

  10. Ultra-small angle X-ray diffraction from muscle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nave, C.; Diakun, G.P.; Bordas, J.

    1986-05-15

    An ultra-small angle X-ray scattering instrument is described. It uses two channel cut crystals, one to monochromatise and collimate the beam and the other to analyse the scattered radiation. It has been used to collect diffraction data from muscle, in which the physiological unit cell, the sarcomere, has a repeat of 2000 nm or more.

  11. Ab initio structure determination via powder X-ray diffraction

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Powder data is especially useful to deduce accurate cell parameters. Rietveld's refinement procedure1,2 has revolutionized the application of powder X-ray diffraction by resulting in a large number of structures being refined in the last decade. If a suitable starting model is available, it has become routine to refine structures ...

  12. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... ring (black) is fixed from polyimide side and (g) finally the metal substrate is etched to prepare the X-ray mask. standardized for the present X-ray lithography beamline. X-ray exposures are carried out in 3–10 keV region selected using two X-ray mirrors kept at grazing incidence angles. The total power ...

  13. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance ...

  14. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-07-02

    Jul 2, 2014 ... Abstract. X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Dia- mond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at ...

  15. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance ...

  16. Simulating X-ray diffraction of textured films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Breiby, Dag W.; Bunk, Oliver; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel

    2008-01-01

    Computationally efficient simulations of grazing-incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) are discussed, with particular attention given to textured thin polycrystalline films on supporting substrates. A computer program has been developed for simulating scattering from thin films exhibiting varying...... from the totally substrate-reflected beam ( two-beam approximation) and refraction effects are also included in the program, together with the geometrical intensity corrections associated with GIXD measurements. To achieve 'user friendliness' for scientists less familiar with diffraction...

  17. Sample cell for in-field X-ray diffraction experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor Höglin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A sample cell making it possible to perform synchrotron radiation X-ray powder diffraction experiments in a magnetic field of 0.35 T has been constructed. The device is an add-on to an existing sample cell and contains a strong permanent magnet of NdFeB-type. Experiments have shown that the setup is working satisfactory making it possible to perform in-field measurements.

  18. In situ x-ray diffraction studies of YBa2Cu3Ox

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, S.; Zheng, J.Q.; Shih, M.C.; Wang, X.K.; Lee, S.J.; Rippert, E.D.; Maglic, S.; Kajiyama, H.; Segel, D.; Dutta, P.; Chang, R.P.H.; Ketterson, J.B.; Roberts, T.; Lin, Y.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Gray, K.

    1992-01-01

    Using a specially designed off-axis faced magnetron sputtering chamber we have performed in situ x-ray diffraction studies of the growth of YBa 2 Cu 3 O x films using a synchrotron light source. The orientation and rocking curve width were studied as a function of substrate temperature, O 2 /Ar partial pressures, and deposition rate. Growth rate was studied on SrTiO 3 , LaAlO 3 , and MgO

  19. The structure of liquid semiconductors, superionic conductors and glasses by neutron scattering, X-ray diffraction and extended X-ray absorption fine structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchanan, P.

    2001-09-01

    A study of the applicability of modern X-ray and neutron scattering techniques to the study of the structure of liquid semiconductors and glasses has been made. The results demonstrate how neutron scattering with isotopic substitution (NDIS), anomalous X-ray scattering and Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS) can be successfully used to elucidate the structure of materials that cannot be studied by NDIS alone. The local coordination structure of Ag 2 Se in its room temperature, superionic and liquid phases has been determined using the EXAFS technique. This EXAFS data have been combined with previously available neutron diffraction data to provide a refinement of the structure obtained through neutron diffraction alone. The structure of GeO 2 has been determined to the full partial structure factor level using a combination of anomalous X-ray scattering and neutron diffraction measurements. The data are in good agreement with previously obtained results. The partial structure factors of P 40 Se 60 and P 50 Se 50 have been determined to the first order difference level using the anomalous X-ray diffraction technique. The structure of liquid Ga 2 Te 3 has been determined to the partial structure factor level using combined neutron diffraction with isotopic substitution (NDIS) and anomalous X-ray diffraction. The structure of liquid FeSe 2 has been determined to the first order difference level using the NDIS technique alone. The structure of liquid FeTe 2 was determined at the total structure factor level using neutron diffraction in order to estimate the effect of chalcogenide ion size on the structure. The results demonstrate the feasibility of the additional structural determination techniques for disordered materials made possible through the development of third generation X-ray synchrotron sources. (author)

  20. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulze, D. (Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (USA)); Anderson, S. (Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (USA)); Mattigod, S. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography.

  1. Synchrotron x-ray sources and new opportunities in the soil and environmental sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulze, D.; Anderson, S.; Mattigod, S.

    1990-07-01

    This report contains the following papers: characteristics of the advanced photon source and comparison with existing synchrotron facilities; x-ray absorption spectroscopy: EXAFS and XANES -- A versatile tool to study the atomic and electronic structure of materials; applications of x-ray spectroscopy and anomalous scattering experiments in the soil and environmental sciences; X-ray fluorescence microprobe and microtomography

  2. Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies on celestite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Yenhua; Yu Shucheng; Huang, Eugene; Lee, P.-L.

    2010-01-01

    High-pressure Raman spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction studies of celestite (SrSO 4 ) were carried out in a diamond anvil cell at room temperature. Variation in the Raman vibrational frequency and change of lattice parameters with pressure indicate that a transformation occurs in celestite. This transformation caused an adjustment in the Sr-O polyhedra that affected the stretching-force constant of SO 4 . Moreover, compressibilities along the crystallographic axes decreased in the order a to c to b. From the compression data, the bulk modulus of the celestite was 87 GPa. Both X-ray and Raman data show that the transition in celestite is reversible.

  3. White Beam, X-Ray, Energy-Dispersive Diffractometry using Synchrotron Radiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gerward, Leif; Buras, B.; Olsen, J. Staun

    1978-01-01

    The special features of left double quote white right double quote beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry using synchrotron radiation are discussed on the basis of experiments performed at the Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron, DESY.......The special features of left double quote white right double quote beam X-ray energy-dispersive diffractometry using synchrotron radiation are discussed on the basis of experiments performed at the Deutsches Electronen-Synchrotron, DESY....

  4. Utilization of synchrotron radiation in analytical chemistry. Soft X-ray emission and absorption spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Yasuji

    2015-01-01

    Synchrotron soft X-ray spectroscopy includes three major types of spectroscopy such as X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). This paper takes up XAS and XES of soft X-rays, and briefly describes the principle. XAS is roughly classified into XANES (X-ray absorption near-edge structure) and EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure), and XANES is mainly used in the analysis based on XAS of soft X-rays. As the examples of the latest soft X-ray analyses, the following are introduced: (1) bandgap of boron implantation diamond and the local structure of boron, (2) catalytic sites in solid fuel cell carbon electrode, and (3) soft X-ray analysis under atmospheric pressure. (A.O.)

  5. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J.; Sweet, R.M.; Pflugrath, J.W.; Stanton, M.

    1990-01-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 10 9 X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensity, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512x512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of 4x4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10 4 . The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 μm on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1deg frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a=275 A) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. (orig.)

  6. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strauss, M.G.; Westbrook, E.M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T.A.; Westbrook, M.L.; Travis, D.J. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)); Sweet, R.M. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA)); Pflugrath, J.W. (Cold Spring Harbor Lab., NY (USA)); Stanton, M. (Brandeis Univ., Waltham, MA (USA))

    1990-11-15

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 10{sup 9} X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensity, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512x512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of 4x4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 10{sup 4}. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 {mu}m on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1deg frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1deg frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a=275 A) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources. (orig.).

  7. CCD-based detector for protein crystallography with synchrotron X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, M. G.; Westbrook, E. M.; Naday, I.; Coleman, T. A.; Westbrook, M. L.; Travis, D. J.; Sweet, R. M.; Pflugrath, J. W.; Stanton, M.

    1990-11-01

    A detector with a 114 mm aperture, based on a charge-coupled device (CCD), has been designed for X-ray diffraction studies in protein crystallography. The detector was tested at the National Synchrotron Light Source with a beam intensity, through a 0.3 mm collimator, of greater than 109 X-ray photons/s. A fiberoptic taper, an image intensifier, and a lens demagnify, intensify, and focus the image onto a CCD having 512×512 pixels. The statistical uncertainty in the detector output was evaluated as a function of conversion gain. From this, a detective quantum efficiency (DQE) of 0.36 was derived. The dynamic range of a 4×4 pixel resolution element, comparable in size to a diffraction peak, was 104. The point-spread function shows FWHM resolution of approximately 1 pixel, where a pixel is 160 μm on the detector face. A data set collected from a chicken egg-white lysozyme crystal, consisting of 495 0.1° frames, was processed by the MADNES data reduction program. The symmetry R-factors for the data were 3.2-3.5%. In a separate experiment a complete lysozyme data set consisting of 45 1° frames was obtained in just 36 s of X-ray exposure. Diffraction images from crystals of the myosin S1 head (a = 275 Å) were also recorded; the Bragg spots, only 5 pixels apart, were separated but not fully resolved. Changes in the detector design that will improve the DQE and spatial resolution are outlined. The overall performance showed that this type of detector is well suited for X-ray scattering investigations with synchrotron sources.

  8. Actinide science with soft x-ray synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuh, D.

    2002-01-01

    Several workshops, some dating back more than fifteen years, recognised both the potential scientific impact and opportunities that would be made available by the capability to investigate actinide materials in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV)/soft X-ray region of the synchrotron radiation (SR) spectrum. This spectral region revolutionized the approach to surface materials chemistry and physics nearly two decades ego. The actinide science community was unable to capitalize on these SR methodologies for the study of actinide materials until recently because of radiological safety concerns. ,The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL is a third-generation light source providing state-of-the-art performance in the VUV/soft X-ray region. Along with corresponding improvements in detector and vacuum technology, the ALS has rendered experiments with small amounts of actinide materials possible. In particular, it has been the emergence and development of micro-spectroscopic techniques that have enabled investigations of actinide materials at the ALS. The primary methods for the experimental investigation of actinide materials in the VUV/soft X-ray region are the complementary photoelectron spectroscopies, near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and X-ray emission spectroscopy (XES) techniques. Resonant photo-emission is capable of resolving the 5f electron contributions to actinide bonding and can be used to characterise the electronic structure of actinide materials. This technique is clearly a most important methodology afforded by the tunable SR source. Core level and valence band photoelectron spectroscopies are valuable for the characterisation of the electronic properties of actinide materials, as well as for general analytical purposes. High-resolution core-level photo-emission and resonant photo-emission measurements from the a (monoclinic) and δ (FCC) allotropic phases of plutonium metal have been collected on beam line 7.0 at the ALS and the spectra show

  9. Electronic properties of crystalline materials observed in X-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovesey, S. W.; Balcar, E.; Knight, K. S.; Fernández Rodríguez, J.

    2005-05-01

    The few electrons in valence states of a material participate in many of its physical properties, including both structural and transport properties. In the diffraction of X-rays, or neutrons, valence electrons can lead to weak Bragg reflections that are extremely sensitive signatures of their charge and magnetic degrees of freedom. In this regard, diffraction instruments supplied with X-rays from a synchrotron source are particularly useful because the brightness, tuneability and polarization of the X-rays are all helpful in making valuable observations. The data obtained from Bragg diffraction can be analyzed on the basis of an atomic model, which has the virtue that it can be used as a common platform for the analysis of X-ray and neutron diffraction and, in addition, the analysis of observations made with X-ray absorption, NMR, EPR, muon and Mössbauer spectroscopies. We present the salient features for the calculation of structure factors based on an atomic model and applied to the analysis of Bragg diffraction by non-magnetic and magnetic materials, with an emphasis on resonant X-ray Bragg diffraction. The presentation contains a new treatment of parity-odd events found in the mixed electric dipole-electric quadrupole channel of scattering. In addition we discuss the complementary observation of dichroic signals, including natural circular and magnetochiral dichroism. The survey of available analytical tools is complemented by a series of worked examples demonstrating the application of the formalism to different materials with different crystal structures and resonant ions: dysprosium borocarbide ( DyB2C2), vanadium sesquioxide (V2O3), gadolinium tetraboride ( GdB4), chromium sesquioxide ( Cr2O3), haematite and perovskite-type manganites.

  10. Electronic properties of crystalline materials observed in X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lovesey, S.W. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., ISIS Facility, RAL, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom) and RIKEN Harima Institute, SPring-8, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan)]. E-mail: s.w.lovesey@rl.ac.uk; Balcar, E. [Vienna University of Technology, Atominstitut, Stadionallee 2, A1020, Vienna (Austria); Knight, K.S. [Diamond Light Source Ltd., ISIS Facility, RAL, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Department of Mineralogy, Natural History Museum, London SW7 5BD (United Kingdom); Fernandez Rodriguez, J. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad de Oviedo, E-33007 Oviedo (Spain)

    2005-05-01

    The few electrons in valence states of a material participate in many of its physical properties, including both structural and transport properties. In the diffraction of X-rays, or neutrons, valence electrons can lead to weak Bragg reflections that are extremely sensitive signatures of their charge and magnetic degrees of freedom. In this regard, diffraction instruments supplied with X-rays from a synchrotron source are particularly useful because the brightness, tuneability and polarization of the X-rays are all helpful in making valuable observations. The data obtained from Bragg diffraction can be analyzed on the basis of an atomic model, which has the virtue that it can be used as a common platform for the analysis of X-ray and neutron diffraction and, in addition, the analysis of observations made with X-ray absorption, NMR, EPR, muon and Mossbauer spectroscopies. We present the salient features for the calculation of structure factors based on an atomic model and applied to the analysis of Bragg diffraction by non-magnetic and magnetic materials, with an emphasis on resonant X-ray Bragg diffraction. The presentation contains a new treatment of parity-odd events found in the mixed electric dipole-electric quadrupole channel of scattering. In addition we discuss the complementary observation of dichroic signals, including natural circular and magnetochiral dichroism. The survey of available analytical tools is complemented by a series of worked examples demonstrating the application of the formalism to different materials with different crystal structures and resonant ions: dysprosium borocarbide (DyB{sub 2}C{sub 2}), vanadium sesquioxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 3}), gadolinium tetraboride (GdB{sub 4}), chromium sesquioxide (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}), haematite and perovskite-type manganites.

  11. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-01

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  12. Controlled molecules for X-ray diffraction experiments at free-electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan

    2013-12-15

    X-ray diffractive imaging is at the very heart of materials science and has been utilized for decades to solve unknown molecular structures. Nowadays, it serves as the key method of structural biology to solve molecular structures of large biological molecules comprising several thousand or even millions of atoms. However, X-ray diffraction from isolated molecules is very weak. Therefore, the regular and periodic arrangement of a huge number of identical copies of a certain molecule of interest within a crystal lattice has been a necessary condition in order to exploit Bragg diffraction of X-rays. This results in a huge increase in scattered signal and a strongly improved signal-to-noise ratio compared to diffraction from non-crystalline samples. The major bottleneck of structural biology is that many of biologically interesting molecules refuse to form crystals of sufficient size to be used at synchrotron X-ray lightsources. However, novel X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs), which became operational very recently, promise to address this issue. X-ray pulses provided by XFELs are many orders of magnitude more intense than X-ray pulses from a synchrotron source and at the same time as short as only several tens of femtoseconds. Combined with wavelengths in the nm-pm range, XFELs are well-suited to study ultrafast atomic and molecular dynamics. Additionally, the ultrashort pulses can be utilized to circumvent the damage threshold which set a limit to the incident intensity in X-ray diffraction experiments before. At XFELs, though eventually destroying the investigated sample, no significant sample deterioration happens on the ultrashort timescale of the XFEL pulse and the measured diffraction pattern is due to an (almost) unharmed sample. In the framework of this thesis, the approach of utilizing the highly intense XFEL pulses for X-ray diffraction of weakly-scattering non-crystalline samples was taken to the limit of small isolated molecules. X-ray diffraction was

  13. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  14. Instrument and method for X-ray diffraction, fluorescence, and crystal texture analysis without sample preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendreau, Keith (Inventor); Martins, Jose Vanderlei (Inventor); Arzoumanian, Zaven (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence instrument for analyzing samples having no sample preparation includes a X-ray source configured to output a collimated X-ray beam comprising a continuum spectrum of X-rays to a predetermined coordinate and a photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer disposed to receive X-rays output from an unprepared sample disposed at the predetermined coordinate upon exposure of the unprepared sample to the collimated X-ray beam. The X-ray source and the photon-counting X-ray imaging spectrometer are arranged in a reflection geometry relative to the predetermined coordinate.

  15. Setup for in situ X-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth by magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Ellmer, K; Weiss, V; Rossner, H

    2001-01-01

    A novel method is described for the in situ-investigation of nucleation and growth of thin films during magnetron sputtering. Energy dispersive X-ray diffraction with synchrotron light is used for the structural analysis during film growth. An in situ-magnetron sputtering chamber was constructed and installed at a synchrotron radiation beam line with a bending magnet. The white synchrotron light (1-70 keV) passes the sputtering chamber through Kapton windows and hits one of the substrates on a four-fold sample holder. The diffracted beam, observed under a fixed diffraction angle between 3 deg. and 10 deg., is energy analyzed by a high purity Ge-detector. The in situ-EDXRD setup is demonstrated for the growth of tin-doped indium oxide (ITO) films prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering from a metallic target.

  16. Single-pulse x-ray diffraction using polycapillary optics for in situ dynamic diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maddox, B. R., E-mail: maddox3@llnl.gov; Akin, M. C., E-mail: akin1@llnl.gov; Teruya, A.; Hunt, D.; Hahn, D.; Cradick, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Morgan, D. V. [National Security Technologies LLC, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Diagnostic use of single-pulse x-ray diffraction (XRD) at pulsed power facilities can be challenging due to factors such as the high flux and brightness requirements for diffraction and the geometric constraints of experimental platforms. By necessity, the x-ray source is usually positioned very close, within a few inches of the sample. On dynamic compression platforms, this puts the x-ray source in the debris field. We coupled x-ray polycapillary optics to a single-shot needle-and-washer x-ray diode source using a laser-based alignment scheme to obtain high-quality x-ray diffraction using a single 16 ns x-ray pulse with the source >1 m from the sample. The system was tested on a Mo sample in reflection geometry using 17 keV x-rays from a Mo anode. We also identified an anode conditioning effect that increased the x-ray intensity by 180%. Quantitative measurements of the x-ray focal spot produced by the polycapillary yielded a total x-ray flux on the sample of 3.3 ± 0.5 × 10{sup 7} molybdenum Kα photons.

  17. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  18. Multiple x-ray diffraction simulation and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, C.A.B.S. da.

    1989-09-01

    A computer program (MULTX) was implemented for simulation X-ray multiple diffraction diagrams in Renninger geometries. The program uses the X-ray multiple diffraction theory for imperfect crystals. The iterative calculation of the intensities is based on the Taylor series general term, and the primary beam power expansion is given as function of the beam x penetration in the crystal surface. This development allows to consider the simultaneous interaction of the beams involved in the multiple diffraction phenomenon. The simulated diagrams are calculated point-to-point and the tests for the Si and GaAs presented good reproduction of the experimental diagrams for different primary reflections. (L.C.J.A.)

  19. Trace element characterization using a synchrotron radiation X-ray microprobe

    OpenAIRE

    早川, 慎二郎

    1996-01-01

    A scanning X-ray microprobe using synchrotron radiation was developed employing an X-ray focusing system with total reflection mirrors. Utilizing a Wolter mirror system, a hard X-ray microbeam was first realized. With an energy tunable X-ray microprobe, sensitivity in X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis can be optimized for the element of interest at less than 1 ppm in relative concentration. Moreover, small area X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) measurements with XRF detection can provide...

  20. Optics for protein microcrystallography using synchrotron and laboratory X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, J.N.; Van Donkelaar, A.; Balaic, D.X.; Barnea, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: For protein crystallography, a highly-intense focused beam overcomes a serious constraint in current biological research: the inability of many protein molecules to form crystals larger than a few tens of microns in size. High structure-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals is currently only being studied at synchrotron X-ray sources. We shall examine how this is being carried out, and also report the development of a novel tapered glass monocapillary toroidal-mirror optic, which achieves a high-intensity, low-divergence focused beam from a rotating-anode Xray generator. We have used this optic, which demonstrates an ∼28x intensity gain at the beam focus to solve the structure of a plant exoglucanse/inhibtor complex microcrystal to 2.8 Angstroms, with volume equivalent to a 30-micron-edge cube

  1. X-rays from synchrotron: A new challenge for neutron scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirane, G.

    1983-01-01

    A brief review is given of current developments in X-ray scattering techniques at synchrotron radiation facilities. Highly collimated, intense sources of white radiation open up new areas of research in condensed matter physics and challenge the traditional domains of neutron scattering. These include energy dispersive scattering, the use of anomalous dispersion, magnetic diffraction and direct energy analysis by backscattering. The relative merits of X-ray and neutron scattering techniques will be discussed. The unique advantage of neutron scattering is the capability of performing polarization analysis. We will discuss in some detail the current developments at Brookhaven inelastic scattering of polarized neutrons. In addition, we will also discuss special technical problems associated with the search for phasons utilizing a high-resolution triple axis spectrometer. (orig.)

  2. Extinction correction in white X-ray and neutron diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomiyoshi, S.; Yamada, M.; Watanabe, H.

    1980-01-01

    Extinction effects in white-beam X-ray and neutron diffraction are considered. In white-beam diffraction, a small deviation of the wavelength from the Bragg condition Δlambda is a variable which represents the line profile of the diffraction peaks, so that by using the new parameter Δlambda the theory is converted to one in white-beam diffraction. It is shown that for a convex crystal, primary extinction agrees with the results calculated already for monochromatic diffraction. The same relation is shown to hold in secondary extinction. It is concluded that extinction theory derived for monochromatic diffraction is applicable without any modification in white-beam diffraction. (Auth.)

  3. X-ray diffraction and X-ray K absorption near edge studies of copper (II) complexes with amino acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, P. K.; Mishra, Ashutosh; Malviya, Varsha; Kame, Rashmi; Malviya, P. K.

    2017-05-01

    Synthesis of copper (II) complexes [CuL1L2X].nH2O, where n=1, 2,3 (X=Cl,Br,NO3) (L1is 2,2’-bipyridine and L2 is L-tyrosine) by the chemical root method. The XRD data for the samples have been recorded. EXAFS spectra have also been recorded at the K-edge of Cu using the dispersive beam line BL-8 at 2.5 Gev Indus-2 Synchrotron radiation source at RRCAT, Indore, India. XRD and EXAFS data have been analysed using the computer software. X-ray diffraction studies of all complexes indicate their crystalline nature. Lattice parameter, bond length, particle size have been determined from XRD data.

  4. Locating and Visualizing Crystals for X-Ray Diffraction Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Michael; Kissick, David J; Ogata, Craig M

    2017-01-01

    Macromolecular crystallography has advanced from using macroscopic crystals, which might be >1 mm on a side, to crystals that are essentially invisible to the naked eye, or even under a standard laboratory microscope. As crystallography requires recognizing crystals when they are produced, and then placing them in an X-ray, electron, or neutron beam, this provides challenges, particularly in the case of advanced X-ray sources, where beams have very small cross sections and crystals may be vanishingly small. Methods for visualizing crystals are reviewed here, and examples of different types of cases are presented, including: standard crystals, crystals grown in mesophase, in situ crystallography, and crystals grown for X-ray Free Electron Laser or Micro Electron Diffraction experiments. As most techniques have limitations, it is desirable to have a range of complementary techniques available to identify and locate crystals. Ideally, a given technique should not cause sample damage, but sometimes it is necessary to use techniques where damage can only be minimized. For extreme circumstances, the act of probing location may be coincident with collecting X-ray diffraction data. Future challenges and directions are also discussed.

  5. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, Thomas D.; Lyubimov, Artem Y.; Ogata, Craig M.; Vo, Huy; Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T.; Berger, James M.

    2015-01-01

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs

  6. A high-transparency, micro-patternable chip for X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals under native growth conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murray, Thomas D. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Lyubimov, Artem Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ogata, Craig M. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Vo, Huy [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Brunger, Axel T., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Berger, James M., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2015-09-26

    A highly X-ray-transparent, silicon nitride-based device has been designed and fabricated to harvest protein microcrystals for high-resolution X-ray diffraction data collection using microfocus beamlines and XFELs. Microcrystals present a significant impediment to the determination of macromolecular structures by X-ray diffraction methods. Although microfocus synchrotron beamlines and X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) can enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from microcrystals, there is a need for efficient methods of harvesting small volumes (<2 µl) of microcrystals grown under common laboratory formats and delivering them to an X-ray beam source under native growth conditions. One approach that shows promise in overcoming the challenges intrinsic to microcrystal analysis is to pair so-called ‘fixed-target’ sample-delivery devices with microbeam-based X-ray diffraction methods. However, to record weak diffraction patterns it is necessary to fabricate devices from X-ray-transparent materials that minimize background scattering. Presented here is the design of a new micro-diffraction device consisting of three layers fabricated from silicon nitride, photoresist and polyimide film. The chip features low X-ray scattering and X-ray absorption properties, and uses a customizable blend of hydrophobic and hydrophilic surface patterns to help localize microcrystals to defined regions. Microcrystals in their native growth conditions can be loaded into the chips with a standard pipette, allowing data collection at room temperature. Diffraction data collected from hen egg-white lysozyme microcrystals (10–15 µm) loaded into the chips yielded a complete, high-resolution (<1.6 Å) data set sufficient to determine a high-quality structure by molecular replacement. The features of the chip allow the rapid and user-friendly analysis of microcrystals grown under virtually any laboratory format at microfocus synchrotron beamlines and XFELs.

  7. X-ray absorption spectroscopy investigations on radioactive matter using MARS beamline at SOLEIL synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Llorens, Isabelle; Solari, Pier Lorenzo; Sitaud, Bruno [Synchrotron SOLEIL - l' Orme des Merisiers Saint Aubin, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); and others

    2014-07-01

    The MARS beamline at the SOLEIL synchrotron is dedicated to the characterization of radioactive material samples. One great advantage of the beamline is the possibility to characterize about 380 radionuclides by different X-ray techniques in the same place. This facility is unique in Europe. A wide energy range from around 3.5 keV to 36 keV K-edges from K to Cs, and L3 edges from Cd to Am and beyond can be used. The MARS beamline is optimized for X-ray absorption spectroscopy techniques (XANES/EXAFS), powder diffraction (XRD) but X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis, High Energy Resolution Fluorescence Detected-XAS (HERFD-XAS), X-ray Emission (XES) and μ-XAS/XRD are also possible. A description of the beamline as well as its performances are given in a first part. Then some scientific examples of XAS studies from users are presented which cover a wide variety of topics in radiochemistry and nuclear materials.

  8. Equation of state and hyperfine parameters of high-spin bridgmanite in the Earth’s lower mantle by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Zhu; Wang, Fan; Lin, Jung-Fu; Fu, Suyu; Yang, Jing; Wu, Xiang; Okuchi, Takuo; Tomioka, Naotaka; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Xiao, Yuming; Chow, Paul

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we performed synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Mössbauer spectroscopy (SMS) measurements on two single-crystal bridgmanite samples [ Embedded Image and Embedded Image ] to investigate the combined effect of Fe and Al on the hyperfine parameters, lattice parameters, and equation of state (EoS) of bridgmanite up to 130 GPa. Our SMS results show that Fe2+ and Fe3+ in Bm6 and Al-Bm11 are predominantly located in the large pseudo-dodecahedral sites (A-site) at lower-mantle pressures. The observed drastic increase in the hyperfine quadrupole splitting (QS) between 13 and 32 GPa can be associated with an enhanced local distortion of the A-site Fe2+ in Bm6. In contrast to Bm6, the enhanced lattice distortion and the presence of extremely high QS values of Fe2+ are not observed in Al-Bm11 at high pressures. Our results here support the notion that the occurrence of the extremely high QS component of approximately 4 mm/s in bridgmanite is due to the lattice distortion in the high-spin (HS) A-site Fe2+, instead of the occurrence of the intermediate-spin state. Both A-site Fe2+ and Fe3+ in Bm6 and Al-Bm11 remain in the HS state at lower-mantle pressures. Together with XRD results, we present the first experimental evidence that the enhanced lattice distortion of A-site Fe2+ does not cause any detectable variation in the EoS parameters, but is associated with anomalous variations in the bond length, tilting angle, and shear strain in the octahedra of Bm6. Analysis of the obtained EoS parameters of bridgmanite at lower-mantle pressures indicates that the substitution of Fe in bridgmanite will cause an enhanced density and a reduced bulk sound velocity (VΦ), whereas the Al and Fe substitution has a reduced effect on density and a negligible effect on VΦ. These experimental results provide new insight into the correlation between lattice, hyperfine, and EoS parameters of bridgmanite in the Earth’s lower mantle.

  9. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  10. Focal construct geometry for high intensity energy dispersive x-ray diffraction based on x-ray capillary optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fangzuo; Liu, Zhiguo; Sun, Tianxi, E-mail: stx@bnu.edu.cn; Jiang, Bowen; Zhu, Yu [The Key Laboratory of Beam Technology and Materials Modification of the Ministry of Education, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Beijing Radiation Center, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2016-03-14

    We presented a focal construct geometry (FCG) method for high intensity energy dispersive X-ray diffraction by utilizing a home-made ellipsoidal single-bounce capillary (ESBC) and a polycapillary parallel X-ray lens (PPXRL). The ESBC was employed to focus the X-rays from a conventional laboratory source into a small focal spot and to produce an annular X-ray beam in the far-field. Additionally, diffracted polychromatic X-rays were confocally collected by the PPXRL attached to a stationary energy-resolved detector. Our FCG method based on ESBC and PPXRL had achieved relatively high intensity diffraction peaks and effectively narrowed the diffraction peak width which was helpful in improving the potential d-spacing resolution for material phase analysis.

  11. K-Edge Subtraction Angiography with Synchrotron X-Rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giacomini, John C.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to utilize dual energy, monochromatic X-rays produced from synchrotrons radiation in order to obtain noninvasive medical imaging. The application of synchrotrons radiation to medical imaging is based on the principle of iodine dichromography, first described by Bertil Jacobson of the Karolinska Institute in 1953. Medical imaging using synchrotrons radiation and K-edge dichromography was pioneered at Stanford University under the leadership of Dr. Ed Rubenstein, and the late Nobel Laureate in Physics, Dr. Robert Hofstadter. With progressive refinements in hardware, clinical-quality images were obtained of human coronary arteries utilizing peripheral injections of iodinated contrast agent. These images even now are far superior to those being presented by investigators using MRI as an imaging tool for coronary arteries. However, new supplies and instruments in the cardiac catheterization laboratory have served to transform coronary angiography into an outpatient procedure, with relatively little morbidity. We extended the principles learned with coronary angiography to noninvasive imaging of the human bronchial tree. For these images, we utilized xenon as the contrast agent, as it has a K-edge very similar to that of iodine. In this case, there is no true competing diagnostic test, and pulmonary neoplasm is an enormous public health concern. In early experiments, we demonstrated remarkably clear images of the human bronchial tree. These images have been shown internationally; however, funding difficulties primarily with the Department of Energy have not allowed for progression of this promising avenue of research. One potential criticism of the project is that in order to obtain these images, we utilized national laboratories. Some have questioned whether this would lead to a practical imaging modality. However, we have shown that the technology exists to allow for construction of a miniature storage ring, with a superconducting

  12. The Use of Small-Angle X-Ray Diffraction Studies for the Analysis of Structural Features in Archaeological Samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wess, T. J.; Drakopoulos, M.; Snigirev, A.

    2001-01-01

    the potential of a laboratory source is also described. Specific examples of analysis using X-ray diffraction of historic parchment, archaeological bone, a Central Mexico style pictograph and microdiffraction of calcified tissues are used to show the scope and versatility of the technique. Diffraction data......X-ray diffraction or scattering analysis provides a powerful non-destructive technique capable of providing important information about the state of archaeological samples in the nanometer length scale. Small-angle diffraction facilities are usually found at synchrotron sources, although...

  13. High Pressure X-ray Diffraction Studies on Barium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, J D; Bennion, R B; Hall, H T

    1963-08-09

    Simultaneous x-ray diffraction and electrical resistance measurements on barium establish, with certainty, that Bridgman's 78-kb resistance transition is identical with his 59-kb volumetransition. During this transition, the bodycentered cubic structure changes to hexagonalclose packed. Lattice parameters for the latter structure at 62 kb (volume scale) are: a = 3.90 A, c = 6.15 A, and c/a = 1.58. Compression (AV/Vo) at 62 kb is 0.359 + 0.005 compared to 0.345 previously reported by Bridgman. Below the transition, at 49 kb, compression is 0.300 +/- 0.005 compared to Bridgman's 0.288. Bridgman's 17-kb volume transition was not detected by x-ray diffraction.

  14. Diffractive-refractive optics: X-ray splitter

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hrdý, Jaromír

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 17, č. 1 (2010), s. 129-131 ISSN 0909-0495 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412; GA AV ČR IAA100100716 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : x-ray splitter * diffractive-refractive optics Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 2.335, year: 2010

  15. X-Ray Diffraction of Iron Containing Samples

    OpenAIRE

    Mos, Yvonne M.; Vermeulen, Arnold C.; Buisman, Cees J.N.; Weijma, Jan

    2018-01-01

    In X-ray diffraction, a good combination of configuration and sample is essential. Copper radiation for iron containing materials leads to a high background. Although this has been recognized, many researchers still use this combination. To clearly show the unsuitability of copper radiation for iron oxides, magnetite, goethite, maghemite, and hematite were analysed in different configurations using copper or cobalt radiation. Results show effects of fluorescence repressing measures and differ...

  16. Nanofabrication of Diffractive Soft X-ray Optics

    OpenAIRE

    Lindblom, Magnus

    2009-01-01

    This thesis summarizes the present status of the nanofabrication of diffractive optics, i.e. zone plates, and test objects for soft x-ray microscopy at KTH. The emphasis is on new and improved fabrication processes for nickel and germanium zone plates. A new concept in which nickel and germanium are combined in a zone plate is also presented. The main techniques used in the fabrication are electron beam lithography for the patterning, followed by plasma etching and electroplating for the stru...

  17. Coherent X-ray diffraction from collagenous soft tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berenguer de la Cuesta, Felisa; Wenger, Marco P.E.; Bean, Richard J.; Bozec, Laurent; Horton, Michael A.; Robinson, Ian K.; (UCL)

    2009-09-11

    Coherent X-ray diffraction has been applied in the imaging of inorganic materials with great success. However, its application to biological specimens has been limited to some notable exceptions, due to the induced radiation damage and the extended nature of biological samples, the last limiting the application of most part of the phasing algorithms. X-ray ptychography, still under development, is a good candidate to overcome such difficulties and become a powerful imaging method for biology. We describe herein the feasibility of applying ptychography to the imaging of biological specimens, in particular collagen rich samples. We report here speckles in diffraction patterns from soft animal tissue, obtained with an optimized small angle X-ray setup that exploits the natural coherence of the beam. By phasing these patterns, dark field images of collagen within tendon, skin, bone, or cornea will eventually be obtained with a resolution of 60-70 nm. We present simulations of the contrast mechanism in collagen based on atomic force microscope images of the samples. Simulations confirmed the 'speckled' nature of the obtained diffraction patterns. Once inverted, the patterns will show the disposition and orientation of the fibers within the tissue, by enhancing the phase contrast between protein and no protein regions of the sample. Our work affords the application of the most innovative coherent X-ray diffraction tools to the study of biological specimens, and this approach will have a significant impact in biology and medicine because it overcomes many of the limits of current microscopy techniques.

  18. X-ray beam splitting design for concurrent imaging at hard X-ray FELs and synchrotron facilities

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Oberta, Peter; Mokso, R.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 729, NOV (2013), s. 85-89 ISSN 0168-9002 R&D Projects: GA MPO FR-TI1/412 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100522 Keywords : diffractive-refractive optics * hard X-ray FEL * X-ray imaging Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 1.316, year: 2013 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0168900213009613

  19. X-ray diffraction from single GaAs nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biermanns, Andreas

    2012-11-12

    In recent years, developments in X-ray focussing optics have allowed to produce highly intense, coherent X-ray beams with spot sizes in the range of 100 nm and below. Together with the development of new experimental stations, X-ray diffraction techniques can now be applied to study single nanometer-sized objects. In the present work, X-ray diffraction is applied to study different aspects of the epitaxial growth of GaAs nanowires. Besides conventional diffraction methods, which employ X-ray beams with dimensions of several tens of {mu}m, special emphasis lies on the use of nanodiffraction methods which allow to study single nanowires in their as-grown state without further preparation. In particular, coherent X-ray diffraction is applied to measure simultaneously the 3-dimensional shape and lattice parameters of GaAs nanowires grown by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. It is observed that due to a high density of zinc-blende rotational twins within the nanowires, their lattice parameter deviates systematically from the bulk zinc-blende phase. In a second step, the initial stage in the growth of GaAs nanowires on Si (1 1 1) surfaces is studied. This nanowires, obtained by Ga-assisted growth in molecular beam epitaxy, grow predominantly in the cubic zinc-blende structure, but contain inclusions of the hexagonal wurtzite phase close to their bottom interface. Using nanodiffraction methods, the position of the different structural units along the growth axis is determined. Because the GaAs lattice is 4% larger than silicon, these nanowires release their lattice mismatch by the inclusion of dislocations at the interface. Whereas NWs with diameters below 50 nm are free of strain, a rough interface structure in nanowires with diameters above 100 nm prevents a complete plastic relaxation, leading to a residual strain at the interface that decays elastically along the growth direction. Finally, measurements on GaAs-core/InAs-shell nanowire heterostructures are presented

  20. Soft X-ray diffractometer for synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Gau, T S; Liu, K Y; Chung, C H; Chen, C K; Lai, S C; Shu, C H; Huang, Y S; Chao, C H; Lee, Y R; Chen, C T; Chang, S L

    2001-01-01

    An ultra-high vacuum soft X-ray diffractometer has been constructed and commissioned at the Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (SRRC) to investigate materials structures in mesoscale. The diffractometer, housed in a UHV tank, consists of a 6-circle goniometer, together with the systems for beam-collimation, signal detection, vacuum, and control panels. The kappa-phi (cursive,open) Greek-psi goniostat is adopted for the sample orientation. Crystal samples can be rotated along a given reciprocal lattice vector by using psi scan. Two orthogonal axes, gamma (or 2 theta) and delta, are used to move the detector. The detector is a semiconductor pin diode, which can be used in UHV ambient. This 6-circle goniometer allows for sample scanning of a wide range in the momentum space. The motors used for goniometer rotation and slit selection are UHV compatible. The UHV tank is placed on an XYZ table capable of positioning the center of the goniometer onto the incident beam. Test experiments have been carried on the 1-...

  1. Advancements in X-ray waveguides and their applications in coherent diffraction imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelliccia, D. [Institut fuer Synchrotronstrahlung-ANKA Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe Herman-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, D-76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)], E-mail: daniele.pelliccia@iss.fzk.de; Bukreeva, I. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy); Giannini, C.; De Caro, L. [Istituto di Cristallografia-CNR, Via Amendola 122/O, 70126 Bari (Italy); Cedola, A.; Scarinci, F.; Lagomarsino, S. [Istituto di Fotonica e Nanotecnologie-CNR, Via Cineto Romano 42, 00156 Roma (Italy)

    2009-10-15

    X-ray planar waveguides are currently used tools, in synchrotron radiation facilities, to produce a coherent beam with typical dimensions in the range of tens or hundreds of nanometers. The properties of waveguided beams such as divergence and coherence turns out to be very interesting for several applications both in synchrotron and in laboratory sources. These features will be reviewed in the present paper for different coupling methods of the radiation field with the waveguide channel. Details of fabrication procedures and experimental results concerning front coupling waveguide are reported. The waveguide properties can be estimated from the far-field diffracted beam by a Fourier analysis giving the autocorrelation function of the exit field. Due to the high degree of coherence of the exiting beam, X-ray waveguides can be successfully exploited in coherent diffraction imaging experiments. We review results concerning Fresnel coherent diffraction imaging experiments with hard X-rays, using planar waveguides as optical elements in one and two dimensions.

  2. Advancements in X-ray waveguides and their applications in coherent diffraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelliccia, D.; Bukreeva, I.; Giannini, C.; De Caro, L.; Cedola, A.; Scarinci, F.; Lagomarsino, S.

    2009-01-01

    X-ray planar waveguides are currently used tools, in synchrotron radiation facilities, to produce a coherent beam with typical dimensions in the range of tens or hundreds of nanometers. The properties of waveguided beams such as divergence and coherence turns out to be very interesting for several applications both in synchrotron and in laboratory sources. These features will be reviewed in the present paper for different coupling methods of the radiation field with the waveguide channel. Details of fabrication procedures and experimental results concerning front coupling waveguide are reported. The waveguide properties can be estimated from the far-field diffracted beam by a Fourier analysis giving the autocorrelation function of the exit field. Due to the high degree of coherence of the exiting beam, X-ray waveguides can be successfully exploited in coherent diffraction imaging experiments. We review results concerning Fresnel coherent diffraction imaging experiments with hard X-rays, using planar waveguides as optical elements in one and two dimensions.

  3. X-ray diffraction at Bragg angles around π/2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayolo, C.M.G. de.

    1991-01-01

    X-ray diffraction at Bragg angles around π/2 is studied from the theoretical and experimental points of view. The proposed corrections to the dynamical theory in the θ β ≅ π/2 cases, has been reviewed showing the equivalence between two formalisms leading to a corrected expression for the dependence of the angular parameter y with the angle of incidence. An expression for y valid in the conventional and θ β ≅ π/2 cases has been obtained. A general expression for Bragg law and for energy resolution after a Bragg diffraction was also deduced. (author)

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago; Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A.; Polikarpov, Igor

    2006-01-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP + reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP + reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source

  5. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of ferredoxin reductase from Leptospira interrogans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nascimento, Alessandro S.; Ferrarezi, Thiago [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil); Catalano-Dupuy, Daniela L.; Ceccarelli, Eduardo A. [Facultad de Ciencias Bioquímicas y Farmacéuticas, Molecular Biology Division, Instituto de Biología Molecular y Celular de Rosario (IBR), CONICET, Universidad Nacional de Rosario, Suipacha 531, S2002LRK Rosario (Argentina); Polikarpov, Igor, E-mail: ipolikarpov@if.sc.usp.br [Instituto de Física de São Carlos, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Trabalhador Saocarlense 400, São Carlos, SP, 13560-970 (Brazil)

    2006-07-01

    Crystals adequate for X-ray diffraction analysis have been prepared from L. interrogans ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase. Ferredoxin-NADP{sup +} reductase (FNR) is an FAD-containing enzyme that catalyzes electron transfer between NADP(H) and ferredoxin. Here, results are reported of the recombinant expression, purification and crystallization of FNR from Leptospira interrogans, a parasitic bacterium of animals and humans. The L. interrogans FNR crystals belong to a primitive monoclinic space group and diffract to 2.4 Å resolution at a synchrotron source.

  6. X-ray diffraction, neutron diffraction and analysis of molecular structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontecilla-Camps, J.C.

    1997-01-01

    The only method that is capable to show the atomic structure of most of macromolecules is the X ray diffraction; neutron diffraction is mostly used for the localization of hydrogen atoms, too light to be detected by X ray diffraction. With the growing number of known structures, the molecular crystallographic study may combine the molecular replacement technique and the co-crystallization method, or use the new Laue method, and leads to the functional and topological analysis of biological molecular structures

  7. Synchrotron x-ray methods in studies of thin organic film structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentle, I.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, the study of the structures of organic films as thin as a single monolayer has been revolutionized by methods that take advantage of the characteristics of synchrotron radiation. In particular, the methods of grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD) and X-ray reflectivity have led to a number of valuable insights into structural aspects of thin films at molecular resolution. Our group has been studying films formed at the air/water interface as insoluble monolayers and subsequently transferred to solid substrates using either the vertical (Langmuir-Blodgett) or horizontal (Langmuir-Schaeffer) methods. The main aim of these experiments is to exert control over film structure in the direction parallel to the substrate surface. This is highly desirable in order to design devices that exploit the optical and electrooptical properties of functional materials, but is difficult to do. By varying the chemical structure of the film materials and controlling deposition conditions a degree of control is possible, but only using synchrotron methods can it be easily verified. We have also developed a novel method of rapidly collecting data from GIXD measurements by the application of area detection (imaging plates), which has made possible measurements of dynamic processes such as in-situ annealing. Such measurements are not possible using traditional scanning methods. One area of current interest is films composed of porphyrins as functional materials, either alone or as mixed films with fatty acids. We have been investigating ways of assembling porphyrins in such a way as to overcome the tendency to aggregate, and to produce patterning and ordered structures in the plane of the interface. Examples will be given of how film composition and deposition method affects the final structure, and of how X-ray methods can be used to elucidate both the structures and the mechanisms. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  8. Study of 3-D stress development in parent and twin pairs of a hexagonal close-packed polycrystal: Part I - In-situ three-dimensional synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdolvand, Hamidreza; Majkut, Marta; Oddershede, Jette

    2015-01-01

    becomes more complicated when deformation twinning plays a significant role in accommodating an externally applied load. In this paper, a comprehensive study of stress development in a coarse grained strongly textured hcp polycrystal Zircaloy-2, is given using three-dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD......) microscopy. In-situ uniaxial straining was carried out at seven steps up to 2.7% in the macroscopic direction that favors twin formation, while center-of-mass position, crystallographic orientation, elastic strain, stress, and relative volume of each grain were measured. This information was used...

  9. On the Use of Wide-Angle Energy-Sensitive Detectors in White-Beam X-Ray Single-Crystal Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buras, B.; Staun Olsen, J.; Gerward, Leif

    1980-01-01

    The possible applications of multiple-element or large-area semiconductor detectors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction are discussed on the basis of experimental results using Bremsstrahlung as well as synchrotron radiation.......The possible applications of multiple-element or large-area semiconductor detectors in single-crystal X-ray diffraction are discussed on the basis of experimental results using Bremsstrahlung as well as synchrotron radiation....

  10. Design and fabrication of micro X-ray diffraction system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Yang Soon; Han, Sun Ho; Kim, Jong Goo; Jee, Kwang Yong

    2006-10-15

    It has been observed that microstructure changes occur at the pellet periphery(rim) of the fuel at very high burn-up. Despite its narrow range (below some hundreds microns in depth), this peripheral region(rim) determines the behaviour of nuclear fuel. To determine lattice parameter with XRD at intervals as small as 30-50 {mu} m in radial direction of irradiated fuel samples, a micro X-ray diffraction system was designed and fabricated. This report describes the micro X-ray diffraction system consisted of an X-ray microbeam alignment system and a sample micro translation system, its characterization, and its performance test through the analysis for the micro region of some specimens. This system will be set in a radiation shielded glove box, and then used for analysis of lattice parameter change and the phase change at intervals as small as 30-50 {mu} m in radial direction of the rim of an irradiated fuel sample and a fuel cladding.

  11. Time-resolved structural studies at synchrotrons and X-ray free electron lasers: opportunities and challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neutze, Richard; Moffat, Keith

    2012-01-01

    X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) are potentially revolutionary X-ray sources because of their very short pulse duration, extreme peak brilliance and high spatial coherence, features that distinguish them from today’s synchrotron sources. We review recent time-resolved Laue diffraction and time-resolved wide angle X-ray scattering (WAXS) studies at synchrotron sources, and initial static studies at XFELs. XFELs have the potential to transform the field of time-resolved structural biology, yet many challenges arise in devising and adapting hardware, experimental design and data analysis strategies to exploit their unusual properties. Despite these challenges, we are confident that XFEL sources are poised to shed new light on ultrafast protein reaction dynamics. PMID:23021004

  12. The biomechanics of amnion rupture: an X-ray diffraction study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Che J Connon

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Pre-term birth is the leading cause of perinatal and neonatal mortality, 40% of which are attributed to the pre-term premature rupture of amnion. Rupture of amnion is thought to be associated with a corresponding decrease in the extracellular collagen content and/or increase in collagenase activity. However, there is very little information concerning the detailed organisation of fibrillar collagen in amnion and how this might influence rupture. Here we identify a loss of lattice like arrangement in collagen organisation from areas near to the rupture site, and present a 9% increase in fibril spacing and a 50% decrease in fibrillar organisation using quantitative measurements gained by transmission electron microscopy and the novel application of synchrotron X-ray diffraction. These data provide an accurate insight into the biomechanical process of amnion rupture and highlight X-ray diffraction as a new and powerful tool in our understanding of this process.

  13. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kiyota, Eduardo [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Sousa, Sylvia Morais de [Centro de Biologia Molecular e Engenharia Genética, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil); Menossi, Marcelo [Departamento de Genética e Evolução, Instituto de Biologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Yunes, José Andrés [Laboratório de Biologia Molecular, Centro Infantil Boldrini, Campinas-SP (Brazil); Aparicio, Ricardo, E-mail: aparicio@iqm.unicamp.br [Laboratório de Biologia Estrutural, Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, CP 6154, 13083-970 Campinas-SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR.

  14. Edge diffraction effect at the refraction of X rays in a diamond prism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur'yanskii, A. G.; Konovalov, O. V.; Gizha, S. S.; Beilin, N. D.

    2014-12-01

    The refraction of monochromatic X-ray radiation in an optically polished diamond prism has been studied. Measurements have been performed on the ID10 channel of the ESRF synchrotron (Grenoble). It has been found that parabolic geometric deviations of the profile of the refractive face of the prism from a plane are responsible for the interference pattern that is similar in the structure of oscillations to an edge diffraction effect. As a result, a diffraction pattern characteristic of the near-field Fresnel zone can be observed in the farfield zone. A high sensitivity to phase perturbations ensures the possibility of using this effect to analyze the parameters of an X-ray wavefront with a dimension of about 1 μm.

  15. Atomic structure of large angle grain boundaries determined by quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzsimmons, M.R.; Sass, S.L.

    1988-01-01

    Quantitative X-ray diffraction techniques have been used to determine the atomic structure of the Σ = 5 and 13 [001] twist boundaries in Au with a resolution of 0.09 Angstrom or better. The reciprocal lattices of these boundaries were mapped out using synchrotron radiation. The atomic structures were obtained by testing model structures against the intensity observations with a chi square analysis. The boundary structure were modeled using polyhedra, including octahedra, special configurations of tetrahedra and Archimedian anti-prisms, interwoven together by the boundary symmetry. The results of this work point to the possibility of obtaining general rules for grain boundary structure based on X-ray diffraction observations that give the atomic positions with high resolution

  16. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of maize aldose reductase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyota, Eduardo; Sousa, Sylvia Morais de; Santos, Marcelo Leite dos; Costa Lima, Aline da; Menossi, Marcelo; Yunes, José Andrés; Aparicio, Ricardo

    2007-01-01

    Preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of apo maize aldose reductase at 2.0 Å resolution are reported. Maize aldose reductase (AR) is a member of the aldo-keto reductase superfamily. In contrast to human AR, maize AR seems to prefer the conversion of sorbitol into glucose. The apoenzyme was crystallized in space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 47.2, b = 54.5, c = 100.6 Å and one molecule in the asymmetric unit. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction data were collected and a final resolution limit of 2.0 Å was obtained after data reduction. Phasing was carried out by an automated molecular-replacement procedure and structural refinement is currently in progress. The refined structure is expected to shed light on the functional/enzymatic mechanism and the unusual activities of maize AR

  17. Serial femtosecond X-ray diffraction of enveloped virus microcrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert M. Lawrence

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX using X-ray free-electron lasers has produced high-resolution, room temperature, time-resolved protein structures. We report preliminary SFX of Sindbis virus, an enveloped icosahedral RNA virus with ∼700 Å diameter. Microcrystals delivered in viscous agarose medium diffracted to ∼40 Å resolution. Small-angle diffuse X-ray scattering overlaid Bragg peaks and analysis suggests this results from molecular transforms of individual particles. Viral proteins undergo structural changes during entry and infection, which could, in principle, be studied with SFX. This is an important step toward determining room temperature structures from virus microcrystals that may enable time-resolved studies of enveloped viruses.

  18. Identifications studies of Lauha Bhasma by X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, S C; Reddy, K R C; Sastry, G V S

    2012-01-01

    Procedures for preparation of Lauha Bhasma are described in ancient texts of Ayurveda. These procedures also begin with different source material for iron such as Teekshna Lauha and Kanta Lauha etc. In the present study, we have selected different source materials viz. magnetite iron ore for Kanta Lauha and pure (Armco grade) iron turnings for Teekshna Lauha. The standard procedures of preparation of Lauha Bhasma are carried out in identical conditions for these two raw materials. The final product from the Puta are characterized by using X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy to understanding the crystallographic form or forms of iron oxides and their composition at the end of each Puta. The iron content at the end of repeated Putas (18 for Kanta Lauha and 20 for Teekshna Lauha) have shown a decrease in case of Teekshna Lauha since the starting material is pure iron while it showed only marginal decreases in the case of Kanta Lauha because the Fe(3)O(4) of magnetite is undergoing oxidation to Fe(2)O(3). The trace elements remain within the Bhasma in the form of various oxides of Si, Al, Ca, etc.

  19. Surface analysis of dental amalgams by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uo, Motohiro; Berglund, Anders; Cardenas, Juan; Pohl, Lars; Watari, Fumio; Bergman, Maud; Sjöberg, Staffan

    2003-11-01

    It is important to characterize the surface of dental amalgam in order to understand the process of mercury release from amalgam restorations in the oral cavity. The mercury evaporation occurs not only from the newly made restoration but also from the set material. The surfaces of four different types of amalgams, which had been well set, were analyzed with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the relationship between surface compositions and mercury release was studied. Fresh amalgam surfaces as well as aged surfaces, which were stored for 30 days in air, were investigated using XPS and the chemical states of amalgam components and oxygen were studied. The aged surfaces were also characterized with XRD and grazing angle XRD. With increased oxidation, the surface contents of tin and oxygen were increased in all amalgams. In contrast, the surface contents of copper and mercury were decreased. An increase of zinc or indium content were observed in zinc or indium containing amalgams, respectively. A surface layer enriched with indium and oxygen was clearly detected by XPS but not with grazing angle XRD. The thickness of the enriched surface layer is estimated to be in the order of few nanometer, which is approximately equal to the analysis depth of XPS. In addition, the presence of metallic elements, like tin and zinc, that readily form a stable oxide layer at the surface suppress the release of mercury.

  20. Microbial biofilm study by synchrotron X-ray microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pennafirme, S.; Lima, I.; Bitencourt, J.A.; Crapez, M.A.C.; Lopes, R.T.

    2015-01-01

    Microbial biofilm has already being used to remove metals and other pollutants from wastewater. In this sense, our proposal was to isolate and cultivate bacteria consortia from mangrove’s sediment resistant to Zn (II) and Cu (II) at 50 mg L −1 and to observe, through synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (microXRF), whether the biofilm sequestered the metal. The biofilm area analyzed was 1 mm 2 and a 2D map was generated (pixel size 20×20 μm 2 , counting time 5 s/point). The biofilm formation and retention followed the sequence Zn>Cu. Bacterial consortium zinc resistant formed dense biofilm and retained 63.83% of zinc, while the bacterial consortium copper resistant retained 3.21% of copper, with lower biofilm formation. Dehydrogenase activity of Zn resistant bacterial consortium was not negatively affect by 50 mg ml −1 zinc input, whereas copper resistant bacterial consortium showed a significant decrease on dehydrogenase activity (50 mg mL −1 of Cu input). In conclusion, biofilm may protect bacterial cells, acting as barrier against metal toxicity. The bacterial consortia Zn resistant, composed by Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp formed dense biofilm and sequestered metal from water, decreasing the metal bioavailability. These bacterial consortia can be used in bioreactors and in bioremediation programs. - Highlights: • We studied bacterial bioremediation by microXRF. • Dense biofilm may act sequestering metal while protecting bacterial metabolism. • Nitratireductor spp. and Pseudomonas spp decreased seawater metal bioavailability. • Bacterial consortia from polluted areas may be used in bioremediation programs.

  1. In situ X-ray diffraction studies on the piezoelectric response of PZT thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davydok, A., E-mail: davydok@mpie.de [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397 Marseille (France); Max-Planck-Institut für Eisenforschung, Department Structure and Nano-/Micromechanics of Materials, D-40237 Düsseldorf (Germany); Cornelius, T.W. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397 Marseille (France); Mocuta, C. [SOLEIL Synchrotron, DiffAbs beamline, L' Orme des Merisiers, Saint-Aubin - BP 48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Lima, E.C. [Universidade Federal do Tocantins, 77500-000 Porto Nacional, TO (Brazil); Araujo, E.B. [Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Av. Brasil, 56 Centro, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil); Thomas, O. [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, Université de Toulon, IM2NP UMR 7334, 13397 Marseille (France)

    2016-03-31

    Piezoelectric properties of randomly oriented self-polarized PbZr{sub 0.50}Ti{sub 0.50}O{sub 3} (PZT) thin films were investigated using in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction. Possibilities for investigating the piezoelectric effect using micro-sized hard X-ray beams are demonstrated and perspectives for future dynamical measurements on PZT samples with variety of compositions and thicknesses are given. Studies performed on the crystalline [100, 110] directions evidenced piezoelectric anisotropy. The piezoelectric coefficient d{sub 33} was calculated in terms of the lab reference frame (d{sub perp}) and found to be two times larger along the [100] direction than along the [110] direction. The absolute values for the d{sub perp} amount to 120 and 230 pm/V being in good agreement with experimental and theoretical values found in literature for bulk PZT ceramics. - Highlights: • We performed in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies on (PZT) thin films. • We discuss anisotropy of piezo effect in different crystallographic directions. • Perpendicular component Piezo coefficient of thin PZT layer is defined.

  2. Identification of inversion domains in KTiOPO{sub 4}via resonant X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabrizi, Federica, E-mail: federica.fabrizi@diamond.ac.uk [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom); Thomas, Pamela A. [Department of Physics, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Nisbet, Gareth; Collins, Stephen P. [Diamond Light Source, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Didcot, OX11 0DE (United Kingdom)

    2015-05-14

    The identification and high-resolution mapping of the absolute crystallographic structure in multi-domain ferroelectric KTiOPO{sub 4} is achieved through a novel synchrotron X-ray diffraction method. On a single Bragg reflection, the intensity ratio in resonant diffraction below and above the Ti absorption K edge demonstrates a domain contrast up to a factor of ∼270, thus implementing a non-contact, non-destructive imaging technique with micrometre spatial resolution, applicable to samples of arbitrarily large dimensions. A novel method is presented for the identification of the absolute crystallographic structure in multi-domain polar materials such as ferroelectric KTiOPO{sub 4}. Resonant (or ‘anomalous’) X-ray diffraction spectra collected across the absorption K edge of Ti (4.966 keV) on a single Bragg reflection demonstrate a huge intensity ratio above and below the edge, providing a polar domain contrast of ∼270. This allows one to map the spatial domain distribution in a periodically inverted sample, with a resolution of ∼1 µm achieved with a microfocused beam. This non-contact, non-destructive technique is well suited for samples of large dimensions (in contrast with traditional resonant X-ray methods based on diffraction from Friedel pairs), and its potential is particularly relevant in the context of physical phenomena connected with an absence of inversion symmetry, which require characterization of the underlying absolute atomic structure (such as in the case of magnetoelectric coupling and multiferroics)

  3. Software system for X-ray diffraction quantitative phase analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuentes, L.; Herrera, V.; Rubio, E.

    1989-01-01

    A system of experimental methods and computer programs for X-ray diffraction analysis is presented. The most important cases occurring in practice are considered. Program MARIA for spectral analysis is described. The external standard method for powder analysis is presented. Program STANDEXT calculates the sample absorption coefficient, the concentrations and standard deviations by a least squares method. For the case of partly identified samples, the internal standard method is developed. All measured peak are considered in the calculations. Program STANDINT solves the concentrations of the identified phases, their errors and the sample's absorption coefficient. A modification is introduced in the so-called direct method for massive sample analysis. The effect of texture is characterized by model representation of the inverse pole figure associated to the sample diffracting surface. Program DIREC is proposed for titting texture-modulated theoretical diffraction patterns to experimental ones, thus calculating phase concentrations and corresponding errors. Examples are given in some applications

  4. Modern trends in x-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goebel, H.E.; Snyder, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    The revival of interest in X-ray powder diffraction, being quoted as a metamorphosis from the 'ugly duckling' to a 'beautiful swan', can be attributed to a number of modern developments in instrumentation and evaluation software. They result in faster data collection, improved accuracy and resolution, and better detectability of minor phases. The ease of data evaluation on small computers coupled direct to the instrument allows convenient execution of previously tedious and time-consuming off-line tasks like qualitative and quantitative analysis, characterization of microcrystalline properties, indexing, and lattice-constant refinements, as well as structure refinements or even exploration of new crystal structures. Powder diffraction has also progressed from an isolated analytical laboratory method to an in situ technique for analysing solid-state reactions or for the on-stream control of industrial processes. The paper surveys these developments and their real and potential applications, and tries to emphasize new trends that are regarded as important steps for the further progress of X-ray powder diffraction

  5. Automation of a Guinier camera for X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duijn, J.H.

    1988-01-01

    The automation of a Guinier X-ray diffraction camera is discussed. The photographic plate in the conventional setup has been replaced by a curved proportional counter (CPC) which has an electronic readout system. As a result the recording time has been reduced from a few hours to a few minutes. The construction and optimum dimensions of the CPC are discussed and the most essential parts of the readout electronics are highlighted. A linewidth of 200 μm FWHM and an accuracy of 30 μm are achieved. 45 refs.; 53 figs.; 4 tabs

  6. Ultrafast X-Ray Diffraction of Heterogeneous Solid Hydrogen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitan, Abraham [Olin College of Engineering, Needham, MA (United States)

    2015-08-19

    Angularly resolved x-ray diffraction at 5.5 keV establishes the structure of a 5 µm diameter solid hydrogen jet, providing a foundation for analysis of hydrogen in a warm dense matter state. The jet was composed of approximately 65 % ± 5% HCP and 35 % ± 5% FCC by volume with an average crystallite size on the order of hundreds of nanometers. Broadening in the angularly resolved spectrum provided strong evidence for anisotropic strain up to approximately 3 % in the HCP lattice. Finally, we found no evidence for orientational ordering of the crystal domains.

  7. X-ray diffraction analysis device with electronic photon counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillit, R.Y.; Bruyas, H.; Patay, F.

    1985-01-01

    The means provided to control the movements around the three axes are composed of step-by-step motors related to exits control logic which is connected to the calculation and monitored by a clock. The clock monitors also the calculator so as that the calculator controls, together with the programmable clock and control logic, the coordination of the whole rotation movements, along the three rotation axes, their velocity, their duration and the acquisition of the measured intensities of the diffracted X-ray beam [fr

  8. Powder X-ray diffraction study af alkali alanates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cao, Thao; Mosegaard Arnbjerg, Lene; Jensen, Torben René

    Powder X-ray diffraction study of alkali alanates Thao Cao, Lene Arnbjerg, Torben R. Jensen. Center for Materials Crystallography (CMC), Center for Energy Materials (CEM), iNANO and Department of Chemistry, Aarhus University, DK-8000, Denmark. Abstract: To meet the energy demand in the future...... for mobile applications, new materials with high gravimetric and volumetric storage capacity of hydrogen have to be developed. Alkali alanates are promising for hydrogen storage materials. Sodium alanate stores hydrogen reversibly at moderate conditions when catalysed with, e.g. titanium, whereas potassium...

  9. X-ray diffraction analysis of InAs nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davydok, Anton

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor nanowires have attracted great interest as building blocks for future electronic and optoelectronic devices. The variability of the growth process opens the opportunity to control and combine the various properties tailoring for specific application. It was shown that the electrical and optical characteristics of the nanowires are strongly connected with their structure. Despite intensive research in this field, the growth process is still not fully understood. In particular, extensive real structure investigations are required. Most of the reports dedicated on the structural researches are based on the results of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) or transmission electron microscopy (TEM). SEM provides an image of the surface with nanostructures and is mainly used to describe the morphology of the sample, but it does not bring information about the internal structure, phase composition and defect structure. At the same time, the internal structure can be examined by TEM down to atomic scale. TEM image of good quality are very expensive due to the efforts in sample preparation and in localisation of a single object. All these aspects make the statistical structural analysis difficult. In the present work, X-ray diffraction analysis has been applied for structural investigation of InAs nanowires grown by different techniques. Using various X-ray diffraction geometries, the nanowire systems were investigated in terms of the lattice parameters, phase composition, strains and displacement fields and stacking defects. In particular, realizing grazing incidence diffraction and controlling the penetration depth of X-ray beam, we characterized sample series grown by Au-assisted metal organic phase epitaxy on GaAs [111]B substrate with different growth time. According to the results of SEM and X-ray investigations, a model of the growth process has been proposed. A more detailed analysis was performed on InAs nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) on

  10. Scanning soft x-ray microscopy with a fresnel zoneplate at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenney, J.M.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.; Feder, R.; Sayre, D.; Howells, M.

    1983-01-01

    We have built a scanning transmission soft x-ray microscope located at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). Images of biological specimens have been formed with submicron resolution. A Fresnel zoneplate serves as the focusing element

  11. Recent trends of X-ray detectors in synchrotron radiation science

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, M

    2003-01-01

    This article attempts to describe the recent trends of X-ray detectors in synchrotron radiation science in the light of not only the advance but also the stagnation of which are seriously dependent upon the current semiconductor technology. (author)

  12. Report of the workshop on transferring X-ray Lithography Synchrotron (XLS) technology to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on plans to develop an x-ray synchrotron for use in lithography. The primary concern of the present paper is technology transfer from national laboratories to private industry. (JDH)

  13. Iron overload of human colon adenocarcinoma cells studied by synchrotron-based X-ray techniques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mihucz, Victor G.; Meirer, Florian; Polgári, Zsófia; Réti, Andrea; Pepponi, Giancarlo; Ingerle, Dieter; Szoboszlai, Norbert; Streli, Christina

    2016-01-01

    Fast- and slow-proliferating human adenocarcinoma colorectal cells, HT-29 and HCA-7, respectively, overloaded with transferrin (Tf), Fe(III) citrate, Fe(III) chloride and Fe(II) sulfate were studied by synchrotron radiation total-reflection X-ray spectrometry (TXRF), TXRF-X-ray absorption near edge

  14. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...

  15. New progress on monolithic X-ray lens in diffraction application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yude; He Yejun; Chen Jun; Luo Ping; Wang Dachun; Yan Yiming

    1999-12-01

    The basic physical properties for monolithic X-ray lens are introduced. The X-ray diffraction for macromolecular crystallography using monolithic X-ray lens were investigated. The experimental results show that in the same X-ray source power the diffracted intensity in the condition with X-ray lens was increased about 7 times, and the resolution was improved by 0.2 x 10 -10 -0.6 x 10 -10 m. The signal to noise ratio was also improved, and the time of measurement was reduced. The X-ray diffraction of Au thin films on the Si(100) single crystal substrates were investigated in a X-ray powder diffractometer. The experimental results show that in the same X-ray source power the diffracted intensity in the condition with X-ray lens was increased about 2 times, and the angular resolution of the diffractometer was enhanced

  16. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  17. X-ray spectrometry with synchrotron radiation; Roentgenspektrometrie mit Synchrotronstrahlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Matthias [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe ' Roentgen- und IR-Spektrometrie' ; Gerlach, Martin; Holfelder, Ina; Hoenicke, Philipp; Lubeck, Janin; Nutsch, Andreas; Pollakowski, Beatrix; Streeck, Cornelia; Unterumsberger, Rainer; Weser, Jan; Beckhoff, Burkhard

    2014-12-15

    The X-ray spectrometry of the PTB at the BESSY II storage ring with radiation in the range from 78 eV to 10.5 keV is described. After a description of the instrumentation development reference-sample free X-ray fluorescence analysis, the determination of fundamental atomic parameters, X-ray fluorescence analysis under glance-angle incidence, highly-resolving absorption spectrometry, and emission spectrometry are considered. Finally liquid cells and in-situ measurement techniques are described. (HSI)

  18. CCD[charge-coupled device]-based synchrotron x-ray detector for protein crystallography: Performance projected from an experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strauss, M.G.; Naday, I.; Sherman, I.S.; Kraimer, M.R.; Westbrook, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    The intense x radiation from a synchrotron source could, with a suitable detector, provide a complete set of diffraction images from a protein crystal before the crystal is damaged by radiation (2 to 3 min). An area detector consisting of a 40 mm dia. x-ray fluorescing phosphor, coupled with an image intensifier and lens to a CCD image sensor, was developed to determine the effectiveness of such a detector in protein crystallography. The detector was used in an experiment with a rotating anode x-ray generator. Diffraction patterns from a lysozyme crystal obtained with this detector are compared to those obtained with film. The two images appear to be virtually identical. The flux of 10 4 x-ray photons/s was observed on the detector at the rotating anode generator. At the 6-GeV synchrotron being designed at Argonne, the flux on an 80 x 80 mm 2 detector is expected to be >10 9 photons/s. The projected design of such a synchrotron detector shows that a diffraction-peak count >10 6 could be obtained in ∼0.5 s. With an additional ∼0.5 s readout time of a 512 x 512 pixel CCD, the data acquisition time per frame would be ∼1 s so that ninety 1 0 diffraction images could be obtained, with approximately 1% precision, in less than 3 min

  19. Variable-metric diffraction crystals for x-ray optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smither, R.K.

    1992-01-01

    The term open-quote Variable-Metricclose quotes (V-M) when applied to diffraction crystals refers to a crystal in which the spacing between crystalline planes varies with the position in the crystal. This variation can be either parallel to the crystalline planes or perpendicular to the crystalline planes. The variation in the crystalline spacing of a V-M crystal can be produced by introducing a thermal gradient in the crystal. This approach works well when the over-all percentage change in the lattice spacing is small (less than 0.1 %). For V-M crystals where the over-all change in spacing is the order of 0.1 percent or larger, it is more practical to produce the change in crystal spacing by growing a crystal made of two or more elements and changing the relative percentages of the two elements as the crystal is grown. One of the simplest applications of this type of crystal diffraction optics is to use V-M crystals to increase the number of photon per unit bandwidth in a diffracted x-ray beam. Typical enhancement factors of 3 to 20 are possible with wiggler sources. For near perfect silicon crystals the rocking curve for (111) planes is typically 8.5 arc seconds at 8 keV and 2.6 arc seconds at 20 keV. If one changes the crystalline spacing to match the change in the incident angle of the beam on the crystalline planes, then the full surface of the diffraction crystal will diffract the same wavelength x-ray. The increase in flux per unit bandwidth in the diffracted beam is 6 to 1 and 20 to 1 for the 8 keV and 20 keV x-rays, respectively, for the NSLS example. In most of the experiments the changes in crystalline spacings were generated with thermal gradients. One set of experiments used a V-M crystal grown with a variable percentage of germanium and silicon. This crystal had a 0.1 percent change in crystal spacing in 1 mm of distance in the crystal

  20. Capture and X-ray diffraction studies of protein microcrystals in a microfluidic trap array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyubimov, Artem Y. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Murray, Thomas D. [University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Koehl, Antoine [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Araci, Ismail Emre [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Uervirojnangkoorn, Monarin; Zeldin, Oliver B. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Cohen, Aina E.; Soltis, S. Michael; Baxter, Elizabeth L. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Brewster, Aaron S.; Sauter, Nicholas K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Brunger, Axel T., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Berger, James M., E-mail: brunger@stanford.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    A microfluidic platform has been developed for the capture and X-ray analysis of protein microcrystals, affording a means to improve the efficiency of XFEL and synchrotron experiments. X-ray free-electron lasers (XFELs) promise to enable the collection of interpretable diffraction data from samples that are refractory to data collection at synchrotron sources. At present, however, more efficient sample-delivery methods that minimize the consumption of microcrystalline material are needed to allow the application of XFEL sources to a wide range of challenging structural targets of biological importance. Here, a microfluidic chip is presented in which microcrystals can be captured at fixed, addressable points in a trap array from a small volume (<10 µl) of a pre-existing slurry grown off-chip. The device can be mounted on a standard goniostat for conducting diffraction experiments at room temperature without the need for flash-cooling. Proof-of-principle tests with a model system (hen egg-white lysozyme) demonstrated the high efficiency of the microfluidic approach for crystal harvesting, permitting the collection of sufficient data from only 265 single-crystal still images to permit determination and refinement of the structure of the protein. This work shows that microfluidic capture devices can be readily used to facilitate data collection from protein microcrystals grown in traditional laboratory formats, enabling analysis when cryopreservation is problematic or when only small numbers of crystals are available. Such microfluidic capture devices may also be useful for data collection at synchrotron sources.

  1. Synchrotron radiation sources: their properties and applications for VUV and X-ray spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, E.E.

    1976-09-01

    Synchrotron radiation from accelerators and storage rings offers far reaching possibilities for many fields of basic and applied physics. The properties of synchrotron radiation, existing and planned synchrotron radiation facilities, as well as instrumental aspects are discussed. In order to illustrate the usefulness of the synchrotron radiation sources a few highlights from atomic, molelucar, and solid state spectroscopy are presented and examples from x-ray experiments and from the field of applied physics are given. (orig.) [de

  2. Characterization of Brazilian asphalt using X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardoso, Edson R.; Pinto, Nivia G.V.; Almeida, Ana P.G.; Braz, Delson; Lopes, Ricardo T. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear], E-mail: ecardoso@lin.ufrj.br; Barroso, Regina C. [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica], E-mail: cely@uerj.br; Motta, Laura M.G. [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro (UFRJ), RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia (COPPE). Lab. de Geotecnia], E-mail: laura@coc.ufrj.br

    2007-07-01

    Asphalt is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid that is presented in most crude petroleum and in some natural deposits. The X ray diffraction can give valuable information over the characteristics of a material. Thus, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) method was employed to investigate parameters that characterize and differentiate asphalt groups (Boscan, CAP20, CAP40, CAP50/60, CAP50/70 and CAP85/100). The scattering measurements were carried out in {theta}-2{theta} reflection geometry using a powder diffractometer Shimadzu XRD-6000 at the Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory, Brazil. Scans were typically done from 8 deg to 28 deg every 0.05. The parameters analyzed were: FWHM, peak area, peak center, peak height, left half width and right half width. Thus, in this study, scattering profiles from different asphalt groups were carefully measured in order to establish characteristic signatures of these materials. The results indicate that by using three parameters (peak centroid, peak area and peak intensity) it is possible to characterize and differentiate the asphalt. (author)

  3. In situ X-ray diffraction studies of (de)lithiation mechanism in silicon nanowire anodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Sumohan; Liu, Nian; Nelson, Johanna; Hong, Seung Sae; Cui, Yi; Toney, Michael F

    2012-06-26

    Silicon is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity. From previous work, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are known to undergo amorphorization during lithiation, and no crystalline Li-Si product has been observed. In this work, we use an X-ray transparent battery cell to perform in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction on SiNWs in real time during electrochemical cycling. At deep lithiation voltages the known metastable Li(15)Si(4) phase forms, and we show that avoiding the formation of this phase, by modifying the SiNW growth temperature, improves the cycling performance of SiNW anodes. Our results provide insight on the (de)lithiation mechanism and a correlation between phase evolution and electrochemical performance for SiNW anodes.

  4. In Situ X-ray Diffraction Studies of (De)lithiation Mechanism in Silicon Nanowire Anodes

    KAUST Repository

    Misra, Sumohan

    2012-06-26

    Figure Persented: Silicon is a promising anode material for Li-ion batteries due to its high theoretical specific capacity. From previous work, silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are known to undergo amorphorization during lithiation, and no crystalline Li-Si product has been observed. In this work, we use an X-ray transparent battery cell to perform in situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction on SiNWs in real time during electrochemical cycling. At deep lithiation voltages the known metastable Li 15Si 4 phase forms, and we show that avoiding the formation of this phase, by modifying the SiNW growth temperature, improves the cycling performance of SiNW anodes. Our results provide insight on the (de)lithiation mechanism and a correlation between phase evolution and electrochemical performance for SiNW anodes. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  5. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    OpenAIRE

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic pro...

  6. Structure of the Si(1 1 3) surface studied by surface X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, Yoshihito; Akimoto, Koichi; Aoyama, Tomohiro; Suzuki, Hidetoshi; Nakahara, Hitoshi; Ichimiya, Ayahiko; Sumitani, Kazushi; Takahashi, Toshio; Zhang Xiaowei; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Kawata, Hiroshi

    2004-01-01

    We carried out a grazing incidence X-ray diffraction analysis of the Si(1 1 3) 3 x 1 surface using synchrotron radiation. We compared the experimental structure factors obtained from the integrated intensities of the fractional-order reflections with the calculated structure factors of the dimerized structure model of Ranke. By minimizing the R-factor, we determined the position and the size of the pentagon in the 3 x 1 dimerized structure model of Ranke. In addition, we found that a model with randomly distributed interstitial atoms at the center of the pentagon gives a smaller R-factor value

  7. A three-dimensional X-ray diffraction microscope for deformation studies of polycrystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fæster Nielsen, Søren; Lauridsen, E.M.; Juul Jensen, D.

    2001-01-01

    -dimensional X-ray diffraction (3DXRD) microscope installed at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility in Grenoble provides a fast and non-destructive technique for mapping the embedded grains within thick samples in three dimensions. All essential features like the position, volume, orientation, stress......-state of the grains can be determined, including the morphology of the grain boundaries. The accuracy of this novel tracking technique is compared with electron microscopy (EBSP), and its 3-D capacity is demonstrated. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  8. Quantification of rutile in anatase by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez R, A.

    2001-01-01

    Nowadays the discovering of new and better materials required in all areas of the industry has been lead to the human being to introduce him to this small and great world. The crystalline materials, have properties markedly directional. When it is necessary to realize a quantitative analysis to these materials the task is not easy. The main objective of this work is the research of a real problem, its solution and perfecting of a technique involving the theoretical and experimental principles which allow the quantification of crystalline phases. The chapter 1 treats about the study of crystalline state during the last century, by means of the X-ray diffraction technique. The chapter 2 studies the nature and production of X-rays, the chapter 3 expounds the principles of the diffraction technique which to carry out when it is satisfied the Bragg law studying the powder diffraction method and its applications. In the chapter 4 it is explained how the intensities of the beams diffracted are determined by the atoms positions inside of the elemental cell of the crystal. The properties of the crystalline samples of anatase and rutile are described in the chapter 5. The results of this last analysis are the information which will be processed by means of the auxiliary software: Diffrac AT, Axum and Peakfit as well as the TAFOR and CUANTI software describing this part with more detail in the chapters 6 and 7 where it is mentioned step by step the function of each software until to reach the quantification of crystalline phases, objective of this work. Finally, in the chapter 8 there are a results analysis and conclusions. The contribution of this work is for those learned institutions of limited resources which can tackle in this way the characterization of materials. (Author)

  9. Data and videos for ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging studies of metal solidification under ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bing Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The data presented in this article are related to the paper entitled ‘Ultrafast synchrotron X-ray imaging studies of microstructure fragmentation in solidification under ultrasound’ [Wang et al., Acta Mater. 144 (2018 505-515]. This data article provides further supporting information and analytical methods, including the data from both experimental and numerical simulation, as well as the Matlab code for processing the X-ray images. Six videos constructed from the processed synchrotron X-ray images are also provided.

  10. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of light elements with synchrotron radiation and special X-ray tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Bauer, V.; Kregsamer, P.; Goergl, R.; Pianetta, P.; Ryon, R.; Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L.

    1997-01-01

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) of light elements, such as C, O and Al (atomic numbers 5-13) generally has poor sensitivity and detection limits due to poor excitation and low fluorescent yields. Special excitation sources are necessary to compensate for these physical limitations. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal source for TXRF due to its high intensity and wide spectral range extending into the low energy region required for light elements. For more routine use, special X-ray tubes can be constructed. Experiments have been performed at the Standford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using beamline III-4, which is specially designed for the sue of low energy photons. Light elements on Si wafers have been analyzed, leading to detection limits below 100 fg for Na, Mg and Al, which corresponds to about 10 9 atoms. A new vacuum chamber is introduced meeting the requirements of wafer handling without the risk of contamination and offering the possibility of scanning a certain area of the wafer. Boron was detected on a wafer with 10 14 atoms cm -2 implanted in the surface layer. A special windowless X-ray tube with Mo, Al and Si as anode materials was also tested. With the optimization of anode geometry, beam path and excitation conditions, a detection limit of 5 pg (corresponds to 10 11 atoms) for Al was achieved. (Author)

  11. Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis of light elements with synchrotron radiation and special X-ray tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Streli, C.; Wobrauschek, P.; Bauer, V.; Kregsamer, P.; Goergl, R. [Atominstitut der Oesterreichischen Universitaeten, Wien (Austria); Pianetta, P. [Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lab. (Canada); Ryon, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. CA (United States); Pahlke, S.; Fabry, L. [Wacker Siltronic AG, Burghausen (Germany)

    1997-06-20

    Total reflection X-ray fluorescence analysis (TXRF) of light elements, such as C, O and Al (atomic numbers 5-13) generally has poor sensitivity and detection limits due to poor excitation and low fluorescent yields. Special excitation sources are necessary to compensate for these physical limitations. Synchrotron radiation is the ideal source for TXRF due to its high intensity and wide spectral range extending into the low energy region required for light elements. For more routine use, special X-ray tubes can be constructed. Experiments have been performed at the Standford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) using beamline III-4, which is specially designed for the sue of low energy photons. Light elements on Si wafers have been analyzed, leading to detection limits below 100 fg for Na, Mg and Al, which corresponds to about 10{sup 9}atoms. A new vacuum chamber is introduced meeting the requirements of wafer handling without the risk of contamination and offering the possibility of scanning a certain area of the wafer. Boron was detected on a wafer with 10{sup 14} atoms cm{sup -2} implanted in the surface layer. A special windowless X-ray tube with Mo, Al and Si as anode materials was also tested. With the optimization of anode geometry, beam path and excitation conditions, a detection limit of 5 pg (corresponds to 10{sup 11} atoms) for Al was achieved. (Author).

  12. Thermal management of next-generation contact-cooled synchrotron x-ray mirrors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khounsary, A.

    1999-10-29

    In the past decade, several third-generation synchrotrons x-ray sources have been constructed and commissioned around the world. Many of the major problems in the development and design of the optical components capable of handling the extremely high heat loads of the generated x-ray beams have been resolved. It is expected, however, that in the next few years even more powerful x-ray beams will be produced at these facilities, for example, by increasing the particle beam current. In this paper, the design of a next generation of synchrotron x-ray mirrors is discussed. The author shows that the design of contact-cooled mirrors capable of handing x-ray beam heat fluxes in excess of 500 W/mm{sup 2} - or more than three times the present level - is well within reach, and the limiting factor is the thermal stress rather then thermally induced slope error.

  13. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for analysis of mineralogical composition of regolith,...

  14. X-Ray Diffraction and Fluorescence Instrument for Mineralogical Analysis at the Lunar Surface, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop LUNA, a compact and lightweight X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) / X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) instrument for mineralogical analysis of regolith, rock...

  15. DIOPTAS: a program for reduction of two-dimensional X-ray diffraction data and data exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prescher, Clemens; Prakapenka, Vitali B.

    2015-07-01

    The amount of data collected during synchrotron X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments is constantly increasing. Most of the time, the data are collected with image detectors, which necessitates the use of image reduction/integration routines to extract structural information from measured XRD patterns. This step turns out to be a bottleneck in the data processing procedure due to a lack of suitable software packages. In particular, fast-running synchrotron experiments require online data reduction and analysis in real time so that experimental parameters can be adjusted interactively. Dioptas is a Python-based program for on-the-fly data processing and exploration of two-dimensional X-ray diffraction area detector data, specifically designed for the large amount of data collected at XRD beamlines at synchrotrons. Its fast data reduction algorithm and graphical data exploration capabilities make it ideal for online data processing during XRD experiments and batch post-processing of large numbers of images.

  16. Construction of a forensic soil database of the Hokkaido region in Japan by synchrotron radiation X-ray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirota, Yusuke; Hirao, Masataka; Abe, Yoshinari; Nakai, Izumi; Osaka, Keiichi; Itou, Masayoshi

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to construct a nation-wide forensic soil database, which allows for the identification of soil evidence based on heavy element and heavy mineral signatures determined by two synchrotron radiation (SR) X-ray techniques, i.e., a high-energy synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence analysis and a synchrotron-radiation X-ray powder diffraction analysis, respectively. The heavy element and heavy mineral compositions of the stream sediments collected at 3024 points located all over Japan were measured by the two SR X-ray techniques. The present paper focuses on a regional characterization of the sediments collected from the Hokkaido areas. The concentrations of heavy elements and heavy minerals in the Hokkaido areas were visualized as maps that enable us to compare the heavy element and heavy mineral compositions with the geological context of the samples. Based on a hierarchical cluster analysis using the semi-quantitative compositions of the heavy minerals, we could successfully classify the sediments into six groups corresponding to their background geologies. A Bonferroni multiple comparison demonstrated that these six groups also have significant differences in the heavy element composition. From these examinations, we could demonstrate that detailed regional identification of unknown samples is possible by analyzing both heavy element and heavy mineral compositions of each sample. (author)

  17. The possibility of using x-ray diffraction with hair to screen for pathologic conditions such as breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    James, Veronica; Cookson, David

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian hair exhibits a complex structure on length scales ranging from a few to hundreds of Angstroms. High-quality synchrotron x-ray images have yielded new insight about the structure and packing of the intermediate keratinous filaments that represent the bulk of a hair's volume. When comparing human hair diffraction patterns from healthy individuals and breast cancer patients significant differences have been seen, raising the possibility that fiber diffraction may be useful as a screening technique for certain pathologic conditions

  18. Acemetacin cocrystal structures by powder X-ray diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetha Bolla

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cocrystals of acemetacin drug (ACM with nicotinamide (NAM, p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA, valerolactam (VLM and 2-pyridone (2HP were prepared by melt crystallization and their X-ray crystal structures determined by high-resolution powder X-ray diffraction. The powerful technique of structure determination from powder data (SDPD provided details of molecular packing and hydrogen bonding in pharmaceutical cocrystals of acemetacin. ACM–NAM occurs in anhydrate and hydrate forms, whereas the other structures crystallized in a single crystalline form. The carboxylic acid group of ACM forms theacid–amide dimer three-point synthon R32(9R22(8R32(9 with three different syn amides (VLM, 2HP and caprolactam. The conformations of the ACM molecule observed in the crystal structures differ mainly in the mutual orientation of chlorobenzene fragment and the neighboring methyl group, being anti (type I or syn (type II. ACM hydrate, ACM—NAM, ACM–NAM-hydrate and the piperazine salt of ACM exhibit the type I conformation, whereas ACM polymorphs and other cocrystals adopt the ACM type II conformation. Hydrogen-bond interactions in all the crystal structures were quantified by calculating their molecular electrostatic potential (MEP surfaces. Hirshfeld surface analysis of the cocrystal surfaces shows that about 50% of the contribution is due to a combination of strong and weak O...H, N...H, Cl...H and C...H interactions. The physicochemical properties of these cocrystals are under study.

  19. The first X-ray diffraction measurements on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Bish

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The Mars Science Laboratory landed in Gale crater on Mars in August 2012, and the Curiosity rover then began field studies on its drive toward Mount Sharp, a central peak made of ancient sediments. CheMin is one of ten instruments on or inside the rover, all designed to provide detailed information on the rocks, soils and atmosphere in this region. CheMin is a miniaturized X-ray diffraction/X-ray fluorescence (XRD/XRF instrument that uses transmission geometry with an energy-discriminating CCD detector. CheMin uses onboard standards for XRD and XRF calibration, and beryl:quartz mixtures constitute the primary XRD standards. Four samples have been analysed by CheMin, namely a soil sample, two samples drilled from mudstones and a sample drilled from a sandstone. Rietveld and full-pattern analysis of the XRD data reveal a complex mineralogy, with contributions from parent igneous rocks, amorphous components and several minerals relating to aqueous alteration. In particular, the mudstone samples all contain one or more phyllosilicates consistent with alteration in liquid water. In addition to quantitative mineralogy, Rietveld refinements also provide unit-cell parameters for the major phases, which can be used to infer the chemical compositions of individual minerals and, by difference, the composition of the amorphous component.

  20. [Diffraction gratings used in x-ray spectroscopy]: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.I.

    1988-01-01

    This subcontract was initiated in order to facilitate the development at MIT of technologies for fabricating the very fine diffraction grating required in x-ray spectroscopy at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL). These gratings are generally gold transmission gratings with spatial periods of 200 nm or less. The major focus of our efforts was to develop a means of fabricating gratings of 100 nm period. We explored two approaches: e-beam fabrication of x-ray lithography masks, and achromatic holographic lithography. This work was pursued by Erik Anderson as a major component of his Ph.D. thesis. Erik was successful in both the e-beam and holographic approaches. However, the e-beam method proved to be highly impractical: exposure times of about 115 days would be required to cover an area of 1 cm 2 . The achromatic holography, on the other hand, should be capable of exposing areas well in excess of 1 cm 2 in times under 1 hour. Moreover, 100 nm-period gratings produced by achromatic holography are coherent over their entire area whereas gratings produced by e-beam lithography are coherent only over areas /approximately/100 μm. The remainder of this report consists of portions excerpted from Erik Anderson's thesis. These contain all the details of our work on 100 nm period gratings. 26 refs., 17 figs

  1. Synchrotron X-ray studies of liquid-vapor interfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The density profile ρ(z) across a liquid-vapor interface may be determined by the reflectivity R(θ) of X-rays at grazing angle incidence θ. The relation between R(θ) and ρ(z) is discussed, and experimental examples illustrating thermal roughness of simple liquids and smectic layering of liquid...

  2. Report on the fifth workshop on synchrotron x ray lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, G. P.; Godel, J. B.; Brown, G. S.; Liebmann, W.

    Semiconductors comprise a greater part of the United States economy than the aircraft, steel, and automobile industries combined. In future the semiconductor manufacturing industry will be forced to switch away from present optical manufacturing methods in the early to mid 1990s. X ray lithography has emerged as the leading contender for continuing production below the 0.4 micron level. Brookhaven National Laboratory began a series of workshops on x ray lithography in 1986 to examine key issues and in particular to enable United States industry to take advantage of the technical base established in this field. Since accelerators provide the brightest sources for x ray lithography, most of the research and development to date has taken place at large accelerator-based research centers such as Brookhaven, the University of Wisconsin, and Stanford. The goals of this Fifth Brookhaven Workshop were to review progress and goals since the last workshop and to establish a blueprint for the future. The meeting focused on the exposure tool, that is, a term defined as the source plus beamline and stepper. In order to assess the appropriateness of schedules for the development of this tool, other aspects of the required technology such as masks, resists and inspection and repair were also reviewed. To accomplish this, two working groups were set up, one to review the overall aspects of x ray lithography and set a time frame, the other to focus on sources.

  3. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    raphy system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray mi- crofluorescence system was .... at the lumbar vertebral body of Wistar rat which are trabecular regions with dimensions smaller than those found in human femora, as can be seen in figure 4. Similar behaviour. (a). (b). Figure 5.

  4. Simulations of X-ray synchrotron beams using the EGS4 code system in medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orion, I.; Henn, A.; Sagi, I.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Pena, L.; Rosenfeld, A.B.

    2001-01-01

    X-ray synchrotron beams are commonly used in biological and medical research. The availability of intense, polarized low-energy photons from the synchrotron beams provides a high dose transfer to biological materials. The EGS4 code system, which includes the photoelectron angular distribution, electron motion inside a magnetic field, and the LSCAT package, found to be the appropriate Monte Carlo code for synchrotron-produced X-ray simulations. The LSCAT package was developed in 1995 for the EGS4 code to contain the routines to simulate the linear polarization, the bound Compton, and the incoherent scattering functions. Three medical applications were demonstrated using the EGS4 Monte Carlo code as a proficient simulation code system for the synchrotron low-energy X-ray source. (orig.)

  5. X-ray diffraction from single molecules at the worlds first X-ray free-electron laser source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stern, Stephan; Kuepper, Jochen; Chapman, Henry; Rolles, Daniel [Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL), DESY, Hamburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The advent of the first X-ray Free-Electron Laser, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS), opens up a new approach for diffractive imaging of even single molecules that cannot be crystallized into macromolecular crystals of sufficient size necessary for conventional X-ray crystallography. Here, we present the concept, the experimental parametric space that has to be addressed together with first experimental results of X-ray diffractive imaging of single molecules in the gas phase at LCLS. We use a supersonically cooled molecular beam to provide an ensemble of test-molecules, laser-align them, and subsequently probe them with the LCLS in order to get diffraction patterns of single molecules.

  6. X-ray diffraction patterns of thermally-reduced graphenes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ju, Hae-Mi; Choi, Sung-Ho; Huh, Seung-Hun

    2010-01-01

    Thermally-reduced graphenes (GPs) from graphene oxides (GOs) in the range of 200 - 800 .deg. C have been investigated by using X-ray diffraction (XRD). The temperature-dependent evolutions of the (002) peaks show that exfoliation of GO sheets occurs, along with wrinkling, at ∼200 .deg. C and that high-quality GPs are produced at ∼ 600 .deg. C (GP 600 ). These phenomena are explained by the vaporization of intercalated water molecules and the effective removal of the oxide groups of GO by thermal annealing, respectively. GP 600 exhibited a clean and sharp (002) peak corresponding to an interlayer distance of 3.392 A, which is close to that of conventional graphene (∼3.4 A). The structure of GP 600 is further discussed.

  7. Powder X-ray diffraction laboratory, Reston, Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piatak, Nadine M.; Dulong, Frank T.; Jackson, John C.; Folger, Helen W.

    2014-01-01

    The powder x-ray diffraction (XRD) laboratory is managed jointly by the Eastern Mineral and Environmental Resources and Eastern Energy Resources Science Centers. Laboratory scientists collaborate on a wide variety of research problems involving other U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) science centers and government agencies, universities, and industry. Capabilities include identification and quantification of crystalline and amorphous phases, and crystallographic and atomic structure analysis for a wide variety of sample media. Customized laboratory procedures and analyses commonly are used to characterize non-routine samples including, but not limited to, organic and inorganic components in petroleum source rocks, ore and mine waste, clay minerals, and glassy phases. Procedures can be adapted to meet a variety of research objectives.

  8. Quantitative biological imaging by ptychographic X-ray diffraction microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giewekemeyer, Klaus; Kalbfleisch, Sebastian; Beerlink, Andre; Salditt, Tim [Institut fuer Roentgenphysik, Georg-August-Universitaet Goettingen (Germany); Thibault, Pierre; Dierolf, Martin; Pfeiffer, Franz [Department Physik (E17), Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Kewish, Cameron M. [Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

    2010-07-01

    Mesoscopic structures with specific functions are abundant in many cellular systems and have been well characterized by electron microscopy in the past. However, the quantitative study of the three-dimensional structure and density of subcellular components remains a difficult problem. In this contribution we show how these limitations could be overcome in the future by the application of recently introduced and now rapidly evolving coherent X-ray imaging techniques for quantitative biological imaging on the nanoscale. More specifically, we report on a recent scanning (ptychographic) diffraction experiment on unstained and unsliced freeze-dried cells of the bacterium Deinococcus radiourans using only a pinhole as beam defining optical element. As a result quantitative density projections well below optical resolution have been achieved.

  9. X-ray diffraction study of choline chloride's β form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrouleas, V.; Lemmon, R.M.; Christensen, A.

    1978-01-01

    The organic salt choline chloride exists in two crystalline polymorphs. One (the α form) is extraordinarily sensitive to ionizing radiation, the other (the β form) is not. The present report describes an x-ray diffraction study of the β form. The structure has been found to be highly disordered face centered cubic. A reasonable least-square refinement of the intensity data has been achieved in the centrosymmetric space group Fm3 or Fm3m by use of a molecular model with restrained bond lengths. The results show that in the β form the electronic density due to the choline cation is closely spaced around the N, so that hydrogen bonding to the chloride is unlikely. Comparison with infrared and NMR data indicates that the disordering is dynamic and can be ascribed to rotations of the choline ion around crystallographic symmetry axes. Possible connections of these results with the radiation stability of the β form are discussed

  10. Analysis of the corium phases by X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trillon, G.

    2004-01-01

    In the framework of the severe accidents R and D studies led by CEA, the better knowledge of the corium behaviour, corium coming from the melting of a nuclear reactor, are fundamental stakes in order to master this kind of accident. Among the available physical properties of the corium, the nature of the final crystalline compounds which have been made during the, cooling gives information about its solidification and its stabilisation. X-Rays Diffraction is the reference method used in order to characterize the corium coming from the different facilities of the European platform PLINIUS of CEA-Cadarache. This work presents the scientific approach that has been followed in order to obtain information both qualitative and quantitative on corium, using X-Rays Diffraction. For instance, a specific method for identifying U 1-x Zr x O 2 solid solutions has been developed, and the validity of quantitative analysis of corium crystalline phases using the Rietveld method (with an internal standard), has been tested. This last method has also permitted semi-quantitative measurements of amorphous phases within corium. For these studies, analysis of prototypical corium has been conducted on samples coming from the experiences led on the different facilities of the PLINIUS platform. These analysis allowed for the first time to obtain quantitative data of the corium crystalline phases in order to validate thermodynamic databases and has been used to estimate the thereto-physical properties of the corium. New information on crystalline phases of corium has also been found, especially for the UO 2 -ZrO 2 pseudo binary system. (author)

  11. Phosphor Scanner For Imaging X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Hecht, Diana L.; Witherow, William K.

    1992-01-01

    Improved optoelectronic scanning apparatus generates digitized image of x-ray image recorded in phosphor. Scanning fiber-optic probe supplies laser light stimulating luminescence in areas of phosphor exposed to x rays. Luminescence passes through probe and fiber to integrating sphere and photomultiplier. Sensitivity and resolution exceed previously available scanners. Intended for use in x-ray crystallography, medical radiography, and molecular biology.

  12. High energy white beam x-ray diffraction studies of residual strains in engineering components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, S. Y.; Vorster, W.; Jun, T. S.; Song, X.; Golshan, M.; Laundy, D.; Walsh, M. J.; Korsunsky, A. M.

    2008-09-01

    In order to predict the durability of engineering components and improve performance, it is mandatory to understand residual stresses. The last decade has witnessed a significant increase of residual stress evaluation using diffraction of penetrating radiation, such as neutrons or high energy X-rays. They provide a powerful non-destructive method for determining the level of residual stresses in engineering components through precise characterisation of interplanar crystal lattice spacing. The unique non-destructive nature of these measurement techniques is particularly beneficial in the context of engineering design, since it allows the evaluation of a variety of structural and deformational parameters inside real components without material removal, or at worst with minimal interference. However, while most real engineering components have complex shape and are often large in size, leading to measurement and interpretation difficulties, since experimental facilities usually have limited space for mounting the sample, limited sample travel range, limited loading capacity of the sample positioning system, etc. Consequently, samples often have to be sectioned, requiring appropriate corrections on measured data; or facilities must be improved. Our research group has contributed to the development of engineering applications of high-energy X-ray diffraction methods for residual stress evaluation, both at synchrotron sources and in the lab setting, including multiple detector setup, large engineering component manipulation and measurement at the UK Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS Daresbury), and in our lab at Oxford. A nickel base superalloy combustion casing and a large MIG welded Al alloy plate were successfully studied.

  13. Nanostructured diffractive optical devices for soft X-ray microscopes

    CERN Document Server

    Hambach, D; Schneider, G

    2001-01-01

    The new transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) installed at the BESSY II electron storage ring uses an off-axis transmission zone plate (OTZ) as diffractive and focusing element of the condenser-monochromator setup. A high resolution micro-zone plate (MZP) forms a magnified image on a CCD-detector. Both, the OTZ with an active area of up to 24 mm sup 2 and the MZP with zone widths as small as 25 nm are generated by a process including electron beam lithography (EBL), dry etching and subsequent electroplating of nickel on top of silicon membrane substrates with about 100-150 nm thickness. The combination of a larger zone width and the usage of nickel zone structures allows to increase the diffraction efficiency of the condenser element at least by a factor of 3 compared to the earlier used KZP7 condenser zone plate in the TXM at BESSY I. Groove diffraction efficiencies of 21.6% and 14.7% were measured for MZP objectives with 40 and 25 nm outermost zone width, respectively.

  14. Fundamentals of powder x-ray diffraction practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, T.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: The goal of powder Xray diffraction is to gain information about a specimen or sample. Key aspects of this goal are 1. the sample selection, preparation and presentation; 2. the data collection process and conditions; 3. the interaction between these and the interpretation of the data. The 'ideal' powder (or polycrystalline) xray diffraction sample is fine grained, randomly orientated, homogenous and representative. There exists standard sample selection and preparation techniques for powders - sometimes however, the required information must be gained by alternate sample selection and preparation techniques. While there are few variables in the data collection process, there are some significant ones such as matching diffractometer resolution and intensity to the data collection goal whether that is phase identity, quantitative analysis or structure refinement, etc. There are also options of optical arrangement (Bragg-Brintano versus parallel beam versus Debye-Scherrer). One important aspect of the collection process is the assessment of the data quality. Powder xray diffraction has many applications from the straight-forward confirmation of phase identity and purity to structural analysis. Some of these applications will be considered and the interaction between the goal of the application and aspects of sample selection. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  15. High-energy X-ray diffraction studies of short- and intermediate-range structure in oxide glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuya, Kentaro

    2002-01-01

    The feature of high-energy X-ray diffraction method is explained. The oxide glasses studies by using BL04B2, high-energy X-ray diffraction beam line of SPring-8, and the random system materials by high-energy monochromatic X-ray diffraction are introduced. An advantage of third generation synchrotron radiation is summarized. On SPring-8, the high-energy X-ray diffraction experiments of random system are carried out by BL04B2 and BL14B1 beam line. BL04B2 can select Si (111)(E=37.8 keV, λ=0.033 nm) and Si(220)(E=61.7 keV, λ=0.020 nm) as Si monochromator. The intermediate-range structure of (MgO) x (P 2 O 5 ) 1-x glass ,MgP 2 O 6 glass, B 2 O 3 glass, SiO 2 and GeO 2 are explained in detail. The future and application of high-energy X-ray diffraction are stated. (S.Y.)

  16. Ultrafast time-resolved X-ray diffraction using an optimized laser-plasma based X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Femtosecond X-ray pulses are invaluable tools to investigate the structural dynamics triggered by a femtosecond laser pulse. These ultrashort X-ray pulses can be provided by lab-sized laser-produced plasma X-ray sources. This thesis is dedicated to optimizing the X-ray emission from the X-ray source at the University of Duisburg-Essen and using this source to investigate ultrafast structural dynamics in laser excited materials. For these purposes, detailed investigations on how the laser intensities, target thicknesses, angles of incidence and different pre-pulse/pre-plasma conditions affecting the emission of Kα-photons from Cu and Ti targets were performed. The outcomes from these studies are applied to optimize the X-ray production of the existing X-ray source for time resolved X-ray diffraction (TRXD) experiments. In the mean time, in order to improve the measurement sensitivity/accuracy, and automatize and speed up the experimental procedures, several other improvements have been implemented in the experimental setup for TRXD experiments. These improvements of the setup are essential to achieve the results of the three TRXD experiments discussed in this thesis. In the first experiment, Debye-Waller effect in a thin laser-excited Au film was observed. The drop of measured diffraction signal with a decay time constant of 4.3±1 ps was measured for high excitation fluences. This result is in good agreement with previous experimental results as well as the Two-Temperature Model (TTM) calculations at high fluences. The second experiment extends the studies of coherent optical phonons in laser-excited Bi to a higher excitation fluence range that has not been investigated previously. Large amplitude coherent atomic motion and a complete softening of the A1g phonon mode were observed. These observations represents conclusive experimental evidence that the Peierls distortion, which defines the equilibrium structure of Bi, vanishes and the material is transformed into

  17. Synchrotron X-Ray Studies of Model SOFC Cathodes, Part I: Thin Film Cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Kee-Chul; Ingram, Brian; Ilavsky, Jan; Lee, Shiwoo; Fuoss, Paul; You, Hoydoo

    2017-11-15

    We present synchrotron x-ray investigations of thin film La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3-δ (LSCF) model cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells, grown on electrolyte substrates by pulse laser deposition, in situ during half-cell operations. We observed dynamic segregations of cations, such as Sr and Co, on the surfaces of the film cathodes. The effects of temperature, applied potentials, and capping layers on the segregations were investigated using a surfacesensitive technique of total external reflection x-ray fluorescence. We also studied patterned thin film LSCF cathodes using high-resolution micro-beam diffraction measurements. We find chemical expansion decreases for narrow stripes. This suggests the expansion is dominated by the bulk pathway reactions. The chemical expansion vs. the distance from the electrode contact was measured at three temperatures and an oxygen vacancy activation energy was estimated to be ~1.4 eV.

  18. $YB_{66} a new soft X-ray monochromator for synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Wong, J; Rowen, M; Schäfers, F; Müller, B R; Rek, Z U

    1999-01-01

    For pt.I see Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res., vol.A291, p.243-8, 1990. YB/sub 66/, a complex boron-rich man-made crystal, has been singled out as a potential monochromator material to disperse synchrotron soft X-rays in the 1-2 keV region. Results of a series of systematic property characterizations pertinent for this application are presented in this paper. These include Laue diffraction patterns and high-precision lattice-constant determination, etch rate, stoichiometry, thermal expansion, soft X-ray reflectivity and rocking-curve measurements, thermal load effects on monochromator performance, nature of intrinsic positive glitches and their reduction. The 004 reflection of YB/sub 66/ has a reflectance of ~3 in this spectral region. The width of the rocking curve varies from 0.25 eV at 1.1 keV to 1.0 eV at 2 keV, which is a factor of two better than that of beryl(1010) in the same energy range, and enables measurements of high-resolution XANES spectra at the Mg, Al and Si K- edges. The thermal bump on the...

  19. Experimental measurement of lattice strain pole figures using synchrotron x rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, M.P.; Bernier, J.V.; Park, J.-S.; Kazimirov, A.

    2005-01-01

    This article describes a system for mechanically loading test specimens in situ for the determination of lattice strain pole figures and their evolution in multiphase alloys via powder diffraction. The data from these experiments provide insight into the three-dimensional mechanical response of a polycrystalline aggregate and represent an extremely powerful material model validation tool. Relatively thin (0.5 mm) iron/copper specimens were axially strained using a mechanical loading frame beyond the macroscopic yield strength of the material. The loading was halted at multiple points during the deformation to conduct a diffraction experiment using a 0.5x0.5 mm 2 monochromatic (50 keV) x ray beam. Entire Debye rings of data were collected for multiple lattice planes ({hkl}'s) in both copper and iron using an online image plate detector. Strain pole figures were constructed by rotating the loading frame about the specimen transverse direction. Ideal powder patterns were superimposed on each image for the purpose of geometric correction. The chosen reference material was cerium (IV) oxide powder, which was spread in a thin layer on the downstream face of the specimen using petroleum jelly to prevent any mechanical coupling. Implementation of the system at the A2 experimental station at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS) is described. The diffraction moduli measured at CHESS were shown to compare favorably to in situ data from neutron-diffraction experiments conducted on the same alloys

  20. Room temperature femtosecond X-ray diffraction of photosystem II microcrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kern, Jan; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Hellmich, Julia; Tran, Rosalie; Hattne, Johan; Laksmono, Hartawan; Glöckner, Carina; Echols, Nathaniel; Sierra, Raymond G.; Sellberg, Jonas; Lassalle-Kaiser, Benedikt; Gildea, Richard J.; Glatzel, Pieter; Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Latimer, Matthew J.; McQueen, Trevor A.; DiFiore, Dörte; Fry, Alan R.; Messerschmidt, Marc; Miahnahri, Alan; Schafer, Donald W.; Seibert, M. Marvin; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Zwart, Petrus H.; White, William E.; Adams, Paul D.; Bogan, Michael J.; Boutet, Sébastien; Williams, Garth J.; Messinger, Johannes; Sauter, Nicholas K.; Zouni, Athina; Bergmann, Uwe; Yano, Junko; Yachandra, Vittal K.

    2012-01-01

    Most of the dioxygen on earth is generated by the oxidation of water by photosystem II (PS II) using light from the sun. This light-driven, four-photon reaction is catalyzed by the Mn4CaO5 cluster located at the lumenal side of PS II. Various X-ray studies have been carried out at cryogenic temperatures to understand the intermediate steps involved in the water oxidation mechanism. However, the necessity for collecting data at room temperature, especially for studying the transient steps during the O–O bond formation, requires the development of new methodologies. In this paper we report room temperature X-ray diffraction data of PS II microcrystals obtained using ultrashort (< 50 fs) 9 keV X-ray pulses from a hard X-ray free electron laser, namely the Linac Coherent Light Source. The results presented here demonstrate that the ”probe before destroy” approach using an X-ray free electron laser works even for the highly-sensitive Mn4CaO5 cluster in PS II at room temperature. We show that these data are comparable to those obtained in synchrotron radiation studies as seen by the similarities in the overall structure of the helices, the protein subunits and the location of the various cofactors. This work is, therefore, an important step toward future studies for resolving the structure of the Mn4CaO5 cluster without any damage at room temperature, and of the reaction intermediates of PS II during O–O bond formation. PMID:22665786

  1. Revisit of alpha-chitin crystal structure using high resolution X-ray diffraction data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikorski, Pawel; Hori, Ritsuko; Wada, Masahisa

    2009-05-11

    High resolution synchrotron X-ray fiber diffraction data recorded from crab tendon chitin have been used to describe the crystal structure of alpha-chitin. Crystal structures at 100 and 300 K have been solved using restrained crystallographic refinement against diffraction intensities measured from the fiber diffraction patterns. The unit cell contains two polymer chains in a 2(1) helix conformation and in the antiparallel orientation. The best agreement between predicated and observed X-ray diffraction intensities is obtained for a model that includes two distinctive conformations of C6-O6 hydroxymethl group. Those conformations are different from what is proposed in the generally accepted alpha-chitin crystal structure (J. Mol. Biol. 1978, 120, 167-181). Based on refined positions of the O6 atoms, a network of hydrogen bonds involving O6 is proposed. This network of hydrogen bonds can explain the main features of the polarized FTIR spectra of alpha-chitin and sheds some light on the origin of splitting of the amide I band observed on alpha-chitin IR spectra.

  2. X-ray Synchrotron Radiation in a Plasma Wiggler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shuoquin; /UCLA /SLAC, SSRL

    2005-09-27

    A relativistic electron beam can radiate due to its betatron motion inside an ion channel. The ion channel is induced by the electron bunch as it propagates through an underdense plasma. In the theory section of this thesis the formation of the ion channel, the trajectories of beam electrons inside the ion channel, the radiation power and the radiation spectrum of the spontaneous emission are studied. The comparison between different plasma wiggler schemes is made. The difficulties in realizing stimulated emission as the beam traverses the ion channel are investigated, with particular emphasis on the bunching mechanism, which is important for the ion channel free electron laser. This thesis reports an experiment conducted at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) to measure the betatron X-ray radiations for the first time. They first describe the construction and characterization of the lithium plasma source. In the experiment, the transverse oscillations of the SLAC 28.5 GeV electron beam traversing through a 1.4 meter long lithium plasma source are clearly seen. These oscillations lead to a quadratic density dependence of the spontaneously emitted betatron X-ray radiation. The divergence angle of the X-ray radiation is measured. The absolute photon yield and the spectral brightness at 14.2 KeV photon energy are estimated and seen to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

  3. Noninvasive 3D Structural Analysis of Arthropod by Synchrotron X-Ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengkun Yao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray imaging techniques significantly advanced our understanding of materials and biology, among which phase contrast X-ray microscopy has obvious advantages in imaging biological specimens which have low contrast by conventional absorption contrast microscopy. In this paper, three-dimensional microstructure of arthropod with high contrast has been demonstrated by synchrotron X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography. The external morphology and internal structures of an earthworm were analyzed based upon tomographic reconstructions with and without phase retrieval. We also identified and characterized various fine structural details such as the musculature system, the digestive system, the nervous system, and the circulatory system. This work exhibited the high efficiency, high precision, and wide potential applications of synchrotron X-ray phase contrast tomography in nondestructive investigation of low-density materials and biology.

  4. Noninvasive 3D Structural Analysis of Arthropod by Synchrotron X-Ray Phase Contrast Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yao, S.; Zong, Y.; Fan, J.; Sun, Z.; Jiang, H.

    2015-01-01

    X-ray imaging techniques significantly advanced our understanding of materials and biology, among which phase contrast X-ray microscopy has obvious advantages in imaging biological specimens which have low contrast by conventional absorption contrast microscopy. In this paper, three-dimensional microstructure of arthropod with high contrast has been demonstrated by synchrotron X-ray in-line phase contrast tomography. The external morphology and internal structures of an earthworm were analyzed based upon tomographic reconstructions with and without phase retrieval. We also identified and characterized various fine structural details such as the musculature system, the digestive system, the nervous system, and the circulatory system. This work exhibited the high efficiency, high precision, and wide potential applications of synchrotron X-ray phase contrast tomography in nondestructive investigation of low-density materials and biology.

  5. X-ray diffraction using the time structure of the SRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, B.K.

    1983-01-01

    The subject is discussed under the headings: introduction (advances in the techniques of X-ray topography; comparison with transmission electron microscopy); stroboscopic X-ray topography; stroboscopic X-ray topography of travelling surface acoustic waves; possible general diffraction experiments. (U.K.)

  6. X-ray diffraction studies of NbTe 2 single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The composition of the grown crystals was confirmed on the basis of energy dispersive analysis by X-ray (EDAX) and remaining structural characterization was also accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Lattice parameters, volume and X-ray density have been carried out for the grown crystals. The particle size ...

  7. Sequential x-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM x-ray optics testing beamline at the advanced photon source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoupin, Stanislav, E-mail: sstoupin@aps.anl.gov; Shvyd’ko, Yuri; Trakhtenberg, Emil; Liu, Zunping; Lang, Keenan; Huang, Xianrong; Wieczorek, Michael; Kasman, Elina; Hammonds, John; Macrander, Albert; Assoufid, Lahsen [Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2016-07-27

    We report progress on implementation and commissioning of sequential X-ray diffraction topography at 1-BM Optics Testing Beamline of the Advanced Photon Source to accommodate growing needs of strain characterization in diffractive crystal optics and other semiconductor single crystals. The setup enables evaluation of strain in single crystals in the nearly-nondispersive double-crystal geometry. Si asymmetric collimator crystals of different crystallographic orientations were designed, fabricated and characterized using in-house capabilities. Imaging the exit beam using digital area detectors permits rapid sequential acquisition of X-ray topographs at different angular positions on the rocking curve of a crystal under investigation. Results on sensitivity and spatial resolution are reported based on experiments with high-quality Si and diamond crystals. The new setup complements laboratory-based X-ray topography capabilities of the Optics group at the Advanced Photon Source.

  8. X-ray grazing incidence diffraction from multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tixier, S.; Boeni, P.; Swygenhoven, H. van; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Grazing incidence scattering geometries using synchrotron radiation have been applied in order to characterise the roughness profiles and the structural coherence of multilayers. The lateral correlation length of the roughness profiles was evaluated using diffuse reflectivity in the `out of plane` geometry. This type of measurement is the only diffuse reflectivity technique allowing large lateral momentum transfer. It is typically suitable for correlation lengths smaller than 1000 A. The lateral structural coherence length of Ni{sub 3}Al/Ni multilayers as a function of the layer thickness was obtained by grazing incidence diffraction (GID). 3 figs., 1 ref.

  9. An autonomous CZT module for X-ray diffraction imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montemont, G.; Monnet, O.; Stanchina, S.; Verger, L.; Kosciesza, D.; Schlomka, J.P.

    2013-01-01

    We present the development of a CZT-based detection module dedicated to X-ray diffraction imaging. This kind of application requires a good energy and spatial resolution in order to resolve Bragg peaks. In a first part, we present the detector configuration used and dimensioning constraints. As the input energy range is comprised between 20 and 150 keV, we use 5 mm thick high resistivity CZT crystals. The 660 mm 2 detection area is segmented on both sides into 192 anodes and 12 cathodes. Signals from both sides are read jointly in order to perform multi parametric event corrections (depth of interaction, charge sharing, induction sharing). In order to be integrated easily inside an X-ray imaging system, the system has been conceived to be completely autonomous: it is powered by a single 12 V supply and is interfaced with the external system by Ethernet for communication and RS485 for synchronization. In a second part, we describe the system readout architecture and then the implementation of the data processing. An FPGA circuit embeds a digital processing chain that carries out readout ASIC interfacing and advanced multi parametric data corrections. Gain, offset but also depth of interaction and charge sharing are corrected on the flow. Incoming events from different channels are clustered together by comparing their location and time of occurrence. The FPGA also embeds a processor running an operating system that controls the system, carries out all calibrations, automated tests and acquisitions. Eventually, we show the results obtained and demonstrate the relative influence of depth of interaction and charge sharing. Homogeneity of detector behavior is also discussed and the reproducibility of the performance between modules is presented. The average energy resolution at 25 C is 2.4 % FWHM at 122 keV and 3.8 % FWHM at 60 keV and the average efficiency is 73 %. (authors)

  10. IL 12: Femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woerner, M.; Zamponi, F.; Rothhardt, P.; Ansari, Z.; Dreyer, J.; Freyer, B.; Premont-Schwarz, M.; Elsaesser, T.

    2010-01-01

    A chemical reaction generates new compounds out of one or more initial species. On a molecular level, the spatial arrangement of electrons and nuclei changes. While the structure of the initial and the product molecules can be measured routinely, the transient structures and molecular motions during a reaction have remained unknown in most cases. This knowledge, however, is a key element for the exact understanding of the reaction. The ultimate dream is a 'reaction microscope' which allows for an in situ imaging of the molecules during a reaction. We report on the first femtosecond x-ray powder diffraction experiment in which we directly map the transient electronic charge density in the unit cell of a crystalline solid with 30 pico-meter spatial and 100 femtosecond temporal resolution. X-ray diffraction from polycrystalline powder samples, the Debye Scherrer diffraction technique, is a standard method for determining equilibrium structures. The intensity of the Debye Scherrer rings is determined by the respective x-ray structure factor which represents the Fourier transform of the spatial electron density. In our experiments, the transient intensity and angular positions of up to 20 Debye Scherrer reactions from a polycrystalline powder are measured and unravel for the first time a concerted electron and proton transfer in hydrogen-bonded ionic (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 crystals. Photoexcitation of ammonium sulfate induces a sub-100 fs electron transfer from the sulfate groups into a highly conned electron channel along the z-axis of the unit cell. The latter geometry is stabilized by transferring protons from the adjacent ammonium groups into the channel. Time-dependent charge density maps derived from the diffraction data display a periodic modulation of the channels charge density by low-frequency lattice motions with a concerted electron and proton motion between the channel and the initial proton binding site. A deeper insight into the underlying microscopic

  11. DEVELOPMENTS IN SYNCHROTRON X-RAY COMPUTED MICROTOMOGRAPHY AT THE NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DOWD,B.A.

    1999-07-23

    Last year, the X27A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) became dedicated solely to X-Ray Computed Microtomography (XCMT). This is a third-generation instrument capable of producing tomographic volumes of 1-2 micron resolution over a 2-3mm field of view. Recent enhancements will be discussed. These have focused on two issues: the desire for real-time data acquisition and processing and the need for highly monochromatic beam (.1 % energy bandpass). The latter will permit k-edge subtraction studies and will provide improved image contrast from below the Cr (6 keV) up to the Cs (36 keV) k-edge. A range of applications that benefit from these improvements will be discussed as well. These two goals are somewhat counterproductive, however; higher monochromaticity yields a lower flux forcing longer data acquisition times. To balance the two, a more efficient scintillator for X-ray conversion is being developed. Some testing of a prototype scintillator has been performed; preliminary results will be presented here. In the meantime, data reconstruction times have been reduced, and the entire tomographic acquisition, reconstruction and volume rendering process streamlined to make efficient use of synchrotron beam time. A Fast Filtered Back Transform (FFBT) reconstruction program recently developed helped to reduce the time to reconstruct a volume of 150 x 150 x 250 pixels{sup 3} (over 5 million voxels) from the raw camera data to 1.5 minutes on a dual R10,000 CPU. With these improvements, one can now obtain a ''quick look'' of a small tomographic volume ({approximately}10{sup 6}voxels) in just over 15 minutes from the start of data acquisition.

  12. Structural Characterization of Perpendicularly Aligned Submicrometer-Thick Synthetic Glycolipid Polycrystalline Films Using Conventional X-ray Diffraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigesaburo Ogawa

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The structural analysis of the synthetic glycolipid crystalline phase has been performed during the past few decades; however, it has not been sufficiently understood in terms of both static and dynamic aspects. We have recently shown that grazing incidence X-ray diffraction (GIXD affords better information than conventional powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD for the crystal structure analysis of octyl β-d-galactoside (MOβGal using sub-micrometer-thick crystalline films and a two-dimensional detector, together with a synchrotron radiation source. However, access to this technique is not universal because of the limited machine time at the required synchrotron radiation sources. Herein, we employed XRD analysis on MOβGal hemihydrate crystalline films using commercial X-ray sources instead of synchrotron radiation sources to extend the availability of the methodology. We investigated some technical aspects of the methodology, such as incident angle and radiation time, using MOβGal polycrystalline films with different thicknesses in order to obtain sufficient reciprocal data for identifying the lattice constants with conventional X-ray sources. Complementary uses of GIXD with a two-dimensional detector, with much higher incident angles than the total reflection angle using a NANO-Viewer system and out-of-plane and in-plane measurements using SmartLab, enabled us to determine the complete lattice parameters for the MOβGal hemihydrate crystalline film.

  13. X rays and condensed matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daillant, J.

    1997-01-01

    After a historical review of the discovery and study of X rays, the various interaction processes between X rays and matter are described: Thomson scattering, Compton scattering, X-photon absorption through photoelectric effect, and magnetic scattering. X ray sources such as the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) are described. The various X-ray applications are presented: imagery such as X tomography, X microscopy, phase contrast; X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy; X-ray scattering and diffraction techniques

  14. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P. (eds.)

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization. (LEW)

  15. Report of the second workshop on synchrotron radiation sources for x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barton, M.Q.; Craft, B.; Williams, G.P.

    1986-01-01

    The reported workshop is part of an effort to implement a US-based x-ray lithography program. Presentations include designs for three storage rings (one superconducting and two conventional) and an overview of a complete lithography program. The background of the effort described, the need for synchrotron radiation, and the international competition in the area are discussed briefly. The technical feasibility of x-ray lithography is discussed, and synchrotron performance specifications and construction options are given, as well as a near-term plan. It is recommended that a prototype synchrotron source be built as soon as possible, and that a research and development plan on critical technologies which could improve cost effectiveness of the synchrotron source be established. It is further recommended that a small number of second generation prototype synchrotrons be distributed to IC manufacturing centers to expedite commercialization

  16. Synchrotron X-ray PIV Technique for Measurement of Blood Flow Velocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Guk Bae; Lee, Sang Joon; Je, Jung Ho

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging method has been used to observe internal structures of various organisms, industrial devices, and so on. However, it is not suitable to see internal flows inside a structure because tracers typically employed in conventional optical flow visualization methods cannot be detectable with the X-ray micro-imaging method. On the other hand, a PIV (particle image velocimetry) method which has recently been accepted as a reliable quantitative flow visualization technique can extract lots of flow information by applying digital image processing techniques However, it is not applicable to opaque fluids such as blood. In this study, we combined the PIV method and the synchrotron X-ray micro-imaging technique to compose a new X-ray PIV technique. Using the X-ray PIV technique, we investigated the optical characteristics of blood for a coherent synchrotron X-ray beam and quantitatively visualized real blood flows inside an opaque tube without any contrast media. The velocity field information acquired would be helpful for investigating hemorheologic characteristics of the blood flow

  17. Effect of toroidal mirror on spatial coherence of synchrotron hard X-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Hua; Yan Shuai; Yan Fen; Mao Chengwen; Liang Dongxun; He Yan; Jiang Sheng; Li Aiguo; Yu Xiaohan

    2012-01-01

    The Gaussian Schell-model source theory is used to describe the hard X-ray micro focusing beamline with an undulator of the Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility. Based on the model and general Huygens-Fresnel principle, propagation of cross-spectral density function in free space is studied. Equivalent source hypothesis is proposed and the effect of toroidal mirror on spatial coherence of the hard X-ray beams is studied. The theoretical results are consistent with the experimental results. Only divergence angles of the incident and outgoing X-rays are considered in the equivalent source hypothesis, hence an easy extension of the hypothesis to other beamline optical elements. (authors)

  18. Time-resolved X-ray diffraction on laser-excited metal nano-particles

    CERN Document Server

    Plech, A; Kurbitz, S; Berg, K J; Graener, H; Berg, G; Gresillon, S; Kaempfe, M; Feldmann, J; Von Plessen, G

    2003-01-01

    The lattice expansion and relaxation of noble-metal nano-particles heated by intense femtosecond laser pulses are measured by pump-probe time-resolved X-ray scattering. Following the laser pulse, shape and angular shift of the (111) Bragg reflection from crystalline silver and gold particles with diameters from 20 to 100 nm are resolved stroboscopically using 100 ps X-ray- pulses from a synchrotron. We observe a transient lattice expansion that corresponds to a laser-induced temperature rise of up to 200 K, and a subsequent lattice relaxation. The relaxation occurs within several hundred picoseconds for embedded silver particles, and several nanoseconds for supported free gold particles. The relaxation time shows a strong dependence on particle size. The relaxation rate appears to be limited by the thermal coupling of the particles to the matrix and substrate; respectively, rather than by bulk thermal diffusion. Furthermore, X-ray diffraction can resolve the internal strain state of the nano-particles to sepa...

  19. Investigation on morphological properties of In2S3 by high pressure x-ray diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuqiang; Wang, Qinglin; Gao, Yang; Liu, Bao; Gao, Chunxiao; Ma, Yanzhang

    2017-08-01

    In2S3 has been investigated under pressures up to 41.3 GPa at room temperature by in situ angle dispersive synchrotron x-ray diffraction in a diamond anvil cell. In the studied pressure range, the diffraction pattern can be indexed into the face centered tetragonal structure. No evident structural phase transition can be determined even with the emergence of some peaks, which can be considered as from impurity. The bulk modulus is determined to be K 0  =  37.8  ±  0.2 GPa with K‧  =  4.44  ±  0.05. In addition, we have documented a difference in the compressibility around two experiments associated with different pressure transmitting medium.

  20. High-Resolution Detector For X-Ray Diffraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Daniel C.; Withrow, William K.; Pusey, Marc L.; Yost, Vaughn H.

    1988-01-01

    Proposed x-ray-sensitive imaging detector offers superior spatial resolution, counting-rate capacity, and dynamic range. Instrument based on laser-stimulated luminescence and reusable x-ray-sensitive film. Detector scans x-ray film line by line. Extracts latent image in film and simultaneously erases film for reuse. Used primarily for protein crystallography. Principle adapted to imaging detectors for electron microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy and general use in astronomy, engineering, and medicine.

  1. LAMBDA 2M GaAs—A multi-megapixel hard X-ray detector for synchrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennicard, D.; Smoljanin, S.; Pithan, F.; Sarajlic, M.; Rothkirch, A.; Yu, Y.; Liermann, H. P.; Morgenroth, W.; Winkler, B.; Jenei, Z.; Stawitz, H.; Becker, J.; Graafsma, H.

    2018-01-01

    Synchrotrons can provide very intense and focused X-ray beams, which can be used to study the structure of matter down to the atomic scale. In many experiments, the quality of the results depends strongly on detector performance; in particular, experiments studying dynamics of samples require fast, sensitive X-ray detectors. "LAMBDA" is a photon-counting hybrid pixel detector system for experiments at synchrotrons, based on the Medipix3 readout chip. Its main features are a combination of comparatively small pixel size (55 μm), high readout speed at up to 2000 frames per second with no time gap between images, a large tileable module design, and compatibility with high-Z sensors for efficient detection of higher X-ray energies. A large LAMBDA system for hard X-ray detection has been built using Cr-compensated GaAs as a sensor material. The system is composed of 6 GaAs tiles, each of 768 by 512 pixels, giving a system with approximately 2 megapixels and an area of 8.5 by 8.5 cm2. While the sensor uniformity of GaAs is not as high as that of silicon, its behaviour is stable over time, and it is possible to correct nonuniformities effectively by postprocessing of images. By using multiple 10 Gigabit Ethernet data links, the system can be read out at the full speed of 2000 frames per second. The system has been used in hard X-ray diffraction experiments studying the structure of samples under extreme pressure in diamond anvil cells. These experiments can provide insight into geological processes. Thanks to the combination of high speed readout, large area and high sensitivity to hard X-rays, it is possible to obtain previously unattainable information in these experiments about atomic-scale structure on a millisecond timescale during rapid changes of pressure or temperature.

  2. Two digital X-ray imaging systems for applications in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Flesher, A.C.; Bryant, C.J.; Lincoln, A.D.; Tucker, P.A.; Swanton, S.W.

    1986-08-01

    Two digital X-ray imaging systems developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are described:- the Mark I and the Mark II. Both use a bidimensionally sensitive Multiwire proportional counter as the basic X-ray image transducer coupled to a digital microcomputer system. The Mark I system provides the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging directly into the computer with the potential for software control of the sample orientation and environment. The Mark II system adds the novel features of signal averaging and multi-frame exposures. (author)

  3. Thermal, structural, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Phillips, W.

    1992-01-01

    Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology have made it possible to produce thin free-standing diamond foils that can be used as the window material in high heat load, synchrotron beamlines. Numerical simulations suggest that these windows can offer an attractive and at times the only altemative to beryllium windows for use in third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, as are the microstructure characteristics bearing on diamond's performance in this role. Analytic and numerical results are also presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows

  4. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  5. Chemical Mapping of Paleontological and Archeological Artifacts with Synchrotron X-Rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergmann, Uwe; Manning, Phillip L.; Wogelius, Roy A.

    2012-07-01

    The application of the recently developed synchrotron rapid scanning X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) technique to the mapping of large objects is the focus of this review. We discuss the advantages of SRS-XRF over traditional systems and the use of other synchrotron radiation (SR) techniques to provide corroborating spectroscopic and diffraction analyses during the same analytical session. After reviewing routine techniques used to analyze precious specimens, we present several case studies that show how SR-based methods have been successfully applied in archeology and paleontology. For example, SRS-XRF imaging of a seventh-century Qur'ān palimpsest and an overpainted original opera score from Luigi Cherubini is described. We also review the recent discovery of soft-tissue residue in fossils of Archaeopteryx and an ancient reptile, as well as work that has successfully resolved the remnants of pigment in Confuciusornis sanctus, a 120-million-year-old fossil of the oldest documented bird with a fully derived avian beak.

  6. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Schuren, Jay C.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.

    2013-03-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  7. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P.; Schuren, Jay C.

    2013-01-01

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 °C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  8. An experimental system for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies with in situ mechanical loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oswald, Benjamin B.; Pagan, Darren C.; Miller, Matthew P. [Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schuren, Jay C. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Air Force Research Laboratory, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio 45433 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    An experimental system with in situ thermomechanical loading has been developed to enable high energy synchrotron x-ray diffraction studies of crystalline materials. The system applies and maintains loads of up to 2250 N in uniaxial tension or compression at a frequency of up to 100 Hz. The furnace heats the specimen uniformly up to a maximum temperature of 1200 Degree-Sign C in a variety of atmospheres (oxidizing, inert, reducing) that, combined with in situ mechanical loading, can be used to mimic processing and operating conditions of engineering components. The loaded specimen is reoriented with respect to the incident beam of x-rays using two rotational axes to increase the number of crystal orientations interrogated. The system was used at the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source to conduct experiments on single crystal silicon and polycrystalline Low Solvus High Refractory nickel-based superalloy. The data from these experiments provide new insights into how stresses evolve at the crystal scale during thermomechanical loading and complement the development of high-fidelity material models.

  9. Effects of synchrotron x-rays on PVD deposited and ion implanted α-Si

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, K.M.; Wang, L.; Walukiewicz, W.; Muto, S.; McCormick, S.; Abelson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    The authors have studied the effects of intense X-ray irradiation on the structure of amorphous Si films. The films were obtained by either physical vapor deposition or by implantation of high energy ions into crystalline Si. They were exposed to different total doses of synchrotron X-rays. From the EXAFS and EXELFS measurements they find that an exposure to X-rays increases the Si coordination number. Also in the PVD films a prolonged X-ray exposure enlarges, by about 2%, the Si-Si bond length. Raman spectroscopy shows that Si amorphized with high energy ions contains small residual amounts of crystalline material. Irradiation of such films with X-rays annihilates those crystallites resulting in homogeneously amorphous layer with a close to four-fold coordination of Si atoms. This rearrangement of the local structure has a pronounced effect on the crystallization process of the amorphous films. Thermal annealing of X-ray irradiated ion amorphized films leads to nearly defect free solid phase epitaxy at 500 C. Also they observe a delay in the onset of the crystallization process in X-ray irradiated PVD films. They associate this with a reduced concentration of nucleation centers in the x-ray treated materials

  10. High-pressure x-ray diffraction study of LiIO sub 3 to 75 GPa

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, W W; Pan Yue Wu; Dong, S S; Liu, J; Zou Guang Tian

    2002-01-01

    In situ high-pressure energy-dispersive x-ray diffraction measurements on alpha-LiIO sub 3 have been performed by using a diamond anvil cell device with synchrotron radiation up to 75 GPa at room temperature. No new phase was found. The second Birch-Murnaghan equation of state is fitted with B sub 0 = 55 +- 3 GPa for the zero-pressure bulk modulus, B sub 0 ' = 2.9 +- 0.4 for its pressure derivative.

  11. Synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy for art conservation: looking back and looking forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotte, Marine; Susini, Jean; Dik, Joris; Janssens, Koen

    2010-06-15

    A variety of analytical techniques augmented by the use of synchrotron radiation (SR), such as X-ray fluorescence (SR-XRF) and X-ray diffraction (SR-XRD), are now readily available, and they differ little, conceptually, from their common laboratory counterparts. Because of numerous advantages afforded by SR-based techniques over benchtop versions, however, SR methods have become popular with archaeologists, art historians, curators, and other researchers in the field of cultural heritage (CH). Although the CH community now commonly uses both SR-XRF and SR-XRD, the use of synchrotron-based X-ray absorption spectroscopy (SR-XAS) techniques remains marginal, mostly because CH specialists rarely interact with SR physicists. In this Account, we examine the basic principles and capabilities of XAS techniques in art preservation. XAS techniques offer a combination of features particularly well-suited for the chemical analysis of works of art. The methods are noninvasive, have low detection limits, afford high lateral resolution, and provide exceptional chemical sensitivity. These characteristics are highly desirable for the chemical characterization of precious, heterogeneous, and complex materials. In particular, the chemical mapping capability, with high spatial resolution that provides information about local composition and chemical states, even for trace elements, is a unique asset. The chemistry involved in both the object's history (that is, during fabrication) and future (that is, during preservation and restoration treatments) can be addressed by XAS. On the one hand, many studies seek to explain optical effects occurring in historical glasses or ceramics by probing the molecular environment of relevant chromophores. Hence, XAS can provide insight into craft skills that were mastered years, decades, or centuries ago but were lost over the course of time. On the other hand, XAS can also be used to characterize unwanted reactions, which are then considered

  12. Spectral feature variations in x-ray diffraction imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolter, Scott D.; Greenberg, Joel A.

    2016-05-01

    Materials with different atomic or molecular structures give rise to unique scatter spectra when measured by X-ray diffraction. The details of these spectra, though, can vary based on both intrinsic (e.g., degree of crystallinity or doping) and extrinsic (e.g., pressure or temperature) conditions. While this sensitivity is useful for detailed characterizations of the material properties, these dependences make it difficult to perform more general classification tasks, such as explosives threat detection in aviation security. A number of challenges, therefore, currently exist for reliable substance detection including the similarity in spectral features among some categories of materials combined with spectral feature variations from materials processing and environmental factors. These factors complicate the creation of a material dictionary and the implementation of conventional classification and detection algorithms. Herein, we report on two prominent factors that lead to variations in spectral features: crystalline texture and temperature variations. Spectral feature comparisons between materials categories will be described for solid metallic sheet, aqueous liquids, polymer sheet, and metallic, organic, and inorganic powder specimens. While liquids are largely immune to texture effects, they are susceptible to temperature changes that can modify their density or produce phase changes. We will describe in situ temperature-dependent measurement of aqueous-based commercial goods in the temperature range of -20°C to 35°C.

  13. Federated repositories of X-ray diffraction images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Androulakis, Steve; Schmidberger, Jason; Bate, Mark A; DeGori, Ross; Beitz, Anthony; Keong, Cyrus; Cameron, Bob; McGowan, Sheena; Porter, Corrine J; Harrison, Andrew; Hunter, Jane; Martin, Jennifer L; Kobe, Bostjan; Dobson, Renwick C J; Parker, Michael W; Whisstock, James C; Gray, Joan; Treloar, Andrew; Groenewegen, David; Dickson, Neil; Buckle, Ashley M

    2008-07-01

    There is a pressing need for the archiving and curation of raw X-ray diffraction data. This information is critical for validation, methods development and improvement of archived structures. However, the relatively large size of these data sets has presented challenges for storage in a single worldwide repository such as the Protein Data Bank archive. This problem can be avoided by using a federated approach, where each institution utilizes its institutional repository for storage, with a discovery service overlaid. Institutional repositories are relatively stable and adequately funded, ensuring persistence. Here, a simple repository solution is described, utilizing Fedora open-source database software and data-annotation and deposition tools that can be deployed at any site cheaply and easily. Data sets and associated metadata from federated repositories are given a unique and persistent handle, providing a simple mechanism for search and retrieval via web interfaces. In addition to ensuring that valuable data is not lost, the provision of raw data has several uses for the crystallographic community. Most importantly, structure determination can only be truly repeated or verified when the raw data are available. Moreover, the availability of raw data is extremely useful for the development of improved methods of image analysis and data processing.

  14. X-Ray Powder Diffraction with Guinier - Haegg Focusing Cameras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Allan

    1970-12-01

    The Guinier - Haegg focusing camera is discussed with reference to its use as an instrument for rapid phase analysis. An actual camera and the alignment procedure employed in its setting up are described. The results obtained with the instrument are compared with those obtained with Debye - Scherrer cameras and powder diffractometers. Exposure times of 15 - 30 minutes with compounds of simple structure are roughly one-sixth of those required for Debye - Scherrer patterns. Coupled with the lower background resulting from the use of a monochromatic X-ray beam, the shorter exposure time gives a ten-fold increase in sensitivity for the detection of minor phases as compared with the Debye - Scherrer camera. Attention is paid to the precautions taken to obtain reliable Bragg angles from Guinier - Haegg film measurements, with particular reference to calibration procedures. The evaluation of unit cell parameters from Guinier - Haegg data is discussed together with the application of tests for the presence of angle-dependent systematic errors. It is concluded that with proper calibration procedures and least squares treatment of the data, accuracies of the order of 0.005% are attainable. A compilation of diffraction data for a number of compounds examined in the Active Central Laboratory at Studsvik is presented to exemplify the scope of this type of powder camera

  15. X-ray diffraction study with small- and wide-angle simultaneous measurement of polymorphic crystallization of triacylglycerols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, Satoru [Hiroshima Univ., Faculty of Applied Biological Science, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2002-01-01

    Polymorphism of triacylglycerols (TAGs) is an important phenomenon which influences the physical chemical properties of fats employed in foods, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics etc. In particular, precise analysis of kinetic properties of polymorphic crystallization is closely related to technical control of fat crystallization in confectionery and food industry. In the melt-mediated crystallization, which is one of the typical methods of crystallizing the more stable form for industrial use, the more stable form is induced by rapidly melting the less stable forms. Recently, X-ray diffraction spectroscopy using a synchrotron radiation source has been used in study of dynamic processes of polymorphic transformations of many TAGs. This approach has allowed us to gain a better understanding of the kinetics of processes occurring during the polymorphic crystallization and transformations of TAGs at the molecular level. In the present study, polymorphic crystallization of TAG has been examined with the time-resolved X-ray diffraction method with small- and wide-angle simultaneous measurement using synchrotron radiation. The main result is as follows: the melt mediation gave rise to the formation of a liquid crystalline structure having long spacing values of 5.1 nm and 4.6 nm in SOS (sn-1,3-distearoyl-2-oleoyl glycerol). Consequently, the use of the time-resolved X-ray diffraction method with small- and wide-angle simultaneous measurement using synchrotron radiation unveiled quite newer aspects of the polymorphic crystallization of the triacylglycerols from neat liquid, which were not detectable in conventional XRD techniques. (author)

  16. High Pressure X-Ray Diffraction Studies of Nanocrystalline Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palosz, B.; Stel'makh, S.; Grzanka, E.; Gierlotka, S.; Palosz, W.

    2004-01-01

    Experimental evidence obtained for a variety of nanocrystalline materials suggest that the crystallographic structure of a very small size particle deviates from that in the bulk crystals. In this paper we show the effect of the surface of nanocrystals on their structure by the analysis of generation and distribution of macro- and micro-strains at high pressures and their dependence on the grain size in nanocrystalline powders of Sic. We studied the structure of Sic nanocrystals by in-situ high-pressure powder diffraction technique using synchrotron and neutron sources and hydrostatic or isostatic pressure conditions. The diffraction measurements were done in HASYLAB at DESY using a Diamond Anvil Cell (DAC) in the energy dispersive geometry in the diffraction vector range up to 3.5 - 4/A and under pressures up to 50 GPa at room temperature. In-situ high pressure neutron diffraction measurements were done at LANSCE in Los Alamos National Laboratory using the HIPD and HIPPO diffractometers with the Paris-Edinburgh and TAP-98 cells, respectively, in the diffraction vector range up to 26 Examination of the response of the material to external stresses requires nonstandard methodology of the materials characterization and description. Although every diffraction pattern contains a complete information on macro- and micro-strains, a high pressure experiment can reveal only those factors which contribute to the characteristic diffraction patterns of the crystalline phases present in the sample. The elastic properties of powders with the grain size from several nm to micrometers were examined using three methodologies: (l), the analysis of positions and widths of individual Bragg reflections (used for calculating macro- and micro-strains generated during densification) [I], (2). the analysis of the dependence of the experimental apparent lattice parameter, alp, on the diffraction vector Q [2], and (3), the atomic Pair Distribution Function (PDF) technique [3]. The results

  17. X-Ray Diffraction and the Discovery of the Structure of DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crouse, David T.

    2007-01-01

    A method is described for teaching the analysis of X-ray diffraction of DNA through a series of steps utilizing the original methods used by James Watson, Francis Crick, Maurice Wilkins and Rosalind Franklin. The X-ray diffraction pattern led to the conclusion of the basic helical structure of DNA and its dimensions while basic chemical principles…

  18. Modelling the X-ray powder diffraction of nitrogen-expanded austenite using the Debye formula

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oddershede, Jette; Christiansen, Thomas; Ståhl, Kenny

    2008-01-01

    Stress-free and homogeneous samples of nitrogen-expanded austenite, a defect-rich f.c.c. structure with a high interstitial nitrogen occupancy (between 0.36 and 0.61), have been studied using X-ray powder diffraction and Debye simulations. The simulations confirm the presence of deformation...... to be indistinguishable to X-ray powder diffraction....

  19. Indentation Size Effects in Single Crystal Copper as Revealed by Synchrotron X-ray Microdiffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, G.; Budiman, A. S.; Nix, W. D.; Tamura, N.; Patel, J. R.

    2007-11-19

    The indentation size effect (ISE) has been observed in numerous nanoindentation studies on crystalline materials; it is found that the hardness increases dramatically with decreasing indentation size - a 'smaller is stronger' phenomenon. Some have attributed the ISE to the existence of strain gradients and the geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs). Since the GND density is directly related to the local lattice curvature, the Scanning X-ray Microdiffraction ({mu}SXRD) technique, which can quantitatively measure relative lattice rotations through the streaking of Laue diffractions, can used to study the strain gradients. The synchrotron {mu}SXRD technique we use - which was developed at the Advanced Light Source (ALS), Berkeley Lab - allows for probing the local plastic behavior of crystals with sub-micrometer resolution. Using this technique, we studied the local plasticity for indentations of different depths in a Cu single crystal. Broadening of Laue diffractions (streaking) was observed, showing local crystal lattice rotation due to the indentation-induced plastic deformation. A quantitative analysis of the streaking allows us to estimate the average GND density in the indentation plastic zones. The size dependence of the hardness, as found by nanoindentation, will be described, and its correlation to the observed lattice rotations will be discussed.

  20. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase from E. Coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: ugama@yandex.ru; Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-09-15

    Enzymes of the phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate synthetase family (PRPPS, EC 2.7.6.1) catalyze the formation of 5-phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate (5-PRPP) from adenosine triphosphate and ribose 5-phosphate. 5-Phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate is an important intermediate in the synthesis of purine, pyrimidine, and pyridine nucleotides, as well as of the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. The crystallization conditions for E. coli PRPPS were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals grown by the counter-diffusion technique using a synchrotron radiation source to 3.1-Å resolution. The crystals of PRPPS belong to sp. gr. P6{sub 3}22 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = b = 104.44 Å, c = 124.98 Å, α = β = 90°, γ = 120°. The collected X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for the solution of the three-dimensional structure of PRPPS at 3.1-Å resolution.

  1. Solving a superstructure from two-wavelength x-ray powder diffraction data - a simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian-Rong; Gu, Yuan-Xin; Fan, Hai-Fu

    2003-03-01

    Two different kinds of phase ambiguities are intrinsic in two-wavelength x-ray powder diffraction from acentric crystal structures having pseudo-translation symmetry. In a test calculation we have solved the problem for the first time by two different phasing procedures developed originally in single-crystal structure analysis. They are the direct method of breaking enantiomorphous phase ambiguity in protein crystallography and that of breaking translational phase ambiguity for superstructures. An artificial structure was used in the test, which is based on atomic coordinates of the known structure, SHAS (C5H6O5N3K), with the atom K replaced by Rb. The arrangement of Rb atoms possesses a subperiodicity of t = (a + b + c)/2. Two-wavelength synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction data were simulated with lambda1=0.0816nm and lambda2=0.1319nm. Overlapped reflections were uniformly decomposed at the beginning and redecomposed afterward when the partial-structure information became available. The enantiomorphous phase ambiguity was resolved only for reflections with h + k + l even. Phases of reflections with h + k + l odd were derived by the direct method of solving superstructures. A fragment was then obtained, which led to the complete structure in five cycles of Fourier iteration.

  2. Beryllium window flange for synchrotron radiation X-ray beamline fabricated by hot isostatic press method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asaoka, Seiji; Maezawa, Hideki; Nishida, Kiyotoshi; Sakamoto, Naoki.

    1995-01-01

    The synchrotron radiation experimental facilities in National Laboratory for High Energy Physics are the experimental facilities for joint utilization, that possess the positron storage ring of 2.5 GeV exclusively used for synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is led through a mainstay beam channel to the laboratory, and in the beam line of X-ray, it is used for experiment through the taking-out window made of beryllium. At this time, the function of the taking-out window is to shut off between the ultrahigh vacuum in the mainstay beam channel and the atmosphere, and to cut the low energy component of synchrotron radiation spectra. The experiment using X-ray is carried out mostly in the atmosphere. The design of the efficient cooling water channel which is compatible with the flange construction is important under the high thermal load of synchrotron radiation. The beryllium window flange for synchrotron radiation X-ray was made by HIP method, and the ultrahigh vacuum test, the high pressure water flow test and the actual machine test were carried out by heat cycle. The properties required for the window material, the requirement of the construction, the new development of HIP method, and the experiments for evaluating the manufactured beryllium window are described. (K.I.)

  3. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  4. Synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers principles of coherent X-ray generation

    CERN Document Server

    Kim, Kwang-Je; Lindberg, Ryan

    2017-01-01

    Learn about the latest advances in high-brightness X-ray physics and technology with this authoritative text. Drawing upon the most recent theoretical developments, pre-eminent leaders in the field guide readers through the fundamental principles and techniques of high-brightness X-ray generation from both synchrotron and free-electron laser sources. A wide range of topics is covered, including high-brightness synchrotron radiation from undulators, self-amplified spontaneous emission, seeded high-gain amplifiers with harmonic generation, ultra-short pulses, tapering for higher power, free-electron laser oscillators, and X-ray oscillator and amplifier configuration. Novel mathematical approaches and numerous figures accompanied by intuitive explanations enable easy understanding of key concepts, whilst practical considerations of performance-improving techniques and discussion of recent experimental results provide the tools and knowledge needed to address current research problems in the field. This is a comp...

  5. On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond foils that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptionally attractive thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulations indicate that diamond windows can offer an attractive and at times the only alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical and numerical results are presented to provide a basis for the design and testing of such windows

  6. A microfocus X-ray fluorescence beamline at Indus-2 synchrotron radiation facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, M K; Gupta, P; Sinha, A K; Kane, S R; Singh, A K; Garg, S R; Garg, C K; Lodha, G S; Deb, S K

    2013-03-01

    A microfocus X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy beamline (BL-16) at the Indian synchrotron radiation facility Indus-2 has been constructed with an experimental emphasis on environmental, archaeological, biomedical and material science applications involving heavy metal speciation and their localization. The beamline offers a combination of different analytical probes, e.g. X-ray fluorescence mapping, X-ray microspectroscopy and total-external-reflection fluorescence characterization. The beamline is installed on a bending-magnet source with a working X-ray energy range of 4-20 keV, enabling it to excite K-edges of all elements from S to Nb and L-edges from Ag to U. The optics of the beamline comprises of a double-crystal monochromator with Si(111) symmetric and asymmetric crystals and a pair of Kirkpatrick-Baez focusing mirrors. This paper describes the performance of the beamline and its capabilities with examples of measured results.

  7. On the theory of time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Niels Engholm; Møller, Klaus Braagaard

    2008-01-01

    We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation of the experimen......We derive the basic theoretical formulation for X-ray diffraction with pulsed fields, using a fully quantized description of light and matter. Relevant time scales are discussed for coherent as well as incoherent X-ray pulses, and we provide expressions to be used for calculation...... of the experimental diffraction signal for both types of X-ray sources. We present a simple analysis of time-resolved X-ray scattering for direct bond breaking in diatomic molecules. This essentially analytical approach highlights the relation between the signal and the time-dependent quantum distribution...

  8. High counting rates of x-ray photon detection using APD detectors on synchrotron machines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakuno, E. M.; Giacomolli, B. A.; Scorzato, C. R. [Universidade Federal do Pampa - UNIPAMPA-Bage, 96413-170 (Brazil); Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron - LNLS, 13086-100 (Brazil)

    2012-05-17

    In this work we show the results of 10 x 10 mm{sup 2} Si-APD detector's test with guard ring detecting x-rays. The result of mapping surface is also exhibited. We show and discuss the difficulty of single photon detection in high counting rate experiments in synchrotrons machines.

  9. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopic studies for bioeffects of nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ying; Cai, Xiaoqing; Li, Jiang; Zhong, Zengtao; Huang, Qing; Fan, Chunhai

    2014-04-01

    There have been increasing interests in studying biological effects of nanomaterials, which are nevertheless faced up with many challenges due to the nanoscale dimensions and unique chemical properties of nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy, an advanced imaging technology with high spatial resolution and excellent elemental specificity, provides a new platform for studying interactions between nanomaterials and living systems. In this article, we review the recent progress of X-ray microscopic studies on bioeffects of nanomaterials in several living systems including cells, model organisms, animals and plants. We aim to provide an overview of the state of the art, and the advantages of using synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy for characterizing in vitro and in vivo behaviors and biodistribution of nanomaterials. We also expect that the use of a combination of new synchrotron techniques should offer unprecedented opportunities for better understanding complex interactions at the nano-biological interface and accounting for unique bioeffects of nanomaterials. Synchrotron-based X-ray microscopy is a non-destructive imaging technique that enables high resolution spatial mapping of metals with elemental level detection methods. This review summarizes the current use and perspectives of this novel technique in studying the biology and tissue interactions of nanomaterials. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms

  11. Fabrication of nested elliptical KB mirrors using profile coating for synchrotron radiation X-ray focusing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Chian; Ice, G.E.; Liu, W.; Assoufid, L.; Qian, J.; Shi, B.; Khachatryan, R.; Wieczorek, M.; Zschack, P.; Tischler, J.Z.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes fabrication methods used to demonstrate the advantages of nested or Montel optics for micro/nanofocusing of synchrotron X-ray beams. A standard Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) mirror system uses two separated elliptical mirrors at glancing angles to the X-ray beam and sequentially arranged at 90° to each other to focus X-rays successively in the vertical and horizontal directions. A nested KB mirror system has the two mirrors positioned perpendicular and side-by-side to each other. Compared to a standard KB mirror system, Montel optics can focus a larger divergence and the mirrors can have a shorter focal length. As a result, nested mirrors can be fabricated with improved demagnification factor and ultimately smaller focal spot, than with a standard KB arrangement. The nested system is also more compact with an increased working distance, and is more stable, with reduced complexity of mirror stages. However, although Montel optics is commercially available for laboratory X-ray sources, due to technical difficulties they have not been used to microfocus synchrotron radiation X-rays, where ultra-precise mirror surfaces are essential. The main challenge in adapting nested optics for synchrotron microfocusing is to fabricate mirrors with a precise elliptical surface profile at the very edge where the two mirrors meet and where X-rays scatter. For example, in our application to achieve a sub-micron focus with high efficiency, a surface figure root-mean-square (rms) error on the order of 1 nm is required in the useable area along the X-ray footprint with a ∼0.1 mm-diameter cross section. In this paper we describe promising ways to fabricate precise nested KB mirrors using our profile coating technique and inexpensive flat Si substrates.

  12. X-ray and neutron diffraction in the study of organic crystalline hydrates.

    OpenAIRE

    Fucke, K.; Steed, J.W.

    2010-01-01

    A review. Diffraction methods are a powerful tool to investigate the crystal structure of organic compounds in general and their hydrates in particular. The laboratory standard technique of single crystal X-ray diffraction gives information about the molecular conformation, packing and hydrogen bonding in the crystal structure, while powder X-ray diffraction on bulk material can trace hydration/dehydration processes and phase transitions under non-ambient conditions. Neutron diffraction is a ...

  13. Characterization of nanowires by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging and ptychography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhigaev, Dmitry

    2017-03-01

    Imaging techniques are of paramount importance for our understanding of the universe. From galaxies and stars explored by huge telescopes down to micro and nanostructures studied by microscopes, imaging systems provide invaluable scientific information. When an object under investigation has a size of about 100 nanometers, X-rays become a perfect probe for non-destructive imaging. The manufacturing process of image forming lenses for X-rays becomes much more complicated comparing to optical ones. Therefore, ''lensless'' techniques which rely on the coherent properties of radiation were developed. With third generation of synchrotron sources highly coherent and intense X-ray beams became widely accessible. They are used in new imaging methods such as coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and X-ray ptychography. Modern nanotechnology opens a wide spectrum of possible applications in different branches of physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. At the nanoscale, matter has different physical and chemical properties compared to the macroscale bulk material. The continuing trend of miniaturization of functional components in semiconductor industry brings new challenges both in growth and characterization methods. This Thesis is focused on application of coherent diffractive imaging methods to reveal the structure of single semiconductor nanowires (NWs). They have been attracting significant attention for a couple of decades due to their efficient strain relaxation properties. And since the strain plays a significant role in NW performance the projects carried out in this work are oriented on Bragg CXDI approaches. Three distinct projects were carried out during my research activity at DESY research center of the Helmholtz Association. Experimental work was performed at P06 and P10 beamlines at PETRA III synchrotron. The first part of this Thesis extends the application of the three-dimensional (3D) Bragg CXDI to strain field mapping in a

  14. Characterization of nanowires by coherent X-ray diffractive imaging and ptychography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhigaev, Dmitry

    2017-03-15

    Imaging techniques are of paramount importance for our understanding of the universe. From galaxies and stars explored by huge telescopes down to micro and nanostructures studied by microscopes, imaging systems provide invaluable scientific information. When an object under investigation has a size of about 100 nanometers, X-rays become a perfect probe for non-destructive imaging. The manufacturing process of image forming lenses for X-rays becomes much more complicated comparing to optical ones. Therefore, ''lensless'' techniques which rely on the coherent properties of radiation were developed. With third generation of synchrotron sources highly coherent and intense X-ray beams became widely accessible. They are used in new imaging methods such as coherent X-ray diffractive imaging (CXDI) and X-ray ptychography. Modern nanotechnology opens a wide spectrum of possible applications in different branches of physics, chemistry, biology and engineering. At the nanoscale, matter has different physical and chemical properties compared to the macroscale bulk material. The continuing trend of miniaturization of functional components in semiconductor industry brings new challenges both in growth and characterization methods. This Thesis is focused on application of coherent diffractive imaging methods to reveal the structure of single semiconductor nanowires (NWs). They have been attracting significant attention for a couple of decades due to their efficient strain relaxation properties. And since the strain plays a significant role in NW performance the projects carried out in this work are oriented on Bragg CXDI approaches. Three distinct projects were carried out during my research activity at DESY research center of the Helmholtz Association. Experimental work was performed at P06 and P10 beamlines at PETRA III synchrotron. The first part of this Thesis extends the application of the three-dimensional (3D) Bragg CXDI to strain field mapping in a

  15. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of B12 coenzymes in free and enzyme bound state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jogl, G.

    1999-11-01

    The molecular structure of the coenzyme B12 binding subunit S (GlmS) of glutamate mutase from Clostridium cochlearium has been determined with x-ray crystallographic methods. GlmS was crystallized with cyanocobalamin in three different crystal forms. High-resolution synchrotron diffraction data have been collected for two crystal forms (P212121, 1.7A; I422, 1.6A). The structure was solved with molecular replacement. In the GlmS crystal structure, cyanocobalamin is observed in its base-off constitution. The protein derived residue Histidin16 displaces the B12 dimethylbenzimidazole base and coordinates to the coenzyme's cobalt center. In a second part, the structure of the radical species cob(II)alamin was determined by single crystal neutron diffraction. Cob(II)alamin was synthesized from D2O and D6-acetone. Large crystals were grown by repeated seeding. Solvent deuterium positions for 2 out of 3 acetone molecules and 7 out of 15 water molecules were located from neutron diffraction data. For comparison with neutron results, a high-resolution synchrotron x-ray data set of cob(II)alamin was collected. Refinement of x-ray data gave the currently most accurate crystallographic structure of a cobalamin molecule. Solvent hydrogen positions have been compared for both structures. The hydrogen bond geometry of a solvent water cluster is analyzed from neutron diffraction results. (author)

  16. Characterization of a Test for Invasive Breast Cancer Using X-ray Diffraction of Hair - Results of a Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary L. Corino

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the performance of a test for breast cancer utilizing synchrotron x-ray diffraction analysis of scalp hair from women undergoing diagnostic radiology assessment. Design and Setting: A double-blinded clinical trial of women who attended diagnostic radiology clinics in Australia. Patients: 1796 women referred for diagnostic radiology, with no previous history of cancer. Main Outcome Measures: Sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the hair test analysis compared to the gold standard of imaging followed by biopsy where indicated. Results: The hair-based assay had an overall accuracy of >77% and a negative predictive value of 99%. For all women, the sensitivity of both mammography and x-ray diffraction alone was 64%, but when used together the sensitivity rose to 86%. The sensitivity of the hair test for women under the age of 70 was 74%. Conclusion: In this large population trial the association between the presence of breast cancer and an altered hair fibre X-ray diffraction pattern previously reported has been confirmed. It appears that mammography and X-ray diffraction of hair detect different populations of breast cancers, and are synergistic when used together.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trincão, José [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Sousa Silva, Marta [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Departamento Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Lisboa (Portugal); Barata, Lídia [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Departamento Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Lisboa (Portugal); Bonifácio, Cecília [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal); Carvalho, Sandra; Tomás, Ana Maria [IBMC - Instituto de Biologia Molecular e Celular, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); ICBAS - Instituto de Ciências Biomédicas Abel Salazar, Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Ferreira, António E. N.; Cordeiro, Carlos; Ponces Freire, Ana [Centro de Química e Bioquímica, Departamento Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edifício C8, Lisboa (Portugal); Romão, Maria João, E-mail: mromao@dq.fct.unl.pt [REQUIMTE-CQFB, Departamento Química, Faculdade de Ciências e Tecnologia, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Caparica (Portugal)

    2006-08-01

    A glyoxalase II from L. infantum was cloned, purified and crystallized and its structure was solved by X-ray crystallography. In trypanosomatids, trypanothione replaces glutathione in all glutathione-dependent processes. Of the two enzymes involved in the glyoxalase pathway, glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II, the latter shows absolute specificity towards trypanothione thioester, making this enzyme an excellent model to understand the molecular basis of trypanothione binding. Cloned glyoxalase II from Leishmania infantum was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. Crystals belong to space group C222{sub 1} (unit-cell parameters a = 65.6, b = 88.3, c = 85.2 Å) and diffract beyond 2.15 Å using synchrotron radiation. The structure was solved by molecular replacement using the human glyoxalase II structure as a search model. These results, together with future detailed kinetic characterization using lactoyltrypanothione, should shed light on the evolutionary selection of trypanothione instead of glutathione by trypano-somatids.

  18. Local layer structure of smectic liquid crystals by X-ray micro-diffraction

    CERN Document Server

    Takanishi, Y

    2003-01-01

    The local layer structure of smectic liquid crystal has been measured using time-resolved synchrotron X-ray micro-diffraction. Typical layer disorders observed in surface stabilized (anti-) ferroelectric liquid crystals, i.e. a stripe texture, a needed-like defect and a zigzag defect, are directly analyzed. The detailed analysis slows that the surface anchoring force due to the interaction between the liquid crystal molecule and the alignment thin film plays an important role to realize both the static and dynamic local layer structures. The layer structure of the circular domain observed in the liquid crystal of bent-shaped molecules found to depend on the applied electric field though the optical micrograph shows little difference. The frustrated, double and single layer structures of the bent-shaped molecule liquid crystal are determined depending on the terminal alkyl chain length. (author)

  19. Transmission in situ and operando high temperature X-ray powder diffraction in variable gaseous environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlicker, Lukas; Doran, Andrew; Schneppmüller, Peter; Gili, Albert; Czasny, Mathias; Penner, Simon; Gurlo, Aleksander

    2018-03-01

    This work describes a device for time-resolved synchrotron-based in situ and operando X-ray powder diffraction measurements at elevated temperatures under controllable gaseous environments. The respective gaseous sample environment is realized via a gas-tight capillary-in-capillary design, where the gas flow is achieved through an open-end 0.5 mm capillary located inside a 0.7 mm capillary filled with a sample powder. Thermal mass flow controllers provide appropriate gas flows and computer-controlled on-the-fly gas mixing capabilities. The capillary system is centered inside an infrared heated, proportional integral differential-controlled capillary furnace allowing access to temperatures up to 1000 °C.

  20. Orthorhombic boron oxide under pressure: In situ study by X-ray diffraction and Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherednichenko, Kirill A.; Le Godec, Yann; Kalinko, Aleksandr; Mezouar, Mohamed; Solozhenko, Vladimir L.

    2016-11-01

    High-pressure phase of boron oxide, orthorhombic β-B2O3, has been studied in situ by synchrotron X-ray diffraction to 22 GPa and Raman scattering to 46 GPa at room temperature. The bulk modulus of β-B2O3 has been found to be 169(3) GPa that is in good agreement with our ab initio calculations. Raman and IR spectra of β-B2O3 have been measured at ambient pressure; all experimentally observed bands have been attributed to the theoretically calculated ones, and the mode assignment has been performed. Based on the data on Raman shift as a function of pressure, combined with equation-of-state data, the Grüneisen parameters of all experimentally observed Raman bands have been calculated. β-B2O3 enriched by 10B isotope has been synthesized, and the effect of boron isotopic substitution on Raman spectra has been studied.

  1. High pressure in-situ X-ray diffraction study on Zn-doped magnetite nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, S.; Bilovol, V.; Pampillo, L. G.; Grinblat, F.; Errandonea, D.

    2018-03-01

    We have performed high pressure synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction experiments on two different samples of Zn-doped magnetite nanoparticles (formula Fe(3-x)ZnxO4; x = 0.2, 0.5). The structural behavior of then a noparticles was studied up to 13.5 GPa for x = 0.2, and up to 17.4 GPa for x = 0.5. We have found that both systems remain in the cubic spinel structure as expected for this range of applied pressures. The analysis of the unit cell volume vs. pressure results in bulk modulus values lower than in both end-members, magnetite (Fe3O4) and zinc ferrite (ZnFe2O4), suggesting that chemical disorder may favor compressibility, which is expected to improve the increase of the Neel temperature under compression.

  2. High temperature x-ray diffraction in transmission under controlled environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margulies, L.; Kramer, M.J.; Williams, J.J.; Deters, E.M.; McCallum, R.W.; Goldman, A.I.; Haeffner, D.R.; Lang, J.C.; Kycia, S.

    1998-01-01

    A compact tube furnace has been developed for high temperature X-ray diffraction studies using high energy synchrotron radiation. The furnace design has a low absorption path in transmission yet allows for a high degree of control of the sample atmosphere and a minimal temperature gradient across the sample. The design allows for a maximum temperature of 1,500 C with a variety of atmospheres including inert, reducing, and oxidizing. Preliminary results obtained at the SRI-CAT 1-ID undulator line (60 keV) at the APS facility and the A2 24 pole wiggler line (45 keV) at CHESS on the Ti 5 Si 3 Z .5 (Z = C, N, O) system will be presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this approach

  3. Purification, crystallization, and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of purine nucleoside phosphorylase from E. coli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramchik, Yu. A., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru; Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: espiov@ibch.ru; Zhukhlistova, N. E., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-15

    Crystals of E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase were grown in microgravity by the capillary counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. The X-ray diffraction data set suitable for the determination of the three-dimensional structure at atomic resolution was collected from one crystal at the Spring-8 synchrotron facility to 0.99 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 74.1 Å, b = 110.2 Å, c = 88.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 111.08°. The crystal contains six subunits of the enzyme comprising a hexamer per asymmetric unit. The hexamer is the biological active form of E. coli. purine nucleoside phosphorylase.

  4. Three-Dimensional X-Ray Diffraction Technique for Metals Science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yubin; Fan, Guohua

    2017-01-01

    implemented in several large synchrotron facilities, e.g. the Advanced Photon Source (APS) in USA and the Spring-8 in Japan. Another family of 3DXRD technique that utilizes white beam synchrotron X-rays has also been developed in parallel in cooperation between Oak Ridge National Laboratory and APS...

  5. Phased-Resolved Strain Measuremetns in Hydrated Ordinary Portland Cement Using Synchrotron x-Rays (Prop. 2003-033)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biernacki, Joseph J.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Parnham, C.J.; Hubbard, Camden R.; Bai, J.

    2006-01-01

    X-ray diffraction methods developed for the determination of residual stress states in crystalline materials have been applied to study residual strains and strains because of mechanical loading of ordinary portland cement paste. Synchrotron X-rays were used to make in situ measurements of interplanar spacings in the calcium hydroxide (CH) phase of hydrated neat portland cement under uniaxial compression. The results indicate that strains on the order of 1/100 000 can be resolved providing an essentially new technique by which to measure the phase-resolved meso-scale mechanical behavior of cement under different loading conditions. Evaluation of these strain data in view of published elastic parameters for CH suggests that the CH carries a large fraction of the applied stress and that plastic interactions with the matrix are notable.

  6. Qualitative analysis of powder x-ray diffraction data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raftery, T.

    1999-01-01

    based methods of considering significant lines such as with the Hanawalt, Fink and alphabetical index; computer based search-match based on FOM and the more recent graphically based full pattern methods of phase identification. No single approach is foolproof. a range of techniques is recommended if a high level of success is required. Copyright (1999) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  7. High-resolution X-ray diffraction with no sample preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansford, G M; Turner, S M R; Degryse, P; Shortland, A J

    2017-07-01

    It is shown that energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (EDXRD) implemented in a back-reflection geometry is extremely insensitive to sample morphology and positioning even in a high-resolution configuration. This technique allows high-quality X-ray diffraction analysis of samples that have not been prepared and is therefore completely non-destructive. The experimental technique was implemented on beamline B18 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron in Oxfordshire, UK. The majority of the experiments in this study were performed with pre-characterized geological materials in order to elucidate the characteristics of this novel technique and to develop the analysis methods. Results are presented that demonstrate phase identification, the derivation of precise unit-cell parameters and extraction of microstructural information on unprepared rock samples and other sample types. A particular highlight was the identification of a specific polytype of a muscovite in an unprepared mica schist sample, avoiding the time-consuming and difficult preparation steps normally required to make this type of identification. The technique was also demonstrated in application to a small number of fossil and archaeological samples. Back-reflection EDXRD implemented in a high-resolution configuration shows great potential in the crystallographic analysis of cultural heritage artefacts for the purposes of scientific research such as provenancing, as well as contributing to the formulation of conservation strategies. Possibilities for moving the technique from the synchrotron into museums are discussed. The avoidance of the need to extract samples from high-value and rare objects is a highly significant advantage, applicable also in other potential research areas such as palaeontology, and the study of meteorites and planetary materials brought to Earth by sample-return missions.

  8. X-ray television area detectors for macromolecular structural studies with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arndt, U.W.; Gilmore, D.J.

    1978-01-01

    Two-dimensional X-ray diffraction patterns may be recorded quantitatively by means of X-ray-to-electron converters which are scanned in a television-type raster scan. Detectors of this type are capable of operating over the whole range of counting rates from very low to higher than those with which other types of converters can deal. The component parts of an X-ray television detector are examined and the limits to the precision of the measurements are analysed. (Auth.)

  9. High pressure and high temperature in situ X-ray diffraction studies in the Paris-Edinburgh cell using a laboratory X-ray source†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulemonde, Pierre; Goujon, Céline; Laversenne, Laetitia; Bordet, Pierre; Bruyère, Rémy; Legendre, Murielle; Leynaud, Olivier; Prat, Alain; Mezouar, Mohamed

    2014-04-01

    We have developed a new laboratory experimental set-up to study in situ the pressure-temperature phase diagram of a given pure element or compound, its associated phase transitions, or the chemical reactions involved at high pressure and high temperature (HP-HT) between different solids and liquids. This new tool allows laboratory studies before conducting further detailed experiments using more brilliant synchrotron X-ray sources or before kinetic studies. This device uses the diffraction of X-rays produced by a quasi-monochromatic micro-beam source operating at the silver radiation (λ(Ag)Kα 1, 2≈0.56 Å). The experimental set-up is based on a VX Paris-Edinburgh cell equipped with tungsten carbide or sintered diamond anvils and uses standard B-epoxy 5 or 7 mm gaskets. The diffracted signal coming from the compressed (and heated) sample is collected on an image plate. The pressure and temperature calibrations were performed by diffraction, using conventional calibrants (BN, NaCl and MgO) for determination of the pressure, and by crossing isochores of BN, NaCl, Cu or Au for the determination of the temperature. The first examples of studies performed with this new laboratory set-up are presented in the article: determination of the melting point of germanium and magnesium under HP-HT, synthesis of MgB2 or C-diamond and partial study of the P, T phase diagram of MgH2.

  10. Two digital X-ray imaging systems for applications in X-ray diffraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.; Flesher, A.C.; Tucker, P.A.; Swanton, S.W.

    1987-01-01

    Two digital X-ray imaging systems developed at the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory are described: the Mark I and the Mark II. Both use a bidimensionally sensitive multiwire proportional counter (MWPC) as the basic X-ray image transducer coupled, in the case of the Mark I to a Digital LSI 11-23 microcomputer system via CAMAC, and in the case of the Mark II to a Digital LSI 11-73 microcomputer system via custom-built data acquisition hardware mounted directly on the Q-bus of the microcomputer. The Mark I system provides the advantages of high speed, high sensitivity digital imaging directly into the computer with the potential for software control of the sample orientation and environment. The Mark II system adds the novel features of signal averaging and multiframe exposures. The dedicated digital memories have a resolution of 512x512 pixels of 16 bits, matching well to the spatial resolution of the xenon-filled MWPC (0.5 mm fwhm over an aperture of 200 mm x 200 mm). A 512x512x4 bit video graphics system displays the images in grey scales or colour. (orig.)

  11. Measurements of internal stresses in bond coating using high energy x-rays from synchrotron radiation source

    CERN Document Server

    Suzuki, K; Akiniwa, Y; Nishio, K; Kawamura, M; Okado, H

    2002-01-01

    Thermal barrier coating (TBC) techniques enable high temperature combustion of turbines made of Ni-base alloy. TBC is made of zirconia top coating on NiCoCrAlY bond coating. The internal stresses in the bond coating play essential role in the delamination or fracture of TBC in service. With the X-rays from laboratory equipments, it is impossible to measure nondestructively the internal stress in the bond coating under the top coating. synchrotron radiations with a high energy and high brightness have a large penetration depth as compared with laboratory X-rays. Using the high energy X-rays from the synchrotron radiation, it is possible to measure the internal stress in the bond coating through the top coating. In this study, the furnace, which can heat a specimen to 1473 K, was developed for the stress measurement of the thermal barrier coatings. The internal stresses in the bond coating were measured at the room temperature, 773 K, 1073 K and 1373 K by using the 311 diffraction from Ni sub 3 Al with about 73...

  12. Single shot diffraction of picosecond 8.7-keV x-ray pulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. H. O’Shea

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate multiphoton, single shot diffraction images of x rays produced by inverse Compton scattering a high-power CO_{2} laser from a relativistic electron beam, creating a pulse of 8.7 keV x rays. The tightly focused, relatively high peak brightness electron beam and high photon density from the 2 J CO_{2} laser yielded 6×10^{7} x-ray photons over the full opening angle in a single shot. Single shot x-ray diffraction is performed by passing the x rays though a vertical slit and on to a flat silicon (111 crystal. 10^{2} diffracted photons were detected. The spectrum of the detected x rays is compared to simulation. The diffraction and detection of 10^{2} x rays is a key step to a more efficient time resolved diagnostic in which the number of observed x rays might reach 10^{4}; enabling a unique, flexible x-ray source as a sub-ps resolution diagnostic for studying the evolution of chemical reactions, lattice deformation and melting, and magnetism.

  13. X-ray and neutron diffraction studies of superionic conductors: protonic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tranqui, D.; Anne, M.

    1982-01-01

    Rapid reviews of X-ray and neutron diffraction theories and instrumentations are presented. It is shown that X-ray diffraction is a very powerful tool to determine three dimensional crystal structures. However localization of light atoms by X-ray is somewhat uncertain in compounds containing heavy atoms. In neutron diffraction the irregular but limited variation of scattering lengths of all elements within the periodic table render it possible to localize almost all atoms, especially hydrogen atoms in solids. Some recent and successful studies of protonic compounds and other by X-ray and neutron diffraction are cited. These examples demonstrate that the combined X-ray and neutron techniques should be used to obtain not only geometrical features of rigid framework in superionic conductor materials but also in an indirect way the dynamic properties of mobile ions. (author)

  14. A conical-type X-ray guide tube for diffraction experiments with small crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroshi; Nakazawa, Hiromoto

    1986-01-01

    The divergence and intensity distribution of X-rays transported through a conical-type X-ray guide tube (XGT) were measured. Diverging X-rays from a point source were condensed by use of the conical-type XGT. The parallelism of X-rays through the XGT was better than that encountered for a cylindrical-type XGT proposed previously. The intensity of the X-ray beam around the central axis of the conical-type XGT was exceedingly high in comparison with that measured without the tube and almost uniform over a cross-sectional area 60 μm in diameter. The high intensity provides the possibility of performing diffraction experiments with crystals as small as 20 μm in diameter with a conventional X-ray diffraction system. (orig.)

  15. A powerful flare from Sgr A* confirms the synchrotron nature of the X-ray emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponti, G.; George, E.; Scaringi, S.; Zhang, S.; Jin, C.; Dexter, J.; Terrier, R.; Clavel, M.; Degenaar, N.; Eisenhauer, F.; Genzel, R.; Gillessen, S.; Goldwurm, A.; Habibi, M.; Haggard, D.; Hailey, C.; Harrison, F.; Merloni, A.; Mori, K.; Nandra, K.; Ott, T.; Pfuhl, O.; Plewa, P. M.; Waisberg, I.

    2017-06-01

    We present the first fully simultaneous fits to the near-infrared (NIR) and X-ray spectral slope (and its evolution) during a very bright flare from Sgr A*, the supermassive black hole at the Milky Way's centre. Our study arises from ambitious multiwavelength monitoring campaigns with XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and SINFONI. The average multiwavelength spectrum is well reproduced by a broken power law with ΓNIR = 1.7 ± 0.1 and ΓX = 2.27 ± 0.12. The difference in spectral slopes (ΔΓ = 0.57 ± 0.09) strongly supports synchrotron emission with a cooling break. The flare starts first in the NIR with a flat and bright NIR spectrum, while X-ray radiation is detected only after about 103 s, when a very steep X-ray spectrum (ΔΓ = 1.8 ± 0.4) is observed. These measurements are consistent with synchrotron emission with a cooling break and they suggest that the high-energy cut-off in the electron distribution (γmax) induces an initial cut-off in the optical-UV band that evolves slowly into the X-ray band. The temporal and spectral evolution observed in all bright X-ray flares are also in line with a slow evolution of γmax. We also observe hints for a variation of the cooling break that might be induced by an evolution of the magnetic field (from B ˜ 30 ± 8 G to B ˜ 4.8 ± 1.7 G at the X-ray peak). Such drop of the magnetic field at the flare peak would be expected if the acceleration mechanism is tapping energy from the magnetic field, such as in magnetic reconnection. We conclude that synchrotron emission with a cooling break is a viable process for Sgr A*'s flaring emission.

  16. On diamond windows for high power synchrotron x-ray beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khounsary, A.M.; Kuzay, T.M.

    1992-01-01

    X-ray windows are often used on the front end of synchrotron beamlines to isolate the ultra high vacuum of the storage ring from the downstream environment. The windows are usually made of low atomic number materials, such as beryllium, for maximum x-ray transmission, and they must survive and remain vacuum tight during repeated thermal cycles. The intense x-ray beams generated by the wigglers and undulators at high energy storage rings can deposit substantial amounts of localized heat in the (actively cooled) windows leading to high temperatures, and vacuum or structural failure. Thermal filters upstream of the windows can be used to reduce the radiation absorbed in the windows. This solution has limitations, however, since a small amount of filtering may still leave an unacceptable amount of heat to be absorbed in the windows, while substantial filtering will absorb a large amount of the useful photons. Recent advances in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technology has made available thin, free-standing polycrystalline diamond films that can be used as the window material on high heat load synchrotron x-ray beamlines. Diamond windows have many advantages that stem from the exceptional thermal, structural, and physical properties of diamond. Numerical simulation indicates that diamond windows offer an attractive alternative to beryllium windows for use on the third generation x-ray synchrotron radiation beamlines. Utilization, design, and fabrication aspects of diamond windows for high heat load x-ray beamlines are discussed, and analytical results are presented to provide a basis for design and testing of such windows

  17. X-ray phase contrast imaging: From synchrotrons to conventional sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olivo, A.; Castelli, E.

    2014-01-01

    Phase-based approaches can revolutionize X-ray imaging and remove its main limitation: poor image contrast arising from low attenuation differences. They exploit the unit decrement of the real part of the refractive index, typically 1000 times larger than the imaginary part driving attenuation. This increases the contrast of all details, and enables the detection of features classically considered 'X-ray invisible'. Following pioneering experiments dating back to the mid-sixties, X-ray phase contrast imaging 'exploded' in the mid-nineties, when third generation synchrotron sources became more widely available. Applications were proposed in fields as diverse as material science, palaeontology, biology, food science, cultural heritage preservation, and many others. Among these applications, medicine has been constantly considered the most important; among medical applications, mammography is arguably the one that attracted most attention. Applications to mammography were pioneered by the SYRMEP (SYnchrotron Radiation for MEdical Physics) group in Trieste, which was already active in the area through a combination of innovative ways to do imaging at synchrotrons and development of novel X-ray detectors. This pioneering phase led to the only clinical experience of phase contrast mammography on human patients, and spawned a number of ideas as to how these advances could be translated into clinical practice.

  18. Synchrotron X-ray adaptative monochromator: study and realization of a prototype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dezoret, D.

    1995-01-01

    This work presents a study of a prototype of a synchrotron X-ray monochromator. The spectral qualities of this optic are sensitive to the heat loads which are particularly important on third synchrotron generation like ESRF. Indeed, powers generated by synchrotron beams can reach few kilowatts and power densities about a few tens watts per square millimeters. The mechanical deformations of the optical elements of the beamlines issue issue of the heat load can damage their spectral efficiencies. In order to compensate the deformations, wa have been studying the transposition of the adaptive astronomical optics technology to the x-ray field. First, we have considered the modifications of the spectral characteristics of a crystal induced by x-rays. We have established the specifications required to a technological realisation. Then, thermomechanical and technological studies have been required to transpose the astronomical technology to an x-ray technology. After these studies, we have begun the realisation of a prototype. This monochromator is composed by a crystal of silicon (111) bonded on a piezo-electric structure. The mechanical control is a loop system composed by a infrared light, a Shack-Hartmann CDD and wave front analyser. This system has to compensate the deformations of the crystal in the 5 kcV to 60 kcV energy range with a power density of 1 watt per square millimeters. (authors)

  19. Measurement of thickness of thin films by the X-ray diffraction method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasan, C.; Balasingh, C.; Singh, A.K.

    1979-07-01

    X-ray diffraction method can be used to measure the thickness of thin films (coatings). The principle and the experimental details of the x-ray diffraction methods are described. The intensities of the diffracted beams are derived assuming a random orientation of the crystallites in the diffracting medium. Consequently, the expressions are not valid when the sample has preferred orientation. To check the performance of the method, thicknesses of nickel deposits on mild steel plates were determined by the x-ray diffraction method and the results compared with those obtained by the weighing method and metallographic examination. The weighing method which gives an accuracy of +- 0.1 micron is taken as the standard. The x-ray diffraction methods and the metallographic examinations give values within +- 1 micron of the value obtained by the weighing method. (author)

  20. Antiferroelectric surface layers in a liquid crystal as observed by synchrotron x-ray scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gramsbergen, E. F.; de Jeu, W. H.; Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage

    1986-01-01

    The X-ray reflectivity form the surface of a liquid crystal with terminally polar (cyano substituted) molecules has been studied using a high-resolution triple-axis X-ray spectrometer in combination with a synchrotron source. It is demonstrated that at the surface of the smectic Al phase a few...... antiferroelectric double layers develop that can be distinguished from the bulk single layer structure. A model is developed that separates the electron density in a contribution from the molecular form factor, and from the structure factor of the mono- and the bilayers, respectively. It shows that (i) the first...

  1. X-ray fluorescence in Member States: Austria. Synchrotron radiation induced TXRF-XANES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meirer, Florian; Wobrauschek, Peter; Streli, Christina; Pepponi, Giancarlo

    2009-01-01

    X ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) analysis was used in combination with Total reflection X ray Fluorescence (TXRF) at different Synchrotron Radiation (SR) facilities to perform elemental analysis and speciation at trace levels. TXRF-XANES was used to perform analysis of contaminations on Silicon wafer surfaces and determine the oxidation state of Fe. Urban aerosols were sampled size fractioned and the oxidation state of Fe was determined for each impactor stage again using TXRF-XANES. The feasibility of XANES analysis at trace element levels using different SR-XRF setups was demonstrated. (author)

  2. Energy Dependence of Synchrotron X-Ray Rims in Tycho's Supernova Remnant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Aaron; Williams, Brian J.; Petre, Robert; Ressler, Sean M.; Reynolds, Stephen P.

    2015-01-01

    Several young supernova remnants exhibit thin X-ray bright rims of synchrotron radiation at their forward shocks. Thin rims require strong magnetic field amplification beyond simple shock compression if rim widths are only limited by electron energy losses. But, magnetic field damping behind the shock could produce similarly thin rims with less extreme field amplification. Variation of rim width with energy may thus discriminate between competing influences on rim widths. We measured rim widths around Tycho's supernova remnant in 5 energy bands using an archival 750 ks Chandra observation. Rims narrow with increasing energy and are well described by either loss-limited or damped scenarios, so X-ray rim width-energy dependence does not uniquely specify a model. But, radio counterparts to thin rims are not loss-limited and better reflect magnetic field structure. Joint radio and X-ray modeling favors magnetic damping in Tycho's SNR with damping lengths approximately 1-5% of remnant radius and magnetic field strengths approximately 50-400 micron G assuming Bohm diffusion. X-ray rim widths are approximately 1% of remnant radius, somewhat smaller than inferred damping lengths. Electron energy losses are important in all models of X-ray rims, suggesting that the distinction between loss-limited and damped models is blurred in soft X-rays. All loss-limited and damping models require magnetic fields approximately greater than 20 micron G, arming the necessity of magnetic field amplification beyond simple compression.

  3. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase from the Thermophilic thermus thermophilus strain HB27

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Sinitsyna, E. V.; Esipov, R. S., E-mail: esipov@mx.ibch.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetases (PRPP synthetases) are among the key enzymes essential for vital functions of organisms and are involved in the biosynthesis of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides, coenzymes, and the amino acids histidine and tryptophan. These enzymes are used in biotechnology for the combined chemoenzymatic synthesis of natural nucleotide analogs. Recombinant phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase I from the thermophilic strain HB27 of the bacterium Thermus thermophilus (T. th HB27) has high thermal stability and shows maximum activity at 75°Ð¡, due to which this enzyme holds promise for biotechnological applications. In order to grow crystals and study them by X-ray crystallography, an enzyme sample, which was produced using a highly efficient producer strain, was purified by affinity and gel-filtration chromatography. The screening of crystallization conditions was performed by the vapor-diffusion technique. The crystals of the enzyme suitable for X-ray diffraction were grown by the counter-diffusion method through a gel layer. These crystals were used to collect the X-ray diffraction data set at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility (Japan) to 3-Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P2{sub 1} and have the following unitcell parameters: a = 107.7 Å, b = 112.6 Å, c = 110.2 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 116.6°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the enzyme at 3.0-Å resolution.

  4. Structure solution from powder neutron and x-ray diffraction data: getting the best of both worlds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, B.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Powder diffraction methods have traditionally been used in three main areas: phase identification and quantification, lattice parameter determination and structure refinement. Until recently structure solution has been the almost exclusive domain of single crystal diffraction methods, predominantly using x-rays. The increasing use of synchrotron and neutron sources, and the unrelenting advances in computing hardware and software means that powder methods are challenging single crystal methods as a practical method for structure solution, especially when single crystal method can not be applied. It is known that structural refinements from a known starting structure using combined X-ray and neutron data sets are capable of providing highly accurate structures. Likewise, using combined x-ray and neutron powder diffraction data in the structure solution process should also be a powerful technique, although to date no one is pursuing this methodology. This paper present examples of solutions to the problem. Namely we are using high resolution powder X-ray and neutron methods to solve the structures of molecular materials and minerals, then refining the structures using both sets of data. In this way we exploit the advantages of both methods while minimising the disadvantages. We present our solution for a small amino acid structure, a metalorganic and a mineral structure

  5. Physical methods for studying minerals and solid materials: X-ray, electron and neutron diffraction; scanning and transmission electron microscopy; X-ray, electron and ion spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eberhart, J.-P.

    1976-01-01

    The following topics are discussed: theoretical aspects of radiation-matter interactions; production and measurement of radiations (X rays, electrons, neutrons); applications of radiation interactions to the study of crystalline materials. The following techniques are presented: X-ray and neutron diffraction, electron microscopy, electron diffraction, X-ray fluorescence analysis, electron probe microanalysis, surface analysis by electron emission spectrometry (ESCA and Auger electrons), scanning electron microscopy, secondary ion emission analysis [fr

  6. Optimizing a synchrotron based x-ray lithography system for IC manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Stephen; Speiser, Kenneth; Thaw, Winston; Heese, Richard N.

    1990-05-01

    The electron storage ring is a realistic solution as a radiation source for production grade, industrial X-ray lithography system. Today several large scale plans are in motion to design and implement synchrotron storage rings of different types for this purpose in the USA and abroad. Most of the scientific and technological problems related to the physics, design and manufacturing engineering, and commissioning of these systems for microlithography have been resolved or are under extensive study. However, investigation on issues connected to application of Synchrotron Orbit Radiation (SOR ) in chip production environment has been somewhat neglected. In this paper we have filled this gap pointing out direct effects of some basic synchrotron design parameters and associated subsystems (injector, X-ray beam line) on the operation and cost of lithography in production. The following factors were considered: synchrotron configuration, injection energy, beam intensity variability, number of beam lines and wafer exposure concept. A cost model has been worked out and applied to three different X-ray Lithography Source (XLS) systems. The results of these applications are compared and conclusions drawn.

  7. Structural Investigations of Nanowires Using X-Ray Diffraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stankevic, Tomas

    Advancements in growth of the nanowire-based devices opened another dimension of possible structures and material combinations, which nd their applications in a wide variety of elds, including everyday life. Characterization of such devices brings its own challenges and here we show that X-rays oer...

  8. (X-ray diffraction experiments with condenser matter)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research on the following topics: high-{Tc} superconductors; The response of crystal to an applied electric field; quasicrystals; surface structure and kinetics of surface layer formation; EXAFS studies of superconductors and heterostructures; effect of iron on the crystal structure of perovskite; x-ray detector development; and SAXS experiments. (LSP)

  9. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xing; Chu Wangsheng; Cai Quan; Xia Dingguo; Wu Zhonghua; Wu Ziyu

    2006-01-01

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L 2,3 edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced

  10. Electronic structure of nanoscale Cu/Pt alloys: A combined X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption investigations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Xing [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Chu Wangsheng [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, 230036 (China); Cai Quan [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, 100864 Beijing (China); Xia Dingguo [College of Environmental and Energy Engineering, Beijing University of Technology, 100022 Beijing (China); Wu Zhonghua [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China); Wu Ziyu [Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Institute of High Energy Physics, CAS, Beijing (China) and National Center for Nanoscience and Technology (China)]. E-mail: wuzy@ihep.ac.cn

    2006-11-15

    PVP-protected Cu/Pt clusters were prepared by glycol/water reduction method and characterized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and absorption spectra. TEM and XRD analysis show that the Cu/Pt clusters with different molar ratio have fcc structure with particle size of about 4 nm, while the lattice parameters in these clusters reduce with increasing Cu concentration. From the X-ray absorption near edge structure (XANES) at Cu-K edge and Pt-L{sub 2,3} edge, we demonstrate that the d-electronic states of Cu and Pt are affected by the local environment as a function of Cu/Pt molar ratio. With increasing Cu concentration, Pt loses a fraction of 5d electrons and the hybridization between p- and d-states at Cu sites is enhanced.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray Analytical Techniques for Studying Materials Electrochemistry in Rechargeable Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Feng; Liu, Yijin; Yu, Xiqian; Cheng, Lei; Singer, Andrej; Shpyrko, Oleg G; Xin, Huolin L; Tamura, Nobumichi; Tian, Chixia; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Yang, Xiao-Qing; Meng, Ying Shirley; Nordlund, Dennis; Yang, Wanli; Doeff, Marca M

    2017-11-08

    Rechargeable battery technologies have ignited major breakthroughs in contemporary society, including but not limited to revolutions in transportation, electronics, and grid energy storage. The remarkable development of rechargeable batteries is largely attributed to in-depth efforts to improve battery electrode and electrolyte materials. There are, however, still intimidating challenges of lower cost, longer cycle and calendar life, higher energy density, and better safety for large scale energy storage and vehicular applications. Further progress with rechargeable batteries may require new chemistries (lithium ion batteries and beyond) and better understanding of materials electrochemistry in the various battery technologies. In the past decade, advancement of battery materials has been complemented by new analytical techniques that are capable of probing battery chemistries at various length and time scales. Synchrotron X-ray techniques stand out as one of the most effective methods that allow for nearly nondestructive probing of materials characteristics such as electronic and geometric structures with various depth sensitivities through spectroscopy, scattering, and imaging capabilities. This article begins with the discussion of various rechargeable batteries and associated important scientific questions in the field, followed by a review of synchrotron X-ray based analytical tools (scattering, spectroscopy, and imaging) and their successful applications (ex situ, in situ, and in operando) in gaining fundamental insights into these scientific questions. Furthermore, electron microscopy and spectroscopy complement the detection length scales of synchrotron X-ray tools and are also discussed toward the end. We highlight the importance of studying battery materials by combining analytical techniques with complementary length sensitivities, such as the combination of X-ray absorption spectroscopy and electron spectroscopy with spatial resolution, because a sole

  12. Microfocussing of synchrotron X-rays using X-ray refractive lens developed at Indus-2 deep X-ray lithography beamline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhamgaye, V.P.; Tiwari, M.K.; Lodha, G.S.; Sawhney, K.J.S.

    2014-01-01

    X-ray lenses are fabricated in polymethyl methacrylate using deep X-ray lithography beamline of Indus-2. The focussing performance of these lenses is evaluated using Indus-2 and Diamond Light Source Ltd. The process steps for the fabrication of X-ray lenses and microfocussing at 10 keV at moderate and low emittance sources are compared. (author)

  13. X-ray Diffraction Crystal Calibration and Characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haugh, Michael J.; Stewart, Richard; Kugland, Nathan

    2009-01-01

    National Security Technologies X-ray Laboratory is comprised of a multi-anode Manson type source and a Henke type source that incorporates a dual goniometer and XYZ translation stage. The first goniometer is used to isolate a particular spectral band. The Manson operates up to 10 kV and the Henke up to 20 kV. The Henke rotation stages and translation stages are automated. Procedures have been developed to characterize and calibrate various NIF diagnostics and their components. The diagnostics include X-ray cameras, gated imagers, streak cameras, and other X-ray imaging systems. Components that have been analyzed include filters, filter arrays, grazing incidence mirrors, and various crystals, both flat and curved. Recent efforts on the Henke system are aimed at characterizing and calibrating imaging crystals and curved crystals used as the major component of an X-ray spectrometer. The presentation will concentrate on these results. The work has been done at energies ranging from 3 keV to 16 keV. The major goal was to evaluate the performance quality of the crystal for its intended application. For the imaging crystals we measured the laser beam reflection offset from the X-ray beam and the reflectivity curves. For the curved spectrometer crystal, which was a natural crystal, resolving power was critical. It was first necessary to find sources of crystals that had sufficiently narrow reflectivity curves. It was then necessary to determine which crystals retained their resolving power after being thinned and glued to a curved substrate

  14. Interaction between lipid monolayers and poloxamer 188: An X-ray reflectivity and diffraction study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, G.H.; Majewski, J.; Ege, C.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism by which poloxamer 188 (P188) seals a damaged cell membrane is examined using the lipid monolayer as a model system. X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction results show that at low nominal lipid density, P188, by physically occupying the available area and phase ...

  15. X-ray diffraction studies of NbTe2 single crystal

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    X-ray (EDAX) and remaining structural characterization was also accomplished by X-ray diffraction (XRD) studies. Lattice parameters, volume and ... The layered structure compound, NbTe2, is one of the typical materials which lead to charge .... financial assistance to carry out this work. References. Brown B E 1966 Acta ...

  16. Microprocessor-based system for automatic X-ray diffraction and fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, A.M. de; Carmo, L.C.S. do; Pereira, V.J.E.; Soares, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    A data acquisition and processing device appropriate for X-ray analysis and goniometer control was built. The Z-80 based system as well as the whole architeture is described. The advantages and new possibilities of the automated instrument as compared to the traditional ones are listed. The X-ray diffraction and fluorescence techniques can take advantage of the automation. (Author) [pt

  17. Modern X-ray diffraction. X-ray diffractometry for materials scientists, physicists, and chemicists. 2. rev. and enl. ed.; Moderne Roentgenbeugung. Roentgendiffraktometrie fuer Materialwissenschaftler, Physiker und Chemiker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spiess, Lothar; Teichert, Gerd; Schwarzer, Robert; Behnken, Herfried; Genzel, Christoph

    2009-07-01

    This book offers a comprehensive survey over the applications of X-ray diffractions in fields like materials technique, metallurgy, electrotechniques, mechanical engineering, as well as micro- and nanotechniques. The necessary baic knowledges of X-ray diffraction are mediated foundedly and illustratively. Thereby new techniques and evaluation procedures are presented as well as well known methods.

  18. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase from Candida albicans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Daisuke; Nishitani, Yuichi; Nonaka, Tsuyoshi; Kita, Akiko; Fukami, Takaaki A.; Mio, Toshiyuki; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Yamada-Okabe, Toshiko; Miki, Kunio

    2006-01-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase was purified and crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP) is an essential enzyme in the synthesis of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine. UAP from Candida albicans was purified and crystallized by the sitting-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals of the substrate and product complexes both diffract X-rays to beyond 2.3 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystals of the substrate complex belong to the triclinic space group P1, with unit-cell parameters a = 47.77, b = 62.89, c = 90.60 Å, α = 90.01, β = 97.72, γ = 92.88°, whereas those of the product complex belong to the orthorhombic space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 61.95, b = 90.87, c = 94.88 Å

  19. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction study of recombinant ribokinase from Thermus Species 2.9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramchik, Yu. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Timofeev, V. I., E-mail: tostars@mail.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics,” (Russian Federation); Muravieva, T. I.; Esipov, R. S., E-mail: espiov@mx.ibch.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shemyakin–Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry (Russian Federation); Kuranova, I. P., E-mail: inna@ns.crys.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics,” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    Ribokinase from a thermophilic strain of Thermus species 2.9 belonging to the carbohydrate ribokinase family (EC 2.7.1.15) was isolated, purified, and crystallized. The crystallization conditions were found by the vapor-diffusion technique and were then optimized to apply the capillary counter-diffusion technique. The X-ray diffraction data set was collected from the crystals, which were grown by the counter-diffusion technique, at the SPring-8 synchrotron radiation facility to 2.87 Å resolution. The crystals belong to sp. gr. P12{sub 1}1 and have the following unit-cell parameters: a = 81.613 Å, b = 156.132 Å, c = 87.714 Å, α = γ = 90°, β = 103.819°. The X-ray diffraction data set is suitable for determining the three-dimensional structure of the protein by the molecular-replacement method.

  20. Exploring the behavior of molybdenum diboride (MoB2): A high pressure x-ray diffraction study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Pingping; Peng, Fang; Yin, Shuai; Liu, Fangming; Wang, Qiming; Zhu, Xuhui; Wang, Pei; He, Duanwei; Liu, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Investigation of the equation of state of molybdenum diboride (MoB 2 ) has been performed to 24.1 GPa using synchrotron radiation angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction techniques (ADXRD) in a diamond anvil cell (DAC) at room temperature. Rietveld refinement of the X-ray powder diffraction data reveals that the rhombohedral structure MoB 2 is stable up to 24.1 GPa. The ADXRD data yield a bulk modulus K 0  = 314(11) GPa with a pressure derivative K 0 ′  = 6.4(1.5). The experimental data are discussed and compared to the results of first-principles calculations. In addition, the compressibility of the unit cell axes (a and c axes) of MoB 2 demonstrates an anisotropic property with pressure increasing