WorldWideScience

Sample records for synchronous impulse reconstruction

  1. Interdependencies of Neural Impulse Pattern and Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Hans; Postnova, Svetlana; Schneider, Horst

    2008-03-01

    Neuronal synchronization plays a crucial role in many physiological functions such as information binding and wake-sleep transitions as well as in pathophysiological processes like Parkinson's disease and epileptic seizures. The occurrence of synchronized activity is often associated with significant alterations of the neuronal impulse pattern, mostly with a transition from tonic firing to burst discharges. We have used Hodgkin-Huxley type simulations to study how alterations of individual neurons' dynamics influence the synchronization in electrotonic coupled networks. The individual neurons have been tuned from tonic firing to bursting with chaotic dynamics in between. Our results demonstrate that these transitions have significant impact on the neurons' synchronization. Vice versa, the synchronization state can essentially modify the impulse pattern. The most remarkably effects appear when the individual neurons operate in a periodically tonic firing regime close to the transition to chaos.

  2. Stabilization and Synchronization of Memristive Chaotic Circuits by Impulsive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Limin Zou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this note is to study impulsive control and synchronization of memristor based chaotic circuits shown by Muthuswamy. We first establish a less conservative sufficient condition for the stability of memristor based chaotic circuits. After that, we discuss the effect of errors on stability. Meanwhile, we also discuss impulsive synchronization of two memristor based chaotic systems. Our results are more general and more applicable than the ones shown by Yang, Li, and Huang. Finally, several numerical examples are given to show the effectiveness of our methods.

  3. Unified synchronization criteria in an array of coupled neural networks with hybrid impulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan; Li, Xuechen; Lu, Jianquan; Alsaadi, Fuad E

    2018-02-07

    This paper investigates the problem of globally exponential synchronization of coupled neural networks with hybrid impulses. Two new concepts on average impulsive interval and average impulsive gain are proposed to deal with the difficulties coming from hybrid impulses. By employing the Lyapunov method combined with some mathematical analysis, some efficient unified criteria are obtained to guarantee the globally exponential synchronization of impulsive networks. Our method and criteria are proved to be effective for impulsively coupled neural networks simultaneously with synchronizing impulses and desynchronizing impulses, and we do not need to discuss these two kinds of impulses separately. Moreover, by using our average impulsive interval method, we can obtain an interesting and valuable result for the case of average impulsive interval T a =∞. For some sparse impulsive sequences with T a =∞, the impulses can happen for infinite number of times, but they do not have essential influence on the synchronization property of networks. Finally, numerical examples including scale-free networks are exploited to illustrate our theoretical results. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. On the Impulsive Synchronization Control for a Class of Chaotic Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Bo Wang; Peng Shi; Xiucheng Dong

    2014-01-01

    The problem on chaos synchronization for a class of chaotic system is addressed. Based on impulsive control theory and by constructing a novel Lyapunov functional, new impulsive synchronization strategies are presented and possess more practical application value. Finally some typical numerical simulation examples are included to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  5. Exponential Synchronization of Stochastic Complex Dynamical Networks with Impulsive Perturbations and Markovian Switching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wuneng Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the exponential synchronization problem of stochastic complex dynamical networks with impulsive perturbation and Markovian switching. The complex dynamical networks consist of κ modes, and the networks switch from one mode to another according to a Markovian chain with known transition probability. Based on the Lyapunov function method and stochastic analysis, by employing M-matrix approach, some sufficient conditions are presented to ensure the exponential synchronization of stochastic complex dynamical networks with impulsive perturbation and Markovian switching, and the upper bound of impulsive gain is evaluated. At the end of this paper, two numerical examples are included to show the effectiveness of our results.

  6. Cluster synchronization of community network with distributed time delays via impulsive control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Hui; Wu, Zhao-Yan

    2016-11-01

    Cluster synchronization is an important dynamical behavior in community networks and deserves further investigations. A community network with distributed time delays is investigated in this paper. For achieving cluster synchronization, an impulsive control scheme is introduced to design proper controllers and an adaptive strategy is adopted to make the impulsive controllers unified for different networks. Through taking advantage of the linear matrix inequality technique and constructing Lyapunov functions, some synchronization criteria with respect to the impulsive gains, instants, and system parameters without adaptive strategy are obtained and generalized to the adaptive case. Finally, numerical examples are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61463022), the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Province, China (Grant No. 20161BAB201021), and the Natural Science Foundation of Jiangxi Educational Committee, China (Grant No. GJJ14273).

  7. Mean-Square Exponential Synchronization of Stochastic Complex Dynamical Networks with Switching Topology by Impulsive Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Wu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the mean-square exponential synchronization issues of delayed stochastic complex dynamical networks with switching topology and impulsive control. By using the Lyapunov functional method, impulsive control theory, and linear matrix inequality (LMI approaches, some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the mean-square exponential synchronization of delay complex dynamical network with switch topology, which are independent of the network size and switch topology. Numerical simulations are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results in the end.

  8. Synchronization of hybrid-coupled delayed dynamical networks with noises by partial mixed impulsive control strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi; Fu, Fangfang; Wang, Jingyi; Feng, Jianwen; Zhang, Haiyu

    2018-02-01

    In this paper, a new control method named partial mixed impulsive control strategy is proposed to investigate the problem of exponential synchronization in mean square for a class of general hybrid-coupled delayed dynamical networks with both internal delay and coupling delay. The partial mixed impulsive effects in this strategy can be taken as local and time-varying, which means that they are not only injected into a fraction of nodes in the whole networks but also contain synchronizing and desynchronizing impulses at the same time. In addition, to be more realistic, a delayed coupling term involving the transmission delay and self-feedback delay is taken into account. By means of the Lyapunov method and the comparison principle for impulsive systems, several sufficient criteria are obtained to guarantee the global exponential synchronization in mean square of the dynamical network. The obtained criteria are closely related to the proportion of the controlled nodes, the strengths of mixed impulses, the impulsive intervals, the time delays and the topology structure of the networks. Finally, a numerical example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of our results.

  9. A novel adaptive-impulsive synchronization of fractional-order chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Y. T. Andrew; Li, Xian-Feng; Chu, Yan-Dong; Zhang, Hui

    2015-10-01

    A novel adaptive-impulsive scheme is proposed for synchronizing fractional-order chaotic systems without the necessity of knowing the attractors’ bounds in priori. The nonlinear functions in these systems are supposed to satisfy local Lipschitz conditions but which are estimated with adaptive laws. The novelty is that the combination of adaptive control and impulsive control offers a control strategy gathering the advantages of both. In order to guarantee the convergence is no less than an expected exponential rate, a combined feedback strength design is created such that the symmetric axis can shift freely according to the updated transient feedback strength. All of the unknown Lipschitz constants are also updated exponentially in the meantime of achieving synchronization. Two different fractional-order chaotic systems are employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the novel adaptive-impulsive control scheme. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundations of China (Grant Nos. 11161027 and 11262009), the Key Natural Science Foundation of Gansu Province, China (Grant No. 1104WCGA195), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant No. 20136204110001).

  10. Master-slave exponential synchronization of delayed complex-valued memristor-based neural networks via impulsive control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaofan; Fang, Jian-An; Li, Huiyuan

    2017-09-01

    This paper investigates master-slave exponential synchronization for a class of complex-valued memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delays via discontinuous impulsive control. Firstly, the master and slave complex-valued memristor-based neural networks with time-varying delays are translated to two real-valued memristor-based neural networks. Secondly, an impulsive control law is constructed and utilized to guarantee master-slave exponential synchronization of the neural networks. Thirdly, the master-slave synchronization problems are transformed into the stability problems of the master-slave error system. By employing linear matrix inequality (LMI) technique and constructing an appropriate Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, some sufficient synchronization criteria are derived. Finally, a numerical simulation is provided to illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained theoretical results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Event-Based Impulsive Control of Continuous-Time Dynamic Systems and Its Application to Synchronization of Memristive Neural Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Dandan; Liu, Lu; Feng, Gang

    2017-08-18

    This paper investigates exponential stabilization of continuous-time dynamic systems (CDSs) via event-based impulsive control (EIC) approaches, where the impulsive instants are determined by certain state-dependent triggering condition. The global exponential stability criteria via EIC are derived for nonlinear and linear CDSs, respectively. It is also shown that there is no Zeno-behavior for the concerned closed loop control system. In addition, the developed event-based impulsive scheme is applied to the synchronization problem of master and slave memristive neural networks. Furthermore, a self-triggered impulsive control scheme is developed to avoid continuous communication between the master system and slave system. Finally, two numerical simulation examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed event-based impulsive controllers.

  12. Impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekar, A; Rakkiyappan, R; Cao, Jinde

    2015-10-01

    This paper studies the impulsive synchronization of Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities via multiple integral approach. The array of neural networks are coupled in a random fashion which is governed by Bernoulli random variable. The aim of this paper is to obtain the synchronization criteria, which is suitable for both exactly known and partly unknown transition probabilities such that the coupled neural network is synchronized with mixed time-delay. The considered impulsive effects can be synchronized at partly unknown transition probabilities. Besides, a multiple integral approach is also proposed to strengthen the Markovian jumping randomly coupled neural networks with partly unknown transition probabilities. By making use of Kronecker product and some useful integral inequalities, a novel Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional was designed for handling the coupled neural network with mixed delay and then impulsive synchronization criteria are solvable in a set of linear matrix inequalities. Finally, numerical examples are presented to illustrate the effectiveness and advantages of the theoretical results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cluster Synchronization of Stochastic Complex Networks with Markovian Switching and Time-Varying Delay via Impulsive Pinning Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the cluster synchronization of a kind of complex networks by means of impulsive pinning control scheme. These networks are subject to stochastic noise perturbations and Markovian switching, as well as internal and outer time-varying delays. Using the Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional, Itö’s formula, and some linear matrix inequalities (LMI, several novel sufficient conditions are obtained to guarantee the desired cluster synchronization. At the end of this writing, a numerical simulation is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of those theoretical results.

  14. Global exponential stability and lag synchronization for delayed memristive fuzzy Cohen-Grossberg BAM neural networks with impulses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wengui; Yu, Wenwu; Cao, Jinde; Alsaadi, Fuad E; Hayat, Tasawar

    2018-02-01

    This paper investigates the stability and lag synchronization for memristor-based fuzzy Cohen-Grossberg bidirectional associative memory (BAM) neural networks with mixed delays (asynchronous time delays and continuously distributed delays) and impulses. By applying the inequality analysis technique, homeomorphism theory and some suitable Lyapunov-Krasovskii functionals, some new sufficient conditions for the uniqueness and global exponential stability of equilibrium point are established. Furthermore, we obtain several sufficient criteria concerning globally exponential lag synchronization for the proposed system based on the framework of Filippov solution, differential inclusion theory and control theory. In addition, some examples with numerical simulations are given to illustrate the feasibility and validity of obtained results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Synchronization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Synchronization, in simple terms, is the adjustment of rhythrns of two mutually interacting systems, such as a pair of coupled oscillators. Synchronization was discov- ered in the seventeenth century by Christiaan Huygens who observed it when working with clocks (see Box 1). He saw that two clocks (pendulums) suspended ...

  16. Mittag-Leffler synchronization of fractional neural networks with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms using impulsive and linear controllers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamova, Ivanka; Stamov, Gani

    2017-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a fractional-order neural network system with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms. We first develop a new Mittag-Leffler synchronization strategy for the controlled nodes via impulsive controllers. Using the fractional Lyapunov method sufficient conditions are given. We also study the global Mittag-Leffler synchronization of two identical fractional impulsive reaction-diffusion neural networks using linear controllers, which was an open problem even for integer-order models. Since the Mittag-Leffler stability notion is a generalization of the exponential stability concept for fractional-order systems, our results extend and improve the exponential impulsive control theory of neural network system with time-varying delays and reaction-diffusion terms to the fractional-order case. The fractional-order derivatives allow us to model the long-term memory in the neural networks, and thus the present research provides with a conceptually straightforward mathematical representation of rather complex processes. Illustrative examples are presented to show the validity of the obtained results. We show that by means of appropriate impulsive controllers we can realize the stability goal and to control the qualitative behavior of the states. An image encryption scheme is extended using fractional derivatives. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A Phase Current Reconstruction Approach for Three-Phase Permanent-Magnet Synchronous Motor Drive

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hao Yan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-phase permanent-magnet synchronous motors (PMSMs are widely used in renewable energy applications such as wind power generation, tidal energy and electric vehicles owing to their merits such as high efficiency, high precision and high reliability. To reduce the cost and volume of the drive system, techniques of reconstructing three-phase current using a single current sensor have been reported for three-phase alternating current (AC control system using the power converts. In existing studies, the reconstruction precision is largely influenced by reconstructing dead zones on the Space Vector Pulse Width Modulation (SVPWM plane, which requires other algorithms to compensate either by modifying PWM modulation or by phase-shifting of the PWM signal. In this paper, a novel extended phase current reconstruction approach for PMSM drive is proposed. Six novel installation positions are obtained by analyzing the sampling results of the current paths between each two power switches. By arranging the single current sensor at these positions, the single current sensor is sampled during zero voltage vectors (ZVV without modifying the PWM signals. This proposed method can reconstruct the three-phase currents without any complex algorithms and is available in the sector boundary region and low modulation region. Finally, this method is validated by experiments.

  18. Are executive function and impulsivity antipodes? A conceptual reconstruction with special reference to addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickel, Warren K.; Jarmolowicz, David P.; Mueller, E. Terry; Gatchalian, Kirstin M.; McClure, Samuel M.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale Although there is considerable interest in how either executive function (EF) or impulsivity relate to addiction, there is little apparent overlap between these research areas. Objectives The present paper aims to determine if components of these two constructs are conceptual antipodes—widely separated on a shared continuum. Methods EFs and impulsivities were compared and contrasted. Specifically, the definitions of the components of EF and impulsivity, the methods used to measure the various components, the populations of drug users that show deficits in these components, and the neural substrates of these components were compared and contrasted. Results Each component of impulsivity had an antipode in EF. EF, however, covered a wider range of phenomena, including compulsivity. Conclusions Impulsivity functions as an antipode of certain components of EF. Recognition of the relationship between EF and impulsivity may inform the scientific inquiry of behavioral problems such as addiction. Other theoretical implications are discussed. PMID:22441659

  19. Synchronization between EMG at Different Uterine Locations Investigated Using Time-Frequency Ridge Reconstruction: Comparison of Pregnancy and Labor Contractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrien, Jérémy; Steingrimsdottir, Thora; Marque, Catherine; Karlsson, Brynjar

    2010-12-01

    The extraction of the frequency components of a signal can be useful for the characterization of the underlying system. One method for isolating a frequency component of a signal is by the extraction and reconstruction of the local maxima or ridge of its time-frequency representation. We compare here the performances of two well-known ridge reconstruction methods, namely the Carmona and Marseille methods, on synthetic signals as well as real electrohysterogram (EHG). We show that Carmona's method presents lower reconstruction errors. We then used the separately reconstructed frequency components of the EHG independently for labor prediction using a synchronization measure. We show that the proposed synchronization parameters present similar prediction rate to classical parameters obtained directly from the time-frequency representation but also seem to provide information complementary to the classical parameters and may thus improve the accuracy in labor prediction when they are used jointly.

  20. 3D reconstruction of a compressible flow by synchronized multi-camera BOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, F.; Donjat, D.; Léon, O.; Le Besnerais, G.; Champagnat, F.; Micheli, F.

    2017-05-01

    This paper investigates the application of a 3D density reconstruction from a limited number of background-oriented schlieren (BOS) images as recently proposed in Nicolas et al. (Exp Fluids 57(1):1-21, 2016), to the case of compressible flows, such as underexpanded jets. First, an optimization of a 2D BOS setup is conducted to mitigate the intense local blurs observed in raw BOS images and caused by strong density gradients present in the jets. It is demonstrated that a careful choice of experimental conditions enables one to obtain sharp deviation fields from 2D BOS images. Second, a 3DBOS experimental bench involving 12 synchronized cameras is specifically designed for the present study. It is shown that the 3DBOS method can provide physically consistent 3D reconstructions of instantaneous and mean density fields for various underexpanded jet flows issued into quiescent air. Finally, an analysis of the density structure of a moderately underexpanded jet is conducted through phase-averaging, highlighting the development of a large-scale coherent structure associated with a jet shear layer instability.

  1. Oromandibular reconstruction with chimeric double-skin paddle flap based on peroneal vessel axis for synchronous opposite double oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shih-Tsai; Liu, Wen-Chung; Chen, Lee-Wei; Yang, Kuo-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Synchronous double oral cancer represents the minority of cases of head and neck cancer. After tumor ablation, 2 separate oromandibular defects, even combined with a through-and-through oral defect, pose a serious reconstructive challenge. The ideal method for reconstruction remains controversial. Based on the peroneal vessel axis, a chimeric double-skin paddle peroneal fasciocutaneous or fibular osteomyocutaneous flap could be designed to accomplish the difficult reconstruction. Six male patients, each with 2 separate oromandibular defects after tumor ablation of synchronous double oral cancer, received double-skin paddle flap reconstruction with 3 peroneal fasciocutaneous and 3 fibular osteomyocutaneous flaps. All 6 flaps survived; however, complications included 1 skin paddle lost due to insufficient perfusion of a visible perforator, and 1 superficial necrosis occurring over the tip of a longer skin paddle. One postoperative intraoral infection and 1 donor site infection were also reported. During follow-up, 3 months later, 1 patient succumbed to local recurrence and bony metastasis. One patient developed a new cancer in the maxillary gingiva, and another had osteoradionecrosis 8 months later. Four patients gained acceptable cosmesis with good oral competence. A chimeric flap based on the peroneal artery could provide a segment of fibular bone, 1 or 2 skin paddles, and a cuff of the flexor hallucis longus muscle simultaneously. For 1-stage reconstruction of separate oromandibular defects after tumor ablation of synchronous double oral cancer, this design could provide all components at 1 transfer.

  2. Spectral reconstruction of phase response curves reveals the synchronization properties of mouse globus pallidus neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Joshua A; Atherton, Jeremy F; Surmeier, D James

    2013-11-01

    The propensity of a neuron to synchronize is captured by its infinitesimal phase response curve (iPRC). Determining whether an iPRC is biphasic, meaning that small depolarizing perturbations can actually delay the next spike, if delivered at appropriate phases, is a daunting experimental task because negative lobes in the iPRC (unlike positive ones) tend to be small and may be occluded by the normal discharge variability of a neuron. To circumvent this problem, iPRCs are commonly derived from numerical models of neurons. Here, we propose a novel and natural method to estimate the iPRC by direct estimation of its spectral modes. First, we show analytically that the spectral modes of the iPRC of an arbitrary oscillator are readily measured by applying weak harmonic perturbations. Next, applying this methodology to biophysical neuronal models, we show that a low-dimensional spectral reconstruction is sufficient to capture the structure of the iPRC. This structure was preserved reasonably well even with added physiological scale jitter in the neuronal models. To validate the methodology empirically, we applied it first to a low-noise electronic oscillator with a known design and then to cortical pyramidal neurons, recorded in whole cell configuration, that are known to possess a monophasic iPRC. Finally, using the methodology in conjunction with perforated-patch recordings from pallidal neurons, we show, in contrast to recent modeling studies, that these neurons have biphasic somatic iPRCs. Biphasic iPRCs would cause lateral somatically targeted pallidal inhibition to desynchronize pallidal neurons, providing a plausible explanation for their lack of synchrony in vivo.

  3. Mode shape reconstruction of an impulse excited structure using continuous scanning laser Doppler vibrometer and empirical mode decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyong, Yongsoo; Kim, Daesung; Dayou, Jedol; Park, Kyihwan; Wang, Semyung

    2008-07-01

    For vibration testing, discrete types of scanning laser Doppler vibrometer (SLDV) have been developed and have proven to be very useful. For complex structures, however, SLDV takes considerable time to scan the surface of structures and require large amounts of data storage. To overcome these problems, a continuous scan was introduced as an alternative. In this continuous method, the Chebyshev demodulation (or polynomial) technique and the Hilbert transform approach have been used for mode shape reconstruction with harmonic excitation. As an alternative, in this paper, the Hilbert-Huang transform approach is applied to impact excitation cases in terms of a numerical approach, where the vibration of the tested structure is modeled using impulse response functions. In order to verify this technique, a clamped-clamped beam was chosen as the test rig in the numerical simulation and real experiment. This paper shows that with additional innovative steps of using ideal bandpass filters and nodal point determination in the postprocessing, the Hilbert-Huang transformation can be used to create a better mode shape reconstruction even in the impact excitation case.

  4. Object segmentation and reconstruction via an oscillatory neural network: interaction among learning, memory, topological organization and gamma-band synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magosso, E; Cuppini, C; Ursino, M

    2006-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity in the gamma-band has been shown to play an important role in higher cognitive functions, by grouping together the necessary information in different cortical areas to achieve a coherent perception. In the present work, we used a neural network of Wilson-Cowan oscillators to analyze the problem of binding and segmentation of high-level objects. Binding is achieved by implementing in the network the similarity and prior knowledge Gestalt rules. Similarity law is realized via topological maps within the network. Prior knowledge originates by means of a Hebbian rule of synaptic change; objects are memorized in the network with different strengths. Segmentation is realized via a global inhibitor which allows desynchronisation among multiple objects avoiding interference. Simulation results performed with a 40x40 neural grid, using three simultaneous input objects, show that the network is able to recognize and segment objects in several different conditions (different degrees of incompleteness or distortion of input patterns), exhibiting the higher reconstruction performances the higher the strength of object memory. The presented model represents an integrated approach for investigating the relationships among learning, memory, topological organization and gamma-band synchronization.

  5. Acoustical source reconstruction from non-synchronous sequential measurements by Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Liang; Antoni, Jerome; Leclere, Quentin; Jiang, Weikang

    2017-11-01

    Acoustical source reconstruction is a typical inverse problem, whose minimum frequency of reconstruction hinges on the size of the array and maximum frequency depends on the spacing distance between the microphones. For the sake of enlarging the frequency of reconstruction and reducing the cost of an acquisition system, Cyclic Projection (CP), a method of sequential measurements without reference, was recently investigated (JSV,2016,372:31-49). In this paper, the Propagation based Fast Iterative Shrinkage Thresholding Algorithm (Propagation-FISTA) is introduced, which improves CP in two aspects: (1) the number of acoustic sources is no longer needed and the only making assumption is that of a ;weakly sparse; eigenvalue spectrum; (2) the construction of the spatial basis is much easier and adaptive to practical scenarios of acoustical measurements benefiting from the introduction of propagation based spatial basis. The proposed Propagation-FISTA is first investigated with different simulations and experimental setups and is next illustrated with an industrial case.

  6. Synchronicity from Synchronized Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Duane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related eventsmysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind and matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1 synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2 the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.

  7. Analysis of ECT Synchronization Performance Based on Different Interpolation Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Zhixin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There are two synchronization methods of electronic transformer in IEC60044-8 standard: impulsive synchronization and interpolation. When the impulsive synchronization method is inapplicability, the data synchronization of electronic transformer can be realized by using the interpolation method. The typical interpolation methods are piecewise linear interpolation, quadratic interpolation, cubic spline interpolation and so on. In this paper, the influences of piecewise linear interpolation, quadratic interpolation and cubic spline interpolation for the data synchronization of electronic transformer are computed, then the computational complexity, the synchronization precision, the reliability, the application range of different interpolation methods are analyzed and compared, which can serve as guide studies for practical applications.

  8. Lag synchronization of chaotic systems with time-delayed linear ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    chaotic systems, which include nonlinear observer approach [4,5], self-adaptive control method [6,7], parameter control [8], impulsive control [9–11], etc. Recently, impulsive control has been widely used to stabilize and synchronize chaotic systems, because it allows the stabilization and synchronization of chaotic systems ...

  9. Synchronization of sound sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Bergweiler, Steffen

    2009-09-11

    Sound generation and interaction are highly complex, nonlinear, and self-organized. Nearly 150 years ago Rayleigh raised the following problem: two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory M. Abel et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2467 (2006)10.1121/1.2170441]. For a detailed investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization-the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.

  10. Synchronization of

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schrader, Jared M; Shapiro, Lucy

    2015-01-01

    .... Cell cycle synchronization experiments have been used to establish the molecular events governing chromosome replication and segregation, to map a genetic regulatory network controlling cell cycle...

  11. Controlled Limiter in the Synchronous Detection Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yauheni Bialetski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This variant of construction of the electrical circuit is aimed at reducing the effects of impulse noise. The measuring channels of the primary transducers are subject to interference of various types. In the case of a small ratio between a useful signal and noise level, synchronous detection is used. Impulse noise leaves a big mark even after using synchronous detection. To improve the performance of such measuring devices, it is proposed to use a controlled amplitude limiter at the input. Comparative analysis of solutions with controlled limiters is carried out in the article and conditions for its optimal operation are determined.

  12. Kick synchronization versus diffusive synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Mauroy, Alexandre; Sacré, Pierre; Sepulchre, Rodolphe

    2012-01-01

    The paper provides an introductory discussion about two fundamental models of oscillator synchronization: the (continuous-time) diffusive model, that dominates the mathematical literature on synchronization, and the (hybrid) kick model, that accounts for most popular examples of synchronization, but for which only few theoretical results exist. The paper stresses fundamental differences between the two models, such as the different contraction measures underlying the analysis, as well as impo...

  13. Buying impulses : a study on impulsive consumption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herabadi, A.G.

    2003-01-01

    This dissertation's objectives were to validate impulse buying tendency as a genuinely distinctive construct related to impulse purchase behavior and attached to fundamental personality traits, and its relationships to a number of relevant factors. Studies reported were steps to a better

  14. Campground marketing - the impulse camper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilbur F. LaPage; Dale P. Ragain

    1972-01-01

    Impulse or unplanned campground visits may account for one-fourth to one-half of all camping activity. The concepts of impulse travel and impulse camping appear to be potentially useful extensions of the broader concept of impulse purchasing, which has become an important influence in retail marketing. Impulse campers may also be impulse buyers; they were found to...

  15. [Affective disorders and impulsivity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belzeaux, R; Correard, N; Mazzola-Pomietto, P; Adida, M; Cermolacce, M; Azorin, J-M

    2014-12-01

    Impulsivity is a complex and important phenomenon in mood disorders. Impulse control disorders, as defined in DSM, are more frequent in mood disorders especially in Bipolar Disorder type I, and are associated with a more severe course of illness. Dimensional studies demonstrate that impulsivity is a core manifestation of bipolar disorder both as state- and trait-dependent markers in patients. Comorbid substance use disorders are often associated with a higher level of impulsivity whereas the relation between suicidal behaviors and higher impulsivity remains uncertain. Moreover, neuropsychological tests were used to study correlation between clinical impulsivity and laboratory measurements of impulsivity. Level of correlation remains weak and several explanations are proposed in the literature. Copyright © 2014 L’Encéphale. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.. All rights reserved.

  16. Synchronization of Sound Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abel, Markus; Ahnert, Karsten; Bergweiler, Steffen

    2009-09-01

    Sound generation and interaction are highly complex, nonlinear, and self-organized. Nearly 150 years ago Rayleigh raised the following problem: two nearby organ pipes of different fundamental frequencies sound together almost inaudibly with identical pitch. This effect is now understood qualitatively by modern synchronization theory M. Abel et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 119, 2467 (2006)JASMAN0001-496610.1121/1.2170441]. For a detailed investigation, we substituted one pipe by an electric speaker. We observe that even minute driving signals force the pipe to synchronization, thus yielding three decades of synchronization—the largest range ever measured to our knowledge. Furthermore, a mutual silencing of the pipe is found, which can be explained by self-organized oscillations, of use for novel methods of noise abatement. Finally, we develop a reconstruction method which yields a perfect quantitative match of experiment and theory.

  17. Synchronizing Fireflies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Gall, Walter; Nabb, Karen Mayumi

    2006-01-01

    "Imagine a tenth of a mile of river front with an unbroken line of trees with fireflies on ever leaf flashing in synchronism. ... Then, if one's imagination is sufficiently vivid, he may form some conception of this amazing spectacle." So wrote the naturalist Hugh Smith. In this article we consider how one might model mathematically the…

  18. Impulsiveness in Professional Fighters

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banks, Sarah J; Mayer, Brittany; Obuchowski, Nancy; Shin, Wanyong; Lowe, Mark; Phillips, Michael; Modic, Michael; Bernick, Charles

    2014-01-01

    ...). Among the behavioral manifestations of CTE is increased impulsiveness. Sports involving repeated head trauma are associated with risk of neurodegenerative disorders such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE...

  19. The latent structure of impulsivity: impulsive choice, impulsive action, and impulsive personality traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKillop, James; Weafer, Jessica; C Gray, Joshua; Oshri, Assaf; Palmer, Abraham; de Wit, Harriet

    2016-09-01

    Impulsivity has been strongly linked to addictive behaviors, but can be operationalized in a number of ways that vary considerably in overlap, suggesting multidimensionality. This study tested the hypothesis that the latent structure among multiple measures of impulsivity would reflect the following three broad categories: impulsive choice, reflecting discounting of delayed rewards; impulsive action, reflecting ability to inhibit a prepotent motor response; and impulsive personality traits, reflecting self-reported attributions of self-regulatory capacity. The study used a cross-sectional confirmatory factor analysis of multiple impulsivity assessments. Participants were 1252 young adults (62 % female) with low levels of addictive behavior, who were assessed in individual laboratory rooms at the University of Chicago and the University of Georgia. The battery comprised a Delay (replace hyphen with space) Discounting Task, Monetary Choice Questionnaire, Conners' Continuous Performance Test, Go/NoGo Task, Stop Signal Task, Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, and the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale. The hypothesized three-factor model provided the best fit to the data, although sensation seeking was excluded from the final model. The three latent factors were largely unrelated to each other and were variably associated with substance use. These findings support the hypothesis that diverse measures of impulsivity can broadly be organized into three categories that are largely distinct from one another. These findings warrant investigation among individuals with clinical levels of addictive behavior and may be applied to understanding the underlying biological mechanisms of these categories.

  20. Dealing with Impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidhardt, Janet

    1987-01-01

    A mother recounts her neurologically impaired son's struggles and progress in combating impulsivity in his work and social habits. Now 23 years old, employed full-time, and off medication, the son is still impulsive, has problems with social skills, but has improved his self-image through a photography hobby. (CB)

  1. Rethinking Impulsivity in Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klonsky, E. David; May, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Elevated impulsivity is thought to facilitate the transition from suicidal thoughts to suicidal behavior. Therefore, impulsivity should distinguish those who have attempted suicide (attempters) from those who have only considered suicide (ideators-only). This hypothesis was examined in three large nonclinical samples: (1) 2,011 military recruits,…

  2. Impulsivity and Academic Cheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderman, Eric M.; Cupp, Pamela K.; Lane, Derek

    2009-01-01

    The authors examined the relations between academic cheating and impulsivity in a large sample of adolescents enrolled in high school health education classes. Results indicated that impulsivity predicts academic cheating for students who report extensive involvement in cheating. However, students who engage in extensive cheating are less likely…

  3. Self-synchronization and controlled synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Nijmeijer, H Henk; Blekhman, I; Fradkov, AL Alexander; Pogromsky, AY Sasha

    1997-01-01

    An attempt is made to give a general formalism for synchronization in dynamical systems encompassing most of the known definitions and applications. The proposed set-up describes synchronization of interconnected systems with respect to a set of functionals and captures peculiarities of both self-synchronization and controlled synchronization. Various illustrative examples are given

  4. Channel Modeling and Time Delay Estimation for Clock Synchronization Among Seaweb Nodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagnon, P; Rice, J; Clark, G A

    2012-07-08

    From simulations, tracking of the impulse response is feasible. Potential to benefit other functions such as ranging between two nodes. Potential to combine the features of different protocols to create a new and more realistic clock-synchronization protocol.

  5. Development of Network Synchronization Predicts Language Abilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doesburg, Sam M; Tingling, Keriann; MacDonald, Matt J; Pang, Elizabeth W

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations among brain areas is understood to mediate network communication supporting cognition, perception, and language. How task-dependent synchronization during word production develops throughout childhood and adolescence, as well as how such network coherence is related to the development of language abilities, remains poorly understood. To address this, we recorded magnetoencephalography while 73 participants aged 4-18 years performed a verb generation task. Atlas-guided source reconstruction was performed, and phase synchronization among regions was calculated. Task-dependent increases in synchronization were observed in the theta, alpha, and beta frequency ranges, and network synchronization differences were observed between age groups. Task-dependent synchronization was strongest in the theta band, as were differences between age groups. Network topologies were calculated for brain regions associated with verb generation and were significantly associated with both age and language abilities. These findings establish the maturational trajectory of network synchronization underlying expressive language abilities throughout childhood and adolescence and provide the first evidence for an association between large-scale neurophysiological network synchronization and individual differences in the development of language abilities.

  6. Applied impulsive mathematical models

    CERN Document Server

    Stamova, Ivanka

    2016-01-01

    Using the theory of impulsive differential equations, this book focuses on mathematical models which reflect current research in biology, population dynamics, neural networks and economics. The authors provide the basic background from the fundamental theory and give a systematic exposition of recent results related to the qualitative analysis of impulsive mathematical models. Consisting of six chapters, the book presents many applicable techniques, making them available in a single source easily accessible to researchers interested in mathematical models and their applications. Serving as a valuable reference, this text is addressed to a wide audience of professionals, including mathematicians, applied researchers and practitioners.

  7. Sex differences in impulsive action and impulsive choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-01-01

    Here, we review the evidence for sex differences in behavioral measures of impulsivity for both humans and laboratory animals. We focus on two specific components of impulsivity: impulsive action (i.e., difficulty inhibiting a prepotent response) and impulsive choice (i.e., difficulty delaying gratification). Sex differences appear to exist on these measures, but the direction and magnitude of the differences vary. In laboratory animals, impulsive action is typically greater in males than females, whereas impulsive choice is typically greater in females. In humans, women discount more steeply than men, but sex differences on measures of impulsive action depend on tasks and subject samples. We discuss implications of these findings as they relate to drug addiction. We also point out the major gaps in this research to date, including the lack of studies designed specifically to examine sex differences in behavioral impulsivity, and the lack of consideration of menstrual or estrous phase or sex hormone levels in the studies. PMID:24286704

  8. Overview of Cell Synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banfalvi, Gaspar

    2017-01-01

    The widespread interest in cell synchronization is maintained by the studies of control mechanism involved in cell cycle regulation. During the synchronization distinct subpopulations of cells are obtained representing different stages of the cell cycle. These subpopulations are then used to study regulatory mechanisms of the cycle at the level of macromolecular biosynthesis (DNA synthesis, gene expression, protein synthesis), protein phosphorylation, development of new drugs, etc. Although several synchronization methods have been described, it is of general interest that scientists get a compilation and an updated view of these synchronization techniques. This introductory chapter summarizes: (1) the basic concepts and principal criteria of cell cycle synchronizations, (2) the most frequently used synchronization methods, such as physical fractionation (flow cytometry, dielectrophoresis, cytofluorometric purification), chemical blockade, (3) synchronization of embryonic cells, (4) synchronization at low temperature, (5) comparison of cell synchrony techniques, (6) synchronization of unicellular organisms, and (7) the effect of synchronization on transfection.

  9. Mathematical foundations of hybrid data assimilation from a synchronization perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, Stephen G.

    2017-12-01

    The state-of-the-art data assimilation methods used today in operational weather prediction centers around the world can be classified as generalized one-way coupled impulsive synchronization. This classification permits the investigation of hybrid data assimilation methods, which combine dynamic error estimates of the system state with long time-averaged (climatological) error estimates, from a synchronization perspective. Illustrative results show how dynamically informed formulations of the coupling matrix (via an Ensemble Kalman Filter, EnKF) can lead to synchronization when observing networks are sparse and how hybrid methods can lead to synchronization when those dynamic formulations are inadequate (due to small ensemble sizes). A large-scale application with a global ocean general circulation model is also presented. Results indicate that the hybrid methods also have useful applications in generalized synchronization, in particular, for correcting systematic model errors.

  10. Micropower impulse radar imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, M.S.

    1995-11-01

    From designs developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in radar and imaging technologies, there exists the potential for a variety of applications in both public and private sectors. Presently tests are being conducted for the detection of buried mines and the analysis of civil structures. These new systems use a patented ultra-wide band (impulse) radar technology known as Micropower Impulse Radar (GPR) imaging systems. LLNL has also developed signal processing software capable of producing 2-D and 3-D images of objects embedded in materials such as soil, wood and concrete. My assignment while at LLNL has focused on the testing of different radar configurations and applications, as well as assisting in the creation of computer algorithms which enable the radar to scan target areas of different geometeries.

  11. On self-synchronization and controlled synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blekhman, I.I.; Fradkov, A.L.; Nijmeijer, Henk; Pogromsky, A.Yu.

    1997-01-01

    An attempt is made to give a general formalism for synchronization in dynamical systems encompassing most of the known definitions and applications. The proposed set-up describes synchronization of interconnected systems with respect to a set of functionals and captures peculiarities of both

  12. Self-synchronization and controlled synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijmeijer, Henk; Blekhman, I.I.; Fradkov, A.L.; Pogromsky, A.Y.

    1997-01-01

    An attempt is made to give a general formalism for synchronization in dynamical systems encompassing most of the known definitions and applications. The proposed set-up describes synchronization of interconnected systems with respect to a set of functionals and captures peculiarities of both

  13. Measuring Impulsivity in Daily Life: The Momentary Impulsivity Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomko, Rachel L.; Carpenter, Ryan W.; Brown, Whitney C.; Solhan, Marika B.; Jahng, Seungmin; Wood, Phillip K.; Trull, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is a core feature of many psychiatric disorders. Traditionally, impulsivity has been assessed using retrospective questionnaires or laboratory tasks. Both approaches neglect intraindividual variability in impulsivity and do not capture impulsivity as it occurs in real-world settings. The goal of the current study was to provide a method for assessing impulsivity in daily life that provides both between-individual and within-individual information. Participants with borderline personality disorder (BPD; n = 67) or a depressive disorder (DD; n = 38) carried an electronic diary for 28 days and responded to 9 impulsivity items up to 6 times per day. Item distributions and iterative exploratory factor analysis (EFA) results were examined to select the items that best captured momentary impulsivity. A brief 4-item scale was created that can be used for the assessment of momentary impulsivity. Model fit was good for both within- and between-individual EFA. As expected, the BPD group showed significantly higher scores on our Momentary Impulsivity Scale than the DD group, and the resulting scale was moderately correlated with common trait impulsivity scales. PMID:24274047

  14. Cluster Synchronization Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Weiguo; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents two approaches to achieving cluster synchronization in dynamical multi-agent systems. In contrast to the widely studied synchronization behavior, where all the coupled agents converge to the same value asymptotically, in the cluster synchronization problem studied in this paper,

  15. Impulse noise estimation and removal for OFDM systems

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Naffouri, Tareq Y.

    2014-03-01

    Orthogonal Frequency Division Multiplexing (OFDM) is a modulation scheme that is widely used in wired and wireless communication systems. While OFDM is ideally suited to deal with frequency selective channels and AWGN, its performance may be dramatically impacted by the presence of impulse noise. In fact, very strong noise impulses in the time domain might result in the erasure of whole OFDM blocks of symbols at the receiver. Impulse noise can be mitigated by considering it as a sparse signal in time, and using recently developed algorithms for sparse signal reconstruction. We propose an algorithm that utilizes the guard band subcarriers for the impulse noise estimation and cancellation. Instead of relying on ℓ1 minimization as done in some popular general-purpose compressive sensing schemes, the proposed method jointly exploits the specific structure of this problem and the available a priori information for sparse signal recovery. The computational complexity of the proposed algorithm is very competitive with respect to sparse signal reconstruction schemes based on ℓ1 minimization. The proposed method is compared with respect to other state-of-the-art methods in terms of achievable rates for an OFDM system with impulse noise and AWGN. © 2014 IEEE.

  16. An approach to chaotic synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Hramov, Alexander E.; Koronovskii, Alexey A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper deals with the chaotic oscillator synchronization. A new approach to the synchronization of chaotic oscillators has been proposed. This approach is based on the analysis of different time scales in the time series generated by the coupled chaotic oscillators. It has been shown that complete synchronization, phase synchronization, lag synchronization and generalized synchronization are the particular cases of the synchronized behavior called as "time-scale synchronization". The quan...

  17. Impulse Detectors for Noised Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lukac

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on a problem of impulse detection in thedynamic image environments corrupted by impulse noise. Using a proposedarchitecture that includes an impulse detector and the median filter,the effective methods can be designed. Thus, the image points areclassified into two classes such as a class of noise free samples and aclass of noised image points. In the case of impulse detection theestimate is performed by a median filter whereas a noise free sample ispassed on the output without the change i.e. system works as anidentity filter.

  18. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Marc N Potenza

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may pro...

  19. Impulse Noise Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philemon; Ho, Kevin; Ryan, Allen F

    2016-05-01

    The new Auditory 4.0 model has been developed for the assessment of auditory outcomes, expressed as temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS), from exposures to impulse noise for unprotected ears, including the prediction of TTS recovery. Auditory 4.0 is an empirical model, constructed from test data collected from chinchillas exposed to impulse noise in the laboratory. Injury outcomes are defined as TTS and PTS, and Auditory 4.0 provides the full range of TTS and PTS dose-response curves with the risk factor constructed from A-weighted sound exposure level. Human data from large weapons noise exposure was also used to guide the development of the recovery model. Guided by data, a 28-dBA shift was applied to the dose-response curves to account for the scaling from chinchillas to humans. Historical data from rifle noise tests were used to validate the dose-response curves. New chinchilla tests were performed to collect recovery data to construct the TTS recovery model. Auditory 4.0 is the only model known to date that provides the full TTS and PTS dose-response curves, including a TTS recovery model. The model shows good agreement with historical data. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  20. IMPULSIVITY PARAMETER FOR SOLAR FLARES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo-Mendieta, W. G.; Alvarado-Gómez, J. D.; Calvo-Mozo, B. [Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Bogotá (Colombia); Martinez-Oliveros, J. C., E-mail: wgfajardom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: bcalvom@unal.edu.co, E-mail: oliveros@ssl.berkeley.edu, E-mail: jalvarad@eso.org [Space Sciences Laboratory, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

    2016-02-10

    Three phases are typically observed during solar flares: the preflare, impulsive, and decay phases. During the impulsive phase, it is believed that the electrons and other particles are accelerated after the stored energy in the magnetic field is released by reconnection. The impulsivity of a solar flare is a quantifiable property that shows how quickly this initial energy release occurs. It is measured via the impulsivity parameter, which we define as the inverse of the overall duration of the impulsive phase. We take the latter as the raw width of the most prominent nonthermal emission of the flare. We computed this observable over a work sample of 48 M-class events that occurred during the current Solar Cycle 24 by using three different methods. The first method takes into account all of the nonthermal flare emission and gives very accurate results, while the other two just cover fixed energy intervals (30–40 keV and 25–50 keV) and are useful for fast calculations. We propose an alternative way to classify solar flares according to their impulsivity parameter values, defining three different types of impulsivity, namely, high, medium, and low. This system of classification is independent of the manner used to calculated the impulsivity parameter. Lastly, we show the relevance of this tool as a discriminator of different HXR generation processes.

  1. Portable High Voltage Impulse Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Gómez

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a portable high voltage impulse generator which was designed and built with insulation up to 20 kV. This design was based on previous work in which simulation software for standard waves was developed. Commercial components and low-cost components were used in this work; however, these particular elements are not generally used for high voltage applications. The impulse generators used in industry and laboratories are usually expensive; they are built to withstand extra high voltage and they are big, making them impossible to transport. The proposed generator is portable, thereby allowing tests to be made on devices that cannot be moved from their location. The results obtained with the proposed impulse generator were satisfactory in terms of time and waveforms compared to other commercial impulse generators and the standard impulse wave simulator.

  2. Recent Insights into the Neurobiology of Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Marci R.; Potenza, Marc N.

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is associated with various psychopathologies, and elevated impulsivity is typically disadvantageous. This manuscript reviews recent investigations into the neurobiology of impulsivity using human imaging techniques and animal models. Both human imaging and preclinical pharmacological manipulations have yielded important insights into the neurobiological underpinnings of impulsivity. A more thorough understanding of the complex neurobiology underlying aspects of impulsivity may provide insight into new treatment options that target elevated impulsivity and psychopathologies such as addictions. PMID:25431750

  3. Synchronizing XPath Views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    synchronization. XPath is the most commonly used language for retrieving parts of XML documents, and is thus an important cornerstone for XML view definitions. This paper presents techniques for discovering schema changes in XML data sources and synchronizing XPath-based views to reflect these schema changes...

  4. Synchronization of hyperchaotic oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, A.; Cenys, A.; Mykolaitis, G.

    1997-01-01

    Synchronization of chaotic oscillators is believed to have promising applications in secure communications. Hyperchaotic systems with multiple positive Lyapunov exponents (LEs) have an advantage over common chaotic systems with only one positive LE. Three different types of hyperchaotic electronic...... oscillators are investigated demonstrating synchronization by means of only one properly selected variable....

  5. Synchronicity and Leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, Philip

    2017-01-01

    LAY SUMMARY SYNCHRONICITY AND LEADERSHIP TILBURG PHD DISSERTATION, PHILIP MERRY World’s First PhD to Research Synchronicity And Leadership Using Grounded Theory OUT OF THE BLUE COINCIDENCES: research topic Most people have had the experience of thinking of someone and then, almost magically have

  6. Control yourself: alcohol and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potenza, Marc N; de Wit, Harriet

    2010-08-01

    Impulsivity represents a complex, multifaceted construct with relevance to alcohol use, abuse, and dependence. Researchers are refining the definitions and assessment of different subtypes of impulsive behavior and relating these to the causes and consequences of alcohol-related behaviors and disorders. A satellite symposium on alcohol and impulsivity was held at the 2009 convention of the Research Society on Alcoholism. This article provides an overview of the rationale for the symposium, a synopsis of review and original research articles emanating from the symposium, and a description of the implications of the work and possible future research directions.

  7. Impulsive Control of Memristive Chaotic Systems with Impulsive Time Window

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FuLi Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The problem of impulsive control for memristor-based chaotic circuit systems with impulsive time windows is investigated. Based on comparison principle, several novel criteria which guarantee the asymptotic stabilization of the memristor-based chaotic circuit systems are obtained. In comparison with previous results, the present results are easily verified. Numerical simulations are given to further illustrate the effectiveness of the theoretical results.

  8. Lightcraft Impulse Measurements under Vacuum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Schall, Wolfgang

    2003-01-01

    Under an EOARD contract, the DLR has conducted a series of comparative impulse measurements for two different lightcraft configurations with the same nozzle exit diameter of 10 cm: The German design (GL...

  9. US German Lightcraft Impulse Measurements

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bonn, Willy

    2001-01-01

    .... In the second phase, he will measure the impulse coupling coefficient of a US supplied lightcraft on the DLR test stand for various laser pulse energies and will write a report discussing the results...

  10. The Neurobiology of Impulsive Aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Robert J R

    2016-02-01

    This selective review provides a model of the neurobiology of impulsive aggression from a cognitive neuroscience perspective. It is argued that prototypical cases of impulsive aggression, those associated with anger, involve the recruitment of the acute threat response system structures; that is, the amygdala, hypothalamus, and periaqueductal gray. It is argued that whether the recruitment of these structures results in impulsive aggression or not reflects the functional roles of ventromedial frontal cortex and dorsomedial frontal and anterior insula cortex in response selection. It is also argued that impulsive aggression may occur because of impaired decision making. The aggression may not be accompanied by anger, but it will reflect disrupted evaluation of the rewards/benefits of the action.

  11. Impulsivity, risk taking, and timing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumann, Ana A; Odum, Amy L

    2012-07-01

    This study examined the relations among measures of impulsivity and timing. Impulsivity was assessed using delay and probability discounting, and self-report impulsivity (as measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale; BIS-11). Timing was assessed using temporal perception as measured on a temporal bisection task and time perspective (as measured by the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory). One hundred and forty three college students completed these measures in a computer laboratory. The degree of delay discounting was positively correlated with the mean and range of the temporal bisection procedure. The degree of delay and probability discounting were also positively correlated. Self-reported motor impulsiveness on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with present hedonism and negatively correlated with future orientation on the ZTPI. Self-reported non-planning on the BIS-11 was positively correlated with fatalism on the ZTPI. These results show that people who overestimate the passage of time (perceive time as passing more quickly) hold less value in delayed rewards. They also confirm previous results regarding the relation between delay and probability discounting, as well as highlight similarities in self-report measures of impulsivity and time perspective. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Synchronic Fallacy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Erik W.

    of definitions. Historical linguistics ('change') is not dependent on an arbitrary synchronic theory. The two language universals polysemy and synonymy are reinterpreted and defined in accordance with the advanced definitions. Louis Hjelmslev's glossematic theory is the general horizon of the argument......The scientifc - methodological and cognitive - fallacies of modern synchronic linguistics are demonstrated. Modern synchronic linguists have reified change and since no such linguist has ever seen - sensed - a change, it is suggested to abandon the word change and replace it with existence...

  13. Asynchronized synchronous machines

    CERN Document Server

    Botvinnik, M M

    1964-01-01

    Asynchronized Synchronous Machines focuses on the theoretical research on asynchronized synchronous (AS) machines, which are "hybrids” of synchronous and induction machines that can operate with slip. Topics covered in this book include the initial equations; vector diagram of an AS machine; regulation in cases of deviation from the law of full compensation; parameters of the excitation system; and schematic diagram of an excitation regulator. The possible applications of AS machines and its calculations in certain cases are also discussed. This publication is beneficial for students and indiv

  14. The Video Head Impulse Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halmagyi, G. M.; Chen, Luke; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Weber, Konrad P.; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Curthoys, Ian S.

    2017-01-01

    In 1988, we introduced impulsive testing of semicircular canal (SCC) function measured with scleral search coils and showed that it could accurately and reliably detect impaired function even of a single lateral canal. Later we showed that it was also possible to test individual vertical canal function in peripheral and also in central vestibular disorders and proposed a physiological mechanism for why this might be so. For the next 20 years, between 1988 and 2008, impulsive testing of individual SCC function could only be accurately done by a few aficionados with the time and money to support scleral search-coil systems—an expensive, complicated and cumbersome, semi-invasive technique that never made the transition from the research lab to the dizzy clinic. Then, in 2009 and 2013, we introduced a video method of testing function of each of the six canals individually. Since 2009, the method has been taken up by most dizzy clinics around the world, with now close to 100 refereed articles in PubMed. In many dizzy clinics around the world, video Head Impulse Testing has supplanted caloric testing as the initial and in some cases the final test of choice in patients with suspected vestibular disorders. Here, we consider seven current, interesting, and controversial aspects of video Head Impulse Testing: (1) introduction to the test; (2) the progress from the head impulse protocol (HIMPs) to the new variant—suppression head impulse protocol (SHIMPs); (3) the physiological basis for head impulse testing; (4) practical aspects and potential pitfalls of video head impulse testing; (5) problems of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain calculations; (6) head impulse testing in central vestibular disorders; and (7) to stay right up-to-date—new clinical disease patterns emerging from video head impulse testing. With thanks and appreciation we dedicate this article to our friend, colleague, and mentor, Dr Bernard Cohen of Mount Sinai Medical School, New York, who since his

  15. The Video Head Impulse Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Halmagyi

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In 1988, we introduced impulsive testing of semicircular canal (SCC function measured with scleral search coils and showed that it could accurately and reliably detect impaired function even of a single lateral canal. Later we showed that it was also possible to test individual vertical canal function in peripheral and also in central vestibular disorders and proposed a physiological mechanism for why this might be so. For the next 20 years, between 1988 and 2008, impulsive testing of individual SCC function could only be accurately done by a few aficionados with the time and money to support scleral search-coil systems—an expensive, complicated and cumbersome, semi-invasive technique that never made the transition from the research lab to the dizzy clinic. Then, in 2009 and 2013, we introduced a video method of testing function of each of the six canals individually. Since 2009, the method has been taken up by most dizzy clinics around the world, with now close to 100 refereed articles in PubMed. In many dizzy clinics around the world, video Head Impulse Testing has supplanted caloric testing as the initial and in some cases the final test of choice in patients with suspected vestibular disorders. Here, we consider seven current, interesting, and controversial aspects of video Head Impulse Testing: (1 introduction to the test; (2 the progress from the head impulse protocol (HIMPs to the new variant—suppression head impulse protocol (SHIMPs; (3 the physiological basis for head impulse testing; (4 practical aspects and potential pitfalls of video head impulse testing; (5 problems of vestibulo-ocular reflex gain calculations; (6 head impulse testing in central vestibular disorders; and (7 to stay right up-to-date—new clinical disease patterns emerging from video head impulse testing. With thanks and appreciation we dedicate this article to our friend, colleague, and mentor, Dr Bernard Cohen of Mount Sinai Medical School, New York, who

  16. Dopamine-agonists and impulsivity in Parkinson's disease: impulsive choices vs. impulsive actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonelli, Francesca; Ko, Ji Hyun; Miyasaki, Janis; Lang, Anthony E; Houle, Sylvain; Valzania, Franco; Ray, Nicola J; Strafella, Antonio P

    2014-06-01

    The control of impulse behavior is a multidimensional concept subdivided into separate subcomponents, which are thought to represent different underlying mechanisms due to either disinhibitory processes or poor decision-making. In patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), dopamine-agonist (DA) therapy has been associated with increased impulsive behavior. However, the relationship among these different components in the disease and the role of DA is not well understood. In this imaging study, we investigated in PD patients the effects of DA medication on patterns of brain activation during tasks testing impulsive choices and actions. Following overnight withdrawal of antiparkinsonian medication, PD patients were studied with a H2 ((15)) O PET before and after administration of DA (1 mg of pramipexole), while they were performing the delay discounting task (DDT) and the GoNoGo Task (GNG). We observed that pramipexole augmented impulsivity during DDT, depending on reward magnitude and activated the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex and deactivated ventral striatum. In contrast, the effect of pramipexole during the GNG task was not significant on behavioral performance and involved different areas (i.e., lateral prefrontal cortex). A voxel-based correlation analysis revealed a significant negative correlation between the discounting value (k) and the activation of medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate suggesting that more impulsive patients had less activation in those cortical areas. Here we report how these different subcomponents of inhibition/impulsivity are differentially sensitive to DA treatment with pramipexole influencing mainly the neural network underlying impulsive choices but not impulsive action. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Synchronization in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  18. Impulse control disorders and depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoyeux, Michel; Arbaretaz, Marie; McLoughlin, Mary; Adès, Jean

    2002-05-01

    This study assessed the frequency of impulse control disorders (ICDs) and their association with bulimia, compulsive buying, and suicide attempts in a population of depressed inpatients. We investigated ICDs using the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. Patients answered the Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale and the Barratt Impulsivity Rating Scale. Among the 31 depressed patients who met criteria for ICD (ICD+ group), we found 18 cases of intermittent explosive disorder, three cases of pathological gambling, four cases of kleptomania, three cases of pyromania, and three cases of trichotillomania. Patients with co-occurring ICDs were significantly younger (mean age = 37.7 versus 42.8 years). Patients with kleptomania had a higher number of previous depressive episodes (5.7 versus 1.3), and patients with pyromania had a higher number of previous depressions (3.3 versus 1.3, p =.01). Bipolar disorders were more frequent in the ICD+ group than in the ICD- group (19% versus 1.3%, p =.002), whereas antisocial personality was not (3% versus 1%, p = ns). Bulimia (42% versus 10.5%, p =.005) and compulsive buying (51% versus 22%, p =.006) were significantly more frequent in the ICD+ group. Patients from the ICD+ group had higher scores of motor impulsivity assessed with the Barratt Impulsivity rating scale (p =.01).

  19. Impulsive oculomotor action selection in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duprez, Joan; Houvenaghel, Jean-François; Argaud, Soizic; Naudet, Florian; Robert, Gabriel; Drapier, Dominique; Vérin, Marc; Sauleau, Paul

    2017-01-27

    The effects of Parkinson's disease (PD) on the dynamics of impulsive action selection and suppression have recently been studied using distributional analyses, but with mixed results, especially for selection. Furthermore, some authors have suggested that impulsivity, regarded as a personality trait, shares common features with behavioral tasks' measures. The current study was designed to clarify the impact of PD on impulsive action selection and suppression, and investigate the link between cognitive action control and self-reported impulsivity. We administered an oculomotor version of the Simon task to 32 patients with PD and 32 matched healthy controls (HC), and conducted distributional analyses in accordance with the activation-suppression model. Patients and HC also filled out the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) questionnaire. Results showed that patients with PD were faster overall and exhibited a greater congruence effect than HC. They also displayed enhanced impulsive action selection. By contrast, the suppression of impulsive responses was similar across both groups. Furthermore, patients had higher impulsivity scores, which were correlated with higher impulsive action selection and higher suppression. Our study yielded two interesting findings. First, PD resulted in a higher number of fast errors. The activation-suppression model suggests that patients with PD are more susceptible to the impulsive action selection induced by the irrelevant stimulus dimension. Second, impulsive action selection and suppression were both associated with trait impulsivity, as measured by the BIS, indicating that these two aspects of impulsivity share common features. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Fast Burst Synchronization for Power Line Communication Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lampe Lutz

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Fast burst synchronization is an important requirement in asynchronous communication networks, where devices transmit short data packets in an unscheduled fashion. Such a synchronization is typically achieved by means of a preamble sent in front of the data packet. In this paper, we study fast burst synchronization for power line communication (PLC systems operating below 500 kHz and transmitting data rates of up to about 500 kbps as it is typical in various PLC network applications. In particular, we are concerned with the receiver processing of the preamble signal and the actual design of preambles suitable for fast burst synchronization in such PLC systems. Our approach is comprehensive in that it takes into account the most distinctive characteristics of the power line channel, which are multipath propagation, highly varying path loss, and disturbance by impulse noise, as well as important practical constraints, especially the need for spectral shaping of the preamble signal and fast adjustment of the automatic gain control (AGC. In fact, we regard the explicit incorporation of these various requirements into the preamble design as the main contribution of this work. We devise an optimization criterion and a stochastic algorithm to search for suitable preamble sequences. A comprehensive performance comparison of a designed and two conventional preambles shows that the designed sequence is superior in terms of (a fast burst synchronization in various transmission environments, (b fast AGC adjustment, and (c compliance of its spectrum with the spectral mask applied to the data transmit signal.

  1. Impulse: Memory System Support for Scientific Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John B. Carter

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Impulse is a new memory system architecture that adds two important features to a traditional memory controller. First, Impulse supports application‐specific optimizations through configurable physical address remapping. By remapping physical addresses, applications control how their data is accessed and cached, improving their cache and bus utilization. Second, Impulse supports prefetching at the memory controller, which can hide much of the latency of DRAM accesses. Because it requires no modification to processor, cache, or bus designs, Impulse can be adopted in conventional systems. In this paper we describe the design of the Impulse architecture, and show how an Impulse memory system can improve the performance of memory‐bound scientific applications. For instance, Impulse decreases the running time of the NAS conjugate gradient benchmark by 67%. We expect that Impulse will also benefit regularly strided, memory‐bound applications of commercial importance, such as database and multimedia programs.

  2. Neuroanatomical and Neurochemical Basis of Impulsivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kemal Yazici

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The term ‘impulsivity’ encompasses a multitude of behaviours that are poorly conceived, premature, inappropriate, and that frequently result in unwanted or deleterious outcomes. Impulsivity manifests as impatience carelessness, risk-taking, sensation-seeking and pleasure-seeking, an underestimated sense of harm, and extroversion. Impulsivity is a core symptom of a broad spectrum of psychiatric disorders. Through focusing on different aspects of impulsive behavior, it has proved possible to devise a variety of behavioral paradigms to measure impulsivity in both human and non-human subjects. These can be broadly divided into two categories: those measuring impulsive action or motoric impulsivity, and those measuring impulsive choice or impulsive decision-making. Impulsive action can be broadly defined as the inability to withhold from making a response. Within the framework of behavioral neuroscience and cognitive psychology, impulse control has been described as an active inhibitory mechanism which modulates the internally or externally driven pre-potent desire for primary reinforcers such as food, sex or other highly desirable rewards. This inhibitory control mechanism may provide the substrate by which rapid conditioned responses and reflexes are transiently suppressed, so that slower cognitive mechanisms can guide behavior. This process is referred to as response inhibition. Two of the most common tests used to study inhibitory processes are the go/no-go and stop-signal reaction time tasks. Impulsivity is also evident in the making of impulsive decisions or choices as well as in impulsive actions. Here, there is no “pre-potent” response that is primed and then forcibly inhibited, but a decision-making processes. Impulsive decision making or impulsive choice is defined as initiating actions without adequately considering other possible choices or consequences. Impulsive choice is typically measured in the delay discounting paradigm. In

  3. Trait Impulsivity and Newlyweds' Marital Trajectories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavner, Justin A; Lamkin, Joanna; Miller, Joshua D

    2017-02-01

    Despite the relationship of impulsivity with interpersonal dysfunction, including romantic relationship dysfunction, surprisingly little research has examined the degree to which impulsivity predicts how marriages unfold over time. The current study used data from 172 newlywed couples to examine spouses' impulsivity in relation to their 4-year trajectories of marital satisfaction, marital problems, relationship commitment, and verbal aggression, as well as their 10-year divorce rates. Hierarchical linear modeling indicated that husbands' and wives' impulsivity predicted their own intercepts of marital satisfaction and marital problems, reflecting lower levels of satisfaction and higher levels of problems. Wives' impulsivity also predicted their relationship commitment and their verbal aggression intercepts. No cross-spouse effects or effects on slopes were found, and impulsivity did not predict 10-year divorce rates. These findings indicate that the relationship distress associated with impulsivity begins early in marriage, and they suggest a need for further research on the processes by which impulsivity undermines marital quality.

  4. Analysis of synchronous machines

    CERN Document Server

    Lipo, TA

    2012-01-01

    Analysis of Synchronous Machines, Second Edition is a thoroughly modern treatment of an old subject. Courses generally teach about synchronous machines by introducing the steady-state per phase equivalent circuit without a clear, thorough presentation of the source of this circuit representation, which is a crucial aspect. Taking a different approach, this book provides a deeper understanding of complex electromechanical drives. Focusing on the terminal rather than on the internal characteristics of machines, the book begins with the general concept of winding functions, describing the placeme

  5. Commentary on Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, Russell A.

    2011-01-01

    Dr. Goldstein continues the laudable practice of reprinting articles of historical significance in the history of ADHD with this selective reprinting of material from the original article by Maurice Laufer, Eric Denhoff, and Gerald Solomons on hyperkinetic impulsive disorder (HID) in children. This article on HID is among the first articles to…

  6. Impulse sales cooler. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedersen, Per Henrik (DTI, Taastrup (Denmark))

    2010-11-15

    In the past years, the use of impulse coolers has increased considerably and it is estimated that at least 30.000 are installed in shops in Denmark. In addition, there are many small barrel-shaped can coolers. Most impulse coolers are open, which results in a large consumption of energy, and the refrigeration systems are often quite inefficient. A typical impulse cooler uses app. 5 - 8 kWh/day corresponding to a consumption of energy in the magnitude of 60 GWh/year. For several years, the Danish company Vestfrost A/S has produced an impulse sales cooler in the high-efficiency end and the energy consumption of the cooler is measured to be 4.15 kWh/day. The POS72 cooler formed the baseline of this project. At the start-up meeting in 2008, several ideas were discussed with the objective to reduce energy consumption and to use natural refrigerants. Among the ideas were better air curtains, removable lids, better condensers, use of R600a refrigeration system and better insulation. Three generations of prototypes were built and tested in a climate chamber at Danish Technological Institute and the third generation showed very good performance: the energy consumption was measured to 2.215 kWh/day, which is a 47% reduction compared to the baseline. That was achieved by: 1) Improving the cold air cycling system including the air curtain. 2) Using the natural refrigerant R600a (isobutane) and the Danfoss NLE9KTK compressor, which has better efficiency compared to the compressor in the baseline product. 3) Using a box type condenser without fins (preventing dust build-up) and with a relatively high surface area. 4) Improving the insulation value of the plastic cabinet by reducing turbulence in the air gap between the plastic walls and improving the insulation value of the EPS moulded insulation surrounding the refrigeration system at the bottom of the cooler. 5) Preventing short-circuit of warm air around the condenser. 6) The improvements are cost efficient and will not add

  7. A New Switching Impulse Generator Based on Transformer Boosting and Insulated Gate Bipolar Transistor Trigger Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Ren

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available To make the switching impulse (SI generator more compact, portable and feasible in field tests, a new approach based on transformer boosting was developed. To address problems such as triggering synchronization and electromagnetic interference involved with the traditional spark gap, an insulated gate bipolar transistor (IGBT module with drive circuit was employed as the impulse trigger. An optimization design for the component parameters of the primary winding side of the transformer was realized by numerical calculation and error correction. Experiment showed that the waveform parameters of SI and oscillating switching impulse (OSI voltages generated by the new generator were consistent with the numerical calculation and the error correction. The generator was finally built on a removable high voltage transformer with small size. Thus the volume of the generator is significantly reduced. Experiments showed that the waveform parameters of SI and OSI voltages generated by the new generator were basically consistent with the numerical calculation and the error correction.

  8. Baseline impulsive choice predicts the effects of nicotine and nicotine withdrawal on impulsivity in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayir, Hakan; Semenova, Svetlana; Markou, Athina

    2014-01-03

    Impulsive choice, a form of impulsivity, is associated with tobacco smoking in humans. Trait impulsivity may be a vulnerability factor for smoking, or smoking may lead to impulsive behaviors. We investigated the effects of 14-day nicotine exposure (6.32mg/kg/day base, subcutaneous minipumps) and spontaneous nicotine withdrawal on impulsive choice in low impulsive (LI) and high impulsive (HI) rats. Impulsive choice was measured in the delayed reward task in which rats choose between a small immediate reward and a large delayed reward. HI and LI rats were selected from the highest and lowest quartiles of the group before exposure to nicotine. In non-selected rats, nicotine or nicotine withdrawal had no effect on impulsive choice. In LI rats, chronic nicotine exposure decreased preference for the large reward with larger effects at longer delays, indicating increased impulsive choice. Impulsive choices for the smaller immediate rewards continued to increase during nicotine withdrawal in LI rats. In HI rats, nicotine exposure and nicotine withdrawal had no effect on impulsive choice, although there was a tendency for decreased preference for the large reward at short delays. These results indicate that nicotine- and nicotine withdrawal-induced increases in impulsive choice depend on trait impulsivity with more pronounced increases in impulsive choice in LI compared to HI subjects. Increased impulsivity during nicotine exposure may strengthen the addictive properties of nicotine and contribute to compulsive nicotine use. © 2013.

  9. Impulsivity, Frontal Lobes and Risk for Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Crews, Fulton Timm; Boettiger, Charlotte Ann

    2009-01-01

    Alcohol and substance abuse disorders involve continued use of substances despite negative consequences, i.e. loss of behavioral control of drug use. The frontal cortical areas of brain oversee behavioral control through executive functions. Executive functions include abstract thinking, motivation, planning, attention to tasks and inhibition of impulsive responses. Impulsiveness generally refers to premature, unduly risky, poorly conceived actions. Dysfunctional impulsivity includes deficits...

  10. Full averaging of fuzzy impulsive differential inclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia V. Skripnik

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the substantiation of the method of full averaging for fuzzy impulsive differential inclusions is studied. We extend the similar results for impulsive differential inclusions with Hukuhara derivative (Skripnik, 2007, for fuzzy impulsive differential equations (Plotnikov and Skripnik, 2009, and for fuzzy differential inclusions (Skripnik, 2009.

  11. Order release in synchronous manufacturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riezebos, J.

    2010-01-01

    Synchronous manufacturing aims at achieving the benefits of intermittent production lines in production situations that operate without lines. Benefits such as short and constant throughput times and predictable capacity loading can be acquired through an appropriate design of the synchronous

  12. Synchronizing Hyperchaotic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tamasevicius, Arunas; Cenys, Antanas; Namajunas, Audrius

    1997-01-01

    Regarding possible applications to secure communications the technique of synchronizing hyperchaotic circuits with a single dynamical variable is discussed. Several specific examples including the fourth-order circuits with two positive Lyapunov exponents as well as the oscillator with a delay line...

  13. Synchronization of respiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garssen, B.

    In order to study synchronization of respiration, three different videofragments were presented to 21 normal subjects. Each fragment showed a ‘therapeutic interview’ specially performed for this purpose, with a ‘patient’ breathing in a particular way. The respiration of model 1 was deep, slow and

  14. Synchronization of networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-11-27

    Nov 27, 2015 ... We study the synchronization of coupled dynamical systems on networks. The dynamics is governed by a local nonlinear oscillator for each node of the network and interactions connecting different nodes via the links of the network. We consider existence and stability conditions for both single- and ...

  15. Nonlinearities and synchronization in musical acoustics and music psychology

    CERN Document Server

    Bader, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinearities are a crucial and founding principle in nearly all musical systems, may they be musical instruments, timbre or rhythm perception and production, or neural networks of music perception. This volume gives an overview about present and past research in these fields. In Musical Acoustics, on the one hand the nonlinearities in musical instruments often produce the musically interesting features. On the other, musical instruments are nonlinear by nature, and tone production is the result of synchronization and self-organization within the instruments. Furthermore, as nearly all musical instruments are driven by impulses an Impulse Pattern Formulation (IPF) is suggested, an iterative framework holding for all musical instruments. It appears that this framework is able to reproduce the complex and perceptionally most salient initial transients of musical instruments. In Music Psychology, nonlinearities are present in all areas of musical features, like pitch, timbre, or rhythm perception. In terms of r...

  16. Impulsive Phase Transport. Chapter 3,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-03-30

    with extensive UV coordinated through the SMY (Svestka, Rust, and Dryer line spectroscopy. Contemporarily though not simultane- 1982). Ground support...calculations of the production of the non- the best job of explaining the wide variety of impulsive-phase thermal red shifted La line by capture processes on...slow if the injection occurred over many sub-resolution elements down. Second. there is strong local heating produced near (a "’ pepper -pot" scenario

  17. Synchronizing Strategies under Partial Observability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Laursen, Simon; Srba, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Embedded devices usually share only partial information about their current configurations as the communication bandwidth can be restricted. Despite this, we may wish to bring a failed device into a given predetermined configuration. This problem, also known as resetting or synchronizing words, has...... been intensively studied for systems that do not provide any information about their configurations. In order to capture more general scenarios, we extend the existing theory of synchronizing words to synchronizing strategies, and study the synchronization, short-synchronization and subset...

  18. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  19. Optimixing Synchronous Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-03-01

    Flavio Rose of MIT. Several hosts. A natural extension to the model of synchronous systems is the inclusion of multiple, independent hosts. The...but just use the Retiming Lemma to improve its clock period as much as possible. With Flavio Rose, we have obtained the following results...than 10 ). Acknowledgment Thanks to Jon Bcntlcy, Dan Hocy, and Flavio Rose for comments and suggestions. Thanks also to S. Rao Kosaraju for

  20. Total Variation Based Parameter-Free Model for Impulse Noise Removal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciacchitano, Federica; Dong, Yiqiu; Andersen, Martin Skovgaard

    2017-01-01

    reconstruction problem using a first-order primal-dual algorithm. The proposed model improves the computational efficiency (in the denoising case) and has the advantage of being regularization parameter-free. Our numerical results suggest that the method is competitive in terms of its restoration capabilities......We propose a new two-phase method for reconstruction of blurred images corrupted by impulse noise. In the first phase, we use a noise detector to identify the pixels that are contaminated by noise, and then, in the second phase, we reconstruct the noisy pixels by solving an equality constrained...... total variation minimization problem that preserves the exact values of the noise-free pixels. For images that are only corrupted by impulse noise (i. e., not blurred) we apply the semismooth Newton's method to a reduced problem, and if the images are also blurred, we solve the equality constrained...

  1. Synchronizing time delay systems using variable delay in coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambika, G., E-mail: g.ambika@iiserpune.ac.in [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Pune 411 021 (India); Amritkar, R.E., E-mail: amritkar@prl.res.in [Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad 380 009 (India)

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: > Delay and anticipation in coupling function varies with system dynamics. > Delay or anticipation of the synchronized state is independent of system delay. > Stability analysis developed is quite general. > We demonstrate enhanced security in communication. > Generalized synchronization possible over a wide range of parameter mismatch. - Abstract: We present a mechanism for synchronizing time delay systems using one way coupling with a variable delay in coupling that is reset at finite intervals. We present the analysis of the error dynamics that helps to isolate regions of stability of the synchronized state in the parameter space of interest for single and multiple delays. We supplement this by numerical simulations in a standard time delay system like Mackey Glass system. This method has the advantage that it can be adjusted to be delay or anticipatory in synchronization with a time which is independent of the system delay. We demonstrate the use of this method in communication using the bi channel scheme. We show that since the synchronizing channel carries information from transmitter only at intervals of reset time, it is not susceptible to an easy reconstruction.

  2. Global synchronization of memristive neural networks subject to random disturbances via distributed pinning control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Zhenyuan; Yang, Shaofu; Wang, Jun

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents theoretical results on global exponential synchronization of multiple memristive neural networks in the presence of external noise by means of two types of distributed pinning control. The multiple memristive neural networks are coupled in a general structure via a nonlinear function, which consists of a linear diffusive term and a discontinuous sign term. A pinning impulsive control law is introduced in the coupled system to synchronize all neural networks. Sufficient conditions are derived for ascertaining global exponential synchronization in mean square. In addition, a pinning adaptive control law is developed to achieve global exponential synchronization in mean square. Both pinning control laws utilize only partial state information received from the neighborhood of the controlled neural network. Simulation results are presented to substantiate the theoretical results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The relationship between impulsive choice and impulsive action: a cross-species translational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broos, Nienke; Schmaal, Lianne; Wiskerke, Joost; Kostelijk, Lennard; Lam, Thomas; Stoop, Nicky; Weierink, Lonneke; Ham, Jannemieke; de Geus, Eco J C; Schoffelmeer, Anton N M; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J; de Vries, Taco J; Pattij, Tommy; Goudriaan, Anna E

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in impulsive choice (delayed reward task) and impulsive action (five-choice serial reaction time task) paradigms. The correlation between those measures was assessed during baseline performance and after pharmacological manipulations with the psychostimulant amphetamine and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. In parallel, to validate the animal data, 101 human subjects performed analogous measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting task, DDT) and impulsive action (immediate and delayed memory task, IMT/DMT). Moreover, all subjects completed the Stop Signal Task (SST, as an additional measure of impulsive action) and filled out the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11). Correlations between DDT and IMT/DMT were determined and a principal component analysis was performed on all human measures of impulsivity. In both rats and humans measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action did not correlate. In rats the within-subject pharmacological effects of amphetamine and atomoxetine did not correlate between tasks, suggesting distinct underlying neural correlates. Furthermore, in humans, principal component analysis identified three independent factors: (1) self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11); (2) impulsive action (IMT/DMT and SST); (3) impulsive choice (DDT). This is the first study directly comparing aspects of impulsivity using a cross-species translational approach. The present data reveal the non-unitary nature of impulsivity on a behavioral and pharmacological level. Collectively, this warrants a stronger focus on the relative contribution of distinct forms of impulsivity in psychopathology.

  4. The relationship between impulsive choice and impulsive action: a cross-species translational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke Broos

    Full Text Available Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in impulsive choice (delayed reward task and impulsive action (five-choice serial reaction time task paradigms. The correlation between those measures was assessed during baseline performance and after pharmacological manipulations with the psychostimulant amphetamine and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. In parallel, to validate the animal data, 101 human subjects performed analogous measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting task, DDT and impulsive action (immediate and delayed memory task, IMT/DMT. Moreover, all subjects completed the Stop Signal Task (SST, as an additional measure of impulsive action and filled out the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11. Correlations between DDT and IMT/DMT were determined and a principal component analysis was performed on all human measures of impulsivity. In both rats and humans measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action did not correlate. In rats the within-subject pharmacological effects of amphetamine and atomoxetine did not correlate between tasks, suggesting distinct underlying neural correlates. Furthermore, in humans, principal component analysis identified three independent factors: (1 self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11; (2 impulsive action (IMT/DMT and SST; (3 impulsive choice (DDT. This is the first study directly comparing aspects of impulsivity using a cross-species translational approach. The present data reveal the non-unitary nature of impulsivity on a behavioral and pharmacological level. Collectively, this warrants a stronger focus on the relative contribution of distinct forms of impulsivity in psychopathology.

  5. The Relationship between Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action: A Cross-Species Translational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskerke, Joost; Kostelijk, Lennard; Lam, Thomas; Stoop, Nicky; Weierink, Lonneke; Ham, Jannemieke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J.; de Vries, Taco J.

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in impulsive choice (delayed reward task) and impulsive action (five-choice serial reaction time task) paradigms. The correlation between those measures was assessed during baseline performance and after pharmacological manipulations with the psychostimulant amphetamine and the norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine. In parallel, to validate the animal data, 101 human subjects performed analogous measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting task, DDT) and impulsive action (immediate and delayed memory task, IMT/DMT). Moreover, all subjects completed the Stop Signal Task (SST, as an additional measure of impulsive action) and filled out the Barratt impulsiveness scale (BIS-11). Correlations between DDT and IMT/DMT were determined and a principal component analysis was performed on all human measures of impulsivity. In both rats and humans measures of impulsive choice and impulsive action did not correlate. In rats the within-subject pharmacological effects of amphetamine and atomoxetine did not correlate between tasks, suggesting distinct underlying neural correlates. Furthermore, in humans, principal component analysis identified three independent factors: (1) self-reported impulsivity (BIS-11); (2) impulsive action (IMT/DMT and SST); (3) impulsive choice (DDT). This is the first study directly comparing aspects of impulsivity using a cross-species translational approach. The present data reveal the non-unitary nature of impulsivity on a behavioral and pharmacological level. Collectively, this warrants a stronger focus on the relative contribution of distinct forms of impulsivity in psychopathology. PMID:22574225

  6. Dynamic Experiments using IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Brian

    2013-06-01

    The ability to examine the dynamic response of materials at extreme conditions requires diagnostics that can provide real-time, in situ ,spatially resolved measurements at the appropriate length. Recent advances in synchrotron sources and diagnostics coupled to dynamic loading platforms are transforming the dynamic compression field to allow for such investigations. In the current work, recent experimental efforts on the IMPULSE (IMPact System for ULtrafast Synchrotron Experiments) capability at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) will be highlighted to describe the development of the capability and its use to examine phenomena including jet-formation in metals, compaction, crack formation and propagation, and material strength and failure. These experimental results have relied in part on: 1) the development of a robust optically multiplexed intensified detector configuration to obtain the first shock movies and 2) gun system improvements to better synchronize the impact event with the 60-ps width X-ray bunch. The IMPULSE capability is expected to continue to reveal novel phenomena for materials subjected to high strain rate loading while developing the required knowledge base to ensure success for future facilities including the Dynamic Compression Sector at the Advanced Photon Source and LANL's MaRIE.

  7. Dynamic experiment using IMPULSE at the Advanced Photon Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, B. J.; Ramos, K. J.; Iverson, A. J.; Bernier, J.; Carlson, C. A.; Yeager, J. D.; Fezzaa, K.; Hooks, D. E.

    2014-05-01

    The ability to examine the dynamic response of materials at extreme conditions requires diagnostics that can provide real-time, in situ, spatially resolved measurements at the appropriate length scale. Recent advances in synchrotron sources and diagnostics coupled to dynamic loading platforms are transforming the dynamic compression field to allow for such investigations. In the current work, recent experimental efforts on the IMPULSE (IMPact System for ULtrafast Synchrotron Experiments) capability at the Advanced Photon Source (Argonne, IL) will be highlighted to describe its development and use to examine phenomena including jet-formation in metals, compaction, crack formation and propagation, and material strength and failure. These experimental results have relied in part on: 1) the development of a robust optically multiplexed intensified detector configuration to obtain the first shock movies and 2) gun system improvements to better synchronize the impact event with the 80-ps width X-ray bunch. The IMPULSE capability is expected to continue to reveal novel phenomena for materials subjected to high strain rate loading while developing the required knowledge base to ensure success for future facilities including the Dynamic Compression Sector at the Advanced Photon Source and LANL's MaRIE.

  8. Impulsive behavior and nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohmura, Yu; Tsutsui-Kimura, Iku; Yoshioka, Mitsuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Higher impulsivity is thought to be a risk factor for drug addiction, criminal involvement, and suicide. Excessive levels of impulsivity are often observed in several psychiatric disorders including attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and schizophrenia. Previous studies have demonstrated that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are involved in impulsive behavior. Here, we introduce recent advances in this field and describe the role of the following nAChR-related brain mechanisms in modulating impulsive behavior: dopamine release in the ventral striatum; α4β2 nAChRs in the infralimbic cortex, which is a ventral part of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); and dopamine release in the mPFC. We also suggest several potential therapeutic drugs to address these mechanisms in impulsivity-related disorders and explore future directions to further elucidate the roles of central nAChRs in impulsive behavior.

  9. Impulsive differential inclusions a fixed point approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ouahab, Abdelghani; Henderson, Johnny

    2013-01-01

    Impulsive differential equations have been developed in modeling impulsive problems in physics, population dynamics, ecology, biotechnology, industrial robotics, pharmacokinetics, optimal control, etc. The questions of existence and stability of solutions for different classes of initial values problems for impulsive differential equations and inclusions with fixed and variable moments are considered in detail. Attention is also given to boundary value problems and relative questions concerning differential equations. This monograph addresses a variety of side issues that arise from its simple

  10. Impaired decisional impulsivity in pathological videogamers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A Irvine

    Full Text Available Pathological gaming is an emerging and poorly understood problem. Impulsivity is commonly impaired in disorders of behavioural and substance addiction, hence we sought to systematically investigate the different subtypes of decisional and motor impulsivity in a well-defined pathological gaming cohort.Fifty-two pathological gaming subjects and age-, gender- and IQ-matched healthy volunteers were tested on decisional impulsivity (Information Sampling Task testing reflection impulsivity and delay discounting questionnaire testing impulsive choice, and motor impulsivity (Stop Signal Task testing motor response inhibition, and the premature responding task. We used stringent diagnostic criteria highlighting functional impairment.In the Information Sampling Task, pathological gaming participants sampled less evidence prior to making a decision and scored fewer points compared with healthy volunteers. Gaming severity was also negatively correlated with evidence gathered and positively correlated with sampling error and points acquired. In the delay discounting task, pathological gamers made more impulsive choices, preferring smaller immediate over larger delayed rewards. Pathological gamers made more premature responses related to comorbid nicotine use. Greater number of hours played also correlated with a Motivational Index. Greater frequency of role playing games was associated with impaired motor response inhibition and strategy games with faster Go reaction time.We show that pathological gaming is associated with impaired decisional impulsivity with negative consequences in task performance. Decisional impulsivity may be a potential target in therapeutic management.

  11. Impulse control disorders in adult psychiatric inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Levine, Laura; Kim, Daniel; Potenza, Marc N

    2005-11-01

    The authors' goal was to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in psychiatric inpatients. They used the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, a semistructured clinical interview assessing pathological gambling, trichotillomania, kleptomania, pyromania, intermittent explosive disorder, compulsive buying, and compulsive sexual behavior, to screen 204 consecutively admitted psychiatric inpatients. One hundred twelve of the inpatients were women (54.9%), and the mean age of the 204 inpatients was 40.5 years (SD=13.2, range=18-83). Patients whose screen was positive for an impulse control disorder were evaluated with structured clinical interviews. Sixty-three patients (30.9%) were diagnosed with at least one current impulse control disorder. The most common impulse control disorders were compulsive buying (N=19 [9.3%]), kleptomania (N=16 [7.8%]), and pathological gambling (N=14 [6.9%]). Patients with and without co-occurring impulse control disorders did not differ significantly from each other on demographic measures or number or type of psychiatric diagnoses other than impulse control disorders. Impulse control disorders appear common among psychiatric inpatients. Additional, larger studies are needed to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders in the general population and specific psychiatric groups.

  12. Impulsivity and internalizing disorders in childhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosi, Sandra; Hernández-Martínez, Carmen; Canals, Josepa; Vigil-Colet, Andreu

    2011-12-30

    Impulsivity has often been related to externalizing disorders, but little is known about how it is related to symptoms of internalizing disorders. This study aims to examine the relationship between impulsivity and depression and anxiety symptoms of depression and anxiety in childhood, and compare it with its relationship with a measure of aggressive behavior, which is present in many externalizing disorders. We administered the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale-11 for children, the Children's Depression Inventory and the Screen for Children's Anxiety Related Emotional Disorders to a case-control sample of 562 children aged between 9 and 13 who were selected from an epidemiological study of anxiety and depression and whose teachers provided information about their proactive and reactive aggression. Impulsivity was related to measures of anxiety, depression and aggressive behavior, and showed higher relationships with measures of internalizing symptoms than with aggression. Motor impulsivity, a component of impulsivity related to inhibition deficits, was the component most related to anxiety and depression. Cognitive impulsivity, on the other hand, was negatively related to anxiety and depression. The relationships between impulsivity and symptoms of internalizing disorders seem to indicate that impulsivity should be taken into account not only in externalizing problems, but also in depression and anxiety in children and adolescents. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. An underwater chaotic lidar sensor based on synchronized blue laser diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumbaugh, Luke K.; Dunn, Kaitlin J.; Bollt, Erik M.; Cochenour, Brandon; Jemison, William D.

    2016-05-01

    We present a novel chaotic lidar system designed for underwater impulse response measurements. The system uses two recently introduced, low-cost, commercially available 462 nm multimode InGaN laser diodes, which are synchronized by a bi-directional optical link. This synchronization results in a noise-like chaotic intensity modulation with over 1 GHz bandwidth and strong modulation depth. An advantage of this approach is its simple transmitter architecture, which uses no electrical signal generator, electro-optic modulator, or optical frequency doubler.

  14. Control of synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous motors are indubitably the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. Their control law is thus critical for combining at the same time high productivity to reduced energy consummation. As far as possible, the control algorithms must exploit the properties of these actuators. Therefore, this work draws on well adapted models resulting from the Park's transformation, for both the most traditional machines with sinusoidal field distribution and for machines with non-sinusoidal field distribution which are more and more used in

  15. Medical issues in synchronized skating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kristin; Hecht, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    Synchronized skating is a unique sport of team skating and currently represents the largest competitive discipline in U.S. Figure Skating. Synchronized skating allows skaters to compete as part of a team with opportunities to represent their country in international competitions. As the popularity of the sport continues to grow, more of these athletes will present to sports medicine clinics with injuries and illnesses related to participation in synchronized skating. The purpose of this article is to review the common injuries and medical conditions affecting synchronized skaters.

  16. Impulsive choice and impulsive action predict vulnerability to distinct stages of nicotine seeking in rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diergaarde, L.; Pattij, T.; Poortvliet, I.; Hogenboom, F.; de Vries, W.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; de Vries, T.J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Although heavy smoking has been associated with impulsivity in humans, it is not clear whether poor impulse control represents a risk factor in the etiology of nicotine dependence. Methods: To address this issue, rats were selected on the basis of individual differences in impulsivity in

  17. Impulsivity and the Sexes: Measurement and Structural Invariance of the UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cyders, Melissa A.

    2013-01-01

    Before it is possible to test whether men and women differ in impulsivity, it is necessary to evaluate whether impulsivity measures are invariant across sex. The UPPS-P Impulsive Behavior Scale (negative urgency, lack of premeditation, lack of perseverance, and sensation seeking, with added subscale of positive urgency) is one measure of five…

  18. Hyperkinetic Impulse Disorder in Children's Behavior Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laufer, Maurice W.; Denhoff, Eric; Solomons, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    A very common cause of children's behavior disorder disturbance is an entity described as the hyperkinetic impulse disorder. This is characterized by hyperactivity, short attention span and poor powers of concentration, irritability, impulsiveness, variability, and poor schoolwork. The existence of this complexity may lead to many psychological…

  19. Impulsive Vaccination for an Epidemiology Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Sen, M.; Garrido, A. J.

    2017-03-01

    This paper investigates sufficient conditions of almost periodic sand periodic solutions of an integral model under impulsive controls. Since the model is of generic epidemiological interest, such impulsive controls are either vaccination actions or abrupt variations of the infected population due to infected immigration or lost of infective numbers due to either vaccination or lost of infected population by out-migration.

  20. Impulsivity, School Context, and School Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Matt; Barton, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity holds a central place in the explanations of adolescent delinquency. Recent research suggests that neighborhood characteristics, particularly SES (socioeconomic status), perceived supervision, and collective efficacy, moderate the association between impulsivity and delinquency. However, findings to date have been equivocal, and the…

  1. Temporal Preparation, Response Inhibition and Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correa, Angel; Trivino, Monica; Perez-Duenas, Carolina; Acosta, Alberto; Lupianez, Juan

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation and impulsivity involve overlapping neural structures (prefrontal cortex) and cognitive functions (response inhibition and time perception), however, their interrelations had not been investigated. We studied such interrelations by comparing the performance of groups with low vs. high non-clinical trait impulsivity during a…

  2. Biologically Inspired Intercellular Slot Synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Tyrrell

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The present article develops a decentralized interbase station slot synchronization algorithm suitable for cellular mobile communication systems. The proposed cellular firefly synchronization (CelFSync algorithm is derived from the theory of pulse-coupled oscillators, common to describe synchronization phenomena in biological systems, such as the spontaneous synchronization of fireflies. In order to maintain synchronization among base stations (BSs, even when there is no direct link between adjacent BSs, some selected user terminals (UTs participate in the network synchronization process. Synchronization emerges by exchanging two distinct synchronization words, one transmitted by BSs and the other by active UTs, without any a priori assumption on the initial timing misalignments of BSs and UTs. In large-scale networks with inter-BS site distances up to a few kilometers, propagation delays severely affect the attainable timing accuracy of CelFSync. We show that by an appropriate combination of CelFSync with the timing advance procedure, which aligns uplink transmission of UTs to arrive simultaneously at the BS, a timing accuracy within a fraction of the inter-BS propagation delay is retained.

  3. Business cycle synchronization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Ulf Michael; Jonung, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study business cycle synchronization in the three Scandinavian countries Denmark, Norway and Sweden prior to, during and after the Scandinavian Currency Union 1873–1913. We find that the degree of synchronization tended to increase during the currency union, thus supporting earlier...

  4. Exploiting Schemas in Data Synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, J. Nathan; Greenwald, Michael B.; Kirkegaard, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Increased reliance on optimistic data replication has led to burgeoning interest in tools and frameworks for disconnected updates to replicated data.We have implemented a generic synchronization framework, called HARMONY, that can be used to build state-based synchronizers for a wide variety of t...

  5. Benefits of Synchronous Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Scott; Smith, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Most online courses are offered as "asynchronous" courses and have no real-time contact with students. The Synchronous online alternative provides normal scheduled class time and allows students to login to a virtual online classroom with the instructor. We provide an overview of two different platforms for hosting synchronous classes…

  6. Non-instantaneous impulses in differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Agarwal, Ravi; O'Regan, Donal

    2017-01-01

    This monograph is the first published book devoted to the theory of differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses. It aims to equip the reader with mathematical models and theory behind real life processes in physics, biology, population dynamics, ecology and pharmacokinetics. The authors examine a wide scope of differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses through three comprehensive chapters, providing an all-rounded and unique presentation on the topic, including: - Ordinary differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses (scalar and n-dimensional case) - Fractional differential equa tions with non-instantaneous impulses (with Caputo fractional derivatives of order q ϵ (0, 1)) - Ordinary differential equations with non-instantaneous impulses occurring at random moments (with exponential, Erlang, or Gamma distribution) Each chapter focuses on theory, proofs and examples, and contains numerous graphs to enrich the reader’s understanding. Additionally, a carefully selected bibliogr...

  7. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesekin, A. N.; Nepp, A. N.

    2015-11-01

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  8. Impulse position control algorithms for nonlinear systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sesekin, A. N., E-mail: sesekin@list.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation); Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics, Ural Division of Russian Academy of Sciences, 16 S. Kovalevskaya, Ekaterinburg, 620990 (Russian Federation); Nepp, A. N., E-mail: anepp@urfu.ru [Ural Federal University, 19 S. Mira, Ekaterinburg, 620002 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    The article is devoted to the formalization and description of impulse-sliding regime in nonlinear dynamical systems that arise in the application of impulse position controls of a special kind. The concept of trajectory impulse-sliding regime formalized as some limiting network element Euler polygons generated by a discrete approximation of the impulse position control This paper differs from the previously published papers in that it uses a definition of solutions of systems with impulse controls, it based on the closure of the set of smooth solutions in the space of functions of bounded variation. The need for the study of such regimes is the fact that they often arise when parry disturbances acting on technical or economic control system.

  9. Impulsive phenomena, the impulsive character (der Triebhafte Charakter) and DSM personality disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, J Christopher; Körner, Annett C

    2011-10-01

    Impulsive phenomena have frequently been associated with personality disorders, beginning with Reich's description of the impulsive-character (Reich, 1925/1975). However, questions remain regarding the cooccurrence of a wide variety of impulsive phenomena and whether an underlying structure influences the differential association of impulses to individual personality disorders. Adults entering residential treatment for treatment-refractory disorders were interviewed about their lifetime histories of 33 impulse items, following independent diagnostic interviews. Factor analysis suggested 12 underlying dimensions of impulsive phenomena, explaining 68% of the variance. Borderline and antisocial PDs had the highest impulse scores, followed by self-defeating, narcissistic, depressive, and passive-aggressive PDs. Schizoid, avoidant, obsessive-compulsive, and dependent types were negatively associated with impulsive phenomena. Individuals with the highest impulse scores showed higher levels of borderline, antisocial and either self-defeating or passive-aggressive personality pathology, and were characterized by high Neuroticism and Openness and low Agreeableness on the NEO-FFI. Personality disorders and the NEO-FFI personality traits both predicted unique variance in impulsive phenomena, with the former predominating. Our findings bear striking similarities to Reich's (1925/1975) descriptions of the impulsive character.

  10. Aggression and impulsivity with impulsive behaviours in patients with purgative anorexia and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalar, Bojan; Weber, Urška; Sernec, Karin

    2011-03-01

    The study aimed to compare purgative anorexia and bulimia nervosa patients in regard of their level of aggression and impulsivity traits, as well as dynamics of selected impulsive behaviours over time-course of eating disorder treatment. 30 females with purgative anorexia nervosa, 33 females with purgative bulimia nervosa and 31 controls were included. Impulsive behaviours were assessed upon hospital admission, discharge, and three and six months after, using the internal ward questionnaire. Aggression and impulsivity traits were evaluated three months after discharge using Buss-Durkee Hostility Inventory and Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, 11th Revision. In all patients, the expressed impulsive behaviours were most frequent upon admission, when bingeing, striking and quarrelling were more expressed in bulimic patients. Later, patient groups did not differ regarding any impulsive behaviour. These all substantially resolved till discharge, and showed further decline at later assessments. All patients had a higher level of aggression and impulsivity traits and lower overt and higher covert aggression than controls. Patient groups had similar within group distribution of aggression and impulsivity intensity levels. Regarding individual dimensions of these traits no difference was found between them, except for the higher level of suspiciousness in anorectic individuals. Purgative anorectic and bulimic patients show similar dynamics of impulsive behaviours which substantially decline over time-course of eating disorder treatment. They both present similarly heightened levels of aggression and impulsivity traits, with some minor differences regarding their individual dimensions, possibly reflecting higher overt aggression in bulimic and higher covert aggression in anorectic patients.

  11. Conversion of Impulse Voltage Generator Into Steep Wave Impulse Test-Equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed Zaid; Tanwar, Surender Singh; Dayama, Ravindra; Choudhary, Rahul Raj; Mangal, Ravindra

    This paper demonstrates the alternative measures to generate the Steep wave impulse by using Impulse Voltage Generator (IVG) for high voltage testing of porcelain insulators. The modification of IVG by incorporating compensation of resistor, inductor, and capacitor has been achieved and further performance of the modified system has been analyzed by applying the generated lightning impulse and analyzing the electrical characteristics of impulse waves under standard lightning and fast rise multiple lightning waveform to determine the effect to improve rise time. The advantageous results have been received and being reported such as increase in overshoot compensation, increase in capacitive and inductive load ranges. Such further reduces the duration of oscillations of standard impulse voltages. The reduction in oscillation duration of steep front impulse voltages may be utilized in up gradation of Impulse Voltage Generator System. Stray capacitance could further be added in order to get the minimized difference of measurement between simulation and the field establishment.

  12. Quantum Synchronization Blockade: Energy Quantization Hinders Synchronization of Identical Oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lörch, Niels; Nigg, Simon E; Nunnenkamp, Andreas; Tiwari, Rakesh P; Bruder, Christoph

    2017-06-16

    Classically, the tendency towards spontaneous synchronization is strongest if the natural frequencies of the self-oscillators are as close as possible. We show that this wisdom fails in the deep quantum regime, where the uncertainty of amplitude narrows down to the level of single quanta. Under these circumstances identical self-oscillators cannot synchronize and detuning their frequencies can actually help synchronization. The effect can be understood in a simple picture: Interaction requires an exchange of energy. In the quantum regime, the possible quanta of energy are discrete. If the extractable energy of one oscillator does not exactly match the amount the second oscillator may absorb, interaction, and thereby synchronization, is blocked. We demonstrate this effect, which we coin quantum synchronization blockade, in the minimal example of two Kerr-type self-oscillators and predict consequences for small oscillator networks, where synchronization between blocked oscillators can be mediated via a detuned oscillator. We also propose concrete implementations with superconducting circuits and trapped ions. This paves the way for investigations of new quantum synchronization phenomena in oscillator networks both theoretically and experimentally.

  13. Adolescent Exposure to Methylphenidate Increases Impulsive Choice Later in Life

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sweet, Arwen; Hernandez, Giovanni; Arvanitogiannis, Andreas; Abbas, Zarish

    2017-01-01

    ...: Using an animal model for impulsive choice, we examined first whether giving MPH through early adolescence alters delay discounting, an operational measure of impulsive choice, later in adulthood...

  14. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  15. Norepinephrine and impulsivity: Effects of acute yohimbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C.; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D.; Cox, Blake; Steinberg, Joel L.; Moeller, F. Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Rapid-response impulsivity, characterized by inability to withhold response to a stimulus until it is adequately appraised, is associated with risky behavior and may be increased in a state-dependent manner by norepinephrine. Objective We assessed effects of yohimbine, which increases norepinephrine release by blocking alpha-2 noradrenergic receptors, on plasma catecholamine metabolites, blood pressure, subjective symptoms, and laboratory-measured rapid-response impulsivity. Methods Subjects were twenty-three healthy controls recruited from the community, with normal physical examination and ECG, and negative history for hypertension, cardiovascular illness, and Axis I or II disorder. Blood pressure, pulse, and behavioral measures were obtained before and periodically after 0.4 mg/kg oral yohimbine or placebo in a randomized, counterbalanced design. Metabolites of norepinephrine (3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol, MHPG; vanillylmandelic acid, VMA) and dopamine (homovanillic acid, HVA) were measured by high pressure liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Rapid-response impulsivity was measured by commission errors and reaction times on the Immediate Memory Task (IMT), a continuous performance test designed to measure impulsivity and attention. Results Yohimbine increased plasma MHPG and VMA but not HVA. Yohimbine increased systolic and diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate. On the IMT, yohimbine increased impulsive errors and impulsive response bias and accelerated reaction times. Yohimbine-associated increase in plasma MHPG correlated with increased impulsive response rates. Time courses varied; effects on blood pressure generally preceded those on metabolites and test performance. Conclusions These effects are consistent with increased rapid-response impulsivity after pharmacological noradrenergic stimulation in healthy controls. Labile noradrenergic responses, or increased sensitivity to norepinephrine, may increase risk for impulsive

  16. Modernization, reconstruction and development of excitation systems for synchronous generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnautović Dušan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the previous results of work and development of excitation systems with digital automatic voltage regulators regarding their design, development, manufacturing and commissioning. A special attention was paid to the characteristics of excitation system voltage regulator.

  17. Emergent hybrid synchronization in coupled chaotic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padmanaban, E; Boccaletti, Stefano; Dana, S K

    2015-02-01

    We evidence an interesting kind of hybrid synchronization in coupled chaotic systems where complete synchronization is restricted to only a subset of variables of two systems while other subset of variables may be in a phase synchronized state or desynchronized. Such hybrid synchronization is a generic emergent feature of coupled systems when a controller based coupling, designed by the Lyapunov function stability, is first engineered to induce complete synchronization in the identical case, and then a large parameter mismatch is introduced. We distinguish between two different hybrid synchronization regimes that emerge with parameter perturbation. The first, called hard hybrid synchronization, occurs when the coupled systems display global phase synchronization, while the second, called soft hybrid synchronization, corresponds to a situation where, instead, the global synchronization feature no longer exists. We verify the existence of both classes of hybrid synchronization in numerical examples of the Rössler system, a Lorenz-like system, and also in electronic experiment.

  18. Synchronization analysis of choir singing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Isao; Kuwahara, Akihiro

    Synchronization plays an essential role in choir singing. Fundamental frequencies of the singing voices should satisfy a rational frequency relationship to produce harmony. The present study attempts to clarify basic properties of synchronization that may influence the chorus quality. As the key features of synchronization, frequency mismatch and timing mismatch were considered. Combining the synthesis technique of choir singing, which can precisely control the detailed frequency structure of the singing voice, with psychoacoustic experiment, criterions were obtained to roughly discriminate good choruses from bad ones. To examine the reliability of the psychoacoustic experiment, acoustic analysis of the singing voices in real chorus was further carried out.

  19. A survey on impulsive dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everaldo Bonotto

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available In this survey we provide an introduction to the theory of impulsive dynamical systems in both the autonomous and nonautonomous cases. In the former, we will show two different approaches which have been proposed to analyze such kind of dynamical systems which can experience some abrupt changes in their evolution (impulses. But, unlike the autonomous framework, the nonautonomous one is being developed right now and some progress is being obtained over the recent years. We will provide some results on how the theory of autonomous impulsive dynamical systems can be extended to cover such nonautonomous situations, which are more often to occur in the real world.

  20. Pathological gambling: an impulse control disorder? Measurement of impulsivity using neurocognitive tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dannon, Pinhas N; Shoenfeld, Netta; Rosenberg, Oded; Kertzman, Semion; Kotler, Moshe

    2010-04-01

    Pathological gambling is classified in the DSM-IV-TR (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders) and in the ICD-10 (International Classification of Disease) as an impulse control disorder. The association between impulsivity and pathological gambling remains a matter of debate: some researchers find high levels of impulsivity within pathological gamblers, others report no difference compared to controls, and yet others even suggest that it is lower. In this review we examine the relationship between pathological gambling and impulsivity assessed by various neurocognitive tests. These tests--the Stroop task, the Stop Signal Task, the Matching Familiar Figures Task, the Iowa Gambling Task, the Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, the Tower of London test, and the Continuous Performance Test--demonstrated less impulsivity in gambling behavior. The differences in performance between pathological gamblers and healthy controls on the neurocognitive tasks could be due to addictive behavior features rather than impulsive behavior.

  1. Incoherence-Mediated Remote Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyue; Motter, Adilson E.; Nishikawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    In previously identified forms of remote synchronization between two nodes, the intermediate portion of the network connecting the two nodes is not synchronized with them but generally exhibits some coherent dynamics. Here we report on a network phenomenon we call incoherence-mediated remote synchronization (IMRS), in which two noncontiguous parts of the network are identically synchronized while the dynamics of the intermediate part is statistically and information-theoretically incoherent. We identify mirror symmetry in the network structure as a mechanism allowing for such behavior, and show that IMRS is robust against dynamical noise as well as against parameter changes. IMRS may underlie neuronal information processing and potentially lead to network solutions for encryption key distribution and secure communication.

  2. Grid Synchronization for Distributed Generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyghami, Saeed; Mokhtari, Hossein; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    interface of the different DGs is dependent on the prime energy resources, and it can be a synchronous/asynchronous generator, and a power electronic converter to control the power. However, power electronic interfaced DGs and DSs are going to be more dominant in the future power systems. All type...... of interfaces needs to be synchronized with the grid or microgird, and hence, a precise synchronization algorithm—mostly based on phase-locked loop—is required to estimate the phase angle and frequency of the voltage at the coupling point. Unlike synchronous generators, in power electronic interfaced DGs......Distributed generators (DGs) like photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, and fuel cell modules, as well as distributed storage (DS) units introduce some advantages to the power systems and make it more reliable, flexible, and controllable in comparison with the conventional power systems. Grid...

  3. Controlling Your Impulses: Electrical Stimulation of the Human Supplementary Motor Complex Prevents Impulsive Errors

    OpenAIRE

    Spieser, L.; Van den Wildenberg, W; Hasbroucq, T.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Burle, B.

    2015-01-01

    International audience; To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, l...

  4. Detecting Impulses in Mechanical Signals by Wavelets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang W-X

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The presence of periodical or nonperiodical impulses in vibration signals often indicates the occurrence of machine faults. This knowledge is applied to the fault diagnosis of such machines as engines, gearboxes, rolling element bearings, and so on. The development of an effective impulse detection technique is necessary and significant for evaluating the working condition of these machines, diagnosing their malfunctions, and keeping them running normally over prolong periods. With the aid of wavelet transforms, a wavelet-based envelope analysis method is proposed. In order to suppress any undesired information and highlight the features of interest, an improved soft threshold method has been designed so that the inspected signal is analyzed in a more exact way. Furthermore, an impulse detection technique is developed based on the aforementioned methods. The effectiveness of the proposed technique on the extraction of impulsive features of mechanical signals has been proved by both simulated and practical experiments.

  5. Shock Tube as an Impulsive Application Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Ranjan Nanda

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Current investigations solely focus on application of an impulse facility in diverse area of high-speed aerodynamics and structural mechanics. Shock tube, the fundamental impulse facility, is specially designed and calibrated for present objectives. Force measurement experiments are performed on a hemispherical test model integrated with the stress wave force balance. Similar test model is considered for heat transfer measurements using coaxial thermocouple. Force and heat transfer experiments demonstrated that the strain gauge and thermocouple have lag time of 11.5 and 9 microseconds, respectively. Response time of these sensors in measuring the peak load is also measured successfully using shock tube facility. As an outcome, these sensors are found to be suitable for impulse testing. Lastly, the response of aluminum plates subjected to impulsive loading is analyzed by measuring the in-plane strain produced during deformation. Thus, possibility of forming tests in shock is also confirmed.

  6. VOLTAGE REGULATORS OF SYNCHRONOUS GENERATORS

    OpenAIRE

    Grigorash O. V.; Korzenkov P. G.; Popuchieva M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronous generators are the primary source of electrical power autonomous electrosupply systems, including backup systems. They are also used in a structure of rotating electricity converters and are widely used in renewable energy as part of wind power plants of small, mini and micro hydroelectric plants. Increasing the speed and the accuracy of the system of the voltage regulation of synchronous generators is possible due to the development of combined systems containing more stabilizers...

  7. Synchronous Photodiode-Signal Sampler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Primus, Howard K.

    1988-01-01

    Synchronous sampling circuit increases signal-to-noise ratio of measurements of chopped signal of known phase and frequency in presence of low-frequency or dc background noise. Used with linear array of photoelectric sensors for locating edge of metal plate. Multiplexing circuit cycles through 16 light-emitting-diode/photodiode pairs, under computer control. Synchronized with multiplexer so edge detector makes one background-subtracted signal measurement per emitter/detector pair in turn.

  8. Principles of synchronous digital hierarchy

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Rajesh Kumar

    2012-01-01

    The book presents the current standards of digital multiplexing, called synchronous digital hierarchy, including analog multiplexing technologies. It is aimed at telecommunication professionals who want to develop an understanding of digital multiplexing and synchronous digital hierarchy in particular and the functioning of practical telecommunication systems in general. The text includes all relevant fundamentals and provides a handy reference for problem solving or defining operations and maintenance strategies. The author covers digital conversion and TDM principles, line coding and digital

  9. Hybrid synchronization of hyperchaotic Lu system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we study the hybrid synchronization between two identical hyperchaotic Lu systems. Hybrid synchronization of hyperchaotic Lu system is achieved through synchronization of two pairs of states and anti-synchronization of the other two pairs of states. Active controls are designed to achieve hybrid ...

  10. Multiswitching combination–combination synchronization of chaotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a novel synchronization scheme is investigated for a class of chaotic systems. Themultiswitching synchronization scheme is extended to the combination–combination synchronization scheme such that the combination of state variables of two drive systems synchronize with different combination of state ...

  11. The utility of rat models of impulsivity in developing pharmacotherapies for impulse control disorders

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winstanley, Catharine A

    2011-01-01

    High levels of impulsive behaviours are a clinically significant symptom in a range of psychiatric disorders, such as attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, bipolar disorder, personality disorders...

  12. Impulsive social influence increases impulsive choices on a temporal discounting task in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilman, Jodi M; Curran, Max T; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E; Evins, A Eden

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented) peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment) and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment) choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18-25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence.

  13. The relationship between impulsivity and impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaias, Ioannis U; Siri, Chiara; Cilia, Roberto; De Gaspari, Danilo; Pezzoli, Gianni; Antonini, Angelo

    2008-02-15

    A range of behaviors presumed to be related to dopaminergic medications have been recently recognized in Parkinson's disease (PD). We evaluated 50 consecutive cognitively intact PD patients on stable dopamine agonist and levodopa therapy and 100 healthy controls for compulsive sexual behavior, compulsive buying, or intermittent explosive disorders assessed by the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview (MIDI), pathological gambling (South Oaks Gambling Screen, SOGS), impulsivity (Barratt Impulsiveness Scale), compulsivity (Maudsley obsessional-compulsive inventory), and depression scores (Geriatric Depression Scale). Overall 28% PD (14/50) and 20% healthy controls (20/100) reported at least one abnormal behavior at MIDI or pathological SOGS score. PD patients had higher scores than controls for impulsivity (P = 0.006), compulsivity (P impulsivity, compulsivity, and depression scores in PD. Male gender and higher impulsivity score, but not dose and kind of dopaminergic medications, were associated in PD with increased probability of impulsive disorders at MIDI. Impulse control disorders are also common in the control population. Individual susceptibility factors, such as high impulsivity and depression, underline abnormal behaviors in PD patients treated with stable dopaminergic therapy. 2007 Movement Disorder Society

  14. Impulsive social influence increases impulsive choices on a temporal discounting task in young adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodi M Gilman

    Full Text Available Adolescents and young adults who affiliate with friends who engage in impulsive behavior are more likely to engage in impulsive behaviors themselves, and those who associate with prosocial (i.e. more prudent, future oriented peers are more likely to engage in prosocial behavior. However, it is difficult to disentangle the contribution of peer influence vs. peer selection (i.e., whether individuals choose friends with similar traits when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which participants were exposed to both impulsive (smaller, sooner or SS payment and non-impulsive (larger, later or LL payment choices from their peers. Young adults in this sample, n = 51, aged 18-25 had a higher rate of SS choices after exposure to impulsive peer influence than after exposure to non-impulsive peer influence. Interestingly, in highly susceptible individuals, the rate of non-impulsive choices did not increase after exposure to non-impulsive influence. There was a positive correlation between self-reported suggestibility and degree of peer influence on SS choices. These results suggest that, in young adults, SS choices appear to be influenced by the choices of same-aged peers, especially for individuals who are highly susceptible to influence.

  15. Impulsive nature in collisional driven reconnection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kitabata, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Takaya; Sato, Tetsuya

    1995-11-01

    Compressible magnetohydrodynamic simulation is carried out in order to investigate energy relaxation process of the driven magnetic reconnection in an open finite system through a long time calculation. It is found that a very impulsive energy release occurs in an intermittent fashion through magnetic reconnection for a continuous magnetic flux injection on the boundary. In the impulsive phase, the reconnection rate is remarkably enhanced up to more than ten times of the driving rate on the boundary. (author).

  16. The loudness of decaying impulsive sounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, S.; Hashimoto, T.; Rice, C. G.

    1987-08-01

    In the case of short duration sounds it is well known that temporal loudness summation occurs within a certain time period (i.e., critical duration), and a trade-off relationship is established between the sound intensity and the duration of the sound. Therefore, for the estimation of the loudness of brief sounds such as impulsive noise the temporal loudness summation must be considered. This paper deals with artificial impulsive sounds with a relatively short rise time and a long decay, as usually observed for actual impulsive sounds, and whether the loudness of an impulsive sound is determined by the peak level of the sound or by the total energy of the sound including the decaying part. L AX in ISO 1996, which is the single event exposure level, is chosen as an energy index of the sound in this paper. It is probable, however, that the time varying pattern of the sound or auditory after effect has an effect on the loudness of impulsive sounds. Such effects, however, are not reflected either in L AX or in the peak level measurement. Accordingly additional experiments have been carried out to examine the temporal characteristics of the hearing mechanism in relation to the loudness of impulsive sounds. As a result, it seems that L AX is a good measure of the loudness of impulsive sounds which are not too short, but when the duration of the sound is less than 60 ms the contribution of the auditory after-effect on the loudness needs to be taken into consideration. No relation could be found between the peak level and the loudness of impulsive sounds.

  17. Forensic Psychiatric Aspects of Impulse Control Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huseyin Soysal

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders is an important psychiatric disorder group which draws attention in recent years. Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and other classical disorders like pyromania, kleptomania, intermittent explosive disorder and compulsive buying could be evasuated under this topic. The aim of this article is to review forensic psychiatric aspects of impulse control disorders and evaluate the disorders in terms of their legal status. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2015; 7(1: 16-29

  18. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying

    OpenAIRE

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva; de Zwaan, Martina; Mueller, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB?), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered question...

  19. Impact of Impulse Stops on Pedestrian Flow

    OpenAIRE

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Jo, Hang-Hyun; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the impact of impulse stops on pedestrian flow for a straight corridor with multiple attractions. The impulse stop is simulated by the switching behavior model, a function of the social influence strength and the number of attendees near the attraction. When the pedestrian influx is low, one can observe a stable flow where attendees make a complete stop at an attraction and then leave the attraction after a certain amount of time. When the pedestrian influx is high, an un...

  20. Cognitive impulsivity in abused children: influencing factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JUAN M. FERNÁNDEZ MILLÁN

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the impulsivity is a topic that it has been studied for some time for different psychologicalschools, it has been in the last decades, at least in our country, when the impulsivity has acquired a biggerinterest. The numerous studies of Buela-Casal’s investigation group can be presented as example ofthis growing interest (Buela-Casal, Carretero-Dios and De los Santos-Roig, 2002. This interest comesmotivated by the relationship that the impulsivity has with the school yield and with the violence, sincesome studies show its linking with the aggressive behaviors. In this study, centered in the continuousReflection-impulsivity (R-I, the existent impulsivity differences are shown among the mistreatedminor took in protection centers, and the minor that have not been mistreated. We have also studiedthe influence or relationship with diverse factors like the school, the years of establishment or thebehavioral impulsivity. We have followed a cognitive-behavioral conceptualization and we have usedthe MMF20 like instrument for the mensuration of the study topic. The results show a correlationbetween the number of made errors and the abuse, as well as with a certain negative correlation betweenerrors and years in school.

  1. [Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Heuvel, O A; Van der Werf, Y D; Groenewegen, H J; Foncke, E M J; Berendse, H W

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is characterised not only by the classic triad of bradykinesia, rigidity and tremor, but also by the frequent occurrence of various non-motor symptoms such as the impulse control disorders (pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive buying, binge eating, punding and dopamine dependency). To increase insight into the clinical presentation, risk factors, treatment and the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. Relevant literature was reviewed. Impulse control disorders belong to an important group of neuropsychiatric disorders that occur at some point in 5-10% of patients with Parkinson's disease. They generally occur in conjunction with dopaminergic medication and can have a marked social, relational and/ or financial impact. Early recognition of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease is important and a close collaboration between the neurologist and the psychiatrist is essential in order to ensure correct diagnosis and the best possible treatment. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease show considerable phenomenological overlap with other repetitive behaviours within the impulsive-compulsive spectrum of disorders to which the obsessive-compulsive disorders and addiction disorders belong. The overlap can possibly be explained by a shared pathophysiological mechanism involving an imbalance between the direct and indirect pathways of the dorsal and ventral frontal-striatal circuits.

  2. Impulsivity across the course of bipolar disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strakowski, Stephen M.; Fleck, David E.; DelBello, Melissa P.; Adler, Caleb M.; Shear, Paula K.; Kotwal, Renu; Arndt, Stephan

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether abnormalities of impulse control persist across the course of bipolar disorder, thereby representing potential state markers and endophenotypes. Methods Impulse control of 108 bipolar I manic or mixed patients was measured on three tasks designed to study response inhibition, ability to delay gratification, and attention; namely a stop signal task, a delayed reward task, and a continuous performance task, respectively. Barrett Impulsivity Scale (BIS-11) scores were also obtained. Patients were then followed for up to one year and re-assessed with the same measures if they developed depression or euthymia. Healthy comparison subjects were also assessed with the same instruments on two occasions to assess measurement stability. Results At baseline, bipolar subjects demonstrated significant deficits on all three tasks as compared to healthy subjects, consistent with more impulsive responding in the bipolar manic/mixed group. In general, performance on the three behavioral tasks normalized upon switching to depression or developing euthymia. In contrast, BIS-11 scores were elevated during mania and remained elevated as bipolar subjects developed depression or achieved euthymia. Conclusions Bipolar I disorder patients demonstrate deficits on laboratory tests of various aspects of impulsivity when manic, as compared to healthy subjects, that largely normalize with recovery and switching into depression. However, elevated BIS scores persist across phases of illness. These findings suggest that impulsivity has both affective-state dependent and trait components in bipolar disorder. PMID:20565435

  3. Sweet taste liking is associated with impulsive behaviors in humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica eWeafer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Evidence from both human and animal studies suggests that sensitivity to rewarding stimuli is positively associated with impulsive behaviors, including both impulsive decision making and inhibitory control. The current study examined associations between the hedonic value of a sweet taste and two forms of impulsivity (impulsive choice and impulsive action in healthy young adults (n=100. Participants completed a sweet taste test in which they rated their liking of various sweetness concentrations. Subjects also completed measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting, and impulsive action (go/no-go task. Subjects who discounted more steeply (i.e., greater impulsive choice liked the high sweetness concentration solutions more. By contrast, sweet liking was not related to impulsive action. These findings indicate that impulsive choice may be associated with heightened sensitivity to the hedonic value of a rewarding stimulus, and that these constructs might share common underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  4. Sweet taste liking is associated with impulsive behaviors in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; Burkhardt, Anne; de Wit, Harriet

    2014-01-01

    Evidence from both human and animal studies suggests that sensitivity to rewarding stimuli is positively associated with impulsive behaviors, including both impulsive decision making and inhibitory control. The current study examined associations between the hedonic value of a sweet taste and two forms of impulsivity (impulsive choice and impulsive action) in healthy young adults (N = 100). Participants completed a sweet taste test in which they rated their liking of various sweetness concentrations. Subjects also completed measures of impulsive choice (delay discounting), and impulsive action (go/no-go task). Subjects who discounted more steeply (i.e., greater impulsive choice) liked the high sweetness concentration solutions more. By contrast, sweet liking was not related to impulsive action. These findings indicate that impulsive choice may be associated with heightened sensitivity to the hedonic value of a rewarding stimulus, and that these constructs might share common underlying neurobiological mechanisms.

  5. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowet, Eric; Roberts, Mark J; Bonizzi, Pietro; Karel, Joël; De Weerd, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent) synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE) of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV) method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT) preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD) of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization-mediated information

  6. Quantifying Neural Oscillatory Synchronization: A Comparison between Spectral Coherence and Phase-Locking Value Approaches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Lowet

    Full Text Available Synchronization or phase-locking between oscillating neuronal groups is considered to be important for coordination of information among cortical networks. Spectral coherence is a commonly used approach to quantify phase locking between neural signals. We systematically explored the validity of spectral coherence measures for quantifying synchronization among neural oscillators. To that aim, we simulated coupled oscillatory signals that exhibited synchronization dynamics using an abstract phase-oscillator model as well as interacting gamma-generating spiking neural networks. We found that, within a large parameter range, the spectral coherence measure deviated substantially from the expected phase-locking. Moreover, spectral coherence did not converge to the expected value with increasing signal-to-noise ratio. We found that spectral coherence particularly failed when oscillators were in the partially (intermittent synchronized state, which we expect to be the most likely state for neural synchronization. The failure was due to the fast frequency and amplitude changes induced by synchronization forces. We then investigated whether spectral coherence reflected the information flow among networks measured by transfer entropy (TE of spike trains. We found that spectral coherence failed to robustly reflect changes in synchrony-mediated information flow between neural networks in many instances. As an alternative approach we explored a phase-locking value (PLV method based on the reconstruction of the instantaneous phase. As one approach for reconstructing instantaneous phase, we used the Hilbert Transform (HT preceded by Singular Spectrum Decomposition (SSD of the signal. PLV estimates have broad applicability as they do not rely on stationarity, and, unlike spectral coherence, they enable more accurate estimations of oscillatory synchronization across a wide range of different synchronization regimes, and better tracking of synchronization

  7. Climate Reconstructions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Paleoclimatology Program archives reconstructions of past climatic conditions derived from paleoclimate proxies, in addition to the Program's large holdings...

  8. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: octavio@ipicyt.edu.mx; Femat, Ricardo [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfemat@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2005-07-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states.

  9. Generation, compression et stabilisation d'impulsions breves emises par des lasers a semi-conducteurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlois, Patrick

    1998-09-01

    Dans une premiere partie de la these (chapitres 1 et 2), nous presentons de nouvelles avenues pour produire des impulsions plus stables et plus breves a partir d'un laser a semi-conducteurs a synchronisation modale active. Nous demontrons pour la premiere fois l'application de la methode d'injection de photons coherents ('coherent photon seeding') pour reduire efficacement le bruit des impulsions emises par cette source. La compression et l'amplification des impulsions est realisee au moyen d'une cavite en anneau extra-cavite comprenant un amplificateur laser a semi-conducteurs. Le mecanisme de compression repose sur un remodelage interferometrique. Dans la deuxieme partie (chapitres 3 et 4), nous proposons et etudions deux nouvelles methodes pour la generation d'impulsions breves avec des lasers a semi- conducteurs. Nous etablissons les conditions d'applicabilite de la synchronisation modale interferentielle a ces lasers. Nos resultats numeriques et experimentaux demontrent qu'une modulation active du gain ou des pertes dans la cavite est necessaire a l'obtention d'un regime d'operation stable. Nous presentons finalement la premiere demonstration experimentale d'un regime d'autosynchronisation modale dans les lasers a semi-conducteurs, base sur un mecanisme d'autoflexion ('self-bending'). La synchronisation modale est initiee lorsque la cavite est desalignee et operee legerement au-dessus du seuil. Des impulsions picosecondes ayant un taux de repetition de 0.8 a 6.4 GHz sont alors produites de facon synchrone dans les deux directions de la cavite.

  10. Further evidence of the heterogeneous nature of impulsivity ?

    OpenAIRE

    Caswell, Amy J.; Bond, Rod; Duka, Theodora; Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    ?Impulsivity? refers to a range of behaviours including preference for immediate reward (temporal-impulsivity) and the tendency to make premature decisions (reflection-impulsivity) and responses (motor-impulsivity). The current study aimed to examine how different behavioural and self-report measurements of impulsivity can be categorised into distinct subtypes. Exploratory factor analysis using full information maximum likelihood was conducted on 10 behavioural and 1 self-report measure of im...

  11. Genetic and Modeling Approaches Reveal Distinct Components of Impulsive Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nautiyal, Katherine M; Wall, Melanie M; Wang, Shuai; Magalong, Valerie M; Ahmari, Susanne E; Balsam, Peter D; Blanco, Carlos; Hen, René

    2017-05-01

    Impulsivity is an endophenotype found in many psychiatric disorders including substance use disorders, pathological gambling, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder. Two behavioral features often considered in impulsive behavior are behavioral inhibition (impulsive action) and delayed gratification (impulsive choice). However, the extent to which these behavioral constructs represent distinct facets of behavior with discrete biological bases is unclear. To test the hypothesis that impulsive action and impulsive choice represent statistically independent behavioral constructs in mice, we collected behavioral measures of impulsivity in a single cohort of mice using well-validated operant behavioral paradigms. Mice with manipulation of serotonin 1B receptor (5-HT1BR) expression were included as a model of disordered impulsivity. A factor analysis was used to characterize correlations between the measures of impulsivity and to identify covariates. Using two approaches, we dissociated impulsive action from impulsive choice. First, the absence of 5-HT1BRs caused increased impulsive action, but not impulsive choice. Second, based on an exploratory factor analysis, a two-factor model described the data well, with measures of impulsive action and choice separating into two independent factors. A multiple-indicator multiple-causes analysis showed that 5-HT1BR expression and sex were significant covariates of impulsivity. Males displayed increased impulsivity in both dimensions, whereas 5-HT1BR expression was a predictor of increased impulsive action only. These data support the conclusion that impulsive action and impulsive choice are distinct behavioral phenotypes with dissociable biological influences that can be modeled in mice. Our work may help inform better classification, diagnosis, and treatment of psychiatric disorders, which present with disordered impulsivity.

  12. The Relationship between Impulsive Choice and Impulsive Action: A Cross-Species Translational Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, Nienke; Schmaal, Lianne; Wiskerke, Joost; Kostelijk, Lennard; Lam, Thomas; Stoop, Nicky; Weierink, Lonneke; Ham, Jannemieke; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; van den Brink, Wim; Veltman, Dick J.; de Vries, Taco J.; Pattij, Tommy; Goudriaan, Anna E.

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in

  13. The relationship between impulsive choice and impulsive action: a cross-species translational study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broos, N.; Schmaal, L.; Wiskerke, J.; Kostelijk, L.; Lam, T.; Stoop, N.; Weierink, L.; Ham, J..; de Geus, E.J.C.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; van den Brink, W.; Veltman, D.J.; de Vries, T.J.; Pattij, T.; Goudriaan, A.E.

    2012-01-01

    Maladaptive impulsivity is a core symptom in various psychiatric disorders. However, there is only limited evidence available on whether different measures of impulsivity represent largely unrelated aspects or a unitary construct. In a cross-species translational study, thirty rats were trained in

  14. Controlling your impulses: electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spieser, Laure; van den Wildenberg, Wery; Hasbroucq, Thierry; Ridderinkhof, K Richard; Burle, Borís

    2015-02-18

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy humans leaves action urges unchanged but prevents them from turning into overt errors. Subjects performed a choice reaction-time task known to trigger impulsive responses, leading to fast errors that can be revealed by analyzing accuracy as a function of poststimulus time. Yet, such fast errors are only the tip of the iceberg: electromyography (EMG) revealed fast subthreshold muscle activation in the incorrect response hand in an even larger proportion of overtly correct trials, revealing covert response impulses not discernible in overt behavior. Analyzing both overt and covert response tendencies enables to gauge the ability to prevent these incorrect impulses from turning into overt action errors. Hyperpolarizing the supplementary motor complex using transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) preserves action impulses but prevents their behavioral expression. This new combination of detailed behavioral, EMG, and tDCS techniques clarifies the neurophysiology of impulse control, and may point to avenues for improving impulse control deficits in various neurologic and psychiatric disorders. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/333010-06$15.00/0.

  15. Controlling your impulses: Electrical stimulation of the human supplementary motor complex prevents impulsive errors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spieser, L.; van den Wildenberg, W.; Hasbroucq, T.; Ridderinkhof, K.R.; Burle, B.

    2015-01-01

    To err is human. However, an inappropriate urge does not always result in error. Impulsive errors thus entail both a motor system capture by an urge to act and a failed inhibition of that impulse. Here we show that neuromodulatory electrical stimulation of the supplementary motor complex in healthy

  16. Impulsive corporal punishment by mothers and antisocial behavior and impulsiveness of children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, M A; Mouradian, V E

    1998-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that corporal punishment (CP), such as spanking or slapping a child for purposes of correcting misbehavior, is associated with antisocial behavior (ASB) and impulsiveness by the child. The data were obtained through interviews with a probability sample of 933 mothers of children age 2-14 in two small American cities. Analyses of variance found that the more CP experienced by the child, the greater the tendency for the child to engage in ASB and to act impulsively. These relationships hold even after controlling for family socioeconomic status, the age and sex of the child, nurturance by the mother, and the level of noncorporal interventions by the mother. There were also significant interaction effects of CP with impulsiveness by the mother. When CP was carried out impulsively, it was most strongly related to child impulsiveness and ASB; when CP was done when the mother was under control, the relationship to child behavior problems was reduced but still present. In view of the fact that there is a high risk of losing control when engaged in CP, even by parents who are not usually impulsive, and the fact that impulsive CP is so strongly associated with child behavior problems, the results of this study suggest that CP is an important risk factor for children developing a pattern of impulsive and antisocial behavior which, in turn, may contribute to the level of violence and other crime in society.

  17. Modeling impulsivity in forensic patients: A three-dimensional model of impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, F.; Cima, M.; Arntz, A.R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether a multidimensional model could underlie impulsivity and its associations with various disorders in a forensic sample. Data were available from self-report and behavioral impulsivity instruments of 87 forensic patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) was

  18. Modeling Impulsivity in Forensic Patients : A Three-Dimensional Model of Impulsivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tonnaer, F.; Cima, M.; Arntz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The current study investigated whether a multidimensional model could underlie impulsivity and its associations with various disorders in a forensic sample. Data were available from self-report and behavioral impulsivity instruments of 87 forensic patients. Principal component analysis (PCA) was

  19. Reduced step length reduces knee joint contact forces during running following anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction but does not alter inter-limb asymmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowersock, Collin D; Willy, Richard W; DeVita, Paul; Willson, John D

    2017-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction is associated with early onset knee osteoarthritis. Running is a typical activity following this surgery, but elevated knee joint contact forces are thought to contribute to osteoarthritis degenerative processes. It is therefore clinically relevant to identify interventions to reduce contact forces during running among individuals after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. The primary purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of reducing step length during running on patellofemoral and tibiofemoral joint contact forces among people with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Inter limb knee joint contact force differences during running were also examined. 18 individuals at an average of 54.8months after unilateral anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction ran in 3 step length conditions (preferred, -5%, -10%). Bilateral patellofemoral, tibiofemoral, and medial tibiofemoral compartment peak force, loading rate, impulse, and impulse per kilometer were evaluated between step length conditions and limbs using separate 2 factor analyses of variance. Reducing step length 5% decreased patellofemoral, tibiofemoral, and medial tibiofemoral compartment peak force, impulse, and impulse per kilometer bilaterally. A 10% step length reduction further decreased peak forces and force impulses, but did not further reduce force impulses per kilometer. Tibiofemoral joint impulse, impulse per kilometer, and patellofemoral joint loading rate were lower in the previously injured limb compared to the contralateral limb. Running with a shorter step length is a feasible clinical intervention to reduce knee joint contact forces during running among people with a history of anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. On the estimation of phase synchronization, spurious synchronization and filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios Herrera, Wady A; Escalona, Joaquín; Rivera López, Daniel; Müller, Markus F

    2016-12-01

    Phase synchronization, viz., the adjustment of instantaneous frequencies of two interacting self-sustained nonlinear oscillators, is frequently used for the detection of a possible interrelationship between empirical data recordings. In this context, the proper estimation of the instantaneous phase from a time series is a crucial aspect. The probability that numerical estimates provide a physically relevant meaning depends sensitively on the shape of its power spectral density. For this purpose, the power spectrum should be narrow banded possessing only one prominent peak [M. Chavez et al., J. Neurosci. Methods 154, 149 (2006)]. If this condition is not fulfilled, band-pass filtering seems to be the adequate technique in order to pre-process data for a posterior synchronization analysis. However, it was reported that band-pass filtering might induce spurious synchronization [L. Xu et al., Phys. Rev. E 73, 065201(R), (2006); J. Sun et al., Phys. Rev. E 77, 046213 (2008); and J. Wang and Z. Liu, EPL 102, 10003 (2013)], a statement that without further specification causes uncertainty over all measures that aim to quantify phase synchronization of broadband field data. We show by using signals derived from different test frameworks that appropriate filtering does not induce spurious synchronization. Instead, filtering in the time domain tends to wash out existent phase interrelations between signals. Furthermore, we show that measures derived for the estimation of phase synchronization like the mean phase coherence are also useful for the detection of interrelations between time series, which are not necessarily derived from coupled self-sustained nonlinear oscillators.

  1. Multicentric Giant Cell Tumor of Bone: Synchronous and Metachronous Presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiner Wirbel

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A 27-year-old man treated 2.5 years ago for synchronous multicentric giant cell tumor of bone located at the right proximal humerus and the right 5th finger presented now with complaints of pain in his right hip and wrist of two-month duration. Radiology and magnetic resonance revealed multicentric giant cell tumor lesions of the right proximal femur, the left ileum, the right distal radius, and the left distal tibia. The patient has an eighteen-year history of a healed osteosarcoma of the right tibia that was treated with chemotherapy, resection, and allograft reconstruction. A literature review establishes this as the first reported case of a patient with synchronous and metachronous multicentric giant cell tumor who also has a history of osteosarcoma.

  2. Bodily Synchronization Underlying Joke Telling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Schmidt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock-knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily dance occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this dance is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction.

  3. PIV applied to landslide generated impulse waves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritz, H.M. [Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. (ETH), Zurich (CH). Lab. of Hydraulics, Hydrology and Glaciology (VAW)

    2002-07-01

    Large scale digital particle image velocimetry (PIV) and laser speckle velocimetry (LSV) are applied to landslide generated impulse waves. The challenges posed to the measurement techniques in an extremely unsteady three phase flow consisting of granular matter, air and water are considered. Areas of interest up to 0.8 m by 0.8 m are investigated in the impulse wave generation zone. The complex flow phenomena present in the first stage of impulse wave initiation are: High speed granular slide impact, impulse flux transfer, flow separation and reattachment, cavity formation and collapse, slide deformation and penetration into fluid. During this first stage the three phases are separated along sharp interfaces changing significantly within time and space. A combined analysis method for PIV in water flow and LSV on the corona of the landslide surface is presented. Digital masking techniques are applied to distinguish between phases thereafter allowing phase separated image processing. The combination of PIV and LSV reveals insight into the impulse transfer mechanism. Applicability of PIV at large scale as well as to flows with large velocity gradients due to the presence of a strong shock are highlighted. (orig.)

  4. Thermal Impulse Sensors for use in Explosions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilers, Hergen; Gunawidjaja, Ray; Anderson, Benjamin

    2017-06-01

    We have developed temperature and thermal impulse (temperature and duration) sensors for use in explosive fireballs. These sensors are seeded into an explosive fireball and record temperature and duration via morphological phase changes that are optically probed. The thermal impulse sensors include two sensor materials with different phase transition kinetics, and may include a reference material which does not undergo temperature-induced phase changes, and can aid in the optical analysis. Analyzing the sensor materials allows us to determine heating temperature and heating duration of an explosion. The temperature sensors and thermal impulse sensors were recently tested and showed promising results. However, we found that the different components of the thermal impulse sensors tend to get separated during the explosion. We are now evaluating several approaches for redesigning our thermal impulse sensors so that the components remain together during the explosion. These approaches include a core/shell assembly, crosslinking, and co-synthesis. The integrity of the chemically bonded components is evaluated by subjecting the sensors to dispersing forces, while temperature-dependent phase changes of these sensors are assessed by rapid heating using a CO2 laser.

  5. Active control strategy for synchronization and anti-synchronization of a fractional chaotic financial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengdai; Cao, Jinde

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the issues of synchronization and anti-synchronization for fractional chaotic financial system with market confidence by taking advantage of active control approach. Some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the synchronization and anti-synchronization for the proposed fractional system. Moreover, the relationship between the order and synchronization(anti-synchronization) is demonstrated numerically. It reveals that synchronization(anti-synchronization) is faster as the order increases. Finally, two illustrative examples are exploited to verify the efficiency of the obtained theoretical results.

  6. Phase synchronization in railway timetables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fretter, C.; Krumov, L.; Weihe, K.; Müller-Hannemann, M.; Hütt, M.-T.

    2010-09-01

    Timetable construction belongs to the most important optimization problems in public transport. Finding optimal or near-optimal timetables under the subsidiary conditions of minimizing travel times and other criteria is a targeted contribution to the functioning of public transport. In addition to efficiency (given, e.g., by minimal average travel times), a significant feature of a timetable is its robustness against delay propagation. Here we study the balance of efficiency and robustness in long-distance railway timetables (in particular the current long-distance railway timetable in Germany) from the perspective of synchronization, exploiting the fact that a major part of the trains run nearly periodically. We find that synchronization is highest at intermediate-sized stations. We argue that this synchronization perspective opens a new avenue towards an understanding of railway timetables by representing them as spatio-temporal phase patterns. Robustness and efficiency can then be viewed as properties of this phase pattern.

  7. How to suppress undesired synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louzada, V. H. P.; Araújo, N. A. M.; Andrade, J. S.; Herrmann, H. J.

    2012-09-01

    Examples of synchronization can be found in a wide range of phenomena such as neurons firing, lasers cascades, chemical reactions, and opinion formation. However, in many situations the formation of a coherent state is not pleasant and should be mitigated. For example, the onset of synchronization can be the root of epileptic seizures, traffic congestion in networks, and the collapse of constructions. Here we propose the use of contrarians to suppress undesired synchronization. We perform a comparative study of different strategies, either requiring local or total knowledge, and show that the most efficient one solely requires local information. Our results also reveal that, even when the distribution of neighboring interactions is narrow, significant improvement is observed when contrarians sit at the highly connected elements. The same qualitative results are obtained for artificially generated networks and two real ones, namely, the Routers of the Internet and a neuronal network.

  8. Control of non-conventional synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Classical synchronous motors are the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. However, numerous applications require efficient controls in non-conventional situations. Firstly, this is the case with synchronous motors supplied by thyristor line-commutated inverters, or with synchronous motors with faults on one or several phases. Secondly, many drive systems use non-conventional motors such as polyphase (more than three phases) synchronous motors, synchronous motors with double excitation, permanent magnet linear synchronous motors,

  9. [Eyebrow reconstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraër, F; Darsonval, V; Lejeune, F; Bochot-Hermouet, B; Rousseau, P

    2013-10-01

    The eyebrow is an essential anatomical area, from a social point of view, so its reconstruction, in case of skin defect, must be as meticulous as possible, with the less residual sequela. Capillary density extremely varies from one person to another and the different methods of restoration of this area should absolutely take this into consideration. We are going to review the various techniques of reconstruction, according to the sex and the surface to cover. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. State observer for synchronous motors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jeffrey H.

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  11. Almost periodic solutions of impulsive differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Stamov, Gani T

    2012-01-01

    Impulsive differential equations are suitable for the mathematical simulation of evolutionary processes in which the parameters undergo relatively long periods of smooth variation followed by short-term rapid changes (that is, jumps) in their values. Processes of this type are often investigated in various fields of science and technology. The question of the existence and uniqueness of almost periodic solutions of differential equations is an age-old problem of great importance. The qualitative theory of impulsive differential equations is currently undergoing rapid development in relation to the investigation of various processes which are subject to impacts during their evolution, and many findings on the existence and uniqueness of almost periodic solutions of these equations are being made. This book systematically presents findings related to almost periodic solutions of impulsive differential equations and illustrates their potential applications.

  12. Impulsive-compulsive buying disorder: clinical overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Allen, Andrea; Altamura, A Carlo; Buoli, Massimiliano; Hollander, Eric

    2008-04-01

    Impulsive-compulsive buying disorder (ICBD) is an impulse control disorder not otherwise specified (ICD-NOS) characterized by impulsive drives and compulsive behaviours (buying unneeded things), personal distress, impaired social and vocational functioning and financial problems. Despite being described in the 19th century, serious attention to ICBD began only in the last decade with the first epidemiological and pharmacological investigation. Biological, social and psychological factors contribute to the aetiology of ICBD. Cognitive-behavioural therapy and selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors are currently considered the more effective interventions in the treatment of ICBD. The present review aims to provide a broad overview of the epidemiology, aetiology, phenomenology and treatment options of ICBD.

  13. Pathological love: impulsivity, personality, and romantic relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sophia, Eglacy C; Tavares, Hermano; Berti, Marina P; Pereira, Ana P; Lorena, Andrea; Mello, Cidália; Gorenstein, Clarice; Zilberman, Monica L

    2009-05-01

    Pathological love (PL)--behavior characterized by providing repetitive and uncontrolled care and attention to the partner in a romantic relationship--is a rarely studied condition, despite not being rare and causing suffering. This study aims at investigating impulsivity, personality, and characteristics related to the romantic relationship in this population. Eighty-nine individuals (50 with PL; 39 individuals with no psychiatric disorder) were compared regarding impulsivity, personality, type of attachment, satisfaction with romantic relationship, and love style. Individuals with PL have higher levels of impulsivity (Promantic relationships (P<.001; Adapted Relationship Assessment Scale). Individuals with PL present personality traits and relationship aspects that must be taken into account in devising assessment and therapeutic strategies for this population.

  14. Structural health monitoring of cylindrical bodies under impulsive hydrodynamic loading by distributed FBG strain measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fanelli, Pierluigi; Biscarini, Chiara; Jannelli, Elio; Ubertini, Filippo; Ubertini, Stefano

    2017-02-01

    Various mechanical, ocean, aerospace and civil engineering problems involve solid bodies impacting the water surface and often result in complex coupled dynamics, characterized by impulsive loading conditions, high amplitude vibrations and large local deformations. Monitoring in such problems for purposes such as remaining fatigue life estimation and real time damage detection is a technical and scientific challenge of primary concern in this context. Open issues include the need for developing distributed sensing systems able to operate at very high acquisition frequencies, to be utilized to study rapidly varying strain fields, with high resolution and very low noise, while scientific challenges mostly relate to the definition of appropriate signal processing and modeling tools enabling the extraction of useful information from distributed sensing signals. Building on previous work by some of the authors, we propose an enhanced method for real time deformed shape reconstruction using distributed FBG strain measurements in curved bodies subjected to impulsive loading and we establish a new framework for applying this method for structural health monitoring purposes, as the main focus of the work. Experiments are carried out on a cylinder impacting the water at various speeds, proving improved performance in displacement reconstruction of the enhanced method compared to its previous version. A numerical study is then carried out considering the same physical problem with different delamination damages affecting the body. The potential for detecting, localizing and quantifying this damage using the reconstruction algorithm is thoroughly investigated. Overall, the results presented in the paper show the potential of distributed FBG strain measurements for real time structural health monitoring of curved bodies under impulsive hydrodynamic loading, defining damage sensitive features in terms of strain or displacement reconstruction errors at selected locations along

  15. Impulsive behavior and associated clinical variables in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abosch, Aviva; Gupte, Akshay; Eberly, Lynn E; Tuite, Paul J; Nance, Martha; Grant, Jon E

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a degenerative brain disorder accompanied by the loss of dopaminergic neurons and the presence of motor and non-motor symptoms. We performed a cross-sectional, questionnaire-based analysis of impulsive behavior in our PD clinic population to assess prevalence and associated characteristics. We found a higher prevalence of impulsive behavior (29.7%) than previously reported, and found multiple, concurrent impulsive behaviors in 26% of subjects reporting impulsive behavior. Our findings contribute to the growing awareness of impulsive behavior in PD, and support the need for longitudinal studies to assess changes in impulsive behaviors in Parkinson's patients. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Disentangling impulsiveness, aggressiveness and impulsive aggression: an empirical approach using self-report measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Andrés-Pueyo, Antonio

    2009-06-30

    There is confusion in the literature concerning the concept of impulsive aggression. Based on previous research, we hypothesize that impulsivity and aggression may be related, though not as closely as to consider them the same construct. So, our aim was to provide empirical evidence of the relationship between the impulsivity and aggressiveness constructs when considered as traits. Two widely used questionnaires [Barratt's Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) and Aggression Questionnaire-Refined (AQ-R)] were administered to 768 healthy respondents. Product-moment and canonical correlations were then calculated. In addition, a principal components analysis was conducted to explore whether impulsive aggression can be defined phenotypically as the expression of a single trait. The common variance between impulsivity and aggressiveness was never higher than 42%. The principal components analysis reveals that one component is not enough to represent all the variables. In conclusion, our results show that impulsivity and aggressiveness are two separate, although related constructs. This is particularly important in view of the misconceptions in the literature.

  17. Test-retest reliability of behavioral measures of impulsive choice, impulsive action, and inattention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weafer, Jessica; Baggott, Matthew J; de Wit, Harriet

    2013-12-01

    Behavioral measures of impulsivity are widely used in substance abuse research, yet relatively little attention has been devoted to establishing their psychometric properties, especially their reliability over repeated administration. The current study examined the test-retest reliability of a battery of standardized behavioral impulsivity tasks, including measures of impulsive choice (i.e., delay discounting, probability discounting, and the Balloon Analogue Risk Task), impulsive action (i.e., the stop signal task, the go/no-go task, and commission errors on the continuous performance task), and inattention (i.e., attention lapses on a simple reaction time task and omission errors on the continuous performance task). Healthy adults (n = 128) performed the battery on two separate occasions. Reliability estimates for the individual tasks ranged from moderate to high, with Pearson correlations within the specific impulsivity domains as follows: impulsive choice (r range: .76-.89, ps reliable measures and thus can be confidently used to assess various facets of impulsivity as intermediate phenotypes for drug abuse.

  18. Minimal Time Problem with Impulsive Controls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunisch, Karl, E-mail: karl.kunisch@uni-graz.at [University of Graz, Institute for Mathematics and Scientific Computing (Austria); Rao, Zhiping, E-mail: zhiping.rao@ricam.oeaw.ac.at [Austrian Academy of Sciences, Radon Institute of Computational and Applied Mathematics (Austria)

    2017-02-15

    Time optimal control problems for systems with impulsive controls are investigated. Sufficient conditions for the existence of time optimal controls are given. A dynamical programming principle is derived and Lipschitz continuity of an appropriately defined value functional is established. The value functional satisfies a Hamilton–Jacobi–Bellman equation in the viscosity sense. A numerical example for a rider-swing system is presented and it is shown that the reachable set is enlargered by allowing for impulsive controls, when compared to nonimpulsive controls.

  19. Fully nonlinear boundary value problems with impulse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Eloe

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available An impulsive boundary value problem with nonlinear boundary conditions for a second order ordinary differential equation is studied. In particular, sufficient conditions are provided so that a compression - expansion cone theoretic fixed point theorem can be applied to imply the existence of positive solutions. The nonlinear forcing term is assumed to satisfy usual sublinear or superlinear growth as $t\\rightarrow\\infty$ or $t\\rightarrow 0^+$. The nonlinear impulse terms and the nonlinear boundary terms are assumed to satisfy the analogous asymptotic behavior.

  20. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HAN Xun

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Impulse control disorders (ICDs in Parkinson's disease (PD are common with a frequency of 13.61% , which are associated with impaired functioning and with depressive, anxiety and obsessive symptoms, novelty seeking and impulsivity. These behaviors have a bad influence on PD patients in the quality of life. Different behavioral subtypes suggest pathophysiological differences. Recent large scale studies and converging findings are beginning to provide an understanding of mechanisms underlying ICDs in PD which can guide the prevention of these behaviors and optimize therapeutic approaches. This paper will take a review on the recent advances in the epidemiology, risk factors, pathophysiology, diagnosis and therapy of ICDs in PD.

  1. Dynamic Properties of Impulse Measuring Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, A.; Lausen, P.

    1971-01-01

    After some basic considerations the dynamic properties of the measuring system are subjected to a general examination based on a number of responses, characteristic of the system. It is demonstrated that an impulse circuit has an internal impedance different from zero, for which reason the intera......After some basic considerations the dynamic properties of the measuring system are subjected to a general examination based on a number of responses, characteristic of the system. It is demonstrated that an impulse circuit has an internal impedance different from zero, for which reason...

  2. Vaginal reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  3. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huajian eCai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In study 1, we surveyed narcissism and the impulsive buying tendency among an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating narcissism and the impulsive buying tendency in 304 twin pairs, study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship.

  4. Presentation of solutions of impulsive fractional Langevin equations and existence results. Impulsive fractional Langevin equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, J.; Fec̆kan, M.; Zhou, Y.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, a class of impulsive fractional Langevin equations is firstly offered. Formula of solutions involving Mittag-Leffler functions and impulsive terms of such equations are successively derived by studying the corresponding linear Langevin equations with two different fractional derivatives. Meanwhile, existence results of solutions are established by utilizing boundedness, continuity, monotonicity and nonnegative of Mittag-Leffler functions and fixed point methods. Further, other existence results of nonlinear impulsive problems are also presented. Finally, an example is given to illustrate our theoretical results.

  5. Research on bit synchronization based on GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huanran; Liu, Yi-jun

    2017-05-01

    The signals transmitted by GPS satellites are divided into three components: carrier, pseudocode and data code. The processes of signal acquisition are acquisition, tracking, bit synchronization, frame synchronization, navigation message extraction, observation extraction and position speed calculation, among which bit synchronization is of greatest importance. The accuracy of bit synchronization and the shortening of bit synchronization time can help us to use satellite to realize positioning and acquire the information transmitted by satellite signals more accurately. Even under the condition of weak signal, how to improve bit synchronization performance is what we need to research. We adopt a method of polymorphic energy accumulation minima so as to find the bit synchronization point, as well as complete the computer simulation to conclude that under the condition of extremely weak signal power, this method still has superior synchronization performance, which can achieve high bit edge detection rate and the optimal bit error rate.

  6. Blended synchronous learning environment: Student perspectives

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sheri Conklina; Beth Oyarzun; Daisyane Barreto

    2017-01-01

    .... Blended synchronous learning environment (BSLE) can be defined as an innovative setting in which students can decide to attend classes either face-to-face or via a synchronous virtual connection...

  7. Pinning Synchronization of Switched Complex Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Network topology and node dynamics play a key role in forming synchronization of complex networks. Unfortunately there is no effective synchronization criterion for pinning synchronization of complex dynamical networks with switching topology. In this paper, pinning synchronization of complex dynamical networks with switching topology is studied. Two basic problems are considered: one is pinning synchronization of switched complex networks under arbitrary switching; the other is pinning synchronization of switched complex networks by design of switching when synchronization cannot achieved by using any individual connection topology alone. For the two problems, common Lyapunov function method and single Lyapunov function method are used respectively, some global synchronization criteria are proposed and the designed switching law is given. Finally, simulation results verify the validity of the results.

  8. Synchronizing Web Documents with Style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Guimarães (Rodrigo); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); A.J. Jansen (Jack)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we report on our efforts to define a set of document extensions to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) that allow for structured timing and synchronization of elements within a Web page. Our work considers the scenario in which the temporal structure can be decoupled from the

  9. Epidemic Synchronization in Robotic Swarms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Ngo, Trung Dung

    2009-01-01

    Clock synchronization in swarms of networked mobile robots is studied in a probabilistic, epidemic framework. In this setting communication and synchonization is considered to be a randomized process, taking place at unplanned instants of geographical rendezvous between robots. In combination wit...

  10. Synchronized whistlers recorded at Varanasi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    physics pp. 1273–1277. Synchronized whistlers recorded at Varanasi. RAJESH SINGH, ASHOK K SINGH and R P SINGH. Physics Department, Atmospheric Research Laboratory, Banaras Hindu University,. Varanasi 221 005 ... An attempt has been made to explain the dynamic spectra using lightning discharge generated.

  11. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  12. Memory formation by neuronal synchronization.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Axmacher, N.; Mormann, F.; Fernandez, G.; Elger, C.E.; Fell, J.

    2006-01-01

    Cognitive functions not only depend on the localization of neural activity, but also on the precise temporal pattern of activity in neural assemblies. Synchronization of action potential discharges provides a link between large-scale EEG recordings and cellular plasticity mechanisms. Here, we focus

  13. Learning through synchronous electronic discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Veerman, A.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    2000-01-01

    This article reports a study examining university student pairs carrying out an electronic discussion task in a synchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) system (NetMeeting). The purpose of the assignment was to raise students' awareness concerning conceptions that characterise effective

  14. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D' Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  15. Analysis, synchronization and FPGA implementation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Karthikeyan Rajagopal

    2017-12-02

    Dec 2, 2017 ... thus switch between chaotic and/or periodical systems can be triggered [36]. Time-delayed differential equations play important roles in some engineering applications [37–42]. Sta- bility analysis of delayed differential equations have been discussed in [38]. Synchronization of such time- delayed systems is ...

  16. Neural synchronization via potassium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Ryazanova, Ludmila S; Mosekilde, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Using a relatively simple model we examine how variations of the extracellular potassium concentration can give rise to synchronization of two nearby pacemaker cells. With the volume of the extracellular space and the rate of potassium diffusion as control parameters, the dual nature...... junctional coupling, potassium signaling gives rise to considerable changes of the cellular response to external stimuli....

  17. Time delay estimation in a reverberant environment by low rate sampling of impulsive acoustic sources

    KAUST Repository

    Omer, Muhammad

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a new method of time delay estimation (TDE) using low sample rates of an impulsive acoustic source in a room environment. The proposed method finds the time delay from the room impulse response (RIR) which makes it robust against room reverberations. The RIR is considered a sparse phenomenon and a recently proposed sparse signal reconstruction technique called orthogonal clustering (OC) is utilized for its estimation from the low rate sampled received signal. The arrival time of the direct path signal at a pair of microphones is identified from the estimated RIR and their difference yields the desired time delay. Low sampling rates reduce the hardware and computational complexity and decrease the communication between the microphones and the centralized location. The performance of the proposed technique is demonstrated by numerical simulations and experimental results. © 2012 IEEE.

  18. Sub-sampling-based 2D localization of an impulsive acoustic source in reverberant environments

    KAUST Repository

    Omer, Muhammad

    2014-07-01

    This paper presents a robust method for two-dimensional (2D) impulsive acoustic source localization in a room environment using low sampling rates. The proposed method finds the time delay from the room impulse response (RIR) which makes it robust against room reverberations. We consider the RIR as a sparse phenomenon and apply a recently proposed sparse signal reconstruction technique called orthogonal clustering (OC) for its estimation from the sub-sampled received signal. The arrival time of the direct path signal at a pair of microphones is identified from the estimated RIR, and their difference yields the desired time delay estimate (TDE). Low sampling rates reduces the hardware and computational complexity and decreases the communication between the microphones and the centralized location. Simulation and experimental results of an actual hardware setup are presented to demonstrate the performance of the proposed technique.

  19. Robust synchronization of chaotic systems via feedback

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Femat, Ricardo [IPICYT, San Luis Potosi (Mexico). Dept. de Matematicas Aplicadas; Solis-Perales, Gualberto [Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Univ. de Ciencias Exactas e Ingenierias (Mexico). Div. de Electronica y Computacion

    2008-07-01

    This volume includes the results derived during last ten years about both suppression and synchronization of chaotic -continuous time- systems. Along this time, the concept was to study how the intrinsic properties of dynamical systems can be exploited to suppress and to synchronize the chaotic behaviour and what synchronization phenomena can be found under feedback interconnection. A compilation of these findings is described in this book. This book shows a perspective on synchronization of chaotic systems. (orig.)

  20. 40 CFR 93.128 - Traffic signal synchronization projects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Traffic signal synchronization... synchronization projects. Traffic signal synchronization projects may be approved, funded, and implemented without... include such regionally significant traffic signal synchronization projects. ...

  1. Modified function projective synchronization of multistable systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The design of generalized form of control functions capable of engineering desired form of synchronization such as complete synchronization, antisynchronization, projective synchronization and function projective has very important applications in real life situations. Inspired by practical application of generalized form of ...

  2. Global chaos synchronization of coupled parametrically excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we study the synchronization behaviour of two linearly coupled parametrically excited chaotic pendula. The stability of the synchronized state is examined using Lyapunov stability theory and linear matrix inequality (LMI); and some sufficient criteria for global asymptotic synchronization are derived from which ...

  3. Lag Synchronization of Coupled Multidelay Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luo Qun

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chaos synchronization is an active topic, and its possible applications have been studied extensively. In this paper we present an improved method for lag synchronization of chaotic systems with coupled multidelay. The Lyapunov theory is used to consider the sufficient condition for synchronization. The specific examples will demonstrate and verify the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  4. Dissecting impulsivity and its relationships to drug addictions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jentsch, J. David; Ashenhurst, James R; Cervantes, M. Catalina; Groman, Stephanie M; James, Alexander S; Pennington, Zachary T

    2014-01-01

    .... This review describes the relationship between varieties of impulsivity and addiction‐related behaviors, the nature of the causal relationship between the two, and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that promote impulsive behaviors...

  5. Relationship between impulsivity, snack consumption and children's weight

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.W.M. Scholten (Eline W. M.); C.Th.M. Schrijvers (Carola); C. Nederkoorn (Chantal); S.P.J. Kremers (Stef); G. Rodenburg (Gerda)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Childhood overweight is a public health problem associated with psychosocial and physical problems. Personality traits, such as impulsivity, may contribute to the development of overweight. Objective: This study examines 1) the association between general impulsivity traits

  6. Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescents: laboratory behavioral assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Brady; Penfold, Robert B; Patak, Michele

    2008-04-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that defines a range of maladaptive behavioral styles. The present research aimed to identify different dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescents from a battery of laboratory behavioral assessments. In one analysis, correlations were examined between two self report and seven laboratory behavioral measures of impulsivity. The correlation between the two self report measures was high compared to correlations between the self report and laboratory behavioral measures. In a second analysis, a principal components analysis was performed with just the laboratory behavioral measures. Three behavioral dimensions were identified -- "impulsive decision-making", "impulsive inattention", and "impulsive disinhibition". These dimensions were further evaluated using the same sample with a confirmatory factor analysis, which did support the hypothesis that these are significant and independent dimensions of impulsivity. This research indicates there are at least three separate subtypes of impulsive behavior when using laboratory behavioral assessments with adolescent participants.

  7. A Multitrait-Multimethod Analysis of Reflection-Impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentler, P. M.; McClain, Janis

    1976-01-01

    The relationship between reflection-impulsivity as assessed by Kagan's Matching Familiar Figures test, and ratings of four personality variables (impulsivity, academic achievement motivation, test anxiety, and extra-version was examined in 68 fifth-grade children. (BRT)

  8. Optimal Impulse conditions for Deflecting Earth Crossing Asteroids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elder, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    .... Impulse times prior to impact from zero to a few orbits are considered. The analysis is presented as three dimensional plots of minimum separation distance as a function of impulse magnitude, direction, and time prior to impact...

  9. Monotone iterative technique for impulsive delay differential equations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Springer Verlag Heidelberg #4 2048 1996 Dec 15 10:16:45

    - tions. Keywords. Contraction mapping theorem; extremal solutions; impulsive delay differential equations. 1. Introduction. In this paper, we discuss the impulsive retarded functional differential equation (IRFDE)... x = f(t,xt), t ∈ [0,T ],t = tk ...

  10. Optimal Impulse conditions for Deflecting Earth Crossing Asteroids

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Elder, Jeffrey

    1997-01-01

    .... The solution is based on two dimensional, two body, Earth intersecting elliptical orbits. Given the asteroid eccentricity, time prior to impact and impulse magnitude and direction, an analysis of impulse to minimum separation distance is generated...

  11. Impulse Control Disorders - The Continuum Hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Georg

    2016-01-01

    The group Parkinson Inside Out is composed of health professionals and academic researchers who have been diagnosed with Parkinson's Disease. In our discussions we try to make use of both our inside perspective as patients, and our outside perspective as professionals. In this paper, we apply the two perspectives to the Impulse Control Disorders. These impulsive behaviour patterns are thought to be relatively uncommon side effects of some of the medication used in dopamine replacement therapy. The phenomenon is usually described as relatively rare (impulses is a very common experience for patients undergoing dopamine replacement therapy. They result from difficulties in decision making engendered by variations in dopamine accessibility in the reward centre of the brain. Only in a minority do the consequences grow to the damaging proportions of a disorder, but most patients are probably affected to some degree. Seeing, and measuring, decision difficulties as a continuous dimension, rather than as a discrete category, brings increased possibilities for early detection and continuous monitoring. With reliable measures of the propensity for impulsive decision making, it may become possible to both reap the benefits and avoid the dangers of the dopamine agonists. We point to ways of empirically testing our continuity hypothesis.

  12. Ultrahigh Specific Impulse Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anne Charmeau; Brandon Cunningham; Samim Anghaie

    2009-02-09

    Research on nuclear thermal propulsion systems (NTP) have been in forefront of the space nuclear power and propulsion due to their design simplicity and their promise for providing very high thrust at reasonably high specific impulse. During NERVA-ROVER program in late 1950's till early 1970's, the United States developed and ground tested about 18 NTP systems without ever deploying them into space. The NERVA-ROVER program included development and testing of NTP systems with very high thrust (~250,000 lbf) and relatively high specific impulse (~850 s). High thrust to weight ratio in NTP systems is an indicator of high acceleration that could be achieved with these systems. The specific impulse in the lowest mass propellant, hydrogen, is a function of square root of absolute temperature in the NTP thrust chamber. Therefor optimizing design performance of NTP systems would require achieving the highest possible hydrogen temperature at reasonably high thrust to weight ratio. High hydrogen exit temperature produces high specific impulse that is a diret measure of propellant usage efficiency.

  13. Functional impulsivity and reinforcement sensitivity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smillie, Luke D; Jackson, Chris J

    2006-02-01

    In this article, we attempt to integrate Dickman's (1990) descriptive concept of Functional Impulsivity (FI) with Gray's (1970, 1991) Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST). Specifically, we consider that FI bears great conceptual similarity to Gray's concept of reward-reactivity, which is thought to be caused by the combined effects of a Behavioral Activation System (BAS) and Behavioral Inhibition System (BIS). In our first study, we examine the construct validity and structural correlates of FI. Results indicate that FI is related positively to measures of BAS and Extraversion, negatively to measures of BIS and Neuroticism, and is separate from Psychoticism and typical trait Impulsivity, which Dickman calls Dysfunctional Impulsivity (DI). In our second study, we use a go/no-go discrimination task to examine the relationship between FI and response bias under conditions of rewarding and punishing feedback. Results indicate that FI, along with two measures of BAS, predicted the development of a response bias for the rewarded alternative. In comparison, high DI appeared to reflect indifference toward either reward or punishment. We consider how these findings might reconcile the perspectives of Gray and Dickman and help clarify the broader understanding of Impulsivity.

  14. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-09-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB-), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB- groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview.

  15. How Many Impulsivities? A Discounting Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Leonard; Myerson, Joel

    2013-01-01

    People discount the value of delayed and uncertain outcomes, and how steeply individuals discount is thought to reflect how impulsive they are. From this perspective, steep discounting of delayed outcomes (which fails to maximize long-term welfare) and shallow discounting of probabilistic outcomes (which fails to adequately take risk into account)…

  16. The Relationship among Spontaneity, Impulsivity, and Creativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipper, David A.; Green, Doreen J.; Prorak, Amanda

    2010-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate two characteristics of spontaneity, its relationship to creativity and to impulsivity. We hypothesized a positive relationship between spontaneity and creativity, consistent with Moreno, 1953 "canon of spontaneity-creativity." We also predicted a negative relationship between spontaneity and…

  17. Impulsive Behaviors in Patients With Pathological Buying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zander, Heike; Claes, Laurence; Voth, Eva M.; de Zwaan, Martina; Müller, Astrid

    2016-01-01

    Aim To investigate impulsive behaviors in pathological buying (PB). Methods The study included three groups matched for age and gender: treatment seeking outpatients with PB (PB+), treatment seeking psychiatric inpatients without PB (PB−), and a healthy control group (HC). PB was assessed by means of the Compulsive Buying Scale and by the impulse control disorder (ICD) module of the research version of the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID-ICD). All participants answered questionnaires concerning symptoms of borderline personality disorder, self-harming behaviors, binge eating and symptoms of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In addition, comorbid ICDs were assessed using the SCID-ICD. Results The PB+ and PB− groups did not differ with regard to borderline personality disorder or ADHD symptoms, but both groups reported significantly more symptoms than the HC group. Frequencies of self-harming behaviors did not differ between the three groups. Patients with PB were more often diagnosed with any current ICD (excluding PB) compared to those without PB and the HC group (38.7% vs. 12.9% vs. 12.9%, respectively, p=.017). Discussion Our findings confirm prior research suggesting more impulsive behaviors in patients with and without PB compared to healthy controls. The results of the questionnaire-based assessment indicate that outpatients with PB perceive themselves equally impulsive and self-harm as frequently as inpatients without PB; but they seem to suffer more often from an ICD as assessed by means of an interview. PMID:27415604

  18. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy On This Page What is breast reconstruction? How ... are some new developments in breast reconstruction after mastectomy? What is breast reconstruction? Many women who have ...

  19. Breast reconstruction - implants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breast implants surgery; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with implants; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction with implants ... to make reconstruction easier. If you will have breast reconstruction later, your surgeon will remove enough skin ...

  20. Impulsive Social Influence Increases Impulsive Choices on a Temporal Discounting Task in Young Adults: e101570

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jodi M Gilman; Max T Curran; Vanessa Calderon; Luke E Stoeckel; A Eden Evins

    2014-01-01

    ...) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which...

  1. Impulsive social influence increases impulsive choices on a temporal discounting task in young adults

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gilman, Jodi M; Curran, Max T; Calderon, Vanessa; Stoeckel, Luke E; Evins, A Eden

    2014-01-01

    ...) when interpreting social behaviors. In this study, we combined a novel social manipulation with a well-validated delay discounting task assessing impulsive behavior to create a social influence delay discounting task, in which...

  2. Nonlinear reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Hong-Ming; Yu, Yu; Pen, Ue-Li; Chen, Xuelei; Yu, Hao-Ran

    2017-12-01

    We present a direct approach to nonparametrically reconstruct the linear density field from an observed nonlinear map. We solve for the unique displacement potential consistent with the nonlinear density and positive definite coordinate transformation using a multigrid algorithm. We show that we recover the linear initial conditions up to the nonlinear scale (rδrδL>0.5 for k ≲1 h /Mpc ) with minimal computational cost. This reconstruction approach generalizes the linear displacement theory to fully nonlinear fields, potentially substantially expanding the baryon acoustic oscillations and redshift space distortions information content of dense large scale structure surveys, including for example SDSS main sample and 21 cm intensity mapping initiatives.

  3. [Impulse cytophotometric investigations on melanoblastoma (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krug, H; Schönfelder, M

    1975-01-01

    We investigated 24 patients with melanotic tumours (under them 22 malignant melanoms). The tumour material (31 x by biopsy, 2 x by autopsy) was homogenized and stained with Ethidium bromide after pepsination. The distribution of the DNA content of the tumour cell nuclei was measured by impulse cytophotometry. The criterion for the curves was the height of the 4-c-peak in percentage of the diploid peak. Our material was divided in 3 groups: I. Without metastases. II. Metastases, slowly progressive. III. Metastases, rapidly progressive. Between the groups there were significant differences: the higher the 4-c-peak, the greater the malignancy. In the group III we mostly had tetraploid populations with the maximal peak at 4-c. The course of the disease (as seen by metastasis, effect of chemotherapy, growing in cell culture) runs parallel to the findings of impulse cytophotometry. In one case of melanosis praeblastomatosa circumscripta Dubreuilh we found a pure diploid cell population without peaks at 4-c. For prognosis (not for diagnosis) the impulse cytophotometric investigation of malignant melanoma is more suitable than the histology. In the discussion we expose the connections between proliferation and DNS distribution of cell nuclei in a tetraploid population. The terminology of cell cycle phases is extended to tetraploid populations with new terms (G', S'). In some cases we found stem lines. As shown by repeated impulse cytophotometric investigations a changing of stem lines in the DNA distribution curve is possible (change from hyperdiploid to tetraploid). The impulse cytophotometry is suitable for such investigations on melanomas.

  4. Fractionating impulsivity: contrasting effects of central 5-HT depletion on different measures of impulsive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winstanley, Catharine A; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Theobald, David E H; Robbins, Trevor W

    2004-07-01

    Reducing levels of 5-HT in the central nervous system has been associated with increases in impulsive behavior. However, the impulsivity construct describes a wide range of behaviors, including the inability to withhold a response, intolerance to delay of reward and perseveration of a nonrewarded response. Although these behaviors are generally studied using instrumental paradigms, impulsivity may also be reflected in simple Pavlovian tasks such as autoshaping and conditioned activity. This experiment aimed to characterize further the effects of central 5-HT depletion and to investigate whether different behavioral measures of impulsivity are inter-related, thus validating the construct. Rats received intracerebroventricular (ICV) infusions of vehicle (n=10) or the serotonergic neurotoxin 5,7-dihydroxytryptamine (n=12) which depleted forebrain 5-HT levels by about 90%. Lesioned animals showed significant increases in the speed and number of responses made in autoshaping, increased premature responding on a simple visual attentional task, enhanced expression of locomotor activity conditioned to food presentation, yet no change in impulsive choice was observed, as measured by a delay-discounting paradigm. Significant positive correlations were found between responses made in autoshaping and the level of conditioned activity, indicating a possible common basis for these behaviors, yet no correlations were found between other behavioral measures. These data strengthen and extend the hypothesis that 5-HT depletion increases certain types of impulsive responding. However, not all measures of impulsivity appear to be uniformly affected by 5-HT depletion, or correlate with each other, supporting the suggestion that impulsivity is not a unitary construct. Copyright 2004 Nature Publishing Group

  5. Causal Reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-02-01

    suitable source of core events supporting causal reconstruction in a range of domains might be a combination of bodily - kinesthetic and simple...suggested in the previ- ous section, a good place to start might be with causal situations involving bodily - kinesthetic events or simple mechanical events...ANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(LS) tý PJIfORMIN’, CRGANIZATION !.LPDRT NUMBEK Artificial Intelligence Laboratory 545 Technology Square AIM 1403 Cambridge

  6. On some impulsive fractional differential equations in Banach spaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JinRong Wang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with some impulsive fractional differential equations in Banach spaces. Utilizing the Leray-Schauder fixed point theorem and the impulsive nonlinear singular version of the Gronwall inequality, the existence of \\(PC\\-mild solutions for some fractional differential equations with impulses are obtained under some easily checked conditions. At last, an example is given for demonstration.

  7. Hybrid-impulsive second order sliding mode control: Lyapunov approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shtessel, Y.; Glumineau, A.; Plestan, F.; Weiss, M.

    2013-01-01

    A perturbed nonlinear system of relative degree two controlled by discontinuous-impulsive feedbacks is studied. The hybrid-impulsive terms serve to drive instantaneously the system trajectories to the origin or to its small vicinity. In particular, impulsive-twisting control exhibits an uniform

  8. Nonlinear impulsive Volterra integral equations in Banach spaces and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dajun Guo

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we first extend results on the existence of maximal solutions for nonlinear Volterra integral equations in Banach spaces to impulsive Volterra integral equations. Then, we give some applications to initial value problems for first order impulsive differential equations in Banach spaces. The results are demonstrated by means of an example of an infinite system for impulsive differential equations.

  9. The Effect of Individual Differences on Adolescents' Impulsive Buying Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chien-Huang; Chuang, Shin-Chieh

    2005-01-01

    This study posits a relationship between Emotional Intelligence (EI) and Impulsive Buying Tendency (IBT). A survey of 574 adolescents found that high-EI adolescents manifested less impulsive behavior than did low-EI adolescents, and high-IBT adolescents were more likely to engage in more impulsive buying behavior than were low-IBT adolescents.…

  10. Parental monitoring may protect impulsive children from overeating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, C; Blissett, J

    2017-10-01

    Research has highlighted links between impulsivity and weight in children and adults. Nevertheless, little is known about the nature of this link in very young children or about the underlying mechanism by which impulsivity leads to greater adiposity. The present study aimed to explore relationships between impulsivity, weight and eating behaviour in a sample of 95 2 to 4-year-olds. Parent-child dyads visited the laboratory and consumed a meal after which parents completed measures of child impulsivity, eating behaviour and parental feeding, whilst children completed impulsivity tasks measuring the impulsivity facet delay of gratification (Snack Delay task), motor impulsivity (Line Walking task) and inhibitory control (Tower task). Pearson's correlations showed that girls with greater motor impulsivity were heavier. Additionally, monitoring moderated the relationship between impulsivity and food approach behaviour, indicating that monitoring may protect more impulsive children from displaying problematic eating behaviours. The motor impulsivity facet appears particularly relevant to child weight; parents can modulate the impact of impulsivity on child eating behaviour through their feeding style. © 2016 World Obesity Federation.

  11. Measuring Impulsivity in Adolescents with Serious Substance and Conduct Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Laetitia L.; Whitmore, Elizabeth A.; Raymond, Kristen M.; Crowley, Thomas J.

    2006-01-01

    Adolescents with substance use and conduct disorders have high rates of aggression and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), all of which have been characterized in part by impulsivity. Developing measures that capture impulsivity behaviorally and correlate with self-reported impulsivity has been difficult. One promising behavioral…

  12. Correction Impulse Method for Turbo Decoding over Middleton Class-A Impulsive Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TRIFINA, L.

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The correction impulse method (CIM is very effective to achieve low error rates in turbo decoding. It was applied for transmission over Additive White Gaussian Noise (AWGN channels, where the correction impulse value must be a real number greater than the minimum distance of the turbo code. The original version of CIM can not be used for channels modeled as Middleton additive white Class-A impulsive noise (MAWCAIN, because of nonlinearity of channel reliability. Thus, in this paper we propose two ways to modify the method such that it improves the system performances in the case of aforementioned channels. In the first one, the value of the correction impulse is chosen to maximize the channel reliability. It depends on the signal to noise ratio (SNR and the error rates are significantly improved compared to those obtained by using the correction impulse value applied for AWGN channels. The second version is based on the least squares method and performs an approximation of the correction impulse. The approximated value depends on the SNR and the parameter A of the MAWCAIN model. The differences between the error rates obtained by the two proposed methods are negligible.

  13. Impulsive for life? The nature of long-term impulsivity in domestic dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riemer, Stefanie; Mills, Daniel S; Wright, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity occur at a cognitive and/or behavioural level and are associated with differing life outcomes. However, there is a lack of empirical evidence to support the long-term stability of these characteristics in non-human animals. This study reports on the stability of convergent measures of impulsivity in domestic dogs assessed more than 6 years apart. Measures were (1) owner assessment by means of a questionnaire, the validated 'Dog Impulsivity Assessment Scale' (DIAS) and (2) dogs' performance in a delayed reward choice test. Dogs had 15-min free access to two food dispensers, one dispensing a piece of food immediately, the other dispensing three pieces after a delay, which increased by 1 s every other time the dogs sampled it. Maximum delay reached in this task reflects decision-making, or cognitive impulsivity, whereas the rate of extra presses on the delayed reward device during the delay can be considered as a measure of motor or behavioural impulsivity. DIAS scores were strongly and significantly correlated across years. The maximum delay reached in the behaviour test was also highly stable, whereas paw-pressing rate was uncorrelated between the years. These results demonstrate that cognitive but not motor impulsivity is highly consistent over time in dogs.

  14. Spatial organization and Synchronization in collective swimming of Hemigrammus bleheri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Intesaaf; Ha, Thanh-Tung; Godoy-Diana, Ramiro; Thiria, Benjamin; Halloy, Jose; Collignon, Bertrand; Laboratoire de Physique et Mécanique des Milieux Hétérogènes (PMMH) Team; Laboratoire Interdisciplinaire des Energies de Demain (LIED) Team

    2016-11-01

    In this work, we study the collective swimming of Hemigrammus bleheri fish using experiments in a shallow swimming channel. We use high-speed video recordings to track the midline kinematics and the spatial organization of fish pairs and triads. Synchronizations are characterized by observance of "out of phase" and "in phase" configurations. We show that the synchronization state is highly correlated to swimming speed. The increase in synchronization led to efficient swimming based on Strouhal number. In case of fish pairs, the collective swimming is 2D and the spatial organization is characterized by two characteristic lengths: the lateral and longitudinal separation distances between fish pairs.For fish triads, different swimming patterns or configurations are observed having three dimensional structures. We performed 3D kinematic analysis by employing 3D reconstruction using the Direct Linear Transformation (DLT). We show that fish still keep their nearest neighbor distance (NND) constant irrespective of swimming speeds and configuration. We also point out characteristic angles between neighbors, hence imposing preferred patterns. At last we will give some perspectives on spatial organization for larger population. Sorbonne Paris City College of Doctoral Schools. European Union Information and Communication Technologies project ASSISIbf, FP7-ICT-FET-601074.

  15. Differences between Impulsive and Non-Impulsive Suicide Attempts among Individuals Treated in Emergency Rooms of South Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Meerae; Lee, Soojung; Park, Jong-Ik

    2016-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of suicide attempts are the result of sudden desires. Understanding such impulsive suicide attempts is necessary for effective interventions. We evaluated the impulsivity of suicide attempters treated in emergency rooms. The aim of the study was to identify the characteristics of impulsive suicide attempts by comparing these individuals to those who attempted to commit suicide in a non-impulsive manner. Methods This study analyzed suicide attempters who vis...

  16. A tree-ring reconstruction of western spruce budworm outbreaks in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado, U.S.A

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ryerson D.E; Swetnam T.W; Lynch A.M

    2003-01-01

    ... (Choristoneura occidentalis Freeman) outbreaks in mixed conifer forests of southern Colorado. Reconstructions in 11 host stands showed a regionally synchronous pattern of at least 14 outbreaks during the past 350 years...

  17. Producing Newborn Synchronous Mammalian Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Thornton, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    A method and bioreactor for the continuous production of synchronous (same age) population of mammalian cells have been invented. The invention involves the attachment and growth of cells on an adhesive-coated porous membrane immersed in a perfused liquid culture medium in a microgravity analog bioreactor. When cells attach to the surface divide, newborn cells are released into the flowing culture medium. The released cells, consisting of a uniform population of synchronous cells are then collected from the effluent culture medium. This invention could be of interest to researchers investigating the effects of the geneotoxic effects of the space environment (microgravity, radiation, chemicals, gases) and to pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies involved in research on aging and cancer, and in new drug development and testing.

  18. Solidarity, synchronization and collective action

    CERN Document Server

    Bruggeman, Jeroen

    2013-01-01

    For people to act collectively in actual situations -- in contrast to public goods experiments -- goal ambiguity, diversity of interests, and uncertain costs and benefits stand in their way. Under such conditions, people seem to have few reasons to cooperate, yet the Arab revolutions, as conspicuous examples, show that collective action can take place despite the odds. I use the Kuramoto model to show how people in a cohesive network topology can synchronize their salient traits (emotions, interests, or other), and that synchronization happens in a phase transition, when group solidarity passes a critical threshold. This yields more precise predictions of outbursts of collective action under adverse conditions, and casts a new light on different measures of social cohesion.

  19. "Impulsive" suicide attempts: What do we really mean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Alexis M; Klonsky, E David

    2016-07-01

    Suicide attempts are often regarded as impulsive acts. However, there is little consensus regarding the definition or clinical characteristics of an "impulsive" attempt. To clarify this issue, we examined 3 indicators of the impulsivity of an attempt: (a) preparation, (b) time contemplating the attempt, and (c) self-report that impulsivity motivated the attempt. We examined relationships among the indicators and their relationship to trait impulsivity and characteristics of the suicide attempt. Adult participants (N = 205) with a history of suicide attempts were administered validated interviews and questionnaires. In general, the 3 attempt impulsivity indicators correlated only moderately with each other and not at all with trait impulsivity or with important characteristics of the attempt (e.g., lethality, preattempt communication, motivations). However, there were 2 exceptions. First, intent to die was inversely related to the 3 attempt impulsivity indicators (rs ranged from -.17 to .45) such that more impulsive attempts were associated with lower intent. Second, self-report that the attempt was motivated by impulsivity was related to 3 facets of trait impulsivity (rs ranged from .16 to .41). These findings suggest that individuals endorsing trait impulsivity are likely to describe their attempts as motivated by impulsivity, regardless of the presence of preparation or prolonged contemplation. Overall, study results suggest that the common conception of a unidimensional impulsive attempt may be inaccurate and that the emphasis on general impulsivity in prevention guidelines should be tempered. Implications for suicide risk assessment and prevention are discussed. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Differences between Impulsive and Non-Impulsive Suicide Attempts among Individuals Treated in Emergency Rooms of South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Meerae; Lee, Soojung

    2016-01-01

    Objective A considerable proportion of suicide attempts are the result of sudden desires. Understanding such impulsive suicide attempts is necessary for effective interventions. We evaluated the impulsivity of suicide attempters treated in emergency rooms. The aim of the study was to identify the characteristics of impulsive suicide attempts by comparing these individuals to those who attempted to commit suicide in a non-impulsive manner. Methods This study analyzed suicide attempters who visited the emergency departments of seven selected university hospitals. A total of 269 medical records in which impulsivity of suicide attempt were confirmed were subject to be analyzed. The impulsivity of the suicide attempt was examined using a summative score of items 6 and 15 on the Suicide Intent Scale. Results A total of 48.0% of the participants were impelled by sudden inclinations to attempt suicide. Impulsive attempters were younger, unmarried and less physical illness than non-impulsive attempters, whereas no significant differences were found on psychiatric history and previous suicide history. Impulsive suicide attempters had suicide ideations that were not as severe (χ2=55.33, psuicide attempts were better than non-impulsive suicide attempts (t=-3.77, psuicide attempts were the result of sudden inclinations. Impulsive attempts were made in relatively earlier stages of suicide ideation; consequently, they have less intent than non-impulsive attempts. PMID:27482239

  1. New Solutions for Synchronized Domineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahri, Sahil; Kruskal, Clyde P.

    Cincotti and Iida invented the game of Synchronized Domineering, and analyzed a few special cases. We develop a more general technique of analysis, and obtain results for many more special cases. We obtain complete results for board sizes 3 ×n, 5 ×n, 7 ×n, and 9 ×n (for n large enough) and partial results for board sizes 2×n, 4 ×n, and 6 ×n.

  2. Digital-data receiver synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen F.; Turner, Gary W.

    2005-08-02

    Digital-data receiver synchronization is provided with composite phase-frequency detectors, mutually cross-connected comparison feedback or both to provide robust reception of digital data signals. A single master clock can be used to provide frequency signals. Advantages can include fast lock-up time in moderately to severely noisy conditions, greater tolerance to noise and jitter when locked, and improved tolerance to clock asymmetries.

  3. [Impulsiveness Among Short-Term Prisoners with Antisocial Personality Disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Fabian U; Otte, Stefanie; Vasic, Nenad; Jäger, Markus; Dudeck, Manuela

    2015-07-01

    The study aimed to investigate the correlation between impulsiveness and the antisocial personality disorder among short-term prisoners. The impulsiveness was diagnosed by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS). Short-term prisoners with antisocial personality disorder scored significant higher marks on the BIS total scale than those without any personality disorder. In detail, they scored higher marks on each subscale regarding attentional, motor and nonplanning impulsiveness. Moderate and high effects were calculated. It is to be considered to regard impulsivity as a conceptual component of antisociality. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. High impulsivity predicting vulnerability to cocaine addiction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molander, Anna C; Mar, Adam; Norbury, Agnes

    2011-01-01

    RATIONALE: Impulsivity is a vulnerability marker for drug addiction in which other behavioural traits such as anxiety and novelty seeking ('sensation seeking') are also widely present. However, inter-relationships between impulsivity, novelty seeking and anxiety traits are poorly understood...... increasing or decreasing impulsivity in SHI and SLI rats, did reduce the contrast in impulsivity between these two groups of animals. CONCLUSIONS: This investigation indicates that behavioural impulsivity in rats on the 5-CSRTT, which predicts vulnerability for cocaine addiction, is distinct from anxiety...

  5. Impulsive action and impulsive choice across substance and behavioral addictions: cause or consequence?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Jon E; Chamberlain, Samuel R

    2014-11-01

    Substance use disorders are prevalent and debilitating. Certain behavioral syndromes ('behavioral addictions') characterized by repetitive habits, such as gambling disorder, stealing, shopping, and compulsive internet use, may share clinical, co-morbid, and neurobiological parallels with substance addictions. This review considers overlap between substance and behavioral addictions with a particular focus on impulsive action (inability to inhibit motor responses), and impulsive choice (preference for immediate smaller rewards to the detriment of long-term outcomes). We find that acute consumption of drugs with abuse potential is capable of modulating impulsive choice and action, although magnitude and direction of effect appear contingent on baseline function. Many lines of evidence, including findings from meta-analyses, show an association between chronic drug use and elevated impulsive choice and action. In some instances, elevated impulsive choice and action have been found to predate the development of substance use disorders, perhaps signifying their candidacy as objective vulnerability markers. Research in behavioral addictions is preliminary, and has mostly focused on impulsive action, finding this to be elevated versus controls, similar to that seen in chronic substance use disorders. Only a handful of imaging studies has explored the neural correlates of impulsive action and choice across these disorders. Key areas for future research are highlighted along with potential implications in terms of neurobiological models and treatment. In particular, future work should further explore whether the cognitive deficits identified are state or trait in nature: i.e. are evident before addiction perhaps signaling risk; or are a consequence of repetitive engagement in habitual behavior; and effects of novel agents known to modulate these cognitive abilities on various addictive disorders. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L L

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship.

  7. Narcissism predicts impulsive buying: phenotypic and genetic evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huajian; Shi, Yuanyuan; Fang, Xiang; Luo, Yu L. L.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsive buying makes billions of dollars for retail businesses every year, particularly in an era of thriving e-commerce. Narcissism, characterized by impulsivity and materialism, may serve as a potential antecedent to impulsive buying. To test this hypothesis, two studies examined the relationship between narcissism and impulsive buying. In Study 1, we surveyed an online sample and found that while adaptive narcissism was not correlated with impulsive buying, maladaptive narcissism was significantly predictive of the impulsive buying tendency. By investigating 304 twin pairs, Study 2 showed that global narcissism and its two components, adaptive and maladaptive narcissism, as well as the impulsive buying tendency were heritable. The study found, moreover, that the connections between global narcissism and impulsive buying, and between maladaptive narcissism and impulsive buying were genetically based. These findings not only establish a link between narcissism and impulsive buying but also help to identify the origins of the link. The present studies deepen our understanding of narcissism, impulsive buying, and their interrelationship. PMID:26217251

  8. A Delayed Impulse Control Strategy for Spacecraft Formations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Sung-Hoon; Choi, Yoonhyuk; Bang, Hyochoong; Leeghim, Henzeh

    2013-12-01

    An impulsive control strategy for spacecraft formation flying is suggested considering secular drift between satellites. The drift motion caused by orbital period difference affects impulsive correction. Preventing the drift has been treated as a natural effort in most of formation flying researches. However, this study proposes preserving the drift behavior by delaying the period-matching maneuver. The paper shows that the impulse delay could be effective under some conditions by reducing the required delta-v. Two impulsive control methods are designed by harnessing the drift in pure Keplerian orbits. By using a linear approximation, the proposed methods avoid iterative steps for obtaining the required impulse, so the new strategy can be implemented with less computational burden compared to numerical optimal solutions. Impulse magnitudes between an existing method and the proposed strategy are compared mathematically and the numerical simulation verifies that the impulse reduction could be achieved with the suggested methods.

  9. Impulsive aggression in adults with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowson, J H; Blackwell, A D

    2010-02-01

    DSM-IV criteria for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) include examples of 'impulsivity'. This term can refer to various dysfunctional behaviours, including some examples of aggressive behaviour. However, impulsive aggression is not included in the DSM-IV criteria for ADHD. The associations of impulsive aggression with ADHD were investigated. Seventy-three male adults with DSM-IV ADHD, and their informants, completed questionnaires. Impulsive aggression was assessed by ratings of two criteria for borderline personality disorder (BPD), involving hot temper and/or self-harm. Logistic regression indicated that features of DSM-IV ADHD were predictors of comorbid impulsive aggression. However, compared with ADHD features, verbal IQ and comorbid psychopathology were more strongly associated with impulsive aggression. The findings support the inclusion of features of impulsive aggression, such as hot temper/short fuse, in the ADHD syndrome in adults. These overlap with features of BPD. The findings inform the selection of research samples.

  10. Self-reported tactics of impulse control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainslie, G

    1987-02-01

    Recent behavioral research has suggested that delayed incentives are discounted in a highly concave curve, which should produce temporary preference for the poorer of two alternatives when that alternative is available earlier than the better one. Unlike the psychoanalytic model of impulsiveness, the temporary preference model implies a rational need for people to forestall impulses by committing their choices in advance. A questionnaire elicited college students' and prisoners' self-reports of approval of four basic kinds of precommitting tactics as applied to 14 commonplace temptations. Endorsement of private rules as a precommitting device was correlated with self-reported compulsive personality traits and negatively correlated with endorsement of extra-psychic (social or physical) devices; the latter endorsement was correlated with self-reported oral/paranoid traits. Female subjects endorsed attention control as a precommitting device more than males, and male subjects endorsed extrapsychic devices more than females. The ego psychology of conflict may be practical at the conscious level.

  11. Impact of Impulse Stops on Pedestrian Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Kwak, Jaeyoung; Luttinen, Tapio; Kosonen, Iisakki

    2015-01-01

    We numerically study the impact of impulse stops on pedestrian flow for a straight corridor with multiple attractions. The impulse stop is simulated by the switching behavior model, a function of the social influence strength and the number of attendees near the attraction. When the pedestrian influx is low, one can observe a stable flow where attendees make a complete stop at an attraction and then leave the attraction after a certain amount of time. When the pedestrian influx is high, an unstable flow is observed for strong social influence. In the unstable flow, attendees near the attraction are crowded out from the clusters by others due to the interpersonal repulsion. The expelled pedestrians impede the pedestrian traffic between the left and right boundaries of the corridor. These collective patterns of pedestrian flow are summarized in a schematic phase diagram.

  12. Experience of a Reconstruction of "Archaeological" Costume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Altynbekov Krym

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article presents a reconstruction of “archaeological” costume restored by the Ostrov Krym Scientific Restoration Laboratory (Almaty, Republic of Kazakhstan by the finds uncovered from Early Iron Age graves. The authors examined organic remains of clothes from barrow no. 11 of Berel burial ground (4th – 3rd centuries BC located on the territory of the Kazakhstan Altai and undertook a partial reconstruction of several items: a fur coat, a headdress and two felt stockings. The accuracy of this reconstruction is confirmed by well-preserved analogues of synchronous Altai barrows on the territory of Russia and Mongolia, belonging to the Pazyryk culture. The article also describes a method by which undisturbed graves can be extracted as one (monolithic block and contains techniques for formation of such blocks in the dig and lab studies of “archaeological” costumes in such blocks, applied by the Ostrov Krym Laboratory.

  13. The Hydraulic Ram (Or Impulse) Pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described,…

  14. Cigarette cravings, impulsivity and the brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane ePotvin

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Craving is a core feature of tobacco use disorder as well as a significant predictor of smoking relapse. Studies have shown that appetitive smoking-related stimuli (e.g. someone smoking trigger significant cravings in smokers which impedes their self-control capacities and promotes drug seeking behavior. In this review, we begin by an overview of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI studies investigating the neural correlates of smokers to appetitive smoking cues. The literature reveals a complex and vastly distributed neuronal network underlying smokers’ craving response that recruits regions involved in self-referential processing, panning/regulatory processes, emotional responding, attentional biases, and automatic conducts. We then selectively review important factors contributing to the heterogeneity of results that significantly limit the implications of these findings, namely between- (abstinence, smoking expectancies and self-regulation and within-studies factors (severity of smoking dependence, sex-differences, motivation to quit and genetic factors. Remarkably, we found that little to no attention has been devoted to examine the influence of personality traits on the neural correlates of cigarette cravings in fMRI studies. Impulsivity has been linked with craving and relapse in substance and tobacco use, which prompted our research team to examine the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings in an fMRI study. We found that the influence of impulsivity on cigarette cravings was mediated by fronto-cingular mechanisms. Given the high prevalence of cigarette smoking in several psychiatric disorders that are characterized by significant levels of impulsivity, we conclude by identifying psychiatric patients as a target population whose tobacco smoking habits deserve further behavioral and neuro-imaging investigation.

  15. An Impulse Model for Computer Viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunming Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Computer virus spread model concerning impulsive control strategy is proposed and analyzed. We prove that there exists a globally attractive infection-free periodic solution when the vaccination rate is larger than θ0. Moreover, we show that the system is uniformly persistent if the vaccination rate is less than θ1. Some numerical simulations are finally given to illustrate the main results.

  16. The hydraulic ram (or impulse) pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Allan

    2014-03-01

    The hydraulic impulse pump utilizes a fraction of the momentum of a flowing stream to lift a small portion of that water to a higher level. There it may be accumulated in an elevated cistern to provide sufficient water for several families, for the pump works 24 h a day with no additional source of energy. The operation of the pump is described, along with a working demonstration model constructed from plastic waste pipe and fittings.

  17. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Deanna K; Finan, Donald S; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A; Murphy, William J; Lankford, James E; Stewart, Michael

    2013-02-01

    This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (L(eqA8)), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤ 25) for the .32-caliber pistol. The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete's overall noise exposure.

  18. Impulse noise generated by starter pistols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinke, Deanna K.; Finan, Donald S.; Soendergaard, Jacob; Flamme, Gregory A.; Murphy, William J.; Lankford, James E.; Stewart, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective This study describes signals generated by .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols in the context of noise-induced hearing loss risk for sports officials and athletes. Design Acoustic comparison of impulses generated from typical .22 and .32 caliber starter pistols firing blanks were made to impulses generated from comparable firearms firing both blanks and live rounds. Acoustic characteristics are described in terms of directionality and distance from the shooter in a simulated outdoor running track. Metrics include peak sound pressure levels (SPL), A-weighted equivalent 8-hour level (LeqA8), and maximum permissible number of individual shots, or maximum permissible exposures (MPE) for the unprotected ear. Results Starter pistols produce peak SPLs above 140 dB. The numbers of MPEs are as few as five for the .22-caliber starter pistol, and somewhat higher (≤25) for the .32-caliber pistol. Conclusion The impulsive sounds produced by starter pistols correspond to MPE numbers that are unacceptably small for unprotected officials and others in the immediate vicinity of the shooter. At the distances included in this study, the risk to athletes appears to be low (when referencing exposure criteria for adults), but the sound associated with the starter pistol will contribute to the athlete’s overall noise exposure. PMID:23373743

  19. Determining the degree of synchronism for intermittent phase synchronization in human electroencephalography data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koloskova, A. D.; Moskalenko, O. I.

    2017-05-01

    The phenomenon of intermittent phase synchronization during development of epileptic activity in human beings has been discovered based on EEG data. The presence of synchronous behavior phases has been detected both during spike-wave discharges and in the regions of background activity of the brain. The degree of synchronism in the intermittent phase-synchronization regime in both cases has been determined, and it has been established that spike-wave discharges are characterized by a higher degree of synchronism than exists in the regions of background activity of the brain. To determine the degree of synchronism, a modified method of evaluating zero conditional Lyapunov exponents from time series is proposed.

  20. Pepper and bones: the secessionist impulse in Nevis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas Midgett

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Describes the history of the recurring impulse for independence from the St. Kitts-Nevis state on the part of Nevis. Author examines the modern political history of the St. Kitts-Nevis state, in order to discern the motivations of the Nevisian people and politicians for their wish of secession. First, he sketches how Nevis and St. Kitts were historically linked since the 17th c., but that socioeconomic differences developed; as after the decline of sugar and plantation agriculture on both islands, St Kitts developed a largely proletarian rural population, whereas Nevis' population came to consist more of smallholders, resulting in the labour movement having more influence in St Kitts than in Nevis, which also had political repercussions. Nevisian parties favoured secession. Author reconstructs elections, partisan and general political developments in the St. Kitts-Nevis union since the 1950s, describing the long dominance of the St. Kitts-dominated Labour Party, and responses in Nevis. For Nevisian secession there seemed to be popular support. In 1998, however, the required majority on Nevis for secession was not obtained. Author concludes that the Nevisian wish for secession did not stem from any strong nationalistic zeal, or a particularly strong sense of separate identity or ethnicity, but mainly from economic and political reasons.

  1. Cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation mediates the opposing effects of amphetamine on impulsive action and impulsive choice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost Wiskerke

    Full Text Available It is well known that acute challenges with psychostimulants such as amphetamine affect impulsive behavior. We here studied the pharmacology underlying the effects of amphetamine in two rat models of impulsivity, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT and the delayed reward task (DRT, providing measures of inhibitory control, an aspect of impulsive action, and impulsive choice, respectively. We focused on the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation in amphetamine-induced impulsivity as there is evidence that acute challenges with psychostimulants activate the endogenous cannabinoid system, and CB1 receptor activity modulates impulsivity in both rodents and humans. Results showed that pretreatment with either the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A or the neutral CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050 dose-dependently improved baseline inhibitory control in the 5-CSRTT. Moreover, both compounds similarly attenuated amphetamine-induced inhibitory control deficits, suggesting that CB1 receptor activation by endogenously released cannabinoids mediates this aspect of impulsive action. Direct CB1 receptor activation by Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC did, however, not affect inhibitory control. Although neither SR141716A nor O-2050 affected baseline impulsive choice in the DRT, both ligands completely prevented amphetamine-induced reductions in impulsive decision making, indicating that CB1 receptor activity may decrease this form of impulsivity. Indeed, acute Δ9-THC was found to reduce impulsive choice in a CB1 receptor-dependent way. Together, these results indicate an important, though complex role for cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity in the regulation of impulsive action and impulsive choice as well as the opposite effects amphetamine has on both forms of impulsive behavior.

  2. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation Mediates the Opposing Effects of Amphetamine on Impulsive Action and Impulsive Choice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskerke, Joost; Stoop, Nicky; Schetters, Dustin; Schoffelmeer, Anton N. M.; Pattij, Tommy

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that acute challenges with psychostimulants such as amphetamine affect impulsive behavior. We here studied the pharmacology underlying the effects of amphetamine in two rat models of impulsivity, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and the delayed reward task (DRT), providing measures of inhibitory control, an aspect of impulsive action, and impulsive choice, respectively. We focused on the role of cannabinoid CB1 receptor activation in amphetamine-induced impulsivity as there is evidence that acute challenges with psychostimulants activate the endogenous cannabinoid system, and CB1 receptor activity modulates impulsivity in both rodents and humans. Results showed that pretreatment with either the CB1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist SR141716A or the neutral CB1 receptor antagonist O-2050 dose-dependently improved baseline inhibitory control in the 5-CSRTT. Moreover, both compounds similarly attenuated amphetamine-induced inhibitory control deficits, suggesting that CB1 receptor activation by endogenously released cannabinoids mediates this aspect of impulsive action. Direct CB1 receptor activation by Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) did, however, not affect inhibitory control. Although neither SR141716A nor O-2050 affected baseline impulsive choice in the DRT, both ligands completely prevented amphetamine-induced reductions in impulsive decision making, indicating that CB1 receptor activity may decrease this form of impulsivity. Indeed, acute Δ9-THC was found to reduce impulsive choice in a CB1 receptor-dependent way. Together, these results indicate an important, though complex role for cannabinoid CB1 receptor activity in the regulation of impulsive action and impulsive choice as well as the opposite effects amphetamine has on both forms of impulsive behavior. PMID:22016780

  3. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9709 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  4. Control for a synchronization-desynchronization switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Guo-Yong; Zhan, Meng

    2014-07-01

    How to freely enhance or suppress synchronization of networked dynamical systems is of great importance in many disciplines. A unified precise control method for a synchronization-desynchronization switch, called the pull-push control method, is suggested. Namely, synchronization can be achieved when the original systems are desynchronous by pulling (or protecting) one node or a certain subset of nodes, whereas desynchronization can be accomplished when the systems are already synchronous by pushing (or kicking) one node or a certain subset of nodes. With this method, the controlled nodes should be chosen by the generalized eigenvector centrality of the critical synchronization mode of the Laplacian matrix. Compared with existing control methods for synchronization, it displays high efficiency, flexibility, and precision as well.

  5. Stock Return Synchronicity and Analysts’ Forecast Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joong-Seok Cho

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Using stock return synchronicity as a measure of a firm’s information environment, our research investigates how the firms’ stock return synchronicity affects analysts’ forecast properties for the accuracy and optimism of the analysts’ annual earnings forecasts. Stock return synchronicity represents the degree to which market and industry information explains firm-level stock return variations. A higher stock return synchronicity indicates the higher quality of a firm’s information environment, because a firm’s stock price reflects more market-level and industry-level information relative to firm-specific information. Our study shows that stock return synchronicity positively affects the forecast properties. Our finding shows that when stock return synchronicity is high, analysts’ annual earnings forecasts are more accurate and less optimistically biased.

  6. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danziger, Michael M., E-mail: michael.danziger@biu.ac.il; Havlin, Shlomo [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya, 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Politehnicheskaya, 77, Saratov 410054 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Xiyun [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Boccaletti, Stefano [CNR-Institute of Complex Systems, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); The Italian Embassy in Israel, 25 Hamered Street, 68125 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10{sup 6}) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  7. Reconstructing Normality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gildberg, Frederik Alkier; Bradley, Stephen K.; Fristed, Peter Billeskov

    2012-01-01

    Forensic psychiatry is an area of priority for the Danish Government. As the field expands, this calls for increased knowledge about mental health nursing practice, as this is part of the forensic psychiatry treatment offered. However, only sparse research exists in this area. The aim of this study...... was to investigate the characteristics of forensic mental health nursing staff interaction with forensic mental health inpatients and to explore how staff give meaning to these interactions. The project included 32 forensic mental health staff members, with over 307 hours of participant observations, 48 informal...... interviews, and seven semistructured interviews. The findings show that staff interaction is typified by the use of trust and relationship-enabling care, which is characterized by the establishment and maintenance of an informal, trusting relationship through a repeated reconstruction of normality...

  8. Impulsivity and cigarette craving among adolescent daily and occasional smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Amanda R; Burris, Jessica L; Froeliger, Brett; Saladin, Michael E; Carpenter, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-dimensional construct that is robustly related to cigarette smoking. While underlying factors that account for this relation are not well understood, craving has been proposed as a central mechanism linking impulsivity to smoking. In order to further refine our understanding of associations between impulsivity and cigarette craving, the current study examined the association between impulsivity and tonic and cue-elicited craving among a sample of adolescent smokers. We expected trait impulsivity would be positively associated with both tonic and cue-elicited craving, and that this relationship would be stronger among daily vs. occasional smokers. 106 smokers (ages 16-20) completed the questionnaires and reported their cigarette craving prior to and immediately following presentation of each of three counterbalanced cue types: (a) in vivo smoking, (b) alcohol, and (c) neutral cue. Impulsivity was positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers (β=.38; p=.005), but not occasional smokers (β=.01; p=.95), with a significant impulsivity x smoker group interaction (β=1.31; p=.03). Impulsivity was unrelated to craving following smoking or alcohol cue, regardless of smoker group (all p's>.16). Results suggest a moderated effect in which impulsivity is positively associated with tonic craving for daily smokers, but not occasional smokers. Tonic craving may serve as a mechanism linking impulsivity, smoking persistence, and nicotine dependence among daily smokers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Spectral analysis of hearing protector impulsive insertion loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fackler, Cameron J; Berger, Elliott H; Murphy, William J; Stergar, Michael E

    2017-01-01

    To characterise the performance of hearing protection devices (HPDs) in impulsive-noise conditions and to compare various protection metrics between impulsive and steady-state noise sources with different characteristics. HPDs were measured per the impulsive test methods of ANSI/ASA S12.42- 2010 . Protectors were measured with impulses generated by both an acoustic shock tube and an AR-15 rifle. The measured data were analysed for impulse peak insertion loss (IPIL) and impulsive spectral insertion loss (ISIL). These impulsive measurements were compared to insertion loss measured with steady-state noise and with real-ear attenuation at threshold (REAT). Tested HPDs included a foam earplug, a level-dependent earplug and an electronic sound-restoration earmuff. IPIL for a given protector varied between measurements with the two impulse noise sources, but ISIL agreed between the two sources. The level-dependent earplug demonstrated level-dependent effects both in IPIL and ISIL. Steady-state insertion loss and REAT measurements tended to provide a conservative estimate of the impulsively-measured attenuation. Measurements of IPIL depend strongly on the source used to measure them, especially for HPDs with less attenuation at low frequencies. ISIL provides an alternative measurement of impulse protection and appears to be a more complete description of an HPD's performance.

  10. Dimensions of impulsive behavior in adolescent smokers and nonsmokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Sherecce; Collins, Christine; Leraas, Kristen; Reynolds, Brady

    2009-10-01

    Robust associations have been identified between impulsive personality characteristics and cigarette smoking during adolescents, indicating that impulsive behavior may play an important role in the initiation of cigarette smoking. The present study extended this research by using laboratory behavioral assessments to explore relationships between three specific dimensions of impulsive behavior (impulsive decision-making, inattention, and disinhibition) and adolescent cigarette smoking. Participants were male and female adolescent smokers (n = 50) and nonsmokers (n = 50). Adolescent smokers were more impulsive on a measure of decision-making; however, there were significant smoking status by gender interaction effects for impulsive inattention and disinhibition. Male smokers were most impulsive on the measure of inattention, but male smokers were least impulsive on the measure of disinhibition. Correlations between biomarkers of smoking and impulsive inattention and disinhibition were found for females but not males. The current findings, coupled with previous findings (Reynolds et al., 2007), indicate there may be robust gender difference in associations between certain types of impulsive behavior and cigarette smoking during adolescence.

  11. The role of impulsive behavior in drug abuse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Jennifer L; Carroll, Marilyn E

    2008-09-01

    Impulsivity is a multifaceted construct that has recently been recognized as a factor contributing to enhanced vulnerability to drug abuse. In the present review, we focus on two facets of impulsivity (and tasks that measure them): (1) impulsive choice (delay discounting task) and (2) inhibitory failure (go/no-go, stop signal reaction time, and five-choice serial reaction time tasks). We also describe how performance on each of these tasks is associated with drug-related behavior during phases of drug abuse that capture the essential features of addiction (acquisition, escalation, and reinstatement of drug-seeking after drug access has terminated). Three hypotheses (H) regarding the relationship between impulsivity and drug abuse are discussed: (1) increased levels of impulsivity lead to drug abuse (H1), (2) drugs of abuse increase impulsivity (H2), and (3) impulsivity and drug abuse are associated through a common third factor (H3). Impulsivity expressed as impulsive choice or inhibitory failure plays a role in several key transition phases of drug abuse. There is evidence to support all three nonexclusive hypotheses. Increased levels of impulsivity lead to acquisition of drug abuse (H1) and subsequent escalation or dysregulation of drug intake. Drugs of abuse may increase impulsivity (H2), which is an additional contributor to escalation/dysregulation. Abstinence, relapse, and treatment may be influenced by both H1 and H2. In addition, there is a relationship between impulsivity and other drug abuse vulnerability factors, such as sex, hormonal status, reactivity to nondrug rewards, and early environmental experiences that may impact drug intake during all phases of addiction (H3). Relating drug abuse and impulsivity in phases of addiction via these three hypotheses provides a heuristic model from which future experimental questions can be addressed.

  12. Challenges in Clock Synchronization for On-Site Coding Digital Beamformer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satheesh Bojja Venkatakrishnan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Typical radio frequency (RF digital beamformers can be highly complex. In addition to a suitable antenna array, they require numerous receiver chains, demodulators, data converter arrays, and digital signal processors. To recover and reconstruct the received signal, synchronization is required since the analog-to-digital converters (ADCs, digital-to-analog converters (DACs, field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs, and local oscillators are all clocked at different frequencies. In this article, we present a clock synchronization topology for a multichannel on-site coding receiver (OSCR using the FPGA as a master clock to drive all RF blocks. This approach reduces synchronization errors by a factor of 8, when compared to conventional digital beamformer.

  13. Fitness for synchronization of network motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, Y.M.; Vázquez-Prada, M.; Pacheco, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the synchronization of Kuramoto's oscillators in small parts of networks known as motifs. We first report on the system dynamics for the case of a scale-free network and show the existence of a non-trivial critical point. We compute the probability that network motifs synchronize, and fi...... that the fitness for synchronization correlates well with motifs interconnectedness and structural complexity. Possible implications for present debates about network evolution in biological and other systems are discussed....

  14. A True Open-Loop Synchronization Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golestan, Saeed; Vidal, Ana; Yepes, Alejandro G.

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization techniques can be broadly classified into two major categories: Closed-loop and open-loop methods. The open-loop synchronization (OLS) techniques, contrary to the closed-loop ones, are unconditionally stable and benefit from a fast dynamic response. Their performance, however, tends...... is to develop a true OLS (and therefore, unconditionally stable) technique without any need for the calculation of sine and cosine functions. The effectiveness of the proposed synchronization technique is confirmed through the simulation and experimental results....

  15. Synchronization Techniques for Chaotic Communication Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Jovic, Branislav

    2011-01-01

    Since the early 1990s, when synchronization of chaotic communication systems became a popular research subject, a vast number of scientific papers have been published. However, most of today's books on chaotic communication systems deal exclusively with the systems where perfect synchronization is assumed, an assumption which separates theoretical from practical, real world, systems. This book is the first of its kind dealing exclusively with the synchronization techniques for chaotic communication systems. It describes a number of novel robust synchronization techniques, which there is a lack

  16. Coupled lasers: phase versus chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidler, I; Nixon, M; Aviad, Y; Guberman, S; Friesem, A A; Rosenbluh, M; Davidson, N; Kanter, I

    2013-10-15

    The synchronization of chaotic lasers and the optical phase synchronization of light originating in multiple coupled lasers have both been extensively studied. However, the interplay between these two phenomena, especially at the network level, is unexplored. Here, we experimentally compare these phenomena by controlling the heterogeneity of the coupling delay times of two lasers. While chaotic lasers exhibit deterioration in synchronization as the time delay heterogeneity increases, phase synchronization is found to be independent of heterogeneity. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with numerical simulations for semiconductor lasers.

  17. High Speed Frame Synchronization and Viterbi Decoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, Erik; Justesen, Jørn; Larsen, Knud J.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of Phase 1 of the study is to describe the system structure and algorithms in sufficient detail to allow drawing the high level architecture of units containing frame synchronization and Viterbi decoding. The systems we consider are high data rate space communication systems. Also...... components. Node synchronization performed within a Viterbi decoder is discussed, and algorithms for frame synchronization are described and analyzed. We present a list of system configurations that we find potentially useful. Further, the high level architecture of units that contain frame synchronization...

  18. Pilotless Frame Synchronization Using LDPC Code Constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Christopher; Vissasenor, John

    2009-01-01

    A method of pilotless frame synchronization has been devised for low- density parity-check (LDPC) codes. In pilotless frame synchronization , there are no pilot symbols; instead, the offset is estimated by ex ploiting selected aspects of the structure of the code. The advantag e of pilotless frame synchronization is that the bandwidth of the sig nal is reduced by an amount associated with elimination of the pilot symbols. The disadvantage is an increase in the amount of receiver data processing needed for frame synchronization.

  19. Public-channel cryptography using chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Einat; Mislovaty, Rachel; Kanter, Ido; Kinzel, Wolfgang

    2005-07-01

    We present a key-exchange protocol that comprises two parties with chaotic dynamics that are mutually coupled and undergo a synchronization process, at the end of which they can use their identical dynamical state as an encryption key. The transferred coupling- signals are based nonlinearly on time-delayed states of the parties, and therefore they conceal the parties' current state and can be transferred over a public channel. Synchronization time is linear in the number of synchronized digits alpha, while the probability for an attacker to synchronize with the parties drops exponentially with alpha. To achieve security with finite alpha we use a network.

  20. Synchronization of coupled metronomes on two layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Yu, Yi-Zhen; Wang, Xin-Gang

    2017-12-01

    Coupled metronomes serve as a paradigmatic model for exploring the collective behaviors of complex dynamical systems, as well as a classical setup for classroom demonstrations of synchronization phenomena. Whereas previous studies of metronome synchronization have been concentrating on symmetric coupling schemes, here we consider the asymmetric case by adopting the scheme of layered metronomes. Specifically, we place two metronomes on each layer, and couple two layers by placing one on top of the other. By varying the initial conditions of the metronomes and adjusting the friction between the two layers, a variety of synchronous patterns are observed in experiment, including the splay synchronization (SS) state, the generalized splay synchronization (GSS) state, the anti-phase synchronization (APS) state, the in-phase delay synchronization (IPDS) state, and the in-phase synchronization (IPS) state. In particular, the IPDS state, in which the metronomes on each layer are synchronized in phase but are of a constant phase delay to metronomes on the other layer, is observed for the first time. In addition, a new technique based on audio signals is proposed for pattern detection, which is more convenient and easier to apply than the existing acquisition techniques. Furthermore, a theoretical model is developed to explain the experimental observations, and is employed to explore the dynamical properties of the patterns, including the basin distributions and the pattern transitions. Our study sheds new lights on the collective behaviors of coupled metronomes, and the developed setup can be used in the classroom for demonstration purposes.

  1. Synchronized Data Aggregation for Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dnyaneshwar, Mantri; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are used for monitoring and data collection purposes. A key challenge in effective data collection is to schedule and synchronize the activities of the nodes with global clock. This paper proposes the Synchronized Data Aggregation Algorithm (SDA) using spanning tree...... mechanism. It provides network-wide time synchronization for sensor network. In the initial stage algorithm established the hierarchical structure in the network and then perform the pair - wise synchronization. SDA aggregate data with a global time scale throughout the network. The aggregated packets...

  2. Price synchronization in retailing: some empirical evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Resende

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigates the synchronization of price changes in the context of retail tire dealers in São Paulo-Brazil and selected items in supermarkets for cleaning supplies and food in Rio de Janeiro-Brazil. Results indicate similar and non-negligible synchronization for different brands, although magnitudes are distant from a perfect synchronization pattern. We find interesting patterns in inter-firm competition, with similar magnitudes across different tire types. Intra-chain synchronization is substantial, indicating that a common price adjustment policy tends to be sustained for each chain across different products.

  3. Methodology for Calculation of Pressure Impulse Distribution at Gas-Impulse Regeneration of Water Well Filters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Ivashechkin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers a mathematical model for process of pressure impulse distribution in a water well which appear as a result of underwater gas explosions in cylindrical and spherical explosive chambers with elastic shells and in a rigid cylindrical chamber which is open from the bottom. The proposed calculation methodology developed on the basis of the mathematical model makes it possible to determine pressure in the impulse on a filter wall and at any point of a water well pre-filter zone. 

  4. Analysis of impulse signals with Hylaty ELF station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulak, A.; Mlynarczyk, J.; Ostrowski, M.; Kubisz, J.; Michalec, A.

    2012-04-01

    Lighting discharges generate electromagnetic field pulses that propagate in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide. The attenuation in the ELF range is so small that the pulses originating from strong atmospheric discharges can be observed even several thousand kilometers away from the individual discharge. The recorded waveform depends on the discharge process, the Earth-ionosphere waveguide properties on the source-receiver path, and the transfer function of the receiver. If the distance from the source is known, an inverse method can be used for reconstructing the current moment waveform and the charge moment of the discharge. In order to reconstruct the source parameters from the recorded signal a reliable model of the radio wave propagation in the Earth-ionosphere waveguide as well as practical signal processing techniques are necessary. We present two methods, both based on analytical formulas. The first method allows for fast calculation of the charge moment of relatively short atmospheric discharges. It is based on peak amplitude measurement of the recorded magnetic component of the ELF EM field and it takes into account the receiver characteristics. The second method, called "inverse channel method" allows reconstructing the complete current moment waveform of strong atmospheric discharges that exhibit the continuing current phase, such as Gigantic Jets and Sprites. The method makes it possible to fully remove from the observed waveform the distortions related to the receiver's impulse response as well as the influence of the Earth-ionosphere propagation channel. Our ELF station is equipped with two magnetic antennas for Bx and By components measurement in the 0.03 to 55 Hz frequency range. ELF Data recording is carried out since 1993, with continuous data acquisition since 2005. The station features low noise level and precise timing. It is battery powered and located in the sparsely populated area, far from major electric power lines, which results in high

  5. Does impulsivity predict outcome in treatment for binge eating disorder? A multimodal investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Manasse, Stephanie M.; Espel, Hallie M.; Schumacher, Leah M.; Kerrigan, Stephanie G.; Zhang, Fengqing; Forman, Evan M.; Juarascio, Adrienne S.

    2016-01-01

    Multiple dimensions of impulsivity (e.g., affect-driven impulsivity, impulsive inhibition – both general and food-specific, and impulsive decision-making) are associated with binge eating pathology cross-sectionally, yet the literature on whether impulsivity predicts treatment outcome is limited. The present pilot study explored impulsivity-related predictors of 20-week outcome in a small open trial (n=17) of a novel treatment for binge eating disorder. Overall, dimensions of impulsivity rela...

  6. Self-reported impulsivity, but not behavioral choice or response impulsivity, partially mediates the effect of stress on drinking behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Kristen R; Ansell, Emily B; Reynolds, Brady; Potenza, Marc N; Sinha, Rajita

    2013-01-01

    Stress and impulsivity contribute to alcohol use, and stress may also act via impulsivity to increase drinking behavior. Impulsivity represents a multi-faceted construct and self-report and behavioral assessments may effectively capture distinct clinically relevant factors. The present research investigated whether aspects of impulsivity mediate the effect of stress on alcohol use. A community-based sample of 192 men and women was assessed on measures of cumulative stress, alcohol use, self-reported impulsivity, and behavioral choice and response impulsivity. Data were analyzed using regression and bootstrapping techniques to estimate indirect effects of stress on drinking via impulsivity. Cumulative adversity exhibited both direct effects and indirect effects (via self-reported impulsivity) on drinking behavior. Additional models examining specific types of stress indicated direct and indirect effects of trauma and recent life events, and indirect effects of major life events and chronic stressors on drinking behavior. Overall, cumulative stress was associated with increased drinking behavior, and this effect was partially mediated by self-reported impulsivity. Self-reported impulsivity also mediated the effects of different types of stress on drinking behavior. These findings highlight the value of mediation models to examine the pathways through which different types of stress increase drinking behavior. Treatment and prevention strategies should focus on enhancing stress management and self-control.

  7. Unique aspects of impulsive traits in substance use and overeating: specific contributions of common assessments of impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaton, Derek; Abdi, Hervé; Filbey, Francesca M

    2014-11-01

    Abstract Background: Impulsivity is a complex trait often studied in substance abuse and overeating disorders, but the exact nature of impulsivity traits and their contribution to these disorders are still debated. Thus, understanding how to measure impulsivity is essential for comprehending addictive behaviors. Identify unique impulsivity traits specific to substance use and overeating. Impulsive Sensation Seeking (ImpSS) and Barratt's Impulsivity scales (BIS) Scales were analyzed with a non-parametric factor analytic technique (discriminant correspondence analysis) to identify group-specific traits on 297 individuals from five groups: Marijuana (n = 88), Nicotine (n = 82), Overeaters (n = 27), Marijuauna + Nicotine (n = 63), and CONTROLs (n = 37). A significant overall factor structure revealed three components of impulsivity that explained respectively 50.19% (pperm impulsivity traits specific to these groups. The group specific traits are (1) CONTROL: low impulse, avoids thrill-seeking behaviors; (2) Marijuana: seeks mild sensation, is focused and attentive; (3) Marijuana + Nicotine: pursues thrill-seeking, lacks focus and attention; (4) Nicotine: lacks focus and planning; (5) Overeating: lacks focus, but plans (short and long term). Our results reveal impulsivity traits specific to each group. This may provide better criteria to define spectrums and trajectories - instead of categories - of symptoms for substance use and eating disorders. Defining symptomatic spectrums could be an important step forward in diagnostic strategies.

  8. Image reconstruction under non-Gaussian noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sciacchitano, Federica

    During acquisition and transmission, images are often blurred and corrupted by noise. One of the fundamental tasks of image processing is to reconstruct the clean image from a degraded version. The process of recovering the original image from the data is an example of inverse problem. Due...... in analogue-to-digital conversion, faulty memory locations in hardware. Cauchy noise is characterized by a very impulsive behaviour and it is mainly used to simulate atmospheric and underwater acoustic noise, in radar and sonar applications, biomedical images and synthetic aperture radar images. For both...... that the CM estimate outperforms the MAP estimate, when the error depends on Bregman distances. This PhD project can have many applications in the modern society, in fact the reconstruction of high quality images with less noise and more details enhances the image processing operations, such as edge detection...

  9. Virtual Classroom: Strategi Pembelajaran Berbasis Synchronous E-Learning

    OpenAIRE

    Suranto, Beni

    2009-01-01

    Synchronous learning adalah interaksi yang berorientasi pada pembelajaran dan difasilitasi denganintruksi-intruksi secara langsung, real-time dan biasanya terjadwal. Synchronous learning berbeda dengankuliah biasa, demo atau penawaran suatu produk, dan aktivitas-aktivitas penyampaian informasi yang lainnya.Synchronous e-Learning adalah Synchronous learning yang dilaksanakan dengan memanfaatkan perangkatelektronik, khususnya komputer dan Internet. Synchronous e-Learning dapat dilaksanakan deng...

  10. Reconstruction of Fine Scale Auroral Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Hirsch, Michael; Zettergren, Matthew; Dahlgren, Hanna; Goenka, Chhavi; Akbari, Hassanali

    2015-01-01

    We present a feasibility study for a high frame rate, short baseline auroral tomographic imaging system useful for estimating parametric variations in the precipitating electron number flux spectrum of dynamic auroral events. Of particular interest are auroral substorms, characterized by spatial variations of order 100 m and temporal variations of order 10 ms. These scales are thought to be produced by dispersive Alfv\\'en waves in the near-Earth magnetosphere. The auroral tomography system characterized in this paper reconstructs the auroral volume emission rate to estimate the characteristic energy and location in the direction perpendicular to the geomagnetic field of peak electron precipitation flux using a distributed network of precisely synchronized ground-based cameras. As the observing baseline decreases, the tomographic inverse problem becomes highly ill-conditioned; as the sampling rate increases, the signal-to-noise ratio degrades and synchronization requirements become increasingly critical. Our a...

  11. Reconstructive Urology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fikret Fatih Önol

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In the treatment of urethral stricture, Buccal Mucosa Graft (BMG and reconstruction is applied with different patch techniques. Recently often prefered, this approach is, in bulber urethra strictures of BMG’s; by “ventral onley”, in pendulous urethra because of thinner spingiosis body, which provides support and nutrition of graft; by means of “dorsal inley” being anastomosis. In the research that Cordon et al. did, they compared conventional BMJ “onley” urethroplast and “pseudo-spongioplasty” which base on periurethral vascular tissues to be nourished by closing onto graft. In repairment of front urethras that spongiosis supportive tissue is insufficient, this method is defined as peripheral dartos [çevre dartos?] and buck’s fascia being mobilized and being combined on BMG patch. Between the years 2007 and 2012, assessment of 56 patients with conventional “ventral onley” BMG urethroplast and 46 patients with “pseudo-spongioplasty” were reported to have similar success rates (80% to 84% in 3.5 year follow-up on average. While 74% of the patients that were applied pseudo-spongioplasty had disease present at distal urethra (pendulous, bulbopendulous, 82% of the patients which were applied conventional onley urethroplast had stricture at proximal (bulber urethra yet. Also lenght of the stricture at the pseudo-spongioplasty group was longer in a statistically significant way (5.8 cm to 4.7 cm on average, p=0.028. This study which Cordon et al. did, shows that conditions in which conventional sponjiyoplasti is not possible, periurethral vascular tissues are adequate to nourish BMG. Even it is an important technique in terms of bringing a new point of view to today’s practice, data especially about complications that may show up after pseudo-spongioplasty usage on long distal strictures (e.g. appearance of urethral diverticulum is not reported. Along with this we think that, providing an oppurtinity to patch directly

  12. Local Fields in Human Subthalamic Nucleus Track the Lead-up to Impulsive Choices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Pearson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ability to adaptively minimize not only motor but cognitive symptoms of neurological diseases, such as Parkinson's Disease (PD and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD, is a primary goal of next-generation deep brain stimulation (DBS devices. On the basis of studies demonstrating a link between beta-band synchronization and severity of motor symptoms in PD, the minimization of beta band activity has been proposed as a potential training target for closed-loop DBS. At present, no comparable signal is known for the impulsive side effects of PD, though multiple studies have implicated theta band activity within the subthalamic nucleus (STN, the site of DBS treatment, in processes of conflict monitoring and countermanding. Here, we address this challenge by recording from multiple independent channels within the STN in a self-paced decision task to test whether these signals carry information sufficient to predict stopping behavior on a trial-by-trial basis. As in previous studies, we found that local field potentials (LFPs exhibited modulations preceding self-initiated movements, with power ramping across multiple frequencies during the deliberation period. In addition, signals showed phasic changes in power around the time of decision. However, a prospective model that attempted to use these signals to predict decision times showed effects of risk level did not improve with the addition of LFPs as regressors. These findings suggest information tracking the lead-up to impulsive choices is distributed across multiple frequency scales in STN, though current techniques may not possess sufficient signal-to-noise ratios to predict—and thus curb—impulsive behavior on a moment-to-moment basis.

  13. Mood instability underlies the relationship between impulsivity and internalizing psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Evyn M; Balbuena, Lloyd; Baetz, Marilyn; Marwaha, Steven; Bowen, Rudy

    2015-10-01

    Impulsivity, the tendency to act without adequate forethought, has been associated with various internalizing disorders. Mood instability, the tendency to experience rapid and intense mood swings, relates to both internalizing disorders and impulsivity. We hypothesized that the association between mood instability and impulsivity accounts for the relationship between impulsivity and internalizing psychopathology. We conducted two studies to test our hypothesis. In Study 1 we used data from the 2007 Adult Psychiatric Morbidity Survey to examine mood instability in the relationship between depression and impulsivity. Mood instability and impulsivity were assessed with the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV Axis-II Personality Disorders and depression was assessed with the revised Clinical Interview Schedule. In Study 2 we used data from the 1984 and 1991 British Health and Lifestyle Surveys to examine mood instability in the longitudinal relationship between impulsivity and internalizing symptoms. Mood instability and impulsivity were measured with the Eysenck Personality Inventory and internalizing symptoms were assessed with the General Health Questionnaire. In both studies we used a sequential regression analysis to test our hypothesis. Results from Study 1 showed that participants with depression were more likely to report impulsivity, but this effect became nonsignificant when mood instability was included in the same regression model. In Study 2 impulsivity predicted internalizing symptoms seven years in the future, but this effect became nonsignificant after mood instability was included in the same regression model. We conclude that impulsivity relates to internalizing psychopathology largely by being associated with mood instability. Research and therapy for internalizing conditions might be more productively directed at mood instability rather than impulsivity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Rapid-Response Impulsivity: Definitions, Measurement Issues, and Clinical Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Hamilton, Kristen R.; Littlefield, Andrew K.; Anastasio, Noelle C.; Cunningham, Kathryn A.; Fink, Latham H.; Wing, Victoria C.; Mathias, Charles W.; Lane, Scott D; Schutz, Christian; Swann, Alan C.; Lejuez, C.W.; Clark, Luke; Moeller, F. Gerard; Potenza, Marc N.

    2015-01-01

    Impulsivity is a multi-faceted construct that is a core feature of multiple psychiatric conditions and personality disorders. However, progress in understanding and treating impulsivity in the context of these conditions is limited by a lack of precision and consistency in its definition and assessment. Rapid-response-impulsivity (RRI) represents a tendency toward immediate action that occurs with diminished forethought and is out of context with the present demands of the environment. Expert...

  15. Application of E^p-Stability to Impulsive Financial Model

    OpenAIRE

    Benjamin Oyediran Oyelami; Sam Olatunji Ale

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we consider an impulsive stochastic model for an investment with production and saving profiles. The conditions for financial growth for the investment are investigated under impulsive action and results are obtained using the quantitative and Ep stability methods. The impulsive stochastic differential equation considered is assumed to be driven by a process with jump and non-linear gestation properties. One of the results established shows that, in the long run, it is impossib...

  16. Sensation seeking and impulsivity as predictors of aggression in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Gázquez, José J.; Mª Carmen PÉREZ-FUENTES; Mª Mar MOLERO; Mª Mar SIMÓN

    2016-01-01

    Adolescence is a stage in which impulsivity and sensation seeking are presented as two factors that come together with a wide range of changes inherent to adolescent development. Impulsivity and sensation seeking have often been linked to risky behavior in adolescents, especially related to aggressiveness. With this paper is to analyze the predictive value of variables related to sensation seeking and impulsiveness, in relation to the adoption of different forms of aggression (physical aggres...

  17. Two Faces of Mobile Shopping: Self-Efficacy and Impulsivity

    OpenAIRE

    Thaemin Lee; Cheol Park; Jongkun Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the positive and negative effects of mobile shopping. It identifies and tests the antecedents and consequences of self-efficacy and impulse buying that result from mobile shopping. The results reveal that perceived convenience, perceived ease of response, and perceived control significantly affect self-efficacy and impulse buying. In addition, the results demonstrate that significant relationships exist between self-efficacy and satisfaction, and impulse buying and regret....

  18. Transient Impulsive Giant Electronic Raman Redistribution

    CERN Document Server

    Miyabe, S

    2014-01-01

    Resonant Raman excitation by ultrafast vacuum ultraviolet laser pulses is a powerful means to study electron dynamics in molecules, but experiments must contend with linear background ionization: frequencies high enough to reach resonant core-valence transitions will usually ionize all occupied orbitals as well, and the ionization cross sections are usually dominant. Here we show that attosecond pulses can induce a new process, transient impulsive stimulated Raman scattering, which can overwhelm valence ionization. Calculations are performed for atomic sodium, but the principal is valid for many molecular systems. This approach opens the path for high fidelity multidimensional spectroscopy with attosecond pulses.

  19. Impulsive started flow by a jellyfish

    OpenAIRE

    市川, 誠司; 望月, 修; Seiji, ICHIKAWA; Osamu, MOCHIZUKI; 東洋大; Toyo University

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the relation between circulation of a vortex ring generated by a disk starting impulsively and necessary force to move the disk. We measured the velocity vector field around the disk by using a PIV method to estimate circulation of the starting vortex ring. It was found that the circulation increased with the square root of the generated energy which is necessary to move the disk. This showed the same relation of the energy of a vortex ring and its c...

  20. Impulsive and compulsive behaviors in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Andrew H; Strafella, Antonio P; Weintraub, Daniel; Stacy, Mark

    2009-08-15

    Antiparkinson therapy can be the primary cause of a range of nonmotor symptoms that include a set of complex disinhibitory psychomotor pathologies and are linked by their repetitive, reward or incentive-based natures. These behaviors relate to aberrant or excessive dopamine receptor stimulation and encompass impulse control disorders (ICDs), punding, and the dopamine dysregulation syndrome (DDS). Common ICDs include pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive eating, and compulsive buying. This review focuses on the phenomenology, epidemiology, and methods to identify and rate these disorders. The management of dopaminergic drug-related compulsive behaviors is discussed in the light of the current understanding of the neurobiological substrate of these disorders. 2009 Movement Disorder Society.

  1. Antiepileptics for aggression and associated impulsivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huband, Nick; Ferriter, Michael; Nathan, Rajan; Jones, Hannah

    2014-01-01

    Background Aggression is a major public health issue and is integral to several mental health disorders. Antiepileptic drugs may reduce aggression by acting on the central nervous system to reduce neuronal hyper-excitability associated with aggression. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of antiepileptic drugs in reducing aggression and associated impulsivity. Search methods We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) and ClinicalTrials.gov to April 2009. We also searched Cochrane Schizophrenia Group’s register of trials on aggression, National Research Record and handsearched for studies. Selection criteria Prospective, placebo-controlled trials of antiepileptic drugs taken regularly by individuals with recurrent aggression to reduce the frequency or intensity of aggressive outbursts. Data collection and analysis Three authors independently selected studies and two authors independently extracted data. We calculated standardised mean differences (SMDs), with odds ratios (ORs) for dichotomous data. Main results Fourteen studies with data from 672 participants met the inclusion criteria. Five different antiepileptic drugs were examined. Sodium valproate/divalproex was superior to placebo for outpatient men with recurrent impulsive aggression, for impulsively aggressive adults with cluster B personality disorders, and for youths with conduct disorder, but not for children and adolescents with pervasive developmental disorder. Carbamazepine was superior to placebo in reducing acts of self-directed aggression in women with borderline personality disorder, but not in children with conduct disorder. Oxcarbazepine was superior to placebo for verbal aggression and aggression against objects in adult outpatients. Phenytoin was superior to placebo on the frequency of aggressive acts in male prisoners and in outpatient men including those with personality disorder, but not on the frequency of ‘behavioral incidents’ in

  2. The genetic correlation between procrastination and impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loehlin, John C; Martin, Nicholas G

    2014-12-01

    The reported genetic correlation of 1.0 between the traits of procrastination and impulsivity (Gustavson, D. E., Miyake, A., Hewitt, J. K., & Friedman, N. P. (2014). Psychological Science), which was held to support an evolutionary origin of the relationship between the two traits, was tested in data from two large samples of twins from Australia. A genetic correlation of 0.299 was obtained. It was concluded that, although the presence of a genetic correlation between the two traits was supported, the modest magnitude of the correlation was such as to be consistent with many possible hypotheses, evolutionary and otherwise, about causal relationships between the traits in question.

  3. Impulsivity, aggression and suicide risk among male schizophrenia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iancu, Iulian; Bodner, Ehud; Roitman, Suzana; Piccone Sapir, Anna; Poreh, Amir; Kotler, Moshe

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity has been shown to be a major variable in the etiology of suicide and aggression, but has not been researched as much in the schizophrenic population, which is characterized by serious suicide and aggression risks. 68 male schizophrenia patients responded to a battery of measures including the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the impulsivity control scale (IS), the Suicide Risk Scale (SRS) and the Overt Aggression Scale. We divided our subjects into those who received scores above and below the median on the IS. The high-impulsivity group had higher present and past rates of suicidal ideation and showed a trend for more lifetime suicidal attempts than the low-impulsivity group. The impulsivity score correlated positively with the SRS score and with some of the scores of the PANSS (the positive symptoms score, the general psychopathology score and the total score). A multiple regression analysis revealed that an older age, higher levels of aggression, high impulsivity and an elevated score on the general psychopathology subscale of the PANSS contributed positively and significantly to the explained variance of the SRS. Our study supports the contention that high impulsivity in schizophrenia patients is significant in the etiology of suicide in schizophrenia. However, the relationship between impulsivity and aggression in schizophrenia patients, and also the amelioration of impulsivity by pharmacological interventions, require further study. Copyright (c) 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. A new Calculation Procedure for Spatial Impulse Responses in Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1999-01-01

    A new procedure for the calculation of spatial impulse responses for linear sound fields is introduced. This calculation procedure uses the well known technique of calculating the spatial impulse response from the intersection of a circle emanating from the projected spherical wave with the bound......A new procedure for the calculation of spatial impulse responses for linear sound fields is introduced. This calculation procedure uses the well known technique of calculating the spatial impulse response from the intersection of a circle emanating from the projected spherical wave...

  5. The Relationship Between Impulsivity And Problem Gambling In Adolescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Secades-Villa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Gambling has become one of the most frequently reported addictive behaviors among young people. Understanding risk factors associated with the onset or maintenance of gambling problems in adolescence has implications for its prevention and treatment. The main aim of the present study was to examine the potential relationships between impulsivity and problem gambling in adolescence. Participants were 874 high school students (average age: 15 years old who were surveyed to provide data on gambling and impulsivity. Self-reported gambling behavior was assessed using the South Oaks Gambling Screen – Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA and impulsivity was measured using the Impulsive Sensation Seeking Questionnaire (ZKPQ, the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11-A, and a delay discounting task. The data were analyzed using both a prospective-longitudinal and a cross-sectional design. In the longitudinal analyses, results showed that the impulsivity subscale of the ZKPQ increased the risk of problem gambling (p =.003. In the cross-sectional analyses, all the impulsivity measures were higher in at-risk/problem gamblers than in non-problem gamblers (p = .04; .03 and .01 respectively. These findings further support the relationship between impulsivity and gambling in adolescence. Moreover, our findings suggest a bidirectional relationship between impulsivity and problem gambling in adolescence. These results have consequences for the development of prevention and treatment programs for adolescents with gambling problems.

  6. Eyes wide shopped: shopping situations trigger arousal in impulsive buyers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfas, Benjamin G; Büttner, Oliver B; Florack, Arnd

    2014-01-01

    The present study proposes arousal as an important mechanism driving buying impulsiveness. We examined the effect of buying impulsiveness on arousal in non-shopping and shopping contexts. In an eye-tracking experiment, we measured pupil dilation while participants viewed and rated pictures of shopping scenes and non-shopping scenes. The results demonstrated that buying impulsiveness is closely associated with arousal as response to viewing pictures of shopping scenes. This pertained for hedonic shopping situations as well as for utilitarian shopping situations. Importantly, the effect did not emerge for non-shopping scenes. Furthermore, we demonstrated that arousal of impulsive buyers is independent from cognitive evaluation of scenes in the pictures.

  7. Association between Impulsivity and Weight Status in a General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bénard, Marc; Camilleri, Géraldine M; Etilé, Fabrice; Méjean, Caroline; Bellisle, France; Reach, Gérard; Hercberg, Serge; Péneau, Sandrine

    2017-03-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the association between impulsivity and weight status in a large sample of the adult general population in France, and the influence of gender on this relationship. A total of 11,929 men and 39,114 women participating in the NutriNet-Santé cohort were selected in this cross-sectional analysis. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11) was used to assess impulsivity. Weight and height were self-reported. The association between impulsivity and BMI was estimated using logistic regressions adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. Individuals with high impulsivity levels (BIS-11 total score >71) were more likely to be obese (Odds Ratio (OR) = 1.80, 95% Confidence Interval (CI): 1.39, 2.33 in men; OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.48 in women) compared to individuals in the average range of impulsivity. The strongest associations between impulsivity and obesity were observed in men, where highly impulsive participants were more likely to be class III obese (BMI > 40 kg/m²) (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 1.86, 6.85). This large sample analysis supports the existence of a relationship between impulsivity and weight status and the importance of psychological factors in the prevention of obesity.

  8. Trait impulsivity components correlate differently with proactive and reactive control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shihua Huang

    Full Text Available The relationship between impulsivity and cognitive control is still unknown. We hypothesized that trait impulsivity would differentially correlate with specific cognitive control processes. Trait impulsivity was measured by the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale, which assesses motor, attention, and non-planning impulsiveness components. Cognitive control was measured by a hybrid-designed Stroop task, which distinguishes proactive and reactive control. Thirty-three participants performed the Stroop task while they were scanned by functional magnetic resonance imaging. Proactive and reactive control involved increased activity in the fronto-parietal network, and brain activity was associated with impulsivity scores. Specifically, higher motor impulsiveness was associated with a larger proactive control effect in the inferior parietal lobule and a smaller reactive control effect in the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC and anterior cingulate contex. Higher attention impulsivity was associated with a smaller proactive control effect in the right DLPFC. Such a correlation pattern suggests that impulsivity trait components are attributable to different cognitive control subsystems.

  9. Relationship between impulsivity traits and awareness of motor intention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannelli, F; Mastrolorenzo, B; Rossi, A; Gavazzi, G; Righi, S; Zaccara, G; Viggiano, M P; Cincotta, M

    2016-10-01

    Deficient voluntary control of behaviour and impulsivity are key aspects of impulse control disorders. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between behavioural measures of impulsivity and the awareness of voluntary action. Seventy-four healthy volunteers completed the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS), a questionnaire used to measure impulsive personality traits, and a go/no-go task. Moreover, all participants performed a behavioural task based on the Libet's clock paradigm in which they were requested to report the time of a self-initiated movement (M-judgement) or the time they first feel their intention to move (W-judgement). A positive relationship between the time in which subjects reported the intention to move (W-judgement) and impulsivity measures emerged. Namely, the higher was the score in the attentional and motor impulsivity subscales of the BIS and the number of inhibitory failure responses in the go/no-go task, the lower was the difference between the W-judgement and the actual movement (i.e. the awareness of intention to move was closer to the voluntary movement execution). In contrast, no relationship emerged with M-judgement. The present findings suggest that impulsivity is related to a delayed awareness of voluntary action. We hypothesize that in impulse control disorders, the short interval between conscious intention and actual movement may interfere with processes underlying the conscious 'veto' of the impending action. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sex differences in impulsivity and brain morphometry in methamphetamine users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogachi, Shannon; Chang, Linda; Alicata, Daniel; Cunningham, Eric; Ernst, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an addictive stimulant, and METH users have abnormal brain structures and function. The aims of this study were to investigate the relationships between impulsivity, brain structures, and possible sex-specific differences between METH users and non-drug using Controls. Structural MRI and the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS) questionnaire were completed in 124 subjects: 62 METH (ages 41.2 ± 1.4 years, 34 males) and 62 Controls (ages 43.3 ± 2.3 years, 36 males). Independent and interactive effects of METH use status and sex were evaluated. Relationships between METH usage characteristics, brain morphometry, and impulsivity scores were examined. METH users had higher impulsivity scores, on both the Cognitive and Behavioral Factors from the BIS (p impulsivity (interaction-p ≤ 0.05). Only female METH users showed relatively larger nucleus accumbens (interaction-p = 0.03). Greater impulsivity and thinner frontal cortices in METH users are validated. Larger superior frontal cortex in male METH users with greater cognitive impulsivity suggest decreased dendritic pruning during adolescence might have contributed to their impulsive and drug use behaviors. In the female METH users, smaller frontal cortices and the associated greater impulsivity suggest greater neurotoxicity to these brain regions, while their relatively larger nucleus accumbens suggest an estrogen-mediated neuroprotective glial response. Men and women may be affected differently by METH use.

  11. Dissecting Impulsivity and its Relationships to Drug Addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashenhurst, James R.; Cervantes, M. Catalina; James, Alexander S.; Groman, Stephanie M.; Pennington, Zachary T.

    2015-01-01

    Addictions are often characterized as forms of impulsive behavior. That said, it is often noted that impulsivity is a multidimensional construct, spanning several psychological domains. This review describes the relationship between varieties of impulsivity and addiction-related behaviors, the nature of the causal relationship between the two and the underlying neurobiological mechanisms that promote impulsive behaviors. We conclude that the available data strongly supports the notion that impulsivity is both a risk factor for, and a consequence of, drug and alcohol consumption. While the evidence indicating that subtypes of impulsive behavior are uniquely informative – either biologically or with respect to their relationships to addictions – is convincing, multiple lines of study link “distinct” subtypes of impulsivity to low dopamine D2 receptor function and perturbed serotonergic transmission, revealing shared mechanisms between the subtypes. Therefore, a common biological framework involving monoaminergic transmitters in key frontostriatal circuits may link multiple forms of impulsivity to drug self-administration and addiction-related behaviors. Further dissection of these relationships is needed before the next phase of genetic and genomic discovery will be able to reveal the biological sources of the vulnerability for addiction indexed by impulsivity. PMID:24654857

  12. Association between Impulsivity and Weight Status in a General Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Bénard

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to examine the association between impulsivity and weight status in a large sample of the adult general population in France, and the influence of gender on this relationship. A total of 11,929 men and 39,114 women participating in the NutriNet-Santé cohort were selected in this cross-sectional analysis. The Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11 was used to assess impulsivity. Weight and height were self-reported. The association between impulsivity and BMI was estimated using logistic regressions adjusted for socio-demographic and lifestyle factors. Individuals with high impulsivity levels (BIS-11 total score >71 were more likely to be obese (Odds Ratio (OR = 1.80, 95% Confidence Interval (CI: 1.39, 2.33 in men; OR = 1.30, 95% CI: 1.15, 1.48 in women compared to individuals in the average range of impulsivity. The strongest associations between impulsivity and obesity were observed in men, where highly impulsive participants were more likely to be class III obese (BMI > 40 kg/m2 (OR = 3.57, 95% CI: 1.86, 6.85. This large sample analysis supports the existence of a relationship between impulsivity and weight status and the importance of psychological factors in the prevention of obesity.

  13. Partial sleep deprivation impacts impulsive action but not impulsive decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demos, K E; Hart, C N; Sweet, L H; Mailloux, K A; Trautvetter, J; Williams, S E; Wing, R R; McCaffery, J M

    2016-10-01

    Sleep deprivation may lead to increased impulsivity, however, previous literature has focused on examining effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) rather than the more common condition, partial sleep deprivation (PSD) or 'short sleep'. Moreover, it has been unclear whether PSD impacts impulse-related cognitive processes, and specifically if it differentially affects impulsive action versus impulsive decision-making. We sought to determine if short compared to long sleep (6 vs. 9h/night) impacts impulsive action via behavioral inhibition (Go/No-Go), and/or impulsive decision-making processes of risk taking (Balloon Analogue Risk Task [BART]) and preferences for immediate over delayed rewards (Delay Discounting). In a within-subject design, 34 participants (71% female, mean age=37.0years, SD=10.54) were assigned to four consecutive nights of 6h/night (short sleep) and 9h/night (long sleep) in their own home in random counterbalanced order. Sleep was measured via wrist-worn actigraphs to confirm adherence to the sleep schedules (mean short sleep=5.9h, SD=0.3; mean long sleep=8.6h, SD=0.3, psleep conditions. Participants had more inhibition errors on the Go/No-Go task after short (mean false alarms=19.79%, SD=14.51) versus long sleep (mean=15.97%, SD=9.51, p=0.039). This effect was strongest in participants reporting longer habitual time in bed (p=0.04). There were no differences in performance following long- versus short-sleep for either delay discounting or the BART (p's>0.4). Overall, these results indicate that four days of PSD diminishes behavioral inhibition abilities, but may not alter impulsive decision-making. These findings contribute to the emerging understanding of how partial sleep deprivation, currently an epidemic, impacts cognitive ability. Future research should continue to explore the connection between PSD and cognitive functions, and ways to minimize the occurrence and negative consequences of short sleep. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All

  14. Control of partial synchronization in chaotic oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-07

    Feb 7, 2015 ... Abstract. A design of coupling is proposed to control partial synchronization in two chaotic oscil- lators in a driver–response mode. A control of synchrony between one response variables is made possible (a transition from a complete synchronization to antisynchronization via amplitude death and vice ...

  15. Have business cycles become more synchronized?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Haan, J; Inklaar, R; Sleijpen, O

    Will further integration make business cycles in EMU countries more similar? This article answers the question by analysing to what extent business cycles in US and German states have become more synchronized and by examining whether synchronization in OECD countries is affected by trade intensity

  16. Inflation Targeting and Business Cycle Synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Flood, Robert P; Rose, Andrew K

    2009-01-01

    Inflation targeting seems to have a small but positive effect on the synchronization of business cycles; countries that target inflation seem to have cycles that move slightly more closely with foreign cycles. Thus the advent of inflation targeting does not explain the decoupling of global business cycles, for two reasons. Indeed business cycles have not in fact become less synchronized across countries.

  17. Modified function projective combination synchronization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-08

    Feb 8, 2017 ... tography, secure communications [6,7], etc. Many ap- proaches have been proposed for the synchronization ... more secure communication. Hyperchaotic systems characterized by more than one positive ... We define the modified function projective synchronization error system e(t) as e(t) = z − f(t)y. (5).

  18. A clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Visser, P.M.; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI (Real Time Application Interface). The skeleton is a thin layer that provides unified but extendible interfaces to the underlying operating system, the synchronization algorithms and the upper level applications in need of clock

  19. Projective synchronization of chaotic systems with bidirectional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper presents a new scheme for constructing bidirectional nonlinear coupled chaotic systems which synchronize projectively. Conditions necessary for projective synchronization (PS) of two bidirectionally coupled chaotic systems are derived using Lyapunov stability theory. The proposed PS scheme is discussed by ...

  20. Identical synchronization of coupled Rossler systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Y.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1999-01-01

    Analyzing the transverse stability of low periodic orbits embedded in the synchronized chaotic state for a system of two coupled Rössler oscillators, we obtain the conditions for synchronization and determine the coupling parameters for which riddled basins of attraction may arise. It is shown how...

  1. Synchronization in Quantum Key Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Pljonkin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the description of quantum key distribution systems, much attention is paid to the operation of quantum cryptography protocols. The main problem is the insufficient study of the synchronization process of quantum key distribution systems. This paper contains a general description of quantum cryptography principles. A two-line fiber-optic quantum key distribution system with phase coding of photon states in transceiver and coding station synchronization mode was examined. A quantum key distribution system was built on the basis of the scheme with automatic compensation of polarization mode distortions. Single-photon avalanche diodes were used as optical radiation detecting devices. It was estimated how the parameters used in quantum key distribution systems of optical detectors affect the detection of the time frame with attenuated optical pulse in synchronization mode with respect to its probabilistic and time-domain characteristics. A design method was given for the process that detects the time frame that includes an optical pulse during synchronization. This paper describes the main quantum communication channel attack methods by removing a portion of optical emission. This paper describes the developed synchronization algorithm that takes into account the time required to restore the photodetector’s operation state after the photon has been registered during synchronization. The computer simulation results of the developed synchronization algorithm were analyzed. The efficiency of the developed algorithm with respect to synchronization process protection from unauthorized gathering of optical emission is demonstrated herein.

  2. Development of a synchronous subset of AADL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filali, Mamoun; Lawall, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We study the definition and the mapping of an AADL subset: the so called synchronous subset. We show that the data port protocol used for delayed and immediate connections between periodic threads can be interpreted in a  synchronous way. In this paper, we formalize this interpretation and study ...

  3. Standardization of Inter-Destination Media Synchronization

    OpenAIRE

    Stokking, H.M.; Brandenburg, R.; Boronat, F.; Montagud, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inter-Destination Media Synchronization (IDMS) is a process in which various receivers of the same content are synchronized in their playout. Standardization of an IDMS solution helps to enable interoperability between receivers manufactured by different companies. This paper describes the efforts by ETSI TISPAN and by the IETF AVTCORE working group on standardization of IDMS.

  4. Standardization of Inter-Destination Media Synchronization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stokking, H.M.; Brandenburg, R. van; Boronat, F.; Montagud, M.

    2012-01-01

    Inter-Destination Media Synchronization (IDMS) is a process in which various receivers of the same content are synchronized in their playout. Standardization of an IDMS solution helps to enable interoperability between receivers manufactured by different companies. This paper describes the efforts

  5. Synchronization of oscillators in complex networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Theory of identical or complete synchronization of identical oscillators in arbitrary networks is introduced. In addition, several graph theory concepts and results that augment the synchronization theory and a tie in closely to random, semirandom, and regular networks are introduced. Combined theories are used to explore ...

  6. Synchronization of coupled chaotic dynamics on networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We review some recent work on the synchronization of coupled dynamical systems on a variety of networks. When nodes show synchronized behaviour, two inter- esting phenomena can be observed. First, there are some nodes of the floating type that show intermittent behaviour between getting attached to some ...

  7. Examining Interactivity in Synchronous Virtual Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Florence; Parker, Michele A.; Deale, Deborah F.

    2012-01-01

    Interaction is crucial to student satisfaction in online courses. Adding synchronous components (virtual classroom technologies) to online courses can facilitate interaction. In this study, interaction within a synchronous virtual classroom was investigated by surveying 21 graduate students in an instructional technology program in the…

  8. Projective synchronization of chaotic systems with bidirectional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    a coupled chaotic system composed of identical chaotic oscillators was first reported by. Fujisaka and Yamada [1,2] and later by Pecora and Carroll [3]. Synchronization is a uni- versal phenomenon in a variety of natural and engineering systems [4]. Over the past two decades, chaos synchronization has received much ...

  9. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Toma, I.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2009-01-01

    frequencies of both pair members to converge to a common value. The myogenic oscillations also synchronized, and the synchronization between the TGF and the myogenic oscillations showed an increased stability against parameter perturbations. Electronic vascular signal propagation is a plausible mechanism...

  10. Complexity in synchronized and non-synchronized states: A comparative analysis and application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Sanjay K.; Fataf, Nur Aisyah Abdul; Md Said, Mohd Rushdan; Mukherjee, Sayan; Banerjee, Santo

    2017-07-01

    This analysis shows the dynamics of a hyperchaotic system changes from its original state to a synchronized state with nonlinear controller. The decreasing complexity of the coupled systems also quantifies the loss of information from its original state to the synchronized state. We proposed and modified a chaos synchronization based secure communication scheme to implement in case of non synchronization. The scheme is designed and illustrated using examples and simulations. Security analysis of the proposed scheme is also investigated. This analysis gives a new direction on chaos based cryptography in case of the coupled systems completely in non synchronized state.

  11. Synchronization and anti-synchronization of chaotic systems: A differential and algebraic approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Guerra, Rafael [Departamento de Control Automatico, Cinvestav-IPN A. P. 14-740, Av. IPN 2508, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: rguerra@ctrl.cinvestav.mx; Pasaye, Jose Juan Rincon [Departamento de Control Automatico, Cinvestav-IPN A. P. 14-740, Av. IPN 2508, 07360 Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)], E-mail: jrincon@ctrl.cinvestav.mx

    2009-10-30

    Chaotic systems synchronization and anti-synchronization problems are tackled by means of differential and algebraic techniques for nonlinear systems. An algebraic observer is proposed for systems satisfying an algebraic observability condition. This observer can be used as a slave system whose states are synchronized with the master (chaotic) system. This approach has the advantages of being independent of the chaotic nature of the master system, it uses a reduced set of measurable signal from the master system and it also solves the anti-synchronization problem as a straightforward extension of the synchronization one. A Colpitts oscillator is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the suggested approach.

  12. Integrated Time and Phase Synchronization Strategy for a Multichannel Spaceborne-Stationary Bistatic SAR System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Hong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The spatial separation of the transmitter and receiver in Bistatic Synthetic Aperture Radar (BiSAR makes it a promising and useful supplement to a classical Monostatic SAR system (MonoSAR. This paper proposes a novel integrated time and phase synchronization strategy for a multichannel spaceborne-stationary BiSAR system. Firstly, the time synchronization strategy is proposed, which includes Pulse Repetition Frequency (PRF generation under noisy conditions, multichannel calibration and the alignment of the recorded data with the orbital data. Furthermore, the phase synchronization strategy, which fully considers the deteriorative factors in the BiSAR configuration, is well studied. The contribution of the phase synchronization strategy includes two aspects: it not only compensates the phase error, but also improves the Signal to Noise Ratio (SNR of the obtained signals. Specifically, all direct signals on different PRF time can be reconstructed with the shift and phase compensation operation using a reference signal. Besides, since the parameters of the reference signal can be estimated only once using the selected practical direct signal and a priori information, the processing complexity is well reduced. Final imaging results with and without compensation for real data are presented to validate the proposed synchronization strategy.

  13. Trait Impulsivity and Anhedonia: Two Gateways for the Development of Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houeto, Jean-Luc; Magnard, Robin; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Belin, David; Carnicella, Sebastien

    2016-01-01

    Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson's disease (PD) that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT), used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs). ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with comorbid affective symptoms, such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits, such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. Thus, we provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical research to better

  14. Proficient motor impulse control in Parkinson disease patients with impulsive and compulsive behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claassen, Daniel O; van den Wildenberg, Wery P M; Harrison, Madaline B; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Kanoff, Kristen; Neimat, Joseph S; Wylie, Scott A

    2015-02-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) patients treated with dopamine agonist therapy can develop maladaptive reward-driven behaviors, known as impulse control disorder (ICD). In this study, we assessed if ICD patients have evidence of motor-impulsivity. We used the stop-signal task in a cohort of patients with and without active symptoms of ICD to evaluate motor-impulsivity. Of those with PD, 12 were diagnosed with ICD symptoms (PD-ICD) and were assessed before clinical reduction of dopamine agonist medication; 12 were without symptoms of ICD [PD-control] and taking equivalent dosages of dopamine agonist. Levodopa, if present, was maintained in both settings. Groups were similar in age, duration, and severity of motor symptoms, levodopa co-therapy, and total levodopa daily dose. All were tested in the dopamine agonist medicated and acutely withdrawn (24 h) state, in a counterbalanced manner. Primary outcome measures were mean reaction time to correct go trials (go reaction time), and mean stop-signal reaction time (SSRT). ICD patients produce faster SSRT than both Healthy Controls, and PD-Controls. Faster SSRT in ICD patients is apparent in both dopamine agonist medication states. Also, we show unique dopamine medication effects on Go Reaction time (GoRT). In dopamine agonist monotherapy patients, dopamine agonist administration speeds GoRT. Conversely, in those with levodopa co-therapy, dopamine agonist administration slows. PD patients with active ICD symptoms are significantly faster at stopping initiated motor actions, and this is not altered by acute dopamine agonist withdrawal. In addition, the effect of dopamine agonist on GoRT is strongly influenced by the presence or absence of levodopa, even though levodopa co-therapy does not appear to influence SSRT. We discuss these findings as they pertain to the multifaceted definition of 'impulsivity,' the lack of evidence for motor-impulsivity in PD-ICD, and dopamine effects on motor-control in PD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc

  15. Trait impulsivity and anhedonia: two gateways for the development of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Luc eHoueto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Apathy and impulsivity are two major comorbid syndromes of Parkinson’s disease (PD that may represent two extremes of a behavioral spectrum modulated by dopamine-dependent processes. PD is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta to which are attributed the cardinal motor symptoms of the disorder. Dopamine replacement therapy (DRT, used widely to treat these motor symptoms, is often associated with deficits in hedonic processing and motivation, including apathy and depression, as well as impulse control disorders (ICDs. ICDs comprise pathological gambling, hypersexuality, compulsive shopping, binge eating, compulsive overuse of dopaminergic medication, and punding. More frequently observed in males with early onset PD, ICDs are associated not only with co-morbid affective symptoms such as depression and anxiety, but also with behavioral traits such as novelty seeking and impulsivity, as well as with personal or familial history of alcohol use. This constellation of associated risk factors highlights the importance of inter-individual differences in the vulnerability to develop comorbid psychiatric disorders in PD patients. Additionally, withdrawal from DRT in patients with ICDs frequently unmasks a severe apathetic state, suggesting that apathy and ICDs may be caused by overlapping neurobiological mechanisms within the cortico-striato-thalamo-cortical networks. We suggest that altered hedonic and impulse control processes represent distinct prodromal substrates for the development of these psychiatric symptoms, the etiopathogenic mechanisms of which remain unknown. Specifically, we argue that deficits in hedonic and motivational states and impulse control are mediated by overlapping, yet dissociable, neural mechanisms that differentially interact with DRT to promote the emergence of ICDs in vulnerable individuals. We thus provide a novel heuristic framework for basic and clinical

  16. Synchronization of noisy systems by stochastic signals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neiman, A.; Schimansky-Geier, L.; Moss, F. [Center for Neurodynamics, University of Missouri at St. Louis, St. Louis, Missouri 63121 (United States); Schimansky-Geier, L. [Institute of Physics, Humboldt University at Berlin, Invalidenstrasse 110, D-10115 Berlin (Germany); Shulgin, B.; Collins, J.J. [Center for BioDynamics and Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    1999-07-01

    We study, in terms of synchronization, the {ital nonlinear response} of noisy bistable systems to a stochastic external signal, represented by Markovian dichotomic noise. We propose a general kinetic model which allows us to conduct a full analytical study of the nonlinear response, including the calculation of cross-correlation measures, the mean switching frequency, and synchronization regions. Theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations of a noisy overdamped bistable oscillator. We show that dichotomic noise can instantaneously synchronize the switching process of the system. We also show that synchronization is most pronounced at an optimal noise level{emdash}this effect connects this phenomenon with aperiodic stochastic resonance. Similar synchronization effects are observed for a stochastic neuron model stimulated by a stochastic spike train. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital The American Physical Society}

  17. Synchronization Dynamics in a Designed Open System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoshi, Nobuhiko; Odagiri, Kazuki; Ishikawa, Akira; Ishihara, Hajime

    2017-05-01

    We theoretically propose a unifying expression for synchronization dynamics between two-level constituents. Although synchronization phenomena require some substantial mediators, the distinct repercussions of their propagation delays remain obscure, especially in open systems. Our scheme directly incorporates the details of the constituents and mediators in an arbitrary environment. As one example, we demonstrate the synchronization dynamics of optical emitters on a dielectric microsphere. We reveal that the whispering gallery modes (WGMs) bridge the well-separated emitters and accelerate the synchronized fluorescence, known as superfluorescence. The emitters are found to overcome the significant and nonuniform retardation, and to build up their pronounced coherence by the WGMs, striking a balance between the roles of resonator and intermediary. Our work directly illustrates the dynamical aspects of many-body synchronizations and contributes to the exploration of research paradigms that consider designed open systems.

  18. Corticospinal beta-band synchronization entails rhythmic gain modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Maij, F.; Schoffelen, J.M.; Overeem, S.; Stegeman, D.F.; Fries, P.

    2010-01-01

    Rhythmic synchronization of neurons in the beta or gamma band occurs almost ubiquitously, and this synchronization has been linked to numerous nervous system functions. Many respective studies make the implicit assumption that neuronal synchronization affects neuronal interactions. Indeed, when

  19. Corticospinal Beta-Band Synchronization Entails Rhythmic Gain Modulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elswijk, G.A.F. van; Maij, F.; Schoffelen, J.M.; Overeem, S.; Stegeman, D.F.; Fries, P.

    2010-01-01

    Rhythmic synchronization of neurons in the beta or gamma band occurs almost ubiquitously, and this synchronization has been linked to numerous nervous system functions. Many respective studies make the implicit assumption that neuronal synchronization affects neuronal interactions. Indeed, when

  20. Impulse Propagation in Disordered Hertzian Chains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciu, Marian; Sen, Surajit; Hurd, Alan J.

    2000-03-01

    It was shown by Nesterenko [1] that an impulse initiated at an end of a chain of elastic grains in mutual contact, i.e., interacting via the nonlinear Hertz potential, travels as a soliton-like object. Recent theoretical [2], experimental [3] and numerical studies [4] have validated his findings. In the presentation we shall examine the propagation of an impulse in an imperfect system that is characterized by grains composed of different elastic materials, different sizes, shapes and velocity-dependent friction. Our study shows that even in the presence of considerable disorder, most of the energy still travels as a weakly dispersive bundle of energy. According to our calculations, the amplitude, position and geometry of the leading pulse are related to chain disorder via simple scaling laws. We shall comment upon the inverse problem of determining the material properties by studying the pulse propagation, with many potential applications. [1] V.F. Nesterenko, J Appl Mech Tech Phys 5, 733 (1983) [2] S. Sen and M. Manciu, Physica A 268, 644 (1999); A. Chatterjee, Phys Rev E 59, 5912 (1999) [3] C. Coste, E. Falcon and S. Fauve, Phys Rev E 56, 6104 (1997); E.J. Hinch and S. Saint-Jean, Proc R Soc A 455, 3201 (1999) [4] M. Manciu, V. Tehan and S. Sen, Chaos (in press)

  1. Rock Directed Breaking Under the Impulse Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomeriki, Sergo; Mataradze, Edgar; Chikhradze, Nikoloz; Losaberidze, Marine; Khomeriki, Davit; Shatberashvili, Grigol

    2016-10-01

    In the work the problem of directed chipping of facing stone material by means of managing of explosion process is considered. The technology of the mining of decorative stone by the use of explosion energy means the very rapid transfer of potential energy of elastic deformations to kinetic energy. As a result, the explosion impulse, in the expanse of the inertia of rock massive, does not cause the increase of existing cracks. In the course of explosion, the shock wave is propagated by ultrasonic velocity and in this case the medium parameters (pressure, density, temperature, velocity) increase in spurts. In spite of this fact the all three conservation laws of mechanics remain valid on basis of three laws the equations are derived by which the parameters of shock wave may be defined by means of the rock physical-mechanical properties. The load on the body volume at breaking under explosion acts over very small period of the time. Therefore, stressed-deformed state of the rock was studied when the impulse load acts on the boundary. It was considered that the mining of the blocks of facing stone is performed from the hard rocks. This means that the breaking proceeds in the zone of elastic deformation. In the conditions of mentioned assumptions, the expression of the stress tensor and displacement of vector components initiated by stressed-deformed state in the rock are written.

  2. Cognitive impulsivity in specific learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donfrancesco, Renato; Mugnaini, Daniele; Dell'Uomo, Andrea

    2005-08-01

    Many studies on cognitive impulsivity in learning disabled children have been criticized for their methodological limitations, and they have not dealt with the different types of learning disability. The aim of this study was to overcome these limitations and to assess if there was a significant cognitive impulsivity in reading disorder and/or spelling disorder by using the 20-item Matching Familiar Figures Test (MFF20). A total of 110 children (second through eighth grades) were recruited from a cohort of children assessed for the first time in a National Health clinic specialized in the study of specific learning disabilities. In all, 30 dyslexic children and 25 children with spelling disorder (all children without an ADHD comorbidity) were compared with 55 children of a control group on the MMF20 (accuracy and time latency). Results showed that the children with reading disorder were less accurate than the children with spelling disability (pdata seem to confirm the idea that, similar to ADHD children, dyslexic children have impaired frontal/prefrontal functions. Clinical and treatment implications are discussed.

  3. Design and construction of an impulse turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, E.

    2013-11-01

    Impulse turbine has been constructed to be used in the program of Hydraulic Machines, Faculty of Mechanical Engineering at the Universidad Pontificia Bolivariana, sede Bucaramanga. For construction of the impulse turbine (Pelton) detailed plans were drawn up taking into account the design and implementation of the fundamental equations of hydraulic turbomachinery. From the experimental data found maximum mechanical efficiency of 0.6 ± 0.03 for a water flow of 2.1 l/s. The maximum overall efficiency was 0.23 ± 0.02 for a water flow of 0.83 l/s. The design parameter used was a power of 1 kW, as flow regulator built a needle type regulator, which performed well, the model of the bucket or vane is built on a machine type CNC (Computer Numerical Control). For the construction of the impeller and blades was used aluminium because of chemical and physical characteristics and the casing was manufactured in acrylic.

  4. Synchronization of world economic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Andreas; Ghil, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Common dynamical properties of business cycle fluctuations are studied in a sample of more than 100 countries that represent economic regions from all around the world. We apply the methodology of multivariate singular spectrum analysis (M-SSA) to identify oscillatory modes and to detect whether these modes are shared by clusters of phase- and frequency-locked oscillators. An extension of the M-SSA approach is introduced to help analyze structural changes in the cluster configuration of synchronization. With this novel technique, we are able to identify a common mode of business cycle activity across our sample, and thus point to the existence of a world business cycle. Superimposed on this mode, we further identify several major events that have markedly influenced the landscape of world economic activity in the postwar era.

  5. Variance based OFDM frame synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fedra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new frame synchronization scheme for OFDM systems and calculates the complexity of this scheme. The scheme is based on the computing of the detection window variance. The variance is computed in two delayed times, so a modified Early-Late loop is used for the frame position detection. The proposed algorithm deals with different variants of OFDM parameters including guard interval, cyclic prefix, and has good properties regarding the choice of the algorithm's parameters since the parameters may be chosen within a wide range without having a high influence on system performance. The verification of the proposed algorithm functionality has been performed on a development environment using universal software radio peripheral (USRP hardware.

  6. Synchronization of nonautonomous dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Kloeden

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The synchronization of two nonautonomous dynamical systems is considered, where the systems are described in terms of a skew-product formalism, i. e., in which an inputed autonomous driving system governs the evolution of the vector field of a differential equation with the passage of time. It is shown that the coupled trajectories converge to each other as time increases for sufficiently large coupling coefficient and also that the component sets of the pullback attractor of the coupled system converges upper semi continuously as the coupling parameter increases to the diagonal of the product of the corresponding component sets of the pullback attractor of a system generated by the average of the vector fields of the original uncoupled systems.

  7. Collapse of Synchronization in a Memristive Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, Mi; Wang, Chun-Ni; Tang, Jun; Ma, Jun

    2015-12-01

    For an oscillating circuit or coupled circuits, damage in electric devices such as inductor, resistance, memristor even capacitor can cause breakdown or collapse of the circuits. These damage could be associated with external attack or aging in electric devices, and then the bifurcation parameters could be deformed from normal values. Resonators or signal generators are often synchronized to produce powerful signal series and this problem could be investigated by using synchronization in network. Complete synchronization could be induced by linear coupling in a two-dimensional network of identical oscillators when the coupling intensity is beyond certain threshold. The collective behavior and synchronization state are much dependent on the bifurcation parameters. Any slight fluctuation in parameter and breakdown in bifurcation parameter can cause transition of synchronization even collapse of synchronization in the network. In this paper, a two-dimensional network composed of the resonators coupled with memristors under nearest-neighbor connection is designed, and the network can reach complete synchronization by carefully selecting coupling intensity. The network keeps synchronization after certain transient period, then a bifurcation parameter in a resonator is switched from the previous value and the adjacent resonators (oscillators) are affected in random. It is found that the synchronization area could be invaded greatly in a diffusive way. The damage area size is much dependent on the selection of diffusive period of damage and deformation degree in the parameter. Indeed, the synchronization area could keep intact at largest size under intermediate deformation degree and coupling intensity. Supported by the National Natural Science of China under Grant Nos. 11265008 and 11365014

  8. Impulsivity trajectories and gambling in adolescence among urban male youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lee, Grace P; Goldweber, Asha; Petras, Hanno; Storr, Carla L; Ialongo, Nicholas S; Martins, Silvia S

    2013-04-01

    Building on the recent emerging literature on the impulsivity trajectory-gambling association, this study investigated the association between developmental trajectories of teacher-rated impulsivity in early adolescence (ages 11-15 years) and subsequent gambling and gambling problems (i.e. at-risk and problem gambling) by age 19. Prospective cohort design. Urban communities in Baltimore, Maryland. The sample consists of 310 predominately minority (87%) and low socio-economic status (SES) (70%) males followed from first grade to late adolescence. Impulsivity was measured using teacher ratings of classroom behavior. Self-reported gambling behavior was assessed using the South Oaks Gambling Screen-Revised for Adolescents (SOGS-RA). Results from a conventional growth model suggest that the intercept of the impulsivity development (as measured by the repeated assessments of impulsivity across the entire developmental period) was associated significantly with gambling. Results from a general growth mixture model evidenced two distinct trajectories: a high impulsivity trajectory (41% of the sample) and a low impulsivity trajectory (59% of the sample). Despite its non-significant association with any gambling, heterogeneity in impulsivity development was associated significantly with gambling problems. Specifically, being in the high impulsivity trajectory doubled the odds of meeting criteria for at-risk or problem gambling [odds ratio (OR) = 2.09, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.02, 4.27)] and tripled the odds of meeting criteria for problem gambling (OR = 2.84, 95% CI: 1.02, 7.91). Development in impulsivity is associated strongly with problem/at-risk gambling in adolescence among urban male youth. Findings highlight the importance of distinguishing gambling problems from any gambling when evaluating programs aimed at reducing youth gambling problems through reducing impulsivity. © 2012 The Authors, Addiction © 2012 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  9. Transmission of radiometer data from the Synchronous Meteorological Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    The Synchronous Meteorological Satellite uses a spin scanner radiometer which generates eight visual signals and two infrared signals. These signals are multiplexed and converted into a 28-Mbps data stream. This signal is transmitted to ground by quadriphase modulation at 1686.1 MHz. On the ground, the digital signal is reconstructed to an analog signal. To conserve bandwidth, an analog-to-digital converter with a nonlinear transfer function was used for the visual signals. The size of the quantization step was made proportional to the noise output of the scanner photomultiplier tube which increases as the square root of incident light. The radiometer data transmission link was simulated on a digital computer to determine the transfer function. Some results of the simulation are shown.

  10. Programmable logic controller based synchronous motor excitation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janda Žarko

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a 3.5 MW synchronous motor excitation system reconstruction. In the proposed solution programmable logic controller is used to control motor, which drives the turbo compressor. Comparing to some other solutions that are used in similar situations, the proposed solution is superior due to its flexibility and usage of mass-production hardware. Moreover, the implementation of PLC enables easy integration of the excitation system with the other technological processes in the plant as well as in the voltage regulation of 'smart grid' system. Also, implementation of various optimization algorithms can be done comfortably and it does not require additional investment in hardware. Some experimental results that depict excitation current during motor start-up, as well as, measured static characteristics of the motor, were presented.

  11. Turbo Processing for Joint Channel Estimation, Synchronization, and Decoding in Coded MIMO-OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a turbo joint channel estimation, synchronization, and decoding scheme for coded multiple-input multiple-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM systems. The effects of carrier frequency offset (CFO, sampling frequency offset (SFO, and channel impulse responses (CIRs on the received samples are analyzed and explored to develop the turbo decoding process and vector recursive least squares (RLSs algorithm for joint CIR, CFO, and SFO tracking. For burst transmission, with initial estimates derived from the preamble, the proposed scheme can operate without the need of pilot tones during the data segment. Simulation results show that the proposed turbo joint channel estimation, synchronization, and decoding scheme offers fast convergence and low mean squared error (MSE performance over quasistatic Rayleigh multipath fading channels. The proposed scheme can be used in a coded MIMO-OFDM transceiver in the presence of multipath fading, carrier frequency offset, and sampling frequency offset to provide a bit error rate (BER performance comparable to that in an ideal case of perfect synchronization and channel estimation over a wide range of SFO values.

  12. Turbo Processing for Joint Channel Estimation, Synchronization, and Decoding in Coded MIMO-OFDM Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ko ChiChung

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a turbo joint channel estimation, synchronization, and decoding scheme for coded multiple-input multiple-output orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (MIMO-OFDM systems. The effects of carrier frequency offset (CFO, sampling frequency offset (SFO, and channel impulse responses (CIRs on the received samples are analyzed and explored to develop the turbo decoding process and vector recursive least squares (RLSs algorithm for joint CIR, CFO, and SFO tracking. For burst transmission, with initial estimates derived from the preamble, the proposed scheme can operate without the need of pilot tones during the data segment. Simulation results show that the proposed turbo joint channel estimation, synchronization, and decoding scheme offers fast convergence and low mean squared error (MSE performance over quasistatic Rayleigh multipath fading channels. The proposed scheme can be used in a coded MIMO-OFDM transceiver in the presence of multipath fading, carrier frequency offset, and sampling frequency offset to provide a bit error rate (BER performance comparable to that in an ideal case of perfect synchronization and channel estimation over a wide range of SFO values.

  13. Impulsivity in adult ADHD patients with and without cocaine dependence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crunelle, Cleo L.; Veltman, Dick J.; van Emmerik-van Oortmerssen, Katelijne; Booij, Jan; van den Brink, Wim

    2013-01-01

    Background: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is present in about a quarter of patients with a substance use disorder (SUD) and impulsivity is a key feature of both disorders. However, very little is known about differences in impulse control and other cognitive functions between ADHD

  14. Cigarette smoking and measures of impulsivity in a college sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balevich, Emily C; Wein, Naftali D; Flory, Janine D

    2013-01-01

    An association between impulsivity and smoking has been consistently reported in the literature, but few studies have examined how distinct dimensions of impulsivity may relate differentially to smoking initiation versus persistent smoking. The aim of the current study was to examine the relationship between self-report and behavioral measures of impulsivity and smoking status in college students. Participants (N = 243) completed a self-report history of tobacco use, 2 self-report measures of impulsivity (the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale and Zuckerman Sensation-Seeking Scale), and 2 behavioral measures (the Delay Discounting Task and Iowa Gambling Task). All participants were classified as never-smokers, triers, or smokers based on their smoking history, and between-group differences on the 4 measures were examined. On the self-report measures, all 3 groups differed on sensation seeking, with the never-smokers reporting the lowest levels and the smokers reporting the highest. Furthermore, the smokers reported significantly higher disinhibitory impulsivity than the triers and never-smokers. The groups did not differ on the behavioral measures. These results indicate that distinct dimensions of impulsivity characterize different smoking phenotypes. In particular, sensation seeking is associated with the initiation of smoking, whereas disinhibitory impulsivity is associated with the transition to more persistent and regular use of cigarettes.

  15. Effects of Strategies Marketing of Collective Buying about Impulsive Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzi Elen Ferreira Dias

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Brazil has the second largest e-commerce market in the world. One model used in this sector is "collective buying", a feature of which is impulse sales. Consumer behavior can be influenced by several factors, two of which are addressed in this article: the individual impulsivity of consumers and strategies of mix marketing. Impulsive buying is characterized by an unplanned purchase, i.e. the need to acquire the product arises just before the purchase. Consumers respond differently to mixed strategies depending on their degree of impulsivity. Thus, this article aims to analyze the efficacy of different marketing mix strategies for impulsive and non-impulsive consumer purchasing behavior. 137 participants were given a questionnaire containing the Buying Impulsiveness scale from Rook and Fisher (1995, and statements about the marketing strategies used by collective buying sites. Through a regression analysis, three strategies were found to relate more to impulsivity: search for products from well-known brands, search for deals with big discounts and confidence in receiving the product. For e-commerce and researchers, this study elucidates which strategies, from the consumer's perspective, effectively persuade purchasing behavior.

  16. A New Comparison Principle for Impulsive Functional Differential Equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We establish a new comparison principle for impulsive differential systems with time delay. Then, using this comparison principle, we obtain some sufficient conditions for several stabilities of impulsive delay differential equations. Finally, we present an example to show the effectiveness of our results.

  17. Individual differences in impulsivity predict anticipatory eye movements.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Cirilli

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale, which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology.

  18. Individual Differences in Impulsivity Predict Anticipatory Eye Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirilli, Laetitia; de Timary, Philippe; Lefèvre, Phillipe; Missal, Marcus

    2011-01-01

    Impulsivity is the tendency to act without forethought. It is a personality trait commonly used in the diagnosis of many psychiatric diseases. In clinical practice, impulsivity is estimated using written questionnaires. However, answers to questions might be subject to personal biases and misinterpretations. In order to alleviate this problem, eye movements could be used to study differences in decision processes related to impulsivity. Therefore, we investigated correlations between impulsivity scores obtained with a questionnaire in healthy subjects and characteristics of their anticipatory eye movements in a simple smooth pursuit task. Healthy subjects were asked to answer the UPPS questionnaire (Urgency Premeditation Perseverance and Sensation seeking Impulsive Behavior scale), which distinguishes four independent dimensions of impulsivity: Urgency, lack of Premeditation, lack of Perseverance, and Sensation seeking. The same subjects took part in an oculomotor task that consisted of pursuing a target that moved in a predictable direction. This task reliably evoked anticipatory saccades and smooth eye movements. We found that eye movement characteristics such as latency and velocity were significantly correlated with UPPS scores. The specific correlations between distinct UPPS factors and oculomotor anticipation parameters support the validity of the UPPS construct and corroborate neurobiological explanations for impulsivity. We suggest that the oculomotor approach of impulsivity put forth in the present study could help bridge the gap between psychiatry and physiology. PMID:22046334

  19. The neuroscience of impulsive and self-controlled decisions.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kalenscher, T.; Ohmann, T.; Güntürkün, O.

    2006-01-01

    Impulsiveness and self-control are two antagonistic choice patterns. Whereas impulsive decisions can be exemplified by the preference for a small, immediate over a large, delayed reward, self-control can be characterised as the opposite preference order. This review focuses on current developments

  20. Individual Differences in Impulsive Choice and Timing in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galtress, Tiffany; Garcia, Ana; Kirkpatrick, Kimberly

    2012-01-01

    Individual differences in impulsive choice behavior have been linked to a variety of behavioral problems including substance abuse, smoking, gambling, and poor financial decision-making. Given the potential importance of individual differences in impulsive choice as a predictor of behavioral problems, the present study sought to measure the extent…

  1. Reference Value of Impulse Oscillometry in Taiwanese Preschool Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen-Hao Lai

    2015-06-01

    Conclusion: This study provided reference values for several variables of the impulse oscillometry measurements in healthy Taiwanese children aged 2–6 years. With these reference data, clinical application of impulse oscillometry would be expedient in diagnosing respiratory diseases in preschool children.

  2. Childhood Symptoms of ADHD and Impulsivity in Abstinent Heroin Users

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalà, Laura; Vasilev, Georgi; Raynov, Ivaylo; Gonzalez, Raul; Vassileva, Jasmin

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Heroin dependence is associated with deficits in impulsivity, which is also a core feature of ADHD. This study aimed to explore the association between childhood ADHD symptoms and cognitive/choice and motor/action impulsivity among abstinent individuals with a history of heroin dependence. Methods Thirty-two abstinent Bulgarian males with a history of heroin dependence participated in the study. Self-rated childhood ADHD symptoms were obtained using the Wender-Utah Rating Scale. Cognitive/choice impulsivity was measured using the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), an index of impulsive decision-making and the Delayed Reward Discounting Task (DRDT), a measure of inter-temporal choice. Motor/action impulsivity was indexed with the Stop Signal Task (SST), a measure of response inhibition. Results Participants, whose average age was 27.66 years (SD = 2.7), had an average ADHD symptom score of 36.6 (SD = 18.6), roughly 7 years (SD = 2.9) of heroin use, and been abstinent for just over a year (M = 402.5 days, SD = 223.8). Linear regression analyses revealed that self-reported ADHD symptoms predicted impulsive decision-making (IGT), but not delay discounting (DRDT) or response inhibition (SST). Conclusions Self-reported childhood ADHD symptoms do not uniformly predict impulsivity among abstinent individuals with heroin dependence. Results suggest the IGT may be more sensitive to externalizing psychopathology among individuals with heroin dependence than other measures of impulsivity. PMID:26457770

  3. Domain-Specific Impulsivity in School-Age Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukayama, Eli; Duckworth, Angela Lee; Kim, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Impulsivity is a salient individual difference in children with well-established predictive validity for life outcomes. The current investigation proposes that impulsive behaviors vary systematically by domain. In a series of studies with ethnically and socioeconomically diverse samples of middle school students, we find that schoolwork-related…

  4. Impulsivity in College Students with and without ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jessica A.

    2010-01-01

    Impulsivity is the cardinal symptom of ADHD. It is estimated that ADHD is present in eighteen percent of children and in four percent of adults. The present study repeats and extends a previous study (Gray, Breier, Foorman, & Fletcher, 2002) that measured impulsivity in adolescents with and without ADHD, which found higher false alarm rates…

  5. Impulsivity in personality disorders: current views and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Catherine; Balaratnasingam, Sivasankaran

    2017-11-07

    Impulsivity is considered a trans-diagnostic feature of many mental disorders, yet our understanding of the concept and approaches to measurement have evolved significantly with advances in neuroimaging. This review will provide an overview of impulsivity as it is currently understood, its association with personality disorder and implications for treatment. Impulsivity is now considered to involve failure of inhibitory control, either motor or cognitive, and deficits of the reward valuation system. Inhibitory control, and discounting of rewards are both independently associated with personality disorder. The tendency to choose immediate rewards over those with an associated delay is a feature of borderline personality disorder (BPD) regardless of conditions of stress. Deficits in response inhibition were also associated with BPD and were worsened under conditions of stress. These findings indicate that state impulsivity has an important role in the expression of impulsive behaviour. Exploratory studies measuring changes in these networks following psychotherapy have confirmed such methods could be used to measuring treatment response. Understanding the discrete mechanisms of impulsive decision-making and behavior, and their implications in personality disorder, offers new targets for diagnosis and intervention. Future research should aim to understand changes of impulsivity with development. Identifying the role of psychological and pharmacological intervention in modulating the development of impulsivity may prevent progression to personality disorder, and associated adverse outcomes.

  6. Dopamine and Impulse Control Disorders in Parkinson's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weintraub, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    There is an increasing awareness that impulse control disorders (ICDs), including compulsive gambling, buying, sexual behavior, and eating, can occur as a complication of Parkinson's disease (PD). In addition, other impulsive or compulsive disorders have been reported to occur, including dopamine

  7. Validity of proposed DSM-5 ADHD impulsivity symptoms in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ünsel Bolat, Gül; Ercan, Eyüp Sabri; Salum, Giovanni Abrahão; Bilaç, Öznur; Massuti, Rafael; Uysal Özaslan, Taciser; Bolat, Hilmi; Rohde, Luis Augusto

    2016-10-01

    The American Psychiatric Association (APA) working group on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) proposed the inclusion of four new impulsivity symptoms. However, they were not included in DSM-5 due to the lack of sufficient evidence. The aim of this study is to investigate the performance of the proposed four ADHD impulsivity symptoms with respect to: (a) ADHD factor structure; (b) performance in predicting clinical impairment; (c) specificity for ADHD diagnosis and (d) best symptomatic threshold to predict clinical impairment. The sample comprised 416 children (31 ADHD subjects according to both DSM-IV and proposed DSM-5, 20 ADHD subjects according to just one diagnostic system and 365 controls) from 12 schools. Diagnoses were derived using semi-structured interviews and ADHD rating scales. Results from confirmatory factor analysis indicate that addition of the four new impulsivity items provided a slightly better factor structure if compared to models including only 18 items. Regression analyses showed that only one of the new impulsivity symptoms (impatient) was part of the list of best predictors of impairment. None of the four new impulsivity items was specifically associated with ADHD diagnosis. The best cutoff point in the hyperactivity/impulsivity dimension for predicting impairment did not change significantly. Overall, our findings suggest that the determination on how to best capture impulsivity dimension as part of the ADHD construct needs more investigation and that there is not enough evidence to include these four assessed impulsivity symptoms as part of the ADHD criteria.

  8. Attention deficit and impulsivity: Driving, drugs and electrophysiology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wester, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    Impulsivity can be interpreted as a cognitive dysfunction or as a motivational dysfunction. Motivational dysfunctions are reflected in impulsive decision making such as increased preference for immediate reward over delayed more beneficial reward (delay aversion) or increased risk taking due to poor

  9. Sex Differences in Impulsivity: A Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cross, Catharine P.; Copping, Lee T.; Campbell, Anne

    2011-01-01

    Men are overrepresented in socially problematic behaviors, such as aggression and criminal behavior, which have been linked to impulsivity. Our review of impulsivity is organized around the tripartite theoretical distinction between reward hypersensitivity, punishment hyposensitivity, and inadequate effortful control. Drawing on evolutionary,…

  10. Periodic and aperiodic synchronization in skilled action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred eCummins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized action is considered as a manifestation of shared skill. Most synchronized behaviors in humans and other animals are based on periodic repetition. Aperiodic synchronization of complex action is found in the experimental task of synchronous speaking, in which naive subjects read a common text in lock step. The demonstration of synchronized behavior without a periodic basis is presented as a challenge for theoretical understanding. A unified treatment of periodic and aperiodic synchronization is suggested by replacing the sequential processing model of cognitivist approaches with the more local notion of a task-specific sensorimotor coordination. On this view, skilled action is the imposition of constraints on the co-variation of movement and sensory flux such that the boundary conditions that define the skill are met. This non-cognitivist approach originates in the work of John Dewey. It allows a unification of the treatment of sensorimotor synchronization in simple rhythmic behavior and in complex skilled behavior and it suggests that skill sharing is a uniquely human trait of considerable import.

  11. Physiological Synchronization in a Vigilance Dual Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization of autonomic arousal levels and other physio-logical responses between people is a potentially important component of work team performance, client-therapist relationships, and other types of human interaction. This study addressed several problems: What statistical models are viable for identifying synchronization for loosely coupled human systems? How is the level of synchronization related to psychosocial variables such as empathy, subjective ratings of workload, and actual performance? Participants were 70 undergraduates who worked in pairs on a vigilance dual task in which they watched a virtual reality security camera, rang a bell when they saw the target intruder, and completed a jig-saw puzzle. Event rates either increased or decreased during the 90 min work period. The average R2 values for each person were .66, .66, .62, and .53 for the linear autoregressive model, linear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, the nonlinear autoregressive model, and the nonlinear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, respectively. All models were more accurate at a lag of 20 sec compared to 50 sec or customized lag lengths. Although the linear models were more accurate overall, the nonlinear synchronization parameters were more often related to psychological variables and performance. In particular, greater synchronization was observed with the nonlinear model when the target event rate increased, compared to when it decreased, which was expected from the general theory of synchronization. Nonlinear models were also more effective for uncovering inhibitory or dampening relationships between the co-workers as well as mutually excitatory relationships. Future research should explore the comparative model results for tasks that induce higher levels of synchronization and involve different types of internal group coordination.

  12. A systematic review of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callesen, Mette Buhl; Scheel-Krüger, Jørgen; Kringelbach, Morten L; Møller, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Throughout the past decade it has been recognized that dopaminergic medication administered to remedy motor symptoms in Parkinson's disease is associated with an enhanced risk for impulse control disorders and related compulsive behaviors such as hobbyism, punding, and the dopamine dysregulation syndrome. These complications are relatively frequent, affecting 6-15.5% of patients, and they most often appear, or worsen, after initiation of dopaminergic therapy or dosage increase. Recently, impulse control disorders have also been associated with subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation. Here we present a systematic overview of literature published between 2000 and January 2013 reporting impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. We consider prevalence rates and discuss the functional neuroanatomy, the impact of dopamine-serotonin interactions, and the cognitive symptomatology associated with impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease. Finally, perspectives for future research and management of impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease are discussed.

  13. Investigation of gas discharge impulse image intensifiers

    CERN Document Server

    Gushchin, E M; Timofeev, M K

    1999-01-01

    The gas discharge impulse image intensifiers (GDIII) operated in the streamer mode are studied in this work. The GDIII has a resolution of 5-15 lines/cm and light amplification up to approx 10 sup 1 sup 0. The possibility to design a single-electron GDIII for RICH-detectors is considered. For this purpose the emission of photoelectrons in He, Ne, Ar, Xe, CO sub 2 , iC sub 4 H sub 1 sub 0 and their mixtures in the 50-760 Torr pressure range have been investigated. The best working gas for the GDIII is Ne+(approx 0.1%)iC sub 4 H sub 1 sub 0 mixture having an electron output factor up to 0.45.

  14. Bistability in Coupled Oscillators Exhibiting Synchronized Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusola, O. I.; Vincent, U. E.; Njah, A. N.; Olowofela, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    We report some new results associated with the synchronization behavior of two coupled double-well Duffing oscillators (DDOs). Some sufficient algebraic criteria for global chaos synchronization of the drive and response DDOs via linear state error feedback control are obtained by means of Lyapunov stability theory. The synchronization is achieved through a bistable state in which a periodic attractor co-exists with a chaotic attractor. Using the linear perturbation analysis, the prevalence of attractors in parameter space and the associated bifurcations are examined. Subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations and abundance of Arnold tongues — a signature of mode locking phenomenon are found.

  15. Adaptive Script H∞ Chaos Anti-synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choon, Ahn Ki

    2010-03-01

    A new adaptive Script H∞ anti-synchronization (AHAS) method is proposed for chaotic systems in the presence of unknown parameters and external disturbances. Based on the Lyapunov theory and linear matrix inequality formulation, the AHAS controller with adaptive laws of unknown parameters is derived to not only guarantee adaptive anti-synchronization but also reduce the effect of external disturbances to an Script H∞ norm constraint. As an application of the proposed AHAS method, the Script H∞ anti-synchronization problem for Genesio-Tesi chaotic systems is investigated.

  16. Acoustophoretic Synchronization of Mammalian Cells in Microchannels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thévoz, P.; Adams, J.D.; Shea, H.

    2010-01-01

    We report the first use of ultrasonic standing waves to achieve cell cycle phase synchronization in mammalian cells in a high-throughput and reagent-free manner. The acoustophoretic cell synchronization (ACS) device utilizes volume-dependent acoustic radiation force within a microchannel...... to selectively purify target cells of desired phase from an asynchronous mixture based on cell cycle-dependent fluctuations in size. We show that ultrasonic separation allows for gentle, scalable, and label-free synchronization with high G1 phase synchrony (84%) and throughput (3 × 106 cells/h per microchannel)....

  17. A Shared Scratchpad Memory with Synchronization Support

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Henrik Enggaard; Maroun, Emad Jacob; Kristensen, Andreas Toftegaard

    2017-01-01

    propose a shared scratchpad memory as a time-predictable communication and synchronization structure, instead of the level 2 cache. The shared on-chip memory is accessed via a time division multiplexing arbiter, isolating the execution time of load and store instructions between processing cores....... Furthermore, the arbiter supports an extended time slot where an atomic load and store instruction can be executed to implement synchronization primitives. In the evaluation we show that a shared scratchpad memory is an efficient communication structure for a small number of processors; in our setup, 9 cores....... Furthermore, we evaluate the efficiency of the synchronization support for implementation of classic locks....

  18. Analysis of Synchronization for Coupled Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zheng; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2006-01-01

    In the control systems with coupled multi-subsystem, the subsystems might be synchronized (i.e. all the subsystems have the same operation states), which results in negative influence to the whole system. For example, in the supermarket refrigeration systems, the synchronized switch of each...... subsystem will cause low efficiency, inferior control performance and a high wear on the compressor. This paper takes the supermarket refrigeration systems as an example to analyze the synchronization and its coupling strengths of coupled hybrid systems, which may provide a base for further research...

  19. On chaos synchronization and secure communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinzel, W; Englert, A; Kanter, I

    2010-01-28

    Chaos synchronization, in particular isochronal synchronization of two chaotic trajectories to each other, may be used to build a means of secure communication over a public channel. In this paper, we give an overview of coupling schemes of Bernoulli units deduced from chaotic laser systems, different ways to transmit information by chaos synchronization and the advantage of bidirectional over unidirectional coupling with respect to secure communication. We present the protocol for using dynamical private commutative filters for tap-proof transmission of information that maps the task of a passive attacker to the class of non-deterministic polynomial time-complete problems. This journal is © 2010 The Royal Society

  20. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton [MagiQ Technologies, Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  1. Fuzzy adaptive synchronization of uncertain chaotic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jae-Hun [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Sudaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jhkim@yeics.yonsei.ac.kr; Park, Chang-Woo [Precision Machinery Research Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, 203-103 B/D 192, Yakdae-dong, Wonmi-gu, Puchon-si, Kyunggi-do 420-140 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Euntai [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Sudaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Mignon [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, 134 Shinchon-dong, Sudaemoon-gu, Seoul 120-749 (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-01-17

    This Letter presents an adaptive approach for synchronization of Takagi-Sugeno (T-S) fuzzy chaotic systems. Since the parameters of chaotic system are assumed unknown, the adaptive law is derived to estimate the unknown parameters and its stability is guaranteed by Lyapunov stability theory. The control law to be designed consists of two parts: one part that can stabilize the synchronization error dynamics and the other part that estimates the unknown parameters. Numerical examples are given to demonstrate the validity of the proposed adaptive synchronization approach.

  2. Synchronization and comparison of Lifelog audio recordings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Andreas Brinch; Hansen, Lars Kai

    2008-01-01

    We investigate concurrent ‘Lifelog’ audio recordings to locate segments from the same environment. We compare two techniques earlier proposed for pattern recognition in extended audio recordings, namely cross-correlation and a fingerprinting technique. If successful, such alignment can be used...... as a preprocessing step to select and synchronize recordings before further processing. The two methods perform similarly in classification, but fingerprinting scales better with the number of recordings, while cross-correlation can offer sample resolution synchronization. We propose and investigate the benefits...... of combining the two. In particular we show that the combination allows sample resolution synchronization and scalability....

  3. Experimental Synchronization by Means of Observers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Martínez-Guerra

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we deal with the experimental synchronization of the Colpitts oscillator in a real-time implementation. Our approach is based on observer design theory in a master-slave configuration thus, a chaos synchronization problem can be posed as an observer design procedure, where the coupling signal is viewed as a measurable output and a slave system is regarded as an observer. A polynomial observer is used for synchronizing the Colpitts oscillator employing linear matrix inequalities. Finally, a comparison with a reduced order observer and a high gain observer is given to assess the performance of the proposed observer.

  4. Impulsivity components measured by the Brazilian version of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alina Gomide Vasconcelos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The main purpose of this study was to investigate the psychometric properties of the Barratt Impulsiveness Scale (BIS-11. Content item analysis was conducted by seven doctoral students. A convenience sample of 897 students was submitted to BIS-11 and they also filled self-reports about Minor Mental Disorder and ADHD symptoms, alcohol use and cigarette smoking. Mean age was 27.32 (SD=8.69 years, 56% were female and 52% had incomplete college degree. Content and factorial analyses revealed that impulsivity was best represented by two latent factors labeled non-planning and inhibition behaviors. Test retest agreement tended to produce similar score patterns seven months after the first evaluation. Additionally, BIS-11 scores discriminated subjects in terms of cigarette smoking and psychopathological symptoms, which indicated evidences regarding criterion-related validity. The theoretical discussion was present based on the neuropsychological model of hot and cool aspects of executive function.

  5. Impulsivity and Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder: Subtype Classification Using the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Drew J; Derefinko, Karen J; Lynam, Donald R; Milich, Richard; Fillmore, Mark T

    2010-09-01

    This study examined the classification accuracy of the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS) in discriminating several attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) subtypes, including predominantly inattentive type (ADHD/I), combined type (ADHD/C), and combined type with behavioral problems (ADHD/ODD), between each other and a non-ADHD control group using logistic regression analyses. The sample consisted of 88 children ranging in age from 9.0 years to 12.8 years, with a mean of 10.9 years. Children were predominantly male (74%) and Caucasian (86%) and in grades 3-7. Results indicated that the UPPS performed well in classifying ADHD subtypes relative to traditional diagnostic measures. In addition, analyses indicated that differences in symptoms between subtypes can be explained by specific pathways to impulsivity. Implications for the assessment of ADHD and conceptual issues are discussed.

  6. Synchronous distance interactive classroom conferencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oz, Halit Hami

    2005-01-01

    New medical schools have been opened in the eastern and southeastern regions of the country. They are also in great need of basic medical science teachers. However, due to security reasons over the past two decades, teachers from the established universities do not desire to travel to these medical schools for lectures. The objective of this study was to develop a synchronous classroom conferencing system to teach basic science courses between two general purpose technology enhanced classrooms of two different universities--Istanbul University (IU) and Istanbul and Harran University (HU), Urfa--located 1,500 miles apart in Turkey. I videostreamed the instructor, content from document camera, Power Point presentations at IU, and the students at both places, IU and HU. In addition, I synchronously broadcast two whiteboards by attaching two mimio devices to the two blackboards in the IU classroom to capture and convert everything written or drawn on them into broadcasting over the intranet. This technique is called "boardcasting," which allows users to stream ink and audio together over the Internet or intranet live. A total of 260 students at IU and 150 students at HU were involved. Off-campus HU students also have asynchronous access to the stored lecture video materials at any time. Midterm and final examinations were administered simultaneously using the same questions at both sites in two universities under the observation of the teaching faculty using the very same system. This system permitted interaction between the students in the class at IU and remote-campus students at HU and the instructor in real time. The instructors at IU were able to maintain a significant level of spontaneity in using their multimedia materials and electronic whiteboards. The mean midterm and final exam scores of students at both universities were similar. The system developed in this study can be used by the medical faculty at the main teaching hospitals to deliver their lectures in

  7. Reflection of the State of Hunger in Impulse Activity of Nose Wing Muscles and Upper Esophageal Sphincter during Search behavior in Rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kromin, A A; Dvoenko, E E; Zenina, O Yu

    2016-07-01

    Reflection of the state of hunger in impulse activity of nose wing muscles and upper esophageal sphincter muscles was studied in chronic experiments on rabbits subjected to 24-h food deprivation in the absence of locomotion and during search behavior. In the absence of apparent behavioral activity, including sniffing, alai nasi muscles of hungry rabbits constantly generated bursts of action potentials synchronous with breathing, while upper esophageal sphincter muscles exhibited regular aperiodic low-amplitude impulse activity of tonic type. Latent form of food motivation was reflected in the structure of temporal organization of impulse activity of alai nasi muscles in the form of bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and in temporal structure of impulse activity of upper esophageal sphincter muscles in the form of monomodal distribution. The latent form of food motivation was manifested in the structure of temporal organization of periods of the action potentials burst-like rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, in the form of monomodal distribution, characterized by a high degree of dispersion of respiratory cycle periods. In the absence of physical activity hungry animals sporadically exhibited sniffing activity, manifested in the change from the burst-like impulse activity of alai nasi muscles to the single-burst activity type with bimodal distribution of interpulse intervals and monomodal distribution of the burst-like action potentials rhythm periods, the maximum of which was shifted towards lower values, which was the cause of increased respiratory rate. At the same time, the monomodal temporal structure of impulse activity of the upper esophageal sphincter muscles was not changed. With increasing food motivation in the process of search behavior temporal structure of periods of the burst-like action potentials rhythm, generated by alai nasi muscles, became similar to that observed during sniffing, not accompanied by animal's locomotion, which is

  8. Impulsivity and self-harm in adolescence: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Joanna; Daley, David; Townsend, Ellen; Sayal, Kapil

    2017-04-01

    Research supports an association between impulsivity and self-harm, yet inconsistencies in methodology across studies have complicated understanding of this relationship. This systematic review examines the association between impulsivity and self-harm in community-based adolescents aged 11-25 years and aims to integrate findings according to differing concepts and methods. Electronic searches of EMBASE, MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, PubMed and The Cochrane Library, and manual searches of reference lists of relevant reviews identified 4496 articles published up to July 2015, of which 28 met inclusion criteria. Twenty-four of the studies reported an association between broadly specified impulsivity and self-harm. However, findings varied according to the conception and measurement of impulsivity and the precision with which self-harm behaviours were specified. Specifically, lifetime non-suicidal self-injury was most consistently associated with mood-based impulsivity-related traits. However, cognitive facets of impulsivity (relating to difficulties maintaining focus or acting without forethought) differentiated current self-harm from past self-harm. These facets also distinguished those with thoughts of self-harm (ideation) from those who acted on thoughts (enaction). The findings suggested that mood-based impulsivity is related to the initiation of self-harm, while cognitive facets of impulsivity are associated with the maintenance of self-harm. In addition, behavioural impulsivity is most relevant to self-harm under conditions of negative affect. Collectively, the findings indicate that distinct impulsivity facets confer unique risks across the life-course of self-harm. From a clinical perspective, the review suggests that interventions focusing on reducing rash reactivity to emotions or improving self-regulation and decision making may offer most benefit in supporting those who self-harm.

  9. Dopaminergic influences on executive function and impulsive behaviour in impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroi, Iracema; Barraclough, Michelle; McKie, Shane; Hinvest, Neal; Evans, Jonathan; Elliott, Rebecca; McDonald, Kathryn

    2013-09-01

    The development of impulse control disorders (ICDs) in Parkinson's disease (PD) may arise from an interaction among cognitive impairment, impulsive responding and dopaminergic state. Dopaminergic state may be influenced by pharmacologic or genotypic (catechol-O-methyltransferase; COMT) factors. We sought to investigate this interaction further by comparing those with (n = 35) and without (n = 55) ICDs on delay-discounting in different pharmacologic conditions (ON or OFF dopaminergic medication) and on response inhibition as well as aspects of executive functioning in the ON state. We then undertook an exploratory sub-group analysis of these same tasks when the overall PD group was divided into different allelic variants of COMT (val/val vs. met/met). A healthy control group (HC; n = 20) was also included. We found that in those with PD and ICDs, 'cognitive flexibility' (set shifting, verbal fluency, and attention) in the ON medication state was not impaired compared with those without ICDs. In contrast, our working memory, or 'cognitive focus', task was impaired in both PD groups compared with the HC group when ON. During the delay-discounting task, the PD with ICDs group expressed greater impulsive choice compared with the PD group without ICDs, when in the ON, but not the OFF, medication state. However, no group difference on the response inhibition task was seen when ON. Finally, the met homozygous group performed differently on tests of executive function compared with the val homozygous group. We concluded that the disparity in levels of impairment among different domains of executive function and impulsive decision-making distinguishes those with ICD in PD from those without ICD, and may in part be affected by dopaminergic status. Both pharmacologic and genotypic influences on dopaminergic state may be important in ICD. © 2013 The British Psychological Society.

  10. Cannabinoid CB1 Receptor Activation Mediates the Opposing Effects of Amphetamine on Impulsive Action and Impulsive Choice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiskerke, J.; Stoop, N.; Schetters, D.; Schoffelmeer, A.N.M.; Pattij, T.

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that acute challenges with psychostimulants such as amphetamine affect impulsive behavior. We here studied the pharmacology underlying the effects of amphetamine in two rat models of impulsivity, the 5-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) and the delayed reward task (DRT),

  11. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Leahy, R.M. [University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  12. Synchronization Model for Pulsating Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S.; Morikawa, M.

    2013-12-01

    A simple model is proposed, which describes the variety of stellar pulsations. In this model, a star is described as an integration of independent elements which interact with each other. This interaction, which may be gravitational or hydrodynamic, promotes the synchronization of elements to yield a coherent mean field pulsation provided some conditions are satisfied. In the case of opacity driven pulsations, the whole star is described as a coupling of many heat engines. In the case of stochastic oscillation, the whole star is described as a coupling of convection cells, interacting through their flow patterns. Convection cells are described by the Lorentz model. In both models, interactions of elements lead to various pulsations, from irregular to regular. The coupled Lorenz model also describes a light curve which shows a semi-regular variability and also shows a low-frequency enhancement proportional to 1/f in its power spectrum. This is in agreement with observations (Kiss et al. 2006). This new modeling method of ‘coupled elements’ may provide a powerful description for a variety of stellar pulsations.

  13. Temporal Ventriloquism in Sensorimotor Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Melody Kay

    Perception of time is multisensory and therefore requires integration of the auditory and visual systems. Temporal ventriloquism is a phenomenon in which discrepant temporal aspects of multisensory stimuli are resolved through auditory dominance. Numerous prior experiments have demonstrated temporal ventriloquism using simple flash and click stimuli. The experiment presented herein employed a sensorimotor synchronization task to examine the effect of visual stimulus type across a range of stimulus onset asynchronies (SOA). This study compared sensorimotor response to three visual stimuli: a flash, a baton swinging, and a mallet striking a block. The results of the experiment indicated that the influence of SOA was greatly dependent on stimulus type. In contrast with the transient flash stimulus, the oscillatory visual stimuli provided more spatiotemporal information. This could explain the significantly reduced effect of temporal ventriloquism observed in response to the baton and mallet relative to the flash. Multisensory integration did not absolutely bias the auditory system; predictive visual dynamics proved useful in the unified perception of temporal occurrence.

  14. Estimation of Synchronous Machine Parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oddvar Hallingstad

    1980-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper gives a short description of an interactive estimation program based on the maximum likelihood (ML method. The program may also perform identifiability analysis by calculating sensitivity functions and the Hessian matrix. For the short circuit test the ML method is able to estimate the q-axis subtransient reactance x''q, which is not possible by means of the conventional graphical method (another set of measurements has to be used. By means of the synchronization and close test, the ML program can estimate the inertial constant (M, the d-axis transient open circuit time constant (T'do, the d-axis subtransient o.c.t.c (T''do and the q-axis subtransient o.c.t.c (T''qo. In particular, T''qo is difficult to estimate by any of the methods at present in use. Parameter identifiability is thoroughly examined both analytically and by numerical methods. Measurements from a small laboratory machine are used.

  15. Synchronous ethernet and IEEE 1588 in telecoms next generation synchronization networks

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the multiple technical aspects of the distribution of synchronization in new generation telecommunication networks, focusing in particular on synchronous Ethernet and IEEE1588 technologies. Many packet network engineers struggle with understanding the challenges that precise synchronization distribution can impose on networks. The usual “why”, “when” and particularly “how” can cause problems for many engineers. In parallel to this, some other markets have identical synchronization requirements, but with their own design requirements, generating further questions. This book attempts to respond to the different questions by providing background technical information. Invaluable information on state of-the-art packet network synchronization and timing architectures is provided, as well as an unbiased view on the synchronization technologies that have been internationally standardized over recent years, with the aim of providing the average reader (who is not skilled in the art) wi...

  16. The augmented lagrange multipliers method for matrix completion from corrupted samplings with application to mixed Gaussian-impulse noise removal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Meng

    Full Text Available This paper studies the problem of the restoration of images corrupted by mixed Gaussian-impulse noise. In recent years, low-rank matrix reconstruction has become a research hotspot in many scientific and engineering domains such as machine learning, image processing, computer vision and bioinformatics, which mainly involves the problem of matrix completion and robust principal component analysis, namely recovering a low-rank matrix from an incomplete but accurate sampling subset of its entries and from an observed data matrix with an unknown fraction of its entries being arbitrarily corrupted, respectively. Inspired by these ideas, we consider the problem of recovering a low-rank matrix from an incomplete sampling subset of its entries with an unknown fraction of the samplings contaminated by arbitrary errors, which is defined as the problem of matrix completion from corrupted samplings and modeled as a convex optimization problem that minimizes a combination of the nuclear norm and the l(1-norm in this paper. Meanwhile, we put forward a novel and effective algorithm called augmented Lagrange multipliers to exactly solve the problem. For mixed Gaussian-impulse noise removal, we regard it as the problem of matrix completion from corrupted samplings, and restore the noisy image following an impulse-detecting procedure. Compared with some existing methods for mixed noise removal, the recovery quality performance of our method is dominant if images possess low-rank features such as geometrically regular textures and similar structured contents; especially when the density of impulse noise is relatively high and the variance of Gaussian noise is small, our method can outperform the traditional methods significantly not only in the simultaneous removal of Gaussian noise and impulse noise, and the restoration ability for a low-rank image matrix, but also in the preservation of textures and details in the image.

  17. The augmented lagrange multipliers method for matrix completion from corrupted samplings with application to mixed Gaussian-impulse noise removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Fan; Yang, Xiaomei; Zhou, Chenghu

    2014-01-01

    This paper studies the problem of the restoration of images corrupted by mixed Gaussian-impulse noise. In recent years, low-rank matrix reconstruction has become a research hotspot in many scientific and engineering domains such as machine learning, image processing, computer vision and bioinformatics, which mainly involves the problem of matrix completion and robust principal component analysis, namely recovering a low-rank matrix from an incomplete but accurate sampling subset of its entries and from an observed data matrix with an unknown fraction of its entries being arbitrarily corrupted, respectively. Inspired by these ideas, we consider the problem of recovering a low-rank matrix from an incomplete sampling subset of its entries with an unknown fraction of the samplings contaminated by arbitrary errors, which is defined as the problem of matrix completion from corrupted samplings and modeled as a convex optimization problem that minimizes a combination of the nuclear norm and the l(1)-norm in this paper. Meanwhile, we put forward a novel and effective algorithm called augmented Lagrange multipliers to exactly solve the problem. For mixed Gaussian-impulse noise removal, we regard it as the problem of matrix completion from corrupted samplings, and restore the noisy image following an impulse-detecting procedure. Compared with some existing methods for mixed noise removal, the recovery quality performance of our method is dominant if images possess low-rank features such as geometrically regular textures and similar structured contents; especially when the density of impulse noise is relatively high and the variance of Gaussian noise is small, our method can outperform the traditional methods significantly not only in the simultaneous removal of Gaussian noise and impulse noise, and the restoration ability for a low-rank image matrix, but also in the preservation of textures and details in the image.

  18. High Speed Frame Synchronization and Viterbi Decoding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paaske, Erik; Justesen, Jørn; Larsen, Knud J.

    1998-01-01

    The study has been divided into two phases. The purpose of Phase 1 of the study was to describe the system structure and algorithms in sufficient detail to allow drawing the high level architecture of units containing frame synchronization and Viterbi decoding. After selection of which specific...... potentially useful.Algorithms for frame synchronization are described and analyzed. Further, the high level architecture of units that contain frame synchronization and various other functions needed in a complete system is presented. Two such units are described, one for placement before the Viterbi decoder...... towards a realization in an FPGA.Node synchronization performed within a Viterbi decoder is discussed, and the high level architectures of three possible implementations of Viterbi decoders are described: The first implementation uses a number of commercially available decoders while the the two others...

  19. Synchronization Analysis of the Supermarket Refrigeration System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Chen, Liang; Larsen, Lars Finn Sloth

    2009-01-01

    The supermarket refrigeration system typically has a distributed control structure, which neglects interactions between its subsystems. These interactions from time to time lead to a synchronization operation of the display-cases which causes an inferior control performance and increased energy...... consumption. The paper focuses on synchronization dynamics of the refrigeration system modeled as a piecewiseaffine switched system. Stability analysis is performed bygluing the subsystems and polyhedra together to form a single dynamical system defined on a coherent state space. Then, system behavior...... is analyzed using the bifurcation and chaos theory. It is demonstrated that the system can have a complex chaotic behavior, which is far from the synchronization. This shows that making the system chaotic is a good choice for a de-synchronization strategy. The positive maximum Lyapunov exponent is usually...

  20. Synchronization of Time-Continuous Chaotic Oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Yuri; Mosekilde, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Considering a system of two coupled identical chaotic oscillators, the paper first establishes the conditions of transverse stability for the fully synchronized chaotic state. Periodic orbit threshold theory is applied to determine the bifurcations through which low-periodic orbits embedded...... in the fully synchronized state lose their transverse stability, and the appearance of globally and locally riddled basins of attraction is discussed, respectively, in terms of the subcritical, supercritical nature of the riddling bifurcations. We show how the introduction of a small parameter mismatch between...... the interacting chaotic oscillators causes a shift of the synchronization manifold. The presence of a coupling asymmetry is found to lead to further modifications of the destabilization process. Finally, the paper considers the problem of partial synchronization in a system of four coupled Rossler oscillators...

  1. Modified function projective combination synchronization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Combination hyperchaotic system; modified function projective combination synchronization; adaptive control; hyperchaotic Lorenz system; hyperchaotic Lu system ... A self-combination system is constructed from hyperchaotic Lorenz system by combining state variables of the Lorenz system with appropriate scaling factors.

  2. Planning for the Synergy of Synchronized Fires

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harness, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    ...: strategic the longest and tactical almost immediately. By carefully synchronizing the three types of fires in time and space, a synergistic effect is created at the tactical level of warfare that can be exploited by the operational commander...

  3. Bifurcation and Synchronization of Two Coupled Generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynyuk, A. À.; Nikitina, N. V.

    2017-03-01

    Coupled generators having the property of multistability (one generator with exponential inertial nonlinearity and Chou generator) are considered. New oscillation conditions occurring under synchronization are established using the characteristic equation for the system of variational equations

  4. Method for emulation of synchronous machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    electronic converters for stabilizing the utility grid during transient conditions and for providing similar stability mechanisms that are inherently present in electric synchronous generators while maintaining the possibility for fast and decoupled following of set points for generated active and...

  5. Synchronization of spin torque nano-oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turtle, James; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Palacios, Antonio; Dabrowski, Christine; In, Visarath; Longhini, Patrick

    2017-04-01

    Synchronization of spin torque nano-oscillators (STNOs) has been a subject of extensive research as various groups try to harness the collective power of STNOs to produce a strong enough microwave signal at the nanoscale. Achieving synchronization has proven to be, however, rather difficult for even small arrays while in larger ones the task of synchronization has eluded theorists and experimentalists altogether. In this work we solve the synchronization problem, analytically and computationally, for networks of STNOs connected in series. The procedure is valid for networks of arbitrary size and it is readily extendable to other network topologies. These results should help guide future experiments and, eventually, lead to the design and fabrication of a nanoscale microwave signal generator.

  6. Disrupted Neural Synchronization in Toddlers with Autism

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dinstein, Ilan; Pierce, Karen; Eyler, Lisa; Solso, Stephanie; Malach, Rafael; Behrmann, Marlene; Courchesne, Eric

    2011-01-01

    .... Here, we show that disrupted synchronization is evident in the spontaneous cortical activity of naturally sleeping toddlers with autism, but not in toddlers with language delay or typical development...

  7. Existence and Globally Asymptotic Stability of Equilibrium Solution for Fractional-Order Hybrid BAM Neural Networks with Distributed Delays and Impulses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the existence and globally asymptotic stability of equilibrium solution for Riemann-Liouville fractional-order hybrid BAM neural networks with distributed delays and impulses. The factors of such network systems including the distributed delays, impulsive effects, and two different fractional-order derivatives between the U-layer and V-layer are taken into account synchronously. Based on the contraction mapping principle, the sufficient conditions are derived to ensure the existence and uniqueness of the equilibrium solution for such network systems. By constructing a novel Lyapunov functional composed of fractional integral and definite integral terms, the globally asymptotic stability criteria of the equilibrium solution are obtained, which are dependent on the order of fractional derivative and network parameters. The advantage of our constructed method is that one may directly calculate integer-order derivative of the Lyapunov functional. A numerical example is also presented to show the validity and feasibility of the theoretical results.

  8. Synchronized sweep algorithms for scalable scheduling constraints

    OpenAIRE

    Letort, Arnaud; Carlsson, Mats; Beldiceanu, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    This report introduces a family of synchronized sweep based filtering algorithms for handling scheduling problems involving resource and precedence constraints. The key idea is to filter all constraints of a scheduling problem in a synchronized way in order to scale better. In addition to normal filtering mode, the algorithms can run in greedy mode, in which case they perform a greedy assignment of start and end times. The filtering mode achieves a significant speed-up over ...

  9. Pitch synchronous transform warping in voice conversion

    OpenAIRE

    Vích, R. (Robert); Vondra, M. (Martin)

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a new voice conversion algorithm is presented, which transforms the utterance of a source speaker into the utterance of a target speaker. The voice conversion approach is based on pitch synchronous speech analysis, Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT), nonlinear spectral warping with spectrum interpolation and pitch synchronous speech synthesis with overlapping using the speech production model. The DCT speech model contains also information about the phase properties of the modeled ...

  10. On the Large Synchronous Machine Parameters Calculatioin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan Adrian Viorel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The large synchronous generators were intensively studied, but not so many papers are entirely dedicated to the analythical calculation of the generator´s parameters. Therefore any contribution should be welcomed if it offers an improvement in the existing procedures or formulae. The paper is dealing with the large synchronous generator smagnetizing and leakage inductances calculation. A coherent algorithm is presented and the calculated parameters for a generator are given.

  11. Chaos synchronization of a fractional nonautonomous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hammouch Zakia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate the dynamic behavior of a nonautonomous fractional-order biological system.With the stability criterion of active nonlinear fractional systems, the synchronization of the studied chaotic system is obtained. On the other hand, using a Phase-Locked-Loop (PLL analogy we synchronize the same system. The numerical results demonstrate the efiectiveness of the proposed methods

  12. Nonlinear State Observer Design for Projective Synchronization of Fractional-Order Permanent Magnet Synchronous Motor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ling; Liang, Deliang; Liu, Chongxin; Zhang, Qun

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, a nonlinear state observer control strategy is developed for projective self-synchronization of the fractional-order chaotic attractors of a permanent magnet synchronous motor (PMSM) system. The mathematical model of PMSM system in a smooth fractional-order form is derived by using the fractional derivative theory. A state observer control design can achieve the full-state projective synchronization of the fractional-order PMSM (FO-PMSM) system without the limitation of partial-linearity. Global stability and asymptotic synchronization between the outputs of drive system and response system can be obtained. Simulation results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of the approach.

  13. On synchronization of clocks in general space-times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. H Khajehpour

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Einstein and transport synchronizations of infinitesimally spaced and distant clocks are considered in a general Riemannian space-time. It is shown that infinitesimally spaced clocks can always be synchronized. In general one can not find observers for whom distant clock are Einstein synchronized but transport synchronized observers do always exit. Whenever both procedures are possible, they are equivalent.

  14. Periodicity and stability for variable-time impulsive neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongfei; Li, Chuandong; Huang, Tingwen

    2017-10-01

    The paper considers a general neural networks model with variable-time impulses. It is shown that each solution of the system intersects with every discontinuous surface exactly once via several new well-proposed assumptions. Moreover, based on the comparison principle, this paper shows that neural networks with variable-time impulse can be reduced to the corresponding neural network with fixed-time impulses under well-selected conditions. Meanwhile, the fixed-time impulsive systems can be regarded as the comparison system of the variable-time impulsive neural networks. Furthermore, a series of sufficient criteria are derived to ensure the existence and global exponential stability of periodic solution of variable-time impulsive neural networks, and to illustrate the same stability properties between variable-time impulsive neural networks and the fixed-time ones. The new criteria are established by applying Schaefer's fixed point theorem combined with the use of inequality technique. Finally, a numerical example is presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed results. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Relationship between Impulsivity, Snack Consumption and Children's Weight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholten, Eline W. M.; Schrijvers, Carola T. M.; Nederkoorn, Chantal; Kremers, Stef P. J.; Rodenburg, Gerda

    2014-01-01

    Background Childhood overweight is a public health problem associated with psychosocial and physical problems. Personality traits, such as impulsivity, may contribute to the development of overweight. Objective This study examines 1) the association between general impulsivity traits (reward sensitivity and disinhibition) and children's weight, 2) the association between impulsivity traits and unhealthy snack consumption, and 3) the potential mediating role of unhealthy snack consumption in the relationship between impulsivity traits and children's weight. Methods Included were 1,377 parent-child dyads participating in the IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT (INPACT). Children had a mean age of 10 years. Parents completed a questionnaire to measure children's unhealthy snack consumption. Children completed a door-opening task to assess reward sensitivity and completed a questionnaire to measure disinhibition. Children's height and weight were measured to calculate their BMI z-scores. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed to test the associations. Results Disinhibition was positively associated with unhealthy snack consumption but not with BMI z-scores. Reward sensitivity was not related to unhealthy snack consumption or to BMI z-scores. Conclusions No evidence was found for a mediating effect of unhealthy snack consumption in the relation between impulsivity traits and children's weight. However, disinhibition appears to have a negative influence on children's unhealthy snack consumption. Future research focusing on food-related impulsivity in addition to general impulsivity will provide additional insight into factors that influence children's unhealthy snack consumption and weight. PMID:24586413

  16. Relationship between impulsivity, snack consumption and children's weight.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline W M Scholten

    Full Text Available Childhood overweight is a public health problem associated with psychosocial and physical problems. Personality traits, such as impulsivity, may contribute to the development of overweight.This study examines 1 the association between general impulsivity traits (reward sensitivity and disinhibition and children's weight, 2 the association between impulsivity traits and unhealthy snack consumption, and 3 the potential mediating role of unhealthy snack consumption in the relationship between impulsivity traits and children's weight.Included were 1,377 parent-child dyads participating in the IVO Nutrition and Physical Activity Child cohorT (INPACT. Children had a mean age of 10 years. Parents completed a questionnaire to measure children's unhealthy snack consumption. Children completed a door-opening task to assess reward sensitivity and completed a questionnaire to measure disinhibition. Children's height and weight were measured to calculate their BMI z-scores. Cross-sectional linear regression analyses were performed to test the associations.Disinhibition was positively associated with unhealthy snack consumption but not with BMI z-scores. Reward sensitivity was not related to unhealthy snack consumption or to BMI z-scores.No evidence was found for a mediating effect of unhealthy snack consumption in the relation between impulsivity traits and children's weight. However, disinhibition appears to have a negative influence on children's unhealthy snack consumption. Future research focusing on food-related impulsivity in addition to general impulsivity will provide additional insight into factors that influence children's unhealthy snack consumption and weight.

  17. Neural correlates of choice behavior related to impulsivity and venturesomeness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinvest, Neal S; Elliott, R; McKie, S; Anderson, Ian M

    2011-07-01

    Impulsivity has been associated with several psychiatric disorders including drug addiction and gambling. Impulsive subjects typically have a preference for short-term over long-term rewards and make risky choices. This study used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate the neural correlates of self-rated impulsivity and venturesomeness during tasks involving delayed and risky choice. A broader sampling approach was taken by recruiting participants with behaviors that have been linked to impulsivity (gambling N=15, and recreational drug use N=10) and those without these behaviors (N=9). Selection between delayed or probabilistic rewards was associated with activation in fronto-parietal regions in line with previous research. When selecting between delayed rewards, activity within the pregenual anterior cingulate cortex and ventrolateral prefrontal cortex correlated positively with impulsivity scores while activity within the orbitofrontal cortex, subgenual anterior cingulate cortex and caudate correlated positively with venturesomeness scores. Selection between probabilistic rewards revealed no correlation between scores and regional activations. The results from this study provide targets for future research investigating the neural substrates of impulsivity. They also provide targets for the further investigation into the pathophysiology of addiction and impulse-control disorders. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Training impulsive choices for healthy and sustainable food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Harm; Chen, Zhang; Tombrock, Merel C; Verpaalen, Iris A M; Schmitz, Laura I; Dijksterhuis, Ap; Holland, Rob W

    2017-06-01

    Many people find it hard to change their dietary choices. Food choice often occurs impulsively, without deliberation, and it has been unclear whether impulsive food choice can be experimentally created. Across 3 exploratory and 2 confirmatory preregistered experiments we examined whether impulsive food choice can be trained. Participants were cued to make motor responses upon the presentation of, among others, healthy and sustainable food items. They subsequently selected these food items more often for actual consumption when they needed to make their choices impulsively as a result of time pressure. This effect disappeared when participants were asked to think about their choices, merely received more time to make their choices, or when choosing required attention to alternatives. Participants preferred high to low valued food items under time pressure and without time pressure, suggesting that the impulsive choices reflect valid preferences. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to train impulsive choices for food items while leaving deliberative choices for these items unaffected, and connect research on attention training to dual-process theories of decision making. The present research suggests that attention training may lead to behavioral change only when people behave impulsively. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  19. Impulse control disorders in non-treatment seeking hair pullers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, Liana R N; Lust, Katherine; Odlaug, Brian; Derbyshire, Katherine L; Grant, Jon

    2013-06-01

    Background and aims Hair pulling is a common body focused repetitive behavior. The purpose of this paper is to examine the prevalence of impulse control disorders (as defined in DSM-IV-TR) in a non-treatment seeking sample of hair pullers. Methods 1,717 college students with (n = 44) and without (n = 1673) hair pulling completed a mental health survey. The college students were sent an online survey assessing hair pulling behavior and other impulse control disorders using the Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview. Results Students with hair pulling were significantly more likely to have a co-occurring impulse control disorder (20.5% vs. 8.9%, p = 0.009, OR = 2.71, CI = 1.28-5.75) and were significantly more likely to meet criteria for compulsive buying, compulsive sexual behavior and intermittent explosive disorder than students without hair pulling. Differences seemed to be moderated by the male gender among students with hair pulling. Discussion and conclusions Hair pulling is often comorbid with another impulse control disorder, which suggests that elements of impulsivity may be important in our understanding of hair pulling. Furthermore, gender may moderate impulse control comorbidity in hair pulling disorder.

  20. Dimensions of impulsivity in relation to eating disorder recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bardone-Cone, Anna M; Butler, Rachel M; Balk, Margaret R; Koller, Katherine A

    2016-11-01

    Impulsivity is associated with eating pathology, but different dimensions of impulsivity have not been extensively studied in the eating disorders. The current study examined the relationship between four facets of impulsivity and eating disorder recovery status. Females formerly seen for an eating disorder were categorized as having an eating disorder (n = 53), partially recovered (n = 15), or fully recovered (n = 20) based on a diagnostic interview and physical, behavioral, and psychological indices. These groups and non-eating disorder controls were compared on impulsivity facets from the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale (UPPS): Urgency (negative urgency), Premeditation (lack of), Perseverance (lack of), and Sensation Seeking. Negative urgency (the tendency to engage in impulsive behavior to alleviate negative affect) was related to recovery. The fully recovered group and controls experienced significantly less negative urgency than those with a current eating disorder; the partially recovered group did not differ from the eating disorder group. Findings suggest that negative urgency may be a particularly important facet of impulsivity to target in therapeutic intervention for eating disorders, especially among those with a history of binge eating and/or purging. Future longitudinal work is needed to test a potential causal relationship between negative urgency and eating disorder recovery. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. (Int J Eat Disord 2016; 49:1027-1031). © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Study of suicidal ideations, hopelessness and impulsivity in elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Surbhi C Trivedi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to assess the suicidal ideations, hopelessness and impulsivity in depressed and non-depressed elderly and to study the relationship of suicidal ideations with hopelessness and impulsivity in them. Materials and Methods: This cross sectional study was done on 60 elderly patients (30 cases and 30 controls above the age of 60 years. The scales used were Geriatric Suicide Ideation Scale, Beck Hopelessness Scale, Barrat′s Impulsiveness Scale, Geriatric Depression Scale. Results: Mean Geriatric Suicide Ideations Scale scores, mean Beck Hopelessness Scale scores and mean Barrat′s Impulsiveness Scale and scores of depressed elderly were higher than that of elderly who were not depressed and these differences were statistically significant. Hopelessness was a significant predictor of suicidal ideation in the entire sample as well as in the depressed and non-depressed elderly when the two groups were considered separately. Impulsivity when considered alone was a significant predictor of suicidal ideations in the entire sample. Conclusion: Hopelessness and impulsivity both by themselves are significant predictors for suicidal ideations in the elderly and when both are considered together hopelessness is a better predictor of suicidal ideations than impulsivity.

  2. Synchronization of mobile chaotic oscillator networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujiwara, Naoya, E-mail: fujiwara@csis.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Center for Spatial Information Science, The University of Tokyo, 277-8568 Chiba (Japan); Kurths, Jürgen [Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research (PIK), 14473 Potsdam, Germany and Institute for Complex Systems and Mathematical Biology, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen (United Kingdom); Díaz-Guilera, Albert [Departament de Física de la Matèria Condensada, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1, 08028 Barcelona, Spain and Universitat de Barcelona Institute of Complex Systems (UBICS), Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain)

    2016-09-15

    We study synchronization of systems in which agents holding chaotic oscillators move in a two-dimensional plane and interact with nearby ones forming a time dependent network. Due to the uncertainty in observing other agents' states, we assume that the interaction contains a certain amount of noise that turns out to be relevant for chaotic dynamics. We find that a synchronization transition takes place by changing a control parameter. But this transition depends on the relative dynamic scale of motion and interaction. When the topology change is slow, we observe an intermittent switching between laminar and burst states close to the transition due to small noise. This novel type of synchronization transition and intermittency can happen even when complete synchronization is linearly stable in the absence of noise. We show that the linear stability of the synchronized state is not a sufficient condition for its stability due to strong fluctuations of the transverse Lyapunov exponent associated with a slow network topology change. Since this effect can be observed within the linearized dynamics, we can expect such an effect in the temporal networks with noisy chaotic oscillators, irrespective of the details of the oscillator dynamics. When the topology change is fast, a linearized approximation describes well the dynamics towards synchrony. These results imply that the fluctuations of the finite-time transverse Lyapunov exponent should also be taken into account to estimate synchronization of the mobile contact networks.

  3. Frame Synchronization Without Attached Sync Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamkins, Jon

    2011-01-01

    We describe a method to synchronize codeword frames without making use of attached synchronization markers (ASMs). Instead, the synchronizer identifies the code structure present in the received symbols, by operating the decoder for a handful of iterations at each possible symbol offset and forming an appropriate metric. This method is computationally more complex and doesn't perform as well as frame synchronizers that utilize an ASM; nevertheless, the new synchronizer acquires frame synchronization in about two seconds when using a 600 kbps software decoder, and would take about 15 milliseconds on prototype hardware. It also eliminates the need for the ASMs, which is an attractive feature for short uplink codes whose coding gain would be diminished by the overheard of ASM bits. The lack of ASMs also would simplify clock distribution for the AR4JA low-density parity-check (LDPC) codes and adds a small amount to the coding gain as well (up to 0.2 dB).

  4. Queue-length synchronization in communication networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Satyam; Gupte, Neelima

    2009-05-01

    We study the synchronization in the context of network traffic on a 2-d communication network with local clustering and geographic separations. The network consists of nodes and randomly distributed hubs where the top five hubs ranked according to their coefficient of betweenness centrality (CBC) are connected by random assortative and gradient mechanisms. For multiple message traffic, messages can trap at the high CBC hubs, and congestion can build up on the network with long queues at the congested hubs. The queue lengths are seen to synchronize in the congested phase. Both complete and phase synchronization are seen, between pairs of hubs. In the decongested phase, the pairs start clearing and synchronization is lost. A cascading master-slave relation is seen between the hubs, with the slower hubs (which are slow to decongest) driving the faster ones. These are usually the hubs of high CBC. Similar results are seen for traffic of constant density. Total synchronization between the hubs of high CBC is also seen in the congested regime. Similar behavior is seen for traffic on a network constructed using the Waxman random topology generator. We also demonstrate the existence of phase synchronization in real internet traffic data.

  5. 3D puzzle reconstruction for archeological fragments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jampy, F.; Hostein, A.; Fauvet, E.; Laligant, O.; Truchetet, F.

    2015-03-01

    The reconstruction of broken artifacts is a common task in archeology domain; it can be supported now by 3D data acquisition device and computer processing. Many works have been dedicated in the past to reconstructing 2D puzzles but very few propose a true 3D approach. We present here a complete solution including a dedicated transportable 3D acquisition set-up and a virtual tool with a graphic interface allowing the archeologists to manipulate the fragments and to, interactively, reconstruct the puzzle. The whole lateral part is acquired by rotating the fragment around an axis chosen within a light sheet thanks to a step-motor synchronized with the camera frame clock. Another camera provides a top view of the fragment under scanning. A scanning accuracy of 100μm is attained. The iterative automatic processing algorithm is based on segmentation into facets of the lateral part of the fragments followed by a 3D matching providing the user with a ranked short list of possible assemblies. The device has been applied to the reconstruction of a set of 1200 fragments from broken tablets supporting a Latin inscription dating from the first century AD.

  6. Impulsivity, gender, and the platelet serotonin transporter in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatella Marazziti

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Donatella Marazziti, Stefano Baroni, Irene Masala, Francesca Golia, Giorgio Consoli, Gabriele Massimetti, Michela Picchetti, Mario Catena Dell’Osso, Gino Giannaccini, Laura Betti, Antonio Lucacchini, Antonio CiapparelliDipartimento di Psichiatria, Neurobiologia, Farmacologia e Biotecnologie, University of Pisa, Pisa, ItalyAbstract: The present study explored the possible relationships between impulsivity, gender, and a peripheral serotonergic marker, the platelet serotonin (5-HT transporter (SERT, in a group of 32 healthy subjects. The impulsivity was measured by means of the Barratt Impulsivity Scale, version 11 (BIS-11, a widely used self-report questionnaire, and the platelet SERT was evaluated by means of the specific binding of 3H-paroxetine (3H-Par to platelet membranes, according to standardized protocols. The results showed that women had a higher BIS-11 total score than men, and also higher scores of two factors of the same scale: the motor impulsivity and the cognitive complexity. The analysis of the correlations revealed that the density of the SERT proteins, as measured by the maximum binding capacity (Bmax of 3H-Par, was significantly and positively related to the cognitive complexity factor, but only in men. Men showed also a significant and negative correlation with the dissociation constant, Kd, of (3H-Par binding, and the motor impulsivity factor. These findings suggest that women are generally more impulsive than men, but that the 5-HT system is more involved in the impulsivity of men than in that of women.Keywords: impulsivity, gender, serotonin transporter, Barratt Impulsivity Scale, platelets, 3H-paroxetine

  7. Temperament and impulsivity predictors of smoking cessation outcomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisca López-Torrecillas

    Full Text Available AIMS: Temperament and impulsivity are powerful predictors of addiction treatment outcomes. However, a comprehensive assessment of these features has not been examined in relation to smoking cessation outcomes. METHODS: Naturalistic prospective study. Treatment-seeking smokers (n = 140 were recruited as they engaged in an occupational health clinic providing smoking cessation treatment between 2009 and 2013. Participants were assessed at baseline with measures of temperament (Temperament and Character Inventory, trait impulsivity (Barratt Impulsivity Scale, and cognitive impulsivity (Go/No Go, Delay Discounting and Iowa Gambling Task. The outcome measure was treatment status, coded as "dropout" versus "relapse" versus "abstinence" at 3, 6, and 12 months endpoints. Participants were telephonically contacted and reminded of follow-up face to face assessments at each endpoint. The participants that failed to answer the phone calls or self-reported discontinuation of treatment and failed to attend the upcoming follow-up session were coded as dropouts. The participants that self-reported continuing treatment, and successfully attended the upcoming follow-up session were coded as either "relapse" or "abstinence", based on the results of smoking behavior self-reports cross-validated with co-oximetry hemoglobin levels. Multinomial regression models were conducted to test whether temperament and impulsivity measures predicted dropout and relapse relative to abstinence outcomes. RESULTS: Higher scores on temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and reward dependence predicted poorer retention across endpoints, whereas only higher scores on persistence predicted greater relapse. Higher scores on the trait dimension of non-planning impulsivity but not performance on cognitive impulsivity predicted poorer retention. Higher non-planning impulsivity and poorer performance in the Iowa Gambling Task predicted greater relapse at 3 and 6 months and 6 months

  8. "Impulsivity": relations between self-report and behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Leigh; Kohl, Krista; Morgan, Theresa A; Clark, Lee Anna

    2013-03-01

    The trait of "impulsivity" is difficult to place within a personality framework due to the many potential pathways to impulsive behavior and the lack of consensus regarding the structure of the trait(s). This lack of consensus also hinders systematic investigation into relations between "impulsivity" and its behavioral manifestations. Undergraduates (Sample 1 N = 507) completed a battery of self-report measures, all purporting to assess trait "impulsivity"; a subset (n = 408) and Sample 2 (N = 388) also completed a retrospective questionnaire about specific behaviors they may have engaged in over the past year, and another subset of Sample 1 agreed to complete (n = 208) and actually completed (n = 152) a 2-week prospective measure of impulsive behaviors. Finally, a subset of Sample 1 (n = 321) and Sample 2 completed an omnibus self-report inventory in a follow-up study. Structural equation modeling confirmed a 3-factor structure of what we call impulsigenic traits-traits that are manifested in impulsive behavior. This finding is consistent with previous research and supports the growing consensus that "impulsivity" is a colloquial label attached to a group of distinct traits that have phenotypically similar behavioral manifestations. Each of these impulsigenic traits relates differentially to impulsive behavior and to broad temperamental dimensions. The results also show clear 2-factor structures of both daily and less frequent (yearly/semiyearly) impulsive behaviors. Finally, a unique method of data collection permitted an investigation of relations between the impulsigenic and other personality traits and observed behaviors, demonstrating the predictive utility of personality traits to discrete, in situ behaviors. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved

  9. Impulsivity and rapid decision-making for reward

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie eBurnett Heyes

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Impulsivity is a feature of many brain disorders. Although often defined as the predisposition to act with an inadequate degree of deliberation, forethought or control, it has proven difficult to measure. This may in part be because, increasingly, impulsivity is recognized as a multifaceted construct, with impulsive decisions potentially arising due to a number of underlying mechanisms. Indeed, in certain contexts, a ‘functional’ degree of impulsivity may promote effective, motivated behavior in healthy participants. Although many tasks have been developed to study impulsivity, few examine decisions made rapidly, for time-sensitive rewards: In this context, a degree of impulsivity may be adaptive. In the current study we examine behavior in 59 adults on a manual ‘Traffic Light’ task which requires participants to take risks under time pressure, if they are to maximize reward. We show that behavioral variables that index rapid anticipatory responding in this paradigm are correlated with a specific self-report measure of impulsivity: ‘lack of premeditation’ on the UPPS Impulsive Behavior Scale. Participants who scored more highly on this subscale performed better on the task. Moreover, anticipatory behavior reduced significantly with age (18-79 years, an effect that continued to be upheld after correction for potential age differences in the ability to judge the timing of responses. Based on these findings, we argue that the Traffic Light task provides a parametric method to study a ‘functional’ aspect of impulsivity in health and disease: namely, rapid decision-making in pursuit of risky, time-sensitive rewards.

  10. Quantum synchronization in an optomechanical system based on Lyapunov control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wenlin; Li, Chong; Song, Heshan

    2016-06-01

    We extend the concepts of quantum complete synchronization and phase synchronization, which were proposed in A. Mari et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 103605 (2013)PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.111.103605, to more widespread quantum generalized synchronization. Generalized synchronization can be considered a necessary condition or a more flexible derivative of complete synchronization, and its criterion and synchronization measure are proposed and analyzed in this paper. As examples, we consider two typical generalized synchronizations in a designed optomechanical system. Unlike the effort to construct a special coupling synchronization system, we purposefully design extra control fields based on Lyapunov control theory. We find that the Lyapunov function can adapt to more flexible control objectives, which is more suitable for generalized synchronization control, and the control fields can be achieved simply with a time-variant voltage. Finally, the existence of quantum entanglement in different generalized synchronizations is also discussed.

  11. Nonlinear Chemical Dynamics and Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning

    Alan Turing's work on morphogenesis, more than half a century ago, continues to motivate and inspire theoretical and experimental biologists even today. That said, there are very few experimental systems for which Turing's theory is applicable. In this thesis we present an experimental reaction-diffusion system ideally suited for testing Turing's ideas in synthetic "cells" consisting of microfluidically produced surfactant-stabilized emulsions in which droplets containing the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) oscillatory chemical reactants are dispersed in oil. The BZ reaction has become the prototype of nonlinear dynamics in chemistry and a preferred system for exploring the behavior of coupled nonlinear oscillators. Our system consists of a surfactant stabilized monodisperse emulsion of drops of aqueous BZ solution dispersed in a continuous phase of oil. In contrast to biology, here the chemistry is understood, rate constants are measured and interdrop coupling is purely diffusive. We explore a large set of parameters through control of rate constants, drop size, spacing, and spatial arrangement of the drops in lines and rings in one-dimension (1D) and hexagonal arrays in two-dimensions (2D). The Turing model is regarded as a metaphor for morphogenesis in biology but not for prediction. Here, we develop a quantitative and falsifiable reaction-diffusion model that we experimentally test with synthetic cells. We quantitatively establish the extent to which the Turing model in 1D describes both stationary pattern formation and temporal synchronization of chemical oscillators via reaction-diffusion and in 2D demonstrate that chemical morphogenesis drives physical differentiation in synthetic cells.

  12. Impulse radar imaging system for concealed object detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podd, F. J. W.; David, M.; Iqbal, G.; Hussain, F.; Morris, D.; Osakue, E.; Yeow, Y.; Zahir, S.; Armitage, D. W.; Peyton, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Electromagnetic systems for imaging concealed objects at checkpoints typically employ radiation at millimetre and terahertz frequencies. These systems have been shown to be effective and provide a sufficiently high resolution image. However there are difficulties and current electromagnetic systems have limitations particularly in accurately differentiating between threat and innocuous objects based on shape, surface emissivity or reflectivity, which are indicative parameters. In addition, water has a high absorption coefficient at millimetre wavelength and terahertz frequencies, which makes it more difficult for these frequencies to image through thick damp clothing. This paper considers the potential of using ultra wideband (UWB) in the low gigahertz range. The application of this frequency band to security screening appears to be a relatively new field. The business case for implementing the UWB system has been made financially viable by the recent availability of low-cost integrated circuits operating at these frequencies. Although designed for the communication sector, these devices can perform the required UWB radar measurements as well. This paper reports the implementation of a 2 to 5 GHz bandwidth linear array scanner. The paper describes the design and fabrication of transmitter and receiver antenna arrays whose individual elements are a type of antipodal Vivaldi antenna. The antenna's frequency and angular response were simulated in CST Microwave Studio and compared with laboratory measurements. The data pre-processing methods of background subtraction and deconvolution are implemented to improve the image quality. The background subtraction method uses a reference dataset to remove antenna crosstalk and room reflections from the dataset. The deconvolution method uses a Wiener filter to "sharpen" the returned echoes which improves the resolution of the reconstructed image. The filter uses an impulse response reference dataset and a signal

  13. Towards Ultrahigh Speed Impulse Radio THz Wireless Communications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xianbin; Galili, Michael; Morioka, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    evaluate the realistic throughput and accessible wireless range of a THz impulse radio communication link based on a uni-travelling photodiode (UTC-PD) as THz emitter and a photoconductive antenna (PCA) as THz receiver. The impact of highly frequency-selective THz channel and the noise in the system......THz impulse radio technologies promise a new paradigm of fast wireless access with simplified wireless reception. However, huge loss of propagating broad bandwidth THz impulse radio signals limits THz wireless transmission distance and reduces the achievable link data rates. In this paper, we...

  14. Impulse control in Kalman-like filtering problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael V. Basin

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper develops the impulse control approach to the observation process in Kalman-like filtering problems, which is based on impulsive modeling of the transition matrix in an observation equation. The impulse control generates the jumps of the estimate variance from its current position down to zero and, as a result, enables us to obtain the filtering equations for the Kalman estimate with zero variance for all post-jump time moments. The filtering equations for the estimates with zero variances are obtained in the conventional linear filtering problem and in the case of scalar nonlinear state and nonlinear observation equations.

  15. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; Transverse upper gracilis flap; TUG; Mastectomy - breast reconstruction with natural tissue; Breast cancer - breast reconstruction ...

  16. Head and face reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002980.htm Head and face reconstruction To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Head and face reconstruction is surgery to repair or reshape deformities ...

  17. Temperamental components of impulsivity in ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Małgorzata Lipowska

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the above research was to identify the temperamental profile differentiating children with diagnosed ADHD from their friends who are not affected by developmental deficiency. Moreover, the objective was to examine whether the temperamental profile of hyperactive children can be characterized by the same specific configuration of traits. Material and method: The experimental group comprised 63 children with diagnosed ADHD (32 girls and 31 boys. The control group consisted of children without any diagnosed developmental deficiency (37 girls and 30 boys in the age adequate to the research group (control group aged M=11.5; SD=0.9; ADHD children aged M=11.6; SD=0.4. Temperamental profile was evaluated by means of Buss and Plomin EAS-C Temperament Questionnaire, Polish version adapted by Oniszczenko (1997 and evaluated by parents and teachers. The severity of symptoms criterial for ADHD was described with the use of Wolańczyk and Kołakowski Questionnaire for diagnosing ADHD and behavioural disorders (2005. Results: Correlates were found between the severity of ADHD symptoms and the child’s specific temperamental profile. In case of hyperactive children, teachers ranked shyness significantly higher (t=-5.2; p=0.000, whereas parents ranked emotionality higher (t=5.1; p=0.000. In both examined groups the activity level was estimated as average and high (6-7 sten. It appeared that the trait differentiating the temperamental profile of children from both groups was emotionality – a higher level of this trait was indicated both by parents (t=8.6; p=0.000 and teachers (t=6.4; p=0.000. As far as the relation between particular temperamental traits and criterial ADHD dimensions is concerned, a correlation was found between emotionality and impulsivity (r=3.4; p=0.008 and hyperactivity (r=3.5; p=0.007 in parents’ evaluation and impulsivity (r=3.6; p=0.004 in teachers’ perception. Moreover, the teachers also emphasised the correlation

  18. Fast Self-Synchronization between LowVoltage Microgrid and Inverter using Virtual Synchronous Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ruhul Amin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fast self-synchronization known as virtual synchronous converter (VSCon between single-phase microgrid and inverter in low-voltage microgrid, has been developed in Matlab/Simulink. The idea is to any phase locked loop (PLL circuit for inverter-microgrid synchronization in order to improve the synchronization time. As known, it is difficult and lengthy process to tune the PLL gain parameters to reach suitable performance for synchronizing among the voltage, phase-angle and frequency between them. Due to this problem, a fast self synchronization technique is needed in order to minimize the time losses at the microgrid connection. Therefore, the VSCon has been developed which is based on the synchronous generator mathematical model but in virtual environment representation. It has been applied in the inverter control for generating switching pattern to the inverter switches in order to respond to the grid voltage for improve the synchronization. For a prove of concept, several simulation tests in MATLAB models have been conducted, in order to see the effectiveness of this VSCon. First test has been conducted, when a 240V, 50Hz frequency grid source is used for observing the self-synchronization the system with the power flows output. Furthermore, the next test is conducted when the grid frequency is changed from the rated frequency at 50Hz to 51Hz and the result shows the VSCon in inverter control takes nearly 40ms to synchronize to this new frequency value. The test on grid phase-angle delay also been tested when ac grid voltage has 150 phase delay. As from all the results, the improved inverter control with VSCon structure is able to have fast and self-synchronized between the invertergrid connection before the power from the inverter can be transferred.

  19. Early-life maternal separation and social isolation produce an increase in impulsive action but not impulsive choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovic, Vedran; Keen, Darren; Fletcher, Paul J; Fleming, Alison S

    2011-08-01

    Early life environment, events, and context, such as mother-offspring relationship, can have profound effects on future behavior and physiology. We investigated the effects of long-term maternal and social separation, through artificial rearing, on adult impulsivity. Rats were maternally reared (MR) or artificially reared (AR) and half of the AR rats were provided with replacement somatosensory stimulation intended to simulate maternal licking. There are at least 2 forms of impulsivity and we compared rats on 1 test of impulsive action (differential reinforcement of low rates of responding-DRL-20s) and 2 tests of impulsive choice (delay discounting and fixed consecutive number schedule-FCN). We found that AR rats are more action impulsive; however, this effect can be reduced by maternal licking-like stimulation. In contrast, AR rats did not display an increase in impulsive choice. Overall, these experiments show that early life maternal and social separation have different effects on the 2 forms of impulsivity. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Statement of capabilities: Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR) technology applied to mine detection and imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azevedo, S.G.; Gavel, D.T.; Mast, J.E.; Warhus, J.P.

    1995-03-13

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has developed radar and imaging technologies with potential applications in mine detection by the armed forces and other agencies involved in demining efforts. These new technologies use a patented ultra-wideband (impulse) radar technology that is compact, low-cost, and low power. Designated as Micropower Impulse Radar, these compact, self-contained radars can easily be assembled into arrays to form complete ground penetrating radar imaging systems. LLNL has also developed tomographic reconstruction and signal processing software capable of producing high-resolution 2-D and 3-D images of objects buried in materials like soil or concrete from radar data. Preliminary test results have shown that a radar imaging system using these technologies has the ability to image both metallic and plastic land mine surrogate targets buried in 5 to 10 cm of moist soil. In dry soil, the system can detect buried objects to a depth of 30 cm and more. This report describes LLNL`s unique capabilities and technologies that can be applied to the demining problem.

  1. Impulse control disorders in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilas, Dolores; Pont-Sunyer, Claustre; Tolosa, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Impulse control disorders (ICDs), a group of complex behavioral disorders, occur more commonly in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients than in the general population, with a reported prevalence up to 13.6% in some studies. The most common ICDs reported are pathological gambling (PG), hypersexuality (HS), compulsive shopping and compulsive eating. More than a quarter of the patients with ICDs have 2 or more behavioral addictions. These abnormal behaviors impair activities of daily living and have a negative impact on quality of life of patients and their families. As with many other non motor symptoms in PD, ICDs are frequently under-reported by patients and caregivers and may be under-recognized by the treating physicians. Treatment with dopamine agonists (DA) is the main risk factor for developing ICDs, and stimulation of mesolimbic D3 receptors by DA is thought to underlie their development. The DA effect seems to be a class effect and not specific for any DA. Levodopa can also induce ICDs but much less so than the DAs. The management of ICDs in PD is complex. Modifications in dopaminergic drug treatment are frequently necessary. In some cases alternative therapies such as atypical antipsychotics, antidepressants or deep brain stimulation if motor symptoms become incapacitating after adjustment of dopamine replacement therapy should be considered. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Adiabatic heating in impulsive solar flares

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maetzler, C.; Bai, T.; Crannell, C. J.; Frost, K. J.

    1978-01-01

    A study is made of adiabatic heating in two impulsive solar flares on the basis of dynamic X-ray spectra in the 28-254 keV range, H-alpha, microwave, and meter-wave radio observations. It is found that the X-ray spectra of the events are like those of thermal bremsstrahlung from single-temperature plasmas in the 10-60 keV range if photospheric albedo is taken into account. The temperature-emission correlation indicates adiabatic compression followed by adiabatic expansion and that the electron distribution remains isotropic. H-alpha data suggest compressive energy transfer. The projected areas and volumes of the flares are estimated assuming that X-ray and microwave emissions are produced in a single thermal plasma. Electron densities of about 10 to the 9th/cu cm are found for homogeneous, spherically symmetric sources. It is noted that the strong self-absorption of hot-plasma gyrosynchrotron radiation reveals low magnetic field strengths.

  3. Impulse oscillometry: a measure for airway obstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vink, Geraldine R; Arets, Hubertus G M; van der Laag, Johan; van der Ent, Cornelis K

    2003-03-01

    The impulse oscillometry system (IOS) was introduced as a new technique to assess airflow obstruction in patients who are not able to perform forced breathing maneuvers, e.g., subjects with cerebral palsy or severe mental retardation, and young children. This study evaluates the sensitivity and specificity of IOS parameters to quantify changes in airflow obstruction in comparison with forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV(1)) and peak expiratory flow (PEF) measurements. Measurements of FEV(1), PEF, and resistance (R) and reactance (X) at frequencies of 5-35 Hz were performed in 19 children with asthma before, during, and after methacholine challenge and subsequent bronchodilatation. All parameters changed significantly during tests. Values of R5 and R10 correlated with FEV(1) (r = -0.71 and -0.73, respectively, P operating characteristic (ROC) curve to predict a 15% fall in FEV(1) showed better sensitivity and specificity for R5 (area under the curve, 0.85) compared to PEF (0.79) or R10 (0.73). We conclude that IOS parameters can be easily used as an indirect measure of airflow obstruction. This might be helpful in patients who are not able to perform forced breathing maneuvers. In individual subjects, R values measured at 5 Hz showed to be superior to PEF measurements in the detection of a 15% fall in FEV(1). Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Mott transition by an impulsive dielectric breakdown

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakawa, H.; Miyamoto, T.; Morimoto, T.; Terashige, T.; Yada, H.; Kida, N.; Suda, M.; Yamamoto, H. M.; Kato, R.; Miyagawa, K.; Kanoda, K.; Okamoto, H.

    2017-11-01

    The transition of a Mott insulator to metal, the Mott transition, can occur via carrier doping by elemental substitution, and by photoirradiation, as observed in transition-metal compounds and in organic materials. Here, we show that the application of a strong electric field can induce a Mott transition by a new pathway, namely through impulsive dielectric breakdown. Irradiation of a terahertz electric-field pulse on an ET-based compound, κ-(ET) 2Cu[N(CN) 2]Br (ET:bis(ethylenedithio)tetrathiafulvalene), collapses the original Mott gap of ~30 meV with a ~0.1 ps time constant after doublon-holon pair productions by quantum tunnelling processes, as indicated by the nonlinear increase of Drude-like low-energy spectral weights. Additionally, we demonstrate metallization using this method is faster than that by a femtosecond laser-pulse irradiation and that the transition dynamics are more electronic and coherent. Thus, strong terahertz-pulse irradiation is an effective approach to achieve a purely electronic Mott transition, enhancing the understanding of its quantum nature.

  5. Synchronous states of slowly rotating pendula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Centre for Applied Dynamics Research, School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom); Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Kapitaniak, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.kapitaniak@p.lodz.pl [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-08-01

    Coupled systems that contain rotating elements are typical in physical, biological and engineering applications and for years have been the subject of intensive studies. One problem of scientific interest, which among others occurs in such systems is the phenomenon of synchronization of different rotating parts. Despite different initial conditions, after a sufficiently long transient, the rotating parts move in the same way — complete synchronization, or a permanent constant shift is established between their displacements, i.e., the angles of rotation — phase synchronization. Synchronization occurs due to dependence of the periods of rotating elements motion and the displacement of the base on which these elements are mounted. We review the studies on the synchronization of rotating pendula and compare them with the results obtained for oscillating pendula. As an example we consider the dynamics of the system consisting of n pendula mounted on the movable beam. The pendula are excited by the external torques which are inversely proportional to the angular velocities of the pendula. As the result of such excitation each pendulum rotates around its axis of rotation. It has been assumed that all pendula rotate in the same direction or in the opposite directions. We consider the case of slowly rotating pendula and estimate the influence of the gravity on their motion. We classify the synchronous states of the identical pendula and observe how the parameters mismatch can influence them. We give evidence that synchronous states are robust as they exist in the wide range of system parameters and can be observed in a simple experiment.

  6. Does interpersonal movement synchronization differ from synchronization with a moving object?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ouwehand, P.W.; Peper, C.E.

    2015-01-01

    We examined whether movement synchronization is different during coordination with another person than during coordination with a moving object. In addition, the influence of belief in the other person's agency was assessed. Participants synchronized their lower-arm movements with a

  7. An adaptive dynamically weighted median filter for impulse noise removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Sajid; Lee, Dong-Ho

    2017-12-01

    A new impulsive noise removal filter, adaptive dynamically weighted median filter (ADWMF), is proposed. A popular method for removing impulsive noise is a median filter whereas the weighted median filter and center weighted median filter were also investigated. ADWMF is based on weighted median filter. In ADWMF, instead of fixed weights, weightages of the filter are dynamically assigned with the results of noise detection. A simple and efficient noise detection method is also used to detect noise candidates and dynamically assign zero or small weights to the noise candidates in the window. This paper proposes an adaptive method which increases the window size according to the amounts of impulsive noise. Simulation results show that the AMWMF works better for both images with low and high density of impulsive noise than existing methods work.

  8. The hierarchical structure of self-reported impulsivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Kris N; Finch, Julia C

    2010-04-01

    The hierarchical structure of 95 self-reported impulsivity items, along with delay-discount rates for money, was examined. A large sample of college students participated in the study (N = 407). Items represented every previously proposed dimension of self-reported impulsivity. Exploratory PCA yielded at least 7 interpretable components: Prepared/Careful, Impetuous, Divertible, Thrill and Risk Seeking, Happy-Go-Lucky, Impatiently Pleasure Seeking, and Reserved. Discount rates loaded on Impatiently Pleasure Seeking, and correlated with the impulsiveness and venturesomeness scales from the I(7) (Eysenck, Pearson, Easting, & Allsopp, 1985). The hierarchical emergence of the components was explored, and we show how this hierarchical structure may help organize conflicting dimensions found in previous analyses. Finally, we argue that the discounting model (Ainslie, 1975) provides a qualitative framework for understanding the dimensions of impulsivity.

  9. Field Independence, Impulsiveness, High School Training, and Academic Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feij, Jan A.

    1976-01-01

    Investigates the relationship between performance on field-independence tests and two variables which may be thought of as important determinants of performance on a variety of cognitive tasks: impulsiveness and previous education. (Author/RC)

  10. Fear signals inhibit impulsive behavior toward rewarding food objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veling, Harm; Aarts, Henk; Stroebe, Wolfgang

    2011-06-01

    We examined whether presentation of environmental cues that are associated with motor inhibition, i.e., fearful facial expressions, can be effective in controlling unintentionally evoked impulses toward rewarding food objects. Participants were presented with palatable foods or control objects. During presentation of the objects, facial expressions displaying fear, disgust, or neutral emotion were shortly presented. Results show that presentation of fearful facial expressions together with palatable foods slowed down subsequent responding to action probes, but only for participants who perceive palatable foods as highly rewarding and impulse-evoking, i.e., restrained eaters. Facial expressions of disgust did not show this effect. This finding suggests that unintentionally evoked motor impulses toward rewarding objects are inhibited upon presentation of a fear signal. The present research provides new insight on how emotional signals may be used to control impulsive responses toward palatable foods by the environment. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Developments in impulse control behaviours of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurowski, Mateusz; O'Brien, Jonathan Darcy

    2015-08-01

    Impulse control behaviours (ICBs) are a frequent comorbidity for patients with Parkinson's disease. They consist of impulse control disorders, dopamine dysregulation syndrome, and punding. The field continues to evolve in the understanding of impulsivity and assessment of risk factors in the development of these behaviours and their appropriate management in patients with Parkinson's disease. Impulsivity is a multifaceted concept that is surprisingly common in untreated patients with Parkinson's disease. The incidence of ICBs increases with demographic, clinical, and biochemical risk factors. Treatments rely on reduction of dopamine agonists with exception of cognitive behavioural therapy and possibly repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation. Reduction of dopamine agonist dose is the mainstay of treatment of ICBs. Other forms of dopaminergic treatment such as deep brain stimulation or jejunal infusion are alternative treatments but may be complicated by dopamine agonist withdrawal syndrome. Other therapies show promise but data are insufficient to suggest their regular use.

  12. 20mN, Variable Specific Impulse Colloid Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Colloid thrusters have long been known for their exceptional thrust efficiency and ability to operate over a range of specific impulse due to easily variable...

  13. Amygdala reactivity to fearful faces correlates positively with impulsive aggression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    da Cunha-Bang, Sofi; Fisher, Patrick M; Hjordt, Liv V

    2018-01-01

    Facial expressions robustly activate the amygdala, a brain structure playing a critical role in aggression. Whereas previous studies suggest that amygdala reactivity is related to various measures of impulsive aggression, we here estimate a composite measure of impulsive aggression and evaluate...... whether it is associated with amygdala reactivity to angry and fearful faces. We estimated amygdala reactivity with functional magnetic resonance imaging in 47 men with varying degree of aggressive traits (19 incarcerated violent offenders and 28 healthy controls). We modeled a composite "impulsive...... aggression" trait construct (LVagg) using a linear structural equation model, with a single latent variable capturing the shared correlation between five self-report measures of trait aggression, anger and impulsivity. We tested for associations between amygdala reactivity and the LVagg, adjusting for age...

  14. Adolescent risk taking, impulsivity, and brain development: implications for prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romer, Daniel

    2010-04-01

    Individual differences in impulsivity underlie a good deal of the risk taking that is observed during adolescence, and some of the most hazardous forms of this behavior are linked to impulsivity traits that are evident early in development. However, early interventions appear able to reduce the severity and impact of these traits by increasing control over behavior and persistence toward valued goals, such as educational achievement. One form of impulsivity, sensation seeking, rises dramatically during adolescence and increases risks to healthy development. However, a review of the evidence for the hypothesis that limitations in brain development during adolescence restrict the ability to control impulsivity suggests that any such limitations are subtle at best. Instead, it is argued that lack of experience with novel adult behavior poses a much greater risk to adolescents than structural deficits in brain maturation. Continued translational research will help to identify strategies that protect youth as they transition to adulthood. (c) 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Relationship between Impulsivity, Social Media Usage and Loneliness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Savci

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between impulsivity, social media usage, and loneliness and to test the structural hypothetical model developed based on the literature. The study was conducted on 307 (164 female, 143 male university students. Data collection instruments of the study were the Barratt Impulsivity Scale Short Form (BIS-11-SF, Social Media Usage Scale (SMUS, and UCLA Loneliness Scale Short Form (ULS-8. The measurement models of the latent variables were tested initially and it was observed that the scales of the latent variables were efficient enough to be included in the structural equation model. In addition, the suggested hypothetical model was tested. According to the analysis, it was observed that impulsivity directly, positively and significantly predicts social media usage, that social media usage directly, positively and significantly predicts loneliness, and that impulsivity indirectly, positively and significantly predicts loneliness.

  16. Comorbidity of impulse control disorders in pathological gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J E; Kim, S W

    2003-09-01

    To investigate the rate of impulse control disorders among pathological gamblers and examine the relationship of comorbidity to gambling severity. Ninety-six adult pathological gamblers [mean age: 46.7 +/- 11.0 years; female: 44 (45.8%)] completed the following: Minnesota Impulsive Disorders Interview, Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive Scale Modified for Pathological Gambling, and Gambling Symptom Assessment Scale. Twenty-two subjects (22.9%) reported a comorbid impulse control disorder, most commonly compulsive sexual behaviour and compulsive buying. Subjects with comorbidity reported significantly greater intensity of urges (t = -2.021; df = 94; P = 0.046) and thoughts (t = -2.147; df = 42.3; P = 0.038) related to gambling, and greater interference (t = -3.913; df = 48.1; P Impulse control disorders appear common among pathological gamblers and are associated with more severe gambling symptoms.

  17. Artificial Heads for High-Level Impulse Sound Measurement

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Buck, K

    1999-01-01

    If the Insertion Loss (IL) of hearing protectors has to be determined with very high impulse or continuous noise levels, the acoustic insulation of the Artificial Test Fixture has to exceed at least the Insertion Loss (IL...

  18. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trudnowski, D. J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general 'rules-of-thumb' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques, different parent system configurations, and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  19. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  20. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  1. Saccadic entropy of head impulses in acute unilateral vestibular loss

    OpenAIRE

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Hung-Ching; Lee, Guo-She

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the complexity of vestibular–ocular reflex (VOR) in patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL) via entropy analysis of head impulses. Methods: Horizontal head impulse test (HIT) with high-velocity alternating directions was used to evaluate 12 participants with AUVL and 16 healthy volunteers. Wireless electro-oculography and electronic gyrometry were used to acquire eye positional signals and head velocity signals. The eye velocity signals were then obtained through ...

  2. Stress and decision making: the role of impulsive personality

    OpenAIRE

    Wise, Richard Julian

    2017-01-01

    Stress, gender, and impulsive personality traits are each associated with altered decision making, but no studies have yet examined interactions between all of these factors. Impulsive personality can be parsed into five subtypes, consisting of Negative Urgency, the tendency to act rashly in the face of extreme negative emotion; Positive Urgency, the tendency to act rashly in the face of strong positive emotion; Lack of Premeditation, the tendency to insufficiently consider actions prior to t...

  3. Reduced Rank Adaptive Filtering in Impulsive Noise Environments

    KAUST Repository

    Soury, Hamza

    2014-01-06

    An impulsive noise environment is used in this paper. A new aspect of signal truncation is deployed to reduce the harmful effect of the impulsive noise to the signal. A full rank direct solution is derived followed by an iterative solution. The reduced rank adaptive filter is presented in this environment by using two methods for rank reduction. The minimized objective function is defined using the Lp norm. The results are presented and the efficiency of each algorithm is discussed.

  4. Relationship between Impulsivity, Social Media Usage and Loneliness

    OpenAIRE

    Mustafa Savci; Ferda Aysan

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the relationships between impulsivity, social media usage, and loneliness and to test the structural hypothetical model developed based on the literature. The study was conducted on 307 (164 female, 143 male) university students. Data collection instruments of the study were the Barratt Impulsivity Scale Short Form (BIS-11-SF), Social Media Usage Scale (SMUS), and UCLA Loneliness Scale Short Form (ULS-8). The measurement models of the latent variables w...

  5. Obesity and dissociable forms of impulsivity in young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chamberlain, Samuel R; Derbyshire, Katherine L; Leppink, Eric; Grant, Jon E

    2015-10-01

    Obesity is one of the leading causes of preventable morbidity and mortality, and young people are increasingly affected. The aim of this study was to examine relationships between obesity and dissociable forms of impulsivity in young adults. A group of young adults (511) was recruited from city areas in the United States using media advertisements. These young adults were administered careful and extensive clinical and neurocognitive assessment in order to quantify different aspects of impulsivity (behavioral/phenomenological-, cognitive-, and personality-related measures). Associations between obesity and impulsivity were explored using multivariate analysis of variance and discriminant function analysis. 10.8% of the sample was obese, and 21.5% was overweight. Compared to controls, subjects with obesity showed significantly elevated rates of maladaptive gambling behaviors, monetary amounts lost to gambling, nicotine consumption, impulsive action (prolonged stop-signal reaction times in the Stop-Signal Test), and impulsive decision-making (reduced modulation of behavior as a function of risk in the Cambridge Gamble Test). Even accounting for potential confounding variables, obesity was significantly predicted by female gender, older age, more maladaptive gambling behaviors, and worse inhibitory control (stop-signal reaction times). Obesity is associated with several dissociable forms of impulsivity in young people, especially gambling and impulse dyscontrol. Family doctors should screen for gambling problems in obese young adults. Successful treatment of nicotine dependence in young obese people is likely to require intensive weight management support. Neuropsychological deficits relating to impulsivity occur in obese people in early adulthood, and may represent vulnerability markers rather than being due to chronic untoward metabolic effects on brain function.

  6. Pre-attentive information processing and impulsivity in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, Alan C; Lijffijt, Marijn; Lane, Scott D; Steinberg, Joel L; Acas, Michelle D; Cox, Blake; Moeller, F Gerard

    2013-12-01

    Early responses to stimuli can be measured by sensory evoked potentials (EP) using repeated identical stimuli, S1 and S2. Response to S1 may represent efficient stimulus detection, while suppression of response to S2 may represent inhibition. Early responses to stimuli may be related to impulsivity. We compared EP reflecting stimulus detection and inhibition in bipolar disorder and healthy controls, and investigated relationships to impulsivity. Subjects were 48 healthy controls without family histories of mood disorder and 48 with bipolar disorder. EP were measured as latencies and amplitudes for auditory P50 (pre-attentional), N100 (initial direction of attention) and P200 (initial conscious awareness), using a paired-click paradigm, with identical stimuli 0.5 s apart. Impulsivity was measured by questionnaire and by laboratory tests for inability to suppress responses to stimuli or to delay response for a reward. Analyses used general linear models. S1 amplitudes for P50, N100, and P200, and gating of N100 and P200, were lower in bipolar disorder than in controls. P50 S1 amplitude correlated with accurate laboratory-task responding, and S2 amplitude correlated with impulsive task performance and fast reaction times, in bipolar disorder. N100 and P200 EP did not correlate with impulsivity. These findings were independent of symptoms, treatment, or substance-use history. EPs were not related to questionnaire-measured or reward-based impulsivity. Bipolar I disorder is characterized by reduced pre-attentional and early attentional stimulus registration relative to controls. Within bipolar disorder, rapid-response impulsivity correlates with impaired pre-attentional response suppression. These results imply specific relationships between ERP-measured response inhibition and rapid-response impulsivity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Gigabit impulse radio UWB signal generation and fiber transmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodes Lopez, Roberto; Gibbon, Timothy Braidwood; Yu, Xianbin

    We demonstrate 3.125 Gb/s photonic impulse radio UWB generation using an uncooled distributed feedback laser. After 50km fiber transmission the signal is recovered without errors using a digital signal processing receiver.......We demonstrate 3.125 Gb/s photonic impulse radio UWB generation using an uncooled distributed feedback laser. After 50km fiber transmission the signal is recovered without errors using a digital signal processing receiver....

  8. A STUDY ON IMPULSIVE CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR AND ITS DETERMINANTS

    OpenAIRE

    Dr. V. Seetha; Suganya, J

    2017-01-01

    Impulse buying is an emerging phenomenon, which has been the focus of the retailers to attract the customers.  Impulse behaviour is the outcome of emotional reactions that generate unpredicted urge to buy. Consumer behaviour is nowadays gaining much importance for retailers. Due to expansion of organized retail in India, retailers are trying to understand the behaviour of consumers that what product the consumer seeks for, why they need a particular product, when they need it and how they are...

  9. Subtypes of trait impulsivity differentially correlate with neural responses to food choices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Laan, Laura N.; Barendse, Marjolein E. A.; Viergever, Max A.; Smeets, Paul A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Impulsivity is a personality trait that is linked to unhealthy eating and overweight. A few studies assessed how impulsivity relates to neural responses to anticipating and tasting food, but it is unknown how impulsivity relates to neural responses during food choice. Although impulsivity is a

  10. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of AERA using a beacon reference transmitter and commercial airplanes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huege Tim

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Radio detection of cosmic-ray air showers requires time synchronization of detectors on a nanosecond level, especially for advanced reconstruction algorithms based on the wavefront curvature and for interferometric analysis approaches. At the Auger Engineering Radio Array, the distributed, autonomous detector stations are time-synchronized via the Global Positioning System which, however, does not provide sufficient timing accuracy. We thus employ a dedicated beacon reference transmitter to correct for eventby-event clock drifts in our offline data analysis. In an independent cross-check of this “beacon correction” using radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, we have shown that the combined timing accuracy of the two methods is better than 2 nanoseconds.

  11. Adaptive Control Algorithm of the Synchronous Generator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko Victor

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the the problem of controlling a synchronous generator, namely, maintaining the stability of the control object in the conditions of occurrence of noise and disturbances in the regulatory process. The model of a synchronous generator is represented by a system of differential equations of Park-Gorev, where state variables are computed relative to synchronously rotating d, q-axis. Management of synchronous generator is proposed to organize on the basis of the position-path control using algorithms to adapt with the reference model. Basic control law directed on the stabilizing indicators the frequency generated by the current and the required power level, which is achieved by controlling the mechanical torque on the shaft of the turbine and the value of the excitation voltage of the synchronous generator. Modification of the classic adaptation algorithm using the reference model, allowing to minimize the error of the reference regulation and the model under investigation within the prescribed limits, produced by means of the introduction of additional variables controller adaptation in the model. Сarried out the mathematical modeling of control provided influence on the studied model of continuous nonlinear and unmeasured the disturbance. Simulation results confirm the high level accuracy of tracking and adaptation investigated model with respect to the reference, and the present value of the loop error depends on parameters performance of regulator.

  12. Blending Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Yamagata-Lynch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will share a qualitative self-study about a 15-week blended 100% online graduate level course facilitated through synchronous meetings on Blackboard Collaborate and asynchronous discussions on Blackboard. I taught the course at the University of Tennessee (UT during the spring 2012 semester and the course topic was online learning environments. The primary research question of this study was: How can the designer/instructor optimize learning experiences for students who are studying about online learning environments in a blended online course relying on both synchronous and asynchronous technologies? I relied on student reflections of course activities during the beginning, middle, and the end of the semester as the primary data source to obtain their insights regarding course experiences. Through the experiences involved in designing and teaching the course and engaging in this study I found that there is room in the instructional technology research community to address strategies for facilitating online synchronous learning that complement asynchronous learning. Synchronous online whole class meetings and well-structured small group meetings can help students feel a stronger sense of connection to their peers and instructor and stay engaged with course activities. In order to provide meaningful learning spaces in synchronous learning environments, the instructor/designer needs to balance the tension between embracing the flexibility that the online space affords to users and designing deliberate structures that will help them take advantage of the flexible space.

  13. Depression in university students: associations with impulse control disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppink, Eric W; Lust, Katherine; Grant, Jon E

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the implications of depression in a sample of university students, particularly relating to impulse control disorders. While previous studies have shown high rates of depression among university students, no study to date has assessed whether levels of depression show associations with the incidence of impulse control disorders in this population. In all, 6000 students participated in the College Student Computer Use Survey. A total of 1717 students completed the scales of interest for this analysis. Participants were assigned to groups based on depression scores: severe (N = 75), mild/moderate (N = 647) and none (N = 995). The three groups were assessed using analysis of variance (ANOVA) or chi-square test. A multinomial logistic regression analysis was used to elucidate associations between depression and impulse control disorder diagnoses. Groups differed across demographic, health and academic variables. The severe depression group reported higher rates of skin-picking disorder, compulsive sexual behaviour and compulsive buying. Results suggest a significant association between depression and impulse control disorders. One possibility is that a facet of impulsivity contributes to both problems, which could be important information for clinicians. Future studies will need to clarify the exact nature of the relationship between depression and impulse control disorders.

  14. Determination of acoustical transfer functions using an impulse method

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPherson, J.

    1985-02-01

    The Transfer Function of a system may be defined as the relationship of the output response to the input of a system. Whilst recent advances in digital processing systems have enabled Impulse Transfer Functions to be determined by computation of the Fast Fourier Transform, there has been little work done in applying these techniques to room acoustics. Acoustical Transfer Functions have been determined for auditoria, using an impulse method. The technique is based on the computation of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of a non-ideal impulsive source, both at the source and at the receiver point. The Impulse Transfer Function (ITF) is obtained by dividing the FFT at the receiver position by the FFT of the source. This quantity is presented both as linear frequency scale plots and also as synthesized one-third octave band data. The technique enables a considerable quantity of data to be obtained from a small number of impulsive signals recorded in the field, thereby minimizing the time and effort required on site. As the characteristics of the source are taken into account in the calculation, the choice of impulsive source is non-critical. The digital analysis equipment required for the analysis is readily available commercially.

  15. Impulsivity and verbal deficits associated with domestic violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Ronald A; Brumm, Virdette; Zawacki, Tricia M; Paul, Robert; Sweet, Lawrence; Rosenbaum, Alan

    2003-07-01

    While neurobiological factors are known to play a role in human aggression, relatively few studies have examined neuropsychological contributions to propensity for violence. We previously demonstrated cognitive deficits among men who committed domestic violence (batterers) compared to non-violent controls. Batterers had deficits in verbal ability, learning and executive problem-solving ability. These findings led us to examine whether executive control problems involving impulsivity contribute to problems with behavioral control among batterers, and to further examine their deficits in verbal functioning. Batterers (n = 41) enrolled in a domestic violence program were compared to 20 non-violent men of similar age, education, and socioeconomic background on neuropsychological tests of executive functioning, including impulsivity. Questionnaires and structured clinical interviews were used to assess emotional distress, aggression and self-reported impulsivity. Batterers showed greater impulsivity compared to non-batterers on several neuropsychological measures. Yet, the severity of these deficits was relatively mild and not evident in all batterers. Consistent with our previous findings, significant verbal deficits were again observed among the batterers. These findings suggest that while impulsivity may be a factor associated with domestic violence, it probably is not the sole determinant of the strong relationship between cognitive functioning and batterer status that we previously observed. Both verbal expressive deficits and behavioral impulsivity appear to be relevant variables in predisposing men to domestic violence.

  16. Self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in problem gamblers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorains, Felicity K; Stout, Julie C; Bradshaw, John L; Dowling, Nicki A; Enticott, Peter G

    2014-01-01

    Impulsivity is considered a core feature of problem gambling; however, self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control may reflect disparate constructs. We examined self-reported impulsivity and inhibitory control in 39 treatment-seeking problem gamblers and 41 matched controls using a range of self-report questionnaires and laboratory inhibitory control tasks. We also investigated differences between treatment-seeking problem gamblers who prefer strategic (e.g., sports betting) and nonstrategic (e.g., electronic gaming machines) gambling activities. Treatment-seeking problem gamblers demonstrated elevated self-reported impulsivity, more go errors on the Stop Signal Task, and a lower gap score on the Random Number Generation task than matched controls. However, overall we did not find strong evidence that treatment-seeking problem gamblers are more impulsive on laboratory inhibitory control measures. Furthermore, strategic and nonstrategic problem gamblers did not differ from their respective controls on either self-reported impulsivity questionnaires or laboratory inhibitory control measures. Contrary to expectations, our results suggest that inhibitory dyscontrol may not be a key component for some treatment-seeking problem gamblers.

  17. Impulsivity in Hong Kong-Chinese club-drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loxton, Natalie J; Wan, Venice L-N; Ho, Ada M-C; Cheung, Ben K-L; Tam, Nicole; Leung, Freedom Y K; Stadlin, Alfreda

    2008-05-01

    To investigate the relationship between personality, club-drug use and high-risk drug-related behaviour, 360 club-drug users and 303 non-drug users in Hong Kong were assessed on measures of two impulsivity dimensions, reward drive and rash impulsivity, and a related trait of punishment sensitivity. The most frequently used drugs were ketamine, ecstasy, and cannabis, with the majority of participants using two or more drugs on any one occasion. Club-drug users were more rash-impulsive and reward-driven, and less punishment-sensitive than non-drug users (p<0.001). Rash impulsivity, but not reward drive or punishment sensitivity, was significantly (p<0.001) associated with risky drug-related behaviour. There was no association between any personality traits and preferred drug. These findings suggest that, while those who use club drugs are generally more impulsive and less punishment-sensitive, some discrete facets of impulsivity are associated with differing patterns of drug-use behaviour.

  18. The nature of impulsivity: visual exposure to natural environments decreases impulsive decision-making in a delay discounting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Meredith S; Sweeney, Mary M; Morath, Justice; Odum, Amy L; Jordan, Kerry E

    2014-01-01

    The benefits of visual exposure to natural environments for human well-being in areas of stress reduction, mood improvement, and attention restoration are well documented, but the effects of natural environments on impulsive decision-making remain unknown. Impulsive decision-making in delay discounting offers generality, predictive validity, and insight into decision-making related to unhealthy behaviors. The present experiment evaluated differences in such decision-making in humans experiencing visual exposure to one of the following conditions: natural (e.g., mountains), built (e.g., buildings), or control (e.g., triangles) using a delay discounting task that required participants to choose between immediate and delayed hypothetical monetary outcomes. Participants viewed the images before and during the delay discounting task. Participants were less impulsive in the condition providing visual exposure to natural scenes compared to built and geometric scenes. Results suggest that exposure to natural environments results in decreased impulsive decision-making relative to built environments.

  19. Water waves generated by impulsively moving obstacle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Kostikov, Vasily

    2017-04-01

    There are several mechanisms of tsunami-type wave formation such as piston displacement of the ocean floor due to a submarine earthquake, landslides, etc. We consider simplified mathematical formulation which involves non-stationary Euler equations of infinitely deep ideal fluid with submerged compact wave-maker. We apply semi-analytical method [1] based on the reduction of fully nonlinear water wave problem to the integral-differential system for the wave elevation together with normal and tangential fluid velocities at the free surface. Recently, small-time asymptotic solutions were constructed by this method for submerged piston modeled by thin elliptic cylinder which starts with constant acceleration from rest [2,3]. By that, the leading-order solution terms describe several regimes of non-stationary free surface flow such as formation of inertial fluid layer, splash jets and diverging waves over the obstacle. Now we construct asymptotic solution taking into account higher-order nonlinear terms in the case of submerged circular cylinder. The role of non-linearity in the formation mechanism of surface waves is clarified in comparison with linear approximations. This work was supported by RFBR (grant No 15-01-03942). References [1] Makarenko N.I. Nonlinear interaction of submerged cylinder with free surface, JOMAE Trans. ASME, 2003, 125(1), 75-78. [2] Makarenko N.I., Kostikov V.K. Unsteady motion of an elliptic cylinder under a free surface, J. Appl. Mech. Techn. Phys., 2013, 54(3), 367-376. [3] Makarenko N.I., Kostikov V.K. Non-linear water waves generated by impulsive motion of submerged obstacle, NHESS, 2014, 14(4), 751-756.

  20. Occurrence statistics of magnetic impulsive events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Moretto

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we perform a statistical investigation of magnetic impulse events identified in the Greenland magnetometer stations through the years 1995–2001. We focus on occurrence statistics that can be determined reliably with an automatic event identification procedure. Durin the first two years we observed almost 40% more events than in the following years. Season is not a significant factor in event occurrence. Event occurrence peaks near 12:00 UT, corresponding to approximately 10:00 magnetic local time (MLT at the west coast of Greenland. More events occur prior to local noon than after. Event days are not distributed evenly. Large amplitude events, particularly, tend to appear on consecutive days. Events are observed at lower latitudes at earlier local times in a way consistent with the projection of the outer magnetospheric boundary into the ionosphere. Event latitude depends on dipole tilt angle in a manner similar to that reported for the cusp. Events occur during intervals of enhanced Kp. The main reason for this is that the events themselves contribute to the Kp index. Events exhibit a preference for high solar wind velocity. In particular, the large amplitude events occur during high-speed streams. A slight preference for lower density and more radial interplanetary magnetic fields, as compared to the nominal solar wind distribution, is also observed. However, both the nominal solar wind and event distribution exhibit large differences from year to year, indicating that events occur under a broad range of conditions.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric disturbances Magnetospheric physics (magnetosphere-ionosphere interactions; solar wind-magnetosphere interactions