WorldWideScience

Sample records for synchronous collaborative medical

  1. Beehive: A Software Application for Synchronous Collaborative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turani, Aiman; Calvo, Rafael A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to describe Beehive, a new web application framework for designing and supporting synchronous collaborative learning. Design/methodology/approach: Our web engineering approach integrates educational design expertise into a technology for building tools for collaborative learning activities. Beehive simplifies…

  2. Community Pharmacist Attitudes on Medication Synchronization Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew Witry

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Medication synchronization is a service offered by an increasing number of community pharmacies that aligns refilling of a patient’s multiple medications. Purported benefits include increased adherence and improved dispensing efficiency. Objective: To assess community pharmacist agreement with a set of declarative statements about medication synchronization programs and to identify variation related to pharmacist characteristics. Methods: In 2015, a cross-sectional survey was mailed to 1,000 pharmacists from 5 Midwestern U.S. states using 4-contacts and an online option. Respondents used a 7-point Likert scale to agree or disagree with 5 statements about medication synchronization. Demographic and workplace characteristics were collected. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and factor analysis. Multiple linear regression tested the relationship between pharmacist characteristics and a 4-item attitude composite. Results: There were 258 usable responses for a response rate of 28.8%. About half (45.0% reported their pharmacy offered medication synchronization. Most pharmacists (82.6% agreed this service has a positive impact on patient adherence but 57% agreed that a “significant change to workflow” was or would be required. Pharmacist agreement that the program provides financial benefits to the pharmacy was higher than agreement that the service provides more opportunities for patient interactions (p<0.001. In the multiple regression analysis, having a PharmD and working at a pharmacy offering Medication Therapy Management were associated with more positive scores on the medication synchronization benefits composite whereas working in a staff role (rather than a manager/owner was lower. No demographic predictors were significantly associated with agreeing that a significant change to workflow would be required for implementation. Conclusions: Pharmacists generally were positive about medication synchronization

  3. Combining Synchronous and Asynchronous Collaboration within 3D City Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimke, Jan; Döllner, Jürgen

    This paper presents an approach for combining spatially distributed synchronous and asynchronous collaboration within 3D city models. Software applications use these models as additional communication medium to facilitate communication of georeferenced and geospatial information. Collaboration tools should support both the communication with other collaborators and their awareness of the current collaboration context. To support collaborative knowledge construction and gathering, we have designed a collaboration system to facilitate (a) creation of annotations that have 3D references to the virtual 3D city model and (b) collection information about the context in which these annotations are created. Our approach supports synchronous collaboration in connection with the creation of non volatile, precisely georeferenced units of information allow for a comprehensible form of cooperation in spatially distributed settings. Storage and retrieval of this information is provided through a Web Feature Service, which eases integration of collaboration data into existing applications. We further introduce a visualization technique that integrates annotations as complex structured data into the 3D visualization. This avoids media breaks and disruptions in working processes and creates a spatial coherence between annotation and annotated feature or geometry.

  4. Synchronous collaboration of virtual and remote laboratories

    OpenAIRE

    Jara, Carlos A.; Candelas-Herías, Francisco A.; Torres, Fernando; Dormido Bencomo, Sebastián; Esquembre Martínez, Francisco

    2009-01-01

    Virtual and remote laboratories(VRLs) are e-learning resources which enhance the accessibility of experimental setups providing a distance teaching framework which meets the student's hands-on learning needs. In addition, online collaborative communication represents a practical and a constructivist method to transmit the knowledge and experience from the teacher to students, overcoming physical distance and isolation. Thus, the integration of learning environments in the form of VRLs inside ...

  5. Multigroup Synchronization in 1D-Bernoulli Chaotic Collaborative CDMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumith Babu Suresh Babu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Code-division multiple access (CDMA has played a remarkable role in the field of wireless communication systems, and its capacity and security requirements are still being addressed. Collaborative multiuser transmission and detection are a contemporary technique used in CDMA systems. The performance of these systems is governed by the proper accommodation of the users and by proper synchronization schemes. The major research concerns in the existing multiuser overloaded CDMA schemes are (i statistically uncorrelated PN sequences that cause multiple-access interference (MAI and (ii the security of the user’s data. In this paper, a novel grouped CDMA scheme, the 1D-Bernoulli chaotic collaborative CDMA (BCC-CDMA, is introduced, in which mutually orthogonal chaotic sequences spread the users’ data within a group. The synchronization of multiple groups in this scheme has been analyzed under MAI limited environments and the results are presented. This increases the user capacity and also provides sufficient security as a result of the correlation properties possessed by the chaotic codes. Multigroup synchronization is achieved using a 1D chaotic pilot sequence generated by the Bernoulli Map. The mathematical model of the proposed system is described and compared with the theoretical model of the synchronization in CDMA, the simulation results of which are presented.

  6. A Synchronous Collaborative Service Oriented Mobile Learning Architecture SCSOMLA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Wamuti

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Despite the growth of mobile learning and advantages offered such as portability social interactivity context sensitivity convenience inclusive and non-discriminatory independence data collected showed that there is low use of such mobile learning systems. Investigation on mobile learning sought the participation of users and availability of users the mimicability of the class room and the various implementations in institutions and attempts at synchronous collaboration in existing Mobile Learning based infrastructure. As seen in the research the social aspect of smart mobile phones has not been leveraged to be incorporated in mobile learning infrastructure where a class is seen as a social place. Mobile Learning has not allowed a collaborative part of the social constructivism theory approach to users of these technologies which have focused on technology other than the fundamental of teaching collaborative pedagogy. Options that would enable group collaboration would be necessary to increase the quality of service for those teaching and learning in a mobile environment. With this lack of environmental feel and exposing the services that are offered in the teaching business service oriented architecture a mature technology was applied due to its seamless integration to business processes. Research explored what standards have been proposed regarding Service Oriented Architecture S.O.A. and M-Learning how has time-based collaboration been archived in other m-learning systems and how can time-based collaboration S.O.A. and M-Learning be wrapped around An architecture based on the intersection of time-based collaboration S.O.A. and M-Learning then was designed and evaluated. Results of a user study comparing a mobile learning system integrated social collaborative pedagogical features suggest that an enhanced social presence was achieved where users worked together similar to a conventional classroom.

  7. Collaborative simulation method with spatiotemporal synchronization process control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yisheng; Ding, Guofu; Zhang, Weihua; Zhang, Jian; Qin, Shengfeng; Tan, John Kian

    2016-10-01

    When designing a complex mechatronics system, such as high speed trains, it is relatively difficult to effectively simulate the entire system's dynamic behaviors because it involves multi-disciplinary subsystems. Currently,a most practical approach for multi-disciplinary simulation is interface based coupling simulation method, but it faces a twofold challenge: spatial and time unsynchronizations among multi-directional coupling simulation of subsystems. A new collaborative simulation method with spatiotemporal synchronization process control is proposed for coupling simulating a given complex mechatronics system across multiple subsystems on different platforms. The method consists of 1) a coupler-based coupling mechanisms to define the interfacing and interaction mechanisms among subsystems, and 2) a simulation process control algorithm to realize the coupling simulation in a spatiotemporal synchronized manner. The test results from a case study show that the proposed method 1) can certainly be used to simulate the sub-systems interactions under different simulation conditions in an engineering system, and 2) effectively supports multi-directional coupling simulation among multi-disciplinary subsystems. This method has been successfully applied in China high speed train design and development processes, demonstrating that it can be applied in a wide range of engineering systems design and simulation with improved efficiency and effectiveness.

  8. Synchronous Online Collaborative Professional Development for Elementary Mathematics Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Francis-Poscente and Michele Jacobsen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Math is often taught poorly emphasizing rote, procedural methods rather than creativity and problem solving. Alberta Education developed a new mathematics curriculum to transform mathematics teaching to inquiry driven methods. This revised curriculum provides a new vision for mathematics and creates opportunities and requirements for professional learning by teachers. Conventional offsite, after school, or weekend professional development is typically “sit and listen, maybe try on Monday”. Professional development that is embedded, responsive, and personalized is known to be more effective at changing teaching practice. Alberta teachers are geographically dispersed making online professional learning a desirable alternative to on-site workshops. As access to and use of the Internet gains momentum in schools across the country, opportunities for collaborative, online professional development become more viable. The online professional development in this hermeneutic study maps on to the new vision promoted in Alberta’s math curriculum, and addresses the challenge of a distributed teacher population. Thirteen geographically dispersed participants, including 10 teachers, a PhD mathematician, and two mathematics education specialists, collaborated in an online professional learning community to build knowledge for teaching mathematics. This paper describes and interprets the shared experiences of learners within an online, synchronous learning community that focused on discipline rich, focused inquiry with mathematics. Findings show that the nature and quality of the mathematics task impacted the quality and nature of the online interaction. Mathematics problems that incorporated easily drawn symbols and minimal text worked best in the online collaborative space. Members of this learning community discovered how to assert their identity in the online environment.

  9. A Study of the Effectiveness of Blackboard Collaborate for Conducting Synchronous Courses at Multiple Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Tonsmann, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the effectiveness of the videoconferencing software Blackboard Collaborate for carrying out instruction at college level to students attending classes synchronously at multiple locations. The paper describes the motivation for this study, a brief literature review on the subject, the methodology used, and the results obtained. The main conclusion of this study is the confirmation that synchronous instruction, in general, and Blackboard Collaborate, in particular, is an effective environment for tuition of students at a distance. Based on this study, several recommendations to be used in synchronous education are provided.

  10. Collaborative Affordances of Medical Records

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bardram, Jakob Eyvind; Houben, Steven

    2017-01-01

    This article proposes the concept of Collaborative Affordances to describe physical and digital properties (i.e., affordances) of an artifact, which affords coordination and collaboration in work. Collaborative Affordances build directly on Gibson (1977)’s affordance concept and extends the work...... by Sellen and Harper (2003) on the affordances of physical paper. Sellen and Harper describe how the physical properties of paper affords easy reading, navigation, mark-up, and writing, but focuses, we argue, mainly on individual use of paper and digital technology. As an extension to this, Collaborative...... Affordances focusses on the properties of physical and digital artifacts that affords collaborative activities. We apply the concept of Collaborative Affordances to the study of paper-based and electronic patient records in hospitals and detail how they afford collaboration through four types of Collaborative...

  11. Collaborative Dialogue in Synchronous Computer-Mediated Communication and Face-to-Face Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Previous research has documented that collaborative dialogue promotes L2 learning in both face-to-face (F2F) and synchronous computer-mediated communication (SCMC) modalities. However, relatively little research has explored modality effects on collaborative dialogue. Thus, motivated by sociocultual theory, this study examines how F2F compares…

  12. Scaffolding Collaborative Technical Writing with Procedural Facilitation and Synchronous Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Shiou-Wen; Lo, Jia-Jiunn; Huang, Jeng-Jia

    2011-01-01

    With the advent of computer technology, researchers and instructors are attempting to devise computer support for effective collaborative technical writing. In this study, a computer-supported environment for collaborative technical writing was developed. This system (Process-Writing Wizard) provides process-oriented scaffolds and a synchronous…

  13. Competence development of synchronously coached trainee teachers in collaborative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hooreman, Ralph W.; Kommers, Petrus A.M.; Jochems, Wim M.G.

    2007-01-01

    The need to make trainee teachers more prepared to coach collaborative learning effectively is increasing, as collaborative learning is becoming more important. One complication in this training process is that it is hard for the teacher trainer to hear and understand the students’ utterances and

  14. Competence development of synchronously coached trainee teachers in collaborative learning

    OpenAIRE

    Hooreman, RW Ralph; Kommers, PAM; Jochems, WMG Wim

    2008-01-01

    The need to make trainee teachers more prepared to coach collaborative learning effectively is increasing, as collaborative learning is becoming more important. One complication in this training process is that it is hard for the teacher trainer to hear and understand the students’ utterances and those of the coaching trainee teacher. Besides, it is essential that the teacher trainer does not intervene with the students directly. This constraint is a strong plea for facilitating the direct wh...

  15. Development of Reasoning Skills through Participation in Collaborative Synchronous Online Discussions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Hee

    2014-01-01

    This article investigates the effect of participation in synchronous online discussions on the development of individual reasoning as manifested in reflective essays. Students from a fourth-grade classroom engaged in a series of real-time online discussions. The format of the discussion was based on the Collaborative Reasoning approach which has…

  16. Self-synchronization in networked teams : Initializing and monitoring interteam collaborations.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezooijen, B.J.A. van; Essens, P.J.M.D.

    2008-01-01

    Networked teams do not only have to make decisions that are in line with the overall goal, but face additional problems because teams have to synchronize decisions and actions with other teams in the network, Experiments have demonstrated that training teams for collaborating with other teams

  17. Collaboration in Complex Medical Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Yan; Mankenzie, Colin F.

    1998-01-01

    Improving our understanding of collaborative work in complex environments has the potential for developing effective supporting technologies, personnel training paradigms, and design principles for multi-crew workplaces. USing a sophisticated audio-video-data acquisition system and a corresponding analysis system, the researchers at University of Maryland have been able to study in detail team performance during real trauma patient resuscitation. The first study reported here was on coordination mechanisms and on characteristics of coordination breakdowns. One of the key findings was that implicit communications were an important coordination mechanism (e.g. through the use of shared workspace and event space). The second study was on the sources of uncertainty during resuscitation. Although incoming trauma patients' status is inherently uncertain, the findings suggest that much of the uncertainty felt by care providers was related to communication and coordination. These two studies demonstrate the value of and need for creating a real-life laboratory for studying team performance with the use of comprehensive and integrated data acquisition and analysis tools.

  18. Synchronous gesture manipulation for collaboration and coordination of co-located Business Process Modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda Scholtz

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate approaches (techniques and technologies for the coordination of collaborative tasks using synchronous gesture manipulation. Business Process Modelling (BPM tasks are often performed in teams of modellers who need to collaborate with each other in order to coordinate and integrate their individual contributions into the various process models in a co-located environment. These collaborative BPM tasks were used as a case study in order to develop the artifact (the BPM-Touch approach as a proof of concept. The BPM-Touch approach allows for the coordination and collaboration of BPM tasks in co-located modelling teams using synchronous gesture manipulation approaches. The Design Science Research (DSR methodology was used and several cycles of developing and evaluating the artifact took place. This paper reports on the last cycle and set of evaluations. The proposed approach was implemented in a BPM software package in order to provide empirical validation. Usability evaluations of the software were undertaken with both students and BPM professionals as participants. The empirical results of the evaluations revealed that the participants found the approach to be effective and rated the usability and satisfaction of the collaboration and gesture manipulation aspects of the software positively.

  19. International Medical Collaboration: Lessons from Cuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelló González, Mauro; Pons Vásquez, Reinaldo; Rodriguez Bencomo, David; Choonara, Imti

    2016-01-01

    Over 50,000 Cuban health professionals are currently working overseas in 67 different countries. They work in conjunction with local health professionals. The majority work in primary care in deprived areas. The aim is to reduce morbidity and mortality but also improve health in the long term by training local health professionals, and building both institutions and a structure to deliver health care alongside educating the local population. Cuba is a small, middle-income country. It has, however, made a significant international contribution in relation to medical collaboration. Cuba’s international collaboration is based on the principles of social justice and equity for all. It has set an example for other countries to emulate. PMID:27763571

  20. International Medical Collaboration: Lessons from Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Castelló González

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Over 50,000 Cuban health professionals are currently working overseas in 67 different countries. They work in conjunction with local health professionals. The majority work in primary care in deprived areas. The aim is to reduce morbidity and mortality but also improve health in the long term by training local health professionals, and building both institutions and a structure to deliver health care alongside educating the local population. Cuba is a small, middle-income country. It has, however, made a significant international contribution in relation to medical collaboration. Cuba’s international collaboration is based on the principles of social justice and equity for all. It has set an example for other countries to emulate.

  1. Synchronization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Towards the end some real life exam- ples are also discussed. 1. Introduction. Synchronization, in simple terms, ..... certain relationship between their phases is termed as phase locking. GENERAL I ARTICLE ral frequencies beginning to oscillate at a common fre- quency owing to coupling is called frequency locking or.

  2. Synchronization

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    When a swarm of fireflies gather, they have been found to flash in synchrony. GENERAL I ARTICLE node is due to synchronization of the rhythms of the collection of pacemaker cells. In a pathological case, the pacemaker cells become faulty which results in an abnormally low heart rate known as bradycardia. This results in ...

  3. Synchronous Communication and Its Effects on the Collaboration of Professional Workplace Employees Engaged in a Problem Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rochester, Michele R.

    2017-01-01

    Asynchronous communication may have a profound impact on employee collaboration and productivity in the workplace due to the loss of face-to-face interaction and the relationships these opportunities may foster. However, as broadly defined within the literature, synchronous communication is a rich media that supports this type of collaboration and…

  4. Non-medical aspects of civilian-military collaboration in management of major incidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khorram-Manesh, A; Lönroth, H; Rotter, P; Wilhelmsson, M; Aremyr, J; Berner, A; Andersson, A Nero; Carlström, E

    2017-10-01

    Disasters and major incidents demand a multidisciplinary management. Recent experiences from terrorist attacks worldwide have resulted in a search for better assessment of the needs, resources, and knowledge in the medical and non-medical management of these incidents and also actualized the need for collaboration between civilian and military healthcare. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the civilian-military collaboration in a Swedish context with the main focus on its non-medical management. An exercise, simulating a foreign military attack centrally on Swedish soil, was designed, initiated, and conducted by a team consisting of civilian and military staff. Data were collected prospectively and evaluated by an expert team. Specific practical and technical issues were presented in collaboration between civilian and military staffs. In addition, shortcomings in decision-making, follow-up, communication, and collaboration due to prominent lack of training and exercising the tasks and positions in all managerial levels of the hospital were identified. Current social and political unrests and terror attacks worldwide necessitate civilian-military collaboration. Such collaboration, however, needs to be synchronized and adjusted to avoid preventable medical and non-medical consequences. Simulation exercises might be one important source to improve such collaboration.

  5. Competence articulation: Alignment of competences and responsibilities in synchronous telemedical collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Simon Bo; Bardram, Jakob Eyvind

    2008-01-01

    Many studies and concepts within CSCW deal with the temporal, spatial, social, and computational aspects of supporting collaborative work. In this paper we want to pay attention to another central aspect to the achievement of collaborative work, namely the competence of the people involved....... In particular, we want to look at the dynamic quality of competences, and investigate how competence is mutually developed in coordinated work. We have termed this process competence articulation, a concept which tries to emphasize competence as well as social development of competence as part of cooperation....... The concept has emerged out of a longitudinal participatory design process investigating telemedical treatment of diabetic foot ulcers using video phones. We analyze the transitions occurring with the introduction of synchronous telemedical consultations and detail how the online video facilitates...

  6. Collaborative CAD Synchronization Based on a Symmetric and Consistent Modeling Procedure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiqi Wu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available One basic issue with collaborative computer aided design (Co-CAD is how to maintain valid and consistent modeling results across all design sites. Moreover, modeling history is important in parametric CAD modeling. Therefore, different from a typical co-editing approach, this paper proposes a novel method for Co-CAD synchronization, in which all Co-CAD sites maintain symmetric and consistent operating procedures. Consequently, the consistency of both modeling results and history can be achieved. In order to generate a valid, unique, and symmetric queue among collaborative sites, a set of correlated mechanisms is presented in this paper. Firstly, the causal relationship of operations is maintained. Secondly, the operation queue is reconstructed for partial concurrency operation, and the concurrent operation can be retrieved. Thirdly, a symmetric, concurrent operation control strategy is proposed to determine the order of operations and resolve possible conflicts. Compared with existing Co-CAD consistency methods, the proposed method is convenient and flexible in supporting collaborative design. The experiment performed based on the collaborative modeling procedure demonstrates the correctness and applicability of this work.

  7. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    of the dynamic reconstructions. We call this idea remote 3D medical collaboration. In this article we motivate and explain the vision for 3D medical collaboration technology; we describe the relevant computer vision, computer graphics, display, and networking research; we present a proof-of-concept prototype...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare....

  8. Collaborative Affordances of Hybrid Patient Record Technologies in Medical Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houben, Steven; Frost, Mads; Bardram, Jakob E

    2015-01-01

    The medical record is a central artifact used to organize, communicate and coordinate information related to patient care. Despite recent deployments of electronic health records (EHR), paper medical records are still widely used because of the affordances of paper. Although a number of approache......PR in a medical simulation. Based on these empirical studies, this paper introduces and discusses the concept of collaborative affordances, which describes a set of properties of the medical record that foster collaborative collocated work....

  9. The benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization: evidence from an experimental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, Sabrina; Eppler, Martin J

    2009-01-01

    A great corpus of studies reports empirical evidence of how information visualization supports comprehension and analysis of data. The benefits of visualization for synchronous group knowledge work, however, have not been addressed extensively. Anecdotal evidence and use cases illustrate the benefits of synchronous collaborative information visualization, but very few empirical studies have rigorously examined the impact of visualization on group knowledge work. We have consequently designed and conducted an experiment in which we have analyzed the impact of visualization on knowledge sharing in situated work groups. Our experimental study consists of evaluating the performance of 131 subjects (all experienced managers) in groups of 5 (for a total of 26 groups), working together on a real-life knowledge sharing task. We compare (1) the control condition (no visualization provided), with two visualization supports: (2) optimal and (3) suboptimal visualization (based on a previous survey). The facilitator of each group was asked to populate the provided interactive visual template with insights from the group, and to organize the contributions according to the group consensus. We have evaluated the results through both objective and subjective measures. Our statistical analysis clearly shows that interactive visualization has a statistically significant, objective and positive impact on the outcomes of knowledge sharing, but that the subjects seem not to be aware of this. In particular, groups supported by visualization achieved higher productivity, higher quality of outcome and greater knowledge gains. No statistically significant results could be found between an optimal and a suboptimal visualization though (as classified by the pre-experiment survey). Subjects also did not seem to be aware of the benefits that the visualizations provided as no difference between the visualization and the control conditions was found for the self-reported measures of satisfaction

  10. Determining sociability, social space, and social presence in (a)synchronous collaborative groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreijns, Karel; Kirschner, Paul A; Jochems, Wim; Van Buuren, Hans

    2004-04-01

    The effectiveness of group learning in asynchronous distributed learning groups depends on the social interaction that takes place. This social interaction affects both cognitive and socioemotional processes that take place during learning, group forming, establishment of group structures, and group dynamics. Though now known to be important, this aspect is often ignored, denied or forgotten by educators and researchers who tend to concentrate on cognitive processes and on-task contexts. This "one-sided" educational focus largely determines the set of requirements in the design of computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) environments resulting in functional CSCL environments. In contrast, our research is aimed at the design and implementation of sociable CSCL environments which may increase the likelihood that a sound social space will emerge. We use a theoretical framework that is based upon an ecological approach to social interaction, centering on the concept of social affordances, the concept of the sociability of CSCL environments, and social presence theory. The hypothesis is that the higher the sociability, the more likely that social interaction will take place or will increase, and the more likely that this will result in an emerging sound social space. In the present research, the variables of interest are sociability, social space, and social presence. This study deals with the construction and validation of three instruments to determine sociability, social space, and social presence in (a)synchronous collaborating groups. The findings suggest that the instruments have potential to be useful as measures for the respective variables. However, it must be realized that these measures are "first steps."

  11. Advanced synchronous luminescence imaging for chemical and medical diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2006-09-05

    A diagnostic method and associated system includes the steps of exposing at least one sample location with excitation radiation through a single optical waveguide or a single optical waveguide bundle, wherein the sample emits emission radiation in response to the excitation radiation. The same single optical waveguide or the single optical waveguide bundle receives at least a portion of the emission radiation from the sample, thus providing co-registration of the excitation radiation and the emission radiation. The wavelength of the excitation radiation and emission radiation is synchronously scanned to produce a spectrum upon which an image can be formed. An increased emission signal is generated by the enhanced overlap of the excitation and emission focal volumes provided by co-registration of the excitation and emission signals thus increasing the sensitivity as well as decreasing the exposure time necessary to obtain an image.

  12. To Enhance Collaborative Learning and Practice Network Knowledge with a Virtualization Laboratory and Online Synchronous Discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu-Yuin Hwang

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Recently, various computer networking courses have included additional laboratory classes in order to enhance students’ learning achievement. However, these classes need to establish a suitable laboratory where each student can connect network devices to configure and test functions within different network topologies. In this case, the Linux operating system can be used to operate network devices and the virtualization technique can include multiple OSs for supporting a significant number of students. In previous research, the virtualization application was successfully applied in a laboratory, but focused only on individual assignments. The present study extends previous research by designing the Networking Virtualization-Based Laboratory (NVBLab, which requires collaborative learning among the experimental students. The students were divided into an experimental group and a control group for the experiment. The experimental group performed their laboratory assignments using NVBLab, whereas the control group completed them on virtual machines (VMs that were installed on their personal computers. Moreover, students using NVBLab were provided with an online synchronous discussion (OSD feature that enabled them to communicate with others. The laboratory assignments were divided into two parts: Basic Labs and Advanced Labs. The results show that the experimental group significantly outperformed the control group in two Advanced Labs and the post-test after Advanced Labs. Furthermore, the experimental group’s activities were better than those of the control group based on the total average of the command count per laboratory. Finally, the findings of the interviews and questionnaires with the experimental group reveal that NVBLab was helpful during and after laboratory class.

  13. Identifying collaborative care teams through electronic medical record utilization patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You; Lorenzi, Nancy M; Sandberg, Warren S; Wolgast, Kelly; Malin, Bradley A

    2017-04-01

    The goal of this investigation was to determine whether automated approaches can learn patient-oriented care teams via utilization of an electronic medical record (EMR) system. To perform this investigation, we designed a data-mining framework that relies on a combination of latent topic modeling and network analysis to infer patterns of collaborative teams. We applied the framework to the EMR utilization records of over 10 000 employees and 17 000 inpatients at a large academic medical center during a 4-month window in 2010. Next, we conducted an extrinsic evaluation of the patterns to determine the plausibility of the inferred care teams via surveys with knowledgeable experts. Finally, we conducted an intrinsic evaluation to contextualize each team in terms of collaboration strength (via a cluster coefficient) and clinical credibility (via associations between teams and patient comorbidities). The framework discovered 34 collaborative care teams, 27 (79.4%) of which were confirmed as administratively plausible. Of those, 26 teams depicted strong collaborations, with a cluster coefficient > 0.5. There were 119 diagnostic conditions associated with 34 care teams. Additionally, to provide clarity on how the survey respondents arrived at their determinations, we worked with several oncologists to develop an illustrative example of how a certain team functions in cancer care. Inferred collaborative teams are plausible; translating such patterns into optimized collaborative care will require administrative review and integration with management practices. EMR utilization records can be mined for collaborative care patterns in large complex medical centers.

  14. A Distributed and Collaborative Intelligent System for Medical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wided LEJOUAD-CHAARI

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we present a distributed collaborative system assisting physicians in diagnosis when processing medical images. This is a Web-based solution since the different participants and resources are on various sites. It is collaborative because these participants (physicians, radiologists, knowledgebasesdesigners, program developers for medical image processing, etc. can work collaboratively to enhance the quality of programs and then the quality of the diagnosis results. It is intelligent since it is a knowledge-based system including, but not only, a knowledge base, an inference engine said supervision engine and ontologies. The current work deals with the osteoporosis detection in bone radiographies. We rely on program supervision techniques that aim to automatically plan and control complex software usage. Our main contribution is to allow physicians, who are not experts in computing, to benefit from technological advances made by experts in image processing, and then to efficiently use various osteoporosis detection programs in a distributed environment.

  15. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas TH; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. METHODS: A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton’s Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. RESULTS: Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R2 = 0.59) and in collaboration (R2 = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. CONCLUSION: Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are

  16. Factors influencing teamwork and collaboration within a tertiary medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Shu Feng; Wan, Thomas Th; Chen, Yu-Chih

    2012-04-26

    To understand how work climate and related factors influence teamwork and collaboration in a large medical center. A survey of 3462 employees was conducted to generate responses to Sexton's Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) to assess perceptions of work environment via a series of five-point, Likert-scaled questions. Path analysis was performed, using teamwork (TW) and collaboration (CO) as endogenous variables. The exogenous variables are effective communication (EC), safety culture (SC), job satisfaction (JS), work pressure (PR), and work climate (WC). The measurement instruments for the variables or summated subscales are presented. Reliability of each sub-scale are calculated. Alpha Cronbach coefficients are relatively strong: TW (0.81), CO (0.76), EC (0.70), SC (0.83), JS (0.91), WP (0.85), and WC (0.78). Confirmatory factor analysis was performed for each of these constructs. Path analysis enables to identify statistically significant predictors of two endogenous variables, teamwork and intra-organizational collaboration. Significant amounts of variance in perceived teamwork (R(2) = 0.59) and in collaboration (R(2) = 0.75) are accounted for by the predictor variables. In the initial model, safety culture is the most important predictor of perceived teamwork, with a β weight of 0.51, and work climate is the most significant predictor of collaboration, with a β weight of 0.84. After eliminating statistically insignificant causal paths and allowing correlated predictors1, the revised model shows that work climate is the only predictor positively influencing both teamwork (β = 0.26) and collaboration (β = 0.88). A relatively weak positive (β = 0.14) but statistically significant relationship exists between teamwork and collaboration when the effects of other predictors are simultaneously controlled. Hospital executives who are interested in improving collaboration should assess the work climate to ensure that employees are operating in a setting conducive

  17. Cooperative Learning in Graduate Student Projects: Comparing Synchronous versus Asynchronous Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strang, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative learning was applied in a graduate project management course to compare the effectiveness of asynchronous versus synchronous online team meetings. An experiment was constructed to allocate students to project teams while ensuring there was a balance of requisite skills, namely systems analysis and design along with HTML/Javascript…

  18. The Impact of Using Synchronous Collaborative Virtual Tangram in Children's Geometric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chiu-Pin; Shao, Yin-juan; Wong, Lung-Hsiang; Li, Yin-Jen; Niramitranon, Jitti

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to develop a collaborative and manipulative virtual Tangram puzzle to facilitate children to learn geometry in the computer-supported collaborative learning environment with Tablet PCs. In promoting peer interactions and stimulating students' higher-order thinking and creativity toward geometric problem-solving, we designed a…

  19. A cloud collaborative medical image platform oriented by social network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniz, Frederico B.; Araújo, Luciano V.; Nunes, Fátima L. S.

    2017-03-01

    Computer-aided diagnosis systems using medical images and three-dimensional models as input data have greatly expanded and developed, but in terms of building suitable image databases to assess them, the challenge remains. Although there are some image databases available for this purpose, they are generally limited to certain types of exams or contain a limited number of medical cases. The objective of this work is to present the concepts and the development of a collaborative platform for sharing medical images and three-dimensional models, providing a resource to share and increase the number of images available for researchers. The collaborative cloud platform, called CATALYZER, aims to increase the availability and sharing of graphic objects, including 3D images, and their reports that are essential for research related to medical images. A survey conducted with researchers and health professionals indicated that this could be an innovative approach in the creation of medical image databases, providing a wider variety of cases together with a considerable amount of shared information among its users.

  20. Client-side Medical Image Colorization in a Collaborative Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virag, Ioan; Stoicu-Tivadar, Lăcrămioara; Crişan-Vida, Mihaela

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents an application related to collaborative medicine using a browser based medical visualization system with focus on the medical image colorization process and the underlying open source web development technologies involved. Browser based systems allow physicians to share medical data with their remotely located counterparts or medical students, assisting them during patient diagnosis, treatment monitoring, surgery planning or for educational purposes. This approach brings forth the advantage of ubiquity. The system can be accessed from a any device, in order to process the images, assuring the independence towards having a specific proprietary operating system. The current work starts with processing of DICOM (Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine) files and ends with the rendering of the resulting bitmap images on a HTML5 (fifth revision of the HyperText Markup Language) canvas element. The application improves the image visualization emphasizing different tissue densities.

  1. A broadband multimedia collaborative system for advanced teleradiology and medical imaging diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, E J; del Pozo, F; Ortiz, E J; Malpica, N; Rahms, H

    1998-09-01

    This paper presents a new telemedicine system currently in routine clinical usage, developed within the European Union (EU) ACTS BONAPARTE project (1). The telemedicine system is developed on an asynchronous transfer mode (ATM) multimedia hardware/software platform comprising the following set of telemedicine services: synchronous cooperative work, high-quality video conference, multimedia mail, medical image digitizing, processing, storing and printing, and local and remote transparent database access. The medical information handled by the platform conforms to the Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) 3.0 medical imaging standard. The telemedicine system has been installed for clinical routines in three Spanish hospitals since November 1997 and has been used in an average of one/two clinical sessions per week. At each clinical session, a usability and clinical evaluation of the system was carried out. Evaluation is carried out through direct observation of interactions and questionnaire-based subjective data. The usability evaluation methodology and the results of the system usability study are also presented in this article. The experience gained from the design, development, and evaluation of the telemedicine system is providing an indepth knowledge of the benefits and difficulties involved in the installation and clinical usage of this type of high-usability and advanced multimedia telemedicine system in the field of teleradiology and collaborative medical imaging diagnosis.

  2. A virtual environment for medical radiation collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridge, Pete; Trapp, Jamie V; Kastanis, Lazaros; Pack, Darren; Parker, Jacqui C

    2015-06-01

    A software-based environment was developed to provide practical training in medical radiation principles and safety. The Virtual Radiation Laboratory application allowed students to conduct virtual experiments using simulated diagnostic and radiotherapy X-ray generators. The experiments were designed to teach students about the inverse square law, half value layer and radiation protection measures and utilised genuine clinical and experimental data. Evaluation of the application was conducted in order to ascertain the impact of the software on students' understanding, satisfaction and collaborative learning skills and also to determine potential further improvements to the software and guidelines for its continued use. Feedback was gathered via an anonymous online survey consisting of a mixture of Likert-style questions and short answer open questions. Student feedback was highly positive with 80 % of students reporting increased understanding of radiation protection principles. Furthermore 72 % enjoyed using the software and 87 % of students felt that the project facilitated collaboration within small groups. The main themes arising in the qualitative feedback comments related to efficiency and effectiveness of teaching, safety of environment, collaboration and realism. Staff and students both report gains in efficiency and effectiveness associated with the virtual experiments. In addition students particularly value the visualisation of "invisible" physical principles and increased opportunity for experimentation and collaborative problem-based learning. Similar ventures will benefit from adopting an approach that allows for individual experimentation while visualizing challenging concepts.

  3. Collaborative Systems Biology Projects for the Military Medical Community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalatoris, Jeffrey J; Scheerer, Julia B; Lebeda, Frank J

    2017-09-01

    This pilot study was conducted to examine, for the first time, the ongoing systems biology research and development projects within the laboratories and centers of the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command (USAMRMC). The analysis has provided an understanding of the breadth of systems biology activities, resources, and collaborations across all USAMRMC subordinate laboratories. The Systems Biology Collaboration Center at USAMRMC issued a survey regarding systems biology research projects to the eight U.S.-based USAMRMC laboratories and centers in August 2016. This survey included a data call worksheet to gather self-identified project and programmatic information. The general topics focused on the investigators and their projects, on the project's research areas, on omics and other large data types being collected and stored, on the analytical or computational tools being used, and on identifying intramural (i.e., USAMRMC) and extramural collaborations. Among seven of the eight laboratories, 62 unique systems biology studies were funded and active during the final quarter of fiscal year 2016. Of 29 preselected medical Research Task Areas, 20 were associated with these studies, some of which were applicable to two or more Research Task Areas. Overall, studies were categorized among six general types of objectives: biological mechanisms of disease, risk of/susceptibility to injury or disease, innate mechanisms of healing, diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers, and host/patient responses to vaccines, and therapeutic strategies including host responses to therapies. We identified eight types of omics studies and four types of study subjects. Studies were categorized on a scale of increasing complexity from single study subject/single omics technology studies (23/62) to studies integrating results across two study subject types and two or more omics technologies (13/62). Investigators at seven USAMRMC laboratories had collaborations with systems biology experts

  4. Library Collaboration with Medical Humanities in an American Medical College in Qatar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally Birch

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The medical humanities, a cross-disciplinary field of practice and research that includes medicine, literature, art, history, philosophy, and sociology, is being increasingly incorporated into medical school curricula internationally. Medical humanities courses in Writing, Literature, Medical Ethics and History can teach physicians-in-training communication skills, doctor-patient relations, and medical ethics, as well as empathy and cross-cultural understanding. In addition to providing educational breadth and variety, the medical humanities can also play a practical role in teaching critical/analytical skills. These skills are utilized in differential diagnosis and problem-based learning, as well as in developing written and oral communications. Communication skills are a required medical competency for passing medical board exams in the U.S., Canada, the UK and elsewhere. The medical library is an integral part of medical humanities training efforts. This contribution provides a case study of the Distributed eLibrary at the Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar in Doha, and its collaboration with the Writing Program in the Premedical Program to teach and develop the medical humanities. Programs and initiatives of the DeLib library include: developing an information literacy course, course guides for specific courses, the 100 Classic Books Project, collection development of ‘doctors’ stories’ related to the practice of medicine (including medically-oriented movies and TV programs, and workshops to teach the analytical and critical thinking skills that form the basis of humanistic approaches to knowledge. This paper outlines a ‘best practices’ approach to developing the medical humanities in collaboration among the medical library, faculty and administrative stakeholders.

  5. 3D medical collaboration technology to enhance emergency healthcare

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welch, Gregory F; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Fuchs, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... system; and we present evaluation results supporting the general hypothesis that 3D remote medical collaboration technology could offer benefits over conventional 2D videoconferencing in emergency healthcare.......Two-dimensional (2D) videoconferencing has been explored widely in the past 15-20 years to support collaboration in healthcare. Two issues that arise in most evaluations of 2D videoconferencing in telemedicine are the difficulty obtaining optimal camera views and poor depth perception. To address...... these problems, we are exploring the use of a small array of cameras to reconstruct dynamic three-dimensional (3D) views of a remote environment and of events taking place within. The 3D views could be sent across wired or wireless networks to remote healthcare professionals equipped with fixed displays...

  6. Leveraging Multiactions to Improve Medical Personalized Ranking for Collaborative Filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Gao

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, providing high-quality recommendation services to users is an essential component in web applications, including shopping, making friends, and healthcare. This can be regarded either as a problem of estimating users’ preference by exploiting explicit feedbacks (numerical ratings, or as a problem of collaborative ranking with implicit feedback (e.g., purchases, views, and clicks. Previous works for solving this issue include pointwise regression methods and pairwise ranking methods. The emerging healthcare websites and online medical databases impose a new challenge for medical service recommendation. In this paper, we develop a model, MBPR (Medical Bayesian Personalized Ranking over multiple users’ actions, based on the simple observation that users tend to assign higher ranks to some kind of healthcare services that are meanwhile preferred in users’ other actions. Experimental results on the real-world datasets demonstrate that MBPR achieves more accurate recommendations than several state-of-the-art methods and shows its generality and scalability via experiments on the datasets from one mobile shopping app.

  7. The Australian Medical Schools Assessment Collaboration: benchmarking the preclinical performance of medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Mara, Deborah A; Canny, Ben J; Rothnie, Imogene P; Wilson, Ian G; Barnard, John; Davies, Llewelyn

    2015-02-02

    To report the level of participation of medical schools in the Australian Medical Schools Assessment Collaboration (AMSAC); and to measure differences in student performance related to medical school characteristics and implementation methods. Retrospective analysis of data using the Rasch statistical model to correct for missing data and variability in item difficulty. Linear model analysis of variance was used to assess differences in student performance. 6401 preclinical students from 13 medical schools that participated in AMSAC from 2011 to 2013. Rasch estimates of preclinical basic and clinical science knowledge. Representation of Australian medical schools and students in AMSAC more than doubled between 2009 and 2013. In 2013 it included 12 of 19 medical schools and 68% of medical students. Graduate-entry students scored higher than students entering straight from school. Students at large schools scored higher than students at small schools. Although the significance level was high (P assessments compared with the test items as part of a single end-of-year examination was negligible. The variables investigated explain only 12% of the total variation in student performance. An increasing number of medical schools are participating in AMSAC to monitor student performance in preclinical sciences against an external benchmark. Medical school characteristics account for only a small part of overall variation in student performance. Student performance was not affected by the different methods of administering test items.

  8. Investigating 6th graders' use of a tablet-based app supporting synchronous use of multiple tools designed to promote collaborative knowledge building in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherwood, Carrie-Anne

    At this pivotal moment in time, when the proliferation of mobile technologies in our daily lives is influencing the relatively fast integration of these technologies into classrooms, there is little known about the process of student learning, and the role of collaboration, with app-based learning environments on mobile devices. To address this gap, this dissertation, comprised of three manuscripts, investigated three pairs of sixth grade students' synchronous collaborative use of a tablet-based science app called WeInvestigate . The first paper illustrated the methodological decisions necessary to conduct the study of student synchronous and face-to-face collaboration and knowledge building within the complex WeInvestigate and classroom learning environments. The second paper provided the theory of collaboration that guided the design of supports in WeInvestigate, and described its subsequent development. The third paper detailed the interactions between pairs of students as they engaged collaboratively in model construction and explanation tasks using WeInvestigate, hypothesizing connections between these interactions and the designed supports for collaboration. Together, these manuscripts provide encouraging evidence regarding the potential of teaching and learning with WeInvestigate. Findings demonstrated that the students in this study learned science through WeInvestigate , and were supported by the app - particularly the collabrification - to engage in collaborative modeling of phenomena. The findings also highlight the potential of the multiple methods used in this study to understand students' face-to-face and technology-based interactions within the "messy" context of an app-based learning environment and a traditional K-12 classroom. However, as the third manuscript most clearly illustrates, there are still a number of modifications to be made to the WeInvestigate technology before it can be optimally used in classrooms to support students' collaborative

  9. An Interagency Collaboration to Facilitate Development of Filovirus Medical Countermeasures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin O. Nuzum

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The Filovirus Animal Non-Clinical Group (FANG is a US interdepartmental and interagency group established to support and facilitate the advanced development of filovirus Medical Countermeasures (MCM, both vaccines and therapeutics. It is co-led by one representative from the Department of Defense (DoD, the first author, and one from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS, the second author. The FANG membership includes operational level program staff and Subject Matter Experts (SME from performing organizations as well as scientific staff and program managers from DoD and HHS funding and regulatory agencies. Focus areas include animal models, assays, reagents, product manufacture and characterization, and other interagency product development issues that will support Food and Drug Administration (FDA licensure of safe and effective filovirus MCMs. The FANG continues to develop strategies to address broadly applicable and interagency product development challenges relevant to filovirus MCM development. This paper summarizes FANG structure and accomplishments and is meant to heighten community awareness of this government-led collaborative effort.

  10. An interagency collaboration to facilitate development of filovirus medical countermeasures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilgore, Nicole; Nuzum, Edwin O

    2012-10-19

    The Filovirus Animal Non-Clinical Group (FANG) is a US interdepartmental and interagency group established to support and facilitate the advanced development of filovirus Medical Countermeasures (MCM), both vaccines and therapeutics. It is co-led by one representative from the Department of Defense (DoD), the first author, and one from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), the second author. The FANG membership includes operational level program staff and Subject Matter Experts (SME) from performing organizations as well as scientific staff and program managers from DoD and HHS funding and regulatory agencies. Focus areas include animal models, assays, reagents, product manufacture and characterization, and other interagency product development issues that will support Food and Drug Administration (FDA) licensure of safe and effective filovirus MCMs. The FANG continues to develop strategies to address broadly applicable and interagency product development challenges relevant to filovirus MCM development. This paper summarizes FANG structure and accomplishments and is meant to heighten community awareness of this government-led collaborative effort.

  11. Medical student perceptions of an initial collaborative immersion experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Joseph B; Cedarbaum, Jacob; Haque, Fatema; Wheaton, Michael; Vredeveld, Jennifer; Purkiss, Joel; Moore, Laurel; Santen, Sally A; Daniel, Michelle

    2018-03-01

    Recent reviews of interprofessional education (IPE) highlight the need for innovative curricula focused on longitudinal clinical learning. We describe the development and early outcomes of the initial clinical experience (ICE), a longitudinal practice-based course for first-year medical students. While IPE courses focus on student-to-student interaction, ICE focuses on introducing students to interprofessional collaboration. Students attend 14 sessions at one of 18 different clinical sites. They work directly with different health professionals from among 17 possible professions, including nurses, pharmacists, social workers, and respiratory, occupational, and physical therapists. Between 2015 and 2016, 167 students completed the course, and 81 completed the end-of-course evaluation. Students agreed or strongly agreed that ICE meaningfully contributed to their understanding of healthcare teams and different professional roles (86%), improved their understanding of healthcare systems (84%), improved their ability to communicate with healthcare professionals (61%), and improved their ability to work on interprofessional teams (65%). Select themes from narrative comments suggest that clinical immersion improves understanding of professional roles, helps students understand their own future roles in healthcare teams, and increases awareness of and respect for other professionals, with the potential to change future practice. ICE may be a template for other schools wishing to expand their current educational offerings, by engaging learners in more authentic, longitudinal clinical experiences with practicing healthcare professionals.

  12. The Phenomenon of Collaboration: A Phenomenologic Study of Collaboration between Family Medicine and Obstetrics and Gynecology Departments at an Academic Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, David R.; Brewster, Cheryl D.; Karides, Marina; Lukas, Lou A.

    2011-01-01

    Collaboration is essential to manage complex real world problems. We used phenomenologic methods to elaborate a description of collaboration between two departments at an academic medical center who considered their relationship to represent a model of effective collaboration. Key collaborative structures included a shared vision and commitment by…

  13. TU-E-211-01: Establishing Multidisciplinary Collaboration as a Medical Physicist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, L; Fraass, B; Ford, E; Chang, S

    2012-06-01

    Many medical physicists are scientists at heart and their career fulfillment includes a balance of clinical service and research development. Multidisciplinary collaboration is a great way for the medical physicists to advance science and technology of our fields and the fields of our collaborators. Cross-pollination among scientists of different fields has been the key for some of the most significant breakthroughs in science and medicine and produced some of the most rewarding experiences for the individuals involved. However, medical physicists face unique challenges in establishing multidisciplinary collaboration because our time and resources for research are often quite limited compared to basic scientists. Yet we medical physicists are uniquely positioned and have a tremendous opportunity to create/contribute to multidisciplinary research: our fields are already multidisciplinary in nature and hospital environment is problem rich. How do we establish and carry out research collaboration with scientists of other fields? How to balance research with your higher priority clinical service? How do you find the right multidisciplinary collaboration in your own environment? We will discuss the challenges, provide real exemplary solutions to the above questions, and offer advise to medical physicists who are interested in starting or improving their multidisciplinary collaboration. There are different kinds of multidisciplinary collaborations a medical physicist can create and participate at different involvement levels. Multidisciplinary collaboration is not for every medical physicist but for those who seek and devote time to it, the experience can be truly rewarding and the impact can be enormous. 1. Learn the types of multidisciplinary collaboration medical physicists can created/participated 2. Learn the approaches and strategies to develop collaborations with scientists and professional of other fields3. Understand the challenges and different approaches to

  14. The Massachusetts Emergency Medical Service Stroke Quality Improvement Collaborative, 2009-2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daudelin, Denise H; Kulick, Erin R; D'Amore, Katrina; Lutz, Jennifer S; Barrientos, Mirian T; Foell, Kathy

    2013-09-26

    Quality improvement collaboratives are a popular model used to address gaps between evidence-based practice and patient care. Little is known about use of such collaboratives in emergency medical services, particularly for improving prehospital stroke care. To determine the feasibility of using this approach to improve prehospital stroke care, we conducted a pilot study of the Emergency Medical Services Stroke Quality Improvement Collaborative. Seventeen Massachusetts emergency medical service agencies participated in the quality improvement collaborative pilot project. We identified 5 prehospital stroke performance measures to assess the quality of prehospital care, guide collaborative activities, and monitor change in performance over time. During learning sessions, participants were trained in quality improvement and performance measurement, analyzed performance measure results, and shared successes and challenges. Focus groups were conducted to understand participants' experiences with the collaborative. Participating emergency medical service agencies collected stroke performance measures on 3,009 stroke patients during the pilot study. Adherence to 4 of 5 performance measures increased significantly over time. Participants acknowledged that the collaborative provided them with an efficient and effective framework for stroke quality improvement and peer-learning opportunities. As evidenced in Massachusetts, quality improvement collaboratives can be an effective tool to improve prehospital stroke care. The data collected, improvements made, participation of emergency medical service agencies, and positive experiences within the collaborative support the continued use of this approach.

  15. Enhancing the Motivation for Rural Career: The Collaboration between the Local Government and Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seguchi, Masaru; Furuta, Noriko; Kobayashi, Seiji; Kato, Kazuhiro; Sasaki, Kouji; Hori, Hiroki; Okuno, Masataka

    2015-07-01

    The shortage of medical workforce in rural areas is a global long-standing problem. Due to the severity of shortages in the medical workforce, Mie prefectural government has collaborated with a medical school and the municipal governments to increase the rural medical workforce. Since 2010, this collaboration has led to an annual lecture series on rural practice for medical students. We distributed questionnaires at the beginning and end of the lecture series to examine the effect of this program. The questionnaire consisted of two parts that included an understanding of rural practice and the motivation to work in rural areas. The lecture series significantly improved the responses to the following questions "Rural practice is interesting" (p motivation of medical students and their interest in a rural career. While collaboration between the local government and medical school rarely occurs in planning medical education programs, this approach may offer a promising way to foster local health professionals.

  16. Collaboration between paediatric surgery and other medical specialties in Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philemon E Okoro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The quality of service and success of patient care and research in most fields of medicine depend on effective collaboration between different specialties. Paediatric surgery is a relatively young specialty in Nigeria and such collaborations are desirable. This survey assesses the nature and extent of collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. Materials and Methods: This is a questionnaire survey carried out in November 2008 among paediatric surgeons and their trainees practising in Nigeria. Questionnaires were distributed and retrieved either by hand or e-mailing. The responses were then collated and analysed using the SPSS 17.0. Results: Forty-seven respondents were included in the survey. Forty-five (95.7% respondents thought that there was inadequate collaboration and that there was a need for an increased collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties. Anaesthesia, paediatrics and radiology are among the specialties where collaborations were most required but not adequately received. Collaboration had been required from these specialties in areas of patient care, training and research. Reasons for inadequate collaboration included the paucity of avenues for inter-specialty communication and exchange of ideas 33 (70.3%, lack of awareness of the need for collaboration 32 (68.1%, tendency to apportion blames for bad outcome 13 (27.7%, and mutual suspicion 8 (17%. Conclusion: There is presently inadequate collaboration between paediatric surgery and other specialties in Nigeria. There is a need for more inter-specialty support, communication, and exchange of ideas in order to achieve desirable outcomes.

  17. The teaching of drug development to medical students: collaboration between the pharmaceutical industry and medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, A G; Jackson, D; Barnett, D B

    2005-04-01

    Collaboration between the medical school at Leicester and a local pharmaceutical company, AstraZeneca, led to the design and implementation of an optional third year special science skills module teaching medical students about drug discovery and development. The module includes didactic teaching about the complexities of the drug discovery process leading to development of candidate drugs for clinical investigation as well as practical experience of the processes involved in drug evaluation preclinically and clinically. It highlights the major ethical and regulatory issues concerned with the production and testing of novel therapies in industry and the NHS. In addition it helps to reinforce other areas of the medical school curriculum, particularly the understanding of clinical study design and critical appraisal. The module is assessed on the basis of a written dissertation and the critical appraisal of a drug advertisement. This paper describes the objectives of the module and its content. In addition we outline the results of an initial student evaluation of the module and an assessment of its impact on student knowledge and the opinion of the pharmaceutical industry partner. This module has proven to be popular with medical students, who acquire a greater understanding of the work required for drug development and therefore reflect more favourably on the role of pharmaceutical companies in the UK.

  18. Collaborative research in medical education: a discussion of theory and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Patricia S; Stoddard, Hugh A; Kalishman, Summers

    2010-12-01

    Medical education researchers are inherently collaborators. This paper presents a discussion of theoretical frameworks, issues and challenges around collaborative research to prepare medical education researchers to enter into successful collaborations. It gives emphasis to the conceptual issues associated with collaborative research and applies these to medical education research. Although not a systematic literature review, the paper provides a rich discussion of issues which medical education researchers might consider when undertaking collaborative studies. Building on the work of others, we have classified collaborative research in three dimensions according to: the number of administrative units represented; the number of academic fields present, and the manner in which knowledge is created. Although some literature on collaboration focuses on the more traditional positivist perspective and emphasises outcomes, other literature comes from the constructivist framework, in which research is not driven by hypotheses and the approaches emphasised, but by the interaction between investigator and subject. Collaborations are more effective when participants overtly clarify their motivations, values, definitions of appropriate data and accepted methodologies. These should be agreed upon prior to commencing a study. The way we currently educate researchers should be restructured if we want them to be able to undertake interdisciplinary research. Despite calls for researchers to be educated differently, most training programmes for developing researchers have demonstrated a limited, if not contrary, response to these calls. Collaborative research in medical education should be driven by the problem being investigated, by the new knowledge gained and by the interpersonal interactions that may be achieved. Success rests on recognising that many of the research problems we, as medical educators, address are fundamentally interdisciplinary in nature. This represents a

  19. The Consortium of Graduate Medical Schools in Australia: formal and informal collaboration in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prideaux, D; Teubner, J; Sefton, A; Field, M; Gordon, J; Price, D

    2000-06-01

    In 1996-97 three Australian medical schools adopted 4-year graduate medical courses. The schools formed a consortium to establish common admissions processes and to collaborate on curriculum and staff development. ADMISSIONS: Outcomes in admissions included the construction of an entry test and agreement on common application procedures. Structured interviews and measures of prior tertiary performance were adopted in each school with some local variations. Formal structures were put into place to manage the development of the test and admissions procedures. CURRICULUM AND STAFF DEVELOPMENT: No formal structures were put into place for curriculum and staff development. While the advantages of common approaches were recognised, it was accepted that it was also important to generate local ownership and commitment to the new courses. Outcomes of educational consortia should not be judged solely by the nature of joint ventures but by the way in which membership of the consortium changes the priorities and practices within the institutions. Examples of the operation of this principle within the three schools include: use of visiting experts to refine and modify approaches to problem-based learning; use of staff from partner institutions to facilitate implementation of the courses; sharing information technology expertise; cooperation in the construction of feedback mechanisms, and sharing advice on fulfilling accreditation requirements. The Consortium has had an important impact on Australian medical education. There is a need for further analysis of the two methods of operation of the consortium, formal and informal, and their relation to its overall functioning.

  20. Delivering team training to medical home staff to impact perceptions of collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treadwell, Janet; Binder, Brenda; Symes, Lene; Krepper, Rebecca

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore whether an evidence-based educational and experiential intervention to develop team skills in medical homes would positively affect team members' perceptions of interprofessional collaboration. The study population consisted of primary care medical home practices associated with the health plan sponsor of this research. All practices were located within the greater Houston region of Texas and had more than 500 patients. A cluster design experimental study was conducted between August 2013 and June 2014. Fifty medical home practices, 25 intervention and 25 attention control, were recruited as study sites. Results indicate that individual team members in the medical homes receiving the intervention were significantly more likely than the individual team members in the attention control groups to report higher levels of positive perception of team collaboration after the 12-week intervention. This research indicates that educating teams about interprofessional collaboration tools and supporting technique use may be an effective strategy to assist medical homes in developing collaborative environments. Case management experience in collaboration supports the role facilitating team training. Transforming culture from hierarchical to team-based care supports the case management approach of collaborative practice. In addition, role satisfaction attained through the respect and communication of team-based care delivery may influence retention within the case management profession. As case managers in primary care settings assume roles of embedded care coordinators, program leaders, and transition facilitators, an understanding of collaboration techniques is needed to support the entire care team to achieve desired outcomes.

  1. Medical and pharmacy students’ attitudes towards physician-pharmacist collaboration in Kuwait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katoue MG

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess and compare the attitudes of medical and pharmacy students towards physician-pharmacist collaboration and explore their opinions about the barriers to collaborative practice in Kuwait. Methods: A cross-sectional survey of pharmacy and medical students (n=467 was conducted in Faculties of Medicine and Pharmacy, Kuwait University. Data were collected via self-administered questionnaire from first-year pharmacy and medical students and students in the last two professional years of the pharmacy and medical programs. Descriptive and comparative analyses were performed using SPSS, version 22. Statistical significance was accepted at p<0.05. Results: The response rate was 82.4%. Respondents had overall positive attitudes towards physician-pharmacist collaboration. Pharmacy students expressed significantly more positive attitudes than medical students (p< 0.001. Medical students rated the three most significant barriers to collaboration to be: pharmacists’ separation from patient care areas (n=100, 70.0%, lack of pharmacists’ access to patients’ medical record (n=90, 63.0% and physicians assuming total responsibility for clinical decision-making (n=87, 60.8%. Pharmacy students’ top three perceived barriers were: lack of pharmacists’ access to patients’ medical record (n=80, 84.2%, organizational obstacles (n=79, 83.2%, and pharmacists’ separation from patient care areas (n=77, 81.1%. Lack of interprofessional education was rated the fourth-largest barrier by both medical (n=79, 55.2% and pharmacy (n=76, 80.0% students. Conclusions: Medical and pharmacy students in Kuwait advocate physician-pharmacist collaborative practice, but both groups identified substantial barriers to implementation. Efforts are needed to enhance undergraduate/postgraduate training in interprofessional collaboration, and to overcome barriers to physician-pharmacist collaboration to advance a team approach to patient care.

  2. Effects of interdisciplinary collaboration in hospitals on medication errors: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manias, Elizabeth

    2018-03-01

    Medication errors are commonly affected by breakdowns in communication. Interdisciplinary collaboration is an important means of facilitating communication between health professionals in clinical practice. To date, there has been little systematic examination of past research in this area. Areas covered: The aims of this integrative review are to examine how interdisciplinary collaboration influences medication errors in hospitals, the araes of interdisciplinary collaboration that have been researched in previous work, and recommendations for future research and practice. An integrative review was undertaken of research papers (N = 30) published from inception to August 2017 using MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Embase. Expert opinion: Five different areas of interdisciplinary collaboration were identified in research involving medication errors. These areas were: communication through tools including guidelines, protocols, and communication logs; participation of pharmacists in interdisciplinary teams; collaborative medication review on admission and at discharge; collaborative workshops and conferences; and complexity of role differentiation and environment. Despite encouraging results demonstrated in past research, medication errors continued to occur. Increased focus is needed on developing tailored, individualized strategies that can be applied in particular contexts to create further reductions in medication errors. Greater understandings are also needed about the changing roles of various disciplines.

  3. Collaborative Care for Depressed Patients With Chronic Medical Conditions: A Randomized Trial in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, Mildred; Perez-Pedrogo, Coralee; Huertas, Sarah Enid; Reyes-Rabanillo, Maria Leticia; Juarbe, Deborah; Huertas, Aracelis; Reyes-Rodriguez, Mae Lynn; Chaplin, William

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined whether a collaborative care model for depression would improve clinical and functional outcomes for depressed patients with chronic general medical conditions in primary care practices in Puerto Rico. Methods A total of 179 primary care patients with major depression and chronic general medical conditions were randomly assigned to receive collaborative care or usual care. The collaborative care intervention involved enhanced collaboration among physicians, mental health specialists, and care managers paired with depression-specific treatment guidelines, patient education, and follow-up. In usual care, study personnel informed the patient and provider of the diagnosis and encouraged patients to discuss treatment options with their provider. Depression severity was assessed with the Hopkins Symptom Checklist; social functioning was assessed with the 36-item Short Form. Results Compared with usual care, collaborative care significantly reduced depressive symptoms and improved social functioning in the six months after randomization. Integration of collaborative care in primary care practices considerably increased depressed patients' use of mental health services. Conclusions Collaborative care significantly improved clinical symptoms and functional status of depressed patients with coexisting chronic general medical conditions receiving treatment for depression in primary care practices in Puerto Rico. These findings highlight the promise of the collaborative care model for strengthening the relationship between mental health and primary care services in Puerto Rico. PMID:20123819

  4. Evaluation of a Danish pharmacist student-physician medication review collaboration model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Sørensen, Ellen Westh; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig

    2014-01-01

    Background Interprofessional collaboration between pharmacists and physicians to conduct joint home medication reviews (HMR) is important for optimizing the medical treatment of patients suffering from chronic illnesses. However, collaboration has proved difficult to achieve. The HMR programme...... "Medisam" was launched in 2009 at the University of Copenhagen with the aim of "developing, implementing and evaluating a collaboration model for HMRs and medicine reconciliations in Denmark". The Medisam programme involves patients, pharmacy internship students, the (pharmacist) supervisor of the pharmacy...... students and physicians. Objective To explore if it was possible through the Medisam programme to obtain a fruitful HMR collaboration between pharmacy internship students and physicians as a means to develop HMR collaboration between trained pharmacists and physicians further. Setting Ten matching pairs...

  5. Psychometrics of the scale of attitudes toward physician-pharmacist collaboration: a study with medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojat, Mohammadreza; Spandorfer, John; Isenberg, Gerald A; Vergare, Michael J; Fassihi, Reza; Gonnella, Joseph S

    2012-01-01

    Despite the emphasis placed on interdisciplinary education and interprofessional collaboration between physicians and pharmacologists, no psychometrically sound instrument is available to measure attitudes toward collaborative relationships. This study was designed to examine psychometrics of an instrument for measuring attitudes toward physician-pharmacist collaborative relationships for administration to students in medical and pharmacy schools and to physicians and pharmacists. The Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Pharmacist Collaboration was completed by 210 students at Jefferson Medical College. Factor analysis and correlational methods were used to examine psychometrics of the instrument. Consistent with the conceptual framework of interprofessional collaboration, three underlying constructs, namely "responsibility and accountability;" "shared authority;" and "interdisciplinary education" emerged from the factor analysis of the instrument providing support for its construct validity. The reliability coefficient alpha for the instrument was 0.90. The instrument's criterion-related validity coefficient with scores of a validated instrument (Jefferson Scale of Attitudes Toward Physician-Nurse Collaboration) was 0.70. Findings provide support for the validity and reliability of the instrument for medical students. The instrument has the potential to be used for the evaluation of interdisciplinary education in medical and pharmacy schools, and for the evaluation of patient outcomes resulting from collaborative physician-pharmacist relationships.

  6. Building an environmentally accountable medical curriculum through international collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Walpole, Sarah Catherine; Vyas, Aditya; Maxwell, Janie

    2017-01-01

    to mitigation of and adaptation to negative health impacts of environmental change. Medical schools have an integral role in training doctors who understand the interdependence of ecosystems and human health. Yet integrating environmental perspectives into busy medical curricula is not a simple task. Content......Background: Global environmental change is associated with significant health threats. The medical profession can address this challenge through advocacy, health system adaptation and workforce preparedness. Stewardship of health systems with attention to their environmental impacts can contribute...

  7. Synchronicity from Synchronized Chaos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory S. Duane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The synchronization of loosely-coupled chaotic oscillators, a phenomenon investigated intensively for the last two decades, may realize the philosophical concept of “synchronicity”—the commonplace notion that related eventsmysteriously occur at the same time. When extended to continuous media and/or large discrete arrays, and when general (non-identical correspondences are considered between states, intermittent synchronous relationships indeed become ubiquitous. Meaningful synchronicity follows naturally if meaningful events are identified with coherent structures, defined by internal synchronization between remote degrees of freedom; a condition that has been posited as necessary for synchronizability with an external system. The important case of synchronization between mind and matter is realized if mind is analogized to a computer model, synchronizing with a sporadically observed system, as in meteorological data assimilation. Evidence for the ubiquity of synchronization is reviewed along with recent proposals that: (1 synchronization of different models of the same objective process may be an expeditious route to improved computational modeling and may also describe the functioning of conscious brains; and (2 the nonlocality in quantum phenomena implied by Bell’s theorem may be explained in a variety of deterministic (hidden variable interpretations if the quantum world resides on a generalized synchronization “manifold”.

  8. Evaluation of a collaborative project to develop sustainable healthcare education in eight UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walpole, S C; Mortimer, F

    2017-09-01

    Environmental change poses pressing challenges to public health and calls for profound and far-reaching changes to policy and practice across communities and health systems. Medical schools can act as a seedbed where knowledge, skills and innovation to address environmental challenges can be developed through innovative and collaborative approaches. The objectives of this study were to (1) explore drivers and challenges of collaboration for educational development between and within medical schools; (2) evaluate the effectiveness of a range of pedagogies for sustainable healthcare education; and (3) identify effective strategies to facilitate the renewal of medical curricula to address evolving health challenges. Participatory action research. Medical school teams participated in a nine-month collaborative project, including a one-day seminar to learn about sustainable healthcare education and develop a project plan. After the seminar, teams were supported to develop, deliver and evaluate new teaching at their medical school. New teaching was introduced at seven medical schools. A variety of pedagogies were represented. Collaboration between schools motivated and informed participants. The main challenges faced related to time pressures. Educators and students commented that new teaching was enjoyable and effective at improving knowledge and skills. Collaborative working supported educators to develop and implement new teaching sessions rapidly and effectively. Collaboration can help to build educators' confidence and capacity in a new area of education development. Different forms of collaboration may be appropriate for different circumstances and at different stages of education development. Copyright © 2017 The Royal Society for Public Health. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chicago medical response to the 2010 earthquake in Haiti: translating academic collaboration into direct humanitarian response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babcock, Christine; Baer, Carolyn; Bayram, Jamil D; Chamberlain, Stacey; Chan, Jennifer L; Galvin, Shannon; Kim, Jimin; Kinet, Melodie; Kysia, Rashid F; Lin, Janet; Malik, Mamta; Murphy, Robert L; Olopade, C Sola; Theodosis, Christian

    2010-06-01

    On January 12, 2010, a major earthquake in Haiti resulted in approximately 212 000 deaths, 300 000 injuries, and more than 1.2 million internally displaced people, making it the most devastating disaster in Haiti's recorded history. Six academic medical centers from the city of Chicago established an interinstitutional collaborative initiative, the Chicago Medical Response, in partnership with nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) in Haiti that provided a sustainable response, sending medical teams to Haiti on a weekly basis for several months. More than 475 medical volunteers were identified, of whom 158 were deployed to Haiti by April 1, 2010. This article presents the shared experiences, observations, and lessons learned by all of the participating institutions. Specifically, it describes the factors that provided the framework for the collaborative initiative, the communication networks that contributed to the ongoing response, the operational aspects of deploying successive medical teams, and the benefits to the institutions as well as to the NGOs and Haitian medical system, along with the challenges facing those institutions individually and collectively. Academic medical institutions can provide a major reservoir of highly qualified volunteer medical personnel that complement the needs of NGOs in disasters for a sustainable medical response. Support of such collaborative initiatives is required to ensure generalizability and sustainability.

  10. Hospital boards and medical specialists collaborating for quality of care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Botje, D.; Plochg, T.; Klazinga, N.; Wagner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Context: In European countries policy briefs are stressing the importance of hospital governance for the quality of care. When governing towards quality it is essential for Hospital Boards to receive the proper information to do so. In the Netherlands, the national association for medical

  11. International Collaboration in Medical Research in Latin America and the Caribbean (2003-2007)

    OpenAIRE

    Chinchilla-Rodríguez, Zaida; Benavent-Pérez, María; Miguel, Sandra; Moya Anegón, Félix de

    2012-01-01

    This paper characterises the patterns of international medical research in Central and South America. The objective is to ascertain countries' capacity to establish intra- and extra-regional scientific collaboration. The methodology used combines bibliometric techniques and social network analysis. Publication patterns are characterised by production volume, specialisation, visibility and collaboration through Scopus database. The results show the recent increase in Central and South American...

  12. ON EXPERIENCE OF THE COLLABORATION AND PROJECT MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM PODIO IMPLEMENTATION IN THE MEDICAL UNIVERSITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrii V. Semenets

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The Information Technologies role in the medical university management is analyzed. The importance of the application of the electronic document management in the medical universities is shown. The implementation capabilities of the electronic document management system within a cloud services are shown. A Podio collaboration and project management cloud service features overview is presented. The methodology of the Podio capabilities usage to the medical university task management solving is developed. An approaches to the Podio Workspaces and Applications development for the faculties collaboration and project management in the departments of the medical universities are presented. The examples of the Podio features usage to the work-flow automation of the information-analytical and hardware and software support departments of the Ternopil State Medical University named after I. Ja. Horbachevsky are shown.

  13. Collaboration with general practitioners: preferences of medical specialists – a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slaets Joris PJ

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates medical specialists to initiate and continue participating with GPs in new collaborative care models. The following question is addressed in this study: What motivates medical specialists to initiate and sustain new models for collaborating with GPs? Methods We conducted semi-structured interviews with eighteen medical specialists in the province of Groningen, in the North of The Netherlands. The sampling criteria were age, gender, type of hospital in which they were practicing, and specialty. The interviews were recorded, fully transcribed, and analysed by three researchers working independently. The resulting motivational factors were grouped into categories. Results 'Teaching GPs' and 'regulating patient flow' (referrals appeared to dominate when the motivational factors were considered. In addition, specialists want to develop relationships with the GPs on a more personal level. Most specialists believe that there is not much they can learn from GPs. 'Lack of time', 'no financial compensation', and 'no support from colleagues' were considered to be the main concerns to establishing collaborative care practices. Additionally, projects were often experienced as too complex and time consuming whereas guidelines were experienced as too restrictive. Conclusion Specialists are particularly interested in collaborating because the GP is the gatekeeper for access to secondary health care resources. Specialists feel that they are able to teach the GPs something, but they do not feel that they have anything to learn from the GPs. With respect to professional expertise, therefore, specialists do not consider GPs as equals. Once personal relationships with the GPs have been established, an

  14. Differential impact of student behaviours on group interaction and collaborative learning: medical students' and tutors' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Maha; Velan, Gary M; O'Sullivan, Anthony J; Balasooriya, Chinthaka

    2016-08-22

    Collaboration is of increasing importance in medical education and medical practice. Students' and tutors' perceptions about small group learning are valuable to inform the development of strategies to promote group dynamics and collaborative learning. This study investigated medical students' and tutors' views on competencies and behaviours which promote effective learning and interaction in small group settings. This study was conducted at UNSW Australia. Five focus group discussions were conducted with first and second year medical students and eight small group tutors were interviewed. Data were transcribed verbatim and thematic analysis was conducted. Students and tutors identified a range of behaviours that influenced collaborative learning. The main themes that emerged included: respectfulness; dominance, strong opinions and openness; constructiveness of feedback; active listening and contribution; goal orientation; acceptance of roles and responsibilities; engagement and enthusiasm; preparedness; self- awareness and positive personal attributes. An important finding was that some of these student behaviours were found to have a differential impact on group interaction compared with collaborative learning. This information could be used to promote higher quality learning in small groups. This study has identified medical students' and tutors' perceptions regarding interactional behaviours in small groups, as well as behaviours which lead to more effective learning in those settings. This information could be used to promote learning in small groups.

  15. The Institute for Safe Medication Practices and Poison Control Centers: Collaborating to Prevent Medication Errors and Unintentional Poisonings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaida, Allen J

    2015-06-01

    This article provides an overview on the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), the only independent nonprofit organization in the USA devoted to the prevention of medication errors. ISMP developed the national Medication Errors Reporting Program (MERP) and investigates and analyzes errors in order to formulate recommendations to prevent further occurrences. ISMP works closely with the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), drug manufacturers, professional organizations, and others to promote changes in package design, practice standards, and healthcare practitioner and consumer education. By collaborating with ISMP to share and disseminate information, Poison Control centers, emergency departments, and toxicologists can help decrease unintentional and accidental poisonings.

  16. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Söderholm, Hanna M.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    We are investigating the potential of 3D telepresence, or televideo, technology to support collaboration among geographically separated medical personnel in trauma emergency care situations. 3D telepresence technology has the potential to provide richer visual information than current 2D...... the medical situation and context into account. In the experiment, we simulated an emergency medical situation involving practicing paramedics and physicians, collaborating remotely via two conditions: with today's 2D videoconferencing and a 3D telepresence proxy. In this article, we examine information...... videoconferencing techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. The 3D telepresence technology does not yet exist, and there is a need to understand its potential before resources are spent on its...

  17. Phase synchronization of oxygenation waves in the frontal areas of children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder detected by optical diffusion spectroscopy correlates with medication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigal, Sharon B.; Polzonetti, Chiara M.; Stehli, Annamarie; Gratton, Enrico

    2012-12-01

    The beneficial effects of pharmacotherapy on children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) are well documented. We use near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) methodology to determine reorganization of brain neurovascular properties following the medication treatment. Twenty-six children with ADHD (ages six through 12) participated in a modified laboratory school protocol to monitor treatment response with lisdexamfetamine dimesylate (LDX; Vyvanse, Shire US Inc.). All children refrained from taking medication for at least two weeks (washout period). To detect neurovascular reorganization, we measured changes in synchronization of oxy (HbO2) and deoxy (HHb) hemoglobin waves between the two frontal lobes. Participants without medication displayed average baseline HbO2 phase difference at about -7-deg. and HHb differences at about 240-deg.. This phase synchronization index changed after pharmacological intervention. Medication induced an average phase changes of HbO2 after first medication to 280-deg. and after medication optimization to 242-deg.. Instead first medication changed of the average HHb phase difference at 186-deg. and then after medication optimization to 120-deg. In agreement with findings of White et al., and Varela et al., we associated the phase synchronization differences of brain hemodynamics in children with ADHD with lobe specific hemodynamic reorganization of HbO2- and HHB oscillations following medication status.

  18. An online app platform enhances collaborative medical student group learning and classroom management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, Justin G; Grande, Joseph P

    2016-01-01

    The authors presented their results in effectively using a free and widely-accessible online app platform to manage and teach a first-year pathology course at Mayo Medical School. The authors utilized the Google "Blogger", "Forms", "Flubaroo", "Sheets", "Docs", and "Slides" apps to effectively build a collaborative classroom teaching and management system. Students were surveyed on the use of the app platform in the classroom, and 44 (94%) students responded. Thirty-two (73%) of the students reported that "Blogger" was an effective place for online discussion of pathology topics and questions. 43 (98%) of the students reported that the "Forms/Flubaroo" grade-reporting system was helpful. 40 (91%) of the students used the remote, collaborative features of "Slides" to create team-based learning presentations, and 39 (89%) of the students found those collaborative features helpful. "Docs" helped teaching assistants to collaboratively create study guides or grading rubrics. Overall, 41 (93%) of the students found that the app platform was helpful in establishing a collaborative, online classroom environment. The online app platform allowed faculty to build an efficient and effective classroom teaching and management system. The ease of accessibility and opportunity for collaboration allowed for collaborative learning, grading, and teaching.

  19. Collaborative work and medical talk: opportunities for learning through knowledge sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsen, Line Lundvoll; Ludvigsen, Sten R

    2010-01-01

    Teleconsultations provide new opportunities for learning in medical settings. This study explores the conditions under which learning among physicians takes place. The empirical context is 47 real-time video conferences carried out to examine collaborative work and the medical talk involved. Sixteen of the observations were consultations wherein general practitioners (GPs) and specialists shared knowledge with the purpose of solving a medical problem related to a patient under treatment. In this exploratory study, the learning opportunities are seen as what medical practitioners with different types of expertise achieve through interaction while working with patients over periods of time. The analysis of medical talk in consultations shows that collaborative work among GPs and specialists creates a shared understanding of the patient's clinical history and treatment trajectory. As knowledge is demanded and attributed and gaps of knowledge become shared, consultations create a work tool that expands the medical work and talk. Collaborative work in and between different levels of the health care service expands knowledge, creates opportunities for learning in everyday settings, and improves the quality of knowledge distribution in the health care system.

  20. (Dis)Orientation of International Medical Graduates: An Approach to Foster Teaching, Learning, and Collaboration (TLC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Adrienne; Hawa, Raed; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Abbey, Susan E.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Teaching for Learning and Collaboration (TLC) Program is a teaching-skills program focusing on methods to improve student learning. This program was adopted to address the professional and personal challenges faced by International Medical Graduates (IMGs) completing a fellowship in psychosomatic medicine. Method: The authors…

  1. Collaborating to integrate curriculum in primary care medical education: successes and challenges from three US medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pipas, Catherine F; Peltier, Deborah A; Fall, Leslie H; Olson, Ardis L; Mahoney, John F; Skochelak, Susan E; Gjerde, Craig L

    2004-01-01

    Traditional medical school department-based clerkship structures can lead to redundancy and/or gaps in curriculum, inefficient administrative systems, and academic isolation for clerkship directors. This paper describes the approaches, successes, and challenges three institutions experienced when implementing an interdepartmental collaboration to create an integrated primary care clerkship experience. Each school combined family medicine, ambulatory pediatrics, and ambulatory medicine into contiguous clerkship blocks. In all institutions, each clerkship maintained certain distinct features while the integrated aspects contained longitudinal curriculum of certain primary care topics. Evaluations by students demonstrated favorable responses to the new content and integrated methods of teaching, as did results of the Association of American Medical Colleges graduation survey. Faculty at each institution reported that their multidisciplinary approach has stimulated important educational collaborations, many of which require an economy of scale not often achievable within a single clerkship. These included innovative evaluation/documentation efforts; centralization of administrative tasks; enhanced recruitment, retention, and development of community-based faculty; an increase in the active core group of local and national primary care leaders; and an increase in scholarly activities. The collaborations have not occurred without challenges, primarily in the need for identifying sustainable resources for these and future collaborative educational endeavors. The benefits involved in developing an integrated primary care experience include expansion of curriculum content and methods, as well as enhancement of collegial support and resources to community-based and academic faculty. These integrations do, however, bring added challenges, time, and costs to traditional independent clerkships.

  2. A network collaboration implementing technology to improve medication dispensing and administration in critical access hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Douglas S; Ward, Marcia M; Loes, Jean L; O'Brien, John

    2010-01-01

    We report how seven independent critical access hospitals collaborated with a rural referral hospital to standardize workflow policies and procedures while jointly implementing the same health information technologies (HITs) to enhance medication care processes. The study hospitals implemented the same electronic health record, computerized provider order entry, pharmacy information systems, automated dispensing cabinets (ADC), and barcode medication administration systems. We conducted interviews and examined project documents to explore factors underlying the successful implementation of ADC and barcode medication administration across the network hospitals. These included a shared culture of collaboration; strategic sequencing of HIT component implementation; interface among HIT components; strategic placement of ADCs; disciplined use and sharing of workflow analyses linked with HIT applications; planning for workflow efficiencies; acquisition of adequate supply of HIT-related devices; and establishing metrics to monitor HIT use and outcomes.

  3. A hard pill to swallow: medication, empathy, and the value of collaborative recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bizub, Anne L

    2013-06-01

    Recovery from mental illness is a complex journey that is greatly facilitated when client and professional helper collaborate in the decision making process. It is further aided when the latter has an empathetic awareness of the client's experience, especially with regard to the impact of pharmacological treatment. The following article describes one psychologist's experience of being prescribed medication during a period of acute illness. Analysis of this experience is via a narrative, phenomenological approach. Results suggest that even when taken as directed, a medication can augment one's subjective feeling of illness. It further shows how challenging it can be for the ailing individual to assert his or her needs for something other than hospitalization. Although only one case is analyzed, it points to the impact that medication may have on the life of a person with mental illness, reinforcing the importance of collaboration and empathetic understanding of the other's experience.

  4. Exploring the potential of video technologies for collaboration in emergency medical care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderholm, Hanna M.; Sonnenwald, Diane H.; Manning, James E.

    2008-01-01

    conferencing techniques. This may be of benefit in diagnosing and treating patients in emergency situations where specialized medical expertise is not locally available. The experimental design and results concerning information behavior are presented in the article "Exploring the Potential of Video...... Technologies for Collaboration in Emergency Medical Care: Part I. Information Sharing" (Sonnenwald et al., this issue). In this article, we explore paramedics' task performance during the experiment as they diagnosed and treated a trauma victim while working alone or in collaboration with a physician via 2D...... of self-efficacy. Interview data confirm these statistical results. Overall, the results indicate that 3D telepresence technology has the potential to improve paramedics' performance of complex medical tasks and improve emergency trauma health care if designed and implemented appropriately....

  5. Advancing medical education: connecting interprofessional collaboration and education opportunities with integrative medicine initiatives to build shared learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templeman, Kate; Robinson, Anske; McKenna, Lisa

    2016-12-01

    BackgroundImproved teamwork between conventional and complementary medicine (CM) practitioners is indicated to achieve effective healthcare. However, little is known about interprofessional collaboration and education in the context of integrative medicine (IM). MethodsThis paper reports the findings from a constructivist-grounded theory method study that explored and highlighted Australian medical students' experiences and opportunities for linking interprofessional collaboration and learning in the context of IM. Following ethical approval, in-depth semi-structured interviews were conducted with 30 medical students from 10 medical education faculties across Australian universities. Results Medical students recognised the importance of interprofessional teamwork between general medical practitioners and CM professionals in patient care and described perspectives of shared responsibilities, profession-specific responsibilities, and collaborative approaches within IM. While students identified that limited interprofessional collaboration currently occurred in the medical curriculum, interprofessional education was considered a means of increasing communication and collaboration between healthcare professionals, helping coordinate effective patient care, and understanding each healthcare team members' professional role and value. Conclusions The findings suggest that medical curricula should include opportunities for medical students to develop required skills, behaviours, and attitudes for interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education within the context of IM. While this is a qualitative study that reflects theoretical saturation from a selected cohort of medical students, the results also point to the importance of including CM professionals within interprofessional collaboration, thus contributing to more person-centred care.

  6. Towards a measurement of internalization of collaboration scripts in the medical context - results of a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiesewetter, Jan; Gluza, Martin; Holzer, Matthias; Saravo, Barbara; Hammitzsch, Laura; Fischer, Martin R

    2015-01-01

    Collaboration as a key qualification in medical education and everyday routine in clinical care can substantially contribute to improving patient safety. Internal collaboration scripts are conceptualized as organized - yet adaptive - knowledge that can be used in specific situations in professional everyday life. This study examines the level of internalization of collaboration scripts in medicine. Internalization is understood as fast retrieval of script information. The goals of the current study were the assessment of collaborative information, which is part of collaboration scripts, and the development of a methodology for measuring the level of internalization of collaboration scripts in medicine. For the contrastive comparison of internal collaboration scripts, 20 collaborative novices (medical students in their final year) and 20 collaborative experts (physicians with specialist degrees in internal medicine or anesthesiology) were included in the study. Eight typical medical collaborative situations as shown on a photo or video were presented to the participants for five seconds each. Afterwards, the participants were asked to describe what they saw on the photo or video. Based on the answers, the amount of information belonging to a collaboration script (script-information) was determined and the time each participant needed for answering was measured. In order to measure the level of internalization, script-information per recall time was calculated. As expected, collaborative experts stated significantly more script-information than collaborative novices. As well, collaborative experts showed a significantly higher level of internalization. Based on the findings of this research, we conclude that our instrument can discriminate between collaboration novices and experts. It therefore can be used to analyze measures to foster subject-specific competency in medical education.

  7. Alcohol medications development: advantages and caveats of government/academia collaborating with the pharmaceutical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litten, Raye Z; Ryan, Megan; Falk, Daniel; Fertig, Joanne

    2014-05-01

    The process of developing pharmacological treatments for alcohol use disorder is notoriously complex and challenging. The path to market is long, costly, and inefficient. One way of expediting and reducing the drug development process is through collaborations-building partnerships among government, academia, pharmaceutical and biotechnology companies, healthcare organizations and advocacy groups, and the patients (end consumers) themselves. By forging collaborations, particularly with pharmaceutical companies, the alcohol treatment field stands to reap benefits in generating new medications for use in mainstream treatment settings. At the same time, there are certain caveats that should be considered, particularly by academic researchers, before entering into such partnerships. This commentary examines the advantages and caveats of government and academia collaborations with pharmaceutical companies. Published 2014. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  8. Do photographs, older adults' narratives and collaborative dialogue foster anticipatory reflection ("preflection") in medical students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Gabrielle; Osborne, Ashlee; Carroll, Mark; Carr, Sandra E; Etherton-Beer, Christopher

    2016-11-11

    In changing higher education environments, medical educators are increasingly challenged to prepare new doctors to care for ageing populations. The Depth of Field: Exploring Ageing resource (DOF) uses photographs, reflective questioning prompts, older adults' narratives and collaborative dialogue to foster anticipatory reflection or 'preflection' in medical students prior to their first geriatric medicine clinical placement. The aim of this research is to explore whether photographs, narratives and small group collaborative dialogue fosters reflective learning, enhances reflective capacity and has the potential to shift medical students' attitudes towards caring for older adults. This study used a mixed method evaluation design, measuring attitudes using pre and post questionnaire responses and individual written reflections drawn from 128 second year medical students, exploring their perceptions toward older adults. Quantitative and qualitative data indicated that the DOF session generated reflective learning that resulted in positive shifts in medical students' perceptions towards older adults. The qualitative reflections were captured in four main themes: the opportunity provided to Envision working with older adults; the Tension created to challenge learners' misinformed assumptions, and the work of Dismantling those assumptions, leading to Seeing older people as individuals. These findings highlight how visual and narrative methodologies can be used as an effective reflective learning tool to challenge medical students' assumptions around ageing and how these may influence their care of older adults.

  9. The medical educator, the discourse analyst, and the phonetician: a collaborative feedback methodology for clinical communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward-Kron, Robyn; Stevens, Mary; Flynn, Eleanor

    2011-05-01

    Frameworks for clinical communication assist educators in making explicit the principles of good communication and providing feedback to medical trainees. However, existing frameworks rarely take into account the roles of culture and language in communication, which can be important for international medical graduates (IMGs) whose first language is not English. This article describes the collaboration by a medical educator, a discourse analyst, and a phonetician to develop a communication and language feedback methodology to assist IMG trainees at a Victorian hospital in Australia with developing their doctor-patient communication skills. The Communication and Language Feedback (CaLF) methodology incorporates a written tool and video recording of role-plays of doctor-patient interactions in a classroom setting or in an objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) practice session with a simulated patient. IMG trainees receive verbal feedback from their hospital-based medical clinical educator, the simulated patient, and linguists. The CaLF tool was informed by a model of language in context, observation of IMG communication training, and process evaluation by IMG participants during January to August 2009. The authors provided participants with a feedback package containing their practice video (which included verbal feedback) and the completed CaLF tool.The CaLF methodology provides a tool for medical educators and language practitioners to work collaboratively with IMGs to enhance communication and language skills. The ongoing interdisciplinary collaboration also provides much-needed applied research opportunities in intercultural health communication, an area the authors believe cannot be adequately addressed from the perspective of one discipline alone. Copyright © by the Association of American medical Colleges.

  10. Team-Based Development of Medical Devices: An Engineering?Business Collaborative

    OpenAIRE

    Eberhardt, Alan W.; Johnson, Ophelia L.; Kirkland, William B.; Dobbs, Joel H.; Moradi, Lee G.

    2016-01-01

    There is a global shift in the teaching methodology of science and engineering toward multidisciplinary, team-based processes. To meet the demands of an evolving technical industry and lead the way in engineering education, innovative curricula are essential. This paper describes the development of multidisciplinary, team-based learning environments in undergraduate and graduate engineering curricula focused on medical device design. In these programs, students actively collaborate with clini...

  11. The roles of federal legislation and evolving health care systems in promoting medical-dental collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelstein, Burton L

    2014-01-01

    Recent federal health care legislation contains explicit and implicit drivers for medical-dental collaboration. These laws implicitly promote health care evolution through value-based financing, "big data" and health information technology, increased number of care providers and a more holistic approach. Additional changes--practice aggregation, consumerism and population health perspectives--may also influence dental care. While dentistry will likely lag behind medicine toward value-based and accountable care organizations, dentists will be affected by changing consumer expectations.

  12. A novel collaborative e-learning platform for medical students - ALERT STUDENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taveira-Gomes, Tiago; Saffarzadeh, Areo; Severo, Milton; Guimarães, M Jorge; Ferreira, Maria Amélia

    2014-07-14

    The increasing complexity of medical curricula would benefit from adaptive computer supported collaborative learning systems that support study management using instructional design and learning object principles. However, to our knowledge, there are scarce reports regarding applications developed to meet this goal and encompass the complete medical curriculum. The aim of ths study was to develop and assess the usability of an adaptive computer supported collaborative learning system for medical students to manage study sessions. A study platform named ALERT STUDENT was built as a free web application. Content chunks are represented as Flashcards that hold knowledge and open ended questions. These can be created in a collaborative fashion. Multiple Flashcards can be combined into custom stacks called Notebooks that can be accessed in study Groups that belong to the user institution. The system provides a Study Mode that features text markers, text notes, timers and color-coded content prioritization based on self-assessment of open ended questions presented in a Quiz Mode. Time spent studying and Perception of knowledge are displayed for each student and peers using charts. Computer supported collaborative learning is achieved by allowing for simultaneous creation of Notebooks and self-assessment questions by many users in a pre-defined Group. Past personal performance data is retrieved when studying new Notebooks containing previously studied Flashcards. Self-report surveys showed that students highly agreed that the system was useful and were willing to use it as a reference tool. The platform employs various instructional design and learning object principles in a computer supported collaborative learning platform for medical students that allows for study management. The application broadens student insight over learning results and supports informed decisions based on past learning performance. It serves as a potential educational model for the medical

  13. Growing partnerships: leveraging the power of collaboration through the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olapade-Olaopa, Emiola Oluwabunmi; Baird, Sarah; Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Kolars, Joseph C

    2014-08-01

    A major goal of the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) is to improve local health systems by strengthening medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. A new approach to collaboration was intended to overcome the one-sided nature of many partnerships that often provide more rewards to institutions from wealthy countries than to their Sub-Saharan African counterparts. The benefits of this MEPI approach are reflected in at least five positive outcomes. First, effective partnerships have been developed across a diverse group of MEPI stakeholders. Second, a "community of practice" has been established to continue strengthening medical education in Sub-Saharan Africa. Third, links have been strengthened among MEPI health science schools in Sub-Saharan Africa, their communities, and ministries of both health and education. Fourth, respect among partners in the United States for a culture of ownership and self-determinism among their African counterparts committed to improving education has been enhanced. And finally, performance metrics for strengthening of health science education in Sub-Saharan Africa have been advanced. Meanwhile, partner medical schools in the United States have witnessed the benefits of collaborating across traditional disciplinary boundaries, such as physicians working within highly functioning community-based health care teams with many of the participating schools in Sub-Saharan Africa. MEPI demonstrates that North-South as well as South-South partnerships, with an explicit focus on improving local health systems through better education, can be designed to empower partners in the South with support from collaborators in the North.

  14. Collaborative-Group Testing Improves Learning and Knowledge Retention of Human Physiology Topics in Second-Year Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-García, Mario

    2018-01-01

    The present study examined the relationship between second-year medical students' group performance and individual performance in a collaborative-learning environment. In recent decades, university professors in the scientific and humanistic disciplines have successfully put into practice different modalities of collaborative approaches to…

  15. Teledermatology: the use of ubiquitous technology to redefine traditional medical instruction, collaboration, and consultation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Richard; Hensley, David

    2012-11-01

    The seemingly ubiquitous use and acceptance of mobile, Wi-Fi-enabled, camera-ready tablets are offering dermatological clinicians a new telemedicine tool and collaborative learning platform, which may come to replace the traditional practice of forwarding digital still photographs to colleagues for consultation. The decreased cost and the increased ease of use of newer generation tablets are removing some of the participation barriers previously experienced by some dermatology professionals. Prior to full clinical implementation within the authors' practice in 2011, they tested the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act-approved Apple FaceTime(®) videoconference platform and found it to be an affordable, convenient, and effective collaboration and consultation tool that may augment andragogical postgraduate medical learning.

  16. Developing a collaborative community partnership program in medical asepsis with tattoo studios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtel, G A; Garrett, C; Grover, S

    1995-10-01

    The possibility of transmission of infectious agents during tattooing has become a legitimate issue of concern for health care providers. A collaborative educational program was developed by a county health department, College of Nursing, and tattoo artists to address issues of medical asepsis with the goal of producing a mechanism for certification of tattoo studios. The group's effort was enhanced by recognizing each other's value systems and by the mutual need for a successful program. A framework for developing, implementing, and evaluating community partnerships was addressed. This program demonstrated that community health nurses can play an instrumental role in collaborating with both health care providers and personal-service workers to minimize transmission of infectious agents during cosmetic procedures.

  17. A newly developed assessment tool on collaborative role of doctor–pharmacist in patient medication management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur Porwal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background Poor communication is one of the most important common factor contributing to medication errors. Despite their common history, there are many intellectual and practical differences between the professions of medicine and pharmacy that eventually affects patient care and health outcomes. Objectives. The main objective of the study is to evaluate the coordination and teamwork between pharmacist and doctor to provide betterment in the care of the patient health. Material and methods . A questionnaire of 10 questions was developed each for the patient, pharmacist and doctor posted on District Hospital, Moradabad (U.P., India and data collected from the patient and medical professionals through questionnaire were analyzed for collaborative role of doctor-pharmacist with respect to patient care. The results were analyzed using Graph Pad Prism 5. Results. The data obtained from the questionnaire highlights a significant effort between pharmacist and doctors. However, some patients often doubt in the skills of pharmacist for treatment outcome, but the majority of people responds positive to doctor-pharmacist role as they prove to be fruitful in removing medication errors. Conclusions . To facilitate the patient care, doctor-pharmacist alliance is necessary, desired and should be motivated as professed by the respondents. Collaboration is an important element of effective patient-focused health care delivery.

  18. Global Health, Medical Anthropology, and Social Marketing: Steps to the Ecology of Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteford, Linda

    2015-06-01

    Anthropology and global health have long been a focus of research for both biological and medical anthropologists. Research has looked at physiological adaptations to high altitudes, community responses to water-borne diseases, the integration of traditional and biomedical approaches to health, global responses to HIV/AIDS, and more recently, to the application of cultural approaches to the control of the Ebola epidemic. Academic anthropology has employed theory and methods to extend knowledge, but less often to apply that knowledge. However, anthropologists outside of the academy have tackled global health issues such as family planning and breast-feeding by bringing together applied medical anthropology and social marketing. In 2014, that potent and provocative combination resulted in the University of South Florida in Tampa, Florida being made the home of an innovative center designed to combine academic and applied anthropology with social marketing in order to facilitate social change. This article discusses how inter- and intra-disciplinary research/application has led to the development of Florida's first World Health Organization Collaborating Center (WHO CC), and the first such center to focus on social marketing, social change and non-communicable diseases. This article explains the genesis of the Center and presents readers with a brief overview, basic principles and applications of social marketing by reviewing a case study of a water conservation project. The article concludes with thoughts on the ecology of collaboration among global health, medical anthropology and social marketing practitioners.

  19. Enhancing Entrepreneurship and Professionalism in Medical Informatics Instruction: A Collaborative Training Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Cathryn A.; Rychlewski, Walt; Teat, Marty; Clawson, Darrin

    2004-01-01

    This report describes an innovative training program designed to foster entrepreneurship and professionalism in students interested in the field of medical informatics. The course was developed through a private–public interinstitutional collaboration involving four academic institutions, one private firm specializing in health care information management systems, and a philanthropic organization. The program challenged students to serve in multiple roles on multidisciplinary teams and develop an innovative hand-held solution for drug information retrieval. Although the course was technically and behaviorally rigorous and required extensive hands-on experience in a nontraditional learning environment, both students and faculty responded positively. PMID:15064292

  20. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C.; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C.; Wu, H. Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP‐accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)‐MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU‐MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two‐year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for‐profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs. PACS numbers: 01.40.Fk, 01.40.gb PMID:24710434

  1. Medical Physics Residency Consortium: collaborative endeavors to meet the ABR 2014 certification requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Brent C; Duhon, John; Yang, Claus C; Wu, H Terry; Hogstrom, Kenneth R; Gibbons, John P

    2014-03-06

    In 2009, Mary Bird Perkins Cancer Center (MBPCC) established a Radiation Oncology Physics Residency Program to provide opportunities for medical physics residency training to MS and PhD graduates of the CAMPEP-accredited Louisiana State University (LSU)-MBPCC Medical Physics Graduate Program. The LSU-MBPCC Program graduates approximately six students yearly, which equates to a need for up to twelve residency positions in a two-year program. To address this need for residency positions, MBPCC has expanded its Program by developing a Consortium consisting of partnerships with medical physics groups located at other nearby clinical institutions. The consortium model offers the residents exposure to a broader range of procedures, technology, and faculty than available at the individual institutions. The Consortium institutions have shown a great deal of support from their medical physics groups and administrations in developing these partnerships. Details of these partnerships are specified within affiliation agreements between MBPCC and each participating institution. All partner sites began resident training in 2011. The Consortium is a network of for-profit, nonprofit, academic, community, and private entities. We feel that these types of collaborative endeavors will be required nationally to reach the number of residency positions needed to meet the 2014 ABR certification requirements and to maintain graduate medical physics training programs.

  2. University engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noohi, Esmat; Abaszadeh, Abas; Maddah, Sadat Sayad Bagher

    2013-11-01

    Collaborative methods of learning in the university have been a successful and the main aspects of the students' engagement. The purpose of this study was to determine university engagement and collaborative learning in nursing students of Kerman University of Medical Sciences. This research was a descriptive correlation study on a total of 238 nursing students with different levels of education were asked to fill four subscales of the modified National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) tool with a total of 40 items. NSSE reliability was confirmed by Cronbach's alpha (r = 0.78). The NSSE instrument relies on a students' self-reports tool. Data were analyzed with descriptive and analytical statistics by SPSS version 16. Means scores of university engagement in nursing students was 96.6 ± 19. 07. There was a significant positive correlation in components including active and collaborative learning (ACL) level, students' level of academic challenge (LAC) as well as student faculty interaction (SFI), supportive campuses environment and enriching educational experiences (EEE)with total score of university engagement (P engagement level in nursing students is moderate and there is a significant association between the model of teaching and ACL, and LAC and EEE.

  3. A collaborative effort of medical and educational facilities for radiation safety training of nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki

    2004-01-01

    The radiation safety training course has been conducted for nurses of the university hospital by the collaboration of medical and educational staffs in Nagasaki University. This course was given for 6 hours covering basics of radiation, effects on human body, tips for radiation protection in clinical settings, and practical training, to more than 350 nurses overall. The pre-instruction survey by questionnaire revealed that 60% of nurses felt fears about radiation when they care for patients, which reduced to less than 15% in the post-instruction survey. The course also motivated nurses to give an answer patients' questions about radiation safety. In contrast, more than 30% of nurses were aware of neither their glass badge readings nor the maximum dose limit of radiation exposure even after the course. These results suggested that medical-educational collaborative training for nurses were effective on reducing nurses' fears about radiation and that repeated and continuous education would be necessary to establish their practice for radiation protection. (author)

  4. Collaboration between Hospital and Community Pharmacists to Improve Medication Management from Hospital to Home

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Kristeller

    2017-05-01

    Covered 0.76 treatment group vs. 0.73 control group, p=0.69, but there was a reduction in hospital readmissions (43% treatment group vs. 62% control group. Conclusion: The feasibility of this model can be improved by integrating medication management with the patient’s existing community pharmacist, rather than an additional network community pharmacist. While there was no difference in medication adherence, collaboration between the hospital and community pharmacists can potentially reduce hospital readmissions, improve medication safety, and facilitate medication therapy management across care transitions. Conflict of Interest "We declare no conflicts of interest or financial interests that the authors or members of their immediate families have in any product or service discussed in the manuscript, including grants (pending or received, employment, gifts, stock holdings or options, honoraria, consultancies, expert testimony, patents and royalties".   Type: Original Research

  5. Cross-standard user description in mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganji, Rama Rao; Mitrea, Mihai; Joveski, Bojan; Chammem, Afef

    2015-03-01

    By combining four different open standards belonging to the ISO/IEC JTC1/SC29 WG11 (a.k.a. MPEG) and W3C, this paper advances an architecture for mobile, medical oriented virtual collaborative environments. The various users are represented according to MPEG-UD (MPEG User Description) while the security issues are dealt with by deploying the WebID principles. On the server side, irrespective of their elementary types (text, image, video, 3D, …), the medical data are aggregated into hierarchical, interactive multimedia scenes which are alternatively represented into MPEG-4 BiFS or HTML5 standards. This way, each type of content can be optimally encoded according to its particular constraints (semantic, medical practice, network conditions, etc.). The mobile device should ensure only the displaying of the content (inside an MPEG player or an HTML5 browser) and the capturing of the user interaction. The overall architecture is implemented and tested under the framework of the MEDUSA European project, in partnership with medical institutions. The testbed considers a server emulated by a PC and heterogeneous user devices (tablets, smartphones, laptops) running under iOS, Android and Windows operating systems. The connection between the users and the server is alternatively ensured by WiFi and 3G/4G networks.

  6. Increasing nursing students' understanding and accuracy with medical dose calculations: A collaborative approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Jane E; Bruce, Catherine D

    2016-05-01

    Accurate calculation of medication dosages can be challenging for nursing students. Specific interventions related to types of errors made by nursing students may improve the learning of this important skill. The objective of this study was to determine areas of challenge for students in performing medication dosage calculations in order to design interventions to improve this skill. Strengths and weaknesses in the teaching and learning of medication dosage calculations were assessed. These data were used to create online interventions which were then measured for the impact on student ability to perform medication dosage calculations. The setting of the study is one university in Canada. The qualitative research participants were 8 nursing students from years 1-3 and 8 faculty members. Quantitative results are based on test data from the same second year clinical course during the academic years 2012 and 2013. Students and faculty participated in one-to-one interviews; responses were recorded and coded for themes. Tests were implemented and scored, then data were assessed to classify the types and number of errors. Students identified conceptual understanding deficits, anxiety, low self-efficacy, and numeracy skills as primary challenges in medication dosage calculations. Faculty identified long division as a particular content challenge, and a lack of online resources for students to practice calculations. Lessons and online resources designed as an intervention to target mathematical and concepts and skills led to improved results and increases in overall pass rates for second year students for medication dosage calculation tests. This study suggests that with concerted effort and a multi-modal approach to supporting nursing students, their abilities to calculate dosages can be improved. The positive results in this study also point to the promise of cross-discipline collaborations between nursing and education. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  7. The Adverse Drug Event Collaborative: a joint venture to measure medication-related patient harm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Mary E; Jackson, Aaron; Cameron, Chris; Young, Mary L; Escott, Linda; Maharaj, Ashika; Miller, Nigel

    2012-01-25

    To measure the extent of patient harm caused by medications (rate of Adverse Drug Events) in three DHBs, using a standardised trigger tool method. Counties Manukau, Capital and Coast and Canterbury DHBs decided to work collaboratively to implement the ADE Trigger Tool (TT). Definitions of ADE were agreed on and triggers refined. A random sample of closed charts (from March 2010 to February 2011) was obtained excluding patients who were admitted for <48 hours, children under the age of 18 and psychiatric admissions. In each DHB trained reviewers scanned these in a structured way to identify any of the 19 triggers. If triggers were identified, a more detailed, though time-limited review of the chart was done to determine whether an ADE had occurred. The severity of patient harm was categorised using the National Coordinating Council for Medication Error Reporting and Prevention Index. No attempt was made to determine preventability of harm and ADEs from acts of omission were excluded. The ADE TT was applied to 1210 charts and 353 ADE were identified, with an average rate of 28.9/100 admissions and 38/1,000 bed days. 94.5% of the ADE identified were in the lower severity scales with temporary harm, however in 5 patients it was considered that the ADE contributed to their death, 9 required an intervention to sustain life and 4 suffered permanent harm. The most commonly implicated drugs were morphine and other opioids, anticoagulants, antibiotics, Non Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) and diuretics. Patients who suffered an ADE were more likely to be female, older with more complex medical illnesses, and have a longer length of stay. The rate of medication-related harm identified by the ADE TT is considerably higher than that identified through traditional voluntary reporting mechanisms. The ADE TT provides a standardised measure of harm over time that can be used to determine trends and the effect of medication safety improvement programmes. This study not

  8. WE-AB-213-02: Status of Medical Physics Collaborations, and Projects in Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman, S.

    2015-06-15

    AAPM projects and collaborations in Africa Adam Shulman (AA-SC Chair) The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to

  9. WE-AB-213-02: Status of Medical Physics Collaborations, and Projects in Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzman, S.

    2015-01-01

    AAPM projects and collaborations in Africa Adam Shulman (AA-SC Chair) The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to

  10. An International Collaboration for the Training of Medical Chief Residents in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Tim; Dusabejambo, Vincent; Ho, Janet J; Karigire, Claudine; Richards, Bradley; Sofair, Andre N

    The year-long position of chief medical resident is a time-honored tradition in the United States that serves to provide the trainee with an opportunity to gain further skills as a clinician, leader, teacher, liaison, and administrator. However, in most training programs in the developing world, this role does not exist. We sought to develop a collaborative program to train the first medical chief residents for the University of Rwanda and to assess the impact of the new chief residency on residency training, using questionnaires and qualitative interviews with Rwandan faculty, chief residents, and residents. The educational context and the process leading up to the appointment of Rwandan chief residents, including selection, job description, and necessary training (in the United States and Rwanda), are described. One year after implementation, we used a parallel, mixed methods approach to evaluate the new chief medical resident program through resident surveys as well as semistructured interviews with key informants, including site chief residents, chief residents, and faculty. We also observed chief residents and site chief residents at work and convened focus groups with postgraduate residents to yield additional qualitative information. Rwandan faculty and residents generally felt that the new position had improved the educational and administrative structure of the teaching program while providing a training ground for future academicians. A collaborative training program between developing and developed world academic institutions provides an efficient model for the development of a new chief residency program in the developing world. Copyright © 2016 Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. GIFT-Cloud: A data sharing and collaboration platform for medical imaging research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doel, Tom; Shakir, Dzhoshkun I; Pratt, Rosalind; Aertsen, Michael; Moggridge, James; Bellon, Erwin; David, Anna L; Deprest, Jan; Vercauteren, Tom; Ourselin, Sébastien

    2017-02-01

    Clinical imaging data are essential for developing research software for computer-aided diagnosis, treatment planning and image-guided surgery, yet existing systems are poorly suited for data sharing between healthcare and academia: research systems rarely provide an integrated approach for data exchange with clinicians; hospital systems are focused towards clinical patient care with limited access for external researchers; and safe haven environments are not well suited to algorithm development. We have established GIFT-Cloud, a data and medical image sharing platform, to meet the needs of GIFT-Surg, an international research collaboration that is developing novel imaging methods for fetal surgery. GIFT-Cloud also has general applicability to other areas of imaging research. GIFT-Cloud builds upon well-established cross-platform technologies. The Server provides secure anonymised data storage, direct web-based data access and a REST API for integrating external software. The Uploader provides automated on-site anonymisation, encryption and data upload. Gateways provide a seamless process for uploading medical data from clinical systems to the research server. GIFT-Cloud has been implemented in a multi-centre study for fetal medicine research. We present a case study of placental segmentation for pre-operative surgical planning, showing how GIFT-Cloud underpins the research and integrates with the clinical workflow. GIFT-Cloud simplifies the transfer of imaging data from clinical to research institutions, facilitating the development and validation of medical research software and the sharing of results back to the clinical partners. GIFT-Cloud supports collaboration between multiple healthcare and research institutions while satisfying the demands of patient confidentiality, data security and data ownership. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Educational impact of an assessment of medical students' collaboration in health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olupeliyawa, Asela; Balasooriya, Chinthaka; Hughes, Chris; O'Sullivan, Anthony

    2014-02-01

    This paper explores how structured feedback and other features of workplace-based assessment (WBA) impact on medical students' learning in the context of an evaluation of a workplace-based performance assessment: the teamwork mini-clinical evaluation exercise (T-MEX). The T-MEX enables observation-based measurement of and feedback on the behaviours required to collaborate effectively as a junior doctor within the health care team. The instrument is based on the mini-clinical evaluation exercise (mini-CEX) format and focuses on clinical encounters such as consultations with medical and allied health professionals, discharge plan preparation, handovers and team meetings. The assessment was implemented during a 6-week period in 2010 with 25 medical students during their final clinical rotation. Content analysis was conducted on the written feedback provided by 23 assessors and the written reflections and action plans proposed by the 25 student participants (in 88 T-MEX forms). Semi-structured interviews with seven assessors and three focus groups with 14 student participants were conducted and the educational impact was explored through thematic analysis. The study enabled the identification of features of WBA that promote the development of collaborative competencies. The focus of the assessment on clinical encounters and behaviours important for collaboration provided opportunities for students to engage with the health care team and highlighted the role of teamwork in these encounters. The focus on specific behaviours and a stage-appropriate response scale helped students identify learning goals and facilitated the provision of focused feedback. Incorporating these features within an established format helped students and supervisors to engage with the instrument. Extending the format to include structured reflection enabled students to self-evaluate and develop plans for improvement. The findings illuminate the mechanisms by which WBA facilitates learning. The

  13. A collaborative comparison of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) standard setting methods at Australian medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malau-Aduli, Bunmi Sherifat; Teague, Peta-Ann; D'Souza, Karen; Heal, Clare; Turner, Richard; Garne, David L; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2017-12-01

    A key issue underpinning the usefulness of the OSCE assessment to medical education is standard setting, but the majority of standard-setting methods remain challenging for performance assessment because they produce varying passing marks. Several studies have compared standard-setting methods; however, most of these studies are limited by their experimental scope, or use data on examinee performance at a single OSCE station or from a single medical school. This collaborative study between 10 Australian medical schools investigated the effect of standard-setting methods on OSCE cut scores and failure rates. This research used 5256 examinee scores from seven shared OSCE stations to calculate cut scores and failure rates using two different compromise standard-setting methods, namely the Borderline Regression and Cohen's methods. The results of this study indicate that Cohen's method yields similar outcomes to the Borderline Regression method, particularly for large examinee cohort sizes. However, with lower examinee numbers on a station, the Borderline Regression method resulted in higher cut scores and larger difference margins in the failure rates. Cohen's method yields similar outcomes as the Borderline Regression method and its application for benchmarking purposes and in resource-limited settings is justifiable, particularly with large examinee numbers.

  14. Collaboration with pharmacy services in a family practice for the medically underserved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell K

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Pharmacist-managed collaborative services in a family practice setting are described, and diabetes and hypertension outcomes are assessed.Methods: Pharmacist-managed clinics, pharmacotherapy consultations, and drug information services are provided for a medically underserved, predominantly African American population. A pharmacy residency director, an ambulatory care pharmacy resident and three PharmD candidate student pharmacists work directly with physicians, nurse practitioners, nurses, and social workers to form an interdisciplinary health care team. Providers utilize pharmacy services through consultations and referrals. Collaboration outcomes were evaluated in twenty-two patients with diabetes and thirty hypertensive patients. Patients were retrospectively followed throughout their history with pharmacy service. Hemoglobin A1c (A1C was tracked before referral to pharmacy services, 3 to 6 months after, and as the most current measure after at least 6 months. Blood pressure (BP was observed before pharmacy involvement, 2 to 4 months later, and then currently for at least 4 months with the service. The mean of the most current markers was calculated, and the percent of patients at their goal marker was compared to national averages.Results: Fifty percent of pharmacy service patients met the American Diabetes Association hemoglobin A1c goal of less than 7% in our evaluation compared to the national mean of 49.8% overall and 44% in African Americans. Thirty percent of patients were at their BP goal while 33.1% of patients without diabetes and 33.2% of patients with diabetes nationally are at goal. Conclusion: The medically underserved patients under the care of pharmacy services achieved a higher percentage at their A1C goal than the national mean. The percentage of patients who achieved their BP goals was comparable to the national average. Increasing utilization of pharmacy services in the family practice setting allows for

  15. Analyzing the Social Knowledge Construction Behavioral Patterns of an Online Synchronous Collaborative Discussion Instructional Activity Using an Instant Messaging Tool: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Huei-Tse; Wu, Sheng-Yi

    2011-01-01

    Online discussions have been widely utilized as an educational activity, and much research has been conducted on the process and behaviors involved in asynchronous discussions. However, research on behavioral patterns in learners' synchronous discussions, including the process of social knowledge construction and project coordination is limited.…

  16. A collaborative effort of medical and educational facilities for radiation safety training of nurses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuda, Naoki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Takao, Hideaki

    2005-01-01

    The proper understanding of radiation safety by nursing staffs in hospitals are essential not only for radiation protection of themselves against occupational radiation exposure but for quality nursing for patients who receive medical radiation exposure. The education program on radiation in nursing schools in Japan is, however, rather limited, and is insufficient for nurses to acquire basic knowledge of radiation safety and protection. Therefore, the radiation safety training of working nurses is quite important. A hospital-based training needs assignment of radiation technologists and radiologists as instructors, which may result in temporary shortage of these staffs for patients' services. Additionally, the equipments and facilities for radiation training in a hospital might not be satisfactory. In order to provide an effective education regarding radiation for working nurses, the radiation safety training course has been conducted for nurse of the university hospital by the collaboration of medical and educational staffs in Nagasaki University. This course was given for 6 hours in Radioisotope Research Center, a research and education facility for radiation workers using radioisotopes. The curriculum of this course included basics of radiation, effects of radiation on human health, procedures in clinical settings for radiation protection and practical training by using survey meters, which were mainly based on the radiation safety training for beginners according to the Japanese law concerning radiation safety with a modification to focus on medical radiation exposure. This course has been given to approximately 25 nurses in a time, and held 13 times in May 2000 through October 2003 for 317 nurse overall. The pre-instruction questionnaire revealed that 60% of nurses felt fears about radiation diagnosis or therapy, which reduced to less than 15% in the post-instruction surveillance. The course also motivated nurses to give an answer to patients' questions about

  17. Mystery behind the match: an undergraduate medical education-graduate medical education collaborative approach to understanding match goals and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagler, Alisa; Engle, Deborah L; Rudd, Mariah; Chudgar, Saumil M; Weinerth, John L; Kuhn, Catherine M; Buckley, Edward; Grochowski, Colleen O'Connor

    2016-01-01

    There is a paucity of information regarding institutional targets for the number of undergraduate medical education (UME) graduates being matched to graduate medical education (GME) programs at their home institutions. At our institution, the Duke University, the number of UME graduates matched to GME programs declined dramatically in 2011. To better understand why this decline may have happened, we sought to identify perceived quality metrics for UME and GME learners, evaluate trends in match outcomes and educational program characteristics, and explore whether there is an ideal retention rate for UME graduates in their home institutions' GME programs. We analyzed the number of Duke University UME graduates remaining at Duke for GME training over the past 5 years. We collected data to assess for changing characteristics of UME and GME, and performed descriptive analysis of trends over time to investigate the potential impact on match outcomes. A one-sample t -test analysis showed no statistically significant difference in the number of Duke UME graduates who stayed for GME training. For both UME and GME, no significant changes in the characteristics of either program were found. We created a process for monitoring data related to the characteristics or perceived quality of UME and GME programs and developed a shared understanding of what may impact match lists for both UME graduates and GME programs, leaving the Match somewhat less mysterious. While we understand the trend of graduates remaining at their home institutions for GME training, we are uncertain whether setting a goal for retention is reasonable, and so some mystery remains. We believe there is an invaluable opportunity for collaboration between UME and GME stakeholders to facilitate discussion about setting shared institutional goals.

  18. New open source medical imaging tools released by CERN and University of Bath collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Rassat, KT group

    2016-01-01

    New toolbox has applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis.   3D X-ray imaging of a patient’s lungs and thorax. The TIGRE toolbox provides a high resolution image with only 1/30th of the radiation for the patient. (Image: Ander Biguri) CERN and the University of Bath have released a new toolbox for fast, accurate 3D X-ray image reconstruction with applications in medical imaging and cancer diagnosis. The software offers a very simple and affordable way to improve imaging and potentially reduce radiation doses for patients. The toolbox is based on Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), a type of scanning process that takes a series of 2D X-ray pictures and that then processes them into a 3D image. As part of the collaborative project between CERN and the University of Bath, Ander Biguri, a PhD student at Bath, has reviewed a broad range of published CBCT algorithms and adapted them to be faster. Ander Biguri modified the algorithms to run on a laptop fitted with a GPU &ndash...

  19. Impact of a collaborative interprofessional learning experience upon medical and social work students in geriatric health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Paul Robert; Lee, Youjung; Berkowitz, Shawn; Bronstein, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional collaborative practice is increasingly recognized as an essential model in health care. This study lends preliminary support to the notion that medical students (including residents) and social work students develop a broader understanding of one another's roles and contributions to enhancing community-dwelling geriatric patients' health, and develop a more thorough understanding of the inherent complexities and unique aspects of geriatric health care. Wilcoxon Signed Rank Tests of participants' scores on the Index of Interdisciplinary Collaboration (IIC) indicated the training made significant changes to the students' perception of interprofessional collaboration. Qualitative analysis of participants' statements illustrated (1) benefits of the IPE experience, including complementary roles in holistic interventions; and (2) challenges to collaboration. The findings suggest that interprofessional educational experiences have a positive impact upon students' learning and strategies for enhanced care of geriatric patients.

  20. Fun, collaboration and formative assessment: skinquizition, a class wide gaming competition in a medical school with a large class.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlegel, Elisabeth F M; Selfridge, Nancy J

    2014-05-01

    Formative assessments are tools for assessing content retention, providing valuable feedback to students and teachers. In medical education, information technology-supported games can accommodate large classes divided into student teams while fostering active engagement. To establish an innovative stimulating approach to formative assessments for large classes furthering collaborative skills that promotes learning and student engagement linked to improvement of academic performance. Using audience response technology, a fast-paced, competitive, interactive quiz game involving dermatology was developed. This stimulating setting, provided on the last day of class, prepares students for high-stakes exams to continue their medical education while training collaborative skills as supported by survey outcomes and average class scores. Educational game competitions provide formative assessments and feedback for students and faculty alike, enhancing learning and teaching processes. In this study, we show an innovative approach to accommodate a large class divided into competing teams furthering collaborative skills reflected by academic performance.

  1. Group concept mapping: An approach to explore group knowledge organization and collaborative learning in senior medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Dario; Daley, Barbara J; Picho, Katherine; Durning, Steven J

    2017-10-01

    Group concept mapping may be used as a learning strategy that can potentially foster collaborative learning and assist instructors to assess the development of knowledge organization in medical students. Group concept maps were created by 39 medical students rotating through a fourth year medicine rotation. The group maps were developed based on a clinical vignette. Descriptive statistics and thematic analysis of students' evaluations were performed. Evaluations indicated that students enjoyed the collaborative nature of the exercise and the knowledge sharing activities associated with it. Group maps can demonstrate different knowledge organization Discussion: Group concept mapping can be used to explore students' organization and integration of knowledge structures in a collaborative setting. Additional research should focus on how group mapping and learning progresses over time and, whether group mapping can help identify curricular strengths and needs.

  2. SuperAssist: A User-Assistant Collaborative Environment for the supervision of medical instrument use at home

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blanson Henkemans, O.A.; Neerincx, M.A.; Lindenberg, J.; Mast, C.A.P.G. van der

    2007-01-01

    With the rise of Transmural care, patients increasingly use medical instruments at home. Maintenance and troubleshooting greatly determines the safety and accuracy of these instruments. For the supervision of these complex tasks, we developed a User-Assistant Collaborative Environment (U-ACE). We

  3. Collaborative diagramming during problem based learning in medical education: Do computerized diagrams support basic science knowledge construction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Leng, Bas; Gijlers, Aaltje H.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To examine how collaborative diagramming affects discussion and knowledge construction when learning complex basic science topics in medical education, including its effectiveness in the reformulation phase of problem-based learning. Methods: Opinions and perceptions of students (n = 70) and

  4. eMedOffice: a web-based collaborative serious game for teaching optimal design of a medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannig, Andreas; Kuth, Nicole; Özman, Monika; Jonas, Stephan; Spreckelsen, Cord

    2012-10-31

    Preparing medical students for the takeover or the start-up of a medical practice is an important challenge in Germany today. Therefore, this paper presents a computer-aided serious game (eMedOffice) developed and currently in use at the RWTH Aachen University Medical School. The game is part of the attempt to teach medical students the organizational and conceptual basics of the medical practice of a general practitioner in a problem-based learning environment. This paper introduces methods and concepts used to develop the serious game and describes the results of an evaluation of the game's application in curricular courses at the Medical School. Results of the conducted evaluation gave evidence of a positive learning effect of the serious game. Educational supervisors observed strong collaboration among the players inspired by the competitive gaming aspects. In addition, an increase in willingness to learn and the exploration of new self-invented ideas were observed and valuable proposals for further prospective enhancements were elicited. A statistical analysis of the results of an evaluation provided a clear indication of the positive learning effect of the game. A usability questionnaire survey revealed a very good overall score of 4.07 (5=best, 1=worst). We consider web-based, collaborative serious games to be a promising means of improving medical education. The insights gained by the implementation of eMedOffice will promote the future development of more effective serious games for integration into curricular courses of the RWTH Aachen University Medical School.

  5. Empirical research in medical ethics: How conceptual accounts on normative-empirical collaboration may improve research practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background The methodology of medical ethics during the last few decades has shifted from a predominant use of normative-philosophical analyses to an increasing involvement of empirical methods. The articles which have been published in the course of this so-called 'empirical turn' can be divided into conceptual accounts of empirical-normative collaboration and studies which use socio-empirical methods to investigate ethically relevant issues in concrete social contexts. Discussion A considered reference to normative research questions can be expected from good quality empirical research in medical ethics. However, a significant proportion of empirical studies currently published in medical ethics lacks such linkage between the empirical research and the normative analysis. In the first part of this paper, we will outline two typical shortcomings of empirical studies in medical ethics with regard to a link between normative questions and empirical data: (1) The complete lack of normative analysis, and (2) cryptonormativity and a missing account with regard to the relationship between 'is' and 'ought' statements. Subsequently, two selected concepts of empirical-normative collaboration will be presented and how these concepts may contribute to improve the linkage between normative and empirical aspects of empirical research in medical ethics will be demonstrated. Based on our analysis, as well as our own practical experience with empirical research in medical ethics, we conclude with a sketch of concrete suggestions for the conduct of empirical research in medical ethics. Summary High quality empirical research in medical ethics is in need of a considered reference to normative analysis. In this paper, we demonstrate how conceptual approaches of empirical-normative collaboration can enhance empirical research in medical ethics with regard to the link between empirical research and normative analysis. PMID:22500496

  6. Using visual art and collaborative reflection to explore medical attitudes toward vulnerable persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Kidd

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vulnerable persons often face stigma-related barriers while seeking health care. Innovative education and professional development methods are needed to help change this. Method: We describe an interdisciplinary group workshop designed around a discomfiting oil portrait, intended to trigger provocative conversations among health care students and practitioners, and we present our mixed methods analysis of participant reflections. Results: After the workshop, participants were significantly more likely to endorse the statements that the observation and interpretive skills involved in viewing visual art are relevant to patient care and that visual art should be used in medical education to improve students’ observational skills, narrative skills, and empathy with their patients.  Subsequent to the workshop, significantly more participants agreed that art interpretation should be required curriculum for health care students. Qualitative comments from two groups from two different education and professional contexts were examined for themes; conversations focused on issues of power, body image/self-esteem, and lessons for clinical practice.    Conclusions: We argue that difficult conversations about affective responses to vulnerable persons are possible in a collaborative context using well-chosen works of visual art that can stand in for a patient.

  7. Team-Based Development of Medical Devices: An Engineering-Business Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Alan W; Johnson, Ophelia L; Kirkland, William B; Dobbs, Joel H; Moradi, Lee G

    2016-07-01

    There is a global shift in the teaching methodology of science and engineering toward multidisciplinary, team-based processes. To meet the demands of an evolving technical industry and lead the way in engineering education, innovative curricula are essential. This paper describes the development of multidisciplinary, team-based learning environments in undergraduate and graduate engineering curricula focused on medical device design. In these programs, students actively collaborate with clinicians, professional engineers, business professionals, and their peers to develop innovative solutions to real-world problems. In the undergraduate senior capstone courses, teams of biomedical engineering (BME) and business students have produced and delivered numerous functional prototypes to satisfied clients. Pursuit of commercialization of devices has led to intellectual property (IP) disclosures and patents. Assessments have indicated high levels of success in attainment of student learning outcomes and student satisfaction with their undergraduate design experience. To advance these projects toward commercialization and further promote innovative team-based learning, a Master of Engineering (MEng) in Design and Commercialization was recently launched. The MEng facilitates teams of graduate students in engineering, life sciences, and business who engage in innovation-commercialization (IC) projects and coursework that take innovative ideas through research and development (R&D) to create marketable devices. The activities are structured with students working together as a "virtual company," with targeted outcomes of commercialization (license agreements and new start-ups), competitive job placement, and/or career advancement.

  8. Using visual art and collaborative reflection to explore medical attitudes toward vulnerable persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Monica; Nixon, Lara; Rosenal, Tom; Jackson, Roberta; Pereles, Laurie; Mitchell, Ian; Bendiak, Glenda; Hughes, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    Vulnerable persons often face stigma-related barriers while seeking health care. Innovative education and professional development methods are needed to help change this. We describe an interdisciplinary group workshop designed around a discomfiting oil portrait, intended to trigger provocative conversations among health care students and practitioners, and we present our mixed methods analysis of participant reflections. After the workshop, participants were significantly more likely to endorse the statements that the observation and interpretive skills involved in viewing visual art are relevant to patient care and that visual art should be used in medical education to improve students' observational skills, narrative skills, and empathy with their patients. Subsequent to the workshop, significantly more participants agreed that art interpretation should be required curriculum for health care students. Qualitative comments from two groups from two different education and professional contexts were examined for themes; conversations focused on issues of power, body image/self-esteem, and lessons for clinical practice. We argue that difficult conversations about affective responses to vulnerable persons are possible in a collaborative context using well-chosen works of visual art that can stand in for a patient.

  9. Bioinformatics and Medical Informatics: Collaborations on the Road to Genomic Medicine?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maojo, Victor; Kulikowski, Casimir A.

    2003-01-01

    In this report, the authors compare and contrast medical informatics (MI) and bioinformatics (BI) and provide a viewpoint on their complementarities and potential for collaboration in various subfields. The authors compare MI and BI along several dimensions, including: (1) historical development of the disciplines, (2) their scientific foundations, (3) data quality and analysis, (4) integration of knowledge and databases, (5) informatics tools to support practice, (6) informatics methods to support research (signal processing, imaging and vision, and computational modeling, (7) professional and patient continuing education, and (8) education and training. It is pointed out that, while the two disciplines differ in their histories, scientific foundations, and methodologic approaches to research in various areas, they nevertheless share methods and tools, which provides a basis for exchange of experience in their different applications. MI expertise in developing health care applications and the strength of BI in biological “discovery science” complement each other well. The new field of biomedical informatics (BMI) holds great promise for developing informatics methods that will be crucial in the development of genomic medicine. The future of BMI will be influenced strongly by whether significant advances in clinical practice and biomedical research come about from separate efforts in MI and BI, or from emerging, hybrid informatics subdisciplines at their interface. PMID:12925552

  10. Team-Based Development of Medical Devices: An Engineering–Business Collaborative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberhardt, Alan W.; Johnson, Ophelia L.; Kirkland, William B.; Dobbs, Joel H.; Moradi, Lee G.

    2016-01-01

    There is a global shift in the teaching methodology of science and engineering toward multidisciplinary, team-based processes. To meet the demands of an evolving technical industry and lead the way in engineering education, innovative curricula are essential. This paper describes the development of multidisciplinary, team-based learning environments in undergraduate and graduate engineering curricula focused on medical device design. In these programs, students actively collaborate with clinicians, professional engineers, business professionals, and their peers to develop innovative solutions to real-world problems. In the undergraduate senior capstone courses, teams of biomedical engineering (BME) and business students have produced and delivered numerous functional prototypes to satisfied clients. Pursuit of commercialization of devices has led to intellectual property (IP) disclosures and patents. Assessments have indicated high levels of success in attainment of student learning outcomes and student satisfaction with their undergraduate design experience. To advance these projects toward commercialization and further promote innovative team-based learning, a Master of Engineering (MEng) in Design and Commercialization was recently launched. The MEng facilitates teams of graduate students in engineering, life sciences, and business who engage in innovation-commercialization (IC) projects and coursework that take innovative ideas through research and development (R&D) to create marketable devices. The activities are structured with students working together as a “virtual company,” with targeted outcomes of commercialization (license agreements and new start-ups), competitive job placement, and/or career advancement. PMID:26902869

  11. A learning collaborative of CMHCs and CHCs to support integration of behavioral health and general medical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannoy, Steven D; Mauer, Barbara; Kern, John; Girn, Kamaljeet; Ingoglia, Charles; Campbell, Jeannie; Galbreath, Laura; Unützer, Jürgen

    2011-07-01

    Integration of general medical and mental health services is a growing priority for safety-net providers. The authors describe a project that established a one-year learning collaborative focused on integration of services between community health centers (CHCs) and community mental health centers (CMHCs). Specific targets were treatment for general medical and psychiatric symptoms related to depression, bipolar disorder, alcohol use disorders, and metabolic syndrome. This observational study used mixed methods. Quantitative measures included 15 patient-level health indicators, practice self-assessment of resources and support for chronic disease self-management, and participant satisfaction. Sixteen CHC-CMHC pairs were selected for the learning collaborative series. One pair dropped out because of personnel turnover. All teams increased capacity on one or more patient health indicators. CHCs scored higher than CMHCs on support for chronic disease self-management. Participation in the learning collaborative increased self-assessment scores for CHCs and CMHCs. Participant satisfaction was high. Observations by faculty indicate that quality improvement challenges included tracking patient-level outcomes, workforce issues, and cross-agency communication. Even though numerous systemic barriers were encountered, the findings support existing literature indicating that the learning collaborative is a viable quality improvement approach for enhancing integration of general medical and mental health services between CHCs and CMHCs. Real-world implementation of evidence-based guidelines presents challenges often absent in research. Technical resources and support, a stable workforce with adequate training, and adequate opportunities for collaborator communications are particular challenges for integrating behavioral and general medical services across CHCs and CMHCs.

  12. Improving Engineering Student Team Collaborative Discussions by Moving Them Online: An Investigation of Synchronous Chat and Face-to-Face Team Conversations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Robin Revette

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative learning, particularly in the context of team-based, project-based learning, is common in undergraduate engineering education and is associated with deeper learning and enhanced student motivation and retention. However, grouping students in teams for project-based learning sometimes has negative outcomes, which can include lowered…

  13. Do photographs, older adults’ narratives and collaborative dialogue foster anticipatory reflection (“preflection” in medical students?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabrielle Brand

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In changing higher education environments, medical educators are increasingly challenged to prepare new doctors to care for ageing populations. The Depth of Field: Exploring Ageing resource (DOF uses photographs, reflective questioning prompts, older adults’ narratives and collaborative dialogue to foster anticipatory reflection or ‘preflection’ in medical students prior to their first geriatric medicine clinical placement. The aim of this research is to explore whether photographs, narratives and small group collaborative dialogue fosters reflective learning, enhances reflective capacity and has the potential to shift medical students’ attitudes towards caring for older adults. Methods This study used a mixed method evaluation design, measuring attitudes using pre and post questionnaire responses and individual written reflections drawn from 128 second year medical students, exploring their perceptions toward older adults. Results Quantitative and qualitative data indicated that the DOF session generated reflective learning that resulted in positive shifts in medical students’ perceptions towards older adults. The qualitative reflections were captured in four main themes: the opportunity provided to Envision working with older adults; the Tension created to challenge learners’ misinformed assumptions, and the work of Dismantling those assumptions, leading to Seeing older people as individuals. Conclusions These findings highlight how visual and narrative methodologies can be used as an effective reflective learning tool to challenge medical students’ assumptions around ageing and how these may influence their care of older adults.

  14. A large-scale mass casualty simulation to develop the non-technical skills medical students require for collaborative teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorm, Christine; Roberts, Chris; Lim, Renee; Roper, Josephine; Skinner, Clare; Robertson, Jeremy; Gentilcore, Stacey; Osomanski, Adam

    2016-03-08

    There is little research on large-scale complex health care simulations designed to facilitate student learning of non-technical skills in a team-working environment. We evaluated the acceptability and effectiveness of a novel natural disaster simulation that enabled medical students to demonstrate their achievement of the non-technical skills of collaboration, negotiation and communication. In a mixed methods approach, survey data were available from 117 students and a thematic analysis undertaken of both student qualitative comments and tutor observer participation data. Ninety three per cent of students found the activity engaging for their learning. Three themes emerged from the qualitative data: the impact of fidelity on student learning, reflexivity on the importance of non-technical skills in clinical care, and opportunities for collaborative teamwork. Physical fidelity was sufficient for good levels of student engagement, as was sociological fidelity. We demonstrated the effectiveness of the simulation in allowing students to reflect upon and evidence their acquisition of skills in collaboration, negotiation and communication, as well as situational awareness and attending to their emotions. Students readily identified emerging learning opportunities though critical reflection. The scenarios challenged students to work together collaboratively to solve clinical problems, using a range of resources including interacting with clinical experts. A large class teaching activity, framed as a simulation of a natural disaster is an acceptable and effective activity for medical students to develop the non-technical skills of collaboration, negotiation and communication, which are essential to team working. The design could be of value in medical schools in disaster prone areas, including within low resource countries, and as a feasible intervention for learning the non-technical skills that are needed for patient safety.

  15. Motives and preferences of general practitioners for new collaboration models with medical specialists : a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berendsen, Annette J.; Benneker, Wim H. G. M.; Jong, Betty Meyboom-de; Klazinga, Niek S.; Schuling, Jan

    2007-01-01

    Background: Collaboration between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists has been the focus of many collaborative care projects during the past decade. Unfortunately, quite a number of these projects failed. This raises the question of what motivates GPs to initiate and continue participating

  16. The importance of social and collaborative learning for online continuing medical education (OCME): directions for future development and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, John; Kokotailo, Patricia; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-01-01

    There is an increasing use of online continuing medical education (OCME), but the potential use of social and collaborative learning to change professional performance and improve patient care has yet to be fully realised. The integration of the main themes from the presentations and comments from participants at a symposium at AMEE 2011. Sociological perspectives on change in professional performance highlight the need for social and collaborative learning in OCME so that learners can share information (explicit knowledge) and opinion (tacit knowledge). The educational topic should be relevant to the complexity of professional practice and use iterative cycles of implementation and critical reflection in social networks so that proposed solutions can be tested in actual practice. The challenge of developing effective online discussions for collaborative learning is recognised. The provision of OCME requires a shift in both policy and practice to emphasise the importance of social and collaborative learning. Further research is recommended, especially to evaluate the implementation and impact of social and collaborative learning for OCME on patient care and the use of newer Web 2.0 approaches.

  17. Collaborative diagramming during problem based learning in medical education: Do computerized diagrams support basic science knowledge construction?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leng, Bas; Gijlers, Hannie

    2015-05-01

    To examine how collaborative diagramming affects discussion and knowledge construction when learning complex basic science topics in medical education, including its effectiveness in the reformulation phase of problem-based learning. Opinions and perceptions of students (n = 70) and tutors (n = 4) who used collaborative diagramming in tutorial groups were collected with a questionnaire and focus group discussions. A framework derived from the analysis of discourse in computer-supported collaborative leaning was used to construct the questionnaire. Video observations were used during the focus group discussions. Both students and tutors felt that collaborative diagramming positively affected discussion and knowledge construction. Students particularly appreciated that diagrams helped them to structure knowledge, to develop an overview of topics, and stimulated them to find relationships between topics. Tutors emphasized that diagramming increased interaction and enhanced the focus and detail of the discussion. Favourable conditions were the following: working with a shared whiteboard, using a diagram format that facilitated distribution, and applying half filled-in diagrams for non-content expert tutors and\\or for heterogeneous groups with low achieving students. The empirical findings in this study support the findings of earlier more descriptive studies that diagramming in a collaborative setting is valuable for learning complex knowledge in medicine.

  18. The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries' collaboration with the Association of American Medical Colleges, Medical Library Association, and other organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Carol G; Bader, Shelley A

    2003-04-01

    The Association of Academic Health Sciences Libraries has made collaboration with other organizations a fundamental success strategy throughout its twenty-five year history. From the beginning its relationships with Association of American Medical Colleges and with the Medical Library Association have shaped its mission and influenced its success at promoting academic health sciences libraries' roles in their institutions. This article describes and evaluates those relationships. It also describes evolving relationships with other organizations including the National Library of Medicine and the Association of Research Libraries.

  19. Psychic energy and synchronicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabriskie, Beverley

    2014-04-01

    Given Jung's interest in physics' formulations of psychic energy and the concept of time, overlaps and convergences in the themes addressed in analytical psychology and in quantum physics are to be expected. These are informed by the active intersections between the matter of mind and mindfulness re matter. In 1911, Jung initiated dinners with Einstein. Jung's definition of libido in the pivotal 1912 Fordham Lectures reveals the influence of these conversations. Twenty years later, a significant period in physics, Wolfgang Pauli contacted Jung. Their collaboration led to the theory of synchronicity. © 2014, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  20. A novel primary-specialist care collaborative demonstration project to improve the access and health care of medically complex patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siu, Henry Yu-Hin; Steward, Nicole; Peter, Jessica; Cooke, Laurel; Arnold, Donald M; Price, David

    2017-09-01

    Objective Medically complex patients experience fragmented health care compounded by long wait times. The MedREACH program was developed to improve access and overall system experience for medically complex patients. Program description MedREACH is a novel primary-tertiary care collaborative demonstration program that features community nursing outreach, community specialist outreach, and a multi-specialty consultation clinic. Methods All 179 patients, referring primary care clinicians, and specialists involved were eligible to participate. Patient and clinician feedback were elicited by feedback surveys. Process measures were evaluated by participant retrospective chart reviews. Community nursing outreach patients completed the Goal Attainment Scale. Results Forty-eight patients and 22 clinicians consented to the feedback survey. About 75% of patients were seen within 2 weeks of referral. Patients spent an average of 3, 1.63, and 1.2 visits with the nursing outreach, multi-specialty clinic, and specialist outreach, respectively. Patients indicated a better medical experience, health enablement, and goals attainment. Family physicians felt more supported in the community management of medically complex patients and, overall, physicians felt MedREACH could improve collaborative care for medically complex patients. Qualitative analysis of clinician responses identified the need for increased mental health services. Discussion MedREACH demonstrates a patient-centered link between primary and tertiary care that could improve health care access and overall experience.

  1. eMedOffice: A web-based collaborative serious game for teaching optimal design of a medical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannig Andreas

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Preparing medical students for the takeover or the start-up of a medical practice is an important challenge in Germany today. Therefore, this paper presents a computer-aided serious game (eMedOffice developed and currently in use at the RWTH Aachen University Medical School. The game is part of the attempt to teach medical students the organizational and conceptual basics of the medical practice of a general practitioner in a problem-based learning environment. This paper introduces methods and concepts used to develop the serious game and describes the results of an evaluation of the game's application in curricular courses at the Medical School. Results Results of the conducted evaluation gave evidence of a positive learning effect of the serious game. Educational supervisors observed strong collaboration among the players inspired by the competitive gaming aspects. In addition, an increase in willingness to learn and the exploration of new self-invented ideas were observed and valuable proposals for further prospective enhancements were elicited. A statistical analysis of the results of an evaluation provided a clear indication of the positive learning effect of the game. A usability questionnaire survey revealed a very good overall score of 4.07 (5=best, 1=worst. Conclusions We consider web-based, collaborative serious games to be a promising means of improving medical education. The insights gained by the implementation of eMedOffice will promote the future development of more effective serious games for integration into curricular courses of the RWTH Aachen University Medical School.

  2. Perceived support in e-collaborative learning: An exploratory study which make use of synchronous and asynchronous online-teaching approaches

    OpenAIRE

    Hillen, Stefanie Andrea; Päivärinta, Tero

    2012-01-01

    Published version of a chapter in the book: Advances in Web-Based Learning - ICWL 2012. Also available from the publisher at: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-33642-3_2 This study compares four different learning environments for e-collaborative learning in two European countries related to the dimension of student’s mutual support. The theoretical baseline is Vygotsky’s zone of proximal development (ZOPD) and the socio-genetic approach of Piaget. The analyzed data are based on question...

  3. SU-E-P-19: A National Collaborative Academic Medical Physics Network: Structure, Activity and Outcomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thwaites, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: A national Australian inter-university medical physics (MP) group was formed in 2011/12, supported by Department of Health Better Access to Radiation Oncology BARO) seed funding. Core membership includes the six universities providing postgraduate MP courses. Objectives include increasing capacity, development and efficiency of national academic MP structures/systems and hence supporting education, clinical training and research, for the MP workforce support. Although the BARO scheme focuses on Radiation Oncology, the group has wider MP interests. Methods: Two further BARO seed grants were achieved: 1) for networked academic activities, including shared-resource teaching, eg using virtual reality systems; MP outreach to schools and undergraduates; developing web-based student and registrar education/resources, etc.; and 2) for conjoint ‘translational research’ posts between universities and partner hospitals, to clinically progress advanced RT technologies and to support students and registrars. Each university received 0.5 FTE post from each grant over 2 years (total: $1.75M) and leveraged local additional partner funds. Results: Total funding: $4–5M. Overall there have been 35 (mainly overseas) postholders bringing specific expertise, beginning in early 2013. Periods in Australia have been from 0.25–2 years (median=1). As well as the education activities, research projects include lung/spine SBRT, 4D RT, FFF beams, technology assessment, complex treatment planning, imaging for radiation oncology, DIR, adaptive breast, datamining, radiomics,etc. Observed positive impacts include: increased interest in MP courses, training support, translational research infrastructure and/or clinical practice in the hospitals involved, plus increased collaboration and effectiveness between the universities. Posts are continuing beyond grant end using leveraged funds, providing the basis for sustainability of some posts. Conclusion: The BARO-funded projects have

  4. Comparison of traditional face-to-face teaching with synchronous e-learning in otolaryngology emergencies teaching to medical undergraduates: a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnabelsi, Talal; Al-Hussaini, Ali; Owens, David

    2015-03-01

    Undergraduate otolaryngology teaching in the UK is generally limited primarily due to curriculum time constraints with traditional face-to-face (FtF) teaching being restrained by the limitations of time and location. Advances in network technology have opened up new doors for the delivery of teaching in the form of online learning. This study compares a traditional instructor-led lecture with synchronous e-learning (SeL) using otolaryngological emergencies teaching as an educational intervention. A randomised controlled trial was designed involving two groups of medical students attending an otolaryngology emergencies management lecture: one present FtF and the other viewing the streamed lecture online. The primary outcome measure was improvement between pre-and post-lecture test scores. Secondary outcomes comprised the students' ratings of the lecture on a Likert-type scale. Students in both groups had improved test scores following the lecture (p teaching in improving students' knowledge on the management of otolaryngological emergencies, and that it is generally positively perceived by medical undergraduates. This highlights the potential utility of e-learning technology in undergraduate otolaryngology training.

  5. An Evaluation of Shared Mental Models and Mutual Trust on General Medical Units: Implications for Collaboration, Teamwork, and Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McComb, Sara A; Lemaster, Matthew; Henneman, Elizabeth A; Hinchey, Kevin T

    2017-12-01

    This study examines nurse-physician teamwork and collaboration, a critical component in the delivery of safe patient care, on general medical units. To that end, we assess shared mental models and mutual trust, 2 coordinating mechanisms that help facilitate teamwork, among nurses and physicians working on general medical units. Data were collected from 37 nurses and 42 physicians at an urban teaching medical center in the Northeastern United States. Shared mental model questionnaire items were iteratively developed with experts' input to ensure content validity. Mutual trust items were adapted from an existing scale; items were reliable. Data were analyzed using χ and independent 2-tailed t tests. Physicians and nurses reported significant differences in their perceptions of the professional responsible for a variety of roles (e.g., advocating for the patient [P = 0.0007], identifying a near miss/error [P = 0.003]). Medication reconciliation is only role for which nurses perceive less responsibility than physicians perceive nurses have. Regarding mutual trust, both groups reported significantly more trust within their own professions; both groups reported similar levels of trust in physicians, with physicians reporting significantly less trust in their nursing colleagues than nurses perceive (P work is needed. To that end, we propose increasing knowledge about their respective roles, providing opportunities for nurse and physician collaboration through rounding or committee work and enhancing the preparedness and professionalism of interactions.

  6. Collaboration between a college of pharmacy and a for-profit health system at an academic medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Matthew L; Dunn, Rebecca L; Hagemann, Tracy M; Burton, Michael E; Britton, Mark L; St Cyr, Mark B

    2012-07-01

    The genesis and growth of a successful 14-year partnership between the University of Oklahoma (OU) college of pharmacy and the OU Medical Center (OUMC) department of pharmacy are described. Pursuant to a 1998 joint operating agreement, the medical center and pharmacy school have achieved a high degree of collaboration on a wide range of educational and clinical initiatives. The close relationship has conferred a number of benefits on both institutions, including (1) expanded experiential education opportunities for pharmacy students, (2) joint faculty and staff funding arrangements that have facilitated the development and accreditation of OU pharmacy residency programs, and (3) patient care initiatives that have increased awareness of pharmacists' important contributions in areas such as venous thromboembolism prophylaxis, antibiotic stewardship, and core measures compliance. In addition to the formal integration of the college of pharmacy into the OUMC organizational structure, ongoing teamwork by clinicians and administrators at the two institutions has strengthened the 14-year partnership while helping to identify creative solutions to evolving communications, technology, and reimbursement challenges. Potential growth opportunities include the expansion of pharmacy services into additional service areas and greater involvement by OU pharmacy school faculty in the training of medical, nursing, and allied health professionals. A large for-profit academic medical center and a college of pharmacy developed a successful collaboration that is mutually beneficial and provides increased clinical, educational, and scholarly opportunities, advancing the mission of both institutions.

  7. Innovative ways to address the mental health and medical needs of marginalized patients: collaborations between family physicians, family therapists, and family psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Warren L; Bray, James H; Davis, Lisa; Holleman, Marsha C

    2004-07-01

    This article describes an innovative program to meet the needs of homeless women, children, and families residing at a transitional living center in an urban setting. The program involves collaboration between medical and mental health professionals to address the multiple problems and unmet needs of this population. Recommendations for future work in expanding collaborative practice are discussed. ((c) 2004 APA, all rights reserved)

  8. Improving Child and Adolescent Psychiatry Education for Medical Students: An Inter-Organizational Collaborative Action Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Geraldine S.; Stock, Saundra; Briscoe, Gregory W.; Beck, Gary L.; Horton, Rita; Hunt, Jeffrey I.; Liu, Howard Y.; Rutter, Ashley Partner; Sexson, Sandra; Schlozman, Steven C.; Stubbe, Dorothy E.; Stuber, Margaret L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: A new Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Medical Education (CAPME) Task Force, sponsored by the Association for Directors of Medical Student Education in Psychiatry (ADMSEP), has created an inter-organizational partnership between child and adolescent psychiatry (CAP) educators and medical student educators in psychiatry. This paper…

  9. How the study of online collaborative learning can guide teachers and predict students' performance in a medical course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saqr, Mohammed; Fors, Uno; Tedre, Matti

    2018-02-06

    Collaborative learning facilitates reflection, diversifies understanding and stimulates skills of critical and higher-order thinking. Although the benefits of collaborative learning have long been recognized, it is still rarely studied by social network analysis (SNA) in medical education, and the relationship of parameters that can be obtained via SNA with students' performance remains largely unknown. The aim of this work was to assess the potential of SNA for studying online collaborative clinical case discussions in a medical course and to find out which activities correlate with better performance and help predict final grade or explain variance in performance. Interaction data were extracted from the learning management system (LMS) forum module of the Surgery course in Qassim University, College of Medicine. The data were analyzed using social network analysis. The analysis included visual as well as a statistical analysis. Correlation with students' performance was calculated, and automatic linear regression was used to predict students' performance. By using social network analysis, we were able to analyze a large number of interactions in online collaborative discussions and gain an overall insight of the course social structure, track the knowledge flow and the interaction patterns, as well as identify the active participants and the prominent discussion moderators. When augmented with calculated network parameters, SNA offered an accurate view of the course network, each user's position, and level of connectedness. Results from correlation coefficients, linear regression, and logistic regression indicated that a student's position and role in information relay in online case discussions, combined with the strength of that student's network (social capital), can be used as predictors of performance in relevant settings. By using social network analysis, researchers can analyze the social structure of an online course and reveal important information

  10. Medical Student Perceptions of the Learning Environment at the End of the First Year: A 28-Medical School Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skochelak, Susan E; Stansfield, R Brent; Dunham, Lisette; Dekhtyar, Michael; Gruppen, Larry D; Christianson, Charles; Filstead, William; Quirk, Mark

    2016-09-01

    Accreditation and professional organizations have recognized the importance of measuring medical students' perceptions of the learning environment, which influences well-being and professional competency development, to optimize professional development. This study was conducted to explore interactions between students' perceptions of the medical school learning environment, student demographic variables, and students' professional attributes of empathy, coping, tolerance of ambiguity, and patient-centeredness to provide ideas for improving the learning environment. Twenty-eight medical schools at 38 campuses recruited 4,664 entering medical students to participate in the two-cohort longitudinal study (2010-2014 or 2011-2015). The authors employed chi-square tests and analysis of variance to examine the relationship between Medical School Learning Environment Survey (MSLES) scores and student characteristics. The authors used mixed-effects models with random school and campus effects to test the overall variances accounted for in MSLES scores at the end of the first year of medical school. Student attributes and demographic characteristics differed significantly across schools but accounted for only 2.2% of the total variance in MSLES scores. Medical school campus explained 15.6% of the variance in MSLES scores. At year's end, students' perceptions toward the learning environment, as reported on the MSLES, differed significantly according to the medical school campus where they trained. Further studies are needed to identify specific factors, such as grading policies, administrative support, and existence of learning communities, which may influence perceptions of the learning environment at various schools. Identifying such variables would assist schools in developing a positive learning environment.

  11. Nutritional recommendations for synchronized swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Sherry; Benardot, Dan; Mountjoy, Margo

    2014-08-01

    The sport of synchronized swimming is unique, because it combines speed, power, and endurance with precise synchronized movements and high-risk acrobatic maneuvers. Athletes must train and compete while spending a great amount of time underwater, upside down, and without the luxury of easily available oxygen. This review assesses the scientific evidence with respect to the physiological demands, energy expenditure, and body composition in these athletes. The role of appropriate energy requirements and guidelines for carbohydrate, protein, fat, and micronutrients for elite synchronized swimmers are reviewed. Because of the aesthetic nature of the sport, which prioritizes leanness, the risks of energy and macronutrient deficiencies are of significant concern. Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport and disordered eating/eating disorders are also of concern for these female athletes. An approach to the healthy management of body composition in synchronized swimming is outlined. Synchronized swimmers should be encouraged to consume a well-balanced diet with sufficient energy to meet demands and to time the intake of carbohydrate, protein, and fat to optimize performance and body composition. Micronutrients of concern for this female athlete population include iron, calcium, and vitamin D. This article reviews the physiological demands of synchronized swimming and makes nutritional recommendations for recovery, training, and competition to help optimize athletic performance and to reduce risks for weight-related medical issues that are of particular concern for elite synchronized swimmers.

  12. Collaborative Development of Anatomy Workshops for Medical and Dental Students in Cambodia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Jennifer A.; Ivanusic, Jason J.; le Roux, Cara M.; Hatzopoulos, Kate; Gonsalvez, David; Hong, Someth; Durward, Callum

    2011-01-01

    After Phnom Penh was liberated from the Khmer Rouge in 1979, health science education in Cambodia had to be completely rebuilt. In this article, the authors report the results of a teaching collaboration between the University of Melbourne (Australia), the International University (Cambodia), and the University of Health Sciences (Cambodia). The…

  13. Reusable Learning Objects for Medical Education: Evolving a Multi-institutional Collaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Leeder; T. Davies; A. Hall

    2004-01-01

    textabstractIn early 2002 a number of UK HE institutions founded a collaborative project to produce a bank of high quality e-learning resources to support and enhance teaching in the traditionally difficult area of statistics, epidemiology and research skills. Creation of these resources is very

  14. Admission factors associated with international medical graduate certification success: a collaborative retrospective review of postgraduate medical education programs in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grierson, Lawrence E M; Mercuri, Mathew; Brailovsky, Carlos; Cole, Gary; Abrahams, Caroline; Archibald, Douglas; Bandiera, Glen; Phillips, Susan P; Stirrett, Glenna; Walton, J Mark; Wong, Eric; Schabort, Inge

    2017-11-24

    The failure rate on certification examinations of The College of Family Physicians of Canada (CFPC) and the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC) is significantly higher for international medical graduates than for Canadian medical school graduates. The purpose of the current study was to generate evidence that supports or refutes the validity of hypotheses proposed to explain the lower success rates. We conducted retrospective analyses of admissions and certification data to determine the factors associated with success of international medical graduate residents on the certification examinations. International medical graduates who entered an Ontario residency program between 2005 and 2012 and had written a certification examination by the time of the analysis (2015) were included in the study. Data available at the time of admission for each resident, including demographic characteristics, previous experiences and previous professional experiences, were collected from each of the 6 Ontario medical schools and matched with certification examination results provided by The CFPC and the RCPSC. We developed logistic regression models to determine the association of each factor with success on the examinations. Data for 900 residents were analyzed. The models revealed resident age to be strongly associated with performance across all examinations. Fluency in English, female sex and the Human Development Index value associated with the country of medical school training had differential associations across the examinations. The findings should contribute to an improved understanding of certification success by international medical graduates, help residency programs identify at-risk residents and underpin the development of specific educational and remedial interventions. In considering the results, it should be kept in mind that some variables are not amenable to changes in selection criteria. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  15. An exploratory study of the potential learning benefits for medical students in collaborative drawing: creativity, reflection and 'critical looking'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Philippa; Letschka, Patrick; Ainsworth, Tom; Haq, Inam

    2013-06-17

    Building on a series of higher educational arts/medicine initiatives, an interdisciplinary drawing module themed on the human body was developed for both year 3 Craft students and year 3 Medicine degree students. This became the subject of a research project exploring how the collaborative approach to drawing adopted on this module impacted on the students' learning. In this article, emphasis is given to issues thought to have most potential relevance to medical education. Using an ethnographic research design, the methods adopted were: direct observation of all aspects of the module sessions, audio and video recordings and photographs of the sessions, the incorporation of a semi-structured discussion at the end of each session, and anonymous student questionnaires. A number of key themes emerged. The complex, phased and multi-sensory nature of the 'critical looking' skills developed through the drawing exercises was seen as of potential value in medical education, being proposed as analogous to processes involved in clinical examination and diagnosis. The experience of interdisciplinary collaborative drawing was significant to the students as a creative, participatory and responsive form of learning. The emphasis on the physical experience of drawing and the thematic use of the human body as drawing subject led to reflective discussions about bodily knowledge and understanding. There were indications that students had a meta-cognitive awareness of the learning shifts that had occurred and the sessions provoked constructive self-reflective explorations of pre-professional identity. This preliminary study suggests, through the themes identified, that there may be potential learning outcomes for medical students in this model of interdisciplinary collaborative drawing of the human body. Further research is needed to explore their applicability and value to medical education. There is a need to explore in more depth the beliefs, motivations and learning styles of

  16. Ensuring safe and quality medication use in nuclear medicine: a collaborative team achieves compliance with medication management standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beach, Trent A; Griffith, Karen; Dam, Hung Q; Manzone, Timothy A

    2012-03-01

    As hospital nuclear medicine departments were established in the 1960s and 1970s, each department developed detailed policies and procedures to meet the specialized and specific handling requirements of radiopharmaceuticals. In many health systems, radiopharmaceuticals are still unique as the only drugs not under the control of the health system pharmacy; however, the clear trend--and now an accreditation requirement--is to merge radiopharmaceutical management with the overall health system medication management system. Accomplishing this can be a challenge for both nuclear medicine and pharmacy because each lacks knowledge of the specifics and needs of the other field. In this paper we will first describe medication management standards, what they cover, and how they are enforced. We will describe how we created a nuclear medicine and pharmacy team to achieve compliance, and we will present the results of their work. We will examine several specific issues raised by incorporating radiopharmaceuticals in the medication management process and describe how our team addressed those issues. Finally, we will look at how the medication management process helps ensure ongoing quality and safety to patients through multiple periodic reviews. The reader will gain an understanding of medication management standards and how they apply to nuclear medicine, learn how a nuclear medicine and pharmacy team can effectively merge nuclear medicine and pharmacy processes, and gain the ability to achieve compliance at the reader's own institution.

  17. The effect of an educational programme on attitudes of nurses and medical residents towards the benefits of positive communication and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaffrey, Ruth; Hayes, Rose Marie; Cassell, Asenath; Miller-Reyes, Sharmin; Donaldson, Audeane; Ferrell, Cheryl

    2012-02-01

    This article is a report of a study to determine the effect of an educational programme and to follow up weekly meetings on nurses and medical resident's attitudes towards positive communication and collaboration. Clear and appropriate communication and interdisciplinary collaboration is critical to the delivery of quality care. Collaborative practice among all healthcare professionals creates a positive work environment, decreases costs, improves job satisfaction among nurses and improves patient care, as well as decreasing patient morbidity and mortality. Poor communication and lack of teamwork or collaboration have been cited as persistent problems in healthcare. The study was conducted in 2008 - 2009 at a hospital where a new medical residency programme was beginning and nurses had no prior experience working with medical residents. A quasi-experimental pre test, post-test design was used. The Jefferson Scale of Attitudes towards Physician-Nurse Collaboration and the Communication, Collaboration and Critical Thinking for Quality Patient Outcomes Survey tool measured the attitudes of 68 nurses and 47 medical residents in the areas of positive communication and collaboration. The study demonstrates that a formal educational programme and follow-up discussions improved the attitudes of both nurses and medical residents on the Jefferson scale (medical residents t = 4·68, P = 0·001, nurses t = 4·37, P = 0·001) and on the communication scale (medical residents t = 4·23, P = 0·001, nurses t = 4·13, P = 0·001). Continuing education for nurses, medical residents and other healthcare providers may assist in developing positive communication styles and promote collegiality and team work. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Medical comorbidity in complicated grief: Results from the HEAL collaborative trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins-Welty, Gregg; Stahl, Sarah; Zhang, Jun; Anderson, Stewart; Schenker, Yael; Shear, M Katherine; Simon, Naomi M; Zisook, Sidney; Skritskaya, Natalia; Mauro, Christina; Lebowitz, Barry D; Reynolds, Charles F

    2018-01-01

    To describe medical comorbidity in persons with Complicated Grief (CG) and to test whether medical comorbidity in individuals with CG is associated with the severity and duration of CG, after adjusting for age, sex, race, and current depressive symptoms. In exploratory analyses, we compared data from participants in an NIMH-sponsored multisite clinical trial of CG ("HEAL": "Healing Emotions After Loss") to archival data from participants matched on age, gender, and race/ethnicity, stratified by the presence or absence of current major depression. We used the Cumulative Illness Rating Scale for Geriatrics (CIRS-G) as a measure of medical polymorbidity. We investigated the association between CG and medical comorbidity via multiple linear regression, adjusting for sociodemographic and clinical variables, including severity of depressive symptoms. Chronological age and severity of co-occurring symptoms of major depression correlated with cumulative medical polymorbidity in persons with Complicated Grief. The severity of CG and the time since loss did not correlate with global medical polymorbidity (CIRS-G score). Nor was there an interaction between severity of depressive symptoms and severity of CG symptoms in predicting global CIRS-G score. Cumulative medical comorbidity, as measured by CIRS-G scores, was greater in subjects with current major depression ("DEPRESSED") than in CG subjects, and both DEPRESSED and CG subjects had greater medical morbidity than CONTROLS. Medical comorbidity is prevalent in Complicated Grief, associated with increasing age and co-occurring depressive symptoms but apparently not with chronicity and severity of Complicated Grief per se. This observation suggests that treating depression in the context of CG may be important to managing medical conditions in individuals with Complicated Grief to attenuate or prevent the long-term medical sequelae of CG. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Teledermatology: The Use of Ubiquitous Technology to Redefine Traditional Medical Instruction, Collaboration, and Consultation

    OpenAIRE

    Brandt, Richard; Hensley, David

    2012-01-01

    The seemingly ubiquitous use and acceptance of mobile, Wi-Fi-enabled, camera-ready tablets are offering dermatological clinicians a new telemedicine tool and collaborative learning platform, which may come to replace the traditional practice of forwarding digital still photographs to colleagues for consultation. The decreased cost and the increased ease of use of newer generation tablets are removing some of the participation barriers previously experienced by some dermatology professionals. ...

  20. Nurses perceptions of the nurse-physician collaboration in relation to medication safety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Ann Lykkegaard; Nielsen, Lars Peter; Poulsen, Birgitte Klindt

    to medication safety and medication management. Methods: A qualitative design using a semi-structured interview guide. The interviews took place in two focus groups consisting of psychiatric nurses (Group 1 (n= 9) and group 2 (n=8)) from two bedwards in a Danish University Hospital. The interviews were carried...... such as hierarchical medical teams and the nurse-physician relationship (NPR). To date, there are no studies of how psychiatric nurses perceive the importance of the NPR in relation to medication issues. Objectives: The objective of this study was to explore psychiatric nurses’ perception of the NPR in relation....... Nurses with somatic experience felt reduced in their professional competencies and perceived the hierarchy in the NPR as profoundly explicit compared to somatic care. Access to discussing specific medication problems with a physician could be difficult due to the type of rounds (an example was group care...

  1. Patients and families as teachers: a mixed methods assessment of a collaborative learning model for medical error disclosure and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Thorsten; Martinez, William; Browning, David M; Varrin, Pamela; Sarnoff Lee, Barbara; Bell, Sigall K

    2016-08-01

    Despite growing interest in engaging patients and families (P/F) in patient safety education, little is known about how P/F can best contribute. We assessed the feasibility and acceptability of a patient-teacher medical error disclosure and prevention training model. We developed an educational intervention bringing together interprofessional clinicians with P/F from hospital advisory councils to discuss error disclosure and prevention. Patient focus groups and orientation sessions informed curriculum and assessment design. A pre-post survey with qualitative and quantitative questions was used to assess P/F and clinician experiences and attitudes about collaborative safety education including participant hopes, fears, perceived value of learning experience and challenges. Responses to open-ended questions were coded according to principles of content analysis. P/F and clinicians hoped to learn about each other's perspectives, communication skills and patient empowerment strategies. Before the intervention, both groups worried about power dynamics dampening effective interaction. Clinicians worried that P/F would learn about their fallibility, while P/F were concerned about clinicians' jargon and defensive posturing. Following workshops, clinicians valued patients' direct feedback, communication strategies for error disclosure and a 'real' learning experience. P/F appreciated clinicians' accountability, and insights into how medical errors affect clinicians. Half of participants found nothing challenging, the remainder clinicians cited emotions and enormity of 'culture change', while P/F commented on medical jargon and desire for more time. Patients and clinicians found the experience valuable. Recommendations about how to develop a patient-teacher programme in patient safety are provided. An educational paradigm that includes patients as teachers and collaborative learners with clinicians in patient safety is feasible, valued by clinicians and P/F and promising for

  2. Developing Continuing Professional Education in the Health and Medical Professions through Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tisdell, Elizabeth J.; Wojnar, Margaret; Sinz, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This chapter focuses on how to negotiate power and interest among multiple stakeholders to develop continuing professional education programs as graduate study for those in the health and medical professions.

  3. Implementing a nurse-shadowing program for first-year medical students to improve interprofessional collaborations on health care teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anuja; Luo, Eva; Yang, Jun; Purkiss, Joel; White, Casey

    2012-09-01

    Although physicians and nurses play critical roles in providing team-based collaborative care, the literature on current relationships between physicians and nurses in typical health care settings reveals troublesome characteristics that affect the quality of the patient care that they provide. Studies report communication failures, poor coordination, and fragmented care within and across organizations, which then have been associated with medication errors, patient safety issues, and patient deaths. Because the physician-nurse relationship is a critical component of a high-functioning patient care team, curricular interventions are needed to improve communication between physicians and nurses and to avoid professional conflict that can potentially compromise the quality of the patient care they offer.Currently, medical schools provide students with limited education and training on the roles of other health care professionals. In 2009, to begin addressing this need in the curriculum, the authors implemented a nurse-shadowing program at the University of Michigan Medical School. They set out to help first-year medical students learn more about the role of nurses in health care to positively influence their attitudes toward nurses and improve their understanding of nurses' roles in health care teams. Pre- and postprogram survey results revealed that medical students' attitudes toward nurses improved and their knowledge of the profession increased as a result of this intervention. In this article, the authors provide a description of the half-day program, evidence of its effectiveness, the implications of those findings, and future directions for teaching medical students about effectively working on interprofessional teams.

  4. Experiences of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners working in collaborative practice models in primary healthcare in Australia - a multiple case study using mixed methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadewaldt, Verena; McInnes, Elizabeth; Hiller, Janet E; Gardner, Anne

    2016-07-29

    In 2010 policy changes were introduced to the Australian healthcare system that granted nurse practitioners access to the public health insurance scheme (Medicare) subject to a collaborative arrangement with a medical practitioner. These changes facilitated nurse practitioner practice in primary healthcare settings. This study investigated the experiences and perceptions of nurse practitioners and medical practitioners who worked together under the new policies and aimed to identify enablers of collaborative practice models. A multiple case study of five primary healthcare sites was undertaken, applying mixed methods research. Six nurse practitioners, 13 medical practitioners and three practice managers participated in the study. Data were collected through direct observations, documents and semi-structured interviews as well as questionnaires including validated scales to measure the level of collaboration, satisfaction with collaboration and beliefs in the benefits of collaboration. Thematic analysis was undertaken for qualitative data from interviews, observations and documents, followed by deductive analysis whereby thematic categories were compared to two theoretical models of collaboration. Questionnaire responses were summarised using descriptive statistics. Using the scale measurements, nurse practitioners and medical practitioners reported high levels of collaboration, were highly satisfied with their collaborative relationship and strongly believed that collaboration benefited the patient. The three themes developed from qualitative data showed a more complex and nuanced picture: 1) Structures such as government policy requirements and local infrastructure disadvantaged nurse practitioners financially and professionally in collaborative practice models; 2) Participants experienced the influence and consequences of individual role enactment through the co-existence of overlapping, complementary, traditional and emerging roles, which blurred perceptions of

  5. Medical education reform in wuhan university, china: a preliminary report of an international collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherer, Renslow; Dong, Hongmei; Yunfeng, Zhou; Stern, Scott; Jiong, Yang; Matlin, Karl; Baoping, Yu; Husain, Aliya N; Morgan, Ivy; Cooper, Brian; Juan, Feng; Mehta, Sujata

    2013-01-01

    In 2008 Wuhan University Medical School in China proposed to reform its curriculum by adapting the curriculum of the University of Chicago Medical School. An assessment of Wuhan University Medical School's traditional curriculum conducted in 2009 informed the reform directions, which included course integration, use of clinical cases, improved relevance of basic sciences to clinical medicine, reduction of lecture time, increase in group and independent learning, and the use of formative assessments. Fifty student volunteers per year were chosen to participate in the reform, and the rest remained in the traditional curriculum. A student survey was conducted in 2011 to evaluate the reform by comparing the attitudes of those in the reform and standard curricula. The reform met the needs of the school, was generally well received, improved satisfaction in reform participants, and had a positive impact on students. Areas needing improvement were also identified.

  6. Collaborative work by using videoconferencing: opportunities for learning in daily medical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundvoll Nilsen, Line

    2011-08-01

    In this article, I explore what happens when general practitioners (GPs) and specialists meet using videoconferencing to collaborate on a patient's treatment. By using videoconferencing, GPs and specialists are offered opportunities to share and produce knowledge. The data corpus was 42 videotaped videoconferences. The treatment of one specific patient was selected.This patient was discussed over a period of 9 days, which constituted five videoconferences. I describe how GPs and specialists discuss treatment strategies and exemplify how knowledge sharing creates opportunities for learning in boundary zones across activity systems as a part of daily practice.The talk about the treatment occurs by information exchange and by consultation. Information exchange without any dilemmas presented might support decisions already made. Consultations wherein dilemmas are presented and solved by bridging knowledge gaps between the general practitioner and the specialist create opportunities for learning.

  7. Communications and Collaboration Keep San Francisco VA Medical Center Project on Track

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal Energy Management Program

    2001-01-01

    This case study about energy saving performance contacts (ESPCs) presents an overview of how the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Francisco established an ESPC contract and the benefits derived from it. The Federal Energy Management Program instituted these special contracts to help federal agencies finance energy-saving projects at their facilities

  8. A collaborative comparison of objective structured clinical examination (OSCE) standard setting methods at Australian medical schools

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malau-Aduli, B.S.; Teague, P.A.; D'Souza, K.; Heal, C.; Turner, R.; Garne, D.L.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A key issue underpinning the usefulness of the OSCE assessment to medical education is standard setting, but the majority of standard-setting methods remain challenging for performance assessment because they produce varying passing marks. Several studies have compared standard-setting

  9. Introducing a Collaborative E2 (Evaluation & Enhancement) Social Accountability Framework for Medical Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, Jeffrey; O'Hearn, Shawna; Latham, Lesley; Harris, Bessie; Davis-Murdoch, Sharon; Paul, Kara

    2016-01-01

    Medical schools recognize that they have an important social mandate beyond their primary role to educate future physicians. The instantiation of social accountability (SA) within faculties of medicine requires intentional, effective partnering with diverse internal and external stakeholders. Despite early, promising academic work in the field of…

  10. Collaborative Strategies for Teaching Common Acid-Base Disorders to Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Marie Warrer; Toksvang, Linea Natalie; Plovsing, Ronni R.; Berg, Ronan M. G.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize and diagnose acid-base disorders is of the utmost importance in the clinical setting. However, it has been the experience of the authors that medical students often have difficulties learning the basic principles of acid-base physiology in the respiratory physiology curriculum, particularly when applying this knowledge to…

  11. Perspectives of carers on medication management in dementia: lessons from collaboratively developing a research proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poland, Fiona; Mapes, Sarah; Pinnock, Hilary; Katona, Cornelius; Sorensen, Susanne; Fox, Chris; Maidment, Ian D

    2014-07-21

    The need for carers to manage medication-related problems for people with dementia living in the community raises dilemmas, which can be identified by carers and people with dementia as key issues for developing carer-relevant research projects. A research planning Public Patient Involvement (PPI) workshop using adapted focus group methodology was held at the Alzheimer's Society's national office, involving carers of people with dementia who were current members of the Alzheimer's Society Research Network (ASRN) in dialogue with health professionals aimed to identify key issues in relation to medication management in dementia from the carer viewpoint. The group was facilitated by a specialist mental health pharmacist, using a topic guide developed systematically with carers, health professionals and researchers. Audio-recordings and field notes were made at the time and were transcribed and analysed thematically. The participants included nine carers in addition to academics, clinicians, and staff from DeNDRoN (Dementias and Neurodegenerative Diseases Research Network) and the Alzheimer's Society. Significant themes, for carers, which emerged from the workshop were related to: (1) medication usage and administration practicalities, (2) communication barriers and facilitators, (3) bearing and sharing responsibility and (4) weighing up medication risks and benefits. These can form the basis for more in-depth qualitative research involving a broader, more diverse sample. The supported discussion enabled carer voices and perspectives to be expressed and to be linked to the process of identifying problems in medications management as directly experienced by carers. This was used to inform an agenda for research proposals which would be meaningful for carers and people with dementia.

  12. Improvement of early detection of breast cancer through collaborative multi-country efforts: Medical physics component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora, Patricia; Faulkner, Keith; Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Gershan, Vesna; Kausik, Aruna; Zdesar, Urban; Brandan, María-Ester; Kurt, Serap; Davidović, Jasna; Salama, Dina H; Aribal, Erkin; Odio, Clara; Chaturvedi, Arvind K; Sabih, Zahida; Vujnović, Saša; Paez, Diana; Delis, Harry

    2018-03-26

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) through a Coordinated Research Project on "Enhancing Capacity for Early Detection and Diagnosis of Breast Cancer through Imaging", brought together a group of mammography radiologists, medical physicists and radiographers; to investigate current practices and improve procedures for the early detection of breast cancer by strengthening both the clinical and medical physics components. This paper addresses the medical physics component. The countries that participated in the CRP were Bosnia and Herzegovina, Costa Rica, Egypt, India, Kenya, the Frmr. Yug. Rep. of Macedonia, Mexico, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines, Slovenia, Turkey, Uganda, United Kingdom and Zambia. Ten institutions participated using IAEA quality control protocols in 9 digital and 3 analogue mammography equipment. A spreadsheet for data collection was generated and distributed. Evaluation of image quality was done using TOR MAX and DMAM2 Gold phantoms. QC results for analogue equipment showed satisfactory results. QC tests performed on digital systems showed that improvements needed to be implemented, especially in thickness accuracy, signal difference to noise ratio (SDNR) values for achievable levels, uniformity and modulation transfer function (MTF). Mean glandular dose (MGD) was below international recommended levels for patient radiation protection. Evaluation of image quality by phantoms also indicated the need for improvement. Common activities facilitated improvement in mammography practice, including training of medical physicists in QC programs and infrastructure was improved and strengthened; networking among medical physicists and radiologists took place and was maintained over time. IAEA QC protocols provided a uniformed approach to QC measurements. Copyright © 2018 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Improving medication management in multimorbidity: development of the MultimorbiditY COllaborative Medication Review And DEcision Making (MY COMRADE) intervention using the Behaviour Change Wheel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinnott, Carol; Mercer, Stewart W; Payne, Rupert A; Duerden, Martin; Bradley, Colin P; Byrne, Molly

    2015-09-24

    Multimorbidity, the presence of two or more chronic conditions, affects over 60 % of patients in primary care. Due to its association with polypharmacy, the development of interventions to optimise medication management in patients with multimorbidity is a priority. The Behaviour Change Wheel is a new approach for applying behavioural theory to intervention development. Here, we describe how we have used results from a review of previous research, original research of our own and the Behaviour Change Wheel to develop an intervention to improve medication management in multimorbidity by general practitioners (GPs), within the overarching UK Medical Research Council guidance on complex interventions. Following the steps of the Behaviour Change Wheel, we sought behaviours associated with medication management in multimorbidity by conducting a systematic review and qualitative study with GPs. From the modifiable GP behaviours identified, we selected one and conducted a focused behavioural analysis to explain why GPs were or were not engaging in this behaviour. We used the behavioural analysis to determine the intervention functions, behavioural change techniques and implementation plan most likely to effect behavioural change. We identified numerous modifiable GP behaviours in the systematic review and qualitative study, from which active medication review (rather than passive maintaining the status quo) was chosen as the target behaviour. Behavioural analysis revealed GPs' capabilities, opportunities and motivations relating to active medication review. We combined the three intervention functions deemed most likely to effect behavioural change (enablement, environmental restructuring and incentivisation) to form the MultimorbiditY COllaborative Medication Review And DEcision Making (MY COMRADE) intervention. MY COMRADE primarily involves the technique of social support: two GPs review the medications prescribed to a complex multimorbid patient together. Four other

  14. Committee for international collaborative research of medical and welfare apparatus; Iryo fukushi kiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu jigyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    The paper summarized activities for an investigational study on the international collaborative research project on the medical and welfare apparatus implemented in fiscal 1995. As investigation activities, the second meeting of information exchanges with E.U. and three north European countries was held following the meeting in fiscal 1994, and at the same time, information exchanges were made with organizations/institutions of industry/government/university in Germany, France and Canada. The study made it clear that Europe is also taking a direction of low-degree action diagnosis/care as Japan is. Further, concrete exchanges of information advanced and an awareness of the common issues was made clear such as the necessity of developing apparatus which meets the apparatus market and users` needs. As international collaborative activities, new methods of information exchanges were adopted such as the satellite meeting of the International MR Society, meetings with researchers who visited Japan. The satellite meeting of the International MR Society was favorably accepted by participants, and it was pointed out that it is important to continue the meeting in view of the materialization of themes, etc. 4 refs., 32 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. WE-AB-213-00: Developments in International Medical Physics Collaborations in Africa and Latin America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to recruitment of professionals with incomplete education. In most LA

  16. WE-AB-213-00: Developments in International Medical Physics Collaborations in Africa and Latin America

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The African Affairs Subcommittee (AA-SC) of the AAPM will present a multi-institutional approach to medical physics support in Africa. Current work to increase the quality of care and level of safety for the medical physics practice in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe will be presented, along with preliminary projects in Nigeria and Botswana. Because the task of addressing the needs of medical physics in countries across Africa is larger than one entity can accomplish on its own, the AA-SC has taken the approach of joining forces with multiple organizations such as Radiating Hope and TreatSafely (NGO’s), the IAEA, companies like BrainLab, Varian and Elekta, medical volunteers and academic institutions such as NYU and Washington University. Elements of current projects include: 1) Distance training and evaluation of the quality of contouring and treatment planning, teaching treatment planning and other subjects, and troubleshooting using modern telecommunications technology in Senegal, Ghana, and Zimbabwe; 2) Assistance in the transition from 2D to 3D in Senegal and Zimbabwe; 3) Assistance in the transition from 3D to IMRT using in-house compensators in Senegal; 4) Modernizing the cancer center in Senegal and increasing safety and; 5) Training on on 3D techniques in Ghana; 6) Assisting a teaching and training radiation oncology center to be built in Zimbabwe; 7) Working with the ISEP Program in Sub-Saharan Africa; 8) Creating instructional videos on linac commissioning; 9) Working on a possible collaboration to train physicists in Nigeria. Building on past achievements, the subcommittee seeks to make a larger impact on the continent, as the number and size of projects increases and more human resources become available. The State of Medical Physics Collaborations and Projects in Latin America Sandra Guzman (Peru) The lack of Medical Physicists (MP) in many Latin American (LA) countries leads to recruitment of professionals with incomplete education. In most LA

  17. Global Health, Medical Anthropology, and Social Marketing: Steps to the Ecology of Collaboration

    OpenAIRE

    Whiteford, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology and global health have long been a focus of research for both biological and medical anthropologists. Research has looked at physiological adaptations to high altitudes, community responses to water-borne diseases, the integration of traditional and biomedical approaches to health, global responses to HIV/AIDS, and more recently, to the application of cultural approaches to the control of the Ebola epidemic. Academic anthropology has employed theory and methods to extend knowledg...

  18. 21 CFR 892.1970 - Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. 892.1970... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Diagnostic Devices § 892.1970 Radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer. (a) Identification. A radiographic ECG/respirator synchronizer is a device intended to be used to...

  19. Meeting End User Needs in Collaborative Medical Device Technology Development Research Projects: A Qualitative Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strisland, Frode; Svagård, Ingrid Storruste; Austad, Hanne Opsahl; Reitan, Jarl

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this case study has been to investigate to what extent user centered design (UCD) methodologies have been applied, how the process and outcomes were perceived by project team members, and what were potential barriers towards meeting end user needs. The case studied was the European Union Framework 7 integrated project d-LIVER (2011-2015), which aimed at developing an integrated care system for chronic liver disease patient management. d-LIVER is an example of a public funded, international, multidisciplinary, collaborative research project where development starts from a low technology readiness level, but where research is motivated by societal needs for better health care solutions. Awareness of central end user needs are therefore crucial. 14 project participants were interviewed. To meet societal and end user needs represent a prominent motivation factor for participants. The project organization with only clinical partners interacting with end users was accepted as a fact of life and not as a project pain point. A summary of observations and recommendations for good practice is given.

  20. Collaborating to improve the global competitiveness of US academic medical centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Molly; Garman, Andrew; Johnson, Tricia; Hohmann, Samuel; Meurer, Steve

    2012-01-01

    President Obama announced the National Export Initiative in his 2010 State of the Union address and set the ambitious goal of doubling US exports by the end of 2014 to support millions of domestic jobs. Understanding the competitive position of US health care in the global market for international patients, University Health System Consortium (UHC), an alliance of 116 academic medical centers and 272 of their affiliated hospitals, representing 90 percent of the nation's non-profit academic medical centers partnered with Rush University, a private University in Chicago, IL and the International Trade Administration of the US Department of Commerce International Trade Administration (ITA) to participate in the Market Development Cooperator Program. The goal of this private-public partnership is to increase the global competitiveness of the US health care industry, which represents over 16 percent of the GDP, amongst foreign health care providers. This article provides an overview of the US health care market and outlines the aims of the US Cooperative for International Patient Programs, the end result of the partnership between UHC, ITA and Rush University.

  1. Enhancing Collaborative Case Diagnoses Through Unified Medical Language System-Based Disambiguation: A Case Study of the Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Albert; Alonso-Calvo, Raúl; Muñoz, Alberto; Crespo, José

    2017-07-01

    During clinical case diagnoses, especially in low-resourced areas, the use of vocabularies within Unified Medical Language System (UMLS) can strengthen discussions between health professionals and, in certain cases, eliminate the need, enabling faster treatment. This article presents the benefits of using UMLS as a collaborative discussion tool and verifies its impact. The Sanar system has been improved by UMLS when using text retrieval to extract relevant medical concepts from cases investigated by the user and to provide contextualized searches of related articles. An experiment was conducted, focused on team engagement and discussion of a Zika virus case using Sanar, both with and without UMLS contextualization. The use of the tool was measured, and it was determined that the discussion in the group with UMLS support was more complete based on better information and inclusion of more variables. Clinicians involved responded to a questionnaire evaluating the relevance of functions. From the questionnaire showed that most of the group supported UMLS as important in complex diagnostics; the use of knowledge extraction before discussion is relevant to align knowledge of participants with more variables, such as the Zika virus, and to minimize the need for interaction in widely discussed cases. Based on the results obtained with the questionnaire, the use of UMLS provides acceleration in the diagnostic process that precedes interaction with other health professionals through clinical discussion tools. For future work, a mobile version will support offline navigation for locations with limited Internet access.

  2. A Collaborative Project to Bridging the Gap between Basic and Clinical Teachers: The Opinion of Medical Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Sentí

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The organization of medical curricula with a clear distinction between basic and clinical subjects makes it difficult for teachers to collaborate and teach students in an integrated way. We designed a new subject, Integrated Medicine, to overcome such limitations. Here, we describe the evaluation of the first three years of running the experience, as well as the opinion of the first group of students in their sixth year. Three cohorts of first-year medical students (n=158 and eight teachers, as well as a group of students of sixth year (n=41, participated in the experiment. Students worked following the problem-based learning approach. Their satisfaction, their subjective improvement of content knowledge in basic and clinical fields, and their belief about the accomplishment of educational objectives were evaluated. The results showed a high level of satisfaction, increased content knowledge, and improvement in solving problems, searching for relevant information, team working, and oral and written communication skills. Students of sixth year agreed that the subject helped them to better understand the clinical manifestations of disease, the diagnosis process, and therapeutic approaches. In conclusion, experiences such as Integrated Medicine may enhance the integration of knowledge by the joint work of basic and clinical teachers.

  3. Multipoint MultimediaSynchronization: A Petri Net Based Approach

    OpenAIRE

    Dutta, Animesh; National Institute of Technology; Pal, Koninika; National Institute of Technology; Dasgupta, Ranjan; National Institute of Technical Teacher’s Training and Research; Bhattacharya, Swapan; Jadavpur University

    2012-01-01

    Maintaining the satisfactory QoS, synchronization is a big challenge to the researcher in the field of Information and Communication Technology (ICT). In this paper we address a multimedia synchronization issue called multipoint synchronization which is necessary in some distributed collaborative application like teleteaching, teleconferencing etc.,involving the play out process of same media stream at different receivers at the same time to achieve fairness among the receivers. We found the i...

  4. Collaborative Concept Mapping and Critical Thinking in Fourth-Year Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bixler, G Michael; Brown, Amy; Way, David; Ledford, Cynthia; Mahan, John D

    2015-08-01

    To test the hypothesis that small group concept mapping of 4 core neonatal topics as part of a fourth-year allopathic medical student elective would improve critical thinking (CT) as measured by the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (CCTST). To describe any correlations between scores on the CCTST and the step 1 and step 2 Clinical Knowledge parts of the United States Medical Licensing Exam. Twenty-seven students participated in this pilot study during a 1-month elective. A pretest CCTST, California Critical Thinking Disposition Inventory (CCTDI), and multiple choice knowledge test (MCKT) were completed immediately before the elective began. Four weekly group sessions were held with assigned reading on each of the 4 neonatal topics. Concept mapping was performed in small groups of 4 to 6 students with a group concept map collected at the end of the exercise. A posttest CCTST and MCKT was completed after the 4 group sessions. Pre-CCTST overall score was 83.9 ± 6, and post-CCTST overall score was 85.6 ± 6.9 (P = .57). Pearson correlation of USMLE step 1 and pre-CCTST showed r(25) = .276, P = .164. Pearson correlation of USMLE step 2 CK and pre-CCTST revealed r(25) = .214, P = .482. The precourse MCKT average was 35%, and the postcourse average 50% (P ≤ .001). A recent meta-analysis confirms this is the first report of a comparison between the increasingly common CCTST and the USMLE. We confirmed that concept mapping is a valid mechanism to teach content knowledge. Although the difference in the CCTST scores was not significant, this study could serve as an important start toward development of a curriculum devoted to teaching content and improving CT. The small number of students may have prevented us from defining a significant impact. © The Author(s) 2015.

  5. The situation analysis of the international relations management and inter-university collaboration in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences, Iran, during the years 2005-2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Farajollahi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nowadays, with the development of science and communication, collaboration with other countriesand universities seems inevitable to universities. The aim of this study was to analyze the situation of internationalrelations management and inter-university collaboration (IRM-IUC in Tabriz University of Medical Sciences (TUMS,Iran, during the years 2005-2010. METHODS: In this descriptive study, one checklist was used for analysis of the inter-university collaboration management and another one for the situation analysis of international relations management which included 4 sections itself. There were a total of 56 questions designed and developed through literature review and the expert panel.RESULTS: The results indicated the poor performance of Tabriz University of Medical Sciences in the international relations management and inter-university collaboration fields. Most of the reviewed items had not been adequatelypaid attention to in the management of international relations and only one out of 14 evaluated items was considered inthe field of inter-university collaboration. CONCLUSIONS: In line with the overall globalization process, education and research have also become globalizedprocesses, and as a result, it is necessary for universities to develop effective ties and relationships with otherorganizations. However, Tabriz University of Medical Sciences has not been doing quite optimally in this regard. Thus,it is suggested that, based on the shortcomings pointed out in this study, new appropriate plans and policies be set todevelop fruitful and effective relations and correspondences with other universities and countries.

  6. A survey of scientific production and collaboration rate among of medical library and information sciences in ISI, scopus and Pubmed databases during 2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefy, Alireza; Malekahmadi, Parisa

    2013-01-01

    Research is essential for development. In other words, scientific development of each country can be evaluated by researchers' scientific production. Understanding and assessing the activities of researchers for planning and policy making is essential. The significance of collaboration in the production of scientific publications in today's complex world where technology is everything is very apparent. Scientists realized that in order to get their work wildly used and cited to by experts, they must collaborate. The collaboration among researchers results in the development of scientific knowledge and hence, attainment of wider information. The main objective of this research is to survey scientific production and collaboration rate in philosophy and theoretical bases of medical library and information sciences in ISI, SCOPUS, and Pubmed databases during 2001-2010. This is a descriptive survey and scientometrics methods were used for this research. Then data gathered via check list and analyzed by the SPSS software. Collaboration rate was calculated according to the formula. Among the 294 related abstracts about philosophy, and theoretical bases of medical library and information science in ISI, SCOPUS, and Pubmed databases during 2001-2010, the year 2007 with 45 articles has the most and the year 2003 with 16 articles has the least number of related collaborative articles in this scope. "B. Hjorland" with eight collaborative articles had the most one among Library and Information Sciences (LIS) professionals in ISI, SCOPUS, and Pubmed. Journal of Documentation with 29 articles and 12 collaborative articles had the most related articles. Medical library and information science challenges with 150 articles had first place in number of articles. Results also show that the most elaborative country in terms of collaboration point of view and number of articles was US. "University of Washington" and "University Western Ontario" are the most elaborative affiliation from

  7. Collaborating with consumer and community representatives in health and medical research in Australia: results from an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartu Anne E

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To collaborate with consumer and community representatives in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project from 2006-2008 http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and evaluate researchers' and consumer and community representatives' perceptions of the process, context and impact of consumer and community participation in the project. Methods We formed two reference groups and sought consumer and community representatives' perspectives on all aspects of the project over a three year period. We developed an evaluation framework and asked consumer and community representatives and researchers to complete a self-administered questionnaire at the end of the project. Results Fifteen researchers (93.8% and seven (53.8% consumer and community representatives completed a questionnaire. Most consumer and community representatives agreed that the process and context measures of their participation had been achieved. Both researchers and consumer and community representatives identified areas for improvement and offered suggestions how these could be improved for future research. Researchers thought consumer and community participation contributed to project outputs and outcomes by enhancing scientific and ethical standards, providing legitimacy and authority, and increasing the project's credibility and participation. They saw it was fundamental to the research process and acknowledged consumer and community representatives for their excellent contribution. Consumer and community representatives were able to directly influence decisions about the research. They thought that consumer and community participation had significant influence on the success of project outputs and outcomes. Conclusions Consumer and community participation is an essential component of good research practice and contributed to the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project by enhancing research processes, outputs and outcomes, and this participation was valued by community and

  8. Partnerships for clinical learning: A collaborative initiative to support medical imaging technology students and their supervisors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, A.; Smythe, L.; Jones, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The involvement of practitioners in the teaching and supervision of medical imaging technology students is central to students' learning. This article presents an overview of a learning partnership initiative, reinforced by an online platform to support students' learning and their medical imaging technologist supervisors' (MITs) teaching within a clinical learning environment in a New Zealand context. Methodology: Data were generated through a series of fourteen collaborative action research focus group meetings with MITs and student MITs. Results: The findings revealed that a robust relationship between a student and their MIT partner gave students an ‘anchor’ for learning and a sense of belonging. The online platform supported the relationship and provided an effective means for communication between students and their MIT partners. The relationship was not one-directional as it also supported the enhancement of MITs' practice. Conclusions: The recommendations from the study suggest learning partnerships between MITs and student MITs will be valuable in supporting teaching and learning respectively. MITs need to be better supported in their teaching role to enable them to make a greater investment in students' learning. A redistribution of funding for clinical education needs to be considered to support the MITs' central role in teaching medical imaging students. - Highlights: • Learning partnerships within a clinical setting support students' learning. • An online platform can provide online support when face-to-face support is not possible. • Learning partnerships can enhance MITs' practice.

  9. Collaborating with consumer and community representatives in health and medical research in Australia: results from an evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; D'Antoine, Heather A; France, Kathryn E; McKenzie, Anne E; Henley, Nadine; Bartu, Anne E; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol

    2011-05-14

    To collaborate with consumer and community representatives in the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project from 2006-2008 http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy and evaluate researchers' and consumer and community representatives' perceptions of the process, context and impact of consumer and community participation in the project. We formed two reference groups and sought consumer and community representatives' perspectives on all aspects of the project over a three year period. We developed an evaluation framework and asked consumer and community representatives and researchers to complete a self-administered questionnaire at the end of the project. Fifteen researchers (93.8%) and seven (53.8%) consumer and community representatives completed a questionnaire. Most consumer and community representatives agreed that the process and context measures of their participation had been achieved. Both researchers and consumer and community representatives identified areas for improvement and offered suggestions how these could be improved for future research. Researchers thought consumer and community participation contributed to project outputs and outcomes by enhancing scientific and ethical standards, providing legitimacy and authority, and increasing the project's credibility and participation. They saw it was fundamental to the research process and acknowledged consumer and community representatives for their excellent contribution. Consumer and community representatives were able to directly influence decisions about the research. They thought that consumer and community participation had significant influence on the success of project outputs and outcomes. Consumer and community participation is an essential component of good research practice and contributed to the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project by enhancing research processes, outputs and outcomes, and this participation was valued by community and consumer representatives and researchers. The National Health and

  10. Building Multicultural Awareness in University Students Using Synchronous Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, Michele Garabedian; Zhang, Jingshun; Wang, Charles Xiaoxue

    2018-01-01

    To explore the potential for building multicultural awareness in university students using synchronous technology, faculty members from an American regional state university and a Chinese regional university collaborated to find appropriate ways to integrate synchronous technology (e.g., Adobe Connect) into a teacher education program in the…

  11. A Model for Content and Communication Management in Synchronous Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, David; Kazuhide, Kanenishi; Matsuura, Kenji; Baudin, Veronique; Gayraud, Thierry; Yano, Yoneo; Diaz, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Asynchronous web-based learning environments are not usually as interactive or adaptive compared to traditional classrooms. The use of synchronous communication tools may be a solution to recreating the link between students and professors. However, synchronous collaborative learning environments are often restricted to a set of communication…

  12. Using the Theory of Planned Behaviour to examine health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2015-08-01

    Safe medication practices depend upon, not only on individual responsibilities, but also effective communication and collaboration between members of the medication team. However, measurement of these skills is fraught with conceptual and practical difficulties. The aims of this study were to explore the utility of a Theory of Planned Behaviour-based questionnaire to predict health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice; and to determine the contribution of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions. A descriptive cross-sectional survey based upon the Theory of Planned Behaviour was designed and tested. A convenience sample of 65 undergraduate pharmacy, nursing and medicine students from one semi-metropolitan Australian university were recruited for the study. Participants' behavioural intentions, attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control to behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety were measured using an online version of the Theory of Planned Behaviour Medication Safety Questionnaire. The Questionnaire had good internal consistency with a Cronbach's alpha of 0.844. The three predictor variables of attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived control accounted for between 30 and 46% of the variance in behavioural intention; this is a strong prediction in comparison to previous studies using the Theory of Planned Behaviour. Data analysis also indicated that attitude was the most significant predictor of participants' intention to collaborate with other team members to improve medication safety. The results from this study provide preliminary support for the Theory of Planned Behaviour-Medication Safety Questionnaire as a valid instrument for examining health professional students' behavioural intentions in relation to medication safety and collaborative practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu-Chih; Chan, Te-Fu; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Chin, Chi-Chun; Chou, Fan-Hao; Lin, Hui-Ju

    2013-09-01

    Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group). Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach α, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA) test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD) comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about "interprofessional communication and collaboration" (p = 0.0184). The scores in the mixed group (37.58 ± 3.26) were higher

  14. Cluster Synchronization Algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Weiguo; Cao, Ming

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents two approaches to achieving cluster synchronization in dynamical multi-agent systems. In contrast to the widely studied synchronization behavior, where all the coupled agents converge to the same value asymptotically, in the cluster synchronization problem studied in this paper,

  15. Collaborative editing within the pervasive collaborative computing environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Agarwal, Deb [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2003-09-11

    Scientific collaborations are established for a wide variety of tasks for which several communication modes are necessary, including messaging, file-sharing, and collaborative editing. In this position paper, we describe our work on the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) which aims to facilitate scientific collaboration within widely distributed environments. The PCCE provides a persistent space in which collaborators can locate each other, exchange messages synchronously and asynchronously and archive conversations. Our current interest is in exploring research and development of shared editing systems with the goal of integrating this technology into the PCCE. We hope to inspire discussion of technology solutions for an integrated approach to synchronous and asynchronous communication and collaborative editing.

  16. Lessons from Google and Apple: creating an open workplace in an academic medical department to foster innovation and collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciotti, Hope A; Armstrong, Walter; Yaari, Gabriel; Campion, Suzanne; Pollard, Mary; Golen, Toni H

    2014-09-01

    An expanding obstetrics-gynecology department at an academic medical center was faced with too little physical space to accommodate its staff, including trainees, attending physicians, researchers, scientists, administrative leadership, nurses, physician assistants, and scheduling/phone staff. Staff also felt that the current use of space was not ideal for collaboration and innovation. In 2011, the department collected data on space use, using a neutral surveyor and a standardized data collection tool. Using these data, architects and facilities managers met with the department to develop a floor plan proposal for a new use of the space. Site visits, departmental meetings, literature reviews, and space mock-ups complemented the decision process. The final architectural plan was developed using an iterative process that included all disciplines within the department. The redesigned workspace accommodates more staff in a modernized, open, egalitarian setup. The authors' informal observations suggest that the physical proximity created by the new workspace has facilitated timely and civil cross-discipline communication and improvements in team-oriented behavior, both of which are important contributors to safe patient care. This innovation is generalizable and may lead other academic departments to make similar changes. In the future, the authors plan to measure the use of the space and to relate that to outcomes, including clinical (coordination of care/patient satisfaction), administrative (absenteeism/attrition), research (grant volume), and efficiency and cost measures.

  17. Synchronization of chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecora, Louis M.; Carroll, Thomas L.

    2015-01-01

    We review some of the history and early work in the area of synchronization in chaotic systems. We start with our own discovery of the phenomenon, but go on to establish the historical timeline of this topic back to the earliest known paper. The topic of synchronization of chaotic systems has always been intriguing, since chaotic systems are known to resist synchronization because of their positive Lyapunov exponents. The convergence of the two systems to identical trajectories is a surprise. We show how people originally thought about this process and how the concept of synchronization changed over the years to a more geometric view using synchronization manifolds. We also show that building synchronizing systems leads naturally to engineering more complex systems whose constituents are chaotic, but which can be tuned to output various chaotic signals. We finally end up at a topic that is still in very active exploration today and that is synchronization of dynamical systems in networks of oscillators

  18. Primary care-based, pharmacist-physician collaborative medication-therapy management of hypertension: a randomized, pragmatic trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Jan D; Steers, Neil; Adler, David S; Kuo, Grace M; Morello, Candis M; Lang, Megan; Singh, Renu F; Wood, Yelena; Kaplan, Robert M; Mangione, Carol M

    2014-09-01

    A collaborative pharmacist-primary care provider (PharmD-PCP) team approach to medication-therapy management (MTM), with pharmacists initiating and changing medications at separate office visits, holds promise for the cost-effective management of hypertension, but has not been evaluated in many systematic trials. The primary objective of this study was to examine blood pressure (BP) control in hypertensive patients managed by a newly formed PharmD-PCP MTM team versus usual care in a university-based primary care clinic. This randomized, pragmatic clinical trial was conducted in hypertensive patients randomly selected for PharmD-PCP MTM or usual care. In the PharmD-PCP MTM group, pharmacists managed drug-therapy initiation and monitoring, medication adjustments, biometric assessments, laboratory tests, and patient education. In the usual-care group, patients continued to see their PCPs. Participants were aged ≥ 18 years, were diagnosed with hypertension, had a most recent BP measurement of ≥ 140/≥ 90 mm Hg (≥ 130/≥ 80 mm Hg if codiagnosed with diabetes mellitus), were on at least 1 antihypertensive medication, and were English speaking. The primary outcome was the difference in the mean change from baseline in systolic BP at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included the percentage achieving therapeutic BP goal and the mean changes from baseline in diastolic BP and low- and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A total of 166 patients were enrolled (69 men; mean age, 67.7 years; PharmD-PCP MTM group, n = 75; usual-care group, n = 91). Mean reduction in SBP was significantly greater in the PharmD-PCP MTM group at 6 months (-7.1 [19.4] vs +1.6 [21.0] mm Hg; P = 0.008), but the difference was no longer statistically significant at 9 months (-5.2 [16.9] vs -1.7 [17.7] mm Hg; P = 0.22), based on an intent-to-treat analysis. In the intervention group, greater percentages of patients who continued to see the MTM pharmacist versus those who returned to their PCP were

  19. How do international medical graduates and colleagues perceive and deal with difficulties in everyday collaboration? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjeggestad, Erik; Norvoll, Reidun; Sandal, Gro M; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2017-06-01

    Many medical doctors work outside their countries of origin. Consequently, language barriers and cultural differences may result in miscommunication and tension in the workplace, leading to poor performance and quality of treatment and affecting patient safety. However, there is little information about how foreign doctors and their colleagues perceive their collaboration and handle situations that can affect the quality of health services. Individual, semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with two groups of informants: 16 doctors who had recently started working in Norway and 12 unrelated Norwegian-born healthcare providers who had extensive experience of working with doctors from foreign countries. The interviews were analysed according to the systematic text condensation method. The foreign doctors described themselves as newcomers and found it difficult to speak with their colleagues about their shortcomings because they wanted to be seen as competent. Their Norwegian colleagues reported that many new foreign doctors had demanding work schedules and therefore they were reluctant to give them negative feedback. They also feared that foreign doctors would react negatively to criticism. All participants, both the new foreign doctors and their colleagues, reported that they took responsibility for the prevention of misunderstandings and errors; nevertheless, they struggled to discuss such issues with each other. Silence was the coping strategy adopted by both the foreign doctors and native healthcare professionals when facing difficulties in their working relationships. In such situations, many foreign doctors are socialized into a new workplace in which uncertainty and shortcomings are not discussed openly. Effective leadership and procedures to facilitate communication may alleviate this area of concern.

  20. Promoting research and audit at medical school: evaluating the educational impact of participation in a student-led national collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Stephen J; Glasbey, James C D; Khatri, Chetan; Kelly, Michael; Nepogodiev, Dmitri; Bhangu, Aneel; Fitzgerald, J Edward F

    2015-03-13

    Medical students often struggle to engage in extra-curricular research and audit. The Student Audit and Research in Surgery (STARSurg) network is a novel student-led, national research collaborative. Student collaborators contribute data to national, clinical studies while gaining an understanding of audit and research methodology and ethical principles. This study aimed to evaluate the educational impact of participation. Participation in the national, clinical project was supported with training interventions, including an academic training day, an online e-learning module, weekly discussion forums and YouTube® educational videos. A non-mandatory, online questionnaire assessed collaborators' self-reported confidence in performing key academic skills and their perceptions of audit and research prior to and following participation. The group completed its first national clinical study ("STARSurgUK") with 273 student collaborators across 109 hospital centres. Ninety-seven paired pre- and post-study participation responses (35.5%) were received (male = 51.5%; median age = 23). Participation led to increased confidence in key academic domains including: communication with local research governance bodies (p students to participate in a national clinical study, which increased their confidence and appreciation of academic principles and skills. Encouraging active participation in collaborative, student-led, national studies offers a novel approach for delivering essential academic training.

  1. Longitudinal burnout-collaboration patterns in Japanese medical care workers at special needs schools: a latent class growth analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanayama M

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mieko Kanayama,1 Machiko Suzuki,1 Yoshikazu Yuma2 1Department of Human Health Sciences, Kyoto University Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto, Japan; 2Department of Human Development Education, Graduate School of Education, Hyogo University of Teacher Education, Kato, Hyogo, Japan Abstract: The present study aimed to identify and characterize potential burnout types and the relationship between burnout and collaboration over time. Latent class growth analysis and the growth mixture model were used to identify and characterize heterogeneous patterns of longitudinal stability and change in burnout, and the relationship between burnout and collaboration. We collected longitudinal data at three time points based on Japanese academic terms. The 396 study participants included academic teachers, yogo teachers, and registered nurses in Japanese special needs schools. The best model included four types of both burnout and collaboration in latent class growth analysis with intercept, slope, and quadratic terms. The four types of burnout were as follows: low stable, moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing. They were identified as involving inverse collaboration function. The results indicated that there could be dynamic burnout types, namely moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing, when focusing on growth trajectories in latent class analyses. The finding that collaboration was dynamic for dynamic burnout types and stable for stable burnout types is of great interest. This was probably related to the inverse relationship between the two constructs. Keywords: burnout, collaboration, latent class growth analysis, interprofessional care, special needs schools

  2. What the Desirable Collaboration between Care Workers in Nursing Homes and Phamacists Should Be: An Approach for Security and Safe Medication for Residents in Nursing Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maki, Hideyuki; Shiraishi, Akira; Miki, Akiko; Satoh, Hiroki; Konishi, Yukari; Asai, Kohei; Funahashi, Kenichi; Usui, Yoshinobu; Sawada, Yasufumi

    2017-01-01

    In our previous research, there was no collaboration between care workers and pharmacists, for the most part. As a result, it was discovered that in some cases, problems concerning medication of nursing home residents had not been resolved. To solve this issue, we brought together care workers and pharmacists for a workshop we conducted. We assigned 12 care workers with at least two years of experience and 12 pharmacists to four mixed groups and guided them in the management of in-home long-term medical care and conducted small group discussions (SGD) using the KJ method. In the pre-survey before the workshop, all 12 care workers replied "yes" to having experienced "concerns over medication" and nine (75%) replied "no" to having experienced "discussions (consultations) with pharmacists regarding the medication of residents". As a result of the SGD, "information sharing among professionals" was revealed as a problem common to all groups. Furthermore, common countermeasures for this issue included communication notes and holding collaborative meetings. In the post-survey after the workshop, 67% of the participants replied that their thoughts concerning countermeasures were "coherent", and everyone replied that their "awareness was increased". In a follow-up survey after the workshop, 82% of the participants replied that they were using some form of what they had learned and discovered in the workshop in their actual work.

  3. Synchronicity and Leadership

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Merry, Philip

    2017-01-01

    LAY SUMMARY SYNCHRONICITY AND LEADERSHIP TILBURG PHD DISSERTATION, PHILIP MERRY World’s First PhD to Research Synchronicity And Leadership Using Grounded Theory OUT OF THE BLUE COINCIDENCES: research topic Most people have had the experience of thinking of someone and then, almost magically have

  4. Synchronization of networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For networks with time-varying topology we compare the synchronization properties of these networks with the corresponding time-average network. We find that if the different coupling matrices corresponding to the time-varying networks commute with each other then the stability of the synchronized state for both the ...

  5. Collaboration in research and the influential factors in Golestan University of Medical Sciences research projects (2005-2007): an academic sample from Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borghei, Afsaneh; Qorbani, Mostafa; Rezapour, Aziz; Majdzadeh, Reza; Nedjat, Saharnaz; Asayesh, Hamid; Mansourian, Morteza; Noroozi, Mahdi; Jahahgir, Fereydoon

    2013-08-01

    Number of Iranian articles published in ISI journals has increased significantly in recent years.Despite the quantitative progress, studies performed in Iran represent low collaboration in research; therefore,we decided to evaluate collaboration in Golestan University of Medical Sciences (GOUMS) research projects. In this cross-sectional study, all GOUMS research projects that had got grants from the universitybetween 2005-2007 were studied. Among 107 research projects included in our study, 102 projects were evaluatedand checklists were completed. The researcher's questionnaire was sent to the principle investigators (n=46) of the projects and eventually 40 questionnaires were collected. The review of 102 research proposals shows that 10 projects (9.8%) have been performed in collaborationwith other organizations. Scientific outputs in these projects have been more than projects which wereconfined to the university (98% compare to 68%; p= 0.04). The total cost of the projects under study was a littlemore than 300,000 US$. In just 12 projects (11.8%) a part of the cost had been provided by organizations outsidethe university. About 50% of researchers declared that they had chosen their research topic based on their"personal interest". Only 1 project was performed by the demand of nongovernmental organizations and 12 researchersreported no collaboration in their activities. This study shows that collaboration in GOUMS research projects is low. Moreover, collaborationswith governmental and nongovernmental organizations are trivial. The scientific outputs in collaborativeresearch projects are much more than other projects.

  6. The impact of an interprofessional problem-based learning curriculum of clinical ethics on medical and nursing students' attitudes and ability of interprofessional collaboration: A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chih Lin

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Clinical ethic situations in modern multiprofessional healthcare systems may involve different healthcare professions who work together for patient care. The undergraduate interprofessional education of clinical ethics would help to incubate healthcare students' ability of interprofessional collaboration in solving ethical problems. However, the impact from an interprofessional educational model on student's attitudes and confidence of interprofessional collaboration should be carefully evaluated during the process of curricular development. This study aimed to conduct a pilot interprofessional PBL curriculum of clinical ethics and evaluate the curricular impact on interprofessional students' attitude and confidence of collaborative teamwork. Thirty-six medical and nursing students volunteered to participate in this study and were divided into three groups (medical group, nursing group, and mixed group. Tutors were recruited from the Medical School and the College of Nursing. The pilot curriculum included one lecture of clinical ethics, one PBL case study with two tutorial sessions, and one session of group discussion and feedback. A narrative story with multiple story lines and a multiperspective problem analysis tool were used in the PBL tutorials. The students' self-evaluation of learning questionnaire was used to evaluate students' learning of clinical ethics and interprofessional collaborative skills and attitude. The internal consistency of the questionnaire was measured by Cronbach α, and the criterion-related validity of the questionnaire was evaluated through associations between the dimension scores with the student group by one-way analysis of variance test (ANOVA test and Tukey-Kramer honestly significant difference (HSD comparison. There was significant difference among different groups in students' ability and attitudes about “interprofessional communication and collaboration” (p = 0.0184. The scores in the mixed group (37

  7. Longitudinal burnout-collaboration patterns in Japanese medical care workers at special needs schools: a latent class growth analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Mieko; Suzuki, Machiko; Yuma, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify and characterize potential burnout types and the relationship between burnout and collaboration over time. Latent class growth analysis and the growth mixture model were used to identify and characterize heterogeneous patterns of longitudinal stability and change in burnout, and the relationship between burnout and collaboration. We collected longitudinal data at three time points based on Japanese academic terms. The 396 study participants included academic teachers, yogo teachers, and registered nurses in Japanese special needs schools. The best model included four types of both burnout and collaboration in latent class growth analysis with intercept, slope, and quadratic terms. The four types of burnout were as follows: low stable, moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing. They were identified as involving inverse collaboration function. The results indicated that there could be dynamic burnout types, namely moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing, when focusing on growth trajectories in latent class analyses. The finding that collaboration was dynamic for dynamic burnout types and stable for stable burnout types is of great interest. This was probably related to the inverse relationship between the two constructs.

  8. Longitudinal burnout-collaboration patterns in Japanese medical care workers at special needs schools: a latent class growth analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanayama, Mieko; Suzuki, Machiko; Yuma, Yoshikazu

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify and characterize potential burnout types and the relationship between burnout and collaboration over time. Latent class growth analysis and the growth mixture model were used to identify and characterize heterogeneous patterns of longitudinal stability and change in burnout, and the relationship between burnout and collaboration. We collected longitudinal data at three time points based on Japanese academic terms. The 396 study participants included academic teachers, yogo teachers, and registered nurses in Japanese special needs schools. The best model included four types of both burnout and collaboration in latent class growth analysis with intercept, slope, and quadratic terms. The four types of burnout were as follows: low stable, moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing. They were identified as involving inverse collaboration function. The results indicated that there could be dynamic burnout types, namely moderate unstable, high unstable, and high decreasing, when focusing on growth trajectories in latent class analyses. The finding that collaboration was dynamic for dynamic burnout types and stable for stable burnout types is of great interest. This was probably related to the inverse relationship between the two constructs. PMID:27366107

  9. Creating opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred care: how nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use communication strategies when managing medications in an acute hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Gerdtz, Marie; Manias, Elizabeth

    2016-10-01

    This paper examines the communication strategies that nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients use when managing medications. Patient-centred medication management is best accomplished through interdisciplinary practice. Effective communication about managing medications between clinicians and patients has a direct influence on patient outcomes. There is a lack of research that adopts a multidisciplinary approach and involves critical in-depth analysis of medication interactions among nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients. A critical ethnographic approach with video reflexivity was adopted to capture communication strategies during medication activities in two general medical wards of an acute care hospital in Melbourne, Australia. A mixed ethnographic approach combining participant observations, field interviews, video recordings and video reflexive focus groups and interviews was employed. Seventy-six nurses, 31 doctors, 1 pharmacist and 27 patients gave written consent to participate in the study. Data analysis was informed by Fairclough's critical discourse analytic framework. Clinicians' use of communication strategies was demonstrated in their interpersonal, authoritative and instructive talk with patients. Doctors adopted the language discourse of normalisation to standardise patients' illness experiences. Nurses and pharmacists employed the language discourses of preparedness and scrutiny to ensure that patient safety was maintained. Patients took up the discourse of politeness to raise medication concerns and question treatment decisions made by doctors, in their attempts to challenge decision-making about their health care treatment. In addition, the video method revealed clinicians' extensive use of body language in communication processes for medication management. The use of communication strategies by nurses, doctors, pharmacists and patients created opportunities for improved interdisciplinary collaboration and patient-centred medication

  10. Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Paul Lecoq assembles a read head made with special crystals for a PET (positron emission tomography) scanner. He is the initiator of the Crystal Clear collaboration, which aims to transfer crystals developed at CERN to applications in medical imaging.

  11. Information Life-Cycle Management at the Erasmus Medical Center : Collaboratively Managing Digital Data for Care, Research, Education and the International Development of the GLOBE 3D Genome Viewer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.A. Knoch (Tobias); P. Walgemoed; H.J.F.M.M. Eussen (Bert)

    2006-01-01

    textabstractInformation Lifecycle Management at the Erasmus University Medical Centre. Collaboratively managing digital data for care, research and education using the international development of the GLOBE 3D Genome Viewer and Erasmus Computing Grid as catalyzing initiatives. The

  12. Supporting collaborative computing and interaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Agarwal, Deborah [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McParland, Charles [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Perry, Marcia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-05-22

    To enable collaboration on the daily tasks involved in scientific research, collaborative frameworks should provide lightweight and ubiquitous components that support a wide variety of interaction modes. We envision a collaborative environment as one that provides a persistent space within which participants can locate each other, exchange synchronous and asynchronous messages, share documents and applications, share workflow, and hold videoconferences. We are developing the Pervasive Collaborative Computing Environment (PCCE) as such an environment. The PCCE will provide integrated tools to support shared computing and task control and monitoring. This paper describes the PCCE and the rationale for its design.

  13. Blending Online Asynchronous and Synchronous Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa C. Yamagata-Lynch

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article I will share a qualitative self-study about a 15-week blended 100% online graduate level course facilitated through synchronous meetings on Blackboard Collaborate and asynchronous discussions on Blackboard. I taught the course at the University of Tennessee (UT during the spring 2012 semester and the course topic was online learning environments. The primary research question of this study was: How can the designer/instructor optimize learning experiences for students who are studying about online learning environments in a blended online course relying on both synchronous and asynchronous technologies? I relied on student reflections of course activities during the beginning, middle, and the end of the semester as the primary data source to obtain their insights regarding course experiences. Through the experiences involved in designing and teaching the course and engaging in this study I found that there is room in the instructional technology research community to address strategies for facilitating online synchronous learning that complement asynchronous learning. Synchronous online whole class meetings and well-structured small group meetings can help students feel a stronger sense of connection to their peers and instructor and stay engaged with course activities. In order to provide meaningful learning spaces in synchronous learning environments, the instructor/designer needs to balance the tension between embracing the flexibility that the online space affords to users and designing deliberate structures that will help them take advantage of the flexible space.

  14. Interdisciplinary collaboration in the provision of a pharmacist-led discharge medication reconciliation service at an Irish teaching hospital.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Holland, Deirdre M

    2015-04-01

    Medication reconciliation is a basic principle of good medicines management. With the establishment of the National Acute Medicines Programme in Ireland, medication reconciliation has been mandated for all patients at all transitions of care. The clinical pharmacist is widely credited as the healthcare professional that plays the most critical role in the provision of medication reconciliation services.

  15. Rural retention of new medical graduates from the Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors (CPIRD): a 12-year retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Techakehakij, Win; Arora, Rajin

    2017-07-01

    Physician scarcity in rural areas is a major obstacle to healthcare access, leading to health inequity worldwide. In Thailand, a special recruitment program of medical education [Collaborative Project to Increase Production of Rural Doctors (CPIRD)] was initiated with four different medical training tracks. No previous research has examined the rural retention of new medical graduates across the CPIRD tracks, compared with those receiving conventional medical education (Normal track). This study examines the public retention of rural physicians from different tracks of entry. A retrospective study was conducted in new medical graduates who entered Ministry of Public Health (MoPH) hospitals from January 2003 to October 2014, and followed up until June 2015, using administrative data from the Personnel Administration Division, MoPH. The CPIRD registry database was used to identify physicians' tracks of entry. Survival analyses and multiple logistic regression analyses were applied to compare the annual retention and the probability of 3-year retention of rural physicians. Results clearly demonstrated a high rural retention of CPIRD medical graduates, compared with their Normal track peers, regarding both lower annual resignation (HR 0.456, P rural retention were revealed across the different CPIRD tracks. Evidence from this study can be used as part of the information to reshape the physician production policy to reduce health inequity in rural areas. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press in association with The London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Afya Jumuishi : towards Interprofessional collaboration between traditional and modern medical practitioners in the Mara Region of Tanzania

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chirangi, Musuto Mutaragara

    2013-01-01

    A scientific correlation study on human resource and organisational policy-oriented study, which was conducted in the Mara Region of Tanzania. It specifically investigates major factors, which correlate to interprofessional collaborative behaviours in the context of health service delivery between

  17. Asynchronized synchronous machines

    CERN Document Server

    Botvinnik, M M

    1964-01-01

    Asynchronized Synchronous Machines focuses on the theoretical research on asynchronized synchronous (AS) machines, which are "hybrids” of synchronous and induction machines that can operate with slip. Topics covered in this book include the initial equations; vector diagram of an AS machine; regulation in cases of deviation from the law of full compensation; parameters of the excitation system; and schematic diagram of an excitation regulator. The possible applications of AS machines and its calculations in certain cases are also discussed. This publication is beneficial for students and indiv

  18. An exploratory study of the potential learning benefits for medical students in collaborative drawing: creativity, reflection and ‘critical looking’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Building on a series of higher educational arts/medicine initiatives, an interdisciplinary drawing module themed on the human body was developed for both year 3 Craft students and year 3 Medicine degree students. This became the subject of a research project exploring how the collaborative approach to drawing adopted on this module impacted on the students’ learning. In this article, emphasis is given to issues thought to have most potential relevance to medical education. Methods Using an ethnographic research design, the methods adopted were: direct observation of all aspects of the module sessions, audio and video recordings and photographs of the sessions, the incorporation of a semi-structured discussion at the end of each session, and anonymous student questionnaires. Results A number of key themes emerged. The complex, phased and multi-sensory nature of the ‘critical looking’ skills developed through the drawing exercises was seen as of potential value in medical education, being proposed as analogous to processes involved in clinical examination and diagnosis. The experience of interdisciplinary collaborative drawing was significant to the students as a creative, participatory and responsive form of learning. The emphasis on the physical experience of drawing and the thematic use of the human body as drawing subject led to reflective discussions about bodily knowledge and understanding. There were indications that students had a meta-cognitive awareness of the learning shifts that had occurred and the sessions provoked constructive self-reflective explorations of pre-professional identity. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests, through the themes identified, that there may be potential learning outcomes for medical students in this model of interdisciplinary collaborative drawing of the human body. Further research is needed to explore their applicability and value to medical education. There is a need to explore in more depth the

  19. Advancing medical device innovation through collaboration and coordination of structured data capture pilots: Report from the Medical Device Epidemiology Network (MDEpiNet) Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Results-Oriented, Time Bound (SMART) Think Tank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Terrie L; Drozda, Joseph P; Baskin, Kevin M; Tcheng, James; Conway, Karen; Wilson, Natalia; Marinac-Dabic, Danica; Heise, Theodore; Krucoff, Mitchell W

    2017-12-01

    The Medical Device Epidemiology Network (MDEpiNet) is a public private partnership (PPP) that provides a platform for collaboration on medical device evaluation and depth of expertise for supporting pilots to capture, exchange and use device information for improving device safety and protecting public health. The MDEpiNet SMART Think Tank, held in February, 2013, sought to engage expert stakeholders who were committed to improving the capture of device data, including Unique Device Identification (UDI), in key electronic health information. Prior to the Think Tank there was limited collaboration among stakeholders beyond a few single health care organizations engaged in electronic capture and exchange of device data. The Think Tank resulted in what has become two sustainable multi-stakeholder device data capture initiatives, BUILD and VANGUARD. These initiatives continue to mature within the MDEpiNet PPP structure and are well aligned with the goals outlined in recent FDA-initiated National Medical Device Planning Board and Medical Device Registry Task Force white papers as well as the vision for the National Evaluation System for health Technology.%. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Evaluation of student nurses' perception of preparedness for oral medication administration in clinical practice: a collaborative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggar, Christina; Dawson, Sonja

    2014-06-01

    Attainment of oral medication administration skills and competency for student nurses is challenging and medication errors are common. The ability of nurses to master a clinical skill is dependent upon educational instruction and practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate nursing students' perception of preparedness for oral medication administration in two practice environments and determine possible relationship between student demographics and their perceived preparedness for oral medication administration. This was a cross sectional, exploratory study. Eighty-eight second year students from a baccalaureate nursing course from two metropolitan Australian tertiary institutions participated. Student nurses' perception of preparedness for oral medication administration was measured via a self-administered, adapted, and validated questionnaire. The overall mean Total Preparedness Score was 86.2 (range 71-102). There was no significant difference for perceived total preparedness to administer oral medications between the two facilities. Whilst there was no significant relationship established between student demographics and their perceived preparedness to administer oral medications, four single questions related to clinical practice were shown to be significant. Low fidelity simulated teaching environments that incorporate time management and post medication situations, may improve student nurses' perceived preparedness for oral medication administration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Synchronization in complex networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenas, A.; Diaz-Guilera, A.; Moreno, Y.; Zhou, C.; Kurths, J.

    2007-12-12

    Synchronization processes in populations of locally interacting elements are in the focus of intense research in physical, biological, chemical, technological and social systems. The many efforts devoted to understand synchronization phenomena in natural systems take now advantage of the recent theory of complex networks. In this review, we report the advances in the comprehension of synchronization phenomena when oscillating elements are constrained to interact in a complex network topology. We also overview the new emergent features coming out from the interplay between the structure and the function of the underlying pattern of connections. Extensive numerical work as well as analytical approaches to the problem are presented. Finally, we review several applications of synchronization in complex networks to different disciplines: biological systems and neuroscience, engineering and computer science, and economy and social sciences.

  2. A unique collaboration of female medical providers within the United States Armed Forces: rehabilitation of a marine with post-concussive vestibulopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottshall, Kim; Gray, Nicola; Drake, Angela I

    2005-01-01

    Uncle Sam's loyal nieces have come a long way from the days of World War I. The development of occupational and physical therapy was heavily influenced by an early relationship with medical specialists during the First World War. This relationship can be considered largely responsible for the eventual acceptance (by the Armed Forces) of women working in this area. Over the past decade active duty women have seen many changes in opportunities to serve and are now stationed aboard aircraft carriers, performing roles previously considered for male personnel. We report a case study of the medical care provided by both military and civilian women working for the United States Armed Forces. Initial assessment was conducted in a battalion aid station of a United States Marine Corp base and the subject was then referred to a military medical center with highly technical vestibular assessment and rehabilitation services. The subject's case represents a unique collaboration of women therapists, enabling a Marines' access to timely and accurate assessment, treatment and ultimately, successful return to active duty. This case study is one of many examples of the acceptance and successful integration of women as providers of medical care within the Military's medical framework.

  3. Synchronous DC Power Supply.

    Science.gov (United States)

    The patent describes a synchronous direct current (dc) power supply which has the power supply input drive synchronized with the pulse repetition...frequency (PRF) of the amplifying or load circuit requiring the dc power for operation. This limits the occurrence of ripple components in the power ... supply output to the spectral positions of the PRF lines, eliminating ripple interference with signal processing in the load. An astable multivibrator is

  4. Learning global health: a pilot study of an online collaborative intercultural peer group activity involving medical students in Australia and Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrose, Mark; Murray, Linda; Handoyo, Nicholas E; Tunggal, Deif; Cooling, Nick

    2017-01-13

    There is limited research to inform effective pedagogies for teaching global health to undergraduate medical students. Theoretically, using a combination of teaching pedagogies typically used in 'international classrooms' may prove to be an effective way of learning global health. This pilot study aimed to explore the experiences of medical students in Australia and Indonesia who participated in a reciprocal intercultural participatory peer e-learning activity (RIPPLE) in global health. Seventy-one third year medical students (49 from Australia and 22 from Indonesia) from the University of Tasmania (Australia) and the University of Nusa Cendana (Indonesia) participated in the RIPPLE activity. Participants were randomly distributed into 11 intercultural 'virtual' groups. The groups collaborated online over two weeks to study a global health topic of their choice, and each group produced a structured research abstract. Pre- and post-RIPPLE questionnaires were used to capture students' experiences of the activity. Descriptive quantitative data were analysed with Microsoft Excel and qualitative data were thematically analysed. Students' motivation to volunteer for this activity included: curiosity about the innovative approach to learning; wanting to expand knowledge of global health; hoping to build personal and professional relationships; and a desire to be part of an intercultural experience. Afer completing the RIPPLE program, participants reported on global health knowledge acquisition, the development of peer relationships, and insight into another culture. Barriers to achieving the learning outcomes associated with RIPPLE included problems with establishing consistent online communication, and effectively managing time to simultaneously complete RIPPLE and other curricula activities. Medical students from both countries found benefits in working together in small virtual groups to complement existing teaching in global health. However, our pilot study

  5. Global collaborative networks on meta-analyses of randomized trials published in high impact factor medical journals: a social network analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalá-López, Ferrán; Alonso-Arroyo, Adolfo; Hutton, Brian; Aleixandre-Benavent, Rafael; Moher, David

    2014-01-29

    Research collaboration contributes to the advancement of knowledge by exploiting the results of scientific efforts more efficiently, but the global patterns of collaboration on meta-analysis are unknown. The purpose of this research was to describe and characterize the global collaborative patterns in meta-analyses of randomized trials published in high impact factor medical journals over the past three decades. This was a cross-sectional, social network analysis. We searched PubMed for relevant meta-analyses of randomized trials published up to December 2012. We selected meta-analyses (including at least randomized trials as primary evidence source) published in the top seven high impact factor general medical journals (according to Journal Citation Reports 2011): The New England Journal of Medicine, The Lancet, the BMJ, JAMA, Annals of Internal Medicine, Archives of Internal Medicine (now renamed JAMA Internal Medicine), and PLoS Medicine. Opinion articles, conceptual papers, narrative reviews, reviews without meta-analysis, reviews of reviews, and other study designs were excluded. Overall, we included 736 meta-analyses, in which 3,178 authors, 891 institutions, and 51 countries participated. The BMJ was the journal that published the greatest number of articles (39%), followed by The Lancet (18%), JAMA (15%) and the Archives of Internal Medicine (15%). The USA, the UK, and Canada headed the absolute global productivity ranking in number of papers. The 64 authors and the 39 institutions with the highest publication rates were identified. We also found 82 clusters of authors (one group with 55 members and one group with 54 members) and 19 clusters of institutions (one major group with 76 members). The most prolific authors were mainly affiliated with the University of Oxford (UK), McMaster University (Canada), and the University of Bern (Switzerland). Our analysis identified networks of authors, institutions and countries publishing meta-analyses of randomized

  6. MO-DE-BRA-03: The Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI): A Practical Model for Academic Program Collaboration in a Multi-Centre City

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McEwen, M [National Research Council Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Rogers, D [Carleton University, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Johns, P

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To build a world-class medical physics educational program that capitalizes on expertise distributed over several clinical, government, and academic centres. Few if any of these centres would have the critical mass to solely resource a program. Methods: In order to enable an academic program, stakeholders from five institutions made a proposal to Carleton University for a) a research network with defined membership requirements and a process for accepting new members, and b) a graduate specialization (MSc and PhD) in medical physics. Both proposals were accepted and the program has grown steadily. Our courses are taught by medical physicists from across the collaboration. Our students have access to physicists in: clinical radiotherapy (the Ottawa Cancer Centre treats 4500 new patients/y), radiology, cardiology and nuclear medicine, Canada’s primary standards dosimetry laboratory, radiobiology, and university-based medical physics research. Our graduate courses emphasize the foundational physics plus applied aspects of imaging, radiotherapy, and radiobiology. Active researchers in the city-wide volunteer-run network are appointed as adjunct professors by Physics, giving them access to national funding competitions and partial student funding through teaching assistantships while opening up facilities in their institutions for student thesis research. Results: The medical physics network has grown to ∼40 members from eight institutions and includes five full-time faculty in Physics and 17 adjunct research professors. The graduate student population is ∼20. Our graduates have proceeded to a spectrum of careers. Our alumni list includes a CCPM Past-President, the current COMP President, many clinical physicists, and the heads of at least three major clinical medical physics departments. Our PhD was Ontario’s first CAMPEP-accredited program. Conclusion: A self-governing volunteer network is the foundational element that enables an MSc/PhD medical

  7. MO-DE-BRA-03: The Ottawa Medical Physics Institute (OMPI): A Practical Model for Academic Program Collaboration in a Multi-Centre City

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McEwen, M; Rogers, D; Johns, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To build a world-class medical physics educational program that capitalizes on expertise distributed over several clinical, government, and academic centres. Few if any of these centres would have the critical mass to solely resource a program. Methods: In order to enable an academic program, stakeholders from five institutions made a proposal to Carleton University for a) a research network with defined membership requirements and a process for accepting new members, and b) a graduate specialization (MSc and PhD) in medical physics. Both proposals were accepted and the program has grown steadily. Our courses are taught by medical physicists from across the collaboration. Our students have access to physicists in: clinical radiotherapy (the Ottawa Cancer Centre treats 4500 new patients/y), radiology, cardiology and nuclear medicine, Canada’s primary standards dosimetry laboratory, radiobiology, and university-based medical physics research. Our graduate courses emphasize the foundational physics plus applied aspects of imaging, radiotherapy, and radiobiology. Active researchers in the city-wide volunteer-run network are appointed as adjunct professors by Physics, giving them access to national funding competitions and partial student funding through teaching assistantships while opening up facilities in their institutions for student thesis research. Results: The medical physics network has grown to ∼40 members from eight institutions and includes five full-time faculty in Physics and 17 adjunct research professors. The graduate student population is ∼20. Our graduates have proceeded to a spectrum of careers. Our alumni list includes a CCPM Past-President, the current COMP President, many clinical physicists, and the heads of at least three major clinical medical physics departments. Our PhD was Ontario’s first CAMPEP-accredited program. Conclusion: A self-governing volunteer network is the foundational element that enables an MSc/PhD medical

  8. Collaboration Platforms in China for Translational and Clinical Research: The Partnership Between Peking University Health Science Center and the University of Michigan Medical School.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolars, Joseph C; Fang, Weigang; Zheng, Kai; Huang, Amy Y; Sun, Qiudan; Wang, Yanfang; Woolliscroft, James O; Ke, Yang

    2017-03-01

    Clinical and translational research is increasing in China, attracting faculty-to-faculty collaborations between U.S. and Chinese researchers. However, examples of successful institution-to-institution collaborations to facilitate this research are limited. The authors describe a partnership between Peking University Health Science Center (PUHSC) and the University of Michigan Medical School (UMMS) designed to enable faculty-initiated joint translational and clinical research projects. In 2009, UMMS leadership identified PUHSC as the most appropriate institutional partner, and the Joint Institute for Translational and Clinical Research was established in 2010. Each contributed $7 million for joint research projects in areas of mutual interest. A shared governance structure, four thematic programs (pulmonary, cardiovascular, liver, and renal diseases), three joint research-enabling cores, and processes for awarding funding have been established along with methods for collaborating and mechanisms to share data and biomaterials. As of November 2015, 52 joint faculty proposals have been submitted, and 25 have been funded. These projects have involved more than 100,000 patients in the United States and China and have generated 13 peer-reviewed publications. Pilot data have been leveraged to secure $3.3 million of U.S. extramural funding. Faculty and trainee exchanges take place regularly (including an annual symposium), and mechanisms exist to link faculty seeking collaborations. Critical determinants of success include having co-ownership at all levels with coinvestment of resources. Each institution is committed to continuing its support with a repeat $7 million investment. Next steps include initiating studies in new clinical areas and pursuing large clinical intervention trials.

  9. collaborative clinical and population-based curriculum for medical students to address primary care needs of the homeless in New York City shelters : Teaching homeless healthcare to medical students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Ramin; Naderi, Ramesh; Gaughran, Margaret; Sckell, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    Background Millions of Americans experience homelessness annually. Medical providers do not receive adequate training in primary care of the homeless.Methods Starting in 2012, a comprehensive curriculum was offered to medical students during their family medicine or ambulatory clerkship, covering clinical, social and advocacy, population-based, and policy aspects. Students were taught to: elicit specific social history, explore health expectations, and assess barriers to healthcare; evaluate clinical conditions specific to the homeless and develop plans for care tailored toward patients' medical and social needs; collaborate with shelter staff and community organizations to improve disease management and engage in advocacy efforts. A mixed methods design was used to evaluate students' knowledge, attitudes, and skills including pre- and post-curriculum surveys, debriefing sessions, and observed clinical skills.Results The mean age of the students (n = 30) was 26.5 years; 55 % were female. The overall scores improved significantly in knowledge, attitude, and self-efficacy domains using paired t‑test (p < 0.01). Specific skills in evaluating mental health, substance abuse, and risky behaviours improved significantly (p < 0.05). In evaluation of communication skills, the majority were rated as having 'outstanding rapport with patients.'Conclusions Comprehensive and ongoing clinical component in shelter clinics, complementary teaching, experienced faculty, and working relationship and collaboration with community organizations were key elements.

  10. Evaluation of a controlled, national collaboration study on a clinical pharmacy service of screening for risk medications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Clemmensen, Marianne Hald; Kronborg, Christian

    2014-01-01

    . Inpatients were screened for the use of five risk medications; anticoagulants, digoxin, methotrexate, NSAIDs and opioids, and during the intervention period recommendations were made by clinical pharmacists according to a standardized intervention scheme. The recommendations were discussed with the physician...

  11. Characteristics of simulation activities at North American medical schools and teaching hospitals: an AAMC-SSH-ASPE-AACN collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Sacks, Heather; Devita, Michael; Reynolds, Robby; Gammon, Wendy; Saleh, Michael; Gliva-McConvey, Gayle; Owens, Tamara; Anderson, Julie; Stillsmoking, Kristina; Cantrell, Mary; Passiment, Morgan

    2012-12-01

    In September 2011, the Association of American Medical Colleges released the results of a survey conducted in 2010 on simulation activities at its member medical schools and teaching hospitals. In this commentary, we offer a synthesis of data and conclude that (1) simulation is used broadly at Association of American Medical Colleges member institutions, for many types of learners, including other health care professionals; (2) it addresses core training competencies and has many educational purposes; (3) its use in learner assessment is more prevalent at medical schools but is still significant at teaching hospitals; and (4) it requires a considerable investment of money, space, personnel, and time. These data confirm general perceptions about the state of simulation in North America for physician training. Future endeavors should include a more granular examination of how simulation is integrated into curricula, a similar survey of other health care-related institutions and professions, and a periodic assessment to characterize trends over time.

  12. A Substantive Medical Education System for Students and Doctors in Collaboration with Obstetricians and Gynecologist, and Pediatricians

    OpenAIRE

    金子, 政時; Masatoki, KANEKO; 宮崎大学医学部医学教育改革推進センター,産婦人科; Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Center for Medical Education, Faculty of Medicine, University of Miyazaki

    2008-01-01

    A substantive medical education system is very important for training young and talented doctors in order to avoid shortage of specialists in the field of obstetrics and gynecology. Before the establishment of a substantive medical education system in Miyazaki prefecture, the prefecture had the highest perinatal mortality rate in Japan. In order to overcome this situation, we began to educate the young and talented doctors who specialized in obstetrics and gynecology. As a result of this prog...

  13. Breaking bad news: evaluation study on self-perceived competences and views of medical and nursing students taking part in a collaborative workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schildmann, Jan; Härlein, Jürgen; Burchardi, Nicole; Schlögl, Mathias; Vollmann, Jochen

    2006-11-01

    To identify possible effects of an interprofessional breaking bad news course for medical and nursing students on perceived key communication skills and to elicit the views of participants on interprofessional aspects of breaking bad news. Medical and nursing students attending an optional course on breaking bad news received a structured questionnaire on self-perceived communication skills and views on interprofessional aspects at the beginning and end of the course. Forty-seven out of 54 students completed the evaluation questionnaires (response rate=87%). Medical students and nursing students rated their key communication skills after the course as significantly better compared with the beginning of the course. Medical students and nursing students disagreed with the statement that a course format for only one of the professional groups would have been more effective than the interprofessional course concept. Students valued the concept of the interprofessional course positively. The improvement of self-perceived communication skills may be interpreted as a positive effect of the teaching session. Further research is necessary to develop strategies to implement a collaborative approach in breaking bad news in clinical practice.

  14. Synchronizing weighted automata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szabolcs Iván

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We introduce two generalizations of synchronizability to automata with transitions weighted in an arbitrary semiring K=(K,+,*,0,1. (or equivalently, to finite sets of matrices in K^nxn. Let us call a matrix A location-synchronizing if there exists a column in A consisting of nonzero entries such that all the other columns of A are filled by zeros. If additionally all the entries of this designated column are the same, we call A synchronizing. Note that these notions coincide for stochastic matrices and also in the Boolean semiring. A set M of matrices in K^nxn is called (location-synchronizing if M generates a matrix subsemigroup containing a (location-synchronizing matrix. The K-(location-synchronizability problem is the following: given a finite set M of nxn matrices with entries in K, is it (location-synchronizing? Both problems are PSPACE-hard for any nontrivial semiring. We give sufficient conditions for the semiring K when the problems are PSPACE-complete and show several undecidability results as well, e.g. synchronizability is undecidable if 1 has infinite order in (K,+,0 or when the free semigroup on two generators can be embedded into (K,*,1.

  15. Collaborative writing: Tools and tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eapen Bell

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Majority of technical writing is done by groups of experts and various web based applications have made this collaboration easy. Email exchange of word processor documents with tracked changes used to be the standard technique for collaborative writing. However web based tools like Google docs and Spreadsheets have made the process fast and efficient. Various versioning tools and synchronous editors are available for those who need additional functionality. Having a group leader who decides the scheduling, communication and conflict resolving protocols is important for successful collaboration.

  16. Collaborative writing: Tools and tips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eapen, Bell Raj

    2007-01-01

    Majority of technical writing is done by groups of experts and various web based applications have made this collaboration easy. Email exchange of word processor documents with tracked changes used to be the standard technique for collaborative writing. However web based tools like Google docs and Spreadsheets have made the process fast and efficient. Various versioning tools and synchronous editors are available for those who need additional functionality. Having a group leader who decides the scheduling, communication and conflict resolving protocols is important for successful collaboration.

  17. Breakdowns in collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2010-01-01

    Collaborative information seeking is integral to many professional activities. In hospital work, the medication process encompasses continual seeking for information and collaborative grounding of information. This study investigates breakdowns in collaborative information seeking through analyses...... introduced risks of new kinds of breakdown in collaborative information seeking. In working to prevent and recover from breakdowns in the seeking and sharing of information a focus on collaborative information seeking will point toward collaborative, organizational, and systemic reasons for breakdown...... of the use of the electronic medication record adopted in a Danish healthcare region and of the reports of five years of medication incidents at Danish hospitals. The results show that breakdowns in collaborative information seeking is a major source of medication incidents, that most of these breakdowns...

  18. Optimistic barrier synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicol, David M.

    1992-01-01

    Barrier synchronization is fundamental operation in parallel computation. In many contexts, at the point a processor enters a barrier it knows that it has already processed all the work required of it prior to synchronization. The alternative case, when a processor cannot enter a barrier with the assurance that it has already performed all the necessary pre-synchronization computation, is treated. The problem arises when the number of pre-sychronization messages to be received by a processor is unkown, for example, in a parallel discrete simulation or any other computation that is largely driven by an unpredictable exchange of messages. We describe an optimistic O(log sup 2 P) barrier algorithm for such problems, study its performance on a large-scale parallel system, and consider extensions to general associative reductions as well as associative parallel prefix computations.

  19. Developing Core Competencies for the Prevention and Management of Prescription Drug Misuse: A Medical Education Collaboration in Massachusetts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antman, Karen H; Berman, Harris A; Flotte, Terence R; Flier, Jeffrey; Dimitri, Dennis M; Bharel, Monica

    2016-10-01

    Drug overdose has become the leading cause of injury death in the United States. More than half of those deaths involve prescription drugs, specifically opioids. A key component of addressing this national epidemic is improving prescriber practices.A review of the curricula at the four medical schools in Massachusetts revealed that, although they taught components of addiction medicine, no uniform standard existed to ensure that all students were taught prevention and management strategies for prescription drug misuse. To fill this gap, the governor and the secretary of health and human services invited the deans of the state's four medical schools to convene to develop a common educational strategy for teaching safe and effective opioid-prescribing practices. With leadership from the Department of Public Health and Massachusetts Medical Society, the deans formed the Medical Education Working Group in 2015. This group reviewed the relevant literature and current standards for treating substance use disorders and defined 10 core competencies for the prevention and management of prescription drug misuse.The medical schools have incorporated these competencies into their curricula and have committed to assessing students' competence in these areas. The members of the Medical Education Working Group have agreed to continue to work together on key next steps, including connecting these competencies to those for residents, equipping interprofessional teams to address prescription drug misuse, and developing materials in pain management and opioid misuse for practicing physicians. This first-in-the-nation partnership has yielded cross-institutional competencies that aim to address a public health emergency in real time.

  20. Improving outcomes for patients with medication-resistant anxiety: effects of collaborative care with cognitive behavioral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Sills, Laura; Roy-Byrne, Peter P; Craske, Michelle G; Bystritsky, Alexander; Sullivan, Greer; Stein, Murray B

    2016-12-01

    Many patients with anxiety disorders remain symptomatic after receiving evidence-based treatment, yet research on treatment-resistant anxiety is limited. We evaluated effects of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) on outcomes of patients with medication-resistant anxiety disorders using data from the Coordinated Anxiety Learning and Management (CALM) trial. Primary care patients who met study entry criteria (including DSM-IV diagnosis of generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, or social anxiety disorder) despite ongoing pharmacotherapy of appropriate type, dose, and duration were classified as medication resistant (n = 227). Logistic regression was used to estimate effects of CALM's CBT program (CALM-CBT; chosen by 104 of 117 medication-resistant patients randomized to CALM) versus usual care (UC; n = 110) on response [≥ 50% reduction of 12-item Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI-12) anxiety and somatic symptom score] and remission (BSI-12 < 6) at 6, 12, and 18 months. Within-group analyses examined outcomes by treatment choice (CBT vs. CBT plus medication management) and CBT dose. Approximately 58% of medication-resistant CALM-CBT patients responded and 46% remitted during the study. Relative to UC, CALM-CBT was associated with greater response at 6 months (AOR = 3.78, 95% CI 2.02-7.07) and 12 months (AOR = 2.49, 95% CI 1.36-4.58) and remission at 6, 12, and 18 months (AORs = 2.44 to 3.18). Patients in CBT plus medication management fared no better than those in CBT only. Some evidence suggested higher CBT dose produced better outcomes. CBT can improve outcomes for patients whose anxiety symptoms are resistant to standard pharmacotherapy. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Process and output: relation between transactivity, temporal synchronicity, and quality of group work during CSCL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, V.; van Leeuwen, A.; Buis, S.C.A.

    2016-01-01

    Do the simultaneous alignment of student activities (temporal synchronicity) and students successively building on each other's reasoning (transactivity) predict the quality of collaborative learning products ? A mixed method approach was used to study 74 first year university students who were

  2. Using Synchronous Peer Tutoring System to Promote Elementary Students' Learning in Mathematics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuei, Mengping

    2012-01-01

    The face-to-face computer-supported collaborative learning has emerged as an important strategy to elementary students' learning. Few studies have explicitly incorporated the structured peer tutoring to the synchronous environment in mathematics. This study was aimed to explore the effects of the synchronous peer tutoring system on children's…

  3. Creating change through collaboration: a twinning partnership to strengthen emergency medicine at Addis Ababa University/Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital--a model for international medical education partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busse, Heidi; Azazh, Aklilu; Teklu, Sisay; Tupesis, Janis P; Woldetsadik, Assefu; Wubben, Ryan J; Tefera, Girma

    2013-12-01

    Morbidity and mortality due to the lack of an organized emergency medical care system are currently high in Ethiopia. Doctors, nurses, and other medical staff often have limited or no formal training on how to handle emergencies. Because of insufficient human and resource capacity needed to assess and treat acutely ill patients, many who are injured may die unnecessarily, at the site of injury, during transport, or at the hospital. This article describes the development of a twinning partnership between Addis Ababa University (AAU), the University of Wisconsin-Madison (UW), and the nonprofit organization People to People (P2P), to strengthen emergency care at Tikur Anbessa Specialized Hospital (TASH) and increase the number of trained emergency medical professionals. The partnership applied the six-phase twinning partnership model, with the overall goal of enhancing and strengthening emergency and trauma care by building institutional and human resource capacity. This was achieved by 1) developing local leaders in emergency medicine (EM), 2) creating training modules adapted to the Ethiopian context, 3) launching an emergency training center, and 4) supporting academic program development. The authors evaluated the program's effectiveness based on our achievements toward these goals. Results include: 1) eight Ethiopian faculty completed a condensed EM fellowship in the United States. Now six Ethiopian physicians serve as EM faculty and two as pediatric EM faculty. 2) Nine emergency training modules were adapted to the Ethiopian context. 3) An emergency training center was opened in 2010 and to date has trained over 4,000 Ethiopian medical professionals. 4) Two academic training programs (EM residency and masters nursing programs) were initiated. With many complex factors affecting the burden of emergency care, innovative and interdisciplinary collaborations are needed in Ethiopia to train medical workers, build local leadership capacity, strengthen infrastructure

  4. The Brotherhood Medical Center: Collaborative Foundation of Maternity and Children’s Healthcare Facility for Displaced Syrians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahma Aburas

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The United Nations has declared the Syrian conflict, with more than 50% of Syria’s population currently displaced, as the worst humanitarian crisis of the twenty-first century. The Syrian conflict has led to a collapse of infrastructure, including access to critical and lifesaving healthcare services. Women and children account for approximately 75% of internally displaced Syrians and refugees. This population is also particularly vulnerable to poor health outcomes, a condition worsened by lack of access to maternal and child health services. In response to this crisis, a partnership of Saudi and Syrian physicians established a non-profit healthcare facility named the Brotherhood Medical Center (BMC to serve women and children within a safe area near the Syrian–Turkish border. The project began in September 2014 and was implemented in three phases of establishment, phased construction and formal launch and operation. Currently, the BMC is working at about 70% of its capacity and is run in partnership with the Syrian Expatriate Medical Association. Although there was strong initial support from donors, the BMC continues to face many financial and operational challenges, including difficulties in transferring money to Syria, shortage of medical supplies, and lack of qualified medical personnel. Despite these challenges, the BMC represents a critical model and an important case study of the challenges of delivering healthcare services to underserved populations during an ongoing conflict. However, more robust support from the international community is needed to ensure it continues its important health and humanitarian mission.

  5. Design, Development and Evaluation of Collaborative Team Training Method in Virtual Worlds for Time-Critical Medical Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanal, Prabal

    2014-01-01

    Medical students acquire and enhance their clinical skills using various available techniques and resources. As the health care profession has move towards team-based practice, students and trainees need to practice team-based procedures that involve timely management of clinical tasks and adequate communication with other members of the team.…

  6. Reforms in VUmc School of Medical Sciences Amsterdam: Student engagement, a Minor elective semester and stakeholder collaboration in improving the quality of assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusurkar, Rashmi A; Daelmans, Hester E; Horrevoets, Anton; de Haan, Marian; van der Meijde, Margreeth; Croiset, Gerda

    2018-03-07

    At VUmc School of Medical Sciences, major curricular reforms occurred in 2005 and 2015, related to the introduction of a Bachelor-Master structure, a new legislation from the Ministry of Education, the changing societal context, and taking note of students' and teachers' needs. Summary of work: Along with the introduction of the Bachelor-Master system, the period between 2005 and 2009 saw the movement from traditional lecture-based teaching to small group teaching in a competency-based curriculum, in which the students were responsible for their learning. Student engagement grew through students' designing learning modules and conducting some of the teaching. In the Bachelor program, an elective "Minor", was designed to broaden and deepen the knowledge of our students beyond the core learning outcomes, in a discipline of their choice. The examination board (EB), responsible for maintaining the quality of assessment, was split into the General EB, which handled overall strategy issues, and the Executive EB, which handled student requests and monitored the quality of assessments. Students develop a sense of what education is about if they are provided opportunities in designing teaching and conducting it. A Minor elective in the medical study can provide the students with an opportunity to learn outside the medical field. Collaborative working between different stakeholders in a medical school is crucial for safeguarding the quality of assessments. Curricular reforms need time to be accepted and integrated into the culture of the medical school. The educational vision needs to be refreshed regularly in alignment with the changing societal context.

  7. Evaluation of the impact of collaborative work by teams from the National Medical Residency Committee and the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery. Retrospective and prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Renato Antunes Dos; Snell, Linda; Nunes, Maria do Patrocínio Tenório

    2016-04-01

    Training for specialist physicians in Brazil can take place in different ways. Closer liaison between institutions providing this training and assessment and health care services may improve qualifications. This article analyzes the impact of closer links and joint work by teams from the National Medical Residency Committee (Comissão Nacional de Residência Médica, CNRM) and the Brazilian Society of Neurosurgery (Sociedade Brasileira de Neurocirurgia, SBN) towards evaluating these programs. Retrospective and prospective study, conducted in a public university on a pilot project developed between CNRM and SBN for joint assessment of training programs across Brazil. The literature in the most relevant databases was reviewed. Documents and legislation produced by official government bodies were evaluated. Training locations were visited. Reports produced about residency programs were analyzed. Only 26% of the programs were immediately approved. The joint assessments found problems relating to teaching and to functioning of clinical service in 35% of the programs. The distribution of programs in this country has a strong relationship with the Human Development Index (HDI) of the regions and is very similar to the distribution of specialists. Closer collaboration between the SBN and CNRM had a positive impact on assessment of neurosurgery medical residency across the country. The low rates of direct approval have produced modifications and improvements to the quality of teaching and care (services). Closer links between the CNRM and other medical specialties have the capability to positively change the structure and function of specialty training in Brazil.

  8. Real Time Synchronization for Creativity in Distributed Innovation Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peitersen, Dennis Kjaersgaard; Dolog, Peter; Pedersen, Esben Staunsbjerg

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a synchronization approach for real time collaborative sketching for creativity in distributed innovation teams. We base our approach on reverse AJAX. This way we ensure scalable solution for real time drawing and sketching important in creativity settings....

  9. Technical Evaluation Report. 54. Best Practices in Synchronous Conferencing Moderation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Lynn; Fyvie, Barb; Koritko, Brenda; McCarthy, Kathy; Paz, Sonia Murillo; Rizzuto, Mary; Tremblay, Remi; Sawyers, Urel

    2006-01-01

    Practical guidelines are offered for the use of synchronous online conferencing software by session administrators and moderators. The configuration of the software prior to conferencing sessions is discussed, and the planning and implementation of useful collaborative activities such as "synchronised browsing." The combination of these…

  10. Synchronous E-Learning: Reflections and Design Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabak, Filiz; Rampal, Rohit

    2014-01-01

    This paper is a personal reflection on the design, development, and delivery of online synchronous conferencing as a pedagogical tool complementing traditional, face-to-face content delivery and learning. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate how instructors can combine collaborative and virtual learning principles in course design. In…

  11. Synchronization of networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    time. Both the number of nodes and the edges connecting the nodes can vary with time. Such a time-varying topology can occur in social networks, computer networks, WWW, biological systems, spread of epidemics etc. Here, we investigate the synchronization properties of networks with time-varying structure and compare.

  12. Synchronization of networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We study the synchronization of coupled dynamical systems on networks. The dynamics is governed by a local nonlinear oscillator for each node of the network and interactions connecting different nodes via the links of the network. We consider existence and stability conditions for both single- and multi-cluster ...

  13. (statcom) in synchronous compensator

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    for adoption of advanced control technologies such as Flexible Alternating Current Transmission System (FACTS) with fast ... APPLICATION OF STATIC SYNCHRONOUS COMPENSATOR (STATCOM) IN IMPROVING POWER SYSTEM PERFORMANCE, R.A Jokojeje .... supply at bus i and is the reactive power demand at.

  14. Challenges and opportunities for medications development in alcoholism: an international perspective on collaborations between academia and industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Bankole A; Mann, Karl; Willenbring, Mark L; Litten, Raye Z; Swift, Robert M; Lesch, Otto M; Berglund, Mats

    2005-08-01

    This article represents the proceedings of a symposium presented at the 12th Congress of the International Society for Biomedical Research on Alcoholism held in Heidelberg/Mannheim, Germany, on September 30, 2004. The organizers and cochairs were Bankole A. Johnson, DSc, MD, PhD, and Karl Mann, MD. The presentations included the following: (1) A Perspective from Academia, by Bankole A. Johnson, DSc, MD, PhD; (2) A Perspective from NIAAA, by Mark L. Willenbring, MD; (3) A Perspective from US Clinical Practice, by Robert M. Swift, MD, PhD; (4) A European Perspective on Medications Development, by Otto M. Lesch, MD, PhD, and (5) A Scandinavian Perspective on Evidence-Based Addiction Treatment, by Mats Berglund, MD.

  15. Synchronizing XPath Views

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Dennis; Pedersen, Torben Bach

    2004-01-01

    . However, the XML data sources are often independent of the data consumers and may change their schemas without notification, invalidating the XML views defined by the data consumers. This requires the view definitions to be updated to reflect the new structure of the data sources, a process termed view......The increasing availability of XML-based data sources, e.g., for publishing data on the WWW, means that more and more applications (data consumers) rely on accessing and using XML data. Typically, the access is achieved by defining views over the XML data, and accessing data through these views...... synchronization. XPath is the most commonly used language for retrieving parts of XML documents, and is thus an important cornerstone for XML view definitions. This paper presents techniques for discovering schema changes in XML data sources and synchronizing XPath-based views to reflect these schema changes...

  16. LHC synchronization test successful

    CERN Multimedia

    The synchronization of the LHC's clockwise beam transfer system and the rest of CERN's accelerator chain was successfully achieved last weekend. Tests began on Friday 8 August when a single bunch of a few particles was taken down the transfer line from the SPS accelerator to the LHC. After a period of optimization, one bunch was kicked up from the transfer line into the LHC beam pipe and steered about 3 kilometres around the LHC itself on the first attempt. On Saturday, the test was repeated several times to optimize the transfer before the operations group handed the machine back for hardware commissioning to resume on Sunday. The anti-clockwise synchronization systems will be tested over the weekend of 22 August.Picture:http://lhc-injection-test.web.cern.ch/lhc-injection-test/

  17. Collaboration and E-collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Razmerita, Liana; Kirchner, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Understanding student’s perception of collaboration and how collaboration is supported by ICT is important for its efficient use in the classroom. This article aims to investigate how students perceive collaboration and how they use new technologies in collaborative group work. Furthermore, it tr...

  18. [Empathy, inter-professional collaboration, and lifelong medical learning in Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who start their postgraduate training in hospitals in Spain. Preliminary outcomes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    San-Martín, Montserrat; Roig-Carrera, Helena; Villalonga-Vadell, Rosa M; Benito-Sevillano, Carmen; Torres-Salinas, Miquel; Claret-Teruel, Gemma; Robles, Bernabé; Sans-Boix, Antonia; Alcorta-Garza, Adelina; Vivanco, Luis

    2017-01-01

    To identify similarities and differences in empathy, abilities toward inter-professional collaboration, and lifelong medical learning, between Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who start their posgraduate training in teaching hospitals in Spain. Observational study using self-administered questionnaires. Five teaching hospitals in the province of Barcelona, Spain. Spanish and Latin-American physicians-in-training who started their first year of post-graduate medical training. Empathy was measured using the Jefferson scale of empathy. Abilities for inter-professional collaboration were measured using the Jefferson scale attitudes towards nurse-physician collaboration. Learning was measured using the Jefferson scale of medical lifelong learning scale. From a sample of 156 physicians-in-training, 110 from Spain and 40 from Latin America, the Spanish group showed the highest empathy (pempathy and inter-professional collaboration for the whole sample (r=+0.34; pempathy in the development of inter-professional collaboration abilities. In Latin-American physicians who start posgraduate training programs, lifelong learning abilities have a positive influence on the development of other professional competencies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Programmable synchronous communications module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horelick, D.

    1979-10-01

    The functional characteristics of a programmable, synchronous serial communications CAMAC module with buffering in block format are described. Both bit and byte oriented protocols can be handled in full duplex depending on the program implemented. The main elements of the module are a Signetics 2652 Multi-Protocol Communications Controller, a Zilog Z-808 8 bit microprocessor with PROM and RAM, and FIFOs for buffering

  20. Digital Synchronizer without Metastability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simle, Robert M.; Cavazos, Jose A.

    2009-01-01

    A proposed design for a digital synchronizing circuit would eliminate metastability that plagues flip-flop circuits in digital input/output interfaces. This metastability is associated with sampling, by use of flip-flops, of an external signal that is asynchronous with a clock signal that drives the flip-flops: it is a temporary flip-flop failure that can occur when a rising or falling edge of an asynchronous signal occurs during the setup and/or hold time of a flip-flop. The proposed design calls for (1) use of a clock frequency greater than the frequency of the asynchronous signal, (2) use of flip-flop asynchronous preset or clear signals for the asynchronous input, (3) use of a clock asynchronous recovery delay with pulse width discriminator, and (4) tying the data inputs to constant logic levels to obtain (5) two half-rate synchronous partial signals - one for the falling and one for the rising edge. Inasmuch as the flip-flop data inputs would be permanently tied to constant logic levels, setup and hold times would not be violated. The half-rate partial signals would be recombined to construct a signal that would replicate the original asynchronous signal at its original rate but would be synchronous with the clock signal.

  1. Integrated complex care coordination for children with medical complexity: A mixed-methods evaluation of tertiary care-community collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cohen Eyal

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Primary care medical homes may improve health outcomes for children with special healthcare needs (CSHCN, by improving care coordination. However, community-based primary care practices may be challenged to deliver comprehensive care coordination to complex subsets of CSHCN such as children with medical complexity (CMC. Linking a tertiary care center with the community may achieve cost effective and high quality care for CMC. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of community-based complex care clinics integrated with a tertiary care center. Methods A before- and after-intervention study design with mixed (quantitative/qualitative methods was utilized. Clinics at two community hospitals distant from tertiary care were staffed by local community pediatricians with the tertiary care center nurse practitioner and linked with primary care providers. Eighty-one children with underlying chronic conditions, fragility, requirement for high intensity care and/or technology assistance, and involvement of multiple providers participated. Main outcome measures included health care utilization and expenditures, parent reports of parent- and child-quality of life [QOL (SF-36®, CPCHILD©, PedsQL™], and family-centered care (MPOC-20®. Comparisons were made in equal (up to 1 year pre- and post-periods supplemented by qualitative perspectives of families and pediatricians. Results Total health care system costs decreased from median (IQR $244 (981 per patient per month (PPPM pre-enrolment to $131 (355 PPPM post-enrolment (p=.007, driven primarily by fewer inpatient days in the tertiary care center (p=.006. Parents reported decreased out of pocket expenses (p© domains [Health Standardization Section (p=.04; Comfort and Emotions (p=.03], while total CPCHILD© score decreased between baseline and 1 year (p=.003. Parents and providers reported the ability to receive care close to home as a key benefit. Conclusions Complex

  2. Health care transformation through collaboration on open-source informatics projects: integrating a medical applications platform, research data repository, and patient summarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Jeffrey G; McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Wattanasin, Nich; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Shawn N

    2013-05-30

    The Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) program seeks to conquer well-understood challenges in medical informatics through breakthrough research. Two SHARP centers have found alignment in their methodological needs: (1) members of the National Center for Cognitive Informatics and Decision-making (NCCD) have developed knowledge bases to support problem-oriented summarizations of patient data, and (2) Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technologies (SMART), which is a platform for reusable medical apps that can run on participating platforms connected to various electronic health records (EHR). Combining the work of these two centers will ensure wide dissemination of new methods for synthesized views of patient data. Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is an NIH-funded clinical research data repository platform in use at over 100 sites worldwide. By also working with a co-occurring initiative to SMART-enabling i2b2, we can confidently write one app that can be used extremely broadly. Our goal was to facilitate development of intuitive, problem-oriented views of the patient record using NCCD knowledge bases that would run in any EHR. To do this, we developed a collaboration between the two SHARPs and an NIH center, i2b2. First, we implemented collaborative tools to connect researchers at three institutions. Next, we developed a patient summarization app using the SMART platform and a previously validated NCCD problem-medication linkage knowledge base derived from the National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Finally, to SMART-enable i2b2, we implemented two new Web service "cells" that expose the SMART application programming interface (API), and we made changes to the Web interface of i2b2 to host a "carousel" of SMART apps. We deployed our SMART-based, NDF-RT-derived patient summarization app in this SMART-i2b2 container. It displays a problem-oriented view of medications and presents a line-graph display of

  3. Health Care Transformation Through Collaboration on Open-Source Informatics Projects: Integrating a Medical Applications Platform, Research Data Repository, and Patient Summarization

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Allison B; Wright, Adam; Wattanasin, Nich; Sittig, Dean F; Murphy, Shawn N

    2013-01-01

    Background The Strategic Health IT Advanced Research Projects (SHARP) program seeks to conquer well-understood challenges in medical informatics through breakthrough research. Two SHARP centers have found alignment in their methodological needs: (1) members of the National Center for Cognitive Informatics and Decision-making (NCCD) have developed knowledge bases to support problem-oriented summarizations of patient data, and (2) Substitutable Medical Apps, Reusable Technologies (SMART), which is a platform for reusable medical apps that can run on participating platforms connected to various electronic health records (EHR). Combining the work of these two centers will ensure wide dissemination of new methods for synthesized views of patient data. Informatics for Integrating Biology and the Bedside (i2b2) is an NIH-funded clinical research data repository platform in use at over 100 sites worldwide. By also working with a co-occurring initiative to SMART-enabling i2b2, we can confidently write one app that can be used extremely broadly. Objective Our goal was to facilitate development of intuitive, problem-oriented views of the patient record using NCCD knowledge bases that would run in any EHR. To do this, we developed a collaboration between the two SHARPs and an NIH center, i2b2. Methods First, we implemented collaborative tools to connect researchers at three institutions. Next, we developed a patient summarization app using the SMART platform and a previously validated NCCD problem-medication linkage knowledge base derived from the National Drug File-Reference Terminology (NDF-RT). Finally, to SMART-enable i2b2, we implemented two new Web service “cells” that expose the SMART application programming interface (API), and we made changes to the Web interface of i2b2 to host a “carousel” of SMART apps. Results We deployed our SMART-based, NDF-RT-derived patient summarization app in this SMART-i2b2 container. It displays a problem-oriented view of

  4. Teamwork training with nursing and medical students: does the method matter? Results of an interinstitutional, interdisciplinary collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Cherri; Sherwood, Gwen; Frush, Karen; Hollar, David; Maynard, Laura; Foster, Beverly; Sawning, Susan; Woodyard, Donald; Durham, Carol; Wright, Melanie; Taekman, Jeffrey

    2010-12-01

    The authors conducted a randomised controlled trial of four pedagogical methods commonly used to deliver teamwork training and measured the effects of each method on the acquisition of student teamwork knowledge, skills, and attitudes. The authors recruited 203 senior nursing students and 235 fourth-year medical students (total N = 438) from two major universities for a 1-day interdisciplinary teamwork training course. All participants received a didactic lecture and then were randomly assigned to one of four educational methods didactic (control), audience response didactic, role play and human patient simulation. Student performance was assessed for teamwork attitudes, knowledge and skills using: (a) a 36-item teamwork attitudes instrument (CHIRP), (b) a 12-item teamwork knowledge test, (c) a 10-item standardised patient (SP) evaluation of student teamwork skills performance and (d) a 20-item modification of items from the Mayo High Performance Teamwork Scale (MHPTS). All four cohorts demonstrated an improvement in attitudes (F(1,370) = 48.7, p = 0.001) and knowledge (F(1,353) = 87.3, p = 0.001) pre- to post-test. No educational modality appeared superior for attitude (F(3,370) = 0.325, p = 0.808) or knowledge (F(3,353) = 0.382, p = 0.766) acquisition. No modality demonstrated a significant change in teamwork skills (F(3,18) = 2.12, p = 0.134). Each of the four modalities demonstrated significantly improved teamwork knowledge and attitudes, but no modality was demonstrated to be superior. Institutions should feel free to utilise educational modalities, which are best supported by their resources to deliver interdisciplinary teamwork training.

  5. A peer evaluation of the community-based education programme for medical students at the University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences: A southern African Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Michaels

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background. The University of Zimbabwe College of Health Sciences (UZCHS, Harare, which has a long tradition of community-based education (CBE, has not been evaluated since 1991. An innovative approach was used to evaluate the programme during 2015. Objectives. To evaluate the CBE programme, using a peer-review model of evaluation and simultaneously introducing and orientating participating colleagues from other medical schools in southern Africa to this review process. Methods. An international team of medical educators, convened through the Medical Education Partnership Initiative, worked collaboratively to modify an existing peer-review assessment method. Data collection took the form of pre-visit surveys, on-site and field-visit interviews with key informants, a review of supporting documentation and a post-review visit. Results. All 5 years of the medical education curriculum at UZCHS included some form of CBE that ranged from community exposure in the 1st year to district hospital-based clinical rotations during the clinical years. Several strengths, including the diversity of community-based activities and the availability of a large teaching platform, were identified. However, despite the expression of satisfaction with the programme, the majority of students indicated that they do not plan to work in rural areas in Zimbabwe. Several key recommendations were offered, central to which was strengthening the academic co-ordination of the programme and curriculum renewal in the context of the overall MB ChB curriculum. Conclusion. This evaluation demonstrated the value of peer review to bring a multidimensional, objective assessment to a CBE programme.

  6. Affordances and synchronization in collective creative construction tasks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tylén, Kristian; Fusaroli, Riccardo

    : the affordances of the task at hand and the gradual consolidation of collaborative practices. Six groups of participants were instructed to construct LEGO models of six abstract notions (“responsibility”, “knowledge”, “justice” etc.), both individually and in groups. We combine video analysis and heart rate...... to the affordances of the task at hand. We also show that during collective, but not individual tasks, within group synchronization grows over time. Finally, we discuss how these measures of synchronization relate to the participants’ engagement in the tasks at hand and to the end products (LEGO models...

  7. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    that are emerging from them, and how governments are responding to these new challenges. In doing so, the book provides both theoretical and practical insights into the future of tourism in a world that is, paradoxically, becoming both increasingly collaborative and individualized. Table of Contents Preface 1.The...... collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...

  8. The transient ladder synchronization of chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, H.-K.; Sheu, L.-J.

    2006-01-01

    A new type for chaotically synchronizing systems, transient ladder chaos synchronization, is proposed in this Letter. For some physical systems, chaotic synchronization is possible in only some of the variables. It is shown that, for the non-synchronizing variable, synchronization up to a constant difference for t 1 = 2 is possible. The transient ladder chaos synchronization and anti-synchronization are illustrated by using two identical chaotic Froude pendulums. Numerical simulations are shown for demonstration

  9. Control of synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Synchronous motors are indubitably the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. Their control law is thus critical for combining at the same time high productivity to reduced energy consummation. As far as possible, the control algorithms must exploit the properties of these actuators. Therefore, this work draws on well adapted models resulting from the Park's transformation, for both the most traditional machines with sinusoidal field distribution and for machines with non-sinusoidal field distribution which are more and more used in

  10. Logarithmically slow onset of synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkoe, Gil; Jensen, Henrik Jeldtoft [Institute for Mathematical Sciences, Imperial College London, 53 Prince' s Gate, South Kensington Campus, SW7 2PG, London (United Kingdom)], E-mail: g.benkoe@imperial.ac.uk, E-mail: h.jensen@imperial.ac.uk

    2010-04-23

    The transient of a synchronizing system is investigated, considering synchronization as a relaxation phenomenon. The stepwise establishment of synchronization is studied in the system of dynamically coupled maps introduced by Ito and Kaneko (2001 Phys. Rev. Lett. 88 028701, 2003 Phys. Rev. E 67 046226), where the plasticity of dynamical couplings might be relevant in the context of neuroscience. Logarithmically slow dynamics in the transient of a fully deterministic dynamical system are shown to occur.

  11. [Projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niimi, Shingo; Umezu, Mitsuo; Iseki, Hiroshi; Harada, Hiroshi Kasanuki Noboru; Mitsuishi, Mamoru; Kitamori, Takehiko; Tei, Yuichi; Nakaoka, Ryusuke; Haishima, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Division of Medical Devices has been conducting the projects to accelerate the practical use of innovative medical devices to collaborate with TWIns, Center for Advanced Biomedical Sciences, Waseda University and School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo. The TWIns has been studying to aim at establishment of preclinical evaluation methods by "Engineering Based Medicine", and established Regulatory Science Institute for Medical Devices. School of Engineering, The University of Tokyo has been studying to aim at establishment of assessment methodology for innovative minimally invasive therapeutic devices, materials, and nanobio diagnostic devices. This report reviews the exchanges of personnel, the implement systems and the research progress of these projects.

  12. Implementing a national program to reduce catheter-associated urinary tract infection: a quality improvement collaboration of state hospital associations, academic medical centers, professional societies, and governmental agencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakih, Mohamad G; George, Christine; Edson, Barbara S; Goeschel, Christine A; Saint, Sanjay

    2013-10-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) represents a significant proportion of healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). The US Department of Health and Human Services issued a plan to reduce HAIs with a target 25% reduction of CAUTI by 2013. Michigan's successful collaborative to reduce unnecessary use of urinary catheters and CAUTI was based on a partnership between diverse hospitals, the state hospital association (SHA), and academic medical centers. Taking the lessons learned from Michigan, we are now spreading this work throughout the 50 states. This national spread leverages the expertise of different groups and organizations for the unified goal of reducing catheter-related harm. The key components of the project are (1) centralized coordination of the effort and dissemination of information to SHAs and hospitals, (2) data collection based on established definitions and approaches, (3) focused guidance on the technical practices that will prevent CAUTI, (4) emphasis on understanding the socioadaptive aspects (both the general, unit-wide issues and CAUTI-specific challenges), and (5) partnering with specialty organizations and governmental agencies who have expertise in the relevant subject area. The work may serve in the future as a model for other large improvement efforts to address other hospital-acquired conditions, such as venous thromboembolism and falls.

  13. Grid Synchronization for Distributed Generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peyghami, Saeed; Mokhtari, Hossein; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2017-01-01

    Distributed generators (DGs) like photovoltaic arrays, wind turbines, and fuel cell modules, as well as distributed storage (DS) units introduce some advantages to the power systems and make it more reliable, flexible, and controllable in comparison with the conventional power systems. Grid...... of interfaces needs to be synchronized with the grid or microgird, and hence, a precise synchronization algorithm—mostly based on phase-locked loop—is required to estimate the phase angle and frequency of the voltage at the coupling point. Unlike synchronous generators, in power electronic interfaced DGs...... grid. Therefore, the synchronization is an important issue in DGs to have a stable and reliable operation....

  14. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    collaborative economy and tourism Dianne Dredge and Szilvia Gyimóthy PART I - Theoretical explorations 2.Definitions and mapping the landscape in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy and Dianne Dredge 3.Business models of the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 4.Responsibility and care...... in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge 5.Networked cultures in the collaborative economy Szilvia Gyimóthy 6.Policy and regulatory perspectives in the collaborative economy Dianne Dredge PART II - Disruptions, innovations and transformations 7.Regulating innovation in the collaborative economy: An examination...... of Airbnb’s early legal issues Daniel Guttentag 8.Free walking tour enterprises in Europe: An evolutionary economic approach Maria del Pilar Leal and L. Xavier Medina, 9.Cultural capitalism: Manipulation and control in Airbnb’s intersection with tourism Michael O' Reganand Jaeyeon Choe 10.Sharing the new...

  15. FPGA based fast synchronous serial multi-wire links synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozniak, Krzysztof T.

    2013-10-01

    The paper debates synchronization method of multi-wire, serial link of constant latency, by means of pseudo-random numbers generators. The solution was designed for various families of FPGA circuits. There were debated synchronization algorithm and functional structure of parameterized transmitter and receiver modules. The modules were realized in VHDL language in a behavioral form.

  16. Collaborative Attack vs. Collaborative Defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shouhuai

    We have witnessed many attacks in the cyberspace. However, most attacks are launched by individual attackers even though an attack may involve many compromised computers. In this paper, we envision what we believe to be the next generation cyber attacks — collaborative attacks. Collaborative attacks can be launched by multiple attackers (i.e., human attackers or criminal organizations), each of which may have some specialized expertise. This is possible because cyber attacks can become very sophisticated and specialization of attack expertise naturally becomes relevant. To counter collaborative attacks, we might need collaborative defense because each “chain” in a collaborative attack may be only adequately dealt with by a different defender. In order to understand collaborative attack and collaborative defense, we present a high-level abstracted framework for evaluating the effectiveness of collaborative defense against collaborative attacks. As a first step towards realizing and instantiating the framework, we explore a characterization of collaborative attacks and collaborative defense from the relevant perspectives.

  17. Exploiting Schemas in Data Synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, J. Nathan; Greenwald, Michael B.; Kirkegaard, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Increased reliance on optimistic data replication has led to burgeoning interest in tools and frameworks for disconnected updates to replicated data.We have implemented a generic synchronization framework, called HARMONY, that can be used to build state-based synchronizers for a wide variety...

  18. Exploiting Schemas in Data Synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foster, J. Nathan; Greenwald, Michael B.; Kirkegaard, Christian

    2005-01-01

    Increased reliance on optimistic data replication has led to burgeoning interest in tools and frameworks for disconnected updates to replicated data.We have implemented a generic synchronization framework, called HARMONY, that can be used to build state-based synchronizers for a wide variety of t...

  19. Synchronizing clocks in distributed networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Weiguo; Cao, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Very recently it has been shown that clocks in distributed networks cannot be synchronized precisely even in idealized situations when asymmetric delays are present [1]. In this paper by determining the clock synchronization errors in the similar settings of the impossibility result just mentioned,

  20. Synchronizing clocks in distributed networks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Xia, Weiguo; Cao, Ming

    2011-01-01

    While various time synchronization protocols for clocks in wired and/or wireless networks are under development, recently it has been shown by Freris, Graham and Kumar that clocks in distributed networks cannot be synchronized precisely even in idealized situations. In this paper by determining the

  1. Digital synchronization and communication techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindsey, William C.

    1992-01-01

    Information on digital synchronization and communication techniques is given in viewgraph form. Topics covered include phase shift keying, modems, characteristics of open loop digital synchronizers, an open loop phase and frequency estimator, and a digital receiver structure using an open loop estimator in a decision directed architecture.

  2. Benefits of Synchronous Online Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, Scott; Smith, Phil

    2015-01-01

    Most online courses are offered as "asynchronous" courses and have no real-time contact with students. The Synchronous online alternative provides normal scheduled class time and allows students to login to a virtual online classroom with the instructor. We provide an overview of two different platforms for hosting synchronous classes…

  3. Business cycle synchronization in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergman, Ulf Michael; Jonung, Lars

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we study business cycle synchronization in the three Scandinavian countries Denmark, Norway and Sweden prior to, during and after the Scandinavian Currency Union 1873–1913. We find that the degree of synchronization tended to increase during the currency union, thus supporting earlier...

  4. Synchronization dynamics of two different dynamical systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo, Albert C.J.; Min Fuhong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Synchronization dynamics of two distinct dynamical systems. → Synchronization, de-synchronization and instantaneous synchronization. → A controlled pendulum synchronizing with the Duffing oscillator. → Synchronization invariant set. → Synchronization parameter map. - Abstract: In this paper, synchronization dynamics of two different dynamical systems is investigated through the theory of discontinuous dynamical systems. The necessary and sufficient conditions for the synchronization, de-synchronization and instantaneous synchronization (penetration or grazing) are presented. Using such a synchronization theory, the synchronization of a controlled pendulum with the Duffing oscillator is systematically discussed as a sampled problem, and the corresponding analytical conditions for the synchronization are presented. The synchronization parameter study is carried out for a better understanding of synchronization characteristics of the controlled pendulum and the Duffing oscillator. Finally, the partial and full synchronizations of the controlled pendulum with periodic and chaotic motions are presented to illustrate the analytical conditions. The synchronization of the Duffing oscillator and pendulum are investigated in order to show the usefulness and efficiency of the methodology in this paper. The synchronization invariant domain is obtained. The technique presented in this paper should have a wide spectrum of applications in engineering. For example, this technique can be applied to the maneuvering target tracking, and the others.

  5. Working Collaboratively

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holder, Anna; Lovett, George

    2009-01-01

    Working collaboratively is arguably an essential skill in architectural practice as the complexity of contemporary projects involves multiple agents in the conception, construction and use of architecture. This has been emphasised by recent government rhetoric. Mass collaboration has been...... identified as a transformative global force of the last decade, most notably in knowledge and information publishing, communication and creation. This paper presents a structured conversation on changing understandings of collaboration, and the realities of collaborative methodology in architectural work....... Ideas of the platforms and structures necessary to support ‘creative’ collaborations are advanced and tested, and a vocabulary of key terms is developed. The conversation extends to reflect on the role of the architecture profession in supporting or enabling collaboration in architectural works....

  6. Collaborative experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Thomas Bøtker

    Literature review: Collaborative experience has been shown to have a positive effect on the collaborative outcome in general (Anand & Khanna, 2000; Kale, Dyer & Singh, 2002). Furthermore, it has been linked to the ability to exploit the network of the firm for learning (Powell, Koput and Smith...... experience was largest the higher the hypothesized ambiguity. Theoretically contribution: This research project aims at contributing to existing literature by arguing, that collaborative experience is a moderating variable which moderates the effects on collaborative outcome from the level of complexity......, that the largest effects from collaborative experience is from recent collaborative experience, since knowledge depreciates when it is not used. Methodologically contribution: The research project studies the dyad and aims at introducing, to this field of research, an established way of collecting data, a new...

  7. Synchronous, bilateral tonsillar carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saber, Camelia Nami; Grønhøj, Christian; Jensen, David Hebbelstrup

    2017-01-01

    -based, consecutive cohort of OPSCCs. METHODS: We identified all patients diagnosed with tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) in eastern Denmark during a 15-year period to detect the incidence of synchronous BiTSCCs. The tumours were assessed for p16Ink4a expression, the presence of HPV DNA and HPV genotypes....... Furthermore, we systematically reviewed the literature examining BiTSCCs. RESULTS: Of the total of 1119 TSCCs diagnosed in eastern Denmark from 2000 to 2014, we identified 12 BiTSCCs, nine of which initially presented as a cancer of unknown primary (CUP) in the neck. Nine cases were bilaterally HPV16 positive...... (HPV16+), while two cases were HPV16+ in one tonsil and respectively, HPV33 and HPV35 positive in the contralateral tonsil. One case was bilaterally HPV-negative. We also identified an increase in the incidence of BiTSCCs after 2012 when histological examination of the entire tonsil tissue became...

  8. Collaborative learning through computer-mediated argumentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Veerman, A.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    1999-01-01

    This article reports on three studies that involved undergraduate students collaboratively working on authentic discussion tasks in synchronous and asynchronous Computer Mediated Communication systems (Netmeeting, Belvédère, Allaire Forums). The purposes of the assignments were respectively to

  9. Collaborative quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luckenbaugh, Amy N; Miller, David C; Ghani, Khurshid R

    2017-07-01

    Quality improvement collaboratives were developed in many medical and surgical disciplines with the goal of measuring and improving the quality of care provided to patients. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of surgical quality improvement collaboratives, and in particular those aimed at improving urological care. Quality improvement collaboratives collect high-quality data using standardized methodologies, and use the data to provide feedback to physicians and practices, and then implement processes to improve patient outcomes. The largest regional collaborative in urology is the Michigan Urological Surgery Improvement Collaborative (MUSIC). Recent efforts by this group have been focused at understanding variation in care, improving patient selection for treatment, reducing treatment morbidity and measuring and optimizing technical skill. The American Urological Association has also recently launched a national quality registry (AQUA), with an initial focus on prostate cancer care. By understanding factors that result in exemplary performance, quality improvement collaboratives are able to develop best practices around areas of care with high variation that have the potential to improve outcomes and reduce costs. These developments have been made possible by the unique model offered by the collaborative structure with the goal of improving patient care at a population level.

  10. Technical Evaluation Report 54: Best practices in synchronous conferencing moderation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynn Anderson, Barb Fyvie, Brenda Koritko, Kathy McCarthy, Sonia Murillo Paz, Mary Rizzuto, Remi Tremblay, and Urel Sawyers

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Practical guidelines are offered for the use of online synchronous conferencing software by session administrators and moderators. The configuration of the software prior to conferencing sessions is discussed, and the planning and implementation of useful collaborative activities such as “synchronised browsing.” The combination of these practices into useful ”patterns” for specific online conferencing purposes is discussed.

  11. Quality of collaborative interactions in different CSCL-environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Munneke, E.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    2003-01-01

    In the Twins project we study the quality of interactions during collaborative learning in different CSCL-environments. The aim of the research is investigating the effects of synchronous and asynchronous systems and different collaborative tasks on interactions between students. Two experiments

  12. An Internet Based Collaborative Distance Learning System: CODILESS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watabe, Kazuo; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Describes the Collaborative Distance Learning Support System (CODILESS) including its research objectives, the conceptual model, and its architecture. CODILESS supports collaborative and resource-based learning within the same environment by integrating asynchronous and synchronous multimedia communication with electronic resources on the local…

  13. Generalized synchronization between chimera states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrzejak, Ralph G.; Ruzzene, Giulia; Malvestio, Irene

    2017-05-01

    Networks of coupled oscillators in chimera states are characterized by an intriguing interplay of synchronous and asynchronous motion. While chimera states were initially discovered in mathematical model systems, there is growing experimental and conceptual evidence that they manifest themselves also in natural and man-made networks. In real-world systems, however, synchronization and desynchronization are not only important within individual networks but also across different interacting networks. It is therefore essential to investigate if chimera states can be synchronized across networks. To address this open problem, we use the classical setting of ring networks of non-locally coupled identical phase oscillators. We apply diffusive drive-response couplings between pairs of such networks that individually show chimera states when there is no coupling between them. The drive and response networks are either identical or they differ by a variable mismatch in their phase lag parameters. In both cases, already for weak couplings, the coherent domain of the response network aligns its position to the one of the driver networks. For identical networks, a sufficiently strong coupling leads to identical synchronization between the drive and response. For non-identical networks, we use the auxiliary system approach to demonstrate that generalized synchronization is established instead. In this case, the response network continues to show a chimera dynamics which however remains distinct from the one of the driver. Hence, segregated synchronized and desynchronized domains in individual networks congregate in generalized synchronization across networks.

  14. Collaborative Prototyping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogers, Marcel; Horst, Willem

    2014-01-01

    changes, and it detects emerging usability problems through active engagement and experimentation. As such, the collaborative prototype acts as a boundary object to represent, understand, and transform knowledge across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries. Our study also identifies some......This paper presents an inductive study that shows how collaborative prototyping across functional, hierarchical, and organizational boundaries can improve the overall prototyping process. Our combined action research and case study approach provides new insights into how collaborative prototyping...... can provide a platform for prototype-driven problem solving in early new product development (NPD). Our findings have important implications for how to facilitate multistakeholder collaboration in prototyping and problem solving, and more generally for how to organize collaborative and open innovation...

  15. Supply Chain Collaboration Roles of Interorganizational Systems, Trust, and Collaborative Culture

    CERN Document Server

    Cao, Mei

    2013-01-01

    To survive and thrive in the competition, firms have strived to achieve greater supply chain collaboration to leverage the resources and knowledge of suppliers and customers.  Internet based technologies, particularly interorganizational systems, further extend the firms’ opportunities to strengthen their supply chain partnerships and share real-time information to optimize their operations.  Supply Chain Collaboration: Roles of Interorganizational Systems, Trust, and Collaborative Culture explores the nature and characteristics, antecedents, and consequences of supply chain collaboration from multiple theoretical perspectives.  Supply Chain Collaboration: Roles of Interorganizational Systems, Trust, and Collaborative Culture conceptualizes supply chain collaboration as seven interconnecting elements including information sharing, incentive alignment, goal congruence, decision synchronization, resource sharing, as well as communication and joint knowledge creation. These seven components define the occur...

  16. Synchronization of weighted networks and complex synchronized regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duan Zhisheng; Chen Guanrong; Huang Lin

    2008-01-01

    Since the Laplacian matrices of weighted networks usually have complex eigenvalues, the problem of complex synchronized regions should be investigated carefully. The present Letter addresses this important problem by converting it to a matrix stability problem with respect to a complex parameter, which gives rise to several types of complex synchronized regions, including bounded, unbounded, disconnected, and empty regions. Because of the existence of disconnected synchronized regions, the convexity characteristic of stability for matrix pencils is further discussed. Then, some efficient methods for designing local feedback controllers and inner-linking matrices to enlarge the synchronized regions are developed and analyzed. Finally, a weighted network of smooth Chua's circuits is presented as an example for illustration

  17. Noncoherent Symbol Synchronization Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    Traditional methods for establishing symbol synchronization (sync) in digital communication receivers assume that carrier sync has already been established, i.e., the problem is addressed at the baseband level assuming that a 'perfect' estimate of carrier phase is available. We refer to this approach as coherent symbol sync. Since, for NRZ signaling, a suppressed carrier sync loop such as an I-Q Costas loop includes integrate-and-dump (I and D) filters in its in-phase (1) and quadrature (Q) arms, the traditional approach is to first track the carrier in the absence of symbol sync information, then feed back the symbol sync estimate to these filters, and then iterate between the two to a desirable operating level In this paper, we revisit the symbol sync problem by examining methods for obtaining such sync in the absence of carrier phase information, i.e., so-called noncoherent symbol sync loops. We compare the performance of these loops with that of a well-known coherent symbol sync loop and examine the conditions under which one is preferable over the other.

  18. Cross-spectrum symbol synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccallister, R. D.; Simon, M. K.

    1981-01-01

    A popular method of symbol synchronization exploits one aspect of generalized harmonic analysis, normally referred to as the cross-spectrum. Utilizing nonlinear techniques, the input symbol energy is effectively concentrated onto multiples of the symbol clock frequency, facilitating application of conventional phase lock synchronization techniques. A general treatment of the cross-spectrum technique is developed and shown to be applicable across a broad class of symbol modulation formats. An important specific symbol synchronization application is then treated, focusing the general development to provide both insight and quantitative measure of the performance impact associated with variation in these key synchronization parameters: symbol modulation format, symbol transition probability, symbol energy to noise density ratio, and symbol rate to filter bandwidth ratio.

  19. Incoherence-Mediated Remote Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyue; Motter, Adilson E.; Nishikawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    In previously identified forms of remote synchronization between two nodes, the intermediate portion of the network connecting the two nodes is not synchronized with them but generally exhibits some coherent dynamics. Here we report on a network phenomenon we call incoherence-mediated remote synchronization (IMRS), in which two noncontiguous parts of the network are identically synchronized while the dynamics of the intermediate part is statistically and information-theoretically incoherent. We identify mirror symmetry in the network structure as a mechanism allowing for such behavior, and show that IMRS is robust against dynamical noise as well as against parameter changes. IMRS may underlie neuronal information processing and potentially lead to network solutions for encryption key distribution and secure communication.

  20. Procedural Portfolio Planning in Plastic Surgery, Part 2: Collaboration Between Surgeons and Hospital Administrators to Develop a Funds Flow Model for Procedures Performed at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hultman, Charles Scott

    2016-06-01

    Although plastic surgeons make important contributions to the clinical, educational, and research missions of academic medical centers (AMCs), determining the financial value of a plastic surgery service can be difficult, due to complex cost accounting systems. We analyzed the financial impact of plastic surgery on an AMC, by examining the contribution margins and operating income of surgical procedures. We collaborated with hospital administrators to implement 3 types of strategic changes: (1) growth of areas with high contribution margin, (2) curtailment of high-risk procedures with negative contribution margin, (3) improved efficiency of mission-critical services with high resource consumption. Outcome measures included: facility charges, hospital collections, contribution margin, operating margin, and operating room times. We also studied the top 50 Current Procedural Terminology codes (total case number × charge/case), ranking procedures for profitability, as determined by operating margin. During the 2-year study period, we had no turnover in faculty; did not pursue any formal marketing; did not change our surgical fees, billing system, or payer mix; and maintained our commitment to indigent care. After rebalancing our case mix, through procedural portfolio planning, average hospital operating income/procedure increased from $-79 to $+816. Volume and diversity of cases increased, with no change in payer mix. Although charges/case decreased, both contribution margin and operating margin increased, due to improved throughput and decreased operating room times. The 5 most profitable procedures for the hospital were hernia repair, mandibular osteotomy, hand skin graft, free fibula flap, and head and neck flap, whereas the 5 least profitable were latissimus breast reconstruction, craniosynostosis repair, free-flap breast reconstruction, trunk skin graft, and cutaneous free flap. Total operating income for the hospital, from plastic surgery procedures, increased

  1. Optimization models for synchronization planning

    OpenAIRE

    Morey, Christopher

    1991-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited Planning for the synchronization of activities on the battlefield for an Army battalion task force requires detailed planning for movement of subordinate units, allocation of personnel and assets to tasks, and many other activities to ensure that maximum damage is inflicted on an enemy force. Currently, this synchronization planning is done manually by task force officers, primarily the operations officer. The process is time consumi...

  2. Hybrid synchronization of hyperchaotic Lu system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, we study the hybrid synchronization between two identical hyperchaotic Lu systems. Hybrid synchronization of hyperchaotic Lu system is achieved through synchronization of two pairs of states and anti-synchronization of the other two pairs of states. Active controls are designed to achieve hybrid ...

  3. Hybrid synchronization of hyperchaotic Lu system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    hyperchaotic Lu systems. Hybrid synchronization of hyperchaotic Lu system is achieved through synchronization of two pairs of states and anti-synchronization of the other two pairs of states. Active controls are designed to achieve hybrid synchronization between drive and response systems using the sum and difference of ...

  4. Multiswitching combination–combination synchronization of chaotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-09

    Feb 9, 2017 ... Abstract. In this paper, a novel synchronization scheme is investigated for a class of chaotic systems. The multiswitching synchronization scheme is extended to the combination–combination synchronization scheme such that the combination of state variables of two drive systems synchronize with different ...

  5. Multiswitching combination–combination synchronization of chaotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this paper, a novel synchronization scheme is investigated for a class of chaotic systems. Themultiswitching synchronization scheme is extended to the combination–combination synchronization scheme such that the combination of state variables of two drive systems synchronize with different combination of state ...

  6. Synchronization and anti-synchronization coexist in Chen-Lee chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, J.-H.; Chen, H.-K.; Lin, Y.-K.

    2009-01-01

    This study demonstrates that synchronization and anti-synchronization can coexist in Chen-Lee chaotic systems by direct linear coupling. Based on Lyapunov's direct method, a linear controller was designed to assure that two different types of synchronization can simultaneously be achieved. Further, the hybrid projective synchronization of Chen-Lee chaotic systems was studied using a nonlinear control scheme. The nonlinear controller was designed according to the Lyapunov stability theory to guarantee the hybrid projective synchronization, including synchronization, anti-synchronization, and projective synchronization. Finally, numerical examples are presented in order to illustrate the proposed synchronization approach.

  7. Adaptive Time Synchronization for Homogeneous WSNs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Chauhan

    2012-11-01

    cluster heads (CHs are synchronized with the sink and then the cluster nodes (CNs are synchronized with their respective CHs. CNs are synchronized with the help of time synchronization node (TSN chosen by the respective CHs. Simulation results show that proposed protocol requires considerably fewer synchronization messages as compared with the reference broadcast synchronization (RBS protocol and minimum variance unbiased estimation (MUVE method. Clock skew correction mechanism applied in proposed protocol guarantees long term stability and hence decreases re‐synchronization frequency thereby conserving more energy.

  8. Collaborative Appropriation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muller, Michael; Neureiter, Katja; Verdezoto, Nervo

    2016-01-01

    Previous workshops and papers have examined how individual users adopt and adapt technologies to meet their own local needs, by “completing design through use.” However, there has been little systematic study of how groups of people engage collaboratively in these activities. This workshop opens...... a discussion for these under-studied forms of collaborative appropriation, using a broad range of perspectives including empirical data, design explorations, research, and critique....

  9. Promoting collaboration in emergency medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagraj, Shobhana; Harrison, Juliet; Hill, Lawrence; Bowker, Lesley; Lindqvist, Susanne

    2018-02-23

    Collaborative practice between paramedics and medical staff is essential for ensuring the safe handover of patients. Handover of care is a critical time in the patient journey, when effective communication and collaborative practice are central to promoting patient safety and to avoiding medical error. To encourage effective collaboration between paramedic and medical students, an innovative, practice-based simulation exercise, known as interprofessional clinical skills (ICS) was developed at the University of East Anglia, UK. Emphasising patient safety, effective handover of care and teamwork, within the context of emergency medicine, the ICS promotes collaborative practice amongst health care students through the use of high- and low-fidelity simulation, human factors and values-based practice. A total of 123 undergraduate students from paramedic (60) and medical backgrounds (63) took part in the ICS. Evaluation data were collected from all students through the completion of an internal feedback/satisfaction questionnaire with 13 statements and one open-ended comment box. The response rate for the questionnaire was 100%. Of the 123 students from paramedic and medical disciplines, 99% agreed or strongly agreed with the statement 'I enjoyed this session'. Students also felt that the ICS helped them to build mutual respect (98%), enhance understanding of roles (94%) and develop as collaborative practitioners (92%). Collaborative practice between paramedics and medical staff is essential CONCLUSION: The ICS is an innovative, enjoyable and meaningful intervention for promoting interprofessional collaborative practice between paramedic and medical students in a simulated practice setting. It encourages students to gain core training in clinical skills and patient safety, within a safe, supervised environment. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  10. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio; Femat, Ricardo

    2005-01-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states

  11. Unidirectional synchronization of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cornejo-Perez, Octavio [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: octavio@ipicyt.edu.mx; Femat, Ricardo [Division de Matematicas Aplicadas y Sistemas, Computacionales, IPICYT, Apdo. Postal 3-74 Tangamanga, 78231 San Luis Potosi (Mexico)]. E-mail: rfemat@ipicyt.edu.mx

    2005-07-01

    Synchronization dynamics of two noiseless Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neurons under the action of feedback control is studied. The spiking patterns of the action potentials evoked by periodic external modulations attain synchronization states under the feedback action. Numerical simulations for the synchronization dynamics of regular-irregular desynchronized spiking sequences are displayed. The results are discussed in context of generalized synchronization. It is also shown that the HH neurons can be synchronized in face of unmeasured states.

  12. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States. Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated. Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  13. Providers’ perspectives on collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Bruner

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Changes in models of health care are required to better meet the needs of diverse, underserved patient populations. Collaboration among providers is one way to promote accessible, comprehensive and continuous care in healthcare organizations. This paper describes the quantitative findings from two time points that examined providers' views of collaboration among a sample of diverse personnel (e.g. clinical nurses, social workers, dental providers, mental health providers, clerical staff, medical assistants, public health staff, and administrators within a federally qualified nurse managed health care centre in the United States.Methods: The quantitative arm of a mixed-method study is presented in this paper. Two instruments, the Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale and the University of the West of England Interprofessional Questionnaire (comprised of 4 subscales-Communication and Teamwork Scale, Interprofessional Learning Scale, Interprofessional Interaction Scale, and Interprofessional Relationships Scale were administered to providers at baseline and three to eight months following six same discipline focus group discussions on collaboration, in order to evaluate whether participating in the focus group discussions changed providers' views of collaboration. A summary of the focus group data which were published elsewhere is additionally summarized to help provide insight to the quantitative findings. Thirty-nine staff participated.Results: Paired t-tests revealed that only one scale out of the five, Collaboration and Satisfaction About Care Decisions Scale (33.97 at time one and 37.45 at time two, significantly and positively changed after the focus group discussion (p=0.046. Providers' views on collaboration ranged from positive to moderate views of collaboration; most measures revealed a non-significant improvement after the focus group discussions. Staff with some graduate school reported the greatest

  14. Bodily Synchronization Underlying Joke Telling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. C. Schmidt

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Advances in video and time series analysis have greatly enhanced our ability to study the bodily synchronization that occurs in natural interactions. Past research has demonstrated that the behavioral synchronization involved in social interactions is similar to dynamical synchronization found generically in nature. The present study investigated how the bodily synchronization in a joke telling task is spread across different nested temporal scales. Pairs of participants enacted knock-knock jokes and times series of their bodily activity were recorded. Coherence and relative phase analyses were used to evaluate the synchronization of bodily rhythms for the whole trial as well as at the subsidiary time scales of the whole joke, the setup of the punch line, the two-person exchange and the utterance. The analyses revealed greater than chance entrainment of the joke teller’s and joke responder’s movements at all time scales and that the relative phasing of the teller’s movements led those of the responder at the longer time scales. Moreover, this entrainment was greater when visual information about the partner’s movements was present but was decreased particularly at the shorter time scales when explicit gesturing in telling the joke was performed. In short, the results demonstrate that a complex interpersonal bodily dance occurs during structured conversation interactions and that this dance is constructed from a set of rhythms associated with the nested behavioral structure of the interaction.

  15. Vestibular hearing and neural synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emami, Seyede Faranak; Daneshi, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. Vestibular hearing as an auditory sensitivity of the saccule in the human ear is revealed by cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs). The range of the vestibular hearing lies in the low frequency. Also, the amplitude of an auditory brainstem response component depends on the amount of synchronized neural activity, and the auditory nerve fibers' responses have the best synchronization with the low frequency. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate correlation between vestibular hearing using cVEMPs and neural synchronization via slow wave Auditory Brainstem Responses (sABR). Study Design. This case-control survey was consisted of twenty-two dizzy patients, compared to twenty healthy controls. Methods. Intervention comprised of Pure Tone Audiometry (PTA), Impedance acoustic metry (IA), Videonystagmography (VNG), fast wave ABR (fABR), sABR, and cVEMPs. Results. The affected ears of the dizzy patients had the abnormal findings of cVEMPs (insecure vestibular hearing) and the abnormal findings of sABR (decreased neural synchronization). Comparison of the cVEMPs at affected ears versus unaffected ears and the normal persons revealed significant differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. Safe vestibular hearing was effective in the improvement of the neural synchronization.

  16. Essential articles on collaborative care models for the treatment of psychiatric disorders in medical settings: a publication by the academy of psychosomatic medicine research and evidence-based practice committee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Jeff C; Niazi, Shehzad K; Rundell, James R; Sharpe, Michael; Katon, Wayne J

    2014-01-01

    Collaborative care interventions for psychiatric disorders combine several components integrated into the medical setting: (1) systematic psychiatric assessment, (2) use of a nonphysician care manager to perform longitudinal symptom monitoring, treatment interventions, and care coordination, and (3) specialist-provided stepped-care recommendations. Collaborative care interventions have now been evaluated in a wide spectrum of care settings and offer great promise as a way of increasing quality of patient care, improving health of populations, and reducing health care costs. A systematic search of PubMed/MEDLINE databases was performed for publications between January 1970 and May 2013 to identify articles describing collaborative care and related interventions. Identified articles were then evaluated independently by multiple reviewers for quality and importance; additional articles were identified by searching reference lists and through recommendations of senior content-matter experts. The articles considered to be both of high quality and most important were then placed into categories and annotated reviews performed. Over 600 articles were identified of which 67 were selected for annotated review. The results reported in these articles indicate that collaborative care interventions for psychiatric disorders have been consistently successful in improving key outcomes in both research and clinical intervention studies; cost analyses also suggest that this model is cost effective. Collaborative care models for psychiatric disorders are likely to serve an increasingly large role in health care given their effect on patient and population outcomes and their focus on integration of care. © 2014 Published by Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine on behalf of Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine.

  17. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach: The analysis is based on a multiple-­‐‑case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-­‐‑parties, etc.). Originality/value: The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library......, clothes-­‐‑sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings: It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...

  18. Collaborative Consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerdrum Pedersen, Esben Rahbek; Netter, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to explore barriers and opportunities for business models based on the ideas of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry. Design/methodology/approach – The analysis is based on a multiple-case study of Scandinavian fashion libraries – a new...... to the new phenomenon of fashion libraries and does not cover other types of collaborative consumption within the fashion industry (Swap-parties, etc.). Originality/value – The paper is one of the first attempts to examine new business models of collaborative consumption in general and the fashion library......, clothes-sharing concept that has emerged as a fashion niche within the last decade. Findings – It is concluded that fashion libraries offers interesting perspectives, e.g. by allowing people to experiment with styles without having to pay the full cost and becoming a meeting place for young designers...

  19. Collaborative Moments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hastrup, Kirsten Blinkenberg

    2017-01-01

    as an experiment in real time, where insights gained intersubjectively gradually shape up as knowledge through analysis. This line of thought is brought to bear on a discussion of collaboration between anthropologists, archaeologists, and biologists in North West Greenland. Through actual experiences from...... the field, this article shows how knowledge generated on the edge of one’s familiar disciplinary territory may both expand and intensify the anthropological field. Collaborative moments are seen to make new anthropological insights emerge through the co-presence of several analytical perspectives...

  20. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    -organisational continuous improvement of their performance, relative to that of other EMEs. Developing a collaborative improvement relationship between companies is a protracted and complex process and, according to some surveys, the failure rate is as low as one to three. This failure rate is affected by a whole range...... of factors. The research presented in this thesis was aimed at identifying these factors and investigating their interplay and influence on the progress and success of the development of the collaborative improvement. This thesis presents our findings regarding the factors found, their interplay...

  1. Collaborative Beamforming Techniques for Data Transmission in Wireless Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Berbakov

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative beamforming is a technique for improving energy efficiency of uplink communications in wireless sensor networks. It is done by synchronizing carrier phases of individual sensor nodes precisely enough, so that they jointly form a beampattern with a stable mainlobe. In this paper, we analyze the impact of additive noise in the received signal on the behavior of an iterative phase synchronization scheme. Besides, we analyze the bit error rate performance of such collaborative transmission. In particular, we consider a decentralized antenna array where sensors are allowed to perform distributed carrier synchronization and collaborative data transmission simultaneously. We evaluate the system performance by using numerical simulations and provide a semi-analytical solution for the algorithm convergence characteristics and the overall bit error rate as a function of the algorithm’s iteration index.

  2. Active control strategy for synchronization and anti-synchronization of a fractional chaotic financial system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengdai; Cao, Jinde

    2017-05-01

    This paper is concerned with the issues of synchronization and anti-synchronization for fractional chaotic financial system with market confidence by taking advantage of active control approach. Some sufficient conditions are derived to guarantee the synchronization and anti-synchronization for the proposed fractional system. Moreover, the relationship between the order and synchronization(anti-synchronization) is demonstrated numerically. It reveals that synchronization(anti-synchronization) is faster as the order increases. Finally, two illustrative examples are exploited to verify the efficiency of the obtained theoretical results.

  3. Synchronization in uncertain complex networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Maoyin; Zhou, Donghua

    2006-03-01

    We consider the problem of synchronization in uncertain generic complex networks. For generic complex networks with unknown dynamics of nodes and unknown coupling functions including uniform and nonuniform inner couplings, some simple linear feedback controllers with updated strengths are designed using the well-known LaSalle invariance principle. The state of an uncertain generic complex network can synchronize an arbitrary assigned state of an isolated node of the network. The famous Lorenz system is stimulated as the nodes of the complex networks with different topologies. We found that the star coupled and scale-free networks with nonuniform inner couplings can be in the state of synchronization if only a fraction of nodes are controlled.

  4. Control of non-conventional synchronous motors

    CERN Document Server

    Louis, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Classical synchronous motors are the most effective device to drive industrial production systems and robots with precision and rapidity. However, numerous applications require efficient controls in non-conventional situations. Firstly, this is the case with synchronous motors supplied by thyristor line-commutated inverters, or with synchronous motors with faults on one or several phases. Secondly, many drive systems use non-conventional motors such as polyphase (more than three phases) synchronous motors, synchronous motors with double excitation, permanent magnet linear synchronous motors,

  5. A synchronous game for binary constraint systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se-Jin; Paulsen, Vern; Schafhauser, Christopher

    2018-03-01

    Recently, Slofstra proved that the set of quantum correlations is not closed. We prove that the set of synchronous quantum correlations is not closed, which implies his result, by giving an example of a synchronous game that has a perfect quantum approximate strategy but no perfect quantum strategy. We also exhibit a graph for which the quantum independence number and the quantum approximate independence number are different. We prove new characterisations of synchronous quantum approximate correlations and synchronous quantum spatial correlations. We solve the synchronous approximation problem of Dykema and the second author, which yields a new equivalence of Connes' embedding problem in terms of synchronous correlations.

  6. The UKCAT-12 study: educational attainment, aptitude test performance, demographic and socio-economic contextual factors as predictors of first year outcome in a cross-sectional collaborative study of 12 UK medical schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Most UK medical schools use aptitude tests during student selection, but large-scale studies of predictive validity are rare. This study assesses the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT), and its four sub-scales, along with measures of educational attainment, individual and contextual socio-economic background factors, as predictors of performance in the first year of medical school training. Methods A prospective study of 4,811 students in 12 UK medical schools taking the UKCAT from 2006 to 2008 as a part of the medical school application, for whom first year medical school examination results were available in 2008 to 2010. Results UKCAT scores and educational attainment measures (General Certificate of Education (GCE): A-levels, and so on; or Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA): Scottish Highers, and so on) were significant predictors of outcome. UKCAT predicted outcome better in female students than male students, and better in mature than non-mature students. Incremental validity of UKCAT taking educational attainment into account was significant, but small. Medical school performance was also affected by sex (male students performing less well), ethnicity (non-White students performing less well), and a contextual measure of secondary schooling, students from secondary schools with greater average attainment at A-level (irrespective of public or private sector) performing less well. Multilevel modeling showed no differences between medical schools in predictive ability of the various measures. UKCAT sub-scales predicted similarly, except that Verbal Reasoning correlated positively with performance on Theory examinations, but negatively with Skills assessments. Conclusions This collaborative study in 12 medical schools shows the power of large-scale studies of medical education for answering previously unanswerable but important questions about medical student selection, education and training. UKCAT has predictive validity as a

  7. The UKCAT-12 study: educational attainment, aptitude test performance, demographic and socio-economic contextual factors as predictors of first year outcome in a cross-sectional collaborative study of 12 UK medical schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McManus, I C; Dewberry, Chris; Nicholson, Sandra; Dowell, Jonathan S

    2013-11-14

    Most UK medical schools use aptitude tests during student selection, but large-scale studies of predictive validity are rare. This study assesses the United Kingdom Clinical Aptitude Test (UKCAT), and its four sub-scales, along with measures of educational attainment, individual and contextual socio-economic background factors, as predictors of performance in the first year of medical school training. A prospective study of 4,811 students in 12 UK medical schools taking the UKCAT from 2006 to 2008 as a part of the medical school application, for whom first year medical school examination results were available in 2008 to 2010. UKCAT scores and educational attainment measures (General Certificate of Education (GCE): A-levels, and so on; or Scottish Qualifications Authority (SQA): Scottish Highers, and so on) were significant predictors of outcome. UKCAT predicted outcome better in female students than male students, and better in mature than non-mature students. Incremental validity of UKCAT taking educational attainment into account was significant, but small. Medical school performance was also affected by sex (male students performing less well), ethnicity (non-White students performing less well), and a contextual measure of secondary schooling, students from secondary schools with greater average attainment at A-level (irrespective of public or private sector) performing less well. Multilevel modeling showed no differences between medical schools in predictive ability of the various measures. UKCAT sub-scales predicted similarly, except that Verbal Reasoning correlated positively with performance on Theory examinations, but negatively with Skills assessments. This collaborative study in 12 medical schools shows the power of large-scale studies of medical education for answering previously unanswerable but important questions about medical student selection, education and training. UKCAT has predictive validity as a predictor of medical school outcome

  8. Collaborative Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broderick, Debora

    2014-01-01

    This practitioner research study investigates the power of multimodal texts within a real-world context and argues that a participatory culture focused on literary arts offers marginalized high school students opportunities for collaborative design and authoring. Additionally, this article invites educators to rethink the at-risk label. This…

  9. When is collaboration not collaboration? When it's militarized.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Karen

    2012-03-01

    In adopting the medical lobby's preferred definition of collaboration where midwives are legally compelled to seek endorsement for their care plan from an obstetrician, Determination 2010 connotes a form of militarized collaboration and thus negates all that genuine collaboration stands for--equality, mutual trust and reciprocal respect. Using Critical Discourse Analysis, the first half of this paper analyses the submissions from medical, midwifery and consumer peak organisations to the Maternity Services Review and Senate reviews held between 2008 and 2010 showing that Determination 2010 privileges the medical lobby worldview in adopting a vertical definition of collaboration. The second half of the paper responds to the principal assumption of Determination 2010--that midwives do not voluntarily collaborate. It argues by reference to a qualitative inquiry conducted into select caseload maternity units in South Australia, Victoria and New South Wales during 2009-2010 that this presupposition is erroneous. The evidence shows that genuine collaboration is possible without legislative force but it requires a coalition of the willing among senior midwives and obstetricians to institute regular interdisciplinary meetings and clinical reviews and to model respectful behaviour to new entrants. Copyright © 2011 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Benchmarking and monitoring framework for interconnected file synchronization and sharing services

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mrówczyński, Piotr; Mościcki, Jakub T.; Lamanna, Massimo

    2018-01-01

    On-premise file synchronization and sharing services are increasingly used in research collaborations and academia. The main motivation for the on-premise deployment is connected with the requirements on the physical location of the data, data protection policies and integration with existing com...

  11. Using a Synchronous Online Learning Environment to Promote and Enhance Transactional Engagement beyond the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wdowik, Steven

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to create a synchronous online learning community through the use of "Blackboard Collaborate!" to promote and enhance transactional engagement outside the classroom. Design/methodology/approach: This paper employs a quantitative and qualitative approach where data were sourced from a third year…

  12. Are you with me or not? : Temporal synchronicity and transactivity during CSCL

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popov, Vitaliy; van Leeuwen, A.; Buis, Stan

    2017-01-01

    Do the simultaneous alignment of student activities (temporal synchronicity) and students successively building on each other's reasoning (transactivity) predict the quality of collaborative learning products? To address this question, we used a mixed-method approach to study 74 first-year

  13. Synchronous and Asynchronous E-Language Learning: A Case Study of Virtual University of Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perveen, Ayesha

    2016-01-01

    This case study evaluated the impact of synchronous and asynchronous E-Language Learning activities (ELL-ivities) in an E-Language Learning Environment (ELLE) at Virtual University of Pakistan. The purpose of the study was to assess e-language learning analytics based on the constructivist approach of collaborative construction of knowledge. The…

  14. Synchronizing Strategies under Partial Observability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Kim Guldstrand; Laursen, Simon; Srba, Jiri

    2014-01-01

    Embedded devices usually share only partial information about their current configurations as the communication bandwidth can be restricted. Despite this, we may wish to bring a failed device into a given predetermined configuration. This problem, also known as resetting or synchronizing words, has...

  15. Synchronizing Web Documents with Style

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.L. Guimarães (Rodrigo); D.C.A. Bulterman (Dick); P.S. Cesar Garcia (Pablo Santiago); A.J. Jansen (Jack)

    2014-01-01

    htmlabstractIn this paper we report on our efforts to define a set of document extensions to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) that allow for structured timing and synchronization of elements within a Web page. Our work considers the scenario in which the temporal structure can be decoupled from the

  16. Learning through synchronous electronic discussion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kanselaar, G.; Veerman, A.L.; Andriessen, J.E.B.

    2000-01-01

    This article reports a study examining university student pairs carrying out an electronic discussion task in a synchronous computer mediated communication (CMC) system (NetMeeting). The purpose of the assignment was to raise students' awareness concerning conceptions that characterise effective

  17. OVULATORY RESFONSE IN PROGESTERONE SYNCHRONIZED ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conception rate and ovarian function following estrus control by progestetone injections in dairy cattle. J. Anim. Sci. 14, 224. VAN NIEKERK, C.H., BELONJE, P.C. & SPREETH, E.B., 1970. Post partum synchronization of the oestrus period of lactating friesland cows with 6-methyl-17-acetozy-Progesterone. (MAP) and PMSG.

  18. Sports Medicine Meets Synchronized Swimming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenz, Betty J.; And Others

    This collection of articles contains information about synchronized swimming. Topics covered include general physiology and cardiovascular conditioning, flexibility exercises, body composition, strength training, nutrition, coach-athlete relationships, coping with competition stress and performance anxiety, and eye care. Chapters are included on…

  19. Generalized synchronization via impulsive control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rong; Xu Zhenyuan; Yang, Simon X.; He Xueming

    2008-01-01

    This paper demonstrates theoretically that two completely different systems can implement GS via impulsive control, moreover by using impulsive control, for a given manifold y = H(x) we construct a response system to achieve GS with drive system and the synchronization manifold is y = H(x). Our theoretical results are supported by numerical examples

  20. Epidemic Synchronization in Robotic Swarms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøler, Henrik; Nielsen, Jens Frederik Dalsgaard; Ngo, Trung Dung

    2009-01-01

    Clock synchronization in swarms of networked mobile robots is studied in a probabilistic, epidemic framework. In this setting communication and synchonization is considered to be a randomized process, taking place at unplanned instants of geographical rendezvous between robots. In combination...... as an infinite-dimensional optimal controlproblem. Illustrative numerical examples are given and commented....

  1. Main injector synchronous timing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokland, W.; Steimel, J.

    1998-01-01

    The Synchronous Timing System is designed to provide sub-nanosecond timing to instrumentation during the acceleration of particles in the Main Injector. Increased energy of the beam particles leads to a small but significant increase in speed, reducing the time it takes to complete a full turn of the ring by 61 nanoseconds (or more than 3 rf buckets). In contrast, the reference signal, used to trigger instrumentation and transmitted over a cable, has a constant group delay. This difference leads to a phase slip during the ramp and prevents instrumentation such as dampers from properly operating without additional measures. The Synchronous Timing System corrects for this phase slip as well as signal propagation time changes due to temperature variations. A module at the LLRF system uses a 1.2 Gbit/s G-Link chip to transmit the rf clock and digital data (e.g. the current frequency) over a single mode fiber around the ring. Fiber optic couplers at service buildings split off part of this signal for a local module which reconstructs a synchronous beam reference signal. This paper describes the background, design and expected performance of the Synchronous Timing System. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  2. Main injector synchronous timing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blokland, Willem; Steimel, James

    1998-01-01

    The Synchronous Timing System is designed to provide sub-nanosecond timing to instrumentation during the acceleration of particles in the Main Injector. Increased energy of the beam particles leads to a small but significant increase in speed, reducing the time it takes to complete a full turn of the ring by 61 nanoseconds (or more than 3 rf buckets). In contrast, the reference signal, used to trigger instrumentation and transmitted over a cable, has a constant group delay. This difference leads to a phase slip during the ramp and prevents instrumentation such as dampers from properly operating without additional measures. The Synchronous Timing System corrects for this phase slip as well as signal propagation time changes due to temperature variations. A module at the LLRF system uses a 1.2 Gbit/s G-Link chip to transmit the rf clock and digital data (e.g. the current frequency) over a single mode fiber around the ring. Fiber optic couplers at service buildings split off part of this signal for a local module which reconstructs a synchronous beam reference signal. This paper describes the background, design and expected performance of the Synchronous Timing System

  3. Synchronized whistlers recorded at Varanasi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    An attempt has been made to explain the dynamic spectra using lightning discharge generated from magnetospheric sources. Keywords. Whistler-mode wave propagation; dispersion; synchronized whistler. PACS No. 94.20.Mm. It is well-known that electromagnetic waves in wide frequency range are associated with.

  4. Fermi Timing and Synchronization System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, R.; Staples, J.; Doolittle, L.; Byrd, J.; Ratti, A.; Kaertner, F.X.; Kim, J.; Chen, J.; Ilday, F.O.; Ludwig, F.; Winter, A.; Ferianis, M.; Danailov, M.; D' Auria, G.

    2006-07-19

    The Fermi FEL will depend critically on precise timing of its RF, laser and diagnostic subsystems. The timing subsystem to coordinate these functions will need to reliably maintain sub-100fs synchronicity between distant points up to 300m apart in the Fermi facility. The technology to do this is not commercially available, and has not been experimentally demonstrated in a working facility. Therefore, new technology must be developed to meet these needs. Two approaches have been researched by different groups working with the Fermi staff. At MIT, a pulse transmission scheme has been developed for synchronization of RF and laser devices. And at LBL, a CW transmission scheme has been developed for RF and laser synchronization. These respective schemes have advantages and disadvantages that will become better understood in coming years. This document presents the work done by both teams, and suggests a possible system design which integrates them both. The integrated system design provides an example of how choices can be made between the different approaches without significantly changing the basic infrastructure of the system. Overall system issues common to any synchronization scheme are also discussed.

  5. Neural synchronization via potassium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, Dmitry E; Ryazanova, Ludmila S; Mosekilde, Erik

    2006-01-01

    Using a relatively simple model we examine how variations of the extracellular potassium concentration can give rise to synchronization of two nearby pacemaker cells. With the volume of the extracellular space and the rate of potassium diffusion as control parameters, the dual nature of this reso...

  6. Neural Synchronization via Potassium Signaling,

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postnov, D. E.; Ryazanova, L. S.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2006-01-01

    Using a relatively simple model we examine how variations of the extracellular potassium concentration can give rise to synchronization of two nearby pacemaker cells. With the volume of the extracellular space and the rate of potassium diffusion as control parameters, the dual nature of this reso...

  7. Digital device for synchronous storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobzar', Yu.M.; Kovtun, V.G.; Pashechko, N.I.

    1991-01-01

    Synchronous storage digital device for IR electron-photon emission spectrometer operating with analogue-to-digital converter F4223 or monocrystal converter K572PV1 is described. The device accomplished deduction of noise-background in each storage cycle. Summation and deduction operational time equals 90 ns, device output code discharge - 20, number of storages -2 23

  8. Research on bit synchronization based on GNSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Huanran; Liu, Yi-jun

    2017-05-01

    The signals transmitted by GPS satellites are divided into three components: carrier, pseudocode and data code. The processes of signal acquisition are acquisition, tracking, bit synchronization, frame synchronization, navigation message extraction, observation extraction and position speed calculation, among which bit synchronization is of greatest importance. The accuracy of bit synchronization and the shortening of bit synchronization time can help us to use satellite to realize positioning and acquire the information transmitted by satellite signals more accurately. Even under the condition of weak signal, how to improve bit synchronization performance is what we need to research. We adopt a method of polymorphic energy accumulation minima so as to find the bit synchronization point, as well as complete the computer simulation to conclude that under the condition of extremely weak signal power, this method still has superior synchronization performance, which can achieve high bit edge detection rate and the optimal bit error rate.

  9. Pinning Synchronization of Switched Complex Dynamical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liming Du

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Network topology and node dynamics play a key role in forming synchronization of complex networks. Unfortunately there is no effective synchronization criterion for pinning synchronization of complex dynamical networks with switching topology. In this paper, pinning synchronization of complex dynamical networks with switching topology is studied. Two basic problems are considered: one is pinning synchronization of switched complex networks under arbitrary switching; the other is pinning synchronization of switched complex networks by design of switching when synchronization cannot achieved by using any individual connection topology alone. For the two problems, common Lyapunov function method and single Lyapunov function method are used respectively, some global synchronization criteria are proposed and the designed switching law is given. Finally, simulation results verify the validity of the results.

  10. Synchronization of linear systems via relative actuation

    OpenAIRE

    Tuna, S. Emre

    2016-01-01

    Synchronization in networks of discrete-time linear time-invariant systems is considered under relative actuation. Neither input nor output matrices are assumed to be commensurable. A distributed algorithm that ensures synchronization via dynamic relative output feedback is presented.

  11. Pain management practices in paediatric emergency departments in Australia and New Zealand: a clinical and organizational audit by National Health and Medical Research Council's National Institute of Clinical Studies and Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herd, David W; Babl, Franz E; Gilhotra, Yuri; Huckson, Sue

    2009-06-01

    To audit pain management practices and organization in paediatric ED across Australia and New Zealand. Retrospective audit of pain management practices in Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative ED in 20 cases each of migraine, abdominal pain and femoral shaft fracture. Review of organizational status of pain management at Paediatric Research in Emergency Departments International Collaborative sites. Of 14 ED, 10 participated in the clinical audit. A total of 196 migraine, 197 abdominal pain and 177 femur fracture cases were reviewed. Less than half had degree of pain measured or had pain score documented on triage. Migraine received analgesia in 62% of cases (opioids in 11%). Abdominal pain received analgesia in 62% of cases (opioids in 14%). Fractured femurs received analgesia in 78% of cases (opioids 49%, femoral nerve blocks 40%). Median minutes to enteral medication were 100, 85 and 75, and for parenteral medication (mainly opiates) 103, 137 and 26, for migraine, abdominal pain and femur fracture, respectively. Thirteen hospitals participated in the organizational audit. Of all ED, 92% had pain management policies or guidelines, 92% taught pain management topics in education programmes and 62% used mandatory pain competencies. Only 15% had quality improvement programmes for pain reduction. We found a notable lack of pain assessment documentation and delays to analgesia. There is a need to improve pain assessment and management, although a majority of paediatric ED surveyed had important organizational and educational structures in place. Issues to explore include use of opioids in migraine and the underuse of femoral nerve blocks.

  12. Infrastructure Support for Collaborative Pervasive Computing Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard Mogensen, Martin

    Collaborative Pervasive Computing Systems (CPCS) are currently being deployed to support areas such as clinical work, emergency situations, education, ad-hoc meetings, and other areas involving information sharing and collaboration.These systems allow the users to work together synchronously......, are all characterized by unstable, volatile environments, either due to the underlying components changing or the nomadic work habits of users. A major challenge, for the creators of collaborative pervasive computing systems, is the construction of infrastructures supporting the system. The complexity......, but from different places, by sharing information and coordinating activities. Several researchers have shown the value of such distributed collaborative systems. However, building these systems is by no means a trivial task and introduces a lot of yet unanswered questions. The aforementioned areas...

  13. Synchronization of coupled chaotic dynamics on networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We review some recent work on the synchronization of coupled dynamical systems on a variety of networks. When nodes show synchronized behaviour, two ... [5], congregations of synchronously flashing fireflies [6], and cricket that chirp in unison [7]. Coupled oscillators were first studied by Winfree [8] and Kuramoto [9].

  14. Synchronization of coupled nonidentical multidelay feedback systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoang, Thang Manh; Nakagawa, Masahiro

    2007-01-01

    We present the lag synchronization of coupled nonidentical multidelay feedback systems, in which the synchronization signal is the sum of nonlinearly transformed components of delayed state variable. The sufficient condition for synchronization is considered by the Krasovskii-Lyapunov theory. The specific examples will demonstrate and verify the effectiveness of the proposed model

  15. Two novel synchronization criterions for a unified chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tao Chaohai; Xiong Hongxia; Hu Feng

    2006-01-01

    Two novel synchronization criterions are proposed in this paper. It includes drive-response synchronization and adaptive synchronization schemes. Moreover, these synchronization criterions can be applied to a large class of chaotic systems and are very useful for secure communication

  16. Fast Self-Synchronization between LowVoltage Microgrid and Inverter using Virtual Synchronous Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Md Ruhul Amin; Shamsul Aizam Zulkifli

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a fast self-synchronization known as virtual synchronous converter (VSCon) between single-phase microgrid and inverter in low-voltage microgrid, has been developed in Matlab/Simulink. The idea is to any phase locked loop (PLL) circuit for inverter-microgrid synchronization in order to improve the synchronization time. As known, it is difficult and lengthy process to tune the PLL gain parameters to reach suitable performance for synchronizing among the voltage, phase-angle and f...

  17. Chaos synchronization of coupled hyperchaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lixin; Chu Yandong; Zhang Jiangang; Li Xianfeng

    2009-01-01

    Chaos synchronization, as an important topic, has become an active research subject in nonlinear science. Over the past two decades, chaos synchronization between nonlinear systems has been extensively studied, and many types of synchronization have been announced. This paper introduces synchronization of coupled hyperchaotic system, based on the Lapunov stability theory, asymptotic stability of the system is guaranteed by means of Lapunov function. The numerical simulation was provided in order to show the effectiveness of this method for the synchronization of the chaotic hyperchaotic Chen system and Rossler system.

  18. Targeting engineering synchronization in chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhowmick, Sourav K.; Ghosh, Dibakar

    2016-07-01

    A method of targeting engineering synchronization states in two identical and mismatch chaotic systems is explained in detail. The method is proposed using linear feedback controller coupling for engineering synchronization such as mixed synchronization, linear and nonlinear generalized synchronization and targeting fixed point. The general form of coupling design to target any desire synchronization state under unidirectional coupling with the help of Lyapunov function stability theory is derived analytically. A scaling factor is introduced in the coupling definition to smooth control without any loss of synchrony. Numerical results are done on two mismatch Lorenz systems and two identical Sprott oscillators.

  19. Modified function projective synchronization of chaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du Hongyue; Zeng Qingshuang; Wang Changhong

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a new type synchronization called modified function projective synchronization, where the drive and response systems could be synchronized up to a desired scale function matrix. It is obvious that the unpredictability of the scaling functions can additionally enhance the security of communication. By active control scheme, we take Lorenz system as an example to illustrate above synchronization phenomenon. Furthermore, based on modified function projective synchronization, a scheme for secure communication is investigated in theory. The corresponding numerical simulations are performed to verify and illustrate the analytical results.

  20. Inevitable components of and steps for ADE management systems: the need for a Unified Ontological Framework (UOF) and a more effective collaboration in medication safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryilmaz, Esat N; Dündar, Gül; Sari, Senem Ozgür

    2009-01-01

    In this article, we will try to address the most basic requirements for facilitating the knowledge management challenges through the elaboration of medical documentation/ record keeping with several implications on patient safety/medication safety and research quality aspects, the main purpose being the simplification of utilizing the usable outputs of ontology development efforts. This simplification is of vital importance from KM implementation in medical and healthcare domains. Because, as Ceusters et al [3] elaborate, reaching consensus on even the most basic concepts will become an intricate work in terms of the wide-scale implementation of ontology-based KM solutions in clinical practice and other healthcare related processes. EHR (Electronic Health Records) standards developed by various SDOs are not easy to implement in all circumstances. Any implementation effort, not complying with a UOF (Unified Ontological Framework), is likely to fail in terms of goal-oriented optimization and high quality safe medical practice. World- wide trend is to standardize medical documents focusing on the use of terminology systems covering care related processes.

  1. Collaborative Improvement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaltoft, Rasmus

    (Denmark, Italy and The Netherlands) each with three to five suppliers were involved. The CO-IMPROVE project and the thesis is based on “action research” and “action learning”. The main aim of the whole project is through actual involvement and actions make the researchers, companies and selected suppliers......The thesis data have been collected in the EU-sponsored project: Collaborative Improvement Tool for the Extended Manufacturing Enterprise, CO-IMPROVE. In this project four universities (Denmark, Ireland, Italy, and The Netherlands), two software vendors (Greece and Sweden) and three companies...

  2. Contested collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonnenwald, Diane H.

    1995-01-01

    to design outcomes. Through a qualitative analysis of a house, expert system, and telecommunications network architecture and management system design situations, a descriptive model of design that characterizes communication among users, designers, and developers as they create an artifact was developed....... The model describes design phases, roles, themes, and intergroup communication networks as they evolve throughout the design process and characterizes design as a process of "contested collaboration". It is a first step towards a predictive design model that suggests strategies which may help participants...

  3. Collaborative Care

    OpenAIRE

    Schuyler, Dean

    2005-01-01

    本書を著したHornbyは英国のソーシャルワーカーである。彼女は1983年に「Collaboration in social work(Journal of social work practice,1.1)」を発表し、ソーシャルワークでの職種間の連携の重要性について報告している。さらに1993年に発刊した本書では、同一機関内の人間関係 ...

  4. Synchronous replication of remote storage

    OpenAIRE

    Mirzoev, Dr. Timur

    2014-01-01

    Storage replication is one of the essential requirements for network environments. While many forms of Network Attached Storage (NAS), Storage Area Networks (SAN) and other forms of network storage exist, there is a need for a reliable synchronous storage replication technique between distant sites (less than 1 mile). Such technology allows setting new standards for network failover and failback systems for virtual servers; specifically, addressing the growing need for effective disaster reco...

  5. Synchronization matters for motor coordination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesce Ibarra, Luigi S

    2018-03-01

    Using electroencephalography and electromyography recordings from healthy participants during a visual-depended bimanual coordination task, de Vries and colleagues showed that functional synchronization is important in motor coordination. The authors reported that higher coordination correlated positively with intermuscular synchrony, but correlated negatively with corticomuscular synchrony. They proposed that these two diverse motor systems operate differently depending on task demands. Similar experimental paradigms could identify motor mechanisms in patients with neurological disorders to design novel rehabilitation strategies.

  6. Medication Risk Mitigation: Coordinating and Collaborating with Health Care Systems, Universities, and Researchers to Facilitate the Design and Execution of Practice-Based Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bain, Kevin T; Knowlton, Calvin H; Turgeon, Jacques

    2017-05-01

    The high prevalence of inappropriate polypharmacy in geriatric populations is unacceptable. Traditional medication risk mitigation (MRM) strategies have proven to be effective at improving polypharmacy, but these strategies have not consistently translated into positive health outcomes. Enhanced MRM strategies, such as using pharmacogenomics information, are needed, and these strategies need to be tested. A formidable challenge is successfully integrating pharmacogenomic information into clinical practice. As the medication experts on health care teams, pharmacists have a clear role to play in developing, integrating, and assessing enhanced MRM strategies to improve therapeutic outcomes for geriatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Impact of interprofessional education about psychological and medical comorbidities on practitioners' knowledge and collaborative practice: mixed method evaluation of a national program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Christine B; Hall, Sally; Irving, Michelle

    2016-09-02

    Many patients with chronic physical illnesses have co-morbid psychological illnesses, which may respond to interprofessional collaborative care. Continuing education programs frequently focus on skills and knowledge relevant for individual illnesses, and unidisciplinary care. This study evaluates the impact of "Mind the Gap", an Australian interprofessional continuing education program about management of dual illnesses, on practitioners' knowledge, use of psychological strategies and collaborative practice. A 6-h module addressing knowledge and skills needed for patients with physical and psychological co-morbid illnesses was delivered to 837 practitioners from mixed health professional backgrounds, through locally-facilitated workshops at 45 Australian sites. We conducted a mixed-methods evaluation, incorporating observation, surveys and network analysis using data collected, before, immediately after, and three months after training. Six hundred forty-five participants enrolled in the evaluation (58 % GPs, 17 % nurses, 15 % mental health professionals, response rate 76 %). Participants' knowledge and confidence to manage patients with psychological and physical illnesses improved immediately. Among the subset surveyed at three months (response rate 24 %), referral networks had increased across seven disciplines, improvements in confidence and knowledge were sustained, and doctors, but no other disciplines, reported an increase in use of motivational interviewing (85.9 % to 96.8 %) and mindfulness (58.6 % to 74 %). Interprofessional workshops had an immediate impact on the stated knowledge and confidence of participants to manage patients with physical and psychological comorbidities, which appears to have been sustained. For some attendees, there was a sustained improvement in the size of their referral networks and their use of some psychological strategies.

  8. Nanotechnology Laboratory Collaborates with Army to Develop Botulism Vaccine | FNLCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Nanotechnology Characterization Laboratory (NCL) is collaborating with the Army to develop a candidate vaccine against botulism. Under a collaboration agreement between the National Cancer Institute and the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of

  9. Improving medication safety in primary care. A review and consensus procedure by the LINNEAUS collaboration on patient safety in primary care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lainer, M.; Vogele, A.; Wensing, M.; Sonnichsen, A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Drug treatment is an important clinical process in primary care that is associated with risk of error and adverse events. OBJECTIVE: To review currently available research evidence on the topic and to develop a framework, which can help to guide improvement of medication safety. METHODS:

  10. An international summer school on health informatics: a collaborative effort of the Amsterdam Medical Informatics Program and IPhiE--the International Partnership for Health Informatics Education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, M. W. M.; Gardner, R. M.; Gatewood, L. C.; Haux, R.; Evans, R. S.

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Today, the need for health informatics training for health care professionals is acknowledged and educational opportunities for these professionals are increasing. To contribute to these efforts, a new initiative was undertaken by the Medical Informatics Program of the University of

  11. Federal Medication Terminologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federal Medication (FedMed) collaboration of 8 partner agencies agreed on a set of standard, comprehensive, freely and easily accessible FMT terminologies to improve the exchange and public availability of medication information.

  12. Collaborative Environments. Considerations Concerning Some Collaborative Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela I. MUNTEAN

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available It is obvious, that all collaborative environments (workgroups, communities of practice, collaborative enterprises are based on knowledge and between collaboration and knowledge management there is a strong interdependence. The evolution of information systems in these collaborative environments led to the sudden necessity to adopt, for maintaining the virtual activities and processes, the latest technologies/systems, which are capable to support integrated collaboration in business services. In these environments, portal-based IT platforms will integrate multi-agent collaborative systems, collaborative tools, different enterprise applications and other useful information systems.

  13. Using Collaborative Engineering to Inform Collaboration Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Lynne P.

    2012-01-01

    Collaboration is a critical competency for modern organizations as they struggle to compete in an increasingly complex, global environment. A large body of research on collaboration in the workplace focuses both on teams, investigating how groups use teamwork to perform their task work, and on the use of information systems to support team processes ("collaboration engineering"). This research essay presents collaboration from an engineering perspective ("collaborative engineering"). It uses examples from professional and student engineering teams to illustrate key differences in collaborative versus collaboration engineering and investigates how challenges in the former can inform opportunities for the latter.

  14. Open Science Grid (OSG) Ticket Synchronization: Keeping Your Home Field Advantage In A Distributed Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Kyle; Hayashi, Soichi; Teige, Scott; Quick, Robert

    2012-12-01

    Large distributed computing collaborations, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), face many issues when it comes to providing a working grid environment for their users. One of these is exchanging tickets between various ticketing systems in use by grid collaborations. Ticket systems such as Footprints, RT, Remedy, and ServiceNow all have different schema that must be addressed in order to provide a reliable exchange of information between support entities and users in different grid environments. To combat this problem, OSG Operations has created a ticket synchronization interface called GOC-TX that relies on web services instead of error-prone email parsing methods of the past. Synchronizing tickets between different ticketing systems allows any user or support entity to work on a ticket in their home environment, thus providing a familiar and comfortable place to provide updates without having to learn another ticketing system. The interface is built in a way that it is generic enough that it can be customized for nearly any ticketing system with a web-service interface with only minor changes. This allows us to be flexible and rapidly bring new ticket synchronization online. Synchronization can be triggered by different methods including mail, web services interface, and active messaging. GOC-TX currently interfaces with Global Grid User Support (GGUS) for WLCG, Remedy at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), and Request Tracker (RT) at the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT). Work is progressing on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) ServiceNow synchronization. This paper will explain the problems faced by OSG and how they led OSG to create and implement this ticket synchronization system along with the technical details that allow synchronization to be preformed at a production level.

  15. Open Science Grid (OSG) Ticket Synchronization: Keeping Your Home Field Advantage In A Distributed Environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, Kyle; Hayashi, Soichi; Teige, Scott; Quick, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Large distributed computing collaborations, such as the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG), face many issues when it comes to providing a working grid environment for their users. One of these is exchanging tickets between various ticketing systems in use by grid collaborations. Ticket systems such as Footprints, RT, Remedy, and ServiceNow all have different schema that must be addressed in order to provide a reliable exchange of information between support entities and users in different grid environments. To combat this problem, OSG Operations has created a ticket synchronization interface called GOC-TX that relies on web services instead of error-prone email parsing methods of the past. Synchronizing tickets between different ticketing systems allows any user or support entity to work on a ticket in their home environment, thus providing a familiar and comfortable place to provide updates without having to learn another ticketing system. The interface is built in a way that it is generic enough that it can be customized for nearly any ticketing system with a web-service interface with only minor changes. This allows us to be flexible and rapidly bring new ticket synchronization online. Synchronization can be triggered by different methods including mail, web services interface, and active messaging. GOC-TX currently interfaces with Global Grid User Support (GGUS) for WLCG, Remedy at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), and Request Tracker (RT) at the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT). Work is progressing on the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) ServiceNow synchronization. This paper will explain the problems faced by OSG and how they led OSG to create and implement this ticket synchronization system along with the technical details that allow synchronization to be preformed at a production level.

  16. Technology collaboration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Jacob [Halliburton (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to present Halliburton's Brazilian technology center. Halliburton has technology centers in the United States, Saudi Arabia, India, Singapore and Brazil, all of which aim at delivering accelerated innovation in the oil sector. The technology centers engage in research and development activities with the help of various universities and in collaboration with the customer or supplier. The Halliburton Brazil technology center provides its customers with timely research and development solutions for enhancing recovery and mitigating reservoir uncertainty; they are specialized in finding solutions for pre- and post-salt carbonate drilling and in the enhancement of production from mature fields. This presentation showcased the work carried out by the Halliburton Brazil technology center to help customers develop their deepwater field activities.

  17. Collaborative Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meged, Jane Widtfeldt; Christensen, Mathilde Dissing

    2017-01-01

    This book employs an interdisciplinary, cross-sectoral lens to explore the collaborative dynamics that are currently disrupting, re-creating and transforming the production and consumption of tourism. House swapping, ridesharing, voluntourism, couchsurfing, dinner hosting, social enterprise...... of Airbnb’s early legal issues Daniel Guttentag 8.Free walking tour enterprises in Europe: An evolutionary economic approach Maria del Pilar Leal and L. Xavier Medina, 9.Cultural capitalism: Manipulation and control in Airbnb’s intersection with tourism Michael O' Reganand Jaeyeon Choe 10.Sharing the new...... and similar phenomena are among these collective innovations in tourism that are shaking the very bedrock of an industrial system that has been traditionally sustained along commercial value chains. To date there has been very little investigation of these trends, which have been inspired by, amongst other...

  18. Rocinante, a virtual collaborative visualizer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McDonald, M.J.

    1996-01-01

    With the goal of improving the ability of people around the world to share the development and use of intelligent systems, Sandia National Laboratories' Intelligent Systems and Robotics Center is developing new Virtual Collaborative Engineering (VCE) and Virtual Collaborative Control (VCC) technologies. A key area of VCE and VCC research is in shared visualization of virtual environments. This paper describes a Virtual Collaborative Visualizer (VCV), named Rocinante, that Sandia developed for VCE and VCC applications. Rocinante allows multiple participants to simultaneously view dynamic geometrically-defined environments. Each viewer can exclude extraneous detail or include additional information in the scene as desired. Shared information can be saved and later replayed in a stand-alone mode. Rocinante automatically scales visualization requirements with computer system capabilities. Models with 30,000 polygons and 4 Megabytes of texture display at 12 to 15 frames per second (fps) on an SGI Onyx and at 3 to 8 fps (without texture) on Indigo 2 Extreme computers. In its networked mode, Rocinante synchronizes its local geometric model with remote simulators and sensory systems by monitoring data transmitted through UDP packets. Rocinante's scalability and performance make it an ideal VCC tool. Users throughout the country can monitor robot motions and the thinking behind their motion planners and simulators

  19. Collaborative work between the West and Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hser, Yih-Ing; Bart, Gavin; Li, Li; Giang, Le Minh

    2013-12-01

    The "Collaborative Work between the West and Asia" session was chaired by Dr. Yih-Ing Hser and had three speakers. The speakers (and their topics) were: Dr. Gavin Bart (Collaborative Addiction Research in Asian Populations Home and Abroad), Dr. Li Li (Implementing Intervention Research Projects in Asia), and Dr. Le Minh Giang (Building Research Infrastructure for International Collaborative Studies on Substance Use Disorder and HIV: The Case of Hanoi Medical University/Vietnam).

  20. Explosive synchronization coexists with classical synchronization in the Kuramoto model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Danziger, Michael M., E-mail: michael.danziger@biu.ac.il; Havlin, Shlomo [Department of Physics, Bar-Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Moskalenko, Olga I.; Kurkin, Semen A. [Faculty of Nonlinear Processes, Saratov State University, Astrakhanskaya, 83, Saratov 410012 (Russian Federation); Saratov State Technical University, Politehnicheskaya, 77, Saratov 410054 (Russian Federation); Zhang, Xiyun [Department of Physics, East China Normal University, Shanghai 200062 (China); Boccaletti, Stefano [CNR-Institute of Complex Systems, Via Madonna del Piano 10, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Florence (Italy); The Italian Embassy in Israel, 25 Hamered Street, 68125 Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2016-06-15

    Explosive synchronization has recently been reported in a system of adaptively coupled Kuramoto oscillators, without any conditions on the frequency or degree of the nodes. Here, we find that, in fact, the explosive phase coexists with the standard phase of the Kuramoto oscillators. We determine this by extending the mean-field theory of adaptively coupled oscillators with full coupling to the case with partial coupling of a fraction f. This analysis shows that a metastable region exists for all finite values of f > 0, and therefore explosive synchronization is expected for any perturbation of adaptively coupling added to the standard Kuramoto model. We verify this theory with GPU-accelerated simulations on very large networks (N ∼ 10{sup 6}) and find that, in fact, an explosive transition with hysteresis is observed for all finite couplings. By demonstrating that explosive transitions coexist with standard transitions in the limit of f → 0, we show that this behavior is far more likely to occur naturally than was previously believed.

  1. Synchronization in complex networks with switching topology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Lei; Wang, Qing-guo

    2011-01-01

    This Letter investigates synchronization issues of complex dynamical networks with switching topology. By constructing a common Lyapunov function, we show that local and global synchronization for a linearly coupled network with switching topology can be evaluated by the time average of second smallest eigenvalues corresponding to the Laplacians of switching topology. This result is quite powerful and can be further used to explore various switching cases for complex dynamical networks. Numerical simulations illustrate the effectiveness of the obtained results in the end. -- Highlights: → Synchronization of complex networks with switching topology is investigated. → A common Lyapunov function is established for synchronization of switching network. → The common Lyapunov function is not necessary to monotonically decrease with time. → Synchronization is determined by the second smallest eigenvalue of its Laplacian. → Synchronization criterion can be used to investigate various switching cases.

  2. Control for a synchronization-desynchronization switch

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhiwei; Wang, Xingang; Zhang, Guo-Yong; Zhan, Meng

    2014-07-01

    How to freely enhance or suppress synchronization of networked dynamical systems is of great importance in many disciplines. A unified precise control method for a synchronization-desynchronization switch, called the pull-push control method, is suggested. Namely, synchronization can be achieved when the original systems are desynchronous by pulling (or protecting) one node or a certain subset of nodes, whereas desynchronization can be accomplished when the systems are already synchronous by pushing (or kicking) one node or a certain subset of nodes. With this method, the controlled nodes should be chosen by the generalized eigenvector centrality of the critical synchronization mode of the Laplacian matrix. Compared with existing control methods for synchronization, it displays high efficiency, flexibility, and precision as well.

  3. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9709 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  4. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L.

    2015-01-01

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  5. Method for Converter Synchronization with RF Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Joshua P. Bruckmeyer; Ivica Kostanic

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an injection method for synchronizing analog to digital converters (ADC). This approach can eliminate the need for precision routed discrete synchronization signals of current technologies, such as JESD204. By eliminating the setup and hold time requirements at the conversion (or near conversion) clock rate, higher sample rate systems can be synchronized. Measured data from an existing multiple ADC conversion system was used to evaluate the method. Coherent beams were simu...

  6. Synchronizing a class of uncertain chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Maoyin; Zhou Donghua; Shang Yun

    2005-01-01

    This Letter deals with the synchronization of a class of uncertain chaotic systems in the drive-response framework. A robust adaptive observer based response system is designed to synchronize a given chaotic system with unknown parameters and external disturbances. Lyapunov stability ensures the global synchronization between the drive and response systems even if Lipschitz constants on function matrices and bounds on uncertainties are unknown. Numerical simulation of Genesio-Tesi system verifies the effectiveness of this scheme

  7. The synchronization of three fractional differential systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Changpin; Yan Jianping

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a new method is proposed and applied to the synchronization of fractional differential systems (or 'differential systems with fractional orders'), where both drive and response systems have the same dimensionality and are coupled by the driving signal. The present technique is based on the stability criterion of linear fractional systems. This method is implemented in (chaos) synchronization of the fractional Lorenz system, Chen system and Chua circuit. Numerical simulations show the present synchronization method works well

  8. Complexity and synchronization in stochastic chaotic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son Dang, Thai; Palit, Sanjay Kumar; Mukherjee, Sayan; Hoang, Thang Manh; Banerjee, Santo

    2016-02-01

    We investigate the complexity of a hyperchaotic dynamical system perturbed by noise and various nonlinear speech and music signals. The complexity is measured by the weighted recurrence entropy of the hyperchaotic and stochastic systems. The synchronization phenomenon between two stochastic systems with complex coupling is also investigated. These criteria are tested on chaotic and perturbed systems by mean conditional recurrence and normalized synchronization error. Numerical results including surface plots, normalized synchronization errors, complexity variations etc show the effectiveness of the proposed analysis.

  9. Impulsive synchronization of Chen's hyperchaotic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haeri, Mohammad; Dehghani, Mahsa

    2006-01-01

    In this Letter the impulsive synchronization of the Chen's hyperchaotic systems is discussed. Some new and sufficient conditions on varying impulsive distance are established in order to guarantee the synchronizabillity of the systems using the synchronization method. In particular, some simple conditions are derived in synchronizing the systems by equal impulsive distances. Two illustrative examples are provided to show the feasibility and the effectiveness of the proposed method. The boundaries of the stable regions are also estimated

  10. Fitness for synchronization of network motifs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vega, Y.M.; Vázquez-Prada, M.; Pacheco, A.F.

    2004-01-01

    We study the synchronization of Kuramoto's oscillators in small parts of networks known as motifs. We first report on the system dynamics for the case of a scale-free network and show the existence of a non-trivial critical point. We compute the probability that network motifs synchronize, and fi...... that the fitness for synchronization correlates well with motifs interconnectedness and structural complexity. Possible implications for present debates about network evolution in biological and other systems are discussed....

  11. Synchronous Behavior of Two Coupled Biological Neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elson, R.C.; Selverston, A.I.; Elson, R.C.; Selverston, A.I.; Huerta, R.; Rulkov, N.F.; Rabinovich, M.I.; Abarbanel, H.D.; Selverston, A.I.; Huerta, R.; Abarbanel, H.D.

    1998-01-01

    We report experimental studies of synchronization phenomena in a pair of biological neurons that interact through naturally occurring, electrical coupling. When these neurons generate irregular bursts of spikes, the natural coupling synchronizes slow oscillations of membrane potential, but not the fast spikes. By adding artificial electrical coupling we studied transitions between synchrony and asynchrony in both slow oscillations and fast spikes. We discuss the dynamics of bursting and synchronization in living neurons with distributed functional morphology. copyright 1998 The American Physical Society

  12. Synchronization of weakly coupled canard oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Köksal Ersöz, Elif; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2017-01-01

    International audience; Synchronization has been studied extensively in the context of weakly coupled oscillators using the so-called phase response curve (PRC) which measures how a change of the phase of an oscillator is affected by a small perturbation. This approach was based upon the work of Malkin, and it has been extended to relaxation oscillators. Namely, synchronization conditions were established under the weak coupling assumption, leading to a criterion for the existence of synchron...

  13. Clinical assessment and management of general surgery patients via synchronous telehealth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cain, Steven M; Moore, Robert; Sturm, Lauren; Mason, Travis; Fuhrman, Caitlin; Smith, Robin; Bojicic, Irfan; Carter, Brandon

    2017-02-01

    Objective This paper describes how a clinical team at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center (LRMC) successfully integrated synchronous telehealth (TH) into their routine clinical practice. Methods and materials Synchronous TH encounters were performed using Polycom® software on surgeons' computers with high-definition (HD) cameras on monitors at distant sites and PolyCom HDX9000® Telehealth Practitioner Carts at originating sites. Patients provided consented and were presented to general surgeons by nurses and medical technicians at Army health clinics throughout the European Theater. Results In calendar year (CY) 2014, five general surgeons and two surgical physician assistants (PAs) at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center along with registered nurses (RNs) at six originating clinic sites throughout Europe completed 130 synchronous TH encounters for 101 general surgery patients resulting in 73 completed and 16 recommended surgeries. Eighty-eight percent of patients had a completed or recommended surgery. No surgeries or procedures planned after initial TH evaluation were cancelled. Originating site clinics ranged in distance from 68 miles to 517 miles. Acceptance by providers, patients and clinic staff was high. Conclusion Synchronous TH was effective and safe in evaluating common general surgical conditions. We excluded sensitive and complex conditions requiring a nuanced physical examination. The TH efforts of the general surgery staff have resulted in high-quality, seamless and predictable TH activities that continue to expand into other surgical and medical specialties beyond general surgery. Seven surgeons and two PAs use synchronous TH regularly serving patients over a broad geographic area.

  14. Calculation principles for a synchronous electromagnetic clutch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panasenkov, M. A.

    1978-01-01

    A detailed explanation of the calculation principles, for a synchronous salient-pole electromagnetic clutch with lumped excitation windings is supplied by direct current. Practical recommendations are given.

  15. Synchronized Data Aggregation for Wireless Sensor Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dnyaneshwar, Mantri; Prasad, Neeli R.; Prasad, Ramjee

    2014-01-01

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) are used for monitoring and data collection purposes. A key challenge in effective data collection is to schedule and synchronize the activities of the nodes with global clock. This paper proposes the Synchronized Data Aggregation Algorithm (SDA) using spanning tree...... mechanism. It provides network-wide time synchronization for sensor network. In the initial stage algorithm established the hierarchical structure in the network and then perform the pair - wise synchronization. SDA aggregate data with a global time scale throughout the network. The aggregated packets...

  16. Coupled lasers: phase versus chaos synchronization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reidler, I; Nixon, M; Aviad, Y; Guberman, S; Friesem, A A; Rosenbluh, M; Davidson, N; Kanter, I

    2013-10-15

    The synchronization of chaotic lasers and the optical phase synchronization of light originating in multiple coupled lasers have both been extensively studied. However, the interplay between these two phenomena, especially at the network level, is unexplored. Here, we experimentally compare these phenomena by controlling the heterogeneity of the coupling delay times of two lasers. While chaotic lasers exhibit deterioration in synchronization as the time delay heterogeneity increases, phase synchronization is found to be independent of heterogeneity. The experimental results are found to be in agreement with numerical simulations for semiconductor lasers.

  17. Fiscal 1996 report on the committee for international collaborative research of medical and welfare apparatus; 1996 nendo chosa hokokusho (iryo fukushi kiki kokusai kyodo kenkyu jigyo)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    From a viewpoint that cancer, cerebral hemorrhage, heart disease, etc. caused by the progress in aging are problems not only to Japan but to all developed countries, a possibility of Japan`s joint study with other countries was examined to promote efficiently and effectively research/development of the apparatus required. Moreover, from a viewpoint of being the same Asian countries, a possibility of the joint study was examined also with developing countries which are largely different in disease structure and environment of the use of apparatus from developed countries. In the examination on medical/welfare apparatus technology of China, before the site examination, a book of data was arranged on the actual state of population and disease structure and the R and D situation of medical/welfare apparatus in Japan, and at the same time, celebrated persons in China were introduced by the scientific society side as widely as possible. By this preliminary study, the original objective of the examination could be achieved. In the examination with the U.S. and Europe, Japan held meetings with engineers of the U.K., France and the U.S. Japan`s `load control type walking supporting apparatus,` of which the development was finished, was very highly evaluated by each organ of the countries

  18. Pharmaceutical interventions by collaboration between staff pharmacists and clinical pharmacists and implementation of Joint Commission International Accreditation Standards on medication use may optimize pharmacotherapy in geriatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen M

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Meng Chen, Quan Zhou Department of Pharmacy, The Second Affiliated Hospital, School of Medicine, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, Zhejiang Province, People’s Republic of ChinaWe read with great interest the prospective study by Cortejoso et al,1 which describes the characteristics of pharmaceutical interventions in two geriatric wards (orthogeriatric ward and geriatric day unit of a general teaching hospital. We strongly agree with their finding that shows the importance of clinical pharmacist involvement in the optimization of pharmacotherapy in elderly patients. Furthermore, we especially appreciate their new and interesting findings that the clinical pharmacist was more frequently requested by physicians and nurses for information about the pharmacotherapy of the patients on the geriatric day unit, compared with the orthogeriatric ward at admission and discharge (5.7% vs 1.2% and 1.7%, respectively, P<0.05, and that the pharmacist asked for more confirmation of the physician orders on the geriatric day unit rather than the orthogeriatric ward (19.8% vs 1.8% and 15.7% at admission and discharge, respectively, P<0.05. We are from a Joint Commission International (JCI-accredited academic medical center hospital with 3200 beds in China. Safe medication management and use are pivotal to patient safety and quality of care on which the state-of-the-art standards of the Joint Commission focus. We would like to share our perspectives in the following paragraphs.View original paper by Cortejoso and colleagues. 

  19. Collaborative information seeking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hertzum, Morten

    2008-01-01

    , the activities involved in information seeking are often performed by varying subgroups of actors. Consequently, collaborative grounding is necessary to share information among collaborating actors and, thereby, establish and maintain the common ground necessary for their collaborative work. By focusing......Since common ground is pivotal to collaboration, this paper proposes to define collaborative information seeking as the combined activity of information seeking and collaborative grounding. While information-seeking activities are necessary for collaborating actors to acquire new information...... on the collaborative level, collaborative information seeking aims to avoid both individual reductionism and group reductionism, while at the same time recognizing that only some information and understanding need be shared....

  20. A Collaborative VirtualWorkspace for Factory Configuration and Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Zinnikus

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of information technologies (IT has enabled the Digital Enterprise in which engineering, production planning, manufacturing and sales processes are supported by IT-based collaboration, simulation and enactment. As a result, borders between reality and its virtual representations become increasingly blurred. Advanced tools need to support flexibility, specialization and collaborative evolution of the design where the exchange of knowledge between domain experts helps to improve informed decision making. In this paper, we present a collaborative, synchronized web-based framework to create 3D scenarios for product design, simulation and training assisted by animated avatars.

  1. An Overview of a Class of Clock Synchronization Algorithms for Wireless Sensor Networks: A Statistical Signal Processing Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Recently, wireless sensor networks (WSNs have drawn great interest due to their outstanding monitoring and management potential in medical, environmental and industrial applications. Most of the applications that employ WSNs demand all of the sensor nodes to run on a common time scale, a requirement that highlights the importance of clock synchronization. The clock synchronization problem in WSNs is inherently related to parameter estimation. The accuracy of clock synchronization algorithms depends essentially on the statistical properties of the parameter estimation algorithms. Recently, studies dedicated to the estimation of synchronization parameters, such as clock offset and skew, have begun to emerge in the literature. The aim of this article is to provide an overview of the state-of-the-art clock synchronization algorithms for WSNs from a statistical signal processing point of view. This article focuses on describing the key features of the class of clock synchronization algorithms that exploit the traditional two-way message (signal exchange mechanism. Upon introducing the two-way message exchange mechanism, the main clock offset estimation algorithms for pairwise synchronization of sensor nodes are first reviewed, and their performance is compared. The class of fully-distributed clock offset estimation algorithms for network-wide synchronization is then surveyed. The paper concludes with a list of open research problems pertaining to clock synchronization of WSNs.

  2. Adaptive synchronization of chaos in permanent magnet synchronous motors based on passivity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei Du-Qu; Luo Xiao-Shu; Zhang Bo

    2012-01-01

    An adaptive synchronization control method is proposed for chaotic permanent magnet synchronous motors based on the property of a passive system. We prove that the controller makes the synchronization error system between the driving and the response systems not only passive but also asymptotically stable. The simulation results show that the proposed method is effective and robust against uncertainties in the systemic parameters. (general)

  3. Simulation-based inter-professional education to improve attitudes towards collaborative practice: a prospective comparative pilot study in a Chinese medical centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ling-Yu; Yang, Ying-Ying; Huang, Chia-Chang; Liang, Jen-Feng; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Cheng, Hao-Min; Huang, Chin-Chou; Kao, Shou-Yen

    2017-11-08

    Inter-professional education (IPE) builds inter-professional collaboration (IPC) attitude/skills of health professionals. This interventional IPE programme evaluates whether benchmarking sharing can successfully cultivate seed instructors responsible for improving their team members' IPC attitudes. Prospective, pre-post comparative cross-sectional pilot study. Thirty four physicians, 30 nurses and 24 pharmacists, who volunteered to be trained as seed instructors participated in 3.5-hour preparation and 3.5-hour simulation courses. Then, participants (n=88) drew lots to decide 44 presenters, half of each profession, who needed to prepare IPC benchmarking and formed Group 1. The remaining participants formed Group 2 (regular). Facilitators rated the Group 1 participants' degree of appropriate transfer and sustainable practice of the learnt IPC skills in the workplace according to successful IPC examples in their benchmarking sharing. For the three professions, improvement in IPC attitude was identified by sequential increase in the post-course (second month, T 2 ) and end-of-study (third month, T 3 ) Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) and Attitudes Towards Healthcare Teams Scale (ATHCTS) scores, compared with pre-course (first month, T 1 ) scores. By IEPS and ATHCTS-based assessment, the degree of sequential improvements in IPC attitude was found to be higher among nurses and pharmacists than in physicians. In benchmarking sharing, the facilitators' agreement about the degree of participants'appropriate transfer and sustainable practice learnt 'communication and teamwork' skills in the workplace were significantly higher among pharmacists and nurses than among physicians. The post-intervention random sampling survey (sixth month, T post ) found that the IPC attitude of the three professions improved after on-site IPC skill promotion by new programme-trained seed instructors within teams. Addition of benchmark sharing to a diamond-based IPE simulation

  4. Collaboration rules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Philip; Wolf, Bob

    2005-01-01

    Corporate leaders seeking to boost growth, learning, and innovation may find the answer in a surprising place: the Linux open-source software community. Linux is developed by an essentially volunteer, self-organizing community of thousands of programmers. Most leaders would sell their grandmothers for workforces that collaborate as efficiently, frictionlessly, and creatively as the self-styled Linux hackers. But Linux is software, and software is hardly a model for mainstream business. The authors have, nonetheless, found surprising parallels between the anarchistic, caffeinated, hirsute world of Linux hackers and the disciplined, tea-sipping, clean-cut world of Toyota engineering. Specifically, Toyota and Linux operate by rules that blend the self-organizing advantages of markets with the low transaction costs of hierarchies. In place of markets' cash and contracts and hierarchies' authority are rules about how individuals and groups work together (with rigorous discipline); how they communicate (widely and with granularity); and how leaders guide them toward a common goal (through example). Those rules, augmented by simple communication technologies and a lack of legal barriers to sharing information, create rich common knowledge, the ability to organize teams modularly, extraordinary motivation, and high levels of trust, which radically lowers transaction costs. Low transaction costs, in turn, make it profitable for organizations to perform more and smaller transactions--and so increase the pace and flexibility typical of high-performance organizations. Once the system achieves critical mass, it feeds on itself. The larger the system, the more broadly shared the knowledge, language, and work style. The greater individuals' reputational capital, the louder the applause and the stronger the motivation. The success of Linux is evidence of the power of that virtuous circle. Toyota's success is evidence that it is also powerful in conventional companies.

  5. Drivers of Collaborative Advantage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weihe, Gudrid

    , the antecedents of collaborative advantage are theoretically examined, and the organizational competences contributing to collaborative success are identified. The conclusion is that operational processes and social dynamics are vital drivers of collaborative advantage. Another significant conclusion...

  6. La Clínica del Pueblo: a model of collaboration between a private media broadcasting corporation and an academic medical center for health education for North Carolina Latinos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calles-Escandón, Jorge; Hunter, Jaimie C; Langdon, Sarah E; Gómez, Eva M; Duren-Winfield, Vanessa T; Woods, Kristy F

    2009-12-01

    La Clínica del Pueblo, a health education collaboration between the Maya Angelou Center for Health Equity at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and Qué Pasa Media, Inc., disseminates culturally appropriate health information to the North Carolina (NC) Latino community. The program includes a weekly radio show and corresponding newspaper column addressing four areas: childhood health, adult health, safety, and utilization. The radio show format includes a didactic presentation followed by a call-in question and answer period. Over 200 consecutive weeks of programming have been completed, averaging 11 calls per show. A Latino healthcare resource guide and hotline also provide resource information. Participant demographic information indicates that 50% of the target population comes from Mexico, 60% are women, and 70% of the community is younger than 38 years. There was an increase in the use of the media as a source of health information over the course of the project, from an initial 33% of respondents to 58% in the last survey. Listenership to La Clínica del Pueblo displayed a pronounced increase (18% initial survey to 55% in last survey, P < 0.05). We also observed a statistically significant increase in medical knowledge from initial survey to the last survey (P < 0.001). By multiple regression analysis, we identified 4 predictors of medical knowledge: order of surveys (1 < 3, P < 0.001), education level (P < 0.0001), female gender (P < 0.01) and radio listenership (P < 0.05). The first three variables predicted higher scores; however, radio listening recognition of our radio program was more common among individuals who had lower scores. In conclusion, La Clínica del Pueblo is a model for a novel approach that can reach the Latino community to improve medical knowledge and possibly affect health behaviors in a positive manner.

  7. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    J. May, Peter; Winter, Søren

    While much of prior research on collaboration addresses the service delivery network as a whole, we address collaborative relationships between one type of organization—municipal employment services—and a range of governmental and non-governmental partners for employment services in Denmark...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  8. Collaborative Service Arrangements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Winter, Søren; J. May, Peter

    2007-01-01

    While much of prior research on collaboration addresses the service delivery network as a whole, we address collaborative relationships between one type of organization—municipal employment services—and a range of governmental and non-governmental partners for employment services in Denmark...... with collaborators. In short, collaboration requires a healthy and active relationship to foster improved outcomes. These findings have implications for future research about collaborative service delivery concerning the measurement of collaboration, different bases for it, and potential impacts....

  9. The Latin American School of Human and Medical Genetics: promoting education and collaboration in genetics and ethics applied to health sciences across the continent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giugliani, Roberto; Baldo, Guilherme; Vairo, Filippo; Lujan Lopez, Monica; Matte, Ursula

    2015-07-01

    The Latin American Network of Human Genetics (RELAGH) created the Latin American School of Human and Medical Genetics (ELAG) to prepare young researchers and professionals of Latin America to deal with the growing challenge of the genomic medicine. ELAG promotes an annually course since 2005, which received 838 students from 17 Latin American countries over these 10 years. ELAG plays an important role to provide education in genetics applied to health sciences to fellows who live in countries with a less favorable economic situation. Influenced, among others, by the humanitarian perspective of José Maria Cantú, one of its founders, ELAG has always favored the discussion of ethical and social issues related to genetics in Latin America. Few initiatives in Latin America lasted 10 consecutive years. One of the factors responsible for the ELAG's success has been its group of faculty members, who contribute to a friendly environment prone to facilitating the exchange of their own experiences with young researchers.

  10. Collaborative repositories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Morten

    2009-01-01

    in general and the web-dictionary in particular within the Danish health care, pharmaceutical, medical device and translation sectors which technologically have been fused into one collective 'knowledge cluster' and it discusses the opportunities for research and business that spring from fusion of language......Textual and communicative competence lies at the heart of the skills of a professional linguistic mediator in general. Such skills are particularly important in specialized writing, which requires deep conceptual and contextual knowledge. One of the main objectives of the activities undertaken...... of such 'deep' knowledge within interdisciplinary and intersectoral 'knowledge clusters'. This paper presents concepts and systems for multilingual terminological and textual knowledge codification, representation, validation, management and sharing structured around the notion of genre following Bergenkotter...

  11. Adaptive projective synchronization between different chaotic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... with adaptive projective synchronization between two different chaotic systems with parametric uncertainties and external disturbances. Based on Lyapunov stability theory, the projective synchronization between a pair of different chaotic systems with fully unknown parameters are derived. An adaptive control law and a ...

  12. Synchronization of oscillators in complex networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/070/06/1175-1198 ... Abstract. Theory of identical or complete synchronization of identical oscillators in arbitrary networks is introduced. ... Combined theories are used to explore and compare three types of semirandom networks for their efficacy in synchronizing oscillators.

  13. A clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huang, Y.; Visser, P.M.; Broenink, Johannes F.

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a clock synchronization skeleton based on RTAI (Real Time Application Interface). The skeleton is a thin layer that provides unified but extendible interfaces to the underlying operating system, the synchronization algorithms and the upper level applications in need of clock

  14. Principal ideal languages and synchronizing automata

    OpenAIRE

    Gusev, Vladimir V.; Maslennikova, Marina I.; Pribavkina, Elena V.

    2013-01-01

    We study ideal languages generated by a single word. We provide an algorithm to construct a strongly connected synchronizing automaton for which such a language serves as the language of synchronizing words. Also we present a compact formula to calculate the syntactic complexity of this language.

  15. Global chaos synchronization of coupled parametrically excited ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    u.vincent@tu-clausthal.de (U E Vincent); njahabdul@yahoo.com (A N Njah). MS received 24 March 2009; ... sufficient criteria for global asymptotic synchronization are derived from which an esti- mated critical coupling is ... ent concepts of synchronization, the reader is referred to the fundamental book by. Pikovsky et al [7].

  16. Synchronization of oscillators in complex networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Theory of identical or complete synchronization of identical oscillators in arbitrary networks is introduced. In addition, several graph theory concepts and results that augment the synchronization theory and a tie in closely to random, semirandom, and regular networks are introduced. Combined theories are used to ...

  17. Development of a synchronous subset of AADL

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Filali, Mamoun; Lawall, Julia

    2010-01-01

    We study the definition and the mapping of an AADL subset: the so called synchronous subset. We show that the data port protocol used for delayed and immediate connections between periodic threads can be interpreted in a  synchronous way. In this paper, we formalize this interpretation and study...

  18. Synchronization in Quantum Key Distribution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Pljonkin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In the description of quantum key distribution systems, much attention is paid to the operation of quantum cryptography protocols. The main problem is the insufficient study of the synchronization process of quantum key distribution systems. This paper contains a general description of quantum cryptography principles. A two-line fiber-optic quantum key distribution system with phase coding of photon states in transceiver and coding station synchronization mode was examined. A quantum key distribution system was built on the basis of the scheme with automatic compensation of polarization mode distortions. Single-photon avalanche diodes were used as optical radiation detecting devices. It was estimated how the parameters used in quantum key distribution systems of optical detectors affect the detection of the time frame with attenuated optical pulse in synchronization mode with respect to its probabilistic and time-domain characteristics. A design method was given for the process that detects the time frame that includes an optical pulse during synchronization. This paper describes the main quantum communication channel attack methods by removing a portion of optical emission. This paper describes the developed synchronization algorithm that takes into account the time required to restore the photodetector’s operation state after the photon has been registered during synchronization. The computer simulation results of the developed synchronization algorithm were analyzed. The efficiency of the developed algorithm with respect to synchronization process protection from unauthorized gathering of optical emission is demonstrated herein.

  19. Modified function projective combination synchronization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-08

    Feb 8, 2017 ... Introduction. Since the concept of synchronizing two identical chaotic systems from different initial conditions was ... tography, secure communications [6,7], etc. Many ap- proaches have been proposed for the synchronization ... more secure communication. Hyperchaotic systems characterized by more than.

  20. Control of partial synchronization in chaotic oscillators

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-02-07

    Feb 7, 2015 ... Abstract. A design of coupling is proposed to control partial synchronization in two chaotic oscil- lators in a driver–response mode. A control of synchrony between one response variables is made possible (a transition from a complete synchronization to antisynchronization via amplitude death and vice ...

  1. Modified function projective combination synchronization of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-02-08

    Feb 8, 2017 ... Abstract. In this work, a novel combination synchronization scheme in which synchronization of a new combination hyperchaotic drive system formed by combining state variables of the original drive system with appropriate scaling factors with a response hyperchaotic system is considered.

  2. Analytical treatment for synchronizing chaos through unidirectional ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Driving a nonlinear system with a periodic signal is a common feature in nonlinear dynamics. However, the idea of using a chaotic signal to drive a nonlinear system and to maintain synchronization in phase and amplitude of the driving and the driven systems is rather new. The idea of synchronizing two identical chaotic ...

  3. Synchronization of indirectly coupled Lorenz oscillators: An ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Partial synchronization occurs in a population of chemical oscillators coupled through the concentration of chemical in the surrounding solutions [19]. Two nonlinear chaotic systems coupled indirectly through a common dynamic environment synchronize to in-phase or anti-phase state [20]. The early stages of Alzheimer's ...

  4. Electrotonic vascular signal conduction and nephron synchronization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marsh, D.J.; Toma, I.; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2009-01-01

    frequencies of both pair members to converge to a common value. The myogenic oscillations also synchronized, and the synchronization between the TGF and the myogenic oscillations showed an increased stability against parameter perturbations. Electronic vascular signal propagation is a plausible mechanism...

  5. Communicating via robust synchronization of chaotic lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez-Gutierrez, R.M. [Engineering Faculty, Baja California Autonomous University (UABC), Km. 103 Carret. Tij-Ens., 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); Posadas-Castillo, C. [Engineering Faculty, Baja California Autonomous University (UABC), Km. 103 Carret. Tij-Ens., 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico); FIME, Autonomous University of Nuevo Leon (UANL), Pedro de Alba, S.N., Cd. Universitaria, San Nicolas de los Garza, NL (Mexico); Lopez-Mancilla, D. [Departamento de Ciencias Exactas y Tecnologicas, Centro Universitario de los Lagos, Universidad de Guadalajara (CULagos-UdeG), Enrique Diaz de Leon s/n, 47460 Lagos de Moreno, Jal. (Mexico); Cruz-Hernandez, C. [Electronics and Telecommunications Department, Scientific Research and Advanced Studies of Ensenada (CICESE), Km. 107 Carret. Tij-Ens., 22860 Ensenada, B.C. (Mexico)], E-mail: ccruz@cicese.mx

    2009-10-15

    In this paper, the robust synchronization problem for coupled chaotic Nd:YAG lasers is addressed. We resort to complex systems theory to achieve chaos synchronization. Based on stability theory, it is shown that the state trajectories of the perturbed error synchronization are ultimately bounded, provided the unperturbed synchronization error system is exponentially stable, and some conditions on the bounds of the perturbation terms are satisfied. So that, encoding, transmission, and decoding in chaotic optical communications are presented. We analyze the transmission and recovery of encrypted information when parameter mismatches are considered. Computer simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of this robustness synchronization property, we present the encrypted transmission of image messages, and we show that, the transmitted image is faithfully recovered.

  6. Communicating via robust synchronization of chaotic lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez-Gutierrez, R.M.; Posadas-Castillo, C.; Lopez-Mancilla, D.; Cruz-Hernandez, C.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the robust synchronization problem for coupled chaotic Nd:YAG lasers is addressed. We resort to complex systems theory to achieve chaos synchronization. Based on stability theory, it is shown that the state trajectories of the perturbed error synchronization are ultimately bounded, provided the unperturbed synchronization error system is exponentially stable, and some conditions on the bounds of the perturbation terms are satisfied. So that, encoding, transmission, and decoding in chaotic optical communications are presented. We analyze the transmission and recovery of encrypted information when parameter mismatches are considered. Computer simulations are provided to show the effectiveness of this robustness synchronization property, we present the encrypted transmission of image messages, and we show that, the transmitted image is faithfully recovered.

  7. Synchronization in networks with heterogeneous coupling delays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Andreas; Radons, Günter; Bachrathy, Dániel; Orosz, Gábor

    2018-01-01

    Synchronization in networks of identical oscillators with heterogeneous coupling delays is studied. A decomposition of the network dynamics is obtained by block diagonalizing a newly introduced adjacency lag operator which contains the topology of the network as well as the corresponding coupling delays. This generalizes the master stability function approach, which was developed for homogenous delays. As a result the network dynamics can be analyzed by delay differential equations with distributed delay, where different delay distributions emerge for different network modes. Frequency domain methods are used for the stability analysis of synchronized equilibria and synchronized periodic orbits. As an example, the synchronization behavior in a system of delay-coupled Hodgkin-Huxley neurons is investigated. It is shown that the parameter regions where synchronized periodic spiking is unstable expand when increasing the delay heterogeneity.

  8. Effects of frustration on explosive synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xia; Gao, Jian; Sun, Yu-Ting; Zheng, Zhi-Gang; Xu, Can

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we consider the emergence of explosive synchronization in scale-free networks by considering the Kuramoto model of coupled phase oscillators. The natural frequencies of oscillators are assumed to be correlated with their degrees and frustration is included in the system. This assumption can enhance or delay the explosive transition to synchronization. Interestingly, a de-synchronization phenomenon occurs and the type of phase transition is also changed. Furthermore, we provide an analytical treatment based on a star graph, which resembles that obtained in scale-free networks. Finally, a self-consistent approach is implemented to study the de-synchronization regime. Our findings have important implications for controlling synchronization in complex networks because frustration is a controllable parameter in experiments and a discontinuous abrupt phase transition is always dangerous in engineering in the real world.

  9. Variance based OFDM frame synchronization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Fedra

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a new frame synchronization scheme for OFDM systems and calculates the complexity of this scheme. The scheme is based on the computing of the detection window variance. The variance is computed in two delayed times, so a modified Early-Late loop is used for the frame position detection. The proposed algorithm deals with different variants of OFDM parameters including guard interval, cyclic prefix, and has good properties regarding the choice of the algorithm's parameters since the parameters may be chosen within a wide range without having a high influence on system performance. The verification of the proposed algorithm functionality has been performed on a development environment using universal software radio peripheral (USRP hardware.

  10. Synchronization of nonautonomous dynamical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter E. Kloeden

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available The synchronization of two nonautonomous dynamical systems is considered, where the systems are described in terms of a skew-product formalism, i. e., in which an inputed autonomous driving system governs the evolution of the vector field of a differential equation with the passage of time. It is shown that the coupled trajectories converge to each other as time increases for sufficiently large coupling coefficient and also that the component sets of the pullback attractor of the coupled system converges upper semi continuously as the coupling parameter increases to the diagonal of the product of the corresponding component sets of the pullback attractor of a system generated by the average of the vector fields of the original uncoupled systems.

  11. Synchronization of world economic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groth, Andreas; Ghil, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Common dynamical properties of business cycle fluctuations are studied in a sample of more than 100 countries that represent economic regions from all around the world. We apply the methodology of multivariate singular spectrum analysis (M-SSA) to identify oscillatory modes and to detect whether these modes are shared by clusters of phase- and frequency-locked oscillators. An extension of the M-SSA approach is introduced to help analyze structural changes in the cluster configuration of synchronization. With this novel technique, we are able to identify a common mode of business cycle activity across our sample, and thus point to the existence of a world business cycle. Superimposed on this mode, we further identify several major events that have markedly influenced the landscape of world economic activity in the postwar era.

  12. PBL and beyond: trends in collaborative learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluta, William J; Richards, Boyd F; Mutnick, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    Building upon the disruption to lecture-based methods triggered by the introduction of problem-based learning, approaches to promote collaborative learning are becoming increasingly diverse, widespread and generally well accepted within medical education. Examples of relatively new, structured collaborative learning methods include team-based learning and just-in-time teaching. Examples of less structured approaches include think-pair share, case discussions, and the flipped classroom. It is now common practice in medical education to employ a range of instructional approaches to support collaborative learning. We believe that the adoption of such approaches is entering a new and challenging era. We define collaborate learning by drawing on the broader literature, including Chi's ICAP framework that emphasizes the importance of sustained, interactive explanation and elaboration by learners. We distinguish collaborate learning from constructive, active, and passive learning and provide preliminary evidence documenting the growth of methods that support collaborative learning. We argue that the rate of adoption of collaborative learning methods will accelerate due to a growing emphasis on the development of team competencies and the increasing availability of digital media. At the same time, the adoption collaborative learning strategies face persistent challenges, stemming from an overdependence on comparative-effectiveness research and a lack of useful guidelines about how best to adapt collaborative learning methods to given learning contexts. The medical education community has struggled to consistently demonstrate superior outcomes when using collaborative learning methods and strategies. Despite this, support for their use will continue to expand. To select approaches with the greatest utility, instructors must carefully align conditions of the learning context with the learning approaches under consideration. Further, it is critical that modifications are made

  13. Chaos synchronization between Chen system and Genesio system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Xianyong; Guan Zhihong; Wu Zhengping; Li Tao

    2007-01-01

    This Letter presents two synchronization schemes between two different chaotic systems. Active control synchronization and adaptive synchronization between Chen system and Genesio system are studied, different controllers are designed to synchronize the drive and response systems, active control synchronization is used when system parameters are known; adaptive synchronization is employed when system parameters are unknown or uncertain. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed schemes

  14. Comparative Effect of Collaborative Care, Pain Medication, and Duloxetine in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder and Comorbid (SubChronic Pain: Results of an Exploratory Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Multicenter Trial (CC:PAINDIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W. de Heer

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available ObjectiveEvidence exists for the efficacy of collaborative care (CC for major depressive disorder (MDD, for the efficacy of the consequent use of pain medication against pain, and for the efficacy of duloxetine against both MDD and neuropathic pain. Their relative effectiveness in comorbid MDD and pain has never been established so far. This study explores the effectiveness of CC with pain medication and duloxetine, and CC with pain medication and placebo, compared with duloxetine alone, on depressive and pain symptoms. This study was prematurely terminated because of massive reorganizations and reimbursement changes in mental health care in the Netherlands during the study period and is therefore of exploratory nature.MethodsThree-armed, randomized, multicenter, placebo-controlled trial at three specialized mental health outpatient clinics with patients who screened positive for MDD. Interventions lasted 12 weeks. Pain medication was administered according to an algorithm that avoids opiate prescription as much as possible, where paracetamol, COX inhibitors, and pregabalin are offered as steps before opiates are considered. Patients who did not show up for three or more sessions were registered as non-compliant. Explorative, intention-to-treat and per protocol, multilevel regression analyses were performed. The trial is listed in the trial registration (http://www.trialregister.nl/trialreg/admin/rctview.asp?TC=1089; NTR number: NTR1089.ResultsSixty patients completed the study. Patients in all treatment groups reported significantly less depressive and pain symptoms after 12 weeks. CC with placebo condition showed the fastest decrease in depressive symptoms compared with the duloxetine alone group (b = −0.78; p = 0.01. Non-compliant patients (n = 31 did not improve over the 12-week period, in contrast to compliant patients (n = 29. Pain outcomes did not differ between the three groups.ConclusionIn MDD and pain, patient

  15. Synchronous advanced gastric adenocarcinoma and advanced esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Augusto Mardiros Herbella

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Synchronous associations of esophageal and gastric cancers are not a common finding, especially with differing histological types and both tumors in advanced forms. A case with such an association is presented, in which an unusual therapy was proposed: palliative gastrectomy and esophageal intubation. CASE REPORT: A 75-year-old white man was referred to our service complaining of malaise and weight loss for one year and dysphagia and vomiting for 2 months. The patient had sought out medical consultation as a result of the latter two complaints.

  16. Energy engineering: Student-researcher collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leban, Krisztina Monika; Ritchie, Ewen; Beckowska, Patrycja Maria

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on cooperation methods between researchers and students at different levels. Levels included in this work are BSc, MSc and PhD student levels. At Aalborg University, Department of Energy Technology education and research are closely linked. The relationship between student......-student; student-researcher and researcher -researcher is analyzed. The problems of work division, synchronization, transportation, storing and dissemination are disused. The importance of a proper work method and collaboration between researchers at different levels is underlined. As a case study, a research...

  17. Australian contemporary management of synchronous metastatic colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouf, Phillip; Gibbs, Peter; Shapiro, Jeremy; Sockler, Jim; Bell, Stephen

    2018-01-01

    This article outlines the current Australian multidisciplinary treatment of synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and assesses the factors that influence patient outcome. This is a retrospective analysis of the prospective 'Treatment of Recurrent and Advanced Colorectal Cancer' registry, describing the patient treatment pathway and documenting the extent of disease, resection of the colorectal primary and metastases, chemotherapy and biological therapy use. Cox regression models for progression-free and overall survival were constructed with a comprehensive set of clinical variables. Analysis was intentionn-ton-treat, quantifying the effect of treatment intent decided at the multidisciplinary team meeting (MDT). One thousand one hundred and nine patients presented with synchronous metastatic disease between July 2009 and November 2015. Median follow-up was 15.8 months; 4.4% (group 1) had already curative resections of primary and metastases prior to MDT, 22.2% (group 2) were considered curative but were referred to MDT for opinion and/or medical oncology treatment prior to resection and 70.2% were considered palliative at MDT (group 3). Overall, 83% received chemotherapy, 55% had their primary resected and 23% had their metastases resected; 13% of resections were synchronous, 20% were staged with primary resected first and 62% had only the colorectal primary managed surgically. Performance status, metastasis resection (R0 versus R1 versus R2 versus no resection), resection of the colorectal primary and treatment intent determined at MDT were the most significant factors for progression-free and overall survival. This is the largest Australian series of synchronous metastatic colorectal adenocarcinoma and offers insight into the nature and utility of contemporary practice. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Surgeons.

  18. Collaboration: The Next Steps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacon, Pamela S.

    2008-01-01

    School media specialists collaborate with many teachers every day. They are so good that sometimes they even collaborate without realizing it. Sometimes, however, a more formal type of collaboration is needed. Not only does formal collaboration give them a chance to shine as the instructional leader, it also allows them to collect data to show…

  19. Collaborative Systems Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocatilu, Paul; Ciurea, Cristian

    2009-01-01

    Collaborative systems are widely used today in various activity fields. Their complexity is high and the development involves numerous resources and costs. Testing collaborative systems has a very important role for the systems' success. In this paper we present taxonomy of collaborative systems. The collaborative systems are classified in many…

  20. Cohesion and Joint Speech: Right Hemisphere Contributions to Synchronized Vocal Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, Kyle M; McGettigan, Carolyn; Agnew, Zarinah K; Lavan, Nadine; Josephs, Oliver; Cummins, Fred; Scott, Sophie K

    2016-04-27

    Synchronized behavior (chanting, singing, praying, dancing) is found in all human cultures and is central to religious, military, and political activities, which require people to act collaboratively and cohesively; however, we know little about the neural underpinnings of many kinds of synchronous behavior (e.g., vocal behavior) or its role in establishing and maintaining group cohesion. In the present study, we measured neural activity using fMRI while participants spoke simultaneously with another person. We manipulated whether the couple spoke the same sentence (allowing synchrony) or different sentences (preventing synchrony), and also whether the voice the participant heard was "live" (allowing rich reciprocal interaction) or prerecorded (with no such mutual influence). Synchronous speech was associated with increased activity in posterior and anterior auditory fields. When, and only when, participants spoke with a partner who was both synchronous and "live," we observed a lack of the suppression of auditory cortex, which is commonly seen as a neural correlate of speech production. Instead, auditory cortex responded as though it were processing another talker's speech. Our results suggest that detecting synchrony leads to a change in the perceptual consequences of one's own actions: they are processed as though they were other-, rather than self-produced. This may contribute to our understanding of synchronized behavior as a group-bonding tool. Synchronized human behavior, such as chanting, dancing, and singing, are cultural universals with functional significance: these activities increase group cohesion and cause participants to like each other and behave more prosocially toward each other. Here we use fMRI brain imaging to investigate the neural basis of one common form of cohesive synchronized behavior: joint speaking (e.g., the synchronous speech seen in chants, prayers, pledges). Results showed that joint speech recruits additional right hemisphere

  1. Cohesion and Joint Speech: Right Hemisphere Contributions to Synchronized Vocal Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmin, Kyle M.; McGettigan, Carolyn; Agnew, Zarinah K.; Lavan, Nadine; Josephs, Oliver; Cummins, Fred

    2016-01-01

    Synchronized behavior (chanting, singing, praying, dancing) is found in all human cultures and is central to religious, military, and political activities, which require people to act collaboratively and cohesively; however, we know little about the neural underpinnings of many kinds of synchronous behavior (e.g., vocal behavior) or its role in establishing and maintaining group cohesion. In the present study, we measured neural activity using fMRI while participants spoke simultaneously with another person. We manipulated whether the couple spoke the same sentence (allowing synchrony) or different sentences (preventing synchrony), and also whether the voice the participant heard was “live” (allowing rich reciprocal interaction) or prerecorded (with no such mutual influence). Synchronous speech was associated with increased activity in posterior and anterior auditory fields. When, and only when, participants spoke with a partner who was both synchronous and “live,” we observed a lack of the suppression of auditory cortex, which is commonly seen as a neural correlate of speech production. Instead, auditory cortex responded as though it were processing another talker's speech. Our results suggest that detecting synchrony leads to a change in the perceptual consequences of one's own actions: they are processed as though they were other-, rather than self-produced. This may contribute to our understanding of synchronized behavior as a group-bonding tool. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Synchronized human behavior, such as chanting, dancing, and singing, are cultural universals with functional significance: these activities increase group cohesion and cause participants to like each other and behave more prosocially toward each other. Here we use fMRI brain imaging to investigate the neural basis of one common form of cohesive synchronized behavior: joint speaking (e.g., the synchronous speech seen in chants, prayers, pledges). Results showed that joint speech recruits

  2. Synchronization of Estrus in Cattle: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Islam

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Numbers of estrus synchronization programmes are available in cattle based on the use of various hormones like progesterone, prostaglandin F2a and their various combinations with other hormones like estrogen and Gonadotrophin Releasing hormone (GnRH. Selection of appropriate estrus synchronization protocol should be made on the basis of management capabilities and expectations of the farmer. Synchronization of oestrus can be accomplished with the injection of prostaglandin F2a alone, but it needs proper detection of the ovarian status of the cows as prostaglandin F2a is active in only functional corpus luteum in between 8 to 17 days of estrous cycle. Progesterone may reduce fertility up to 14 percent, but short time progesterone exposure (less than 14 days is beneficial. Addition of GnRH in the Progesterone or Prostaglandin based synchronization programme is helpful for more synchrony in estrus as GnRH may be helpful to synchronize the oestrous cycle in delayed pubertal heifers and post partum cows (Post partum anoestrum and further a single, timed artificial insemination is possible with this method. New methods of synchronizing estrus in which the GnRH-PG protocol is preceded by progesterone treatment offer effective synchronization of estrus with high fertility. [Vet. World 2011; 4(3.000: 136-141

  3. Periodic and aperiodic synchronization in skilled action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred eCummins

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Synchronized action is considered as a manifestation of shared skill. Most synchronized behaviors in humans and other animals are based on periodic repetition. Aperiodic synchronization of complex action is found in the experimental task of synchronous speaking, in which naive subjects read a common text in lock step. The demonstration of synchronized behavior without a periodic basis is presented as a challenge for theoretical understanding. A unified treatment of periodic and aperiodic synchronization is suggested by replacing the sequential processing model of cognitivist approaches with the more local notion of a task-specific sensorimotor coordination. On this view, skilled action is the imposition of constraints on the co-variation of movement and sensory flux such that the boundary conditions that define the skill are met. This non-cognitivist approach originates in the work of John Dewey. It allows a unification of the treatment of sensorimotor synchronization in simple rhythmic behavior and in complex skilled behavior and it suggests that skill sharing is a uniquely human trait of considerable import.

  4. V123 Beam Synchronous Encoder Module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerner, T.; Conkling, C. R.; Oerter, B.

    1999-01-01

    The V123 Synchronous Encoder Module transmits events to distributed trigger modules and embedded decoders around the RHIC rings where they are used to provide beam instrumentation triggers [1,2,3]. The RHIC beam synchronous event link hardware is mainly comprised of three VMEbus board designs, the central input modules (V201), and encoder modules (V123), and the distributed trigger modules (V124). Two beam synchronous links, one for each ring, are distributed via fiberoptic and fanned out via twisted wire pair cables. The V123 synchronizes with the RF system clock derived from the beam bucket frequency and a revolution fiducial pulse. The RF system clock is used to create the beam synchronous event link carrier and events are synchronized with the rotation fiducial. A low jitter RF clock is later recovered from this carrier by phase lock loops in the trigger modules. Prioritized hardware and software triggers fill up to 15 beam event code transmission slots per revolution while tracking the ramping RF acceleration frequency and storage frequency. The revolution fiducial event is always the first event transmitted which is used to synchronize the firing of the abort kicker and to locate the first bucket for decoders distributed about the ring

  5. Collaboration between SSMJ and its readers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All of us in the healthcare professions throughout the world can learn much from each other. This has been demonstrated so well by the collaboration between the editors, authors, medical experts and readers of the South Sudan Medical Journal. The Editor-in-Chief recently sent out a request for photographs and received a ...

  6. Physiological Synchronization in a Vigilance Dual Task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guastello, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    The synchronization of autonomic arousal levels and other physio-logical responses between people is a potentially important component of work team performance, client-therapist relationships, and other types of human interaction. This study addressed several problems: What statistical models are viable for identifying synchronization for loosely coupled human systems? How is the level of synchronization related to psychosocial variables such as empathy, subjective ratings of workload, and actual performance? Participants were 70 undergraduates who worked in pairs on a vigilance dual task in which they watched a virtual reality security camera, rang a bell when they saw the target intruder, and completed a jig-saw puzzle. Event rates either increased or decreased during the 90 min work period. The average R2 values for each person were .66, .66, .62, and .53 for the linear autoregressive model, linear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, the nonlinear autoregressive model, and the nonlinear autoregressive model with a synchronization component, respectively. All models were more accurate at a lag of 20 sec compared to 50 sec or customized lag lengths. Although the linear models were more accurate overall, the nonlinear synchronization parameters were more often related to psychological variables and performance. In particular, greater synchronization was observed with the nonlinear model when the target event rate increased, compared to when it decreased, which was expected from the general theory of synchronization. Nonlinear models were also more effective for uncovering inhibitory or dampening relationships between the co-workers as well as mutually excitatory relationships. Future research should explore the comparative model results for tasks that induce higher levels of synchronization and involve different types of internal group coordination.

  7. Synchronization of two coupled turbulent fires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Kazushi; Gotoda, Hiroshi; Miyano, Takaya; Murayama, Shogo; Tokuda, Isao T.

    2018-04-01

    We numerically study the scale-free nature of a buoyancy-induced turbulent fire and synchronization of two coupled turbulent fires. A scale-free structure is detected in weighted networks between vortices, while its lifetime obeys a clear power law, indicating intermittent appearances, disappearances, and reappearances of the scale-free property. A significant decrease in the distance between the two fire sources gives rise to a synchronized state in the near field dominated by the unstable motion of large-scale of transverse vortex rings. The synchronized state vanishes in the far field forming well-developed turbulent plumes, regardless of the distance between the two fire sources.

  8. Bistability in Coupled Oscillators Exhibiting Synchronized Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olusola, O. I.; Vincent, U. E.; Njah, A. N.; Olowofela, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    We report some new results associated with the synchronization behavior of two coupled double-well Duffing oscillators (DDOs). Some sufficient algebraic criteria for global chaos synchronization of the drive and response DDOs via linear state error feedback control are obtained by means of Lyapunov stability theory. The synchronization is achieved through a bistable state in which a periodic attractor co-exists with a chaotic attractor. Using the linear perturbation analysis, the prevalence of attractors in parameter space and the associated bifurcations are examined. Subcritical and supercritical Hopf bifurcations and abundance of Arnold tongues — a signature of mode locking phenomenon are found.

  9. Usability of synchronization for cognitive modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diebner, Hans H.; Grond, Florian

    2005-01-01

    We discuss the synchronization features of a previously introduced adaptive system for dynamics recognition in more detail. We investigate the usability of synchronization for modeling and parameter estimations. It is pointed out inhowfar the adaptive system based on synchronization can become a powerful tool in modeling. The adaptive system can store modules of pre-adapted dynamics and is potentially capable of undergoing self-modification. We compare the stored modules with pre-knowledge that a modeler puts into his or her models. In this sense the adaptive system functions like an expert system

  10. Synchronization of Time-Continuous Chaotic Oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yanchuk, S.; Maistrenko, Yuri; Mosekilde, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Considering a system of two coupled identical chaotic oscillators, the paper first establishes the conditions of transverse stability for the fully synchronized chaotic state. Periodic orbit threshold theory is applied to determine the bifurcations through which low-periodic orbits embedded...... the interacting chaotic oscillators causes a shift of the synchronization manifold. The presence of a coupling asymmetry is found to lead to further modifications of the destabilization process. Finally, the paper considers the problem of partial synchronization in a system of four coupled Rossler oscillators...

  11. Synchronization Of Parallel Discrete Event Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Jeffrey S.

    1992-01-01

    Adaptive, parallel, discrete-event-simulation-synchronization algorithm, Breathing Time Buckets, developed in Synchronous Parallel Environment for Emulation and Discrete Event Simulation (SPEEDES) operating system. Algorithm allows parallel simulations to process events optimistically in fluctuating time cycles that naturally adapt while simulation in progress. Combines best of optimistic and conservative synchronization strategies while avoiding major disadvantages. Algorithm processes events optimistically in time cycles adapting while simulation in progress. Well suited for modeling communication networks, for large-scale war games, for simulated flights of aircraft, for simulations of computer equipment, for mathematical modeling, for interactive engineering simulations, and for depictions of flows of information.

  12. Analysis of Synchronization for Coupled Hybrid Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Li, Zheng; Wisniewski, Rafal

    2006-01-01

    subsystem will cause low efficiency, inferior control performance and a high wear on the compressor. This paper takes the supermarket refrigeration systems as an example to analyze the synchronization and its coupling strengths of coupled hybrid systems, which may provide a base for further research...... of control strategies. This paper combines topology and section mapping theories together to show a new way of analyzing hybrid systems......In the control systems with coupled multi-subsystem, the subsystems might be synchronized (i.e. all the subsystems have the same operation states), which results in negative influence to the whole system. For example, in the supermarket refrigeration systems, the synchronized switch of each...

  13. Synchronous and Asynchronous ATM Multiplexor Properties Comparsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Zabka

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is aimed to ATM multiplexor computer model utilisation. Based on simulation runs we try to review aspects of use a synchronous and asynchronous ATM multiplexors. ATM multiplexor is the input queuing model with three inputs. Synchronous multiplexor works without an input priority. Multiplexor inputs are served periodically. Asynchronous multiplexor model supports several queuing and priority mechanisms. CLR and CTD are basic performance parameters. Input cell flows are generated as IPP sources. The article refers to [1] which verifies the ATM synchronous multiplexor model functionality.

  14. Synchronization System for Next Generation Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zavriyev, Anton [MagiQ Technologies, Inc., Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-03-27

    An alternative synchronization technique – one that would allow explicit control of the pulse train including its repetition rate and delay is clearly desired. We propose such a scheme. Our method is based on optical interferometry and permits synchronization of the pulse trains generated by two independent mode-locked lasers. As the next generation x-ray sources will be driven by a clock signal derived from a mode-locked optical source, our technique will provide a way to synchronize x-ray probe with the optical pump pulses.

  15. Fuzzy stability and synchronization of hyperchaos systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Junwei; Xiong Xiaohua; Zhao Meichun; Zhang Yanbin

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies stability and synchronization of hyperchaos systems via a fuzzy-model-based control design methodology. First, we utilize a Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy model to represent a hyperchaos system. Second, we design fuzzy-model-based controllers for stability and synchronization of the system, based on so-called 'parallel distributed compensation (PDC)'. Third, we reduce a question of stabilizing and synchronizing hyperchaos systems to linear matrix inequalities (LMI) so that convex programming techniques can solve these LMIs efficiently. Finally, the generalized Lorenz hyperchaos system is employed to illustrate the effectiveness of our designing controller

  16. Adaptive H∞ Chaos Anti-synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahn, Choon Ki

    2010-01-01

    A new adaptive H ∞ anti-synchronization (AHAS) method is proposed for chaotic systems in the presence of unknown parameters and external disturbances. Based on the Lyapunov theory and linear matrix inequality formulation, the AHAS controller with adaptive laws of unknown parameters is derived to not only guarantee adaptive anti-synchronization but also reduce the effect of external disturbances to an H ∞ norm constraint. As an application of the proposed AHAS method, the H ∞ anti-synchronization problem for Genesio–Tesi chaotic systems is investigated. (general)

  17. So simple, so hard: Taking medication as directed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkholder, Rebecca; Linn, Elaine

    Millions of Americans either fail to take the full course of prescribed medication or they take it incorrectly. The problem is particularly serious for people with cardiovascular disease, respiratory disease, and diabetes, and for racially and ethnically diverse populations. The (U.S.) National Consumers League through its Script Your Future medication adherence awareness campaign presented the conference "So Simple, So Hard: Taking Medications as Directed", convening health care professionals, community health workers, consumer and patient advocates, researchers, industry representatives, public agencies, and policymakers. This a one-day research symposium aimed to explore challenges and barriers to medication adherence and to highlight tools and strategies to improve adherence and health outcomes, particularly among underserved populations. The conference began with presentations on adherence research and health disparities, and continued with presentations on strategies and tools to improve adherence that could be utilized in health care practices or organizations (including assessing adherence, medication synchronization, and comprehensive medication management). Through group discussions, the conference provided a forum for participants to interact and lay the groundwork to develop partnerships for collaborative initiatives to improve appropriate medication use and adherence. Participants surveyed at the end of the day and 30 days after the conference reported that they found the meeting highly useful (rated 4.6 out of 5), with the vast majority saying they learned about research and tools they can apply in their work and made new connections for potential collaborations. The conference learnings are being shared by participants and disseminated to other interested organizations and individuals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Traces Synchronization in Distributed Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Clément

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article proposes a novel approach to synchronize a posteriori the detailed execution traces from several networked computers. It can be used to debug and investigate complex performance problems in systems where several computers exchange information. When the distributed system is under study, detailed execution traces are generated locally on each system using an efficient and accurate system level tracer, LTTng. When the tracing is finished, the individual traces are collected and analysed together. The messaging events in all the traces are then identified and correlated in order to estimate the time offset over time between each node. The time offset computation imprecision, associated with asymmetric network delays and operating system latency in message sending and receiving, is amortized over a large time interval through a linear least square fit over several messages covering a large time span. The resulting accuracy is such that it is possible to estimate the clock offsets in a distributed system, even with a relatively low volume of messages exchanged, to within the order of a microsecond while having a very low impact on the system execution, which is sufficient to properly order the events traced on the individual computers in the distributed system.

  19. Synchronization Model for Pulsating Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, S.; Morikawa, M.

    2013-12-01

    A simple model is proposed, which describes the variety of stellar pulsations. In this model, a star is described as an integration of independent elements which interact with each other. This interaction, which may be gravitational or hydrodynamic, promotes the synchronization of elements to yield a coherent mean field pulsation provided some conditions are satisfied. In the case of opacity driven pulsations, the whole star is described as a coupling of many heat engines. In the case of stochastic oscillation, the whole star is described as a coupling of convection cells, interacting through their flow patterns. Convection cells are described by the Lorentz model. In both models, interactions of elements lead to various pulsations, from irregular to regular. The coupled Lorenz model also describes a light curve which shows a semi-regular variability and also shows a low-frequency enhancement proportional to 1/f in its power spectrum. This is in agreement with observations (Kiss et al. 2006). This new modeling method of ‘coupled elements’ may provide a powerful description for a variety of stellar pulsations.

  20. Synchronous ethernet and IEEE 1588 in telecoms next generation synchronization networks

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book addresses the multiple technical aspects of the distribution of synchronization in new generation telecommunication networks, focusing in particular on synchronous Ethernet and IEEE1588 technologies. Many packet network engineers struggle with understanding the challenges that precise synchronization distribution can impose on networks. The usual “why”, “when” and particularly “how” can cause problems for many engineers. In parallel to this, some other markets have identical synchronization requirements, but with their own design requirements, generating further questions. This book attempts to respond to the different questions by providing background technical information. Invaluable information on state of-the-art packet network synchronization and timing architectures is provided, as well as an unbiased view on the synchronization technologies that have been internationally standardized over recent years, with the aim of providing the average reader (who is not skilled in the art) wi...

  1. Cloud Computing Concepts for Academic Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K.K. Jabbour

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to explain how cloud computing technologies improve academic collaboration. To accomplish that, we have to explore the current trend of the global computer network field. During the past few years, technology has evolved in many ways; many valuable web applications and services have been introduced to internet users. Social networking, synchronous/asynchronous communication, on-line video conferencing, and wikis are just a few examples of those web technologies that altered the way people interact nowadays. By utilizing some of the latest web tools and services and combining them with the most recent semantic Cloud Computing techniques, a wide and growing array of technology services and applications are provided, which are highly specialized or distinctive to individual or to educational campuses. Therefore, cloud computing can facilitate a new way of world academic collaboration; and introduce students to new and different ways that can help them manage massive workloads.

  2. Some Considerations on Seriality and Synchronicity

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Nechita

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the results that have been obtained lately on seriality and synchronicity and their link, in the light of the new theories and within the frame of complexity science.

  3. Some Considerations on Seriality and Synchronicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nechita

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of the results that have been obtained lately on seriality and synchronicity and their link, in the light of the new theories and within the frame of complexity science.

  4. Synchronization of coupled chaotic dynamics on networks

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/pram/064/03/0455-0464. Keywords. Dynamical systems; linear stability analysis; floating nodes. Abstract. We review some recent work on the synchronization of coupled dynamical systems on a variety of networks.

  5. Synchronization Analysis of the Supermarket Refrigeration System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wisniewski, Rafal; Chen, Liang; Larsen, Lars Finn Sloth

    2009-01-01

    consumption. The paper focuses on synchronization dynamics of the refrigeration system modeled as a piecewiseaffine switched system. Stability analysis is performed bygluing the subsystems and polyhedra together to form a single dynamical system defined on a coherent state space. Then, system behavior......The supermarket refrigeration system typically has a distributed control structure, which neglects interactions between its subsystems. These interactions from time to time lead to a synchronization operation of the display-cases which causes an inferior control performance and increased energy...... is analyzed using the bifurcation and chaos theory. It is demonstrated that the system can have a complex chaotic behavior, which is far from the synchronization. This shows that making the system chaotic is a good choice for a de-synchronization strategy. The positive maximum Lyapunov exponent is usually...

  6. Synchronous correlation matrices and Connes’ embedding conjecture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dykema, Kenneth J., E-mail: kdykema@math.tamu.edu [Department of Mathematics, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3368 (United States); Paulsen, Vern, E-mail: vern@math.uh.edu [Department of Mathematics, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2016-01-15

    In the work of Paulsen et al. [J. Funct. Anal. (in press); preprint arXiv:1407.6918], the concept of synchronous quantum correlation matrices was introduced and these were shown to correspond to traces on certain C*-algebras. In particular, synchronous correlation matrices arose in their study of various versions of quantum chromatic numbers of graphs and other quantum versions of graph theoretic parameters. In this paper, we develop these ideas further, focusing on the relations between synchronous correlation matrices and microstates. We prove that Connes’ embedding conjecture is equivalent to the equality of two families of synchronous quantum correlation matrices. We prove that if Connes’ embedding conjecture has a positive answer, then the tracial rank and projective rank are equal for every graph. We then apply these results to more general non-local games.

  7. Observations on oestrus synchronization in Zebu cattle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galina, C.S.; Porras, A.; Navarro Fierro, R.; Wild, C.; Orihuela, A.; Hernandez, C.

    1990-01-01

    A series of experiments were conducted to test the efficacy of drugs used to synchronize oestrus in Zebu cattle. Fertility (conception rates) in adult cows following synchronized (PGF 2α ) and non-synchronized oestruses and AI were found to be 22% and 27% respectively; fertility after natural mating (NM) was 47% for cows synchronized with PGF 2α and 41% for control animals. After a 60 day breeding period NM groups were 13% more fertile overall than the AI groups (P 2α were compared in the same herd, no differences in fertility were found, although groups treated with progesterone showed a higher incidence of oestrus than those administered PGF 2α (60 vs. 27%, P<0.01). (author). 22 refs, 1 fig., 6 tabs

  8. Pitch Synchronous Segmentation of Speech Signals

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pitch Synchronous Segmentation (PSS) that accelerates speech without changing its fundamental frequency method could be applied and evaluated for use at NASA....

  9. On synchronization of three chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Jianping; Li Changpin

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, a simple but efficient method is applied to the synchronization of three chaotic systems, i.e., the chaotic Lorenz, Chua, and Chen systems. Numerical simulations show this method works very well

  10. Method for emulation of synchronous machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    electronic converters for stabilizing the utility grid during transient conditions and for providing similar stability mechanisms that are inherently present in electric synchronous generators while maintaining the possibility for fast and decoupled following of set points for generated active and...

  11. Synchronous thymoma and oligodendroglioma: A rare association

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Vaziri

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Clinicians should be aware of the possibility of synchronous malignancies in order to use screening procedures in patients with reported increased risk of double malignancy. Such clinical alertness may lead to a better outcome for double primary tumor cases.

  12. Synchronization in complex networks with adaptive coupling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Rong; Hu Manfeng; Xu Zhenyuan

    2007-01-01

    Generally it is very difficult to realized synchronization for some complex networks. In order to synchronize, the coupling coefficient of networks has to be very large, especially when the number of coupled nodes is larger. In this Letter, we consider the problem of synchronization in complex networks with adaptive coupling. A new concept about asymptotic stability is presented, then we proved by using the well-known LaSalle invariance principle, that the state of such a complex network can synchronize an arbitrary assigned state of an isolated node of the network as long as the feedback gain is positive. Unified system is simulated as the nodes of adaptive coupling complex networks with different topologies

  13. Planning for the Synergy of Synchronized Fires

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Harness, Christopher

    2002-01-01

    ...: strategic the longest and tactical almost immediately. By carefully synchronizing the three types of fires in time and space, a synergistic effect is created at the tactical level of warfare that can be exploited by the operational commander...

  14. Design of non conventional Synchronous Reluctance machine

    OpenAIRE

    Gamba, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    Synchronous reluctance (SyR) and Permanent magnet Synchronous Reluctance (PM-SyR) machines represent an answer to the growing emphasis on higher efficiency, higher torque density and overload capability of ac machines for variable-speed applications. Their high performance is particularly attractive in electric traction and industry applications. The SyR technology represents a convenient solution to obtain high efficiency machines at reduced cost and high reliability. The manufacturing costs...

  15. Projective synchronization based on suitable separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Guohui; Xiong Chuan; Sun Xiaonan

    2007-01-01

    A new approach for constructing a projective-synchronized chaotic slave system is proposed in this paper. This method is based on suitable separation by decomposing the system as the linear part and the nonlinear one. From matrix measure theory, some simple but efficient criteria are derived for projective synchronization of chaotic system. Numerical simulations for the Lorenz system show that this control method works very well

  16. Synchronous and Asynchronous ATM Multiplexor Properties Comparsion

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Zabka

    2006-01-01

    The article is aimed to ATM multiplexor computer model utilisation. Based on simulation runs we try to review aspects of use a synchronous and asynchronous ATM multiplexors. ATM multiplexor is the input queuing model with three inputs. Synchronous multiplexor works without an input priority. Multiplexor inputs are served periodically. Asynchronous multiplexor model supports several queuing and priority mechanisms. CLR and CTD are basic performance parameters. Input cell flows are genera...

  17. Complete synchronization of two Chen-Lee systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, L-J; Chen, J-H; Chen, H-K; Tam, L-M; Lao, S-K; Chen, W-C; Lin, K-T

    2008-01-01

    This study demonstrates that complete synchronization of two Chen-Lee chaotic systems can be easily achieved. The upper bound of the Chen-Lee chaotic system is estimated numerically. A controller is designed to synchronize two chaotic systems. Sufficient conditions for synchronization are obtained using Lyapunov's direct method. Two numerical examples are presented to verify the proposed synchronization approach

  18. Nonlinear observer based phase synchronization of chaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meng Juan; Wang Xingyuan

    2007-01-01

    This Letter analyzes the phase synchronization problem of autonomous chaotic systems. Based on the nonlinear state observer algorithm and the pole placement technique, a phase synchronization scheme is designed. The phase synchronization of a new chaotic system is achieved by using this observer controller. Numerical simulations further demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed phase synchronization scheme

  19. Full state hybrid projective synchronization in hyperchaotic systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu Yandong; Chang Yingxiang; Zhang Jiangang; Li Xianfeng; An Xinlei

    2009-01-01

    In this letter, we investigate the full state hybrid projective synchronization (FSHPS) which includes complete synchronization, anti-synchronization and projective synchronization as its special items. Based on Lyapunov stability theory a controller can be designed for achieving the FSHPS of hyperchaotic systems. Numerical simulations are provided to verify the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  20. On synchronization of clocks in general space-times

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. H Khajehpour

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available   Einstein and transport synchronizations of infinitesimally spaced and distant clocks are considered in a general Riemannian space-time. It is shown that infinitesimally spaced clocks can always be synchronized. In general one can not find observers for whom distant clock are Einstein synchronized but transport synchronized observers do always exit. Whenever both procedures are possible, they are equivalent.

  1. Synchronization of mobile chaotic oscillator networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujiwara, Naoya; Kurths, Jürgen; Díaz-Guilera, Albert

    2016-01-01

    We study synchronization of systems in which agents holding chaotic oscillators move in a two-dimensional plane and interact with nearby ones forming a time dependent network. Due to the uncertainty in observing other agents' states, we assume that the interaction contains a certain amount of noise that turns out to be relevant for chaotic dynamics. We find that a synchronization transition takes place by changing a control parameter. But this transition depends on the relative dynamic scale of motion and interaction. When the topology change is slow, we observe an intermittent switching between laminar and burst states close to the transition due to small noise. This novel type of synchronization transition and intermittency can happen even when complete synchronization is linearly stable in the absence of noise. We show that the linear stability of the synchronized state is not a sufficient condition for its stability due to strong fluctuations of the transverse Lyapunov exponent associated with a slow network topology change. Since this effect can be observed within the linearized dynamics, we can expect such an effect in the temporal networks with noisy chaotic oscillators, irrespective of the details of the oscillator dynamics. When the topology change is fast, a linearized approximation describes well the dynamics towards synchrony. These results imply that the fluctuations of the finite-time transverse Lyapunov exponent should also be taken into account to estimate synchronization of the mobile contact networks.

  2. Monitoring and speeding up chaotic synchronization

    CERN Document Server

    Vaidya, P G

    2003-01-01

    Pecora and Caroll showed in the case of the Lorenz equation (written in terms of three state variables: X, Y and Z) that two such oscillators can be synchronized with one another by simply sending information about X or Y from one to the other. Since then, this property, called ''Chaotic Synchronization'', has also been observed in other systems. We consider a situation in which the sender in some remote location has sent X. The receiver has no knowledge of the initial conditions. The receiver knows that the synchronization will eventually take place, but usually has no idea about the progress of synchronization. One way to solve this problem is to use an additional device which, when connected to the receiving oscillator, will help monitor the progress of synchronization. In fact, using our new algorithm for accurate calculation of derivatives, we can precisely state how far apart the Y and Z states are as they move towards eventual synchronization. In the second part, we use an accurate derivative algorithm...

  3. New synchronization method for Plasmodium falciparum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mwangi Jonathan M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum is usually asynchronous during in vitro culture. Although various synchronization methods are available, they are not able to narrow the range of ages of parasites. A newly developed method is described that allows synchronization of parasites to produce cultures with an age range as low as 30 minutes. Methods Trophozoites and schizonts are enriched using Plasmion. The enriched late stage parasites are immobilized as a monolayer onto plastic Petri dishes using concanavalin A. Uninfected erythrocytes are placed onto the monolayer for a limited time period, during which time schizonts on the monolayer rupture and the released merozoites invade the fresh erythrocytes. The overlay is then taken off into a culture flask, resulting in a highly synchronized population of parasites. Results Plasmion treatment results in a 10- to 13-fold enrichment of late stage parasites. The monolayer method results in highly synchronized cultures of parasites where invasion has occurred within a very limited time window, which can be as low as 30 minutes. The method is simple, requiring no specialized equipment and relatively cheap reagents. Conclusions The new method for parasite synchronization results in highly synchronized populations of parasites, which will be useful for studies of the parasite asexual cell cycle.

  4. Synchronization of weakly coupled canard oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köksal Ersöz, Elif; Desroches, Mathieu; Krupa, Martin

    2017-06-01

    Synchronization has been studied extensively in the context of weakly coupled oscillators using the so-called phase response curve (PRC) which measures how a change of the phase of an oscillator is affected by a small perturbation. This approach was based upon the work of Malkin, and it has been extended to relaxation oscillators. Namely, synchronization conditions were established under the weak coupling assumption, leading to a criterion for the existence of synchronous solutions of weakly coupled relaxation oscillators. Previous analysis relies on the fact that the slow nullcline does not intersect the fast nullcline near one of its fold points, where canard solutions can arise. In the present study we use numerical continuation techniques to solve the adjoint equations and we show that synchronization properties of canard cycles are different than those of classical relaxation cycles. In particular, we highlight a new special role of the maximal canard in separating two distinct synchronization regimes: the Hopf regime and the relaxation regime. Phase plane analysis of slow-fast oscillators undergoing a canard explosion provides an explanation for this change of synchronization properties across the maximal canard.

  5. Fault-tolerant clock synchronization in distributed systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, Parameswaran; Shin, Kang G.; Butler, Ricky W.

    1990-01-01

    Existing fault-tolerant clock synchronization algorithms are compared and contrasted. These include the following: software synchronization algorithms, such as convergence-averaging, convergence-nonaveraging, and consistency algorithms, as well as probabilistic synchronization; hardware synchronization algorithms; and hybrid synchronization. The worst-case clock skews guaranteed by representative algorithms are compared, along with other important aspects such as time, message, and cost overhead imposed by the algorithms. More recent developments such as hardware-assisted software synchronization and algorithms for synchronizing large, partially connected distributed systems are especially emphasized.

  6. GOC-TX: A Reliable Ticket Synchronization Application for the Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Soichi; Gopu, Arvind; Quick, Robert

    2011-01-01

    One of the major operational issues faced by large multi-institutional collaborations is permitting its users and support staff to use their native ticket tracking environment while also exchanging these tickets with collaborators. After several failed attempts at email-parser based ticket exchanges, the OSG Operations Group has designed a comprehensive ticket synchronizing application. The GOC-TX application uses web-service interfaces offered by various commercial, open source and other homegrown ticketing systems, to synchronize tickets between two or more of these systems. GOC-TX operates independently from any ticketing system. It can be triggered by one ticketing system via email, active messaging, or a web-services call to check for current sync-status, pull applicable recent updates since prior synchronizations to the source ticket, and apply the updates to a destination ticket. The currently deployed production version of GOC-TX is able to synchronize tickets between the Numara Footprints ticketing system used by the OSG and the following systems: European Grid Initiative's system Global Grid User Support (GGUS) and the Request Tracker (RT) system used by Brookhaven. Additional interfaces to the BMC Remedy system used by Fermilab, and to other instances of RT used by other OSG partners, are expected to be completed in summer 2010. A fully configurable open source version is expected to be made available by early autumn 2010. This paper will cover the structure of the GOC-TX application, its evolution, and the problems encountered by OSG Operations group with ticket exchange within the OSG Collaboration.

  7. Fast Self-Synchronization between LowVoltage Microgrid and Inverter using Virtual Synchronous Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md Ruhul Amin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fast self-synchronization known as virtual synchronous converter (VSCon between single-phase microgrid and inverter in low-voltage microgrid, has been developed in Matlab/Simulink. The idea is to any phase locked loop (PLL circuit for inverter-microgrid synchronization in order to improve the synchronization time. As known, it is difficult and lengthy process to tune the PLL gain parameters to reach suitable performance for synchronizing among the voltage, phase-angle and frequency between them. Due to this problem, a fast self synchronization technique is needed in order to minimize the time losses at the microgrid connection. Therefore, the VSCon has been developed which is based on the synchronous generator mathematical model but in virtual environment representation. It has been applied in the inverter control for generating switching pattern to the inverter switches in order to respond to the grid voltage for improve the synchronization. For a prove of concept, several simulation tests in MATLAB models have been conducted, in order to see the effectiveness of this VSCon. First test has been conducted, when a 240V, 50Hz frequency grid source is used for observing the self-synchronization the system with the power flows output. Furthermore, the next test is conducted when the grid frequency is changed from the rated frequency at 50Hz to 51Hz and the result shows the VSCon in inverter control takes nearly 40ms to synchronize to this new frequency value. The test on grid phase-angle delay also been tested when ac grid voltage has 150 phase delay. As from all the results, the improved inverter control with VSCon structure is able to have fast and self-synchronized between the invertergrid connection before the power from the inverter can be transferred.

  8. Chaos synchronization in autonomous chaotic system via hybrid feedback control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Lixin; Chu Yandong; Zhang Jiangang; Li Xianfeng; Chang Yingxiang

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents the synchronization of chaos by designing united controller. First, this method is implemented in synchronization of a simple system, then we realize the synchronization of Lue hyperchaotic system, we also take tracking control to realize the synchronization of Lue hyperchaotic system. Comparing with results, we can find that hybrid feedback control approach is more effective than tracking control for hyperchaotic system. Numerical simulations show the united synchronization method works well.

  9. Global Collaborative STEM Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meabh Kelly, Susan; Smith, Walter

    2016-04-01

    Global Collaborative STEM Education, as the name suggests, simultaneously supports two sets of knowledge and skills. The first set is STEM -- science, technology, engineering and math. The other set of content knowledge and skills is that of global collaboration. Successful global partnerships require awareness of one's own culture, the biases embedded within that culture, as well as developing awareness of the collaborators' culture. Workforce skills fostered include open-mindedness, perseverance when faced with obstacles, and resourceful use of technological "bridges" to facilitate and sustain communication. In respect for the 2016 GIFT Workshop focus, Global Collaborative STEM Education projects dedicated to astronomy research will be presented. The projects represent different benchmarks within the Global Collaborative STEM Education continuum, culminating in an astronomy research experience that fully reflects how the global STEM workforce collaborates. To facilitate wider engagement in Global Collaborative STEM Education, project summaries, classroom resources and contact information for established international collaborative astronomy research projects will be disseminated.

  10. Collaborative Contracting in Projects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suprapto, M.

    2016-01-01

    Project practitioners have increasingly recognized the importance of collaborative relationships to ensure successful executions of projects. However, the ability to sustain and consistenly drive real collaborative attitudes and behavior for achieving the desired outcomes remains of enduring

  11. Medical emplotment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mønsted, Troels Sune

    ’. Theoretically the project departs from Computer Supported Cooperative Work and Participatory Design and is informed by Medical Informatics, Design Research and Science and Technology Studies. Methodically the project is founded on collaborative prototyping, ethnographic studies, and design interventions...... philosophy and building on theory on narrative reasoning, the dissertation offers the notions of emplotment and re-emplotment to describe how physicians marshal information from various sources, including the medical record, the patient and coSummary to form a narrative, when making sense of patients...

  12. Collaborative pharmacy practice: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Law AV

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Anandi V Law, Eric K Gupta, Micah Hata, Karl M Hess, Roger S Klotz, Quang A Le, Emmanuelle Schwartzman, Bik-Wai Bilvick Tai Department of Pharmacy Practice and Administration, College of Pharmacy, Western University of Health Sciences, Pomona, CA, USA Abstract: Collaborative practice among health professionals is slowly coming of age, given the global focus on efficiency and effectiveness of care to achieve positive patient outcomes and to reduce the economic burden of fragmented care. Collaborative pharmacy practice (CPP is accordingly evolving within different models including: disease management, medication therapy management, patient centered medical home, and accountable care organizations. Pharmacist roles in these models relate to drug therapy management and include therapy introduction, adjustment, or discontinuation, patient counseling and education, and identification, resolution, and prevention of problems leading to drug interactions and adverse reactions. Most forms of CPP occur with physicians in various settings. Collaborative practice agreements exist in many states in the US and are mentioned in the International Pharmaceutical Federation policy statement. Impetus for CPP comes from health system and economic concerns, as well as from a regulatory push. There are positive examples in community, ambulatory care, and inpatient settings that have well documented protocols, indicators of care, and measurement and reporting of clinical, economic, and patient reported outcomes; however, implementation of the practice is still not widespread. Conceptual and implementation challenges include health professional training, attitudes, confidence and comfort levels, power and communication issues, logistic barriers of time, workload, proximity, resistance to establish and adopt regulations, and importantly, payment models. Some of the attitudinal and perceptual challenges can be mitigated by incorporation of interprofessional concepts and

  13. Building Connecticut's clinical biodosimetry laboratory surge capacity to mitigate the health consequences of radiological and nuclear disasters: A collaborative approach between the state biodosimetry laboratory and Connecticut's medical infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albanese, Joseph; Martens, Kelly; Arnold, Jeffrey L.; Kelley, Katherine; Kristie, Virginia; Forte, Elaine; Schneider, Mark; Dainiak, Nicholas

    2007-01-01

    further optimize biodosimetry specimen processing protocols in Connecticut. Based on our findings, we conclude that clinical laboratory professionals are an important resource for assisting with the processing biodosimetry specimens that are used for triage of patients from accidental or terrorist-related mass-casualty radiological or nuclear catastrophies. The approach described in this paper to enroll and train clinical laboratorians in sample preparation for dicentric analysis forms the basis for the next step (namely, further training on harvesting cultured cells and preparing cytogenetic slides) in collaborative efforts between the State of Connecticut's Biodosimetry Laboratory and the state's medical infrastructure towards building laboratory surge capacity to estimate radiation dose in victims of a mass casualty event

  14. Synchronous states of slowly rotating pendula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Centre for Applied Dynamics Research, School of Engineering, University of Aberdeen, AB24 3UE Aberdeen, Scotland (United Kingdom); Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland); Kapitaniak, Tomasz, E-mail: tomasz.kapitaniak@p.lodz.pl [Division of Dynamics, Technical University of Lodz, Stefanowskiego 1/15, 90-924 Lodz (Poland)

    2014-08-01

    Coupled systems that contain rotating elements are typical in physical, biological and engineering applications and for years have been the subject of intensive studies. One problem of scientific interest, which among others occurs in such systems is the phenomenon of synchronization of different rotating parts. Despite different initial conditions, after a sufficiently long transient, the rotating parts move in the same way — complete synchronization, or a permanent constant shift is established between their displacements, i.e., the angles of rotation — phase synchronization. Synchronization occurs due to dependence of the periods of rotating elements motion and the displacement of the base on which these elements are mounted. We review the studies on the synchronization of rotating pendula and compare them with the results obtained for oscillating pendula. As an example we consider the dynamics of the system consisting of n pendula mounted on the movable beam. The pendula are excited by the external torques which are inversely proportional to the angular velocities of the pendula. As the result of such excitation each pendulum rotates around its axis of rotation. It has been assumed that all pendula rotate in the same direction or in the opposite directions. We consider the case of slowly rotating pendula and estimate the influence of the gravity on their motion. We classify the synchronous states of the identical pendula and observe how the parameters mismatch can influence them. We give evidence that synchronous states are robust as they exist in the wide range of system parameters and can be observed in a simple experiment.

  15. Synchronous states of slowly rotating pendula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapitaniak, Marcin; Czolczynski, Krzysztof; Perlikowski, Przemysław; Stefanski, Andrzej; Kapitaniak, Tomasz

    2014-01-01

    Coupled systems that contain rotating elements are typical in physical, biological and engineering applications and for years have been the subject of intensive studies. One problem of scientific interest, which among others occurs in such systems is the phenomenon of synchronization of different rotating parts. Despite different initial conditions, after a sufficiently long transient, the rotating parts move in the same way — complete synchronization, or a permanent constant shift is established between their displacements, i.e., the angles of rotation — phase synchronization. Synchronization occurs due to dependence of the periods of rotating elements motion and the displacement of the base on which these elements are mounted. We review the studies on the synchronization of rotating pendula and compare them with the results obtained for oscillating pendula. As an example we consider the dynamics of the system consisting of n pendula mounted on the movable beam. The pendula are excited by the external torques which are inversely proportional to the angular velocities of the pendula. As the result of such excitation each pendulum rotates around its axis of rotation. It has been assumed that all pendula rotate in the same direction or in the opposite directions. We consider the case of slowly rotating pendula and estimate the influence of the gravity on their motion. We classify the synchronous states of the identical pendula and observe how the parameters mismatch can influence them. We give evidence that synchronous states are robust as they exist in the wide range of system parameters and can be observed in a simple experiment

  16. Frequency Characteristics of Synchronous Generator Damper Winding Circuit and Study on Out-of-phase Synchronization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiramatsu, Daisuke; Uemura, Yoichi; Koyanagi, Kaoru; Hirayama, Kaiichirou; Otaka, Toru; Kakiuchi, Mikio; Shiina, Jun; Tokumasu, Tadashi; Fujita, Masafumi; Ara, Takahiro

    The authors have studied the frequency characteristics of synchronous generator equivalent circuit model. The authors examined the frequency characteristics of damper winding circuits using FEM. Then the new transient analysis method considering the impedance change with frequency is proposed during the transient phenomena such as out-of-phase synchronization using the electromagnetic transients program (EMTP-ATP).

  17. Breaking projective chaos synchronization secure communication using filtering and generalized synchronization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, G.; Li Shujun; Montoya, F.; Pastor, G.; Romera, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the security weaknesses of a recently proposed secure communication method based on chaotic masking using projective synchronization of two chaotic systems. We show that the system is insecure and how to break it in two different ways, by high-pass filtering and by generalized synchronization

  18. Pinning-controlled synchronization of complex networks with bounded or unbounded synchronized regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan-Li, Zou; Guan-Rong, Chen

    2009-01-01

    This paper studies pinning-controlled synchronization of complex networks with bounded or unbounded synchronized regions. To study a state-feedback pinning-controlled network with N nodes, it first converts the controlled network to an extended network of N+1 nodes without controls. It is shown that the controlled synchronizability of the given network is determined by the real part of the smallest nonzero eigenvalue of the coupling matrix of its extended network when the synchronized region is unbounded; but it is determined by the ratio of the real parts of the largest and the smallest nonzero eigenvalues of the coupling matrix when the synchronized region is bounded. Both theoretical analysis and numerical simulation show that the portion of controlled nodes has no critical values when the synchronized region is unbounded, but it has a critical value when the synchronized region is bounded. In the former case, therefore, it is possible to control the network to achieve synchronization by pinning only one node. In the latter case, the network can achieve controlled synchronization only when the portion of controlled nodes is larger than the critical value. (general)

  19. Designing collaborative policy innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Annika; Sørensen, Eva

    2014-01-01

    , the chapter investigates the extent to which and how collaboration between politicians and relevant stakeholders can spur the formulation, implementation and diffusion of new innovative policies. A case study of a process of collaborative policy innovation in a Danish municipality shows that collaborative...

  20. Symbol synchronization and sampling frequency synchronization techniques in real-time DDO-OFDM systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming; He, Jing; Cao, Zizheng; Tang, Jin; Chen, Lin; Wu, Xian

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we propose and experimentally demonstrate a symbol synchronization and sampling frequency synchronization techniques in real-time direct-detection optical orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (DDO-OFDM) system, over 100-km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) using a cost-effective directly modulated distributed feedback (DFB) laser. The experiment results show that the proposed symbol synchronization based on training sequence (TS) has a low complexity and high accuracy even at a sampling frequency offset (SFO) of 5000-ppm. Meanwhile, the proposed pilot-assisted sampling frequency synchronization between digital-to-analog converter (DAC) and analog-to-digital converter (ADC) is capable of estimating SFOs with an accuracy of technique can also compensate SFO effects within a small residual SFO caused by deviation of SFO estimation and low-precision or unstable clock source. The two synchronization techniques are suitable for high-speed DDO-OFDM transmission systems.