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Sample records for synchrotron light laboratory

  1. The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, 20 years of synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-08-01

    The Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) is now operating as a fully dedicated light source with low emittance electron optics, delivering high brightness photon beams to 25 experimental stations six to seven months per year. On October 1, 1993 SSRL became a Division of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, rather than an Independent Laboratory of Stanford University, so that high energy physics and synchrotron radiation now function under a single DOE contract. The SSRL division of SLAC has responsibility for operating, maintaining and improving the SPEAR accelerator complex, which includes the storage ring and a 3 GeV injector. SSRL has thirteen x-ray stations and twelve VUV/Soft x-ray stations serving its 600 users. Recently opened to users is a new spherical grating monochromator (SGM) and a multiundulator beam line. Circularly polarized capabilities are being exploited on a second SGM line. New YB 66 crystals installed in a vacuum double-crystal monochromator line have sparked new interest for Al and Mg edge studies. One of the most heavily subscribed stations is the rotation camera, which has been recently enhanced with a MAR imaging plate detector system for protein crystallography on a multipole wiggler. Under construction is a new wiggler-based structural molecular biology beam line with experimental stations for crystallography, small angle scattering and x-ray absorption spectroscopy. Plans for new developments include wiggler beam lines and associated facilities specialized for environmental research and materials processing

  2. Light source for synchrotron radiation x-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Jiyong; Jiang Jianhua; Tian Yulian

    1992-01-01

    Characteristics of the synchrotron radiation source for X-ray topography study at Beijing Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (BSRL) is described, local geometrical resolution of topographies is discussed, and the diffracting intensities of white beam topography is given

  3. Synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-01-01

    'Synchrotron Light' is an interactive and detailed introduction to the physics and technology of the generation of coherent radiation from accelerators as well as to its widespread high-tech applications in science, medicine and engineering. The topics covered are the interaction of light and matter, the technology of synchrotron light sources, spectroscopy, imaging, scattering and diffraction of X-rays, and applications to materials science, biology, biochemistry, medicine, chemistry, food and pharmaceutical technology. All synchrotron light facilities are introduced with their home-page addresses. 'Synchrotron Light' provides an instructive and comprehensive multimedia learning tool for students, experienced practitioners and novices wishing to apply synchrotron radiation in their future work. Its multiple-entry points permit an easy exploration of the CD-Rom according to the users knowledge and interest. 2-D and 3-D animations and virtual reconstruction with computer-generated images guide visitors into the scientific and technical world of a synchrotron and into the applications of synchrotron radiation. This bilingual (English and French) CD-Rom can be used for self-teaching and in courses at various levels in physics, chemistry, engineering, and biology. (author)

  4. LNLS - Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory Activity Report 2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    This activity report highlight the activities as follows: atomic local order of hafnium and silicon in dielectric films; development of bio absorbent for arsenite; insights into enzyme-substrate interaction; investigation of metastable phases in zirconia-ceria nano-ceramics by synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction; lattice distortion effects on magneto-structural phase transition of Mn As; mechanism of orbital ordering in transition-metal oxides; organic molecules in star-forming regions; spatially ordered In P dots grown on compositionally modulated In Ga P layers; structural insights into {beta}-Xylosidase from Trichoderma reesei, and surface random alloys studied by synchrotron based photoelectron diffraction.

  5. Dazzling new light source opens at Stanford synchrotron radiation laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    SPEAR3, the Stanford Positron Electron Asymmetric Ring, was formally opened at a dedication ceremony at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center on Jan. 29. It incorporates the latest technology to make it competitive with the best synchrotron sources in the world (1/2 page)

  6. Synchrotron light beam and a synchrotron light experiment facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Masami

    1980-01-01

    In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, about two years ago, the requirements of synchrotron light beam in respective measuring instruments were discussed. Then, also the arrangement (lattice) of a storage ring, the nature of synchrotron light beam, a synchrotron light experiment facility and the arrangement of the beam lines were studied. During the period of two years since then, due to the changes in the circumstances, the design of the lattice was altered. Accordingly, the arrangement of the beam lines and of measuring instruments were largely changed. At this point, the results of discussions in various meetings are described, though they may still be subject to future changes, with due consideration to beam, environment and beam lines required for the design of the measuring instruments: (1) storage ring and synchrotron light beam, (2) requirements on small beam size and beam stability, (3) a synchrotron light experiment facility. (J.P.N.)

  7. New Perspectives for Advanced Science at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tolentino, Helio C.N.

    2003-01-01

    The LNLS (Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron) is a national laboratory in Brazil that operates a 1.37 GeV storage ring for synchrotron light users since July 1997. Eleven bending magnet beamlines are open to a wide range of possibilities for research in ultra-violet and X-ray spectroscopy, single crystal and powder diffraction, magnetic and anomalous scattering, protein crystallography, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray lithography and small angle X-ray scattering. The recent conclusion of the booster injector opened the way for insertion devices to be accommodated in the four straight sections available. A multipolar wiggler, for protein crystallography using the MAD technique, is the first planned to be installed during 2003. The construction of the first LNLS undulator, for the vaccum ultra-violet and soft X-ray domain, has already started and will expand the possibilities in atomic, molecular and surface physics, as well as in catalysis and magnetism. LNLS has expanded its infra-structure as an open multidisciplinary research laboratory into complementary areas, such as electron and scanning probe microscopy, nanostructure synthesis and molecular biology. Many technological and scientific achievements have been attained in these last five years. Some of them will be highlighted here, with emphasis in the area of nanostructured and magnetic materials

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1991-04-01

    This report discussion research being conducted at the National Synchrotron light source. In particular, this report contains operations summaries; symposia, workshops, and projects; NSLS highlights; and abstracts of science at the NSLS

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source comprises two high intensity electron storage rings for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength domain (700 MeV e - ring) and in the x-ray wavelength domain (2.5 GeV e - ring). A description is presented of the basic facility and the characteristics of the synchrotron radiation sources. The present plans for specific beam lines will be enumerated and the planned use of beam wigglers and undulators will be discussed

  10. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is being planned as a national user facility for the production of high-brightness and partially coherent x-ray and ultraviolet synchrotron radiation. The ALS is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV with insertion devices in 11 long straight sections and up to 48 bend-magnet ports. High-brightness photon beams, from less than 10 eV to more than 1 keV, will be produced by undulators, thereby providing many research opportunities in materials and surface science, biology, atomic physics and chemistry. Wigglers and bend magnets will provide high-flux, broad-band radiation at energies to 10 keV. 6 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs

  11. Vacuum system of Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) linear accelerator: project and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rocha, L.R.B.; Gomes, P.A.P.

    1990-01-01

    The LINAC, electron linear accelerator used as injector for storage ring in production of synchrotron radiation at Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron (LNLS) is described. The LINAC basic parameters, the dimension calculations of vacuum system and the final project with all components are presented. The vacuum system for electron gun tests and accelerator structure tests is described. (M.C.K.)

  12. Synchrotron light source data book

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''Synchrotron Light Source Data Book'' is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-ray Data Booklet, edited by D. Vaughan (LBL PUB-490), address the 'use' of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in 'practical units' and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices

  13. The Advanced Light Source: A new 1.5 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, F.

    1990-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), presently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, will be the world's brightest synchrotron-radiation source of ultraviolet and soft x-ray photons when it opens its doors to users in April 1993. The ALS is a third-generation source that is based on a low-emittance electron storage ring, optimized for operation at 1.5 GeV, with long straight sections for insertion devices. Its naturally short pulses are ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will produce high-brightness beams from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wigglers will produce high fluxes of harder x-rays to energies above 10 keV. The ALS will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy). Biological applications will include x-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity in the water window of the spectrum where water is much more transparent than protein. The ALS will be an excellent research tool for atomic physics and chemistry because the high flux will allow measurements to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Undulator radiation can excite the K shell of elements up to silicon and the L shell of elements up to krypton, and wiggler radiation can excite the L shell of nearly every element. The ALS will operate as a national user facility; interested scientists are encouraged to contact the ALS Scientific Program Coordinator to explore their scientific and technological research interests

  14. Development of an x-ray fluorescence microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory: Early results: Comparison with data from other techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, J.V.; Rivers, M.L.; Sutton, S.R.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.; Gordon, B.M.

    1986-01-01

    Theoretical predictions for the detection levels in x-ray fluorescence analysis with a synchrotron storage ring are being achieved experimentally at several laboratories. This paper is deliberately restricted to the state of development of the Brookhaven National Laboratory/University of Chicago instruments. Analyses at the parts per million (ppM) level are being made using white light apertured to 20 μm and an energy dispersive system. This system is particularly useful for elements with Z > 20 in materials dominated by elements with Z < 20. Diffraction causes an interference for crystalline materials. Development of a focusing microprobe for tunable monochromatic x-rays and a wavelength dispersive spectrometer (WDS) is delayed by problems in shaping an 8:1 focusing mirror to the required accuracy. Reconnaissance analyses with a wiggler source on the CHESS synchrotron have been made in the K spectrum up to Z = 80

  15. The synchrotron light source ROSY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einfeld, D.; Buettig, H.; Dienel, S.; Glaeser, W.; Goetz, T.; Guratzsch, H.; Hartmann, B.; Janssen, D.; Krug, H.; Linnemann, J.; Matz, W.; Murphy, J.B.; Neumann, W.; Oehme, W.; Picard, M.; Plesko, M.; Proehl, D.; Schlenk, R.; Tomassini, D.; Tyrroff, H.

    1994-01-01

    ROSY, a 3rd generation synchrotron light source, has been proposed to be built at the Research Center Rossendorf/Dresden in Germany. With its low emittance and optimized space for installing insertion devices ROSY will be the first synchrotron radiation source in the 3 GeV range in Europe, dedicated to materials research and industrial application. The critical wavelength of the synchrotron radiation spectra was designed to be 0.15 nm corresponding to a critical photon energy of 8.4 keV. It is proposed to use a ''modified multiple bend achromat'' (MBA) lattice in order to get a compact machine as well as a low emittance. For 3 GeV an emittance smaller than 30π nm rad can be obtained. With a fourfold symmetry and two larger straight sections within the achromatic arcs the circumference is 148 m. 23% of the circumference can be used for installing insertion devices. (orig.)

  16. Australian synchrotron light source - (boomerang)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.

    2001-01-01

    The Australian National Synchrotron Light Source - (Boomerang) is to be installed at the Monash University in Victoria. This report provides some background to the proposed facility and discusses aspects of a prospective design. Recently, significant effort was devoted to refining the in principle design and a lattice providing an emittance od 18 nm rad was obtained with a distributed dispersion in the straight section of 0.29m. Exhaustive studies have been made of the economic benefits that would accrue to Australia to Australia following the installation of this facility. This design is a refinement of the design concept presented to the SRI -2000, Berlin (Boldeman, Einfeld et al), to the meeting of the 4th Asian Forum and the Preliminary Design Study presented to the Australian Synchrotron Research Program

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source: vacuum system for National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schuchman, J.C.; Godel, J.B.; Jordan, W.; Oversluizen, T.

    1978-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a 24 million dollar project under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is a research facility dedicated to the production of synchrotron radiation. Synchrotron radiation is that radiation produced by the acceleration of charged particles at near the speed of light. This facility will provide a continuous spectrum of radiation from the vacuum ultraviolet to the hard x-ray range. The radiation will be highly intense, 100% polarized, extremely well collimated and will have a pulsed time structure. The radiation will be produced in two electron storage rings at energies of 700 MeV and 2.5 GeV, respectively. A maximum of one ampere at 2 GeV, or one-half ampere at 2.5 GeV, of electron beam will be stored

  18. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Light Source (SSRL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The SSRL at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory was built in 1974 to take and use for synchrotron studies the intense x-ray beams from the SPEAR storage ring that...

  19. National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation: technologic potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, C.E.T.G. da; Rodrigues, A.R.D.

    1987-01-01

    The technological or industrial developments based on the accumulated experience by research group of condensed matter physics, in Brazil, are described. The potential of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation for personnel training, absorption and adaptation of economically important technologies for Brazil, is presented. Examples of cooperations between the Laboratory and some national interprises, and some industrial applications of the synchrotron radiation are done. (M.C.K.) [pt

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    This report discusses the experiment done at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Most experiments discussed involves the use of the x-ray beams to study physical properties of solid materials. (LSP)

  1. Synchrotron light sources in developing countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mtingwa, Sekazi K.; Winick, Herman

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the role that synchrotron light sources, such as SESAME, could play in improving the socioeconomic conditions in developing countries. After providing a brief description of a synchrotron light source, we discuss the important role that they played in the development of several economically emerging countries. Then we describe the state of synchrotron science in South Africa and that country’s leadership role in founding the African Light Source initiative. Next, we highlight a new initiative called Lightsources for Africa, the Americas & Middle East Project, which is a global initiative led by the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and the International Union of Crystallography, with initial funding provided by the International Council for Science. Finally, we comment on a new technology called the multibend achromat that has launched a new paradigm for the design of synchrotron light sources that should be attractive for construction in developing countries.

  2. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-11-01

    After moved from Tanashi to Kashiwa Campus in the spring of 2000, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the High-brilliance Light Source project, Super SOR project, in cooperation with the nationwide user group as well as with the users of the University of Tokyo. In May of 2001, the project has met with a dramatic progress. The Ministry of Education, Science, Sports and Culture organized the Advisory Board and started to discuss the future synchrotron radiation facilities in EUV and SX regime in Japan. Based on extensive discussion, they proposed the new facility consisting of a 1.8 GeV storage ring of 3rd generation type. The University of Tokyo approved to construct the proposed facility in the Kashiwa campus. The plan is supported not only by researchers in academic institutions but also bio- and chemical-industries. We strongly hope the plan will be realized in near future. On the other hand, SRL maintains a branch laboratory in the Photon Factory (PF) High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) at Tsukuba with a Revolver undulator, two beamlines and three experimental stations (BL-18A, 19A and 19B), which are and fully opened to the outside users. In the fiscal year of 2001, the operation time of the beamlines was more than 5000 hours and the number of the users was about 200. The main scientific interests and activities in the SRL at KEK-PF are directed to the electronic structures of new materials with new transport, magnetic and optical properties. The electronic structures of solid surfaces and interfaces are also intensively studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron microscopy. The accelerator group of SRL is carrying out research works of the accelerator physics and developing the accelerator-related technology, many parts of which will be directly applied to the new light source project. This report contains the activities of the staff members of SRL and users of the three beamlines in FY2001. The status of

  3. Activity report of Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 2005

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-11-01

    Since 1980s, the Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SRL) has been promoting the 'Super-SOR' project, the new synchrotron radiation facility dedicated to sciences in vacuum ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions. The University of Tokyo considered the project as one of the most important future academic plans and strongly endorsed to construct the new facility with an electron storage ring of third generation type in the Kashiwa campus. During last year, the design of the accelerator system was slightly modified to obtain stronger support of the people in the field of bio-sciences, such as medicine, pharmacy, agriculture, etc. The energy of the storage ring was increased to 2.4 GeV, which is determined to obtain undulator radiation with sufficient brightness in X-ray region for the protein crystallography experiments. The value was also optimised to avoid considerable degradation of undulator radiation in the VUV and soft X-ray regions. However, in October last year, the president office of the University found out that the promotion of the project was very difficult for financial reasons. The budget for the new facility project is too big to be supported by a single university. The decision was intensively discussed by the International Review Committee on the Institute for Solid State Physics (ISSP), which was held at ISSP from November 14 to 16. The committee understood that the restructuring of the University system in Japan would overstrain the financial resources of the University of Tokyo and accepted the decision by the University. Presently, SRL has inclined to install beamlines using undulator radiation in other SR facilities instead of constructing a facility with a light source accelerator. At new beamlines, SRL will promote advanced materials sciences utilizing high brilliance and small emittance of synchrotron radiation which have been considered in the Super-SOR project. They are those such as microscopy and time-resolved experiments, which will only be

  4. Synchrotron environmental laboratory (SUL) at Anka

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denecke, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    A research facility dedicated to environmental/geochemical research, the Synchrotron Environmental Laboratory (SUL), is planned to be installed and operated at ANKA. ANKA is the new synchrotron facility at the Research Centre Karlsruhe (FZK), Karlsruhe, Germany. ANKA is now in commissioning and planning operations for the fall of 2000. As the Institute for Nuclear Waste Disposal (INE) at FZK conducts a vigorous synchrotron-based research programme, INE was instrumental in the original impetus for installing such a facility at ANKA. These research activities at INE concentrate on actinide speciation in nuclear waste forms, geological media and geochemical model systems. In order for INE to direct their synchrotron research activities to ANKA, equipment and licensing required for performing experiments on actinide-containing samples is required. One great advantage of performing experiments on actinide-containing samples at ANKA is that the INE radiological laboratories lie in the near vicinity of the facility. This will minimise transport hazards and costs and allow experiments to be performed on samples whose characteristics may change with time. Experiments on radioactive samples with activities below the exemption level, according to German regulations, will be possible at ANKA at the start of operations. Licensing for work on higher levels of activity will be applied for in the future. The decades of experience in radiological work at FZK will facilitate development of procedure and equipment as prerequisites to licensing. A consortium of synchrotron radiation-user groups with environmental research interests has specified their requirements and needs for this facility. This scientific case serves as the foundation for the SUL design and is the basis for an application for federal funding. The SUL design reflects the heterogeneity and complexity of challenges facing researchers in the environmental/geochemical sciences. X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS

  5. Research using synchrotron radiation at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1982-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is now becoming operational with synchrotron radiation experiments beginning on the 700 MeV VUV electron storage ring. Commissioning of the 2.5 GeV x-ray storage ring has also begun with the experimental program expected to begin in 1983. The current status of the experimental program and instrumentation and the plans for future developments, will be discussed. Although some early results have been obtained on VUV beam lines no attempt will be made in this paper to describe them. Instead, an overview of the beam line characteristics will be given, with an indication of those already operational. In the oral presentation some initial experimental results will be discussed

  6. Synchrotron light and its uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewett, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    It was known for a century that charged particles radiate when accelerated and that relativistic electrons in the energy range between 100 MeV and several GeV and constrained to travel in circular orbits emit concentrated, intense beams with broad continuous spectra that can cover the electromagnetic spectrum from infrared through hard x-rays. Recently the possible applications of this radiation were appreciated and electron synchrotrons and electron storage rings are now being used in many centers for studies of the properties of matter in the solid, liquid and gaseous states. 10 references

  7. Proposal for a national synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blewett, J.P.

    1977-02-01

    Since 1971 discussions have been held at Brookhaven National Laboratory on the desirability of construction of a storage ring which would be used exclusively for production of intense beams of photons with wavelengths in the ultraviolet and X-ray ranges. A proposal is given which discusses in detail the machine, its characteristics, and its expected uses. The proposal includes: (1) characteristics of synchrotron radiation; (2) scientific justification for a synchrotron radiation facility; (3) facility design; (4) wiggler magnets; (5) experimental facilities; (6) buildings and utilities; (7) construction schedules, costs, and manpower; and (8) environmental assessment

  8. Ideas for future synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.; Hassenzahl, W.; Meddahi, M.

    1992-03-01

    Synchrotron light sources have advanced in the past two-to-three decades through three ''generations,'' from irritating parasitic sources on high-energy physics accelerators to dedicated electron and position storage rings of unprecedented low emittance, utilizing undulator and wiggler magnets. The evolution through these three generations followed a predicable, science-driven, course towards brighter beams of VUV- and x-radiation. The requirements of future light sources is not so clear. The limit on how emittance has certainly not been reached, and diffraction-limited sources at shorter wavelengths would be the natural progression from previous generations. However, scientists are now looking at other radiation characteristics that might better serve their needs, for example, more coherent power, fast switching polarization, ultra-short (sub-picosecond) time structure, and synchronized beams for pump-probe experiments. This paper discusses some current ideas that might drive the fourth-generation synchrotron light source

  9. National synchrotron light source medical personnel protection interlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buda, S.; Gmur, N.F.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1998-01-01

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated

  10. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE MEDICAL PERSONNEL PROTECTION INTERLOCK

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BUDA,S.; GMUR,N.F.; LARSON,R.; THOMLINSON,W.

    1998-11-03

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated.

  11. Current schemes for National Synchrotron Light Source UV beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.P.; Howells, M.R.; McKinney, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    We describe in some detail four beamlines proposed for the National Synchrotron Light Source uv ring at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Three grazing-incidence instruments, one of the plane grating Mijake type and two with toroidal gratings at grazing angles of 2-1/2 0 and 15 0 are described. Two normal incidence instruments, one using the source as entrance slit and accepting 75 milliradians horizontally are also discussed. In each case we have estimated the output fluxes expected from such beamlines

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasta, K.

    2009-01-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R and D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source 2008 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nasta,K.

    2009-05-01

    Funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a national user facility that operates two electron storage rings: X-Ray (2.8 GeV, 300 mA) and Vacuum Ultraviolet (VUV) (800 mev, 1.0A). These two rings provide intense light spanning the electromagnetic spectrum -- from very long infrared rays to ultraviolet light and super-short x-rays -- to analyze very small or highly dilute samples. The properties of this light, and the specially designed experimental stations, called beamlines, allow scientists in many diverse disciplines of research to perform experiments not possible at their own laboratories. Each year, about 2,200 scientists from more than 400 universities and companies use the NSLS for research in such diverse fields as biology, physics, chemistry, geology, medicine, and environmental and materials sciences. For example, researchers have used the NSLS to examine the minute details of computer chips, decipher the structures of viruses, probe the density of bone, determine the chemical composition of moon rocks, and reveal countless other mysteries of science. The facility has 65 operating beamlines, with 51 beamlines on the X-Ray Ring and 14 beamlines on the VUV-Infrared Ring. It runs seven days a week, 24 hours a day throughout the year, except during periods of maintenance and studies. Researchers are not charged for beam time, provided that the research results are published in open literature. Proprietary research is conducted on a full-cost-recovery basis. With close to 1,000 publications per year, the NSLS is one of the most prolific scientific facilities in the world. Among the many accolades given to its users and staff, the NSLS has won nine R&D 100 Awards for innovations ranging from a closed orbit feedback system to the first device able to focus a large spread of high-energy x-rays. In addition, a visiting NSLS researcher shared the 2003 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for

  14. Electron beam spectrum monitor using synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reagan, D.; Hostetler, T.E.

    1979-03-01

    This instrument shows the positions, widths, and shapes of momentum spectra of SLAC beams. It uses synchrotron light produced when the beam is deflected by a magnet. Some of the light is focused on the face of an image splitter consisting of acrylic light pipes. The light pipes illuminate twelve photomultiplier tubes. Pulses from the PM tubes are integrated, multiplexed, and displayed on an oscilloscope. The resolution of the instrument is usually better than 0.2%. It has some advantages over the secondary emitter foil spectrum monitors (SEM's) currently in use at SLAC. It need never be put out of service to avoid disturbing the beam. It is as sensitive as the most sensitive SLAC SEM. (Its performance has been optimized for high-current beams; it can easily be made much more sensitive.) It provides information on a pulse-to-pulse basis and, with better cables, could indicate electron beam pulse shapes

  15. The Synchrotron Topography Project (STP) at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilello, J.C.; Hmelo, A.B.; Liu, J.M.; Herley, P.J.; Chen, H.; Birnbaum, H.K.; Illinois Univ., Urbana; Green, R.E. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The collaborators have participated in the Synchrotron Topography Project (STP) which has designed and developed instrumentation for an X-ray topography station at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The two principle instruments constructed consist of a White Beam Camera (WBC) and a Multiple Crystal Camera (MCC) with high planar collimation and wide area image coverage. It is possible to perform in situ studies in a versatile environmental chamber equipped with a miniature mechanical testing stage for both the WBC and MCC systems. Real-time video imaging plus a rapid feed cassette holder for high resolution photographic plates is available for recording topographs. Provisions are made for other types of photon detection as well as spectroscopy. The facilities for the entire station have been designed for remote operation using a LSI-11/23 plus suitable interfacing. These instruments will be described briefly and the current status of the program will be reviewed. (orig.)

  16. High resolution synchrotron light analysis at ELSA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Switka, Michael; Zander, Sven; Hillert, Wolfgang [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Elektronen-Stretcher Anlage ELSA-Facility (ELSA)

    2013-07-01

    The pulse stretcher ring ELSA provides polarized electrons with energies up to 3.5 GeV for external hadron experiments. In order to suffice the need of stored beam intensities towards 200 mA, advanced beam instability studies need to be carried out. An external diagnostic beamline for synchrotron light analysis has been set up and provides the space for multiple diagnostic tools including a streak camera with time resolution of <1 ps. Beam profile measurements are expected to identify instabilities and reveal their thresholds. The effect of adequate countermeasures is subject to analysis. The current status of the beamline development is presented.

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K.J.

    2010-01-01

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of electricity or hydrogen; (3

  18. National Synchrotron Light Source 2010 Activity Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.; Snyder, K. J.

    2010-12-29

    This is a very exciting period for photon sciences at Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is also a time of unprecedented growth for the Photon Sciences Directorate, which operates the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) and is constructing NSLS-II, both funded by the Department of Energy's Office of Science. Reflecting the quick pace of our activities, we chose the theme 'Discovery at Light Speed' for the directorate's 2010 annual report, a fiscal year bookended by October 2009 and September 2010. The year began with the news that NSLS users Venki Ramakrishnan of Cambridge University (also a former employee in Brookhaven's biology department) and Thomas A. Steitz of Yale University were sharing the 2009 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Ada E. Yonath of the Weizmann Institute of Science. Every research project has the potential for accolades. In 2010, NSLS users and staff published close to 900 papers, with about 170 appearing in premiere journals. Those are impressive stats for a facility nearly three decades old, testament to the highly dedicated team keeping NSLS at peak performance and the high quality of its user community. Our NSLS users come from a worldwide community of scientists using photons, or light, to carry out research in energy and environmental sciences, physics, materials science, chemistry, biology and medicine. All are looking forward to the new capabilities enabled by NSLS-II, which will offer unprecedented resolution at the nanoscale. The new facility will produce x-rays more than 10,000 times brighter than the current NSLS and host a suite of sophisticated instruments for cutting-edge science. Some of the scientific discoveries we anticipate at NSLS-II will lead to major advances in alternative energy technologies, such as hydrogen and solar. These discoveries could pave the way to: (1) catalysts that split water with sunlight for hydrogen production; (2) materials that can reversibly store large quantities of

  19. Industrial research enhancement program at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jun; Nasta, Kathleen; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-01-01

    Industrial research has attracted more and more attention recently at synchrotron facilities. Bringing the state-of-the-art research capabilities provided by these facilities to the industrial user community will help this community to improve their products and processing methods, to foster competition and build the economy. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) has a long and celebrated history in research partnerships with industry since its inception more than 25 years ago, and both industry and the facility have benefited tremendously from these partnerships. Over the years, the ways in which industrial research is conducted at synchrotron facilities have evolved significantly, and a new paradigm of collaboration between industry and facilities is clearly needed to address this changing situation. In this presentation, the discussion will focus on an enhancement plan recently implemented at the NSLS to address industrial users' concerns and needs. The goal of NSLS Industrial Program Enhancement plan is to encourage greater use of synchrotron tools by industry researchers, improve access to NSLS beamlines by industrial researchers and facilitate research collaborations between industrial researchers and NSLS staff as well as researchers from university and government laboratories. Examples of recent developments in these areas will be presented.

  20. Ferroelectrics under the Synchrotron Light: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Cobas, Luis E.; Montero-Cabrera, María E.; Pardo, Lorena; Fuentes-Montero, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Currently, an intensive search for high-performance lead-free ferroelectric materials is taking place. ABO3 perovskites (A = Ba, Bi, Ca, K and Na; B = Fe, Nb, Ti, and Zr) appear as promising candidates. Understanding the structure–function relationship is mandatory, and, in this field, the roles of long- and short-range crystal orders and interactions are decisive. In this review, recent advances in the global and local characterization of ferroelectric materials by synchrotron light diffraction, scattering and absorption are analyzed. Single- and poly-crystal synchrotron diffraction studies allow high-resolution investigations regarding the long-range average position of ions and subtle global symmetry break-downs. Ferroelectric materials, under the action of electric fields, undergo crystal symmetry, crystallite/domain orientation distribution and strain condition transformations. Methodological aspects of monitoring these processes are discussed. Two-dimensional diffraction clarify larger scale ordering: polycrystal texture is measured from the intensities distribution along the Debye rings. Local order is investigated by diffuse scattering (DS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) experiments. DS provides information about thermal, chemical and displacive low-dimensional disorders. XAFS investigation of ferroelectrics reveals local B-cation off-centering and oxidation state. This technique has the advantage of being element-selective. Representative reports of the mentioned studies are described. PMID:28787814

  1. Ferroelectrics under the Synchrotron Light: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis E. Fuentes-Cobas

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, an intensive search for high-performance lead-free ferroelectric materials is taking place. ABO3 perovskites (A = Ba, Bi, Ca, K and Na; B = Fe, Nb, Ti, and Zr appear as promising candidates. Understanding the structure–function relationship is mandatory, and, in this field, the roles of long- and short-range crystal orders and interactions are decisive. In this review, recent advances in the global and local characterization of ferroelectric materials by synchrotron light diffraction, scattering and absorption are analyzed. Single- and poly-crystal synchrotron diffraction studies allow high-resolution investigations regarding the long-range average position of ions and subtle global symmetry break-downs. Ferroelectric materials, under the action of electric fields, undergo crystal symmetry, crystallite/domain orientation distribution and strain condition transformations. Methodological aspects of monitoring these processes are discussed. Two-dimensional diffraction clarify larger scale ordering: polycrystal texture is measured from the intensities distribution along the Debye rings. Local order is investigated by diffuse scattering (DS and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS experiments. DS provides information about thermal, chemical and displacive low-dimensional disorders. XAFS investigation of ferroelectrics reveals local B-cation off-centering and oxidation state. This technique has the advantage of being element-selective. Representative reports of the mentioned studies are described.

  2. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials

  3. 1994 activity report: Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; Dunn, L. [eds.

    1994-01-01

    The SSRL facility delivered 89% of the scheduled user beam to 25 experimental stations during 6.5 months of user running. Users from private industry were involved in 31% of these experiments. The SPEAR accelerator ran very well with no major component failures and an unscheduled down time of only 2.9%. In addition to this increased reliability, there was a significant improvement in the stability of the beam. The enhancements to the SPEAR orbit as part of a concerted three-year program were particularly noticeable to users. The standard deviation of beam movement (both planes) in the last part of the run was 80 microns, major progress toward the ultimate goal of 50-micron stability. This was a significant improvement from the previous year when the movement was 400 microns in the horizontal and 200 microns in the vertical. A new accelerator Personal Protection System (PPS), built with full redundancy and providing protection from both radiation exposure and electrical hazards, was installed in 1994. It is not possible to describe in this summary all of the scientific experimentation which was performed during the run. However, the flavor of current research projects and the many significant accomplishments can be realized by the following highlights: A multinational collaboration performed several experiments involving x-ray scattering from nuclear resonances; Studies related to nuclear waste remediation by groups from Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratories continued in 1994; Diffraction data sets for a number of important protein crystals were obtained; During the past two years a collaboration consisting of groups from Hewlett Packard, Intel, Fisons Instruments and SSRL has been exploring the utility of synchrotron radiation for total reflection x-ray fluorescence (TRXRF); and High-resolution angle-resolved photoemission experiments have continued to generate exciting new results from highly correlated and magnetic materials.

  4. PHOTOACOUSTIC SPECTROSCOPY USING A SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JACKSON, R.S.; MICHAELIAN, K.H.; HOMES, C.C.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the use of a synchrotron as a source for infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy. A synchrotron has an intrinsically high radiance, which is beneficial when photoacoustic spectroscopy is applied to small samples, especially at long wavelengths

  5. National synchrotron light source basic design and project status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1981-01-01

    A summary description and the basic design parameters of the National Synchrotron Light Source, a facility for the generation of intense synchrotron radiation in the vuv and x-ray range is presented, the parameters of the sources are given, the presently planned facility beam lines are tabulated and the status of the project is indicated

  6. Status of the National Synchrotron Light Source project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heese, R.N.

    1981-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is in its final stages of construction, and as the turn-on time for the 700 MeV vuv storage ring draws near, an overview of the project is presented. Emphasis is placed on the linac and booster synchrotron performance and the status of major subsystems

  7. Stability and vibration control in synchrotron light source buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godel, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron light sources have undergone three generations of development in the last two decades. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has two second generation'' storage rings that currently provide the world's most intense sources of photons in the VUV and X-ray spectral ranges. There are almost 90 beam lines serving a community of 2600 scientists from 370 institutions. They are engaged in basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, materials science and various technologies. When design of the NSLS began in 1977, emphasis was given to the stability of the concrete slab on which the storage rings and experimental beam lines were placed. Stability is the result of controlling: vibration from sources internal and external to the building, thermal effects of air and water temperature variations, foundation settlement and contact between the slab and underlying subsoil. With the advent of new research where highly focused beams of x-rays must be placed on increasingly smaller targets located 35 meters or more from the source, and the development of x-ray lithography with resolutions approaching 0.1 micron at chip exposure stations, even greater attention to stability is required in building designs. This paper will review the results of the successful NSLS experience and give an integrated design approach that includes elements which contribute to instabilities, and the means available to reduce them to acceptable levels.

  8. Stability and vibration control in synchrotron light source buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godel, J.B.

    1991-12-31

    Synchrotron light sources have undergone three generations of development in the last two decades. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has two ``second generation`` storage rings that currently provide the world`s most intense sources of photons in the VUV and X-ray spectral ranges. There are almost 90 beam lines serving a community of 2600 scientists from 370 institutions. They are engaged in basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, materials science and various technologies. When design of the NSLS began in 1977, emphasis was given to the stability of the concrete slab on which the storage rings and experimental beam lines were placed. Stability is the result of controlling: vibration from sources internal and external to the building, thermal effects of air and water temperature variations, foundation settlement and contact between the slab and underlying subsoil. With the advent of new research where highly focused beams of x-rays must be placed on increasingly smaller targets located 35 meters or more from the source, and the development of x-ray lithography with resolutions approaching 0.1 micron at chip exposure stations, even greater attention to stability is required in building designs. This paper will review the results of the successful NSLS experience and give an integrated design approach that includes elements which contribute to instabilities, and the means available to reduce them to acceptable levels.

  9. Stability and vibration control in synchrotron light source buildings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Godel, J.B.

    1991-01-01

    Synchrotron light sources have undergone three generations of development in the last two decades. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory has two ''second generation'' storage rings that currently provide the world's most intense sources of photons in the VUV and X-ray spectral ranges. There are almost 90 beam lines serving a community of 2600 scientists from 370 institutions. They are engaged in basic and applied research in physics, chemistry, biology, medicine, materials science and various technologies. When design of the NSLS began in 1977, emphasis was given to the stability of the concrete slab on which the storage rings and experimental beam lines were placed. Stability is the result of controlling: vibration from sources internal and external to the building, thermal effects of air and water temperature variations, foundation settlement and contact between the slab and underlying subsoil. With the advent of new research where highly focused beams of x-rays must be placed on increasingly smaller targets located 35 meters or more from the source, and the development of x-ray lithography with resolutions approaching 0.1 micron at chip exposure stations, even greater attention to stability is required in building designs. This paper will review the results of the successful NSLS experience and give an integrated design approach that includes elements which contribute to instabilities, and the means available to reduce them to acceptable levels

  10. Photoemission studies using laboratory and synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phase, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources, providing intense, polarized and stable beams of ultra violet soft and hard X-ray photons, are having great impact on physics, chemistry, biology materials science and other areas research. In particular synchrotron radiation has revolutionized photoelectron spectroscopy by enhancing its capabilities for investigating the electronic properties of solids. The first Indian synchrotron storage ring, Indus- 1 is in operation at RRCAT, Indore. The UGC-DAE CSR with the help of university scientist had designed and developed an angle integrated photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) beamline on this 450 MeV storage ring. A storage ring of this kind is most suitable for investigation in the energy range from few electron volts to around five hundred electron volts. In this lecture we will describe the details of PES beamline and its experimental station. Till date the different university users carried out photoemission measurements on variety of samples. Some of the spectra recorded by users will be presented in order to show the capability of this beamline. In the later part we will report a review of our recent research work carried out on dilute magnetic thin films using this beamline. (author)

  11. National synchrotron light source VUV storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blumberg, L.; Bittner, J.; Galayda, J.; Heese, R.; Krinsky, S.; Schuchman, J.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    A 700 MeV electron storage ring designed for synchrotron radiation applications is described. Lattice and stability calculations are presented and the vacuum, correction and injection systems are discussed

  12. A NEW THERMIONIC RF ELECTRON GUN FOR SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsaev, Sergey; Agustsson, R.; Hartzell, J; Murokh, A.; Nassiri, A.; Savin, E.; Smirnov, A.V.; Smirnov, A. Yu; Sun, Y.; Verma, A; Waldschmidt, Geoff; Zholents, A.

    2017-06-02

    A thermionic RF gun is a compact and efficient source of electrons used in many practical applications. RadiaBeam Systems and the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory collaborate in developing of a reliable and robust thermionic RF gun for synchrotron light sources which would offer substantial improvements over existing thermionic RF guns and allow stable operation with up to 1A of beam peak current at a 100 Hz pulse repetition rate and a 1.5 μs RF pulse length. In this paper, we discuss the electromagnetic and engineering design of the cavity and report the progress towards high power tests of the cathode assembly of the new gun.

  13. A preliminary study of synchrotron light sources for x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffmann, C.R.; Bigham, C.B.; Ebrahim, N.A.; Sawicki, J.A.; Taylor, T.

    1989-02-01

    A preliminary study of synchrotron light sources has been made, primarily oriented toward x-ray lithography. X-ray lithography is being pursued vigorously in several countries, with a goal of manufacturing high-density computer chips (0.25 μm feature sizes), and may attain commercial success in the next decade. Many other applications of soft x-rays appear worthy of investigation as well. The study group visited synchrotron radiation facilities and had discussions with members of the synchrotron radiation community, particularly Canadians. It concluded that accelerator technology for a conventional synchrotron light source appropriate for x-ray lithography is well established and is consistent with skills and experience at Chalk River Nuclear Laboratories. Compact superconducting systems are being developed also. Their technical requirements overlap with capabilities at Chalk River. (32 refs)

  14. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 x 10 -9 m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different RF systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target. A conceptual layout is shown

  15. Conceptual design of the Argonne 6-GeV synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.; Khoe, T.

    1985-01-01

    The Argonne National Laboratory Synchrotron Light Source Storage Ring is designed to have a natural emittance of 6.5 X 10 -9 m for circulating 6-GeV positrons. Thirty of the 32 long straight sections, each 6.5-m long, will be available for synchrotron light insertion devices. A circulating positron current of 300 mA can be injected in about 8 min. from a booster synchrotron operating with a repetition time of 1.2 sec. The booster synchrotron will contain two different rf systems. The lower frequency system (38.97 MHz) will accept positrons from a 360-MeV linac and will accelerate them to 2.25 GeV. The higher frequency system (350.76 MHz) will accelerate the positrons to 6 GeV. The positrons will be produced from a 300-MeV electron beam on a tungsten target

  16. National Synchrotron Light Source medical personnel protection interlock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buda, S.; Gmuer, N.F.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1998-11-01

    This report is founded on reports written in April 1987 by Robert Hettel for angiography operations at the Stanford Synchrotron Research Laboratory (SSRL) and a subsequent report covering angiography operations at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS); BNL Informal Report 47681, June 1992. The latter report has now been rewritten in order to accurately reflect the design and installation of a new medical safety system at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). Known originally as the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI), this system has been modified to incorporate other medical imaging research programs on the same beamline and thus the name has been changed to the more generic Medical Personnel Protection Interlock (MPPI). This report will deal almost exclusively with the human imaging (angiography, bronchography, mammography) aspects of the safety system, but will briefly explain the modular aspects of the system allowing other medical experiments to be incorporated. This MPPI report is organized such that the level of detail changes from a general overview to detailed engineering drawings of the hardware system. The general overview is presented in Section 1.0, MPPI Operational Mode and Procedures. The various MPPI components are described in detail in Section 2.0. Section 3.0 presents some simplified logic diagrams and accompanying text. This section was written to allow readers to become familiar with the logic system without having to work through the entire set of detailed engineering drawings listed in the Appendix. Detailed logic specifications are given in Section 4.0. The Appendix also contains copies of the current MPPI interlock test procedures for Setup and Patient Modes.

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source safety-analysis report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batchelor, K.

    1982-07-01

    This document covers all of the safety issues relating to the design and operation of the storage rings and injection system of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The building systems for fire protection, access and egress are described together with air and other gaseous control or venting systems. Details of shielding against prompt bremstrahlung radiation and synchrotron radiation are described and the administrative requirements to be satisfied for operation of a beam line at the facility are given

  18. NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, L.

    2005-01-01

    for the environmental science community, is also very important, as it will help to satisfy the large over subscription rate for this technique at the NSLS. Two other important upgrades that were initiated this past year are the replacement of the X25 wiggler with an undulator and the construction of the X9 undulator beamline for small-angle scattering, with an emphasis on nanoscience research. Another key activity that will benefit all users was the restoration of the x-ray ring lattice symmetry, which reduced the horizontal emittance and made the operational lattice more robust. Similarly, all users will benefit from the introduction of the PASS (Proposal Allocation Safety Scheduling) system this past year, which has greatly improved the process of proposal submission, review, allocation, and scheduling. This coming year we will work to add Rapid Access to the capabilities of PASS. Overall, the success of these and the many other projects that space does not permit listing is a testament to the dedication, hard work, and skill of the NSLS staff. Safety has always been an important issue at a large, complex scientific facility like the NSLS and in 2004 it received renewed attention. Safety is our highest priority and we spent a great deal of time reviewing and refining our safety practices and procedures. A new 'Safety Highlights' web page was created for safety news, and a large number of safety meetings and discussions were held. These reviews and meetings generated many ideas on how the NSLS might improve its safety practices, and we are committed to putting these in place and improving our already very good safety program. We had no lost-time accidents in 2004, which is a notable accomplishment. Our goal is to be best in class and I'm confident that by working together we can achieve that status. Several activities took place this past year to advance our proposal to replace the NSLS with a new National Synchrotron Light Source-II facility. These included a major

  19. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ajemian, Robert C. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences and Engineering

    1995-01-01

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions.

  20. Analysis of stray radiation produced by the advanced light source (1.9 GeV synchrotron radiation source) at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ajemian, R.C.

    1995-01-01

    The yearly environmental dose equivalent likely to result at the closest site boundary from the Advanced Light Source was determined by generating multiple linear regressions. The independent variables comprised quantified accelerator operating parameters and measurements from synchronized, in-close (outside shielding prior to significant atmospheric scattering), state-of-the-art neutron remmeters and photon G-M tubes. Neutron regression models were more successful than photon models due to lower relative background radiation and redundant detectors at the site boundary. As expected, Storage Ring Beam Fill and Beam Crashes produced radiation at a higher rate than gradual Beam Decay; however, only the latter did not include zero in its 95% confidence interval. By summing for all three accelerator operating modes, a combined yearly DE of 4.3 mRem/yr with a 90% CI of (0.04-8.63) was obtained. These results fall below the DOE reporting level of 10 mRem/yr and suggest repeating the study with improved experimental conditions

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1992 activity report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1993-01-01

    Under SLAC's supervision, the SPEAR ring and injector system were operated for the first time in a truly dedicated mode for user experimentation. In October, SSRL became a division of SLAC. With that organizational change, SSRL became fully responsible for the operation, maintenance and improvement of SPEAR and its injection accelerators. At the same time, other radiation sources were studied. Free electron lasers providing enormous peak brightnesses and time average brightnesses about two orders of magnitude greater than the machines presently being constructed or commissioned were the object of one line of analysis. Ultra-short pulse beams at lower photons energies were also studied. These, as well, are described in Chapter 2. Significant gains were also made on the beam lines. Perhaps the most dramatic was the introduction of YB 66 crystals into the Jumbo monochromator, as described in Chapter 3. Looking to the future, SSRL held a workshop on Fourth Generation Light Sources in February and two workshops in conjunction with the Users Meeting. The impact of the high quality running is demonstrated by the many high quality experimental programs performed on SPEAR during the year. These are described in Chapter 6

  2. Obtaining laser safety at a synchrotron radiation user facility: The Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barat, K.

    1996-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a US national facility for scientific research and development located at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in California. The ALS delivers the world's brightest synchrotron radiation in the far ultraviolet and soft X-ray regions of the spectrum. As a user facility it is available to researchers from industry, academia, and laboratories from around the world. Subsequently, a wide range of safety concerns become involved. This article relates not only to synchrotron facilities but to any user facility. A growing number of US centers are attracting organizations and individuals to use the equipment on site, for a fee. This includes synchrotron radiation and/or free electron facilities, specialty research centers, and laser job shops. Personnel coming to such a facility bring with them a broad spectrum of safety cultures. Upon entering, the guests must accommodate to the host facility safety procedures. This article describes a successful method to deal with that responsibility

  3. Research by industry at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-05-01

    The world's foremost facility for research using x-rays and ultraviolet and infrared radiation, is operated by the National Synchrotron Light Source dept. This pamphlet described the participating research teams that built most of the beam lines, various techniques for studying materials, treatment of materials, and various industrial research (catalysis, pharmaceuticals, etc.)

  4. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-01-01

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field

  5. SUNY beamline facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source (Final Report)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coppens, Philip

    2003-06-22

    The DOE sponsored SUNY synchrotron project has involved close cooperation among faculty at several SUNY campuses. A large number of students and postdoctoral associates have participated in its operation which was centered at the X3 beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Four stations with capabilities for Small Angle Scattering, Single Crystal and Powder and Surface diffraction and EXAFS were designed and operated with capability to perform experiments at very low as well as elevated temperatures and under high vacuum. A large amount of cutting-edge science was performed at the facility, which in addition provided excellent training for students and postdoctoral scientists in the field.

  6. Singapore Synchrotron Light Source - Status, first results, program

    CERN Document Server

    Moser, H O; Kempson, V C; Kong, J R; Li, Z W; Nyunt, T; Qian, H J; Rossmanith, R; Tor, P H; Wilhelmi, O; Yang, P; Zheng, H W; Underhay, I J

    2003-01-01

    The Singapore Synchrotron Light Source is a general-purpose synchrotron radiation facility serving research organisations and industry. Beamlines active or coming up within 2002 include lithography for micro/nanofabrication, phase contrast imaging, surface science, and X-ray diffraction and absorption. An infrared spectro/microscopy beamline is expected to become operational in 2003. Further beamlines are under discussion with user groups. The Microtron Undulator Radiation Facility (MURF) is under development to provide brilliant VUV radiation and to prepare for subsequent development of an EUV and X-ray FEL.

  7. National synchrotron light source guidelines for the conduct of operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, M.

    1998-01-01

    To improve the quality and uniformity of operations at the Department of Energy's facilities, the DOE issued Order 5480.19 ''Conduct of Operations Requirements at DOE facilities.'' This order recognizes that the success of a facility's mission critically depends upon a high level of performance by its personnel and equipment. This performance can be severely impaired if the facility's Conduct of Operations pays inadequate attention to issues of organization, safety, health, and the environment. These guidelines are Brookhaven National Laboratory's and the National Synchrotron Light Source's acknowledgement of the principles of Conduct of Operations and the response to DOE Order 5480.19. These guidelines cover the following areas: (1) operations organization and administration; (2) shift routines and operating practices; (3) control area activities; (4) communications; (5) control of on-shift training; (6) investigation of abnormal events; (7) notifications; (8) control of equipment and system studies; (9) lockouts and tagouts; (10) independent verification; (11) log-keeping; (12) operations turnover; (13) operations aspects of facility process control (14) required reading; (15) timely orders to operators; (16) operations procedures; (17) operator aid posting; and (18) equipment sizing and labeling

  8. Synchrotron-radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunningham, J.E.

    1982-01-01

    The use of radiation from synchrotron sources has started a renaissance in materials, physics, chemistry, and biology. Synchrotron radiation has advantages over conventional x rays in that its source brightness is a thousand times greater throughout a continuous energy spectrum, and resonances are produced with specific electron energy levels. Two major synchrotron radiation sources are operated by DOE: the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory at SLAC, and the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven

  9. Synchrotron radiation applications in medical research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1997-08-01

    In the relatively short time that synchrotrons have been available to the scientific community, their characteristic beams of UV and X-ray radiation have been applied to virtually all areas of medical science which use ionizing radiation. The ability to tune intense monochromatic beams over wide energy ranges clearly differentiates these sources from standard clinical and research tools. The tunable spectrum, high intrinsic collimation of the beams, polarization and intensity of the beams make possible in-vitro and in-vivo research and therapeutic programs not otherwise possible. From the beginning of research operation at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), many programs have been carrying out basic biomedical research. At first, the research was limited to in-vitro programs such as the x-ray microscope, circular dichroism, XAFS, protein crystallography, micro-tomography and fluorescence analysis. Later, as the coronary angiography program made plans to move its experimental phase from SSRL to the NSLS, it became clear that other in-vivo projects could also be carried out at the synchrotron. The development of SMERF (Synchrotron Medical Research Facility) on beamline X17 became the home not only for angiography but also for the MECT (Multiple Energy Computed Tomography) project for cerebral and vascular imaging. The high energy spectrum on X17 is necessary for the MRT (Microplanar Radiation Therapy) experiments. Experience with these programs and the existence of the Medical Programs Group at the NSLS led to the development of a program in synchrotron based mammography. A recent adaptation of the angiography hardware has made it possible to image human lungs (bronchography). Fig. 1 schematically depicts the broad range of active programs at the NSLS

  10. Review of third and next generation synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilderback, Donald H; Elleaume, Pascal; Weckert, Edgar

    2005-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is having a very large impact on interdisciplinary science and has been tremendously successful with the arrival of third generation synchrotron x-ray sources. But the revolution in x-ray science is still gaining momentum. Even though new storage rings are currently under construction, even more advanced rings are under design (PETRA III and the ultra high energy x-ray source) and the uses of linacs (energy recovery linac, x-ray free electron laser) can take us further into the future, to provide the unique synchrotron light that is so highly prized for today's studies in science in such fields as materials science, physics, chemistry and biology, for example. All these machines are highly reliant upon the consequences of Einstein's special theory of relativity. The consequences of relativity account for the small opening angle of synchrotron radiation in the forward direction and the increasing mass an electron gains as it is accelerated to high energy. These are familiar results to every synchrotron scientist. In this paper we outline not only the origins of SR but discuss how Einstein's strong character and his intuition and excellence have not only marked the physics of the 20th century but provide the foundation for continuing accelerator developments into the 21st century

  11. HESYRL: a dedicated synchrotron radiation laboratory in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiu, L.J.

    1985-01-01

    The HESYRL national synchrotron radiation laboratory was first proposed in 1977 as a conclusion of a general planning meeting on nationwide development of natural science and technology at which a topic was the application of synchrotron radiation. A study group was formed in 1978 to carry out preliminary research and prototype development work. The final approval of the project was given in April 1983 and the lab was soon founded. Designs of the main facilities and building completed in Oct 1984. The ground breaking was in Nov 1984. Manufacturing and purchasing of all the equipment and components are now in progress. The overall layout of HESYRL project is shown. the main facilities are an 800 MeV electron storage ring, a 88 meter transport line and a 240 MeV linac as the injector. Some basic considerations in the selecting of major machine parameters are discussed

  12. The national synchrotron light source and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    We describe the National Synchrotron Light Source facility including its beamlines and operational characteristics. Research results on selected beamlines on the VUV ring which highlight new experimental capabilities are described since they are more relevant to the program at HESYRL. Examples chosen are spin-polarized photoemission, infra-red surface science, high resolution core level spectroscopy, X- Ray lithography, photoelectron/Auger coincidence spectroscopy and high electron momentum resolution surface studies. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Minimum emittance of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source

    CERN Document Server

    Shoji, Y

    1999-01-01

    Theoretically achievable minimum emittances of isochronus rings for synchrotron light source are calculated. The rings discussed in this paper consist of isochronus and achromatic bending cells, isochronus TBA (triple bend achromat) cells with negative dispersion, isochronus TBA cells with inverse bends or isochronus QBA (four bend achromat) cells. We show that the minimum emittances of these rings are roughly 2 or 3 times of those of the optimized non-isochronus rings.

  14. Status of the National Synchrotron Light Source upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Culwick, B.B.; Smith, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    The demands for real-time control, data acquisition and display from accelerators of the National Synchrotron Light Source have exceeded the capabilities of the computer control system designed in 1978. In January 1985, a workshop on control systems was held at Brookhaven, one of the purposes of which was to provide impetus and design goals for an upgrade of the NSLS control system. The resulting design is described and its status reported

  15. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, poweful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia

  16. Synchrotron light sources: A powerful tool for science and technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, F.; Robinson, A.

    1996-01-01

    A new generation of synchrotron light sources is producing extremely bright beams of vacuum-ultraviolet and x-ray radiation, powerful new tools for research in a wide variety of basic and applied sciences. Spectromicroscopy using high spectral and spatial resolution is a new way of seeing, offering many opportunities in the study of matter. Development of a new light source provides the country or region of the world in which the light source is located many new opportunities: a focal point for research in many scientific and technological areas, a means of upgrading the technology infrastructure of the country, a means of training students, and a potential service to industry. A light source for Southeast Asia would thus be a major resource for many years. Scientists and engineers from light sources around the world look forward to providing assistance to make this a reality in Southeast Asia

  17. The three-dimensional microstructure of polycrystalline materials unravelled by synchrotron light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ludwig, W.; King, A.; Herbig, M.

    2011-01-01

    The three-dimensional microstructure of polycrystalline materials unravelled by synchrotron light Synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer new possibilities for non-destructive bulk characterization of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (diff...

  18. Science research with high-brilliance synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanyal, Milan K.

    2013-01-01

    Synchrotron-science has changed dramatically since the development of high brilliance electron accelerator-based light sources in 1990s. In the last twenty years or so, several such facilities have come up, particularly in developed countries, as material characterizations in relevant atmosphere and protein crystallography with tiny-crystals have strong implications in industrial competitiveness. Moreover several new techniques have been developed recently over the entire spectral range of emitted light, from infra-red to high energy X-rays, which have altered our basic understanding of various materials like biomaterials, nanomaterials, soft-matter and semiconductor quantum structures. In addition, rapid development of various X-ray imaging techniques for nondestructive evaluation of compositional/structural homogeneity of engineering materials with nanometer resolution will have tremendous impact in manufacturing industries. As India becomes a developed country, it must have access to such an advanced synchrotron facility in the country that enables knowledge generation in the ever-expanding fields of design-characterization-production of advanced materials and modern medicines. Development of such state-of-the art facility will also enable us to carry out frontier-basic-research in our own country and help us to retain and bring back Indian talents to India. Here we shall discuss briefly the characteristics of a high brilliance synchrotron source and outline the nature of basic and applied science research that can be done with such a state-of-the-art facility. (author)

  19. Single bunch transfer system for the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheehan, J.; Singh, O.; Rambo, W.

    1983-01-01

    The accelerator system at the National Synchrotron Light Source consists of an S-band 85 MeV linac and three synchrotron rings. The electron beam from the linac is accelerated by the booster ring to 600 MeV and transferred to one of the two storage rings. The smaller of the two rings operates between 300 and 800 MeV emtting photons in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), while the larger storage ring operates up to 2.5 GeV and emits photons in the x-ray spectrum. A system is described for loading the storage rings by filling a single-phase space bunch in the booster ring and transferring it at the end of each booster cycle into a selected bucket in one of the storage rings. By controlling the timing of the transfer on successive transfer cycles, many fill patterns may be obtained

  20. Synchrotron light: A success story over six decades

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Margaritondo, G.

    2017-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation research continues to be a major factor in the progress of science and technology, as it has been for more than half a century. We present different aspects of its history, starting with an unconventional approach: a fictional version, which should bring to light the reasons that make this field so broadly important. Then, we narrate the real history from three different points of view: the progress of electron accelerators, the evolution of synchrotron-based experiments, and the human factors. Finally, we discuss the present situation, characterized by the arrival of a new generation of sources with exceptional performances: the x-ray free electron lasers (x-FEL's).

  1. A virtual laboratory for neutron and synchrotron strain scanning

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, J. A.; Santisteban, J. R.; Edwards, L.; Daymond, M. R.

    2004-07-01

    The new generation of dedicated Engineering Strain Scanners at neutron and synchrotron facilities offer considerable improvements in both counting time and spatial resolution. In order to make full use of these advances in instrumentation, the routine tasks associated with setting up measurement runs and analysing the data need to be made as efficient as possible. Such tasks include the planning of the experiment, the alignment and positioning of the specimen, the least-squares refinement of diffraction spectra, the definition of strain in the sample coordinate system, and its visualization within a 3D model of the specimen. With this aim in mind, we have written a software providing support for most of these operations. The approach is based on a virtual lab consisting of 3D models of the sample and laboratory equipment. The system has been developed for ENGIN-X, the new engineering strain scanner recently commissioned at ISIS, but it is flexible enough to be ported to other neutron or synchrotron strain scanners. The software has been designed with visiting industrial and academic researchers in mind, users who need to be able to control the instrument after only a short period of training.

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, S.; Cantwell, K. [eds.

    1988-12-31

    During 1987, SSRL achieved many significant advances and reached several major milestones utilizing both SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources as described in this report. Perhaps the following two are worthy of particular mention: (1) SPEAR reached an all time high of 4,190 delivered user-shifts during calendar year 1987, highlights of the many scientific results are given; (2) during a 12 day run in December of 1987, PEP was operated in a low emittance mode (calculated emittance 6.4 nanometer-radians) at 7.1 GeV with currents up to 33 mA. A second undulator beam line on PEP was commissioned during this run and used to record many spectra showing the extremely high brightness of the radiation. PEP is now by far the highest brightness synchrotron radiation source in the world. The report is divided into the following sections: (1) laboratory operations; (2) accelerator physics programs; (3) experimental facilities; (4) engineering division; (5) conferences and workshops; (6) SSRL organization; (7) experimental progress reports; (8) active proposals; (9) SSRL experiments and proposals by institution; and (10) SSRL publications.

  3. Phase II beam lines at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.

    1984-06-01

    The expansion of the National Synchrotron Light Source has been funded by the US Department of Energy. The Phase II program consists of both increased conventional facilities and six new beam lines. In this paper, an overview of the six beam lines which will be constructed during Phase II is presented. For five of the lines special radiation sources are necessary and the designs of four of the devices are complete. The relevant parameters of the insertion devices under construction and development are presented

  4. High-pressure synchrotron infrared spectroscopy at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hemley, R.J.; Goncharov, A.F.; Lu, R.; Struzhkin, V.V.; Li, M.; Mao, H.K.

    1998-01-01

    The paper describes a synchrotron infrared facility for high-pressure spectroscopy and microspectroscopy at the National Synchrotron Light-Source (NSLS). Located at beamline U2B on the VUV ring of the NSLS, the facility utilizes a commercial FT-IR together with custom-built microscope optics designed for a variety of diamond anvil cell experiments, including low- and high- temperature studies. The system contains an integrated laser optical/grating spectrometer for concurrent optical experiments. The facility has been used to characterize a growing number of materials to ultrahigh pressure and has been instrumental of new high-pressure phenomena. Experiments on dense hydrogen to >200 GPa have led to the discovery of numerous unexpected properties of this fundamental system. The theoretically predicted molecular-atomic transition of H 2 O ice to the symmetric hydrogen-bonded structure has been identified, and new classes of high-density clathrates and molecular compounds have been characterized. Experiments on natural and synthetic mineral samples have been performed to study hydrogen speciation, phase transformations, and microscopic inclusions in multiphase assemblages. Detailed information on the behavior of new materials, including novel high-pressure glasses and ceramics, has also been obtained

  5. Phase 2 safety analysis report: National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefan, P.

    1989-06-01

    The Phase II program was established in order to provide additional space for experiments, and also staging and equipment storage areas. It also provides additional office space and new types of advanced instrumentation for users. This document will deal with the new safety issues resulting from this extensive expansion program, and should be used as a supplement to BNL Report No. 51584 ''National Synchrotron Light Source Safety Analysis Report,'' July 1982 (hereafter referred to as the Phase I SAR). The initial NSLS facility is described in the Phase I SAR. It comprises two electron storage rings, an injection system common to both, experimental beam lines and equipment, and office and support areas, all of which are housed in a 74,000 sq. ft. building. The X-ray Ring provides for 28 primary beam ports and the VUV Ring, 16. Each port is capable of division into 2 or 3 separate beam lines. All ports receive their synchrotron light from conventional bending magnet sources, the magnets being part of the storage ring lattice. 4 refs

  6. Far infrared spectroscopy of high-Tc superconductors at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perkowitz, S.; Williams, G.P.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports the first far infrared transmission spectra for micron-thick films of high-T c rare-earth superconductors such as DyBaCuO, with implications for the superconducting gap. Spectra were obtained at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source, a new high-intensity, broad-band millimeter to infrared source. The National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory, known for powerful X-ray and UV output, is also a high-intensity (10 to 1000 times above a black body), high-brightness (intensity per solid angle), broad-band, picosecond, millimeter to infrared source. These features make it valuable for far-infrared condensed matter experiments, especially those in highly absorbing or extremely small systems. A first application has been to measure very small infrared transmissions through thick bulk-like high-T c superconducting films. Preliminary measurements through films of the conventional superconductor Nb 3 Ge established techniques. These were followed by the first measurements (to the author's knowledge) through micron-thick films of high-T c rare-earth superconductors such as DyBaCuO over 10-300 cm -1 , which includes the superconducting gap according to BCS or moderately strong-coupled theory. The authors discuss the transmission evidence bearing on the existence of a gap and other important features of high-T c superconductors, and describe the synchrotron and instrumentation features which make possible these unusual measurements

  7. Construction and commissioning of the national synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galayda, J.N.; Blume, M.

    1985-01-01

    The road from conception to completion of a large facility like the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a long and tortuous one. More than fifteen years have passed since the first discussions of a synchrotron radiation source at BNL, and there have been many twists and turns in the process. In putting together an accelerator project like this, there are many critical skills that must be assembled, and budgets, schedules and organizations must be properly examined. The lessons learned in design and commissioning of the NSLS rings may be summarized as follows: (1) the damped emittances expected of a Chasman-Green lattice are attainable at high current, if ion trapping problems can be circumvented; (2) there have been no unexpected effects from the rather strong sextupoles required to correct the chromaticities in this type of lattice; (3) the most important beam instabilities are coupled-bunch, and can be counteracted; and (4) commissioning the NSLS rings was mostly an effort to bring the hardware into conformation with the original ring design; achievement of the specified magnetic fields, injection timing, vacuum, RF voltages, etc. led to ring performance which was easily good enough to begin operation

  8. Ozone production at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weilandics, C.; Rohrig, N.; Gmur, N.F.

    1987-01-01

    Ozone production by synchrotron radiation as a function of power density in air was investigated using a white beam at the BNL National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) x-ray ring. Power densities were calculated from the energy spectrum at 2.52 GeV. Ozone concentrations in small beam pipes were measured for power densities between I = 10 12 and 10 15 eV . cm -3 . sec -1 . The measured ozone half-life was 37 +- 2 min. The measured G-value was 2.69 +- 0.14 mol/100 eV and the ozone destruction factor k was less than 7 x 10 -19 cm 3 . eV -1 . The random uncertainties stated are approximately one standard error. The large departure of the values for G and k from previous values suggest that some undiscovered systematic error may exist in the experiment. Ozone concentration in excess of the 0.1 ppM ACGIH TLV can be generated in the experimental hutches but can readily be controlled. Industrial hygiene aspects of operation and possible control measures will be discussed. 19 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  9. Light fragment production at CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, Yu.B. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow (Russian Federation); Bogoliubov Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, JINR, Dubna (Russian Federation); Soldatov, A.A. [National Research Centre ' ' Kurchatov Institute' ' , Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2017-11-15

    Recent data on the deuteron and {sup 3}He production in central Pb+Pb collisions at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) energies measured by the NA49 Collaboration are analyzed within the model of the three-fluid dynamics (3FD) complemented by the coalescence model for the light-fragment production. The simulations are performed with different equations of state - with and without deconfinement transition. It is found that scenarios with the deconfinement transition are preferable for reproduction rapidity distributions of deuterons and {sup 3}He, the corresponding results well agree with the experimental data. At the same time the calculated transverse-mass spectra at midrapidity do not agree that nicely with the experimental data. The latter apparently indicate that coalescence coefficients should be temperature and/or momentum dependent. (orig.)

  10. Swiss synchrotron light source at the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-02-01

    The brochure describes the Swiss project for a synchrotron light source to be built at the Paul Scherrer Institute at Villigen. According to the project the synchrotron light source shall be realized up to the year 2001 at costs of 165 Million Swiss Francs. figs., tabs

  11. NBS SURF 11: A small versatile synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rakowsky, G.

    1981-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation sources do not have to be large multi-megadollar installations. SURF II is based on a compact electron storage ring with a radius of only 0.84 m, an operating energy of 250 MeV, and useful light output down to 5 nm. Small beam size, high brightness and wide-angle light ports give SURF II unique capabilities. Presently five beamlines are instrumented and operational, supporting experiments in atomic and molecular physics, surface science and materials studies, as well as providing optical calibration services. Nearing completion is a large facility for calibrating optical instruments, especially those intended for space flight. The capability of determining the absolute light flux emitted by SURF II has recently been improved and is now operational. The technique employs ultralinear silicon photodiodes to detect and count individual electrons in the stored beam. Other user conveniences include close access to the machine, flexible scheduling and close interaction with the operations staff. The machine's simplicity contributes to reliability and a high ratio of beamtime to downtime

  12. Synchrotron Vacuum Ultraviolet Light and Soft X-Ray Radiation Effects on Aluminized Teflon FEP Investigated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Townsend, Jacqueline A.; Gaier, James R.; Jalics, Alice I.

    1999-01-01

    Since the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) was deployed in low Earth orbit in April 1990, two servicing missions have been conducted to upgrade its scientific capabilities. Minor cracking of second-surface metalized Teflon FEP (DuPont; fluorinated ethylene propylene) surfaces from multilayer insulation (MLI) was first observed upon close examination of samples with high solar exposure retrieved during the first servicing mission, which was conducted 3.6 years after deployment. During the second HST servicing mission, 6.8 years after deployment, astronaut observations and photographic documentation revealed significant cracks in the Teflon FEP layer of the MLI on both the solar- and anti-solar-facing surfaces of the telescope. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center directed the efforts of the Hubble Space Telescope MLI Failure Review Board, whose goals included identifying the low-Earth-orbit environmental constituent(s) responsible for the cracking and embrittling of Teflon FEP which was observed during the second servicing mission. The NASA Lewis Research Center provided significant support to this effort. Because soft x-ray radiation from solar flares had been considered as a possible cause for the degradation of the mechanical properties of Teflon FEP (ref. 1), the effects of soft xray radiation and vacuum ultraviolet light on Teflon FEP were investigated. In this Lewisled effort, samples of Teflon FEP with a 100-nm layer of vapor-deposited aluminum (VDA) on the backside were exposed to synchrotron radiation of various vacuum ultraviolet and soft x-ray wavelengths between 18 nm (69 eV) and 0.65 nm (1900 eV). Synchrotron radiation exposures were conducted using the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Samples of FEP/VDA were exposed with the FEP surface facing the synchrotron beam. Doses and fluences were compared with those estimated for the 20-yr Hubble Space Telescope mission.

  13. Environmental Remediation Sciences Program at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bargar, John R.

    2006-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR)-based techniques provide unique capabilities to address scientific issues underpinning environmental remediation science and have emerged as major research tools in this field. The high intensity of SR sources and x-ray photon-in/photon-out detection allow noninvasive in-situ analysis of dilute, hydrated, and chemically/structurally complex natural samples. SR x-rays can be focused to beams of micron and sub-micron dimension, which allows the study of microstructures, chemical microgradients, and microenvironments such as in biofilms, pore spaces, and around plant roots, that may control the transformation of contaminants in the environment. The utilization of SR techniques in environmental remediation sciences is often frustrated, however, by an ''activation energy barrier'', which is associated with the need to become familiar with an array of data acquisition and analysis techniques, a new technical vocabulary, beam lines, experimental instrumentation, and user facility administrative procedures. Many investigators find it challenging to become sufficiently expert in all of these areas or to maintain their training as techniques evolve. Another challenge is the dearth of facilities for hard x-ray micro-spectroscopy, particularly in the 15 to 23 KeV range, which includes x-ray absorption edges of the priority DOE contaminants Sr, U, Np, Pu, and Tc. Prior to the current program, there were only two (heavily oversubscribed) microprobe facilities in the U.S. that could fully address this energy range (one at each of APS and NSLS); none existed in the Western U.S., in spite of the relatively large number of DOE laboratories in this region

  14. Synchrotron radiation laboratories at the Bonn electron accelerators. a status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hormes, J.

    1987-07-01

    At the Physikalisches Institut of the University in Bonn experiments with synchrotron radiation were carried out ever since 1962. At the moment (June 1986) all work takes place in the SR-laboratory at the 2.5 GeV synchrotron. A 3.5 GeV stretcher ring (ELSA) is under construction and will come into operation at the end of 1986. This accelerator will also run as a storage ring for synchrotron radiation experiments and a laboratory to be used at this machine is also under consideration. The SR experiments which are carried out in Bonn try to take advantage of the fact that we are still using a high energy synchrotron for our work. Besides basic research also applied work is done using synchrotron radiation even as a production tool for X-ray lithography.

  15. SESAME — A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Å°lkü, Dinçer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    . Additional funds to purchase components of the new ring and beamlines are being sought from the EU, the US, and other sources. SESAME has benefited greatly from offers by other light source facilities of equipment and training fellowships in both accelerator technology and applications of synchrotron radiation. Details of this, and other aspects of the training program, are given below. It is hoped that in the future fellowship offers will continue to be made by many light source laboratories to further increase the level of experience with accelerator technology and synchrotron light science in preparation for the start of operation of SESAME.

  16. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    U˝Lkü, Dinçer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    . Additional funds to purchase components of the new ring and beamlines are being sought from the EU, the US, and other sources. SESAME has benefited greatly from offers by other light source facilities of equipment and training fellowships in both accelerator technology and applications of synchrotron radiation. Details of this, and other aspects of the training program, are given below. It is hoped that in the future fellowship offers will continue to be made by many light source laboratories to further increase the level of experience with accelerator technology and synchrotron light science in preparation for the start of operation of SESAME.

  17. SESAME - A 3rd Generation Synchrotron Light Source for the Middle East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulkue, Dincer; Rahighi, Javad; Winick, Herman

    2007-01-01

    . Additional funds to purchase components of the new ring and beamlines are being sought from the EU, the US, and other sources. SESAME has benefited greatly from offers by other light source facilities of equipment and training fellowships in both accelerator technology and applications of synchrotron radiation. Details of this, and other aspects of the training program, are given below. It is hoped that in the future fellowship offers will continue to be made by many light source laboratories to further increase the level of experience with accelerator technology and synchrotron light science in preparation for the start of operation of SESAME

  18. Study of Laser Wakefield Accelerators as injectors for Synchrotron light sources

    CERN Document Server

    Hillenbrand, Steffen; Müller, Anke-Susanne; Jansen, Oliver; Judin, Vitali; Pukhov, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Laser WakeField Accelerators (LWFA) feature short bunch lengths and high peak currents, combined with a small facility footprint. This makes them very interesting as injectors for Synchrotron light sources. Using the ANKA Synchrotron as an example, we investigate the possibility to inject a LWFA bunch into an electron storage ring. Particular emphasis is put on the longitudinal evolution of the bunch.

  19. Biological infrared microspectroscopy at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, Lisa M.; Carr, G. Lawrence; Williams, Gwyn P.; Sullivan, Michael; Chance, Mark R.

    2000-01-01

    Beamline U2B at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been designed and built as an infrared beamline dedicated to the study of biomedical problems. In 1997, the horizontal and vertical acceptances of Beamline U2B were increased in order to increase the overall flux of the beamline. A wedged, CVD diamond window separates the UHV vacuum of the VUV ring from the rough vacuum of the beamline. The endstation consists of a Nicolet Magna 860 step-scan FTIR and a NicPlan infrared microscope. The spectrometer is equipped with beamsplitter/detector combinations that permit data collection in the mid-and far-infrared regions. We have also made provisions for mounting an external detector (e.g. bolometer) for far infrared microspectroscopy. Thus far, Beamline U2B has been used to (1) perform chemical imaging of bone tissue and brain cells to address issues related to bone disease and epilepsy, respectively, and (2) examine time-resolved protein structure in the sub-millisecond folding of cytochrome c

  20. XUV synchrotron optical components for the Advanced Light Source: Summary of the requirements and the developmental program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, W.; Irick, S.; Lunt, D.

    1992-07-01

    We give a brief summary of the requirements for water cooled optical components for the Advanced Light Source (ALS), a third generation synchrotron radiation source under construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL). Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from a finished water cooled copper alloy mirror will be used to demonstrate the state of the art in optical metrology with the Takacs Long Trace Profiler (LTP II)

  1. Design and Optimisation Strategies of Nonlinear Dynamics for Diffraction Limited Synchrotron Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Bartolini, R.

    2016-01-01

    This paper introduces the most recent achievements in the control of nonlinear dynamics in electron synchrotron light sources, with special attention to diffraction limited storage rings. Guidelines for the design and optimization of the magnetic lattice are reviewed and discussed.

  2. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements

  3. National synchrotron light source. [Annual report], October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1994-04-01

    This report contains brief discussions on the research being conducted at the National Synchrotron Light source. Some of the topics covered are: X-ray spectroscopy; nuclear physics; atomic and molecular science; meetings and workshops; operations; and facility improvements.

  4. 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation facility at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.

    1985-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation facility optimized to generate soft x-ray and vacuum ultraviole (XUV) light using magnetic insertion devices, was proposed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in 1982. It consists of a 1.3-GeV injection system, an electron storage ring optimized at 1.3 GeV (with the capability of 1.9-GeV operation), and a number of photon beamlines emanating from twelve 6-meter-long straight sections, as shown in Fig. 1. In addition, 24 bending-magnet ports will be avialable for development. The ALS was conceived as a research tool whose range and power would stimulate fundamentally new research in fields from biology to materials science (1-4). The conceptual design and associated cost estimate for the ALS have been completed and reviewed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), but preliminary design activities have not yet begun. The focus in this paper is on the history of the ALS as an example of how a technical construction project was conceived, designed, proposed, and validated within the framwork of a national laboratory funded largely by the DOE

  5. Operational experience with synchrotron light interferometers for CEBAF experimental beam lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pavel Chevtsov

    2006-10-24

    Beam size and energy spread monitoring systems based on Synchrotron Light Interferometers (SLI) have been in operations at Jefferson Lab for several years. A non-invasive nature and a very high (a few mm) resolution of SLI make these instruments valuable beam diagnostic tools for the CEBAF accelerator. This presentation describes the evolution of the Synchrotron Light Interferometer at Jefferson Lab and highlights our extensive experience in the installation and operation of the SLI for CEBAF experimental beam lines.

  6. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices

  7. Synchrotron light source data book: Version 4, Revision 05/96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murphy, J.B.

    1996-05-01

    This book is as its name implies a collection of data on existing and planned synchrotron light sources. The intention was to provide a compendium of tools for the design of electron storage rings as synchrotron radiation sources. The slant is toward the accelerator physicist as other booklets such as the X-Ray Data Booklet address the use of synchrotron radiation. It is hoped that the booklet serves as a pocket sized reference to facilitate back of the envelope type calculations. It contains some useful formulae in practical units and a brief description of many of the existing and planned light source lattices.

  8. Using synchrotron light to accelerate EUV resist and mask materials learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naulleau, Patrick; Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Gideon; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Mochi, Iacopo; Montgomery, Warren; Rekawa, Seno; Wallow, Tom

    2011-03-01

    As commercialization of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) progresses, direct industry activities are being focused on near term concerns. The question of long term extendibility of EUVL, however, remains crucial given the magnitude of the investments yet required to make EUVL a reality. Extendibility questions are best addressed using advanced research tools such as the SEMATECH Berkeley microfield exposure tool (MET) and actinic inspection tool (AIT). Utilizing Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's Advanced Light Source facility as the light source, these tools benefit from the unique properties of synchrotron light enabling research at nodes generations ahead of what is possible with commercial tools. The MET for example uses extremely bright undulator radiation to enable a lossless fully programmable coherence illuminator. Using such a system, resolution enhancing illuminations achieving k1 factors of 0.25 can readily be attained. Given the MET numerical aperture of 0.3, this translates to an ultimate resolution capability of 12 nm. Using such methods, the SEMATECH Berkeley MET has demonstrated resolution in resist to 16-nm half pitch and below in an imageable spin-on hard mask. At a half pitch of 16 nm, this material achieves a line-edge roughness of 2 nm with a correlation length of 6 nm. These new results demonstrate that the observed stall in ultimate resolution progress in chemically amplified resists is a materials issue rather than a tool limitation. With a resolution limit of 20-22 nm, the CAR champion from 2008 remains as the highest performing CAR tested to date. To enable continued advanced learning in EUV resists, SEMATECH has initiated a plan to implement a 0.5 NA microfield tool at the Advanced Light Source synchrotron facility. This tool will be capable of printing down to 8-nm half pitch.

  9. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cai, Yunhai

    2012-01-01

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend achromatic cell, we

  10. Future Synchrotron Light Sources Based on Ultimate Storage Rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2012-04-09

    The main purpose of this talk is to describe how far one might push the state of the art in storage ring design. The talk will start with an overview of the latest developments and advances in the design of synchrotron light sources based on the concept of an 'ultimate' storage ring. The review will establish how bright a ring based light source might be, where the frontier of technological challenges are, and what the limits of accelerator physics are. Emphasis will be given to possible improvements in accelerator design and developments in technology toward the goal of achieving an ultimate storage ring. An ultimate storage ring (USR), defined as an electron ring-based light source having an emittance in both transverse planes at the diffraction limit for the range of X-ray wavelengths of interest for a scientific community, would provide very high brightness photons having high transverse coherence that would extend the capabilities of X-ray imaging and probe techniques beyond today's performance. It would be a cost-effective, high-coherence 4th generation light source, competitive with one based on energy recovery linac (ERL) technology, serving a large number of users studying material, chemical, and biological sciences. Furthermore, because of the experience accumulated over many decades of ring operation, it would have the great advantage of stability and reliability. In this paper we consider the design of an USR having 10-pm-rad emittance. It is a tremendous challenge to design a storage ring having such an extremely low emittance, a factor of 100 smaller than those in existing light sources, especially such that it has adequate dynamic aperture and beam lifetime. In many ultra-low emittance designs, the injection acceptances are not large enough for accumulation of the electron beam, necessitating on-axis injection where stored electron bunches are completely replaced with newly injected ones. Recently, starting with the MAX-IV 7-bend

  11. Dynamic response analysis of the LBL Advanced Light Source synchrotron radiation storage ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, K.

    1993-05-01

    This paper presents the dynamic response analysis of the photon source synchrotron radiation storage ring excited by ground motion measured at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory advanced light source building site. The high spectral brilliance requirement the photon beams of the advanced light source storage ring specified displacement of the quadrupole focusing magnets in the order of 1 micron in vertical motion.There are 19 magnets supported by a 430-inch steel box beam girder. The girder and all magnets are supported by the kinematic mount system normally used in optical equipment. The kinematic mount called a six-strut magnet support system is now considered as an alternative system for supporting SSC magnets in the Super Collider. The effectively designed and effectively operated six-strut support system is now successfully operated for the Advanced Light Source (ALS) accelerator at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This paper will present the method of analysis and results of the dynamic motion study at the center of the magnets under the most critical excitation source as recorded at the LBL site

  12. Electromagnetic Coupling Between High Intensity LHC Beams and the Synchrotron Radiation Monitor Light Extraction System

    CERN Document Server

    Andreazza, W; Bravin, E; Caspers, F; Garlasch`e, M; Gras, J; Goldblatt, A; Lefevre, T; Jones, R; Metral, E; Nosych, A; Roncarolo_, F; Salvant, B; Trad, G; Veness, R; Vollinger, C; Wendt, M

    2013-01-01

    The CERN LHC is equipped with two Synchrotron Radiation Monitor (BSRT) systems used to characterise transverse and longitudinal beam distributions. Since the end of the 2011 LHC run the light extraction system, based on a retractable mirror, has suffered deformation and mechanical failure that is correlated to the increase in beam intensity. Temperature probes have associated these observations to a strong heating of the mirror support with a dependence on the longitudinal bunch length and shape, indicating the origin as electromagnetic coupling between the beam and the structure. This paper combines all this information with the aim of characterising and improving the system in view of its upgrade during the current LHC shutdown. Beam-based observations are presented along with electromagnetic and thermomechanical simulations and complemented by laboratory measurements, including the study of the RF properties of different mirror bulk and coating materials.

  13. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J. [eds.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users` meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide.

  14. Environmental Remediation Science at Beamline X26A at the National Synchrotron Light Source- Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertsch, Paul [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States)

    2013-11-07

    The goal of this project was to provide support for an advanced X-ray microspectroscopy facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. This facility is operated by the University of Chicago and the University of Kentucky. The facility is available to researchers at both institutions as well as researchers around the globe through the general user program. This facility was successfully supported during the project period. It provided access to advanced X-ray microanalysis techniques which lead to fundamental advances in understanding the behavior of contaminants and geochemistry that is applicable to environmental remediation of DOE legacy sites as well as contaminated sites around the United States and beyond.

  15. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1994--September 30, 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.

    1996-05-01

    This report discusses research conducted at the National Synchrotron Light Source in the following areas: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy, and tomography; nuclear physics; scattering and crystallography studies of biological materials; time resolved spectroscopy; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; the 1995 NSLS annual users' meeting; 17th international free electron laser conference; micro bunches workshop; VUV machine; VUV storage ring parameters; beamline technical improvements; x-ray beamlines; x-ray storage ring parameters; the NSLS source development laboratory; the accelerator test facility (ATF); NSLS facility improvements; NSLS advisory committees; NSLS staff; VUV beamline guide; and x-ray beamline guide

  16. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory activity report for 1986

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1987-12-31

    1986 was another year of major advances for SSRL as the ultimate capabilities of PEP as a synchrotron radiation source became more apparent and a second PEP beam line was initiated, while effective development and utilization of SPEAR proceeded. Given these various PEP developments, SSRL abandoned its plans for a separate diffraction limited ring, as they abandoned their plans for a 6--7 GeV ring of the APS type last year. It has become increasingly apparent that SSRL should concentrate on developing SPEAR and PEP as synchrotron radiation sources. Consequently, initial planning for a 3 GeV booster synchrotron injector for SPEAR was performed in 1986, with a proposal to the Department of Energy resulting. As described in Chapter 2, the New Rings Group and the Machine Physics Group were combined into one Accelerator Physics Group. This group is focusing mainly on the improvement of SPEAR`s operating conditions and on planning for the conversion of PEP into a fourth generation x-ray source. Considerable emphasis is also being given to the training of accelerator physics graduate students. At the same time, several improvements of SSRL`s existing facilities were made. These are described in Chapter 3. Chapter 4 describes new SSRL beam lines being commissioned. Chapter 5 discusses SSRL`s present construction projects. Chapter 6 discusses a number of projects presently underway in the engineering division. Chapter 7 describes SSRL`s advisory panels while Chapter 8 discusses SSRL`s overall organization. Chapter 9 describes the experimental progress reports.

  17. Construction of a synchrotron radiation research laboratory in Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takehiko

    2005-01-01

    Various obstacles encountered during the course of the construction of the synchrotron radiation facilities in Thailand are described. First background information such as the brief history, the purpose of the project, and the human resources development are mentioned. Then difficulty in promoting the new project is described. Some serious problems having emerged and been overcome in the accelerator construction are mentioned. They are non-uniform floor subsidence, the broken injection timing system, the breaking of newly built vacuum chambers, the unstable operation of the linac, and electrical shortage between layers of coils of quadrupole magnets. (author)

  18. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, A.L.; Perera, R.C.C.; Schlachter, A.S.

    1991-10-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), scheduled to be operational in the spring of 1993 as a US Department of Energy national user facility, will be a next- generation source of soft x-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) synchrotron radiation. Undulators will provide the world's brightest synchrotron radiation at photon energies from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; wiggler and bend-magnet radiation will extend the spectral coverage with high fluxes above 10 keV. These capabilities will support an extensive research program in a broad spectrum of scientific and technological areas in which XUV radiation is used to study and manipulate matter in all its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The ALS will also serve those interested in developing the fabrication technology for micro- and nanostructures, as well as characterizing them

  19. Synchrotron light sources: The search for quantum chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, Fred

    2001-01-01

    A storage ring is a specialized synchrotron in which a stored beam of relativistic electrons produces radiation in the vuv and x-ray regions of the spectrum. High-brightness radiation is used at the ALS to study doubly excited autoionizing states of the helium atom in the search for quantum chaos

  20. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL's history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia's leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR's performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY '91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL's three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL's users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report

  1. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K. [ed.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL`s users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL`s experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year.

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.

    1996-01-01

    For SSRL operations, 1988 was a year of stark contrasts. The first extended PEP parasitic running since the construction of our two beam lines on that storage ring took place in November and December. Four experiments discussed below, were performed and detailed operational procedures which allowed synchrotron radiation an high energy users to coexist were established. SSRL anticipates that there will be significant amounts of beam time when PEP is run again for high energy physics. On the other hand, activity on SPEAR consisted of brief parasitic running on the VUV lines in December when the ring was operated at 1.85 GeV for colliding beam experiments. There was no dedicated SPEAR running throughout the entire calendar year. This is the first time since dedicated SPEAR operation was initiated in 1980 that there was no such running. The decision was motivated by both cost and performance factors, as discussed in Section 1 of this report. Fortunately, SLAC and SSRL have reached an agreement on SPEAR and PEP dedicated time charges which eliminates the cost volatility which was so important in the cancellation of the June-July dedicated SPEAR run. As discussed in Section 2, the 3 GeV SPEAR injector construction is proceeding on budget and on schedule. The injector will overcome the difficulties associated with the SLC-era constraint of only two injections per day. SSR and SLAC have also embarked on a program to upgrade SPEAR to achieve high reliability and performance. As a consequence, SSRL's users may anticipate a highly effective SPEAR by 1991, at the latest. At that time, SPEAR is expected to be fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research and operated by SSRL. Also contained in this report is a discussion of the improvements to SSRL's experimental facilities and highlights of the experiments of the past year

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Activity report for 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-01-01

    The April, 1990 SPEAR synchrotron radiation run was one of the two or three best in SSRL`s history. High currents were accumulated, ramping went easily, lifetimes were long, beam dumps were infrequent and the average current was 42.9 milliamps. In the one month of operation, 63 different experiments involving 208 scientists from 50 institutions received beam. The end-of-run summary forms completed by the experimenters indicated high levels of user satisfaction with the beam quality and with the outstanding support received from the SSRL technical and scientific staffs. These fine experimental conditions result largely from the SPEAR repairs and improvements performed during the past year and described in Section I. Also quite significant was Max Cornacchia`s leadership of the SLAG staff. SPEAR`s performance this past April stands in marked contrast to that of the January-March, 1989 run which is also described in Section I. It is, we hope, a harbinger of the operation which will be provided in FY `91, when the SPEAR injector project is completed and SPEAR is fully dedicated to synchrotron radiation research. Over the coming years, SSRL intends to give highest priority to increasing the effectiveness of SPEAR and its various beam lines. The beam line and facility improvements performed during 1989 are described in Section III. In order to concentrate effort on SSRL`s three highest priorities prior to the March-April run: (1) to have a successful run, (2) to complete and commission the injector, and (3) to prepare to operate, maintain and improve the SPEAR/injector system, SSRL was reorganized. In the new organization, all the technical staff is contained in three groups: Accelerator Research and Operations Division, Injector Project and Photon Research and Operations Division, as described in Section IV. In spite of the limited effectiveness of the January-March, 1989 run, SSRL`s users made significant scientific progress, as described in Section V of this report.

  4. Advanced Light Source, a 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berkner, K.H.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation facility optimized to generate soft x-ray and vacuum ultraviolet (XUV) light using magnetic insertion devices, was proposed by the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory in 1982. It consists of a 1.3-GeV injection system, an electron storage ring optimized at 1.3 GeV (with the capability of 1.9-GeV operation), and a number of photon beamlines emanating from twelve 6-meter-long straight sections. In addition, 24 bending-magnet ports will be available for development. The ALS was conceived as a research tool whose range and power would stimulate fundamentally new research in fields from biology to materials science. The conceptual design and associated cost estimate for the ALS have been completed and reviewed by the US Department of Energy (DOE), but Title I activities have not yet begun. The focus in this study is on the history of the ALS as an example of how a technical construction project was conceived, designed, proposed, and validated within the framework of a national laboratory funded largely by the DOE

  5. Development and trial measurement of synchrotron-radiation-light-illuminated scanning tunneling microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsushima, Takeshi; Okuda, Taichi; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Ono, Masanori; Harasawa, Ayumi; Wakita, Takanori; Kataoka, Akira; Hamada, Masayuki; Kamoshida, Atsushi; Hasegawa, Yukio; Kinoshita, Toyohiko

    2004-01-01

    Scanning tunneling microscope (STM) study is performed under synchrotron-radiation-light illumination. The equipment is designed so as to achieve atomic resolution even under rather noisy conditions in the synchrotron radiation facility. By measuring photoexcited electron current by the STM tip together with the conventional STM tunneling current, Si 2p soft-x-ray absorption spectra are successfully obtained from a small area of Si(111) surface. The results are a first step toward realizing a new element-specific microscope

  6. Passive beam sprending systems and light-weight gentries for synchrotron based hadron therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maier, A.

    1998-12-01

    Hadron therapy is a promising technique that uses beams of protons or light ions for the treatment of cancer. In order to open this technique to a wider application, dedicated hospital based treatment centers are now needed. The Proton-Ion Medical Machine Study (PIMMS) in CERN is concerned with the design of such a center that would use both protons and light ions. The dual species operation makes it preferable to base the center on a synchrotron. The present thesis is concerned with the beam delivery for the protons. After introducing the basic vocabulary of linear beam optics, the feasibility of a light-weight gantry with passive beam spreading fed by a synchrotron is investigated. The device is a non-linear magnetic structure, which can be described as a magnetic guide or as a proton pipe. Detailed studies show that while it is possible to design an optically stable 270 o section, which would be necessary for a gantry, the properties do not fulfil the requirements of a gantry for medical purposes. It was therefore concluded that a conventional isocentric gantry would be used for protons. The problem of passive beam-spreading is also investigated. A detailed knowledge of multiple scattering is necessary for the design of such a system. The basic principles of multiple scattering following Moliere's theory are mentioned. In addition, a Gaussian approximation of multiple scattering developed by Highland is described. A treatment of multiple scattering for thick and thin scatterers is then developed using the so-called Q-formalism that is frequently used in accelerator optics. This is then used to give a statistical description of the beam with scattering included using the Twiss formalism that is also used widely in accelerator physics. Excellent agreement is demonstrated with Monte-Carlo data. The Twiss-Scatterer relations obtained make it possible to include arbitrary, thick scatterers in accelerator codes. High intensities for protons are less readily available

  7. Use of a synchrotron radiation x-ray microprobe for elemental analysis at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1980-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is a facility consisting of a 700 MeV and a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring and dedicated to providing synchrotron radiation in the energy range from the vacuum ultraviolet to high energy x rays. Some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that contribute to its usefulness for x-ray fluorescence are: a continuous, tunable energy spectrum, strong collimation in the horizontal plane, high polarization in the storage ring plane, and relatively low energy deposition. The highest priority is for the development of an x-ray microprobe beam line capable of trace analysis in the parts per million range with spatial resolution as low as one micrometer. An eventual capability for bulk sample analysis is also planned with sensitivities in the more favorable cases beings low as 50 parts per billion in dry biological tissue. The microprobe technique has application to a variety of fields including the geological, medical, materials and environmental sciences. Examples of investigations include multielemental trace analysis across grain boundaries for the study of diffusion and cooling processes in geological and materials sciences samples; in leukocytes and other types of individual cells for studying the relationship between trace element concentrations and disease or nutrition; and in individual particles in air pollution samples

  8. A 1.5 GeV high brilliance synchrotron light source with combined function lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eriksson, M.; Lindgren, L.J.; Andersson, Aa.; Roejsel, P.; Werin, S.

    1988-01-01

    A 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source with a combined function lattice is studied. The light source will offer X-ray radiation with λc=1.0 angstrom from a superconducting wiggler and high brilliance VUV-radiation from undulators. The magnet lattice, magnet design and ring performance is discussed. (authors)

  9. Rf power systems for the national synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dickinson, T.; Rheaume, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The booster synchrotron and the two storage rings at the NSLS are provided with rf power systems of 3 kW, 50 kW, and 500 kW nominal output power, all at 53 MHz. This power is supplied by grounded grid tetrode amplifiers designed for television broadcast service. These amplifiers and associated power supplies, control and interlock systems, rf controls, and computer interface are described

  10. Compton profile with synchrotron light - application to Y-123 superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De, Udayan

    2005-01-01

    Electron beam accelerated to 6 GeV in the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) at Grenoble, France, can deliver highly mono-energetic, intense (10 12 photons/sec at sample at 100 mA ring current) and fine photon beam reaching x-ray and γ energies. So photons of 57 keV from this synchrotron has been used for Compton Profile or CP experiment (at different temperatures down to 70 K) on our YBa 2 Cu 3 O 7 or Y-123 single crystals with T c = 91 K. Photons, Compton scattered even at a definite angle, θ, show a distribution (called Compton Profile) of energy and hence of momentum reflecting the EMD or electron momentum distribution in the solid. The temperature variation of S-parameter, defined as the fraction of low momentum electrons, has been found from preliminary CP data. It confirmed the surprising double minimum found from Doppler broadening of positron annihilation radiation lineshape (DBPARL). The CP set-up at the synchrotron including the detectors and cryogenics as well as the new results are outlined. (author)

  11. A gas phase work station for the Brazilian National Synchrotron Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, G.G.B. de

    1988-01-01

    A gas phase work station which has been proposed to the Brazilian National Synchrotron Laboratory is described with emphasis on the broad spectrum of physical and chemical processes which can be studied with the incorporated instrumentation. (A.C.A.S.) [pt

  12. The LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornacchia, M.

    1987-03-01

    A description is presented of the conceptual design of the 1 to 2 GeV Synchrotron Radiation Source proposed for construction at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. This facility is designed to produce ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation. The accelerator complex consists of an injection system (linac plus booster synchrotron) and a low-emittance storage ring optimized for insertion devices. Eleven straight sections are available for undulators and wigglers, and up to 48 photon beam lines may ultimately emanate from bending magnets. Design features of the radiation source are the high brightness of the photon beams, the very short pulses (tens of picoseconds), and the tunability of the radiation

  13. A CCD-based area detector for X-ray crystallography using synchrotron and laboratory sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, W.C.; Li Youli; Stanton, M.; Xie Yuanhui; O'Mara, D.; Kalata, K.

    1993-01-01

    The design and characteristics of a CCD-based area detector suitable for X-ray crystallographic studies using both synchrotron and laboratory sources are described. The active area is 75 mm in diameter, the FWHM of the point response function is 0.20 mm, and for Bragg peaks the dynamic range is 900 and the DQE ∼0.3. The 1320x1035-pixel Kodak CCD is read out into an 8 Mbyte memory system in 0.14 s and digitized to 12 bits. X-ray crystallographic data collected at the NSLS synchrotron from cubic insulin crystals are presented. (orig.)

  14. Development of compact synchrotron light source LUNA for x-ray lithography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Mandai, S.; Hoshi, Y.; Kohno, Y.

    1992-01-01

    A compact synchrotron light source LUNA has been developed by Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries Co., Ltd. (IHI), especially for x-ray lithography. It consists of a 45-MeV linac as an electron injector and an 800-MeV synchrotron. The peak wavelength of synchrotron radiation is around 10 A. The installation of LUNA was completed in April 1989 at the Tsuchiura Facility of IHI. The synchrotron radiation was first observed in December 1989. A stored beam current of 50 mA at 800 MeV and a lifetime over 1 h have been achieved. At present, experiments are still continuing to increase the stored current and the lifetime. X-ray lithography testing is scheduled to begin in a clean room in this facility. This paper describes the outline of LUNA and the present status

  15. Materials research utilizing NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedl, G.L.

    1986-08-01

    Research was conducted using NSLS synchrotron radiation on the following: decomposition kinetics of a supersaturated Ni-Si alloy, hexane monolayers on graphite, layering of Fe(CO) 5 on graphite, charge density waves, aging of Al-Li, superlattices in ternary MBE-grown semiconductor films, phase transformation in Cu-Be and Al-Zn, microstructural changes in complex alloys, diffuse x-ray scattering, ion conduction in Ag-Ge-Se glass, organic monolayers of the Langmuir Blodgett type, and residual stress in coating

  16. Coherent scattering X-ray imaging at the Brazilian National Synchrotron Laboratory: Preliminary breast images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, C.R.F. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory-COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil); Barroso, R.C. [Physics Institute-University of Rio de Janeiro State, Rio de Janeiro 20559-900 (Brazil)]. E-mail: cely@uerij.br; Oliveira, L.F. de [Physics Institute-University of Rio de Janeiro State, Rio de Janeiro 20559-900 (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Nuclear Instrumentation Laboratory-COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Rio de Janeiro 21945-970 (Brazil)

    2005-08-11

    The angular distribution of coherent scatter (low-momentum transfer) carries information about atomic structures, resulting in a pattern, which can be used to reconstruct a series of images. Coherent-scatter computed tomography is a novel imaging method developed to produce cross-sectional images based on the X-ray diffraction properties of an object. A different approach to coherent X-ray imaging is possible by fixing the detector at a given scatter angle {theta}, which produces an interference peak and then, carried out a tomography in the standard way. The cross-sectional images obtained allow determining the spatial dependence of coherent scatter cross-section of selected volume elements of inhomogeneous, extend objects for a single predetermined value of {theta} of interest, leading to a simplification of the data processing and the complexity of the apparatus. This work presents preliminary coherent scattering images carried out at the X-ray Diffraction beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory in Campinas, Brazil. The specimens were excised human breast tissues fixed in formaline. No frozen procedure was used in order to minimize preferred orientation during sample preparation. About 1mm thick slices cut from each of the fresh samples were mounted in frames without windows and placed on a translator to allow acquisition of scattering spectra. Cylinders containing healthy and cancerous (infiltrating ductal carcinoma) breast tissues were imagined at the characteristic angle for adipose tissue. Transmission and coherent scatter images are compared.

  17. Synchrotron applications of pixel and strip detectors at Diamond Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marchal, J.; Tartoni, N.; Nave, C.

    2009-01-01

    A wide range of position-sensitive X-ray detectors have been commissioned on the synchrotron X-ray beamlines operating at the Diamond Light Source in UK. In addition to mature technologies such as image-plates, CCD-based detectors, multi-wire and micro-strip gas detectors, more recent detectors based on semiconductor pixel or strip sensors coupled to CMOS read-out chips are also in use for routine synchrotron X-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The performance of several commercial and developmental pixel/strip detectors for synchrotron studies are discussed with emphasis on the image quality achieved with these devices. Examples of pixel or strip detector applications at Diamond Light Source as well as the status of the commissioning of these detectors on the beamlines are presented. Finally, priorities and ideas for future developments are discussed.

  18. Progress with ELETTRA, the synchrotron light source in Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puglisi, M.; Wrulich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ELETTRA, the 3rd generation synchrotron radiation source under construction in Trieste has passed the design phase. The present schedule calls for a start of commissioning by the second half of 1993. The buildings are under construction and prototypes for all main components of the accelerator complex have been constructed and industrial production has started. A high power cavity fully equipped with cooling circuit and input coupling loop, as well as mechanical tuning system, has been tested and measured. Prototype cavities equipped with higher order mode suppressors are under development. In-house prototypes for each magnet type have been built and magnetic measurements have been performed. The vacuum chamber prototype has been baked under vacuum and tested with its pumping system. A prototype pure permanent magnet undulator has been assembled and measured. The first 100 MeV sections of the 1.5 GeV injection linac will go in operation in August 1990

  19. Mechanical Design of the HER Synchrotron Light Monitor Primary Mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Edward F.; /SLAC; Fisher, Alan S.; Kurita, Nadine R.; Langton, J.; /SLAC

    2011-09-14

    This paper describes the mechanical design of the primary mirror that images the visible portion of the synchrotron radiation (SR) extracted from the High Energy Ring (HER) of the PEP-II B-Factory. During off-axis operation, the water-cooled GlidCop mirror is subjected to a heat flux in excess of 2000 W/cm2. When on-axis imaging occurs, the heat flux due to scattered SR, resistive wall losses and Higher-Order-Mode (HOM) heating is estimated at 1 W/cm2. The imaging surface is plated with Electroless Nickel to improve its optical characteristics. The design requirements for the primary mirror are listed and discussed. Calculated mechanical distortions and stresses experienced by the mirror during on-axis and off-axis operation will be presented.

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source angiography personnel protection interlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, N.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1992-06-01

    This document has been written to describe the safety system operation at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). The angiography exposure process involves scanning a patient up and down through dual fixed-position x-ray beams; exposure is controlled by opening and closing a fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism at precise times in relation to the up and down motion of the scan chair. The fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism is the primary radiation-stopping element protecting the patient while the chair is at rest and while it is reversing directions during the scan. Its fail-safe and fast operation is essential for the safety of the patient. Operation of X17B2 as a human subject angiography station necessitates the implementation of a personnel protection interlock system that, in conjunction with the Safety Shutters: permits safe access to the patient exposure area while the synchrotron radiation beam is illuminating the upstream dual energy monochromator; allows a patient to be imaged by the monochromatized beam under the supervision of a Responsible Physician, with scan chair motion and precision shutter actuation regulated by an angiography control computer, while providing a suitable number of safeguards against accidental radiation exposure; has different modes of operation to accommodate equipment set-up, test, and calibration; and patient exposure; and ensures the quick extinction of the beam if a potentially unsafe condition is detected. The interlock system which performs these safety functions is called the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI). The APPI Document is organized such that the level of detail changes from a general overview to detailed engineering drawings of the hardware system

  1. National Synchrotron Light Source angiography personnel protection interlock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gmuer, N.; Larson, R.; Thomlinson, W.

    1992-06-01

    This document has been written to describe the safety system operation at the NSLS X17B2 beamline Synchrotron Medical Research Facility (SMERF). The angiography exposure process involves scanning a patient up and down through dual fixed-position x-ray beams; exposure is controlled by opening and closing a fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism at precise times in relation to the up and down motion of the scan chair. The fast-acting Safety Shutter mechanism is the primary radiation-stopping element protecting the patient while the chair is at rest and while it is reversing directions during the scan. Its fail-safe and fast operation is essential for the safety of the patient. Operation of X17B2 as a human subject angiography station necessitates the implementation of a personnel protection interlock system that, in conjunction with the Safety Shutters: permits safe access to the patient exposure area while the synchrotron radiation beam is illuminating the upstream dual energy monochromator; allows a patient to be imaged by the monochromatized beam under the supervision of a Responsible Physician, with scan chair motion and precision shutter actuation regulated by an angiography control computer, while providing a suitable number of safeguards against accidental radiation exposure; has different modes of operation to accommodate equipment set-up, test, and calibration; and patient exposure; and ensures the quick extinction of the beam if a potentially unsafe condition is detected. The interlock system which performs these safety functions is called the Angiography Personnel Protection Interlock (APPI). The APPI Document is organized such that the level of detail changes from a general overview to detailed engineering drawings of the hardware system.

  2. Bringing Physics, Synchrotron Light and Probing Neutrons to the Public: A Collaborative Outreach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micklavzina, Stanley; Almqvist, Monica; Sörensen, Stacey L.

    2014-01-01

    Stanley Micklavzina, a US physics educator on sabbatical, teams up with a Swedish national research laboratory, a synchrotron radiation experimental group and a university science centre to develop and create educational and public outreach projects. Descriptions of the physics, science centre displays and public demonstrations covering the…

  3. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2016-01-01

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  4. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; White, Thomas G. [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom); Drakopoulos, Michael [Diamond Light Source, I12 Joint Engineering, Environmental, Processing (JEEP) Beamline, Didcot, Oxfordshire (United Kingdom); Rack, Alexander [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble (France); Eakins, Daniel E., E-mail: d.eakins@imperial.ac.uk [Imperial College London, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-24

    Scintillator performance in time-resolved, hard, indirect detection X-ray studies on the sub-microsecond timescale at synchrotron light sources is reviewed, modelled and examined experimentally. LYSO:Ce is found to be the only commercially available crystal suitable for these experiments. The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits)

  5. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z. [ed.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility.

  6. 1994 Activity Report, National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report, October 1, 1993-September 30, 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothman, E.Z.

    1995-05-01

    This report is a summary of activities carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Source during 1994. It consists of sections which summarize the work carried out in differing scientific disciplines, meetings and workshops, operations experience of the facility, projects undertaken for upgrades, administrative reports, and collections of abstracts and publications generated from work done at the facility

  7. Project planning workshop 6-GeV synchrotron light source: Volume 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    A model 6 GeV synchrotron light source is described, and the costs, schedule, and manpower associated with producing such a synthrotron light source are summarized. A program consisting of a two-year pre-construction phase, a five-year construction phase, and a three-year post-construction phase and costing a total of $379.6 million is assumed

  8. Induced Radioactivity in Lead Shielding at the National Synchrotron Light Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Vinita J; Schaefer, Charles; Kahnhauser, Henry

    2017-06-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory was shut down in September 2014. Lead bricks used as radiological shadow shielding within the accelerator were exposed to stray radiation fields during normal operations. The FLUKA code, a fully integrated Monte Carlo simulation package for the interaction and transport of particles and nuclei in matter, was used to estimate induced radioactivity in this shielding and stainless steel beam pipe from known beam losses. The FLUKA output was processed using MICROSHIELD® to estimate on-contact exposure rates with individually exposed bricks to help design and optimize the radiological survey process. This entire process can be modeled using FLUKA, but use of MICROSHIELD® as a secondary method was chosen because of the project's resource constraints. Due to the compressed schedule and lack of shielding configuration data, simple FLUKA models were developed. FLUKA activity estimates for stainless steel were compared with sampling data to validate results, which show that simple FLUKA models and irradiation geometries can be used to predict radioactivity inventories accurately in exposed materials. During decommissioning 0.1% of the lead bricks were found to have measurable levels of induced radioactivity. Post-processing with MICROSHIELD® provides an acceptable secondary method of estimating residual exposure rates.

  9. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1986-10-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem will be briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail

  10. Operation of general purpose stepping motor controllers at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1987-01-01

    A prototype and four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a sixth subsystem is nearing completion. The subsystems effect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motors and their associated position encoders. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a standard 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Short descriptions of the positioning apparatus actuated at each of the test and experiment stations employing a motor control unit are given. Additions and enhancements to the sub-system made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail

  11. Light Guide Collector Prototype: Laboratory Testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka - Mohelnikova

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article reviews the potential of light guide system equipped by a concentrator device capturing daylight applicable for illumination of building interiors and presents results of experiments on performance of its prototype. The main goal is focused on the comparison of traditional solutions and newly developed prototype of the light guide system and presents examination of its light transmission efficiency based on the laboratory experiments.

  12. Light Guide Collector Prototype: Laboratory Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Jitka - Mohelnikova; Stanislav Darula; Ayodeji Omishore; Petr Mohelnik; Denis Micek

    2017-01-01

    The article reviews the potential of light guide system equipped by a concentrator device capturing daylight applicable for illumination of building interiors and presents results of experiments on performance of its prototype. The main goal is focused on the comparison of traditional solutions and newly developed prototype of the light guide system and presents examination of its light transmission efficiency based on the laboratory experiments.

  13. Insertion devices and beamlines for the proposed Australian synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.F.; Boldeman, J.W.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The proposed Australian synchrotron light source, Boomerang, is a third generation 3 GeV storage ring which is designed to provide for the great majority of Australian requirements for synchrotron radiation well into the next century. The storage ring could accommodate up to 60 experimental stations, including beamlines from 9 insertion devices, which far exceeds the projected Australian requirements over the life of the facility. Undulator radiation will be available up to 20 keV. The first phase construction of Boomerang includes funding for 9 beamlines, comprising 5 bending magnet and 4 insertion device beamlines. The beamline complement has been chosen to cater for approximately 95% of the current and projected Australian demand for synchrotron radiation over the first 5 years operation of the facility. Details will be shown of the performance of the proposed insertion devices, and the initial beamline complement will be presented

  14. Sesame Synchrotron Light for Experimental Sciences and Application in the Middle East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Khalafawy, T.A.

    2003-01-01

    Anew international center for synchrotron radiation for research excellence for scientists from throughout the Middle East as well as other parts of the world could do for science what CERN has done for science in Europe. SESAME Project (Synchrotron Light for Experimental Sciences and Application in the Middle East ) under the umbrella for UNESCO establish the first major international research center as a cooperative venture by the scientists and governments of the Middle East, opened to all qualified scientists. It will be propeller for the regional economy while promoting the peaceful development of science and technology in the Middle East. SESAME will have as its centerpiece a synchrotron radiation based on a gift from Germany of the 0.8 GeV BESSYI storage ring and injector system which stopped operation at the end of November 1999

  15. The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Microspectroscopy and fast timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.

    1998-05-01

    A set of new infrared (IR) beamlines on the 1.4 bending magnet port at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL, are described. Using a synchrotron as an IR source provides considerable brightness advantages, which manifests itself most beneficially when performing spectroscopy on a microscopic length scale. Beamline (BL) 1.4.3 is a dedicated microspectroscopy beamline, where the much smaller focused spot size using the synchrotron source is utilized. This enables an entirely new set of experiments to be performed where spectroscopy on a truly microscopic scale is now possible. BL 1.4.2 consists of a vacuum FTIR bench with a wide spectral range and step-scan capabilities. The fast timing is demonstrated by observing the synchrotron electron storage pattern at the ALS

  16. Nanoparticles and synchrotron light for brain tumors therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taupin, Florence

    2013-01-01

    Gliomas treatment is still a serious challenge in medicine. Available treatments are mainly palliative and patients' survival is increased by a few months only. An original radiotherapy technique consists in increasing the dose delivered to the tumor by loading it with high Z atoms before an irradiation with low energy X-rays (50-100 keV). Preclinical studies have been conducted using iodine contrast agent (CA) (Z=53) and 50 keV X-rays. The increase of the animals' survival leads today to the beginning of clinical trials (phases I and II) at the medical beamline of the European synchrotron, where the available monochromatic and intense photons beam is well suited for this treatment. The use of intravenously injected CA is however insufficient for curing rat's bearing glioma. Indeed, the contrast agent's accumulation is limited by the presence of the BBB and it remains extracellular. Metallic nanoparticles (NPs) appear interesting for improving the treatment efficacy. During this work, three different types of NPs have been studied: GdNPs (3 nm), AuNPs (13 nm) and PtNPs (6 nm). Their toxicity and internalization have been evaluated in vitro on F98 rodent glioma cells. Cells' survival has also been measured after different irradiation conditions in presence of these NPs and with monochromatic photons beams. Several mechanisms implicated in the treatment have been highlighted by the study of the cells' response dependence to the incident particles energy and to the sub cellular NPs distribution during irradiation. For identical concentrations, NPs were more efficient in cells killing than CA, illustrating their microdosimetric potential. The effect was also preferential for low energy X-rays, indicating that photoactivation of heavy atoms plays a role in the cells' death. GdNPs and PtNPs have also lead to an effect in combination to high energy photons (1.25 MeV), indicating that another mechanism may also increase the cell

  17. Second meeting of the Scientific Societies for the feasibility study of implantation of a synchrotron radiation national laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-01-01

    Feasibility study for the implantation of a national laboratory of synchrotron radiation in Brazil is discussed by several Brazilian Scientific Societies. Problems related with cost, personnel training and machine uses are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  18. Note on the preliminar proposal of the feasibility study for the implantation of a national laboratory of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, R.; Muniz, R.P.A.

    1983-01-01

    Some socio-economic and political aspects on the implantation of a National Laboratory of Synchrotron Radiation in Brazil are discussed. Some applications of such a radiation, including technological ones, are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  19. Measurements of a prototype synchrotron radiation pumped absorber for future light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, T.S.; Foerster, C.L.; Halama, H.; Lanni, C.

    1988-01-01

    In the new generation of advanced synchrotron light sources, the conventional concept of distributed pumping is no longer suitable for removing the gas load caused by photon stimulated desorption (PSD). A new concept using a combination of photon absorber and pumping station has been designed, constructed, and installed in the U1OB beam line at the VUV ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source. The system consists of an electrically insulated water cooled copper block, a titanium sublimation pump, calibrated BA gauges, a calibrated RGA, and a known conductance. A photon beam 10 milliradian wide and 3.26 milliradian high, having critical energy of 500 eV, is directed on the absorber. PSD yield is studied as a function of total beam dose and absorber surface preparation. The results from this experiment, pump characteristics, design of an absorber pump for future light sources, and the pressure improvement factors will be presented. 5 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab

  20. Consideration of a non-baked start-up of a synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hori, Y.; Kobayashi, M.

    1996-01-01

    Vacuum baking of large complex uhv devices, such as synchrotron light sources, requires both careful design and consideration of potential problems regarding the operation and maintenance of the device. Intense synchrotron irradiation can be utilized for degassing; it is indeed necessary to achieve the required operating pressure in most light sources. To examine a non-baked start-up, the outgassing of non-baked chambers by SR irradiation was measured. Also, a non-baked start-up was carried out at the Photon Factory ring. Both results demonstrate the feasibility of a non-baked start-up of a light source. The experiments and results are described, together with several other problems which must be solved for a non-baked start-up. (Author)

  1. BNL National Synchrotron Light Source activity report 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-05-01

    During FY 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory celebrated its 50th Anniversary and 50 years of outstanding achievement under the management of Associated Universities, Inc. This progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) science highlights; (3) meetings and workshops; (4) operations; (5) projects; (6) organization; and (7) abstracts and publications

  2. BNL National Synchrotron Light Source activity report 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-05-01

    During FY 1997 Brookhaven National Laboratory celebrated its 50th Anniversary and 50 years of outstanding achievement under the management of Associated Universities, Inc. This progress report is divided into the following sections: (1) introduction; (2) science highlights; (3) meetings and workshops; (4) operations; (5) projects; (6) organization; and (7) abstracts and publications.

  3. Synchrotron light sources and free-electron lasers accelerator physics, instrumentation and science applications

    CERN Document Server

    Khan, Shaukat; Schneider, Jochen; Hastings, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Hardly any other discovery of the nineteenth century did have such an impact on science and technology as Wilhelm Conrad Röntgen’s seminal find of the X-rays. X-ray tubes soon made their way as excellent instruments for numerous applications in medicine, biology, materials science and testing, chemistry and public security. Developing new radiation sources with higher brilliance and much extended spectral range resulted in stunning developments like the electron synchrotron and electron storage ring and the freeelectron laser. This handbook highlights these developments in fifty chapters. The reader is given not only an inside view of exciting science areas but also of design concepts for the most advanced light sources. The theory of synchrotron radiation and of the freeelectron laser, design examples and the technology basis are presented. The handbook presents advanced concepts like seeding and harmonic generation, the booming field of Terahertz radiation sources and upcoming brilliant light sources dri...

  4. National Synchrotron Light Source users manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beam lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, N.F.; White-DePace, S.M.

    1987-08-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source in the years to come will be based, in large part, on the size of the users community and the diversity of the scientific disciplines represented by these users. In order to promote this philosophy, this National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) Users Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beam Lines, has been published. This manual serves a number of purposes. In an effort to attract new research, it will present to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture and capabilities of the various VUV and x-ray beam lines and storage rings. We anticipate that this publication will be updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes at the NSLS

  5. The synchrotron light source as a tool for microtechnology

    CERN Document Server

    Harvey, E C

    2002-01-01

    We are all familiar with lathes and milling machines for shaping parts in machine shops and factories. But what if the parts we need to make are significantly smaller than a millimetre, and featuring details even smaller? Semiconductor chip manufacturers have faced these problems and have learnt to use new ways to make devices. No longer are transistors made one at a time, but rather are 'printed' millions at a time, together with their interconnection wiring in a process called photolithography. Light from an excimer laser is directed through masks that incorporate the patterns required and photoexposes surfaces positioned behind the masks. This form of photolithography is today a standard process in semiconductor FAB plants and has several critical advantages in terms of cost, reproducibility, reliability and its ability to scale towards ever smaller and more complex systems

  6. Time-resolved far-infrared experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanner, D.B.; Reitze, D.H.; Carr, G.L.

    1999-01-01

    A facility for time-resolved infrared and far-infrared spectroscopy has been built and commissioned at the National Synchrotron Light Source. This facility permits the study of time dependent phenomena over a frequency range from 2-8000cm -1 (0.25 meV-1 eV). Temporal resolution is approximately 200 psec and time dependent phenomena in the time range out to 100 nsec can be investigated

  7. Modeling of synchrotron-based laboratory simulations of Titan's ionospheric photochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco, Nathalie; Peng, Zhe; Pernot, Pascal

    2014-11-01

    The APSIS reactor has been designed to simulate in the laboratory with a VUV synchrotron irradiation the photochemistry occurring in planetary upper atmospheres. A N2-CH4 Titan-like gas mixture has been studied, whose photochemistry in Titan's ionospheric irradiation conditions leads to a coupled chemical network involving both radicals and ions. In the present work, an ion-neutral coupled model is developed to interpret the experimental data, taking into account the uncertainties on the kinetic parameters by Monte Carlo sampling. The model predicts species concentrations in agreement with mass spectrometry measurements of the methane consumption and product blocks intensities. Ion chemistry and in particular dissociative recombination are found to be very important through sensitivity analysis. The model is also applied to complementary environmental conditions, corresponding to Titan's ionospheric average conditions and to another existing synchrotron setup. An innovative study of the correlations between species concentrations identifies two main competitive families, leading respectively to saturated and unsaturated species. We find that the unsaturated growth family, driven by C2H2 , is dominant in Titan's upper atmosphere, as observed by the Cassini INMS. But the saturated species are substantially more intense in the measurements of the two synchrotron experimental setups, and likely originate from catalysis by metallic walls of the reactors.

  8. The first synchrotron infrared beamlines at the Advanced Light Source: Spectromicroscopy and fast timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    1999-01-01

    Two recently commissioned infrared beamlines on the 1.4 bending magnet port at the Advanced Light Source, LBNL, are described. Using a synchrotron as an IR source provides three primary advantages: increased brightness, very fast light pulses, and enhanced far-IR flux. The considerable brightness advantage manifests itself most beneficially when performing spectroscopy on a microscopic length scale. Beamline (BL) 1.4.3 is a dedicated FTIR spectromicroscopy beamline, where a diffraction-limited spot size using the synchrotron source is utilized. BL 1.4.2 consists of a vacuum FTIR bench with a wide spectral range and step-scan capability. This BL makes use of the pulsed nature of the synchrotron light as well as the far-IR flux. Fast timing is demonstrated by observing the pulses from the electron bunch storage pattern at the ALS. Results from several experiments from both IR beamlines will be presented as an overview of the IR research currently being done at the ALS

  9. Development trends for insertion devices of future synchrotron light sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. S. Hwang

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The in-vacuum undulator with a permanent magnet at room temperature is a mature technology and is widely used; with a short period length in a medium-energy facility, it can enhance photon brilliance in the hard x-ray region. A cryogenic permanent magnet has been investigated as an in-vacuum undulator; this undulator will become the best prospective device to satisfy the requirements of a photon source with great brilliance in the hard x-ray region. For the further hard x-ray region, a superconducting wiggler can provide great flux with a continuous spectrum, whereas a superconducting undulator will provide great brilliance with a discrete spectrum. High-temperature superconducting wires are highly promising for use in the development of superconducting undulators; unique algorithms for their development with an extremely short period in a small-magnet gap have been devised. Some out-of-vacuum planar undulators with special functions must also be fabricated to enable diverse applications in various light-source facilities. This article describes current and future developments for insertion devices in storage-ring and free-electron-laser facilities and discusses their feasibility for use therein.

  10. Evaluating scintillator performance in time-resolved hard X-ray studies at synchrotron light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E; Chapman, David J; White, Thomas G; Drakopoulos, Michael; Rack, Alexander; Eakins, Daniel E

    2016-05-01

    The short pulse duration, small effective source size and high flux of synchrotron radiation is ideally suited for probing a wide range of transient deformation processes in materials under extreme conditions. In this paper, the challenges of high-resolution time-resolved indirect X-ray detection are reviewed in the context of dynamic synchrotron experiments. In particular, the discussion is targeted at two-dimensional integrating detector methods, such as those focused on dynamic radiography and diffraction experiments. The response of a scintillator to periodic synchrotron X-ray excitation is modelled and validated against experimental data collected at the Diamond Light Source (DLS) and European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF). An upper bound on the dynamic range accessible in a time-resolved experiment for a given bunch separation is calculated for a range of scintillators. New bunch structures are suggested for DLS and ESRF using the highest-performing commercially available crystal LYSO:Ce, allowing time-resolved experiments with an interframe time of 189 ns and a maximum dynamic range of 98 (6.6 bits).

  11. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L. [Design and Accelerator Operations Consulting, 568 Wintergreen Ct Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Breitfeller, M. [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  12. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1989 (for the period of October 1, 1988--September 30, 1989)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.; Williams, G.P.

    1990-04-01

    This report discusses research at the National Synchrotron Light Source for the year 1989. Included in this report are operations summaries, symposia, workshops and projects, NSLS committees and administration information; informational guides; and abstracts from paper release during the year

  13. Ultra-high vacuum system of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foerster, C.L.

    1995-01-01

    The rings of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been supplying light to numerous users for approximately a decade and recently a fully conditioned machine vacuum at design currents was obtained. A brief description of the x-ray storage ring, the VUV storage ring and their current supply is given along with some of their features. The ultra-high vacuum system employed for the storage rings and their advantages for the necessary stored beam environments are discussed including, a brief history of time. 15 refs., 2 tabs., 8 figs

  14. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helliwell, J.R.; Walker, R.P.

    1985-01-01

    A detailed account of the research work associated with the Synchrotron Radiation Source at Daresbury Laboratory, United Kingdom, in 1984/85, is presented in the Appendix to the Laboratory's Annual Report. (U.K.)

  15. Materials research and beam line operation utilizing NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source]: Progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedl, G.L.

    1987-10-01

    MATRIX is a group of scientists who have common interests in utilizing x-ray synchrotron radiation for materials research. This group has developed a specialized beam line (X-18A) for x-ray scattering studies at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The beam line was designed to optimize experimental conditions for diffuse scattering and surface/interface studies. An extension of diffuse scattering to provide better quantitative data has been shown as well as a unique application to the solution of the phase problem. In the x-ray surface scattering area the first reported experiment to illustrate the capabilities for studying monolayers on water was performed. Current beam line upgrade projects are also described. In addition to a change to a UHV system and improvements dictated by operational experience, two new systems are described, a unique small angle scattering chamber (SAXS) for dynamic studies of nucleation and growth and a surface scattering chamber. 5 figs

  16. Operation of a general purpose stepping motor-encoder positioning subsystem at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stubblefield, F.W.

    1985-11-01

    Four copies of a general purpose subsystem for mechanical positioning of detectors, samples, and beam line optical elements which constitute experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source facility of Brookhaven National Laboratory have been constructed and placed into operation. Construction of a fifth subsystem unit is nearing completion. The subsystems affect mechanical positioning by controlling a set of stepping motor-encoder pairs. The units are general purpose in the sense that they receive commands over a 9600 baud asynchronous serial line compatible with the RS-232-C electrical signal standard, generate TTL-compatible streams of stepping pulses which can be used with a wide variety of stepping motors, and read back position values from a number of different types and models of position encoder. The basic structure of the motor controller subsystem is briefly reviewed. Additions to the subsystem made in response to problems indicated by actual operation of the four installed units are described in more detail

  17. National Synchrotron Light Source: Annual report 1986 for the period of October 1, 1985 through September 30, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White-DePace, S.; Gmur, N.

    1986-10-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is the nation's largest facility dedicated solely to the production of synchrotron radiation. The facility has two electron storage rings: a vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) ring which operates at an electron energy of 750 MeV designed for optimum radiation at energies from 10 eV to 1 keV, and an x-ray ring which operates at 2.5 GeV to optimize radiation from 1 keV to 20 keV. A total of 44 beam ports emanate from these rings. Each beam port is capable of supporting one to four experiments. The VUV and x-ray rings presently accommodate over 800 scientists representing over 71 universities, industries, and government laboratories. Both basic and applied research are being done at the NSLS by groups from a variety of disciplines which include physics, chemistry, materials science, metallurgy, biology, and medicine. Among the techniques used are EXAFS (extended x-ray absorption fine structure), scattering, diffraction, topography, fluorescence, gas phase spectroscopy, lithography, tomography, microscopy, and circular dichroism

  18. Iranian Light Source Facility, A third generation light source laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Rahighi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The Iranian Light Source Facility (ILSF project is the first large scale accelerator facility which is currently under planning in Iran. On the basis of the present design, circumference of the 3 GeV storage ring is 528 m. Beam current and natural beam emittance are 400 mA and 0.477 nm.rad, respectively. Some prototype accelerator components such as high power solid state radio frequency amplifiers, low level RF system, thermionic RF gun, H-type dipole and quadruple magnets, magnetic measurement laboratory and highly stable magnet power supplies have been constructed at ILSF R&D laboratory

  19. Uses of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.

    1982-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence has long been used as a technique for elemental analysis. X-ray fluorescence techniques have a number of features that make them attractive for application to biomedical samples. In the past few years synchrotron radiation x-ray sources have been developed and, because of their properties, their use can improve the sensitivity for trace element analysis by two to three orders of magnitude. Also, synchrotron radiation will make possible an x-ray microprobe with resolution in the micrometer range. The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), a dedicated synchrotron radiation source recently built at Brookhaven National Laboratory, will have a facility for trace element analysis by x-ray fluorescence and will be available to all interested users

  20. A critical experimental test of synchrotron radiation theory with 3rd generation light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    A recent ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS apparently demonstrated that after a microbunched electron beam is kicked on a large angle compared to the divergence of the FEL radiation, the microbunching wave front is readjusted along the new direction of motion of the kicked beam. Therefore, coherent radiation from an undulator placed after the kicker is emitted along the kicked direction without suppression. This strong emission of coherent undulator radiation in the kicked direction cannot be explained in the framework of conventional synchrotron radiation theory. In a previous paper we explained this puzzle. We demonstrated that, in accelerator physics, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of results from particle dynamics treated according to the absolute time convention and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell equations treated according to the standard (Einstein) synchronization convention. Here lies the misconception which led to the strong qualitative disagreement between theory and experiment. After the ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS, it became clear that the conventional theory of synchrotron radiation cannot ensure the correct description of coherent and spontaneous emission from a kicked electron beam, nor the emission from a beam with finite angular divergence, in an undulator or a bending magnet. However, this result requires further experimental confirmation. In this publication we propose an uncomplicated and inexpensive experiment to test synchrotron radiation theory at 3rd generation light sources.

  1. A critical experimental test of synchrotron radiation theory with 3rd generation light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geloni, Gianluca; Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni

    2016-05-01

    A recent ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS apparently demonstrated that after a microbunched electron beam is kicked on a large angle compared to the divergence of the FEL radiation, the microbunching wave front is readjusted along the new direction of motion of the kicked beam. Therefore, coherent radiation from an undulator placed after the kicker is emitted along the kicked direction without suppression. This strong emission of coherent undulator radiation in the kicked direction cannot be explained in the framework of conventional synchrotron radiation theory. In a previous paper we explained this puzzle. We demonstrated that, in accelerator physics, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of results from particle dynamics treated according to the absolute time convention and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell equations treated according to the standard (Einstein) synchronization convention. Here lies the misconception which led to the strong qualitative disagreement between theory and experiment. After the ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS, it became clear that the conventional theory of synchrotron radiation cannot ensure the correct description of coherent and spontaneous emission from a kicked electron beam, nor the emission from a beam with finite angular divergence, in an undulator or a bending magnet. However, this result requires further experimental confirmation. In this publication we propose an uncomplicated and inexpensive experiment to test synchrotron radiation theory at 3rd generation light sources.

  2. Development of a scanning tunneling microscope combined with a synchrotron radiation light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasegawa, Yukio; Okuda, Taichi; Eguchi, Toyoaki; Matsushima, Takeshi; Harasawa, Ayumi; Akiyama, Kotone; Kinoshita, Toyohiko

    2005-01-01

    We have developed a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) combined with a synchrotron-radiation light source (SR-STM) aiming at elemental analysis in a spatial resolution of STM. Using SR-STM atomically resolved STM images under the irradiation and also X-ray adsorption spectra clearly showing an adsorption edge of a substrate were successfully obtained by detecting photo-emitted electrons with the STM tip. In order to focus the probing area of the photo-induced current, a glass-coated metal tip sharpened with focused ion beam was used as a probe. The present situation and prospects of the instrument are discussed in this review. (author)

  3. The present status of the synchrotron radiation laboratory of the institute for solid state physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishii, Takehiko; Miyahara, Yoshikazu; Suga, Shigemasa; Kakizaki, Akito

    1988-01-01

    The SOR-ring was initially designed so as to do steady operation at 300 MeV, but at present, it is used by injecting electrons at 308 MeV, and thereafter, accelerating to 380 MeV. The beam transport system carrying electrons from an electron synchrotron as the injector to the SOR-ring and the arrangement of the SOR-ring proper are shown. The action of the electron synchrotron and the SOR-ring is outlined. There are eight deflecting electromagnets and four sets of quadrupole electromagnets in the SOR-ring. The length of the straight parts is 1.3 m, and a high frequency accelerating cavity is placed in one of the straight parts, while exhaust pumps are installed in other parts. The arrangement of the electromagnets and the action of various equipments are explained. There are five beam lines in the SOR-ring. The way of using these beam lines is described. The research using the SOR-ring is classified into the research on the state of electrons in solids, the research on the state of electrons by optical reaction, absorption and light emission, the effect of vacuum ultraviolet irradiation to living things, and the research on beam dynamics in the ring. The mode of operation is explained. (Kako, I.)

  4. Synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Kunz, C

    1974-01-01

    The production of synchrotron radiation as a by-product of circular high-energy electron (positron) accelerators or storage rings is briefly discussed. A listing of existing or planned synchrotron radiation laboratories is included. The following properties are discussed: spectrum, collimation, polarization, and intensity; a short comparison with other sources (lasers and X-ray tubes) is also given. The remainder of the paper describes the experimental installations at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and DORIS storage rings, presents a few typical examples out of the fields of atomic, molecular, and solid-state spectroscopy, and finishes with an outlook on the use of synchrotron radiation in molecular biology. (21 refs).

  5. Synchrotron radiation shielding design for the Brockhouse sector at the Canadian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassey, Bassey; Moreno, Beatriz; Gomez, Ariel; Ahmed, Asm Sabbir; Ullrich, Doug; Chapman, Dean

    2014-01-01

    At the Canadian Light Source (CLS), the plans for the construction of three beamlines under the Brockhouse Project are underway. The beamlines, to be classified under the CLS Phase III beamlines, will comprise of a wiggler and an undulator, and will be dedicated to x-ray diffraction and scattering experiments. The energy range of these beamlines will be 7–22 keV (low energy wiggler beamline), 20–94 keV (high energy wiggler beamline), and 5–21 keV (undulator beamline). The beamlines will have a total of five hutches. Presented is the shielding design against target scattered white and monochromatic synchrotron radiations for these beamlines. The shielding design is based on: scatter target material-water, dose object-anthropomorphic phantom of the adult human (anteroposterior-AP geometry), and shielding thicknesses of steel and lead that will drop the radiation leakage from the hutches to below 0.5 μSv/h. - Highlights: • The Brockhouse project will add 3 new beamlines at the Canadian Light Source (CLS). • The shielding design against synchrotron radiation was required for these beamlines. • We have completed the required shielding design. • Our design will reduce radiation leakage to <0.5 μSv/h; CLS requires 1.0 μSv/h

  6. NSLS 2005 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, L.

    2006-01-01

    efforts on NSLS-II, the world-leading third-generation synchrotron planned for construction at BNL. NSLS-II passed a critical milestone in 2005 with the approval by the Department of Energy of CD-0. BNL has established the NSLS-II Project Organization within the Light Sources Directorate to put in place the management systems and infrastructure necessary to execute this complex undertaking. I will serve as NSLS-II Project Director and also retain my position as Associate Laboratory Director for Light Sources, with the NSLS reporting to me. Another exciting development is the planned establishment of the Joint Photon Sciences Institute (JPSI). JPSI will be devoted to cultivating and fostering collaborative, interdisciplinary R and D in areas of the physical sciences, engineering, and the life sciences that are united in employing synchrotron-based methods. JPSI will also develop new methods and applications that exploit the unique capabilities of NSLS-II and will serve as a gateway for NSLS-II users. JPSI will be a partnership between the Department of Energy and New York State, and I am delighted that New York State Governor George Pataki has pledged $30 million for the construction of the JPSI building. The building will be located adjacent to NSLS-II and will contain offices, meeting rooms, and specialized laboratories. The operating expenses of JPSI and funding for its research programs will be provided by the federal government. Until a permanent NSLS Director is selected, NSLS User Science Division Associate Chair Chi-Chang Kao will serve as the Interim NSLS Director. I couldn't be leaving the facility in more capable hands. Chi-Chang will lead NSLS staff and users this year in the development of a five-year strategic plan for the NSLS, scheduled for completion by the end of summer 2006. The plan will outline the course for the future operation and development of the NSLS, and will help ensure that the future of the NSLS remains as bright as its past

  7. Ne, Ar, Fe, and Cu Auger-electron production at National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, D.H.; Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Guardala, N.A.; Price, J.L.; Stumborg, M.F.; Glass, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    Energetic K and L Auger electrons produced by focussed, filtered, broad-band synchrotron radiation have been measured at the x-ray ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The x-ray beam was used to study inner-shell photoionization of Ne and Ar gas and Fe and Cu solid film targets. The Auger electrons were analyzed by means of a semi-hemispherical electrostatic electron spectrometer at the energy resolution of ∼ 3 %. The electrons were detected at both 90 degree and 0 degree with respect to the photon beam direction. Broad distributions of the inner-shell photoelectrons were also observed, reflecting the incoming photon flux distribution. The Fe and Cu K Auger electron spectra were found to be very similar to the Ar K Auger electron spectra. This was expected, since deep inner-shell Auger processes are not affected by the outer valence electrons. Above 3 keV in electron energy, there have been few previous Auger electron measurements. 2 figs., 13 refs

  8. Design of a compact synchrotron light source for medical applications at NIRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torikoshi, M.; Endo, M.; Kumada, M.; Noda, K.; Yamada, S.; Kawachi, K.

    1998-01-01

    A synchrotron light source dedicated to medical applications is required to be compact for installation in limited spaces at hospitals. The NIRS storage ring, with a circumference of 44.8 m, is designed to accelerate electrons up to 1.8 GeV and to store a beam of 400 mA. The ring is composed of superconducting bending magnets for downsizing. A beam of 300 MeV is injected into the ring from a microtron operated at an L-band RF frequency. There are two superconducting multipole wigglers with nine poles and a maximum field of 8 T, which can produce a photon flux of about 1.4 x 10 13 photons s -1 mrad -1 (0.1% bandwidth) -1 at 33 keV used for coronary angiography

  9. Hard X-ray synchrotron light source for industrial and materials research applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehr, H.; Ehrfeld, W.; Moser, H.O.; Schmidt, M.; Herminghaus, H.

    1992-01-01

    The requirements for industrial production or for an industry-related analytical environment is demonstrated for the case of the proposed hard X-ray synchrotron light source. The source is intended to provide radiation mainly for deep X-ray lithography as part of the LIGA-process in microfabrication, and for analytical and diagnostic purposes in materials research and microtechnology. It offers up to 48 bending magnet beamlines with a characteristic wavelength of 2 A. An electron energy of 2.5 GeV and normal conducting magnets will be used. A FODO lattice with a beam emittance of 3x10 -7 m rad and four dispersion-free straight sections to accommodate insertion devices, injection elements and RF structures has been designed. (R.P.) 5 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  10. The low emittance 2.5 GeV synchrotron light source LISA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einfeld, D.; Hormes, J.; Husmann, D.

    1992-01-01

    LISA, a Light source for Industrial and Scientific Applications, has been proposed. Due to the intention to use the source above all for the LIGA (Lithographie, Galvanik, Abformtechnik) method to produce micromechanical structures, the critical wavelength of the synchrotron radiation spectrum is foreseen to be 0.2 nm. Therefore, the electron energy and the field strength of the ring dipoles have been chosen to be 2.5 GeV and 1.5 T, respectively. It is proposed to make use of a modified 'quadrupole ben achromat' (QBA) lattice. The novel feature of this lattice is the application of two types of bending magnets of different lengths, i.e. different bending angels. (author) 9 refs.; 6 figs.; 1 tab

  11. X-RAY IRRADIATION OF H{sub 2}O + CO ICE MIXTURES WITH SYNCHROTRON LIGHT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Escobar, A.; Ciaravella, A.; Micela, G.; Cecchi-Pestellini, C. [INAF–Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, P.za Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Chen, Y.-J.; Huang, C.-H., E-mail: jimenezea@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: ciarave@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: giusi@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: cecchi-pestellini@astropa.inaf.it, E-mail: asperchen@phy.ncu.edu.tw, E-mail: 101222023@cc.ncu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Central University, Jhongli District, Taoyuan City 32054, Taiwan (China)

    2016-03-20

    We irradiated a (4:1) mixture of water and carbon monoxide with soft X-rays of energies up to 1.2 keV. The experiments were performed using the spherical grating monochromator beamline at National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center in Taiwan. Both monochromatic (300 and 900 eV) and broader energy fluxes (250–1200 eV) were employed. During the irradiation, the H{sub 2}O + CO mixture was ionized, excited, and fragmented, producing a number of reactive species. The composition of the ice has been monitored throughout both the irradiation and warm-up phases. We identified several products, which can be related through a plausible chemical reaction scheme. Such chemistry is initiated by the injection of energetic photoelectrons that produce multiple ionization events generating a secondary electron cascade. The results have been discussed in light of a model for protoplanetary disks around young solar-type stars.

  12. Storage Rings for Science with: Electron-Positron Collisions, Hadron Collisions and Synchrotron Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozaki, S.

    2009-01-01

    The author is honored to receive the 2009 Robert Wilson Prize and the recognition that comes with it. The citation for the prize reads, 'For his outstanding contribution to the design and construction of accelerators that has led to the realization of major machines for fundamental science on two continents and his promotion of international collaboration.' In this article, he will discuss the two construction projects, which he led, one (TRISTAN e + e - Collider at KEK) in Japan and the other (RHIC at BNL) in the USA, covering project issues and lessons learned from these projects. Although both of them were built on separate continents, it is interesting to note that they are both built on long off-shore islands. He will also add comments on his recent engagement in the development of the Conceptual Design for the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II).

  13. In-situ shearing interferometry of National Synchrotron Light Source mirrors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, S.N.; Rarback, H.; Shu, D.; Takacs, P.Z.

    1987-01-01

    In situ mirror distortion measurements were made with a lateral shearing interferometer on three mirrors in beam line X17T at the National Syn203hrotron Light Source. Lateral shearing interference is insensitive to vibrational motion in five of the six degrees of freedom, so it is well-suited for investigations in the synchrotron radiation (SR) environment. No distortion was seen in an uncooled silicon carbide mirror and in a colled copper alloy mirror on X17TB, but a change in the radius of an uncooled electroless nickel-plated aluminium cylinder mirror of about 6.2% was observed on X17TA. Angular vibrations in the 2 to 3 arc second range were easily observed on one of the beam lines, as was an overall mirror rotation in the arc second range

  14. National Synchrotron Light Source user's manual: Guide to the VUV and x-ray beamlines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gmuer, N.F.

    1993-04-01

    The success of the National Synchrotron Light Source is based, in large part, on the size of the user community and the diversity of the scientific and technical disciplines represented by these users. As evidence of this success, the VUV Ring has just celebrated its 10th anniversary and the X-ray Ring will do the same in 1995. In order to enhance this success, the NSLS User's Manual: Guide to the VUV and X-Ray Beamlines - Fifth Edition, is being published. This Manual presents to the scientific community-at-large the current and projected architecture, capabilities and research programs of the various VUV and X-ray beamlines. Also detailed is the research and computer equipment a General User can expect to find and use at each beamline when working at the NSLS. The Manual is updated periodically in order to keep pace with the constant changes on these beamlines

  15. Photoionization mass spectrometer for studies of flame chemistry with a synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cool, Terrill A.; McIlroy, Andrew; Qi, Fei; Westmoreland, Phillip R.; Poisson, Lionel; Peterka, Darcy S.; Ahmed, Musahid

    2005-01-01

    A flame-sampling molecular-beam photoionization mass spectrometer, recently designed and constructed for use with a synchrotron-radiation light source, provides significant improvements over previous molecular-beam mass spectrometers that have employed either electron-impact ionization or vacuum ultraviolet laser photoionization. These include superior signal-to-noise ratio, soft ionization, and photon energies easily and precisely tunable [E/ΔE(FWHM)≅250-400] over the 7.8-17-eV range required for quantitative measurements of the concentrations and isomeric compositions of flame species. Mass resolution of the time-of-flight mass spectrometer is m/Δm=400 and sensitivity reaches ppm levels. The design of the instrument and its advantages for studies of flame chemistry are discussed

  16. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature.

  17. Infrared synchrotron radiation from electron storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.D.; Williams, G.P.

    1983-01-01

    Simple and useful approximations, valid at infrared wavelengths, to the equations for synchrotron radiation are presented and used to quantify the brightness and power advantage of current synchrotron radiation light sources over conventional infrared broadband laboratory sources. The Daresbury Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) and the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source (vacuum ultraviolet) [NSLS(VUV)] storage rings are used as examples in the calculation of the properties of infrared synchrotron radiation. The pulsed nature of the emission is also discussed, and potential areas of application for the brightness, power, and time structure advantages are presented. The use of infrared free electron lasers and undulators on the next generation of storage ring light sources is briefly considered

  18. A laboratory experimental setup for photo-absorption studies using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Shastri, A; Saraswati, P; Sunanda, K

    2002-01-01

    The photophysics beamline, which is being installed at the 450 MeV Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS), Indus-l, is a medium resolution beamline useful for a variety of experiments in the VUV region viz. 500-2000 A. One of the major applications of this beamline is gas-phase photo-absorption studies. An experimental set up to be used for these experiments was designed, developed and tested in our laboratory. The setup consists of a high vacuum absorption cell, 1/4 m monochromator and detection system. For the purpose of testing, xenon and tungsten continuum sources were used and absorption spectra were recorded in the UV region. This setup was used to record the absorption spectrum of a few molecules like acetone, ammonia, benzene, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde in order to evaluate the performance of the experimental system which will subsequently be used with the photophysics beamline. Details of the design, fabrication and testing of the absorption cell and experimental procedures are presented in this repor...

  19. Absorption and Phase Contrast X-Ray Imaging in Paleontology Using Laboratory and Synchrotron Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bidola, Pidassa; Stockmar, Marco; Achterhold, Klaus; Pfeiffer, Franz; Pacheco, Mirian L.A.F.; Soriano, Carmen; Beckmann, Felix; Herzen, Julia

    2015-10-01

    X-ray micro-computed tomography (CT) is commonly used for imaging of samples in biomedical or materials science research. Owing to the ability to visualize a sample in a nondestructive way, X-ray CT is perfectly suited to inspect fossilized specimens, which are mostly unique or rare. In certain regions of the world where important sedimentation events occurred in the Precambrian geological time, several fossilized animals are studied to understand questions related to their origin, environment, and life evolution. This article demonstrates the advantages of applying absorption and phase-contrast CT on the enigmatic fossil Corumbella werneri, one of the oldest known animals capable of building hard parts, originally discovered in Corumba (Brazil). Different tomographic setups were tested to visualize the fossilized inner structures: a commercial laboratory-based CT device, two synchrotron-based imaging setups using conventional absorption and propagation-based phase contrast, and a commercial X-ray microscope with a lens-coupled detector system, dedicated for radiography and tomography. Based on our results we discuss the strengths and weaknesses of the different imaging setups for paleontological studies.

  20. Design status of the 2.5 GeV National Synchrotron Light Source x-ray ring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.; Blumberg, L.; Bittner, J.; Galayda, J.; Heese, R.; Schuchman, J.C.; van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    The present state of the design of the 2.5 GeV electron storage ring for the National Synchrotron Light Source is described. This ring will serve as a dedicated source of synchrotron radiation in the wavelength range 0.1 A to 30 A. While maintaining the basic high brigtness features of the eariler developed lattice structure, recent work resulted in a more economical magnet system, is simplified chromaticity corrections, and improved distribution of the X-ray beam lines. In addition, the adequacy of the dynamic aperture for stable betatron oscillations has been verified for a variety of betatron tunes

  1. National synchrotron light source. Activity report, October 1, 1995--September 30, 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rothman, E.Z.; Hastings, J.B. [eds.

    1997-05-01

    The hard work done by the synchrotron radiation community, in collaboration with all those using large-scale central facilities during 1995, paid off in FY 1996 through the DOE`s Presidential Scientific Facilities Initiative. In comparison with the other DOE synchrotron radiation facilities, the National Synchrotron Light Source benefited least in operating budgets because it was unable to increase running time beyond 100%-nevertheless, the number of station hours was maintained. The major thrust at Brookhaven came from a 15% increase in budget which allowed the recruitment of seven staff in the beamlines support group and permitted a step increment in the funding of the extremely long list of upgrades; both to the sources and to the beamlines. During the December 1995 shutdown, the VUV Ring quadrant around U10-U12 was totally reconstructed. New front ends, enabling apertures up to 90 mrad on U10 and U12, were installed. During the year new PRTs were in formation for the infrared beamlines, encouraged by the investment the lab was able to commit from the initiative funds and by awards from the Scientific Facilities Initiative. A new PRT, specifically for small and wide angle x-ray scattering from polymers, will start work on X27C in FY 1997 and existing PRTs on X26C and X9B working on macromolecular crystallography will be joined by new members. Plans to replace aging radio frequency cavities by an improved design, originally a painfully slow six or eight year project, were brought forward so that the first pair of cavities (half of the project for the X-Ray Ring) will now be installed in FY 1997. Current upgrades to 350 mA initially and to 438 mA later in the X-Ray Ring were set aside due to lack of funds for the necessary thermally robust beryllium windows. The Scientific Facilities Initiative allowed purchase of all 34 windows in FY 1996 so that the power upgrade will be achieved in FY 1997.

  2. Multiple energy computed tomography for neuroradiology with monochromatic x-rays from the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F.A.; Garrett, R.F.; Thomlinson, W.C.; Berman, L.E.; Chapman, L.D.; Gmuer, N.F.; Lazarz, N.M.; Moulin, H.R.; Oversluizen, T.; Slatkin, D.N.; Stojanoff, V.; Volkow, N.D.; Zeman, H.D.; Luke, P.N.; Thompson, A.C.

    1990-01-01

    Monochromatic and tunable 33--100 keV x-rays from the X17 superconducting wiggler of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) will be used for computed tomography (CT) of the human head and neck. The CT configuration will be one of a fixed horizontal fan-shaped beam and a seated rotating subject. The system, which is under development, will employ a two-crystal monochromator with an energy bandwidth of about 0.1%, and high-purity germanium linear array detector with 0.5 mm element width and 200 mm total width. Narrow energy bands not only eliminate beam hardening but are ideal for carrying out the following dial-energy methods: (a) dual-photon absorptiometry CT, that provides separate images of the low-Z and the intermediate-Z elements; and (b) K-edge subtraction CT of iodine and perhaps of heavier contrast elements. As a result, the system should provide ∼10-fold improvement in image contrast resolution and in quantitative precision over conventional CT. A prototype system for a 45 mm subject diameter will be ready in 1991, which will be used for studies with phantoms and small animals. The human imaging system will have a field of view of 200 mm. The in-plane spatial resolution in both systems will be 0.5 mm FWHM. 34 refs., 6 figs

  3. Developing EnviroSuite Resources at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paul Northrup; Jeffrey Fitts; Mark Fuhrmann; Paul Kalb

    2006-01-01

    The objective of Brookhaven National Laboratory's EnviroSuite Initiative is to develop the facilities, user support infrastructure, and techniques necessary to conduct world-class molecular environmental science research at the NSLS. This is intended to benefit the research of ERSD-supported scientists, both through direct access and assistance and through the indirect benefits of a broader network of environmental scientists as collaborators and users. Much of the EnviroSuite research involves close collaboration with members of the Center for Environmental Molecular Science (CEMS), an EMSI based at BNL and nearby Stony Brook University and jointly supported by ERSD (Project 1023761, P. Kalb) and NSF. This offers unique opportunities to benefit from both national laboratory facilities and university resources. Other collaborators, from around the US and the world, investigate various aspects of the underlying molecular-scale processes in complex natural systems. In general, synchrotron techniques are ideal for studying the molecular-scale structures, chemical/physical interactions, and transformations that govern the macroscopic properties and processes (e.g. transport, bioavailability) of contaminants in the environment. These techniques are element-specific, non-destructive, and sensitive to the very low concentrations found in real-world samples

  4. Ultra-high vacuum system of the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foerster, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    The rings of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) have been supplying light to numerous users for approximately a decade and we recently enjoyed a fully conditioned machine vacuum at design currents. A brief description of the X-Ray storage ring, the VUV storage ring and their current supply is given along with some of their features. The ultra-high vacuum system employed for the storage rings and their advantages for the necessary stored beam environments are discussed including, a brief history of time. After several hundred amp hours of stored beam current operation, very little improvement in machine performance was seen due to conditioning. Sections of the rings were vented, to dry nitrogen and replacement components were pre-baked and pre-argon glow conditioned prior to installation. Very little machine conditioning was needed to return to operation after recovering vacuum due to well established conditioning procedures. All straight sections in the X-Ray ring and the VUV ring have been filled with various insertion devices and most are fully operational. Each storage ring has a computer controlled total pressure and partial pressure monitoring system for the ring and its beam ports, to insure good vacuum.

  5. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poole, M.W.; Lea, K.R.

    1982-01-01

    A report is given on the work involving the Synchrotron Radiation Division of the Daresbury Laboratory during the period January 1981 - March 1982. Development of the source, beamlines and experimental stations is described. Progress reports from individual investigators are presented which reveal the general diversity and interdisciplinary nature of the research which benefits from access to synchrotron radiation and the associated facilities. Information is given on the organisation of the Division and publications written by the staff are listed. (U.K.)

  6. Historical overview of the synchrotron radiation research in Japan. From the view point of creative works in the development of light sources and related technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitsubo, Hiromichi

    2007-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation research in Japan started in early 1960's when the first electron synchrotron was commissioned at the Institute of Nuclear Study (INS), University of Tokyo (UT). This review covers the parasite use of the INS electron synchrotron and research works done at the light sources in Japan such as SOR-RING, Photon Factory (KEK-PF) Accumulator Ring (KEK-AR), and SPring-8. History of synchrotron radiation research in Japan was overviewed by paying attention to the creative works in the development of light sources and related technology, as well as the pioneering works on the development of experimental techniques and methods. At present there are more than ten synchrotron radiation sources are in operation and the number of their users, especially users from industries in Japan is increasing very rapidly and the research fields of users are also developing. Accordingly the synchrotron radiation facility becomes more and more indispensable facility in the society in Japan. (author)

  7. Nonlinear momentum compaction and coherent synchrotron radiation at the metrology light source. Low-α commissioning and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ries, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Short pulses of synchrotron radiation are becoming an increasingly demanded tool in various fields of science. The generation of short synchrotron radiation pulses can be accomplished by different accelerator-based approaches such as free electron lasers, energy recovery linacs or electron storage rings. Linear accelerator driven free electron lasers are capable of generating intense pulses in the femtosecond regime at moderate repetition rates. In comparison, electron storage rings generate pulses of lower intensity with the advantage of large repetition rates. However, electron storage rings rely on radiation emitted by the same bunch(es) every turn, which are present in an equilibrium state. Thus making the electron storage ring a yet unchallenged source of short synchrotron radiation pulses in terms of stability and reproducibility. In addition, storage rings are capable to serve a large number of users simultaneously. In general, it is possible to distinguish the user community of short pulses at electron storage rings. The first user group is interested in time-resolution applying incoherent synchrotron radiation up to the X-ray regime. The second user group makes use of coherent synchrotron radiation emitted by short bunches at wavelengths large compared to the bunch dimensions, which commonly applies up to the THz-regime. Both user groups are interested in the high average power and stability available at electron storage rings. However, there is a current limitation for stable short bunch operation of electron storage rings, which is due to an instability driven by the emission of coherent synchrotron radiation. The subject of this thesis is the operation of an electron storage ring at a low momentum compaction to generate short electron bunches as a source for coherent synchrotron radiation. For this purpose the Metrology Light Source is ideally suited, as it is the first light source designed with the ability to adjust the three leading orders of the

  8. Physics and technology challenges of ultra low emittance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krinsky, S.

    1991-01-01

    There is a great activity throughout the world in the development of synchrotron radiation facilities to serve as sources for basic and applied research. We discuss some of the the opportunities and challenges presented by the development of ever higher brightness synchrotron radiation sources. 39 refs.

  9. Construction and maintenance of SUNY facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Progress report, 1 July 1982-1 July 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.

    1983-01-01

    Experimental facilities on the X-21 beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source are described, and synchrotron radiation experiments performed by PRT members are discussed. The report includes a description of the beam line development stages and the experimental equipment

  10. Launch of the I13-2 data beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bodey, A J; Rau, C

    2017-01-01

    Users of the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 commonly spend many months analysing the large volumes of tomographic data generated in a single beamtime. This is due to the difficulties inherent in performing complicated, computationally-expensive analyses on large datasets with workstations of limited computing power. To improve productivity, a ‘data beamline’ was launched in January 2016. Users are scheduled for visits to the data beamline in the same way as for regular beamlines, with bookings made via the User Administration System and provision of financial support for travel and subsistence. Two high-performance graphics workstations were acquired, with sufficient RAM to enable simultaneous analysis of several tomographic volumes. Users are given high priority on Diamond’s central computing cluster for the duration of their visit, and if necessary, archived data are restored to a high-performance disk array. Within the first six months of operation, thirteen user visits were made, lasting an average of 4.5 days each. The I13-2 data beamline was the first to be launched at Diamond Light Source and, to the authors’ knowledge, the first to be formalised in this way at any synchrotron. (paper)

  11. Launch of the I13-2 data beamline at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodey, A. J.; Rau, C.

    2017-06-01

    Users of the Diamond-Manchester Imaging Branchline I13-2 commonly spend many months analysing the large volumes of tomographic data generated in a single beamtime. This is due to the difficulties inherent in performing complicated, computationally-expensive analyses on large datasets with workstations of limited computing power. To improve productivity, a ‘data beamline’ was launched in January 2016. Users are scheduled for visits to the data beamline in the same way as for regular beamlines, with bookings made via the User Administration System and provision of financial support for travel and subsistence. Two high-performance graphics workstations were acquired, with sufficient RAM to enable simultaneous analysis of several tomographic volumes. Users are given high priority on Diamond’s central computing cluster for the duration of their visit, and if necessary, archived data are restored to a high-performance disk array. Within the first six months of operation, thirteen user visits were made, lasting an average of 4.5 days each. The I13-2 data beamline was the first to be launched at Diamond Light Source and, to the authors’ knowledge, the first to be formalised in this way at any synchrotron.

  12. A scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ade, H.; Kirz, J.; Hulbert, S.; Johnson, E.; Anderson, E.; Kern, D.; Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY; Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA; International Business Machines Corp., Yorktown Heights, NY

    1989-01-01

    We are in the process of developing and commissioning a scanning photoelectron microscope (SPEM) at the X1A beamline of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). It is designed to make use of the Soft X-ray Undulator (SXU) at the NSLS. This high brightness source illuminates a Fresnel zone plate, which forms a focused probe, ≤ 0.2μm in size, on the specimen surface. A grating monochromator selects the photon energy in the 400-800 eV range with an energy resolution of better than 1 eV. The expected flux in the focus is in the 5 x 10 7 - 10 9 photons/s range. A single pass Cylindrical Mirror Analyzer (CMA) is used to record photoemission spectra, or to form an image within a fixed electron energy bandwidth as the specimen is mechanically scanned. As a first test, a 1000 mesh Au grid was successfully imaged with a resolution of about 1μm and the CMA tuned to the Au 4 f photoelectron peak. Once it is commissioned, a program is planned which will utilize the microscope to study beam sensitive systems, such as thin oxide/sub-oxide films of alumina and silica, and ultimately various adsorbates on these films. 14 refs., 4 figs

  13. Latest experience on insertion devices at the National Synchrotron Light Source-II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanabe, Toshiya; Cappadoro, Peter; Corwin, Todd

    2016-01-01

    National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II) is the latest storage ring of 3 GeV energy with the horizontal emittance of the electron beam being 0.9 nm.rad. Nine In-Vacuum Undulators (IVUs) are utilized at the NSLS-II as of February 2016. All IVUs have a unique side window derived from the experience from the CHESS facility in Cornell University. An R and D activity called 'Vacuum Seal Test' was conducted to ensure the viability of aluminum wire seal. Another R and D activity to develop a measurement system for Cryogenic Permanent Magnet Undulator (CPMU) was also performed. Other in-air devices, namely damping wigglers (DWs) and elliptically polarizing undulators (EPUs) utilize extruded aluminum chambers with Non-Evaporable Getter (NEG) coating. The beam-based integral estimates were obtained from the virtual kicks at the upstream and downstream of the undulator that best fit the measured orbit distortion in a model lattice with Tracy. In some cases, there are fairly large discrepancies between magnetic measurement data and observed integrals by the beam. Beam studies were carried out to explain the discrepancies mentioned earlier. The latest experiences on ID development and commissioning are discussed in conjunction with related activities in the world. (author)

  14. NSLS [National Synchrotron Light Source] X-19A beamline performance for x-ray absorption measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, C.Y.; Penner-Hahn, J.E.; Stefan, P.M.

    1989-01-01

    Characterization of the X-19A beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) is described. The beamline is designed for high resolution x-ray absorption spectroscopy over a wide energy range. All of the beamline optical components are compatible with ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) operation. This permits measurements to be made in a window-less mode, thereby facilitating lower energy (<4 KeV) studies. To upgrade the beamline performance, several possible improvements in instrumentation and practice are discussed to increase photon statistics with an optimum energy resolution, while decreasing the harmonic contamination and noise level. A special effort has been made to improve the stability and UHV compatibility of the monochromator system. Initial x-ray absorption results demonstrate the capabilities of this beamline for x-ray absorption studies of low Z elements (e.g. S) in highly dilute systems. The future use of this beamline for carrying out various x-ray absorption experiments is presented. 10 refs., 4 figs

  15. Generating picosecond x-ray pulses in synchrotron light sources using dipole kickers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Guo

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available The duration of the x-ray pulse generated at a synchrotron light source is typically tens of picoseconds. Shorter pulses are highly desired by the users. In electron storage rings, the vertical beam size is usually orders of magnitude less than the bunch length due to radiation damping; therefore, a shorter pulse can be obtained by slitting the vertically tilted bunch. Zholents proposed tilting the bunch using rf deflection. We found that tilted bunches can also be generated by a dipole magnet kick. A vertical tilt is developed after the kick in the presence of nonzero chromaticity. The tilt was successfully observed and a 4.2-ps pulse was obtained from a 27-ps electron bunch at the Advanced Photon Source. Based on this principle, we propose a short-pulse generation scheme that produces picosecond x-ray pulses at a repetition rate of 1–2 kHz, which can be used for pump-probe experiments.

  16. Visible-light beam size monitors using synchrotron radiation at CESR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, S.T., E-mail: sw565@cornell.edu [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Science and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Rubin, D.L.; Conway, J.; Palmer, M.; Hartill, D. [Cornell Laboratory for Accelerator-Based Science and Education, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Campbell, R.; Holtzapple, R. [Physics Department, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, CA 93407 (United States)

    2013-03-01

    A beam profile monitor utilizing visible synchrotron radiation (SR) from a bending magnet has been designed and installed in Cornell Electron-Positron Storage Ring (CESR). The monitor employs a double-slit interferometer to measure both the horizontal and vertical beam sizes over a wide range of beam currents. By varying the separation of the slits, beam sizes ranging from 50 to 500 μm can be measured with a resolution of approximately 5 μm. To measure larger beam size (>500 μm), direct imaging can be employed by rotating the double slits away from SR beam path. By imaging the π-polarized component of SR, a small vertical beam size (∼70 μm) was measured during an undulator test run in CESR, which was consistent with the interferometer measurement. To measure the bunch length, a beam splitter is inserted to direct a fraction of light into a streak camera setup. This beam size monitor measures the transverse and longitudinal beam sizes simultaneously, which is successfully used for intrabeam scattering studies. Detailed error analysis is discussed.

  17. Industrial applications of micro/nanofabrication at Singapore Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jian, L K; Casse, B D F; Heussler, S P; Kong, J R; Saw, B T; Mahmood, Shahrain bin; Moser, H O

    2006-01-01

    SSLS (Singapore Synchrotron Light Source) has set up a complete one-stop shop for micro/nanofabrication in the framework of the LIGA process. It is dubbed LiMiNT for Lithography for Micro and Nanotechnology and allows complete prototyping using the integral cycle of the LIGA process for producing micro/nanostructures from mask design/fabrication over X-ray lithography to electroplating in Ni, Cu, or Au, and, finally, hot embossing in a wide variety of plastics as one of the capabilities to cover a wide range of application fields and to go into higher volume production. The process chain also includes plasma cleaning and sputtering as well as substrate preparation processes including metal buffer layers, plating bases, and spin coating, polishing, and dicing. Furthermore, metrology using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), optical profilometry, and optical microscopy is available. LiMiNT is run as a research lab as well as a foundry. In this paper, several industrial applications will be presented, in which LiMiNT functions as a foundry to provide external customers the micro/nano fabrication services. These services include the fabrication of optical or X-ray masks, of micro/nano structures from polymers or from metals and of moulds for hot embossing or injection moulding

  18. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  19. Radiation monitoring in a synchrotron light source facility using magnetically levitated electrode ionization chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ichiki, Hirofumi; Kawaguchi, Toshirou; Utsunomiya, Yoshitomo; Ishibashi, Kenji; Ikeda, Nobuo; Korenaga, Kazuhito

    2009-01-01

    We developed a highly accurate differential-type automatic radiation dosimeter to measure very low radiation doses. The dosimeter had two ionization chambers, each of which had a magnetically levitated electrode and it was operated in a repetitive-time integration mode. We first installed the differential-type automatic radiation dosimeter with MALICs at a high-energy electron accelerator facility (Kyushu Synchrotron Light Research Center Facility) and measured the background and ionizing radiations in the facility as well as the gaseous radiation in air. In the background dose measurements, the accuracy of the repetitive-time integration-type dosimeter was three times better than that of a commercial ionization chamber. When the radiation dose increased momentarily at the electron injection from the linac to the operating storage ring, the dosimeter with repetitive-time integral mode gave a successful response to the actual dose variation. The gaseous radiation dose in the facility was at the same level as that in Fukuoka City. We confirmed that the dosimeter with magnetically levitated electrode ionization chambers was usable in the accelerator facility, in spite of its limited response when operated in the repetitive-time integration mode. (author)

  20. National Synchrotron Light Source Facility Manual Maintenance Management Program. Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fewell, N.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this program s to meet the policy and objectives for the management and performance of cost-effective maintenance and repair of the National Synchrotron Light Source, as required by the US Department of Energy order DOE 433O.4A. It is the DOE`s policy that: The maintenance management program for the NSLS be consistent with this Order and that NSLS property is maintained in a manner which promotes operational safety, worker health, environmental protection and compliance, property preservation, and cost-effectiveness while meeting the NSLS`s programmatic mission. Structures, components and systems (active and passive) that are imporant to safe operation of the NSLS shall be subject to a maintenance program to ensure that they meet or exceed their design requirements throughout the life of the NSLS. Periodic examination of structures, systems components and equipment be performed to determine deterioration or technical obsolescence which may threaten performance and/or safety. Primary responsibility, authority, and accountability for the direction and management of the maintenance program at the NSLS reside with the line management assigned direct programmatic responsibility. Budgeting and accounting for maintenance programs are consistent with DOE Orders guidance.

  1. Synchrotron X-Ray Microdiffraction Studies of Electromigration in Interconnect lines at the Advanced Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Nobumichi; Chen, Kai; Kunz, Martin

    2009-05-01

    Synchrotron polychromatic X-ray microdiffraction is a particularly suitable technique to study in situ the effect of electromigration in metal interconnects as add spatial resolution to grain orientation and strain sensitivity. This technique has been extensively used at the Advanced Light Source to monitor changes in aluminum and copper interconnect test structures while high-density current is passed into them during accelerated tests at elevated temperature. One of the principal findings is the observation of electromigration-induced plasticity in the metal lines that appear during the very early stages of electromigration. In some of the lines, high density of geometrically necessary dislocation are formed leading to additional diffusion paths causing an enhancement of electromigration effect at test temperature. This paper presents an overview of the principal results obtained from X-ray microdiffraction studies of electromigration effects on aluminum and copper interconnects at the ALS throughout continuous efforts that spanned over a decade (1998-2008) from approximately 40 weeks of combined beamtime.

  2. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M.

    1992-01-01

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included

  3. Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory 1991 activity report. Facility developments January 1991--March 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantwell, K.; St. Pierre, M. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    SSRL is a national facility supported primarily by the Department of Energy for the utilization of synchrotron radiation for basic and applied research in the natural sciences and engineering. It is a user-oriented facility which welcomes proposals for experiments from all researchers. The synchrotron radiation is produced by the 3.5 GeV storage ring, SPEAR, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SPEAR is a fully dedicated synchrotron radiation facility which operates for user experiments 7 to 9 months per year. SSRL currently has 24 experimental stations on the SPEAR storage ring. There are 145 active proposals for experimental work from 81 institutions involving approximately 500 scientists. There is normally no charge for use of beam time by experimenters. This report summarizes the activity at SSRL for the period January 1, 1991 to December 31, 1991 for research. Facility development through March 1992 is included.

  4. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knotek, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation has had a revolutionary effect on a broad range of scientific studies, from physics, chemistry and metallurgy to biology, medicine and geoscience. The situation during the last decade has been one of very rapid growth, there is a great vitality to the field and a capability has been given to a very broad range of scientific disciplines which was undreamed of just a decade or so ago. Here we will discuss some of the properties of synchrotron radiation that makes it so interesting and something of the sources in existence today including the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS). The NSLS is one of the new facilities built specifically for synchrotron radiation research and the model that was developed there for involvement of the scientific community is a good one which provides some good lessons for these facilities and others

  5. Monochromator for synchrotron light with temperature controlled by electrical current on silicon crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cusatis, Cesar; Souza, Paulo E.N. [Universidade Federal do Parana (LORXI/UFPR), Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica. Lab. de Optica de Raios X e Instrumentacao; Franco, Margareth Kobayaski; Kakuno, Edson [Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincroton (LNLS), Campinas, SP (Brazil); Gobbi, Angelo; Carvalho Junior, Wilson de [Centro de Pesquisa e Desenvolvimento em Telecomunicacoes (CPqD), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Full text. doped silicon crystal was used simultaneously as a monochromator, sensor and actuator in such way that its temperature could be controlled. Ohmic contacts allowed resistance measurements on a perfect silicon crystal, which were correlated to its temperature. Using the ohmic contacts, an electrical current caused Joule heating on the monochromator that was used to control its temperature. A simple stand-alone electronic box controlled the system. The device was built and tested with white beam synchrotron light on the double crystal monochromator of the XRD line of LNLS, Laboratorio Nacional de Luz Sincrotron, Campinas. The first crystal of a double crystal monochromator determines the energy that is delivered to a synchrotron experimental station and its temperature instability is a major source of energy and intensity instability. If the (333) silicon monochromator is at theta Bragg near 45 degree the variation of the diffraction angle is around one second of arc per degree Kelvin. It may take several minutes for the first crystal temperature to stabilize at the beginning of the station operation when the crystal and its environment are cold. With water refrigeration, the average overall temperature of the crystal may be constant, but the temperature of the surface changes with and without the white beam. The time used to wait for stabilization of the beam energy/intensity is lost unless the temperature of the crystal surface is kept constant. One solution for keeping the temperature of the monochromator and its environment constant or nearly constant is Joule heating it with a controlled small electrical current flowing on the surface of a doped perfect crystal. When the white beam is on, this small amount of extra power will be more concentrated at the beam footpath because the resistance is lower in this region due to the higher temperature. In addition, if the crystal itself is used to detect the temperature variation by measuring the electrical

  6. NSLS 2002 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2002)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, L.

    2003-01-01

    The year 2002 has been another highly productive year at the NSLS and an impressive array of highlights from this scientific activity is included in this Activity Report. They have taken significant steps this past year toward better supporting beamlines and users. The number of user science support staff has been increased by about ten positions. They have also worked with their users, DOE, and the other DOE synchrotron facilities to develop a new, more flexible user access policy. Doing things safely remains a top priority, and they are reviewing their training and safety requirements to ensure they are thorough and everyone fully understands the necessity of abiding by them. A major development this past year was approval from DOE for BNL to begin the conceptual design of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). The CFN will have a dramatic impact on nanoscience in the Northeast, facilitating the synthesis, characterization and scientific exploration of new classes of novel nanostructured materials. It will be located adjacent to the NSLS and a number of NSLS beamlines will be optimized to serve the needs of the nanoscience community. The NSLS and CFN user programs will be coordinated to facilitate easy access to both in a single visit. The VUV and X-Ray rings operated with excellent reliability as a result of continued attention to aging critical systems. The DUV-FEL achieved several important milestones this year, including production of Self-Amplified Spontaneous Emission (SASE) laser light at 400 nm and 266 nm, laser seeded saturation at 266 nm, and the first observation of High Gain Harmonic Generation (HGHG) light at 266 nm, with a third harmonic at 89 nm. Light from the DUV-FEL is now enabling user science experiments in ion pair imaging and they look forward to an expanding user program and a continued series of pioneering accelerator physics studies. In 2002, they continued to work with their user community to develop a plan to upgrade the

  7. NSLS 2007 Activity Report (National Synchrotron Light Source Activity Report 2007)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller ,L.; Nasta, K.

    2008-05-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source is one of the world's most productive and cost-effective user facilities. With 2,219 individual users, about 100 more than last year, and a record-high 985 publications, 2007 was no exception. In addition to producing an impressive array of science highlights, which are included in this Activity Report, many NSLS users were honored this year for their scientific accomplishments. Throughout the year, there were major strides in the development of the scientific programs by strengthening strategic partnerships with major research resources and with the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN). Of particular note, the Consortium for Materials Properties Research in Earth Sciences (COMPRES) received renewed funding for the next five years through the National Science Foundation. COMPRES operates four high-pressure NSLS beamlines--X17B2, X17B3, X17C, and U2A--and serves the earth science community as well as the rapidly expanding segment of researchers using high-pressure techniques in materials, chemical, and energy-related sciences. A joint appointment was made between the NSLS and Stony Brook University to further enhance interactions with COMPRES. There was major progress on two key beamline projects outlined in the Five-Year Strategic Plan: the X25 beamline upgrade and the construction of the X9 small angle scattering (SAXS) beamline. The X25 overhaul, which began with the installation of the in-vacuum mini-gap undulator (MGU) in January 2006, is now complete. X25 is once again the brightest beamline for macromolecular crystallography at the NSLS, and in tandem with the X29 undulator beamline, it will keep the NSLS at the cutting edge in this important area of research. Upgrade work associated with the new MGU and the front end for the X9 SAXS beamline--jointly developed by the NSLS and the CFN--also was completed. Beamline X9 will host the SAXS program that currently exists at beamline X21 and will provide new microbeam

  8. Measuring circular dichroism in a capillary cell using the b23 synchrotron radiation CD beamline at diamond light source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jávorfi, Tamás; Hussain, Rohanah; Myatt, Daniel; Siligardi, Giuliano

    2010-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation circular dichroism (SRCD) is a well-established method in structural biology. The first UV-VIS beamline dedicated to circular dichroism at Diamond Light Source, a third generation synchrotron facility in South Oxfordshire, has recently become operational and it is now available for the user community. Herein we present an important application of SRCD: the CD measurement of protein solutions in fused silica rectangular capillary cells. This was achieved without the use of any lens between the photoelastic modulator and the photomultiplier tube detectors by exploiting the high photon flux of the collimated beam that can be as little as half a millimeter squared. Measures to minimize or eliminate vacuum-UV protein denaturation effects are discussed. The CD spectra measured in capillaries is a proof of principle to address CD measurements in microdevice systems using the new B23 SRCD beamline. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Byrd, John; Martin, Michael C; Robin, David; Sannibale, Fernando; Schönlein, Robert W; Zholents, Alexander; Zolotorev, Max S

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the "femtoslicing" beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. This CSR, whose measured intensity is routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing experiments, represents a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for its characterization and in this paper an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation is presented.

  10. Synchrotron light techniques for the investigation of advanced nuclear reactor structural materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pouchon, M.A.; Froideval, A.; Degueldre, C.; Gavillet, D.; Hoffelner, W.

    2008-01-01

    In the frame of the Generation IV initiative, different structural material candidates are investigated at the Paul Scherrer Institute. These are oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels, intermetallic materials and ceramic composite materials. The response of the material to different potential loads (irradiation, temperature...) is addressed in a multi-scale approach, both, modelling wise and also experimentally. The investigation of each scale delivers at least a qualitative understanding of possibly evolving damage in the material and also delivers a validation of the corresponding scale on the modelling side. From the experimental side, the lower end of the scale, the atomistic and structural level, can be investigated by conventional techniques, as for example transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). However, the use of synchrotron radiation techniques offers an ideal, complementary way to investigate the material structure and other properties. This paper presents applications in the field of the ODS research, where the structural behaviour of the nano-scopic dispersoids can selectively be investigated, although only being present with roughly 5 wt % in the matrix. A study showing the structural behaviour of these oxide particles as a function of irradiation illustrates the potential of the extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) technique. Using X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD), which is a difference-signal of two X-ray absorption spectra recorded for positive and negative helicities of the beam, the magnetic structure and some magnetic parameters, can be resolved. An example shows, how this can be applied to understand (Fe,Cr) systems, which is the base alloy of the investigated ODS steel. The results deliver an important cross-check for modelling. Beside the presentation of these techniques, this paper shows how beamline techniques can serve nuclear research, with possibly activated materials. At the Paul

  11. Ultra high-speed x-ray imaging of laser-driven shock compression using synchrotron light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbinado, Margie P.; Cantelli, Valentina; Mathon, Olivier; Pascarelli, Sakura; Grenzer, Joerg; Pelka, Alexander; Roedel, Melanie; Prencipe, Irene; Laso Garcia, Alejandro; Helbig, Uwe; Kraus, Dominik; Schramm, Ulrich; Cowan, Tom; Scheel, Mario; Pradel, Pierre; De Resseguier, Thibaut; Rack, Alexander

    2018-02-01

    A high-power, nanosecond pulsed laser impacting the surface of a material can generate an ablation plasma that drives a shock wave into it; while in situ x-ray imaging can provide a time-resolved probe of the shock-induced material behaviour on macroscopic length scales. Here, we report on an investigation into laser-driven shock compression of a polyurethane foam and a graphite rod by means of single-pulse synchrotron x-ray phase-contrast imaging with MHz frame rate. A 6 J, 10 ns pulsed laser was used to generate shock compression. Physical processes governing the laser-induced dynamic response such as elastic compression, compaction, pore collapse, fracture, and fragmentation have been imaged; and the advantage of exploiting the partial spatial coherence of a synchrotron source for studying low-density, carbon-based materials is emphasized. The successful combination of a high-energy laser and ultra high-speed x-ray imaging using synchrotron light demonstrates the potentiality of accessing complementary information from scientific studies of laser-driven shock compression.

  12. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms

  13. Support for the Advanced Polymers Beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsiao, Benjamin S. [State Univ. of New York (SUNY), Stonybrook, NY (United States)

    2008-10-01

    The primary focus of the X27C beamline is to investigate frontier polymer science and engineering problems with emphasis on real-time studies of structures, morphologies and dynamics from atomic, nanoscopic, microscopic to mesoscopic scales using simultaneous small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and wide-angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) techniques. The scientific merit of this project is as follows. Currently, many unique sample chambers for in-situ synchrotron studies, developed by the PI (B. Hsiao) and Co-PI (B. Chu), are available for general users of X27C at NSLS. These instruments include a gel/melt spinning apparatus, a continuous fiber drawing apparatus, a tensile stretching apparatus, a high pressure X-ray cell using supercritical carbon dioxide, a parallel plate strain-controlled shear stage and a dynamic rheometer for small-strain oscillatory deformation study. Based on the use of these instruments in combination with synchrotron X-rays, many new insights into the relationships between processing and structure have been obtained in recent years. The broader impact of this project is as follows. The X27C beamline is the first synchrotron facility in the United States dedicated to chemistry/materials research (with emphasis on polymers). The major benefit of this facility to the materials community is that no extensive synchrotron experience and equipment preparation are required from general users to carry out cutting-edge experiments.

  14. Atomic physics with hard X-rays from high brilliance synchrotron light sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Southworth, S.; Gemmell, D.

    1996-08-01

    A century after the discovery of x rays, the experimental capability for studying atomic structure and dynamics with hard, bright synchrotron radiation is increasing remarkably. Tempting opportunities arise for experiments on many-body effects, aspects of fundamental photon-atom interaction processes, and relativistic and quantum-electrodynamic phenomena. Some of these possibilities are surveyed in general terms.

  15. Natural and laboratory compaction bands in porous carbonates: a three-dimensional characterization using synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilona, A.; Arzilli, F.; Mancini, L.; Emanuele, T.

    2014-12-01

    Porous carbonates form important reservoirs for water and hydrocarbons. The fluid flow properties of carbonate reservoirs may be affected by post-depositional processes (e.g., mechanical and chemical), which need to be quantified. Field-based studies described bed-parallel compaction bands (CBs) within carbonates with a wide range of porosities. These burial-related structures accommodate volumetric strain by grain rotation, translation, pore collapse and pressure solution. Recently, the same structures have been reproduced for the first time in the laboratory by performing triaxial compaction experiments on porous grainstones. These laboratory studies characterized and compared the microstructures of natural and laboratory CBs, but no analysis of pore connectivity has been performed. In this paper, we use an innovative approach to characterize the pore networks (e.g. porosity, connectivity) of natural and laboratory CBs and compare them with the host rock one. We collected the data using the synchrotron X-ray computed microtomography technique at the SYRMEP beamline of the Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste Laboratory (Italy). Quantitative analyses of the samples were performed with the Pore3D software library. The porosity was calculated from segmented 3D images of pristine and deformed carbonates. A process of skeletonization was then applied to quantify the number of connected pores within the rock volume. The analysis of the skeleton allowed us to highlight the differences between natural and laboratory CBs, and to investigate how pore connectivity evolves as a function of different deformation pathways. Both pore volume and connectivity are reduced within the CBs respect to the pristine rock and the natural CB has a lower porosity with respect to the laboratory one. The grain contacts in the natural CB are welded, whereas in the laboratory one they have more irregular shapes and grain crushing is the predominant process.

  16. Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asfour, F.I

    2000-01-01

    Synchrotron light is produced by electron accelerators combined with storage rings. This light is generated over a wide spectral region; from infra-red (IR) through the visible and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV), and into the X-ray region. For relativistic electrons (moving nearly with the speed of light), most radiation is concentrated in a small cone with an opening angle of 1/gamma(some 0.1 to 1 milliradian),where gamma is the electron energy in units of rest energy (typically 10 3 -10 4 ). In synchrotron radiation sources (storage rings) highly relativistic electrons are stored to travel along a circular path for many hours. Radiation is caused by transverse acceleration due to magnetic forces(bending magnets). The radiation is emitted in pulses of 10-20 picosecond, separated by some 2 nanosecond or longer separation

  17. X-ray diffraction studies of Pompeian wall paintings using synchrotron radiation and dedicated laboratory made systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duran, A.; Castaing, J.; Walter, P.

    2010-01-01

    The full identification of artwork materials requires not only elemental analysis but also structural information of the compounds as provided by X-ray diffraction (XRD). This is easily done when taking samples (or micro-samples) from artworks. However, there is an increasing interest in performing non-destructive studies that require adapted XRD systems. Comparative study of synchrotron high-resolution X-ray powder diffraction (SR-HRPD) and laboratory non-destructive systems (portable XRD and micro-XRD) is the main objective of this work. There are no qualitative differences among the three systems as for detected phases in the Pompeian wall paintings that were studied, except in the case of minority phases which only were detected by SR-HRPD. The identified pigments were goethite, hematite, cinnabar, glauconite, Pompeian blue, together with calcite, dolomite and aragonite. Synchrotron XRD diagrams show better resolution than the others. In general, the peak widths in the diagrams obtained with the portable XRD system are similar to those obtained by micro-diffraction equipment. Factors such as residual divergence of X-ray sources, incidence angle and slit or collimator size are discussed in relation with the quality of XRD diagrams. (orig.)

  18. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube

  19. The Advanced Photon Source: A national synchrotron radiation research facility at Argonne National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-10-01

    The vision of the APS sprang from prospective users, whose unflagging support the project has enjoyed throughout the decade it has taken to make this facility a reality. Perhaps the most extraordinary aspect of synchrotron radiation research, is the extensive and diverse scientific makeup of the user community. From this primordial soup of scientists exchanging ideas and information, come the collaborative and interdisciplinary accomplishments that no individual alone could produce. So, unlike the solitary Roentgen, scientists are engaged in a collective and dynamic enterprise with the potential to see and understand the structures of the most complex materials that nature or man can produce--and which underlie virtually all modern technologies. This booklet provides scientists and laymen alike with a sense of both the extraordinary history of x-rays and the knowledge they have produced, as well as the potential for future discovery contained in the APS--a source a million million times brighter than the Roentgen tube.

  20. Optics for protein microcrystallography using synchrotron and laboratory X-ray sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, J.N.; Van Donkelaar, A.; Balaic, D.X.; Barnea, Z.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: For protein crystallography, a highly-intense focused beam overcomes a serious constraint in current biological research: the inability of many protein molecules to form crystals larger than a few tens of microns in size. High structure-resolution X-ray diffraction analysis of microcrystals is currently only being studied at synchrotron X-ray sources. We shall examine how this is being carried out, and also report the development of a novel tapered glass monocapillary toroidal-mirror optic, which achieves a high-intensity, low-divergence focused beam from a rotating-anode Xray generator. We have used this optic, which demonstrates an ∼28x intensity gain at the beam focus to solve the structure of a plant exoglucanse/inhibtor complex microcrystal to 2.8 Angstroms, with volume equivalent to a 30-micron-edge cube

  1. The three-dimensional microstructure of polycrystalline materials unravelled by synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludwig, W.; Herbig, M.; Ludwig, W.; King, A; Reischig, P.; Marrow, J.; Babout, L.; Mejdal Lauridsen, E.; Proudhon, H.

    2011-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer new possibilities for non-destructive bulk characterization of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (different crystallographic phases, cracks, porosities) can be detected using 3D imaging modes exploiting Fresnel diffraction and the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography, a technique based on Bragg diffraction imaging, provides access to the 3D shape, orientation and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing several hundred up to a few thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities allows a comprehensive description of the microstructure of the material at the micrometer length scale. Repeated observations during (interrupted) mechanical tests provide unprecedented insight into crystallographic and grain microstructure related aspects of polycrystal deformation and degradation mechanisms in materials, fulfilling some conditions on grain size and deformation state. (authors)

  2. Intense, broadband, pulsed I-R source at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, G.P.

    1984-01-01

    We describe a broadband (1 μm to 1 mm) synchrotron radiation infrared source, pulsed each 20 to 180 nseconds and delivering about 10 15 photons/sec/1% bandpass into f10 optics. The source size is diffraction limited. This source is thus 100 to 1000 times brighter than a 2000 0 K black body, very stable and capable of being used for calibration

  3. National synchrotron light source. Annual report 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomlinson, W.; White-DePace, S.

    1985-10-01

    The NSLS has made great strides in the past year. Both storage rings are now in full operational status. The users have assembled a most impressive array of beam lines and are making creative use of them. This report outlines the status, describes the facility, and discusses some of the science which is being produced. The facility represents not only a large increase in the national capacity to do synchrotron research, but a new level of capability, with further gains occurring rapidly

  4. Shining a light on Jarosite: formation, alteration and stability studies using in situ experimental synchrotron and neutron techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, H. E. A.; Scarlett, N. V. Y.; Wilson, S. A.; Frierdich, A. J.; Grey, I. E.

    2016-12-01

    Jarosites and related minerals are critical to a range of mineral processing and research applications. They are used in the removal of iron species from smelting processes; they occur in metal bioleaching systems, and they are present in acid mine drainage environments. There has been a recent resurgence in interest in jarosites since their detection on Mars. In this context, the presence of jarosite has been recognised as a likely indicator of liquid water at the surface of Mars in the past & it is thought that their study will provide insight into the environmental history of Mars. Acid sulfate soils cover large areas of the Australian coastline and are likely to be a major constituent of the Martian environment. The oxidation of acid sulfate soils, coupled with potential release of heavy metals and acidic groundwaters, can have serious consequences for fragile ecosystems. Understanding these sediments will provide insight into the biogeochemical processes that affect the lifetimes of transient mineral species on Earth, and may be used to better understand soil acidification, contaminant mobility at sites affected by acid and metalliferous drainage, and even constrain past weathering and putative biosignatures on Mars. Knowledge of the behaviour of jarosite minerals under the actual conditions that they are found in is crucial to understanding their potential environmental impacts on both Earth and Mars. To this end, we are engaged in a program to study the formation, stability and alteration of natural and synthetic jarosite minerals using a complementary suite of in situ synchrotron and neutron techniques. There are 3 sections to this work that will introduce the experimental techniques and sample environments that make these measurements possible: Studying the nucleation and growth of jarosites under laboratory conditions. The experimentation consisted of time-resolved synchrotron small angle X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction. Studying the stability of

  5. X-ray metrology of an array of active edge pixel sensors for use at synchrotron light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plackett, R.; Arndt, K.; Bortoletto, D.; Horswell, I.; Lockwood, G.; Shipsey, I.; Tartoni, N.; Williams, S.

    2018-01-01

    We report on the production and testing of an array of active edge silicon sensors as a prototype of a large array. Four Medipix3RX.1 chips were bump bonded to four single chip sized Advacam active edge n-on-n sensors. These detectors were then mounted into a 2 by 2 array and tested on B16 at Diamond Light Source with an x-ray beam spot of 2um. The results from these tests, compared with optical metrology demonstrate that this type of sensor is sensitive to the physical edge of the silicon, with only a modest loss of efficiency in the final two rows of pixels. We present the efficiency maps recorded with the microfocus beam and a sample powder diffraction measurement. These results give confidence that this sensor technology can be used effectively in larger arrays of detectors at synchrotron light sources.

  6. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stitt, C.A., E-mail: Camilla.stitt@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hart, M., E-mail: oxford.mike@gmail.com [Diamond Light Source Limited, Harwell Science and Innovation Campus, Fermi Avenue, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Harker, N.J., E-mail: nicholas.harker@esrf.fr [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Hallam, K.R., E-mail: k.r.hallam@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); MacFarlane, J., E-mail: james.macfarlane@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Banos, A., E-mail: antonis.banos@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Paraskevoulakos, C., E-mail: cp13846@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom); Butcher, E., E-mail: ed.j.butcher@nnl.co.uk [National Nuclear Laboratory, Seascale, Cumbria CA20 1 PG (United Kingdom); Padovani, C., E-mail: cristiano.padovani@nda.gov.uk [Radioactive Waste Management Limited (formerly the Radioactive Waste Management Directorate of the UK Nuclear Decommissioning Authority), Curie Avenue, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0RH (United Kingdom); Scott, T.B., E-mail: t.b.scott@bristol.ac.uk [Interface Analysis Centre, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, Tyndall Avenue, Bristol BS8 1TL (United Kingdom)

    2015-03-21

    Highlights: • Unirradiated Magnox uranium was encapsulated in grout and exposed to hydrogen. • Synchrotron X-ray tomography imaged the uranium corrosion before and after exposure. • Synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction identified the corrosion products; UH{sub 3} and UO{sub 2}. • Uranium encapsulated in grout oxidised via the anoxic U + H{sub 2}O regime. • Successful in-situ, non-invasive examination of pyrophoric and radioactive material - Abstract: How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H{sub 2} corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U + H{sub 2}O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO{sub 2} and UH{sub 3}, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems.

  7. Smart*Light: A table-top synchrotron for the investigation of art objects

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2018-01-01

    Immediately after its discovery in 1895, X-ray radiation started to make an enormous contribution to the study of artwork. X-ray radiography, MA-XRF scanning and X-ray tomography have been of great help in the understanding, preservation, and authentication of works of art. Notwithstanding major developments over the past century, there are three important intrinsic limitations to X-ray tubes - the conventional X-ray sources used in the lab: their relative low intensity, the poor coherence of radiation and the selective availability of X-ray energies. Since the late 1970s synchrotron sources have become available, which offer high-brilliance, coherent and energy-tunable X-rays, but these are only available at a limited number of specialized facilities worldwide, providing scarce beam time – at a high cost – outside the museum lab. This contribution will discuss the future development and application of a revolutionary, compact, affordable and miniaturized alternative to a synchrotron facility – a tabl...

  8. Terahertz Coherent Synchrotron Radiation from Femtosecond Laser Modulation of the Electron Beam at the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byrd, John M.; Hao, Zhao; Martin, Michael C.; Robin, David S.; Sannibale, Fernando; Schoenlein, Robert W.; Zholents, Alexander A.; Zolotorev, Max S.

    2005-01-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), the ''femtoslicing'' beamline is in operation since 1999 for the production of x-ray synchrotron radiation pulses with femtosecond duration. The mechanism used for generating the short x-ray pulses induces at the same time temporary structures in the electron bunch longitudinal distribution with very short characteristic length. Such structures emit intense coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the terahertz frequency range. These CSR pulses were first observed at the ALS, and the measurement of their intensity is now routinely used as a diagnostics for the tune-up of the femtoslicing x-ray experiments. At the same time, these CSR pulses synchronous with the modulating laser, represent a potential source of terahertz radiation with very interesting features. Several measurements have been performed for their characterization and in this paper we present an updated description of the experimental results and of their interpretation. In particular, we include more data on the interesting interaction, previously observed at the ALS, between the slicing and the microbunching instability (MBI), where under particular circumstances, the slicing seems to trigger the onset of the instability

  9. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farge, Y.

    1982-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation is produced by electrons accelerated near the velocity of light in storage rings, which are used for high energy Physics experiments. The radiation light exhibits a wide spread continuous spectrum ranging from 01 nanometre to radiofrequency. This radiation is characterized by high power (several kilowatts) and intense brightness. The paper recalls the emission laws and the distinctive properties of the radiation, and gives some of the numerous applications in research, such as molecular spectroscopy, X ray diffraction by heavy proteins and X ray microlithography in LVSI circuit making [fr

  10. Data acquisition and experiment control system for high-data-rate experiments at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberi, J.L.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1981-11-01

    A data acquisition and experiment control system for experiments at the Biology Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Station at the National Synchrotron Light Source has been developed based on a multiprocessor, functionally distributed architecture. The system controls an x-ray monochromator and spectrometer and acquires data from any one of three position-sensitive x-ray detectors. The average data rate from the position-sensitive detector is approx. 10 6 events/sec. Data is stored in a one megaword histogramming memory. The experiments at this Station require that x-ray diffraction patterns be correlated with timed stimuli at the sample. Therefore, depending on which detector is in use, up to 10 3 time-correlated diffraction patterns may be held in the system memory simultaneously. The operation of the system is functionally distributed over four processors communicating via a multiport memory

  11. Construction and maintenance of SUNY facilities at the National Synchrotron Light Source. Progress report, 1 October 1981-1 July 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bigeleisen, J.

    1982-01-01

    Development of the SUNY beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source is described. The line now includes monochromator/mirror optics with tandem arrangement of experiments. The beamline computer system is now working with CAMAC data acquisition, and a four-circle diffractometer, a small-angle-scattering bench, and a fluorescence EXAFS apparatus should be ready soon

  12. ''Use of synchrotron radiation in France: present status and perspectives''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiry, P.

    1996-01-01

    LURE (laboratory for the use of electromagnetic radiation) plays an important role as a research center, as a synchrotron radiation producer and as a leading pole about new light source studies. The necessity to maintain LURE at a high level of technological competitiveness implies to build a new facility called SOLEIL. This article describes the present equipment of LURE, its activity fields and draws the prospect of synchrotron radiation in France. (A.C.)

  13. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; /SLAC; Vylet, Vaclav; /Jefferson Lab

    2009-12-11

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power ({approx} 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  14. Nuclear waste viewed in a new light; a synchrotron study of uranium encapsulated in grout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stitt, C A; Hart, M; Harker, N J; Hallam, K R; MacFarlane, J; Banos, A; Paraskevoulakos, C; Butcher, E; Padovani, C; Scott, T B

    2015-03-21

    How do you characterise the contents of a sealed nuclear waste package without breaking it open? This question is important when the contained corrosion products are potentially reactive with air and radioactive. Synchrotron X-rays have been used to perform micro-scale in-situ observation and characterisation of uranium encapsulated in grout; a simulation for a typical intermediate level waste storage packet. X-ray tomography and X-ray powder diffraction generated both qualitative and quantitative data from a grout-encapsulated uranium sample before, and after, deliberately constrained H2 corrosion. Tomographic reconstructions provided a means of assessing the extent, rates and character of the corrosion reactions by comparing the relative densities between the materials and the volume of reaction products. The oxidation of uranium in grout was found to follow the anoxic U+H2O oxidation regime, and the pore network within the grout was observed to influence the growth of uranium hydride sites across the metal surface. Powder diffraction analysis identified the corrosion products as UO2 and UH3, and permitted measurement of corrosion-induced strain. Together, X-ray tomography and diffraction provide means of accurately determining the types and extent of uranium corrosion occurring, thereby offering a future tool for isolating and studying the reactions occurring in real full-scale waste package systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Operational Radiation Protection in Synchrotron Light and Free Electron Laser Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, James C.; Rokni, Sayed H.; Vylet, Vaclav

    2009-01-01

    The 3rd generation synchrotron radiation (SR) facilities are storage ring based facilities with many insertion devices and photon beamlines, and have low injection beam power (< few tens of watts), but extremely high stored beam power (∼ 1 GW). The 4th generation x-ray free electron laser (FEL) facilities are based on an electron Linac with a long undulator and have high injection beam power (a few kW). Due to its electron and photon beam characteristics and modes of operation, storage ring and photon beamlines have unique safety aspects, which are the main subjects of this paper. The shielding design limits, operational modes, and beam losses are first reviewed. Shielding analysis (source terms and methodologies) and interlocked safety systems for storage ring and photon beamlines (including SR and gas bremsstrahlung) are described. Specific safety issues for storage ring top-off injection operation and FEL facilities are discussed. The operational safety program, e.g., operation authorization, commissioning, training, and radiation measurements, for SR facilities is also presented.

  16. Preliminary studies of enhanced contrast radiography in anatomy and embryology of insects with Elettra synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoennicke, M.G.; Foerster, L.A.; Navarro-Silva, M.A.; Menk, R.-H.; Rigon, L.; Cusatis, C.

    2005-01-01

    Enhanced contrast X-ray imaging is achieved by exploiting the real part of the refraction index, which is responsible for the phase shifts, in addition to the imaginary part, which is responsible for the absorption. Such techniques are called X-ray phase contrast imaging. An analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast imaging set-up with Diffraction Enhanced Imaging processing (DEI) were used for preliminary studies in anatomy and embryology of insects. Parasitized stinkbug and moth eggs used as control agents of pests in vegetables and adult stinkbugs and mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) were used as samples. The experimental setup was mounted in the SYRMEP beamline at ELETTRA. Images were obtained using a high spatial resolution CCD detector (pixel size 14x14μm 2 ) coupled with magnifying optics. Analyzer-based X-ray phase contrast images (PCI) and edge detection images show contrast and details not observed with conventional synchrotron radiography and open the possibility for future study in the embryonic development of insects

  17. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pattison, P.; Quinn, P.

    1990-01-01

    This report details the activities in synchrotron radiation and related areas at Daresbury Laboratory during 1989/90. The number and scope of the scientific reports submitted by external users and in-house staff is a reflection of the large amount of scheduled beamtime and high operating efficiency achieved at the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) during the past year. Over 4000 hours of user beam were available, equivalent to about 80% of the total scheduled time. Many of the reports collected here illustrate the increasing technical complexity of the experiments now being carried out at Daresbury. Provision of the appropriate technical and scientific infrastructure and support is a continuing challenge. The development of the Materials Science Laboratory together with the existing Biological Support Laboratory will extend the range of experiments which can be carried out on the SRS. This will particularly facilitate work in which the sample must be prepared or characterised immediately before or during an experiment. The year 1989/90 has also seen a substantial upgrade of several stations, especially in the area of x-ray optics. Many of the advantages of the High Brightness Lattice can only be exploited effectively with the use of focusing optics. As the performance of these stations improves, the range of experiments which are feasible on the SRS will be extended significantly. (author)

  18. A new fixed-target approach for serial crystallography at synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, Philip

    2017-07-15

    In the framework of this thesis, a new method for high-speed fixed-target serial crystallography experiments and its applicability to biomacromolecular crystallography at both synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is presented. The method is based on a sample holder, which can carry up to 20,000 microcrystals and which is made of single-crystalline silicon. Using synchrotron radiation, the structure of Operophtera brumata cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 18 polyhedrin, lysozyme and cubic insulin was determined by collecting X-ray diffraction data from multiple microcrystals. Data collection was shown to be possible at both cryogenic and ambient conditions. For room-temperature measurements, both global and specific indications of radiation damage were investigated and characterized. Due to the sieve-like structure of the chip, the microcrystals tend to arrange themselves according to the micropore pattern, which allows for efficient sampling of the sample material. In combination with a high-speed scanning stage, the sample holder was furthermore shown to be highly suitable for serial femtosecond crystallography experiments. By fast raster scanning of the chip through the pulsed X-ray beam of an XFEL, structure determination of a virus, using the example of bovine enterovirus type 2, has been demonstrated at an XFEL for the first time. Hit rates of up to 100% were obtained by the presented method, which refers to a reduction in sample consumption by at least three orders of magnitude with respect to common liquid-jet injection methods used for sample delivery. In this way, the typical time needed for data collection in serial femtosecond crystallography is significantly decreased. The presented technique for sample loading of the chip is easy to learn and results in efficient removal of the surrounding mother liquor, thereby reducing the generated background signal. Since the chip is made of single-crystalline silicon, in principle no

  19. A new fixed-target approach for serial crystallography at synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedig, Philip

    2017-07-01

    In the framework of this thesis, a new method for high-speed fixed-target serial crystallography experiments and its applicability to biomacromolecular crystallography at both synchrotron light sources and X-ray free electron lasers (XFELs) is presented. The method is based on a sample holder, which can carry up to 20,000 microcrystals and which is made of single-crystalline silicon. Using synchrotron radiation, the structure of Operophtera brumata cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus type 18 polyhedrin, lysozyme and cubic insulin was determined by collecting X-ray diffraction data from multiple microcrystals. Data collection was shown to be possible at both cryogenic and ambient conditions. For room-temperature measurements, both global and specific indications of radiation damage were investigated and characterized. Due to the sieve-like structure of the chip, the microcrystals tend to arrange themselves according to the micropore pattern, which allows for efficient sampling of the sample material. In combination with a high-speed scanning stage, the sample holder was furthermore shown to be highly suitable for serial femtosecond crystallography experiments. By fast raster scanning of the chip through the pulsed X-ray beam of an XFEL, structure determination of a virus, using the example of bovine enterovirus type 2, has been demonstrated at an XFEL for the first time. Hit rates of up to 100% were obtained by the presented method, which refers to a reduction in sample consumption by at least three orders of magnitude with respect to common liquid-jet injection methods used for sample delivery. In this way, the typical time needed for data collection in serial femtosecond crystallography is significantly decreased. The presented technique for sample loading of the chip is easy to learn and results in efficient removal of the surrounding mother liquor, thereby reducing the generated background signal. Since the chip is made of single-crystalline silicon, in principle no

  20. The three-dimensional microstructure of polycrystalline materials unravelled by synchrotron light; La microstructure 3D des materiaux polycristallins vue sous la lumiere synchrotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludwig, W.; Herbig, M. [Universite de Lyon, INSA-Lyon, MATEIS, UMR 5510 CNRS, LyonTech Campus, Bat. Saint-Exupery, 25 avenue Jean Capelle, F-69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Ludwig, W.; King, A; Reischig, P. [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, 6 rue J. Horowitz, BP 220, F-38043 Grenoble (France); Marrow, J. [University of Oxford, Department of Materiels, Parks road, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom); Babout, L. [Computer Engineering Department, Technical University of Lodz, ul. Stefanowskiego 18/22, PL-90- 537 Lodz (Poland); Mejdal Lauridsen, E. [Materials Research Department, Riso National Laboratory for Sustainable Energy, Technical University of Denmark (DTU), Building 228, PO Box 49, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Proudhon, H. [MINES ParisTech, Centre des Materiaux, UMR 7633 CNRS, BP 87, F-91003 Evry Cedex (France)

    2011-07-01

    Synchrotron radiation X-ray imaging and diffraction techniques offer new possibilities for non-destructive bulk characterization of polycrystalline materials. Minute changes in electron density (different crystallographic phases, cracks, porosities) can be detected using 3D imaging modes exploiting Fresnel diffraction and the coherence properties of third generation synchrotron beams. X-ray diffraction contrast tomography, a technique based on Bragg diffraction imaging, provides access to the 3D shape, orientation and elastic strain state of the individual grains from polycrystalline sample volumes containing several hundred up to a few thousand grains. Combining both imaging modalities allows a comprehensive description of the microstructure of the material at the micrometer length scale. Repeated observations during (interrupted) mechanical tests provide unprecedented insight into crystallographic and grain microstructure related aspects of polycrystal deformation and degradation mechanisms in materials, fulfilling some conditions on grain size and deformation state. (authors)

  1. Design and project status of the National Synchrotron Light Source; storage rings (2.5 GeV, 0.7 GeV) for the generation of bright synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1980-01-01

    Two high intensity storage rings are being constructed at Brookhaven National Laboratory for the generation of intense fluxes of synchrotron radiation in the vuv wavelength region (700 MeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 31.5 A) and in the x-ray wavelength region (2.5 GeV ring, lambda/sub c/ = 2.5 A). A description is given of the facility, the main features of the storage rings are presented and the basic parameters are enumerated. High field superconducting wigglers, to lower the short wavelength cutoff in the x-ray ring, and undulators, for flux enhancement or a free electron laser experiment will be incorporated and parameters are given here. Special design aspects to optimize the electron storage rings as dedicated synchrotron radiation sources will be emphasized and the status of the project will be given

  2. Molecular Chemical Structure of Barley Proteins Revealed by Ultra-Spatially Resolved Synchrotron Light Sourced FTIR Microspectroscopy: Comparison of Barley Varieties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2007-01-01

    Barley protein structure affects the barley quality, fermentation, and degradation behavior in both humans and animals among other factors such as protein matrix. Publications show various biological differences among barley varieties such as Valier and Harrington, which have significantly different degradation behaviors. The objectives of this study were to reveal the molecular structure of barley protein, comparing various varieties (Dolly, Valier, Harrington, LP955, AC Metcalfe, and Sisler), and quantify protein structure profiles using Gaussian and Lorentzian methods of multi-component peak modeling by using the ultra-spatially resolved synchrotron light sourced Fourier transform infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The items of the protein molecular structure revealed included protein structure α-helices, β-sheets, and others such as β-turns and random coils. The experiment was performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, US Department of Energy, NY). The results showed that with the SFTIRM, the molecular structure of barley protein could be revealed. Barley protein structures exhibited significant differences among the varieties in terms of proportion and ratio of model-fitted α-helices, β-sheets, and others. By using multi-component peaks modeling at protein amide I region of 1710-1576 cm -1 , the results show that barley protein consisted of approximately 18-34% of α-helices, 14-25% of β-sheets, and 44-69% others. AC Metcalfe, Sisler, and LP955 consisted of higher (P 0.05). The ratio of α-helices to others (0.3 to 1.0, P < 0.05) and that of β-sheets to others (0.2 to 0.8, P < 0.05) were different among the barley varieties. It needs to be pointed out that using a multi-peak modeling for protein structure analysis is only for making relative estimates and not exact determinations and only for the comparison purpose between varieties. The principal component analysis showed that protein amide I Fourier

  3. THE Low-level Radio Frequency System for the superconducting cavities of National Synchrotron Light Source II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, H.; Rose, J.; Holub, B.; Cupolo, J.; Oliva, J.; Sikora, R.; Yeddulla, M.

    2011-01-01

    A digital low-level radio frequency (LLRF) field controller has been developed for the storage ring of The National Synchrotron Light Source-II (NSLS-II). The primary performance goal for the LLRF is to support the required RF operation of the superconducting cavities with a beam current of 500mA and a 0.14 degree or better RF phase stability. The digital field controller is FPGA-based, in a standard format 19-inch/I-U chassis. It has an option of high-level control support with MATLAB running on a local host computer through a USB2.0 port. The field controller has been field tested with the high-power superconducting RF (SRF) at Canadian light Source, and successfully stored a high beam current of 250 mA. The test results show that required specifications for the cavity RF field stability are met. This digital field controller is also currently being used as a development platform for other functional modules in the NSLS-II RF systems.

  4. Hazards analysis for the E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory x-ray absorption experiments to be performed at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edelstein, N.M.; Shuh, D.K.; Bucher, J.B.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this experiment is to determine the oxidation state(s) of neptunium (Np) in mouse skeleton and in soft tissue by X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES). If Np is present in sufficient concentration, X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (XAFS) data will be obtained in order to further identify the Np species present. These data will be crucial in understanding the metabolic pathway of Np in mammals which will help in the design of reagents which can eliminate Np from mammals in the event of accidental exposure. It is proposed to run these experiments at the Standard Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL). This laboratory is a DOE national user facility located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). The 237 Np nucleus decays by the emission of an alpha particle and this particle emission is the principal hazard in handling Np samples. This hazard is mitigated by physical containment of the sample which stops the alpha particles within the containment. The total amount of Np material that will be shipped to and be at SSRL at any one time will be less than 1 gram. This limit on the amount of Np will ensure that SLAC remains a low hazard, non-nuclear facility. The Np samples will be solids or Np ions in aqueous solution. The Np samples will be shipped to SSRL/SLAC OHP. SLAC OHP will inventory the samples and swipe the containers holding the triply contained samples, and then bring them to the SSRL Actinide trailer located outside building 131. The QA counting records from the samples, as measured at LBNL, will be provided to SSRL and SLAC OHP prior to the arrival of the samples at SLAC OHP. In addition, strict monitoring of the storage and experimental areas will be performed in accordance with SLAC/OHP radiation protection procedures to ensure against the release of contamination

  5. The Australian synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhi, R.

    2005-06-01

    This document recalls the historical aspects of the Australian Synchrotron which will be implemented in 2007. It presents then the objectives of this program, the specifications of the ring and the light lines. (A.L.B.)

  6. Is photocleavage of DNA by YOYO-1 using a synchrotron radiation light source sequence dependent?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilroy, Emma L.; Hoffmann, Søren Vrønning; Jones, Nykola C.

    2011-01-01

    ) throughout the irradiation period. The dependence of LD signals on DNA sequences and on time in the intense light beam was explored and quantified for single-stranded poly(dA), poly[(dA-dT)2], calf thymus DNA (ctDNA) and Micrococcus luteus DNA (mlDNA). The DNA and ligand regions of the spectrum showed...

  7. Beam heat load investigations with a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics in a synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voutta, Robert

    2016-04-22

    The beam heat load is a crucial input parameter for the cryogenic design of superconducting insertion devices. To understand the discrepancies between the predicted heat load of an electron beam to a cold bore and the heat load observed in superconducting devices, a cold vacuum chamber for diagnostics has been built. Extensive beam heat load measurements were performed at the Diamond light source. They are analysed systematically and combined with complementary impedance bench measurements.

  8. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, L.

    2006-01-01

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven. However, with opportunities come challenges. One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007 budget

  9. NSLS 2006 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2006)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MILLER, L. (EDITOR)

    2006-12-31

    This past year has seen both challenges and fantastic new opportunities for the user community at the NSLS. The fantastic new opportunities are clear and abundant. We now have a five-year strategic plan for new development and continued operation of the NSLS. The NSLS continues to be an extremely productive facility, and the UEC is delighted at how NSLS Chair Chi-Chang Kao has consulted widely within the user community to develop a five-year plan for strategic upgrades and continued operation of the facility. The NSLS-II project, led by Associate Lab Director Steve Dierker, has done very well in its Department of Energy (DOE) reviews and will hopefully soon receive Critical Decision-1 (CD-1) approval, which in DOE lingo gives a go-ahead to launch the detailed design of the facility. We also held the first joint user meeting between the NSLS and Brookhaven's Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN), for which the building is near completion. The joint user meeting is an important step toward the close collaboration of the two facilities. The CFN, led by Emilio Mendez, promises to provide capabilities and research foci that are complementary to those at the NSLS. Together, all of these developments give a clear path to an exciting future of synchrotron radiation research at Brookhaven! However, with opportunities come challenges! One of the largest of these faced in the past year involved congressional support for scientific research in general, and DOE user facilities in particular. As you likely know, Congress did not complete its usual budget process in 2006, with the exceptions of the departments of Defense and Homeland Security. This left science funding at the budget levels enacted in late 2005 for FY2006, and unfortunately, FY2006 was not a particularly memorable vintage for science support. The good news is that you, the user community, have spoken up with unprecedented vigor about this, and Congress appears to be listening. As we look at the FY2007

  10. Laboratory X-ray Studies with Trapped Highly Charged Ions Using Synchrotrons and Free-electron Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo López-Urrutia, José R.

    2018-06-01

    Laboratory studies on highly charged ions (HCI) using electron beam ion traps (EBITs) can cover all charge states and chemical elements found in astrophysical sources. Since their introduction in 1986, a wealth of emission measurements from the optical to the x-ray range has been carried out by different groups. In most of the work, electron-impact excitation was the driving mechanism, and high resolution spectrometers were used for the diagnostic of the emitted radiation. Other recent studies included x-ray emission following charge exchange, a mechanism which is present in many astrophysical environments and can help explain some of the unknown spectral features at 3.55 keV.In the last decade, excitation and photoionization have also been investigated by exposing HCI trapped in an EBIT to intense, monochromatic radiation from free-electron lasers and synchrotron sources. Here, advanced monochromators in powerful undulator beamlines allowed us to work at photon energies from 50 eV to 15 keV while resolving the natural linewidths of x-ray transitions like the Kα complex of Fe up to the highest charge states, and to measure the oscillator strengths of, e. g., the neonlike Fe16+ spectrum. Photoionization studies have been performed for those species as well. Very recently, our novel compact EBIT with an off-axis electron gun allows for simultaneously using the photon beam downstream, enabling exact wavelength determinations referenced to HCI with accurately calculable transitions. We have performed a recalibration of the molecular and atomic oxygen soft x-ray absorption lines in the 500 eV range with an uncertainty estimate of 30 meV. This revealed a 600 meV calibration error that propagated through the literature for decades with the consequence of a 200 km/s misfit of the velocity in interstellar oxygen absorbers. Other possibilities for the compact EBIT are investigations of resonant photorecombination processes with excellent energy resolution. With the

  11. Use of synchrotron radiation in radiation biology research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Takeshi

    1981-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) holds great expectation as a new research tool in the new areas of material science, because it has the continuous spectral distribution from visible light to X-ray, and its intensity is 10 2 to 10 3 times as strong as that of conventional radiation sources. In the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, a synchrotron radiation experimental facility has been constructed, which will start operation in fiscal 1982. With this SR, the photons having the wavelength in undeveloped region from vacuum ultraviolet to soft X-ray are obtained as intense mono-wavelength light. The SR thus should contribute to the elucidation of the fundamentals in the biological action of radiation. The following matters are described: synchrotron radiation, experimental facility using SR, electron storage ring, features of SR, photon factory plan and synchrotron radiation experimental facility, utilization of SR in radiation biology field. (J.P.N.)

  12. X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

    1983-01-01

    Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light

  13. Spectrometer control subsystem with high level functionality for use at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberi, J.L.; Stubblefield, F.W.

    1980-11-01

    We have developed a subsystem capable of controlling stepping motors in a wide variety of vuv and x-ray spectrometers to be used at the National Sychrotron Light Source. The subsystem is capable of controlling up to 15 motors with encoder readback and ramped acceleration/deceleration. Both absolute and incremental encoders may be used in any mixture. Function commands to the subsystem are communicated via ASCII characters over an asynchronous serial link in a well-defined protocol in decipherable English. Thus the unit can be controlled via write statements in a high-level language. Details of hardware implementation will be presented

  14. Analysis of peripheral thermal damage after laser irradiation of dentin using polarized light microscopy and synchrotron radiation infrared spectromicroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dela Rosa, Alfredo; Sarma, Anupama V.; Le, Charles Q.; Jones, Robert S.; Fried, Daniel

    2004-05-01

    It is necessary to minimize peripheral thermal damage during laser irradiation, since thermal damage to collagen and mineral compromises the bond strength to restorative materials in dentin and inhibits healing and osteointegration in bone. The overall objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that lasers resonant to the specific absorption of water, collagen, and hydroxyapatite with pulse durations less than the thermal relaxation times at each respective laser wavelength will efficiently remove dentin with minimal peripheral thermal damage. Precise incisions were produced in 3 x 3 mm2 blocks of human dentin using CO2 (9.6 μm), Er:YSGG (2.79 μm), and Nd:YAG (355 nm) lasers with and without a computer controlled water spray. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography was used to obtain optical cross-sections of each incision to determine the rate and efficiency of ablation. The peripheral thermal damage zone around each incision was analyzed using polarized light microscopy (PLM) and Synchrotron-Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared Spectro-microscopy (SR-FTIR). Thermally induced chemical changes to both mineral and the collagen matrix was observed with SR-FTIR with a 10-μm spatial resolution and those changes were correlated with optical changes observed with PLM. Minimal (alveolar bone.

  15. Free electron laser facilities employing a 150-MeV linac injector for Saga synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomimasu, T.; Yasumoto, M.; Ochiai, Y.; Ishibashi, M.; Murayama, T.

    1999-01-01

    Free electron laser (FEL) facilities as the FELI FEL Facility are proposed, for which a 150-MeV linac type injector for a Saga synchrotron light source (SLS) is employed in FEL mode. The linac has two operating modes; short macropulse mode a 1 μs at 150 MeV for injection to a 1 - 1.3-GeV third generation type storage ring and long macropulse mode of 12 μs at 100 MeV for four FEL Facilities. The macropulse beam consists of a train of several ps, 0.6 nC microbunches (peak current 100 A) repeating at 89.25 MHz. We are aiming to supply high power level photon beams covering an attractive wavelength range from 0.05 nm (25 keV) to 200 μm (0.006 eV) for scientific researches, bio-medical and industrial applications, using the Saga third generation type SLS with a superconducting wiggler and the proposed four FEL Facilities. (author)

  16. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  17. Metrology of reflection optics for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, P.Z.

    1985-09-01

    Recent years have seen an almost explosive growth in the number of beam lines on new and existing synchrotron radiation facilities throughout the world. The need for optical components to utilize the unique characteristics of synchrotron radiation has increased accordingly. Unfortunately, the technology to manufacture and measure the large, smooth, exotic optical surfaces required to focus and steer the synchrotron radiation beam has not progressed as rapidly as the operational demands on these components. Most companies do not wish to become involved with a project that requires producing a single, very expensive, aspheric optic with surface roughness and figure tolerances that are beyond their capabilities to measure. This paper will review some of the experiences of the National Synchrotron Light Source in procuring grazing incidence optical components over the past several years. We will review the specification process - how it is related to the function of the optic, and how it relates to the metrology available during the manufacturing process and after delivery to the user's laboratory. We will also discuss practical aspects of our experience with new technologies, such as single point diamond turning of metal mirrors and the use of SiC as a mirror material. Recent advances in metrology instrumentation have the potential to move the measurement of surface figure and finish from the research laboratory into the optical shop, which should stimulate growth and interest in the manufacturing of optics to meet the needs of the synchrotron radiation user community

  18. The Advanced Light Source at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory: a new tool for research in atomic physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlachter, A.S.; Robinson, A.L.

    1991-01-01

    The Advanced Light Source, a third-generation national synchrotron-radiation facility now under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, is scheduled to begin serving qualified users across a broad spectrum of research areas in the spring of 1993. Based on a low-emittance electron storage ring optimized to operate at 1.5 GeV, the ALS will have 10 long straight sections available for insertion devices (undulators and wigglers) and 24 high-quality bend-magnet ports. The short pulse width (30-50 ps) will be ideal for time-resolved measurements. Undulators will generate high-brightness partially coherent soft X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) radiation from below 10 eV to above 2 keV; this radiation is plane polarized. Wigglers and bend magnets will extend the spectrum by generating high fluxes of X-rays to photon energies above 10 keV. The ALS will have an extensive research program in which XUV radiation is used to study matter in allk its varied gaseous, liquid, and solid forms. The high brightness will open new areas of research in the materials sciences, such as spatially resolved spectroscopy (spectromicroscopy), and in biology, such as X-ray microscopy with element-specific sensitivity; the high flux will allow measurements in atomic physics and chemistry to be made with tenuous gas-phase targets. Technological applications could include lithography and nano-fabrication. (orig.)

  19. Informal proposal for an Atomic Physics Facility at the National Synchrotron Light Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, K.W.; Johnson, B.M.; Meron, M.

    1986-01-01

    An Atomic Physics Facility (APF) for experiments that will use radiation from a superconducting wiggler on the NSLS X-13 port is described. The scientific justification for the APF is given and the elements of the facility are discussed. It is shown that it will be possible to conduct a uniquely varied set of experiments that can probe most aspects of atomic physics. A major component of the proposal is a heavy-ion storage ring capable of containing ions with energies of about 10 MeV/nucleon. The ring can be filled with heavy ions produced at the BNL MP Tandem Laboratory or from independent ion-source systems. A preliminary cost estimate for the facility is presented.

  20. Vacuum system for the Argonne 6 GeV synchrotron light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wehrle, R.; Moenich, J.

    1985-01-01

    The ANL vacuum system for the 6 GeV light source storage ring features non-evaporable strip getter pumps for uniform pumping around the ring within a gas desorption antechamber, and it also features lumped getter pumping directly under and above crotch radiation absorbers that are positioned after each bending magnet. Based on experiments at ANL in 1980 and by others, the technical and economical advantages have been established for the use of the distributed NeG pumps of non-magnetic strips coated with a non-evaporable Zr Al getter matrix. The NeG strip pump lifetime approaches ten years. The antechamber improves the isolation of the gas desorption process from the main beam chamber and beam. The combination of these vacuum techniques; the NeG strip getter pumps, the gas desorption antechambers, and the lumped ion and lumped getter pumping provide a unique and reliable system for maintaining long beam lifetime

  1. Synchrotron radiation structure analyses of the light-induced radical pair of a hexaarylbiimidazolyl derivative. Origin of the spin-multiplicity change

    CERN Document Server

    Kawano, M; Matsubara, K; Imabayashi, H; Mitsumi, M; Toriumi, K; Ohashi, Y

    2002-01-01

    In situ synchrotron radiation structure analyses of a light-induced radical pair from o-Cl-HABI were performed by using an X-ray vacuum camera at 23-70K at the BL02B1 station of SPring-8. The combined results of X-ray analysis with theoretical calculation, IR, and UV-vis spectroscopy reveal that a slight conformational change of the radical pair causes the drastic spin-multiplicity change during 2-140K. (author)

  2. Synchrotron radiation from protons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutt, S.K.

    1992-12-01

    Synchrotron radiation from protons, though described by the same equations as the radiation from electrons, exhibits a number of interesting features on account of the parameters reached in praxis. In this presentation, we shall point out some of the features relating to (i) normal synchrotron radiation from dipoles in proton machines such as the High Energy Booster and the Superconducting Super Collider; (ii) synchrotron radiation from short dipoles, and its application to light monitors for proton machines, and (iii) synchrotron radiation from undulators in the limit when, the deflection parameter is much smaller than unity. The material for this presentation is taken largely from the work of Hofmann, Coisson, Bossart, and their collaborators, and from a paper by Kim. We shall emphasize the qualitative aspects of synchrotron radiation in the cases mentioned above, making, when possible, simple arguments for estimating the spectral and angular properties of the radiation. Detailed analyses can be found in the literature

  3. NSLS 2003 ACTIVITY REPORT (NATIONAL SYNCHROTRON LIGHT SOURCE ACTIVITY REPORT 2003)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MILLER, L.

    2004-01-01

    -resolution curved position sensitive detector for powder diffraction was also developed and made available to users to enable time-resolved studies of reaction mechanisms, phase transformations, chemical kinetics, and material dynamics. At the DUV-FEL, this past year saw the achievement of HGHG light at 266 nm, with a substantial third harmonic at 89 nm. User science experiments were initiated and published in Physical Review Letters and a successful workshop was held to identify the new scientific opportunities in the chemical sciences enabled by this unique light source. These and many other important projects are described more fully in the Facility Report

  4. Assessment of In Situ Time Resolved Shock Experiments at Synchrotron Light Sources*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belak, J.; Ilavsky, J.; Hessler, J. P.

    2005-07-01

    Prior to fielding in situ time resolved experiments of shock wave loading at the Advanced Photon Source, we have performed feasibility experiments assessing a single photon bunch. Using single and poly-crystal Al, Ti, V and Cu shock to incipient spallation on the gas gun, samples were prepared from slices normal to the spall plane of thickness 100-500 microns. In addition, single crystal Al of thickness 500 microns was shocked to incipient spallation and soft recovered using the LLNL e-gun mini-flyer system. The e-gun mini-flyer impacts the sample target producing a 10's ns flat-top shock transient. Here, we present results for imaging, small-angle scattering (SAS), and diffraction. In particular, there is little SAS away from the spall plane and significant SAS at the spall plane, demonstrating the presence of sub-micron voids. * Use of the Advanced Photon Source was supported by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. W-31-109-Eng-38 and work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Calculation of coupled bunch effects in the synchrotron light source BESSY VSR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruprecht, Martin

    2016-02-22

    In the scope of this thesis, the strength of coupled bunch instabilities (CBIs) driven by longitudinal monopole higher order modes (HOMs) and transverse dipole and quadrupole HOMs is evaluated for the upgrade project BESSY Variable Pulse Length Storage Ring (BESSY VSR) at Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie GmbH (HZB), based on analytic calculations and tracking simulations, and compared to the performance of an active bunch-by-bunch feedback (BBFB). Algorithms for tracking codes are derived, and a semi-empirical formula for the estimation of transverse quadrupole CBIs is presented. CBI studies are an integral part of the benchmarking of the cavity models for BESSY VSR and have been accompanying and influencing their entire design process. Based on the BESSY VSR cavity model with highly advanced HOM damping, beam stability is likely to be reached with a BBFB system, independent of the bunch fill pattern. Additionally, measurements of CBIs have been performed at BESSY II and the Metrology Light Source of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (MLS), where the longitudinal long range impedance was characterized. Transient beam loading is evaluated by means of analytic formulas and new experimentally verified tracking codes. For the baseline bunch fill pattern of BESSY VSR, it is shown that the particular setup of cavity frequencies amplifies the transient effect on the long bunch, limiting its elongation and potentially resulting in increased Touschek losses.

  6. Elemental Composition of Mars Return Samples Using X-Ray Fluorescence Imaging at the National Synchrotron Light Source II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thieme, J.; Hurowitz, J. A.; Schoonen, M. A.; Fogelqvist, E.; Gregerson, J.; Farley, K. A.; Sherman, S.; Hill, J.

    2018-04-01

    NSLS-II at BNL provides a unique and critical capability to perform assessments of the elemental composition and the chemical state of Mars returned samples using synchrotron radiation X-ray fluorescence imaging and X-ray absorption spectroscopy.

  7. Design of a synchrotron radiation detector for the test beam lines at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hutton, R.D.

    1994-01-01

    As part of the particle- and momentum-tagging instrumentation required for the test beam lines of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC), the synchrotron radiation detector (SRD) was designed to provide electron tagging at momentum above 75 GeV. In a parallel effort to the three test beam lines at the SSC, schedule demands required testing and calibration operations to be initiated at Fermilab. Synchrotron radiation detectors also were to be installed in the NM and MW beam lines at Femilab before the test beam lines at the SSC would become operational. The SRD is the last instrument in a series of three used in the SSC test beam fines. It follows a 20-m drift section of beam tube downstream of the last silicon strip detector. A bending dipole just in of the last silicon strip detector produces the synchrotron radiation that is detected in a 50-mm-square cross section NaI crystal. A secondary scintillator made of Bicron BC-400 plastic is used to discriminate whether it is synchrotron radiation or a stray particle that causes the triggering of the NaI crystal's photo multiplier tube (PMT)

  8. Femto-second pulses of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zholents, A.A.; Zolotorev, M.S.

    1995-07-01

    A method capable of producing femto-second pulses of synchrotron radiation is proposed. It is based on the interaction of femto-second light pulses with electrons in a storage ring. The application of the method to the generation of ultra-short x-ray pulses at the Advance Light Source of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been considered. The same method can also be used for extraction of electrons from a storage ring in ultra-short series of microbunches spaced by the periodicity of light wavelength

  9. Dynamic View on Nanostructures: A Technique for Time Resolved Optical Luminescence Using Synchrotron Light Pulses at SRC, APS, and CLS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heigl, F.; Jurgensen, A.; Zhou, X.-T.; Lam, S.; Murphy, M.; Ko, J.Y.P.; Sham, T.K.; Rosenberg, R.A.; Gordon, R.; Brewe, D.; Regier, T.; Armelao, L.

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimental technique using the time structure of synchrotron radiation to study time resolved X-ray excited optical luminescence. In particular we are taking advantage of the bunched distribution of electrons in a synchrotron storage ring, giving short x-ray pulses (10-10 2 picoseconds) which are separated by non-radiating gaps on the nano- to tens of nanosecond scale - sufficiently wide to study a broad range of optical decay channels observed in advanced nanostructured materials.

  10. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  11. Application of synchrotron radiation to x-ray fluorescence analysis of trace elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Hanson, A.L.

    1986-08-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation x-ray sources has provided the means to greatly extend the capabilities of x-ray fluorescence analysis for determinations of trace element concentrations. A brief description of synchrotron radiation properties provides a background for a discussion of the improved detection limits compared to existing x-ray fluorescence techniques. Calculated detection limits for x-ray microprobes with micrometer spatial resolutions are described and compared with experimental results beginning to appear from a number of laboratories. The current activities and future plans for a dedicated x-ray microprobe beam line at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) of Brookhaven National Laboratory are presented

  12. Versatile user-oriented atomic and molecular beam apparatus for use with the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.A.; Grover, J.R.

    1978-11-01

    A proposed atomic and moleuclar beam apparatus is described for photon interaction studies using the National Sychrotron Light Source at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This apparatus will employ ultrahigh vacuum techniques compatible with storage ring operation. Supersonic nozzle sources will be used to produce the beams and signal detection will be accomplished using a quadrupole mass analysis system. The equipment is intended for use both by in-house and outside users and primary consideration has been given to flexibility of design. The application of photoionization techniques to the study of crossed beam reactive scattering with particular emphasis on internal energy distribution analysis is discussed

  13. National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines

  14. Atoms, molecules, clusters and synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kui Rexi; Ju Xin

    1995-01-01

    The importance of synchrotron radiation, especially the third generation synchrotron radiation light source, in atomic, molecular and cluster physics is discussed and some views are presented on new methods which may become available for research in the above fields

  15. Synchrotron radiation sources: general features and vacuum system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Craievich, A.F.

    1985-01-01

    In the last years the electron or positron storage rings, which were until 1970 only used for high energy physics experiments, begun to be built in several countries exclusively as electromagnetic radiation source (synchrotron radiation). The sources are generally made up by injector (linear accelerator or microtron), 'booster' (synchrotron), storage ring, insertions ('Wigglers' and ondulators) and light lines. The interest by these sources are due to the high intensity, large spectrum (from infrared to the X-rays), polarization and pulsed structure of the produced radiation. For the ultra-vacuum obtainement, necessary for the functioning storage rings (p=10 -9 Torr), several special procedures are used. In Brazil the Synchrotron Radiation National Laboratory of the CNPq worked out a conceptual project of synchrotron radiation source, whose execution should begin by the construction of the several components prototypes. (L.C.) [pt

  16. Sirius synchrotron linear accelerator radiological shields; Blindagens radiológicas do acelerador linear do síncrotron Sirius

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchim Neto, F.A.; Rodrigues, A.R.D.; Madacki, R., E-mail: fernando.bacchim@lnls.br [Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncrotron (LNLS/CNPEM), Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    The Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) is building its second synchrotron light source. Sirius will be the largest and most complex scientific structure in the country and one of the world's first 4{sup th} generation synchrotron light sources. The first of the three Sirius accelerator structures will be a LINAC of 150 MeV. For the development of the radiological shields required throughout the Sirius project, the FLUKA Software based on the Monte-Carlo Method and analytical strategies are used. In the work will be described calculations and preliminary simulations performed during the beam dump project to contain the beam produced by Sirius LINAC.

  17. Temporal Evolution of the Gamma-ray Burst Afterglow Spectrum for an Observer: GeV–TeV Synchrotron Self-Compton Light Curve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukushima, Takuma; Fujita, Yutaka [Department of Earth and Space Science, Osaka University, Osaka, 560-0043 (Japan); To, Sho; Asano, Katsuaki, E-mail: fukushima@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: fujita@vega.ess.sci.osaka-u.ac.jp, E-mail: tosho@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp, E-mail: asanok@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, The University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2017-08-01

    We numerically simulate the gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow emission with a one-zone time-dependent code. The temporal evolutions of the decelerating shocked shell and energy distributions of electrons and photons are consistently calculated. The photon spectrum and light curves for an observer are obtained taking into account the relativistic propagation of the shocked shell and the curvature of the emission surface. We find that the onset time of the afterglow is significantly earlier than the previous analytical estimate. The analytical formulae of the shock propagation and light curve for the radiative case are also different from our results. Our results show that even if the emission mechanism is switching from synchrotron to synchrotron self-Compton, the gamma-ray light curves can be a smooth power law, which agrees with the observed light curve and the late detection of a 32 GeV photon in GRB 130427A. The uncertainty of the model parameters obtained with the analytical formula is discussed, especially in connection with the closure relation between spectral index and decay index.

  18. Chemistry with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preses, J.; Grover, J.R.; White, M.G.; Kvick, A.

    1990-01-01

    An accidental by-product of high-energy physics, synchrotron radiation, has emerged as one of the most powerful tools for the understanding of chemical reactions. Advances made by using synchrotron radiation in physical chemistry are reviewed herein. Descriptions of experiments exploiting the many ways that synchrotron radiation can be manipulated are presented. These manipulations include intensification of the radiation and compression or shifting of its spectral structure. Combinations of the use of synchrotron radiation, which provides access to very short wavelengths and is, at the same time, continuously and easily tunable, with laser radiation, which offers much higher resolution and much more intense radiation per pulse, but is difficult to tune in the ultraviolet region of the spectra, gives the chemist a way to map a molecule's potential energy curve, to note the lengths and strengths of chemical bonds, and to predict and explain novel reactions of more complex molecules. The use of diffraction of x-rays to study the spacing of atoms in crystals is discussed. Various applications of synchrotron radiation to studies of the fluorescence of hydrocarbons and to the chiral dichroism studies of other natural products like DNA and RNA are described. Methods for enhancing synchrotron light sources by insertion devices, such as wigglers and undulators, that increase the available photo flux and construction of new sources of synchrotron radiation are mentioned

  19. Application of circular polarized synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyahara, Tsuneaki; Kawata, Hiroshi

    1988-03-01

    The idea of using the polarizing property of light for physical experiment by controlling it variously has been known from old time, and the Faraday effect and the research by polarizing microscopy are its examples. The light emitted from the electron orbit of an accelerator has the different polarizing characteristics from those of the light of a laboratory light source, and as far as observing it within the electron orbit plane, it becomes linearly polarized light. By utilizing this property well, research is carried out at present in synchrotron experimental facilities. Recently, the technology related to the insert type light cources using permanent magnets has advanced remarkably, and circular polarized light has become to be producible. If the light like this can be obtained with the energy not only in far ultraviolet region but also to x-ray region at high luminance, new possibility should open. At the stage that the design of an insert type light source was finished, and its manufacture was started, the research on the method of evaluating the degree of circular polarization and the research on the utilization of circular polarized synchrotron radiation are earnestly carried out. In this report, the results of researches presented at the study meeting are summarized. Moreover, the design and manufacture of the beam lines for exclusive use will be carried out. (Kako, I.)

  20. Advances and synergy of high pressure sciences at synchrotron sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, H.; Ehm, L.; Duffy, T.; Crichton, W.; Aoki, K.

    2009-01-01

    Introductory overview to the special issue papers on high-pressure sciences and synchrotron radiation. High-pressure research in geosciences, materials science and condensed matter physics at synchrotron sources is experiencing growth and development through synergistic efforts around the world. A series of high-pressure science workshops were organized in 2008 to highlight these developments. One of these workshops, on 'Advances in high-pressure science using synchrotron X-rays', was held at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA, on 4 October 2008. This workshop was organized in honour of Drs Jingzhu Hu and Quanzhong Guo in celebration of their retirement after up to 18 years of dedicated service to the high-pressure community as beamline scientists at X17 of NSLS. Following this celebration of the often unheralded role of the beamline scientist, a special issue of the Journal of Synchrotron Radiation on Advances and Synergy of High-Pressure Sciences at Synchrotron Sources was proposed, and we were pleased to invite contributions from colleagues who participated in the workshop as well as others who are making similar efforts at synchrotron sources worldwide.

  1. Synchrotron radiation facilities in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, G.

    1996-01-01

    With the successful commissioning and achievement of significant milestones at both the 7-GeV Advanced Photon Source (APS) and the 1.5- GeV Advanced Light Source (ALS) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, synchrotron radiation research capability in the United States holds the promise of many important discoveries in the decade to come. An overview of current accelerator commissioning performance at the American third-generation light sources, state-of-the-art developments at first- and second-generation sources, and a preview of fourth-generation source progress is presented

  2. Future Synchrotron Radiation Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Winick, Herman

    2003-01-01

    Sources of synchrotron radiation (also called synchrotron light) and their associated research facilities have experienced a spectacular growth in number, performance, and breadth of application in the past two to three decades. In 1978 there were eleven electron storage rings used as light sources. Three of these were small rings, all below 500 mega-electron volts (MeV), dedicated to this purpose; the others, with energy up to 5 giga-electron volts (GeV), were used parasitically during the operation of the ring for high energy physics research. In addition, at that time synchrotron radiation from nine cyclic electron synchrotrons, with energy up to 5 GeV, was also used parasitically. At present no cyclic synchrotrons are used, while about 50 electron storage rings are in operation around the world as fully dedicated light sources for basic and applied research in a wide variety of fields. Among these fields are structural molecular biology, molecular environmental science, materials, analytic chemistry, micr...

  3. Experience with synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of synchrotron radiation sources is discussed, emphasizing characteristics important for x-ray microscopy. Bending magnets, wigglers and undulators are considered as sources of radiation. Operating experience at the national Synchrotron Light Source on the VUV and XRAY storage rings is reviewed, with particular consideration given to achieved current and lifetime, transverse bunch dimensions, and orbit stability. 6 refs., 3 figs

  4. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nave, C.; Quinn, P.; Blake, R.J.

    1988-01-01

    The paper on Synchrotron Radiation contains the appendix to the Daresbury Annual Report 1987/88. The appendix is mainly devoted to the scientific progress reports on the work at the Synchrotron Radiation Source in 1987/8. The parameters of the Experimental Stations and the index to the Scientific Reports are also included in the appendix. (U.K.)

  5. European Synchrotron Radiation Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buras, B.

    1985-01-01

    How a European Synchrotron Radiation Facility has developed into a detailed proposal recently accepted as the basis for construction of the facility at Grenoble is discussed. In November 1977, the General Assembly of the European Science Foundation (ESF) approved the report of the ESF working party on synchrotron radiation entitled Synchrotron Radiation - a Perspective View for Europe. This report contained as one of its principal recommendations that work should commence on a feasibility study for a European synchrotron radiation laboratory having a dedicated hard X-ray storage ring and appropriate advanced instrumentation. In order to prepare a feasibility study the European Science Foundation set up the Ad-hoc Committee on Synchrotron Radiation, which in turn formed two working groups: one for the machine and another for instrumentation. This feasibility study was completed in 1979 with the publication of the Blue Book describing in detail the so called 1979 European Synchrotron Radiation Facility. The heart of the facility was a 5 GeV electron storage ring and it was assumed that mainly the radiation from bending magnets will be used. The facility is described

  6. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seddon, E.A.; Reid, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    Work at the Daresbury SRS has of necessity been interrupted this year (1991/92) due to the incorporation of Wiggler II. However, considerable beamtime was awarded before the shutdown and the major part of this appendix is concerned with the progress reports of the research undertaken then. The reports have been organised under the following broad headings: Molecular Science (19 papers), Surface and Materials Science (169 papers), Biological Science (85 papers), Instrumental and Technique Developments (13 papers) and Accelerator Physics (3 papers). It is hoped that in time the number of contributions on accelerator physics will grow to reflect the in-house activity on, for example, accelerator improvement and design. The research reports are preceded by the Annual Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Facilities Committee, which outlines the research highlights identified by that Committee (also included are details of the current membership of the SRFC and the chairmen of the Beamtime Allocation Panels). Following the reports are the specifications for the beamlines and stations. This year Section 3 contains 289 reports (nearly 100 more than last year) and the number of publications, generated by scientists and engineers who have used or are associated with Daresbury Laboratory facilities, has topped 500 for the first time. (author)

  7. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation: Theory and Simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novokhatski, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    The physics of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) emitted by ultra-relativistic electron bunches, known since the last century, has become increasingly important with the development of high peak current free electron lasers and shorter bunch lengths in storage rings. Coherent radiation can be described as a low frequency part of the familiar synchrotron radiation in bending magnets. As this part is independent of the electron energy, the fields of different electrons of a short bunch can be in phase and the total power of the radiation will be quadratic with the number of electrons. Naturally the frequency spectrum of the longitudinal electron distribution in a bunch is of the same importance as the overall electron bunch length. The interest in the utilization of high power radiation from the terahertz and far infrared region in the field of chemical, physical and biological processes has led synchrotron radiation facilities to pay more attention to the production of coherent radiation. Several laboratories have proposed the construction of a facility wholly dedicated to terahertz production using the coherent radiation in bending magnets initiated by the longitudinal instabilities in the ring. Existing synchrotron radiation facilities also consider such a possibility among their future plans. There is a beautiful introduction to CSR in the 'ICFA Beam Dynamics Newsletter' N 35 (Editor C. Biscari). In this paper we recall the basic properties of CSR from the theory and what new effects, we can get from the precise simulations of the coherent radiation using numerical solutions of Maxwell's equations. In particular, transverse variation of the particle energy loss in a bunch, discovered in these simulations, explains the slice emittance growth in bending magnets of the bunch compressors and transverse de-coherence in undulators. CSR may play same the role as the effect of quantum fluctuations of synchrotron radiation in damping rings. It can limit the minimum

  8. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory/University of California lighting program overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berman, S.

    1981-12-01

    The objective of the Lighting Program is to assist and work in concert with the lighting community (composed of manufacturers, designers, and users) to achieve a more efficient lighting economy. To implement its objectives, the Lighting Program has been divided into three major categories: technical engineering, buildings applications, and human impacts (impacts on health and vision). The technical program aims to undertake research and development projects that are both long-range and high-risk and which the lighting industry has little interest in pursuing on its own, but from which significant benefits could accrue to both the public and the industry. The building applications program studies the effects that introducing daylighting in commercial buildings has on lighting and cooling electrical energy requirements as well as on peak demand. This program also examines optimization strategies for integrating energy-efficient design, lighting hardware, daylighting, and overall building energy requirements. The impacts program examines relationships between the user and the physical lighting environment, in particular how new energy-efficient technologies relate to human productivity and health. These efforts are interdisciplinary, involving engineering, optometry, and medicine. The program facilities are described and the personnel in the program is identified.

  9. The reaction of fish to light (laboratory experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Potter, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the study on the title subject can contribute to the realization of decreasing the damage to eel, caused by cooling water input of thermal power plants and turbines of hydroelectric power plants. Eel can be diverted from the cooling water inlets by means of light screens. Bench-scale experiments were executed to analyze the impact of the rate of the water flow to the reaction of eel to light. Also the effectiveness of light bulbs and fluorescence lamps are compared. Eel shows a clear aversion to a small amount of light. The diversion percentage decreases with a higher velocity of the water flow. Application of energy-efficient fluorescent lamps is considered to be a good option for diversion light systems

  10. The reaction of fish to light (laboratory experiments)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Potter, M.R.

    1993-01-01

    The results of the study on the title subject can contribute to the realization of decreasing the damage to sea trout, caused by cooling water input of thermal power plants and turbines of hydroelectric power plants. Trout can be diverted from the cooling water inlets by means of light screens. Bench-scale experiments were executed to analyze the impact of the rate of the water flow to the reaction of young sea trout (smolts) to light. Also the effectiveness of light bulbs and fluorescence lamps are compared. The smolts show a clear aversion to a small amount of light. For a high water flow and in standing water the aversion reaction to light is considerably smaller or absent

  11. Sensitivities in synchrotron radiation TXRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pianetta, P.; Baur, K.; Brennan, S.

    2000-01-01

    This work describes the progress we achieved at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) in improving the sensitivity for both the transition metals and light elements such as Al and Na. The transition metal work has matured to the point where a facility exists at SSRL in which semiconductor companies are able to perform industrially relevant measurements at state of the art detection limits. This facility features clean wafer handling and automated data acquisition making routine analytical measurements possible. The best sensitivity demonstrated so far is 3.4 E7 atoms/cm 2 for a 5000 second count time corresponding to 7.6 E7 atoms/cm 2 for a standard 1000 second count time. This is more than a factor of 100 better than what can be achieved with conventional TXRF systems. The detection of light elements such as Al and Na is challenging due to the presence of the h stronger Si fluorescence peak. For traditional energy-dispersive detection only the tunability of synchrotron radiation to excitation energies below the Si-K absorption edge leads to an acceptable sensitivity for Al detection which is limited by a large background due to inelastic x-ray Raman scattering. An alternative approach to overcome the Raman contribution and the strong Si fluorescence is to use a wavelength-dispersive spectrometer for fluorescence detection. The benefits of such a multilayer spectrometer over a solid state detector are its higher energy resolution and greater dynamic range. This strategy allows primary excitation above the Si K absorption edge, eliminating the background due to Raman scattering, and a gracing emission geometry to guarantee high surface sensitivity. Studies testing this concept in combination with high flux synchrotron radiation are underway and first results will be presented. (author)

  12. Status report of the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Radiation Source (CHESS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batterman, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The Wilson Laboratory at Cornell University has done pioneering work on the development of high energy synchrotrons. In the last decade the 12 GeV Wilson Synchrotron was the most energetic electron synchrotron in the world. In 1975 plans were formulated at the Wilson Laboratory to build a new electron-positron storage ring to cover the range from 4-8 GeV. The storage ring was to be constructed in the same tunnel as the present synchrotron and to use the latter as an injector for the ring. A novel injection feature was to be incorporated, namely, vernier phase compression. In this scheme, positron coalesence is to be performed by compressing a 30-60 bunch positron beam by tranferring individual bunches from the storage ring to the synchrotron and stacking back into the storage ring. This procedure takes advantage of the slight circumferential difference between the storage ring and the synchrotron. Positron beams of 10 mA have been achieved in CESR at the present time. The first colliding beam studies were performed in an October 1979 two-week running period at which time CHESS, the synchrotron radiation source associated with CESR, also had its first extended experience with synchrotron light. (orig.)

  13. Advances in indirect detector systems for ultra high-speed hard X-ray imaging with synchrotron light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbinado, M. P.; Grenzer, J.; Pradel, P.; De Resseguier, T.; Vagovic, P.; Zdora, M.-C.; Guzenko, V. A.; David, C.; Rack, A.

    2018-04-01

    We report on indirect X-ray detector systems for various full-field, ultra high-speed X-ray imaging methodologies, such as X-ray phase-contrast radiography, diffraction topography, grating interferometry and speckle-based imaging performed at the hard X-ray imaging beamline ID19 of the European Synchrotron—ESRF. Our work highlights the versatility of indirect X-ray detectors to multiple goals such as single synchrotron pulse isolation, multiple-frame recording up to millions frames per second, high efficiency, and high spatial resolution. Besides the technical advancements, potential applications are briefly introduced and discussed.

  14. Programmed improvements of the alternating gradient synchrotron complex at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose and need for DOE to undertake the actions described in this document are to improve the efficiency of the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) complex. Benefits would include optimization of the AGS scientific program, increased high-energy and nuclear physics experimentation, improved health and safety conditions for workers and users, reduced impact on the environment and the general public, energy conservation, decreased generation of hazardous and radioactive wastes, and completion of actions required to permit the AGS to be the injector to the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC)., Improved efficiency is defined as increasing the AGS's capabilities to capture and accelerate the proton intensity transferred to the AGS from the AGS booster. Improved capture of beam intensity would reduce the beam losses which equate to lost scientific opportunity for study and increased potential for radiation doses to workers and the general public. The action would also refurbish magnets used in the transfer tunnel which connects the AGS complex to RHIC to permit smooth injection of beam into the RHIC accelerator. These magnets were previously used to direct beam to fixed targets for high energy physics studies but have hot received proper maintenance to be reliable as injectors to RHIC. The document describes alternative actions, the affected environment, and environmental impacts

  15. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallmeier, K.H.; Meisel, A.; Ranft, J.

    1982-01-01

    The physical background and the properties of synchrotron radiation are described. The radiation offers many useful applications in the fields of spectroscopy and structural investigations. Some examples are given

  16. Synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norman, D.; Walker, R.P.; Durham, P.J.; Ridley, P.A.

    1986-01-01

    The paper on synchrotron radiation is the appendix to the Daresbury (United Kingdom) annual report, 1985/86. The bulk of the volume is made up of the progress reports for the work carried out during the year under review using the Synchrotron Radiation Source (SRS) at Daresbury. The Appendix also contains: the scientific programmes at the the SRS, progress on beamlines, instrumentation and computing developments, and activities connected with accelerator development. (U.K.)

  17. Laboratory based degradation of light crude oil by aquatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Water samples were collected from Dundaye river (an offshoot of sokoto river Rima) using sterile conical flasks. The samples were immediately transported to the Microbiology Laboratory and introduced into petri dishes containing hemp seeds ( Crotalaria juncea) and allowed to stand on the bench. The hemp seeds served ...

  18. Shining light on interstellar matter : a laboratory study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paardekooper, D.M.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years it has become clear that the space in between the stars, contains a remarkable amount of highly diverse molecules, ranging from simple diatomics to large complex species. Astronomical observations and dedicated laboratory experiments show that icy dust grains play a prominent role in

  19. Australian synchrotron radiation science

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Synchrotron Radiation Program, ASRP, has been set up as a major national research facility to provide facilities for scientists and technologists in physics, chemistry, biology and materials science who need access to synchrotron radiation. Australia has a strong tradition in crystallography and structure determination covering small molecule crystallography, biological and protein crystallography, diffraction science and materials science and several strong groups are working in x-ray optics, soft x-ray and vacuum ultra-violet physics. A number of groups whose primary interest is in the structure and dynamics of surfaces, catalysts, polymer and surfactant science and colloid science are hoping to use scattering methods and, if experience in Europe, Japan and USA can be taken as a guide, many of these groups will need third generation synchrotron access. To provide for this growing community, the Australian National Beamline at the Photon Factory, Tsukuba, Japan, has been established since 1990 through a generous collaboration with Japanese colleagues, the beamline equipment being largely produced in Australia. This will be supplemented in 1997 with access to the world's most powerful synchrotron x-ray source at the Advanced Photon Source, Argonne National Laboratory, USA. Some recent experiments in surface science using neutrons as well as x-rays from the Australian National Beamline will be used to illustrate one of the challenges that synchrotron x-rays may meet

  20. Continuous Flow Science in an Undergraduate Teaching Laboratory: Photocatalytic Thiol-Ene Reaction Using Visible Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santandrea, Jeffrey; Kairouz, Vanessa; Collins, Shawn K.

    2018-01-01

    An undergraduate teaching laboratory experiment involving a continuous flow, photocatalytic thiol-ene reaction using visible-light irradiation is described that allows students to explore concepts of green chemistry, photochemistry, photocatalysis, and continuous flow chemistry.

  1. LABORATORY FLUME EXPERIMENT WITH A CODED STRUCTURED LIGHT SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Akca

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The topography of inland deltas is influenced chiefly by the water-sediment balance in distributary channels and local evaporation and seepage rates. In a previous study, a reduced complexity model has been applied to simulate the process of inland delta formation. Results have been compared with the Okavango Delta, Botswana and with a laboratory experiment. Both in the macro scale and the micro scale cases, high quality digital elevation models (DEM are essential. This work elaborates the laboratory experiment where an artificial inland delta is generated on laboratory scale and its topography is measured using a Breuckmann 3D scanner. The space-time evolution of the inland delta is monitored in the consecutive DEM layers. Regarding the 1.0m x 1.0m x 0.3m size of the working area, better than 100 micron precision is achieved which gives a relative precision of 1/10 000. The entire 3D modelling workflow is presented in terms of scanning, co-registration, surface generation, editing, and visualization steps. The co-registered high resolution topographic data allows us to analyse the stratigraphy patterns of the experiment and gain quantitative insight into the spatio-temporal evolution of the delta formation process.

  2. A control and data acquisition system for photoelectron spectroscopy experiment station at Hefei National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Weimin; Liu Yinim

    1992-01-01

    The paper describes system configuration and software design. The system has the following features; flexible user interface, succinct control levels, strict protection and high intelligence. It can run EDC, CFS, CIS experiment modes very conveniently with SR light source. Its construction and design idea of the system can be applied to other data acquisition systems. (author)

  3. A light-water detritiation project at Chalk River Laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boniface, H.A.; Castillo, I.; Everatt, A.E.; Ryland, D.K.

    2010-01-01

    The NRU reactor rod bays is a large, open pool of water that receives hundreds of fuel rods annually, each carrying a small amount of residual tritiated heavy water. The tritium concentration of the rod bays water has risen over the years, to a level that is of concern to the operations staff and to the environment. The proposed long-term solution is to reduce the rod bays tritium concentration by direct detritiation of the water. The Combined Electrolytic-Catalytic Exchange (CECE) process is well suited to the light-water detritiation problem. With a tritium-protium separation factor greater than five, a CECE detritiation process can easily achieve the eight orders of magnitude separation required to split a tritiated light-water feed into an essentially tritium-free effluent stream and a tritiated heavy water product suitable for recycling through a heavy water upgrader. This paper describes a CECE light-water detritiation process specifically designed to reduce the tritium concentration in the NRU rod bays to an acceptable level. The conceptual design of a 600 Mg/a detritiation process has been developed and is now at the stage of project review and the beginning of detailed design. (author)

  4. Bringing light into the nano-world: What can you do with an atomic force microscope on top of your synchrotron radiation sample holder?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Mario Manuel Silveira

    2009-01-01

    This thesis had as a major objective to combine scanning probe microscopy in particular, atomic force microscopy with synchrotron light spectroscopies. The combination of these two types of spectroscopies is meant to be in-situ and in real time. Thus this thesis aimed at introducing new types of experimental techniques suitable for the investigation of nano-sized materials. The proposed new instrumentation, would provide chemical-specific contrast at unprecedented lateral resolution of up to 10-40 nanometers, thus overcoming existing limitations of the two families of spectroscopy methods and opening a wide range of research opportunities and challenges. For the purpose of combining these techniques an atomic force microscope was developed. The atomic force microscope (AFM) was developed around a quartz tuning fork crystal which was used as the sensor with which atomic forces are detected. The developed AFM was then used in several beam lines with essentially two different purposes. A first goal was to do spectroscopy, such as the measurement of an absorption edge, locally with the tip of the AFM. Such measurements were indeed done, but the lateral resolution is still dominated by the X-ray beam size rather than by the tip apex shape. The AFM tip was also used to measure Bragg peaks from crystals with sizes on the nanometer scale. A second goal was to use the AFM as an instrument to mechanical interact with nano-sized systems while the X-ray beam was used to probe changes in the lattice parameter of the studied systems. Thus the AFM tip was used to elastically indent a SiGe crystal while diffraction was simultaneously measured. It was possible to observe shifts of the Bragg peak as a consequence of the applied pressure. The in-situ combination of AFM with synchrotron light permitted, in this way, to measure the Young modulus of a crystal at the nano-scale without any kind of adjustable parameter. (author)

  5. Present status and future plans at INS 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.

    1984-01-01

    The 1.3 GeV electron synchrotron at the Institute for Nuclear Study, University of Tokyo, was completed in 1961, and it was the first accelerator in Japan that was able to be used for the study on particle physics. The brief chronicle is shown. One of the purposes to construct the electron synchrotron was to train accelerator physicists for the next big project of building a high energy proton synchrotron. This project led to the foundation of the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics, and the Photon Factory was completed in 1982 there. The electron synchrotron has been continuously operated for 22 years. Meanwhile, the major components such as the injector linac, the vacuum system and the of acceleration system were renewed. By these improvement, the beam intensity and stability of the synchrotron were much improved. The circulating current is now 160 mA, and the number of accelerated electrons is 2.5 x 10 12 /sec. These are the highest values in the world. The parameters of the present synchrotron and the operational status are shown. There are five beam channels, that is, bremsstrahlung channel, tagged photon beam, fast extracted electron beam, synchrotron light channel and detector test channel. The recent activities with the INS electron synchrotron and the future plans are summarized. (Kako, I.)

  6. Light absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    The light absorption of carbonaceous aerosols plays an important role in the atmospheric radiation balance. Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also called brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution ...

  7. JHF synchrotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    The Japan Hadron Facility (JHF) consists of two synchrotrons and an injector linac. First, we will present a brief review of the specifications and lattice of the synchrotrons; one is 3 GeV booster and the other is 50 GeV main ring. Secondly, some detailed results of design study will be discussed, together with the present status of the R and D programs in progress. Among them, an estimate of beam loss is one of critical issues in beam dynamics. The development of a high gradient RF cavity is also crucial for a high intensity machine. (author)

  8. X-Ray-induced Deuterium Enrichment of N-rich Organics in Protoplanetary Disks: An Experimental Investigation Using Synchrotron Light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavilan, Lisseth; Carrasco, Nathalie [LATMOS, Université Versailles St Quentin, UPMC Université Paris 06, CNRS, 11 blvd d’Alembert, F-78280 Guyancourt (France); Remusat, Laurent; Roskosz, Mathieu [IMPMC, CNRS UMR 7590, Sorbonne Universités, UPMC Université Paris 06, IRD, Muséum National d’Histoire Naturelle, CP 52, 57 rue Cuvier, Paris F-75231 (France); Popescu, Horia; Jaouen, Nicolas [SEXTANTS beamline, SOLEIL synchrotron, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Sandt, Christophe [SMIS beamline, SOLEIL synchrotron, L’Orme des Merisiers, F-91190 Saint-Aubin (France); Jäger, Cornelia [Laboratory Astrophysics and Cluster Physics Group of the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University and Institute of Solid State Physics, Helmholtzweg 3, D-07743 Jena (Germany); Henning, Thomas [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Simionovici, Alexandre [Institut des Sciences de la Terre, Observatoire des Sciences de l’Univers de Grenoble, BP 53, F-38041 Grenoble (France); Lemaire, Jean Louis [Institut des Sciences Moléculaires d’Orsay (ISMO), CNRS, Univ. Paris Sud, Université Paris-Saclay, F-91405 Orsay (France); Mangin, Denis, E-mail: lisseth.gavilan@latmos.ipsl.fr [Institut Jean Lamour, CNRS, Université de Lorraine, F-54011 Nancy (France)

    2017-05-01

    The deuterium enrichment of organics in the interstellar medium, protoplanetary disks, and meteorites has been proposed to be the result of ionizing radiation. The goal of this study is to simulate and quantify the effects of soft X-rays (0.1–2 keV), an important component of stellar radiation fields illuminating protoplanetary disks, on the refractory organics present in the disks. We prepared tholins, nitrogen-rich organic analogs to solids found in several astrophysical environments, e.g., Titan’s atmosphere, cometary surfaces, and protoplanetary disks, via plasma deposition. Controlled irradiation experiments with soft X-rays at 0.5 and 1.3 keV were performed at the SEXTANTS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, and were immediately followed by ex-situ infrared, Raman, and isotopic diagnostics. Infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential loss of singly bonded groups (N–H, C–H, and R–N≡C) and the formation of sp{sup 3} carbon defects with signatures at ∼1250–1300 cm{sup −1}. Raman analysis revealed that, while the length of polyaromatic units is only slightly modified, the introduction of defects leads to structural amorphization. Finally, tholins were measured via secondary ion mass spectrometry to quantify the D, H, and C elemental abundances in the irradiated versus non-irradiated areas. Isotopic analysis revealed that significant D-enrichment is induced by X-ray irradiation. Our results are compared to previous experimental studies involving the thermal degradation and electron irradiation of organics. The penetration depth of soft X-rays in μ m-sized tholins leads to volume rather than surface modifications: lower-energy X-rays (0.5 keV) induce a larger D-enrichment than 1.3 keV X-rays, reaching a plateau for doses larger than 5 × 10{sup 27} eV cm{sup −3}. Synchrotron fluences fall within the expected soft X-ray fluences in protoplanetary disks, and thus provide evidence of a new non-thermal pathway to deuterium fractionation of

  9. X-Ray-induced Deuterium Enrichment of N-rich Organics in Protoplanetary Disks: An Experimental Investigation Using Synchrotron Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavilan, Lisseth; Remusat, Laurent; Roskosz, Mathieu; Popescu, Horia; Jaouen, Nicolas; Sandt, Christophe; Jäger, Cornelia; Henning, Thomas; Simionovici, Alexandre; Lemaire, Jean Louis; Mangin, Denis; Carrasco, Nathalie

    2017-05-01

    The deuterium enrichment of organics in the interstellar medium, protoplanetary disks, and meteorites has been proposed to be the result of ionizing radiation. The goal of this study is to simulate and quantify the effects of soft X-rays (0.1-2 keV), an important component of stellar radiation fields illuminating protoplanetary disks, on the refractory organics present in the disks. We prepared tholins, nitrogen-rich organic analogs to solids found in several astrophysical environments, e.g., Titan’s atmosphere, cometary surfaces, and protoplanetary disks, via plasma deposition. Controlled irradiation experiments with soft X-rays at 0.5 and 1.3 keV were performed at the SEXTANTS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, and were immediately followed by ex-situ infrared, Raman, and isotopic diagnostics. Infrared spectroscopy revealed the preferential loss of singly bonded groups (N-H, C-H, and R-N≡C) and the formation of sp3 carbon defects with signatures at ˜1250-1300 cm-1. Raman analysis revealed that, while the length of polyaromatic units is only slightly modified, the introduction of defects leads to structural amorphization. Finally, tholins were measured via secondary ion mass spectrometry to quantify the D, H, and C elemental abundances in the irradiated versus non-irradiated areas. Isotopic analysis revealed that significant D-enrichment is induced by X-ray irradiation. Our results are compared to previous experimental studies involving the thermal degradation and electron irradiation of organics. The penetration depth of soft X-rays in μm-sized tholins leads to volume rather than surface modifications: lower-energy X-rays (0.5 keV) induce a larger D-enrichment than 1.3 keV X-rays, reaching a plateau for doses larger than 5 × 1027 eV cm-3. Synchrotron fluences fall within the expected soft X-ray fluences in protoplanetary disks, and thus provide evidence of a new non-thermal pathway to deuterium fractionation of organic matter.

  10. Clay pigment structure characterisation as a guide for provenance determination--a comparison between laboratory powder micro-XRD and synchrotron radiation XRD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Švarcová, Silvie; Bezdička, Petr; Hradil, David; Hradilová, Janka; Žižak, Ivo

    2011-01-01

    Application of X-ray diffraction (XRD)-based techniques in the analysis of painted artworks is not only beneficial for indisputable identification of crystal constituents in colour layers, but it can also bring insight in material crystal structure, which can be affected by their geological formation, manufacturing procedure or secondary changes. This knowledge might be helpful for art historic evaluation of an artwork as well as for its conservation. By way of example of kaolinite, we show that classification of its crystal structure order based on XRD data is useful for estimation of its provenance. We found kaolinite in the preparation layer of a Gothic wall painting in a Czech church situated near Karlovy Vary, where there are important kaolin deposits. Comparing reference kaolin materials from eight various Czech deposits, we found that these can be differentiated just according to the kaolinite crystallinity. Within this study, we compared laboratory powder X-ray micro-diffraction (micro-XRD) with synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction analysing the same real sample. We found that both techniques led to the same results.

  11. Performance of the undulator based ultraviolet and soft x-ray beamline for catalysis and surface science at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Liangliang [University of Science and Technology of China, Department of Precision Machinery and Precision Instrumentation, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Du, Xuewei, E-mail: xwdu@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Wei, Shen [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Li, Chaoyang [China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang, Sichuan 621900 (China); Pan, Congyuan; Ju, Huanxin [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Wang, Qiuping, E-mail: qiuping@ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China); Zhu, Junfa [University of Science and Technology of China, National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory, Hefei, Anhui 230029 (China)

    2016-12-01

    The undulator based ultraviolet and soft x-ray beamline BL11U for catalysis and surface science at National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) has been under opteration for months and the present performance is described. This beamline utilizes radiation from an in-vacuum undulator, which has 30 magnetic periods with the period length of 40 mm. A varied-line-spacing plane grating monochromator is employed tto cover the photon energy region of 20–600 eV by two gratings with nominal groove densities of 400 llmm and 1200 l/mm respectively. The energy resolution power E/ΔE is measured with a gas ionization chamber and the photon flux is measured by a photodiode. Results show that the resolution power is better than 10,000 at a photon energy of 29.2 eV. And the flux is higher than 1×10{sup 10} phs/s under 300 mA ring beam current for most of the covered photon energy.

  12. SEDIMENTARY FEATURES OF TSUNAMI BACKWASH DEPOSITS AS ASSESSED BY MICRO-BEAM SYNCHROTRON X-RAY FLUORESCENCE (μ-SXRF AT THE SIAM PHOTON LABORATORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siwatt Pongpiachan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few years, several attempts have been performed to find alternative “chemical proxies” in order to discriminate “tsunami backwash deposits” from “typical marine sediments”. A wide range of statistical tools has been selected in order to investigate the sediments and/or terrestrial soils transportation mechanism during the tsunami inundation period by using several types of chemical tracers. To relate the physical and chemical characteristics of Typical Marine Sediments (TMS,Tsunami Backwash Deposits (TBD, Onshore Tsunami Deposits (OTD and Coastal Zone Soils (CZS with their synchrotron radiation based micro-X-ray Fluorescence (μ-SXRF spectra, the μ- SXRF spectra were built in the appropriate selected spectra range from 3,000 eV to 8,000 eV. Further challenges were considered by using the first-order derivative μ-SXRF spectra coupled with Probability Distribution Function (PDF, Hierarchical Cluster Analysis (HCA and Principal Component Analysis (PCA in order to investigate the elemental distribution characteristics in various types of terrestrial soils and marine sediments. Dendrographic classifications and multi-dimensional plots of principal components (i.e. bi-polar and three dimensional plots could indicate the impacts of terrestrial soils and/or marine sediments transport on onshore and/or offshore during the tsunami inundation period. Obviously, these advanced statistical analyses are quite useful and provide valuable information and thus shed new light on the study of paleotsunami.

  13. CORNELL: Synchrotron 25

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    A recent celebration marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Cornell Electron Synchrotron. The major milestone in the commissioning of the synchrotron was on October 11, 1967 when Helen Edwards, Boyce McDaniel, and Maury Tigner achieved a 7 GeV beam, a worldrecord energy for electron synchrotrons at that time. Like so many advances in experimental physics, this occurred early in the morning - 3 a.m.! The transition from accelerator commissioning to high energy physics operation was extremely rapid; 7 GeV operation for data collection was routine just five weeks later. Throughout its life as a source of photon and electron beams for fixed target experiments, the synchrotron maintained energy leadership for circular electron machines. Originally designed for operation at 10 GeV, eventually it consistently provided beams for experiments at energies up to 11.6 GeV. It now operates at 5 GeV, serving as the injector for the CESR electron-positron storage ring. Robert Wilson was director of the laboratory during the design and most of the construction of the machine. He left near the end of the construction to become the first director of Fermilab and was replaced by Boyce McDaniel, who guided the laboratory from the completion of the synchrotron to the construction and early operation of CESR. Wilson recalled how the laboratory had originally proposed a 3 GeV turnkey machine to be built entirely by industry and would fit in the space previously occupied by earlier Cornell accelerators. However, members of the laboratory realized that 3 GeV would not open new physics frontiers, that the construction of the accelerator was much of the fun of doing high energy physics experiments, and that a more challenging project was needed. This led to the proposal for the 10 GeV synchrotron which was built in the ''Cornell Style'' with many of the components fabricated and nearly all of the assembly done at Cornell

  14. CORNELL: Synchrotron 25

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1993-03-15

    A recent celebration marked the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Cornell Electron Synchrotron. The major milestone in the commissioning of the synchrotron was on October 11, 1967 when Helen Edwards, Boyce McDaniel, and Maury Tigner achieved a 7 GeV beam, a worldrecord energy for electron synchrotrons at that time. Like so many advances in experimental physics, this occurred early in the morning - 3 a.m.! The transition from accelerator commissioning to high energy physics operation was extremely rapid; 7 GeV operation for data collection was routine just five weeks later. Throughout its life as a source of photon and electron beams for fixed target experiments, the synchrotron maintained energy leadership for circular electron machines. Originally designed for operation at 10 GeV, eventually it consistently provided beams for experiments at energies up to 11.6 GeV. It now operates at 5 GeV, serving as the injector for the CESR electron-positron storage ring. Robert Wilson was director of the laboratory during the design and most of the construction of the machine. He left near the end of the construction to become the first director of Fermilab and was replaced by Boyce McDaniel, who guided the laboratory from the completion of the synchrotron to the construction and early operation of CESR. Wilson recalled how the laboratory had originally proposed a 3 GeV turnkey machine to be built entirely by industry and would fit in the space previously occupied by earlier Cornell accelerators. However, members of the laboratory realized that 3 GeV would not open new physics frontiers, that the construction of the accelerator was much of the fun of doing high energy physics experiments, and that a more challenging project was needed. This led to the proposal for the 10 GeV synchrotron which was built in the ''Cornell Style'' with many of the components fabricated and nearly all of the assembly done at Cornell.

  15. X-ray imaging by partially coherent synchrotron light. Application to metallic alloys, tooth dentin and natural rock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zabler, Simon Andreas

    2007-10-09

    The hard spectrum which is available on the BAMline at Berlin's synchrotron BESSY offers the rare opportunity to perform high-resolution X-ray imaging experiments with a partially coherent beam. This thesis work reports on the development of a new tomography system, including Fresnel-propagated imaging, and its application to three specific materials science problems from the fields of engineering materials, biology and earth science. Static and dynamic 2D and 3D images were recorded from a variety of aluminum-based alloys. Coarsening of particle agglomerates (at high solid volume fraction) in liquid solution, as well as rheological properties of semi-solid alloys are thus characterized. Dentin is characterized by a quasi-parallel arrangement of micrometer-sized tubules. This work shows how high-resolution 3D images of water-immersed tooth dentin are recorded, and detailed simulations of the optical wave propagation reveal that Fresnel-images contain additional information about the dense cuff of peritubular dentin surrounding the tubules. The cuff thickness can be extrapolated from the interference fringes that form the propagated images of tubules. Absorption and Fresnel-propagated X-ray tomography are applied to measure samples of different rocks before and after mechanical compression nondestructively. In a first approach, limestone and greywacke are investigated, representing two sedimentary rocks of different grain size. Basalt and granite are tested in a second approach to compare different rock types. Development of cracks is observed in all materials, leading to fracture when increasing mechanical load is applied. In this work, relatively small mm-sized samples are used in order to test a classical fracture model wherein micro-flaws initiate the formation of larger cracks. For the first time, Fresnel-propagated imaging is applied to rock samples, highlighting micrometer-sized intergranular porosity as well as different material phases. The latter is

  16. X-ray imaging by partially coherent synchrotron light. Application to metallic alloys, tooth dentin and natural rock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zabler, Simon Andreas

    2007-01-01

    The hard spectrum which is available on the BAMline at Berlin's synchrotron BESSY offers the rare opportunity to perform high-resolution X-ray imaging experiments with a partially coherent beam. This thesis work reports on the development of a new tomography system, including Fresnel-propagated imaging, and its application to three specific materials science problems from the fields of engineering materials, biology and earth science. Static and dynamic 2D and 3D images were recorded from a variety of aluminum-based alloys. Coarsening of particle agglomerates (at high solid volume fraction) in liquid solution, as well as rheological properties of semi-solid alloys are thus characterized. Dentin is characterized by a quasi-parallel arrangement of micrometer-sized tubules. This work shows how high-resolution 3D images of water-immersed tooth dentin are recorded, and detailed simulations of the optical wave propagation reveal that Fresnel-images contain additional information about the dense cuff of peritubular dentin surrounding the tubules. The cuff thickness can be extrapolated from the interference fringes that form the propagated images of tubules. Absorption and Fresnel-propagated X-ray tomography are applied to measure samples of different rocks before and after mechanical compression nondestructively. In a first approach, limestone and greywacke are investigated, representing two sedimentary rocks of different grain size. Basalt and granite are tested in a second approach to compare different rock types. Development of cracks is observed in all materials, leading to fracture when increasing mechanical load is applied. In this work, relatively small mm-sized samples are used in order to test a classical fracture model wherein micro-flaws initiate the formation of larger cracks. For the first time, Fresnel-propagated imaging is applied to rock samples, highlighting micrometer-sized intergranular porosity as well as different material phases. The latter is shown

  17. Preliminar plan of a machine for the synchrotron radiation production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscati, G.; Takahashi, J.; Miyao, Y.

    1985-01-01

    A preliminar plan, with all the technical specifications, for the construction of a machine for the synchrotron radiation production to be done by the National Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory in Brazil is presented. (L.C.) [pt

  18. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A.; Williams, G.P.

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization

  19. FT-IR microscopical analysis with synchrotron radiation: The microscope optics and system performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reffner, J.A.; Martoglio, P.A. [Spectra-Tech, Inc., Shelton, CT (United States); Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1995-01-01

    When a Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) microspectrometer was first interfaced with the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) in September 1993, there was an instant realization that the performance at the diffraction limit had increased 40-100 times. The synchrotron source transformed the IR microspectrometer into a true IR microprobe, providing high-quality IR spectra for probe diameters at the diffraction limit. The combination of IR microspectroscopy and synchrotron radiation provides a powerful new tool for molecular spectroscopy. The ability to perform IR microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation is still under development at Brookhaven National Laboratory, but several initial studies have been completed that demonstrate the broad-ranging applications of this technology and its potential for materials characterization.

  20. Infrared spectroscopy by use of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanba, Takao

    1991-01-01

    During five years since the author wrote the paper on the utilization of synchrotron radiation in long wavelength region, it seems to be recognized that in synchrotron radiation, the light from infrared to milli wave can be utilized, and is considerably useful. Recently the research on coherent synchrotron radiation in this region using electron linac has been developed by Tohoku University group, and the high capability of synchrotron radiation as light source is verified. This paper is the report on the infrared spectroscopic research using incoherent synchrotron radiation obtained from the deflection electromagnet part of electron storage rings. Synchrotron radiation is high luminance white light source including from X-ray to micro wave. The example of research that the author carried out at UVSOR is reported, and the perspective in near future is mentioned. Synchrotron radiation as the light source for infrared spectroscopy, the intensity and dimensions of the light source, far infrared region and mid infrared region, far infrared high pressure spectroscopic experiment, and the heightening of luminance of synchrotron radiation as infrared light source are described. (K.I.)

  1. National laboratories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moscati, G.

    1983-01-01

    The foundation of a 'National Laboratory' which would support a Research center in synchrotron radiation applications is proposed. The essential features of such a laboratory differing of others centers in Brazil are presented. (L.C.) [pt

  2. Synchrotron radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markus, N.

    1995-01-01

    In the many varied application fields of accelerators, synchrotron radiation ranks as one of the most valuable and widely useful tools. Synchrotron radiation is produced in multi-GeV electron synchrotrons and storage rings, and emerges tangentially in a narrow vertical fan. Synchrotron radiation has been used extensively for basic studies and, more recently, for applied research in the chemical, materials, biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries. Initially, the radiation was a byproduct of high energy physics laboratories but the high demand soon resulted in the construction of dedicated electron storage rings. The accelerator technology is now well developed and a large number of sources have been constructed, with energies ranging from about 1.5 to 8 GeV including the 6 GeV European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) source at Grenoble, France. A modern third-generation synchrotron radiation source has an electron storage ring with a complex magnet lattice to produce ultra-low emittance beams, long straights for 'insertion devices', and 'undulator' or 'wiggler' magnets to generate radiation with particular properties. Large beam currents are necessary to give high radiation fluxes and long beam lifetimes require ultra high vacuum systems. Industrial synchrotron radiation research programmes use either Xray diffraction or spectroscopy to determine the structures of a wide range of materials. Biological and pharmaceutical applications study the functions of various proteins. With this knowledge, it is possible to design molecules to change protein behaviour for pharmaceuticals, or to configure more active proteins, such as enzymes, for industrial processes. Recent advances in molecular biology have resulted in a large increase in protein crystallography studies, with researchers using crystals which, although small and weakly diffracting, benefit from the high intensity. Examples with commercial significance include the study of

  3. Berkeley Lab's ALS generates femtosecond synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, A L

    2000-01-01

    A team at Berkeley's Advanced Light Source has shown how a laser time-slicing technique provides a path to experiments with ultrafast time resolution. A Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory team has succeeded in generating 300 fs pulses of synchrotron radiation at the ALS synchrotron radiation machine. The team's members come from the Materials Sciences Division (MSD), the Center for Beam Physics in the Accelerator and Fusion Research Division and the Advanced Light Source (ALS). Although this proof-of principle experiment made use of visible light on a borrowed beamline, the laser "time-slicing" technique at the heart of the demonstration will soon be applied in a new bend magnet beamline that was designed specially for the production of femtosecond pulses of X-rays to study long-range and local order in condensed matter with ultrafast time resolution. An undulator beamline based on the same technique has been proposed that will dramatically increase the flux and brightness. The use of X-rays to study the c...

  4. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe 2 and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials

  5. Light-absorbing carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonaceous aerosols are ubiquitous in the atmosphere and can directly affect Earth’s climate by absorbing and scattering incoming solar radiation. Both field and laboratory measurements have confirmed that biomass burning (BB) is an important primary source of light absorbing o...

  6. Electrolytic production of light lanthanides from molten chloride alloys on a large laboratory scale

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szklarski, W.; Bogacz, A.; Strzyzewska, M.

    1979-01-01

    Literature data relating to electrolytic production of rare earth metals are presented. Conditions and results are given of own investigations into the electrolytic process of light lanthanide chloride solutions (LA-Nd) in molten potassium and sodium chlorides conducted on a large laboratory scale using molybdenic, iron, cobaltic and zinc cathodes. Design schemes of employed electrolysers are enclosed. (author)

  7. Aspects of a new light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, G.P.

    1980-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source, under construction at Brookhaven Laboratory, will be a uniquely copious source of x-ray and ultraviolet photons with a wide spectrum. Some of the potential uses of this intense radiation include studies of absorption spectra, photoemission of electrons, x-ray scattering, biochemical studies and other areas of basic research. It can also be used for micro-lithography of integrated circuits for ultra dense semiconductor devices. The basic operation of the electron synchrotron is described. This includes the three step acceleration of the electrons thru a linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron and finally in a synchrotron storage ring. The synchrotron magnet power system, the responsibility of a black engineer, is described. An SCR chopper approach is used with precision components to achieve current stability and repeatability of .01%. This current generates the magnetic fields which bend and focus the electron beam

  8. Aspects of a new light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagley, G.P.

    1978-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source, under construction at Brookhaven Laboratory, will be a uniquely copious source of x-ray and ultraviolet photons with a wide spectrum. Some of the potential uses of this intense radiation include studies of absorption spectra, photo-emission of electrons, x-ray scattering, biochemical studies and other areas of basic research. It can also be used for micro-lithography of integrated circuits for ultra dense semiconductor devices. The basic operation of the electron synchrotron is described. This includes the three step acceleration of the electrons through a linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron and finally in a synchrotron storage ring. The synchrotron magnet power system, the responsibility of a black engineer, is described. An SCR chopper approach is used with precision components to achieve current stability and repeatability of 0.01 percent. This current generates the magnetic fields which bend and focus the electron beam

  9. Instrumentation of x-ray diffraction and materials research on the National Synchrotron Light Source. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liedl, G.L.

    1984-11-01

    MATRIX was organized in 1980 to formulate a research team to design and construct a beam line at NSLS for x-ray diffraction studies of materials. A versatile system was designed to allow a full range of experimental capabilities for wide angle x-ray scattering experiments including surface diffraction studies. The design and construction of the system has been completed. Testing of parts of the system was completed at CHESS and with x-ray sources or other equipment at member institutions. Installation of the beam line at NSLS is in progress and will proceed in parallel with the commissioning of the x-ray ring at NSLS. Full operation of the beam line is expected to be ready by December 1, 1984 being limited only by the source power of NSLS at that time. Useful experiments could be started if the power is at least 2 GeV and 100ma. The MATRIX beam line was one of the first x-ray beam lines to see light in the beam line in early spring of 1984. In July of 1984, the MATRIX beam line as the first port at NSLS to have a monochromatic beam and to scan part of the spectrum from the source. As part of this contract, six publications have resulted from the various projects. Three publications are concerned directly with the beam line and/or its operation while the other three publications are the result of research associated with the project

  10. Synchrotron Radiation in Biology and Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelka, J.B.

    2008-01-01

    This work is focused on a present status of synchrotron radiation X-ray applications in medicine and biology to imaging, diagnostics, and radio- therapy. Properties of X-ray beams generated by synchrotron sources are compared with radiation produced by classical laboratory X-ray tubes. A list of operating and planned synchrotron facilities applicable to biomedical purposes is given, together with their basic characteristics. A concise overview of typical X-ray synchrotron techniques in biology and medicine is carried out with discussion of their specific properties and examples of typical results. (author)

  11. Atomic physics research with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crasemann, B.; Wuilleumier, F.

    1985-01-01

    This chapter discusses applications of synchrotron light in atomic and molecular physics. Use of the radiation from storage rings has expanded and lent access to new areas of absorption and photoemission spectroscopy and scattering experiments. Techniques applied in connection with synchrotron radiation are discussed including absorption spectroscopy, photoelectron spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray scattering. Problem areas that are being studied by the techniques mentioned above are discussed. Synchrotron radiation has provided the means for measuring the threshold-excitation and interference effects that signal the breakdown of the two-step model of atomic excitation/deexcitation. Synchrotron radiation provides more means of excited-state photoionization measurements

  12. Effect of stress on the hydrogen solubility in the Zr2.5% Nb alloy studied by synchrotron light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vizcaino, P; Santisteban, J R; Vicente Alvarez, M A; Banchik, A.D; Almer, J

    2012-01-01

    This paper is the last of a series of works that resulted from X ray diffraction experiments performed in the line 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory, Illinois, USA in July 2008. Experiments were performed to study the hydrogen solubility in a zirconium alloy under externally applied stress, using a highly collimated beam and a CCD area detector located in transmission geometry. The study material is Zr2.5% Nb, an alloy used to fabricate pressure tubes for CANDU nuclear reactors. From the 2D diffraction images, the intensity, the radius and area under the Debye rings were analyzed as a function of temperature with the aim of studying the kinetic effect of the hydrogen solubility. The hydrides were identified as .- hydrides. The experiment allowed determining the temperatures of terminal solid solubility (TTSS) and the effect of external stresses on these temperatures. The values obtained under an applied tension of 225 MPa showed significant changes on TTSS with respect to those obtained for the same samples in the unloaded condition. Depending on hydrogen concentration (45 to 130 wppm) a reduction of the hysteresis between TTSS in dissolution and TTSS in precipitation of 20 o C to 30 o C was observed. The study of the spacing between basal planes (c-axis of the hexagonal cell) as a function of temperature showed that the tension causes a redistribution of the hydrogen atoms between different orientations of the grains of the microstructure. Precipitation starts at a higher temperature in those grains whose c-axis is under tensile stress, increasing the number of hydrides precipitated in such grains. The observed changes in the solubility temperature under stress can be explained in terms of an analysis of the energy required to accommodate the hydride precipitates into the metal matrix (author)

  13. A laboratory analogue of the event horizon using slow light in an atomic medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Ulf

    2002-01-24

    Singularities underlie many optical phenomena. The rainbow, for example, involves a particular type of singularity-a ray catastrophe-in which light rays become infinitely intense. In practice, the wave nature of light resolves these infinities, producing interference patterns. At the event horizon of a black hole, time stands still and waves oscillate with infinitely small wavelengths. However, the quantum nature of light results in evasion of the catastrophe and the emission of Hawking radiation. Here I report a theoretical laboratory analogue of an event horizon: a parabolic profile of the group velocity of light brought to a standstill in an atomic medium can cause a wave singularity similar to that associated with black holes. In turn, the quantum vacuum is forced to create photon pairs with a characteristic spectrum, a phenomenon related to Hawking radiation. The idea may initiate a theory of 'quantum' catastrophes, extending classical catastrophe theory.

  14. The synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chevallier, P.

    1994-01-01

    Synchrotron Radiation is a fantastic source of electromagnetic radiation the energy spectrum of which spreads continuously from the far infrared to hard X-rays. For this reason a wide part of the scientific community, fundamentalists as well as industry, is concerned by its use. We shall describe here the main properties of this light source and give two examples of application in the field of characterization of materials: EXAFS (Extended X-Ray Absorption Fine Structure) and X-ray fluorescence. (author). 8 figs., 21 refs

  15. Synchrotron radiation and biomedical imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luccio, A.

    1986-08-01

    In this lecture we describe the characteristics of Synchrotron radiation as a source of X rays. We discuss the properties of SR arc sources, wigglers, undulators and the use of backscattering of laser light. Applications to angiography, X ray microscopy and tomography are reviewed. 16 refs., 23 figs

  16. Synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics

    CERN Document Server

    Pechkova, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the current state of research in both synchrotron radiation and structural proteomics from different laboratories worldwide. The book presents recent research results in the most advanced methods of synchrotron radiation analysis, protein micro- and nano crystallography, X-ray scattering and X-ray optics, coherent X-Ray diffraction, and laser cutting and contactless sample manipulation are described in details. The book focuses on biological applications and highlights important aspects such as radiation damage and molecular modeling.

  17. X-ray diffraction microtomography using synchrotron radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Barroso, R C; Jesus, E F O; Oliveira, L F

    2001-01-01

    The X-ray diffraction computed tomography technique is based on the interference phenomena of the coherent scatter. For low-momentum transfer, it is most probable that the scattering interaction will be coherent. A selective discrimination of a given element in a scanned specimen can be realized by fixing the Bragg angle which produces an interference peak and then, to carry out the computed tomography in the standard mode. The image reconstructed exalts the presence of this element with respect to other ones in a sample. This work reports the feasibility of a non-destructive synchrotron radiation X-ray diffraction imaging technique. This research was performed at the X-ray Diffraction beam line of the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS) in Brazil. The coherent scattering properties of different tissue and bone substitute materials were evaluated. Furthermore, diffraction patterns of some polycrystalline solids were studied due to industrial and environmental human exposure to these metals. The obtai...

  18. Application of X-ray synchrotron microscopy instrumentation in biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gasperini, F. M.; Pereira, G. R.; Granjeiro, J. M.; Calasans-Maia, M. D.; Rossi, A. M.; Perez, C. A.; Lopes, R. T.; Lima, I.

    2011-01-01

    X-ray micro-fluorescence imaging technique has been used as a significant tool in order to investigate minerals contents in some kinds of materials. The aim of this study was to evaluate the elemental distribution of calcium and zinc in bone substitute materials (nano-hydroxyapatite spheres) and cortical bones through X-Ray Micro-fluorescence analysis with the increment of Synchrotron Radiation in order to evaluate the characteristics of the newly formed bone and its interface, the preexisting bone and biomaterials by the arrangement of collagen fibers and its birefringence. The elemental mapping was carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo, Brazil working at D09-XRF beam line. Based on this study, the results suggest that hydroxyapatite-based biomaterials are biocompatible, promote osteo-conduction and favored bone repair. (authors)

  19. Magnet power supplies for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, L.T.; Lutz, I.C.

    1989-03-01

    The Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is building an Advanced Light Source (ALS) to produce synchrotron radiation. An electron linear accelerator, and a booster synchrotron are used to accelerate the electron beam to 1.5 GeV to fill the storage ring. This paper describes the power supplies used for the magnets in the booster and the storage ring and the interface requirements for computer control and monitoring the power supplies and magnet currents. 1 ref., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  20. Light-absorbing organic carbon from prescribed and laboratory biomass burning and gasoline vehicle emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Mingjie; Hays, Michael D; Holder, Amara L

    2017-08-04

    Light-absorbing organic carbon (OC), also termed brown carbon (BrC), from laboratory-based biomass burning (BB) has been studied intensively to understand the contribution of BB to radiative forcing. However, relatively few measurements have been conducted on field-based BB and even fewer measurements have examined BrC from anthropogenic combustion sources like motor vehicle emissions. In this work, the light absorption of methanol-extractable OC from prescribed and laboratory BB and gasoline vehicle emissions was examined using spectrophotometry. The light absorption of methanol extracts showed a strong wavelength dependence for both BB and gasoline vehicle emissions. The mass absorption coefficients at 365 nm (MAC 365 , m 2 g -1 C) - used as a measurement proxy for BrC - were significantly correlated (p burn conditions and fuel types may impact BB BrC characteristics. The average MAC 365 of gasoline vehicle emission samples is 0.62 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C, which is similar in magnitude to the BB samples (1.27 ± 0.76 m 2  g -1 C). These results suggest that in addition to BB, gasoline vehicle emissions may also be an important BrC source in urban areas.

  1. Medical applications with synchrotron radiation in Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takeda, T.; Itai, Y. [Univ. of Tsukuba, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Tsukuba (Japan); Hyodo, K.; Ando, M. [KEK, Tsukuba (Japan); Akatsuka, T. [Yamagata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Yamagata (Japan); Uyama, C. [National Cardiovascular Centre, Suita (Japan)

    1998-05-01

    In Japan, various medical applications of synchrotron X-ray imaging, such as angiography, monochromatic X-ray computed tomography (CT), radiography and radiation therapy, are being developed. In particular, coronary arteriography (CAG) is quite an important clinical application of synchrotron radiation. Using a two-dimensional imaging method, the first human intravenous CAG was carried out at KEK in May 1996; however, further improvements of image quality are required in clinical practice. On the other hand, two-dimensional aortographic CAG revealed canine coronary arteries as clearly as those on selective CAG, and coronary arteries less than 0.2 mm in diameter. Among applications of synchrotron radiation to X-ray CT, phase-contrast X-ray CT and fluorescent X-ray CT are expected to be very interesting future applications of synchrotron radiation. For actual clinical applications of synchrotron radiation, a medical beamline and a laboratory are now being constructed at SPring-8 in Harima. 55 refs.

  2. Comparison of the light flash phenomena observed in space and in laboratory experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McNulty, P.J.; Pease, V.P.; Bond, V.P.

    1976-01-01

    Astronauts on Apollo and Skylab missions have reported observing a variety of visual phenomena when their eyes were closed and adapted to darkness. These observations were studied under controlled conditions during a number of sessions on board Apollo and Skylab spacecraft and the data available to date on these so-called light flashes is in the form of descriptions of the phenomena and frequency of occurrence. Similar visual phenomena have been demonstrated in a number of laboratories by exposing the eyes of human subjects to beams of neutrons, alphas, pions, and protons. More than one physical mechanism is involved in the laboratory and space phenomena. No direct comparison of the laboratory and space observations has been made by observers who have experienced both. However, the range of visual phenomena observed in the laboratory is consistent with the Apollo and Skylab observations. Measured detection efficiencies can be used to estimate the frequencies with which various phenomena would be observed if the subject was exposed to cosmic rays in space

  3. A manual for a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for light stable isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    1998-01-01

    The reliability and accuracy of isotopic data can be improved by utilizing database software to (i) store information about samples, (ii) store the results of mass spectrometric isotope-ratio analyses of samples, (iii) calculate analytical results using standardized algorithms stored in a database, (iv) normalize stable isotopic data to international scales using isotopic reference materials, and (v) generate multi-sheet paper templates for convenient sample loading of automated mass-spectrometer sample preparation manifolds. Such a database program is presented herein. Major benefits of this system include (i) an increase in laboratory efficiency, (ii) reduction in the use of paper, (iii) reduction in workload due to the elimination or reduction of retyping of data by laboratory personnel, and (iv) decreased errors in data reported to sample submitters. Such a database provides a complete record of when and how often laboratory reference materials have been analyzed and provides a record of what correction factors have been used through time. It provides an audit trail for stable isotope laboratories. Since the original publication of the manual for LIMS for Light Stable Isotopes, the isotopes 3 H, 3 He, and 14 C, and the chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113, have been added to this program.

  4. BOOMERANG - the Australian light source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boldeman, J.W.; Garrett, R.L.

    1999-01-01

    A proposal has been prepared for the installation in Australia of a national high performance synchrotron light facility called Boomerang. The Boomerang proposal had its origin in the establishment of the Australian Synchrotron Research Program (ASRP) which was one of the seven Major National Research Facilities announced by the Federal Government in December 1995. The ASRP provides the opportunity and funding for Australian researchers to access international synchrotron facilities, specifically two consortia at the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at the Argonne National Laboratory, USA and continued interaction with the Photon Factory at the KEK Laboratory in Japan. The ASRP was the successor to the Australian National Beamline Facility project (ANBF) which began in 1991 following the ASTEC inquiry titled 'Small Country - Big Science'. The Federal Government also provided funding for a Feasibility Study to determine the value of establishing an Australian-based synchrotron radiation facility. The Feasibility Study was completed in August 1998 and endorsed by the institutional members of the ASRP and the research community in general. The study concluded that, on the data available in Australia, there was a strong case for the installation of an Australian-based facility. The study considered several options for an Australian-based facility and recommended that these options and the data supporting the general conclusions receive further investigation. A mission was arranged to a select group of overseas laboratories to explore these questions in detail. The review team included a mix of scientific and industrial experience and also represented the interests of the ASRP and an Industrial Synchrotron Consortium based in Victoria. Based on the conclusions of the overseas mission and incorporating the advice of all international specialists in the design and use of synchrotron facilities consulted during the mission, the most cost-effective option was an extended

  5. Variable magnification with Kirkpatrick-Baez optics for synchrotron x-ray microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Jach, T.; Bakulin, A. S.; Durbin, S. M.; Pedulla, J.; Macrander, A.

    2006-01-01

    We describe the distinction between the operation of a short focal length x-ray microscope forming a real image with a laboratory source (convergent illumination) and with a highly collimated intense beam from a synchrotron light source (Kohler illumination). We demonstrate the distinction with a Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope consisting of short focal length multilayer mirrors operating at an energy of 8 keV. In add...

  6. Photonuclear physics at the Bonn synchrotrons. Present status and future plans at the Bonn synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mecking, B.A.

    1983-11-01

    The activities in the field of photonuclear physics at the Bonn 500 MeV and 2.5 GeV synchrotrons are reviewed. The experiments concentrate on photodisintegration and pion-photoproduction reactions on light nuclei. (orig.)

  7. A 2D MWPC area detector for use with synchrotron X-radiation at the Daresbury Laboratory for small angle diffraction and scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helliwell, J.R.; Hughes, G.; Przybylski, M.M.; Ridley, P.A.; Sumner, I.; Bateman, J.E.; Connolly, J.F.; Stephenson, R.

    1982-01-01

    A 2D multiwire proportional chamber area detector is being developed to provide a real time data acquisition system for small angle scattering and diffraction experiments with synchrotron X-radiation at the Daresbury synchrotron radiation source (SRS). The chamber has a circular aperture, 200 mm diameter with an anode and cathode wire pitch of 1 mm; a front cathode-anode spacing of 6 mm and a 6 mm spacing between anode and rear cathode. A 1 mm thick front beryllium window and a rear aluminium cover plate with indium seals provide a gas-tight system. Previous experiments with a similar chamber design allowed continual use of the chamber for up to 2 years without refill. A digitising time of 2 μs is expected based on a 260 mm delay line and Lecroy TDC linked to a mass semiconductor memory of 512 x 256 elements. The experiment will be controlled by a PDP 11/04 computer with 28 K memory interfaced to a CAMAC create with 64 K fast access CAMAC memory. The system should be relatively easy to use with good order to order resolution and reasonable rate for small angle diffraction and scattering experiments on biological systems. Evaluation of the set-up for protein crystallography is planned though a TV based image intensifier (Enraf-Nonius) is preferred for this application at the SRS. (orig.)

  8. Application of synchrotron radiation to elemental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, K.W.; Gordon, B.M.; Hanson, A.L.; Hastings, J.B.; Howells, M.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Chen, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    The use of a synchrotron storage ring as a high brightness source for production of monoergic, variable energy, and highly polarized x-ray beams promises to revolutionize the field of elemental analysis. The results of exploratory work using the Cornell synchrotron facility, CHESS, will be described. Design considerations and features of the new X-Ray Microprobe Facility now under construction at the Brookhaven National Synchrotron Light Source will be presented. This facility will be used for bulk analysis and for microanalysis with an initial spatial resolution of the order of 30 μm

  9. Report of the Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avery, R.T.

    1984-06-01

    The Synchrotron Radiation Vacuum Workshop was held to consider two vacuum-related problems that bear on the design of storage rings and beam lines for synchrotron radiation facilities. These problems are gas desorption from the vacuum chamber walls and carbon deposition on optical components. Participants surveyed existing knowledge on these topics and recommended studies that should be performed as soon as possible to provide more definitive experimental data on these topics. This data will permit optimization of the final design of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) and its associated beam lines. It also should prove useful for other synchrotron radiation facilities as well

  10. Early British synchrotrons, an informal history

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawson, J.D.

    1997-02-01

    An historical account of the design and construction of early synchrotrons in the United Kingdom, based partly on personal reminiscences, is presented. Material is also drawn from archives at Birmingham and CERN. The document covers the period from plans for the world's first synchrotron at Malvern after the Second World War to work done at Harwell Laboratory for CERN in the period 1951-1953. (UK)

  11. Synchrotron X-radiation research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kabler, M.N.; Nagel, D.J.; Skelton, E.F.

    1990-05-01

    The Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) has been involved in the exploitation of X rays since the 1920s. The report gives a brief description of the generation and characteristics of synchrotron radiation, and review highlights of current research. Research examples include soft-X-ray optics, semiconductor surface passivation, surface electron dynamics, space-charge dynamics on silicon, photochemistry on GaAs, local atomic structure, crystal structures from X-ray diffraction. The report then discusses emerging research opportunities

  12. The Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jackson, A.

    1991-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS), a national user facility currently under construction at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed to produce extremely bright beams of synchrotron radiation in the energy range from a few eV to 10 keV. The design is based on a 1--1.9-GeV electron storage ring (optimized at 1.5 GeV), and utilizes special magnets, known as undulators and wigglers (collectively referred to as insertion devices), to generate the radiation. The facility is scheduled to begin operating in April 1993. In this paper we describe the progress in the design, construction, and commissioning of the accelerator systems, insertion devices, and beamlines. Companion presentations at this conference give more detail of specific components in the ALS, and describe the activities towards establishing an exciting user program. 3 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Elemental concentration in normal skin and fibroepithelial polip lesions by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, Julio C.A.C.R.; Canellas, Catarine G.L.; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Anjos, Marcelino J.

    2011-01-01

    In this work, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in acrochordon, a skin lesion also known as skin tag or fibroepithelial polyp, as well as in normal skin from the same patient. The samples were analysed by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X- ray Fluorescence (SRTXRF) in the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (LNLS) in Campinas/Sao Paulo-Brazil. The collection of lesion and healthy skin samples, including papillary dermis and epidermis, has involved 17 patients. It was evaluated the presence of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Cr, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Br and Rb in the paired samples, which were compared, and significant differences were found in some of them. (author)

  14. Calculation of collective effects and beam lifetimes for the LBL [Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory] 1-2 GeV synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chattopadhyay, S.; Zisman, M.S.

    1987-03-01

    In designing a third-generation high brightness synchrotron radiation source, attention must be paid to the various collective effects that can influence beam performance. We report on calculations, performed with the code ZAP, of the bunch length, the transverse emittance and the beam lifetime (from both Touschek and gas scattering) for our 1-2 GeV storage ring. In addition, we estimate the growth times for both longitudinal and transverse coupled bunch instabilities. Bunch lengths of about 20 ps should be obtainable and intrabeam scattering emittance growth is small. For a limiting undulator gap of 1 cm and residual gas pressure of 1n Torr, the beam lifetime is about 5 hours in the single-bunch mode; in the multibunch mode, lifetimes in excess of 6 hours are expected. These results indicate that all performance goals for the facility should be achievable

  15. Overview and perspective of materials characterization by using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamitsubo, Hiromichi

    2009-01-01

    A peculiarity of techniques and the methods of synchrotron radiation are explained. It consists of five sections such as introduction, synchrotron radiation, interaction between X-ray and materials, analytical methods of materials using synchrotron radiation and perspective and problems. The second section described the principles of synchrotron orbit radiation, synchrotron light source, the main formulae and schematic drawing of undulator, and the synchrotron radiation facilities in Japan. The third section explained behavior of X-ray in materials, absorption, reflection, refraction and scattering of X-ray. The fourth section stated many analytical methods of materials; the surface diffractometer, powder diffractometer, high-energy X-ray diffraction, core-electron absorption spectroscopy, micro-beam diffraction, X-ray fluorescence, X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS), and photoemission spectroscopy (PES). A characteristic feature of synchrotron radiation contains the large wave length ranges from infrared to X-ray, high directivity and brightness, linear (circular) polarization, pulsed light, good control and stability. The brightness spectra of Spring-8 and SAGA-LS, concept of synchrotron light source, undulator and wiggler, nine synchrotron radiation facilities in Japan, mass absorption coefficients of Cu and Au, and analysis of materials using synchrotron radiation are illustrated. (S.Y.)

  16. Laboratory and field measurements of enantiomeric monoterpene emissions as a function of chemotype, light and temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, W.; Staudt, M.; Bourgeois, I.; Williams, J.

    2014-03-01

    Plants emit significant amounts of monoterpenes into the earth's atmosphere, where they react rapidly to form a multitude of gas phase species and particles. Many monoterpenes exist in mirror-image forms or enantiomers. In this study the enantiomeric monoterpene profile for several representative plants (Quercus ilex L., Rosmarinus officinalis L., and Pinus halepensis Mill.) was investigated as a function of chemotype, light and temperature both in the laboratory and in the field. Analysis of enantiomeric monoterpenes from 19 Quercus ilex individuals from Southern France and Spain revealed four regiospecific chemotypes (genetically fixed emission patterns). In agreement with previous work, only Quercus ilex emissions increased strongly with light. However, for all three plant species no consistent enantiomeric variation was observed as a function of light, and the enantiomeric ratio of α-pinene was found to vary by less than 20% from 100 and 1000 μmol m-2 s-1 PAR (photosynthetically active radiation). The rate of monoterpene emission increased with temperature from all three plant species, but little variation in the enantiomeric distribution of α-pinene was observed with temperature. There was more enantiomeric variability between individuals of the same species than could be induced by either light or temperature. Field measurements of α-pinene enantiomer mixing ratios in the air, taken at a Quercus ilex forest in Southern France, and several other previously reported field enantiomeric ratio diel cycle profiles are compared. All show smoothly varying diel cycles (some positive and some negative) even over changing wind directions. This is surprising in comparison with variations of enantiomeric emission patterns shown by individuals of the same species.

  17. Synchrotron radiation in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garrett, R.F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Synchrotron radiation research in Australia is entering a new era with the commencement of the Australian synchrotron project, which will construct a 3 GeV third generation synchrotron facility at Monash University in Victoria. To date Australian scientists have used overseas facilities, primarily those managed by the Australian Synchrotron Research Program in Japan and the USA. A fast developing and maturing Australian synchrotron user program has developed around these overseas facilities. The field of synchrotron radiation and its importance to a wide range of research will be introduced and Australia's current involvement and facilities will be described. The current status and technical specifications of the Australian synchrotron will be presented. Copyright (2002) Australian X-ray Analytical Association Inc

  18. Calibration of a laboratory spectrophotometer for specular light by means of stacked glass plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, W. A.; Richardson, A. J.

    1971-01-01

    Stacked glass plates have been used to calibrate a laboratory spectrophotometer, over the spectral range 0.5-2.5 microns, for specular light. The uncalibrated instrument was characterized by systematic errors when used to measure the reflectance and transmittance of stacked glass plates. Calibration included first, a determination of the reflectance of a standard composed of barium sulfate paint deposited on an aluminum plate; second, the approximation of the reflectance and transmittance residuals between observed and computed values by means of cubic equations; and, finally, the removal of the systematic errors by a computer. The instrument, after calibration, was accurate to 1% when used to measure the reflectance and transmittance of stacked glass plates.

  19. Historical development of synchrotron x-ray diffraction topography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawado, Seiji

    2011-01-01

    After a short history of X-ray diffraction topography, from the early stage of laboratory X-ray topography to recent synchrotron-radiation applications, is described, the development of science and technology for the synchrotron X-ray topography and its industrial applications are reviewed in more detail. In addition, the recent trend to synchrotron topography research is clarified on the basis of several data obtained from 256 papers which have been published since 2000. (author)

  20. Atomic photoelectron-spectroscopy studies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobrin, P.H.

    1983-02-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy combined with tunable synchrotron radiation has been used to study the photoionization process in several atomic systems. The time structure of the synchrotron radiation source at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) was used to record time-of-flight (TOF) photoelectron spectra of gaseous Cd, Hg, Ne, Ar, Ba, and Mn. The use of two TOF analyzers made possible the measurement of photoelectron angular distributions as well as branching ratios and partial cross sections

  1. Infrared microspectroscopy with synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carr, G.L.; Williams, G.P. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). National Synchrotron Light Source

    1997-09-01

    Infrared microspectroscopy with a high brightness synchrotron source can achieve a spatial resolution approaching the diffraction limit. However, in order to realize this intrinsic source brightness at the specimen location, some care must be taken in designing the optical system. Also, when operating in diffraction limited conditions, the effective spatial resolution is no longer controlled by the apertures typically used for a conventional (geometrically defined) measurement. Instead, the spatial resolution depends on the wavelength of light and the effective apertures of the microscope`s Schwarzchild objectives. The authors have modeled the optical system from the synchrotron source up to the sample location and determined the diffraction-limited spatial distribution of light. Effects due to the dependence of the synchrotron source`s numerical aperture on wavelength, as well as the difference between transmission and reflection measurement modes, are also addressed. Lastly, they examine the benefits (when using a high brightness source) of an extrinsic germanium photoconductive detector with cone optics as a replacement for the standard MCT detector.

  2. Multielemental analysis in Brazilian cigarettes using total reflection X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serpa, Renata F.B.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Moreira, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify major and trace elements in conventional and light Brazilian cigarettes, Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence with Synchrotron Radiation (SR-TXRF) was used. The fluorescence measurements were carried out at Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas - Sao Paulo. This technique enables detection limit is in the ngg -1 range, which is very useful in elemental tobacco smoke analysis, since it presents most of its elements at a trace level. The major elements identified in tobacco samples were: S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe and Cd, and the trace elements were: Ti, Cr, Ni, Cu, Zn, Br, Rb, Sr and Ba. However in tobacco smoke samples, there were only two major elements: K and Ca, the others were present a trace level. The rate transfer of tobacco to tobacco smoke was about 2.5 % for all elements studied. (author)

  3. High-energy synchrotron X-ray radiography of shock-compressed materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Michael E.; Chapman, David J.; Collinson, Mark A.; Jones, David R.; Music, Jasmina; Stafford, Samuel J. P.; Tear, Gareth R.; White, Thomas G.; Winters, John B. R.; Drakopoulos, Michael; Eakins, Daniel E.

    2015-06-01

    This presentation will discuss the development and application of a high-energy (50 to 250 keV) synchrotron X-ray imaging method to study shock-compressed, high-Z samples at Beamline I12 at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron (Rutherford-Appleton Laboratory, UK). Shock waves are driven into materials using a portable, single-stage gas gun designed by the Institute of Shock Physics. Following plate impact, material deformation is probed in-situ by white-beam X-ray radiography and complimentary velocimetry diagnostics. The high energies, large beam size (13 x 13 mm), and appreciable sample volumes (~ 1 cm3) viable for study at Beamline I12 compliment existing in-house pulsed X-ray capabilities and studies at the Dynamic Compression Sector. The authors gratefully acknowledge the ongoing support of Imperial College London, EPSRC, STFC and the Diamond Light Source, and AWE Plc.

  4. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  5. DarkLight: A Search for Dark Forces at the Jefferson Laboratory Free-Electron Laser Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balewski, Jan; Bernauer, J; Bertozzi, William; Bessuille, Jason; Buck, B; Cowan, Ray; Dow, K; Epstein, C; Fisher, Peter; Gilad, Shalev; Ihloff, Ernest; Kahn, Yonatan; Kelleher, Aidan; Kelsey, J; Milner, Richard; Moran, C; Ou, Longwu; Russell, R; Schmookler, Barak; Thaler, J; Tschalar, C; Vidal, Christopher; Winnebeck, A; Benson, Stephen [JLAB; Gould, Christopher [JLAB; Biallas, George [JLAB; Boyce, James [JLAB; Coleman, James [JLAB; Douglas, David [JLAB; Ent, Rolf [JLAB; Evtushenko, Pavel [JLAB; Fenker, Howard [JLAB; Gubeli, Joseph [JLAB; Hannon, Fay [JLAB; Huang, Jia [JLAB; Jordan, Kevin [JLAB; Legg, Robert [JLAB; Marchlik, Matthew [JLAB; Moore, Steven [JLAB; Neil, George [JLAB; Shinn, Michelle D [JLAB; Tennant, Christopher [JLAB; Walker, Richard [JLAB; Williams, Gwyn [JLAB; Zhang, Shukui [JLAB; Freytsis, M; Fiorito, Ralph; O' Shea, P; Alarcon, Ricardo; Dipert, R; Ovanesyan, G; Gunter, Thoth; Kalantarians, Narbe; Kohl, M; Albayrak, Ibrahim; Horn, Tanja; Gunarathne, D S; Martoff, C J; Olvitt, D L; Surrow, Bernd; Lia, X; Beck, Reinhard; Schmitz, R; Walther, D; Brinkmann, K; Zaunig, H

    2014-05-01

    We give a short overview of the DarkLight detector concept which is designed to search for a heavy photon A' with a mass in the range 10 MeV/c^2 < m(A') < 90 MeV/c^2 and which decays to lepton pairs. We describe the intended operating environment, the Jefferson Laboratory free electon laser, and a way to extend DarkLight's reach using A' --> invisible decays.

  6. Notes on the design of experiments and beam diagnostics with synchrotron light detected by a gated photomultiplier for the Fermilab superconducting electron linac and for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Romanov, Aleksandr [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Ruan, Jinhao [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Santucci, James [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Thurman-Keup, Randy [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Valishev, Alexander [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States)

    2017-11-08

    We outline the design of beam experiments for the electron linac at the Fermilab Accelerator Science and Technology (FAST) facility and for the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA), based on synchrotron light emitted by the electrons in bend dipoles, detected with gated microchannel-plate photomultipliers (MCP-PMTs). The system can be used both for beam diagnostics (e.g., beam intensity with full dynamic range, turn-by-turn beam vibrations, etc.) and for scientific experiments, such as the direct observation of the time structure of the radiation emitted by single electrons in a storage ring. The similarity between photon pulses and spectrum at the downstream end of the electron linac and in the IOTA ring allows one to test the apparatus during commissioning of the linac.

  7. The Beamline X28C of the Center for Synchrotron Biosciences: a National Resource for Biomolecular Structure and Dynamics Experiments Using Synchrotron Footprinting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, S.; Sullivan, M.; Toomey, J.; Kiselar, J.; Chance, M.

    2007-01-01

    Structural mapping of proteins and nucleic acids with high resolution in solution is of critical importance for understanding their biological function. A wide range of footprinting technologies have been developed over the last ten years to address this need. Beamline X28C, a white-beam X-ray source at the National Synchrotron Light Source of Brookhaven National Laboratory, functions as a platform for synchrotron footprinting research and further technology development in this growing field. An expanding set of user groups utilize this national resource funded by the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering of the National Institutes of Health. The facility is operated by the Center for Synchrotron Biosciences and the Center for Proteomics of Case Western Reserve University. The facility includes instrumentation suitable for conducting both steady-state and millisecond time-resolved footprinting experiments based on the production of hydroxyl radicals by X-rays. Footprinting studies of nucleic acids are routinely conducted with X-ray exposures of tens of milliseconds, which include studies of nucleic acid folding and their interactions with proteins. This technology can also be used to study protein structure and dynamics in solution as well as protein-protein interactions in large macromolecular complexes. This article provides an overview of the X28C beamline technology and defines protocols for its adoption at other synchrotron facilities. Lastly, several examples of published results provide illustrations of the kinds of experiments likely to be successful using these approaches

  8. Synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence techniques

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchrotron X-ray imaging systems with fluorescence techniques was developed for biomedical researches in Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory. An X-ray fluorescence microtomography system was implemented to analyse human prostate and breast samples and an X-ray microfluorescence system was implemented to ...

  9. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Radiation Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, A.L.; Oldfather, D.E.; Lindner, A.F.

    1993-08-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a 1.5 Gev synchrotron light source facility consisting of a 120 kev electron gun, 50 Mev linear accelerator, 1.5 Gev booster synchrotron, 200 meter circumference electron storage ring, and many photon beamline transport systems for research. Figure 1. ALS floor plan. Pairs of neutron and gamma radiation monitors are shown as dots numbered from 1 to 12. The Radiation Safety System for the ALS has been designed and built with a primary goal of providing protection against inadvertent personnel exposure to gamma and neutron radiation and, secondarily, to enhance the electrical safety of select magnet power supplies

  10. The Advanced Light Source (ALS) Radiation Safety System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritchie, A.; Oldfather, D.; Lindner, A.

    1993-05-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) is a 1.5 GeV synchrotron light source facility consisting of a 120 keV electron gun, 50 MeV linear accelerator, 1.5 Gev booster synchrotron, 200 meter circumference electron storage ring, and many photon beamline transport systems for research. The Radiation Safety System for the ALS has been designed and built with a primary goal of providing protection against inadvertent personnel exposure to gamma and neutron radiation and, secondarily, to enhance the electrical safety of select magnet power supplies

  11. 3 GeV Booster Synchrotron Conceptual Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedemann, Helmut

    2009-06-02

    Synchrotron light cna be produced from a relativistic particle beam circulating in a storage ring at extremely high intensity and brilliance over a large spectral region reaching from the far infrared regime to hard x-rays. The particles, either electrons or positrons, radiate as they are deflected in the fields of the storage ring bending magnets or of magnets specially optimized for the production of synchrotron light. The synchrotron light being very intense and well collimated in the forward direction has become a major tool in a large variety of research fields in physics, chemistry, material science, biology, and medicine.

  12. X-ray fluorescence with synchrotron radiation to elemental analysis of lead and calcium content of primary teeth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza Guerra, Carolina de; Fernanda Gerlach, Raquel; Graciele Villela Pinto, Nivia; Coutinho Cardoso, Simone; Moreira, Silvana; Pereira de Almeida, Andre; Teixeira Alves Peixoto, Iza; Henrique Meloni, Carlos; Lemos Mota, Carla; Fernando de Oliveira, Luis; Braz, Delson; Cely Barroso, Regina

    2010-01-01

    Primary teeth were analyzed by micro-SRXRF. The aim of this study was to determine the elemental distribution of lead and calcium in different regions of primary incisor of children living in a notoriously contaminated area (Santo Amaro da Purificacao, Bahia State, Brazil). The measurements were performed in standard geometry of 45 deg. incidence, exciting with a white beam and using a conventional system collimation (orthogonal slits) in the XRF beamline at the Synchrotron Light National Laboratory (Campinas, Brazil).

  13. Learning evaluation of interference and diffraction of light in physics laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Bravo

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation referred to the learning of interference and diffraction of light in the context of a physic laboratory, through the application of a didactic proposal with students from an undergraduate course in physics. The design of the experimental activities has taken into account the difficulties reported by educational research, as well as the contribution of the Vergnaud conceptual fields theory, Ausubel meaningful learning theory and Vigotsky sociolinguistics theory. The research was focused in the study of students cognitive development during the implementation of the didactic proposal and the assessment of it through the skills development. A methodological qualitative approach was used, in an interpretative perspective, with a research-action design, where the researcher acts as a teacher while he collects the data. Researcher's field notes have been used in a complementarily, audio recordings of group interactions, video recordings of students’ teamwork, group reports about the individual activities and assessments. The results obtained from the analysis of the content of the registers and the interpretation from the theory of conceptual fields show an evolution in the students’ schemes. Their initials schemes, which were focused on ray optics, evolve to schemes focused on the wave model. The results obtained from the group reports and from the individual assessment show that all the students have managed to develop most skills raised as learning objectives in the didactic proposal.

  14. Dust ablation laboratory experiments to measure the plasma and light production of meteoroids in the atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sternovsky, Z.; DeLuca, M.; Janches, D.; Marshall, R. A.; Munsat, T.; Plane, J. M. C.; Horanyi, M.

    2017-12-01

    Radars play an important role in characterizing the distribution of meteoroids entering Earth's atmosphere, and they are sensitive to the size range where most of the mass input occurs. The interpretation of meteor radar measurements, however, is handicapped by the incomplete understanding of the microphysical processes relevant to meteoric ablation. A facility has been developed to simulate the ablation of small dust particles in laboratory conditions and to determine the most critical parameters. An electrostatic dust accelerator is used to generate iron, aluminum and meteoric analog particles with velocities of 1-70 km/s. The particles are then introduced into a cell filled with nitrogen, air, oxygen, or carbon dioxide gas with pressures adjustable in the 0.02 - 0.5 Torr range, where partial or complete ablation occurs over a short distance. An array of biased electrodes is used to collect the ionized products with spatial resolution along the ablating particles' path. An optical observation setup using a 64 channel PMT system allows direct observation of the particle and estimating the light output. A new addition to the facility, using pickup tube detectors and precise timing, allows measurement of the drag coefficient of the particle's slowdown, which we find to be significantly higher than commonly used in existing models. Measurements also indicated that the ionization efficiency of iron and aluminum at low velocities is larger than previously expected.

  15. Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, R.C.

    1983-03-01

    The Advanced Light Source (ALS) is a new synchrotron radiation source which has been proposed by Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory. The ALS will be a key component in a major new research facility, the National Center for Advanced Materials. The ALS will consist of an electron linear accelerator, a booster synchrotron, a 1.3-GeV electron storage ring, and a number of photon beam lines. Most or all photon beam lines will originate from wiggler and undulator magnets placed in the 12 long straight sections of the ALS. A very low electron beam emittance will provide photon beams of unsurpassed spectral brilliance from specially-designed undulators, and a high radiofrequency will produce very short pulse lengths

  16. The World of Synchrotrons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    de Ciencias Fisicas,. Universidad Nacional. Autonoma de Mexico. Sameen Ahmed Khan. A summary of results on synchrotron radiation is presented along with notes on its properties and applications. Quantum aspects are briefly mentioned. Synchrotron radiation facilities are described briefly with a detailed coverage of ...

  17. Synchrotron radiation sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    van Steenbergen, A.

    1979-01-01

    As a result of the exponential growth of the utilization of synchrotron radiation for research in the domain of the material sciences, atomic and molecular physics, biology and technology, a major construction activity has been generated towards new dedicated electron storage rings, designed optimally for synchrotron radiation applications, also, expansion programs are underway at the existing facilities, such as DORIS, SPEAR, and VEPP. In this report the basic properties of synchrotron radiation will be discussed, a short overview will be given of the existing and new facilities, some aspects of the optimization of a structure for a synchrotron radiation source will be discussed and the addition of wigglers and undulators for spectrum enhancement will be described. Finally, some parameters of an optimized synchrotron radiation source will be given.

  18. CHESS-the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Batterman, B.W.; Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY

    1980-01-01

    The Wilson Laboratory at Cornell University has done pioneering work on development of high energy synchrotrons. In the last decade, the 12 GeV synchrotron has been the most energetic electron synchrotron in the world. In 1975 plans were formulated to build a 4-8 GeV storage ring in the same tunnel as the synchrotron and to use the latter as the injector for the storage ring. This small radius (the normal bend magnets have R = 87 m), coupled with the relatively high electron energy of the storage ring, makes these magnets potent sources of synchrotron radiation. In June of 1978 the National Science Foundation funded a project to create CHESS, the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source. (orig./FKS)

  19. Apparatus development for high-pressure X-ray diffraction using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez, L.G.; Orlando, M.T.D.; Rossi, J.L.; Passamai Junior, J.L.; Melo, F.C.L.; Ferreira, F.F.

    2006-01-01

    Some phenomena in the field of condensed matter physics can be studied when the matter is submitted to extreme conditions of pressure, magnetic fields or temperatures. Once submitted to these conditions it is generally necessary to measure the properties of the matter in situ. The existence of a synchrotron light laboratory in Brazil opens up the chance of studying materials in extreme conditions by techniques like X-ray diffraction and absorption. However, when compared to high-energy synchrotrons accelerators, the Brazilian source offers a narrower energy range and lower flux. These facts impose limitation to perform diffraction experiments by energy dispersion and, consequently, the use of pressure cells with denser anvils like diamond. However, for a lower-pressure range, preliminary studies showed the viability of measurements in an angular dispersion configuration. This allows the use of silicon carbide anvils B 4C . In this work it is described the development of a hydrostatic pressure cell suitable for X-rays diffraction measurements in the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory using materials and technologies developed by the institutions and researchers involved in this project (IPEN, UFES, CTA and LNLS). This development can provide the scientific community with the possibility of performing X-ray diffraction measurements under hydrostatic pressure, initially up to 2 GPa, with possibilities of increasing the maximum pressure to higher values, with or without application of magnetic fields and high or low temperatures. (author)

  20. New theoretical results in synchrotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagrov, V.G. [Tomsk State University, Lenin Avenue 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: bagrov@phys.tsu.ru; Gitman, D.M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, C.P. 66318, 05315-970 Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Tlyachev, V.B. [Tomsk Institute of High Current Electronics, Akademicheskiy Avenue 4, Tomsk (Russian Federation); Jarovoi, A.T. [Tomsk State University, Lenin Avenue 36, 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-15

    One of the remarkable features of the relativistic electron synchrotron radiation is its concentration in small angle {delta}{approx}1/{gamma} (here {gamma}-relativistic factor: {gamma}=E/mc{sup 2}, E - energy, m - electron rest mass, c - light velocity) near rotation orbit plane [V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V.G. Bulenok, V. Ya. Epp, Kinematical projection of pulsar synchrotron radiation profiles, in: Proceedings of IV ISTC Scientific Advisory Commitee Seminar on Basic Science in ISTC Aktivities, Akademgorodok, Novosibirsk, April 23-27, 2001, p. 293-300]. This theoretically predicted and experimentally confirmed feature is peculiar to total (spectrum summarized) radiating intensity. This angular distribution property has been supposed to be (at least qualitatively) conserved and for separate spectrum synchrotron radiation components. In the work of V.G. Bagrov, V.A. Bordovitsyn, V. Ch. Zhukovskii, Development of the theory of synchrotron radiation and related processes. Synchrotron source of JINR: the perspective of research, in: The Materials of the Second International Work Conference, Dubna, April 2-6, 2001, pp. 15-30 and in Angular dependence of synchrotron radiation intensity. http://lanl.arXiv.org/abs/physics/0209097, it is shown that the angular distribution of separate synchrotron radiation spectrum components demonstrates directly inverse tendency - the angular distribution deconcentration relatively the orbit plane takes place with electron energy growth. The present work is devoted to detailed investigation of this situation. For exact quantitative estimation of angular concentration degree of synchrotron radiation the definition of radiation effective angle and deviation angle is proposed. For different polarization components of radiation the dependence of introduced characteristics was investigated as a functions of electron energy and number of spectrum component.

  1. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe[sub 2] and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  2. Synchrotron radiation in transactinium research report of the workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-11-01

    This report contains viewgraphs on the following topics. The advanced light source U8 undulator beamline, 20--300 eV; gas-phase actinide studies with synchrotron radiation; atomic structure calculations for heavy atoms; flux growth of single crystal uranium intermetallics: Extension to transuranics; x-ray absorption near-edge structure studies of actinide compounds; surface as a new stage for studying actinides: Theoretical study of the surface electronic structure of uranium; magnetic x-ray scattering experiments at resonant energies; beamline instruments for radioactive materials; the search for x-ray absorption magnetic circular dichroism in actinide materials: preliminary experiments using UFe{sub 2} and U-S; the laser plasma laboratory light source: a source of preliminary transuranic data; electron spectroscopy of heavy fermion actinide materials; study of thin layers of actinides. Present status and future use of synchrotron radiation; electronic structure and correlated-electron theory for actinide materials; and heavy fermion and kondo phenomena in actinide materials.

  3. NSLS source development laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Zvi, I.; Blum, E.; Johnson, E.D.

    1995-01-01

    The National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) has initiated an ambitious project to develop fourth generation radiation sources. To achieve this goal, the Source Development Laboratory (SDL) builds on the experience gained at the NSLS, and at the highly successful BNL Accelerator Test Facility. The SDL accelerator system will consist of a high brightness short pulse linac, a station for coherent synchrotron and transition radiation experiments, a short bunch storage ring, and an ultra-violet free electron laser utilizing the NISUS wiggler. The electrons will be provided by a laser photocathode gun feeding a 210 MeV S-band electron linac, with magnetic bunch compression at 80 MeV. Electron bunches as short as 100 μm with 1 nC charge will be used for pump-probe experiments utilizing coherent transition radiation. Beam will also be injected into a compact storage ring which will be a source of millimeter wave coherent synchrotron radiation. The linac will also serve as the driver for an FEL designed to allow the study of various aspects of single pass amplifiers. The first FEL configuration will be as a self-amplified spontaneous emission (SASE) FEL at 900 nm. Seeded beam and sub-harmonic seeded beam operations will push the output wavelength below 200 nm. Chirped pulse amplification (CPA) operation will also be possible, and a planned energy upgrade (by powering a fifth linac section) to 310 MeV will extend the wavelength range of the FEL to below 100 nm

  4. Overview of United States synchrotron radiation facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    There has been considerable activity within the past year involving the creation of new and the improvement of existing capabilities for research with synchrotron light. The purpose of this review is to summarize what has happened within the United States. Being a status report, some of the information necessarily has a date attached to it - the date, in this case, being early September 1983

  5. Compact x-ray microradiograph for in situ imaging of solidification processes: Bringing in situ x-ray micro-imaging from the synchrotron to the laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rakete, C.; Baumbach, C.; Goldschmidt, A.; Samberg, D.; Schroer, C. G. [Institut fuer Strukturphysik, Technische Universitaet Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Breede, F.; Stenzel, C. [Astrium-Space Transportation, Department: TO 611, Claude-Dornier-Strasse, D-88039 Friedrichshafen (Germany); Zimmermann, G.; Pickmann, C. [ACCESS e.V., Intzestrasse 5, D-52072 Aachen (Germany); Houltz, Y.; Lockowandt, C. [Science Services Division, SSC, Box 4207, SE-17104 Solna (Sweden); Svenonius, O.; Wiklund, P. [Scint-X AB, Torshamnsgatan 35, SE-164 40 Kista (Sweden); Mathiesen, R. H. [Inst. for Fysikk, NTNU, N-7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2011-10-15

    A laboratory based high resolution x-ray radiograph was developed for the investigation of solidification dynamics in alloys. It is based on a low-power microfocus x-ray tube and is potentially appropriate for x-ray diagnostics in space. The x-ray microscope offers a high spatial resolution down to approximately 5 {mu}m. Dynamic processes can be resolved with a frequency of up to 6 Hz. In reference experiments, the setup was optimized to yield a high contrast for AlCu-alloys. With samples of about 150 {mu}m thickness, high quality image sequences of the solidification process were obtained with high resolution in time and space.

  6. BERKELEY: Light Source anniversary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1994-01-01

    The staff of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been too busy to celebrate the first anniversary of the facility's transition from a US Department of Energy construction project to operating third-generation synchrotron radiation source. Based on a 1.5-GeV, low-emittance electron storage ring that accommodates up to ten insertion-device radiation sources optimized primarily for the soft X-ray and vacuum ultra-violet regions of the spectrum, the ALS has completed

  7. BERKELEY: Light Source anniversary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1994-10-15

    The staff of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory has been too busy to celebrate the first anniversary of the facility's transition from a US Department of Energy construction project to operating third-generation synchrotron radiation source. Based on a 1.5-GeV, low-emittance electron storage ring that accommodates up to ten insertion-device radiation sources optimized primarily for the soft X-ray and vacuum ultra-violet regions of the spectrum, the ALS has completed.

  8. Moving at the speed of light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1983-01-01

    A short survey is given about synchrotron radiation research. In this connection the US National Synchrotron light source is described. Then the application to angiography is considered. Furthermore some further synchrotron radiation sources in USA and the synchrotron radiation research in Novosibirsk are considered. Finally the development of Wigglers and undulators is discussed. (HSI).

  9. Synchrotron radiation at Trieste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1986-06-15

    The fast developing field of synchrotron radiation has its origins in the mastery of storage rings in high energy physics and is a prime example of spinoff from pure science. Intense electromagnetic radiation streams off when beams of high energy electrons are bent or shaken. This synchrotron radiation was once an annoying waste of energy in particle storage rings, but now the wheel has turned full circle, with dedicated machines supplying this radiation for a wide range of science. The astonishing growth rate in this field was highlighted at an International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation, held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy from 7-11 April.

  10. Synchrotron radiation at Trieste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    The fast developing field of synchrotron radiation has its origins in the mastery of storage rings in high energy physics and is a prime example of spinoff from pure science. Intense electromagnetic radiation streams off when beams of high energy electrons are bent or shaken. This synchrotron radiation was once an annoying waste of energy in particle storage rings, but now the wheel has turned full circle, with dedicated machines supplying this radiation for a wide range of science. The astonishing growth rate in this field was highlighted at an International Conference on Synchrotron Radiation, held at the International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP), Trieste, Italy from 7-11 April

  11. CAT-ACT—A new highly versatile x-ray spectroscopy beamline for catalysis and radionuclide science at the KIT synchrotron light facility ANKA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimina, A.; Dardenne, K.; Denecke, M. A.; Doronkin, D. E.; Huttel, E.; Lichtenberg, H.; Mangold, S.; Pruessmann, T.; Rothe, J.; Spangenberg, Th.; Steininger, R.; Vitova, T.; Geckeis, H.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2017-11-01

    CAT-ACT—the hard X-ray beamline for CATalysis and ACTinide/radionuclide research at the KIT synchrotron radiation facility ANKA—is dedicated to X-ray spectroscopy, including "flux hungry" photon-in/photon-out and correlative techniques and combines state-of-the-art optics with a unique infrastructure for radionuclide and catalysis research. Measurements can be performed at photon energies varying between 3.4 keV and 55 keV, thus encompassing the actinide M- and L-edge or potassium K-edge up to the K-edges of the lanthanide series such as cerium. Well-established X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy in transmission and fluorescence detection modes is available in combination with high energy-resolution X-ray emission spectroscopy or X-ray diffraction techniques. The modular beamline design with two alternately operated in-line experimental stations enables sufficient flexibility to adapt sample environments and detection systems to many scientific challenges. The ACT experimental station focuses on various aspects of nuclear waste disposal within the mission of the Helmholtz association to contribute to the solution of one of the greatest scientific and social challenges of our time—the safe disposal of heat producing, highly radioactive waste forms from nuclear energy production. It augments present capabilities at the INE-Beamline by increasing the flux and extending the energy range into the hard X-ray regime. The CAT experimental station focuses on catalytic materials, e.g., for energy-related and exhaust gas catalysis. Characterization of catalytically active materials under realistic reaction conditions and the development of in situ and operando cells for sample environments close to industrial reactors are essential aspects at CAT.

  12. An introduction to synchrotron radiation techniques and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Willmott, Philip

    2011-01-01

    This book introduces the reader to the basic concepts of the generation and manipulation of synchrotron light, its interaction with matter, and the application of synchrotron light in the “classical” techniques, while including some of the most modern technological developments. As much as possible, complicated mathematical derivations and formulas are avoided. A more heuristic approach is adopted, whereby the general physical reasoning behind the equations is highlighted.

  13. Lighting.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1992-09-01

    Since lighting accounts for about one-third of the energy used in commercial buildings, there is opportunity to conserve. There are two ways to reduce lighting energy use: modify lighting systems so that they used less electricity and/or reduce the number of hours the lights are used. This booklet presents a number of ways to do both. Topics covered include: reassessing lighting levels, reducing lighting levels, increasing bulb & fixture efficiency, using controls to regulate lighting, and taking advantage of daylight.

  14. Photometrics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Purpose:The Photometrics Laboratory provides the capability to measure, analyze and characterize radiometric and photometric properties of light sources and filters,...

  15. Inauguration of Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1960-01-01

    On 5 February 1960, the Proton Synchrotron (PS) was formally inaugurated. The great Danish physicist, Niels Bohr, releases a bottle of champagne against a shielding block to launch the PS on its voyage in physics.

  16. Photoemission spectroscopy using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, K.L.I.

    1980-01-01

    It is an epoch making event for photoemission spectroscopy that the light sources of continuous wavelength from vacuum ultra-violet to X-ray region have become available by the advent of synchrotron radiation. Specifically the progress after stable intense light has become obtainable from storage rings is very significant. One of the features of these synchrotron radiation is its extreme polarization of radiating pattern. Though the elementary processes of photoemission out of solids are the basic themes, phenomenalistic 3-stage model is usually applied to the analysis of experiments. In this model, the process of photoemission is considered by dividing into three stages, namely the generation of photoelectrons due to optical transition between electron status -- the transportation of photoelectrons to solid surfaces -- breaking away from the surfaces. The spectrometers, the energy analyzers of photoelectrons, and sample-preparing room used for photoemission spectroscopy are described. Next, energy distribution curves are explained. At the end, photoelectron yield spectroscopy, CFS (constant final energy spectroscopy) and CIS (constant initial energy spectroscopy), Auger yield and interatomic Auger yield, the determination of surface structure by normal emission CIS, and surface EXAFS (extended X-ray absorption fine structure) are described. As seen above, the application specifically to surface physics is promising in the future. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Total and available metal contents in sediments by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Silvana; Sobrinho, Gilmar A.; Jesus, Edgar F.O. de; Lopes, Ricardo T.

    2002-01-01

    In this work the total and available contents of Al, Si, Cl, K, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr, Zr, Ba, Ce and Pb in sediments from river Atibaia were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence technique. The detection limits for K series varies from 200 ng.mL -1 for Al to 2 ng.mL -1 for Zn while for L series the value varies from 20 ng.mL -1 for Ba to 10 ng.mL -1 for Pb. The samples were submitted to two different processes, in order to obtain the total and biological available metal contents. The information about metal content is a important parameter for a correct evaluation about the hydrologic cycle in Piracicaba basin. All the measure were carried out at the National Synchrotron Light Laboratory, Campinas, SP, Brazil, using a white beam for excitation. (author)

  18. Beer analysis by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, Silvana; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F.; Zucchi, Orgheda L.D.A.

    2005-01-01

    In this work the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian Legislation and the nutritive values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL). The measurements were performed at the X-ray Fluorescence Beamline at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 μL of sample beers containing just an internal standard, used to correct geometry effects, were analyzed without any pre-treatment. The measuring time was 100 s and the detection limits obtained varied from 1μg.L -1 for Mn and Fe to 15μg.L -1 for P. (author)

  19. Multielemental analysis of samples from patients with dermatological pathologies using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soares, J.C.A.C.R.; Canellas, C.G.L.; Anjos, M.J.; Lopes, R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Using synchrotron radiation total X-ray fluorescence (SRTXRF) technique, the concentrations of trace elements were measured in four skin lesions: seborrheic keratosis, fibroepithelial polyp, cherry angioma and dermatosis papulosa nigra. The concentrations of P, S, K, Ca, Fe, Cu, Zn and Rb were evaluated in 62 pairs of lesions and healthy samples, each one having been collected from the same patient. The results revealed significant differences of P, Ca, K, Fe and Cu levels as well as a common trend in their variations between lesion and control samples among the skin diseases. This study revealed a powerful tool that can be useful for skin disorders research. The measurements were conducted at Brazilian National Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). - Highlights: • Concentrations of trace elements were measured and compared in four skin lesions. • The results revealed significant differences of P, Ca, K, Fe and Cu levels. • This study revealed a powerful tool that can be useful for skin disorders research

  20. Virtual dissection of Thoropa miliaris tadpole using phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidalgo, G.; Colaço, M. V.; Nogueira, L. P.; Braz, D.; Silva, H. R.; Colaço, G.; Barroso, R. C.

    2018-05-01

    In this work, in-line phase-contrast synchrotron microtomography was used in order to study the external and internal morphology of Thoropa miliaris tadpoles. Whole-specimens of T. miliaris in larval stages of development 28, 37 and 42, collected in the municipality of Mangaratiba (Rio de Janeiro, Brazil) were used for the study. The samples were scanned in microtomography beamline (IMX) at the Brazilian Synchrotron Light Laboratory (LNLS). The phase-contrast technique allowed us to obtain high quality images which made possible the structures segmentation on the rendered volume by the Avizo graphic image editing software. The combination of high quality images and segmentation process provides adequate visualization of different organs and soft (liver, notochord, brain, crystalline, cartilages) and hard (elements of the bone skeleton) tissues.

  1. Investigation of mineral distribution in bone by synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy after tibolone therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Rio de Janeiro State Univ., Nova Friburgo, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering and Energy; Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Carvalho, A.C.B.; Henriques, H.N.; Guzman-Silva, M.A. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Lab. of Experimental Pathology; Sales, E.; Lopes, R.T. [Federal Univ. of Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Nuclear Instrumentation Lab. - COPPE; Granjeiro, J.M. [Fluminense Federal Univ., Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Dept. of Cellular and Molecular Biology

    2011-07-01

    Tibolone is a synthetic steroid with estrogenic, androgenic, and progestagenic properties used for the prevention of postmenopausal osteoporosis and treatment of climacteric symptoms. Tibolone shows almost no action on breast and endometrium, which are target-organs for estrogens and progesterone activity. The aim of this work was to investigate the spatial distribution of calcium and zinc minerals in the femoral head of ovariectomized rat in order to evaluate the effects of the long-term administration of tibolone. For that purpose X-ray microfluorescence was used with synchrotron radiation imaging technique which was performed at Brazilian Light Synchrotron Laboratory, Campinas, SP. Minerals were not homogeneously distributed in trabecular bone areas; a higher concentration of calcium in the trabecular regions at femoral heads was found in ovariectomized and tibolone-treated rats compared to ovariectomized and control groups. (orig.)

  2. X-ray diffraction on nanoparticles chromium and nickel oxides obtained by gelatin using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menezes, Alan Silva de; Medeiros, Angela Maria de Lemos; Miranda, Marcus Aurelio Ribeiro; Almeida, Juliana Marcela Abraao; Remedios, Claudio Marcio Rocha; Silva, Lindomar R.D. da; Gouveia, S.T.; Sasaki, Jose Marcos; Jardim, P.M.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Cr 2 O 3 nanoparticles has many applications like green pigments, wear resistance, and coating materials for thermal protection. Several methods to produce chromium oxide nanoparticles have already been studied, gas condensation, laser induced pyrolysis, microwave plasma, sol-gel and gamma radiation methods. Many applications for this kind of material can be provide concerning the particle size. For instance, particle size approximately of 200 nm are preferable as pigment due to its opacity and below 50 nm can be used as transparent pigment. In this work we have demonstrated that chromium and nickel oxide nanoparticles can be prepared by gelatin method. X-Ray diffraction (XRD) show that mean particle size for chromium oxide of 15-150 nm and nickel oxide of 90 nm were obtained for several temperature of sintering. The X-Ray powder diffraction pattern were performed using Synchrotron Radiation X-Ray source at XRD1 beamline in National Laboratory of Light Synchrotron (LNLS). (author)

  3. Beer analysis by synchrotron radiation total reflection X-ray fluorescence (SR-TXRF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreira, Silvana [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia Civil, Arquitetura e Urbanismo. Dept. de Recursos Hidricos]. E-mail: silvana@fec.unicamp.br; Vives, Ana Elisa S. de [Universidade Metodista de Piracicaba (UNIMEP), Santa Barbara D' Oeste, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia, Arquitetura e Urbanismo]. E-mail: aesvives@unimep.br; Nascimento Filho, Virgilio F. [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Instrumentacao Nuclear]. E-mail: virgilio@cena.usp.br; Zucchi, Orgheda L.D.A. [Sao Paulo Univ., Ribeirao Preto, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas de Ribeirao Preto]. E-mail: olzucchi@fcfrp.usp.br

    2005-07-01

    In this work the concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Mn, Fe, Zn and Br in twenty-nine brands of national and international beers were determined by Synchrotron Radiation Total Reflection X-Ray Fluorescence analysis (SR-TXRF). The results were compared with the limits established by the Brazilian Legislation and the nutritive values established by National Agricultural Library (NAL). The measurements were performed at the X-ray Fluorescence Beamline at Synchrotron Light Source Laboratory, in Campinas, Sao Paulo, Brazil, using a polychromatic beam for excitation. A small volume of 5 {mu}L of sample beers containing just an internal standard, used to correct geometry effects, were analyzed without any pre-treatment. The measuring time was 100 s and the detection limits obtained varied from 1{mu}g.L{sup -1} for Mn and Fe to 15{mu}g.L{sup -1} for P. (author)

  4. Reactive Light Design in the ‘laboratory of the street’

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben Skouboe; Andersen, Hans Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    in a reactive system. Using video from 3 thermal cameras and computer vision analysis; people’s flow patterns were monitored and send as input into a reactive light system. Using physical as well as digital models 4 different light scenarios is designed and tested in full-scale. Results show that people...... on the square did not engage in the changing illumination and often they did not realized that the light changed according to their presence. However from the edge of the square people observed the light patterns “painted” on the city square, as such people became actors on the urban stage, often without...

  5. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases

  6. Chemical applications of synchrotron radiation: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1989-04-01

    The most recent in a series of topical meetings for Advanced Photon Source user subgroups, the Workshop on Chemical Applications of Synchrotron Radiation (held at Argonne National Laboratory, October 3-4, 1988) dealt with surfaces and kinetics, spectroscopy, small-angle scattering, diffraction, and topography and imaging. The primary objectives were to provide an educational resource for the chemistry community on the scientific research being conducted at existing synchrotron sources and to indicate some of the unique opportunities that will be made available with the Advanced Photon Source. The workshop organizers were also interested in gauging the interest of chemists in the field of synchrotron radiation. Interest expressed at the meeting has led to initial steps toward formation of a Chemistry Users Group at the APS. Individual projects are processed separately for the data bases.

  7. Fifth school on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Beaurepaire, Eric; Scheurer, Fabrice; Kappler, Jean-Paul; Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation : New Trends

    2010-01-01

    Advances in the synthesis of new materials with often complex, nano-scaled structures require increasingly sophisticated experimental techniques that can probe the electronic states, the atomic magnetic moments and the magnetic microstructures responsible for the properties of these materials. At the same time, progress in synchrotron radiation techniques has ensured that these light sources remain a key tool of investigation, e.g. synchrotron radiation sources of the third generation are able to support magnetic imaging on a sub-micrometer scale. With the Fifth Mittelwihr School on Magnetism and Synchrotron Radiation the tradition of teaching the state-of-the-art on modern research developments continues and is expressed through the present set of extensive lectures provided in this volume. While primarily aimed at postgraduate students and newcomers to the field, this volume will also benefit researchers and lecturers actively working in the field.

  8. Luminescence spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation: History, highlights, future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerer, Georg

    2006-01-01

    Luminescence spectroscopy and the investigation of dynamical processes with synchrotron radiation (SR) started about 35 years ago in nearly all SR laboratories existing at that time. In the present paper, the pioneering experiments are particularly emphasized. The exciting development is illustrated presenting highlights for the whole period from the beginning to the present day. The highlights are taken from fields like exciton self-trapping, inelastic electron-electron scattering, optically stimulated desorption, cross luminescence, or probing of cluster properties with luminescence spectroscopic methods. More technological aspects play a role in present day's experiments, like quantum cutting in rare-earth-doped insulators. Promising two-photon excitation and light amplification experiments with SR will be included, as well as the first results obtained in a luminescence experiment with selective Vaccum ultraviolet-free electron laser excitation. Finally, a few ideas concerning the future development of luminescence spectroscopy with SR will be sketched

  9. Survey of surface roughness properties of synchrotron radiation optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takacs, P.Z.; Colbert, J.; Church, E.L.

    1986-03-01

    Measurements of surface roughness were made on a large number of grazing incidence mirrors delivered for use at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The measurements were made with a WYKO optical profiler using a 2.5X and a 10X objective and analyzed with our PROFILE code to generate an average periodogram representation for each surface. The data is presented in the form of representative profiles with all of the periodogram curves arranged according to figure type. Analysis of the periodograms allows one to compute bandwidth-limited values for RMS roughness and slope, to provide valuable feedback information to manufacturers regarding compliance with specifications, and to predict the performance of the optic at x-ray wavelengths

  10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  11. Synchrotron small-angle x-ray scattering investigation on integral membrane protein light-harvesting complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacterium rhodopseudomonas acidophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Luchao; Weng Yuxiang; Hong Xinguo; Xian Dingchang; Kobayashi Katsumi

    2006-01-01

    Structures of membrane protein in solution are different from that in crystal phase. We present the primary results of small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) resolved topological structures of a light harvesting antenna membrane protein complex LH2 from photosynthetic bacteria Rhodopseudomonas acidophila in detergent solution for the first time. Our results show that the elliptical shape of the LH2 complex in solution clearly deviates from its circular structure in crystal phase determined by x-ray diffraction. This result provides an insight into the structure and function interplay in LH2. (authors)

  12. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  13. Synchrotron Photoionization Investigation of the Oxidation of Ethyl tert-Butyl Ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winfough, Matthew; Yao, Rong; Ng, Martin; Catani, Katherine; Meloni, Giovanni

    2017-02-23

    The oxidation of ethyl tert-butyl ether (ETBE), a widely used fuel oxygenated additive, is investigated using Cl atoms as initiators in the presence of oxygen. The reaction is carried out at 293, 550, and 700 K. Reaction products are probed by a multiplexed chemical kinetics photoionization mass spectrometer coupled with the synchrotron radiation produced at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Products are identified on the basis of mass-to-charge ratio, ionization energies, and shape of photoionization spectra. Reaction pathways are proposed together with detected primary products.

  14. Towards Establishing of National Centre of Synchrotron Radiation in Poland

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolodziej, J.J.; Szymonski, M.

    2004-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation facilities (SRF) are established part of contemporary world research landscape. They facilitate fast advances of life, health, and physical sciences as well as development of new technologies. The extent of synchrotron radiation (SR) use has been growing up steadily for the last two decades all over the world and it is anticipated that the growth will continue in future. Growing community of SR users has generated increasing demand for the beam-time in infrared, vacuum UV and X-ray ranges. In response, many new SR facilities are now being constructed and planned, not only in large countries of strong economy but also in developing countries. It is expected that such trends will be followed in other parts of the world. No doubt, the ''cutting edge'' of research activity will continue to create the demand for beams of higher brightness, flux and photon energy but it is predictable that the increasing fraction of research done presently with laboratory radiation sources will be shifting towards small-scale SR facilities. Several hundred Polish scientists, a meaningful fraction of all SR users, take part in experiments using synchrotron sources all over the world. Many of them belong to the Polish Synchrotron Radiation Society - an active body promoting the use of SR. Present European Union priorities include knowledge, research and innovation as the key priorities and a pillar of development and stable welfare of Europe. Poland as a new member of EU will have to conform to the EU policy. The government strategy assumes a fast increase of investments in research and development sector starting from 2005. No other scientific research installations has had such major impact on advances in science an technology as the SRF. It is obvious that the time is ripe now for establishing a National Centre of Synchrotron Radiation in Poland. Recently, several Polish educational and research institutions constituted around the idea of Polish SRF. The initiative

  15. Investigating the combined effects of heat and lighting on students reaction time in laboratory condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Mohebian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In many workplaces there is exposure to heat and light simultaneously. This study investigated the combined effect of heat and lighting on some cognitive performance, i.e. reaction time. Methodology: the present semi-experimental study was conducted 2015 on 33 healthy students (16 girls and 17 boys with a mean age of 22.1 in the thermal stress chamber. The reaction time parameter by the reaction time measurement device, after exposure to different heat surfaces (dry temperatures 22 °C and 37 °C and lighting surfaces (200, 500 and 1500 lux. Data were analyzed using ANOVA test in SPSS-20. Results: The results showed that the average simple, diagnostic, two-color selective, two-sound selective reaction times and reaction time error increased after combined exposure to heat and lighting and showed a significant difference (P<0.05. The maximum score of reaction time belong to temperature of 37 c° and lighting of 1500 lux, the minimum score of reaction time belong to temperature of 22 °c and lighting of 1500 lux.

  16. Characterization and long term operation of a novel superconducting undulator with 15 mm period length in a synchrotron light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Casalbuoni

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A new cryogen-free full scale (1.5 m long superconducting undulator with a period length of 15 mm (SCU15 has been successfully tested in the ANKA storage ring. This represents a very important milestone in the development of superconducting undulators for third and fourth generation light sources carried on by the collaboration between the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology and the industrial partner Babcock Noell GmbH. SCU15 is the first full length device worldwide that with beam reaches a higher peak field than what expected with the same geometry (vacuum gap and period length with an ideal cryogenic permanent magnet undulator built with the best material available PrFeB. After a summary on the design and main parameters of the device, we present here the characterization in terms of spectral properties and the long term operation of the SCU15 in the ANKA storage ring.

  17. Circadian phase-shifting effects of a laboratory environment: a clinical trial with bright and dim light

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elliott Jeffrey A

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Our aims were to examine the influence of different bright light schedules on mood, sleep, and circadian organization in older adults (n = 60, ages 60–79 years with insomnia and/or depression, contrasting with responses of young, healthy controls (n = 30, ages 20–40 years. Methods Volunteers were assessed for one week in their home environments. Urine was collected over two 24-hour periods to establish baseline acrophase of 6-sulphatoxymelatonin (aMT6s excretion. Immediately following home recording, volunteers spent five nights and four days in the laboratory. Sleep periods were fixed at eight hours in darkness, consistent with the volunteers' usual sleep periods. Volunteers were randomly assigned to one of three light treatments (four hours per day within the wake period: (A two hours of 3,000 lux at 1–3 hours and 13–15 hours after arising; (B four hours of 3,000 lux at 6–10 hours after arising; (C four hours of dim placebo light at 6–10 hours after arising. Lighting was 50 lux during the remainder of wakefulness. The resulting aMT6s acrophase was determined during the final 30 hours in the laboratory. Results Neither mood nor total melatonin excretion differed significantly by treatment. For the three light treatments, significant and similar phase-response plots were found, indicating that the shift in aMT6s acrophase was dependent upon the circadian time of treatment. The changes in circadian timing were not significantly correlated to changes in sleep or mood. Conclusion The trial failed to demonstrate photoperiodic effects. The results suggest that even low levels of illumination and/or fixed timing of behavior had significant phase-shifting effects.

  18. The third generation French synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1997-01-01

    This short paper gives a concise presentation of the SOLEIL project of the LURE synchrotron radiation national laboratory at Orsay (France). This new accelerator is devoted to replace the DCI and Super ACO rings of first and second generation, respectively. The main research domains of this project concern: the micro-fluorescence and micro-diffraction characterization of materials, and in particular the electronic components; the study of matter in extreme conditions (high temperature and high pressure); the bio-crystallography; the study of aggregates; and the manufacturing of micro-instruments for micro-electronics or medical applications. SOLEIL will be equipped with special magnetic wigglers to obtain very high brightness sources. The source will be a 336 m circumference ring for 2.5 GeV electron storage, able to produce a large spectrum synchrotron radiation. The injection system will comprise a low energy-high current linear electron accelerator and two electron beam transport lines. The installation will be buried at a 4 m depth to ensure the environmental protection and to limit vibrations. (J.S.)

  19. Sirepo for Synchrotron Radiation Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-10-25

    Sirepo is an open source framework for cloud computing. The graphical user interface (GUI) for Sirepo, also known as the client, executes in any HTML5 compliant web browser on any computing platform, including tablets. The client is built in JavaScript, making use of the following open source libraries: Bootstrap, which is fundamental for cross-platform web applications; AngularJS, which provides a model–view–controller (MVC) architecture and GUI components; and D3.js, which provides interactive plots and data-driven transformations. The Sirepo server is built on the following Python technologies: Flask, which is a lightweight framework for web development; Jinja, which is a secure and widely used templating language; and Werkzeug, a utility library that is compliant with the WSGI standard. We use Nginx as the HTTP server and proxy, which provides a scalable event-driven architecture. The physics codes supported by Sirepo execute inside a Docker container. One of the codes supported by Sirepo is the Synchrotron Radiation Workshop (SRW). SRW computes synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons in arbitrary magnetic fields and propagates the radiation wavefronts through optical beamlines. SRW is open source and is primarily supported by Dr. Oleg Chubar of NSLS-II at Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  20. Precision synchrotron radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levi, M.; Rouse, F.; Butler, J.

    1989-03-01

    Precision detectors to measure synchrotron radiation beam positions have been designed and installed as part of beam energy spectrometers at the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC). The distance between pairs of synchrotron radiation beams is measured absolutely to better than 28 /mu/m on a pulse-to-pulse basis. This contributes less than 5 MeV to the error in the measurement of SLC beam energies (approximately 50 GeV). A system of high-resolution video cameras viewing precisely-aligned fiducial wire arrays overlaying phosphorescent screens has achieved this accuracy. Also, detectors of synchrotron radiation using the charge developed by the ejection of Compton-recoil electrons from an array of fine wires are being developed. 4 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  1. Properties of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Materlik, G.

    1982-01-01

    This paper forms the introductory chapter to a book concerning the use of synchrotron radiation for investigation of the structure and mechanism of biological macromolecules. After a historical section, the physics of synchrotron radiation is summarized so that the most promising experiments may be extrapolated. Irradiated power and intensity, polarization and angular distribution, brilliance of a real source, and developments such as wigglers and undulators are briefly dealt with. The paper includes a tabulated compilation of proposed and operating machines in 1982, with some of their characteristics. (U.K.)

  2. Development of a digital astronomical intensity interferometer: laboratory results with thermal light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Nolan; Kieda, David; LeBohec, Stephan

    2018-06-01

    We present measurements of the second-order spatial coherence function of thermal light sources using Hanbury-Brown and Twiss interferometry with a digital correlator. We demonstrate that intensity fluctuations between orthogonal polarizations, or at detector separations greater than the spatial coherence length of the source, are uncorrelated but can be used to reduce systematic noise. The work performed here can readily be applied to existing and future Imaging Air-Cherenkov Telescopes used as star light collectors for stellar intensity interferometry to measure spatial properties of astronomical objects.

  3. Overview of Industrial Synchrotron Radiation Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laderman, Stephen S.

    1996-03-01

    Relevant, reliable and accessible synchrotron radiation methods can play an important role in industrial activities. To date, the application of synchrotron radiation based materials characterization methods by industrial concerns has followed the path of laboratory based x-ray methods: early adoption, continuous improvement, and a high degree of specialization to meet specific goals, which may change over time. Like all x-ray methods, their applicability to segments of the biotechnology, chemical, electronics, medical and metallurgical industries arises from a need to develop sophisticated processes for precisely controlling microstructures. An increasing number of those processes are being developed in ways which can, in principle, be more effectively studied if synchrotron radiation based analyses are performed. Technical limitations confined the efforts of early synchrotron radiation users to long-range research investigations. Nowadays, progress in data collection methods, analysis algorithims, accelerator performance, and worker training, have removed many constraints. However, commercial technologies are being improved at steadily higher rates, shortening the time between research, development and manufacturing and, in many cases, blurring their distinctions. Certainly, rapid rates of innovation increase the opportunities for synchrotron radiation techniques to bring competitive advantage since they can be used to shrink development times, to maintain yields and, perhaps, as part of advanced manufacturing. At the same time, rapid rates of innovation also impose stringent criteria on the reliability and timeliness of the supporting methods. Successful conventional x-ray methods have resulted from efforts to create useful new capabilities that effectively balance such forces. Currently, synchrotron radiation users throughout the world are pursuing analogous goals.

  4. Crop yield and light/energy efficiency in a closed ecological system: Laboratory Biosphere experiments with wheat and sweet potato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M; Dempster, W F; Silverstone, S; Alling, A; Allen, J P; van Thillo, M

    2005-01-01

    Two crop growth experiments in the soil-based closed ecological facility, Laboratory Biosphere, were conducted from 2003 to 2004 with candidate space life support crops. Apogee wheat (Utah State University variety) was grown, planted at two densities, 400 and 800 seeds m-2. The lighting regime for the wheat crop was 16 h of light-8 h dark at a total light intensity of around 840 micromoles m-2 s-1 and 48.4 mol m-2 d-1 over 84 days. Average biomass was 1395 g m-2, 16.0 g m-2 d-1 and average seed production was 689 g m-2 and 7.9 g m-2 d-1. The less densely planted side was more productive than the denser planting, with 1634 g m-2 and 18.8 g m-2 d-1 of biomass vs. 1156 g m-2 and 13.3 g m-2 d-1; and a seed harvest of 812.3 g m-2 and 9.3 g m-2 d-1 vs. 566.5 g m-2 and 6.5 g m-2 d-1. Harvest index was 0.49 for the wheat crop. The experiment with sweet potato used TU-82-155 a compact variety developed at Tuskegee University. Light during the sweet potato experiment, on a 18 h on/6 h dark cycle, totaled 5568 total moles of light per square meter in 126 days for the sweet potatoes, or an average of 44.2 mol m-2 d-1. Temperature regime was 28 +/- 3 degrees C day/22 +/- 4 degrees C night. Sweet potato tuber yield was 39.7 kg wet weight, or an average of 7.4 kg m-2, and 7.7 kg dry weight of tubers since dry weight was about 18.6% wet weight. Average per day production was 58.7 g m-2 d-1 wet weight and 11.3 g m-2 d-1. For the wheat, average light efficiency was 0.34 g biomass per mole, and 0.17 g seed per mole. The best area of wheat had an efficiency of light utilization of 0.51 g biomass per mole and 0.22 g seed per mole. For the sweet potato crop, light efficiency per tuber wet weight was 1.33 g mol-1 and 0.34 g dry weight of tuber per mole of light. The best area of tuber production had 1.77 g mol-1 wet weight and 0.34 g mol-1 of light dry weight. The Laboratory Biosphere experiment's light efficiency was somewhat higher than the USU field results but somewhat below

  5. The photoelectric effect and study of the diffraction of light: Two new experiments in UNILabs virtual and remote laboratories network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sánchez, Juan Pedro; Carreras, Carmen; Yuste, Manuel; Dormido, Sebastián; Sáenz, Jacobo; De la Torre, Luis; Rubén, Heradio

    2015-01-01

    This work describes two experiments: 'study of the diffraction of light: Fraunhofer approximation' and 'the photoelectric effect'. Both of them count with a virtual, simulated, version of the experiment as well as with a real one which can be operated remotely. The two previous virtual and remote labs (built using Easy Java(script) Simulations) are integrated in UNILabs, a network of online interactive laboratories based on the free Learning Management System Moodle. In this web environment, students can find not only the virtual and remote labs but also manuals with related theory, the user interface description for each application, and so on.

  6. Power supplies for the injector synchrotron quadrupoles and sextupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fathizadeh, M.

    1995-01-01

    This light source note will describe the power supplies for the injector synchrotron quadrupole and sextupole magnets. The injector synchrotron has two families of quadrupole magnets. Each family consists of 40 quadrupole magnets connected in series. These magnets are energized by two phase-controlled, 12-pulse power supplies. Therefore, each power supply will be rated to deliver the necessary power to only 40 quadrupole magnets. The two families of sextupole magnets in the injector synchrotron each consists of 32 sextupole magnets connected in series, powered by a phase-controlled power supply. Thus, each power supply shall be capable of delivering power to only 32 sextupole magnets

  7. Synchrotron radiation generation: Technological considerations, feasibility of practical realization with available way in the Country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreira, A.F.O.

    1983-01-01

    Technological aspects linked to the synchrotron radiation generation in laboratory are discussed. A feasibility study for the implantation of a machine for such a radiation in a laboratory in Brazil is also discussed. (L.C.) [pt

  8. Reflectometry with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krumrey, Michael; Cibik, Levent; Fischer, Andreas; Gottwald, Alexander; Kroth, Udo; Scholze, Frank

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of the reflectivity for VUV, XUV, and X-radiation at the PTB synchrotron radiation sources is described. The corresponding data of the used beams are presented. Results of experiments on a Cu-Ni double-layer, SiO 2 , Si, and MgF 2 are presented. (HSI)

  9. Coherent synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agoh, Tomonori

    2006-01-01

    This article presents basic properties of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) with numerical examples and introduces the reader to important aspects of CSR in future accelerators with short bunches. We show interesting features of the single bunch instability due to CSR in storage rings and discuss the longitudinal CSR field via the impedance representation. (author)

  10. Characteristics of synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.

    1984-01-01

    The characteristics and production of synchrotron radiation are qualitatively discussed. The spectral properties of wigglers and undulators are briefly described. Possible applications in condensed matter physics are outlined. These include atomic and molecular studies, crystallography, impurities in solids and radiographic imaging

  11. X-ray fluorescence imaging with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivers, M.L.

    1987-01-01

    The micro-distribution of trace elements is of great interest in fields such as geochemistry, biology and material science. The synchrotron x-ray fluorescence microprobe provides a technique to quantitatively measure trace element compositions at individual points and to construct semiquantitative two dimensional maps of trace element compositions. This paper describes an x-ray fluorescence system used at the National Synchrotron Light Source

  12. Noise characteristics of U. S. synchrotron radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Powers, L.

    1986-01-01

    Noise characteristics of the U. S. x-ray synchrotron sources are compared in the 0--2.5-kHz region. In general, little difference is found in the characteristic frequencies of the noise on focused and unfocused beamlines of a particular source, but the magnitude and white-noise levels differ. The National Synchrotron Light Source shows the least characteristic noise and the noise that is observed is small in magnitude (2--3 times the white-noise level)

  13. Two spatial light modulator system for laboratory simulation of random beam propagation in random media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fei; Toselli, Italo; Korotkova, Olga

    2016-02-10

    An optical system consisting of a laser source and two independent consecutive phase-only spatial light modulators (SLMs) is shown to accurately simulate a generated random beam (first SLM) after interaction with a stationary random medium (second SLM). To illustrate the range of possibilities, a recently introduced class of random optical frames is examined on propagation in free space and several weak turbulent channels with Kolmogorov and non-Kolmogorov statistics.

  14. Synchrotron radiation sources in the Soviet Union

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitza, S.P.

    1987-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation (SR) is now recognized to be an important instrument for experimental work in many fields of science. Recently the application of SR in medicine and industry, especially as a light source for microelectronics production have been demonstrated. Thus the development of SR sources has now grown to become a significant and independent dimension for accelerator research and technology. This article describes SR work in the Soviet Union

  15. Materials science and technology by synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chikawa, J.

    1990-01-01

    In the present paper, features of the Photon Factory, a facility for synchrotron research installed at the National Laboratory for High Energy Physics in Japan, are outlined, and then the impact of the advent of synchrotron radiation is discussed in relation to its outcome during the past seven years. Prospects for future development of synchrotron radiation are also presented. The facility consists of an injector linac to accelerate electrons up to 2.5 GeV and a ring to store the accelerated electrons in a closed orbit. In the Photon Factory, a 400m-long linac has been constructed for use as injector for both the Photon Factory and the TRISTAN electron-positron collider. The storage ring is operated at the same electron energy of 2.5 GeV. The present report also describes some applications of synchrotron radiation, focusing on spectroscopy (X-ray fluorescence technique and time-resolved X-ray absorption spectroscopy), diffraction and scattering (surface structure studies and protein crystallography), and photo-chemical processing. (N.K.)

  16. Laboratory studies of the growth, sublimation, and light- scattering properties of single levitated ice particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Neil Julian

    2001-12-01

    I describe experiments to investigate the properties of microscopic ice particles. The goal of the work was to measure parameters that are important in cloud processes and radiative transfer, using a novel technique that avoids the use of substrates. The experiments were conducted in two separate electrodynamic balance chambers. Single, charged ice particles were formed from frost particles or from droplets frozen either homogeneously or heteroge neously with a bionucleant. The particles were trapped at temperatures between -38°C and -4°C and grown or sublimated according to the temperature gradient in the cham ber. I describe observations of breakup of sublimating frost particles, measurements of light scattering by hexagonal crystals, and observations of the morphology of ice particles grown from frozen water droplets and frost particles. The breaking strength of frost particles was an order of magnitude less than that of bulk ice. Light scattering features not previously observed were analyzed and related to crystal dimension. Initial results from a computer model failed to reproduce these features. The widths of scattering peaks suggest that surface roughness may play a role in determining the angular distribution of scattered light. Ice particle mass evolution was found to be consistent with diffusion- limited growth. Crystals grown slowly from frozen droplets adopted isometric habits, while faster growth resulted in thin side-planes, although there was not an exact correspondence between growth conditions and particle morphology. From the morphological transition, I infer lower limits for the critical supersaturation for layer nucleation on the prism face of 2.4% at -15°C, 4.4% at -20°C, and 3.1% at -25°C. Analytic expressions for the size dependence of facet stability are developed, indicating a strong dependence of stability on both crystal size and surface kinetics, and compared with data. I discuss the role of complex particle morphologies in

  17. An Evaluation of the Instruction Carried out with Printed Laboratory Materials Designed in Accordance with 5E Model: Reflection of Light and Image on a Plane Mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayvaci, Hakan Sevki; Yildiz, Mehmet; Bakirci, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    This study employed a print laboratory material based on 5E model of constructivist learning approach to teach reflection of light and Image on a Plane Mirror. The effect of the instruction which conducted with the designed print laboratory material on academic achievements of prospective science and technology teachers and their attitudes towards…

  18. Non-destructive trace element microanalysis of as-received cometary nucleus samples using synchrotron x ray fluorescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutton, S.R.

    1989-01-01

    The Synchrotron X ray Fluorescence (SXRF) microprobe at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), Brookhaven National Laboratory, will be an excellent instrument for non-destructive trace element analyses of cometary nucleus samples. Trace element analyses of as-received cometary nucleus material will also be possible with this technique. Bulk analysis of relatively volatile elements will be important in establishing comet formation conditions. However, as demonstrated for meteorites, microanalyses of individual phases in their petrographic context are crucial in defining the histories of particular components in unequilibrated specimens. Perhaps most informative in comparing cometary material with meteorites will be the halogens and trace metals. In-situ, high spatial resolution microanalyses will be essential in establishing host phases for these elements and identifying terrestrial (collection/processing) overprints. The present SXRF microprobe is a simple, yet powerful, instrument in which specimens are excited with filtered, continuum synchrotron radiation from a bending magnet on a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. A refrigerated cell will be constructed to permit analyses at low temperatures. The cell will consist essentially of an air tight housing with a cold stage. Kapton windows will be used to allow the incident synchrotron beam to enter the cell and fluorescent x rays to exit it. The cell will be either under vacuum or continuous purge by ultrapure helium during analyses. Several other improvements of the NSLS microprobe will be made prior to the cometary nucleus sample return mission that will greatly enhance the sensitivity of the technique

  19. Laboratory validation of an in-home method for assessing circadian phase using dim light melatonin onset (DLMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullman, Rebecca E; Roepke, Stephanie E; Duffy, Jeanne F

    2012-06-01

    To determine whether an accurate circadian phase assessment could be obtained from saliva samples collected by patients in their home. Twenty-four individuals with a complaint of sleep initiation or sleep maintenance difficulty were studied for two evenings. Each participant received instructions for collecting eight hourly saliva samples in dim light at home. On the following evening they spent 9h in a laboratory room with controlled dim (light where hourly saliva samples were collected. Circadian phase of dim light melatonin onset (DLMO) was determined using both an absolute threshold (3 pg ml(-1)) and a relative threshold (two standard deviations above the mean of three baseline values). Neither threshold method worked well for one participant who was a "low-secretor". In four cases the participants' in-lab melatonin levels rose much earlier or were much higher than their at-home levels, and one participant appeared to take the at home samples out of order. Overall, the at-home and in-lab DLMO values were significantly correlated using both methods, and differed on average by 37 (± 19)min using the absolute threshold and by 54 (± 36)min using the relative threshold. The at-home assessment procedure was able to determine an accurate DLMO using an absolute threshold in 62.5% of the participants. Thus, an at-home procedure for assessing circadian phase could be practical for evaluating patients for circadian rhythm sleep disorders. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling Protein Structures in Feed and Seed Tissues Using Novel Synchrotron-Based Analytical Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, P.

    2008-01-01

    Traditional 'wet' chemical analyses usually looks for a specific known component (such as protein) through homogenization and separation of the components of interest from the complex tissue matrix. Traditional 'wet' chemical analyses rely heavily on the use of harsh chemicals and derivatization, therefore altering the native feed protein structures and possibly generating artifacts. The objective of this study was to introduce a novel and non-destructive method to estimate protein structures in feed and seeds within intact tissues using advanced synchrotron-based infrared microspectroscopy (SFTIRM). The experiments were performed at the National Synchrotron Light Source in Brookhaven National Laboratory (US Dept. of Energy, NY). The results show that with synchrotron-based SFTIRM, we are able to localize relatively 'pure' protein without destructions of the feed and seed tissues and qualify protein internal structures in terms of the proportions and ratios of a-helix, β-sheet, random coil and β-turns on a relative basis using multi-peak modeling procedures. These protein structure profile (a-helix, β-sheet, etc.) may influence protein quality and availability in animals. Several examples of feed and seeds were provided. The implications of this study are that we can use this new method to compare internal protein structures between feeds and between seed verities. We can also use this method to detect heat-induced the structural changes of protein in feeds.

  1. Synchrotron topographic project. Progress report, February 20, 1981-January 20, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilello, J.C.

    1982-01-01

    The Synchrotron Topography Project (STP) has under design and construction various phases of a dedicated beam line for x-ray diffraction topography users in conjunction with the National Synchrotron Light Source at Brookhaven National Laboratory. During the past year final design and procurement phase has been completed for the following: (1) Experimental Hutch, (2) White Beam Camera, (3) Detector Arm for White Beam Camera, (4) Film Cassette System, (5) Medium Resolution Real-time TV System, (6) Lift Table Assembly, (7) Asymmetric Camera Base Mount, (8) Motor Control System, and (9) Computer system. Experimental work has been initiated on using reflection topography to study fracture surfaces. Preliminary results, both with Berg-Barrett, as well as with Synchrotron Topography done in collaboration with the Daresbury, U.K. facility show that defects generated in the near surface layers can be detected. Research work on the effects of stress concentration and geometric effects due to grain boundaries on the fracture of tungsten has been completed

  2. Light scattering at small angles by atmospheric irregular particles: modelling and laboratory measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lurton, T.; Renard, J.-B.; Vignelles, D.; Jeannot, M.; Akiki, R.; Mineau, J.-L.; Tonnelier, T.

    2014-04-01

    We have investigated the behaviour of light scattering by particulates of various sizes (0.1 μm to 100 μm) at a small scattering angle (below 20°). It has been previously shown that, for a small angle, the scattered intensities are weakly dependent upon the particulates' composition (Renard et al., 2010). Particles found in the atmosphere exhibit roughness that leads to large discrepancies with the classical Mie solution in terms of scattered intensities in the low angular set-up. This article focuses on building an effective theoretical tool to predict the behaviour of light scattering by real particulates at a small scattering angle. We present both the classical Mie theory and its adaptation to the case of rough particulates with a fairly simple roughness parameterisation. An experimental device was built, corresponding to the angular set-up of interest (low scattering angle and therefore low angular aperture). Measurements are presented that confirm the theoretical results with good agreement. It was found that differences between the classical Mie solution and actual measurements - especially for large particulates - can be attributed to the particulate roughness. It was also found that, in this low angular set-up, saturation of the scattered intensities occurs for relatively small values of the roughness parameter. This confirms the low variability in the scattered intensities observed for atmospheric particulates of different kinds. A direct interest of this study is a broadening of the dynamic range of optical counters: using a small angle of aperture for measurements allows greater dynamics in terms of particle size. Thus it allows a single device to observe a broad range of particle sizes whilst utilising the same electronics.

  3. Laboratory measurement of the absorption coefficient of riboflavin for ultraviolet light (365 nm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iseli, Hans Peter; Popp, Max; Seiler, Theo; Spoerl, Eberhard; Mrochen, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Corneal cross-linking (CXL) is an increasingly used treatment technique for stabilizing the cornea in keratoconus. Cross-linking (polymerization) between collagen fibrils is induced by riboflavin (vitamin B2) and ultraviolet light (365 nm). Although reported to reach a constant value at higher riboflavin concentrations, the Lambert-Beer law predicts a linear increase in the absorption coefficient. This work was carried out to determine absorption behavior at different riboflavin concentrations and to further investigate the purported plateau absorption coefficient value of riboflavin and to identify possible bleaching effects. The Lambert-Beer law was used to calculate the absorption coefficient at various riboflavin concentrations. The following investigated concentrations of riboflavin solutions were prepared using a mixture of 0.5% riboflavin and 20% Dextran T500 dissolved in 0.9% sodium chloride solution: 0%, 0.02%, 0.03%, 0.04%, 0.05%, 0.06%, 0.08%, 0.1%, 0.2%, 0.3%, 0.4%, and 0.5%, and were investigated with and without aperture plate implementation. An additional test series measured the transmitted power at selected riboflavin concentrations over time. In diluted solutions, a linear correlation exists between the absorption coefficient and riboflavin concentration. The absorption coefficient reaches a plateau, but this occurs at a higher riboflavin concentration (0.1%) than previously reported (just above 0.04%). Transmitted light power increases over time, indicating a bleaching effect of riboflavin. The riboflavin concentration can be effectively varied as a treatment parameter in a considerably broader range than previously thought. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  4. A guide for the laboratory information management system (LIMS) for light stable isotopes--Versions 7 and 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coplen, Tyler B.

    2000-01-01

    The reliability and accuracy of isotopic data can be improved by utilizing database software to (i) store information about samples, (ii) store the results of mass spectrometric isotope-ratio analyses of samples, (iii) calculate analytical results using standardized algorithms stored in a database, (iv) normalize stable isotopic data to international scales using isotopic reference materials, and (v) generate multi-sheet paper templates for convenient sample loading of automated mass-spectrometer sample preparation manifolds. Such a database program, the Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) for Light Stable Isotopes, is presented herein. Major benefits of this system include (i) a dramatic improvement in quality assurance, (ii) an increase in laboratory efficiency, (iii) a reduction in workload due to the elimination or reduction of retyping of data by laboratory personnel, and (iv) a decrease in errors in data reported to sample submitters. Such a database provides a complete record of when and how often laboratory reference materials have been analyzed and provides a record of what correction factors have been used through time. It provides an audit trail for laboratories. LIMS for Light Stable Isotopes is available for both Microsoft Office 97 Professional and Microsoft Office 2000 Professional as versions 7 and 8, respectively. Both source code (mdb file) and precompiled executable files (mde) are available. Numerous improvements have been made for continuous flow isotopic analysis in this version (specifically 7.13 for Microsoft Access 97 and 8.13 for Microsoft Access 2000). It is much easier to import isotopic results from Finnigan ISODAT worksheets, even worksheets on which corrections for amount of sample (linearity corrections) have been added. The capability to determine blank corrections using isotope mass balance from analyses of elemental analyzer samples has been added. It is now possible to calculate and apply drift corrections to isotopic

  5. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  6. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M.

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system

  7. Status of the National Synchrotron Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heese, R.

    1987-04-01

    An overview of the present capabilities of the NSLS 750 MeV VUV ring and the 2.5 GeV x-ray ring is presented. Emphasis is placed on performance of the now operational facility, the efforts to improve this performance, a description of the ''Phase II'' upgrade, and outlook for the future

  8. National Synchrotron Light Source. Annual report 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. [eds.

    1993-04-01

    This report contains seven sections discussing the following: (1) scientific research at the NSLS; (2) symposia and workshops held at the NSLS; (3) a facility report; (4) NSLS projects; (5) NSLS operational highlights; (6) informational guides to the VUV and X-ray beamlines; and (7) appendices which include abstracts on projects carried out at the VUV and X-ray beamlines.

  9. National Synchrotron Light Source annual report 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hulbert, S.L.; Lazarz, N.M. (eds.)

    1992-04-01

    This report discusses the following research conducted at NSLS: atomic and molecular science; energy dispersive diffraction; lithography, microscopy and tomography; nuclear physics; UV photoemission and surface science; x-ray absorption spectroscopy; x-ray scattering and crystallography; x-ray topography; workshop on surface structure; workshop on electronic and chemical phenomena at surfaces; workshop on imaging; UV FEL machine reviews; VUV machine operations; VUV beamline operations; VUV storage ring parameters; x-ray machine operations; x-ray beamline operations; x-ray storage ring parameters; superconducting x-ray lithography source; SXLS storage ring parameters; the accelerator test facility; proposed UV-FEL user facility at the NSLS; global orbit feedback systems; and NSLS computer system.

  10. Chemical Dynamics, Molecular Energetics, and Kinetics at the Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leone, Stephen R.; Ahmed, Musahid; Wilson, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Scientists at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline of the Advanced Light Source in Berkeley are continuously reinventing synchrotron investigations of physical chemistry and chemical physics with vacuum ultraviolet light. One of the unique aspects of a synchrotron for chemical physics research is the widely tunable vacuum ultraviolet light that permits threshold ionization of large molecules with minimal fragmentation. This provides novel opportunities to assess molecular energetics and reaction mechanisms, even beyond simple gas phase molecules. In this perspective, significant new directions utilizing the capabilities at the Chemical Dynamics Beamline are presented, along with an outlook for future synchrotron and free electron laser science in chemical dynamics. Among the established and emerging fields of investigations are cluster and biological molecule spectroscopy and structure, combustion flame chemistry mechanisms, radical kinetics and product isomer dynamics, aerosol heterogeneous chemistry, planetary and interstellar chemistry, and secondary neutral ion-beam desorption imaging of biological matter and materials chemistry.

  11. Technique for the comparison of light spectra from natural and laboratory generated lightning current arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchard, D.; Clark, D.; Carr, D.; Haddad, A.

    2016-01-01

    A technique was developed for the comparison of observed emission spectra from lightning current arcs generated through self-breakdown in air and the use of two types of initiation wire, aluminum bronze and nichrome, against previously published spectra of natural lightning events. A spectrograph system was used in which the wavelength of light emitted by the lightning arc was analyzed to derive elemental interactions. A lightning impulse of up to 100 kA was applied to a two hemispherical tungsten electrode configuration which allowed the effect of the lightning current and lightning arc length to be investigated. A natural lightning reference spectrum was reconstructed from literature, and generated lightning spectra were obtained from self-breakdown across a 14.0 mm air gap and triggered along initiation wires of length up to 72.4 mm. A comparison of the spectra showed that the generated lightning arc induced via self-breakdown produced a very similar spectrum to that of natural lightning, with the addition of only a few lines from the tungsten electrodes. A comparison of the results from the aluminum bronze initiation wire showed several more lines, whereas results from the nichrome initiation wire differed greatly across large parts of the spectrum. This work highlights the potential use for spectrographic techniques in the study of lightning interactions with surrounding media and materials, and in natural phenomena such as recently observed ball lightning.

  12. Tabletop synchrotron and its unique features

    CERN Document Server

    Yamada, H

    2002-01-01

    Two synchrotrons, AURORA and MIRRORCLE, were built in Ritsumeikan University. MIRRORCLE-20 is the smallest normal conduction synchrotron (15 cm orbit radius and 1.2 m outer diameter) in the world. It uses 2/3 resonance method for electron beam incidence but is not optimized for X-ray generation. MIRRORCLE-6 shall be optimized for X-ray generation. X-ray generated by MIRRORCLE shows very flat white light, rich in hard X-ray, pulse with width changeable from a few mu s to a few ms , wide radiation angle of 25 mrad at MIRRORCLE-20 and 80 mrad at MIRRORCLE-8 and high coherence. The feature such as pulsed light and high coherence is expected to new application which photon radiation cannot practice. Imaging experiments by MIRRORCLE were carried out by Cu plate, Al plate, Teflon and acryl plate. We took a photograph of insect, electric lamp, connector, and cyclotron. New X-ray generation mechanism, X-ray strength, development of tabletop synchrotron and features of X-ray beam are explained. (S.Y.)

  13. Tabletop synchrotron and its unique features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, Hironari

    2002-01-01

    Two synchrotrons, AURORA and MIRRORCLE, were built in Ritsumeikan University. MIRRORCLE-20 is the smallest normal conduction synchrotron (15 cm orbit radius and 1.2 m outer diameter) in the world. It uses 2/3 resonance method for electron beam incidence but is not optimized for X-ray generation. MIRRORCLE-6 shall be optimized for X-ray generation. X-ray generated by MIRRORCLE shows very flat white light, rich in hard X-ray, pulse with width changeable from a few μs to a few ms , wide radiation angle of 25 mrad at MIRRORCLE-20 and 80 mrad at MIRRORCLE-8 and high coherence. The feature such as pulsed light and high coherence is expected to new application which photon radiation cannot practice. Imaging experiments by MIRRORCLE were carried out by Cu plate, Al plate, Teflon and acryl plate. We took a photograph of insect, electric lamp, connector, and cyclotron. New X-ray generation mechanism, X-ray strength, development of tabletop synchrotron and features of X-ray beam are explained. (S.Y.)

  14. Synchrotron Infrared Science: Physics, Biology, Environmental Science and Coherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, M.C.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: In recent years, infrared microscopy and spectroscopy has greatly benefited from a bright new source of light, namely synchrotrons. Synchrotrons provide a significant improvement in brightness, and therefore spatial resolution for mapping characteristic vibrational signatures of molecular species with high signal to noise. This has opened up new scientific directions for physicists, biologists, chemists, industrial applications, forensics, and more. I will present a brief overview of the technique followed by several scientific highlights of synchrotron infrared spectromicroscopy research being performed in Berkeley. I will then turn to the future by discussing our recent understanding of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR). We are proposing a new ring which will use CSR to provide a far-infrared (THz) source having intensities between 7 and 10 orders of magnitude higher than present broadband sources. I will motivate and discuss the exciting capabilities of this revolutionary new source

  15. The 400 GeV proton synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-05-01

    A general account is given of the 400-GeV proton synchrotron, known as Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), of the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) at Geneva. A brief chapter on the history of the project covers the steps leading to the earlier plan for a 300-GeV accelerator at a new CERN laboratory elsewhere in Europe, abandoned in 1971 in favour of the present machine, and the progress of construction of the latter. The general features of the SPS design are outlined, illustrated by an aerial view of the CERN site, a plan of the SPS, and interior views of the SPS ring tunnel and main control room. (WSN)

  16. Coronary angiography using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akatsuka, Takao; Hiranaka, Yukio; Takeda, Tohru; Hyodo, Kazuyuki.

    1990-01-01

    Invasive coronary angiography is the imaging technique of choice for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease. Recently, the application of synchrotron radiation in coronary angiography has been investigated in the world, with the aim of developing the noninvasive technique for visualizing the heart. In this article, backgrounds and present situation of coronary angiography using synchrotron radiation are reviewed. Firstly, visual imaging techniques of the cardiovascular system are discussed in terms of angiography and digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Conventional temporal, energy, and hybrid subtraction modes used in DSA are referred to. Secondly, the application of synchrotron radiation is presented, focusing on the property of synchrotron radiation and K-edge subtraction angiography. Two kinds of synchrotron radiation beam methods are outlined. Interpretation of image data and various subtraction procedures remain unestablished. There is much to be done before coronary angiography using synchrotron radiation comes into a clinical practice. (N.K.)

  17. ANKA - new horizons with synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagelstein, M.; Czolk, R.

    2001-01-01

    ANKA GmbH operates a state-of-the-art electron storage ring (2.5 GeV energy, 400 mA maximum current) for the production of high-intensity synchrotron radiation. The produced 'superlight' ranges from the hard X-ray to the infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum. To use the light for microfabrication and analysis a number of modern, high quality production and experimental facilities exist on this circular (diameter about 35 m) synchrotron radiation sources. The experimental facilities are consolidated by a young, experienced and highly motivated team of experts. For the patterning of polymers by deep X-ray lithography three end-stations (so-called beamlines) are available. For analytical tasks five beamlines are established where different experiments can be made based on X-ray methods such as X-ray absorption, diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as IR-spectroscopy. (orig.)

  18. The Pre-Injector Linac for the Diamond Light Source

    CERN Document Server

    Christou, C

    2004-01-01

    The Diamond Light Source is a new medium-energy high brightness synchrotron light facility which is under construction on the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory site in the U.K. The accelerator facility can be divided into three major components; a 3 GeV 561 m circumference storage ring, a full-energy booster synchrotron and a 100 MeV pre-injector linac. This paper describes the linac design and plans for operation. The linac is supplied by ACCEL Instruments GmbH under a turn-key contract, with Diamond Light Source Ltd. providing linac beam diagnostics, control system hardware and standard vacuum components. Commissioning of the linac will take place in early 2005 and user operation of the facility will commence in 2007.

  19. Characteristics of synchrotron radiation and of its sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krinsky, S.; Perlman, M.L.; Watson, R.E.

    1979-01-01

    Synchrotron light emission and the classical relativistic electromagnetic theory describing it are reviewed. The electron optics of storage rings are considered in some detail, beginning with the ideal electron orbit and the distribution which electrons take around it. This is folded with the process of synchrotron light emission itself to define the effective photon source. The predictions of classical relativistic theory are compared with experiment, and one finds agreement within the experimental uncertainties. Further refinements, such as wiggler magnets and free electron lasers are also considered

  20. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  1. Cowpeas and pinto beans: yields and light efficiency of candidate space crops in the Laboratory Biosphere closed ecological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, M.; Dempster, W. F.; Silverstone, S.; Alling, A.; Allen, J. P.; van Thillo, M.

    An experiment utilizing cowpeas Vigna unguiculata pinto beans Phaseolus vulgaris L and Apogee ultra-dwarf wheat was conducted in the soil-based closed ecological facility Laboratory Biosphere from February to May 2005 The lighting regime was 13 hours light 11 hours dark at a light intensity of 960 mu mol m -2 s -1 45 moles m -2 day -1 supplied by high-pressure sodium lamps The pinto beans and cowpeas were grown at two different plant densities The pinto bean produced 710 g m -2 total aboveground biomass and 341 g m -2 at 33 5 plants per m 2 and at 37 5 plants per m 2 produced 1092 g m -2 total biomass and 537 g m -2 of dry seed an increase of almost 50 Cowpeas at 28 plants m -2 yielded 1060 g m -2 of total biomass and 387 g seed m -2 outproducing the less dense planting by more than double 209 in biomass and 86 more seed as the planting of 21 plants m -2 produced 508 g m-2 of total biomass and 209 g m-2 of seed Edible yield rate EYR for the denser cowpea bean was 4 6 g m -2 day -1 vs 2 5 g m -2 day -1 for the less dense stand average yield was 3 5 g m -2 day -1 EYR for the denser pinto bean was 8 5 g m -2 day -1 vs 5 3 g m -2 day -1 average EYR for the pinto beans was 7 0 g m -2 day -1 Yield efficiency rate YER the ratio of edible to non-edible biomass was 0 97 for the dense pinto bean 0 92 for the less dense pinto bean and average 0 94 for the entire crop The cowpeas

  2. Compact synchrotron radiation source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, N.; Wang, T.; Tian, J.; Lin, Y.; Chen, S.; He, W.; Hu, Y.; Li, Q.

    1985-01-01

    A compact 800 MeV synchrotron radiation source is discussed. The storage ring has a circumference of 30.3 m, two 90 degree and four 45 degree bending magnet sections, two long straight sections and four short straight sections. The radius of the bending magnet is 2.224m. The critical wave length is 24A. The injector is a 15 Mev Microtron Electrons are accelerated from 15 Mev to 800 Mev by ramping the field of the ring. The expected stored current will be around 100 ma

  3. Synchrotron Moessbauer reflectometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagy, D.L.; Bottyan, L.; Deak, L.; Szilagyi, E. [KFKI Research Institute for Particle and Nuclear Physics (Hungary); Spiering, H. [Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie (Germany); Dekoster, J.; Langouche, G. [K.U. Leuven, Instituut voor Kern- en Stralingsfysica (Belgium)

    2000-07-15

    Grazing incidence nuclear resonant scattering of synchrotron radiation can be applied to perform depth-selective phase analysis and to determine the isotopic and magnetic structure of thin films and multilayers. Principles and recent experiments of this new kind of reflectometry are briefly reviewed. Methodological aspects are discussed. Model calculations demonstrate how the orientations of the sublattice magnetisation in ferro- and antiferromagnetic multilayers affect time-integral and time-differential spectra. Experimental examples show the efficiency of the method in investigating finite-stacking, in-plane and out-of-plane anisotropy and spin-flop effects in magnetic multilayers.

  4. ACCELERATOR SCHOOL: Casting light

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anon.

    1989-07-15

    A booming spinoff from high energy physics is the synchrotron radiation sector which exploits the intense radiation given off when beams of charged particles are bent. With particle physics and the applications of synchrotron radiation very different, and with new dedicated laboratories being built for the latter, there is a natural tendency for the two communities to drift apart. However a step in the other direction came with the course 'Synchrotron Radiation and Free Electron Lasers' organized by the CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and the Daresbury Laboratory, held in Chester, UK.

  5. Proceedings of the Meeting on Techniques and Applications of Synchrotron Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    Several techniques and applications of the synchrotron radiation used in Physics, Biophysics and Chemistry are extensively discussed. The major part of the subjects of the works treat with the possible implantation of a national synchrotron radiation laboratory in Brazil. (L.C.) [pt

  6. Shielding NSLS-II light source: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses [Shielding Synchrotron Light Sources: Importance of geometry for calculating radiation levels from beam losses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.; Wahl, W.

    2016-01-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produces significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than a lower energy beam injection and ramped operations. Minimizing this dose will require adequate knowledge of where the miss-steered beam can occur and sufficient EM shielding close to the loss point, in order to attenuate the energy of the particles in the EM shower below the neutron production threshold (<10 MeV), which will spread the incident energy on the bulk shield walls and thereby the dose penetrating the shield walls. Designing supplemental shielding near the loss point using the analytic shielding model is shown to be inadequate because of its lack of geometry specification for the EM shower process. To predict the dose rates outside the tunnel requires detailed description of the geometry and materials that the beam losses will encounter inside the tunnel. Modern radiation shielding Monte-Carlo codes, like FLUKA, can handle this geometric description of the radiation transport process in sufficient detail, allowing accurate predictions of the dose rates expected and the ability to show weaknesses in the design before a high radiation incident occurs. The effort required to adequately define the accelerator geometry for these codes has been greatly reduced with the implementation of the graphical interface of FLAIR to FLUKA. This made the effective shielding process for NSLS-II quite accurate and reliable. Lastly, the principles used to provide

  7. Synchrotron Elettra. Status and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remec, I.

    1992-01-01

    Synchrotron radiation and the possibilities for its applications are shortly presented. Elettra, the third generation synchrotron, now under construction in Trieste, Italy, is briefly described and its main characteristics are given. Current activities in Slovenia, related to Elettra, are presented. (author) [sl

  8. Basis of medical accelerator. Synchrotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawachi, Kiyomitsu

    2014-01-01

    On the synchrotron as a medical accelerator, this paper introduces the basic principle, basic techniques and the like. The accelerator, when synchrotron is adopted as an ion beam radiotherapy system, is the composite accelerator composed of ion sources, injector, and synchrotron. This paper introduces the overall structure of synchrotron, and conceptually explains the basic behavior of high-frequency waves and magnetic field of synchrotron, as well as the deflection electromagnet of medical synchrotron and the operation pattern of high-frequency acceleration system. The types of synchrotron can be classified to the function combination type and function separation type, and this paper introduces the features of each type and various types of synchrotrons. It also explains beam dynamics important for ensuring the stability of beams, with a focus on the coordinate system, vertical movement, and lateral movement. In addition, it explains the incidence and outgoing of beams that are important for properly operating the accelerator, with a focus on their techniques. (A.O.)

  9. Characterization of biomass burning aerosols produced in the laboratory with a light-scattering aerosol mass spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middlebrook, A. M.; Adler, G. A.; Coggon, M.; De Gouw, J. A.; Franchin, A.; Gilman, J.; Koss, A.; Krechmer, J. E.; Lamb, K.; Manfred, K.; Roberts, J. M.; Schwarz, J. P.; Sekimoto, K.; Selimovic, V.; Stockwell, C.; Wagner, N.; Warneke, C.; Washenfelder, R. A.; Womack, C.; Yokelson, R. J.; Yuan, B.

    2017-12-01

    During the 2016 NOAA FIREX project at the Missoula Fire Sciences Laboratory, small fires of known fuel type and properties were ignited to characterize their direct emissions with a large variety of new sampling methods. Two types of experiments were employed: sampling smoke directly from the exhaust stack throughout the lifecycle of the fires (stack burns) or sampling when the exhaust vent was closed to fill the room with smoke (room burns). For both types of burns, photo-oxidation chambers were at times used to mimic aging in the atmosphere. During all these experiments, we measured the non-refractory components of the smoke particles using an Aerodyne compact time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS) with a light scattering module and diluted the sample line as little as possible (usually by a factor of 10) without overwhelming our instrument. For the stack burns, our AMS was placed near the top of the exhaust stack to capture the composition and size distribution during the rapidly changing stages of the fires. We found that the chemical composition of the aerosols varied with fuel type and combustion conditions on time scales of a few minutes as the fuels went through different stages of heating and combustion. For the room burns, we obtained additional measurements with the light-scattering module aimed at understanding how well smoke particles are measured with the AMS, along with characterization of their physical properties. We will present a summary of our results, with connections to their relevance for constraining model treatments of fire emissions on the atmosphere.

  10. Evaluation of osteoporotic bone structure through synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, I. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], E-mail: inaya@lin.ufrj.br; Anjos, M.J. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Physics Institute, UERJ (Brazil); Farias, M.L.F. [University Hospital, UFRJ (Brazil); Pantaleao, T.U.; Correa da Costa, V.M. [Biophysics Institute, UFRJ (Brazil); Lopes, R.T. [Nuclear Engineering Program/COPPE/UFRJ, P.O. Box 68509, Av. Horacio Macedo 2030, Sala I-133, Cidade Universitaria, 21941-914 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2008-12-15

    The abnormal accumulation or deficiency of trace elements may theoretically impair the formation of bone and contribute to osteoporosis. In this context, the knowledge of major and trace elements is very important in order to clarify many issues regarding diseases of the bone, such as osteoporosis, that remain unresolved. Several kinds of imaging techniques can be useful to access morphology and the minerals present in osteoporotic bones. In this work, synchrotron radiation X-ray microfluorescence was used as an X-ray imaging technique to investigate bone structures. Therefore, this research aims to improve the knowledge about some aspects of bone quality. The measurements were carried out at the Brazilian Synchrotron Laboratory Light Laboratory, in Brazil. A white beam with an energy range of 4-23 keV, a 45 deg./45 deg. geometry and a capillary optics were used. It was demonstrated that bone quality can and must be evaluated not only by considering the architecture of bones but also by taking into account the concentration and the distribution of minerals. Our results showed that the elemental distributions in bone zones on a micron scale were very helpful to understand functions in those structures.

  11. Synchrotron radiation research facility conceptual design report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-06-01

    A report is presented to define, in general outline, the extent and proportions, the type of construction, the schedule for accomplishment, and the estimated cost for a new Synchrotron Radiation Facility, as proposed to the Energy Research and Development Administration by the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The report is concerned only indirectly with the scientific and technological justification for undertaking this project; the latter is addressed explicitly in separate documents. The report does consider user requirements, however, in order to establish a basis for design development. Preliminary drawings, outline specifications, estimated cost data, and other descriptive material are included as supporting documentation on the current status of the project in this preconstruction phase

  12. Coherent Synchrotron Radiation in Storage Rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venturini, Marco

    2002-01-01

    We take a detour from the main theme of this volume and present a discussion of coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) in the context of storage rings rather than single-pass systems. Interest in this topic has been revived by a series of measurements carried out at several light source facilities. There is strong evidence that the observed coherent signal is accompanied by a beam instability, possibly driven by CSR itself. In this paper we review a ''self-consistent'' model of longitudinal beam dynamics in which CSR is the only agent of collective forces. The model yields numerical solutions that appear to reproduce the main features of the observations

  13. The tristan super light facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-12-01

    The Photon Factory and its user group have achieved excellent scientific results since its commissioning in 1982, ranging from material science to medical application, by using the synchrotron radiation at the 2.5 GeV PF storage ring, and since 1986, further at the 6.5 GeV Tristan accumulation ring which provides brilliant photons in high energy region. Efforts are exerted currently at National Laboratory for High Energy Physics for the extensive research and development works to study the feasibility of the Tristan e + e - collider main ring to be utilized as an extremely intense and highly advanced light source, which is called Tristan super light facility. What kinds of the application are expected for such highly brilliant source and their scientific significance should be clarified. This design report is an outcome by the joint work of in-house staffs and outside users, and it would serve as an excellent guide for the future studies on a next generation synchrotron radiation light source. The conversion plan of Tristan, the basic design of insertion devices, coherent X-ray sources, beam lines, instrumentation and others are reported. (K.I.)

  14. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis

  15. Applications of synchrotron radiation to Chemical Engineering Science: Workshop report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-07-01

    This report contains extended abstracts that summarize presentations made at the Workshop on Applications of Synchrotron Radiation to Chemical Engineering Science held at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Argonne, IL, on April 22--23, 1991. The talks emphasized the application of techniques involving absorption fluorescence, diffraction, and reflection of synchrotron x-rays, with a focus on problems in applied chemistry and chemical engineering, as well as on the use of x-rays in topographic, tomographic, and lithographic procedures. The attendees at the workshop included experts in the field of synchrotron science, scientists and engineers from ANL, other national laboratories, industry, and universities; and graduate and undergraduate students who were enrolled in ANL educational programs at the time of the workshop. Talks in the Plenary and Overview Session described the status of and special capabilities to be offered by the Advanced Photon Source (APS), as well as strategies and opportunities for utilization of synchrotron radiation to solve science and engineering problems. Invited talks given in subsequent sessions covered the use of intense infrared, ultraviolet, and x-ray photon beams (as provided by synchrotrons) in traditional and nontraditional areas of chemical engineering research related to electrochemical and corrosion science, catalyst development and characterization, lithography and imaging techniques, and microanalysis.

  16. 200 MeV RF linac for synchrotron injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitham, K.; Anamkath, H.; Lyons, S.; Manca, J.; Miller, R.; Treas, P.; Zante, T.; Miller, R.

    1992-01-01

    Construction has been completed on an electron linear accelerator for the Brookhaven National Laboratory. This accelerator will be used for the injection of a 200 MeV electron beam into a synchrotron for lithography experiments. This paper describes the conceptual design of the linac, its e-gun pulser, and its control and timing systems. 3 figs., ref

  17. A Medley with over ten years of (mostly light-ion production measurements at The Svedberg Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prokofiev A.V.

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years an experimental programme has been run at the neutron beam of The Svedberg Laboratory with the aim to study light-ion production induced by 96 and 175 MeV neutrons for a wide variety of targets. The measurements have been conducted using the Medley facility which allows measurement of p, d, t, He-3 and alpha production at fixed angles (from 20 to 160 degrees in steps of 20 degrees over a wide dynamic range. An overview of the results obtained at the now finished campaign at 96 MeV will be given. Since 2007 we have been running at 175 MeV with C, O, Si, Fe, Bi and U as target material. Preliminary results from these measurements will be shown and compared to model calculations with Talys-1.2. We also summarize the Medley measurements of elastic np and nd scattering and of angular distributions of fission fragments.

  18. Proton synchrotron accelerator theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, E.J.N.

    1977-01-01

    This is the text of a series of lectures given as part of the CERN Academic Training Programme and primarily intended for young engineers and technicians in preparation for the running-in of the 400 GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS). Following the definition of basic quantities, the problems of betatron motion and the effect of momentum spread and orbital errors on the transverse motion of the beam are reviewed. Consideration is then given to multipole fields, chromaticity and non-linear resonances. After dealing with basic relations governing longitudinal beam dynamics, the space-charge, resistive-wall and other collective effects are treated, with reference to precautions in the SPS to prevent their occurrence. (Auth.)

  19. Workshop on performance optimization of synchrotron radiation storage rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decker, G.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this workshop was to provide a forum, with user participation, for accelerator physicists the synchrotron light source field to discuss current and planned state-of-the-art techniques storage ring performance. The scope of the workshop focused on two areas: lattice characterization and measurement, and fundamental limitations on low frequency beam stability

  20. Report of the workshop on transferring X-ray Lithography Synchrotron (XLS) technology to industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marcuse, W.

    1987-01-01

    This paper reports on plans to develop an x-ray synchrotron for use in lithography. The primary concern of the present paper is technology transfer from national laboratories to private industry. (JDH)