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Sample records for synaptosomes

  1. Protein synthesis in synaptosomes: a proteomics analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jimenez, C.R.; Eyman, M.; Lavina, Z.S.; Goio, A.; Li, K.W.; van der Schors, R.C.; Geraerts, W.P.M.; Giuditta, A.; Kaplan, B.B.; van Minnen, J.

    2002-01-01

    A proteomics approach was used to identify the translation products of a unique synaptic model system, squid optic lobe synaptosomes. Unlike its vertebrate counterparts, this preparation is largely free of perikaryal cell fragments and consists predominantly of pre-synaptic terminals derived from

  2. Protein synthesis in synaptosomes: a proteomics analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, C R; Eyman, M; Lavina, Z Scotto; Gioio, A; Li, K W; van der Schors, R C; Geraerts, W P M; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B; van Minnen, J

    2002-05-01

    A proteomics approach was used to identify the translation products of a unique synaptic model system, squid optic lobe synaptosomes. Unlike its vertebrate counterparts, this preparation is largely free of perikaryal cell fragments and consists predominantly of pre-synaptic terminals derived from retinal photoreceptor neurones. We metabolically labelled synaptosomes with [(35)S] methionine and applied two-dimensional gel electrophoresis to resolve newly synthesized proteins at high resolution. Autoradiographs of blotted two-dimensional gels revealed de novo synthesis of about 80 different proteins, 18 of which could be matched to silver-stained gels that were run in parallel. In-gel digestion of the matched spots and mass spectrometric analyses revealed the identities of various cytosolic enzymes, cytoskeletal proteins, molecular chaperones and nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins. A number of novel proteins (i.e. not matching with database sequences) were also detected. In situ hybridization was employed to confirm the presence of mRNA and rRNA in synaptosomes. Together, our data show that pre-synaptic endings of squid photoreceptor neurones actively synthesize a wide variety of proteins involved in synaptic functioning, such as transmitter recycling, energy supply and synaptic architecture.

  3. ANAEROBIC GLYCOLYSIS AND POSTANOXIC RECOVERY OF RESPIRATION OF RAT CORTICAL SYNAPTOSOMES ARE REDUCED BY SYNAPTOSOMAL SODIUM LOAD

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GLEITZ, J; BEILE, A; KHAN, S; WILFFERT, B; TEGTMEIER, F

    1993-01-01

    Synaptosomes of rat cerebral cortex were used to study the effect of veratridine-induced Na+ load on postanoxic recovery of respiration and on aerobic and anaerobic ATP turnover, calculated from rates of oxygen consumption and lactate production. Non-stimulated synaptosomes: after onset of anoxia

  4. Protein synthesis in a synaptosomal fraction from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Castigli, E; Perrone Capano, C; Martin, R; Menichini, E; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1993-08-01

    A synaptosomal fraction from squid brain containing a large proportion of well-presarved nerve terminals displays a high rate of [(35)S]methionine incorporation into protein. The reaction is dependent on time and protein concentration, is strongly inhibited by hypo-osmotic shock and cycloheximide, and is not affected by RNase. Chloramphenicol, an inhibitor of mitochondrial protein synthesis, partially inhibits the reaction. The ionic composition of the incubation medium markedly modulates the rate of [(35)S]methionine incorporation. Na(+) and K(+) ions are required for maximal activity, while complete inhibition is achieved by addition of the calcium ionophore A23187 and, to a substantial extent, by tetraethylammonium, ouabain, and high concentrations K(+). A thermostable inhibitor of synaptosomal protein synthesis is also present in the soluble fraction of squid brain. Using sucrose density gradient sedimentation procedures, cytoplasmic polysomes associated with nascent radiolabeled peptide chains have been identified in the synaptosomal preparation. Newly synthesized synaptosomal proteins are largely associated with a readily sedimented particulate fraction and may be resolved by gel electrophoresis into more than 30 discrete bands ranging in size from about 14 to 200 kDa. The electrophoretic pattern of the newly synthesized synaptosomal proteins is significantly different from the corresponding patterns displayed by the giant axon's axoplasm and by glial and nerve cell bodies (in the stellate nerve and ganglion, respectively). On the whole, these observations suggest that the nerve endings from squid brain are capable of protein synthesis.

  5. Uptake and release of [14C] GABA from rabbit retina synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Redburn, D.A.

    1977-01-01

    A partial separation of two synaptosomal fractions was achieved using modifications of conventional homogenization and centrifugation techniques. The two fractions contained morphologically distinct synaptosomal populations, receptor cell synaptosomes (large synaptosomes, P 1 ), and synaptosomes from the other cell types (smaller, conventional-sized synaptosomes, P 2 ). [ 14 C]GABA was bound and released from subcellular fractions from retina under conditions which support its role as a neurotransmitter in retina. On the other hand, [ 3 H]leucine, which is very likely a non-transmitter compound, was bound by retinal fractions but not released to the appropriate stimulation. [ 14 C]GABA binding and release sites were more prevalent in P 2 fractions. [ 14 C]GABA was bound by P 1 fractions containing photoreceptor synaptosomes; however, the K + stimulated release of [ 14 C]GABA appeared to be insensitive to external Ca 2+ . Possible mechanisms are discussed. (author)

  6. Free radical production induced by methamphetamine in rat striatal synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pubill, David; Chipana, Carlos; Camins, Antonio; Pallàs, Mercè; Camarasa, Jordi; Escubedo, Elena

    2005-04-01

    The pro-oxidative effect of methamphetamine (METH) in dopamine terminals was studied in rat striatal synaptosomes. Flow cytometry analysis showed increased production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in METH-treated synaptosomes, without reduction in the density of dopamine transporters. In synaptosomes from dopamine (DA)-depleted animals, METH did not induce ROS production. Reserpine, in vitro, completely inhibited METH-induced ROS production. These results point to endogenous DA as the main source of ROS induced by METH. Antioxidants and inhibitors of neuronal nitric oxide synthase and protein kinase C (PKC) prevented the METH-induced oxidative effect. EGTA and the specific antagonist methyllycaconitine (MLA, 50 microM) prevented METH-induced ROS production, thus implicating calcium and alpha7 nicotinic receptors in such effect. Higher concentrations of MLA (>100 microM) showed nonspecific antioxidant effect. Preincubation of synaptosomes with METH (1 microM) for 30 min reduced [(3)H]DA uptake by 0%. The METH effect was attenuated by MLA and EGTA and potentiated by nicotine, indicating that activation of alpha(7) nicotinic receptors and Ca(2+) entry are necessary and take place before DAT inhibition. From these findings, it can be postulated that, in our model, METH induces DA release from synaptic vesicles to the cytosol. Simultaneously, METH activates alpha(7) nicotinic receptors, probably inducing depolarization and an increase in intrasynaptosomal Ca(2+). This would lead to DAT inhibition and NOS and PKC activation, initiating oxidation of cytosolic DA.

  7. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  8. Messenger RNAs in synaptosomal fractions from rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Capano, C P; Aiello, A; Iannetti, E; Cupello, A; Giuditta, A

    2001-12-30

    Synaptosomal fractions from rat brain have been analyzed with semi-quantitative RT-PCR methods to determine their content of mRNAs coding for presynaptic, postsynaptic, glial, and neuronal proteins. Each mRNA was determined with reference to the standard HPRT mRNA. In our analyses, mRNAs were considered to be associated with synaptosomes only if their relative amounts were higher than in microsomes prepared in a polysome stabilizing medium, rich in Mg(++) and K(+) ions, or in the homogenate. According to this stringent criterion, the following synaptosomal mRNAs could not be attributed to microsomal contamination and were assumed to derive from the subcellular structures known to harbor their translation products, i.e. GAT-1 mRNAs from presynaptic terminals and glial processes, MAP2 mRNA from dendrites, GFAP mRNA from glial processes, and TAU mRNA from neuronal fragments. This interpretation is in agreement with the involvement of extrasomatic mRNAs in local translation processes.

  9. Synaptosomal protein synthesis in P2 and Ficoll purified fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Bruno, Annapaola; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2012-01-30

    Cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes has generally been determined in the Ficoll purified fraction which contains fewer contaminating mitochondria, microsomes and myelin fragments than the parent P2 fraction. Using a highly selective assay of this activity we have compared the total translation activity and the specific activity of the proteins synthesized by either fraction in control rats and in rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task. In control rats the specific activity remained essentially the same in both fractions but in trained rats the value of the Ficoll fraction was markedly lower (38.5%) than in the P2 fraction. Furthermore, the total translation activity of the Ficoll fraction was 30% lower than in the P2 fraction in control rats and 62% lower in trained rats. These decrements indicate that a large proportion of active synaptosomes present in the P2 fraction is not recovered in the Ficoll fraction, notably in rats undergoing plastic brain changes. We conclude that cytoplasmic protein synthesis of brain synaptosomes is better preserved in the P2 fraction. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Synaptosomal protein synthesis is selectively modulated by learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-02-09

    Synaptosomes from rat brain have long been used to investigate the properties of synaptic protein synthesis. Comparable analyses have now been made in adult male rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task to examine the hypothesis of its direct participation in brain plastic events. Using Ficoll-purified synaptosomes from neocortex, hippocampus and cerebellum, our data indicate that the capacity of synaptosomal protein synthesis and the specific activity of newly synthesized proteins were not different in trained rats in comparison with home-caged control rats. On the other hand, the synthesis of two proteins of 66.5 kDa and 87.6 kDa separated by SDS-PAGE and analyzed by quantitative densitometry was selectively enhanced in trained rats. In addition, the synthesis of the 66.5 kDa protein, but not of the 87.6 kDa protein, correlated with avoidances and escapes and inversely correlated with freezings in the neocortex, while in the cerebellum it correlated with avoidances and escapes. The data demonstrate the participation of synaptic protein synthesis in plastic events of behaving rats, and the selective, region-specific modulation of the synthesis of a synaptic 66.5 kDa protein by the newly acquired avoidance response and by the reprogramming of innate neural circuits subserving escape and freezing responses.

  11. Active polysomes are present in the large presynaptic endings of the synaptosomal fraction from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Kaplan, B B; Martin, R; Alvarez, J; Chun, J T; Benech, J C; Giuditta, A

    1997-10-15

    Previous data have suggested that the large nerve terminals present in the synaptosomal fraction from squid optic lobe are capable of protein synthesis (Crispino et al., 1993a,b). We have further examined this issue by comparing the translation products of synaptosomal and microsomal polysomes. Both preparations programmed an active process of translation, which was completely abolished by their previous treatment with EDTA. After immunoabsorption of the newly synthesized neurofilament (NF) proteins, the labeling ratio of the 60 and 70 kDa NF proteins was found to differ, in agreement with comparable differences obtained with intact synaptosomes. These observations indicate that the set of mRNAs translated by synaptosomes differs from that translated by nerve cell bodies. Hence, because NF proteins are neuron-specific, they support the view that the active synaptosomal polysomes are mostly localized in the large nerve terminals that represent the most abundant neuronal component of the fraction. This hypothesis was confirmed (1) by electron spectroscopic data demonstrating the presence of ribosomes and polysomes within the large nerve endings of the synaptosomal fraction, as well as in the carrot-like nerve endings of the retinal photoreceptors that constitute the only large terminals in the optic lobe, and (2) by light and high resolution autoradiography of synaptosomal samples incubated with [3H]leucine, showing that most labeled proteins are associated with the large nerve endings. This response was abolished by cycloheximide. Taken together, the data provide the first unequivocal demonstration that presynaptic nerve terminals are capable of protein synthesis.

  12. Norepinephrine release and reuptake by hypothalamic synaptosomes of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hano, T.; Jeng, Y.; Rho, J.

    1989-01-01

    We compared the overflow of endogenous norepinephrine during electrical field stimulation, the norepinephrine content, and the rate of initial neuronal uptake of [3H]norepinephrine in synaptosomes isolated from hypothalamus and brainstem of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats at 7 and 13 weeks of age. The synaptosomes of two rats, a SHR and a WKY rat control, were simultaneously processed and subjected to the same electrical field stimulation. The overflow of endogenous norepinephrine during electrical stimulation (2 Hz, 2 minutes) in the hypothalamic synaptosomes of 7-week-old SHR was significantly greater, whereas the overflow of 13-week-old SHR was equivalent to the age-matched WKY rat. The norepinephrine content of synaptosomes was about the same in SHR and age-matched controls. There was also significantly enhanced [3H]norepinephrine uptake in the hypothalamic synaptosomes of young SHR, but neither the hypothalamic nor the brainstem samples of 13-week-old SHR showed any significant difference in their rate of [3H]norepinephrine uptake. These data are similar to those we observed (unpublished observations) in perfused mesenteric artery system in which norepinephrine release was significantly elevated during periarterial nerve stimulation only in young SHR. Thus, these results suggest that a parallel enhancement of norepinephrine release in hypothalamus with that of peripheral nervous system may play an important role during development of hypertension in young SHR

  13. [Na+-K+-ATPase activity in guinea pig brain synaptosomal fraction in experimental allergic encephalomyelitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belik, J V; Terlets'ka, J T; Metal'nykova, N P; Berezhnyj, H A

    1977-01-01

    The activity Na+, K+-ATPase of the guinea pig brain synaptosome fraction as well as the effect on this enzyme of the blood serum obtained in guinea pigs in different periods after sensibilization of the animals with the basic encephalitogenic protein were studied in dynamics of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis development. The Na+,K+-ATPase activity in the guinea pig brain synaptosome fraction is more than 50% lower from the seventh day of sensibilization up to development of characteristic symptoms of the disease in animals. The guinea pigs blood serum obtained on the seventh and tenth days of sensibilization has an inhibitory effect of the same order on the studied activity of the normal guinea pig brain synaptosome fraction. At the later stages of the disease development and with the presence of characteristic symptoms of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in the animals the blood serum has no similar effect.

  14. Changes in markers of oxidative stress and membrane properties in synaptosomes from rats exposed prenatally to toluene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelfors, Sven; Hass, Ulla; Hougaard, Karin S.

    2002-01-01

    for the experiments, Synaptosomes from rats exposed prenatally to toluene exhibited an increased level of oxidative stress when incubated with toluene in vitro compared to synaptosomes from unexposed offspring. Also the cell membrane was affected, as the calcium leakage was more increased from exposed synaptosomes......The present study was undertaken in order to investigate if toluene induced oxidative stress in brains from rats exposed prenatally to 1800 ppm toluene 6 hr/day at days 7-20 during the pregnancy. 35-42 days after birth the rats were killed and synaptosomal fractions were prepared...... than from unexposed. The membrane fluidity increased significantly when synaptosomes were incubated with toluene for 10 min. in vitro but the change in fluidity was identical in both groups of offspring. The results indicate that prenatal exposure to toluene induces long-lasting changes in oxidative...

  15. Relationship between presynaptic membrane potential and acetylcholine release in synaptosomes from Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, F M

    1984-01-01

    The membrane potential of purely cholinergic synaptosomes isolated from Torpedo electric organ was monitored with fluorescent carbocyanine dyes. An increased fluorescence was associated with depolarization and a quenching with hyperpolarization. Fluorescence data provided evidence that Torpedo synaptosomes have a membrane potential mainly driven by a K+ diffusion potential and a membrane potential of about -50 mV could be estimated after calibration of fluorescence signals with ionophore antibiotics. The release of acetylcholine (ACh) from Torpedo synaptosomes was monitored continuously by measuring the light emitted by a chemiluminescent method (Israël & Lesbats, 1981 a). Using fluorescence data, the release of ACh was expressed as a function of membrane potential. The relationship between presynaptic potential and transmitter release as determined by biochemical methods at cholinergic nerve endings showed striking similarities to that observed at the squid giant synapse. Several substances were also tested with regard to their depolarizing and releasing properties and it was found that the toxin isolated from the venom of the annelid Glycera convoluta, which induced a large increase in quantal release of transmitter (Manaranche, Thieffry, & Israël, 1980) promoted a depolarization of Torpedo synaptosomes in addition to ACh release. PMID:6207289

  16. Mouse brain synaptosomal sodium channels: activation by aconitine, batrachotoxin, and veratridine, and inhibition by tetrodotoxin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiasuddin, S M; Soderlund, D M

    1984-01-01

    Batrachotoxin, veratridine and aconitine, activators of the voltage-dependent sodium channel in excitable cell membranes, increase the rate of 22Na+ uptake by mouse brain synaptosomes. Batrachotoxin was both the most potent (K0.5, 0.49 microM) and most effective activator of specific 22Na+ uptake. Veratridine (K0.5, 34.5 microM) and aconitine (K0.5, 19.6 microM) produced maximal stimulations of 22Na+ uptake that were 73% and 46%, respectively, of that produced by batrachotoxin. Activation of 22Na+ uptake by veratridine was completely inhibited by tetrodotoxin (I50, 6 nM ), a specific blocker of nerve membrane sodium channels. These results identify appropriate conditions for measuring sodium channel-dependent 22Na+ flux in mouse brain synaptosomes. The pharmacological properties of mouse brain synaptosomal sodium channels described here are distinct from those previously described for sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes and mouse neuroblastoma cells.

  17. Studies of two naturally occurring compounds which effect release of acetylcholine from synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koenig, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    Two naturally occurring compounds which effect the release of neurotransmitter from synaptosomes have been purified to apparent homogeneity. Iotrochotin (IOT) isolated from wound exudate of the Caribbean purple bleeder sponge promotes release in a manner that is independent of the extracellular Ca 2+ ion concentration. Leptinotarsin (LPT-d), a protein taken from hemolymph of the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata, stimulates Ca 2+ -dependent release. IOT is slightly acidic and has a molecular weight of approximately 18 kD. [ 3 H]acetylcholine which has been introduced into synaptosomes as [ 3 H]choline can be released by IOT. The toxin releasable pool of labelled neurotransmitter is not depleted by depolarization of the synaptosomes with high potassium, and therefore seems to be primarily extravesicular. LPT-d is a larger protein (molecular weight = 45 kD) than IOT, and seems to effect primarily vesicular release by opening at least one type of presynaptic Ca 2+ channel. The facilitatory effects of the toxin on synaptosomal release can be inhibited by inorganic Ca 2+ channel antagonists, but are not generally affected by organic antagonists

  18. Interactions between alpha-latrotoxin and trivalent cations in rat striatal synaptosomal preparations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheer, H.W.

    1989-05-01

    The interactions between alpha-latrotoxin (alpha-LTx), a neurosecretagogue purified from the venom of the black widow spider, and the trivalent cations Al3+, Y3+, La3+, Gd3+, and Yb3+ were investigated in rat striatal synaptosomal preparations. All trivalent cations tested were inhibitors of alpha-LTx-induced (/sup 3/H)dopamine ((/sup 3/H)DA) release (order of potency: Yb3+ greater than Gd3+ approximately Y3+ greater than La3+ greater than Al3+). Only with Al3+ could inhibition of (/sup 3/H)DA release be attributed to a block of /sup 125/I-alpha-LTx specific binding to synaptosomal preparations. The inhibitory effect of trivalent ions was reversible provided synaptosomes were washed with buffer containing EDTA. Trivalent ions also inhibited alpha-LTx-induced (/sup 3/H)DA release at times when alpha-LTx-stimulated release was already evident. alpha-LTx-induced synaptosomal membrane depolarization was blocked by La3+, but not affected by Gd3+, Y3+, and Yb3+. alpha-LTx-stimulated uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ was inhibited by all trivalent cations tested. These results demonstrate that there exist at least three means by which trivalent cations can inhibit alpha-LTx action in rat striatal synaptosomal preparations: (1) inhibition of alpha-LTx binding (Al3+); (2) inhibition of alpha-LTx-induced depolarization (La3+); and (3) inhibition of alpha-LTx-induced /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake (Gd3+, Y3+, Yb3+, La3+).

  19. Pergolide inhibition of calcium-induced 3H-dopamine release from striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowyer, J.F.; Weiner, N.

    1986-01-01

    Several investigators have reported that dopamine agonists or antagonists are unable to modulate the K + -evoked release of 3 H-dopamine ( 3 H-DA) from striatal synaptosomes. To further assess the role of DA in regulating its release, they have examined the effects of pergolide on Ca ++ (1.25 mM)-evoked release of 3 H-DA from partially K + -depolarized striatal synaptosomes. Synaptosomes (P2 pellet) were isolated from rat striatum and incubated for 5 min at 37 0 C in a Ca ++ -free Krebs-Ringer buffer containing 25 nM 3 H-DA. After radiolabeling, the synaptosomes were superfused for 12 min with Ca ++ -free 6 mM Krebs-Ringer buffer to determine basal release of 3 H-DA. Synaptosomes were then exposed to test drugs for 8 min prior to Ca ++ challenge. Ca ++ addition resulted in a 3-fold increase in 3 H-DA release within 2-4 min. Pergolide inhibited the release of 3 H-DA in a concentration-dependent manner. Release was inhibited to 56% of control by 10 nM pergolide. This was largely reversed by 0.1 μM S-sulpiride. Ca ++ -evoked release was inhibited over 70% by 1 μM tetrodotoxin (TTX), indicating that voltage-dependent Na + channels may play a role in the release process. The combination of pergolide and TTX inhibited release to a degree similar to TTX alone. These results suggest that pergolide may inhibit 3 H-DA release by a TTX-sensitive mechanism and that the dopaminergic autoreceptors may be linked to voltage-sensitive Na + channels

  20. Effects of mercuric chloride on [3H]dopamine release from rat brain striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hare, M.F.; Minnema, D.J.; Cooper, G.P.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1989-01-01

    Electrophysiological studies employing amphibian neuromuscular preparations have shown that mercuric chloride (HgCl2) in vitro increases both spontaneous and evoked neurotransmitter release. The present study examines the effect of HgCl2 on the release of [ 3 H]dopamine from synaptosomes prepared from mammalian brain tissue. Mercuric chloride (3-10 microM) produces a concentration-dependent increase in spontaneous [ 3 H]dopamine release from ''purified'' rat striatal synaptosomes, in both the presence and absence of extra-synaptosomal calcium. The effects of HgCl2 on transmitter release from amphibian neuromuscular junction preparations resemble those produced by the Na+, K+-ATPase inhibitor ouabain. Experiments were performed to determine whether the HgCl2 effects on mammalian synaptosomal dopamine release are a consequence of Na+, K+-ATPase inhibition. Na+, K+-ATPase activity in lysed synaptosomal membranes is inhibited by HgCl2 (IC50 = 160 nM). However, mercuric chloride in the presence of 1 mM ouabain still increased [3H]dopamine release. The specific inhibitor of Na+-dependent, high-affinity dopamine transport, RMI81,182 inhibited ouabain-induced [3H]dopamine release whereas it had no effect on HgCl2-induced [ 3 H]dopamine release. These data suggest that augmentation of spontaneous [ 3 H]dopamine release by HgCl2 probably is not mediated by an inhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase and HgCl2 does not act directly on the dopamine transporter

  1. Brain synaptosomes harbor more than one cytoplasmic system of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cefaliello, Carolina; Eyman, Maria; Melck, Dominique; De Stefano, Rosanna; Ferrara, Eugenia; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2014-11-01

    Synaptosomal protein synthesis from rat brain is selectively increased by learning and is massively enhanced during the recovery period from brain ischemia. To lay the groundwork for identification of the involved synaptic elements, we examined the effects induced by varying the concentrations of extracellular cations and endogenous calcium. Most of the recorded rate response curves exhibited biphasic profiles that suggested the presence of more than one translation system. Because comparable profiles were obtained by fully inhibiting mitochondrial translation, the data indicated the involvement of cytoplasmic translation systems present in different synaptosomal classes. Their properties may be individually investigated by exploiting the partially inhibited conditions we have described. The identification of the synaptic elements from which they originated and their newly synthesized proteins will significantly expand our understanding of the synaptic contribution to brain plastic events. Copyright © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Role of sialic acid in synaptosomal transport of amino acid transmitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska, M.M.; Erecinska, M.

    1987-01-01

    Active, high-affinity, sodium-dependent uptake of [ 14 C]-aminobutyric acid and of the acidic amino acid D-[ 3 H]-aspartate was inhibited by pretreatment of synaptosomes with neuraminidase from Vibrio cholerae. Inhibition was of a noncompetitive type and was related to the amount of sialic acid released. The maximum accumulation ratios of both amino acids (intracellular [amino acid]/extracellular [amino acid]) remained largely unaltered. Treatment with neuraminidase affected neither the synaptosomal energy levels nor the concentration of internal potassium. It is suggested that the γ-aminobutyric acid and acidic amino acid transporters are glycosylated and that sialic acid is involved in the operation of the carrier proteins directly and not through modification of driving forces responsible for amino acid uptake

  3. Effects of cadmium on the uptake of dopamine and norepinephrine in rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1986-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) a known environmental contaminant is neurotoxic. Kinetics of cadmium inhibition indicate that the metal may compete with ATP and Na + sites on Na + -K + ATPase in rat brain synaptosomes. Uptake and release processes of catecholamines into the central nervous system are dependent on membrane bound Na + -K + ATPase. It is suggested that the uptake and release processes of dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) in neurons are energy utilizing and hence are dependent on active ion transport. If the two aforementioned mechanisms are truly interdependent, then any alteration caused by a toxin to either of the above two mechanisms should also cause a parallel change in the other. The purpose of this study was to examine in vitro effects of cadmium chloride on the uptake of DA and NE and the activity of ATPase in the rat brain synaptosome

  4. A method to determine insulin responsiveness in synaptosomes isolated from frozen brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Whitney; Taglialatela, Giulio

    2016-03-01

    Studying the insulin signaling response at the synapse is an important approach to understand molecular mechanisms involved in disease-related neurodegenerative processes. We developed a method for studying the insulin responsiveness at the synaptic level by isolating functional synaptosomes from fresh or frozen tissue and exposing them to insulin in the presence of ATP (a critical step) to detect insulin receptor (IR) activation. We performed an ATP dose-response curve, insulin dose-response curve, and insulin response time course to optimize this method. We also demonstrated that our protocol reflects the degree of insulin responsiveness in vivo by using an animal model of known insulin resistance, AtENPP1-Tg mice. This method is advantageous over other methods detecting IR in total brain homogenates due to the ability to detect IR response without confounding contributions from other cell areas and cell types also expressing IR. Furthermore, ex vivo insulin stimulation can be compared to baseline synaptosomes obtained from the same animal which improves reliability and statistical power while decreasing the number of animals required to perform individual experiments. We have developed a reliable, efficient method to measure insulin-driven ex vivo phosphorylation of the synaptosomal insulin receptor that can reliably reflect the pre-existing insulin responsiveness status in the CNS of the animal. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first evidence of stimulation of isolated synaptosomes with insulin and a promising new technique to study the synaptic CNS insulin responsiveness under physiological or disease conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Biotransformation of endorphins by a synaptosomal plasma membrane preparation of rat brain and by human serum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Loeber, J.G.; Verhoef, J.; Kloet, E.R. de; Wied, D. de

    1979-01-01

    β-Endorphin (β-LPH 61–91), γ-endorphin (61–77), des-tyrosine-γ-endorphin (62–77), α-endorphin (61–76), and β-LPH 61–69 either labeled with [125I] at the N-terminal 61-tyrosine residue or unlabeled were incubated with a crude synaptosomal plasma membrane fraction of rat brain or in human serum. At

  6. [Phosphorylation of rat brain synaptosomal proteins stimulated by alpha-latrotroxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdniakova, N G; Storchak, L G; Gimmel'reĭkh, N G

    1996-09-01

    alpha-Latrotoxin (LTX) is a presynaptic neurotoxin from black widow spider (Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus) venom; it causes massive Ca(2+)-independent neurotransmitter release. The effect of LTX on phosphorylation of synaptosomal proteins was studied including synapsin I, synaptotagmin, and dynamin. Experiments were performed in Ca(2+)-supplemented medium containing 1 mM CaCl2 or nominally Ca(2+)-free medium (without added Ca2+ and EGTA) using intact synaptosomes isolated from rat brain and prelabeled with 32P(i). The data indicate the exposure of synaptosomes to 10 nM LTX for 10 sec stimulates 32P(i) incorporation into synapsin I up to 143% versus control in Ca(2+)-supplemented medium and up to 130% in Ca(2+)-free medium. LTX (20 nM) significantly stimulated synapsin I phosphorylation (up to 173% versus control) only in Ca(2+)-free medium. Under these conditions, dephosphorylation of dynamin was not observed. Exposure of synaptosomes to LTX in Ca(2+)-supplemented medium for 10 sec did not affect 32P(i) incorporation into synaptotagmin but increase in incubation time up to 30 sec results in dephosphorylation of synaptotagmin down to 70% versus control level. In Ca(2+)-free medium, LTX stimulates the 32Pi incorporation into synaptotagmin (up to 140% versus control) and the effect was not time-dependent. Thus, LTX-stimulated neurosecretion in Ca(2+)-supplemented and Ca(2+)-free medium requires phosphorylation of synapsin I. Phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle of synaptotagmin can be important for regulation of recyclization of synaptic vesicles.

  7. Alteration of aluminium inhibition of synaptosomal (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase by colestipol administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, V S; Oliveira, L; Gonçalves, P P

    2013-11-01

    The ability of aluminium to inhibit the (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity has been observed by several authors. During chronic dietary exposure to AlCl3, brain (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity drops, even if no alterations of catalytic subunit protein expression and of energy charge potential are observed. The aluminium effect on (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase activity seems to implicate the reduction of interacting protomers within the oligomeric ensemble of the membrane-bound (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase. The activity of (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase is altered by the microviscosity of lipid environment. We studied if aluminium inhibitory effect on (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase is modified by alterations in synaptosomal membrane cholesterol content. Adult male Wistar rats were submitted to chronic dietary AlCl3 exposure (0.03 g/day of AlCl3) and/or to colestipol, a hypolidaemic drug (0.31 g/day) during 4 months. The activity of (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase was studied in brain cortex synaptosomes with different cholesterol contents. Additionally, we incubate synaptosomes with methyl-β-cyclodextrin for both enrichment and depletion of membrane cholesterol content, with or without 300 μM AlCl3. This enzyme activity was significantly reduced by micromolar AlCl3 added in vitro and when aluminium was orally administered to rats. The oral administration of colestipol reduced the cholesterol content and concomitantly inhibited the (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase. The aluminium inhibitory effect on synaptosomal (Na(+)/K(+))ATPase was reduced by cholesterol depletion both in vitro and in vivo. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Proteomic analysis of acrylamide-protein adduct formation in rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, David S.; LoPachin, Richard M.

    2004-01-01

    Evidence suggests that the neurological defects (gait abnormalities, foot splay, and skeletal muscle weakness) associated with acrylamide (ACR) intoxication are mediated by impaired neurotransmission at central and peripheral synapses. ACR can form adducts with nucleophilic residues on proteins and thereby alter corresponding structure and function. To evaluate protein adduction in nerve terminals as a possible mechanism of action, recombinant N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) was exposed in vitro to ACR (10 μmol) and mass spectrometry (MS) was used to identify adduct sites. MS analyses demonstrated that ACR formed adducts with sulfhydryl groups on cysteine residues (carbamoylethylcysteine, or CEC) of NSF. Ex vivo incubation of whole brain synaptosomes with ACR (0.001-1.0 M) produced concentration-dependent increases in CEC that were inversely correlated to reductions in neurotransmitter release that occurred over the same neurotoxicant concentration range. In synaptosomes isolated from rats intoxicated at a higher (50 mg/kg per day x 3, 5, 8, or 11 days) or a lower (21 mg/kg per day x 14, 21, or 28 day) ACR dose rate, CEC levels increased progressively up to a moderate level of neurotoxicity. To identify protein adducts, synaptosomal proteins labeled by ex vivo 14 C-ACR exposure were separated by gel electrophoresis and probed by immunoblot analysis. Results showed that NSF and the SNARE protein, SNAP-25, were tentative ACR targets. Subsequent experiments indicated that ACR exposure increased synaptosomal levels of the 7S SNARE core complex, which is consistent with inhibition of NSF, SNAP-25 function, or both. These data suggest that adduction of cysteine residues on NSF and certain SNARE proteins might be causally involved in the nerve terminal dysfunction induced by ACR

  9. Effect of in vitro inorganic lead on dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minnema, D.J.; Greenland, R.D.; Michaelson, I.A.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of inorganic lead in vitro in several aspects of [ 3 H]dopamine release from superfused rat striatal synaptosomes was examined. Under conditions of spontaneous release, lead (1-30 microM) induced dopamine release in a concentration-dependent manner. The onset of the lead-induced release was delayed by approximately 15-30 sec. The magnitude of dopamine release induced by lead was increased when calcium was removed from the superfusing buffer. Lead-induced release was unaffected in the presence of putative calcium, sodium, and/or potassium channel blockers (nickel, tetrodotoxin, tetraethylammonium, respectively). Depolarization-evoked dopamine release, produced by a 1-sec exposure to 61 mM potassium, was diminished at calcium concentrations below 0.254 mM. The onset of depolarization-evoked release was essentially immediate following exposure of the synaptosomes to high potassium. The combination of lead (3 or 10 microM) with high potassium reduced the magnitude of depolarization-evoked dopamine release. This depression of depolarization-evoked release by lead was greater in the presence of 0.25 mM than 2.54 mM calcium in the superfusing buffer. These findings demonstrate multiple actions of lead on synaptosomal dopamine release. Lead can induce dopamine release by yet unidentified neuronal mechanisms independent of external calcium. Lead can also reduce depolarization-evoked dopamine release by apparent competition with calcium influx at the neuronal membrane calcium channel

  10. RNA sequencing reveals pronounced changes in the noncoding transcriptome of aging synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bei Jun; Ueberham, Uwe; Mills, James D; Kirazov, Ludmil; Kirazov, Evgeni; Knobloch, Mara; Bochmann, Jana; Jendrek, Renate; Takenaka, Konii; Bliim, Nicola; Arendt, Thomas; Janitz, Michael

    2017-08-01

    Normal aging is associated with impairments in cognitive functions. These alterations are caused by diminutive changes in the biology of synapses, and ineffective neurotransmission, rather than loss of neurons. Hitherto, only a few studies, exploring molecular mechanisms of healthy brain aging in higher vertebrates, utilized synaptosomal fractions to survey local changes in aging-related transcriptome dynamics. Here we present, for the first time, a comparative analysis of the synaptosomes transcriptome in the aging mouse brain using RNA sequencing. Our results show changes in the expression of genes contributing to biological pathways related to neurite guidance, synaptosomal physiology, and RNA splicing. More intriguingly, we also discovered alterations in the expression of thousands of novel, unannotated lincRNAs during aging. Further, detailed characterization of the cleavage and polyadenylation factor I subunit 1 (Clp1) mRNA and protein expression indicates its increased expression in neuronal processes of hippocampal stratum radiatum in aging mice. Together, our study uncovers a new layer of transcriptional regulation which is targeted by aging within the local environment of interconnecting neuronal cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Stimulation of [3H]ouabain binding to rat synaptosomal (Na+ + K+)-ATPase by aluminum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caspers, M.L.; Dow, M.J.; Kwaiser, T.M.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aluminum on the (Na + + K + )-ATPase. Synaptosomes were prepared from the cerebral cortices of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation of [ 3 H]ouabain binding to the high affinity isoform of the (Na + + K + )-ATPase produced by AlCl 3 developed slowly, with a maximum effect observed after a 40 min preincubation. AlCl 3 produced a 26.5% stimulation in [ 3 H]ouabain binding to the synaptosomal (Na + + K + )-ATPase and this stimulation increased to 33.3% at 100 μM. Scatchard analysis of [ 3 H]ouabain binding data in the presence of 100 μM AlCl 3 yielded a B max of 79.4 ± 3.5 pmol/mg protein, significantly elevated from the B max value obtained in the absence of aluminum. The K D values were similar in the presence or absence of aluminum. In summary, aluminum affects the functioning of the synaptosomal (Na + + K + )-ATPase. This may contribute, at least in part, to the disruption of neuronal function associated with disorders where elevated aluminum content in the CNS is noted

  12. Mazindol and amphetamine as inhibitors of the uptake and releasers of 3H-dopamine by rat striatal synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruba, M O; Picotti, G B; Zambotti, F; Mantegazza, P

    1977-05-01

    The effects of mazindol, amphetamine and fenfluramine on uptake and release of 3H-DA by synaptosomes were studied in different systems. In in vitro incubations of 3H-DA with synaptosomes isolated from the caudate nucleus of the rat, mazindol inhibited the uptake of the radioactivity more potently than did amphetamine. When the synaptosomes were isolated from the caudate nuclei of rats treated in vivo with either mazindol or amphetamine, the uptake of 3H-DA during in vitro incuation was lower with synaptosomes of amphetamine-treated rats than with those of mazindol-treated rats. When synaptosomes of untreated rats were prelabelled with 3H-DA and incubated in the presence of amphetamine or of mazindol, amphetamine caused a greater release of radioactivity than did mazindol. Fenfluramine was without activity in all these systems. In spite of the quantitative differences, both amphetamine and mazindol appear to have similar effects on uptake and release of dopamine, and this may account for their analogous pharmacological profile.

  13. Effect of inhibitory avoidance trainning, ACTH, beta-endorphin and adrenaline on the incorporation of 14C-leucine into synaptosomal proteins of rat hypothalamus, amygdala and hippocampus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalmaz, C.; Maia, H.M.M.; Izquierdo, I.

    1986-01-01

    'In vitro' incorporation of leucine to protein was studied in synaptosomes isolated from the hypothalamus, amygdala and hippocampus of rats submitted to inhibitory avoidance training or to the i.p. injection of ACTH, beta-endorphin or adrenaline; or in synaptosomes incubated with these substances. (M.A.C.) [pt

  14. Uptake of [N-Me-3H]-choline by synaptosomes from the central nervous system of Locusta migratoria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breer, H.

    1982-01-01

    The accumulation of 3H-choline by isolated synaptosomes from the central nervous system of locust was studied at concentrations varying from 0.05 to 40 microM. Kinetic analysis of the saturable process revealed a high-affinity and a low-affinity system. The high-affinity uptake was competitively inhibited by hemicholinium-3 and was absolutely dependent on external sodium. Elevated potassium concentrations inhibited choline uptake. The choline uptake by insect synaptosomes was found to be remarkably resistant to a variety of metabolic inhibitors. The reduced choline uptake under depolarizing conditions (high potassium concentration or veratridine) in the absence of calcium implies that electrochemical gradients are important for high-affinity choline uptake. Depolarization of preloaded synaptosomes under appropriate conditions resulted in a significant release of newly accumulated choline radioactivity

  15. The effects of in vitro exposure to white spirit on [Ca2+] in synaptosomes from rats exposed prenatally to white spirit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelfors, S.; Hass, Ulla; Ravn-Jonsen, A.

    1999-01-01

    Female rats were exposed to white spirit (400 and 800 ppm for 6 hr/day) at day 7-20 during pregnancy. Thirty-five days after birth all female offspring were sacrificed, the brains removed, and the synaptosomal fractions prepared for in vitro studies. The cytosolic calcium concentration was measured...... using the FURA-2 technique. The results show that cytosolic calcium was increased in synaptosomes from rats exposed to white spirit prenatally compared to synaptosomes from unexposed rats. When synaptosomes were exposed to white spirit in vitro, the cytosolic calcium concentration changes were identical...... in all groups of rats. The membrane leakage measured as FURA-2 leakage from the synaptosomes identical in all three groups of animals. The results suggest that prenatal exposure to white spirit induces long-lasting and possibly irreversible changes in calcium homeostasis in the rat nervous system....

  16. Inhibitory effect of novel pyrimidines on ATP and ADP hydrolysis in synaptosomes from rat cerebral cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cechin, Sirlene R; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Zanatta, Nilo; Madruga, Claudia C; Pacholski, Iraci L; Flores, Darlene C; Bonacorso, Helio G; Martins, Marcos A P; Morsch, Vera M

    2003-11-01

    In this study, a new series of trihalomethyl-substituted pyrimidines and dihydropyrimidines were synthesized and tested as potential NTPDase inhibitors. For this purpose, synaptosomes from rat cerebral cortex were used as the enzyme source and ATP and ADP were used as the substrate. Among the new compounds, 4-methyl-2-methylsulfanyl-6-trichloromethylpyrimidine (2b) was found to be the most effective noncompetitive inhibitor, with an estimated K(i) value of 0.18 and 0.55 mM for ATP and ADP, respectively. Other pyrimidines inhibited NTPDase activity with the following rank order of inhibitory potency: 3,6-dimethyl-2-methylsulfanyl-4-trifluoromethyl-3,4-dihydro-pyrimidin-4-ol (3a) > 5-methyl-2-(4-methyl-6-trifluoromethyl-pyrimidin-2-yl)-3-trifluoromethyl-3,4-dihydro-2H-3-pyrazol-3-ol (6a) > 5-bromo-4,6-dimethoxy-4-trichloromethyl-1,2,3,4-tetrahydro-2-pyrimidin-2-one (9) for ATP and 6a > 9 > 3a for ADP. Our results demonstrate that a novel group of pyrimidines compounds can act as inhibitors of ATP and ADP hydrolysis in synaptosomes from rat cerebral cortex. These results can contribute for the understanding of the NTPDase activity and for further studies involving new compounds that can enlist as it inhibitors.

  17. Ionizing radiation alters the properties of sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mullin, M.J.; Hunt, W.A.; Harris, R.A.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of ionizing radiation on neuronal membrane function was assessed by measurement of neurotoxin-stimulated /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake by rat brain synaptosomes. High-energy electrons and gamma photons were equally effective in reducing the maximal uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ with no significant change in the affinity of veratridine for its binding site in the channel. Ionizing radiation reduced the veratridine-stimulated uptake at the earliest times measured (3 and 5 s), when the rate of uptake was greatest. Batrachotoxin-stimulated /sup 22/Na/sup +/ uptake was less sensitive to inhibition by radiation. The binding of (/sup 3/H)saxitoxin to its receptor in the sodium channel was unaffected by exposure to ionizing radiation. The effect of ionizing radiation on the lipid order of rat brain synaptic plasma membranes was measured by the fluorescence polarization of the molecular probes 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene and 1-(4-(trimethylammonium)phenyl)-6-phenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene. A dose of radiation that reduced the veratridine-stimulated uptake of /sup 22/Na/sup +/ had no effect on the fluorescence polarization of either probe. These results demonstrate an inhibitory effect of ionizing radiation on the voltage-sensitive sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes. This effect of radiation is not dependent on changes in the order of membrane lipids.

  18. Developmental and Diurnal Expression of the Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (Snap25) in the Rat Pineal Gland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anna S; Rath, Martin Fredensborg; Rohde, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Snap25 (synaptosomal-associated protein) is a 25 kDa protein, belonging to the SNARE-family (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors) of proteins, essential for synaptic and secretory vesicle exocytosis. Snap25 has by immunohistochemistry been demonstrated in the rat...

  19. Affinity chromatography of tetanus toxin, tetanus toxoid, and botulinum A toxin on synaptosomes, and differentiation of their acceptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Habermann, E.

    1976-01-01

    125 I-labelled tetanus toxin and 125 I-labelled botulinum A neurotoxin are known to be specifically bound to brain synaptosomes. In order to discriminate between active toxin and inactive admixtures present in the starting material or arising during iodination, synaptosome columns were prepared using bromacetylcellulose and/or kieselgur (Celite) as carriers. Both types of columns adsorb the toxins from low ionic strength medium and release them if the pH and ionic strength are raised. Botulinum toxin was eluted with lower ionic strength than tetanus toxin, and could be freed from nontoxic admixtures. Analysis by affinity chromatography disclosed partially toxoided tetanus toxin in both labelled and unlabelled toxin samples. High concentrations of formaldehyde (0.5%) destroyed both toxicity and affinity to the synaptosomes of tetanus toxin. Low concentrations of formaldehyde (0.05%) yielded a derivative of low toxicity which was still, however less firmly, bound to synaptosomes. Tetanus and botulinum toxin differ by their acceptors. Whereas unlabelled botulinum toxin is unable to compete with labelled tetanus toxin, unlabelled tetanus toxin slightly competes with botulinum toxin. Both labelled toxins display anomalous binding behaviour in that they cannot be displaced completely even with a large excess of unlabelled toxin. (orig.) [de

  20. The effect of ageing and in vitro exposure to xylene and KCl on [Ca2+](i) in synaptosomes from rats exposed prenatally to xylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edelfors, S.; Hass, Ulla; Ravn-Jonsen, A.

    1996-01-01

    Female rats (Mol:WIST) were exposed prenatally to 500 p.p.m, of technical xylene on days 7-20. At the age of fourteen months the rats were sacrified and the synaptosomal fraction prepared for in vivo studies. The cytosolic calcium concentration was measured using the FURA-2 technique. The cytosolic...... calcium was increased in synaptosomes from old rats compared to those from rats at the age of three months, but no effect of prenatal exposure was seen. When synaptosomes were incubated with xylene, potassium or both, the cytosolic calcium concentration was changed identically in all groups of rats. When...

  1. Fluorescent spectral studies of the toxic effect of chlororganic pesticides on the biochemical parameters of synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraev, K. M.; Bekshokov, K. S.; Ashurbekov, N. A.; Abdullaeva, N. M.; Israpov, E. Kh.; Gashimov, I. Sh.

    2017-04-01

    The results of the study of the fluorescence spectra of suspensions of synaptosomes, which have been exposed to a chlororganic pesticide, thiamethoxam, at a concentration of 50 MPC during different time periods, at the excitation/emission wavelengths of 290 ± 5/310-600, 340 ± 5/360-700, and 420 ± 5/450-800 nm are given for the first time. It has been demonstrated that the development of intoxication results in weakening of the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan, NAD(P)·H, derivatives of vitamin B6, and vitamin A and in an increase in the fluorescence of pyridoxic acid, lipofuscin, and flavin and porphyrin complexes. The results of the spectral studies indicate that the toxic effect of the chlororganic pesticide for the functioning of living systems is based on free radical toxicity.

  2. Characterization of alpha-latrotoxin interaction with rat brain synaptosomes and PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, A; Pelliccia, M; Alemà, S

    1982-01-01

    alpha-latrotoxin, a polypeptide neurotoxin purified from the venom of the spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, induces a massive release of a variety of neurotransmitters from rat brain synaptosomes and a clonal pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 cells). In both systems secretion of catecholamines is dose- and calcium-dependent. Efflux of catecholamines is coupled with a substantial release of intracellular ATP. Independent of alpha-latrotoxin with PC12 cells is followed by a rapid influx of calcium and sodium ions, the rate being dependent on toxin and calcium concentrations. By reductive methylation it is possible to radioactively label alpha-latrotoxin without appreciable loss of neurotoxicity. A sensitive binding assay in vitro allows the identification of a limited number of specific binding sites in central nervous system synaptic membranes and PC12 cells, for which tritiated alpha-latrotoxin displays nanomolar affinity.

  3. Interactions of [3H]amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-[ 3 H]amphetamine (d-[ 3 H]AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-[ 3 H]AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-[ 3 H]AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of [ 3 H] dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-[ 3 H]AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed

  4. Interactions of [3H]amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. I. Saturable sequestration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; Goldberg, H.; Mccann, D.J.; De Souza, E.B.

    1991-01-01

    Previous studies have identified a saturable site of d-[ 3 H]amphetamine sequestration (AMSEQ) in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study characterized AMSEQ with respect to its subcellular, neuronal and regional distributions, ontogenetic development, pharmacological specificity and factors required for its maintenance. Although AMSEQ was reduced when assays were performed in Krebs' buffer incubated at 37 degree C as compared to assays performed in isotonic Tris-sucrose buffer incubated at room temperature, the pharmacological profiles of AMSEQ were virtually identical under both conditions. AMSEQ was negligible in tissues outside the central nervous system, enriched in synaptosomes and partially reduced by striatal kainic acid lesion, indicating neuronal localization. The distribution of AMSEQ in the central nervous system was heterogenous. Highest levels were present in hypothalamus with progressively lower levels noted in parietal cortex, frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons-medulla and spinal cord. With regard to its ontogeny, AMSEQ increased early in neonatal life, reaching adult levels by postnatal day 14. Although the effects of amphetamine to abolish the transynaptosomal pH gradient suggest a possible role for this gradient in the maintenance of AMSEQ, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicates that other factors are involved. An interaction with an intrasynaptosomal acid, such as N-acetylaspartate, may account for AMSEQ maintenance. AMSEQ did not possess a stereospecific preference for either d-(IC50 = 177 microM) or I-amphetamine (IC50 = 173 microM). However, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicated structural specificity with antidepressants being relatively potent inhibitors. (Abstract Truncated)

  5. Tau hyperphosphorylation in synaptosomes and neuroinflammation are associated with canine cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolek, Tomas; Madari, Aladar; Farbakova, Jana; Kandrac, Ondrej; Jadhav, Santosh; Cente, Martin; Brezovakova, Veronika; Novak, Michal; Zilka, Norbert

    2016-03-01

    Canine cognitive impairment syndrome (CDS) represents a group of symptoms related to the aging of the canine brain. These changes ultimately lead to a decline of memory function and learning abilities, alteration of social interaction, impairment of normal housetraining, and changes in sleep-wake cycle and general activity. We have clinically examined 215 dogs, 28 of which underwent autopsy. With canine brains, we performed extensive analysis of pathological abnormalities characteristic of human Alzheimer's disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration, including β-amyloid senile plaques, tau neurofibrillary tangles, and fused in sarcoma (FUS) and TAR DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP43) inclusions. Most demented dogs displayed senile plaques, mainly in the frontal and temporal cortex. Tau neurofibrillary inclusions were found in only one dog. They were identified with antibodies used to detect tau neurofibrillary lesions in the human brain. The inclusions were also positive for Gallyas silver staining. As in humans, they were distributed mainly in the entorhinal cortex, hippocampus, and temporal cortex. On the other hand, FUS and TDP43 aggregates were not present in any of the examined brain samples. We also found that CDS was characterized by the presence of reactive and senescent microglial cells in the frontal cortex. Our transcriptomic study revealed a significant dysregulation of genes involved in neuroinflammation. Finally, we analyzed tau phosphoproteome in the synaptosomes. Proteomic studies revealed a significant increase of hyperphosphorylated tau in synaptosomes of demented dogs compared with nondemented dogs. This study suggests that cognitive decline in dogs is related to the tau synaptic impairment and neuroinflammation. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:874-895, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. I. Saturable sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; Goldberg, H.; Mccann, D.J.; De Souza, E.B. (Addiction Research Center, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Previous studies have identified a saturable site of d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine sequestration (AMSEQ) in rat brain synaptosomes. The present study characterized AMSEQ with respect to its subcellular, neuronal and regional distributions, ontogenetic development, pharmacological specificity and factors required for its maintenance. Although AMSEQ was reduced when assays were performed in Krebs' buffer incubated at 37{degree}C as compared to assays performed in isotonic Tris-sucrose buffer incubated at room temperature, the pharmacological profiles of AMSEQ were virtually identical under both conditions. AMSEQ was negligible in tissues outside the central nervous system, enriched in synaptosomes and partially reduced by striatal kainic acid lesion, indicating neuronal localization. The distribution of AMSEQ in the central nervous system was heterogenous. Highest levels were present in hypothalamus with progressively lower levels noted in parietal cortex, frontal cortex, striatum, thalamus, hippocampus, midbrain, cerebellum, pons-medulla and spinal cord. With regard to its ontogeny, AMSEQ increased early in neonatal life, reaching adult levels by postnatal day 14. Although the effects of amphetamine to abolish the transynaptosomal pH gradient suggest a possible role for this gradient in the maintenance of AMSEQ, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicates that other factors are involved. An interaction with an intrasynaptosomal acid, such as N-acetylaspartate, may account for AMSEQ maintenance. AMSEQ did not possess a stereospecific preference for either d-(IC50 = 177 microM) or I-amphetamine (IC50 = 173 microM). However, the pharmacological profile of AMSEQ indicated structural specificity with antidepressants being relatively potent inhibitors. (Abstract Truncated)

  7. Interactions of ( sup 3 H)amphetamine with rat brain synaptosomes. II. Active transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaczek, R.; Culp, S.; De Souza, E.B. (Addiction Research Center, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1991-05-01

    The accumulation of 5 nM d-({sup 3}H)amphetamine (d-({sup 3}H)AMPH) into rat brain synaptosomes was examined using physiological buffer conditions. The accumulation of d-({sup 3}H)AMPH into striatal synaptosomes was saturable, of high affinity, ouabain-sensitive and temperature-dependent, suggesting an active transport phenomenon. Eadee-Hofstee analysis of striatal d-({sup 3}H)AMPH transport (AMT) saturation isotherms indicated an apparent Km of 97 nM and a Vmax of 3.0 fmol/mg tissue/min. Lesion of the striatal dopaminergic innervation led to equivalent decreases of ({sup 3}H) dopamine (DA) transport and AMT, indicating that AMT occurs in DA terminals. Furthermore, AMT was not evident in cerebral cortex, a brain region with a paucity of DA terminals. In competition studies, AMT was stereospecific; d-AMPH (IC50 = 60 nM) was an 8-fold more potent inhibitor of the transport than its I-isomer (IC50 = 466 nM). DA(IC50 = 257 nM), DA uptake blockers and substrates were found to be potent inhibitors of AMT: GBR12909 IC50 = 5 nM; methamphetamine IC50 = 48 nM; methylphenidate IC50 = 53 nM; and cocaine IC50 = 172 nM. In contrast, serotonin was relatively weak in inhibiting AMT (IC50 = 7.9 microM). There was a highly significant (P less than .001; slope = 1.2) linear correlation between the AMT-inhibiting potencies of AMPH analogs and their potencies in stimulating locomotor activity in rodents. AMT may be important in the low dose effects of AMPH such as increased locomotor activity in rodents and stimulant activity in man. Differences between AMT and d-({sup 3}H)AMPH sequestration described earlier, as well as their possible relevance to behavioral and neurochemical sequelae of AMPH administration are also discussed.

  8. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test.

  9. Mitochondrial base excision repair in mouse synaptosomes during normal aging and in a model of Alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diaz, Ricardo Gredilla; Weissman, Lior; Yang, JL

    2012-01-01

    Brain aging is associated with synaptic decline and synaptic function is highly dependent on mitochondria. Increased levels of oxidative DNA base damage and accumulation of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) mutations or deletions lead to mitochondrial dysfunction, playing an important role in the aging...... process and the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases. Here we have investigated the repair of oxidative base damage, in synaptosomes of mouse brain during normal aging and in an AD model. During normal aging, a reduction in the base excision repair (BER) capacity was observed...... suggest that the age-related reduction in BER capacity in the synaptosomal fraction might contribute to mitochondrial and synaptic dysfunction during aging. The development of AD-like pathology in the 3xTgAD mouse model was, however, not associated with deficiencies of the BER mechanisms...

  10. Effect of Leu-enkephalin and delta sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) on endogenous noradrenaline release by rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lozhanets, V.V.; Anosov, A.K.

    1986-01-01

    The nonapeptide delta-sleep inducing peptide (DSIP) causes specific changes in the encephalogram of recipient animals: It prolongs the phase of long-wave or delta sleep. The cellular mechanism of action of DSIP has not yet been explained. To test the hyporhesis that this peptide or its degradation product may be presynaptic regulators of catecholamine release, the action of Leu-enkephaline, DSIP, and amino acids composing DSIP on release of endogenous noradrenalin (NA) from synaptosomes during depolarization was compared. Subcellular fractions from cerebral hemisphere of noninbred male albino rats were isolated. Lactate dehydrogenase activity was determined in the suspension of synaptosomes before and after addition of 0.5% Triton X-100. The results were subjected to statistical analysis, using the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney nonparametric test

  11. (/sup 3/H)adrenaline release from hypothalamic synaptosomes and its modulation by clonidine: effects of chronic antidepressant drug regimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McWilliam, J.R.; Campbell, I.C.

    1987-07-13

    (/sup 3/H)Adrenaline ((/sup 3/H)ADR, 40nM) was accumulated by rat hypothalamic synaptosomes (P/sub 2/) more rapidly and in significantly greater amounts than by similar preparations from cerebral cortex. There was no significant difference between these two tissues in the rate or amount of (/sup 3/H)noradrenaline ((/sup 3/H)NA, 40nM) accumulation. Talusupram (10..mu..M), maximally inhibited the uptake of (/sup 3/H)ADR into hypothalamic synaptosomes by 60%. Nomifensine further inhibited uptake by 14%. From these observations it was concluded that some (/sup 3/H)ADR was accumulated into non adrenergic neuronal terminals. The effects of desipramine (DMI, 10mg/kg/day and clorgyline (1mg/kg/day) administration for 28 days on K/sup +/-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)ADR was investigated using superfused hypothalamic synaptosomes. After both chronic antidepressant drug regimens, total (/sup 3/H)ADR release (spontaneous + evoked) was significantly reduced. Evoked release of (numberH)ADR (by KCl, 16mM) was significantly reduced after the DMI but not the clorgyline regimens. Presynaptic ..cap alpha../sub 2/-adrenoceptor function in the hypothalamus was assessed during superfusion by measuring the reduction in /sup +/-evoked release of (/sup 3/H)ADR caused by clonidine (1/sup +/M). 30 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  12. Studies on the effects of acetylcholine and antiepileptic drugs on /sup 32/P incorporation into phospholipids of rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aly, M.I.; Abdel-Latif, A.A.

    1982-02-01

    Studies were conducted on the effects of antiepileptic drugs on the acetylcholine-stimulated /sup 32/P labeling of phospholipids in rat brain synaptosomes. Of the four antiepileptic drugs investigated in the present study, namely phenytoin, carbamazepine, phenobarbital, and valproate, only phenytoin blocked the acetylcholine-stimulated /sup 32/P labeling of phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidic acid, and the acetylcholine-stimulated breakdown of polyphosphoinositides. Phenytoin alone, like atropine alone, had no effect on the /sup 32/P labeling of phospholipids nor on the specific radioactivity of (/sup 32/P)ATP. Omission of Na/sup +/ drastically reduced both the /sup 32/P labeling of synaptosomal phospholipids and the specific radioactivity of (/sup 32/P)ATP and furthermore it significantly decreased the phosphoinositide effect. It was concluded that certain antiepileptic drugs, such as phenytoin, could exert their pharmacological actions through their antimuscarinic effects. In addition the finding that phenytoin, which acts to regulate NA/sup +/ and Ca/sup 2 +/ permeability of neuronal membranes, also inhibited the phosphoinositide effects in synaptosomes, support the conclusions that Ca2+ and Na+ are probably involved in the molecular mechanism underlying this phenomenon in excitable tissues.

  13. [3H]adrenaline release from hypothalamic synaptosomes and its modulation by clonidine: effects of chronic antidepressant drug regimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McWilliam, J.R.; Campbell, I.C.

    1987-01-01

    [ 3 H]Adrenaline ([ 3 H]ADR, 40nM) was accumulated by rat hypothalamic synaptosomes (P 2 ) more rapidly and in significantly greater amounts than by similar preparations from cerebral cortex. There was no significant difference between these two tissues in the rate or amount of [ 3 H]noradrenaline ([ 3 H]NA, 40nM) accumulation. Talusupram (10μM), maximally inhibited the uptake of [ 3 H]ADR into hypothalamic synaptosomes by 60%. Nomifensine further inhibited uptake by 14%. From these observations it was concluded that some [ 3 H]ADR was accumulated into non adrenergic neuronal terminals. The effects of desipramine (DMI, 10mg/kg/day and clorgyline (1mg/kg/day) administration for 28 days on K + -evoked release of [ 3 H]ADR was investigated using superfused hypothalamic synaptosomes. After both chronic antidepressant drug regimens, total [ 3 H]ADR release (spontaneous + evoked) was significantly reduced. Evoked release of [numberH]ADR (by KCl, 16mM) was significantly reduced after the DMI but not the clorgyline regimens. Presynaptic α 2 -adrenoceptor function in the hypothalamus was assessed during superfusion by measuring the reduction in + -evoked release of [ 3 H]ADR caused by clonidine (1 + M). 30 references, 3 figures, 1 table

  14. Characterization of the binding of the Ptychodiscus brevis neurotoxin T17 to sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) have been determined to bind to a unique receptor site associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in rat brain synaptosomes. Reduction of the C 42 aldehyde function of T34 to the alcohol function of T17 using NaB 3 H 4 yielded 3 H-T17 with a specific activity of 15 Ci;/mmol. Using this specific probe, binding to sodium channels was measured at 4 0 CC, 22 0 C, and 37 0 C. Rosenthal analysis of the binding data yielded a K/sub d/ of 2.9 nM and B/sub max/ of 6.8 pmoles 3 H-T17 per mg of synaptosomal protein at 4 0 C. Both K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ were found to be temperature dependent. Depolarization of the synaptosomes by osmotic lysis resulted in the loss of 34% of the available receptor sites, with no decrease in binding affinity. Unlabeled T17, T34, and synthetic T17 (reduced T34) were equipotent in their ability to displace 3 H-T17 from its specific receptor site. Competition experiments using natural toxin probes specific for sites I-IV on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel demonstrate that 3 H-T17 does not bind to any of the previously-described neurotoxin receptor sites. A fifth site is proposed

  15. Stimulation of ( sup 3 H)ouabain binding to rat synaptosomal (Na sup + + K sup + )-ATPase by aluminum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caspers, M.L.; Dow, M.J.; Kwaiser, T.M. (Univ. of Detroit, MI (United States))

    1991-03-11

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of aluminum on the (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase. Synaptosomes were prepared from the cerebral cortices of adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats. The stimulation of ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding to the high affinity isoform of the (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase produced by AlCl{sub 3} developed slowly, with a maximum effect observed after a 40 min preincubation. AlCl{sub 3} produced a 26.5% stimulation in ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding to the synaptosomal (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase and this stimulation increased to 33.3% at 100 {mu}M. Scatchard analysis of ({sup 3}H)ouabain binding data in the presence of 100 {mu}M AlCl{sub 3} yielded a B{sub max} of 79.4 {plus minus} 3.5 pmol/mg protein, significantly elevated from the B{sub max} value obtained in the absence of aluminum. The K{sub D}values were similar in the presence or absence of aluminum. In summary, aluminum affects the functioning of the synaptosomal (Na{sup +} + K{sup +})-ATPase. This may contribute, at least in part, to the disruption of neuronal function associated with disorders where elevated aluminum content in the CNS is noted.

  16. Ca2+ transport by reconstituted synaptosomal ATPase is associated with H+ countertransport and net charge displacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Inesi, G; Rigaud, J L; Mata, A M

    1998-07-17

    The synaptosomal plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase (PMCA) purified from pig brain was reconstituted with liposomes prepared by reverse phase evaporation at a lipid to protein ratio of 150/1 (w/w). ATP-dependent Ca2+ uptake and H+ ejection by the reconstituted proteoliposomes were demonstrated by following light absorption and fluorescence changes undergone by arsenazo III and 8-hydroxy-1,3, 6-pyrene trisulfonate, respectively. Ca2+ uptake was increased up to 2-3-fold by the H+ ionophore carbonyl cyanide p-trifluoromethoxyphenylhydrazone, consistent with relief of an inhibitory transmembrane pH gradient (i.e. lumenal alkalinization) generated by H+ countertransport. The stoichiometric ratio of Ca2+/H+ countertransport was 1.0/0.6, and the ATP/Ca2+ coupling stoichiometry was 1/1 at 25 degrees C. The electrogenic character of the Ca2+/H+ countertransport was demonstrated by measuring light absorption changes undergone by oxonol VI. It was shown that a 20 mV steady state potential (positive on the lumenal side) was formed as a consequence of net charge transfer associated with the 1/1 Ca2+/H+ countertransport. Calmodulin stimulated ATPase activity, Ca2+ uptake, and H+ ejection, demonstrating that these parameters are linked by the same mechanism of PMCA regulation.

  17. Purification of the synaptosomal plasma membrane (Ca(2+) + Mg(2+))-ATPase from pig brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Mata, A M

    1996-04-01

    The Ca(2+)-ATPase from the synaptosomal plasma membrane has been purified nearly to homogeneity from pig brain by a new procedure involving the calmodulin-affinity-chromatography technique. This is a convenient alternative to the standard methods for the purification of the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase from different sources that were unsuitable to purify the enzyme from pig brain. The main feature of this procedure is the use of 15% (v/v) glycerol as stabilizing agent, instead of acidic phospholipid. By using this protocol the enzyme was purified 36-fold with respect to the plasma membrane vesicle fraction, showing a specific activity of 2.3 i.u. in the presence of acidic phospholipid. In SDS/PAGE, it appears as a single protein band around Mr140 000 that can be phosphorylated by [gamma-(32)P]ATP in the presence of La(3+) and recognized by specific antibodies against the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase from pig antral smooth muscle. Calmodulin activates the enzyme 1.5-1.8-fold in the presence of phosphatidylcholine but not in the presence of phosphatidylserine.

  18. Striatal Synaptosomes from Hdh140Q/140Q Knock-in Mice have Altered Protein Levels, Novel Sites of Methionine Oxidation, and Excess Glutamate Release after Stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Kimm, Jeffrey S.; McClory, Hollis; Ansong, Kwadwo A.; Yohrling, George; Kwak, Seung; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Aronin, Neil; DiFiglia, Marian

    2014-01-01

    Background: Synaptic connections are disrupted in patients with Huntington’s disease (HD). Synaptosomes from postmortem brain are ideal for synaptic function studies because they are enriched in pre- and post-synaptic proteins important in vesicle fusion, vesicle release, and neurotransmitter receptor activation. Objective: To examine striatal synaptosomes from 3, 6 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice for levels of synaptic proteins, methionine oxidation, and glutamate release. Methods: We used Western blot analysis, glutamate release assays, and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Results: Striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had less DARPP32, syntaxin 1 and calmodulin compared to WT. Striatal synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice had lower levels of DARPP32, alpha actinin, HAP40, Na+/K+-ATPase, PSD95, SNAP-25, TrkA and VAMP1, VGlut1 and VGlut2, increased levels of VAMP2, and modifications in actin and calmodulin compared to WT. More glutamate released from vesicles of depolarized striatal synaptosomes of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q than from age matched WT mice but there was no difference in glutamate release in synaptosomes of 3 and 12 month old WT and Hdh140Q/140Q mice. LC-MS/MS of 6 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice striatal synaptosomes revealed that about 4% of total proteins detected (>600 detected) had novel sites of methionine oxidation including proteins involved with vesicle fusion, trafficking, and neurotransmitter function (synaptophysin, synapsin 2, syntaxin 1, calmodulin, cytoplasmic actin 2, neurofilament, and tubulin). Altered protein levels and novel methionine oxidations were also seen in cortical synaptosomes of 12 month old Hdh140Q/140Q mice. Conclusions: Findings provide support for early synaptic dysfunction in Hdh140Q/140Q knock-in mice arising from altered protein levels, oxidative damage, and impaired glutamate neurotransmission and suggest that study of synaptosomes could be of

  19. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 gene polymorphisms and antisocial personality disorder: association with temperament and psychopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basoglu, Cengiz; Oner, Ozgur; Ates, Alpay; Algul, Ayhan; Bez, Yasin; Cetin, Mesut; Herken, Hasan; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Munir, Kerim M

    2011-06-01

    The molecular genetic of personality disorders has been investigated in several studies; however, the association of antisocial behaviours with synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25) gene polymorphisms has not. This association is of interest as SNAP25 gene polymorphism has been associated with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and personality. We compared the distribution of DdeI and MnII polymorphisms in 91 young male offenders and in 38 sex-matched healthy control subjects. We also investigated the association of SNAP25 gene polymorphisms with severity of psychopathy and with temperament traits: novelty seeking, harm avoidance, and reward dependence. The MnII T/T and DdeI T/T genotypes were more frequently present in male subjects with antisocial personality disorder (APD) than in sex-matched healthy control subjects. The association was stronger when the frequency of both DdeI and MnII T/T were taken into account. In the APD group, the genotype was not significantly associated with the Psychopathy Checklist-Revised scores, measuring the severity of psychopathy. However, the APD subjects with the MnII T/T genotype had higher novelty seeking scores; whereas, subjects with the DdeI T/T genotype had lower reward dependence scores. Again, the association between genotype and novelty seeking was stronger when both DdeI and MnII genotypes were taken into account. DdeI and MnII T/T genotypes may be a risk factor for antisocial behaviours. The association of the SNAP25 DdeI T/T and MnII T/T genotypes with lower reward dependence and higher novelty seeking suggested that SNAP25 genotype might influence other personality disorders, as well.

  20. Measurement of release of endogenous GABA and catabolites of [3H]GABA from synaptosomal preparations using ion-exchange chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grove, J.; Gardner, C.R.; Richards, M.H.

    1982-01-01

    Picomole quantities of endogenous GABA in acidified superfusates of synaptosomal preparations have been measured using micro-bore ion-exchange chromatography and post-column formation of the fluorescent iso-indole derivative. Using this technique superfusates have been analyzed directly, without further manipulations, to investigate the release of endogenous GABA. Spontaneous release of GABA was 2-5 pmol/200 microliters superfusate increasing to 20 pmol/200 microliters with potassium stimulation. When gamma-vinyl GABA (RMI 71754), an inhibitor of GABA-T was injected into rats (750 mg/kg) and synaptosomes prepared the potassium-evoked release of GABA was increased 3-fold compared to controls. Chromatographic separations and measurement of release of endogenous and radiolabeled GABA allowed the real specific activity of released GABA to be calculated. Only when 500 microM amino-oxyacetic acid was added during isolation of synaptosomes was the specific activity of released GABA the same as the initial specific activity

  1. Characterization of the binding of the Ptychodiscus brevis neurotoxin T17 to sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poli, M.A.

    1985-01-01

    The lipid-soluble polyether neurotoxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) have been determined to bind to a unique receptor site associated with the voltage-sensitive sodium channel in rat brain synaptosomes. Reduction of the C/sub 42/ aldehyde function of T34 to the alcohol function of T17 using NaB/sup 3/H/sub 4/ yielded /sup 3/H-T17 with a specific activity of 15 Ci;/mmol. Using this specific probe, binding to sodium channels was measured at 4/sup 0/CC, 22/sup 0/C, and 37/sup 0/C. Rosenthal analysis of the binding data yielded a K/sub d/ of 2.9 nM and B/sub max/ of 6.8 pmoles /sup 3/H-T17 per mg of synaptosomal protein at 4/sup 0/C. Both K/sub d/ and B/sub max/ were found to be temperature dependent. Depolarization of the synaptosomes by osmotic lysis resulted in the loss of 34% of the available receptor sites, with no decrease in binding affinity. Unlabeled T17, T34, and synthetic T17 (reduced T34) were equipotent in their ability to displace /sup 3/H-T17 from its specific receptor site. Competition experiments using natural toxin probes specific for sites I-IV on the voltage-sensitive sodium channel demonstrate that /sup 3/H-T17 does not bind to any of the previously-described neurotoxin receptor sites. A fifth site is proposed.

  2. Group I mGlu receptors potentiate synaptosomal [3H]glutamate release independently of exogenously applied arachidonic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, M.E.; Toms, N.J.; Bedingfield, J.S.; Roberts, P.J.

    1999-01-01

    In the current study, we have characterized group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptor enhancement of 4-aminopyridine (4AP)-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. The broad spectrum mGlu receptor agonist (1S,3R)-1-aminocyclopentane-1,3-dicarboxylic acid ((1S,3R)-ACPD, 10 μM) increased 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (143.32±2.73% control) only in the presence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid; an effect reversed by the inclusion of bovine serum albumin (BSA, fatty acid free). In contrast, the selective group I mGlu receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (DHPG) potentiated (EC 50 =1.60±0.25 μM; E max =147.61±10.96% control) 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release, in the absence of arachidonic acid. This potentiation could be abolished by either the selective mGlu 1 receptor antagonist (R,S)-1-aminoindan-1,5-dicarboxylic acid (AIDA, 1 mM) or the selective PKC inhibitor (Ro 31-8220, 10 μM) and was BSA-insensitive. The selective mGlu 5 receptor agonist (R,S)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG, 300μM) was without effect. DHPG (100 μM) also potentiated both 30 mM and 50 mM K + -evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release (121.60±12.77% and 121.50±4.45% control, respectively). DHPG (100 μM) failed to influence both 4AP-stimulated 45 Ca 2+ influx and 50 mM K + -induced changes in synaptosomal membrane potential. Possible group I mGlu receptor suppression of tonic adenosine A 1 receptor, group II/III mGlu receptors or GABA B receptor activity is unlikely since 4AP-evoked [ 3 H]glutamate release was insensitive to the selective inhibitory receptor antagonists 8-cyclopentyl-1,3-dimethylxanthine, (R,S)-α-cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine or CGP55845A, respectively. These data suggest an 'mGlu 1 receptor-like' receptor potentiates [ 3 H]glutamate release from cerebrocortical synaptosomes in the absence of exogenously applied arachidonic acid. This PKC dependent effect is unlikely to be via modulation of synaptosomal membrane

  3. [Effect of synaptosomal cytosolic [3H]GABA pool depletion on secretory ability of alpha-latrotoxin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linets'ka, M V; Storchak, L H; Himmelreĭch, N H

    2002-01-01

    alpha-Latrotoxin, a presynaptic neurotoxin from the venom of Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, induces massive [3H]GABA release from rat brain synaptosomes as a result of interaction with either Ca(2+)-dependent (neurexin 1 alpha or Ca(2+)-independent (latrophilin) membrane receptor. The main aim of the study was to elucidate whether the binding of alpha-latrotoxin to different types of receptors led to [3H]GABA secretion from one pool or in each case the source of neurotransmitter differs: in the presence of Ca2+ exocytosis is induced, while in the absence of Ca(2+)--outflow by mobile membrane GABA transporter from cytoplasm. We examined the effect of the depletion of cytosolic [3H]GABA pool by competitive inhibitors of the GABA transporter (nipecotic acid and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid) on the alpha-latrotoxin-stimulated neurotransmitter release. We also compared the influence of these agents on neurosecretion, evoked by depolarization with that evoked by alpha-latrotoxin. Depolarization was stimulated by 4-aminopyridine in the Ca(2+)-containing saline and high KCl in Ca(2+)-free medium. In synaptosomes treated with nipecotic acid unstimulated [3H]GABA release was significantly augmented and high KCl-evoked Ca(2+)-independent [3H]GABA release was essentially inhibited. But under the same conditions neurosecretion stimulated by alpha-latrotoxin greatly raised with respect to the control response. The similar results were obtained with the synaptosomes treated with 2,4-diaminobutyric acid. Another way to determine which of GABA pool is the target of alpha-latrotoxin action lay in analysis of the toxin effects on the preliminary depolarized synaptosomes. alpha-Latrotoxin influence was diminished by the preceding depolarization by 4-aminopyridine in Ca2+ presence. But after the high KCl stimulation effect of alpha-latrotoxin didn't change. These data suggest that alpha-latrotoxin triggers neurotransmitter release from synaptic vesicles via exocytosis. We suppose

  4. Fluoxetine-induced inhibition of synaptosomal ( sup 3 H)5-HT release: Possible Ca sup 2+ -channel inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauderman, K.A. (Marion Merrell Dow Research Inst., Cincinnati, OH (United States)); Gandhi, V.C.; Jones, D.J. (Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States))

    1992-01-01

    Fluoxetine, a selective 5-Ht uptake inhibitor, inhibited 15 mM K{sup +}-induced ({sup 3}H)5-HT release from rat spinal cord and cortical synaptosomes at concentrations > 0.5 uM. This effect reflected a property shared by another selective 5-HT uptake inhibitor paroxetine but not by less selective uptake inhibitors such as amitriptyline, desipramine, imipramine or nortriptyline. Inhibition of release by fluoxetine was inversely related to both the concentration of K{sup +} used to depolarize the synaptosomes and the concentration of external Ca{sup 2+}. Experiments aimed at determining a mechanism of action revealed that fluoxetine did not inhibit voltage-independent release of ({sup 3}H)5-HT release induced by the Ca{sup 2+}-ionophore A 23187 or Ca{sup 2+}-independent release induced by fenfluramine. Moreover the 5-HT autoreceptor antagonist methiothepin did not reverse the inhibitory actions of fluoxetine on K{sup +}-induced release. Further studies examined the effects of fluoxetine on voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} channels and Ca{sup 2+} entry.

  5. Aniracetam restores the effects of amyloid-beta protein or ageing on membrane fluidity and intracellular calcium concentration in mice synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y; Wang, J-J; Cai, J-X

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, we observed the in vitro effect of aniracetam on membrane fluidity and free calcium concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i) of frontal cortical (FC) and hippocampal (HP) synaptosomes of aged mice and young mice treated with amyloid-beta protein (Abeta) Membrane fluidity was measured by using fluorescence anisotropy of the lipophilic probe, 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (DPH). [Ca(2+)]i was measured by using Fura 2-AM fluorescent spectrophotometry. We found that membrane fluidity of the FC and HP synaptosomes was decreased in 14 months old mice compared with that in 3 months old mice. Similarly, Abeta25-35 (1 microM) decreased the membrane fluidity in 3 months old mice. These effects of ageing and Abeta25-35 on membrane fluidity were restored by aniracetam in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, Abeta25-35 (1 microM) largely increased [Ca(2+)]i in FC and HP synaptosomes in 3 months old mice, but this effect on HP synaptosomes was effectively reversed by aniracetam (1-4 mM). The present findings suggest that aniracetam restores age- and Abeta-induced alterations in membrane fluidity or Abeta-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]i, demonstrating a possible beneficial role of aniracetam in the clinic treatment for senile dementia or Alzheimer's disease.

  6. Mechanisms of L-Triiodothyronine-Induced Inhibition of Synaptosomal Na+-K+-ATPase Activity in Young Adult Rat Brain Cerebral Cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradip K. Sarkar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The role of thyroid hormones (TH in the normal functioning of adult mammalian brain is unclear. Our studies have identified synaptosomal Na+-K+-ATPase as a TH-responsive physiological parameter in adult rat cerebral cortex. L-triiodothyronine (T3 and L-thyroxine (T4 both inhibited Na+-K+-ATPase activity (but not Mg2+-ATPase activity in similar dose-dependent fashions, while other metabolites of TH were less effective. Although both T3 and the β-adrenergic agonist isoproterenol inhibited Na+-K+-ATPase activity in cerebrocortical synaptosomes in similar ways, the β-adrenergic receptor blocker propranolol did not counteract the effect of T3. Instead, propranolol further inhibited Na+-K+-ATPase activity in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting that the effect of T3 on synaptosomal Na+-K+-ATPase activity was independent of β-adrenergic receptor activation. The effect of T3 on synaptosomal Na+-K+-ATPase activity was inhibited by the α2-adrenergic agonist clonidine and by glutamate. Notably, both clonidine and glutamate activate Gi-proteins of the membrane second messenger system, suggesting a potential mechanism for the inhibition of the effects of TH. In this paper, we provide support for a nongenomic mechanism of action of TH in a neuronal membrane-related energy-linked process for signal transduction in the adult condition.

  7. Effect of lithium and of other drugs used in the treatment of manic illness on the cation-transporting properties of Na+,K+-ATPase in mouse brain synaptosomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wood, A.J.; Elphick, M.; Grahame-Smith, D.G.

    1989-04-01

    We have developed and used a novel technique to investigate the effects of lithium and other psychotropic drugs on the cation-transporting properties of the sodium- and potassium-activated ATPase enzyme (Na+,K+-ATPase) in intact synaptosomes. Rubidium-86 uptake into intact synaptosomes is an active process and is inhibited by approximately 75% in the presence of the Na+,K+-ATPase inhibitor acetylstrophanthidin. In vitro addition of lithium to synaptosomes prepared from untreated mice causes a progressive inhibition of acetylstrophanthidin-sensitive /sup 86/Rb uptake, but only at concentrations higher than the clinical therapeutic range. However, pretreatment of mice for 14 days in vivo with lithium, carbamazepine, and haloperidol, but not phenytoin, causes a significant stimulation of /sup 86/Rb uptake into synaptosomes via Na+,K+-ATPase.

  8. Effects of vanadium on different adenosinetriphosphatases and binding of 3H-labeled ouabain and calcium-45 to rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mishra, S.K.; Osborn, R.L.; Desaiah, D.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of vanadium chloride on rat brain synaptosomal adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activities was determined in vitro and in rats treated at 1 mg/kg and 10 mg/kg for 10 d. Additional experiments were conducted to determine the effect of vanadium chloride on binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 45 Ca to rat brain synaptosomes. Na + + K + - and Ca 2+ -ATPase activities were inhibited significantly in a concentration-dependent manner by V in vitro. Mg 2+ -ATPase inhibition was neither dose-dependent nor significant except at 10 -5 M. Na + + K + -ATPase inhibition by V was more pronounced than that of other ATPases studied. Vanadium inhibited [ 3 H]ouabain binding to synaptosomes by 90% at 10 -3 M; the inhibition was concentration-dependent. Binding of 45 Ca was inhibited 50% at 10 -4 M; but concentration-dependent inhibition was not evident. Rats treated with vanadium chloride neither became myotonic nor showed any changes in ATPase activities or binding of [ 3 H]ouabain and 45 Ca to brain synaptosomes. Line-weaver-Burke plots of the in vitro inhibition of Na + + K + -ATPase and [ 3 H]ouabain binding revealed that (1) Na + + K + -ATPase activation by ATP was inhibited by V with an increase in K/sub m/ and a decrease in V/sub max/; (2) Na + activation was inhibited noncompetitively by V, as evidenced by a decrease in V/sub max/ and no change in K/sub m/; (3) K + activation was inhibited by V with a decrease in both V/sub max/ and K/sub m/; (4) noncompetitive inhibition of Mg 2+ -ATPase by V was observed; and (5) the kinetic behavior of [ 3 H]ouabain binding inhibition by V with respect to ATP and Na + activation was mixed and noncompetitive, respectively

  9. Effect of interaction of heavy metals on (Na+-K+) ATPase and uptake of 3H-DA and 3H-NA in rat brain synaptosomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, S.V.; Murthy, R.C.; Husain, T.; Bansal, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    The effect of interaction of Mn 2+ , Pb 2+ and CD 2+ on (Na + -K + ) ATPase and uptake of labelled dopamine ( 3 H-DA) and labelled noradrenaline ( 3 H-NA) were studied in vitro in rat brain synaptosomes. The inhibition of (Na + -K + )ATPase by Pb 2+ + Cd 2+ alone was concentration dependent, however, Mn 2+ had almost no effect on the activity of this enzyme. Interaction of Cd 2+ with either Pb 2+ or Mn 2+ was almost powerful in inhibiting the activity of synaptosomal transport ATPase. Lower concentrations of Pb 2+ increased while higher concentrations inhibited synaptosomal uptake of 3 H-DA and 3 H-NA. Lower concentrations of CD 2+ increased the uptake of 3 H-DA while at concentrations of 100 μM, the uptake was inhibited, this metal had strong inhibitory effect on the uptake of 3 H-NA. Mn 2+ had inhibited the uptake of labelled amines. Interaction of Mn 2+ with Pb 2+ or Cd 2+ produced inhibition on the uptake of 3 H-DA and 3 H-NA. The results of the uptake of biogenic amines in the presence of metal ions apparently had no correlation with the activity og (Na + -K + ) ATPase which is involved in the active transport of cations across cell membranes. (author)

  10. Synaptosomal bioenergetic defects are associated with cognitive impairment in a transgenic rat model of early Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Quijano, Celia; Magnani, Natalia; Galeano, Pablo; Evelson, Pablo; Cassina, Adriana; Do Carmo, Sonia; Leal, María C; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic bioenergetic deficiencies may be associated with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). To explore this concept, we assessed pre-synaptic mitochondrial function in hemizygous (+/-)TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats. The low burden of Aβ and the wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments described in 6-month-old hemizygous TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats (Tg(+/-)) support their use to investigate synaptic bioenergetics deficiencies described in subjects with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this report, we show that pre-synaptic mitochondria from Tg(+/-) rats evidence a decreased respiratory control ratio and spare respiratory capacity associated with deficits in complex I enzymatic activity. Cognitive impairments were prevented and bioenergetic deficits partially reversed when Tg(+/-) rats were fed a nutritionally complete diet from weaning to 6-month-old supplemented with pyrroloquinoline quinone, a mitochondrial biogenesis stimulator with antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. These results provide evidence that, as described in AD brain and not proven in Tg mice models with AD-like phenotype, the mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity of synaptosomes is not conserved in the Tg(+/-) rats. This animal model may be suitable for understanding the basic biochemical mechanisms involved in early AD. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Synaptosomal bioenergetic defects are associated with cognitive impairment in a transgenic rat model of early Alzheimer's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Quijano, Celia; Magnani, Natalia; Galeano, Pablo; Evelson, Pablo; Cassina, Adriana; Do Carmo, Sonia; Leal, María C; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic bioenergetic deficiencies may be associated with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). To explore this concept, we assessed pre-synaptic mitochondrial function in hemizygous (+/−)TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats. The low burden of Aβ and the wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments described in 6-month-old hemizygous TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats (Tg(+/−)) support their use to investigate synaptic bioenergetics deficiencies described in subjects with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this report, we show that pre-synaptic mitochondria from Tg(+/−) rats evidence a decreased respiratory control ratio and spare respiratory capacity associated with deficits in complex I enzymatic activity. Cognitive impairments were prevented and bioenergetic deficits partially reversed when Tg(+/−) rats were fed a nutritionally complete diet from weaning to 6-month-old supplemented with pyrroloquinoline quinone, a mitochondrial biogenesis stimulator with antioxidant and neuroprotective effects. These results provide evidence that, as described in AD brain and not proven in Tg mice models with AD-like phenotype, the mitochondrial bioenergetic capacity of synaptosomes is not conserved in the Tg(+/−) rats. This animal model may be suitable for understanding the basic biochemical mechanisms involved in early AD. PMID:26661224

  12. Lithium-induced inhibition of Na-K ATPase and Ca ATPase activities in rat brain synaptosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. W.

    1995-01-01

    To explore the action mechanism of lithium in the brain, the author investigated the effects of lithium on Na-K ATPase and Ca ATPase in rat brain synaptosomes prepared from forebrains by the method of Booth and Clark. The activities of Na-K ATPase and Ca ATPase were assayed by the level of inorganic phosphate liberated from the hydrolysis of ATP. Lithium at the optimum therapeutic concentration of 1 mM decreased the activity of Na-K ATPase from the control value of 19.08 +/- 0.29 to 18.27 +/- 0.10 micromoles Pi/mg protein/h and also reduced the activity of Ca ATPase from 6.38 +/- 0.12 to 5.64 +/- 0.12 micromoles Pi/mg protein/h. The decreased activity of Na-K ATPase will decrease the rate of Ca2+ efflux, probably via an Na-Ca exchange mechanism and will increase the rate of Ca2+ entry by the depolarization of nerve terminals. The reduced activity of Ca ATPase will result in the decreased efflux of Ca2+. As a Conclusion, it can be speculated that lithium elevates the intrasynaptosomal Ca2+ concentration via inhibition of the activities of Na-K ATPase and Ca ATPase, and this increased [Ca2+]i will cause the release of neurotransmitters and neurological effects of lithium. PMID:7598829

  13. Protein fingerprints of cultured CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons: comparative analysis of the distribution of synaptosomal and cytosolic proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cerutti Sergio

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All studies aimed at understanding complex molecular changes occurring at synapses face the problem of how a complete view of the synaptic proteome and of its changes can be efficiently met. This is highly desirable when synaptic plasticity processes are analyzed since the structure and the biochemistry of neurons and synapses get completely reshaped. Because most molecular studies of synapses are nowadays mainly or at least in part based on protein extracts from neuronal cultures, this is not a feasible option: these simplified versions of the brain tissue on one hand provide an homogeneous pure population of neurons but on the other yield only tiny amounts of proteins, many orders of magnitude smaller than conventional brain tissue. As a way to overcome this limitation and to find a simple way to screen for protein changes at cultured synapses, we have produced and characterized two dimensional electrophoresis (2DE maps of the synaptic proteome of CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons in culture. Results To obtain 2D maps, hippocampal cultures were mass produced and after synaptic maturation, proteins were extracted following subfractionation procedures and separated by 2D gel electrophoresis. Similar maps were obtained for the crude cytosol of cultured neurons and for synaptosomes purified from CA3-CA1 hippocampal tissue. To efficiently compare these different maps some clearly identifiable reference points were molecularly identified by mass spectrometry and immunolabeling methods. This information was used to run a differential analysis and establish homologies and dissimilarities in these 2D protein profiles. Conclusion Because reproducible fingerprints of cultured synapses were clearly obtained, we believe that our mapping effort could represent a simple tool to screen for protein expression and/or protein localization changes in CA3-CA1 hippocampal neurons following plasticity.

  14. Influence of Glucose Deprivation on Membrane Potentials of Plasma Membranes, Mitochondria and Synaptic Vesicles in Rat Brain Synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrynevich, Sviatlana V; Pekun, Tatyana G; Waseem, Tatyana V; Fedorovich, Sergei V

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia can cause neuronal cell death similar to that of glutamate-induced cell death. In the present paper, we investigated the effect of glucose removal from incubation medium on changes of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials in rat brain synaptosomes using the fluorescent dyes DiSC3(5) and JC-1. We also monitored pH gradients in synaptic vesicles and their recycling by the fluorescent dye acridine orange. Glucose deprivation was found to cause an inhibition of K(+)-induced Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and a shift of mitochondrial and plasma membrane potentials to more positive values. The sensitivity of these parameters to the energy deficit caused by the removal of glucose showed the following order: mitochondrial membrane potential > plasma membrane potential > pH gradient in synaptic vesicles. The latter was almost unaffected by deprivation compared with the control. The pH-dependent dye acridine orange was used to investigate synaptic vesicle recycling. However, the compound's fluorescence was shown to be enhanced also by the mixture of mitochondrial toxins rotenone (10 µM) and oligomycin (5 µg/mL). This means that acridine orange can presumably be partially distributed in the intermembrane space of mitochondria. Glucose removal from the incubation medium resulted in a 3.7-fold raise of acridine orange response to rotenone + oligomycin suggesting a dramatic increase in the mitochondrial pH gradient. Our results suggest that the biophysical characteristics of neuronal presynaptic endings do not favor excessive non-controlled neurotransmitter release in case of hypoglycemia. The inhibition of exocytosis and the increase of the mitochondrial pH gradient, while preserving the vesicular pH gradient, are proposed as compensatory mechanisms.

  15. Enhancement of glycine release from human brain cortex synaptosomes by acetylcholine acting at M4 muscarinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C; Marchi, M; Andrioli, G C; Cavazzani, P; Raiteri, M

    1993-07-01

    Synaptosomes prepared from fresh specimens of human cerebral cortex were labeled with [3H]glycine ([3H]Gly) and distributed in parallel superfusion chambers. Exposure to 15 mM KCl evoked a tritium overflow which was largely prevented by 10 mM Mg++, suggesting a consistent component of Ca(++)-dependent [3H]Gly release. Acetylcholine (ACh; 1-100 microM), added during K(+)-depolarization, increased the release of tritium in a concentration-dependent manner (maximal effect, 60%; EC50 = 7 microM). Oxotremorine (1-100 microM) mimicked ACh. The effect of 10 microM ACh was insensitive to the nicotinic antagonist mecamylamine (100 microM), but it was blocked by the muscarinic antagonist atropine (0.1 microM). Three muscarinic receptor antagonists, pirenzepine, AF-DX 116 (11-[12-[diethylamino-methyl]-1-piperidinyl]acetyl-5-11-dihydro -6H-pyrido-[2-3-b][1,4]benzodiazepine-6-one) and himbacine, endowed with relative selectivity for various muscarinic receptor subtypes, prevented with differential affinities the effect of 10 microM ACh. Himbacine was the most potent antagonist of ACh, its pA2 (8.34) being 20- or 50-fold higher than that of pirenzepine (7.27) or AF-DX 116 (6.65). It is concluded that: 1) ACh can increase the release of Gly in human cerebral cortex; 2) the interaction occurs through muscarinic receptors which resemble most the M4 subtype; and 3) considering that Gly is required to activate the N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor, the ACh-evoked Gly release may represent a linkage between cholinergic and glutamatergic transmission, two systems strongly implicated in cognitive processes.

  16. 17β-Estradiol-Induced Synaptic Rearrangements Are Accompanied by Altered Ectonucleotidase Activities in Male Rat Hippocampal Synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Nataša; Zarić, Marina; Drakulić, Dunja; Martinović, Jelena; Sévigny, Jean; Stanojlović, Miloš; Nedeljković, Nadežda; Grković, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    17β-Estradiol (E2) rapidly, by binding to membrane estrogen receptors, activates cell signaling cascades which induce formation of new dendritic spines in the hippocampus of males as in females, but the interaction with other metabolic processes, such as extracellular adenine nucleotides metabolism, are currently unknown. Extracellular adenine nucleotides play significant roles, controlling excitatory glutamatergic synapses and development of neural circuits and synaptic plasticity. Their precise regulation in the synaptic cleft is tightly controlled by ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase)/ecto-5'-nucleotidase (eN) enzyme chain. Therefore, we sought to clarify whether a single systemic injection of E2 in male rats is accompanied by changes in the expression of the pre- and postsynaptic proteins and downstream kinases linked to E2-induced synaptic rearrangement as well as alterations in NTPDase/eN pathway in the hippocampal synaptosomes. Obtained data showed activation of mammalian target of rapamycin and upregulation of key synaptic proteins necessary for spine formation, 24 h after systemic E2 administration. In E2-mediated conditions, we found downregulation of NTPDase1 and NTPDase2 and attenuation of adenine nucleotide hydrolysis by NTPDase/eN enzyme chain, without changes in NTPDase3 properties and augmentation of synaptic tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) activity. Despite reduced NTPDase activities, increased TNAP activity probably prevents toxic accumulation of ATP in the extracellular milieu and also hydrolyzes accumulated ADP due to unchanged NTPDase3 activity. Thus, our initial evaluation supports idea of specific roles of different ectonucleotidases and their coordinated actions in E2-mediated spine remodeling and maintenance.

  17. Hypothyroidism Enhanced Ectonucleotidases and Acetylcholinesterase Activities in Rat Synaptosomes can be Prevented by the Naturally Occurring Polyphenol Quercetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldissarelli, Jucimara; Santi, Adriana; Schmatz, Roberta; Abdalla, Fátima Husein; Cardoso, Andréia Machado; Martins, Caroline Curry; Dias, Glaecir R Mundstock; Calgaroto, Nicéia Spanholi; Pelinson, Luana Paula; Reichert, Karine Paula; Loro, Vania Lucia; Morsch, Vera Maria Melchiors; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2017-01-01

    Thyroid hormones have an influence on the functioning of the central nervous system. Furthermore, the cholinergic and purinergic systems also are extensively involved in brain function. In this context, quercetin is a polyphenol with antioxidant and neuroprotective properties. This study investigated the effects of (MMI)-induced hypothyroidism on the NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase, adenosine deaminase (ADA), and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activities in synaptosomes of rats and whether the quercetin can prevent it. MMI at a concentration of 20 mg/100 mL was administered for 90 days in the drinking water. The animals were divided into six groups: control/water (CT/W), control/quercetin 10 mg/kg, control/quercetin 25 mg/kg, methimazole/water (MMI/W), methimazole/quercetin 10 mg/kg (MMI/Q10), and methimazole/quercetin 25 mg/kg (MMI/Q25). On the 30th day, hormonal dosing was performed to confirm hypothyroidism, and the animals were subsequently treated with 10 or 25 mg/kg quercetin for 60 days. NTPDase activity was not altered in the MMI/W group. However, treatment with quercetin decreased ATP and ADP hydrolysis in the MMI/Q10 and MMI/Q25 groups. 5'-nucleotidase activity increased in the MMI/W group, but treatments with 10 or 25 mg/kg quercetin decreased 5'-nucleotidase activity. ADA activity decreased in the CT/25 and MMI/Q25 groups. Furthermore, AChE activity was reduced in all groups with hypothyroidism. In vitro tests also demonstrated that quercetin per se decreased NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase, and AChE activities. This study demonstrated changes in the 5'-nucleotidase and AChE activities indicating that purinergic and cholinergic neurotransmission are altered in this condition. In addition, quercetin can alter these parameters and may be a promising natural compound with important neuroprotective actions in hypothyroidism.

  18. Effects of surface functionalization of hydrophilic NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ on glutamate and GABA transport in brain synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sojka, Bartlomiej; Kociołek, Daria; Banski, Mateusz; Borisova, Tatiana; Pozdnyakova, Natalia; Pastukhov, Artem; Borysov, Arsenii; Dudarenko, Marina; Podhorodecki, Artur

    2017-08-01

    Specific rare earth doped nanocrystals (NCs), a recent class of nanoparticles with fluorescent features, have great bioanalytical potential. Neuroactive properties of NaYF4 nanocrystals doped with Eu3+ were assessed based on the analysis of their effects on glutamate- and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transport process in nerve terminals isolated from rat brain (synaptosomes). Two types of hydrophilic NCs were examined in this work: (i) coated by polyethylene glycol (PEG) and (ii) with OH groups at the surface. It was found that NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH within the concentration range of 0.5-3.5 and 0.5-1.5 mg/ml, respectively, did not influence Na+-dependent transporter-dependent l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA uptake and the ambient level of the neurotransmitters in the synaptosomes. An increase in NaYF4:Eu3+-PEG and NaYF4:Eu3+-OH concentrations up to 7.5 and 3.5 mg/ml, respectively, led to the (1) attenuation of the initial velocity of uptake of l-[14C]glutamate and [3H]GABA and (2) elevation of ambient neurotransmitters in the suspension of nerve terminals. In the mentioned concentrations, nanocrystals did not influence acidification of synaptic vesicles that was shown with pH-sensitive fluorescent dye acridine orange, however, decreased the potential of the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. In comparison with other nanoparticles studied with similar methodological approach, NCs start to exhibit their effects on neurotransmitter transport at concentrations several times higher than those shown for carbon dots, detonation nanodiamonds and an iron storage protein ferritin, whose activity can be registered at 0.08, 0.5 and 0.08 mg/ml, respectively. Therefore, NCs can be considered lesser neurotoxic as compared to above nanoparticles.

  19. Effects of Ca2+, Mg2+, and depolarizing agents, on the 32Pi-labeling and degradation of phosphatidylinositols in rat brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinetti, G V; Morris, T W; Leaky, P

    1993-03-01

    In isolated synaptosomes from rat brain, 100 microM antimycin A and 10 microM oxamic acid inhibit the 32Pi-labeling of phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) and phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PIP) by 90% and 95-99% respectively. 10 mM sodium fluoride inhibits the labeling by 50-60% and 10 mM A23187 inhibits the labeling by 63-70%. Phospholipase A2 inhibits the labeling of PIP2 and PIP by 93-94% and stimulates their degradation by 84-92%. Depolarization of synaptosomes with 75 mM K+ or 100 microM veratrine decreases the labeling of PIP2 and PIP by 66-74%. The decreased labeling results in large part from the Ca(2+)-dependent degradation of 32P-labeled PIP2 and PIP as shown by pulse-chase experiments in which PIP2 and PIP were prelabeled with 32Pi. Depolarization of synaptosomes results in the stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake with the concomitant hydrolysis of PIP and PIP2. Addition of 1 mM Ca2+ accounts for 25% of the enhanced degradation whereas depolarization with 75 mM K+ accounts for 75% of the enhanced degradation of PIP2 and PIP. Depolarization with 100 mM veratrine results in a 223% increase in inositol trisphosphate as evidenced by stimulation of 45Ca2+ uptake. EGTA (10 mM) and Mg2+ (5-10 mM) inhibit the degradation of PIP and PIP2 and counteract the action of 1 mM Ca2+. Our data demonstrate that 45Ca2+, Mg2+, and membrane depolarization play an important role in the turnover of membrane phosphatidylinositols.

  20. Thallium-Induced Toxicity in Rat Brain Crude Synaptosomal/Mitochondrial Fractions is Sensitive to Anti-excitatory and Antioxidant Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maya-López, Marisol; Mireles-García, María Verónica; Ramírez-Toledo, Monserrat; Colín-González, Ana Laura; Galván-Arzate, Sonia; Túnez, Isaac; Santamaría, Abel

    2018-04-01

    The mechanisms by which the heavy metal thallium (Tl + ) produces toxicity in the brain remain unclear. Herein, isolated synaptosomal/mitochondrial P2 crude fractions from adult rat brains were exposed to Tl + (5-250 μM) for 30 min. Three toxic endpoints were evaluated: mitochondrial dysfunction, lipid peroxidation, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity inhibition. Concentration-response curves for two of these endpoints revealed the optimum concentration of Tl + to induce damage in this preparation, 5 μM. Toxic markers were also estimated in preconditioned synaptosomes incubated in the presence of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist kynurenic acid (KYNA, 50 μM), the cannabinoid receptor agonist WIN 55,212-2 (1 μM), or the antioxidant S-allyl-L-cysteine (SAC, 100 μM). All these agents prevented Tl + toxicity, though SAC did it with lower efficacy. Our results suggest that energy depletion, oxidative damage, and Na + /K + -ATPase activity inhibition account for the toxic pattern elicited by Tl + in nerve terminals. In addition, the efficacy of the drugs employed against Tl + toxicity supports an active role of excitatory/cannabinoid and oxidative components in the toxic pattern elicited by the metal.

  1. 3,4-Methylenedioxyamphetamine (MDA) analogues exhibit differential effects on synaptosomal release of 3H-dopamine and 3H-5-hydroxytryptamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKenna, D.J.; Guan, X.M.; Shulgin, A.T. (Department of Neurology Neurological Sciences, Stanford University Medical Center, CA (USA))

    1991-03-01

    The effect of various analogues of the neurotoxic amphetamine derivative, MDA (3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine) on carrier-mediated, calcium-independent release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA from rat brain synaptosomes was investigated. Both enantiomers of the neurotoxic analogues MDA and MDMA (3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine) induce synaptosomal release of 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA in vitro. The release of 3H-5-HT induced by MDMA is partially blocked by 10(-6) M fluoxetine. The (+) enantiomers of both MDA and MDMA are more potent than the (-) enantiomers as releasers of both 3H-5-HT and 3H-DA. Eleven analogues, differing from MDA with respect to the nature and number of ring and/or side chain substituents, also show some activity in the release experiments, and are more potent as releasers of 3H-5-HT than of 3H-DA. The amphetamine derivatives {plus minus}fenfluramine, {plus minus}norfenfluramine, {plus minus}MDE, {plus minus}PCA, and d-methamphetamine are all potent releasers of 3H-5-HT and show varying degrees of activity as 3H-DA releasers. The hallucinogen DOM does not cause significant release of either 3H-monoamine. Possible long-term serotonergic neurotoxicity was assessed by quantifying the density of 5-HT uptake sites in rats treated with multiple doses of selected analogues using 3H-paroxetine to label 5-HT uptake sites. In the neurotoxicity study of the compounds investigated, only (+)MDA caused a significant loss of 5-HT uptake sites in comparison to saline-treated controls. These results are discussed in terms of the apparent structure-activity properties affecting 3H-monoamine release and their possible relevance to neurotoxicity in this series of MDA congeners.

  2. Presynaptic nicotinic α7 and non-α7 receptors stimulate endogenous GABA release from rat hippocampal synaptosomes through two mechanisms of action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Zappettini

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although converging evidence has suggested that nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR play a role in the modulation of GABA release in rat hippocampus, the specific involvement of different nAChR subtypes at presynaptic level is still a matter of debate. In the present work we investigated, using selective α7 and α4β2 nAChR agonists, the presence of different nAChR subtypes on hippocampal GABA nerve endings to assess to what extent and through which mechanisms they stimulate endogenous GABA release. METHODOLOGY/FINDINGS: All agonists elicited GABA overflow. Choline (Ch-evoked GABA overflow was dependent to external Ca(2+, but unaltered in the presence of Cd(2+, tetrodotoxin (TTX, dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE and 1-(4,4-Diphenyl-3-butenyl-3-piperidinecarboxylic acid hydrochloride SKF 89976A. The effect of Ch was blocked by methyllycaconitine (MLA, α-bungarotoxin (α-BTX, dantrolene, thapsigargin and xestospongin C, suggesting that GABA release might be triggered by Ca(2+ entry into synaptosomes through the α7 nAChR channel with the involvement of calcium from intracellular stores. Additionally, 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380 elicited GABA overflow, which was Ca(2+ dependent, blocked by Cd(2+, and significantly inhibited by TTX and DHβE, but unaffected by MLA, SKF 89976A, thapsigargin and xestospongin C and dantrolene. These findings confirm the involvement of α4β2 nAChR in 5IA85380-induced GABA release that seems to occur following membrane depolarization and opening calcium channels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Rat hippocampal synaptosomes possess both α7 and α4β2 nAChR subtypes, which can modulate GABA release via two distinct mechanisms of action. The finding that GABA release evoked by the mixture of sub-maximal concentration of 5IA85380 plus sub-threshold concentrations of Ch was significantly larger than that elicited by the sum of the effects of the two agonists is compatible with the possibility that

  3. Exploring the proteome of an echinoderm nervous system: 2-DE of the sea star radial nerve cord and the synaptosomal membranes subproteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Catarina Ferraz; Santos, Romana; Coelho, Ana Varela

    2011-04-01

    We describe the first proteomic characterization of the radial nerve cord (RNC) of an echinoderm, the sea star Marthasterias glacialis. The combination of 2-DE with MS (MALDI-TOF/TOF) resulted in the identification of 286 proteins in the RNC. Additionally, 158 proteins were identified in the synaptosomal membranes enriched fraction after 1-DE separation. The 2-DE RNC reference map is available via the WORLD-2DPAGE Portal (http://www.expasy.ch/world-2dpage/) along with the associated protein identification data which are also available in the PRIDE database. The identified proteins constitute the first high-throughput evidence that seems to indicate that echinoderms nervous transmission relies primarily on chemical synapses which is similar to the synaptic activity in adult mammal's spinal cord. Furthermore, several homologous proteins known to participate in the regeneration events of other organisms were also identified, and thus can be used as targets for future studies aiming to understand the poorly uncharacterized regeneration capability of echinoderms. This "echinoderm missing link" is also a contribution to unravel the mystery of deuterostomian CNS evolution. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Effects of x-irradiation induced loss of cerebellar granule cells on the synaptosomal levels and the high affinity uptake of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rohde, B.H.; Rea, M.A.; Simon, J.R.; McBride, W.J.

    1979-01-01

    Crude synaptosomal (P 2 ) preparations were obtained from the cerebella of rats in which the granule cell population had been selectively reduced by X-irradiation treatment and from the cerebella of control animals. In the P 2 fraction form control cerebella, the level of glutamate was greater than any other of the 5 amino acids measured and was 2-fold higher than taurine. The content of taurine, GABA, glycine, and alanine were not changed by the X-irradiation treatment. The uptake of 1.0 micrometers-L-[ 3 H]glutamate and L-[ 3 H]aspartate was reduced approx 20% by X-irradiation treatment, whereas the uptake of 1.0 micrometers-[ 3 H]GABA and [ 3 H]taurine was unchanged. In a second study, the uptake of L-[ 3 H]glutamate, L-[ 3 H]aspartate and [ 3 H]GABA was measured using P 2 fractions obtained from the cerebella of rats in which the population of granule, stellate and basket cells had been reduced by X-irradiation treatment. The uptake of 1.0 micrometers-L-[ 3 H]glutamate, L-[ 3 H]aspartate and [ 3 H]GABA was significantly (P < 0.05) reduced to 57.68 and 59% respectively, of control values. The data are discussed in terms of glutamate being the excitatory neurotransmitter released from granule cells and GABA being the inhibitory neurotransmitter released from basket cells. (author)

  5. Immunohistochemical detection of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, anti-oxidant like 1 protein (AOP-1 and synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25 in the cerebella of dogs naturally infected with spontaneous canine distemper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tereza C. Cardoso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In most viral infections of the central nervous system (CNS, the integrity of brain extracelluar matrix (ECM, oxidative stress and dysfunction in neuronal transmission may contribute to the observed pathology. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of these factors in demyelinating canine distemper virus (CDV infections. Regardless of ECM integrity, the expression of metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9 was visualized in microglial-like cells, whereas the expression of anti-oxidant like-1 (AOP-1 and synaptosomal associated protein (SNAP-25 was frequently detected in Purkinje cells (r2 = 0.989; p < 0.05, regardless of whether the lesions were classified as acute or chronic. Increased numbers of immunolabeled microglia-like cells and reactive gliosis were observed in advanced cases of demyelinating CDV, suggesting that the expression of AOP-1 and SNAP-25 is correlated with the ultimate death of affected cells. Our findings bring a new perspective to understanding the role of the AOP-1, MMP-9 and SNAP-25 proteins in mediating chronic leukoencephalitis caused by CDV. (Folia Histochemica et Cytobiologica 2011; Vol. 49, No. 1, pp. 41–48

  6. Training old rats selectively modulates synaptosomal protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Mandile, Paola; Piscopo, Stefania; Crispino, Marianna; Giuditta, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    We have previously shown that the local synthesis of two synaptic proteins of 66.5-kDa and 87.6-kDa is selectively enhanced in male adult rats trained for a two-way active avoidance task. We report here that a comparable but not identical response occurs in 2-year-old male rats trained for the same task. In the latter age group, the local synthesis of the 66.5-kDa protein markedly increases in cerebral cortex, brainstem, and cerebellum, with a somewhat lower increment in synthesis of the 87.6-kDa protein. On the other hand, the newly synthesized 87.6-kDa protein correlates with avoidances and escapes and inversely correlates with freezings in cerebral cortex and brainstem, whereas the correlations of the newly synthesized 66.5-kDa protein remain below significance. These correlative patterns are sharply at variance with those present in trained adult rats. Our data confirm that the local system of synaptic protein synthesis is selectively modulated by training and show that the synaptic response of old rats differs from that of adult rats as reflected in behavioral responses. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Synaptosomal ecto-5'-nucleotidases activity modulation after ionizing irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drakulic, D.; Stanojevic, I.; Petrovic, S.; Velickovic, N.; Horvat, A.

    2009-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides, such as ATP and adenosine are involved in the regulation of variety of physiological processes in the central nervous system (CNS), including development and tissue remodeling following trauma, stroke, ischemia or neurodegenerative disorders. Ecto-5'- nucleotidase (ecto-5'-NT), membrane enzyme, catalyzes the last step of extracellular nucleotide degradation and it is responsible for purinergic signaling modulation and termination. In order to investigate if ionizing irradiation could modulate CNS purinergic signalization in synaptic plasma membranes (SPM) the activity of ecto-5'-NT was monitored after whole-body acute irradiation with low (0,5 Gy) or therapeutic (2 Gy) doses, 1h, 24h and 72h after irradiating juvenile (15-day old), prepubertal (30 days), pubertal (60 days) and adult (90-day old) female rats. Results suggest that acute irradiation could modulate activity of the enzymes that are necessary for purinergic signal termination depended of dose and time after irradiation, as well as brain development stage. (author) [sr

  8. Quinolinic acid induces oxidative stress in rat brain synaptosomes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Santamaria, A.; Galván-Arzate, S.; Lisý, Václav; Ali, S. F.; Duhart, H. M.; Osorio-Rico, L.; Rios, C.; Šťastný, František

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 4 (2001), s. 871-874 ISSN 0959-4965 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA309/99/0211; GA ČR GA305/99/1317 Grant - others: CONACyT (MX) J28612-M; CONACyT (MX) 130.205 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid * brain regions * glutathione Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.374, year: 2001

  9. Ionizing Radiation Alters the Properties of Sodium Channels in Rat Brain Synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    in the order of membrane lipids. Key greatest. Batrachotoxin -stimulated 22Na’ uptake was Words: Ionizing radiation-Sodium channels-Mem- less sensitive...action potential, Received October 18, 1985; accepted February 14, 1986. Abbreviations used: BTX, batrachotoxin DPH, 1.6-diphenyl- Address correspondence

  10. No evidence for specific opioid effects on batrachotoxin-modified sodium channels from human brain synaptosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frenkel, C; Gerhard, A; Wartenberg, H C; Rehberg, B; Urban, B W

    1997-06-20

    Human central nervous system (CNS) sodium channels modified by batrachotoxin and incorporated inter voltage-clamped lipid bilayers, were exposed to various concentrations of the opioid alfentanil (0.2-8.0 mM). Alfentanil caused a concentration-dependent and membrane potential independent reduction of the single channel amplitude and the fractional channel open-time. The weighted computer fit of the dose-response curve yielded a maximal conductance block of 50% with an EC50 of 1.3 mM. These effects occurred at levels beyond clinically relevant human serum/brain levels (0.003 mM) but within the predicted concentration range using the Meyer-Overton (lipid solubility/anaesthetic potency) correlation. Thus, human CNS sodium channels are probably not a main target site for the clinical effects of alfentanil but they provide a model system to estimate the proportion of the lipophilic interactions contributing to its overall effect.

  11. Notexin preferentially inhibits the release of newly synthesized acetylcholine from rat brain synaptosomal fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gundersen, C.B.; Jenden, D.J.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation was made of the effects of the snake venom neurotoxin, notexin, on acetylcholine turnover in rat brain P2 fractions using a gas chromatographic mass spectrometric assay for acetylcholine and choline. In contrast to earlier reports, we found a stimulation of the uptake and acetylation of labeled choline by toxin-treated P2 fractions. More significantly, notexin inhibited the release of this newly synthesized transmitter. These effects were found to be dependent on the dose of the toxin and the time of exposure of the P2 fraction to notexin. Longer exposure to notexin or experiments involving resuspension of notexin-treated P2 fractions appeared to result in considerable lysis of the transmitter-containing particles. Thus, notexin may alter acetylcholine compartmentation in the nerve ending and thereby affect acetylcholine synthesis

  12. RNA sequencing reveals pronounced changes in the noncoding transcriptome of aging synaptosomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Bei Jun; Ueberham, Uwe; Mills, James D.; Kirazov, Ludmil; Kirazov, Evgeni; Knobloch, Mara; Bochmann, Jana; Jendrek, Renate; Takenaka, Konii; Bliim, Nicola; Arendt, Thomas; Janitz, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Normal aging is associated with impairments in cognitive functions. These alterations are caused by diminutive changes in the biology of synapses, and ineffective neurotransmission, rather than loss of neurons. Hitherto, only a few studies, exploring molecular mechanisms of healthy brain aging in

  13. Effect of flunarizine and calcium on serotonin uptake in human and rat blood platelets and rat synaptosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, P N; Smith, D F; Poulsen, J H

    1994-01-01

    that the effect is not coupled to a blockade of cellular calcium influx. In human blood platelets, the inhibition was of the noncompetitive type. These results indicate that flunarizine interacts directly with the 5-HT uptake site. The relatively high concentration of flunarizine required to inhibit 5-HT uptake...

  14. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap-25) gene polymorphism frequency in fibromyalgia syndrome and relationship with clinical symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balkarli, Ayse; Sengül, Cem; Tepeli, Emre; Balkarli, Huseyin; Cobankara, Veli

    2014-05-31

    SNAP-25 protein is contributory to plasma membrane and synaptic vesicle fusions that are critical points in neurotransmission. SNAP-25 gene is associated with behavioral symptoms, personality and psychological disorders. In addition, SNAP-25 protein can be related to different neurotransmitter functions due to its association with vesicle membrane transition and fusion. This is important because neurologic, cognitive, and psychologic disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) can be related to this function. This relationship may be enlightening for etiopathogenesis of FMS and treatment approaches. We aimed to study a SNAP-25 gene polymorphism, which is related to many psychiatric diseases, and FMS association in this prospective study. We included 71 patients who were diagnosed according to new criteria and 57 matched healthy women in this study. Both groups were evaluated regarding age, height, weight, BMI, education level, marital and occupational status. A new diagnosis of FMS was made from criteria scoring, SF-36, Beck depression scale, and VAS that were applied to the patient group. SNAP-25 gene polymorphism and disease activity score correlations were compared. Mean age was 38±5,196 and 38.12±4.939 in patient and control groups, respectively (p=0.542). No significant difference was found between groups regarding age, height, weight, BMI, education level, marital or occupational status (p > 0.05). Ddel T/C genotype was significantly higher in the patient group (p = 0.009). MnlI gene polymorphism did not show a correlation with any score whereas a significant correlation was found between Ddel T/C genotype and Beck depression scale and VAS score (p etiopathogenesis is not clearly known. Numerous neurologic, cognitive and psychological disorders were found during studies looking at cause. Our study showed increased SNAP-25 Ddel T/C genotype in FMS patients compared to the control group, which is related to behavioral symptoms, personality and psychological disorders in FMS patients.

  15. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (Snap-25) gene Polymorphism frequency in fibromyalgia syndrome and relationship with clinical symptoms

    OpenAIRE

    Balkarli, Ayse; Sengül, Cem; Tepeli, Emre; Balkarli, Huseyin; Cobankara, Veli

    2014-01-01

    Background SNAP-25 protein is contributory to plasma membrane and synaptic vesicle fusions that are critical points in neurotransmission. SNAP-25 gene is associated with behavioral symptoms, personality and psychological disorders. In addition, SNAP-25 protein can be related to different neurotransmitter functions due to its association with vesicle membrane transition and fusion. This is important because neurologic, cognitive, and psychologic disorders in fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) can be ...

  16. Assessment of Dopaminergic Homeostasis in Mice by Use of High-performance Liquid Chromatography Analysis and Synaptosomal Dopamine Uptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kathrine L; Runegaard, Annika H; Weikop, Pia

    2017-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) is a modulatory neurotransmitter controlling motor activity, reward processes and cognitive function. Impairment of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurotransmission is strongly associated with several central nervous system-associated diseases such as Parkinson's disease, attention......-deficit-hyperactivity disorder and drug addiction(1)(,)(2)(,)(3)(,)(4). Delineating disease mechanisms involving DA imbalance is critically dependent on animal models to mimic aspects of the diseases, and thus protocols that assess specific parts of the DA homeostasis are important to provide novel insights and possible...... therapeutic targets for these diseases. Here, we present two useful experimental protocols that when combined provide a functional read-out of the DAergic system in mice. Biochemical and functional parameters on DA homeostasis are obtained through assessment of DA levels and dopamine transporter (DAT...

  17. Protective Effects Induced by Microwave-Assisted Aqueous Harpagophytum Extract on Rat Cortex Synaptosomes Challenged with Amyloid β-Peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrante, Claudio; Recinella, Lucia; Locatelli, Marcello; Guglielmi, Paolo; Secci, Daniela; Leporini, Lidia; Chiavaroli, Annalisa; Leone, Sheila; Martinotti, Sara; Brunetti, Luigi; Vacca, Michele; Menghini, Luigi; Orlando, Giustino

    2017-08-01

    Harpagophytum procumbens is a plant species that displays anti-inflammatory properties in multiple tissues. The iridoid glycosides arpagoside, harpagide, and procumbide appear to be the most therapeutically important constituents. In addition, harpagoside treatment exerted neuroprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo. Considering these findings, the aim of the present work is to explore the possible protective role of the previously described microwave-assisted aqueous extract of H. procumbens on rat hypothalamic (Hypo-E22) cells, and in rat cortex challenged with amyloid β-peptide (1-40). In this context, we assayed the protective effects induced by H. procumbens by measuring the levels of malondialdehyde, 3-hydroxykynurenine (3-HK), brain-derived neurotrophic factor, and tumor necrosis factor-α, 3-HK. Finally, we evaluated the effects of H. procumbens treatment on cortex levels of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin. H. procumbens extract was well tolerated by Hypo-E22 cells and upregulated brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene expression but down-regulated tumor necrosis factor-α gene expression. In addition, the extract reduced amyloid β-peptide stimulation of malondialdehyde and 3-HK and blunted the decrease of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin, in the cortex. In this context, our work supports further studies for the evaluation and confirmation of Harpagophytum in the management of the clinical symptoms related to Alzheimer's disease. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels. Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    scorpion venom-induced enhancement of batrachotoxin - Seffect of ethanol on rotoxin-stimulated sodium uptake was stimulated sodium uptake. The inhibitory...Ethanol reduced rate of batrachotoxin -stimulated sodium ethanol has an inhibitory effect on neurotoxin-stimulated sodium CC uptake whenq sjjred at 3, 5 and...potential were due to a transient increased ) . AUUBROREVTIONS CNS, central nervous system; TTX, tetrodotoxin; BTX, batrachotoxin ; VER, veratitdne; ScV

  19. Effect of spermine on the activity of synaptosomal plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase reconstituted in neutral or acidic phospholipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palacios, Javier; Sepúlveda, M Rosario; Salvador, J M; Mata, Ana M

    2003-04-01

    The activity of purified plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) from pig brain was inhibited by spermine (a naturally occurring and highly abundant polycation in brain). The level of inhibition was dependent on the phospholipid used for reconstitution as well as on the intact or truncated state of the enzyme. An IC(50) value of 12.5 mM spermine was obtained for both, the intact protein plus calmodulin and the trypsin-digested protein, reconstituted in phosphatidylcholine (PC). In the absence of calmodulin the intact Ca(2+)-ATPase gave an IC(50) of 27 mM. This form was more sensitive to spermine inhibition when it was reconstituted with phosphatidylserine (PS), showing an IC(50) value of 2.5 mM spermine. However, the truncated form was less responsive to spermine inhibition, having an IC(50) value of 12.5 mM. Spermine has no effect on the affinity of the PMCA for Ca(2+) or ATP, but its effect on the protein is pH-dependent. It is suggested that spermine could bind to negatively charged residues on the ATPase with different accessibility, depending on the structural rearrangement of the protein. Further, when the protein is reconstituted in PS, spermine also binds to the lipid.

  20. Actions of Ethanol on Voltage-Sensitive Sodium Channels: Effects on Neurotoxin-Stimulated Sodium Uptake in Synaptosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-01-01

    e o t .brane. Using the squid giant axon, Hodgkin and Huxley (1952)R ceived f r publication April 20, 19P4. ’ Supported in part by a Postdoctoral...to 100 mM was required to produce a HODGKIN , A. L. AND HUXLEY , A. F.: A quantitative description of membrane significant inhibitory effect. Previous...scorpion venom; HEPES, 4-(2- 01hydroxyethyl)-l -piporazineethanesulfonic acid. 41" -’--1K_ 414 Mullin and Hunt Vol. 232 perneabilit y to sodium

  1. Synaptosomal bioenergetic defects are associated with cognitive impairment in a transgenic rat model of early Alzheimer's disease

    OpenAIRE

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Quijano, Celia; Magnani, Natalia; Galeano, Pablo; Evelson, Pablo; Cassina, Adriana; Do Carmo, Sonia; Leal, María C; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic bioenergetic deficiencies may be associated with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). To explore this concept, we assessed pre-synaptic mitochondrial function in hemizygous (+/−)TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats. The low burden of Aβ and the wide array of behavioral and cognitive impairments described in 6-month-old hemizygous TgMcGill-R-Thy1-APP rats (Tg(+/−)) support their use to investigate synaptic bioenergetics deficiencies described in subjects with early Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this re...

  2. Synaptosomal Protein of 25 kDa (Snap25 Polymorphisms Associated with Glycemic Parameters in Type 2 Diabetes Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasser M. Al-Daghri

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A possible role of Snap25 polymorphisms in type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM was evaluated by analyzing three SNPs within intron 1 in a region known to affect the gene expression in vitro. Genomic DNA from 1019 Saudi individuals (489 confirmed T2DM and 530 controls was genotyped for SNPs rs363039, rs363043, and rs363050 in Snap25 using the TaqMan Genotyping Assay. Significantly higher levels of fasting glucose and HbA1c were detected in T2DM patients carrying the rs363050 (AG/GG genotypes compared to the (AA genotype (f=4.41, df=1, and p=0.03 and f=5.31, df=1, and p=0.03, resp.. In these same patients, insulin levels were significantly decreased compared to the (AA individuals (f=7.29, df=1, and p=0.009. Significant associations were detected between rs363050 (AG/GG genotypes and increasing fasting glucose levels (p=0.01 and OR: 1.05, HbA1c levels (OR: 5.06 and p=0.02, and lower insulinemia (p=0.03 and OR: 0.95 in T2DM patients. The minor Snap25 rs363050 (G allele, which results in a reduced expression of Snap25, is associated with altered glycemic parameters in T2DM possibly because of reduced functionality in the exocytotic machinery leading to suboptimal release of insulin.

  3. β-Endorphin biotransformation in brain: Formation of γ-endorphin by a synaptosomal plasma membrane associated endopeptidase distinct from cathepsin D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Loeber, J.G.; Verhoef, J.; Kloet, E.R. de

    1980-01-01

    cSPM preparations of rat brain contain a peptidase activity which generates γ-endorphin from β-endorphin. Some properties of this enzyme were studied and compared with those of cathepsin D. Maximal accumulation of γ-endorphin upon digestion of β-endorphin with a cSPM preparation was found at neutral

  4. Presence of Cleaved Synaptosomal-Associated Protein-25 and Decrease of Purinergic Receptors P2X3 in the Bladder Urothelium Influence Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Chen, Sung-Ho; Chancellor, Michael B; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A) injection and Lipotoxin (liposomes with 200 U of BoNT-A) instillation target different proteins, including P2X3, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A, and SNAP-25, in the bladder mucosa, leading to different treatment outcomes. This was a retrospective study performed in a tertiary teaching hospital. We evaluated the clinical results of 27 OAB patients treated with intravesical BoNT-A injection (n = 16) or Lipotoxin instillation (n = 11). Seven controls were treated with saline. Patients were injected with 100 U of BoNT-A or Lipotoxinin a single intravesical instillation. The patients enrolled in this study all had bladder biopsies performed at baseline and one month after BoNT-A therapy. Treatment outcome was measured by the decreases in urgency and frequency episodes at 1 month. The functional protein expressions in the urothelium were measured at baseline and after 1 month. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and ordinal logistic regression were used to compare the treatment outcomes. Both BoNT-A injection and Lipotoxin instillation treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in OAB patients. Lipotoxin instillation did not increase post-void residual volume. BoNT-A injection effectively cleaved SNAP-25 (p < 0.01). Liposome encapsulated BoNT-A decreased urothelial P2X3 expression in the five responders (p = 0.04), while SNAP-25 was not significantly cleaved. The results of this study provide a possible mechanism for the therapeutic effects of BoNT-A for the treatment of OAB via different treatment forms. BoNT-A and Lipotoxin treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in patients with OAB.

  5. Presence of Cleaved Synaptosomal-Associated Protein-25 and Decrease of Purinergic Receptors P2X3 in the Bladder Urothelium Influence Efficacy of Botulinum Toxin Treatment for Overactive Bladder Syndrome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsin-Tzu Liu

    Full Text Available To evaluate whether botulinum toxin A (BoNT-A injection and Lipotoxin (liposomes with 200 U of BoNT-A instillation target different proteins, including P2X3, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2A, and SNAP-25, in the bladder mucosa, leading to different treatment outcomes.This was a retrospective study performed in a tertiary teaching hospital. We evaluated the clinical results of 27 OAB patients treated with intravesical BoNT-A injection (n = 16 or Lipotoxin instillation (n = 11. Seven controls were treated with saline. Patients were injected with 100 U of BoNT-A or Lipotoxinin a single intravesical instillation. The patients enrolled in this study all had bladder biopsies performed at baseline and one month after BoNT-A therapy. Treatment outcome was measured by the decreases in urgency and frequency episodes at 1 month. The functional protein expressions in the urothelium were measured at baseline and after 1 month. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test and ordinal logistic regression were used to compare the treatment outcomes.Both BoNT-A injection and Lipotoxin instillation treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in OAB patients. Lipotoxin instillation did not increase post-void residual volume. BoNT-A injection effectively cleaved SNAP-25 (p < 0.01. Liposome encapsulated BoNT-A decreased urothelial P2X3 expression in the five responders (p = 0.04, while SNAP-25 was not significantly cleaved.The results of this study provide a possible mechanism for the therapeutic effects of BoNT-A for the treatment of OAB via different treatment forms. BoNT-A and Lipotoxin treatments effectively decreased the frequency of urgency episodes in patients with OAB.

  6. Neurofilament proteins are synthesized in nerve endings from squid brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crispino, M; Capano, C P; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1993-09-01

    It is generally believed that the proteins of the nerve endings are synthesized on perikaryal polysomes and are eventually delivered to the presynaptic domain by axoplasmic flow. At variance with this view, we have reported previously that a synaptosomal fraction from squid brain actively synthesizes proteins whose electrophoretic profile differs substantially from that of the proteins made in nerve cell bodies, axons, or glial cells, i.e., by the possible contaminants of the synaptosomal fraction. Using western analyses and immunoabsorption methods, we report now that (a) the translation products of the squid synaptosomal fraction include neurofilament (NF) proteins and (b) the electrophoretic pattern of the synaptosomal newly synthesized NF proteins is drastically different from that of the NF proteins synthesized by nerve cell bodies. The latter results exclude the possibility that NF proteins synthesized by the synaptosomal fraction originate in fragments of nerve cell bodies possibly contaminating the synaptosomal fraction. They rather indicate that in squid brain, nerve terminals synthesize NF proteins.

  7. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sung W; Gerencser, Akos A; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R; Gibson, Bradford W; Nicholls, David G; Bredesen, Dale E; Brand, Martin D

    2012-11-21

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer's disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months, and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to age-matched controls. No consistent bioenergetic deficiencies were detected in synaptosomes from the three models; only APP/PS cortical synaptosomes from 14-month-old mice showed an increase in respiration associated with proton leak. J20 mice were chosen for a highly stringent investigation of mitochondrial function and content. There were no significant differences in the quality of the synaptosomal preparations or the mitochondrial volume fraction. Furthermore, respiratory variables, calcium handling, and membrane potentials of synaptosomes from symptomatic J20 mice under calcium-imposed stress were not consistently impaired. The recovery of marker proteins during synaptosome preparation was the same, ruling out the possibility that the lack of functional bioenergetic defects in synaptosomes from J20 mice was due to the selective loss of damaged synaptosomes during sample preparation. Our results support the conclusion that the intrinsic bioenergetic capacities of presynaptic nerve terminals are maintained in these symptomatic AD mouse models.

  8. Mechanisms of acetylcholine synthesis: Coupling with choline transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rylett, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed to assess the utilization of choline transported by synaptosomal sodium-dependent, high-affinity choline carriers for the synthesis of ACh; it was determined that a significantly higher percentage of tritium-choline transported into rat forebrain synaptosomes was acetylated immediately compared to that of guinea-pig. Studies were performed to determine whether inhibition of synaptosomal ChAT was produced by incubating guinea-pig brain synaptosomes with ChMAz, comparable to that observed with rat brain synaptosomes. Very little ChAT activity was measured in guinea-pig brain; that this difference could reflect differing subcellular localizations of ChAT and different relativities with respect to coupling with choline carriers is speculative and currtly being investigated

  9. Four weeks' inhalation exposure of Long Evans rats to 4-tert-butyltoluene: Effect on evoked potentials, behaviour and brain neurochemistry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Ladefoged, Ole; Østergaard, Grete

    2000-01-01

    and somatosensory evoked potentials were not affected by TBT In Auditory Brain Stem Response there was no shift in hearing threshold, but the amplitude of the first wave was increased in both exposed groups at high stimulus levels. Three to four months after the end of exposure, behavioural studies in Morris water...... maze and eight-arm maze failed to demonstrate any TBT induced effects. Exposure was followed by a 5 months exposure-free period prior to gross regional and subcellular (synaptosomal) neurochemical investigations of the brain. TBT reduced the NA concentration in whole brain minus cerebellum......, respectively. We hypothesise that a reduced yield of synaptosomal protein reflects a more general effect of organic solvent exposure on the software of the brain. The synaptosomal concentration per mg synaptosomal protein and the total amount of 5-hydroxytryptamine were not affected whereas the total amount...

  10. Detection of marine neurotoxins and characterization of the presynaptic activity of iotrochotin from the sponge Iotrochota birotulata

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, J.V.

    1987-01-01

    In order to detect novel presynaptic neurotoxins, a total of 766 extracts from marine organisms collected during expeditions of the research vessel Alpha Helix around the peninsula of Baja Mexico in 1974 and through the Caribbean in 1978 were tested for activity in a synaptosomal assay for the release of acetylcholine (ACh). To eliminate from consideration sample extracts which lysed the synaptosomal membrane, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity was measured as a cytoplasmic marker. On the basis of the screening studies the extract of the sponge lotrochota birotulata was chosen for more detailed characterization. The active factor, iotrochotin (IOT), was sensitive to thermal inactivation, was partially activated by trypsin treatment and had a molecular weight of 12,000-13,000. The activity of IOT was found to be complete by one minute. The maximal release of radioactivity from synaptosomes preloaded with [ 3 H]choline was found to be dependent on the concentration of IOT irrespective of the time of further incubation. The concentration-response curve of IOT activity showed a sigmoid shape which did not fit the Hill equation. IOT caused release of both ACh and choline. Of the radioactivity released by IOT from synaptosomes preloaded with [ 3 H]choline, 50-60% was [ 3 H]ACh. IOT also released [ 3 H]GABA and [ 3 H]norepinephrine from synaptosomes preincubated with these labeled neurotransmitters. The activity of IOT was only minimally sensitive to reduction in Na + or Ca 2+ levels, and was not sensitive to tetrodotoxin. IOT did not dramatically change the fluorescence of synaptosomes incubated with a depolarization-indicating dye. However, depolarization of synaptosomes with high concentrations of K + was still detectable by this method in the presence of IOT

  11. Altered acetylcholine metabolism of brain in uremia: role of secondary hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smogorzewski, Miroslaw J; Massry, Shaul G

    2008-01-01

    Cholinergic system and its neurotransmitter, acetylcholine (ACh), play a major role in both behavior and motor function of the nervous system. Cholinergic neurons synthesize ACh from choline and acetyl-CoA by choline acetyltransferase in the nerve ending. The release of ACh in response to nerve impulses is dependent on the intracellular calcium ([Ca2+]i) concentration and its gradient. The regulation of a synthesis of ACh after depolarization and ACh release is controlled by mass-action effect on choline acetyltransferase equilibrium. Behavioral and motor changes in uremia may be due in part to derangements in ACh metabolism and such possible abnormalities may be related to the state of secondary hyperparathyroidism of chronic renal failure (CRF). We studied ACh and choline content, choline release, choline kinase activity in brain synaptosomes of CRF with and without secondary hyperparathyroidism and in CRF rats treated with verapamil which normalize [Ca2+]i in brain synaptosomes of CRF rats. The content of ACh of brain synaptosomes increased progressively with the duration of CRF from 3 to 6 weeks. ACh and choline release as well as choline uptake were significantly higher in CRF rats at all time intervals studied. Choline content and the activity of choline kinase of brain synaptosomes were deceased after 3 weeks of CRF and were significantly lower than in synaptosomes of normal. Normalization of ACh and choline content as well as ACh release and the activity of choline kinase by parathyroidectomy or treatment with verapamil but these maneuvers did not prevent the rise in choline uptake and choline release. Resting levels of cytosolic calcium of brain synaptosomes in rats with CRF were significantly higher (437 +/- 9 nM) as compared to normal rats (345 +/- 9 nM). This rise in [Ca2+]i was prevented either by parathyroidectomy prior induction of CRF or by treatment of CRF rats with calcium channel blocker verapamil.

  12. Glucose, Lactate and Glutamine but not Glutamate Support Depolarization-Induced Increased Respiration in Isolated Nerve Terminals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Bak, Lasse K

    2017-01-01

    . Synaptosomal respiration using glutamate and glutamine as substrates was significantly higher compared to basal respiration, whereas oligomycin-dependent and FCCP-induced respiration was lower compared to the responses obtained in the presence of glucose as substrate. We provide evidence that synaptosomes...... are able to use besides glucose and pyruvate also the substrates lactate, glutamate and glutamine to support their basal respiration. Veratridine was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate, lactate and glutamine and FCCP was found to increase respiration supported by glucose, pyruvate...

  13. The muscarinic stimulation of phospholipid labeling in hippocampus is independent of its cholinergic input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, S.K.; Boast, C.A.; Agranoff, B.W.

    1980-01-01

    The authors have examined the role of cholinergic innervation on the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced 'phospholipid labeling effect' (PLE) in synaptosomes derived from the hippocampus. The hippocampus supports a robust PLE and its sole cholinergic input from the septal nuclei can be readily disrupted by the placement of lesions in the fornix. The lesion is expected to cause degeneration of cholinergic presynaptic fibers, but should have little effect on the integrity of postsynaptic structures, and thus provide a means of further localizing the synaptosomal PLE. (Auth.)

  14. Association among SNAP-25 Gene "Dd"eI and "Mnl"I Polymorphisms and Hemodynamic Changes during Methylphenidate Use: A Functional Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oner, Ozgur; Akin, Ata; Herken, Hasan; Erdal, Mehmet Emin; Ciftci, Koray; Ay, Mustafa Ertan; Bicer, Duygu; Oncu, Bedriye; Bozkurt, Ozlem Hekim; Munir, Kerim; Yazgan, Yanki

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the interaction of treatment-related hemodynamic changes with genotype status for Synaptosomal associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) gene in participants with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) on and off single dose short-acting methylphenidate treatment with functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). Method:…

  15. Oxytocin biotransformation in the rat limbic brain: Characterization of peptidase activities and significance in the formation of oxytocin fragments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Kloet, E.R. de; Wied, D. de

    1980-01-01

    The enzymatic conversion of oxytocin by brain peptidases has been studied. Oxytocin was incubated with synaptosomal plasma membranes (SPM) isolated from the rat brain. Qualitative studies using a microdansylation technique revealed two types of oxytocin converting peptidases, e.g. aminopeptidase and

  16. Hexabromocyclododecane inhibits depolarization-induced increase in intracellular calcium levels and neurotransmitter release in PC12 cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dingemans, M.M.L.; Heusinkveld, H.J.; de Groot, A.; Bergman, A.; van den Berg, M.; Westerink, R.H.S.

    2009-01-01

    Environmental levels of the brominated flame retardant (BFR) hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) have been increasing. HBCD has been shown to cause adverse effects on learning and behavior in mice, as well as on dopamine uptake in rat synaptosomes and synaptic vesicles. For other BFRs, alterations in the

  17. Clipboard

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The most severe form of the disease is caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Plasmodium falciparum leading to ... Since malaria is a highly complex, multifactorial disease, the spectrum of research ... blocks voltage-sensitive Na+ channels in rat synaptosomes and cortical membranes and this could be the basis for ...

  18. Diphenyl ditelluride impairs short-term memory and alters neurochemical parameters in young rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stangherlin, Eluza Curte; Rocha, João Batista Teixeira; Nogueira, Cristina Wayne

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate if maternal exposure to 0.03 mg/kg of diphenyl ditelluride (PhTe)2 during the first 14 days of lactational period in Wistar rats alters recognition memory and neurochemical parameters in young rats. Object recognition memory task, evaluation of synaptosomal [3H]glutamate uptake and release as well as cerebral Na+/K+ATPase activity were evaluated in 4 week-old rats. There were no significant specific overt signs of maternal intoxication. The body weight gain of rats was similar among groups. (PhTe)2-exposed group showed a significantly lower time exploring the novel object when compared to the performance of the control group in short-term memory (STM) test. In addition, (PhTe)2 significantly inhibited synaptosomal [3H]glutamate uptake and cerebral Na+/K+ATPase activity in animals. The synaptosomal [3H]glutamate release was similar between (PhTe)2 and control groups. In conclusion, the present study establishes that young rats presented cognitive impairment after exposure to (PhTe)2 via maternal milk, demonstrated by the performance of animals in object recognition memory task. The possible mechanism involved in (PhTe)2 action in memory of recognition might involve inhibition of cerebral Na+/K+ATPase activity and synaptosomal [3H]glutamate uptake.

  19. An Investigation of the Stoichiometry of Na+ Cotransport with Dopamine in Rat and Human Dopamine Transporters Expressed in Human Embryonic Kidney Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-05-01

    Res. Commun. 91, 1430-1436. Holz K. W. and Coyle J. T. (1974) The effects of various salts, temperature, and alkaloids, veratridine and batrachotoxin on... batrachotoxin on the uptake of [3H]-dopamine into synaptosomes from rat striatum. Mol. Pharm. 10, 746-758. Jacquez J. A. (1972) Ion gradient hypotheses and the

  20. Common variants underlying cognitive ability: further evidence for association between the SNAP-25 gene and cognition using a family-based study in two independent Dutch cohorts.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gosso, M.F.; de Geus, E.J.C.; Polderman, T.J.C.; Boomsma, D.I.; Heutink, P.; Posthuma, D.

    2008-01-01

    The synaptosomal associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) gene, located on chromosome 20 p12-12p11.2 encodes a presynaptic terminal protein. SNAP-25 is differentially expressed in the brain, and primarily present in the neocortex, hippocampus, anterior thalamic nuclei, substantia nigra and cerebellar

  1. Characterization of taurine binding, uptake, and release in the rat hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanretta, A.T.

    1985-01-01

    The neurotransmitter criteria of specific receptors, inactivation, and release were experimentally examined for taurine in the hypothalamus. Specific membrane binding and synaptosomal uptake of taurine both displayed high affinity and low affinity systems. The neurotransmitter criterion of release was studied in superfused synaptosomes. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the high affinity uptake range (1.5 μM) to either 56 mM K + or 100 μM veratridine evoked a Ca 2+ -independent release. Exposure of synaptosomes which had been preloaded with a concentration of [ 3 H]taurine in the low affinity uptake range (2 mM) to 56 mM K + induced a Ca 2+ -independent release, whereas 100 + M veratridine did not, either in the presence or absence of Ca 2+ . Based on these results, as well as other observations, a model is proposed in which the high affinity uptake system is located on neuronal membranes and the low affinity uptake system is located on glial membranes. The mechanisms of binding, uptake, and release in relation to the cellular location of each are discussed. We conclude that the neurotransmitter criterion of activation by re-uptake is satisfied for taurine in the hypothalamus. However, the failure to demonstrate both a specific taurine receptor site and a Ca 2+ -dependent evoked release, necessitates that we conclude that taurine appears not to function as a hypothalamic neurotransmitter, at least not in the classical sense

  2. Syntaxin 1A interaction with the dopamine transporter promotes amphetamine-induced dopamine efflux

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Binda, Francesca; Dipace, Concetta; Bowton, Erica

    2008-01-01

    of the dopamine (DA) transporter (DAT) as the site of direct interaction with SYN1A. Amphetamine (AMPH) increases the association of SYN1A with human DAT (hDAT) in a heterologous expression system (hDAT cells) and with native DAT in murine striatal synaptosomes. Immunoprecipitation of DAT from the biotinylated...

  3. Membrane depolarization and carbamoylcholine stimulate phosphatidylinositol turnover in intact nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Audigier, S.M.P.; Wang, J.K.T.; Greengard, P.

    1988-01-01

    Synaptosomes, purified from rat cerebral cortex, were prelabeled with [ 3 H]inositol to study phosphatidylinositol turnover in nerve terminals. Labeled synaptosomes were either depolarized with 40 mM K + or exposed to carbamoylcholine (carbachol). K + depolarization increased the level of inositol phosphates in a time-dependent manner. The inositol bisphosphate level also increased rapidly, but its elevated level was sustained during continued depolarization. The elevated level of inositol bisphosphate was reversed upon repolarization of the synaptosomes. The level of inositol monophosphate increased slowly to 120-130% of control. These effects of K + depolarization depended on the presence of Ca 2+ in the incubation medium. Carbachol stimulated the turnover of phosphatidylinositol in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The level of inositol bisphosphate increased to 210% of control, and this maximal response was seen from 15 to 60 min. Accumulation of inositol monophosphate was larger than that of inositol bisphosphate, but its time course was slower. Atropine and pirenzepine inhibited the carbachol effect with high affinities. These data show that both Ca 2+ influx and M 1 muscarinic receptor activation stimulate phospholipase C activity in synaptosomes, suggesting that phosphatidylinositol turnover may be involved in regulating neurotransmitter release from nerve terminals

  4. Cyclin dependent kinase 5 regulates endocytosis in nerve terminals via dynamin I phosphorylation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, T.C.; Hansra, G.; Calova, V.; Cousin, M.; Robinson, P.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Synaptic vesicle endocytosis (SVE) in nerve terminals is essential for normal synaptic transmission and for memory retrieval. Dynamin I is a 96kDa nerve terminal phosphoprotein necessary for synaptic vesicle endocytosis in the nerve terminal. Dynamin I is dephosphorylated and rephosphorylated in a cyclical fashion with nerve terminal depolarisation and repolarisation. A number of kinases phosphorylate dynamin I in vitro including PKC, MAP kinase and cdc2. PKC phosphorylates dynamin in the proline rich domain on Ser 795 and is also thought to be the in vivo kinase for dynamin I. Another candidate is the neuron specific kinase cdk5, crucial for CNS development. The aim of this study is to identify the kinase which phosphorylates dynamin I in intact nerve terminals. Here we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (cdk5) phosphorylates dynamin I in the proline-rich tail on Ser-774 or Ser-778. The phosphorylation of these sites but not Ser-795 also occurred in intact nerve terminals suggesting that cdk5 is the physiologically relevant enzyme for dynamin I. Synaptosomes prepared from rat brains (after cervical dislocations) and labelled with 32 Pi, were incubated with 100 M roscovitine (a selective inhibitor of cdks), 10 M Ro 31-8220 (a selective PKC inhibitor) and 100 M PD 98059 (a MEK kinase inhibitor). Dynamin rephosphorylation during repolarisation was reduced in synaptosomes treated with roscovitine and Ro 38-8220 but not in synaptosomes treated with PD 98059. Fluorimetric experiments on intact synaptosomes utilising FM-210 (a fluorescent dye) indicate that endocytosis was reduced in synaptosomes treated with 100 M roscovitine. Our results suggest that dynamin phosphorylation in intact nerve terminals may not be regulated by PKC or MAP kinase and that dynamin phosphorylation by cdk5 may regulate endocytosis. Copyright (2002) Australian Neuroscience Society

  5. Presynaptic transporter-mediated release of glutamate evoked by the protonophore FCCP increases under altered gravity conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T. A.; Krisanova, N. V.

    2008-12-01

    High-affinity Na +-dependent glutamate transporters of the plasma membrane mediate the glutamate uptake into neurons, and thus maintain low levels of extracellular glutamate in the synaptic cleft. The study focused on the release of glutamate by reversal of Na +-dependent glutamate transporters from rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes) under conditions of centrifuge-induced hypergravity. Flow cytometric analysis revealed similarity in the size and cytoplasmic granularity between synaptosomal preparations obtained from control and G-loaded animals (10 G, 1 h). The release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes was evaluated using the protonophore FCCP, which dissipated synaptic vesicle proton gradient, thus synaptic vesicles were not able to keep glutamate inside and the latter enriched cytosol. FCCP per se induced the greater release of L-[ 14C]glutamate in hypergravity as compared to control (4.8 ± 1.0% and 8.0 ± 1.0% of total label). Exocytotic release of L-[ 14C]glutamate evoked by depolarization was reduced down to zero after FCCP application under both conditions studied. Depolarization stimulated release of cytosolic L-[ 14C]glutamate from synaptosomes preliminary treated with FCCP was considerably increased from 27.0 ± 2.2% of total label in control to 35.0 ± 2.3% in hypergravity. Non-transportable inhibitor of glutamate transporter DL-threo-β-benzyloxyaspartate was found to significantly inhibit high-KCl and FCCP-stimulated release of L-[ 14C]glutamate, confirming the release by reversal of glutamate transporters. The enhancement of transporter-mediated release of glutamate in hypergravity was found to result at least partially from the inhibition of the activity of Na/K-ATPase in the plasma membrane of synaptosomes. We suggested that hypergravity-induced alteration in transporter-mediated release of glutamate indicated hypoxic injury of neurons.

  6. Glutamate dehydrogenase is essential to sustain neuronal oxidative energy metabolism during stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hohnholt, Michaela C; Andersen, Vibe H; Andersen, Jens V

    2017-01-01

    precursor used by neurons to sustain the pool of glutamate, but glutamine is also vividly oxidized for support of energy metabolism. This study investigates the role of GDH in neuronal metabolism by employing the Cns- Glud1-/- mouse, lacking GDH in the brain (GDH KO) and metabolic mapping using 13C......-labelled glutamine and glucose. We observed a severely reduced oxidative glutamine metabolism during glucose deprivation in synaptosomes and cultured neurons not expressing GDH. In contrast, in the presence of glucose, glutamine metabolism was not affected by the lack of GDH expression. Respiration fuelled...... by glutamate was significantly lower in brain mitochondria from GDH KO mice and synaptosomes were not able to increase their respiration upon an elevated energy demand. The role of GDH for metabolism of glutamine and the respiratory capacity underscore the importance of GDH for neurons particularly during...

  7. Squid photoreceptor terminals synthesize calexcitin, a learning related protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Crispino, Marianna; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2003-08-14

    Nerve endings of squid photoreceptor neurons generate large synaptosomes upon homogenization of the optic lobe. Using several independent methods, these presynaptic structures have been shown to synthesize a wealth of soluble, cytoskeletal and nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins, and to account for essentially all the translation activity of the synaptosomal fraction. We are now presenting evidence that calexcitin, a learning related, Ca(2+)-binding protein of the B photoreceptors of Hermissenda crassicornis (a mollusk), is synthesized and subjected to post-translational modifications in the squid photoreceptor terminals. In view of the essential role of presynaptic protein synthesis in long-term memory formation in Aplysia, our data suggest that a comparable role may be played by calexcitin synthesized in the squid photoreceptor terminals.

  8. Curcumin improves synaptic plasticity impairment induced by HIV-1gp120 V3 loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-ling Shen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin has been shown to significantly improve spatial memory impairment induced by HIV-1 gp120 V3 in rats, but the electrophysiological mechanism remains unknown. Using extracellular microelectrode recording techniques, this study confirmed that the gp120 V3 loop could suppress long-term potentiation in the rat hippocampal CA1 region and synaptic plasticity, and that curcumin could antagonize these inhibitory effects. Using a Fura-2/AM calcium ion probe, we found that curcumin resisted the effects of the gp120 V3 loop on hippocampal synaptosomes and decreased Ca 2+ concentration in synaptosomes. This effect of curcumin was identical to nimodipine, suggesting that curcumin improved the inhibitory effects of gp120 on synaptic plasticity, ameliorated damage caused to the central nervous system, and might be a potential neuroprotective drug.

  9. Impact of Combined Prenatal Ethanol and Prenatal Stress Exposures on Markers of Activity-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity in Rat Dentate Gyrus

    OpenAIRE

    Staples, Miranda C.; Porch, Morgan W.; Savage, Daniel D.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal ethanol exposure and prenatal stress can each cause long-lasting deficits in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and disrupt learning and memory processes. However, the mechanisms underlying these perturbations following a learning event are still poorly understood. We examined the effects of prenatal ethanol exposure and prenatal stress exposure, either alone or in combination, on the cytosolic expression of activity-regulated cytoskeletal (ARC) protein and the synaptosomal expression o...

  10. New effects of GABAB receptor allosteric modulator rac-BHFF on ambient GABA, uptake/release, Em and synaptic vesicle acidification in nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozdnyakova, N; Dudarenko, M; Borisova, T

    2015-09-24

    Positive allosteric modulators of GABAB receptors have great therapeutic potential for medications of anxiety, depression, etc. The effects of recently discovered modulator rac-BHFF on the key characteristics of GABAergic neurotransmission were investigated in cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals of rats (synaptosomes). The ambient level of [(3)H]GABA that is a balance between release and uptake of the neurotransmitter increased significantly in the presence of rac-BHFF (at concentrations 10-30μM). The initial velocity of synaptosomal [(3)H]GABA uptake was suppressed by the modulator. In the presence of GABA transporter blocker NO-711, it was shown that rac-BHFF increased tonic release of [(3)H]GABA from synaptosomes (at concentrations 3-30μM). Rac-BHFF within the concentration range of 0.3-30μM did not enhance inhibiting effect of (±)-baclofen on depolarization-induced exocytotic release of [(3)H]GABA. Rac-BHFF (0.3-30μM) caused dose-dependent depolarization of the plasma membrane and dissipation of the proton gradient of synaptic vesicles in synaptosomes that was shown in the absence/presence of GABAB receptor antagonist saclofen using fluorescent dyes rhodamine 6G and acridine orange, respectively, and so, the above effects of rac-BHFF were not associated with the modulation of presynaptic GABAB receptors. Therefore, drug development strategy of positive allosteric modulation of GABAB receptors is to eliminate the above side effects of rac-BHFF in presynapse, and vice versa, these new properties of rac-BHFF may be exploited appropriately. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. New type of tachykinin binding site in the rat brain characterized by specific binding of a labeled eledoisin derivative

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beaujouan, J.C.; Torrens, Y.; Viger, A.; Glowinski, J.

    1984-09-01

    A new ligand for investigating tachykinin-binding site subtypes was synthesized by coupling the /sup 125/I-Bolton and Hunter reagent to eledoisin (/sup 125/I-BHE). Using a synaptosomal preparation (P2 fraction) of rat cerebral cortex, /sup 125/I-BHE was shown to bind with apparent high affinity (apparent Kd . 15.3 nM). When concentrations of up to 30 nM /sup 125/I-BHE were used, /sup 125/I-BHE binding was specific, saturable, reversible, and temperature-dependent. In contrast to (/sup 3/H)dopamine, /sup 125/I-BHE was not taken up within synaptosomes by an ouabain-sensitive process. Eledoisin, kassinin, and substance P were examined for their ability to inhibit specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding to cortical synaptosomes. Eledoisin and kassinin were considerably more potent than substance P, in contrast to the order of potency observed for specific /sup 125/I-Bolton-Hunter substance P (/sup 125/I-BHSP) binding. Specific /sup 125/I-BHE binding was highest in the cerebral cortex and hypothalamus; intermediate in the hippocampus, striatum, and thalamus; low in the mesencephalon, septum, and substantia nigra; and absent in the cerebellum. Comparison of these data with those previously obtained for /sup 125/I-BHSP binding to synaptosomes indicated that /sup 125/I-BHE-labeled binding sites differ markedly from those of /sup 125/I-BHSP-labeled binding sites. Therefore, tachykinin receptors other than substance P receptors seem to be present in the central nervous system.

  12. Age-related changes in membrane fluidity and fluorescence intensity by tachykinin neuropeptide NKB and Aβ (25-35 with 17β estradiol in female rat brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rashmi Jha

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available      Changes in the fluidity of membrane lipids are known to occur during aging and by lipid peroxidation. It is well documented that the fluidity state of the lipid phase in a membrane is important for the activity of intrinsic membrane proteins. Oxidants and fluidity of membrane lipids play a significant role in aging and age related neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of tachykinin neuropeptide, Neurokinin B (NKB and Amyloid beta fragment Aβ (25-35 on 17β estradiol (E2 treated aging female rat synaptosomes of different age groups. Aging brain functions were measured by membrane fluidity and fluorescent intensity with neuropeptides. An in-vitro incubation of Aβ (25-35 in E2 treated brain synaptosomes showed toxic effects on all the parameters. These effects of aging and Aβ (25–35 on membrane fluidity were restored by NKB and combined NKB and Aβ (25–35 with E2. Furthermore, we measured the Tryptophan (Trp fluorescence to monitor changes in proteins and to make inferences regarding structure and dynamics. Trp is a sensitive marker of protein oxidation and its fluorescence significantly increased in E2 treated synaptosomes of aging rats. Furthermore, to evaluate the effect of oxidative stress on the membrane and protein conformation, fluorescent probe 1-Anilino-8-Naphthalenesulfonate (ANS were used. An increase in ANS fluorescence in E2 treated synaptosomes of aging rats indicated that E2 is associated with significant conformational changes and surface hydrophobicity of membranes and proteins.

  13. Purification and characterization of progenitor and mature human astrocytes reveals transcriptional and functional differences with mouse

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ye; Sloan, Steven A.; Clarke, Laura E.; Caneda, Christine; Plaza, Colton A.; Blumenthal, Paul D.; Vogel, Hannes; Steinberg, Gary K.; Edwards, Michael S. B.; Li, Gordon; Duncan, John A.; Cheshier, Samuel H.; Shuer, Lawrence M.; Chang, Edward F.; Grant, Gerald A.

    2015-01-01

    The functional and molecular similarities and distinctions between human and murine astrocytes are poorly understood. Here we report the development of an immunopanning method to acutely purify astrocytes from fetal, juvenile, and adult human brains, and to maintain these cells in serum-free cultures. We found that human astrocytes have similar abilities to murine astrocytes in promoting neuronal survival, inducing functional synapse formation, and engulfing synaptosomes. In contrast to exist...

  14. Effects of irradiation on neuronal dopamine uptake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, C.; Pham, H.T.; Becker, C.; Fatome, M.

    1996-01-01

    The aim of this study was to better understand the mechanism of action of gamma and neutron radiation on the central nervous system, particularly the dopaminergic system. The influence of the two irradiation modalities on the 3 H-DA uptake by synaptosomes prepared from striatum was studied in mice. Four hours after increase of neuronal dopamine uptake is observed. (Authors). 6 refs., 2 figs

  15. No consistent bioenergetic defects in presynaptic nerve terminals isolated from mouse models of Alzheimer’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Choi, Sung W.; Gerencser, Akos A.; Ng, Ryan; Flynn, James M.; Melov, Simon; Danielson, Steven R.; Gibson, Bradford W.; Nicholls, David G.; Bredesen, Dale E.; Brand, Martin D.

    2012-01-01

    Depressed cortical energy supply and impaired synaptic function are predominant associations of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). To test the hypothesis that presynaptic bioenergetic deficits are associated with the progression of AD pathogenesis, we compared bioenergetic variables of cortical and hippocampal presynaptic nerve terminals (synaptosomes) from commonly used mouse models with AD-like phenotypes (J20 age 6 months, Tg2576 age 16 months and APP/PS age 9 and 14 months) to ag...

  16. Preparation and properties of a neurotoxin purified from the venom of black widow spider (Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasso, A

    1976-08-09

    A neurotoxin of the venom of the spider Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, has been prepared in a homogeneous form and examined by a variety of techniques. The protein has a molecular weight of 130 000 and its toxicity in mice is about 49 000 LD50 mg pure protein/g body weight. The toxin releases norepinephrine from synaptosomes prepared from rat brain and shows most of the toxic effects of the crude venom preparation.

  17. Activation of protein kinase C delta following cerebral ischemia leads to release of cytochrome C from the mitochondria via bad pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kunjan R Dave

    Full Text Available The release of cytochrome c from the mitochondria following cerebral ischemia is a key event leading to cell death. The goal of the present study was to determine the mechanisms involved in post-ischemic activation of protein kinase c delta (δPKC that lead to cytochrome c release.We used a rat model of cardiac arrest as an in vivo model, and an in vitro analog, oxygen glucose deprivation (OGD in rat hippocampal synaptosomes. Cardiac arrest triggered translocation of δPKC to the mitochondrial fraction at 1 h reperfusion. In synaptosomes, the peptide inhibitor of δPKC blocked OGD-induced translocation to the mitochondria. We tested two potential pathways by which δPKC activation could lead to cytochrome c release: phosphorylation of phospholipid scramblase-3 (PLSCR3 and/or protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A. Cardiac arrest increased levels of phosphorlyated PLSCR3; however, inhibition of δPKC translocation failed to affect the OGD-induced increase in PLSCR3 in synaptosomal mitochondria suggesting the post-ischemic phosphorylation of PLSCR3 is not mediated by δPKC. Inhibition of either δPKC or PP2A decreased cytochrome c release from synaptosomal mitochondria. Cardiac arrest results in the dephosphorylation of Bad and Bax, both downstream targets of PP2A promoting apoptosis. Inhibition of δPKC or PP2A prevented OGD-induced Bad, but not Bax, dephosphorylation. To complement these studies, we used proteomics to identify novel mitochondrial substrates of δPKC.We conclude that δPKC initiates cytochrome c release via phosphorylation of PP2A and subsequent dephosphorylation of Bad and identified δPKC, PP2A and additional mitochondrial proteins as potential therapeutic targets for ischemic neuroprotection.

  18. [Effect of baicalin on ATPase and LDH and its regulatory effect on the AC/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway in rats with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Rong-Yi; Wang, Jiao-Jiao; You, Yue; Sun, Ji-Chao; Song, Yu-Chen; Yuan, Hai-Xia; Han, Xin-Min

    2017-05-01

    To study the effect of baicalin on synaptosomal adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and its regulatory effect on the adenylate cyclase (AC)/cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in rats with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 40 SHR rats were randomly divided into five groups: ADHD model, methylphenidate hydrochloride treatment (0.07 mg/mL), and low-dose (3.33 mg/mL), medium-dose (6.67 mg/mL), and high-dose (10 mg/mL) baicalin treatment (n=8 each). Eight WKY rats were selected as normal control group. Percoll density gradient centrifugation was used to prepare brain synaptosomes and an electron microscope was used to observe their structure. Colorimetry was used to measure the activities of ATPase and LDH in synaptosomes. ELISA was used to measure the content of AC, cAMP, and PKA. Compared with the normal control group, the ADHD model group had a significant reduction in the ATPase activity, a significant increase in the LDH activity, and significant reductions in the content of AC, cAMP, and PKA (PATPase activity (PATPase activity (PATPase activity (PATPase and LDH activities in rats with ADHD. The effect of baicalin is dose-dependent, and high-dose baicalin has a significantly greater effect than methylphenidate hydrochloride. Baicalin exerts its therapeutic effect possibly by upregulating the AC/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway.

  19. Isolation of functionally active and highly purified neuronal mitochondria from human cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Nicolas K; Yablonska, Svitlana; Baranov, Sergei V; Baranova, Oxana V; Kretz, Eric S; Larkin, Timothy M; Carlisle, Diane L; Richardson, R Mark; Friedlander, Robert M

    2016-04-01

    Functional and structural properties of mitochondria are highly tissue and cell dependent, but isolation of highly purified human neuronal mitochondria is not currently available. We developed and validated a procedure to isolate purified neuronal mitochondria from brain tissue. The method combines Percoll gradient centrifugation to obtain synaptosomal fraction with nitrogen cavitation mediated synaptosome disruption and extraction of mitochondria using anti mitochondrial outer membrane protein antibodies conjugated to magnetic beads. The final products of isolation are non-synaptosomal mitochondria, which are a mixture of mitochondria isolated from different brain cells (i.e. neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, microglia) and synaptic mitochondria, which are of neuronal origin. This method is well suited for preparing functional mitochondria from human cortex tissue that is surgically extracted. The procedure produces mitochondria with minimal cytoplasmic contaminations that are functionally active based on measurements of mitochondrial respiration as well as mitochondrial protein import. The procedure requires approximately four hours for the isolation of human neuronal mitochondria and can also be used to isolate mitochondria from mouse/rat/monkey brains. This method will allow researchers to study highly enriched neuronal mitochondria without the confounding effect of cellular and organelle contaminants. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Proteomic Characterization of a Mouse Model of Familial Danish Dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Vitale

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A dominant mutation in the ITM2B/BRI2 gene causes familial Danish dementia (FDD in humans. To model FDD in animal systems, a knock-in approach was recently implemented in mice expressing a wild-type and mutant allele, which bears the FDD-associated mutation. Since these FDDKI mice show behavioural alterations and impaired synaptic function, we characterized their synaptosomal proteome via two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis. After identification by nanoliquid chromatography coupled to electrospray-linear ion trap tandem mass spectrometry, the differentially expressed proteins were classified according to their gene ontology descriptions and their predicted functional interactions. The Dlg4/Psd95 scaffold protein and additional signalling proteins, including protein phosphatases, were revealed by STRING analysis as potential players in the altered synaptic function of FDDKI mice. Immunoblotting analysis finally demonstrated the actual downregulation of the synaptosomal scaffold protein Dlg4/Psd95 and of the dual-specificity phosphatase Dusp3 in the synaptosomes of FDDKI mice.

  1. Synaptic mRNAs are modulated by learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrara, Eugenia; Cefaliello, Carolina; Eyman, Maria; De Stefano, Rosanna; Giuditta, Antonio; Crispino, Marianna

    2009-07-01

    We have recently demonstrated that brain plastic events significantly modify synaptic protein synthesis measured by the incorporation of [(35)S]methionine in brain synaptosomal proteins. Notably, in rats learning a two-way active avoidance task, the local synthesis of two synaptic proteins was selectively enhanced. Because this effect may be attributed to transcriptional modulation, we used reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction methods to determine the content of discrete synaptosomal mRNAs in rats exposed to the same training protocol. Correlative analyses between behavioral responses and synaptosomal mRNA content showed that GAT-1 mRNA (a prevalent presynaptic component) correlates with avoidances and escapes in rat cerebellum, while glial fibrillary acid protein mRNA (an astrocytic component) correlates with freezings in cerebellum and cerebral cortex. These observations support the hypothesis that synaptic protein synthesis may be transcriptionally regulated. The cellular origin of synaptic transcripts is briefly discussed, with special regard to those present at large distances from neuron somas. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. Permanent brain ischemia induces marked increments in hsp72 expression and local protein synthesis in synapses of the ischemic hemisphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mariucci, Giuseppina; Tantucci, Michela; Giuditta, Antonio; Ambrosini, Maria Vittoria

    2007-03-19

    Transient focal ischemia induced in rat brain by occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCAo) elicits a generalized induction of the 72 kDa heat-shock protein (hsp72) heralding functional recovery. As this effect implies activation of protein synthesis, and local systems of protein synthesis are present in brain synapses, and may be analyzed in preparations of brain synaptosomes, we evaluated hsp72 expression and protein synthesis in synaptosomal fractions of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) subjected to permanent MCAo. SHRs were randomly divided in ischemics and sham controls, anaesthesia controls and passive controls. Focal ischemia was induced under chloral hydrate anaesthesia by unilateral permanent MCAo. Protein synthesis was determined by [35S]methionine incorporation into synaptosomal proteins from ischemic and contralateral cortex/striatum, and from cerebellum. Hsp72 expression was measured in the same fractions by immunoblotting. Our data demonstrate that under these conditions synaptic hsp72 markedly increases in the ischemic hemisphere 1 and 2 days after MCAo, progressively declining in the following 2 days, while no significant change occurs in control rats. In addition, in the ischemic hemisphere the rate of synaptic protein synthesis increases more than two-fold between 1 and 4 days after MCAo, without showing signs of an impending decline. The present data provide the first demonstration that synaptic protein synthesis is massively involved in brain plastic events elicited by permanent focal ischemia.

  3. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Spatial relationship and site coupling between the batrachotoxin and Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelides, K J; Brown, G B

    1984-05-25

    A fluorescent N- methylanthraniloyl derivative of the potent depolarizing agent batrachotoxin has been used to probe the structural and conformational properties of the neurotoxin receptor site on the voltage-dependent sodium channel. Batrachotoxin A 20-alpha-N- methylanthranilate (BTX-NMA) retains high affinity for its receptor site on the synaptosomal sodium channel with a Kd between 78 and 91 nM and an average site capacity of 2 pmol/mg of synaptosomal protein in the presence of Leiurus quinquestriatus quinquestriatus alpha-scorpion toxin. The fluorescence emission of BTX-NMA upon binding to synaptosomes indicates a hydrophobic environment. Toxin V from L. quinquestriatus, an allosteric activator, effects a 20-nm red shift in the spectrum of bound BTX-NMA and a 4-fold enhancement in the fluorescence quantum yield disclosing a conformational change into a hydrophilic environment. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer measurements show that the distance separating the receptor sites is 37 +/- 10 A. Thus, the binding of alpha-scorpion toxin must involve conformational changes that extend over large distances from the batrachotoxin-binding locus. This information together with the distance measurements between the tetrodotoxin and alpha-scorpion toxin receptors and the conformational transition associated with this distance upon batrachotoxin addition indicate a conformationally flexible channel with coupling of sites through the polyatomic framework of individual subunits or through extensive alterations in subunit/subunit interactions.

  4. Linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA stimulates vesicular transport of α7 ACh receptors towards surface membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akito; Nishizaki, Tomoyuki

    2012-01-01

    We have earlier found that the linoleic acid derivative DCP-LA could ameliorate learning and memory impairment by targeting α7 ACh receptor. The present study aimed at understanding DCP-LA-regulated α7 ACh receptor trafficking. We monitored currents through α7 ACh receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes and assayed the receptor mobilizations using fractions with a sucrose density gradient centrifugation, synaptosome preparation, and acutely dissociated neurons from rat hippocampal slices. DCP-LA persistently potentiated α7 ACh receptor currents, and the effect was inhibited by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor or vesicular transport inhibitors. DCP-LA did not induce PKC phosphorylation of α7 ACh receptors. DCP-LA stimulated translocation of α7 ACh receptors from the cytosol toward the plasma membrane or from extra-synaptosomes into synaptosomes and accumulated the receptors at the presynaptic site in hippocampal neurons. The results of the present study demonstrate that DCP-LA increases surface localization of α7 ACh receptors in hippocampal neurons, specifically at presynaptic terminals, by stimulating vesicular transport of the receptors, resulting in potentiation of α7 ACh receptor responses, regardless of PKC phosphorylation of the receptors. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kilbride, Sean M

    2011-07-26

    Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2) and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1) are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington\\'s disease and Alzheimer\\'s disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes) depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  6. High-level inhibition of mitochondrial complexes III and IV is required to increase glutamate release from the nerve terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kilbride Seán M

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The activities of mitochondrial complex III (ubiquinol-cytochrome c reductase, EC 1.10.2.2 and complex IV (cytochrome c oxidase EC 1.9.3.1 are reduced by 30-70% in Huntington's disease and Alzheimer's disease, respectively, and are associated with excitotoxic cell death in these disorders. In this study, we investigated the control that complexes III and complex IV exert on glutamate release from the isolated nerve terminal. Results Inhibition of complex III activity by 60-90% was necessary for a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release to occur from isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes depolarized with 4-aminopyridine or KCl. Similarly, an 85-90% inhibition of complex IV activity was required before a major increase in the rate of Ca2+-independent glutamate release from depolarized synaptosomes was observed. Inhibition of complex III and IV activities by ~ 60% and above was required before rates of glutamate efflux from polarized synaptosomes were increased. Conclusions These results suggest that nerve terminal mitochondria possess high reserves of complex III and IV activity and that high inhibition thresholds must be reached before excess glutamate is released from the nerve terminal. The implications of the results in the context of the relationship between electron transport chain enzyme deficiencies and excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  7. Regulation of somatostatin release in the nervous system of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheppard, M.

    1979-08-01

    This thesis represents the work done to study the release of somatostatin from the rat central nervous system in vitro, providing some evidence for a physiological role for somatostatin. Somatostatin was measured by a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay devoloped in the laboratory. Chapter 2 reviews the literature on hypothalamic peptides and control of an anterior pituitary function, somatostatin, other central nervous system peptides and neurosecretion. Chapter 3 describes the central nervous system tissue dissection technique, the radioimmunoassay for somatostatin and the tissue levels of somatostatin immunoreactivity in different areas of the central nervous system. Chapter 4 deals with the release of immunoreactive somatostatin from incubated rat hypothalamus in vitro and the influence of other hormones and neuropeptides on this release. Chapter 5 describes the preparation of isolated nerve endings (synaptosomes) from four different areas of rat brain, the localisation of somatostatin to the synaptosome fraction of brain homogenates and the release of somatostatin from these synaptosomes. Chapter 6 deals with the release of somatostatin from incubated rat spinal cord in vitro. Chapter 7 presents the results of the characterisation of released immunoreactive material, the technique utilised being serial dilution of immunoreactive material and comparison to the standard curve, Sephadex gel chromatography, affinity chromatography, and the effect of released immunoreactive somatostatin on growth hormone release from perifused hemipituitaries in vitro, i.e. biological activity. Chapter 8 provides a summary of the main conclusions reached in this study and is followed by the Appendix describing chemical and biochemical methods, histological techniques, and statistical methods

  8. Methyllycaconitine prevents methamphetamine-induced effects in mouse striatum: involvement of alpha7 nicotinic receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escubedo, Elena; Chipana, Carlos; Pérez-Sánchez, Mónica; Camarasa, Jordi; Pubill, David

    2005-11-01

    In a previous study, we demonstrated that in rat striatal synaptosomes, methamphetamine (METH)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production was prevented by methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific antagonist of alpha7 neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (alpha7 nAChR). The aim of this study was to test the influence of MLA on acute METH effects and neurotoxicity in mice, using both in vivo and in vitro models. MLA inhibited METH-induced climbing behavior by 50%. Acute effects after 30-min preincubation with 1 microM METH also included a decrease in striatal synaptosome dopamine (DA) uptake, which was prevented by MLA. METH-induced neurotoxicity was assessed in vivo in terms of loss of striatal dopaminergic terminals (73%) and of tyrosine hydroxylase levels (by 90%) at 72 h post-treatment, which was significantly attenuated by MLA. Microglial activation [measured as 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxamide binding] was also present at 24 h post-treatment and was fully prevented by MLA, tending to confirm its neuroprotective activity. MLA had no effect on METH-induced hyperthermia. Additionally, flow cytometry assays showed that METH-induced ROS generation occurs inside synaptosomes from mouse striatum. This effect implied release of vesicular DA and was calcium-, neuronal nitric-oxide synthase-, and protein kinase C-dependent. MLA and alpha-bungarotoxin, but not dihydro-beta-erythroidine (an antagonist that blocks nAChR-containing beta2 subunits), fully prevented METH-induced ROS production without affecting vesicular DA uptake. The importance of this study lies not only in the neuroprotective effect elicited by the blockade of the alpha7 nicotinic receptors by MLA but also in that it proposes a new mechanism with which to study METH-induced acute and long-term effects.

  9. Insulin prevents mitochondrial generation of H₂O₂ in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Alexandre Pastoris; Haas, Clarissa Branco; Camacho-Pereira, Juliana; Brochier, Andressa Wigner; Gnoatto, Jussânia; Zimmer, Eduardo Rigon; de Souza, Diogo Onofre; Galina, Antonio; Portela, Luis Valmor

    2013-09-01

    The mitochondrial electron transport system (ETS) is a main source of cellular ROS, including hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂). The production of H₂O₂ also involves the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) and oxygen consumption. Impaired insulin signaling causes oxidative neuronal damage and places the brain at risk of neurodegeneration. We evaluated whether insulin signaling cross-talks with ETS components (complexes I and F₀F₁ATP synthase) and ΔΨm to regulate mitochondrial H₂O₂ production, in tissue preparations from rat brain. Insulin (50 to 100 ng/mL) decreased H₂O₂ production in synaptosomal preparations in high Na(+) buffer (polarized state), stimulated by glucose and pyruvate, without affecting the oxygen consumption. In addition, insulin (10 to 100 ng/mL) decreased H₂O₂ production induced by succinate in synaptosomes in high K(+) (depolarized state), whereas wortmannin and LY290042, inhibitors of the PI3K pathway, reversed this effect; heated insulin had no effect. Insulin decreased H₂O₂ production when complexes I and F₀F₁ATP synthase were inhibited by rotenone and oligomycin respectively suggesting a target effect on complex III. Also, insulin prevented the generation of maximum level of ∆Ψm induced by succinate. The PI3K inhibitors and heated insulin maintained the maximum level of ∆Ψm induced by succinate in synaptosomes in a depolarized state. Similarly, insulin decreased ROS production in neuronal cultures. In mitochondrial preparations, insulin neither modulated H2O2 production or oxygen consumption. In conclusion, the normal downstream insulin receptor signaling is necessary to regulate complex III of ETS avoiding the generation of maximal ∆Ψm and increased mitochondrial H2O2 production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Photoaffinity labeling of the dopamine reuptake carrier protein with 3-azido 3H GBR-12935

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, S.P.; Martenson, R.E.; Laing, P.; Thurkauf, A.; Decosta, B.; Rice, K.C.; Paul, S.M.

    1991-01-01

    A high affinity tritiated azido-diphenylpiperazine derivative, 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935, was synthesized as a potential photoaffinity probe of the dopamine transporter. Initially, the reversible binding of 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 to crude synaptosomal membranes from the rat striatum was characterized. Specific binding was sodium dependent and inhibited by a variety of drugs that are known to potently inhibit dopamine uptake. Other neurotransmitter uptake inhibitors, as well as cis-flupenthixol, a potent inhibitor of 3 H GBR-12935 binding to piperazine binding sites, failed to inhibit specific binding at concentrations of less than or equal to 10 microM. A good correlation was observed between the relative potencies of these drugs in inhibiting dopamine uptake into synaptosomes and in inhibiting specific 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 binding to rat striatal membranes. These data suggest that 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935, like other diphenylpiperazines such as 3 H GBR-12935 and 3 H GBR-12909, binds primarily to the dopamine transporter under defined assay conditions. After UV photolysis of crude synaptosomal membranes preincubated with 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 (1-2 nM), a single radiolabeled polypeptide with an apparent molecular mass of 80 kDa was observed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and fluorography. Photoincorporation of 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 into this polypeptide was inhibited selectively by compounds that inhibit the uptake of dopamine and was completely dependent on the presence of Na+. No photolabeled proteins were observed when cerebellar membranes were substituted for striatal membranes. Essentially complete adsorption of the radiolabeled 80-kDa polypeptide to wheat germ agglutinin and elution with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine strongly suggest that the dopamine transporter polypeptide photolabeled by 3-azido 3 H GBR-12935 is glycosylated

  11. A critical role for protein degradation in the nucleus accumbens core in cocaine reward memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhen-Yu; Liu, Meng-Meng; Xue, Yan-Xue; Ding, Zeng-Bo; Xue, Li-Fen; Zhai, Suo-Di; Lu, Lin

    2013-04-01

    The intense associative memories that develop between cocaine-paired contexts and rewarding stimuli contribute to cocaine seeking and relapse. Previous studies have shown impairment in cocaine reward memories by manipulating a labile state induced by memory retrieval, but the mechanisms that underlie the destabilization of cocaine reward memory are unknown. In this study, using a Pavlovian cocaine-induced conditioned place preference (CPP) procedure in rats, we tested the contribution of ubiquitin-proteasome system-dependent protein degradation in destabilization of cocaine reward memory. First, we found that polyubiquitinated protein expression levels and polyubiquitinated N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion (NSF) markedly increased 15 min after retrieval while NSF protein levels decreased 1 h after retrieval in the synaptosomal membrane fraction in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. We then found that infusion of the proteasome inhibitor lactacystin into the NAc core prevented the impairment of memory reconsolidation induced by the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin and reversed the effects of anisomycin on NSF and glutamate receptor 2 (GluR2) protein levels in the synaptosomal membrane fraction in the NAc core. We also found that lactacystin infusion into the NAc core but not into the shell immediately after extinction training sessions inhibited CPP extinction and reversed the extinction training-induced decrease in NSF and GluR2 in the synaptosomal membrane fraction in the NAc core. Finally, infusions of lactacystin by itself into the NAc core immediately after each training session or before the CPP retrieval test had no effect on the consolidation and retrieval of cocaine reward memory. These findings suggest that ubiquitin-proteasome system-dependent protein degradation is critical for retrieval-induced memory destabilization.

  12. Characterization and regulation of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake and release in rodent spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stauderman, K.A.

    1986-01-01

    The uptake and release of (/sup 3/H)-serotonin were investigated in rat spinal cord synaptosomes. In the uptake experiments, sodium-dependent and sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation processes were found. Sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation was: linear with sodium concentrations up to 180 mM; decreased by disruption of membrane integrity or ionic gradients; associated with purified synaptosomal fractions; and reduced after description of descending serotonergic neurons in the spinal cord. Of the uptake inhibitors tested, the most potent was fluoxetine (IC/sub 50/ 75 nM), followed by desipramine (IC/sub 50/ 430 nM) and nomifensine (IC/sub 50/ 950 nM). The sodium-independent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin accumulation process was insensitive to most treatments and probably represents nonspecific membrane binding. Thus, only sodium-dependent (/sup 3/H)-serotonin uptake represents the uptake process of serotonergic nerve terminals in rat spinal cord homogenates. In the release experiments, K/sup +/-induced release of previously accumulated (/sup 3/H)-serotonin was Ca/sup 2 +/-dependent, and originated from serotonergic synaptosomes. Exogenous serotonin and 5-methyoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine inhibited (/sup 3/H)-serotonin release in a concentration-dependent way. Of the antagonists tested, only methiothepin effectively blocked the effect of serotonin. These data support the existence of presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors on serotonergic nerve terminals in the rat spinal cord that act to inhibit a voltage and Ca/sup 2 +/-sensitive process linked to serotonin release. Alteration of spinai cord serotonergic function may therefore be possible by drugs acting on presynaptic serotonin autoreceptors in the spinal cord.

  13. CXCR4 and NMDA Receptors Are Functionally Coupled in Rat Hippocampal Noradrenergic and Glutamatergic Nerve Endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Prisco, Silvia; Olivero, Guendalina; Merega, Elisa; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Previous studies had shown that the HIV-1 capsidic glycoprotein gp120 (strain IIIB) modulates presynaptic release-regulating NMDA receptors on noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals. This study aims to assess whether the chemokine CXC4 receptors (CXCR4s) has a role in the gp120-mediated effects. The effect of CXCL12, the endogenous ligand at CXCR4, on the NMDA-mediated releasing activity was therefore investigated. Rat hippocampal synaptosomes were preloaded with [ 3 H]noradrenaline ([ 3 H]NA) or [ 3 H]D-aspartate ([ 3 H]D-Asp) and acutely exposed to CXCL12, to NMDA or to both agonists. CXCL12, inactive on its own, facilitated the NMDA-evoked tritium release. The NMDA antagonist MK-801 abolished the NMDA/CXCL12-evoked tritium release of both radiolabelled tracers, while the CXCR4 antagonist AMD 3100 halved it, suggesting that rat hippocampal nerve endings possess presynaptic release-regulating CXCR4 receptors colocalized with NMDA receptors. Accordingly, Western blot analysis confirmed the presence of CXCR4 proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes. In both synaptosomal preparations, CXCL12-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release was dependent upon PLC-mediated src-induced events leading to mobilization of Ca 2+ from intraterminal IP 3 -sensitive stores Finally, the gp120-induced facilitation of NMDA-mediated release of [ 3 H]NA and [ 3 H]D-Asp was prevented by AMD 3100. We propose that CXCR4s are functionally coupled to NMDA receptors in rat hippocampal noradrenergic and glutamatergic terminals and account for the gp120-induced modulation of the NMDA-mediated central effects. The NMDA/CXCR4 cross-talk could have a role in the neuropsychiatric symptoms often observed in HIV-1 positive patients.

  14. Development of paradigm for the study of amino acid neurotransmitter release in human autopsy brain samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuo, K.-W.; Dodd, P.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full text: This study attempted to establish a release protocol to characterize both the vesicular and cytoplasmic components of amino acid transmitter release in human synaptosomes. Experiments with rat synaptosomes showed that, with depolarizing concentrations of K + ions, vesicular release could be successfully differentiated from cytoplasmic release for preloaded L-[ 3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA. However, human tissue studies did not give clear-cut results. Experiments were carried out to optimize the release paradigm as well as to improve the vesicular uptake of labeled transmitters. A 'pulse- chase' protocol, with an unlabelled D-aspartate chase, was performed in human tissue samples in order to enhance the L-[ 3 H ] glutamate release signal derived from exocytosis by removing the cytoplasmic pool of L-[ 3 H ] glutamate first. However, the results showed that total release was not enhanced effectively in comparison with the non-pulse-chase protocol. In brief, the pulse-chase protocol did not build up the vesicular pool of L-[ 3 H ]glutamate, though the cytoplasmic L- [ 3 H ] glutamate pool was effectively depressed by D-aspartate. Further studies applied 4- aminopyridine (4-AP) to trigger release, to circumvent the problem of the reversal of plasma membrane transporters caused by raised K + ion concentrations. The results showed that the application of 4-AP elicited the release of amino acid transmitters from rat synaptosomes, but failed to produce successful release signals in the human tissue experiments. Our findings suggest that the vesicular compartment may be impaired by freezing and affected by post-mortem delay (PMD). Rat studies showed that the freezing step had a major effect on Ca 2+-dependent release, as less L- [3 H ]glutamate and [ 14 C ]GABA were released from the frozen rat tissue preparations. Moreover, there was an indication of a decline in L-[ 3 H ]glutamate release with increasing PMD. Copyright (2001) Australian Neuroscience Society

  15. Region-Specific Defects of Respiratory Capacities in the Ndufs4(KO Mouse Brain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernst-Bernhard Kayser

    Full Text Available Lack of NDUFS4, a subunit of mitochondrial complex I (NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase, causes Leigh syndrome (LS, a progressive encephalomyopathy. Knocking out Ndufs4, either systemically or in brain only, elicits LS in mice. In patients as well as in KO mice distinct regions of the brain degenerate while surrounding tissue survives despite systemic complex I dysfunction. For the understanding of disease etiology and ultimately for the development of rationale treatments for LS, it appears important to uncover the mechanisms that govern focal neurodegeneration.Here we used the Ndufs4(KO mouse to investigate whether regional and temporal differences in respiratory capacity of the brain could be correlated with neurodegeneration. In the KO the respiratory capacity of synaptosomes from the degeneration prone regions olfactory bulb, brainstem and cerebellum was significantly decreased. The difference was measurable even before the onset of neurological symptoms. Furthermore, neither compensating nor exacerbating changes in glycolytic capacity of the synaptosomes were found. By contrast, the KO retained near normal levels of synaptosomal respiration in the degeneration-resistant/resilient "rest" of the brain. We also investigated non-synaptic mitochondria. The KO expectedly had diminished capacity for oxidative phosphorylation (state 3 respiration with complex I dependent substrate combinations pyruvate/malate and glutamate/malate but surprisingly had normal activity with α-ketoglutarate/malate. No correlation between oxidative phosphorylation (pyruvate/malate driven state 3 respiration and neurodegeneration was found: Notably, state 3 remained constant in the KO while in controls it tended to increase with time leading to significant differences between the genotypes in older mice in both vulnerable and resilient brain regions. Neither regional ROS damage, measured as HNE-modified protein, nor regional complex I stability, assessed by blue native

  16. Expression of microRNAs and other small RNAs in prefrontal cortex in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depressed subjects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil R Smalheiser

    Full Text Available Because of the role played by miRNAs in post-transcriptional regulation of an array of genes, their impact in neuropsychiatric disease pathophysiology has increasingly been evident. In the present study, we assessed microRNA expression in prefrontal cortex (Brodmann area 10 of a well-characterized cohort of major depressed, bipolar, and schizophrenia subjects (obtained from Stanley Neuropathology Consortium; n = 15 in each group, using high throughput RT-PCR plates. Discrete miRNA alterations were observed in all disorders, as well as in suicide subjects (pooled across diagnostic categories compared to all non-suicide subjects. The changes in the schizophrenia group were partially similar to those in the bipolar group, but distinct from changes in depression and suicide. Intriguingly, those miRNAs which were down-regulated in the schizophrenia group tended to be synaptically enriched, whereas up-regulated miRNAs tended not to be. To follow this up, we purified synaptosomes from pooled samples of the schizophrenia vs. control groups and subjected them to Illumina deep sequencing. There was a significant loss of small RNA expression in schizophrenia synaptosomes only for certain sequence lengths within the miRNA range. Moreover, 73 miRNAs were significantly down-regulated whereas only one was up-regulated. Strikingly, across all expressed miRNAs in synaptosomes, there was a significant inverse correlation between the fold-change of a given miRNA seen in schizophrenia and its synaptic enrichment ratio observed in controls. Thus, synaptic miRNAs tended to be down-regulated in schizophrenia, and the more highly synaptically enriched miRNAs tended to show greater down-regulation. These findings point to some deficit in miRNA biogenesis, transport, processing or turnover in schizophrenia that is selective for the synaptic compartment. A novel class of ncRNA-derived small RNAs, shown to be strongly induced during an early phase of learning in mouse

  17. Expression of presynaptic markers in a neurodevelopmental animal model with relevance to schizophrenia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Anna S; Kaalund, Sanne Simone; Møller, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist phencyclidine (PCP) to rat pups at postnatal day (PND) 7, 9, and 11 [neonatal PCP (neoPCP) model] induces cognitive deficits similar to those observed in schizophrenia. Expression of presynaptic SNARE protein, synaptosomal......-associated protein of 25 kDa (Snap25), has been shown to be downregulated in postmortem brains from patients with schizophrenia. The present study was designed to investigate the long-term effects of neoPCP administration on expression of presynaptic markers altered in schizophrenia. Using radioactive in...

  18. Evidence for an inhibitory presynaptic component of neuroleptic drug action.

    OpenAIRE

    de Belleroche, J. S.; Bradford, H. F.

    1981-01-01

    1 The action of five neuroleptic drugs (haloperidol, cis-flupenthixol, chlorpromazine, fluphenazine and thioridazine) was studied on the synthesis and release of dopamine from rat striatal synaptosomes. 2. In vitro application of the drugs induced an inhibition of synthesis of [14C]-dopamine from L-[U-14C]-tyrosine and a decrease in the tissue content of [14-C]-dopamine, with IC50 values for the latter effect ranging from 3.6 x 10(-7) to 5.9 x 10(-5) M. The rank of their potency was similar t...

  19. The in vivo phosphorylation sites of rat brain dynamin I

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graham, Mark E; Anggono, Victor; Bache, Nicolai

    2007-01-01

    Dynamin I (dynI) is phosphorylated in synaptosomes at Ser(774) and Ser(778) by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 to regulate recruitment of syndapin I for synaptic vesicle endocytosis, and in PC12 cells on Ser(857). Hierarchical phosphorylation of Ser(774) precedes phosphorylation of Ser(778). In contrast......, Thr(780) phosphorylation by cdk5 has been reported as the sole site (Tomizawa, K., Sunada, S., Lu, Y. F., Oda, Y., Kinuta, M., Ohshima, T., Saito, T., Wei, F. Y., Matsushita, M., Li, S. T., Tsutsui, K., Hisanaga, S. I., Mikoshiba, K., Takei, K., and Matsui, H. (2003) J. Cell Biol. 163, 813...

  20. ASIC2 Subunits Target Acid-Sensing Ion Channels to the Synapse via an Association with PSD-95

    OpenAIRE

    Zha, Xiang-ming; Costa, Vivian; Harding, Anne Marie S.; Reznikov, Leah; Benson, Christopher J.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel-1a (ASIC1a) mediates H+-gated current to influence normal brain physiology and impact several models of disease. Although ASIC2 subunits are widely expressed in brain and modulate ASIC1a current, their function remains poorly understood. We identified ASIC2a in dendrites, dendritic spines, and brain synaptosomes. This localization largely relied on ASIC2a binding to PSD-95 and matched that of ASIC1a, which does not co-immunoprecipitate with PSD-95. We found that ASIC2...

  1. 5-HT2A-mGlu2/3 receptor complex in rat spinal cord glutamatergic nerve endings: A 5-HT2Ato mGlu2/3 signalling to amplify presynaptic mechanism of auto-control of glutamate exocytosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivero, Guendalina; Grilli, Massimo; Vergassola, Matteo; Bonfiglio, Tommaso; Padolecchia, Cristina; Garrone, Beatrice; Di Giorgio, Francesco Paolo; Tongiani, Serena; Usai, Cesare; Marchi, Mario; Pittaluga, Anna

    2018-05-01

    Presynaptic mGlu2/3 autoreceptors exist in rat spinal cord nerve terminals as suggested by the finding that LY379268 inhibited the 15 mM KCl-evoked release of [ 3 H]D-aspartate ([ 3 H]D-Asp) in a LY341495-sensitive manner. Spinal cord glutamatergic nerve terminals also possess presynaptic release-regulating 5-HT 2A heteroreceptors. Actually, the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp exocytosis from spinal cord synaptosomes was reduced by the 5-HT 2A agonist (±)DOI, an effect reversed by the 5-HT 2A antagonists MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and trazodone (TZD). We investigated whether mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and cross-talk in these terminals and if 5-HT 2A ligands modulate the mGlu2/3-mediated control of glutamate exocytosis. Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy highlighted the presence of mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor proteins in spinal cord VGLUT1 positive synaptosomes, where mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptor immunoreactivities largely colocalize. Furthermore, mGlu2/3 immunoprecipitates from spinal cord synaptosomes were also 5-HT 2A immunopositive. Interestingly, the 100 pM LY379268-induced reduction of the 15 mM KCl-evoked [ 3 H]D-Asp overflow as well as its inhibition by 100 nM (±)DOI became undetectable when the two agonists were concomitantly added. Conversely, 5-HT 2A antagonists (MDL11,939, MDL100907, ketanserin and TZD) reinforced the release-regulating activity of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors. Increased expression of mGlu2/3 receptor proteins in synaptosomal plasmamembranes paralleled the gain of function of the mGlu2/3 autoreceptors elicited by 5-HT 2A antagonists. Based on these results, we propose that in spinal cord glutamatergic terminals i) mGlu2/3 and 5-HT 2A receptors colocalize and interact one each other in an antagonist-like manner, ii) 5-HT 2A antagonists are indirect positive allosteric modulator of mGlu2/3 autoreceptors controlling glutamate exocytosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Estradiol receptors mediate estradiol-induced inhibition of mitochondrial Ca^{2+} efflux in rat caudate nucleus and brain stem

    OpenAIRE

    PETROVIC, SNJEZANA; MILOSEVIC, MAJA; RISTIC-MEDIC, DANIJELA; VELICKOVIC, NATASA; DRAKULIC, DUNJA; GRKOVIC, IVANA; HORVAT, ANICA

    2015-01-01

    Our earlier studies found that in vitro estradiol modulates mitochondrial Ca2+ transport in discrete brain regions. The present study examined the role of estradiol receptors (ERs) in estradiol-induced inhibition of Ca^{2+} efflux from synaptosomal mitochondria isolated from rat caudate nuclei and brain stems. Radioactively labeled CaCl_2 (0.6?0.75 µCi ^45CaCl_{2}) was used for Ca^{2+} transport monitoring. The results revealed that in the presence of ER antagonist 7\\alpha,17ß-[9[(4,4,5,5,5-...

  3. Effect of γ-irradiated carbohydrates on isolated synaptic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaler, G.V.; Lyskova, T.I.; Shadyro, O.I.; Samoilenko, S.G.; Edimecheva, I.P.; Aksentsev, S.L.; Konev, S.V.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of γ-irradiated solutions of carbohydrates, mainly glucose, upon Na + , K + -ATPase and lipid peroxidation in rat brain synaptosomal membranes was studied. The membrane damage by irradiated glucose was enhanced in the presence of Fe 2+ and was diminished when a free-radical scavenger (BHT) or metal chelators (EDTA, EGTA) were present. It is suggested that a key element in the free-radical membrane damage by irradiated carbohydrates is an Fe 2+ -complex of some species of the radiolysis products. Participation of radiotoxins of carbohydrate origin in radiogbiological effects is discussed. (orig.)

  4. Manipulation of isolated brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nano-sized particles and assessment of their effects on glutamate transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, Tatiana; Krisanova, Natalia; Borуsov, Arsenii; Sivko, Roman; Ostapchenko, Ludmila; Babic, Michal; Horak, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    The manipulation of brain nerve terminals by an external magnetic field promises breakthroughs in nano-neurotechnology. D-Mannose-coated superparamagnetic nanoparticles were synthesized by coprecipitation of Fe(II) and Fe(III) salts followed by oxidation with sodium hypochlorite and addition of D-mannose. Effects of D-mannose-coated superparamagnetic maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles on key characteristics of the glutamatergic neurotransmission were analysed. Using radiolabeled L-[(14)C]glutamate, it was shown that D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles did not affect high-affinity Na(+)-dependent uptake, tonic release and the extracellular level of L-[(14)C]glutamate in isolated rat brain nerve terminals (synaptosomes). Also, the membrane potential of synaptosomes and acidification of synaptic vesicles was not changed as a result of the application of D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles. This was demonstrated with the potential-sensitive fluorescent dye rhodamine 6G and the pH-sensitive dye acridine orange. The study also focused on the analysis of the potential use of these nanoparticles for manipulation of nerve terminals by an external magnetic field. It was shown that more than 84.3 ± 5.0% of L-[(14)C]glutamate-loaded synaptosomes (1 mg of protein/mL) incubated for 5 min with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (250 µg/mL) moved to an area, in which the magnet (250 mT, gradient 5.5 Т/m) was applied compared to 33.5 ± 3.0% of the control and 48.6 ± 3.0% of samples that were treated with uncoated nanoparticles. Therefore, isolated brain nerve terminals can be easily manipulated by an external magnetic field using D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles, while the key characteristics of glutamatergic neurotransmission are not affected. In other words, functionally active synaptosomes labeled with D-mannose-coated γ-Fe2O3 nanoparticles were obtained.

  5. Does extracellular calcium determine what pool of GABA is the target for alpha-latrotoxin?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storchak, L G; Linetska, M V; Himmelreich, N H

    2002-04-01

    Presynaptic neurotoxin alpha-latrotoxin, from the venom of Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus, causes massive [(3)H]GABA release from rat brain synaptosomes, irrespective of calcium presence in the extracellular medium. Whether the binding of alpha-latrotoxin to Ca(2+)-dependent (neurexin 1 alpha) or to Ca(2+)-independent (latrophilin) receptor triggers [(3)H]GABA release by the same mechanisms or different ones, inducing either exocytotic process or outflow by mobile membrane GABA transporter, is unknown. We examined alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release from synaptosomes which cytosolic [(3)H]GABA pool was depleted either by applying competitive inhibitors of the GABA transporter, nipecotic acid and 2,4-diaminobutyric acid, or by permeation with digitonin. We also compared the effect of the GABA transporter inhibitors on depolarisation-evoked and alpha-latrotoxin-evoked [(3)H]GABA release using as depolarising agents 4-aminopyridine and high KCl in the Ca(2+)-containing and in Ca(2+)-free medium, respectively. Incubation of synaptosomes with nipecotic acid induced the essential acceleration of unstimulated [(3)H]GABA release and deep inhibition of high KCl-evoked Ca(2+)-independent [(3)H]GABA release. In contrast, at the similar conditions the effect of alpha-latrotoxin was greatly augmented with respect to the control response. Another way to assay what GABA pool was involved in alpha-latrotoxin-induced release lays in an analysis of the effects of depolarisation and alpha-latrotoxin in consecutive order. The preliminary 4-aminopyridine-stimulated [(3)H]GABA release attenuated the toxin effect. But when depolarisation occurred in Ca(2+)-free medium, no influence on alpha-latrotoxin effect was revealed. Employing digitonin-permeated synaptosomes, we have shown that alpha-latrotoxin could stimulate [3H]GABA release in the medium with 1mM EGTA, this effect of the toxin was blocked by concanavalin A and was ATP-dependent. The latter suggests that alpha

  6. Effect of hypoxia on the incorporation of [2-3H] glycerol and [1-14C[-palmitate into lipids of various brain regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberghina, M.; Giuffrida, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The lipid metabolism in guinea pig brain after intermittent hypoxia, prolonged for 80 hrs, was markedly impaired. The in vivo incorporation of [2-3H] glycerol and [1-14C] palmitate into lipids of microsomes, mitochondria, myelin, and synaptosomes, purified form cerebral hemispheres, was significantly lower in the hypoxic animals than in the controls. The same effect was observed on the incorporation of labeled precursors into lipids of mitochondria purified from cerebellum and brainstem. In particular, the labeling of th major phospholipids present - ie, phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) - in the mitochondria of the three brain regions examined decreased after hypoxic treatment

  7. [Detection of ciguatoxins: advantages and drawbacks of different biological methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boydron-Le Garrec, Raphaële; Benoit, Evelyne; Sauviat, Martin-Pierre; Laurent, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Ciguatera is a seafood intoxication that results from ingestion of reef fish contaminated with ciguatoxins at levels orally toxic for humans. Precursors of those toxins, gambiertoxins, are produced by benthic dinoflagellates (genus Gambierdiscus), and then accumulated and biotransformed by herbivorous and carnivorous fishes into ciguatoxins, more toxic for humans. In the absence of specific treatment, that disease remains a health problem with otherwise adverse socio-economic impacts. Thus a cost-effective means of detecting ciguatoxins in fish has long been searched for. Many assays have been developed, including in vivo, in vitro, chemical or immunochemical approaches. This review focuses on some biological methods, from the well-standardised mouse assay to the specific radio-labelled ligand binding assay that is performed on rat brain synaptosomes. In addition to the mouse, the chick and the mongoose were still recently used, in particular for preliminary tests before ciguatoxin extraction from fish, since assays in these animals can directly assay the whole flesh. In contrast, various other in vivo methods, such as the kitten, mosquito and diptera larvae assays, were abandoned despite their interesting results. Finally, the mouse neuroblastoma and rat brain synaptosome assays, carried out in vitro as alternative approaches to animal-using assays, are highly sensitive and much more specific than the in vivo methods to detect ciguatoxins.

  8. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract reverses amyloid beta-peptide-induced isoprostane production in rat brain in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunetti, Luigi; Orlando, Giustino; Menghini, Luigi; Ferrante, Claudio; Chiavaroli, Annalisa; Vacca, Michele

    2006-11-01

    Isoprostanes are prostaglandin (PG) isomers generated from oxygen radical peroxidation of arachidonic acid, which are reliable markers of membrane oxidative damage. Aging is characterized by an imbalance between the generation of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant detoxification pathways. Ginkgo biloba leaf extract is reputed as a neuroprotective antioxidant agent. We have tested the effects of a Ginkgo biloba extract {containing 24.1 % flavonoids and 181 % terpene lactones [bilobalide (0.542 %), ginkgolide A (0.570 %), ginkgolide B (0.293 %), ginkgolide C (0.263 %), and ginkgolide J (0.138 %)]} on the production of 8-iso-PGF2alpha from rat brain synaptosomes obtained from young (3 months old) or aged (12 and 24 months old) rats, both in the basal state and after oxidative stress induced by either hydrogen peroxide or amyloid beta-peptide. Our findings show that Ginkgo biloba extract pretreatment is able to completely reverse both basal and hydrogen peroxide-stimulated isoprostane production (IC50 of 81.92 microM and 31.89 microM, respectively). Amyloid beta-peptide-induced isoprostane production was also inhibited, both in young and aged rats, to a level even lower than that in unstimulated synaptosomes. This suggests that the oxygen radical scavenging properties of the Ginkgo biloba extract are fully effective in young, as well as in old rats, showing a greater inhibition of isoprostane production in the latter.

  9. Differential effects of benzodiazepines on phospholipid methylation in hippocampus and cerebellum of rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacconi, M.T.; Salmona, M.

    1988-01-01

    To elucidate the relationship between the occupancy of BDZ binding sites and phospholipid methylation in brain, the authors examined phosphatidylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase (PEMT) activity in synaptosomes of rat hippocampi and cerebella in the presence of BDZ ligands with different modes of action. We found that Ro 5-4864, a specific ligand for peripheral type receptors, increased PL methylation in hippocampal and cerebellar synaptosomes. This effect was directly related to receptor occupancy, since the specific antagonist PK11195 inhibited the rise in PEMT activity induced by Ro 5-4864. Clonazepam, on the other hand, tended to reduce PL production in cerebellum and hippocampus except for hiccocampal (/sup 3/H)-phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine which was elevated by 40 to 70% at doses ranging from 10/sup -9/ to 10/sup -6/M. When equimolar concentrations of the antagonist Ro 15-1788 were given in association the clonazepam-induced phosphatidyl-N-monomethylethanolamine increase was reduced by 70%. These data support the involvement of structural and functional membrane alterations in the action of BDZ. 20 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Mechanism of toxicity of MPTP: A cause of Parkinsonism in human beings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denton, T.L.

    1988-01-01

    1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was found in 1983 to cause a syndrome virtually identical to Parkinson's Disease in humans and other primates. The symptoms, as in idiopathic Parkinson's syndrome, are due to destruction of dopaminergic neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra resulting in depletion of dopamine in the basal ganglia. The mechanism of toxicity was investigated with a dopamine containing cell line, PC12, a MPTP resistant variant (MPTP r ), and synaptosomes from the striate cortex of mice, rats, guinea pigs and a monkey. The mechanism of acute effects was studied with membrane preparations from human and rat striate cortex. MPTP displaced [ 3 H]haloperidol from binding sites in human and rat striate cortex, but could not displace [ 3 H]flupenthixol, suggesting that MPTP is a D2 receptor ligand of equivalent potency in both species. MPTP was a competitive inhibitor of uptake of [ 3 H]dopamine in PC12 but did not accumulate in PC12 or in synaptosomes of rat, guinea pig, mouse or monkey striate cortex. 100 uM MPTP depleted catecholamine levels in PC12 cells by about 50%, without killing

  11. [{sup 14}C]Serotonin uptake and [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine kinetics in porcine brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, D.F. E-mail: dfsmith@inet.uni2.dk; Hansen, S.B.; Oestergaard, L.; Gee, A.D.; Danielsen, E.; Ishizu, K.; Bender, D.; Poulsen, P.H.; Gjedde, A

    2001-08-01

    As part of our program of developing PET tracers for neuroimaging of psychotropic compounds, venlafaxine, an antidepressant drug, was evaluated. First, we measured in vitro rates of serotonin uptake in synaptosomes prepared from selected regions of porcine brain. Then, we determined the pharmacokinetics of venlafaxine, [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]-labeled for PET. Synaptosomal studies showed that the active uptake of [{sup 14}C]5-HT differed markedly between brain regions, with highest rates in hypothalamus, raphe region, and thalamus, and lowest rates in cortex and cerebellum. PET studies showed that the unidirectional rate of uptake of [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine from blood to brain was highest in the hypothalamus, raphe region, thalamus and basal ganglia and lowest in the cortex and cerebellum. Under normal physiological conditions, the capillary permeability-surface area (PS) product for [O-methyl-{sup 11}C]venlafaxine could not be estimated, because of complete flow-limitation of the cerebral uptake. Nevertheless, a correlation occurred between the apparent partition volume of the radiotracer and the rate of active uptake of 5-HT in selected regions of the porcine brain. During hypercapnia, limitations of blood-brain transfer were observed, giving PS-products for water that were only ca. 50% higher than those of venlafaxine. Thus, under normal physiological conditions, the rate of uptake of venlafaxine from blood into brain is completely flow-limited.

  12. Cystatins from bovine brain: purification, some properties, and action on substance P degrading activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghajanyan, H G; Arzumanyan, A M; Arutunyan, A A; Akopyan, T N

    1988-08-01

    Two cystatins were purified from tissue extract of bovine brain by alkaline treatment, acetone fractionation, gel chromatography on Sephadex G-75, and affinity chromatography on S-carboxymethyl-papain-Sepharose. One of the inhibitors had a relatively high molecular mass, 25 kDa (HMM-cystatin) with pI 4.7, and the other, 11 kDa (LMM-cystatin) with pI 5.23. Both inhibitors showed considerable stability at pH 2 and 80 degrees C. The cystatins inhibited papain, ficin, and cathepsins B and H, but not trypsin, chymotrypsin, thermolysin, nagarse, and cathepsin D. Ki values for the complexes of papain and the inhibitors were estimated to be 2.8 x 10(-10) M for HMM-cystatin and 1.3 x 10(-9) M for LMM-cystatin. Both purified cystatins prevented degradation of substance P by soluble fraction and lysosomal extract obtained from synaptosomes, but did not suppress the cleavage of the peptide by synaptosomal plasma membranes.

  13. Distribution of physostigmine and metabolites in brain subcellular fractions of the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, B.F.; Somani, S.M.

    1987-01-01

    The distribution of 3 H-physostigmine (Phy) has been studied in the rat brain subcellular fractions at various time intervals following i.v. injection. 3 H-Phy or its metabolites rapidly accumulate into the cytoplasm of cells and penetrates the intracellular compartments. Kinetic studies of the subcellular distribution of radioactivity (RA) per gm of rat brain following i.v. injection of 3 H-Phy show peak concentrations at 30 min in all subcellular fractions with the exception of mitochondria. In the mitochondrial fraction the RA levels continue to rise from 4682 +/- 875 DPM/gm at 5 min to 27,474 +/- 2825 DPM/gm at 60 min (P < .05). The cytosol contains the highest RA: 223,341 +/- 21,044 DPM/gm at 30 min which declined to 53,475 +/- 3756 DPM/gm at 60 min. RA in synaptosome, microsomes and myelin increases from 5 to 30 min, and declines at 60 min. In vitro studies did not show a greater uptake of RA by the mitochondrial or synaptosomal fractions. The finding of relatively high concentrations of RA in the mitochondrial fraction at 60 min increases the likelihood that Phy or its metabolites could interfere with the physiological function of the organelle. 21 references, 1 figure, 2 tables

  14. Regulation of Phosphatidic Acid Metabolism by Sphingolipids in the Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana J. Pasquaré

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the way ceramide, sphingosine, ceramide 1-phosphate, and sphingosine 1-phosphate modulate the generation of second lipid messengers from phosphatidic acid in two experimental models of the central nervous system: in vertebrate rod outer segments prepared from dark-adapted retinas as well as in rod outer segments prepared from light-adapted retinas and in rat cerebral cortex synaptosomes under physiological aging conditions. Particular attention is paid to lipid phosphate phosphatase, diacylglycerol lipase, and monoacylglycerol lipase. Based on the findings reported in this paper, it can be concluded that proteins related to phototransduction phenomena are involved in the effects derived from sphingosine 1-phosphate/sphingosine or ceramide 1-phosphate/ceramide and that age-related changes occur in the metabolism of phosphatidic acid from cerebral cortex synaptosomes in the presence of either sphingosine 1-phosphate/sphingosine or ceramide 1-phosphate/ceramide. The present paper demonstrates, in two different models of central nervous system, how sphingolipids influence phosphatidic acid metabolism under different physiological conditions such as light and aging.

  15. Species dependent dual modulation of the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel by dihydroergosine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pericic, D.; Tvrdeic, A. (Rudjer Boskovic Institute, Zagreb (Yugoslavia))

    1990-01-01

    Dihydroergosine enhanced the incidence of bicuculline induced convulsions in female rats, while 100 mg/kg of dihydroergosine given to female mice made 45% convulsive dose of bicuculline to be subconvulsive. The same dose of dihydroergosine enhanced in mice the latency of bicuculline-induced convulsions. Although, in in vitro experiments dihydroergosine showed very weak ability to prevent the binding of {sup 3}H-muscimol, the drug was able to diminish and to augment the IC{sub 50} of bicuculline and GABA when added to crude synaptosomal pellet of the rat and mouse brain respectively. Lower concentrations of dihydroergosine stimulated and higher inhibited {sup 3}H-TBOB binding to the crude synaptosomal pellet of the rat brain. In the preparation of mouse brain dihydroergosine produced only inhibition of {sup 3}H-TBOB binding. Only slight quantitative differences were observed in bicuculline-induced stimulation and in GABA- and diazepam-induced inhibition of {sup 3}H-TBOB binding between the two species. The results suggest that the opposite species-dependent effects of dihydroergosine on bicuculline-induced convulsions are due to the ability of this drug to modulate species-dependently the benzodiazepine/GABA receptor chloride channel complex.

  16. Effective Mechanism for Synthesis of Neurotransmitter Glutamate and its Loading into Synaptic Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Kouji; Ueda, Tetsufumi

    2017-01-01

    Glutamate accumulation into synaptic vesicles is a pivotal step in glutamate transmission. This process is achieved by a vesicular glutamate transporter (VGLUT) coupled to v-type proton ATPase. Normal synaptic transmission, in particular during intensive neuronal firing, would demand rapid transmitter re-filling of emptied synaptic vesicles. We have previously shown that isolated synaptic vesicles are capable of synthesizing glutamate from α-ketoglutarate (not from glutamine) by vesicle-bound aspartate aminotransferase for immediate uptake, in addition to ATP required for uptake by vesicle-bound glycolytic enzymes. This suggests that local synthesis of these substances, essential for glutamate transmission, could occur at the synaptic vesicle. Here we provide evidence that synaptosomes (pinched-off nerve terminals) also accumulate α-ketoglutarate-derived glutamate into synaptic vesicles within, at the expense of ATP generated through glycolysis. Glutamine-derived glutamate is also accumulated into synaptic vesicles in synaptosomes. The underlying mechanism is discussed. It is suggested that local synthesis of both glutamate and ATP at the presynaptic synaptic vesicle would represent an efficient mechanism for swift glutamate loading into synaptic vesicles, supporting maintenance of normal synaptic transmission.

  17. Adolescent and adult rat cortical protein kinase A display divergent responses to acute ethanol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gigante, Eduardo D; Santerre, Jessica L; Carter, Jenna M; Werner, David F

    2014-08-01

    Adolescent rats display reduced sensitivity to many dysphoria-related effects of alcohol (ethanol) including motor ataxia and sedative hypnosis, but the underlying neurobiological factors that contribute to these differences remain unknown. The cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) pathway, particularly the type II regulatory subunit (RII), has been implicated in ethanol-induced molecular and behavioral responses in adults. Therefore, the current study examined cerebral cortical PKA in adolescent and adult ethanol responses. With the exception of early adolescence, PKA RIIα and RIIβ subunit levels largely did not differ from adult levels in either whole cell lysate or P2 synaptosomal expression. However, following acute ethanol exposure, PKA RIIβ P2 synaptosomal expression and activity were increased in adults, but not in adolescents. Behaviorally, intracerebroventricular administration of the PKA activator Sp-cAMP and inhibitor Rp-cAMP prior to ethanol administration increased adolescent sensitivity to the sedative-hypnotic effects of ethanol compared to controls. Sp-cAMP was ineffective in adults whereas Rp-cAMP suggestively reduced loss of righting reflex (LORR) with paralleled increases in blood ethanol concentrations. Overall, these data suggest that PKA activity modulates the sedative/hypnotic effects of ethanol and may potentially play a wider role in the differential ethanol responses observed between adolescents and adults. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of ionizing radiation on voltage-sensitive sodium channels in the brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, W.A.; Mullin, M.J.

    1984-01-01

    It has generally been assumed that the mature central nervous system is not sensitive to ionizing radiation because cell division of neurons no longer occurs. In general, rather large doses have been required in order to observe changes in morphological, physiological, biochemical, and behavioral endpoints. In order to focus on one of the most fundamental mechanisms in the generation and propagation of action potentials, experiments were undertaken to determine whether ionizing radiation could alter the ability of the neurotoxins, veratridine and batrachotoxin, to stimulate /sup 22/Na uptake into synaptosomes. Synaptosomal preparations were irradiated with varying doses of high-energy electrons or gamma photons. Both qualities of radiation reduced /sup 22/Na uptake stimulated by either toxin after doses as low as 100 rad in a concentration-dependent manner. When concentration-response curves for the neurotoxins were derived at increasing doses of radiation, the maximum effectiveness of the toxins was progressively diminished. The data suggest that the central nervous system may be more sensitive to the effects of ionizing radiation than previously believed and that the effects observed may reflect a loss of viable sodium channels. Such effects may have biological significance

  19. Binding assays for the quantitative detection of P. brevis polyether neurotoxins in biological samples and antibodies as therapeutic aids for polyether marine intoxication. Annual report, 1 December 1987-30 November 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baden, D.G.

    1988-12-15

    The polyether lipid-soluble toxins isolated from the marine dinoflagellate Ptychodiscus brevis (formerly Gymnodinium breve) can be detected using two separate types of specific binding reaction. Using tritiated PbTx-3 as a specific probe for binding to voltage-dependent sodium channels in rat brain synaptosomes or to specific polyclonal antibodies, binding equilibria and displacement by unlabeled brevetoxins were compared. Labeled toxin can be displaced in a competitive manner by any of the other 5 naturally-occurring toxins; the quantitative displacement ability of each appears to reflect individual potency in fish bioassay. A comparison of ED50 in Radioimmunoassay and ED50 in synaptosome binding assay indicates that the former assay is useful for detection of toxins which possess the structural backbone of PbTx-3, the immunizing hapten. Thus, the two assays have quantitative applicability; the sodium channel with respect to potency and the antibodies with respect to structure. Microtiter plate assays utilizing each specific brevetoxin binding component and enzyme-linked toxin hapten have been successful and indicate a general applicability of colorimetric prototypes. There, is however, considerable manipulation required to decrease non-specific binding of the hydrophobic toxin-enzyme complex to the plates. Preliminary studies aimed at producing monoclonal antibodies have been explored using brevetoxins linked to keyhole limpet hemocyanin.

  20. The short- and long-term proteomic effects of sleep deprivation on the cortical and thalamic synapses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simor, Attila; Györffy, Balázs András; Gulyássy, Péter; Völgyi, Katalin; Tóth, Vilmos; Todorov, Mihail Ivilinov; Kis, Viktor; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Szabó, Zoltán; Janáky, Tamás; Drahos, László; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin Adrienna

    2017-03-01

    Acute total sleep deprivation (SD) impairs memory consolidation, attention, working memory and perception. Structural, electrophysiological and molecular experimental approaches provided evidences for the involvement of sleep in synaptic functions. Despite the wide scientific interest on the effects of sleep on the synapse, there is a lack of systematic investigation of sleep-related changes in the synaptic proteome. We isolated parietal cortical and thalamic synaptosomes of rats after 8h of total SD by gentle handling and 16h after the end of deprivation to investigate the short- and longer-term effects of SD on the synaptic proteome, respectively. The SD efficiency was verified by electrophysiology. Protein abundance alterations of the synaptosomes were analyzed by fluorescent two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis and by tandem mass spectrometry. As several altered proteins were found to be involved in synaptic strength regulation, our data can support the synaptic homeostasis hypothesis function of sleep and highlight the long-term influence of SD after the recovery sleep period, mostly on cortical synapses. Furthermore, the large-scale and brain area-specific protein network change in the synapses may support both ideas of sleep-related synaptogenesis and molecular maintenance and reorganization in normal rat brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. [Neurotoxin of the black widow spider and its interaction with receptors from the rat brain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushkarev, Iu A; Grishin, E V

    1986-01-01

    A presynaptic neurotoxin isolated from the venom of the Central Asia spider karakurt (Black Widow Spider, Latrodectus mactans tredecimguttatus) is shown to consist of two identical subunits of mol. weight about 118 kDa. The iodinated neurotoxin binds to the rat brain synaptosomal plasma membranes with Kd 0.1 nM (Bmax 0.1 pmol/mg of protein) at 37 degrees C, and with Kd 0.35 nM (Bmax 0.2 pmol/mg of protein) at 5 degrees C. At intermediate temperatures both types of receptors are detectable. It is supposed that the dimeric form of the toxin interacts with a single class of receptors possessing lateral mobility in the membrane. By the use of different bifunctional reagents it is revealed that the neurotoxin interacts with a presynaptic membrane protein of mol. weight 95 kDa. A protein of the same size accompanied by a 71 kDa protein was isolated by the affinity chromatography of solubilized synaptosomal membranes on the absorbent, containing immobilized neurotoxin.

  2. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu; Lu, Cheng-Wei; Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng; Wang, Su-Jane

    2012-01-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K + channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca 2+ ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca 2+ concentration ([Ca 2+ ] C ), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca v 2.2 (N-type) and Ca v 2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na + /Ca 2+ exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca 2+ entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat cerebrocortical synaptosomes. ► This action did

  3. Hispidulin inhibits the release of glutamate in rat cerebrocortical nerve terminals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Tzu-Yu [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Yuan Ze University, Taoyuan, 320, Taiwan (China); Lu, Cheng-Wei [Department of Anesthesiology, Far-Eastern Memorial Hospital, Pan-Chiao District, New Taipei, 22060, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chia-Chuan; Lu, Jyh-Feng [School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); Wang, Su-Jane, E-mail: med0003@mail.fju.edu.tw [Graduate Institute of Basic Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China); School of Medicine, Fu Jen Catholic University, No.510, Zhongzheng Rd., Xinzhuang Dist., New Taipei, 24205, Taiwan (China)

    2012-09-01

    Hispidulin, a naturally occurring flavone, has been reported to have an antiepileptic profile. An excessive release of glutamate is considered to be related to neuropathology of epilepsy. We investigated whether hispidulin affected endogenous glutamate release in rat cerebral cortex nerve terminals (synaptosomes) and explored the possible mechanism. Hispidulin inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K{sup +} channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effects of hispidulin on the evoked glutamate release were prevented by the chelation of extracellular Ca{sup 2+} ions and the vesicular transporter inhibitor bafilomycin A1. However, the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate did not have any effect on hispidulin action. Hispidulin reduced the depolarization-induced increase in cytosolic free Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub C}), but did not alter 4-AP-mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Ca{sub v}2.2 (N-type) and Ca{sub v}2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na{sup +}/Ca{sup 2+} exchange. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK) inhibition also prevented the inhibitory effect of hispidulin on evoked glutamate release. Western blot analyses showed that hispidulin decreased the 4-AP-induced phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2) and synaptic vesicle-associated protein synapsin I, a major presynaptic substrate for ERK; this decrease was also blocked by the MEK inhibitor. Moreover, the inhibition of glutamate release by hispidulin was strongly attenuated in mice without synapsin I. These results show that hispidulin inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca{sup 2+} entry and ERK/synapsin I signaling pathway. -- Highlights: ► Hispidulin inhibited glutamate release from rat

  4. Differing effects of transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by nerve terminals before and after exposure of rats to artificial gravity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisova, T.; Krisanova, N.; Himmelreich, N.

    Glutamate is the major excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain. Subsequent to its release from glutamatergic neurons and activation of receptors, it is removed from extracellular space by high affinity Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters, which utilize the Na^+/K^+ electrochemical gradient as a driving force and located in nerve terminals and astrocytes. The glutamate transporters may modify the time course of synaptic events. Like glutamate itself, glutamate transporters are somehow involved in almost all aspects of normal and abnormal brain activity (e.g. cerebral ischemia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy and schizophrenia). The present study assessed transporter inhibitor for the ability to inhibit glutamate uptake by synaptosomes at the normal and hypergravity conditions (rats were rotated in a long-arm centrifuge at ten-G during one-hour period). DL-threo-beta-benzyloxyaspartate (DL-TBOA) is a newly developed competitive inhibitor of the high-affinity, Na^+-dependent glutamate transporters. As a potent, non- transported inhibitor of glutamate transporters, DL-TBOA promises to be a valuable new compound for the study of glutamatergic mechanisms. We demonstrated that DL-TBOA inhibited glutamate uptake ( 100 μM glutamate, 30 sec incubation period) in dose-dependent manner as in control as in hypergravity. The effect of this transport inhibitor on glutamate uptake by control synaptosomes and synaptosomes prepared of animals exposed to hypergravity was different. IC50 values calculated on the basis of curves of non-linear regression kinetic analysis was 18±2 μM and 11±2 μM ((P≤0,05) before and after exposure to artificial gravity, respectively. Inhibition caused by 10 μM DL-TBOA was significantly increased from 38,0±3,8 % in control group to 51,0±4,1 % in animals, exposed to hypergravity (P≤0,05). Thus, DL-TBOA had complex effect on glutamate uptake process and perhaps, became more potent under

  5. Altered acetylcholine release in the hippocampus of dystrophin-deficient mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parames, S F; Coletta-Yudice, E D; Nogueira, F M; Nering de Sousa, M B; Hayashi, M A; Lima-Landman, M T R; Lapa, A J; Souccar, C

    2014-06-06

    Mild cognitive impairments have been described in one-third of patients with Duchenne muscle dystrophy (DMD). DMD is characterized by progressive and irreversible muscle degeneration caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene and lack of the protein expression. Previously, we have reported altered concentrations of α7- and β2-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) in hippocampal membranes of dystrophic (mdx) mice. This suggests that alterations in the central cholinergic synapses are associated with dystrophin deficiency. In this study, we examined the release of acetylcholine (ACh) and the level of the vesicular ACh transporter (VAChT) using synaptosomes isolated from brain regions that normally have a high density of dystrophin (cortex, hippocampus and cerebellum), in control and mdx mice at 4 and 12months of age. ACh release evoked by nicotinic stimulation or K(+) depolarization was measured as the tritium outflow from superfused synaptosomes preloaded with [(3)H]-choline. The results showed that the evoked tritium release was Ca(2+)-dependent and mostly formed by [(3)H]-ACh. β2-containing nAChRs were involved in agonist-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release in control and mdx preparations. In hippocampal synaptosomes from 12-month-old mdx mice, nAChR-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release increased by 57% compared to age-matched controls. Moreover, there was a 98% increase in [(3)H]-ACh release compared to 4-month-old mdx mice. [(3)H]-ACh release evoked by K(+) depolarization was not altered, while the VAChT protein level was decreased (19%) compared to that of age-matched controls. In cortical and cerebellar preparations, there was no difference in nAChR-evoked [(3)H]-ACh release and VAChT levels between mdx and age-matched control groups. Our previous findings and the presynaptic alterations observed in the hippocampi of 12-month-old mdx mice indicate possible dysfunction of nicotinic cholinergic synapses associated with dystrophin deficiency. These changes may

  6. Pyrethroid insecticides and radioligand displacement from the GABA receptor chloride ionophore complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crofton, K.M.; Reiter, L.W.; Mailman, R.B.

    1987-01-01

    Radioligand binding displacement studies were conducted to determine the effects of Type I and II pyrethroids on /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FLU), /sup 3/H-muscimol (MUS), and (/sup 35/S-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) binding. Competition experiments with /sup 3/H-FLU and /sup 3/H-MUS indicate a lack of competition for binding by the pyrethroids. Type I pyrethroids failed to compete for the binding of (/sup 35/S-TBPS at concentrations as high as 50 pM. Type II pyrethroids inhibited (/sup 35/S-TBPS binding to rat brain synaptosomes with Ki values ranging from 5-10 pM. The data presented suggest that the interaction of Type II pyrethroids with the GABA receptor-ionophore complex is restricted to a site near the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site.

  7. Changes in lipid composition of the brain cellular membranes of an hibernating mammal during its circannual rhythm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, J; Montaudon, D; Dubourg, L; Rebel, G; Miro, J L; Canguilhem, B

    1982-01-01

    The lipid composition of whole brain hemispheres and subcellular fractions of European Hamsters (Cricetus cricetus) was investigated at four different periods of the year. 1. No difference was observed in winter between hibernating animals and active animals awake for 24 hr. 2. A slight increase of cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio was observed in winter. 3. A slight increase of the ratio ethanolamine phosphoglycerides/choline phosphoglycerides was observed in summer and autumn. 4. Some changes in sugar moieties proportions of gangliosides were observed, with a tendency of increased polysialylation in winter. 5. An increase of docosahexaenoic acid was observed in summer, while a slight increase of linoleic acid and of the monounsaturated fatty acids was observed in winter. These changes were mainly exhibited in the synaptosomal fraction. All the changes observed were of very small magnitude and might not be sufficient for the maintenance of a fluid state of membranes during hibernation.

  8. Inhibition of calmodulin - regulated calcium pump activity in rat brain by toxaphene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trottman, C.H.; Moorthy, K.S.

    1986-01-01

    In vivo effects of toxaphene on calcium pump activity in rat brain synaptosomes was studied. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were dosed with toxaphene at 0,25,50, and 100 mg/kg/day for 3 days and sacrificed 24 h after last dose. Ca 2+ -ATPase activity and 45 Ca uptake were determined in brain P 2 fraction. Toxaphene inhibited both Ca 2+ -ATPase activity and 45 Ca 2+ uptake and the inhibition was dose dependent. Both substrate and Ca 2+ activation kinetics of Ca 2+ -ATPase indicated non-competitive type of inhibition as evidenced by decreased catalytic velocity but not enzyme-substrate affinity. The inhibited Ca 2+ -ATPase activity and Ca 2+ uptake were restored to normal level by exogenously added calmodulin which increased both velocity and affinity. The inhibition of Ca 2+ -ATPase activity and Ca 2+ uptake and restoration by calmodulin suggests that toxaphene may impair active calcium transport mechanisms by decreasing regulator protein calmodulin levels

  9. [3H] 5,7-dichlorokynurenic acid, a high affinity ligand for the NMDA receptor glycine regulatory site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurt, S.D.; Baron, B.M.

    1991-01-01

    The NMDA subtype of glutamate receptors is allosterically linked to a strychnine-insensitive glycine regulatory site. Kynurenic acid and its halogenated derivatives are non-competitive NMDA antagonists acting at the glycine site. The authors have prepared [3H] 5,7-dichlorokyrurenic acid (DCKA) as an antagonist radioligand and have characterized its binding. 3-Bromo-5,7-DCKA was catalytically dehalogenated in the presence of tritium gas and HPLC purified to yield [3H] 5,7-DCKA with a specific activity of 17.6 Ci/mmol. [3H] 5,7-DCKA bound to rat brain synaptosomes with a Kd of 69 ± 23 nM and Bmax = 14.5 ± 3.2 pmoles/mg protein. Binding was 65-70% specific at 10 nM [3H] 5,7-DCKA. This ligand is thus more selective and has higher affinity than [3H] glycine, in addition to being an antagonist

  10. Selective effects of aniracetam across receptor types and forms of synaptic facilitation in hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, P; Staubli, U; Kessler, M; Lynch, G

    1991-10-01

    Aniracetam reversibly increased synaptic responses mediated by the AMPA but not the NMDA subclass of glutamate receptors in hippocampus and was considerably more potent than structurally similar nootropics. The drug had greater effects on field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (EPSPs) in the dentate gyrus and CA1 region than it did in the CA3 region, suggesting that it differentiates between variants of the AMPA receptor. Ligand binding to glutamate receptors in synaptosomal membrane fractions was minimally changed by aniracetam. Finally, the percent facilitation produced by aniracetam in the CA1 region was not reduced by any of three treatments (4-aminopyridine, changes in extracellular calcium concentrations, paired-pulse stimulation) that affect release but, in accord with a previous report, was substantially decreased by long-term potentiation. These results support the conclusion that aniracetam selectively increases the conductance of a subgroup of synaptic AMPA receptors in hippocampus and suggest that receptor changes underlie the expression of long-term potentiation.

  11. Reduced acetylcholine synthesis in Alzheimer's disease is a clinically relevant change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, D.M.; Neary, D.; Sims, N.R.; Snowden, J.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents a study of patients in the presenium. Psychological assessment was carried out to provide measures of relative severity of dementia, with which pathological and chemical indices of impairment could be compared. Fresh cortical biopsy tissue permitted the assay of ChAT activity, and also the determination of acetylcholine synthesis in a preparation enriched in cortical synaptosomes. Additionally, choline uptake has been measured for comparison. Nuerosurgical samples from all patients were handled and processed for measuring acetylcholine synthesis by incorporation of U- 14 C-glucoase into C 14-acetylcholine in neocortical tissue prisms. Cortical sections from most of the patients were found on light microscopy to contain the characteristic changes of Alzheimer's disease

  12. 2-Amino-3-(3-hydroxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)propionic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Tommy N; Janin, Yves L; Nielsen, Birgitte

    2002-01-01

    In order to identify new subtype-selective (S)-glutamate (Glu) receptor ligands we have synthesized (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-1,2,5-thiadiazol-4-yl)propionic acid [(RS)-TDPA]. Resolution of (RS)-TDPA by chiral chromatography was performed using a Crownpac CR(+) column affording (R)- and (S......)-TDPA of high enantiomeric purity (enantiomeric excess=99.9%). An X-ray crystallographic analysis revealed that the early eluting enantiomer has R-configuration. Both enantiomers showed high affinity as well as high agonist activity at (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA...... a remarkably low AMPA receptor stereoselectivity, (S)-TDPA showing the highest affinity and (R)-TDPA the most potent agonist activity. In addition, (S)-TDPA was shown to interact with synaptosomal Glu uptake sites displacing [(3)H](R)-aspartic acid (IC(50 ) approximately 390 microM). An enantiospecific...

  13. A novel dopamine transporter transgenic mouse line for identification and purification of midbrain dopaminergic neurons reveals midbrain heterogeneity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mia Apuschkin; Stilling, Sara; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels

    2015-01-01

    Midbrain dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons are a heterogeneous cell group, composed of functionally distinct cell populations projecting to the basal ganglia, prefrontal cortex and limbic system. Despite their functional significance, the midbrain population of DAergic neurons is sparse, constituting...... in synaptosomal DA uptake nor altered levels of DAT and TH in both striatum and midbrain. No behavioural difference between Dat1-eGFP and wild-type was found, suggesting that the strain is not aberrant. Finally, cell populations highly enriched in DAergic neurons can be obtained from postnatal mice...... only 20 000-30 000 neurons in mice, and development of novel tools to identify these cells is warranted. Here, a bacterial artificial chromosome mouse line [Dat1-enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)] from the Gene Expression Nervous System Atlas (GENSAT) that expresses eGFP under control...

  14. Deficit of spinal cord glycine/strychnine receptors in inherited myoclonus of Poll Hereford calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundlach, A L; Dodd, P R; Grabara, C S; Watson, W E; Johnston, G A; Harper, P A; Dennis, J A; Healy, P J

    1988-09-30

    Inherited myoclonus of Poll Hereford calves is characterized by hyperesthesia and myoclonic jerks of the skeletal musculature, which occur spontaneously and in response to sensory stimuli. The disease shows autosomal recessive inheritance, and significant proportions of the Poll Hereford herds in many countries are thought to be carriers of the mutant gene. Studies revealed a specific and marked (90 to 95 percent) deficit in [3H]strychnine binding sites in spinal cord membranes from myoclonic animals compared to controls, reflecting a loss of, or defect in, glycine/strychnine receptors. Spinal cord synaptosomes prepared from affected animals showed a significantly increased ability to accumulate [3H]glycine, indicating an increased capacity of the high-affinity neuronal uptake system for glycine. In contrast, stimulus-induced glycine release and spinal cord glycine concentrations were unaltered.

  15. Neuroprotective effects of the novel glutamate transporter inhibitor (-)-3-hydroxy-4,5,6,6a-tetrahydro-3aH-pyrrolo[3,4-d]-isoxazole-4-carboxylic acid, which preferentially inhibits reverse transport (glutamate release) compared with glutamate reuptake

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colleoni, Simona; Jensen, Anders Asbjørn; Landucci, Elisa

    2008-01-01

    of glutamate uptake. In organotypic rat hippocampal slices and mixed mouse brain cortical cultures, TBOA, but not (-)-HIP-A, had toxic effects. Under ischemic conditions, a neuroprotective effect was found with 10 to 30 microM (-)-HIP-A, but not with 10 to 30 microM TBOA or 100 microM (-)-HIP-A. The effect...... of (-)-HIP-A suggests that, under ischemia, EAATs mediate both release (reverse transport) and uptake of glutamate. The neuroprotection with the lower (-)-HIP-A concentrations may indicate a selective inhibition of the reverse transport confirming the data obtained in synaptosomes. The selective interference...... with glutamate-induced glutamate release might offer a new strategy for neuroprotective action....

  16. Taurine effects on 45Ca2+ transport in retinal subcellular fractions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pasantes-Morales, H.; Ademe, R.M.; Lopez-Colome, A.M.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of taurine on 45 Ca 2+ transport by subcellular fractions from the chick retina was examined. An inhibitory action of taurine on 45 Ca 2+ uptake was observed in retinal fractions incubated for 1-5 min in a Krebs-bicarbonate medium, pH 7.4. In the crude nuclear fraction, 25 mM taurine produced a decrease of 50% in 45 Ca 2+ uptake; in the crude synaptosomal fraction, taurine reduced 45 Ca 2+ accumulation by 70%; the maximum inhibitory effect of taurine on 45 Ca 2+ uptake (80%) was observed in a fraction containing outer segments and pigment epithelium cells. Taurine effect was specific, dose-dependent and related to osmotically sensitive particles. The results suggest a role of taurine in the regulation of calcium fluxes in the retina. (Auth.)

  17. Novel 1-hydroxyazole bioisosteres of glutamic acid. Synthesis, protolytic properties, and pharmacology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensbøl, Tine B; Uhlmann, Peter; Morel, Sandrine

    2002-01-01

    +/- 30 microM) and EAAT2 (IC(50) = 300 +/- 80 microM). By contrast, compound 8b showed no appreciable affinity for Glu uptake sites, neither synaptosomal nor cloned. Compounds 9a-c and 10a,b, possessing 1-hydroxyimidazole as the terminal acidic function, were devoid of activity in all of the systems...... tested. Protolytic properties of compounds 7a,b, 8b, and 9b were determined by titration, and a correlation between the pK(a) values and the activity at AMPA receptors was apparent. Optimized structures of all the synthesized ligands were fitted to the known crystal structure of an AMPA-GluR2 construct...

  18. Effects of white spirits on rat brain 5-HT receptor functions and synaptic remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Plenge, P.; Jørgensen, O.S.

    2001-01-01

    , and subcellular levels. This study investigates the effects of two types of white spirit on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporters (5-HTT), 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptor expression in forebrain, and on neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 25-kDa synaptosomal associated protein (SNAP-25) concentrations when......Previously, inhalation exposure to different types of white spirit (i.e. complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic, alkyl aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons) has been shown to induce neurochemical effects in rat brains. Especially, the serotonergic system was involved at the global, regional...... applied as indices for synaptic remodeling in forebrain, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0, 400, or 800 ppm of aromatic (20 vol.% aromatic hydrocarbons) or dearomatized white spirit (catalytically hydrogenated white spirit) in the inhaled air for 6 h/day, 7 days...

  19. Effect of runway training on rat brain tyrosine hydroxylase: differential effect of continuous and partial reinforcement schedules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boarder, M R; Feldon, J; Gray, J A; Fillenz, M

    1979-12-01

    Previous experiments have implicated ascending noradrenergic systems in the development of the behavioural responses to different patterns of reward. In this report food deprived male Sprague--Dawley rats were trained to run a straight alley for good reward on a continuous reinforcement (CRF) or a partial reinforcement (PRF) schedule. Tyrosine hydroxylase measured in a partially solubilized preparation from hippocampus and hypothalamus at the end of acquisition was not different from controls, indicating that enzyme induction does not occur during either training schedules. However, hippocampal synaptosomal tyrosine hydroxylation rates from the CRF group was significantly higher than from either the PRF group or the handled controls. This indicates that at the end of the acquisition schedule the noradrenergic projection to hippocampus was more active in the CRF group than with the PRF group or the handled control.

  20. Oridonin Attenuates Synaptic Loss and Cognitive Deficits in an Aβ1-42-Induced Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulei Wang

    Full Text Available Synaptic loss induced by beta-amyloid (Aβ plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease (AD, but the mechanisms underlying this process remain unknown. In this study, we found that oridonin (Ori rescued synaptic loss induced by Aβ1-42 in vivo and in vitro and attenuated the alterations in dendritic structure and spine density observed in the hippocampus of AD mice. In addition, Ori increased the expression of PSD-95 and synaptophysin and promoted mitochondrial activity in the synaptosomes of AD mice. Ori also activated the BDNF/TrkB/CREB signaling pathway in the hippocampus of AD mice. Furthermore, in the Morris water maze test, Ori reduced latency and searching distance and increased the number of platform crosses in AD mice. These data suggest that Ori might prevent synaptic loss and improve behavioral symptoms in Aβ1-42-induced AD mice.

  1. Effects of sodium on cell surface and intracellular 3H-naloxone binding sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollack, A.E.; Wooten, G.F.

    1987-01-01

    The binding of the opiate antagonist 3 H-naloxone was examined in rat whole brain homogenates and in crude subcellular fractions of these homogenates (nuclear, synaptosomal, and mitochondrial fractions) using buffers that approximated intra- (low sodium concentration) and extracellular (high sodium concentration) fluids. Saturation studies showed a two-fold decrease in the dissociation constant (Kd) in all subcellular fractions examined in extracellular buffer compared to intracellular buffer. In contrast, there was no significant effect of the buffers on the Bmax. Thus, 3 H-naloxone did not distinguish between binding sites present on cell surface and intracellular tissues in these two buffers. These results show that the sodium effect of opiate antagonist binding is probably not a function of altered selection of intra- and extracellular binding sites. 17 references, 2 tables

  2. Mazindol anorexia is mediated by activation of dopaminergic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruk, Z L; Zarrindast, M R

    1976-01-01

    1 Anorexia in rats following injections of mazindol (0.1-8 mg/kg i.p.) could be antagonized by pretreatment with a dopamine receptor blocker (primozide) but not by pretreatment with an alpha-adrenoceptor blocker (phenoxybenzamine), a beta-adrenoceptor blocker ((-)-propranolol), or a 5-hydroxytryptamine receptor blocker (methergoline). 2 In rats with a unilateral lesion in the substantia nigra made by stereotaxic injection of 6-hydroxydopamine, mazindol caused a dose-dependent turning towards the lesioned side, indicating an indirect mechanism of action. This effect could be antagonized by pretreatment with a dopamine receptor blocker. 3 In rats pretreated with reserpine and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine, mazindol did not have any motor stimulant action. 4 In vitro studies with synaptosomes prepared from rat brain, indicated that mazindol blocks uptake and causes release of dopamine. 5 It is concluded that the anorectic action of mazindol is mediated by a dopaminergic mechanism. PMID:990591

  3. Effects of white spirits on rat brain 5-HT receptor functions and synaptic remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Henrik Rye; Plenge, P.; Jørgensen, O.S.

    2001-01-01

    Previously, inhalation exposure to different types of white spirit (i.e. complex mixtures of aliphatic, aromatic, alkyl aromatic, and naphthenic hydrocarbons) has been shown to induce neurochemical effects in rat brains. Especially, the serotonergic system was involved at the global, regional......, and subcellular levels. This study investigates the effects of two types of white spirit on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) transporters (5-HTT), 5-HT2A and 5-HT4 receptor expression in forebrain, and on neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) and 25-kDa synaptosomal associated protein (SNAP-25) concentrations when...... applied as indices for synaptic remodeling in forebrain, hippocampus, and entorhinal cortex. Male Wistar rats were exposed to 0, 400, or 800 ppm of aromatic (20 vol.% aromatic hydrocarbons) or dearomatized white spirit (catalytically hydrogenated white spirit) in the inhaled air for 6 h/day, 7 days...

  4. The SNARE protein SNAP23 and the SNARE-interacting protein Munc18c in human skeletal muscle are implicated in insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Vind, Birgitte

    2010-01-01

    association between lipid accumulation in skeletal muscle and insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes in humans, as well as to identify a potential regulator of SNAP23. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We analyzed skeletal muscle biopsies from patients with type 2 diabetes and healthy, insulin-sensitive control......OBJECTIVE: Our previous studies suggest that the SNARE protein synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP23) is involved in the link between increased lipid levels and insulin resistance in cardiomyocytes. The objective was to determine whether SNAP23 may also be involved in the known...... subjects for expression (mRNA and protein) and intracellular localization (subcellular fractionation and immunohistochemistry) of SNAP23, and for expression of proteins known to interact with SNARE proteins. Insulin resistance was determined by a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp. Potential mechanisms...

  5. Aging synaptic mitochondria exhibit dynamic proteomic changes while maintaining bioenergetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-04-01

    Aging correlates with a progressive impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis and is an influential factor for several forms of neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related alterations in synaptosomal mitochondria, a neuronal mitochondria population highly susceptible to insults and critical for brain function, remain incompletely understood. Therefore this study investigates the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic and bioenergetic alterations that occur with age. The utilization of a state of the art quantitative proteomics approach allowed for the comparison of protein expression levels in synaptic mitochondria isolated from 5 (mature), 12 (old), and 24 (aged) month old mice. During the process of aging we find that dynamic proteomic alterations occur in synaptic mitochondria. Despite direct (mitochondrial DNA deletions) and indirect (increased antioxidant protein levels) signs of mitochondrial damage in the aged mice, there was an overall maintenance of mitochondrial function. Therefore the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic changes that occur with aging correlate with preservation of synaptic mitochondrial function.

  6. Pentobarbital modifies the lipid raft-protein interaction: A first clue about the anesthesia mechanism on NMDA and GABAAreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sierra-Valdez, Francisco Javier; Ruiz-Suárez, J C; Delint-Ramirez, Ilse

    2016-11-01

    Recent studies have shown that anesthetic agents alter the physical properties of lipid rafts on model membranes. However, if this destabilization occurs in brain membranes, altering the lipid raft-protein interaction, remains unknown. We analyzed the effects produced by pentobarbital (PB) on brain plasma membranes and lipid rafts in vivo. We characterized for the first time the thermotropic behavior of plasma membranes, synaptosomes, and lipid rafts from rat brain. We found that the transition temperature from the ordered gel to disordered liquid phase of lipids is close to physiological temperature. We then studied the effect of PB on protein composition of lipid rafts. Our results show a reduction of the total protein associated to rafts, with a higher reduction of the NMDAR compared to the GABA A receptor. Both receptors are considered the main targets of PB. In general, our results suggest that lipid rafts could be plausible mediators in anesthetic action. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Characterization of [125I]omega-conotoxin binding to brain N calcium channels and (-)[3H] desmethoxyverapamil binding to novel calcium channels in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    This dissertation provides molecular evidence for a diversity of Ca 2+ channels in neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. First, I demonstrated specific, reversible, saturable binding sites for omega [ 125 I]conotoxin GVIA (omega[ 125 I]CTX) in rat brain and rabbit sympathetic ganglion. Omega [ 125 I]CTX binding has a unique pharmacology, ion selectivity, and anatomical distribution in rat brain. Omega [ 125 I]CTX binding was solubilized, retaining an appropriate pharmacology and ion selectivity. Omega[ 125 I]CTX binding may be associated with a Ca 2+ channel because the K/sub D/ of omega [ 125 I]CTX is similar to the IC 50 of inhibition of depolarization-induced 45 Ca 2+ flux into rat brain synaptosomes. Specific (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxyverapamil ((-)[ 3 H]DMV) binding sites were demonstrated on osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cell membranes

  8. Purification of a neurotoxin from the venom of the 'armed spider' and synthesis of a radioactive probe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea; Renterghem, Catherine Van; Mori, Yasuo; Martin-Moutot, Nicole; Mansuelle, Pascal; Sampieri, Francois; Seagar, Michel; Lima, Maria Elena de

    2002-01-01

    The venom of the 'armed spider', a South American spider from the genus Phoneutria contains several toxins that exert important biological effects. ω-Phonetoxin IIA (ω-PtxIIA) is a potent neurotoxin from this venom evoking flaccid paralysis and death after intracerebro-ventricular injection in mouse. This toxin blocks HVA calcium channels. Calcium channels have been shown to be important targets in neurological pathophysiology like ataxia and migraine. In order to shed more light on the mechanism of action of w-PtxIIA, we have purified this toxin to synthesize a radioactive probe. Crude venom was fractionated in three steps of reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Spectrometric analysis of the purified fraction (causing flaccid paralysis) was recorded on a MALDI-TOF Perseptive Voyager Elite spectrometer and a 8363 kDa peptide was detected. After amino acid sequencing the purity of the peptide was confirmed and it was identified as ω-PtxIIA. ω-PtxIIA was radiolabeled with 125 I using the lactoperoxidase as a oxidizing agent. The stability of the probe synthesized was verified by the binding studies on rat brain synaptosomal membranes. The specific and saturable binding of the 125 I-ω-PtxIIA to the membranes indicate that the iodine introduced in the toxin molecule did not interfere with its activity. Native ω-PtxIIA competed with the 125 I-ω-PtxIIA bound to the specific sites on synaptosomes (IC 50 = 0.54 n M). In this paper we described a new and simpler purification protocol of the ω-PtxIIA and synthesized a probe that proved to be useful to study the mechanism of action of 125 I-ω-PtxIIA. Selective toxins for calcium channel are very useful tools to the study of some neuronal pathophysiology. (author)

  9. Purification of a neurotoxin from the venom of the 'armed spider' and synthesis of a radioactive probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Raquel Gouvea [INSERM, Marseille (France). Lab. Canaux Ioniques]|[Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Renterghem, Catherine Van; Mori, Yasuo; Martin-Moutot, Nicole; Mansuelle, Pascal; Sampieri, Francois; Seagar, Michel [INSERM, Marseille (France). Lab. Canaux Ioniques; Cordeiro, Marta Nascimento; Diniz, Carlos Ribeiro [FUNED - Fundacao Ezequiel Dias, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Lima, Maria Elena de [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biologicas. Lab. de Venenos e Toxinas Animais

    2002-07-01

    The venom of the 'armed spider', a South American spider from the genus Phoneutria contains several toxins that exert important biological effects. {omega}-Phonetoxin IIA ({omega}-PtxIIA) is a potent neurotoxin from this venom evoking flaccid paralysis and death after intracerebro-ventricular injection in mouse. This toxin blocks HVA calcium channels. Calcium channels have been shown to be important targets in neurological pathophysiology like ataxia and migraine. In order to shed more light on the mechanism of action of w-PtxIIA, we have purified this toxin to synthesize a radioactive probe. Crude venom was fractionated in three steps of reversed-phase liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Spectrometric analysis of the purified fraction (causing flaccid paralysis) was recorded on a MALDI-TOF Perseptive Voyager Elite spectrometer and a 8363 kDa peptide was detected. After amino acid sequencing the purity of the peptide was confirmed and it was identified as {omega}-PtxIIA. {omega}-PtxIIA was radiolabeled with {sup 125} I using the lactoperoxidase as a oxidizing agent. The stability of the probe synthesized was verified by the binding studies on rat brain synaptosomal membranes. The specific and saturable binding of the {sup 125} I-{omega}-PtxIIA to the membranes indicate that the iodine introduced in the toxin molecule did not interfere with its activity. Native {omega}-PtxIIA competed with the {sup 125} I-{omega}-PtxIIA bound to the specific sites on synaptosomes (IC{sub 50}= 0.54 n M). In this paper we described a new and simpler purification protocol of the {omega}-PtxIIA and synthesized a probe that proved to be useful to study the mechanism of action of {sup 125} I-{omega}-PtxIIA. Selective toxins for calcium channel are very useful tools to the study of some neuronal pathophysiology. (author)

  10. Effects of antibiotics on uptake of calcium into isolated nerve terminals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atchison, W.D.; Adgate, L.; Beaman, C.M.

    1988-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to determine whether several antibiotics which are known to block neuromuscular transmission would impair depolarization-dependent and/or -independent uptake of calcium into isolated nerve terminals prepared from forebrain synaptosomes of rats by conventional methods. Antibiotics tested for potential block of Ca++ uptake included the aminoglycosides neomycin and streptomycin, the lincosamide clindamycin, oxytetracycline and polymyxin B. Drugs were applied in concentrations ranging from 1 to 1000 microM. Uptake of 45Ca was determined during depolarization induced by an elevated K+ concentration (77.5 mM). Influxes of 45Ca during 1 and 10 sec of depolarization were used to assess Ca++ uptake via a fast, inactivating path and total uptake, respectively. Uptake of 45Ca during 10 sec of depolarization into synaptosomes which were previously depolarized for 10 sec in the presence of 77.5 mM K+ but in the absence of external Ca++ was used to measure uptake during a slow, noninactivating path. Total depolarization-dependent uptake of 45Ca was depressed significantly by all antibiotics tested except oxytetracycline; however, the various agents differed with respect to their efficacy and potency as blockers of Ca influx. The fast component of uptake, which is thought to be associated with neurotransmitter release, was decreased significantly by all antibiotics. Neomycin and polymyxin were the most potent and most effective at lowering fast phase 45Ca influx; streptomycin, was intermediate in effectiveness whereas clindamycin and oxytetracycline were only effective at concentrations greater than or equal to 100 microM. Only clindamycin, streptomycin and polymyxin B caused significant reductions in the slow phase of 45Ca uptake

  11. Sex-specific differences in mitochondria biogenesis, morphology, respiratory function, and ROS homeostasis in young mouse heart and brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalifa, Abdel Rahman M; Abdel-Rahman, Engy A; Mahmoud, Ali M; Ali, Mohamed H; Noureldin, Maha; Saber, Saber H; Mohsen, Mahmoud; Ali, Sameh S

    2017-03-01

    Sex-specific differences in mitochondrial function and free radical homeostasis are reported in the context of aging but not well-established in pathogeneses occurring early in life. Here, we examine if sex disparity in mitochondria function, morphology, and redox status starts early and hence can be implicated in sexual dimorphism in cardiac as well as neurological disorders prevalent at young age. Although mitochondrial activity in the heart did not significantly vary between sexes, female brain exhibited enhanced respiration and higher reserve capacity. This was associated with lower H 2 O 2 production in female cardiac and brain tissues. Using transmission electron microscopy, we found that the number of female cardiac mitochondria is moderately greater (117 ± 3%, P  = 0.049, N  = 4) than male's, which increased significantly for cortical mitochondria (134 ± 4%, P  = 0.001, N  = 4). However, male's cardiac mitochondria exhibited fragmented, circular, and smaller mitochondria relative to female's mitochondria, while no morphologic sex-dependent differences were observed in cortical mitochondria. No sex differences were detected in Nox2 and Nox4 proteins or O 2 -consuming/H 2 O 2 -producing activities in brain homogenate or synaptosomes. However, a strong trend of increased EPR-detected NOX superoxide in male synaptosomes hinted at higher superoxide dismutase activity in female brains, which was confirmed by two independent protocols. We also provide direct evidence that respiring mitochondria generally produce an order-of-magnitude lower reactive oxygen species (ROS) proportions than currently estimated. Our results indicate that sex differences in mitochondrial biogenesis, bioenergetics, and morphology may start at young age and that sex-dependent SOD capacity may be responsible for differences in ROS homeostasis in heart and brain. © 2017 The Authors. Physiological Reports published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Physiological

  12. Memantine protects against amphetamine derivatives-induced neurotoxic damage in rodents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; Torres, I; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-06-01

    We hypothesize that 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) interact with alpha-7 nicotinic receptors (nAChR). Here we examine whether memantine (MEM), an antagonist of NMDAR and alpha-7 nAChR, prevents MDMA and METH neurotoxicity. MEM prevented both serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rat and dopaminergic lesion by METH in mice. MEM has a better protective effect in front of MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity than methyllycaconitine (MLA), a specific alpha-7 nAChR antagonist. The double antagonism that MEM exerts on NMDA receptor and on alpha-7 nAChR, probably contributes to its effectiveness. MEM inhibited reactive oxygen species production induced by MDMA or METH in synaptosomes. This effect was not modified by NMDA receptor antagonists, but reversed by alpha-7 nAChR agonist (PNU 282987), demonstrating a preventive effect of MEM as a result of it blocking alpha-7 nAChR. In synaptosomes, MDMA decreased 5-HT uptake by about 40%. This decrease was prevented by MEM and by MLA but enhanced by PNU 282987. A similar pattern was observed when we measured the dopamine transport inhibited by METH. The inhibition of both transporters by amphetamine derivatives seems to be regulated by the calcium incorporation after activation of alpha-7 nAChR. MDMA competitively displaces [(3)H]MLA from rat brain membranes. MEM and METH also displace [(3)H]MLA with non-competitive displacement profiles that fit a two-site model. We conclude that MEM prevents MDMA and METH effects in rodents. MEM may offer neuroprotection against neurotoxicity induced by MDMA and METH by preventing the deleterious effects of these amphetamine derivatives on their respective transporters.

  13. Local synthesis of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins in the presynaptic nerve terminal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioio, A E; Eyman, M; Zhang, H; Lavina, Z S; Giuditta, A; Kaplan, B B

    2001-06-01

    One of the central tenets in neuroscience has been that the protein constituents of distal compartments of the neuron (e.g., the axon and nerve terminal) are synthesized in the nerve cell body and are subsequently transported to their ultimate sites of function. In contrast to this postulate, we have established previously that a heterogeneous population of mRNAs and biologically active polyribosomes exist in the giant axon and presynaptic nerve terminals of the photoreceptor neurons in squid. We report that these mRNA populations contain mRNAs for nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins to include: cytochrome oxidase subunit 17, propionyl-CoA carboxylase (EC 6.4.1.3), dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase (EC 1.8.1.4), and coenzyme Q subunit 7. The mRNA for heat shock protein 70, a chaperone protein known to be involved in the import of proteins into mitochondria, has also been identified. Electrophoretic gel analysis of newly synthesized proteins in the synaptosomal fraction isolated from the squid optic lobe revealed that the large presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neuron contain a cytoplasmic protein synthetic system. Importantly, a significant amount of the cycloheximide resistant proteins locally synthesized in the terminal becomes associated with mitochondria. PCR analysis of RNA from synaptosomal polysomes establishes that COX17 and CoQ7 mRNAs are being actively translated. Taken together, these findings indicate that proteins required for the maintenance of mitochondrial function are synthesized locally in the presynaptic nerve terminal, and call attention to the intimacy of the relationship between the terminal and its energy generating system. J. Neurosci. Res. 64:447-453, 2001. Published 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Elevated NADPH oxidase activity contributes to oxidative stress and cell death in Huntington's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia, Antonio; Sapp, Ellen; Kimm, Jeffrey S.; McClory, Hollis; Reeves, Patrick B.; Alexander, Jonathan; Ansong, Kwadwo A.; Masso, Nicholas; Frosch, Matthew P.; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Li, Xueyi; DiFiglia, Marian

    2013-01-01

    A mutation in the huntingtin (Htt) gene produces mutant Htt and Huntington's disease (HD), a neurodegenerative disorder. HD patients have oxidative damage in the brain, but the causes are unclear. Compared with controls, we found brain levels of NADPH oxidase (NOX) activity, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS), elevated in human HD postmortem cortex and striatum and highest in striatum of presymptomatic individuals. Synaptosome fractions from cortex and striatum of HD140Q/140Q mice had elevated NOX activity at 3 months of age and a further rise at 6 and 12 months compared with synaptosomes of age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. High NOX activity in primary cortical and striatal neurons of HD140Q/140Q mice correlated with more ROS and neurite swellings. These features and neuronal cell death were markedly reduced by treatment with NOX inhibitors such as diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), apocynin (APO) and VAS2870. The rise in ROS levels in mitochondria of HD140Q/140Q neurons followed the rise in NOX activity and inhibiting only mitochondrial ROS was not neuroprotective. Mutant Htt colocalized at plasma membrane lipid rafts with gp91-phox, a catalytic subunit for the NOX2 isoform. Assembly of NOX2 components at lipid rafts requires activation of Rac1 which was also elevated in HD140Q/140Q neurons. HD140Q/140Q mice bred to gp91-phox knock-out mice had lower NOX activity in the brain and in primary neurons, and neurons had normal ROS levels and significantly improved survival. These findings suggest that increased NOX2 activity at lipid rafts is an early and major source of oxidative stress and cell death in HD140Q/140Q neurons. PMID:23223017

  15. The human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat and its discrete fragments evoke selective release of acetylcholine from human and rat cerebrocortical terminals through species-specific mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feligioni, Marco; Raiteri, Luca; Pattarini, Roberto; Grilli, Massimo; Bruzzone, Santina; Cavazzani, Paolo; Raiteri, Maurizio; Pittaluga, Anna

    2003-07-30

    The effect of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 protein Tat was investigated on neurotransmitter release from human and rat cortical nerve endings. Tat failed to affect the release of several neurotransmitters, such as glutamate, GABA, norepinephrine, and others, but it evoked the release of [3H]ACh via increase of cytosolic [Ca2+]. In human nerve terminals, the Tat effect partly depends on Ca2+ entry through voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels, because Cd2+ halved the Tat-evoked release. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluR) and mobilization of Ca2+ from IP3-sensitive intraterminal stores are also involved, because the Tat effect was prevented by mGluR antagonists 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride and 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester and by the IP3 receptor antagonists heparin and xestospongin C. Furthermore, the group I selective mGlu agonist (RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine enhanced [3H]ACh release. In rat nerve terminals, the Tat-evoked release neither depends on external Ca2+ ions entry nor on IP3-mediated mechanisms. Tat seems to cause mobilization of Ca2+ from ryanodine-sensitive internal stores because its effect was prevented by both 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose and dantrolene. The Tat-evoked release from human synaptosomes was mimicked by the peptide sequences Tat 32-62, Tat 49-86, and Tat 41-60. In contrast, the Tat 49-86 and Tat 61-80 fragments, but not the Tat 32-62 fragment, were active in rat synaptosomes. In conclusion, Tat elicits Ca2+-dependent [3H]ACh release by species-specific intraterminal mechanisms by binding via discrete amino acid sequences to different receptive sites on human and rat cholinergic terminals.

  16. Acute stress increases depolarization-evoked glutamate release in the rat prefrontal/frontal cortex: the dampening action of antidepressants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Musazzi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Behavioral stress is recognized as a main risk factor for neuropsychiatric diseases. Converging evidence suggested that acute stress is associated with increase of excitatory transmission in certain forebrain areas. Aim of this work was to investigate the mechanism whereby acute stress increases glutamate release, and if therapeutic drugs prevent the effect of stress on glutamate release.Rats were chronically treated with vehicle or drugs employed for therapy of mood/anxiety disorders (fluoxetine, desipramine, venlafaxine, agomelatine and then subjected to unpredictable footshock stress. Acute stress induced marked increase in depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex in superfusion, and the chronic drug treatments prevented the increase of glutamate release. Stress induced rapid increase in the circulating levels of corticosterone in all rats (both vehicle- and drug-treated, and glutamate release increase was blocked by previous administration of selective antagonist of glucocorticoid receptor (RU 486. On the molecular level, stress induced accumulation of presynaptic SNARE complexes in synaptic membranes (both in vehicle- and drug-treated rats. Patch-clamp recordings of pyramidal neurons in the prefrontal cortex revealed that stress increased glutamatergic transmission through both pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms, and that antidepressants may normalize it by reducing release probability.Acute footshock stress up-regulated depolarization-evoked release of glutamate from synaptosomes of prefrontal/frontal cortex. Stress-induced increase of glutamate release was dependent on stimulation of glucocorticoid receptor by corticosterone. Because all drugs employed did not block either elevation of corticosterone or accumulation of SNARE complexes, the dampening action of the drugs on glutamate release must be downstream of these processes. This novel effect of antidepressants on the response to stress

  17. Interaction of tachykinins with their receptors studied with cyclic analogues of substance P and neurokinin B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploux, O.; Lavielle, S.; Chassaing, G.; Julien, S.; Marquet, A.; D' Orleans-Juste, P.; Dion, S.; Regoli, D.; Beaujouan, J.C.; Bergstroem, L.

    1987-11-01

    The activities of two groups of cyclic agonists of substance P (SP) have been studied. The disulfide bridge constraints have been designed on the basis of conformational studies on SP and physalaemin indicating an ..cap alpha..-helical structure for the core of these two tachykinins (group I) and a folding of the C-terminal carboxamide towards the side chains of the glutamines 5 and 6 (group II). Only peptides simulating the ..cap alpha..-helix present substantial potencies. (Cys/sup 3,6/)SP is as active as SP in inhibiting /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton and Hunter SP-specific binding on rat brain synaptosomes and on dog carotid bioassay, two assays specific for the neurokinin 1 receptor. Moreover, (Cys/sup 3,6/)SP is a potent as neurokinin B in inhibiting /sup 125/I-labeled Bolton and Hunter eledoisin-specific binding on rat cortical synaptosomes as well as in stimulating rat portal vein, two tests specific for the neurokinin 3 receptor. Interestingly, in contrast to neurokinin B, (Cys/sup 3,6/)SP is a weak agonist of the neurokinin 2 receptor subtype, as evidenced by its binding potency in inhibiting /sup 3/H-labeled neurokinin A-specific binding on rat duodenum and in inducing the contractions of the rabbit pulmonary artery, a neurokinin 2-type bioassay. To increase the specificity of the cyclic analogue (Cys/sup 3,6/)SP positions 8 and 9 were modified. Collectively, these results suggest that the neurokinin 1 and neurokinin 3 tachykinin receptors may recognize a similar three-dimensional structure of the core of the tachykinins. Different orientations of the common C-terminal tripeptide may be related to the selectivity for the different receptor subtypes.

  18. Fisetin as a caloric restriction mimetic protects rat brain against aging induced oxidative stress, apoptosis and neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sandeep; Singh, Abhishek Kumar; Garg, Geetika; Rizvi, Syed Ibrahim

    2018-01-15

    In the present study, attempts have been made to evaluate the potential role of fisetin, a caloric restriction mimetic (CRM), for neuroprotection in D-galactose (D-gal) induced accelerated and natural aging models of rat. Fisetin was supplemented (15mg/kg b.w., orally) to young, D-gal induced aged (D-gal 500mg/kg b.w subcutaneously) and naturally aged rats for 6weeks. Standard protocols were employed to measure pro-oxidants, antioxidants and mitochondrial membrane potential in brain tissues. Gene expression analysis with reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was performed to assess the expression of autophagy, neuronal, aging as well as inflammatory marker genes. We have also evaluated apoptotic cell death and synaptosomal membrane-bound ion transporter activities in brain tissues. Our data demonstrated that fisetin significantly decreased the level of pro-oxidants and increased the level of antioxidants. Furthermore, fisetin also ameliorated mitochondrial membrane depolarization, apoptotic cell death and impairments in the activities of synaptosomal membrane-bound ion transporters in aging rat brain. RT-PCR data revealed that fisetin up-regulated the expression of autophagy genes (Atg-3 and Beclin-1), sirtuin-1 and neuronal markers (NSE and Ngb), and down-regulated the expression of inflammatory (IL-1β and TNF-α) and Sirt-2 genes respectively in aging brain. The present study suggests that fisetin supplementation may provide neuroprotection against aging-induced oxidative stress, apoptotic cell death, neuro-inflammation, and neurodegeneration in rat brain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Role of DHA in aging-related changes in mouse brain synaptic plasma membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Huang, Bill X; Desai, Abhishek; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Aging has been related to diminished cognitive function, which could be a result of ineffective synaptic function. We have previously shown that synaptic plasma membrane proteins supporting synaptic integrity and neurotransmission were downregulated in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-deprived brains, suggesting an important role of DHA in synaptic function. In this study, we demonstrate aging-induced synaptic proteome changes and DHA-dependent mitigation of such changes using mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation combined with western blot or messenger RNA analysis. We found significant reduction of 15 synaptic plasma membrane proteins in aging brains including fodrin-α, synaptopodin, postsynaptic density protein 95, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptosomal-associated protein-α, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit epsilon-2 precursor, AMPA2, AP2, VGluT1, munc18-1, dynamin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, rab3A, and EAAT1, most of which are involved in synaptic transmission. Notably, the first 9 proteins were further reduced when brain DHA was depleted by diet, indicating that DHA plays an important role in sustaining these synaptic proteins downregulated during aging. Reduction of 2 of these proteins was reversed by raising the brain DHA level by supplementing aged animals with an omega-3 fatty acid sufficient diet for 2 months. The recognition memory compromised in DHA-depleted animals was also improved. Our results suggest a potential role of DHA in alleviating aging-associated cognitive decline by offsetting the loss of neurotransmission-regulating synaptic proteins involved in synaptic function. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Impaired neurotransmission in ether lipid-deficient nerve terminals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodde, Alexander; Teigler, Andre; Brugger, Britta; Lehmann, Wolf D; Wieland, Felix; Berger, Johannes; Just, Wilhelm W

    2012-06-15

    Isolated defects of ether lipid (EL) biosynthesis in humans cause rhizomelic chondrodysplasia punctata type 2 and type 3, serious peroxisomal disorders. Using a previously described mouse model [Rodemer, C., Thai, T.P., Brugger, B., Kaercher, T., Werner, H., Nave, K.A., Wieland, F., Gorgas, K., and Just, W.W. (2003) Inactivation of ether lipid biosynthesis causes male infertility, defects in eye development and optic nerve hypoplasia in mice. Hum. Mol. Genet., 12, 1881-1895], we investigated the effect of EL deficiency in isolated murine nerve terminals (synaptosomes) on the pre-synaptic release of the neurotransmitters (NTs) glutamate and acetylcholine. Both Ca(2+)-dependent exocytosis and Ca(2+)-independent efflux of the transmitters were affected. EL-deficient synaptosomes respire at a reduced rate and exhibit a lowered adenosin-5'-triphosphate/adenosine diphosphate (ATP/ADP) ratio. Consequently, ATP-driven processes, such as synaptic vesicle cycling and maintenance of Na(+), K(+) and Ca(2+) homeostasis, might be disturbed. Analyzing reactive oxygen species in EL-deficient neural and non-neural tissues revealed that plasmalogens (PLs), the most abundant EL species in mammalian central nervous system, considerably contribute to the generation of the lipid peroxidation product malondialdehyde. Although EL-deficient tissue contains less lipid peroxidation products, fibroblasts lacking ELs are more susceptible to induced oxidative stress. In summary, these results suggest that due to the reduced energy state of EL-deficient tissue, the Ca(2+)-independent efflux of NTs increases while the Ca(2+)-dependent release declines. Furthermore, lack of PLs is mainly compensated for by an increase in the concentration of phosphatidylethanolamine and results in a significantly lowered level of lipid peroxidation products in the brain cortex and cerebellum.

  1. Inter-channel scaffolding of presynaptic CaV2.2 via the C terminal PDZ ligand domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabiha R. Gardezi

    2013-04-01

    Calcium entry through CaV2.2 calcium channels clustered at the active zone (AZ of the presynaptic nerve terminal gates synaptic vesicle (SV fusion and the discharge of neurotransmitters, but the mechanism of channel scaffolding remains poorly understood. Recent studies have implicated the binding of a PDZ ligand domain (PDZ-LD at the tip of the channel C terminal to a partner PDZ domain on RIM1/2, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein. To explore CaV2.2 scaffolding, we created intracellular region fusion proteins and used these to test for binding by ‘fishing’ for native CaV2.2 channels from cell lysates. Fusion proteins mimicking the distal half of the channel C terminal (C3strep reliably captured CaV2.2 from whole brain crude membrane or purified synaptosome membrane lysates, whereas channel I–II loop or the distal half of the II–III loop proteins were negative. This capture could be replicated in a non-synaptic environment using CaV2.2 expressed in a cell line. The distal tip PDZ-LD, DDWC-COOH, was confirmed as the critical binding site by block of pull-down with mimetic peptides. Pull-down experiments using brain crude membrane lysates confirmed that RIM1/2 can bind to the DDWC PDZ-LD. However, robust CaV2.2 capture was observed from synaptosome membrane or in the cell line expression system with little or no RIM1/2 co-capture. Thus, we conclude that CaV2.2 channels can scaffold to each other via an interaction that involves the PDZ-LD by an inter-channel linkage bridged by an unknown protein.

  2. Effects of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom and its toxin TsTX-V on neurotransmitter uptake in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cecchini, Alessandra L.; Vasconcelos, Flavio; Amara, Susan G.; Giglio, Jose Roberto; Arantes, Eliane Candiani

    2006-01-01

    Scorpion neurotoxins targeting the Na v channel can be classified into two classes: α- and β-neurotoxins and are reported as highly active in mammalian brain. In this work, we evaluate the effects of Tityus serrulatus venom (Ts venom) and its α-neurotoxin TsTX-V on γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), dopamine (DA) and glutamate (Glu) uptake in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. TsTX-V was isolated from Ts venom by ion exchange chromatography followed by reverse-phase (C18) high-performance liquid chromatography. Neither Ts venom nor TsTX-V was able to affect 3 H-Glu uptake. On the other hand, Ts venom (0.13 μg/mg) significantly inhibited both 3 H-GABA and 3 H-DA uptake (∼ 50%). TsTX-V showed IC 5 values of 9.37 μM and 22.2 μM for the inhibition of 3 H-GABA and 3 H-DA uptake, respectively. These effects were abolished by pre-treatment with tetrodotoxin (TTX, 1 μM), indicating the involvement of voltage-gated Na + channels in this process. In the absence of Ca 2+ , and at low Ts venom concentrations, the reduction of 3 H-GABA uptake was not as marked as in the presence of Ca 2+ . TsTX-V did not reduce 3 H-GABA uptake in COS-7 cells expressing the GABA transporters GAT-1 and GAT-3, suggesting that this toxin indirectly reduces the transport. The reduced 3 H-GABA uptake by synaptosomes might be due to rapid cell depolarization as revealed by confocal microscopy of C6 glioma cells. Thus, TsTX-V causes a reduction of 3 H-GABA and 3 H-DA uptake in a Ca 2+ -dependent manner, not directly affecting GABA transporters, but, in consequence of depolarization, involving voltage-gated Na + channels

  3. Characterization of Am IT, an anti-insect β-toxin isolated from the venom of scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oukkache, Naoual; ElJaoudi, Rachid; Chgoury, Fatima; Rocha, Marisa Teixeira; Sabatier, Jean-Marc

    2015-06-25

    In the present study, a 'novel' toxin, called Am IT from the venom of scorpion Androctonus mauretanicus is isolated and characterized. A detailed analysis of the action of Am IT on insect axonal sodium currents is reported. Am IT was purified through gel filtration followed by C18 reversed-phase HPLC. Toxicity of Am IT in vivo was assessed on male German cockroach (Blattella germanica) larvae and C57/BL6 mice. Cross-reactivity of Am IT with two β-toxins was evidenced using (125)I-iodinated toxin-based radioimmunoassays with synaptosomal preparations from rat brain. The complete amino acid sequence of Am IT was finally determined by Edman sequencing. Am IT was observed to compete with AaH IT4 purified from the venom of scorpion Androctonus australis in binding assays. It was recognized by an antibody raised against a β-type toxin, which indicated some structural similarity with β-toxins (or related toxin family). The 'novel' toxin exhibited dual activity since it competed with anti-mammal toxins in binding assays as well as showed contracting activity to insect. The toxin competed with radio-labeled β-toxin Css IV by binding to Na(+) channels of rat brain synaptosomes. Analysis of toxin amino acid sequences showed that Am IT shares high structural identity (92%) with AaH IT4. In conclusion, Am IT not only reveals an anti-insect compound properties secreted by 'Old World' scorpions, paralyzing insect larvae by binding to Na(+) channels on larvae's nerve-cell membranes, but also exerts toxic activity in mice, which is similar to anti-mammal toxins from 'New World' scorpions (North and South Americas). Therefore, Am IT appears to be structurally and functionally similar to AaH IT4.

  4. Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Associated Increase in Na-K ATPase Activity in the Rat Brain is Due to Noradrenaline Induced α1-Adrenoceptor Mediated Increased α-Subunit of the Enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amar, Megha; Mallick, Birendra Nath

    2015-08-01

    Rapid eye movement sleep (REMS) modulates Na-K ATPase activity and maintains brain excitability. REMS deprivation (REMSD)-associated increased Na-K ATPase activity is mediated by noradrenaline (NA) acting on α1-adrenoceptor (AR) in the brain. It was shown that NA-induced increased Na-K ATPase activity was due to allosteric modulation as well as increased turnover of the enzyme. Although the former has been studied in detail, our understanding on the latter was lacking, which we have studied. Male Wistar rats were REMS deprived for 4-days by classical flower-pot method; suitable control experiments were conducted. In another set, α1-AR antagonist prazosin (PRZ) was i.p. injected 48 h REMSD onward. At the end of experiments rats were sacrificed by cervical dislocation and brains were removed. Synaptosomes prepared from the brains were used to estimate Na-K ATPase activity as well as protein expressions of different isoforms of the enzyme subunits using western blot. REMSD significantly increased synaptosomal Na-K ATPase activity and that was due to differential increase in the expressions of α1-, α2- and α3-isoforms, but not that of β1- and β2-isoforms. PRZ reduced the REMSD-induced increased Na-K ATPase activity and protein expressions. We also observed that the increased Na-K ATPase subunit expression was not due to enhanced mRNA synthesis, which suggests the possibility of post-transcriptional regulation. Thus, the findings suggest that REMSD-associated increased Na-K ATPase activity is due to elevated level of α-subunit of the enzyme and that is induced by NA acting on α1-AR mediated mRNA-stabilization.

  5. Biochemical evidence that L-glutamate is a neurotransmitter of primary vagal afferent nerve fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perrone, M.H.

    1981-01-01

    To determine in rat if vagal afferent fibers projecting into the intermediate one third of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), the site of termination of baroafferents, utilize glutamate as a neurotransmitter, the high-affinity uptake of [ 3 H]L-glutamate and content of glutamate were analyzed in micropunches of rat brain stem. The intermediate NTS contains a high-affinity synaptosomal uptake system for [ 3 H]L-glutamate that is greater in capacity than that in areas adjacent to the NTS; it is almost two-fold higher than uptake in medial septum and nucleus accumbens and equal to that of hippocampal regions purportedly containing a rich glutamatergic innervation. Unilateral ablation of the nodose ganglion (i.e. cells of origin of vagal afferents) resulted, within 24 h in a prolonged significant reduction, to 56% of control, of [ 3 H]L-glutamate uptake, bilaterally in the NTS. The reduction of Na + -dependent synaptosomal uptake of [ 3 H]L-glutamate, resulted from a decrease in Vsub(max) without change in the Ksub(m) of the process, was anatomically restricted to the intermediate NTS, and was not associated with changes in [ 3 H]GABA uptake. The content of glutamate in the NTS was significantly (P < 0.01) decreased by 30% 7 days following unilateral extirpation of the nodose ganglion without changes in the concentrations of aspartate, glycine, glutamine, or GABA. A population of vagal afferent fibers projecting to NTS are glutamatergic. The results are consistent with the hypothesis obtained by physiological and pharmacological techniques that glutamate is a neurotransmitter of baroafferents. (Auth.)

  6. Synaptic vesicle dynamic changes in a model of fragile X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broek, Jantine A C; Lin, Zhanmin; de Gruiter, H Martijn; van 't Spijker, Heleen; Haasdijk, Elize D; Cox, David; Ozcan, Sureyya; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Willemsen, Rob; de Zeeuw, Chris I; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single-gene disorder that is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). FXS is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats in the promoter region of the fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1). This leads to a lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which regulates translation of a wide range of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The extent of expression level alterations of synaptic proteins affected by FMRP loss and their consequences on synaptic dynamics in FXS has not been fully investigated. Here, we used an Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying FXS by monitoring protein expression changes using shotgun label-free liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) in brain tissue and synaptosome fractions. FXS-associated candidate proteins were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in synaptosome fractions for targeted protein quantification. Furthermore, functional alterations in synaptic release and dynamics were evaluated using live-cell imaging, and interpretation of synaptic dynamics differences was investigated using electron microscopy. Key findings relate to altered levels of proteins involved in GABA-signalling, especially in the cerebellum. Further exploration using microscopy studies found reduced synaptic vesicle unloading of hippocampal neurons and increased vesicle unloading in cerebellar neurons, which suggests a general decrease of synaptic transmission. Our findings suggest that FMRP is a regulator of synaptic vesicle dynamics, which supports the role of FMRP in presynaptic functions. Taken together, these studies provide novel insights into the molecular changes associated with FXS.

  7. Neurotoxicity of a methylated analog of MPTP in mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heikkila, R.E.; Youngster, S.K.; Kindt, M.V.; Sonsalla, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    Under conditions in which the dopaminergic neurotoxin 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) was relatively ineffective, (2 injections per day at 6-hr intervals on 2 successive days; total dose of 0.45 mmoles/kg) a methylated analog of MPTP, namely 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP, produced a marked depletion in the neostriatal content of dopamine (DA) and its metabolites, a corresponding reduction of /sup 3/H-DA uptake into neostriatal synaptosomes, and an extensive loss of neurons in the pars compacta of the substantia nigra. 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP is oxidized in vitro by monoamine oxidase-B in brain mitochondrial preparations, although at a much faster rate than is MPTP. And like the MPTP metabolite (MPP/sup +/), 1-methyl-4-(2'methylphenyl)pyridinium (2'CH/sub 3/-MPP/sup +/) is an excellent substrate for the DA transport system (as evidenced by its ability to release previously accumulated /sup 3/H-DA from synaptosomes, and the ability of the dopamine uptake inhibitor, mazindol, to prevent this release). In vivo, the pretreatment of mice with DA uptake inhibitors or monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors attenuated the above-mentioned biochemical changes induced by 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP. It appears as if 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP produces neurotoxicity in a manner similar to MPTP. That 2'CH/sub 3/-MPTP is oxidized at a faster rate than MPTP likely contributes to the fact that it is more potent than MPTP, although most certainly, other unknown considerations also are relevant.

  8. Characterization, localization and function of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the nervous systems of Aplysia and Loligo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vogel, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    The author has characterized pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the nervous systems of the gastropod mollusc Aplysia and the cephalopod Loligo using [ 32 P]ADP-ribosylation and immunoblotting with G protein specific antisera. As in vertebrates, this class of G protein is associated with membranes and enriched in nervous tissue in Aplysia. Analysis of dissected Aplysia ganglia reveal that it is enriched in neuropil, a region containing most of the central nervous system synapses. Because both Aplysia and Loligo synaptosomes are enriched in pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins, it is likely that they are found in synaptic terminals. Fractionation of Aplysia synaptosomes into membrane and vesicle fractions reveals that, although the majority of G protein is recovered in the plasma membrane fraction, a small proportion is recovered in the vesicle fraction. He shows that G proteins are on intracellular membranes by ADP-ribosylating extruded axoplasm with pertussis toxin. A plausible explanation for vesicular localization of G protein in axoplasm is that G proteins are transported to terminals on vesicles. He has shown, using ligature experiments with Aplysia connectives and temperature block experiments in the giant axon of Loligo, that G proteins move by anterograde fast axonal transport. Injection of pertussis toxin into the identified Aplysia neuron L10 blocks histamine-induced presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release. This suggests that pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins play a role in modulating transmitter release at synaptic terminals. In the giant synapse of Loligo, he presents preliminary data that demonstrates that the activation of G proteins in the presynaptic terminal results in decreased transmitter release

  9. Decreased number of interneurons and increased seizures in neuropilin 2 deficient mice: implications for autism and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gant, John C; Thibault, Oliver; Blalock, Eric M; Yang, Jun; Bachstetter, Adam; Kotick, James; Schauwecker, Paula E; Hauser, Kurt F; Smith, George M; Mervis, Ron; Li, YanFang; Barnes, Gregory N

    2009-04-01

    Clinically, perturbations in the semaphorin signaling system have been associated with autism and epilepsy. The semaphorins have been implicated in guidance, migration, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity of neurons. The semaphorin 3F (Sema3F) ligand and its receptor, neuropilin 2 (NPN2) are highly expressed within limbic areas. NPN2 signaling may intimately direct the apposition of presynaptic and postsynaptic locations, facilitating the development and maturity of hippocampal synaptic function. To further understand the role of NPN2 signaling in central nevous system (CNS) plasticity, structural and functional alterations were assessed in NPN2 deficient mice. In NPN2 deficient mice, we measured seizure susceptibility after kainic acid or pentylenetetrazol, neuronal excitability and synaptic throughput in slice preparations, principal and interneuron cell counts with immunocytochemical protocols, synaptosomal protein levels with immunoblots, and dendritic morphology with Golgi-staining. NPN2 deficient mice had shorter seizure latencies, increased vulnerability to seizure-related death, were more likely to develop spontaneous recurrent seizure activity after chemical challenge, and had an increased slope on input/output curves. Principal cell counts were unchanged, but GABA, parvalbumin, and neuropeptide Y interneuron cell counts were significantly reduced. Synaptosomal NPN2 protein levels and total number of GABAergic synapses were decreased in a gene dose-dependent fashion. CA1 pyramidal cells showed reduced dendritic length and complexity, as well as an increased number of dendritic spines. These data suggest the novel hypothesis that the Sema 3F signaling system's role in appropriate placement of subsets of hippocampal interneurons has critical downstream consequences for hippocampal function, resulting in a more seizure susceptible phenotype.

  10. Piracetam prevents scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marisco, Patricia C; Carvalho, Fabiano B; Rosa, Michelle M; Girardi, Bruna A; Gutierres, Jessié M; Jaques, Jeandre A S; Salla, Ana P S; Pimentel, Víctor C; Schetinger, Maria Rosa C; Leal, Daniela B R; Mello, Carlos F; Rubin, Maribel A

    2013-08-01

    Piracetam improves cognitive function in animals and in human beings, but its mechanism of action is still not completely known. In the present study, we investigated whether enzymes involved in extracellular adenine nucleotide metabolism, adenosine triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (NTPDase), 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) are affected by piracetam in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex of animals subjected to scopolamine-induced memory impairment. Piracetam (0.02 μmol/5 μL, intracerebroventricular, 60 min pre-training) prevented memory impairment induced by scopolamine (1 mg/kg, intraperitoneal, immediately post-training) in the inhibitory avoidance learning and in the object recognition task. Scopolamine reduced the activity of NTPDase in hippocampus (53 % for ATP and 53 % for ADP hydrolysis) and cerebral cortex (28 % for ATP hydrolysis). Scopolamine also decreased the activity of 5'-nucleotidase (43 %) and ADA (91 %) in hippocampus. The same effect was observed in the cerebral cortex for 5'-nucleotidase (38 %) and ADA (68 %) activities. Piracetam fully prevented scopolamine-induced memory impairment and decrease of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and adenosine deaminase activities in synaptosomes from cerebral cortex and hippocampus. In vitro experiments show that piracetam and scopolamine did not alter enzymatic activity in cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Moreover, piracetam prevented scopolamine-induced increase of TBARS levels in hippocampus and cerebral cortex. These results suggest that piracetam-induced improvement of memory is associated with protection against oxidative stress and maintenance of NTPDase, 5'-nucleotidase and ADA activities, and suggest the purinergic system as a putative target of piracetam.

  11. Distinct expression of synaptic NR2A and NR2B in the central nervous system and impaired morphine tolerance and physical dependence in mice deficient in postsynaptic density-93 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johns Roger A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Postsynaptic density (PSD-93, a neuronal scaffolding protein, binds to and clusters N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR subunits NR2A and NR2B at cellular membranes in vitro. However, the roles of PSD-93 in synaptic NR2A and NR2B targeting in the central nervous system and NMDAR-dependent physiologic and pathologic processes are still unclear. We report here that PSD-93 deficiency significantly decreased the amount of NR2A and NR2B in the synaptosomal membrane fractions derived from spinal cord dorsal horn and forebrain cortex but did not change their levels in the total soluble fraction from either region. However, PSD-93 deficiency did not markedly change the amounts of NR2A and NR2B in either synaptosomal or total soluble fractions from cerebellum. In mice deficient in PSD-93, morphine dose-dependent curve failed to shift significantly rightward as it did in wild type (WT mice after acute and chronic morphine challenge. Unlike WT mice, PSD-93 knockout mice also showed marked losses of NMDAR-dependent morphine analgesic tolerance and associated abnormal sensitivity in response to mechanical, noxious thermal, and formalin-induced inflammatory stimuli after repeated morphine injection. In addition, PSD-93 knockout mice displayed dramatic loss of jumping activity, a typical NMDAR-mediated morphine withdrawal abstinence behavior. These findings indicate that impaired NMDAR-dependent neuronal plasticity following repeated morphine injection in PSD-93 knockout mice is attributed to PSD-93 deletion-induced alterations of synaptic NR2A and NR2B expression in dorsal horn and forebrain cortex neurons. The selective effect of PSD-93 deletion on synaptic NMDAR expression in these two major pain-related regions might provide the better strategies for the prevention and treatment of opioid tolerance and physical dependence.

  12. Cyclic nucleotide regulation of inositol lipid metabolism in rat cerebral cortex

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicchitta, C.V.; Williamson, J.R.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of compounds known to elevate cAMP levels and/or activate the cAMP dependent protein kinase on resting and stimulated inositol lipid metabolism in rat cortical slices and synaptosomes. In [ 3 H]-myo-inositol-labeled brain slices, carbamylcholine-stimulated accumulation of [ 3 H]-myo-inositol 1-phosphate (IP 1 ) was decreased 50% by forskolin (150μM) isobutylmethylxantihine (IBMX) (1mM), 8-bromo cAMP (5mM) or 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) cAMP (5mM). In studies with synaptosomes, the incorporation of [ 32 Pi] into phosphatidylinositol (PI), phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP), phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP 2 ) and phosphatidic acid (PA) was also reduced in the presence of forskolin or the cAMP phosphodiesterase inhibitors IBMX and RO20-1724 (+/-)-4-(3-butoxy-4-methoxybenzyl)-2-imidazolidinone. In the presence of maximally effective concentrations of these agents, steady state PIP levels were reduced by 50% and PIP 2 and PA levels by 40%. The effects of these compounds on [ 32 Pi] labeling of the phosphoinositides and PA are consistent with an inhibition of flux through the inositide cycle, presumably through the action of cAMP. Such an inhibition may account for the reduction in carbamylcholine sensitive IP 1 accumulation observed in brain slices. These studies indicate that in rat brain, β-adrenergic stimulation may be involved in modulating the activity of muscarinic cholinergic agonists. This regulation appears to be at the level of inositol lipid metabolism

  13. Memantine prevents MDMA-induced neurotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-01-01

    MDMA (ecstasy) is an illicit drug causing long-term neurotoxicity. Previous studies demonstrated the interaction of MDMA with alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in mouse brain membranes and the involvement of alpha-7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR) in dopaminergic neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in mice. The aim of the present study was to investigate the utility of memantine (MEM), an alpha-7 nAChR antagonist used for treatment of Alzheimer's disease patients, to prevent neurotoxicity induced by MDMA in rats and the oxidative effect of this amphetamine derivative in mice striatal synaptosomes. In isolated mouse striatal synaptosomes (an in vitro model of MDMA neurotoxicity of dopaminergic origin), MDMA (50 microM)-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that was fully inhibited by MEM (0.3 microM). This effect of MEM was fully prevented by PNU 282987 (0.5 microM), a specific agonist of alpha-7 nAChR. The preventive effect of MEM on this oxidative effect can be attributed to a direct antagonism between MDMA (acting probably as agonist) and MEM (acting as antagonist) at the alpha-7 nAChR. In Dark Agouti rats (an in vivo model of MDMA neurotoxicity of serotonergic origin), a single dose of MDMA (18 mg/kg) induced persistent hyperthermia, which was not affected by MEM pre-treatment. [(3)H]Paroxetine binding (a marker of serotonergic injury) was measured in the hippocampus of animals killed at 24h and 7 days after treatment. MDMA induced a significant reduction in [(3)H]paroxetine binding sites at both times of sacrifice that was fully prevented by pre-treatment with MEM. Since previous studies demonstrate that increased glutamate activity is not involved in the neurotoxic action of MDMA, it can be concluded that the effectiveness of MEM against MDMA-induced neurotoxicity would be the result of blockade of alpha-7 nAChR, although an indirect mechanism based on the interplay among the various neurotransmission systems leading to an

  14. Different oxidative profile and nicotinic receptor interaction of amphetamine and 3,4-methylenedioxy-methamphetamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipana, C; García-Ratés, S; Camarasa, J; Pubill, D; Escubedo, E

    2008-02-01

    d-Amphetamine (AMPH) and MDMA increased intracellular production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in isolated mouse striatal synaptosomes. MDMA showed a maximal oxidative effect at 50-100 microM. However, for AMPH a double maximum was obtained, the first between 0.1 and 1 microM and the second at 1mM. No oxidative effect was present in synaptosomes from reserpinized mice. Cocaine and l-deprenyl inhibited MDMA and AMPH (0.1 microM) ROS production but not that of AMPH at a higher concentration (1mM). When this high concentration was used, its oxidative effect was abolished by a phospholipase A(2) inhibitor. Delta(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol fully prevented the oxidative effect of AMPH and MDMA, by a CB(1) receptor-independent mechanism, as did it NPC 15437 and genistein. The pro-oxidative effect induced by AMPH and MDMA showed a strong dependence on calcium (extracellular and from internal stores) and also was inhibited by nicotinic receptor (nAChR) antagonists dihydro-beta-erythroidine, methyllycaconitine (MLA) and alpha-bungarotoxin. MDMA displaced [(3)H]epibatidine and [(3)H]MLA binding with higher affinity than AMPH. Both amphetamines competitively displaced [(3)H]epibatidine from heteromeric receptors but results obtained from [(3)H]MLA binding demonstrated a non-competitive profile. Preincubation of PC12 cells with AMPH or MDMA reduced [(3)H]dopamine uptake. For MDMA, this effect was prevented by MLA. To summarize, comparing AMPH and MDMA we have demonstrated that these drugs induce an oxidative effect dependent on drug concentration and also reduce dopamine uptake. Processes that are known to affect dopamine transporter functionality also seem to modulate amphetamine derivatives-induced ROS production. For MDMA, acute effects tested are blocked by nAChR antagonists, which points to the possibility that these antagonists could be used to treat some of the adverse effects described in MDMA abusers. Conversely, no implication of nicotinic receptors has been proved

  15. Beta amyloid differently modulate nicotinic and muscarinic receptor subtypes which regulate in vitro and in vivo the release of glycine in the rat hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania eZappettini

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Using both in vitro (hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion and in vivo (microdialysis approaches we investigated whether and to what extent β amyloid peptide 1-40 (Aβ 1-40 interferes with the cholinergic modulation of the release of glycine (GLY in the rat hippocampus. The nicotine-evoked overflow of endogenous GLY in hippocampal synaptosomes in superfusion was significantly inhibited by Aβ 1-40 (10 nM while increasing the concentration to 100 nM the inhibitory effect did not further increase. Both the Choline (Ch (α7 agonist; 1 mM and the 5-Iodo-A-85380 dihydrochloride (5IA85380, α4β2 agonist; 10 nM-evoked GLY overflow were inhibited by Aβ1-40 at 100 nM but not at 10nM concentrations. The KCl evoked [3H]GLY and [3H]Acetylcholine (ACh overflow were strongly inhibited in presence of oxotremorine; however this inhibitory muscarinic effect was not affected by Aβ1-40. The effects of Aβ1-40 on the administration of nicotine, veratridine, 5IA85380 and PHA 543613 hydrochloride (PHA543613 (a selective agonist of α7 subtypes on hippocampal endogenous GLY release in vivo were also studied. Aβ 1-40 significantly reduced (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM the nicotine evoked in vivo release of GLY. Aβ 1-40 (at 10 μM but not at 1 μM significantly inhibited the PHA543613 (1 mM-elicited GLY overflow while was ineffective on the GLY overflow evoked by 5IA85380 (1 mM. Aβ 40-1 (10 μM did not produce any inhibitory effect on nicotine evoked GLY overflow both in the in vitro and in vivo experiments. Our results indicate that a the cholinergic modulation of the release of GLY occurs by the activation of both α7 and α4β2 nicotinic ACh receptors (nAChRs as well as by the activation of inhibitory muscarinic ACh receptors (mAChRs and b Aβ 1-40 can modulate cholinergic evoked GLY release exclusively through the interaction with α7 and the α4β2 nAChR nicotinic receptors but not through mAChR subtypes.

  16. Radioligand binding assays in the drug discovery process: potential pitfalls of high throughput screenings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noël, F; Mendonça-Silva, D L; Quintas, L E

    2001-02-01

    Radioligand binding assays evaluating directly the ability of a drug to interact with a defined molecular target is part of the drug discovery process. The need for a high throughput rate in screening drugs is actually leading to simplified experimental schemes that increase the probability of false negative results. Special concern involves voltage-gated ion channel drug discovery where a great care is required in designing assays because of frequent multiplicity of (interacting) binding sites. To clearly illustrate this situation, three different assays used in the academic drug discovery program of the authors were selected because they are rich of intrinsic artifacts: (I) (20 mmol/l caffeine almost duplicated [3H]ryanodine binding (89% higher than control) to rat heart microsomes at 0.3 mumol/l free calcium but did not exert any effect when using a high (107 mumol/l) free calcium, as mostly used in ryanodine binding assays; (II) An agonist for the ionotropic glutamate receptor of the kainate type can distinctly affect [3H]kainate binding to chicken cerebellum membranes depending on its concentration: unlabelled kainic acid per se either stimulated about 30% (at 50-100 nmol/l), had no effect (at 200 nmol/l) or even progressively decreased (at 0.3-2 mumol/l) the binding of 5 nmol/l [3H]kainate, emphasizing the risk of using a single concentration for screening a drug; (III) in a classical [3H]flunitrazepam binding assay, the stimulatory effect of a GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid) agonist was only observed when using extensively washed rat brain synaptosomes (10 mumol/l GABA increased flunitrazepam binding by 90%). On the other hand, the inhibitory effect of a GABA antagonist was only observed when using crude synaptosomes (10 mumol/l bicuculine reduced [3H]flunitrazepam binding by 40%). It can be concluded that carefully designed radioligand assays which can be performed in an academic laboratory are appropriate for screening a small number of drugs, especially if

  17. The Roles of Dopamine Transport Inhibition and Dopamine Release Facilitation in Wake Enhancement and Rebound Hypersomnolence Induced by Dopaminergic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruner, John A.; Marcy, Val R.; Lin, Yin-Guo; Bozyczko-Coyne, Donna; Marino, Michael J.; Gasior, Maciej

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: Rebound hypersomnolence (RHS: increased sleep following increased wake) is a limiting side-effect of many wake-promoting agents. In particular, RHS in the first few hours following wake appears to be associated with dopamine (DA)-releasing agents, e.g., amphetamine, but whether it can also be produced by DA transporter (DAT) inhibition alone is unknown. In these studies, DA-releasing and DAT-inhibiting agents and their interaction were systematically examined for their ability to increase wake and induce RHS. Design: Chronically implanted rats were evaluated in a blinded, pseudo-randomized design. Participants: 237 rats were used in these studies with 1 week between repeat tests. Interventions: Animals were habituated overnight and dosed the next day, 5 h after lights on, with test agents. Measurements and Results: Sleep/wake activity and RHS were evaluated using EEG/EMG recording up to 22 h post dosing. In vitro dopamine release was evaluated in rat synaptosomes. At doses that produced equal increases in wake, DA-releasing (amphetamine, methamphetamine, phentermine) and several DAT-inhibiting agents (cocaine, bupropion, and methylphenidate) produced RHS during the first few hours after the onset of sleep recovery. However, other DAT-inhibiting agents (mazindol, nomifensine, GBR-12909, and GBR-12935) did not produce RHS. Combination treatment with amphetamine and nomifensine produced waking activity greater than the sum of their individual activities alone while ameliorating the amphetamine-like RHS. In rat synaptosomes, nomifensine reduced the potency of amphetamine to induce DA release ∼270-fold, potentially explaining its action in ameliorating amphetamine-induced RHS. Conclusions: All DA releasing agents tested, and some DAT-inhibiting agents, produced RHS at equal wake-promoting doses. Thus amphetamine-like DA release appears sufficient for inducing RHS, but additional properties (pharmacologic and/or pharmacokinetic) evidently underlie RHS

  18. Recovery of dopamine neuronal transporter but lack of change of its mRNA in substantia nigra after inactivation by a new irreversible inhibitor characterized in vitro and ex vivo in the rat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Régo, Jean-Claude; Syringas, Maria; Leblond, Bertrand; Costentin, Jean; Bonnet, Jean-Jacques

    1999-01-01

    In vitro, the ability of DEEP-NCS {1-[2-(diphenylmethoxy)ethyl]-4-[2-(4-isothiocyanatophenyl)ethyl]-piperazine} to inhibit [3H]-dopamine uptake by rat striatal synaptosomes was concentration-dependent and inversely related to the protein concentration. This inhibition was irreversible and resulted from changes in Vmax and KM. DEEP-NCS was less potent on noradrenaline, serotonin and choline transport. One day after intrastriatal injections of DEEP-NCS (100 and 1000 pmol) in 20% dimethylsulphoxide, moderate decreases in the ex vivo dopamine uptake were observed in synaptosomes obtained from striatum injected with DEEP-NCS or solvent, and the contralateral uninjected striatum. In similar conditions, 300 pmol DEEP-NCS in 45% 2 hydroxypropyl-γ-cyclodextrin–0.5% dimethylsulphoxide solution sub-totally reduced ex vivo dopamine uptake and mazindol binding, and moderately decreased choline and serotonin transport. These reductions were specific to DEEP-NCS-injected striata. A clomipramine pretreatment (16 mg kg−1 i.p. 1 h before) was performed in following experiments, since it reduced the DEEP-NCS-elicited decrease in serotonin uptake without affecting other indices. One day after intrastriatal injection, DEEP-NCS elicited similar dose-dependent decreases in ex vivo dopamine uptake and mazindol binding (ID50=6.9-8 ng striatum−1). Changes in KM and Vmax for ex vivo dopamine transport produced by DEEP-NCS disappeared according to similar time-courses. The t½ for transporter recovery was 6.1 days. This value should correspond to its actual turnover rate in vivo, since no change in transporter mRNA level was observed in substantia nigra ipsilateral to 300 pmol DEEP-NCS-injected striatum. The results indicate that DEEP-NCS behaves as a potent, quite selective, irreversible inhibitor of the DAT, in vitro and in vivo. Its use in vivo suggests that the physiological half-life of the rat striatal DAT is close to 6 days. PMID:10498834

  19. Hydrogen Sulfide Ameliorates Homocysteine-Induced Alzheimer's Disease-Like Pathology, Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption, and Synaptic Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamat, Pradip K; Kyles, Philip; Kalani, Anuradha; Tyagi, Neetu

    2016-05-01

    Elevated plasma total homocysteine (Hcy) level is associated with an increased risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD). During transsulfuration pathways, Hcy is metabolized into hydrogen sulfide (H2S), which is a synaptic modulator, as well as a neuro-protective agent. However, the role of hydrogen sulfide, as well as N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation, in hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and synaptic dysfunction, leading to AD pathology is not clear. Therefore, we hypothesized that the inhibition of neuronal NMDA-R by H2S and MK801 mitigate the Hcy-induced BBB disruption and synapse dysfunction, in part by decreasing neuronal matrix degradation. Hcy intracerebral (IC) treatment significantly impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF), and cerebral circulation and memory function. Hcy treatment also decreases the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) and cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) in the brain along with increased expression of NMDA-R (NR1) and synaptosomal Ca(2+) indicating excitotoxicity. Additionally, we found that Hcy treatment increased protein and mRNA expression of intracellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, and MMP-9 and also increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 activity in the brain. The increased expression of ICAM-1, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and the decreased expression of vascular endothelial (VE)-cadherin and claudin-5 indicates BBB disruption and vascular inflammation. Moreover, we also found decreased expression of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP-2), postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), synapse-associated protein 97 (SAP-97), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) showing synapse dysfunction in the hippocampus. Furthermore, NaHS and MK801 treatment ameliorates BBB disruption, CBF, and synapse functions in the mice brain. These results demonstrate a neuro-protective effect of H2S over Hcy

  20. Mitochondrial proteins NIP-SNAP-1 and -2 are a target for the immunomodulatory activity of clarithromycin, which involves NF-κB-mediated cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Soh; Ogasawara, Noriko; Yamamoto, Keisuke; Uemura, Chika; Takaya, Yoshiaki; Shiraishi, Tsukasa; Sato, Toyotaka; Hashimoto, Shin; Tsutsumi, Hiroyuki; Takano, Kenichi; Himi, Tetsuo; Yokota, Shin-Ichi

    2017-02-12

    Macrolide antibiotics have immunomodulatory activities, including suppression of cytokine production, cell adhesion molecule expression, and mucin production. These immunomodulatory activities improve the symptoms of respiratory diseases associated with chronic inflammation. However, the underlying molecular mechanism(s) is not well understood yet. To address this, we prepared clarithromycin (CAM)-conjugated Sepharose and examined bound cellular proteins by proteome analysis. We identified mitochondrial proteins 4-nitrophenylphosphatase domain and non-neuronal synaptosomal associated protein 25-like protein homolog (NIP-SNAP)-1 and -2 and very long-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase (VLCAD) as CAM-binding proteins. Production of proinflammatory cytokines (IL-8 and IL-6) induced by lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) and Pam 3 -CSK 4 in human epithelial cell lines BEAS-2B and T24 were suppressed by knockdown of NIP-SNAP-1 or -2, and partly by knockdown of VLCAD. Also, knockdown of NIP-SNAP-1 or -2 in various cell lines suppressed LPS-induced expression of IL-8 and IL-6 mRNA and NF-κB activity. Thus, CAM suppresses NF-κB-mediated proinflammatory cytokine production by interacting with mitochondrial proteins, NIP-SNAP-1 and -2. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Desensitization of B-adrenergic receptors following repeated injections of 2-substituted-4-phenylquinolines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alhaider, A.A.

    1986-03-05

    In a previous work, they synthesized some new 2-substituted-4-phenylquinoline derivatives which demonstrated potent antidepressant activities as revealed by their antagonism to the uptake of /sup 3/(H)-norepinephrine and /sup 3/(H)-serotonin into brain synaptosomal preparation. Also, these compounds have demonstrated less anticholinergic, antihistamine and cardiovascular effects as compared to imipramine in animal models. In this present work, the chronic effects of some of these compounds on the sensitivity of the noradrenergic cyclic-AMP generating system on rat brain cortex has been conducted by the daily injection of 20 mg/kg i.p. for a period of three weeks. Imipramine and trazodone were utilized as standards, representing typical and atypical antidepressants, respectively. Acute treatment (single dose 20 mg/kg) and subchronic treatment (20 mg/kg for 10 days) produced no significant desensitization of the B-adrenoceptors. However, chronic treatment with the compounds significantly decreased isoprenaline-induced increase in c-AMP in the cortex which suggests desensitization of B-adrenoceptors. This effect coupled with the previous findings point to a potential rule of these compounds as suitable antidepressant candidates.

  2. Neuronal expression of muskelin in the rodent central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges-Labouesse Elisabeth

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The kelch repeat protein muskelin mediates cytoskeletal responses to the extracellular matrix protein thrombospondin 1, (TSP1, that is known to promote synaptogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS. Muskelin displays intracellular localization and affects cytoskeletal organization in adherent cells. Muskelin is expressed in adult brain and has been reported to bind the Cdk5 activator p39, which also facilitates the formation of functional synapses. Since little is known about muskelin in neuronal tissues, we here analysed the tissue distribution of muskelin in rodent brain and analysed its subcellular localization using cultured neurons from multiple life stages. Results Our data show that muskelin transcripts and polypeptides are expressed throughout the central nervous system with significantly high levels in hippocampus and cerebellum, a finding that resembles the tissue distribution of p39. At the subcellular level, muskelin is found in the soma, in neurite projections and the nucleus with a punctate distribution in both axons and dendrites. Immunostaining and synaptosome preparations identify partial localization of muskelin at synaptic sites. Differential centrifugation further reveals muskelin in membrane-enriched, rather than cytosolic fractions. Conclusion Our results suggest that muskelin represents a multifunctional protein associated with membranes and/or large protein complexes in most neurons of the central nervous system. These data are in conclusion with distinct roles of muskelin's functional interaction partners.

  3. Central metabolism of angiotensins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camara, C.G.

    1984-01-01

    High performance liquid chromatography analyses of the radioactivity derived from 125 I-angiotensins and bound to cellular receptors in the brain and peripheral tissue reveal that, first, the specifically bound radioactivity is a heterogeneous mixture of several molecular species. Second, the observed patterns of 125 I-angiotensin degradation are largely the result of the activity of membrane-bound amino peptidases, which are enriched in the crude mitochrondrial tissue fraction; third, in general, peptidase inhibitors decrease the apparent binding of 125 I-angiotensins to brain tissue, and they decrease this binding more than they decrease the degradation of the radioligands; fourth, peptidase inhibitors specific for individual enzymes, but not broad-spectrum peptidase inhibitors, actually decrease the amount of 125 I-angiotensin II bound to brain tissue, suggesting that angiotensin receptors in the brain may be associated with membrane-bound peptidases; fifth, tyrosine and other aromatic and branched-chain aliphatic amino acids, end products of angiotensin degradation by membrane peptidases, are quickly removed from the extracellular compartment by the activity of a high-affinity transport system, identical with the leucine-preferring uptake system, which is enriched in the crude mitochondrial tissue fraction, containing the synaptosomes; and sixth, the distribution of this uptake system in rat and gerbil brain is nearly identical and corresponds with the central distribution of 125 I-angiotensin binding in the gerbil, but neither with the distribution of 125 I-angiotensin II binding in the rat brain

  4. Modification by oxazepam of the diurnal variations in brain 125I-melatonin binding sites in sham-operated and pinealectomized rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anis, Y.; Zisapel, N.; Nir, I.; Schmidt, U.

    1992-01-01

    Sham-operated and pinealectomized male rats were maintained at 14 h light: 10 h dark cycles (lights-on 5.00 h) and injected daily, for 14 days, with oxazepam or vehicle. 125 I-melatonin binding was recorded in synaptosomes prepared at 10.00, 18.00, and 24.00 h from the hypothalamus, hippocampus and medulla-pons of the rats. In the sham-operated, vehicle treated rats, specific 125 I-melatonin binding in all brain areas studied was higher at 18.00 h, whereas in the oxazepam-treated animals, binding was higher at 24.00 h than at the other times tested. In the pinealectomized, vehicle-treated rats, the binding recorded at 18.00 h in all three brain areas, was lower than at the other times of day tested. Oxazepam treatment decreased 125 I-melatonin binding at 24.00 h in the hippocampus and medulla-pons of the pinealectomized rats and did not significantly affect the binding in the hypothalamus. These results indicate the ability of oxazepam, pinealectomy and their combination, to manipulate the diurnal variations in 125 I-melatonin binding sites in the rat brain

  5. Cloning, molecular characterization and expression of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase-1 from Torpedo electric organ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Satué, Mireia; Torrejón-Escribano, Benjamín; Felipe, Antonio; de Aranda, Inmaculada Gómez; Elías, Marc; Marsal, Jordi; Blasi, Juan; Solsona, Carles

    2007-01-01

    During synaptic transmission large amounts of ATP are released from pre- and post-synaptic sources of Torpedo electric organ. A chain reaction sequentially hydrolyses ATP to adenosine, which inhibits acetylcholine secretion. The first enzyme implicated in this extracellular ATP hydrolysis is an ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase (E-NTPDase) that dephosphorylates both ATP and ADP to AMP. This enzyme has been biochemically characterized in the synaptosomal fraction of Torpedo electric organ, having almost equal affinity for ATP as for ADP, a fact that pointed to the type-1 NTPDase enzyme. In the present work we describe the cloning and molecular characterization of the cDNA for an NTPDase from Torpedo marmorata electric organ. The clone, obtained using the RACE-PCR technique, contains and open-reading frame of 1506bp and encodes a 502 amino acids protein that exhibits high homology with other NTPDases1 from vertebrates previously identified, including those of zebrafish and Xenopus, as well as human, rat and mouse. Topology analyses revealed the existence of two transmembrane regions, two short cytoplasmic tails and a long extracellular domain containing five apyrase-conserved regions. Gene expression studies revealed that this gene is expressed in all the Torpedo tissues analyzed. Finally, activity and cellular localization of the protein encoded by this newly cloned cDNA was assessed by heterologous expression experiments involving COS-7 and HeLa cells.

  6. Modulation of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) system by Passiflora incarnata L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appel, Kurt; Rose, Thorsten; Fiebich, Bernd; Kammler, Thomas; Hoffmann, Christine; Weiss, Gabriele

    2011-06-01

    Passiflora incarnata L. (Passifloraceae) is important in herbal medicine for treating anxiety or nervousness, Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD), symptoms of opiate withdrawal, insomnia, neuralgia, convulsion, spasmodic asthma, ADHD, palpitations, cardiac rhythm abnormalities, hypertension, sexual dysfunction and menopause. However, the mechanism of action is still under discussion. Despite gaps in our understanding of neurophysiological processes, it is increasingly being recognized that dysfunction of the GABA system is implicated in many neuropsychiatric conditions, including anxiety and depressive disorders. Therefore, the in vitro effects of a dry extract of Passiflora incarnata (sole active ingredient in Pascoflair® 425 mg) on the GABA system were investigated. The extract inhibited [(3) H]-GABA uptake into rat cortical synaptosomes but had no effect on GABA release and GABA transaminase activity. Passiflora incarnata inhibited concentration dependently the binding of [(3) H]- SR95531 to GABA(A) -receptors and of [(3) H]-CGP 54626 to GABA(B) -receptors. Using the [(35) S]-GTPγS binding assay Passiflora could be classified as an antagonist of the GABA(B) receptor. In contrast, the ethanol- and the benzodiazepine-site of the GABA(A) -receptor were not affected by this extract. In conclusion, the first evidence was shown that numerous pharmacological effects of Passiflora incarnata are mediated via modulation of the GABA system including affinity to GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors, and effects on GABA uptake. Copyright © 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Exposure to static magnetic fields increases insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells by activating the transcription of the insulin gene and up-regulating the expression of vesicle-secreted proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Libin; Wang, Huiqin; Ma, Fenghui; Guo, Zhixia; He, Hongpeng; Zhou, Hao; Wang, Nan

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the effect of static magnetic fields (SMFs) on insulin secretion and explore the mechanisms underlying exposure to SMF-induced insulin secretion in rat insulinoma INS-1 cells. INS-1 cells were exposed to a 400 mT SMF for 72 h, and the proliferation of INS-1 cells was detected by (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The secretion of insulin was measured with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA), the expression of genes was detected by real-time PCR, and the expression of proteins was measured by Western blotting. Exposure to an SMF increased the expression and secretion of insulin by INS-1 cells but did not affect cell proliferation. Moreover, SMF exposure up-regulated the expression of several pancreas-specific transcriptional factors. Specifically, the activity of the rat insulin promoter was enhanced in INS-1 cells exposed to an SMF, and the expression levels of synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) and syntaxin-1A were up-regulated after exposure to an SMF. SMF exposure can promote insulin secretion in rat INS-1 cells by activating the transcription of the insulin gene and up-regulating the expression of vesicle-secreted proteins.

  8. Reconstitution of high-affinity opioid agonist binding in brain membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remmers, A.E.; Medzihradsky, F. (Univ. of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor (United States))

    1991-03-15

    In synaptosomal membranes from rat brain cortex, the {mu} selective agonist ({sup 3}H)dihydromorphine in the absence of sodium, and the nonselective antagonist ({sup 3}H)naltrexone in the presence of sodium, bound to two populations of opioid receptor sites with K{sub d} values of 0.69 and 8.7 nM for dihydromorphine, and 0.34 and 5.5 nM for naltrexone. The addition of 5 {mu}M guanosine 5{prime}-({gamma}-thio)triphosphate (GTP({gamma}S)) strongly reduced high-affinity agonist but not antagonist binding. Exposure of the membranes to high pH reduced the number of GTP({gamma}-{sup 35}S) binding sites by 90% and low K{sub m}, opioid-sensitive GTPase activity by 95%. In these membranes, high-affinity agonist binding was abolished and modulation of residual binding by GTP({gamma}S) was diminished. Alkali treatment of the glioma cell membranes prior to fusion inhibited most of the low K{sub m} GTPase activity and prevented the reconstitution of agonist binding. The results show that high-affinity opioid agonist binding reflects the ligand-occupied receptor - guanine nucleotide binding protein complex.

  9. Local synthesis of axonal and presynaptic RNA in squid model systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Ferrara, Eugenia; De Stefano, Rosanna; Lavina, Zeno Scotto; Crispino, Marianna; Squillace, Angela; van Minnen, Jan; Kaplan, Barry B; Giuditta, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    The presence of active systems of protein synthesis in axons and nerve endings raises the question of the cellular origin of the corresponding RNAs. Our present experiments demonstrate that, besides a possible derivation from neuronal cell bodies, axoplasmic RNAs originate in periaxonal glial cells and presynaptic RNAs derive from nearby cells, presumably glial cells. Indeed, in perfused squid giant axons, delivery of newly synthesized RNA to the axon perfusate is strongly stimulated by axonal depolarization or agonists of glial glutamate and acetylcholine receptors. Likewise, incubation of squid optic lobe slices with [3H]uridine leads to a marked accumulation of [3H]RNA in the large synaptosomes derived from the nerve terminals of retinal photoreceptor neurons. As the cell bodies of these neurons lie outside the optic lobe, the data demonstrate that presynaptic RNA is locally synthesized, presumably by perisynaptic glial cells. Overall, our results support the view that axons and presynaptic regions are endowed with local systems of gene expression which may prove essential for the maintenance and plasticity of these extrasomatic neuronal domains.

  10. Protein synthesis in presynaptic endings from squid brain: modulation by calcium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benech, J C; Crispino, M; Kaplan, B B; Giuditta, A

    1999-03-15

    Previous biochemical, autoradiographic, and ultrastructural data have shown that, in the synaptosomal fraction of the squid optic lobe, protein synthesis is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the retinal photoreceptor neurons (Crispino et al. [1993a] Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 4:366-374; Crispino et al. [1993b] J. Neurochem. 61:1144-1146; Crispino et al. [1997] J. Neurosci. 17:7694-7702). We now report that this process is close to its maximum at the basal concentration of cytosolic Ca++, and is markedly inhibited when the concentration of this ion is either decreased or increased. This conclusion is supported by the results of experiments with: 1) compounds known to increase the level of cytosolic Ca++, such as A23187, ionomycin, thapsigargin, and caffeine; 2) compounds sequestering cytosolic calcium ions such as BAPTA-AM; and 3) agents that block the role of Ca++ as second messenger, such as TFP and W7, which inhibit calmodulin, and calphostin, which inhibits protein kinase C. We conclude that variations in the level of cytosolic Ca++ induced in presynaptic terminals by neuronal activity may contribute to the modulation of the local synthesis of protein.

  11. Axonal and presynaptic RNAs are locally transcribed in glial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Chun, Jong Tai; Eyman, Maria; Cefaliello, Carolina; Bruno, Anna Paola; Crispino, Marianna

    2007-01-01

    In the last few years, the long-standing opinion that axonal and presynaptic proteins are exclusively derived from the neuron cell body has been substantially modified by the demonstration that active systems of protein synthesis are present in axons and nerve terminals. These observations have raised the issue of the cellular origin of the involved RNAs, which has been generally attributed to the neuron soma. However, data gathered in a number of model systems indicated that axonal RNAs are synthesized in the surrounding glial cells. More recent experiments on the perfused squid giant axon have definitively proved that axoplasmic RNAs are transcribed in periaxonal glia. Their delivery to the axon occurs by a modulatory mechanism based on the release of neurotransmitters from the stimulated axon and on their binding to glial receptors. In additional experiments on squid optic lobe synaptosomes, presynaptic RNA has been also shown to be synthesized locally, presumably in nearby glia. Together with a wealth of literature data, these observations indicate that axons and nerve terminals are endowed with a local system of gene expression that supports the maintenance and plasticity of these neuronal domains.

  12. Brain Metabolic DNA in Rat Cytoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuditta, Antonio; Rutigliano, Bruno

    2018-02-09

    Brain metabolic DNA (BMD) is not involved in cell division or DNA repair but is modulated by memory acquisition, sleep processing, and circadian oscillations. Using routine methods of subcellular fractionation, newly synthesized BMD from male rats is shown to be localized in crude nuclear, mitochondrial, and microsomal fractions and in two fractions of purified nuclei. Sub-fractionation of the mitochondrial fraction indicates the prevalent localization of BMD in free mitochondria and to a lesser degree in synaptosomes and myelin. Cesium density profiles of homogenate, subcellular fractions, and purified nuclei obtained after incorporation periods from 30 min to 4 h indicate that BMD synthesis takes place by reverse transcription in cytoplasmic organelles. Following the acquisition of the double-stranded structure, BMD is transferred to nuclei. Kinetic analyses lasting several weeks highlight the massive BMD turnover in subcellular fractions and purified nuclei and its dependence on age. Data are in agreement with the role of BMD as a temporary information store of cell responses of potential use in comparable forthcoming experiences.

  13. Protein synthesizing units in presynaptic and postsynaptic domains of squid neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, R; Vaida, B; Bleher, R; Crispino, M; Giuditta, A

    1998-11-01

    Putative protein synthesizing domains, called plaques, are characterized in the squid giant synapse and axon and in terminals of squid photoreceptor neurons. Plaques are oval-shaped formations of about 1 microm in size, which (1) generate signals that have spectroscopic electron energy loss characteristics of ribosomes, (2) exhibit ribonuclease-sensitive binding of YOYO-1, a fluorescent RNA/DNA dye, and (3) in part hybridize with a poly(dT) oligonucleotide. In the giant synapse plaques are abundant in the postsynaptic area, but are absent in the presynaptic terminal. In the cortical layer of the optic lobes, plaques are localized in the large carrot-shaped presynaptic terminals of photoreceptor neurons, where they are surrounded by synaptic vesicles and mitochondria. Biochemical and autoradiographic data have documented that the protein synthetic activity of squid optic lobe synaptosomes is largely due to the presynaptic terminals of the photoreceptor neurons. The identification of ribosomes and poly(A+)-mRNA in the plaques indicates that these structures are sites of local protein synthesis in synaptic domains.

  14. Dopamine Release Suppression Dependent on an Increase of Intracellular Ca2+ Contributed to Rotenone-induced Neurotoxicity in PC12 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai, Yan; Chen, Junfeng; Ye, Feng; Zhao, Yuanpeng; Zou, Zhongmin; Cao, Jia; Dong, Zhaojun

    2013-01-01

    Rotenone is an inhibitor of mitochondrial complex I that produces a model of Parkinson’s disease (PD), in which neurons undergo dopamine release dysfunction and other features. In neurons, exocytosis is one of the processes associated with dopamine release and is dependent on Ca2+ dynamic changes of the cell. In the present study, we have investigated the exocytosis of dopamine and the involvement of Ca2+ in dopamine release in PC12 cells administrated with rotenone. Results demonstrated that rotenone led to an elevation of intracellular Ca2+ through Ca2+ influx by opening of the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel and influenced the soluble N-ethylmaleimide attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins expression (including syntaxin, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2) and synaptosome-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25)); pretreatment with a blocker of L-type voltage-activated Ca2+ channels (nifedipine) decreased the intracellular dopamine levels and ROS formation, increased the cell viability and enhanced the neurite outgrowth and exocytosis of synaptic vesicles. These results indicated that the involvement of intracellular Ca2+ was one of the factors resulting in suppression of dopamine release suppression in PC12 cells intoxicated with rotenone, which was associated with the rotenone-induced dopamine neurotoxicity. PMID:23914057

  15. Oxidative stress, serotonergic changes and decreased ultrasonic vocalizations in a mouse model of Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharif, N F; Korade, Z; Porter, N A; Harrison, F E

    2017-07-01

    Smith-Lemli-Opitz syndrome is an inherited monogenic disorder in which mutations to the 7-dehydrocholesterol (7-DHC) reductase (Dhcr7) gene lead to deficits in cholesterol synthesis. As a result, many patients suffer from gross physiological and neurological deficits. The purpose of this study was to identify a potential abnormal behavioral phenotype in a compound mutant mouse model for Smith-Lemli-Opitz disease (Dhcr7 Δ3 -5/ T93M ) to further validate the model and to provide potential targets for future therapeutic interventions. We also sought to identify some of the underlying changes in brain function that may be responsible for behavioral differences among groups. The Dhcr7 compound mutant mice were smaller than their single mutant littermates. Both single and compound heterozygous mice made fewer ultrasonic vocalizations when separated from the dam, which may suggest a communication deficit in these animals. Striking increases of the highly oxidizable 7-DHC were observed in the compound mutant mice. 7-Dehydrocholesterol is the precursor to cholesterol and builds up because of decreased function of the mutated Dhcr7 enzyme. Additionally, several differences were noted in the serotonergic system including increased expression of the serotonin transporter and increased uptake of serotonin by isolated synaptosomes. We propose that changes to the oxidative environment during development can have a significant impact on the development of serotonergic function and that this contributes to behavioral differences observed in the mutant mice. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  16. Dietary Selenium or Zinc Supplementation Restores Brain Lipid Composition and Membrane Fluidity in Protein-Undernourished Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Salau, Bamidele A; Sandhir, Rajat; Adenuga, Gbenga A

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that protein undernutrition (PU) modifies the membrane lipid composition in the intestine and liver, as well as in plasma and other areas. However, there is limited information on the effect of PU on synaptosomal membrane lipid composition and fluidity and the protective role of selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn), which is a major focus of the present study. For 10 weeks, rats were fed diets containing 16% casein, which constituted the adequate protein diet, or 5% casein, representing the PU diet. The animals were supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 and 227 mg L-1, respectively, in drinking water for 3 weeks. The results showed a significant increase in total lipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, and the cholesterol/phospholipid (Chol/PL) ratio, and a significant reduction in phospholipids and membrane fluidity. Se and Zn supplementation to PU rats, however, significantly lowered total lipids, glycolipids, triglycerides, cholesterol, and the Chol/PL ratio, while phospholipids and membrane fluidity were significantly restored. It is concluded that a perturbed lipid composition induced by PU affects the membrane structure and fluidity, which in turn influences membrane functions. The study suggests that Se and Zn supplementation might be beneficial in restoring the lipid dyshomeostasis associated with PU. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Reduced expressions of calmodulin genes and protein and reduced ability of calmodulin to activate plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase in the brain of protein undernourished rats: modulatory roles of selenium and zinc supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Khera, Alka; Sandhir, Rajat; Adenuga, Gbenga A

    2016-03-01

    The roles of protein undernutrition as well as selenium (Se) and zinc (Zn) supplementation on the ability of calmodulin (CaM) to activate erythrocyte ghost membrane (EGM) Ca(2+)-ATPase and the calmodulin genes and protein expressions in rat's cortex and cerebellum were investigated. Rats on adequate protein diet and protein-undernourished (PU) rats were fed with diet containing 16% and 5% casein, respectively, for a period of 10 weeks. The rats were then supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 and 227 mg l(-1), respectively, in drinking water for 3 weeks. The results obtained from the study showed significant reductions in synaptosomal plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase (PMCA) activity, Ca(2+)/CaM activated EGM Ca(2+) ATPase activity and calmodulin genes and protein expressions in PU rats. Se or Zn supplementation improved the ability of Ca(2+)/CaM to activate EGM Ca(2+)-ATPase and protein expressions. Se or Zn supplementation improved gene expression in the cerebellum but not in the cortex. Also, the activity of PMCA was significantly improved by Zn. In conclusion, it is postulated that Se and Zn might be beneficial antioxidants in protecting against neuronal dysfunction resulting from reduced level of calmodulin such as present in protein undernutrition. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. UV Irradiation Accelerates Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP) Processing and Disrupts APP Axonal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almenar-Queralt, Angels; Falzone, Tomas L.; Shen, Zhouxin; Lillo, Concepcion; Killian, Rhiannon L.; Arreola, Angela S.; Niederst, Emily D.; Ng, Kheng S.; Kim, Sonia N.; Briggs, Steven P.; Williams, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression and/or abnormal cleavage of amyloid precursor protein (APP) are linked to Alzheimer's disease (AD) development and progression. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cellular levels of APP or its processing, and the physiological and pathological consequences of altered processing are not well understood. Here, using mouse and human cells, we found that neuronal damage induced by UV irradiation leads to specific APP, APLP1, and APLP2 decline by accelerating their secretase-dependent processing. Pharmacological inhibition of endosomal/lysosomal activity partially protects UV-induced APP processing implying contribution of the endosomal and/or lysosomal compartments in this process. We found that a biological consequence of UV-induced γ-secretase processing of APP is impairment of APP axonal transport. To probe the functional consequences of impaired APP axonal transport, we isolated and analyzed presumptive APP-containing axonal transport vesicles from mouse cortical synaptosomes using electron microscopy, biochemical, and mass spectrometry analyses. We identified a population of morphologically heterogeneous organelles that contains APP, the secretase machinery, molecular motors, and previously proposed and new residents of APP vesicles. These possible cargoes are enriched in proteins whose dysfunction could contribute to neuronal malfunction and diseases of the nervous system including AD. Together, these results suggest that damage-induced APP processing might impair APP axonal transport, which could result in failure of synaptic maintenance and neuronal dysfunction. PMID:24573290

  19. Aniracetam improves behavioural responses and facilitates signal transduction in the rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventra, C; Grimaldi, M; Meucci, O; Scorziello, A; Apicella, A; Filetti, E; Marino, A; Schettini, G

    1994-01-01

    The effect of aniracetam (10, 50, 100 mg/kg i.p. daily for 15 days) on both behavioural and biochemical parameters was investigated in the adult rat. Animals given aniracetam (50 mg/kg 1 h before the trial) showed a significant increase in the percentage of conditioned active avoidance responses and a reduction of latency times. Aniracetam significantly counteracted the scopolamine-induced memory failure at the passive avoidance (step down) test, while it did not modify the locomotion of the animals. In purified frontocortical and hippocampal synaptic membranes of rats treated with aniracetam (50 mg/kg i.p. daily for 15 days) a potentiation of basal, carbamylcholine-, dopamine- and norepinephrine-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity was observed, while forskolin-stimulated enzyme activity was not modified. With regard to inositol phosphate production measured in fronto-cortical synaptoneurosomes, aniracetam potentiated the stimulation by angiotensin II, while the stimulation by carbamylcholine, not affected by 10 and 50 mg/kg aniracetam, was notably, although not significantly, decreased by 100 mg/kg aniracetam. Furthermore, in synaptosomes derived from hippocampus, aniracetam (50 mg/kg i.p. daily for 15 days) caused an increase of both basal and K(+)-stimulated intrasynaptosomal Ca(2+) concentration. In conclusion, a correlation between the improvement of behavioural performance and the modulation of transducing systems by aniracetam seems to take place in brain areas, such as frontal cortex and hippocampus, known to play a major role in the control of cognitive functions.

  20. In vitro evaluation of antioxidant and neuroprotective effects of curcumin loaded in Pluronic micelles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cvetelina Gorinova

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Curcumin is a polyphenolic substance with attractive pharmacological activities (e.g. antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, anticancer. Incorporation of curcumin in polymeric micelles could overcome the problems associated with its instability and low aqueous solubility. The aim of this study was to load curcumin in polymeric micelles based on Pluronic® P 123 or Pluronic® F 127 triblock copolymers and evaluate the antioxidant and neuroprotective effects after micellization. The micelles were prepared and loaded with curcumin by applying the dissolution method. Higher encapsulation efficiency was observed in the micelles formulated with Pluronic® P 123. These micelles were characterized with small size and narrow size distribution. The effects of micellar curcumin were investigated in two in vitro models. First, the capacity of micellar curcumin to inhibit iron/ascorbic acid-induced lipid peroxidation in rat liver microsomes was evaluated. Micellar curcumin and free drug showed similar inhibition of lipid peroxidation. Second, micellar curcumin and free curcumin showed protective potential in a model of 6-hydroxydopamine induced neurotoxicity in rat brain synaptosomes. The results from both methods indicated preservation of antioxidant and neuroprotective activity of curcumin in micelles. The small micellar size, high loading capacity and preservation of antioxidant activity of curcumin into Pluronic micelles, suggested their further evaluation as a curcumin delivery system.

  1. Site of anticonvulsant action on sodium channels: autoradiographic and electrophysiological studies in rat brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worley, P.F.; Baraban, J.M.

    1987-05-01

    The anticonvulsants phenytoin and carbamazepine interact allosterically with the batrachotoxin binding site of sodium channels. In the present study, we demonstrate an autoradiographic technique to localize the batrachotoxin binding site on sodium channels in rat brain using (/sup 3/H)batrachotoxinin-A 20-alpha-benzoate (BTX-B). Binding of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B to brain sections is dependent on potentiating allosteric interactions with scorpion venom and is displaced by BTX-B (Kd approximately 200 nM), aconitine, veratridine, and phenytoin with the same rank order of potencies as described in brain synaptosomes. The maximum number of (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites in forebrain sections also agrees with biochemical determinations. Autoradiographic localizations indicate that (/sup 3/H)BTX-B binding sites are not restricted to cell bodies and axons but are present in synaptic zones throughout the brain. For example, a particularly dense concentration of these sites in the substantia nigra is associated with afferent terminals of the striatonigral projection. By contrast, myelinated structures possess much lower densities of binding sites. In addition, we present electrophysiological evidence that synaptic transmission, as opposed to axonal conduction, is preferentially sensitive to the action of aconitine and veratridine. Finally, the synaptic block produced by these sodium channel activators is inhibited by phenytoin and carbamazepine at therapeutic anticonvulsant concentrations.

  2. Synthesis, storage, and release of propionylcholine by the electric organ of Torpedo marmorata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Regan, S.

    1982-09-01

    Little is known about the specificity of the mechanisms involved in the synthesis and release of acetylcholine for the acetyl moiety. To test this, blocks of tissue from the electric organ of Torpedo were incubated with either (1-/sup 14/C)acetate or (1-/sup 14/C)propionate, and the synthesis, storage, and release of (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine and (/sup 14/C)propionylcholine were compared. To obtain equivalent amounts of the two labeled choline esters, a 50-fold higher concentration of propionate than of acetate was needed. Following subcellular fractionation, similar proportions of (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine and (/sup 14/C)propionylcholine were recovered with synaptosomes and with synaptic vesicles. Furthermore, both labeled choline esters were protected to a similar extent from degradation during homogenization of tissue in physiological medium, indicating that the two choline esters were equally well incorporated into synaptic vesicles. Yet depolarization of tissue blocks by 50 mM KCl released much less (/sup 14/C)propionylcholine than (/sup 14/C)acetylcholine. During field stimulation of the tissue blocks, the difference between the releasibility of the two choline esters was less marked, but acetylcholine was still released in preference to propionylcholine. Evidence for specificity of the release mechanism was also obtained when the release of the two choline esters in response to field stimulation was compared in tissue blocks preincubated with both (/sup 3/H)choline and (/sup 14/C)propionate.

  3. Distribution of the intracellular Ca(2+)-ATPase isoform 2b in pig brain subcellular fractions and cross-reaction with a monoclonal antibody raised against the enzyme isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvador, J M; Berengena, M; Sepúlveda, M R; Mata, A M

    2001-04-01

    The presence and distribution of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) isoform 2b in microsomes and other subcellular fractions isolated from pig brain has been demonstrated by the combined use of a specific antibody raised against the SERCA2b isoform and ATP phosphorylation experiments. All subcellular fractions show an approximately 110 kDa phosphorylated protein, the band intensity being stronger in microsomes. Preliminary treatment of the samples with trypsin generates two phosphorylated fragments of about 57 and 33 kDa in the presence of Ca(2+). The observed fragments are typical trypsinized products of the SERCA2b isoform. The monoclonal antibody Y/1F4 raised against the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (isoform 1) binds to the 110 kDa band in membranes isolated from brain. The binding was stronger in microsomes than in other fractions. Furthermore, this antibody also recognizes a clear band at around 115 kDa. This band is always stronger in plasma membrane than in synaptosomes or microsomes and is unaffected by trypsin. Phosphorylation studies in the absence of Ca(2+) suggest that the 115 kDa protein is not a Ca(2+)-ATPase.

  4. Cholecystokinin-8 suppressed /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to rat brain opiate receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, X.J.; Fan, S.G.; Ren, M.F.; Han, J.S.

    1989-01-01

    Radioreceptor assay (RRA) was adopted to analyze the influence of CCK-8 on /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to opiate receptors in rat brain synaptosomal membranes (P2). In the competition experiment CCK-8 suppressed the binding of /sup 3/H-etorphine. This effect was completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Rosenthal analysis for saturation revealed two populations of /sup 3/H-etorphine binding sites. CCK-8 inhibited /sup 3/H-etorphine binding to the high affinity sites by an increase in Kd and decrease in Bmax without significant changes in the Kd and Bmax of the low affinity sites. This effect of CCK-8 was also completely reversed by proglumide at 1/mu/M. Unsulfated CCK-8 produced only a slight increase in Kd of the high affinity sites without affecting Bmax. The results suggest that CCK-8 might be capable of suppressing the high affinity opioid binding sites via the activation of CCK receptor.

  5. Effect of thyroxine on SNARE complex and synaptotagmin-1 expression in the prefrontal cortex of rats with adult-onset hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, H Y; Sun, C P; Jia, X M; Gui, L; Zhu, D F; Ma, W Q

    2012-03-01

    Thyroid hormone insufficiency in adulthood causes a wide range of brain impairments, including altered synaptic proteins in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). The present study investigated whether adult-onset hypothyroidism altered the expression of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes and synaptotagmin-1 (syt-1) in the PFC of rats. Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into 4 groups: control, hypothyroid, and hypothyroid treated with T(4) [5 or 20 μg/100 g body weight (BW)]. Adult-onset hypothyroidism was induced in rats with the antithyroid drug 6-n-propyl-2-thiouracil (ip injection). PFC levels of synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), syntaxin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP-2) and syt-1 were determined by immunohistochemistry and western blot analyses. The results showed that syntaxin-1 and syt-1 were expressed at significantly lower levels in hypothyroid rats, VAMP-2 levels were not altered, and SNAP-25 levels were much higher compared to controls. A 2-week treatment with 5 μg T(4)/100 g BW partially normalized levels of SNARE complex and syt-1, and 20 μg T(4)/100 g BW restored these proteins closer to normal levels. Our findings indicate that dysregulation of SNARE complex and syt-1 in PFC of adult-onset hypothyroidism can be restored by T(4) treatment. © 2012, Editrice Kurtis.

  6. Polyphenols differentially inhibit degranulation of distinct subsets of vesicles in mast cells by specific interaction with granule-type-dependent SNARE complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yoosoo; Oh, Jung-Mi; Heo, Paul; Shin, Jae Yoon; Kong, Byoungjae; Shin, Jonghyeok; Lee, Ji-Chun; Oh, Jeong Su; Park, Kye Won; Lee, Choong Hwan; Shin, Yeon-Kyun; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Anti-allergic effects of dietary polyphenols were extensively studied in numerous allergic disease models, but the molecular mechanisms of anti-allergic effects by polyphenols remain poorly understood. In the present study, we show that the release of granular cargo molecules, contained in distinct subsets of granules of mast cells, is specifically mediated by two sets of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins, and that various polyphenols differentially inhibit the formation of those SNARE complexes. Expression analysis of RBL-2H3 cells for 11 SNARE genes and a lipid mixing assay of 24 possible combinations of reconstituted SNAREs indicated that the only two active SNARE complexes involved in mast cell degranulation are Syn (syntaxin) 4/SNAP (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein)-23/VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein) 2 and Syn4/SNAP-23/VAMP8. Various polyphenols selectively or commonly interfered with ternary complex formation of these two SNARE complexes, thereby stopping membrane fusion between granules and plasma membrane. This led to the differential effect of polyphenols on degranulation of three distinct subsets of granules. These results suggest the possibility that formation of a variety of SNARE complexes in numerous cell types is controlled by polyphenols which, in turn, might regulate corresponding membrane trafficking. PMID:23252429

  7. Pharmacological analysis of calcium antagonist receptors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reynolds, I.J.

    1987-01-01

    This work focuses on two aspects of the action of calcium antagonist drugs, namely, the interaction of drugs with receptors for verapamil-like calcium antagonists, and the interactions of drugs with voltage-sensitive calcium fluxes in rat brain synaptosomes. From binding studies I have found that the ligand of choice for labeling the verapamil receptor is (-)[ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil. This drug labels potently, reversibly and stereoselectively two receptors in membranes prepared from rat brain and rabbit skeletal muscle tissues. In equilibrium studies dihydropyridine calcium antagonists interact in a non-competitive fashion, while many non-DHPs are apparently competitive. In-depth kinetic studies in skeletal muscle membranes indicate that the two receptors are linked in a negative heterotropic fashion, and that low-affinity binding of (-) [ 3 H]desmethoxy-verapamil may be to the diltiazem receptor. However, these studies were not able to distinguish between the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to spatially separate, allosterically coupled receptors, and the hypothesis that diltiazem binds to a subsite of the verapamil receptor

  8. Excitatory amino acid receptor ligands: resolution, absolute stereochemistry, and enantiopharmacology of 2-amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, T N; Ebert, B; Bräuner-Osborne, Hans

    1998-01-01

    (RS)-2-Amino-3-(4-butyl-3-hydroxyisoxazol-5-yl)propionic acid (Bu-HIBO, 6) has previously been shown to be an agonist at (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazol-4-yl)propionic acid (AMPA) receptors and an inhibitor of CaCl2-dependent [3H]-(S)-glutamic acid binding (J. Med. Chem. 1992, 35, 3512......-3519). To elucidate the pharmacological significance of this latter binding affinity, which is also shown by quisqualic acid (3) but not by AMPA, we have now resolved Bu-HIBO via diastereomeric salt formation using the diprotected Bu-HIBO derivative 11 and the enantiomers of 1-phenylethylamine (PEA). The absolute...... equipotent as inhibitors of CaCl2-dependent [3H]-(S)-glutamic acid binding, neither enantiomer showed significant affinity for the synaptosomal (S)-glutamic acid uptake system(s). AMPA receptor affinity (IC50 = 0.48 microM) and agonism (EC50 = 17 microM) were shown to reside exclusively in the S...

  9. ETUDE FONCTIONNELLE DES SYSTEMES DE CAPTURE SYNAPTOSOMALE ET VESICULAIRE DE DOPAMINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M SLIMANI

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available L‘injection stéréotaxique unilatérale dans la substance noire de la 6 hydroxy-dopamine ( 6OH-DA se traduit par une chute  parallèle  de  la   capture de dopamine tritiée au  niveau  synaptosomale de  l'ordre  de -70 % et dans les préparations vésiculaires de l'ordre de -69 %, comparées aux préparations issues de Rats non lésés. Ces résultats montrent que ces deux préparations synaptosomales et vésiculaires sont bien d'origine dopaminergique. D'autre part, une étude comparative de l'effet de quelques agents pharmacologiques (β carbolines, imipraminiques, amphétamine et les inhibiteurs purs de la capture synaptosomale sur la capture synaptosomale et vésiculaire de la dopamine tritiée in-vitro, montre qu'ils agissent comme de puissants inhibiteurs. Nous montrons également que le transporteur vésiculaire diffère du transporteur synaptosomal par sa stéréospécificité et sa sensibilité aux agents pharmacologiques.

  10. Neurochemical, pharmacological, and developmental studies on cerebellar receptors for dicarboxylic amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharif, N.A.; Roberts, P.J.

    1984-01-01

    Specific binding of L-[ 3 H]glutamate ([ 3 H]Glu) and L[ 3 H]Asp) to cerebellar membranes represented a time-, temperature-, pH- and protein-dependent interaction which was both saturable and reversible. Binding sites for both radioligands appeared maximally enriched in synaptosomal fractions isolated by gradient centrifugation. Kinetically derived dissociation constant (K/sub off//K/sub on/ . K/sub d/) for [ 3 H]Glu binding to this fraction indicated high-affinity (433 nM). Competition experiments employing analogs of excitatory amino acids, including new antagonists, helped identify binding sites for [ 3 H]Glu and [ 3 H]Asp as receptors with differential pharmacological specificities. Membrane freezing reduced numbers of both receptor types, but binding activity could be recovered partially by incubation at 37 degrees C. Glu receptors exhibited a pronounced deleterious sensitivity to thiol modifying reagents and L-Glu (50-1000 microM) provided protection against these compounds during co-incubation with cerebellar membranes. It is suggested that cold storage may induce partially reversible receptor inactivation by promoting sulfhydryl group/bond modification. Rat cerebellar glutamatergic function (endogenous Glu content, Glu uptake and receptor sites) exhibited an apparent ontogenetic peak between days 8-12 postpartum with a plateauing profile from day 30 to adulthood. The accelerated development (days 8-12) coincides with the first demonstrable Glu release and kainic acid neurotoxicity, as described previously

  11. Resolving Contributions of Oxygen-Consuming and ROS-Generating Enzymes at the Synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engy A. Abdel-Rahman

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Disruption of cellular redox homeostasis is implicated in a wide variety of pathologic conditions and aging. A fundamental factor that dictates such balance is the ratio between mitochondria-mediated complete oxygen reduction into water and incomplete reduction into superoxide radical by mitochondria and NADPH oxidase (NOX enzymatic activity. Here we determined mitochondrial as well as NOX-dependent rates of oxygen consumption in parallel with H2O2 generation in freshly isolated synaptosomes using high resolution respirometry combined with fluorescence or electrochemical sensory. Our results indicate that although synaptic mitochondria exhibit substantially higher respiratory activities (8–82-fold greater than NOX oxygen consumption depending on mitochondrial respiratory state, NADPH-dependent oxygen consumption is associated with greater H2O2 production (6-7-fold higher NOX-H2O2. We also show that, in terms of the consumed oxygen, while synaptic mitochondria “leaked” 0.71%±0.12 H2O2 during NAD+-linked resting, 0.21%±0.04 during NAD+-linked active respiration, and 0.07%±0.02 during FAD+-linked active respiration, NOX converted 38%±13 of O2 into H2O2. Our results indicate that NOX rather than mitochondria is the major source of synaptic H2O2. The present approach may assist in the identification of redox-modulating synaptic factors that underlie a variety of physiological and pathological processes in neurons.

  12. Functional evolution of the trace amine associated receptors in mammals and the loss of TAAR1 in dogs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Westmoreland Susan V

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The trace amine associated receptor family is a diverse array of GPCRs that arose before the first vertebrates walked on land. Trace amine associated receptor 1 (TAAR1 is a wide spectrum aminergic receptor that acts as a modulator in brain monoaminergic systems. Other trace amine associated receptors appear to relate to environmental perception and show a birth-and-death pattern in mammals similar to olfactory receptors. Results Across mammals, avians, and amphibians, the TAAR1 gene is intact and appears to be under strong purifying selection based on rates of amino acid fixation compared to neutral mutations. We have found that in dogs it has become a pseudogene. Our analyses using a comparative genetics approach revealed that the pseudogenization event predated the emergence of the Canini tribe rather than being coincident with canine domestication. By assessing the effects of the TAAR1 agonist β-phenylethylamine on [3H]dopamine uptake in canine striatal synaptosomes and comparing the degree and pattern of uptake inhibition to that seen in other mammals, including TAAR1 knockout mice, wild type mice and rhesus monkey, we found that the TAAR1 pseudogenization event resulted in an uncompensated loss of function. Conclusion The gene family has seen expansions among certain mammals, notably rodents, and reductions in others, including primates. By placing the trace amine associated receptors in an evolutionary context we can better understand their function and their potential associations with behavior and neurological disease.

  13. Metabolism of γ-hydroxyl-[1-14C] butyrate by rat brain: relationship to the Krebs cycle and metabolic compartmentation of amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doherty, J.D.; Roth, R.H.

    1978-01-01

    Ninhydrin decarboxylation experiments were carried out on the labelled amino acids produced following intraventricular injection of either γ-hydroxy-[1- 14 C] butyric acid (GHB) or [1- 14 C] succinate. The loss of isotope (as 14 CO 2 ) was similar for both substances. The [1- 14 C] GHB metabolites lost 75% of the label and the [1- 14 C] succinate metabolites lost 68%. This observation gives support to the hypothesis that the rat brain has the enzymatic capacity to metabolize [1- 14 C] GHB to succinate and to amino acids that have the isotope in the carboxylic acid group adjacent to the α-amino group. These results also indicate that the label from [1- 14 C] GHB does not enter the Krebs cycle as acetate. The specific activity ratio of radio-labelled glutamine to glutamic acid was determined in order to evaluate which of the two major metabolic compartments prefentially metabolize GHB. It was found that for [1- 14 C] GHB the ratio was 4.20 +- 0.18 (S.E. for n = 7) and for [1- 14 C] succinate the ratio was 7.71 (average of two trials, 7.74 and 7.69). These results suggest that the compartment thought to be associated with glial cells and synaptosomal structures is largely responsible for the metabolism of GHB. Metabolism as it might relate to the neuropharmacological action of GHB is discussed. (author)

  14. Serotonin Transporter-Independent Actions of the Antidepressant Vortioxetine As Revealed Using the SERT Met172 Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nackenoff, Alex G; Simmler, Linda D; Baganz, Nicole L; Pehrson, Alan L; Sánchez, Connie; Blakely, Randy D

    2017-05-17

    Selective serotonin (5-HT, SERT) reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are the most commonly prescribed treatments for depression. However, they have delayed efficacy and can induce side-effects that can encourage discontinuation. Recently, agents have been developed, including vortioxetine (Trintellix), that augment SERT blockade with interactions at other targets. At therapeutic doses, vortioxetine interacts with SERT as well as 5-HT 1A , 5-HT 1B , 5-HT 3 , and 5-HT 7 receptors. We assessed the SERT-dependency of vortioxetine action using the SERT Met172 mouse model, which disrupts high-affinity interactions of many antidepressants with the transporter. We demonstrate that the SERT Met172 substitution induces an ∼19-fold loss in vortioxetine potency for SERT inhibition in midbrain synaptosomes. Moreover, in these mice, we observed reduced SERT occupancy, a diminished ability to prolong 5-HT clearance, and a reduced capacity to elevate extracellular 5-HT. Despite reduced interactions with SERT, vortioxetine maintained its ability to enhance mobility in tail suspension and forced swim tests, reduce consumption latency in the novelty induced hypophagia test, and promoted proliferation and survival of subgranular zone hippocampal stem cells. Our findings suggest that the antidepressant actions of vortioxetine may be SERT-independent, and encourage consideration of agents that mimic one or more actions of the drug in the development of improved depression treatments.

  15. Ferulic Acid Suppresses Glutamate Release Through Inhibition of Voltage-Dependent Calcium Entry in Rat Cerebrocortical Nerve Terminals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu Yu; Lu, Cheng Wei; Huang, Shu-Kuei

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study investigated the effects and possible mechanism of ferulic acid, a naturally occurring phenolic compound, on endogenous glutamate release in the nerve terminals of the cerebral cortex in rats. Results show that ferulic acid inhibited the release of glutamate evoked by the K+ channel blocker 4-aminopyridine (4-AP). The effect of ferulic acid on the evoked glutamate release was prevented by chelating the extracellular Ca2+ ions, but was insensitive to the glutamate transporter inhibitor DL-threo-beta-benzyl-oxyaspartate. Ferulic acid suppressed the depolarization-induced increase in a cytosolic-free Ca2+ concentration, but did not alter 4-AP–mediated depolarization. Furthermore, the effect of ferulic acid on evoked glutamate release was abolished by blocking the Cav2.2 (N-type) and Cav2.1 (P/Q-type) channels, but not by blocking ryanodine receptors or mitochondrial Na+/Ca2+ exchange. These results show that ferulic acid inhibits glutamate release from cortical synaptosomes in rats through the suppression of presynaptic voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry. PMID:23342970

  16. Comparison of the effects of central and peripheral aluminum administration on regional 2-deoxy-D-glucose incorporation in the rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, J.J.; Tolchard, S.

    1989-01-01

    Intracerebroventricular (ICV) Injection of aluminum tartrate (ALT 205.7 mcg) in the rat induces a progressive encephalopathy characterized by neurobehavioral derangements. The condition is associated with a reduced ability of cerebral synaptosomes to incorporate radiolabeled 2-Deoxy-D-glucose (2DG) in vitro. The present study surveyed and compared the in vivo regional cerebral glucose uptake (rCGlu) capacity of rats injected with ALT 7 or 14 days previously either by the ICV or intraperitoneal routes. ICV injection produces transient rCGlu depression in caudate-putamen, geniculate bodies and periaquaeductal gray, resolving by day 14. Thalamic nuclei exhibit depressed rCGlu by the 7th day undergoing further depression by day 14. The rCGlu of occipitoparietal cortices, normal at day 7, was increased by day 14. In contrast, peripheral aluminum administration produced transient rCGlu depression in olfactory bulbs, frontal and occipitoparietal cortices, nucleus accumbens and cerebellum, and transiently increased rCGlu in the geniculate nuclei. These effects, present by day 7, had resolved by day 14 when rCGlu has increased in the previously normal pontine nuclei and decreased in the previously normal hippocampus

  17. Desensitization of B-adrenergic receptors following repeated injections of 2-substituted-4-phenylquinolines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhaider, A.A.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous work, they synthesized some new 2-substituted-4-phenylquinoline derivatives which demonstrated potent antidepressant activities as revealed by their antagonism to the uptake of 3 (H)-norepinephrine and 3 (H)-serotonin into brain synaptosomal preparation. Also, these compounds have demonstrated less anticholinergic, antihistamine and cardiovascular effects as compared to imipramine in animal models. In this present work, the chronic effects of some of these compounds on the sensitivity of the noradrenergic cyclic-AMP generating system on rat brain cortex has been conducted by the daily injection of 20 mg/kg i.p. for a period of three weeks. Imipramine and trazodone were utilized as standards, representing typical and atypical antidepressants, respectively. Acute treatment (single dose 20 mg/kg) and subchronic treatment (20 mg/kg for 10 days) produced no significant desensitization of the B-adrenoceptors. However, chronic treatment with the compounds significantly decreased isoprenaline-induced increase in c-AMP in the cortex which suggests desensitization of B-adrenoceptors. This effect coupled with the previous findings point to a potential rule of these compounds as suitable antidepressant candidates

  18. Identification of fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a protein receptor for botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birgitte P S Jacky

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A causes transient muscle paralysis by entering motor nerve terminals (MNTs where it cleaves the SNARE protein Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25206 to yield SNAP25197. Cleavage of SNAP25 results in blockage of synaptic vesicle fusion and inhibition of the release of acetylcholine. The specific uptake of BoNT/A into pre-synaptic nerve terminals is a tightly controlled multistep process, involving a combination of high and low affinity receptors. Interestingly, the C-terminal binding domain region of BoNT/A, HC/A, is homologous to fibroblast growth factors (FGFs, making it a possible ligand for Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs. Here we present data supporting the identification of Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptor 3 (FGFR3 as a high affinity receptor for BoNT/A in neuronal cells. HC/A binds with high affinity to the two extra-cellular loops of FGFR3 and acts similar to an agonist ligand for FGFR3, resulting in phosphorylation of the receptor. Native ligands for FGFR3; FGF1, FGF2, and FGF9 compete for binding to FGFR3 and block BoNT/A cellular uptake. These findings show that FGFR3 plays a pivotal role in the specific uptake of BoNT/A across the cell membrane being part of a larger receptor complex involving ganglioside- and protein-protein interactions.

  19. Release of [3H]-monoamines from superfused rat striatal slices by methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levin, J.A.; Schmidt, C.J.; Lovenberg, W.

    1986-01-01

    MDMA is a phenylisopropylamine which is reported to have unique behavioral effects in man. Because of its structural similarities to the amphetamines the authors have compared the effects of MDMA and two related amphetamines on the spontaneous release of tritiated dopamine (DA) and serotonin (5HT) from superfused rat striatal slices. At concentrations of 10 -7 - 10 -5 M MDMA and the serotonergic neurotoxin, p-chloroamphetamine, were equipotent releasers of [ 3 H]5HT being approximately 10x more potent than methamphetamine. However, methamphetamine was the more potent releaser of [ 3 H]DA by a factor of approximately 10x. MDMA-induced release of both [ 5 H]5HT and [ 3 H]DA was Ca 2+ -independent and inhibited by selective monoamine uptake blockers suggesting a carrier-dependent release mechanism. Synaptosomal uptake experiments with (+)[ 3 H]MDMA indicated no specific uptake of the drug further suggesting the effect of uptake blockers may be to inhibit the carrier-mediated export of amines displaced by MDMA

  20. Label-free electrochemical detection of botulinum neurotoxin type E based on its enzymatic activity using interdigitated electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyun, Sang Hwa; Park, Dae Keun; Kang, Aeyeon; Kim, Soohyun; Kim, Daehee; Shin, Yu Mi; Song, Ji-Joon; Yun, Wan Soo

    2016-02-01

    We report a simple label-free electrochemical method of detecting low concentrations of botulinum neurotoxin type E light chain (BoNT/E LC) based on its peptide cleavage activity. Dual-mode cyclic voltammetry was employed to observe changes in the redox signal of ferri-/ferro-cyanide on interdigitated microelectrodes, whose surfaces were covered by peptides designed from synaptosomal-associated protein 25 to be cleaved by BoNT/E LC. With the introduction of BoNT/E LC, the redox signal showed a time-dependent increase due to cleavage of the immobilized peptide molecules. In addition to the increased redox signal intensity, its time-dependence can be considered as a strong evidence of BoNT/E sensing, since the time-dependent increase can only result from the enzymatic activity of BoNT/E LC. Using this method, BoNT/E LC, at concentrations as low as 5 pg/ml, was readily measurable with only an hour of incubation.

  1. Proteomic profiling of the hypothalamus in two mouse models of narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzam, Sausan; Schlatzer, Daniela; Nethery, David; Saleh, Dania; Li, Xiaolin; Akladious, Afaf; Chance, Mark R; Strohl, Kingman P

    2017-07-01

    Narcolepsy is a disabling neurological disorder of sleepiness linked to the loss of neurons producing orexin neuropeptides in the hypothalamus. Two well-characterized phenotypic mouse models of narcolepsy, loss-of-function (orexin-knockout), and progressive loss of orexin (orexin/ataxin-3) exist. The open question is whether the proteomics signatures of the hypothalamus would be different between the two models. To address this gap, we utilized a label-free proteomics approach and conducted a hypothalamic proteome analysis by comparing each disease model to that of wild type. Following data processing and statistical analysis, 14 484 peptides mapping to 2282 nonredundant proteins were identified, of which 39 proteins showed significant differences in protein expression across groups. Altered proteins in both models showed commonalties in pathways for mitochondrial dysfunction and neuronal degeneration, as well as altered proteins related to inflammatory demyelination, insulin resistance, metabolic responses, and the dopaminergic and monoaminergic systems. Model-specific alterations in insulin degraded enzyme (IDE) and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 were unique to orexin-KO and orexin/ataxin-3, respectively. For both models, proteomics not only identified clinically suspected consequences of orexin loss on energy homeostasis and neurotransmitter systems, but also identified commonalities in inflammation and degeneration despite the entirely different genetic basis of the two mouse models. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Inhibition of serotonin release by bombesin-like peptides in rat hypothalamus in vitro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saporito, M.S.; Warwick, R.O. Jr.

    1989-01-01

    We investigated the activity of bombesin (BN), neuromedin-C (NM-C) and neuromedin-B (NM-B) on serotonin (5-HT) release and reuptake in rat hypothalamus (HYP) in vitro. BN and NM-C but not NM-B decreased K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release from superfused HYP slices by 25%. Bacitracin, a nonspecific peptidase inhibitor, reversed the inhibitory effect of BN on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Phosphoramidon (PAN, 10 /mu/M) an endopeptidase 24.11 inhibitor, abolished the inhibitory effect of BN, but not NM-C, on K/sup +/ evoked /sup 3/H-5-HT release. The peptidyl dipeptidase A inhibitor enalaprilat (ENP, 10 /mu/M), enhanced both BN and NM-C inhibition of /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Bestatin (BST, 10 /mu/M) had no effect on BN or NM-C inhibitory activity on /sup 3/H-5-HT release. Neither BN, NM-C nor NM-B affected reuptake of /sup 3/H-5-HT into HYP synaptosomes alone or in combination with any of the peptidase inhibitors, nor did these peptides alter the ability of fluoxetine to inhibit /sup 3/H-5-HT uptake.

  3. Inhibition of Activity of GABA Transporter GAT1 by δ-Opioid Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Pu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Analgesia is a well-documented effect of acupuncture. A critical role in pain sensation plays the nervous system, including the GABAergic system and opioid receptor (OR activation. Here we investigated regulation of GABA transporter GAT1 by δOR in rats and in Xenopus oocytes. Synaptosomes of brain from rats chronically exposed to opiates exhibited reduced GABA uptake, indicating that GABA transport might be regulated by opioid receptors. For further investigation we have expressed GAT1 of mouse brain together with mouse δOR and μOR in Xenopus oocytes. The function of GAT1 was analyzed in terms of Na+-dependent [3H]GABA uptake as well as GAT1-mediated currents. Coexpression of δOR led to reduced number of fully functional GAT1 transporters, reduced substrate translocation, and GAT1-mediated current. Activation of δOR further reduced the rate of GABA uptake as well as GAT1-mediated current. Coexpression of μOR, as well as μOR activation, affected neither the number of transporters, nor rate of GABA uptake, nor GAT1-mediated current. Inhibition of GAT1-mediated current by activation of δOR was confirmed in whole-cell patch-clamp experiments on rat brain slices of periaqueductal gray. We conclude that inhibition of GAT1 function will strengthen the inhibitory action of the GABAergic system and hence may contribute to acupuncture-induced analgesia.

  4. Differential sensitivity of long-sleep and short-sleep mice to high doses of cocaine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Fiebre, C M; Ruth, J A; Collins, A C

    1989-12-01

    The cocaine sensitivity of male and female long-sleep (LS) and short-sleep (SS) mice, which have been selectively bred for differential ethanol-induced "sleep-time," was examined in a battery of behavioral and physiological tests. Differences between these two mouse lines were subtle and were seen primarily at high doses. At high doses, SS mice were more sensitive than LS mice, particularly to cocaine-induced hypothermia; however, significant hypothermia was not seen except at doses which were very near to the seizure threshold. During a 60-min test of locomotor activity, LS mice showed greater stimulation of Y-maze activity by 20 mg/kg cocaine than SS mice. Consistent with the finding of subtle differences in sensitivity to low doses of cocaine. LS and SS mice did not differ in sensitivity to cocaine inhibition of synaptosomal uptake of [3H]-dopamine, [3H]-norepinephrine or [3H]-5-hydroxytryptamine. However, consistent with the finding of differential sensitivity to high doses of cocaine, SS mice were more sensitive to the seizure-producing effects of the cocaine and lidocaine, a local anesthetic. It is hypothesized that the differential sensitivity of these mouse lines to high doses of cocaine is due to differential sensitivity to cocaine's actions on systems that regulate local anesthetic effects. Selective breeding for differential duration of alcohol-induced "sleep-time" may have resulted in differential ion channel structure or function in these mice.

  5. Chronic Cerebral Ischaemia Forms New Cholinergic Mechanisms of Learning and Memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. I. Zakharova

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was a comparative analysis of cholinergic synaptic organization following learning and memory in normal and chronic cerebral ischaemic rats in the Morris water maze model. Choline acetyltransferase and protein content were determined in subpopulations of presynapses of “light” and “heavy” synaptosomal fractions of the cortex and the hippocampus, and the cholinergic projective and intrinsic systems of the brain structures were taken into consideration. We found a strong involvement of cholinergic systems, both projective and intrinsic, in all forms of cognition. Each form of cognition had an individual cholinergic molecular profile and the cholinergic synaptic compositions in the ischaemic rat brains differed significantly from normal ones. Our data demonstrated that under ischaemic conditions, instead of damaged connections new key synaptic relationships, which were stable against pathological influences and able to restore damaged cognitive functions, arose. The plasticity of neurochemical links in the individual organization of certain types of cognition gave a new input into brain pathology and can be used in the future for alternative corrections of vascular and other degenerative dementias.

  6. Monoacylated Cellular Prion Proteins Reduce Amyloid-β-Induced Activation of Cytoplasmic Phospholipase A2 and Synapse Damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan West

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is a progressive neurodegenerative disease characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ and the loss of synapses. Aggregation of the cellular prion protein (PrPC by Aβ oligomers induced synapse damage in cultured neurons. PrPC is attached to membranes via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI anchor, the composition of which affects protein targeting and cell signaling. Monoacylated PrPC incorporated into neurons bound “natural Aβ”, sequestering Aβ outside lipid rafts and preventing its accumulation at synapses. The presence of monoacylated PrPC reduced the Aβ-induced activation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2 and Aβ-induced synapse damage. This protective effect was stimulus specific, as treated neurons remained sensitive to α-synuclein, a protein associated with synapse damage in Parkinson’s disease. In synaptosomes, the aggregation of PrPC by Aβ oligomers triggered the formation of a signaling complex containing the cPLA2.a process, disrupted by monoacylated PrPC. We propose that monoacylated PrPC acts as a molecular sponge, binding Aβ oligomers at the neuronal perikarya without activating cPLA2 or triggering synapse damage.

  7. Pam (Peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase) heterozygosity alters brain copper handling with region specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, Eric D; Miller, Megan B; Ralle, Martina; Aryal, Dipendra; Wetsel, William C; Mains, Richard E; Eipper, Betty A

    2013-01-01

    Copper (Cu), an essential trace element present throughout the mammalian nervous system, is crucial for normal synaptic function. Neuronal handling of Cu is poorly understood. We studied the localization and expression of Atp7a, the major intracellular Cu transporter in the brain, and its relation to peptidylglycine α-amidating monooxygenase (PAM), an essential cuproenzyme and regulator of Cu homeostasis in neuroendocrine cells. Based on biochemical fractionation and immunostaining of dissociated neurons, Atp7a was enriched in postsynaptic vesicular fractions. Cu followed a similar pattern, with ~20% of total Cu in synaptosomes. A mouse model heterozygous for the Pam gene (PAM+/−) is selectively Cu deficient in the amygdala. As in cortex and hippocampus, Atp7a and PAM expression overlap in the amygdala, with highest expression in interneurons. Messenger RNA levels of Atox-1 and Atp7a, which deliver Cu to the secretory pathway, were reduced in the amygdala but not the hippocampus in PAM+/− mice, along with GABAB receptor mRNA levels. Consistent with Cu deficiency, dopamine β-monooxygenase function was impaired as evidenced by elevated dopamine metabolites in the amygdala, but not the hippocampus, of PAM+/− mice. These alterations in Cu delivery to the secretory pathway in the PAM+/− amygdala may contribute to the physiological and behavioral deficits observed. PMID:24032518

  8. Brain uptake of pipecolic acid, amino acids, amines following intracarotid injection in the mouse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishio, H.; Giacobini, E.

    1981-01-01

    The uptake of pipecolic acid by the mouse brain was compared to that of several amino acids and amines, following an injection of a double-labeled mixture into the carotid artery. In general, BUI (brain uptake index) values were lower in the mouse than those previously reported in the rat. The only exception was proline. Lysine, a precursor of pipecolic acid biosynthesis in brain, showed a higher BUI than pipecolic acid. The BUI of D,L-[3H]pipecolic acid was found to be 3.39 (at 0.114 mM). This was saturable between a concentration of 0.114 and 3.44 mM. Kinetic analysis suggests the presence of two kinds of transport systems. Substances structurally related to pipecolic acid, such as nipecotic acid, isonipecotic acid, L-proline, and piperidine show a significant inhibitory effect. Amont the amino acids tested, only GABA showed an inhibitory effect. Data are reported which, when considered with other findings present evidence that pipecolic acid is (1) synthesized both in vitro and in vivo in the mouse brain, (2) actively transported in vivo into the brain, and (3) taken up in vitro by synaptosomal preparations

  9. Glutamatergic alterations and mitochondrial impairment in a murine model of Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassano, Tommaso; Serviddio, Gaetano; Gaetani, Silvana; Romano, Adele; Dipasquale, Pasqua; Cianci, Silvia; Bellanti, Francesco; Laconca, Leonardo; Romano, Antonino Davide; Padalino, Iolanda; LaFerla, Frank M; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Vendemiale, Gianluigi

    2012-06-01

    Deficits in glutamate neurotransmission and mitochondrial functions were detected in the frontal cortex (FC) and hippopcampus (HIPP) of aged 3×Tg-Alzheimer's disease (AD) mice, compared with their wild type littermates (non-Tg). In particular, basal levels of glutamate and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1) expression were reduced in both areas. Cortical glutamate release responded to K(+) stimulation, whereas no peak release was observed in the HIPP of mutant mice. Synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25), glutamate/aspartate transporter (GLAST), glutamate transporter 1 (GLT1) and excitatory amino acid carrier 1 (EAAC1) were reduced in HIPP homogenates, where the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content was lower. In contrast, glutamate transporter 1 and glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) were found to be higher in the frontal cortex. The respiration rates of complex-I, II, IV, and the membrane potential were reduced in cortical mitochondria, where unaltered proton leak, F(0)F(1)-ATPase activity and ATP content, with increased hydrogen peroxide production (H(2)O(2)), were also observed. In contrast, complex-I respiration rate was significantly increased in hippocampal mitochondria, together with increased proton leak and H(2)O(2) production. Moreover, loss of complex-IV and F(0)F(1)-ATPase activities were observed. These data suggest that impairments of mitochondrial bioenergetics might sustain the failure in the energy-requiring glutamatergic transmission. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Glycogen synthase kinase-3 inhibitors reverse deficits in long-term potentiation and cognition in Fragile X mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franklin, Aimee V.; King, Margaret K.; Palomo, Valle; Martinez, Ana; McMahon, Lori L.; Jope, Richard S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Identifying feasible therapeutic interventions is crucial for ameliorating the intellectual disability and other afflictions of Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), the most common inherited cause of intellectual disability and autism. Hippocampal glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK3) is hyperactive in the mouse model of FXS (FX mice), and hyperactive GSK3 promotes locomotor hyperactivity and audiogenic seizure susceptibility in FX mice, raising the possibility that specific GSK3 inhibitors may improve cognitive processes. Methods We tested if specific GSK3 inhibitors improve deficits in N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-dependent long term potentiation (LTP) at medial perforant path synapses onto dentate granule cells (MPP-DGC) and dentate gyrus-dependent cognitive behavioral tasks. Results GSK3 inhibitors completely rescued deficits in LTP at MPP-DGC synapses in FX mice. Furthermore, synaptosomes from the dentate gyrus of FX mice displayed decreased inhibitory serine-phosphorylation of GSK3β compared with wild-type littermates. The potential therapeutic utility of GSK3 inhibitors was further tested on dentate gyrus-dependent congnitive behaviors. In vivo administration of GSK3 inhibitors completely reversed impairments in several cognitive tasks in FX mice, including novel object detection, coordinate and categorical spatial processing, and temporal ordering for visual objects. Conclusions These findings establish that synaptic plasticity and cognitive deficits in FX mice can be improved by intervention with inhibitors of GSK3, which may prove therapeutically beneficial in FXS. PMID:24041505

  11. Neuronal Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Amphetamine-Induced Oxidative Damage and Neurotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Escubedo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Amphetamine derivatives such as methamphetamine (METH and 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “ecstasy” are widely abused drugs in a recreational context. This has led to concern because of the evidence that they are neurotoxic in animal models and cognitive impairments have been described in heavy abusers. The main targets of these drugs are plasmalemmal and vesicular monoamine transporters, leading to reverse transport and increased monoamine efflux to the synapse. As far as neurotoxicity is concerned, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production seems to be one of the main causes. Recent research has demonstrated that blockade of a7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR inhibits METH- and MDMA-induced ROS production in striatal synaptosomes which is dependent on calcium and on NO-synthase activation. Moreover, a7 nAChR antagonists (methyllycaconitine and memantine attenuated in vivo the neurotoxicity induced by METH and MDMA, and memantine prevented the cognitive impairment induced by these drugs. Radioligand binding experiments demonstrated that both drugs have affinity to a7 and heteromeric nAChR, with MDMA showing lower Ki values, while fluorescence calcium experiments indicated that MDMA behaves as a partial agonist on a7 and as an antagonist on heteromeric nAChR. Sustained Ca increase led to calpain and caspase-3 activation. In addition, modulatory effects of MDMA on a7 and heteromeric nAChR populations have been found.

  12. Morphine enhances the release of 3H-purines from rat brain cerebral cortical prisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, P.H.; Phillis, J.W.; Yuen, H.

    1982-01-01

    In vitro experiments have shown that 3 H-purines can be released from 3 H-adenosine preloaded rat brain cortical prisms by a KCl-evoked depolarization. The KCl-evoked release of 3 H-purines is dependent on the concentration of KCl present in the superfusate. At concentrations of 10(-7) approximately 10(-5)M morphine did not influence the basal release of 3 H-purines from the prisms, although it enhanced the KCl-evoked release of 3 H-purines. The enhancement of KCl-evoked 3 H-purine release by morphine was concentration-dependent and was antagonized by naloxone, suggesting the involvement of opiate receptors. Uptake studies with rat brain cerebral cortical synaptosomes show that morphine is a very weak inhibitor of adenosine uptake. Comparisons with dipyridamole, a potent inhibitor of adenosine uptake, suggest that this low level of inhibition of the uptake did not contribute significantly to the release of 3 H-purine by morphine seen in our experiments. It is therefore suggested that morphine enhances KCl-evoked 3 H-purine release by an interaction with opiate receptors and that the resultant increase in extracellular purine (adenosine) levels may account for some of the actions of morphine

  13. Effects of spinal transection on presynaptic markers for glutamatergic neurons in the rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singer, H.S.; Coyle, J.T.; Frangia, J.; Price, D.L.

    1981-01-01

    To evaluate the hypothesis that glutamic acid may be the neurotransmitter of descending, excitatory supraspinal pathways, the uptake and release of L-[3H] glutamate and the levels of endogenous glutamate were measured in preparations from rat lumbar spinal cord following complete mid-thoracic transection. Following transection, the activity of the synaptosomal high-affinity glutamate uptake process was increased in both dorsal and ventral halves of lumbar cord between 1 and 14 days after transection and returned to control levels by 21 days posttransection. At 7 days, the increased activity of the uptake process for L-[3H]glutamate resulted in elevation of Vmax with no significant alteration in KT as compared to age-matched controls. Depolarization-induced release of L-[3H]glutamate from prelabeled slices did not differ significantly from control in the lesioned rat except at 21 days after lesion when the amount of tritium release was significantly greater in the transected preparations than in control. Amino acid analysis of the lumbar cord from control and transected rats indicated only a 10% decrease in the level of endogenous glutamate and no alterations in the concentration of GABA and glycine 7 days after lesion. These findings do not support the hypothesis that glutamate serves as a major excitatory neurotransmitter in supraspinal pathways innervating the lumbar cord of the rat

  14. Thiamin deficiency on fetal brain development with and without prenatal alcohol exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloss, Olena; Eskin, N A Michael; Suh, Miyoung

    2018-04-01

    Adequate thiamin levels are crucial for optimal health through maintenance of homeostasis and viability of metabolic enzymes, which require thiamine as a co-factor. Thiamin deficiency occurs during pregnancy when the dietary intake is inadequate or excessive alcohol is consumed. Thiamin deficiency leads to brain dysfunction because thiamin is involved in the synthesis of myelin and neurotransmitters (e.g., acetylcholine, γ-aminobutyric acid, glutamate), and its deficiency increases oxidative stress by decreasing the production of reducing agents. Thiamin deficiency also leads to neural membrane dysfunction, because thiamin is a structural component of mitochondrial and synaptosomal membranes. Similarly, in-utero exposure to alcohol leads to fetal brain dysfunction, resulting in negative effects such as fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). Thiamin deficiency and prenatal exposure to alcohol could act synergistically to produce negative effects on fetal development; however, this area of research is currently under-studied. This minireview summarizes the evidence for the potential role of thiamin deficiency in fetal brain development, with or without prenatal exposure to alcohol. Such evidence may influence the development of new nutritional strategies for preventing or mitigating the symptoms of FASD.

  15. Glucostatic regulation of (+)-[3H]amphetamine binding in the hypothalamus: correlation with Na+, K+-ATPase activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angel, I.; Hauger, R.L.; Luu, M.D.; Giblin, B.; Skolnick, P.; Paul, S.M.

    1985-01-01

    Preincubation of rat hypothalamic slices in glucose-free Krebs-Ringer buffer (37 0 C) resulted in a time-dependent decrease in specific (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding in the crude synaptosomal fraction prepared from these slices. The addition of D-glucose resulted in a dose- and time-dependent stimulation of (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding, whereas incubations with L-glucose, 2-deoxy-D-glucose, or 3-O-methyl-D-glucose failed to increase the number of (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding sites. Ouabain potently inhibited the glucose-induced stimulation of (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding, suggesting the involvement of Na + , K + -ATPase. Preincubation of hypothalamic slices with glucose also resulted in an increase in Na + ,K + -ATPase activity and the number of specific high-affinity binding sites for [ 3 H]ouabain, and a good correlation was observed between the glucose-stimulated increase in (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine and [ 3 H]ouabain binding. These data suggest that the (+)-[ 3 H]amphetamine binding site in hypothalamus, previously linked to the anorectic actions of various phenylethylamines, is regulated both in vitro and in vivo by physiological concentrations of glucose. Glucose and amphetamine appear to interact at common sites in the hypothalamus to stimulate Na + ,K + -ATPase activity, and the latter may be involved in the glucostatic regulation of appetite

  16. Methamphetamine and inflammatory cytokines increase neuronal Na+/K+-ATPase isoform 3: relevance for HIV associated neurocognitive disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gurudutt Pendyala

    Full Text Available Methamphetamine (METH abuse in conjunction with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV exacerbates neuropathogenesis and accelerates neurocognitive impairments in the central nervous system (CNS, collectively termed HIV Associated Neurocognitive Disorders (HAND. Since both HIV and METH have been implicated in altering the synaptic architecture, this study focused on investigating alterations in synaptic proteins. Employing a quantitative proteomics approach on synaptosomes isolated from the caudate nucleus from two groups of rhesus monkeys chronically infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV differing by one regimen, METH treatment, we identified the neuron specific Na(+/K(+-ATPase alpha 1 isoform 3 (ATP1A3 to be up regulated after METH treatment, and validated its up regulation by METH in vitro. Further studies on signaling mechanisms revealed that the activation of ATP1A3 involves the extracellular regulated kinase (ERK pathway. Given its function in maintaining ionic gradients and emerging role as a signaling molecule, changes in ATP1A3 yields insights into the mechanisms associated with HAND and interactions with drugs of abuse.

  17. Ascorbic acid and striatal transport of [3H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP+) and [3H]dopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debler, E.A.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.; Sershen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibition of uptake of [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP + ) was examined in mouse striatal synaptosomal preparations. Kinetic analysis indicated that ascorbic acid is a noncompetitive inhibitor of [ 3 H]MPP + uptake. No inhibition of [ 3 H]dopamine uptake is observed. The dopamine uptake blockers, GBR-12909, cocaine, and mazindol strongly inhibit (IC 50 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]MPP + transport. Nicotine, its metabolites, and other tobacco alkaloids are weak inhibitors except 4-phenylpyridine and lobeline, which are moderate inhibitors of both [ 3 H]dopamine and [ 3 H]MPP + uptake. These similarities in potencies are in agreement with the suggestion that [ 3 H]MPP + and [ 3 H] are transported by the same carrier. The differences observed in the alteration of dopaminergic transport and mazindol binding by ascorbic acid suggest that ascorbic acid's effects on [ 3 H]MPP + transport are related to translocation and/or dissociation processes occurring subsequent to the initial binding event

  18. Ascorbic acid and striatal transport of (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) and (/sup 3/H)dopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debler, E.A.; Hashim, A.; Lajtha, A.; Sershen, H.

    1988-01-01

    The inhibition of uptake of (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)1-methyl-4-phenylpyridine (MPP/sup +/) was examined in mouse striatal synaptosomal preparations. Kinetic analysis indicated that ascorbic acid is a noncompetitive inhibitor of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. No inhibition of (/sup 3/H)dopamine uptake is observed. The dopamine uptake blockers, GBR-12909, cocaine, and mazindol strongly inhibit (IC/sub 50/ < 1 ..mu..M) both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport. Nicotine, its metabolites, and other tobacco alkaloids are weak inhibitors except 4-phenylpyridine and lobeline, which are moderate inhibitors of both (/sup 3/H)dopamine and (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ uptake. These similarities in potencies are in agreement with the suggestion that (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ and (/sup 3/H) are transported by the same carrier. The differences observed in the alteration of dopaminergic transport and mazindol binding by ascorbic acid suggest that ascorbic acid's effects on (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ transport are related to translocation and/or dissociation processes occurring subsequent to the initial binding event.

  19. Low affinity hypothalamic [3H]mazindol binding: a probe for hypothalamic body weight regulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiter, C H; Linnoila, M; Nutt, D J

    1989-04-01

    It has been previously suggested that low affinity [3H]mazindol binding in the hypothalamus correlates with body weight and obesity. Low affinity [3H]mazindol binding in hypothalamic crude synaptosome preparations was carried out in normoglycemic obese mice (C57 B1/6J ob/ob) as well as in their lean littermates (C57 B1/6J +/?). NIH Swiss mice were used as additional controls. Furthermore the effect on this binding site of repeated electroconvulsive shock (ECS), a treatment known to change body weight gain, was studied in rats. Neither Bmax nor Kd were altered in obese mice compared with their lean littermates or NIH Swiss mice. The obese mice had a significantly greater body weight and weight gain than either control group. Once-daily ECS over 10 days (which significantly reduced weight gain in rats) did not change binding parameters for [3H]mazindol in hypothalami. The present data do not appear to support the hypothesis that this low affinity binding site has a physiological function in the control of body weight and obesity, at least in the examined paradigm.

  20. Affinity-purified tetanus neurotoxin interaction with synaptic membranes: properties of a protease-sensitive receptor component

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarovici, P.; Yavin, E.

    1986-01-01

    The pharmacokinetic interaction of an affinity-purified 125 I-labeled tetanotoxin fraction with guinea pig brain synaptosomal preparations was investigated. Binding of tetanotoxin was time- and temperature-dependent, was proportional to protein concentration, and was saturable at about 8 x 10 -9 M as estimated by a solid-surface binding assay. Binding was optimal at pH 6.5 under low ionic strength buffer and was almost entirely blocked by gangliosides or antitoxin. In analogy to intact nerve cells, binding of toxin to membranes resulted in a tight association operationally defined as sequestration. Binding and sequestration were abolished after membrane pretreatment with sialidase. The enzyme could not dissociate the membrane-bound toxin formed at 4 or 37 0 C under low ionic strength conditions, which is in part compatible with internalization as defined in nerve cell cultures. In the latter system the toxin could be removed at 4 0 C but not at 37 0 C. Binding was significantly reduced upon pretreatment of guinea pig brain membranes by a variety of hydrolytic enzymes. It is proposed that, in addition to a ganglioside, interaction of tetanotoxin with synaptic membranes is facilitated by a protein and may also require an appropriate lipid environment. These latter membrane constituents may play a pivotal role in the sequestration of the toxin

  1. binding characteristics of 125I-labelled tetanus toxin to primary tissue cultures from mouse embryonic CNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimpfel, W.; Habermann, E.

    1977-01-01

    The interaction of 125 I-labelled tetanus toxin with cells in tissue cultures derived from embryonic CNS has been studied. The optimum toxin binding occurs about 2 to 3 weeks after transfer of the cells to culture conditions. The amount of label bound per culture was doubled at this time in comparison to the fourth day after inoculation. The amount of toxin bound depended on the concentration applied. It reached its maximum 8 h after application then decreased slowly. Low amounts of radioactivity were still detectable 97 h after washing off the unbound toxin. Up to 80% of the label could be replaced by simultaneous application of 'cold' toxin. Fixation of the toxin was higher at 4 0 C than at 37 0 C. Preincubation of the cultures with neuraminidase prevented about 75% of the binding. The presence of cytochalasin B led to a small but reproducible decrease of binding, whereas colchicine had no measurable effect. The radioactive ( 125 I) material was identified by a double-isotope technique in disc gel electrophoresis before and after reductive cleavage of its disulphide bonds. In every test it was indistinguishable from 131 I-labelled toxin added as standard. These results largely parallel those obtained with synaptosomes and other systems. They suggest that gangliosides might be the acceptor molecules, and that the culture system will be suitable for studying the actions of this toxin in vitro. (author)

  2. Time-related sex differences in cerebral hypoperfusion-induced brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojlović Miloš

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the model of cerebral hypoperfusion in rats has been a matter of many investigations over the years, the exact intracellular and biochemical mechanisms that lead to neuron loss and memory decline have not been clearly identified. In the current study, we examined whether cerebral hypoperfusion causes changes in hippocampal protein expression of apoptotic markers in the synaptosomal fraction and neurodegeneration in a time-dependent and sex-specific manner. Adult male and female Wistar rats were divided into two main groups, controls that underwent sham operation, and animals subjected to permanent bilateral occlusion of common carotid arteries. Both male and female rats were killed 3, 7 or 90 days following the insult. The obtained results indicate that the peak of processes that lead to apoptosis occured on postoperative day 7 and that they were more prominent in males, indicating that neuroprotective effects of certain substances (planned for future experiments, should be tested at this time point. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173044 i br. 41014

  3. The assembly of lipid droplets and its relation to cellular insulin sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boström, Pontus; Andersson, Linda; Li, Lu

    2009-01-01

    The assembly of lipid droplets is dependent on PtdIns(4,5)P(2) that activates PLD(1) (phospholipase D(1)), which is important for the assembly process. ERK2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 2) phosphorylates the motor protein dynein and sorts it to lipid droplets, allowing them to be transp......The assembly of lipid droplets is dependent on PtdIns(4,5)P(2) that activates PLD(1) (phospholipase D(1)), which is important for the assembly process. ERK2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 2) phosphorylates the motor protein dynein and sorts it to lipid droplets, allowing them...... to be transported on microtubules. Lipid droplets grow in size by fusion, which is dependent on dynein and the transfer on microtubules, and is catalysed by the SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptor) proteins SNAP-23 (23 kDa synaptosome-associated protein), syntaxin-5...... and VAMP-4 (vesicle-associated protein 4). SNAP-23 is also involved in the insulin-dependent translocation of the glucose transporter GLUT4 to the plasma membrane. Fatty acids induce a missorting of SNAP-23, from the plasma membrane to the interior of the cell, resulting in cellular insulin resistance...

  4. Variations of glutamate concentration within synaptic cleft in the presence of electromagnetic fields: an artificial neural networks study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoudian, Neda; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Afrasiabi, Ali; Modaresi, Seyed Mohamad Sadegh; Dadras, Ali; Rafiei, Shahrbanoo; Yazdankhah, Meysam; Lyaghi, Atiye; Jarah, Mostafa; Ahmadian, Shahin; Seidkhani, Hossein

    2015-04-01

    Glutamate is an excitatory neurotransmitter that is released by the majority of central nervous system synapses and is involved in developmental processes, cognitive functions, learning and memory. Excessive elevated concentrations of Glu in synaptic cleft results in neural cell apoptosis which is called excitotoxicity causing neurodegenerative diseases. Hence, we investigated the possibility of extremely low frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF) as a risk factor which is able to change Glu concentration in synaptic clef. Synaptosomes as a model of nervous terminal were exposed to ELF-EMF for 15-55 min in flux intensity range from 0.1 to 2 mT and frequency range from 50 to 230 Hz. Finally, all raw data by INForm v4.02 software as an artificial neural network program was analyzed to predict the effect of whole mentioned range spectra. The results showed the tolerance of all effects between the ranges from -35 to +40 % compared to normal state when glutamatergic systems exposed to ELF-EMF. It indicates that glutamatergic system attempts to compensate environmental changes though release or reuptake in order to keep the system safe. Regarding to the wide range of ELF-EMF acquired in this study, the obtained outcomes have potential for developing treatments based on ELF-EMF for some neurological diseases; however, in vivo experiments on the cross linking responses between glutamatergic and cholinergic systems in the presence of ELF-EMF would be needed.

  5. Anxiolytic-Like Effects of Compound Zhi Zhu Xiang in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Li Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine whether compound zhi zhu xiang (CZZX exerts anxiolytic-like effects in rats. The animals were orally administered CZZX (0.75, 1.5, and 3 g/kg daily for 10 days and tested in the elevated plus maze (EPM, Vogel conflict test (VCT, and open field. Repeated treatment with CZZX (3 g/kg/day, p.o. significantly increased the percentage of both entries into and time spent on the open arms of the EPM compared with saline controls. In the VCT, repeated treatment with CZZX (1.5 and 3 g/kg/day, p.o. significantly increased the number of punished licks. The drug did not change the total entries into the open arms of the EPM or interfere with water consumption or nociceptive threshold, discarding potential confounding factors in the two tests. In the open field, locomotion was not reduced, discarding the possible sedative effect of CZZX. In the binding assay, the binding of [3H] Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil to the benzodiazepine binding site in washed crude synaptosomal membranes from rat cerebral cortex was affected by CZZX. These data indicate an anxiolytic-like profile of action for CZZX without sedative side effects, and this activity may be mediated by benzodiazepine binding site modulation at γ-aminobutyric acid-A receptors.

  6. Disturbances in the secretion of neurotransmitters in IA-2/IA-2beta null mice: changes in behavior, learning and lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, T; Kubosaki, A; Ito, Y; Notkins, A L

    2009-03-17

    Islet-associated protein 2 (IA-2) and IA-2beta are major autoantigens in type 1 diabetes and transmembrane proteins in dense core secretory vesicles (DCV) of neuroendocrine cells. The deletion of these genes results in a decrease in insulin secretion. The present study was initiated to test the hypothesis that this deletion not only affects the secretion of insulin, but has a more global effect on neuroendocrine secretion that leads to disturbances in behavior and learning. Measurement of neurotransmitters showed that norepinephrine, dopamine and 5-HT were significantly decreased in the brain of double knockout (DKO) mice (Plearning, the DKO mice showed a highly significant increase in anxiety-like behavior (Plearning (Pfractionation studies revealed that IA-2beta, but not IA-2, co-purifies with fractions rich in synaptic vesicles (SV), and that the secretion of dopamine, GABA and glutamate from the synaptosomes of the DKO mice was significantly decreased as was the number of SV (Plearning disturbances, seizures and reduced lifespan.

  7. A single amino acid mutation in SNAP-25 induces anxiety-related behavior in mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masakazu Kataoka

    Full Text Available Synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25 is a presynaptic protein essential for neurotransmitter release. Previously, we demonstrate that protein kinase C (PKC phosphorylates Ser(187 of SNAP-25, and enhances neurotransmitter release by recruiting secretory vesicles near to the plasma membrane. As PKC is abundant in the brain and SNAP-25 is essential for synaptic transmission, SNAP-25 phosphorylation is likely to play a crucial role in the central nervous system. We therefore generated a mutant mouse, substituting Ser(187 of SNAP-25 with Ala using "knock-in" technology. The most striking effect of the mutation was observed in their behavior. The homozygous mutant mice froze readily in response to environmental change, and showed strong anxiety-related behavior in general activity and light and dark preference tests. In addition, the mutant mice sometimes exhibited spontaneously occurring convulsive seizures. Microdialysis measurements revealed that serotonin and dopamine release were markedly reduced in amygdala. These results clearly indicate that PKC-dependent SNAP-25 phosphorylation plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional behavior as well as the suppression of epileptic seizures, and the lack of enhancement of monoamine release is one of the possible mechanisms underlying these defects.

  8. Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IIα (αCaMKII) controls the activity of the dopamine transporter: implications for Angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Yang, Jae-Won; Montgomery, Therese R; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Winkler, Marie-Therese; Sucic, Sonja; Lubec, Gert; Freissmuth, Michael; Elgersma, Ype; Sitte, Harald H; Kudlacek, Oliver

    2012-08-24

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a crucial regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission, controlling the length and brevity of dopaminergic signaling. DAT is also the primary target of psychostimulant drugs such as cocaine and amphetamines. Conversely, methylphenidate and amphetamine are both used clinically in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. The action of amphetamines, which induce transport reversal, relies primarily on the ionic composition of the intra- and extracellular milieus. Recent findings suggest that DAT interacting proteins may also play a significant role in the modulation of reverse dopamine transport. The pharmacological inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase αCaMKII attenuates amphetamine-triggered DAT-mediated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP(+)) efflux. More importantly, αCaMKII has also been shown to bind DAT in vitro and is therefore believed to be an important player within the DAT interactome. Herein, we show that αCaMKII co-immunoprecipitates with DAT in mouse striatal synaptosomes. Mice, which lack αCaMKII or which express a permanently self-inhibited αCaMKII (αCaMKII(T305D)), exhibit significantly reduced amphetamine-triggered DAT-mediated MPP(+) efflux. Additionally, we investigated mice that mimic a neurogenetic disease known as Angelman syndrome. These mice possess reduced αCaMKII activity. Angelman syndrome mice demonstrated an impaired DAT efflux function, which was comparable with that of the αCaMKII mutant mice, indicating that DAT-mediated dopaminergic signaling is affected in Angelman syndrome.

  9. Cytokines and cytokine networks target neurons to modulate long-term potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, G Aleph; Cotman, Carl W

    2017-04-01

    Cytokines play crucial roles in the communication between brain cells including neurons and glia, as well as in the brain-periphery interactions. In the brain, cytokines modulate long-term potentiation (LTP), a cellular correlate of memory. Whether cytokines regulate LTP by direct effects on neurons or by indirect mechanisms mediated by non-neuronal cells is poorly understood. Elucidating neuron-specific effects of cytokines has been challenging because most brain cells express cytokine receptors. Moreover, cytokines commonly increase the expression of multiple cytokines in their target cells, thus increasing the complexity of brain cytokine networks even after single-cytokine challenges. Here, we review evidence on both direct and indirect-mediated modulation of LTP by cytokines. We also describe novel approaches based on neuron- and synaptosome-enriched systems to identify cytokines able to directly modulate LTP, by targeting neurons and synapses. These approaches can test multiple samples in parallel, thus allowing the study of multiple cytokines simultaneously. Hence, a cytokine networks perspective coupled with neuron-specific analysis may contribute to delineation of maps of the modulation of LTP by cytokines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. SNAP-25 in hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou Qiuling; Gao Xiang; Lu Qi; Zhang Xuehan; Tu Yanyang; Jin Meilei; Zhao Guoping; Yu Lei; Jing Naihe; Li Baoming

    2006-01-01

    SNAP-25 is a synaptosomal protein of 25 kDa, a key component of synaptic vesicle-docking/fusion machinery, and plays a critical role in exocytosis and neurotransmitter release. We previously reported that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA1 region is involved in consolidation of contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory (Hou et al. European J Neuroscience, 20: 1593-1603, 2004). SNAP-25 is expressed not only in the CA1 region, but also in the CA3 region, and the SNAP-25 mRNA level in the CA3 region is higher than in the CA1 region. Here, we provide evidence that SNAP-25 in the CA3 region is also involved in learning/memory. Intra-CA3 infusion of SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide impaired both long-term contextual fear memory and water-maze spatial memory, with short-term memory intact. Furthermore, the SNAP-25 antisense oligonucleotide suppressed the long-term potentiation (LTP) of field excitatory post-synaptic potential (fEPSP) in the mossy-fiber pathway (DG-CA3 pathway), with no effect on paired-pulse facilitation of the fEPSP. These results are consistent with the notion that SNAP-25 in the hippocampal CA3 region is required for long-term memory formation

  11. Effects of surgical and chemical lesions on neurotransmitter candidates in the nucleus accumbens of the rat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walaas, I.; Fonnum, F.

    1979-01-01

    The origin of fibers containing different neurotransmitter candidates in the nucleus accumbens of rat brain has been studied with surgical and chemical lesion techniques. Destruction of the medial forebrain bundle decreased the activity of aromatic amino acid decarboxylase by 80% in the nucleus. Cutting of the fornix or a hemitransection decreased the high affinity uptake of glutamate by 45% and the endogenous level of glutamate by 33%. The high affinity uptake of glutamate was concentrated in the synaptosomal fraction and the decrease after the lesion was most pronounced in this fraction. Restricted lesions indicated that fibers in the fimbria/fornix coming from the subiculum were responsible for this part of the glutamate uptake in the nucleus. Local injection of kainic acid into the nucleus was accompanied by a 75% decrease in choline acetyltransferase and a 35% decrease in acetylcholineserase activities, a 70% decrease in glutamate decarboxylase activity and a 60% decrease in the high affinity uptake of ..gamma..-aminobutyrate, a 45% decrease in high affinity glutamate uptake, and no change in aromatic amino acid decarboxylase activity. Performing a lesion of the fornix after kainic acid injection led to an 85% decrease in high affinity glutamate uptake, without further affecting the other neuronal markers. The results indicate that all aminergic fibers to the nucleus accumbens are ascending in the medial forebrain bundle, that the subiculum-accumbens fibers are glutamergic and the nucleus also contains intrinsic glutamergic or aspartergic cells. Cholinergic and ..gamma..-aminobutyrate-containing cells are wholly intrinsic to the nucleus.

  12. Synaptic proteome changes in the hypothalamus of mother rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvari, Edina Brigitta; Völgyi, Katalin; Gulyássy, Péter; Dimén, Diána; Kis, Viktor; Barna, János; Szabó, Éva Rebeka; Lubec, Gert; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin Adrienna; Dobolyi, Árpád

    2017-04-21

    To establish synaptic proteome changes associated with motherhood, we isolated synaptosome fractions from the hypothalamus of mother rats and non-maternal control females at the 11th postpartum day. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric protein identification established 26 significant proteins, 7 increasing and 19 decreasing protein levels in the dams. The altered proteins are mainly involved in energy homeostasis, protein folding, and metabolic processes suggesting the involvement of these cellular processes in maternal adaptations. The decrease in a significantly altered protein, complement component 1q subcomponent-binding protein (C1qbp) was validated with Western blotting. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed its presence in hypothalamic fibers and terminals in agreement with its presence in synaptosomes. We also found the expression of C1qbp in different hypothalamic nuclei including the preoptic area and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus at the protein and at the mRNA level using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization histochemistry, respectively. Bioinformatical network analysis revealed that cytokines, growth factors, and protein kinases are common regulators, which indicates a complex regulation of the proteome change in mothers. The results suggest that maternal responsiveness is associated with synaptic proteins level changes in the hypothalamus, and that growth factors and cytokines may govern these alterations. The period of motherhood is accompanied with several behavioral, neuroendocrine, emotional and metabolic adaptations in the brain. Although it is established that various hypothalamic networks participate in the maternal adaptations of the rodent brain, our knowledge on the molecular background of these alterations remains seriously limited. In the present study, we first determined that the functional alterations of the maternal brain can be detected at the

  13. Pre-Clinical Study of a Novel Recombinant Botulinum Neurotoxin Derivative Engineered for Improved Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Cintron, Edwin; Tenezaca, Luis; Angeles, Christopher; Syngkon, Aurelia; Liublinska, Victoria; Ichtchenko, Konstantin; Band, Philip

    2016-08-03

    Cyto-012 is a recombinant derivative of Botulinum neurotoxin Type A (BoNT/A). It primarily differs from wild type (wt) BoNT/A1 in that it incorporates two amino acid substitutions in the catalytic domain of the light chain (LC) metalloprotease (E224 > A and Y366 > A), designed to provide a safer clinical profile. Cyto-012 is specifically internalized into rat cortical and hippocampal neurons, and cleaves Synaptosomal-Associated Protein 25 (SNAP-25), the substrate of wt BoNT/A, but exhibits slower cleavage kinetics and therefore requires a higher absolute dose to exhibit pharmacologic activity. The pharmacodynamics of Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A have similar onset and duration of action using the Digital Abduction Assay (DAS). Intramuscular LD50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A respectively, were 0.63 ug (95% CI = 0.61, 0.66) and 6.22 pg (95% CI = 5.42, 7.02). ED50 values for Cyto-012 and wt BoNT/A were respectively, 0.030 ug (95% CI = 0.026, 0.034) and 0.592 pg (95% CI = 0.488, 0.696). The safety margin (intramuscular LD50/ED50 ratio) for Cyto-012 was found to be improved 2-fold relative to wt BoNT/A (p < 0.001). The DAS response to Cyto-012 was diminished when a second injection was administered 32 days after the first. These data suggest that the safety margin of BoNT/A can be improved by modulating their activity towards SNAP-25.

  14. Neurobehavioral toxicology of pyrethroid insecticides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crofton, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are classified as either Type I or Type II based upon in vivo toxic signs, and neurophysiological and biochemical data. Both axonal sodium channels and the ..gamma..-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor complex have been proposed as the major site of action of the Type II pyrethroids. This investigation characterized the behavior and biochemical effects of low dosages of pyrethroids in rats. Type I and II pyrethroids were tested for effects on figure-eight maze activity and the acoustic startle response (ASR). All compounds decreased figure-eight maze activity. Interactions of Type I and II pyrethroids with the three major binding sites on the GABA complex were determined in vivo. Radioligand binding experiments assessed in vitro interactions of pyrethroids with the three major GABA-complex binding sites. None of the pyrethroids competed for (/sup 3/H)-muscimol or (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam binding. Only Type II pyrethroids inhibited binding of (/sup 35/S)-t-butylbicyclophosphorothionate (TBPS) in cortical synaptosome preparations with K/sub i/ values of 5 to 10 ..mu..M. The (/sup 35/S)-TBPS data implicate the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding site in the mechanism of Type II pyrethroid toxicity. The results of these experiments support the classification of pyrethroids into two classes, and demonstrate the utility of the figure-eight maze and the ASR in studies to elucidate neurotoxic mechanisms. The interaction of the Type II pyrethroids is probably restricted to the TBPS/picrotoxinin binding domain on the GABA complex as shown by both the in vivo and in vitro studies.

  15. The contributions of respiration and glycolysis to extracellular acid production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mookerjee, Shona A; Goncalves, Renata L S; Gerencser, Akos A; Nicholls, David G; Brand, Martin D

    2015-02-01

    The rate at which cells acidify the extracellular medium is frequently used to report glycolytic rate, with the implicit assumption that conversion of uncharged glucose or glycogen to lactate(-)+H(+) is the only significant source of acidification. However, another potential source of extracellular protons is the production of CO2 during substrate oxidation: CO2 is hydrated to H2CO3, which then dissociates to HCO3(-)+H(+). O2 consumption and pH were monitored in a popular platform for measuring extracellular acidification (the Seahorse XF Analyzer). We found that CO2 produced during respiration caused almost stoichiometric release of H(+) into the medium. With C2C12 myoblasts given glucose, respiration-derived CO2 contributed 34% of the total extracellular acidification. When glucose was omitted or replaced by palmitate or pyruvate, this value was 67-100%. Analysis of primary cells, cancer cell lines, stem cell lines, and isolated synaptosomes revealed contributions of CO2-produced acidification that were usually substantial, ranging from 3% to 100% of the total acidification rate. Measurement of glycolytic rate using extracellular acidification requires differentiation between respiratory and glycolytic acid production. The data presented here demonstrate the importance of this correction when extracellular acidification is used for quantitative measurement of glycolytic flux to lactate. We describe a simple way to correct the measured extracellular acidification rate for respiratory acid production, using simultaneous measurement of oxygen consumption rate. Extracellular acidification is often assumed to result solely from glycolytic lactate production, but respiratory CO2 also contributes. We demonstrate that extracellular acidification by myoblasts given glucose is 66% glycolytic and 34% respiratory and describe a method to differentiate these sources. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Decreased hippocampal homoarginine and increased nitric oxide and nitric oxide synthase levels in rats parallel training in a radial arm maze.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sase, Ajinkya; Nawaratna, Gayan; Hu, Shengdi; Wu, Guoyao; Lubec, Gert

    2016-09-01

    L-homoarginine (hArg) is derived from enzymatic guanidination of lysine. It was demonstrated that hArg is a substrate for nitric oxide (NO) synthesis, blocks lysine transport and inhibits the uptake of arginine into synaptosomes and modulates GABA responses ex vivo. As there is limited information on its physiological roles in the brain, the aim of the study was to show whether hippocampal or frontal lobe (FL) hArg is paralleling training in the radial arm maze (RAM) or NO formation. Hippocampi and FL of male Sprague-Dawley rats were taken from trained or yoked in a RAM. Then hArg and metabolites, NO and NO synthase (NOS) were determined by standard methods. The animals learned the task in the RAM showing significant reduction of working memory errors. hArg showed decreased levels in both brain regions of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Nitrate plus nitrite (NOx) concentrations and NOS activity were significantly increased in hippocampi, F(1,36) = 170.5; P ≤ 0.0001 and FL, F(1,36) = 74.67; P ≤ 0.0001 of trained animals as compared to yoked animals. Levels of hArg were negatively correlated with NOx in hippocampus (r = -0.6355; P = 0.0483) but not in FL and with lysine in the FL (r = -0.6650; P = 0.0358). NOx levels were positively correlated with NOS in both the hippocampus (r = 0.7474; P = 0.0129) and FL (r = 0.9563; P ≤  0.0001). These novel findings indicate that hArg is linked to NO formation in hippocampus but not in FL and is paralleling spatial memory in the RAM.

  17. Dopamine-galanin receptor heteromers modulate cholinergic neurotransmission in the rat ventral hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Estefanía; Vaz, Sandra H.; Cai, Ning-Sheng; Ferrada, Carla; Quiroz, César; Barodia, Sandeep; Kabbani, Nadine; Canela, Enric I.; McCormick, Peter J.; Lluis, Carme; Franco, Rafael; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M.; Ferré, Sergi

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that dopamine and galanin modulate cholinergic transmission in the hippocampus, but little is known about the mechanisms involved and their possible interactions. By using resonance energy transfer techniques in transfected mammalian cells we demonstrated the existence of heteromers between the dopamine D1-like receptors (D1 and D5) and galanin Gal1, but not Gal2 receptors. Within the D1-Gal1 and D5-Gal1 receptor heteromers, dopamine receptor activation potentiated and dopamine receptor blockade counteracted MAPK activation induced by stimulation of Gal1 receptors, while Gal1 receptor activation or blockade did not modify D1-like receptor-mediated MAPK activation. Ability of a D1-like receptor antagonist to block galanin-induced MAPK activation (cross-antagonism) was used as a “biochemical fingerprint” of D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers, allowing their identification in the rat ventral hippocampus. The functional role of D1-like-Gal receptor heteromers was demonstrated in synaptosomes from rat ventral hippocampus, where galanin facilitated acetylcholine release, but only with co-stimulation of D1-like receptors. Electrophysiological experiments in rat ventral hippocampal slices showed that these receptor interactions modulate hippocampal synaptic transmission. Thus, a D1-like receptor agonist, that was ineffective when administered alone, turned an inhibitory effect of galanin into an excitatory effect, an interaction that required cholinergic neurotransmission. Altogether, our results strongly suggest that D1-like-Gal1 receptor heteromers act as processors that integrate signals of two different neurotransmitters, dopamine and acetylcholine, to modulate hippocampal cholinergic neurotransmission. PMID:21593325

  18. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar E-mail: jogeshwar_mukherjee@ketthealth.com; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-10-01

    We have developed {sup 18}F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 {mu}M) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with {sup 18}F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of {sup 18}F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine.

  19. Caffeine acts through neuronal adenosine A2A receptors to prevent mood and memory dysfunction triggered by chronic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaster, Manuella P; Machado, Nuno J; Silva, Henrique B; Nunes, Ana; Ardais, Ana Paula; Santana, Magda; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E; Rodrigues, Ana Lúcia S; Porciúncula, Lisiane O; Chen, Jiang Fan; Tomé, Ângelo R; Agostinho, Paula; Canas, Paula M; Cunha, Rodrigo A

    2015-06-23

    The consumption of caffeine (an adenosine receptor antagonist) correlates inversely with depression and memory deterioration, and adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) antagonists emerge as candidate therapeutic targets because they control aberrant synaptic plasticity and afford neuroprotection. Therefore we tested the ability of A2AR to control the behavioral, electrophysiological, and neurochemical modifications caused by chronic unpredictable stress (CUS), which alters hippocampal circuits, dampens mood and memory performance, and enhances susceptibility to depression. CUS for 3 wk in adult mice induced anxiogenic and helpless-like behavior and decreased memory performance. These behavioral changes were accompanied by synaptic alterations, typified by a decrease in synaptic plasticity and a reduced density of synaptic proteins (synaptosomal-associated protein 25, syntaxin, and vesicular glutamate transporter type 1), together with an increased density of A2AR in glutamatergic terminals in the hippocampus. Except for anxiety, for which results were mixed, CUS-induced behavioral and synaptic alterations were prevented by (i) caffeine (1 g/L in the drinking water, starting 3 wk before and continued throughout CUS); (ii) the selective A2AR antagonist KW6002 (3 mg/kg, p.o.); (iii) global A2AR deletion; and (iv) selective A2AR deletion in forebrain neurons. Notably, A2AR blockade was not only prophylactic but also therapeutically efficacious, because a 3-wk treatment with the A2AR antagonist SCH58261 (0.1 mg/kg, i.p.) reversed the mood and synaptic dysfunction caused by CUS. These results herald a key role for synaptic A2AR in the control of chronic stress-induced modifications and suggest A2AR as candidate targets to alleviate the consequences of chronic stress on brain function.

  20. Mitochondrial respiration deficits driven by reactive oxygen species in experimental temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Shane; Liang, Li-Ping; Fulton, Ruth; Shimizu, Takahiko; Day, Brian; Patel, Manisha

    2015-03-01

    Metabolic alterations have been implicated in the etiology of temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE), but whether or not they have a functional impact on cellular energy producing pathways (glycolysis and/or oxidative phosphorylation) is unknown. The goal of this study was to determine if alterations in cellular bioenergetics occur using real-time analysis of mitochondrial oxygen consumption and glycolytic rates in an animal model of TLE. We hypothesized that increased steady-state levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) initiated by epileptogenic injury result in impaired mitochondrial respiration. We established methodology for assessment of bioenergetic parameters in isolated synaptosomes from the hippocampus of Sprague-Dawley rats at various times in the kainate (KA) model of TLE. Deficits in indices of mitochondrial respiration were observed at time points corresponding with the acute and chronic phases of epileptogenesis. We asked if mitochondrial bioenergetic dysfunction occurred as a result of increased mitochondrial ROS and if it could be attenuated in the KA model by pharmacologically scavenging ROS. Increased steady-state ROS in mice with forebrain-specific conditional deletion of manganese superoxide dismutase (Sod2(fl/fl)NEX(Cre/Cre)) in mice resulted in profound deficits in mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Pharmacological scavenging of ROS with a catalytic antioxidant restored mitochondrial respiration deficits in the KA model of TLE. Together, these results demonstrate that mitochondrial respiration deficits occur in experimental TLE and ROS mechanistically contribute to these deficits. Furthermore, this study provides novel methodology for assessing cellular metabolism during the entire time course of disease development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Green fluorescence protein-based content-mixing assay of SNARE-driven membrane fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Paul; Kong, Byoungjae; Jung, Young-Hun; Park, Joon-Bum; Shin, Jonghyeok; Park, Myungseo; Kweon, Dae-Hyuk

    2017-06-17

    Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins mediate intracellular membrane fusion by forming a ternary SNARE complex. A minimalist approach utilizing proteoliposomes with reconstituted SNARE proteins yielded a wealth of information pinpointing the molecular mechanism of SNARE-mediated fusion and its regulation by accessory proteins. Two important attributes of a membrane fusion are lipid-mixing and the formation of an aqueous passage between apposing membranes. These two attributes are typically observed by using various fluorescent dyes. Currently available in vitro assay systems for observing fusion pore opening have several weaknesses such as cargo-bleeding, incomplete removal of unencapsulated dyes, and inadequate information regarding the size of the fusion pore, limiting measurements of the final stage of membrane fusion. In the present study, we used a biotinylated green fluorescence protein and streptavidin conjugated with Dylight 594 (DyStrp) as a Föster resonance energy transfer (FRET) donor and acceptor, respectively. This FRET pair encapsulated in each v-vesicle containing synaptobrevin and t-vesicle containing a binary acceptor complex of syntaxin 1a and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 revealed the opening of a large fusion pore of more than 5 nm, without the unwanted signals from unencapsulated dyes or leakage. This system enabled determination of the stoichiometry of the merging vesicles because the FRET efficiency of the FRET pair depended on the molar ratio between dyes. Here, we report a robust and informative assay for SNARE-mediated fusion pore opening. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. The sigma-1 receptor modulates dopamine transporter conformation and cocaine binding and may thereby potentiate cocaine self-administration in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Weimin Conrad; Yano, Hideaki; Hiranita, Takato; Chin, Frederick T; McCurdy, Christopher R; Su, Tsung-Ping; Amara, Susan G; Katz, Jonathan L

    2017-07-07

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) regulates dopamine (DA) neurotransmission by recapturing DA into the presynaptic terminals and is a principal target of the psychostimulant cocaine. The sigma-1 receptor (σ 1 R) is a molecular chaperone, and its ligands have been shown to modulate DA neuronal signaling, although their effects on DAT activity are unclear. Here, we report that the prototypical σ 1 R agonist (+)-pentazocine potentiated the dose response of cocaine self-administration in rats, consistent with the effects of the σR agonists PRE-084 and DTG (1,3-di- o -tolylguanidine) reported previously. These behavioral effects appeared to be correlated with functional changes of DAT. Preincubation with (+)-pentazocine or PRE-084 increased the B max values of [ 3 H]WIN35428 binding to DAT in rat striatal synaptosomes and transfected cells. A specific interaction between σ 1 R and DAT was detected by co-immunoprecipitation and bioluminescence resonance energy transfer assays. Mutational analyses indicated that the transmembrane domain of σ 1 R likely mediated this interaction. Furthermore, cysteine accessibility assays showed that σ 1 R agonist preincubation potentiated cocaine-induced changes in DAT conformation, which were blocked by the specific σ 1 R antagonist CM304. Moreover, σ 1 R ligands had distinct effects on σ 1 R multimerization. CM304 increased the proportion of multimeric σ 1 Rs, whereas (+)-pentazocine increased monomeric σ 1 Rs. Together these results support the hypothesis that σ 1 R agonists promote dissociation of σ 1 R multimers into monomers, which then interact with DAT to stabilize an outward-facing DAT conformation and enhance cocaine binding. We propose that this novel molecular mechanism underlies the behavioral potentiation of cocaine self-administration by σ 1 R agonists in animal models. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Protein synthesis in axons and terminals: significance for maintenance, plasticity and regulation of phenotype. With a critique of slow transport theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, J; Giuditta, A; Koenig, E

    2000-09-01

    This article focuses on local protein synthesis as a basis for maintaining axoplasmic mass, and expression of plasticity in axons and terminals. Recent evidence of discrete ribosomal domains, subjacent to the axolemma, which are distributed at intermittent intervals along axons, are described. Studies of locally synthesized proteins, and proteins encoded by RNA transcripts in axons indicate that the latter comprise constituents of the so-called slow transport rate groups. A comprehensive review and analysis of published data on synaptosomes and identified presynaptic terminals warrants the conclusion that a cytoribosomal machinery is present, and that protein synthesis could play a role in long-term changes of modifiable synapses. The concept that all axonal proteins are supplied by slow transport after synthesis in the perikaryon is challenged because the underlying assumptions of the model are discordant with known metabolic principles. The flawed slow transport model is supplanted by a metabolic model that is supported by evidence of local synthesis and turnover of proteins in axons. A comparison of the relative strengths of the two models shows that, unlike the local synthesis model, the slow transport model fails as a credible theoretical construct to account for axons and terminals as we know them. Evidence for a dynamic anatomy of axons is presented. It is proposed that a distributed "sprouting program," which governs local plasticity of axons, is regulated by environmental cues, and ultimately depends on local synthesis. In this respect, nerve regeneration is treated as a special case of the sprouting program. The term merotrophism is proposed to denote a class of phenomena, in which regional phenotype changes are regulated locally without specific involvement of the neuronal nucleus.

  4. Mechanisms of Kappa Opioid Receptor Potentiation of Dopamine D2 Receptor Function in Quinpirole-Induced Locomotor Sensitization in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Angélica P; González, Marcela P; Meza, Rodrigo C; Noches, Verónica; Henny, Pablo; Gysling, Katia; España, Rodrigo A; Fuentealba, José A

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Increased locomotor activity in response to the same stimulus is an index of behavioral sensitization observed in preclinical models of drug addiction and compulsive behaviors. Repeated administration of quinpirole, a D2/D3 dopamine agonist, induces locomotor sensitization. This effect is potentiated and accelerated by co-administration of U69593, a kappa opioid receptor agonist. The mechanism underlying kappa opioid receptor potentiation of quinpirole-induced locomotor sensitization remains to be elucidated. Methods Immunofluorescence anatomical studies were undertaken in mice brain slices and rat presynaptic synaptosomes to reveal kappa opioid receptor and D2R pre- and postsynaptic colocalization in the nucleus accumbens. Tonic and phasic dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens of rats repeatedly treated with U69593 and quinpirole was assessed by microdialysis and fast scan cyclic voltammetry. Results Anatomical data show that kappa opioid receptor and D2R colocalize postsynaptically in medium spiny neurons of the nucleus accumbens and the highest presynaptic colocalization occurs on the same dopamine terminals. Significantly reduced dopamine levels were observed in quinpirole, and U69593-quinpirole treated rats, explaining sensitization of D2R. Presynaptic inhibition induced by kappa opioid receptor and D2R of electrically evoked dopamine release was faster in U69593-quinpirole compared with quinpirole-repeatedly treated rats. Conclusions Pre- and postsynaptic colocalization of kappa opioid receptor and D2R supports a role for kappa opioid receptor potentiating both the D2R inhibitory autoreceptor function and the inhibitory action of D2R on efferent medium spiny neurons. Kappa opioid receptor co-activation accelerates D2R sensitization by contributing to decrease dopamine release in the nucleus accumbens. PMID:28531297

  5. Substrate Binding Mode and its Implication on Drug Design for Botulinum Neurotoxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumaran, D.; Rawat, R; Ahmed, A; Swaminathan, S

    2008-01-01

    The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A), cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25). An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide 197QRATKM202 and its variant 197RRATKM202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5? sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197) chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1?-Arg198, occupies the S1? site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2? subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3? subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4?-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5?-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  6. Neurotoxins from Clostridium botulinum (serotype A) isolated from the soil of Mendoza (Argentina) differ from the A-Hall archetype and from that causing infant botulism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, P; Troncoso, M; Patterson, S I; López Gómez, C; Fernandez, R; Sosa, M A

    2016-10-01

    The type A of neurotoxin produced by Clostridium botulinum is the prevalent serotype in strains of Mendoza. The soil is the main reservoir for C.botulinum and is possibly one of the infection sources in infant botulism. In this study, we characterized and compared autochthonous C. botulinum strains and their neurotoxins. Bacterial samples were obtained from the soil and from fecal samples collected from children with infant botulism. We first observed differences in the appearance of the colonies between strains from each source and with the A Hall control strain. In addition, purified neurotoxins of both strains were found to be enriched in a band of 300 kDa, whereas the A-Hall strain was mainly made up of a band of ∼600 kDa. This finding is in line with the lack of hemagglutinating activity of the neurotoxins under study. Moreover, the proteolytic activity of C. botulinum neurotoxins was evaluated against SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein receptor) proteins from rat brain. It was observed that both, SNAP 25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25) and VAMP 2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein) were cleaved by the neurotoxins isolated from the soil strains, whereas the neurotoxins from infant botulism strains only induced a partial cleavage of VAMP 2. On the other hand, the neurotoxin from the A-Hall strain was able to cleave both proteins, though at a lesser extent. Our data indicate that the C.botulinum strain isolated from the soil, and its BoNT, exhibit different properties compared to the strain obtained from infant botulism patients, and from the A-Hall archetype. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Reactive Oxygen Species-Mediated Loss of Synaptic Akt1 Signaling Leads to Deficient Activity-Dependent Protein Translation Early in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Faraz; Singh, Kunal; Das, Debajyoti; Gowaikar, Ruturaj; Shaw, Eisha; Ramachandran, Arathy; Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kommaddi, Reddy Peera; Bennett, David A; Ravindranath, Vijayalakshmi

    2017-12-01

    Synaptic deficits are known to underlie the cognitive dysfunction seen in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) by β-amyloid has also been implicated in AD pathogenesis. However, it is unclear whether ROS contributes to synaptic dysfunction seen in AD pathogenesis and, therefore, we examined whether altered redox signaling could contribute to synaptic deficits in AD. Activity dependent but not basal translation was impaired in synaptoneurosomes from 1-month old presymptomatic APP Swe /PS1ΔE9 (APP/PS1) mice, and this deficit was sustained till middle age (MA, 9-10 months). ROS generation leads to oxidative modification of Akt1 in the synapse and consequent reduction in Akt1-mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, leading to deficiency in activity-dependent protein translation. Moreover, we found a similar loss of activity-dependent protein translation in synaptoneurosomes from postmortem AD brains. Loss of activity-dependent protein translation occurs presymptomatically early in the pathogenesis of AD. This is caused by ROS-mediated loss of pAkt1, leading to reduced synaptic Akt1-mTOR signaling and is rescued by overexpression of Akt1. ROS-mediated damage is restricted to the synaptosomes, indicating selectivity. We demonstrate that ROS-mediated oxidative modification of Akt1 contributes to synaptic dysfunction in AD, seen as loss of activity-dependent protein translation that is essential for synaptic plasticity and maintenance. Therapeutic strategies promoting Akt1-mTOR signaling at synapses may provide novel target(s) for disease-modifying therapy in AD. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1269-1280.

  8. Protective roles of selenium and zinc against postnatal protein-undernutrition-induced alterations in Ca(2+)-homeostasis leading to cognitive deficits in Wistar rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adebayo, Olusegun L; Sandhir, Rajat; Adenuga, Gbenga A

    2015-06-01

    Postnatal protein-undernutrition impacts on mental development and cognition in children and can lead to problem with attention and unresponsiveness which compromise children's ability to learn. These behavioral disorders might be due to alteration in calcium homeostasis as calcium plays critical roles in fundamental functions of neuron. The role of low protein diet as well as Se and Zn supplementation on intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), Ca(2+)-ATPase, Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase, calpain and caspase-3 activities from rat cortex and cerebellum were investigated. Well-fed (WF) and low protein diet-fed (LPDF) rats were given diets containing 16% and 5% casein, respectively, for a period of 10 weeks. Then, the rats were supplemented with Se and Zn at a concentration of 0.15 mgL(-1) and 227 mgL(-1), respectively, in drinking water for 3 weeks. The results obtained from the study showed a significant increase in [Ca(2+)]i; calpain and caspase-3 activities as well as increase transfer latency in water maze study and reductions in Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase activities for LPDF rats compared to WF rats. Se and Zn supplementation to LPDF rats reversed the elevation in [Ca(2+)]i, calpain and caspase-3 activities and restored the cognitive deficits and the activities of Ca(2+)-ATPase and Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase. Conclusively, protein-undernutrition results in the accumulation of synaptosomal calcium and inhibition of calcium transporters presumably via free radical generations and results in cognitive impairment which also probably results from neuronal death in rats through calpain activation and the caspase cascade mechanisms. However, Se and Zn supplementations ameliorated the anomalies observed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Chronic Stress Triggers Expression of Immediate Early Genes and Differentially Affects the Expression of AMPA and NMDA Subunits in Dorsal and Ventral Hippocampus of Rats

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    Anibal Pacheco

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in rats have demonstrated that chronic restraint stress triggers anhedonia, depressive-like behaviors, anxiety and a reduction in dendritic spine density in hippocampal neurons. In this study, we compared the effect of repeated stress on the expression of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptor subunits in dorsal and ventral hippocampus (VH. Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into control and stressed groups, and were daily restrained in their motion (2.5 h/day during 14 days. We found that chronic stress promotes an increase in c-Fos mRNA levels in both hippocampal areas, although it was observed a reduction in the immunoreactivity at pyramidal cell layer. Furthermore, Arc mRNAs levels were increased in both dorsal and VH, accompanied by an increase in Arc immunoreactivity in dendritic hippocampal layers. Furthermore, stress triggered a reduction in PSD-95 and NR1 protein levels in whole extract of dorsal and VH. Moreover, a reduction in NR2A/NR2B ratio was observed only in dorsal pole. In synaptosomal fractions, we detected a rise in NR1 in dorsal hippocampus (DH. By indirect immunofluorescence we found that NR1 subunits rise, especially in neuropil areas of dorsal, but not VH. In relation to AMPA receptor (AMPAR subunits, chronic stress did not trigger any change, either in dorsal or ventral hippocampal areas. These data suggest that DH is more sensitive than VH to chronic stress exposure, mainly altering the expression of NMDA receptor (NMDAR subunits, and probably favors changes in the configuration of this receptor that may influence the function of this area.

  10. Aniracetam, 1-BCP and cyclothiazide differentially modulate the function of NMDA and AMPA receptors mediating enhancement of noradrenaline release in rat hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittaluga, A; Bonfanti, A; Arvigo, D; Raiteri, M

    1999-04-01

    Aniracetam, 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl-carbonyl)piperidine (1-BCP) and cyclothiazide, three compounds considered to enhance cognition through modulation of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors, were evaluated in the 'kynurenate test', a biochemical assay in which some nootropics have been shown to prevent the antagonism by kynurenic acid of the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-evoked [3H]noradrenaline ([3H]NA) release from rat hippocampal slices. Aniracetam attenuated the kynurenate (100 microM) antagonism of the [3H]NA release elicited by 100 microM NMDA with high potency (EC50aniracetam, respectively. The effect of aniracetam persisted in the presence of the AMPA receptor antagonist 6-nitro-7-sulphamoyl-benzo[f]quinoxaline-2,3-dione (NBQX) added at 5 microM, a concentration that did not affect NMDA receptors; in contrast, NBQX reduced the effect of 1-BCP and abolished that of cyclothiazide. The AMPA-evoked release of [3H]NA from hippocampal slices or synaptosomes was enhanced by cyclothiazide, less potently by 1-BCP and weakly by aniracetam. High concentrations of kynurenate (1 mM) antagonized the AMPA-evoked [3H]NA release in slices; this antagonism was attenuated by 1 microM cyclothiazide and reversed to an enhancement of AMPA-evoked [3H]NA release by 10 microM of the drug, but was insensitive to 1-BCP or aniracetam. It is concluded that aniracetam exerts a dual effect on glutamatergic transmission: modulation of NMDA receptor function at nanomolar concentrations, and modulation of AMPA receptors at high micromolar concentrations. As to cyclothiazide and 1-BCP, our data concur with the idea that both compounds largely act through AMPA receptors, although an NMDA component may be involved in the effect of 1-BCP.

  11. [3H]aniracetam binds to specific recognition sites in brain membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallarino, F; Genazzani, A A; Silla, S; L'Episcopo, M R; Camici, O; Corazzi, L; Nicoletti, F; Fioretti, M C

    1995-08-01

    [3H]Aniracetam bound to specific and saturable recognition sites in membranes prepared from discrete regions of rat brain. In crude membrane preparation from rat cerebral cortex, specific binding was Na+ independent, was still largely detectable at low temperature (4 degrees C), and underwent rapid dissociation. Scatchard analysis of [3H]aniracetam binding revealed a single population of sites with an apparent KD value of approximately 70 nM and a maximal density of 3.5 pmol/mg of protein. Specifically bound [3H]aniracetam was not displaced by various metabolites of aniracetam, nor by other pyrrolidinone-containing nootropic drugs such as piracetam or oxiracetam. Subcellular distribution studies showed that a high percentage of specific [3H]aniracetam binding was present in purified synaptosomes or mitochondria, whereas specific binding was low in the myelin fraction. The possibility that at least some [3H]aniracetam binding sites are associated with glutamate receptors is supported by the evidence that specific binding was abolished when membranes were preincubated at 37 degrees C under fast shaking (a procedure that substantially reduced the amount of glutamate trapped in the membranes) and could be restored after addition of either glutamate or alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) but not kainate. The action of AMPA was antagonized by DNQX, which also reduced specific [3H]aniracetam binding in unwashed membranes. High levels of [3H]aniracetam binding were detected in hippocampal, cortical, or cerebellar membranes, which contain a high density of excitatory amino acid receptors.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Differential expression of metabotropic glutamate and GABAB receptors at neocortical glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals

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    Luca eBragina

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and GABAB receptors are highly expressed at presynaptic sites. To verify the possibility that the two classes of metabotropic receptors contribute to axon terminals heterogeneity, we studied the localization of mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7 and GABAB1 in VGLUT1-, VGLUT2- and VGAT-positive terminals in the cerebral cortex of adult rats. VGLUT1-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (~5%, mGluR5 (~6%, mGluR2/3 (~22%, mGluR7 (~17%, and GABAB1 (~40%; VGLUT2-positive terminals expressed mGluR1α (~10%, mGluR5 (~11%, mGluR2/3 (~20%, mGluR7 (~28%, and GABAB1 (~25%; whereas VGAT-positive puncta expressed mGluR1α (~27%, mGluR5 (~24%, mGluR2/3 (~38%, mGluR7 (~31%, and GABAB1 (~19%. Control experiments ruled out the possibility that post-synaptic mGluRs and GABAB1 might have significantly biased our results. We also performed functional assays in synaptosomal preparations, and showed that all agonists modify Glu and GABA levels, which return to baseline upon exposure to antagonists.Overall, these findings indicate that mGluR1α, mGluR5, mGluR2/3, mGluR7 and GABAB1 expression differ significantly between glutamatergic and GABAergic axon terminals, and that the robust expression of heteroreceptors may contribute to the homeostatic regulation of the balance between excitation and inhibition.

  13. delta-Atracotoxins from australian funnel-web spiders compete with scorpion alpha-toxin binding but differentially modulate alkaloid toxin activation of voltage-gated sodium channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, M J; Zappia, C; Gilles, N; Connor, M; Tyler, M I; Martin-Eauclaire, M F; Gordon, D; Nicholson, G M

    1998-10-16

    delta-Atracotoxins from the venom of Australian funnel-web spiders are a unique group of peptide toxins that slow sodium current inactivation in a manner similar to scorpion alpha-toxins. To analyze their interaction with known sodium channel neurotoxin receptor sites, we studied their effect on [3H]batrachotoxin and 125I-Lqh II (where Lqh is alpha-toxin II from the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus) binding and on alkaloid toxin-stimulated 22Na+ uptake in rat brain synaptosomes. delta-Atracotoxins significantly increased [3H]batrachotoxin binding yet decreased maximal batrachotoxin-activated 22Na+ uptake by 70-80%, the latter in marked contrast to the effect of scorpion alpha-toxins. Unlike the inhibition of batrachotoxin-activated 22Na+ uptake, delta-atracotoxins increased veratridine-stimulated 22Na+ uptake by converting veratridine from a partial to a full agonist, analogous to scorpion alpha-toxins. Hence, delta-atracotoxins are able to differentiate between the open state of the sodium channel stabilized by batrachotoxin and veratridine and suggest a distinct sub-conductance state stabilized by delta-atracotoxins. Despite these actions, low concentrations of delta-atracotoxins completely inhibited the binding of the scorpion alpha-toxin, 125I-Lqh II, indicating that they bind to similar, or partially overlapping, receptor sites. The apparent uncoupling between the increase in binding but inhibition of the effect of batrachotoxin induced by delta-atracotoxins suggests that the binding and action of certain alkaloid toxins may represent at least two distinguishable steps. These results further contribute to the understanding of the complex dynamic interactions between neurotoxin receptor site areas related to sodium channel gating.

  14. Leftward shift in the voltage-dependence for Ca2+ currents activation induced by a new toxin from Phoneutria reidyi (Aranae, Ctenidae) venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, L B; Pimenta, A M C; Richardson, M; Bemquerer, M P; Reis, H J; Cruz, J S; Gomez, M V; Santoro, M M; Ferreira-de-Oliveira, R; Figueiredo, S G; Snutch, T P; Cordeiro, M N

    2007-02-01

    Various neurotoxins have been described from the venom of the Brazilian spider Phoneutria nigriventer, but little is known about the venoms of the other species of this genus. In the present work, we describe the purification and some structural and pharmacological features of a new toxin (PRTx3-7) from Phoneutria reidyi that causes flaccid paralysis in mice. The observed molecular mass (4627.26 Da) was in accordance with the calculated mass for the amidated form of the amino acid sequence (4627.08 Da). The presence of an alpha-amidated C-terminus was confirmed by MS/MS analysis of the C-terminal peptide, isolated after enzymatic digestion of the native protein with Glu-C endoproteinase. The purified protein was injected (intracerebro-ventricular) into mice at dose levels of 5 microg/mouse causing immediate agitation and clockwise gyration, followed by the gradual development of general flaccid paralysis. PRTx3-7 at 1 microM inhibited by 20% the KCl-induced increase on [Ca2+]i in rat brain synaptosomes. The HEK cells permanently expressing L, N, P/Q and R HVA Ca2+ channels were also used to better characterize the pharmacological features of PRTx3-7. To our surprise, PRTx3-7 shifted the voltage-dependence for activation towards hyperpolarized membrane potentials for L (-4 mV), P/Q (-8 mV) and R (-5 mV) type Ca2+ currents. In addition, the new toxin also affected the steady state of inactivation of L-, N- and P/Q-type Ca2+ currents.

  15. Studies on the mechanism of the epileptiform activity induced by U18666A. II. concentration, half-life and distribution of radiolabeled U18666A in the brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cenedella, R.J.; Sarkar, C.P.; Towns, L.

    1982-06-01

    The concentration, half-life, and distribution in brain of U18666A, a drug that can drastically alter cerebral lipids and induce a chronic epileptiform state, was determined following both acute and chronic drug administration. U18666A specifically labeled with tritium was prepared by custom synthesis. Brain levels of 1 x 10(-6)M and higher were reached soon after giving an acute 10-mg/kg dose (i.p. or s.c.) of U18666A containing 7-/sup 3/H-U18666A of known specific activity. A steady state concentration of 1 to 2 x 10(-6)M was reached with chronic injection of 10 mg/kg every 4th day, a treatment schedule that results in altered brain lipids and induction of epilepsy if begun soon after birth. The disappearance of U18666A from both brain and serum was described by two similar biexponential processes, a brief rapid clearance (t1/2 . 10 h) and a sustained and much slower one (t1/2 . 65 h). Brain levels of the drug were about 10 times higher than serum at all times examined. Few differences were seen in the regional distribution of radiolabeled drug in brain as determined by both direct analysis and by autoradiographic examination; but the drug did concentrate in lipid-rich subcellular fractions. For example, the synaptosome and myelin fractions each contained about 25-35% of both the total /sup 3/H-labeled drug and total lipid in whole brain. The lipid composition of these fractions was drastically altered in treated animals. In conclusion, the chronic epileptiform state induced by U18666A does not appear to involve localization of the drug in a specific brain region or particular cell type. Rather, the condition could involve localization of the drug in lipid-rich membranes and marked changes in the composition of these membranes.

  16. Functional Coding Variation in Recombinant Inbred Mouse Lines Reveals Novel Serotonin Transporter-Associated Phenotypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carneiro, Ana [Vanderbilt University; Airey, David [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Thompson, Brent [Vanderbilt University; Zhu, C [Vanderbilt University; Rinchik, Eugene M [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Erikson, Keith [University of North Carolina; Blakely, Randy [Vanderbilt University

    2009-01-01

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology or treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here we utilize naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify novel phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by two nonsynonymous coding variants (Gly39 and Lys152 (GK)). At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode Glu39 and Arg152 (ER haplotype), assignments found also in hSERT. Synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant. Heterologous expression studies confirmed a reduced SERT turnover rate for the GK variant. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57Bl/6J X DBA/2J=BXD) identifies multiple anatomical, biochemical and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are multiple traits associated with anxiety and alcohol consumption, as well as of the control of dopamine (DA) signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates ironregulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide a novel example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo and in silico approaches using murine RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  17. Selective expression of muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype M3 by mouse type III taste bud cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yusuke; Eguchi, Kohgaku; Yoshii, Kiyonori; Ohtubo, Yoshitaka

    2016-11-01

    Each taste bud cell (TBC) type responds to a different taste. Previously, we showed that an unidentified cell type(s) functionally expresses a muscarinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subtype, M3, and we suggested the ACh-dependent modification of its taste responsiveness. In this study, we found that M3 is expressed by type III TBCs, which is the only cell type that possesses synaptic contacts with taste nerve fibers in taste buds. The application of ACh to the basolateral membrane of mouse fungiform TBCs in situ increased the intracellular Ca 2+ concentration in 2.4 ± 1.4 cells per taste bud (mean ± SD, n = 14). After Ca 2+ imaging, we supravitally labeled type II cells (phospholipase C β2 [PLCβ2]-immunoreactive cells) with Lucifer yellow CH (LY), a fluorescent dye and investigated the positional relationship between ACh-responding cells and LY-labeled cells. After fixation, the TBCs were immunohistostained to investigate the positional relationships between immunohistochemically classified cells and LY-labeled cells. The overlay of the two positional relationships obtained by superimposing the LY-labeled cells showed that all of the ACh-responding cells were type III cells (synaptosomal-associated protein 25 [SNAP-25]-immunoreactive cells). The ACh responses required no added Ca 2+ in the bathing solution. The addition of 1 μM U73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, decreased the magnitude of the ACh response, whereas that of 1 μM U73343, a negative control, had no effect. These results suggest that type III cells respond to ACh and release Ca 2+ from intracellular stores. We also discuss the underlying mechanism of the Ca 2+ response and the role of M3 in type III cells.

  18. Proteomic analysis of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment of an infantile spasm model induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid and prenatal stress.

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    Jing Wang

    Full Text Available Infantile spasms is an age-specific epileptic syndrome associated with poor developmental outcomes and poor response to nearly all traditional antiepileptic drugs except adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH. We investigated the protective mechanism of ACTH against brain damage. An infantile spasm rat model induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA in neonate rats was used. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into the stress-exposed and the non-stress exposed groups, and their offspring were randomly divided into ACTH-treated spasm model, untreated spasm model, and control groups. A proteomics-based approach was used to detect the proteome differences between ACTH-treated and untreated groups. Gel image analysis was followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric protein identification and bioinformatics analysis. Prenatal stress exposure resulted in more severe seizures, and ACTH treatment reduced and delayed the onset of seizures. The most significantly up-regulated proteins included isoform 1 of tubulin β-5 chain, cofilin-1 (CFL1, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, malate dehydrogenase, N(G,N(G-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1, annexin A3 (ANXA3, and rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA. In contrast, tubulin α-1A chain was down-regulated. Three of the identified proteins, ARHGDIA, ANXA3, and CFL1, were validated using western blot analysis. ARHGDIA expression was assayed in the brain samples of five infantile spasm patients. These proteins are involved in the cytoskeleton, synapses, energy metabolism, vascular regulation, signal transduction, and acetylation. The mechanism underlying the effects of ACTH involves the molecular events affected by these proteins, and protein acetylation is the mechanism of action of the drug treatment.

  19. Levels of glutamate, aspartate, GABA, and taurine in different regions of the cerebellum after x-irradiation-induced neuronal loss

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rea, M.A.; McBride, W.J.; Rohde, B.H.

    1981-01-01

    The levels of glutamate (Glu), aspartate (Asp), gamma-amino-n-butyric acid (GABA), and taurine (Tau) were determined in the cortex, molecular layer, and deep nuclei of cerebella of adult rats exposed to X-irradiation at 12-15 days following birth (to prevent the acquisition of late-forming granule cells; 12-15x group) and 8-15 days following birth (to prevent the acquisition of granule and stellate cells; 8-15x group). Also, the levels of the four amino acids were measured in the crude synaptosomal fraction (P2) isolated from the whole cerebella of the control, 12-15x, and 8-15x groups. The level of Glu was significantly decreased by (1) 6-20% in the cerebellar cortex; (2) 15-20% in the molecular layer; and (3) 25-50% in the P2 fraction of the X-irradiated groups relative to control values. The content of Glu in the deep nuclei was not changed by X-irradiation treatment. Regional levels of Asp were unchanged by X-irradiation, while its level in P2 decreased by 15-30% after treatment. The levels of GABA and Tau in the molecular layer, deep nuclei, or P2 were not changed in the experimental groups. However, there was a 15% increase in the levels of GABA and Tau in the cerebellar cortex of the 8-15x group relative to control values. The data support the proposed role of glutamate as the excitatory transmitter released from the cerebellar granule cells but are inconclusive regarding a transmitter role for either Tau or GABA from cerebellar stellate cells

  20. Calcium dysregulation via L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels and ryanodine receptors underlies memory deficits and synaptic dysfunction during chronic neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopp, Sarah C; D'Angelo, Heather M; Royer, Sarah E; Kaercher, Roxanne M; Crockett, Alexis M; Adzovic, Linda; Wenk, Gary L

    2015-03-25

    Chronic neuroinflammation and calcium (Ca(+2)) dysregulation are both components of Alzheimer's disease. Prolonged neuroinflammation produces elevation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and reactive oxygen species which can alter neuronal Ca(+2) homeostasis via L-type voltage-dependent Ca(+2) channels (L-VDCCs) and ryanodine receptors (RyRs). Chronic neuroinflammation also leads to deficits in spatial memory, which may be related to Ca(+2) dysregulation. The studies herein use an in vivo model of chronic neuroinflammation: rats were infused intraventricularly with a continuous small dose of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) for 28 days. The rats were treated with the L-VDCC antagonist nimodipine or the RyR antagonist dantrolene. LPS-infused rats had significant memory deficits in the Morris water maze, and this deficit was ameliorated by treatment with nimodipine. Synaptosomes from LPS-infused rats had increased Ca(+2) uptake, which was reduced by a blockade of L-VDCCs either in vivo or ex vivo. Taken together, these data indicate that Ca(+2) dysregulation during chronic neuroinflammation is partially dependent on increases in L-VDCC function. However, blockade of the RyRs also slightly improved spatial memory of the LPS-infused rats, demonstrating that other Ca(+2) channels are dysregulated during chronic neuroinflammation. Ca(+2)-dependent immediate early gene expression was reduced in LPS-infused rats treated with dantrolene or nimodipine, indicating normalized synaptic function that may underlie improvements in spatial memory. Pro-inflammatory markers are also reduced in LPS-infused rats treated with either drug. Overall, these data suggest that Ca(+2) dysregulation via L-VDCCs and RyRs play a crucial role in memory deficits resulting from chronic neuroinflammation.

  1. Effects of immobilization and aerobic training on proteins related to intramuscular substrate storage and metabolism in young and older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigelsø, Andreas; Gram, Martin; Wiuff, Caroline; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Prats, Clara; Dela, Flemming; Helge, Jørn Wulff

    2016-03-01

    Aging and inactivity lead to skeletal muscle metabolic inflexibility, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely elucidated. Therefore, we investigated how muscle lipid and glycogen stores and major regulatory proteins were affected by short-term immobilization followed by aerobic training in young and older men. 17 young (23 ± 1 years, 24 ± 1 kg m(-2), and 20 ± 2% body fat) and 15 older men (68 ± 1 years; 27 ± 1 kg m(-2), and 29 ± 2% body fat) underwent 2 weeks' one leg immobilization followed by 6 weeks' cycle training. Biopsies were obtained from m. vastus lateralis just before immobilization (at inclusion), after immobilization, and the after 6 weeks' training. The biopsies were analyzed for muscle substrates; muscle perilipin protein (PLIN), glycogen synthase (GS), synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa (SNAP23) protein content, and muscle 3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase (HAD) activity The older men had higher intramuscular triglyceride (IMTG) (73 %) and Glycogen (16%) levels compared to the young men, and IMTG tended to increase with immobilization. PLIN2 and 3 protein content increased with immobilization in the older men only. The young men had higher GS (74%) protein compared to the older men. Immobilization decreased and training restored HAD activity, GS and SNAP23 protein content in young and older men. Evidence of age-related metabolic inflexibility is presented, seen as body fat and IMTG accumulation. The question arises as to whether IMTG accumulation in the older men is caused by or leading to the increase in PLIN2 and 3 protein content. Training decreased body fat and IMTG levels in both young and older men; hence, training should be prioritized to reduce the detrimental effect of aging on metabolism.

  2. Motor and Sensory Deficits in the teetering Mice Result from Mutation of the ESCRT Component HGS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer A Watson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are particularly vulnerable to perturbations in endo-lysosomal transport, as several neurological disorders are caused by a primary deficit in this pathway. In this report, we used positional cloning to show that the spontaneously occurring neurological mutation teetering (tn is a single nucleotide substitution in hepatocyte growth factor-regulated tyrosine kinase substrate (Hgs/Hrs, a component of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT. The tn mice exhibit hypokenesis, muscle weakness, reduced muscle size and early perinatal lethality by 5-weeks of age. Although HGS has been suggested to be essential for the sorting of ubiquitinated membrane proteins to the lysosome, there were no alterations in receptor tyrosine kinase levels in the central nervous system, and only a modest decrease in tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB in the sciatic nerves of the tn mice. Instead, loss of HGS resulted in structural alterations at the neuromuscular junction (NMJ, including swellings and ultra-terminal sprouting at motor axon terminals and an increase in the number of endosomes and multivesicular bodies. These structural changes were accompanied by a reduction in spontaneous and evoked release of acetylcholine, indicating a deficit in neurotransmitter release at the NMJ. These deficits in synaptic transmission were associated with elevated levels of ubiquitinated proteins in the synaptosome fraction. In addition to the deficits in neuronal function, mutation of Hgs resulted in both hypermyelinated and dysmyelinated axons in the tn mice, which supports a growing body of evidence that ESCRTs are required for proper myelination of peripheral nerves. Our results indicate that HGS has multiple roles in the nervous system and demonstrate a previously unanticipated requirement for ESCRTs in the maintenance of synaptic transmission.

  3. Charybdotoxin is a new member of the K sup + channel toxin family that includes dendrotoxin I and mast cell degranulating peptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweitz, H.; Bidard, J.N.; Lazdunski, M. (Universite de Nice (France)); Maes, P. (Institut Pasteur de Lille (France))

    1989-12-12

    A polypeptide was identified in the venom of the scorpion Leiurus quinquestriatus hebraeus by its potency to inhibit the high affinity binding of the radiolabeled snake venom toxin dendrotoxin I ({sup 125}I-DTX{sub I}) to its receptor site. It has been purified, and its properties investigated by different techniques were found to be similar to those of MCD and DTX{sub I}, two polypeptide toxins active on a voltage-dependent K{sup +} channel. However, its amino acid sequence was determined, and it was shown that this toxin is in fact charybdotoxin (ChTX), a toxin classically used as a specific tool to block one class of Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels. ChTX, DTX{sub I}, and MCD are potent convulsants and are highly toxic when injected intracerebroventricularly in mice. Their toxicities correlate well with their affinities for their receptors in rat brain. These three structurally different toxins release ({sup 3}H)GABA from preloaded synaptosomes, the efficiency order being DTX{sub I} > ChTX > MCD. Both binding and cross-linking experiments of ChTX to rat brain membranes and to the purified MCD/DTX{sub I} binding protein have shown that the {alpha}-subunit of the MCD/DTX{sub I}-sensitive K{sup +} channel protein also contains the ChTX binding sites. Binding sites for DTX{sub I}, MCD, and ChTX are in negative allosteric interaction. The results show that charybdotoxin belongs to the family of toxins which already includes the dendrotoxins and MCD, which are blockers of voltage-sensitive K{sup +} channels. ChTX is clearly not selective for Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channel.

  4. Effects of co-administration of ketamine and ethanol on the dopamine system via the cortex-striatum circuitry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Xu, Tian-Yong; Zhang, Zhi-Bi; Leung, Chi-Kwan; You, Ding-Yun; Wang, Shang-Wen; Yi, Shuai; Jing, Qiang; Xie, Run-Fang; Li, Huifang-Jie; Zeng, Xiao-Feng

    2017-06-15

    Ketamine and ethanol are increasingly being used together as recreational drugs in rave parties. Their effects on the dopamine (DA) system remain largely unknown. This study aimed to investigate the effects of consuming two different concentrations of ketamine with and without alcohol on the DA system. We employed the conditioned place preference (CPP) paradigm to evaluate the rewarding effects of the combined administration of two different doses of ketamine (30mg/kg and 60mg/kg) with ethanol (0.3156g/kg). We evaluated the effects of the combined drug treatment on the transcriptional output of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopa decarboxylase (DDC), synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP25), and vesicular monoamine transporter 2 (VMAT2) as well as protein expression level of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) and striatum. We found that rats exhibited a dose-dependent, drug-paired, place preference to ketamine and ethanol associated with an elevated DA level in the striatum but not in the PFC. Moreover, treatment involving low- or high-dose ketamine with or without ethanol caused a differential regulatory response in the mRNA levels of the four DA metabolism genes and the cellular protein abundance of BDNF via the cortex-striatum circuitry. This study investigated the molecular mechanisms that occur following the combined administration of ketamine and ethanol in the DA system, which could potentially lead to alterations in the mental status and behavior of ketamine/ethanol users. Our findings may aid the development of therapeutic strategies for substance abuse patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Co-application of the GABAB receptor agonist, baclofen, and the mGlu receptor agonist, L-CCG-I, facilitates [(3)H]GABA release from rat cortical nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samengo, Irene A; Scotti, Valerio; Martire, Maria

    2013-12-01

    Interaction between different transmitter receptor systems is an emerging feature of neurotransmission at central synapses. G protein-coupled receptors' ability to form dimers or larger hetero-oligomers probably serves to facilitate the integration of diverse signals within the cell. We found that, in nerve terminals isolated from the cerebral cortices of rats, co-application of the GABAB agonist, baclofen, and of the non-selective mGlu agonist, L-CCG-I, potentiates the basal and depolarization-evoked release of [(3)H]GABA via a mechanism that involves mobilization of intracellular Ca(2+) ions. The effect of L-CCG-I + baclofen was abolished by the phospholipase C inhibitor U73122, reduced by Xestospongin C (an IP3 receptor blocker), and blocked by 2-APB, an IP3 receptor antagonist. Pretreatment of the synaptosomes with the lipid-soluble Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM also inhibited the effects of L-CCG-I + baclofen. Subtype-selective non-competitive group I mGlu receptor antagonists, MPEP and CPCCOEt, had no effect on the release enhancement produced by baclofen + L-CCG-I. The enhancement was reversed by the GABAB receptor antagonist, CGP54626, and by the group I/group II mGlu receptor antagonist (R,S)-MCPG. The GABA release-enhancing effects of L-CCG-I + baclofen in our model might reflect the presence on cortical nerve endings of GABAB/group I mGlu receptor heteromers with pharmacological properties distinct from those of the component receptors. Activation of these heteromeric receptors might modify the function of the GABAB receptor in such a way that it facilitates GABAergic transmission, an effect that might be useful under conditions of excessive glutamatergic activity.

  6. Prolonged high fat diet reduces dopamine reuptake without altering DAT gene expression.

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    Jackson J Cone

    Full Text Available The development of diet-induced obesity (DIO can potently alter multiple aspects of dopamine signaling, including dopamine transporter (DAT expression and dopamine reuptake. However, the time-course of diet-induced changes in DAT expression and function and whether such changes are dependent upon the development of DIO remains unresolved. Here, we fed rats a high (HFD or low (LFD fat diet for 2 or 6 weeks. Following diet exposure, rats were anesthetized with urethane and striatal DAT function was assessed by electrically stimulating the dopamine cell bodies in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and recording resultant changes in dopamine concentration in the ventral striatum using fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. We also quantified the effect of HFD on membrane associated DAT in striatal cell fractions from a separate group of rats following exposure to the same diet protocol. Notably, none of our treatment groups differed in body weight. We found a deficit in the rate of dopamine reuptake in HFD rats relative to LFD rats after 6 but not 2 weeks of diet exposure. Additionally, the increase in evoked dopamine following a pharmacological challenge of cocaine was significantly attenuated in HFD relative to LFD rats. Western blot analysis revealed that there was no effect of diet on total DAT protein. However, 6 weeks of HFD exposure significantly reduced the 50 kDa DAT isoform in a synaptosomal membrane-associated fraction, but not in a fraction associated with recycling endosomes. Our data provide further evidence for diet-induced alterations in dopamine reuptake independent of changes in DAT production and demonstrates that such changes can manifest without the development of DIO.

  7. Ureases display biological effects independent of enzymatic activity: Is there a connection to diseases caused by urease-producing bacteria?

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    D. Olivera-Severo

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Ureases are enzymes from plants, fungi and bacteria that catalyze the hydrolysis of urea to form ammonia and carbon dioxide. While fungal and plant ureases are homo-oligomers of 90-kDa subunits, bacterial ureases are multimers of two or three subunit complexes. We showed that some isoforms of jack bean urease, canatoxin and the classical urease, bind to glycoconjugates and induce platelet aggregation. Canatoxin also promotes release of histamine from mast cells, insulin from pancreatic cells and neurotransmitters from brain synaptosomes. In vivo it induces rat paw edema and neutrophil chemotaxis. These effects are independent of ureolytic activity and require activation of eicosanoid metabolism and calcium channels. Helicobacter pylori, a Gram-negative bacterium that colonizes the human stomach mucosa, causes gastric ulcers and cancer by a mechanism that is not understood. H. pylori produces factors that damage gastric epithelial cells, such as the vacuolating cytotoxin VacA, the cytotoxin-associated protein CagA, and a urease (up to 10% of bacterial protein that neutralizes the acidic medium permitting its survival in the stomach. H. pylori whole cells or extracts of its water-soluble proteins promote inflammation, activate neutrophils and induce the release of cytokines. In this paper we review data from the literature suggesting that H. pylori urease displays many of the biological activities observed for jack bean ureases and show that bacterial ureases have a secretagogue effect modulated by eicosanoid metabolites through lipoxygenase pathways. These findings could be relevant to the elucidation of the role of urease in the pathogenesis of the gastrointestinal disease caused by H. pylori.

  8. Evaluation of the binding of the radiolabeled antidepressant drug, 18F-fluoxetine in the rodent brain: an in vitro and in vivo study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, Jogeshwar; Das, Malay K.; Yang Zhiying; Lew, Robert

    1998-01-01

    We have developed 18 F-fluoxetine as a radiotracer analog of the antidepressant drug fluoxetine (Prozac). In vitro saturation experiments of 18 F-fluoxetine were carried out on rat midbrain tissue and citalopram was used for measuring nonspecific binding. A saturation curve for the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine was not obtained. Even when fluoxetine (10 μM) was used for measurements of nonspecific binding, a saturation curve was difficult to obtain. Other compounds, such as deprenyl, clorgyline, amphetamine, and reserpine were also not able to reduce the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine. Ex vivo autoradiographic experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine did not reveal any specific uptake in various brain regions. In vivo administration of 18 F-fluoxetine in rats showed similar uptake in all the brain regions with little regional selectivity. A subcellular analysis of rat brain tissue after intravenous (IV) administration of 18 F-fluoxetine indicated significant amounts of binding in mitochondria and synaptosomes. In summary, in vitro experiments with 18 F-fluoxetine indicate little specific binding. Binding to the serotonin transporter was not identifiable. High nonspecific binding of the tracer resulting from its subcellular nature in the brain masks the ability to detect binding to the serotonin uptake sites in vivo. These findings indicate that a large portion of the binding of 18 F-fluoxetine in rat brains is subcellular and clears slowly out of the cells. Other sites, such as monoamine oxidase, may also play a significant role in the action of fluoxetine

  9. Substrate binding mode and its implication on drug design for botulinum neurotoxin A.

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    Desigan Kumaran

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The seven antigenically distinct serotypes of Clostridium botulinum neurotoxins, the causative agents of botulism, block the neurotransmitter release by specifically cleaving one of the three SNARE proteins and induce flaccid paralysis. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC has declared them as Category A biowarfare agents. The most potent among them, botulinum neurotoxin type A (BoNT/A, cleaves its substrate synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25. An efficient drug for botulism can be developed only with the knowledge of interactions between the substrate and enzyme at the active site. Here, we report the crystal structures of the catalytic domain of BoNT/A with its uncleavable SNAP-25 peptide (197QRATKM(202 and its variant (197RRATKM(202 to 1.5 A and 1.6 A, respectively. This is the first time the structure of an uncleavable substrate bound to an active botulinum neurotoxin is reported and it has helped in unequivocally defining S1 to S5' sites. These substrate peptides make interactions with the enzyme predominantly by the residues from 160, 200, 250 and 370 loops. Most notably, the amino nitrogen and carbonyl oxygen of P1 residue (Gln197 chelate the zinc ion and replace the nucleophilic water. The P1'-Arg198, occupies the S1' site formed by Arg363, Thr220, Asp370, Thr215, Ile161, Phe163 and Phe194. The S2' subsite is formed by Arg363, Asn368 and Asp370, while S3' subsite is formed by Tyr251, Leu256, Val258, Tyr366, Phe369 and Asn388. P4'-Lys201 makes hydrogen bond with Gln162. P5'-Met202 binds in the hydrophobic pocket formed by the residues from the 250 and 200 loop. Knowledge of interactions between the enzyme and substrate peptide from these complex structures should form the basis for design of potent inhibitors for this neurotoxin.

  10. Interaction of Munc18c and syntaxin4 facilitates invadopodium formation and extracellular matrix invasion of tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasher, Megan I; Martynowicz, David M; Grafinger, Olivia R; Hucik, Andrea; Shanks-Skinner, Emma; Uniacke, James; Coppolino, Marc G

    2017-09-29

    Tumor cell invasion involves targeted localization of proteins required for interactions with the extracellular matrix and for proteolysis. The localization of many proteins during these cell-extracellular matrix interactions relies on membrane trafficking mediated in part by SNAREs. The SNARE protein syntaxin4 (Stx4) is involved in the formation of invasive structures called invadopodia; however, it is unclear how Stx4 function is regulated during tumor cell invasion. Munc18c is known to regulate Stx4 activity, and here we show that Munc18c is required for Stx4-mediated invadopodium formation and cell invasion. Biochemical and microscopic analyses revealed a physical association between Munc18c and Stx4, which was enhanced during invadopodium formation, and that a reduction in Munc18c expression decreases invadopodium formation. We also found that an N-terminal Stx4-derived peptide associates with Munc18c and inhibits endogenous interactions of Stx4 with synaptosome-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) and vesicle-associated membrane protein 2 (VAMP2). Furthermore, expression of the Stx4 N-terminal peptide decreased invadopodium formation and cell invasion in vitro Of note, cells expressing the Stx4 N-terminal peptide exhibited impaired trafficking of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) and EGF receptor (EGFR) to the cell surface during invadopodium formation. Our findings implicate Munc18c as a regulator of Stx4-mediated trafficking of MT1-MMP and EGFR, advancing our understanding of the role of SNARE function in the localization of proteins that drive tumor cell invasion. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. The Rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme binds cells via an Arg-Gly-Asp motif.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Höltje, Markus; Adolf, Andrej; Oms, Elisabeth; Hagemann, Sandra; Ahnert-Hilger, Gudrun; Just, Ingo

    2017-10-27

    The Rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme (C3bot) is a bacterial protein toxin devoid of a cell-binding or -translocation domain. Nevertheless, C3 can efficiently enter intact cells, including neurons, but the mechanism of C3 binding and uptake is not yet understood. Previously, we identified the intermediate filament vimentin as an extracellular membranous interaction partner of C3. However, uptake of C3 into cells still occurs (although reduced) in the absence of vimentin, indicating involvement of an additional host cell receptor. C3 harbors an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif, which is the major integrin-binding site, present in a variety of integrin ligands. To check whether the RGD motif of C3 is involved in binding to cells, we performed a competition assay with C3 and RGD peptide or with a monoclonal antibody binding to β1-integrin subunit and binding assays in different cell lines, primary neurons, and synaptosomes with C3-RGD mutants. Here, we report that preincubation of cells with the GRGDNP peptide strongly reduced C3 binding to cells. Moreover, mutation of the RGD motif reduced C3 binding to intact cells and also to recombinant vimentin. Anti-integrin antibodies also lowered the C3 binding to cells. Our results indicate that the RGD motif of C3 is at least one essential C3 motif for binding to host cells and that integrin is an additional receptor for C3 besides vimentin. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. Utilizing Combined Methodologies to Define the Role of Plasma Membrane Delivery During Axon Branching and Neuronal Morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Cortney C; Hanlin, Christopher C; Gupton, Stephanie L

    2016-03-16

    During neural development, growing axons extend to multiple synaptic partners by elaborating axonal branches. Axon branching is promoted by extracellular guidance cues like netrin-1 and results in dramatic increases to the surface area of the axonal plasma membrane. Netrin-1-dependent axon branching likely involves temporal and spatial control of plasma membrane expansion, the components of which are supplied through exocytic vesicle fusion. These fusion events are preceded by formation of SNARE complexes, comprising a v-SNARE, such as VAMP2 (vesicle-associated membrane protein 2), and plasma membrane t-SNAREs, syntaxin-1 and SNAP25 (synaptosomal-associated protein 25). Detailed herein isa multi-pronged approach used to examine the role of SNARE mediated exocytosis in axon branching. The strength of the combined approach is data acquisition at a range of spatial and temporal resolutions, spanning from the dynamics of single vesicle fusion events in individual neurons to SNARE complex formation and axon branching in populations of cultured neurons. This protocol takes advantage of established biochemical approaches to assay levels of endogenous SNARE complexes and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy of cortical neurons expressing VAMP2 tagged with a pH-sensitive GFP (VAMP2-pHlourin) to identify netrin-1 dependent changes in exocytic activity in individual neurons. To elucidate the timing of netrin-1-dependent branching, time-lapse differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy of single neurons over the order of hours is utilized. Fixed cell immunofluorescence paired with botulinum neurotoxins that cleave SNARE machinery and block exocytosis demonstrates that netrin-1 dependent axon branching requires SNARE-mediated exocytic activity.

  13. Exogenous hydrogen sulfide eliminates spatial memory retrieval impairment and hippocampal CA1 LTD enhancement caused by acute stress via promoting glutamate uptake.

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    He, Jin; Guo, Ruixian; Qiu, Pengxin; Su, Xingwen; Yan, Guangmei; Feng, Jianqiang

    2017-05-14

    Acute stress impairs the hippocampus-dependent spatial memory retrieval, and its synaptic mechanisms are associated with hippocampal CA1 long-term depression (LTD) enhancement in the adult rats. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H 2 S) is recognized as a novel gasotransmitter and has the neural protective roles. However, very little attention has been paid to understanding the effects of H 2 S on spatial memory retrieval impairment. We observed the protective effects of NaHS (a donor of H 2 S) against spatial memory retrieval impairment caused by acute stress and its synaptic mechanisms. Our results showed that NaHS abolished spatial memory retrieval impairment and hippocampal CA1 LTD enhancement caused by acute stress, but not by glutamate transporter inhibitor l-trans-pyrrolidine-2,4-dicarboxylic (tPDC), indicating that the activation of glutamate transporters is necessary for exogenous H 2 S to exert its roles. Moreover, NaHS restored the decreased glutamate uptake in the hippocampal CA1 synaptosomal fraction caused by acute stress. Dithiothreitol (DTT, a disulfide reducing agent) abolished a decrease in the glutamate uptake caused by acute stress, and NaHS eradicated the decreased glutamate uptake caused by 5,5'-dithio-bis(2-nitrobenzoic)acid (DTNB, a thiol oxidizing agent), collectively, revealing that exogenous H 2 S increases glutamate uptake by reducing disulfide bonds of the glutamate transporters. Additionally, NaHS inhibited the increased expression level of phosphorylated c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) in the hippocampal CA1 region caused by acute stress. The JNK inhibitor SP600125 eliminated spatial memory retrieval impairment, hippocampal CA1 LTD enhancement and the decreased glutamate uptake caused by acute stress, indicating that exogenous H 2 S exerts these roles by inhibiting the activation of JNK signaling pathway. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of DEHP and its metabolite MEHP on insulin signalling and proteins involved in GLUT4 translocation in cultured L6 myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Mangala Priya; Mullainadhan, Vigneswari; Chinnaiyan, Mayilvanan; Karundevi, Balasubramanian

    2017-07-01

    Di-(2-ethyl hexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the plasticizer used in variety of medical and consumer products to impart structural flexibility. DEHP and its primary metabolite mono-(2-ethyl hexyl)phthalate (MEHP) posed a considerable interest because of their contribution to insulin resistance, type-2 diabetes and obesity. Experimental and epidemiological data have shown that DEHP affects blood glucose homeostasis. However, direct effect of DEHP and its metabolite MEHP on insulin signal transduction and glucose transporter 4 (GLUT4) translocation remain obscure. The present study was delineated to decipher the direct effects of DEHP and MEHP on insulin signal transduction and proteins involved in GLUT4 translocation in cultured L6 myotubes, the rat skeletal muscle model. For this study we have exposed cells with 50 and 100μM DEHP and MEHP for 24h followed by insulin stimulation for 20min. GLUT4 level in both cytosol and plasma membrane fractions were analysed by western blot analysis and found to be significantly decreased. Further, DEHP and MEHP treatment significantly altered the insulin signalling molecules and proteins involved in GLUT4 translocation (Rab8A (Ras related proteins in skeletal muscle), insulin - regulated amino peptidase (IRAP), synaptosomal - associated protein 23 (SNAP23), Syntaxin4, Munc18c) from cytosol to plasma membrane. Impaired GLUT4 in the plasma membrane resulted in decreased 14 C-deoxy glucose uptake. 14 C-glucose oxidation and glycogen content were also significantly decreased in treated groups. In essence, the present study is first of its kind to show the direct adverse effects of DEHP and MEHP on insulin signal transduction and GLUT4 translocation in cultured L6 myotubes. Further, MEHP is found to be more effective than DEHP as a result of its differential structure and physico-chemical properties. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Clostridium Perfringens Epsilon Toxin Binds to Membrane Lipids and Its Cytotoxic Action Depends on Sulfatide.

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    Carles Gil

    Full Text Available Epsilon toxin (Etx is one of the major lethal toxins produced by Clostridium perfringens types B and D, being the causal agent of fatal enterotoxemia in animals, mainly sheep and goats. Etx is synthesized as a non-active prototoxin form (proEtx that becomes active upon proteolytic activation. Etx exhibits a cytotoxic effect through the formation of a pore in the plasma membrane of selected cell targets where Etx specifically binds due to the presence of specific receptors. However, the identity and nature of host receptors of Etx remain a matter of controversy. In the present study, the interactions between Etx and membrane lipids from the synaptosome-enriched fraction from rat brain (P2 fraction and MDCK cell plasma membrane preparations were analyzed. Our findings show that both Etx and proEtx bind to lipids extracted from lipid rafts from the two different models as assessed by protein-lipid overlay assay. Lipid rafts are membrane microdomains enriched in cholesterol and sphingolipids. Binding of proEtx to sulfatide, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol (3-phosphate and phosphatidylinositol (5-phosphate was detected. Removal of the sulphate groups via sulfatase treatment led to a dramatic decrease in Etx-induced cytotoxicity, but not in proEtx-GFP binding to MDCK cells or a significant shift in oligomer formation, pointing to a role of sulfatide in pore formation in rafts but not in toxin binding to the target cell membrane. These results show for the first time the interaction between Etx and membrane lipids from host tissue and point to a major role for sulfatides in C. perfringens epsilon toxin pathophysiology.

  16. Progress and Promise of Attention-Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder Pharmacogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Froehlich, Tanya E.; McGough, James J.; Stein, Mark A.

    2010-01-01

    One strategy for understanding variability in attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) medication response, and therefore redressing the current trial-and-error approach to ADHD medication management, is to identify genetic moderators of treatment. This article summarizes ADHD pharmacogenetic investigative efforts to date, which have primarily focused on short-term response to methylphenidate and largely been limited by modest sample sizes. The most well studied genes include the dopamine transporter and dopamine D4 receptor, with additional genes that have been significantly associated with stimulant medication response including the adrenergic α2A-receptor, catechol-O-methyltransferase, D5 receptor, noradrenaline (norepinephrine) transporter protein 1 and synaptosomal-associated protein 25 kDa. Unfortunately, results of current ADHD pharmacogenetic studies have not been entirely consistent, possibly due to differences in study design, medication dosing regimens and outcome measures. Future directions for ADHD pharmacogenetics investigations may include examination of drug-metabolizing enzymes and a wider range of stimulant and non-stimulant medications. In addition, researchers are increasingly interested in going beyond the individual candidate gene approach to investigate gene-gene interactions or pathways, effect modification by additional environmental exposures and whole genome approaches. Advancements in ADHD pharmacogenetics will be facilitated by multi-site collaborations to obtain larger sample sizes using standardized protocols. Although ADHD pharmacogenetic efforts are still in a relatively early stage, their potential clinical applications may include the development of treatment efficacy and adverse effect prediction algorithms that incorporate the interplay of genetic and environmental factors, as well as the development of novel ADHD treatments. PMID:20088618

  17. Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing protein 1 (Tmub1/HOPS facilitates surface expression of GluR2-containing AMPA receptors.

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    Hyunjeong Yang

    Full Text Available Some ubiquitin-like (UBL domain-containing proteins are known to play roles in receptor trafficking. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs undergo constitutive cycling between the intracellular compartment and the cell surface in the central nervous system. However, the function of UBL domain-containing proteins in the recycling of the AMPARs to the synaptic surface has not yet been reported.Here, we report that the Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing 1 (Tmub1 protein, formerly known as the Hepatocyte Odd Protein Shuttling (HOPS protein, which is abundantly expressed in the brain and which exists in a synaptosomal membrane fraction, facilitates the recycling of the AMPAR subunit GluR2 to the cell surface. Neurons transfected with Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi plasmids showed a significant reduction in the AMPAR current as compared to their control neurons. Consistently, the synaptic surface expression of GluR2, but not of GluR1, was significantly decreased in the neurons transfected with the Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi and increased in the neurons overexpressing EGFP-Tmub1/HOPS. The altered surface expression of GluR2 was speculated to be due to the altered surface-recycling of the internalized GluR2 in our recycling assay. Eventually, we found that GluR2 and glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP were coimmunoprecipitated by the anti-Tmub1/HOPS antibody from the mouse brain. Taken together, these observations show that the Tmub1/HOPS plays a role in regulating basal synaptic transmission; it contributes to maintain the synaptic surface number of the GluR2-containing AMPARs by facilitating the recycling of GluR2 to the plasma membrane.

  18. Synthesis, characterization and monoamine transporter activity of the new psychoactive substance mexedrone and its N-methoxy positional isomer, N-methoxymephedrone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Gavin; Morris, Noreen; Kavanagh, Pierce V; Power, John D; Dowling, Geraldine; Twamley, Brendan; O'Brien, John; Talbot, Brian; Walther, Donna; Partilla, John S; Baumann, Michael H; Brandt, Simon D

    2017-03-01

    3-Methoxy-2-(methylamino)-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one (mexedrone) appeared in 2015 and was advertised by UK Internet retailers as a non-controlled mephedrone derivative (2-(methylamino)-1-(4-methylphenyl)propan-1-one), which was of particular interest to countries who operate generic drugs legislation. This study describes the synthesis and analytical characterization of mexedrone and the differentiation from its isomer, N-methoxymephedrone, which was predicted to be a suitable candidate before the identity of mexedrone was revealed. A full analytical characterization is described using various chromatographic, spectroscopic and mass spectrometric platforms and X-ray crystal structure analysis. The analytical data obtained for a vendor sample were consistent with the synthesized mexedrone reference standard and analytical differentiation between the mexedrone and N-methoxymephedrone positional isomers was achieved. Furthermore, α-chloromethylmephedrone was identified as a by-product during mexedrone synthesis. All three substances were also studied for their uptake and releasing properties at dopamine transporters (DAT), norepinephrine transporters (NET) and serotonin transporters (SERT) using in vitro monoamine transporter assays in rat brain synaptosomes and compared to mephedrone. Mexedrone was a weak non-selective uptake blocker with IC 50 values in the low μM range. It was also devoid of releasing activity at DAT and NET but displayed weak releasing activity at SERT (EC 50  = 2.5 μM). The isomer N-methoxymephedrone was found to be a weak uptake blocker at DAT, NET and SERT, as well as a fully efficacious substrate-type releasing agent across all three transporters with EC 50 values in the low micromolar range. The synthesis by-product α-chloromethylmephedrone was inactive in all assays. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Functional coding variation in recombinant inbred mouse lines reveals multiple serotonin transporter-associated phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Ana M D; Airey, David C; Thompson, Brent; Zhu, Chong-Bin; Lu, Lu; Chesler, Elissa J; Erikson, Keith M; Blakely, Randy D

    2009-02-10

    The human serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) transporter (hSERT, SLC6A4) figures prominently in the etiology and treatment of many prevalent neurobehavioral disorders including anxiety, alcoholism, depression, autism, and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). Here, we use naturally occurring polymorphisms in recombinant inbred (RI) lines to identify multiple phenotypes associated with altered SERT function. The widely used mouse strain C57BL/6J, harbors a SERT haplotype defined by 2 nonsynonymous coding variants [Gly-39 and Lys-152 (GK)]. At these positions, many other mouse lines, including DBA/2J, encode, respectively, Glu-39 and Arg-152 (ER haplotype), amino acids found also in hSERT. Ex vivo synaptosomal 5-HT transport studies revealed reduced uptake associated with the GK variant, a finding confirmed by in vitro heterologous expression studies. Experimental and in silico approaches using RI lines (C57BL/6J x DBA/2J = BXD) identify multiple anatomical, biochemical, and behavioral phenotypes specifically impacted by GK/ER variation. Among our findings are several traits associated with alcohol consumption and multiple traits associated with dopamine signaling. Further bioinformatic analysis of BXD phenotypes, combined with biochemical evaluation of SERT knockout mice, nominates SERT-dependent 5-HT signaling as a major determinant of midbrain iron homeostasis that, in turn, dictates iron-regulated DA phenotypes. Our studies provide an example of the power of coordinated in vitro, in vivo, and in silico approaches using mouse RI lines to elucidate and quantify the system-level impact of gene variation.

  20. The interaction of standard oxime reactivators with hemicholinium-3 sensitive choline carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soukup, O; Kristofikova, Z; Jun, D; Tambor, V; Ripova, D; Kuca, K

    2012-08-03

    Organophosphorus poisoning manifests as a cholinergic syndrome due to an inhibition of acetylcholinesterase. It is treated symptomatically by anticholinergics and oxime reactivators are used as causal antidotes. Reactivators possess a complex mechanism of action and interact at various levels of the cholinergic transmission. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of standard oxime reactivators (HI-6, obidoxime, trimedoxime, methoxime and pralidoxime) on the hemicholinium-3 sensitive carriers, which are involved in the high-affinity choline uptake (HACU) transport, a key regulatory step in the synthesis of acetylcholine. The activity of the carriers was estimated in vitro on hippocampal synaptosomes using the substrate (3H)-choline and the competitive inhibitor (3H)-hemicholinium-3. Furthermore, the effect of the reactivators on the fluidity of hippocampal membranes was assessed. All tested compounds, except methoxime, showed an acute inhibitory effect on the carriers, however, only at μM concentrations. Trimedoxime showed the highest potency to inhibit HACU among all tested compounds (I(max) 62%, IC(50)=3 μM). All compounds, except HI-6, influenced also a membrane fluidity in the region of the hydrophilic heads of phospholipid bilayer, nevertheless, only methoxime was able to penetrate more deeply into the hydrocarbon core. We suggest that the direct interaction of oxime reactivators with the carrier protein (HI-6 and trimedoxime) and/or the changes in carrier conformation mediated by alterations in membrane fluidity (trimedoxime, obidoxime and pralidoxime) could occur here. The influence of reactivators on the carriers could be unfavorable in the case of their prolonged administration in vivo. From this point of view, the application of methoxime appears to be the best. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Autoradiographic localization of 3H-paroxetine-labeled serotonin uptake sites in rat brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Souza, E.B.; Kuyatt, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    Paroxetine is a potent and selective inhibitor of serotonin uptake into neurons. Serotonin uptake sites have been identified, localized, and quantified in rat brain by autoradiography with 3H-paroxetine; 3H-paroxetine binding in slide-mounted sections of rat forebrain was of high affinity (KD = 10 pM) and the inhibition affinity constant (Ki) values of various drugs in competing 3H-paroxetine binding significantly correlated with their reported potencies in inhibiting synaptosomal serotonin uptake. Serotonin uptake sites labeled by 3H-paroxetine were highly concentrated in the dorsal and median raphe nuclei, central gray, superficial layer of the superior colliculus, lateral septal nucleus, paraventricular nucleus of the thalamus, and the islands of Calleja. High concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in brainstem areas containing dopamine (substantia nigra and ventral tegmental area) and norepinephrine (locus coeruleus) cell bodies. Moderate concentrations of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were present in laminae I and IV of the frontal parietal cortex, primary olfactory cortex, olfactory tubercle, regions of the basal ganglia, septum, amygdala, thalamus, hypothalamus, hippocampus, and some brainstem areas including the interpeduncular, trigeminal, and parabrachial nuclei. Lower densities of 3H-paroxetine binding sites were found in other regions of the neocortex and very low to nonsignificant levels of binding were present in white matter tracts and in the cerebellum. Lesioning of serotonin neurons with 3,4-methylenedioxyamphetamine caused large decreases in 3H-paroxetine binding. The autoradiographic distribution of 3H-paroxetine binding sites in rat brain corresponds extremely well to the distribution of serotonin terminals and cell bodies as well as with the pharmacological sites of action of serotonin

  2. The subcellular and organ distribution and natural form of histidyl-proline diketopiperazine in rat brain determined by a specific radioimmunoassay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagisawa, T; Prasad, C; Peterkofsky, A

    1980-11-10

    Histidyl-proline diketopiperazine is produced in brain as a product of the metabolism of thyrotropin-releasing hormone. A number of the previously observed central nervous system and pituitary activities resulting from an exposure to thyrotropin-releasing hormone appear to involve the conversion of the releasing factor to the cyclic dipeptide. In the present study, the development of a rabbit antiserum that is highly specific for histidyl-proline diketopiperazine is described; the antiserum has essentially no capability to bind thyrotropin-releasing hormone or a number of other related peptides. The antibody can also distinguish between the natural form of the cyclic dipeptide and a diastereomer containing D-proline. A procedure for extraction, with high yield, of histidyl-proline diketopiperazine from brain is described. With the aid of the specific antiserum it was found that the preponderance of the cyclic dipeptide in rat brain is bound to high molecular weight material, mainly in the range of Mr = 70,000; histidyl-proline diketopiperazine can be disassociated from this material by boiling in salt/methanol solution. The concentration of the dipeptide in rat brain is in the range of 275 to 565 pmol/brain, approximately 2.5 times the concentrations determined for thyrotropin-releasing hormone (113 to 210 pmol/brain). A study of the subcellular distribution of histidyl-proline diketopiperazine and thyrotropin-releasing hormone suggests that the releasing factor is concentrated in synaptosomal vesicles while the diketopiperazine is not. A determination of the regional distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone and histidyl-proline diketopiperazine indicated that both peptides are found in highest concentrations in pituitary and hypothalamus, but are detectable in other areas of brain as well.

  3. A daily single dose of a novel modafinil analogue CE-123 improves memory acquisition and memory retrieval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristofova, Martina; Aher, Yogesh D; Ilic, Marija; Radoman, Bojana; Kalaba, Predrag; Dragacevic, Vladimir; Aher, Nilima Y; Leban, Johann; Korz, Volker; Zanon, Lisa; Neuhaus, Winfried; Wieder, Marcus; Langer, Thierry; Urban, Ernst; Sitte, Harald H; Hoeger, Harald; Lubec, Gert; Aradska, Jana

    2018-05-02

    Dopamine reuptake inhibitors have been shown to improve cognitive parameters in various tasks and animal models. We recently reported a series of modafinil analogues, of which the most promising, 5-((benzhydrylsulfinyl)methyl) thiazole (CE-123), was selected for further development. The present study aims to characterize pharmacological properties of CE-123 and to investigate the potential to enhance memory performance in a rat model. In vitro transporter assays were performed in cells expressing human transporters. CE-123 blocked uptake of [3H] dopamine (IC50 = 4.606 μM) while effects on serotonin (SERT) and the norepinephrine transporter (NET) were negligible. Blood-brain barrier and pharmacokinetic studies showed that the compound reached the brain and lower elimination than R-modafinil. The Pro-cognitive effect was evaluated in a spatial hole-board task in male Sprague-Dawley rats and CE-123 enhances memory acquisition and memory retrieval, represented by significantly increased reference memory indices and shortened latency. Since DAT blockers can be considered as indirect dopamine receptor agonists, western blotting was used to quantify protein levels of dopamine receptors D1R, D2R and D5R and DAT in the synaptosomal fraction of hippocampal subregions CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG). CE-123 administration in rats increased total DAT levels and D1R protein levels were significantly increased in CA1 and CA3 in treated/trained groups. The increase of D5R was observed in DG only. Dopamine receptors, particularly D1R, seem to play a role in mediating CE-123-induced memory enhancement. Dopamine reuptake inhibition by CE-123 may represent a novel and improved stimulant therapeutic for impairments of cognitive functions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Protein-energy malnutrition developing after global brain ischemia induces an atypical acute-phase response and hinders expression of GAP-43.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Shari E; Figley, Sarah A; Schreyer, David J; Paterson, Phyllis G

    2014-01-01

    Protein-energy malnutrition (PEM) is a common post-stroke problem. PEM can independently induce a systemic acute-phase response, and pre-existing malnutrition can exacerbate neuroinflammation induced by brain ischemia. In contrast, the effects of PEM developing in the post-ischemic period have not been studied. Since excessive inflammation can impede brain remodeling, we investigated the effects of post-ischemic malnutrition on neuroinflammation, the acute-phase reaction, and neuroplasticity-related proteins. Male, Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to global forebrain ischemia using the 2-vessel occlusion model or sham surgery. The sham rats were assigned to control diet (18% protein) on day 3 after surgery, whereas the rats exposed to global ischemia were assigned to either control diet or a low protein (PEM, 2% protein) diet. Post-ischemic PEM decreased growth associated protein-43, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein-25 immunofluorescence within the hippocampal CA3 mossy fiber terminals on day 21, whereas the glial response in the hippocampal CA1 and CA3 subregions was unaltered by PEM. No systemic acute-phase reaction attributable to global ischemia was detected in control diet-fed rats, as reflected by serum concentrations of alpha-2-macroglobulin, alpha-1-acid glycoprotein, haptoglobin, and albumin. Acute exposure to the PEM regimen after global brain ischemia caused an atypical acute-phase response. PEM decreased the serum concentrations of albumin and haptoglobin on day 5, with the decreases sustained to day 21. Serum alpha-2-macroglobulin concentrations were significantly higher in malnourished rats on day 21. This provides the first direct evidence that PEM developing after brain ischemia exerts wide-ranging effects on mechanisms important to stroke recovery.

  5. 2BC Non-Structural Protein of Enterovirus A71 Interacts with SNARE Proteins to Trigger Autolysosome Formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jeffrey K F; Sam, I-Ching; Verlhac, Pauline; Baguet, Joël; Eskelinen, Eeva-Liisa; Faure, Mathias; Chan, Yoke Fun

    2017-07-04

    Viruses have evolved unique strategies to evade or subvert autophagy machinery. Enterovirus A71 (EV-A71) induces autophagy during infection in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we report that EV-A71 triggers autolysosome formation during infection in human rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells to facilitate its replication. Blocking autophagosome-lysosome fusion with chloroquine inhibited virus RNA replication, resulting in lower viral titres, viral RNA copies and viral proteins. Overexpression of the non-structural protein 2BC of EV-A71 induced autolysosome formation. Yeast 2-hybrid and co-affinity purification assays showed that 2BC physically and specifically interacted with a N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment receptor (SNARE) protein, syntaxin-17 (STX17). Co-immunoprecipitation assay further showed that 2BC binds to SNARE proteins, STX17 and synaptosome associated protein 29 (SNAP29). Transient knockdown of STX17, SNAP29, and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3B (LC3B), crucial proteins in the fusion between autophagosomes and lysosomes) as well as the lysosomal-associated membrane protein 1 (LAMP1) impaired production of infectious EV-A71 in RD cells. Collectively, these results demonstrate that the generation of autolysosomes triggered by the 2BC non-structural protein is important for EV-A71 replication, revealing a potential molecular pathway targeted by the virus to exploit autophagy. This study opens the possibility for the development of novel antivirals that specifically target 2BC to inhibit formation of autolysosomes during EV-A71 infection.

  6. Neuronal nicotinic receptor agonists ameliorate spontaneous motor asymmetries and motor discoordination in a unilateral mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucinski, Aaron; Wersinger, Scott; Stachowiak, Ewa K; Corso, Thomas D; Parry, Matthew J; Zhang, Jenny; Jordan, Kristen; Letchworth, Sharon; Bencherif, Merouane; Stachowiak, Michal K

    2013-10-01

    The degeneration of the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) system underlies the motor deficits in Parkinson's disease (PD). In recent years, epidemiological reports that smokers have lower incidences of PD have brought attention to the nicotinic acetylcholine system as a potential target for novel therapeutics. Nicotine, an agonist of neuronal nicotinic receptors (NNRs), modulates functions relevant to PD via stimulation of dopaminergic transmission in the nigrostriatal pathway, particularly via activation of α6β2* and α4β2* NNRs. Recently, reduced support of DA neurons by neurotrophic growth factors has been described in PD. Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) is critical for the development and protection of adult DA neurons. In FGF-2 knockout mice and the related th-fgfr1(tk-) mouse model there is heightened sensitivity to DA neuronal oxidative neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). In the present study, FGF-deficient transgenic mice th-fgfr1(tk-) were used to analyze the effects of novel full (TC-8831) and partial (TC-8581) agonists of β2-containing nicotinic receptors on impaired motor behavior following unilateral 6-OHDA lesions. The lesions generated spontaneous (drug-naïve) turning asymmetries that correlated exponentially with the depletion of DA biomarkers in the lesioned striata. These mice also exhibited a reduced capacity to remain on the accelerating rotarod. Oral administration of TC-8831, an NNR agonist with high specificity for β2 subunits and a full agonist at producing DA release from striatal synaptosomes, attenuated unidirectional turning and improved motor coordination. In contrast, partial β2 NNR agonist TC-8581 had no effect on behaviors in this model. This study demonstrates the potential of NNR targeting-compounds to facilitate motor function in PD. © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Ca2+/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase IIα (αCaMKII) Controls the Activity of the Dopamine Transporter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, Thomas; Yang, Jae-Won; Montgomery, Therese R.; Chen, Wei-Qiang; Winkler, Marie-Therese; Sucic, Sonja; Lubec, Gert; Freissmuth, Michael; Elgersma, Ype; Sitte, Harald H.; Kudlacek, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) is a crucial regulator of dopaminergic neurotransmission, controlling the length and brevity of dopaminergic signaling. DAT is also the primary target of psychostimulant drugs such as cocaine and amphetamines. Conversely, methylphenidate and amphetamine are both used clinically in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. The action of amphetamines, which induce transport reversal, relies primarily on the ionic composition of the intra- and extracellular milieus. Recent findings suggest that DAT interacting proteins may also play a significant role in the modulation of reverse dopamine transport. The pharmacological inhibition of the serine/threonine kinase αCaMKII attenuates amphetamine-triggered DAT-mediated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP+) efflux. More importantly, αCaMKII has also been shown to bind DAT in vitro and is therefore believed to be an important player within the DAT interactome. Herein, we show that αCaMKII co-immunoprecipitates with DAT in mouse striatal synaptosomes. Mice, which lack αCaMKII or which express a permanently self-inhibited αCaMKII (αCaMKIIT305D), exhibit significantly reduced amphetamine-triggered DAT-mediated MPP+ efflux. Additionally, we investigated mice that mimic a neurogenetic disease known as Angelman syndrome. These mice possess reduced αCaMKII activity. Angelman syndrome mice demonstrated an impaired DAT efflux function, which was comparable with that of the αCaMKII mutant mice, indicating that DAT-mediated dopaminergic signaling is affected in Angelman syndrome. PMID:22778257

  8. Proteomic Analysis of Adrenocorticotropic Hormone Treatment of an Infantile Spasm Model Induced by N-Methyl-d-Aspartic Acid and Prenatal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Shang, Ai-Jia; Zou, Li-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Infantile spasms is an age-specific epileptic syndrome associated with poor developmental outcomes and poor response to nearly all traditional antiepileptic drugs except adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). We investigated the protective mechanism of ACTH against brain damage. An infantile spasm rat model induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) in neonate rats was used. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into the stress-exposed and the non-stress exposed groups, and their offspring were randomly divided into ACTH-treated spasm model, untreated spasm model, and control groups. A proteomics-based approach was used to detect the proteome differences between ACTH-treated and untreated groups. Gel image analysis was followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric protein identification and bioinformatics analysis. Prenatal stress exposure resulted in more severe seizures, and ACTH treatment reduced and delayed the onset of seizures. The most significantly up-regulated proteins included isoform 1 of tubulin β-5 chain, cofilin-1 (CFL1), synaptosomal-associated protein 25, malate dehydrogenase, N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1, annexin A3 (ANXA3), and rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA). In contrast, tubulin α-1A chain was down-regulated. Three of the identified proteins, ARHGDIA, ANXA3, and CFL1, were validated using western blot analysis. ARHGDIA expression was assayed in the brain samples of five infantile spasm patients. These proteins are involved in the cytoskeleton, synapses, energy metabolism, vascular regulation, signal transduction, and acetylation. The mechanism underlying the effects of ACTH involves the molecular events affected by these proteins, and protein acetylation is the mechanism of action of the drug treatment. PMID:23028951

  9. Proteomic analysis of adrenocorticotropic hormone treatment of an infantile spasm model induced by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid and prenatal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Wang, Juan; Zhang, Ying; Yang, Guang; Zhou, Wen-Jing; Shang, Ai-Jia; Zou, Li-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Infantile spasms is an age-specific epileptic syndrome associated with poor developmental outcomes and poor response to nearly all traditional antiepileptic drugs except adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH). We investigated the protective mechanism of ACTH against brain damage. An infantile spasm rat model induced by N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) in neonate rats was used. Pregnant rats were randomly divided into the stress-exposed and the non-stress exposed groups, and their offspring were randomly divided into ACTH-treated spasm model, untreated spasm model, and control groups. A proteomics-based approach was used to detect the proteome differences between ACTH-treated and untreated groups. Gel image analysis was followed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric protein identification and bioinformatics analysis. Prenatal stress exposure resulted in more severe seizures, and ACTH treatment reduced and delayed the onset of seizures. The most significantly up-regulated proteins included isoform 1 of tubulin β-5 chain, cofilin-1 (CFL1), synaptosomal-associated protein 25, malate dehydrogenase, N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1, annexin A3 (ANXA3), and rho GDP-dissociation inhibitor 1 (ARHGDIA). In contrast, tubulin α-1A chain was down-regulated. Three of the identified proteins, ARHGDIA, ANXA3, and CFL1, were validated using western blot analysis. ARHGDIA expression was assayed in the brain samples of five infantile spasm patients. These proteins are involved in the cytoskeleton, synapses, energy metabolism, vascular regulation, signal transduction, and acetylation. The mechanism underlying the effects of ACTH involves the molecular events affected by these proteins, and protein acetylation is the mechanism of action of the drug treatment.

  10. Differential sensitivity to detergents of actin cytoskeleton from nerve endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubí, Roger; Matas, Lluís A; Pou, Marta; Aguilera, José; Gil, Carles

    2013-11-01

    Detergent-resistant membranes (DRM), an experimental model used to study lipid rafts, are typically extracted from cells by means of detergent treatment and subsequent ultracentrifugation in density gradients, Triton X-100 being the detergent of choice in most of the works. Since lipid rafts are membrane microdomains rich in cholesterol, depletion of this component causes solubilization of DRM with detergent. In previous works from our group, the lack of effect of cholesterol depletion on DRM solubilization with Triton X-100 was detected in isolated rat brain synaptosomes. In consequence, the aim of the present work is to explore reasons for this observation, analyzing the possible role of the actin cytoskeleton, as well as the use of an alternative detergent, Brij 98, to overcome the insensitivity to Triton X-100 of cholesterol-depleted DRM. Brij 98 yields Brij-DRM that are highly dependent on cholesterol, since marker proteins (Flotillin-1 and Thy-1), as well as actin, appear solubilized after MCD treatment. Pretreatment with Latrunculin A results in a significant increase in Flotillin-1, Thy-1 and actin solubilization by Triton X-100 after cholesterol depletion. Studies with transmission electron microscopy show that combined treatment with MCD and Latrunculin A leads to a significant increase in solubilization of DRM with Triton X-100. Thus, Triton-DRM resistance to cholesterol depletion can be explained, at least partially, thanks to the scaffolding action of the actin cytoskeleton, without discarding differential effects of Brij 98 and Triton X-100 on specific membrane components. In conclusion, the detergent of choice is important when events that depend on the actin cytoskeleton are going to be studied. © 2013.

  11. Proteomic analysis of host brain components that bind to infectious particles in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipkorir, Terry; Colangelo, Christopher M; Manuelidis, Laura

    2015-09-01

    Transmissible encephalopathies (TSEs), such as Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) and scrapie, are caused by infectious agents that provoke strain-specific patterns of disease. Misfolded host prion protein (PrP-res amyloid) is believed to be the causal infectious agent. However, particles that are stripped of PrP retain both high infectivity and viral proteins not detectable in uninfected mouse controls. We here detail host proteins bound with FU-CJD agent infectious brain particles by proteomic analysis. More than 98 proteins were differentially regulated, and 56 FU-CJD exclusive proteins were revealed after PrP, GFAP, C1q, ApoE, and other late pathologic response proteins were removed. Stripped FU-CJD particles revealed HSC70 (144× the uninfected control), cyclophilin B, an FU-CJD exclusive protein required by many viruses, and early endosome-membrane pathways known to facilitate viral processing, replication, and spread. Synaptosomal elements including synapsin-2 (at 33×) and AP180 (a major FU-CJD exclusive protein) paralleled the known ultrastructural location of 25 nm virus-like TSE particles and infectivity in synapses. Proteins without apparent viral or neurodegenerative links (copine-3), and others involved in viral-induced protein misfolding and aggregation, were also identified. Human sCJD brain particles contained 146 exclusive proteins, and heat shock, synaptic, and viral pathways were again prominent, in addition to Alzheimer, Parkinson, and Huntington aggregation proteins. Host proteins that bind TSE infectious particles can prevent host immune recognition and contribute to prolonged cross-species transmissions (the species barrier). Our infectious particle strategy, which reduces background sequences by >99%, emphasizes host targets for new therapeutic initiatives. Such therapies can simultaneously subvert common pathways of neurodegeneration. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer’s-Associated Aβ Oligomers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Kyle C.; Marunde, Matthew R.; Das, Aditi; Velasco, Pauline T.; Kuhns, Benjamin D.; Marty, Michael T.; Jiang, Haoming; Luan, Chi-Hao; Sligar, Stephen G.; Klein, William L.

    2015-01-01

    Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS) tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs). AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer’s dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs). This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL)—a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer’s model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can facilitate drug

  13. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer's-Associated Aβ Oligomers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle C Wilcox

    Full Text Available Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs. AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer's dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs. This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL--a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer's model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can

  14. Nanoscale Synaptic Membrane Mimetic Allows Unbiased High Throughput Screen That Targets Binding Sites for Alzheimer's-Associated Aβ Oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Kyle C; Marunde, Matthew R; Das, Aditi; Velasco, Pauline T; Kuhns, Benjamin D; Marty, Michael T; Jiang, Haoming; Luan, Chi-Hao; Sligar, Stephen G; Klein, William L

    2015-01-01

    Despite their value as sources of therapeutic drug targets, membrane proteomes are largely inaccessible to high-throughput screening (HTS) tools designed for soluble proteins. An important example comprises the membrane proteins that bind amyloid β oligomers (AβOs). AβOs are neurotoxic ligands thought to instigate the synapse damage that leads to Alzheimer's dementia. At present, the identities of initial AβO binding sites are highly uncertain, largely because of extensive protein-protein interactions that occur following attachment of AβOs to surface membranes. Here, we show that AβO binding sites can be obtained in a state suitable for unbiased HTS by encapsulating the solubilized synaptic membrane proteome into nanoscale lipid bilayers (Nanodiscs). This method gives a soluble membrane protein library (SMPL)--a collection of individualized synaptic proteins in a soluble state. Proteins within SMPL Nanodiscs showed enzymatic and ligand binding activity consistent with conformational integrity. AβOs were found to bind SMPL Nanodiscs with high affinity and specificity, with binding dependent on intact synaptic membrane proteins, and selective for the higher molecular weight oligomers known to accumulate at synapses. Combining SMPL Nanodiscs with a mix-incubate-read chemiluminescence assay provided a solution-based HTS platform to discover antagonists of AβO binding. Screening a library of 2700 drug-like compounds and natural products yielded one compound that potently reduced AβO binding to SMPL Nanodiscs, synaptosomes, and synapses in nerve cell cultures. Although not a therapeutic candidate, this small molecule inhibitor of synaptic AβO binding will provide a useful experimental antagonist for future mechanistic studies of AβOs in Alzheimer's model systems. Overall, results provide proof of concept for using SMPLs in high throughput screening for AβO binding antagonists, and illustrate in general how a SMPL Nanodisc system can facilitate drug discovery

  15. Diphenyl diselenide elicits antidepressant-like activity in rats exposed to monosodium glutamate: A contribution of serotonin uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quines, Caroline B; Rosa, Suzan G; Velasquez, Daniela; Da Rocha, Juliana T; Neto, José S S; Nogueira, Cristina W

    2016-03-15

    Depression is a disorder with symptoms manifested at the psychological, behavioral and physiological levels. Monosodium glutamate (MSG) is the most widely used additive in the food industry; however, some adverse effects induced by this additive have been demonstrated in experimental animals and humans, including functional and behavioral alterations. The aim of this study was to investigate the possible antidepressant-like effect of diphenyl diselenide (PhSe)2, an organoselenium compound with pharmacological properties already documented, in the depressive-like behavior induced by MSG in rats. Male and female newborn Wistar rats were divided in control and MSG groups, which received, respectively, a daily subcutaneous injection of saline (0.9%) or MSG (4g/kg/day) from the 1st to 5th postnatal day. At 60th day of life, animals received (PhSe)2 (10mg/kg, intragastrically) 25min before spontaneous locomotor and forced swimming tests (FST). The cerebral cortices of rats were removed to determine [(3)H] serotonin (5-HT) uptake and Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity. A single administration of (PhSe)2 was effective against locomotor hyperactivity caused by MSG in rats. (PhSe)2 treatment protected against the increase in the immobility time and a decrease in the latency for the first episode of immobility in the FST induced by MSG. Furthermore, (PhSe)2 reduced the [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and restored Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity altered by MSG. In the present study a single administration of (PhSe)2 elicited an antidepressant-like effect and decrease the synaptosomal [(3)H] 5-HT uptake and an increase in the Na(+), K(+)-ATPase activity in MSG-treated rats. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. A Preliminary Report on Brain-Derived Extracellular Vesicle as Novel Blood Biomarkers for Sport-Related Concussions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Kawata

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to test the utility of unique panel of blood biomarkers as a means to reflect one’s recovery process after sport-related neurotrauma. We established a panel of biomarkers that reacted positive with CD81 (extracellular vesicle marker and various neuron- and glia-specific antigens [e.g., neurofilament light polypeptide (NF-L, tau, synaptosome-associated protein 25 (SNAP25, glial fibrillary acidic protein, and myelin basic protein]. We first evaluated test–retest reliabilities of brain-derived exosome markers, followed by an application of these markers in eight professional ice hockey players to detect cumulative neuronal burden from a single ice hockey season. During the season, two players were diagnosed with concussions by team physician based on an exhibition of symptoms as well as abnormality in balance and ocular motor testing. One player reached symptom-free status 7 days after the concussion, while the other player required 36 days for symptoms to completely resolve. Blood samples and clinical assessments including balance error scoring system and near point of convergence throughout recovery process were obtained. Biomarkers indicative of axonal damage, neuronal inflammation, and glial activation showed excellent test–retest reliabilities (intraclass correlation coefficient: 0.713–0.998, p’s < 0.01. There was a statistically significant increase in the NF-L marker at post-season follow-up compared to pre-season baseline (Z = −2.100, P = 0.036; however the statistical significance did not withstand Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. In concussion cases, neuronal and microglia markers notably increased after concussions, with the unique expression patterns being similar to that of concussion recovery process. These longitudinal data coupled with excellent test–retest reliabilities of novel array of blood biomarkers potentially reflect the damage in neural cell

  17. Defective lysosomal proteolysis and axonal transport are early pathogenic events that worsen with age leading to increased APP metabolism and synaptic Abeta in transgenic APP/PS1 hippocampus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torres Manuel

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Axonal pathology might constitute one of the earliest manifestations of Alzheimer disease. Axonal dystrophies were observed in Alzheimer’s patients and transgenic models at early ages. These axonal dystrophies could reflect the disruption of axonal transport and the accumulation of multiple vesicles at local points. It has been also proposed that dystrophies might interfere with normal intracellular proteolysis. In this work, we have investigated the progression of the hippocampal pathology and the possible implication in Abeta production in young (6 months and aged (18 months PS1(M146L/APP(751sl transgenic mice. Results Our data demonstrated the existence of a progressive, age-dependent, formation of axonal dystrophies, mainly located in contact with congophilic Abeta deposition, which exhibited tau and neurofilament hyperphosphorylation. This progressive pathology was paralleled with decreased expression of the motor proteins kinesin and dynein. Furthermore, we also observed an early decrease in the activity of cathepsins B and D, progressing to a deep inhibition of these lysosomal proteases at late ages. This lysosomal impairment could be responsible for the accumulation of LC3-II and ubiquitinated proteins within axonal dystrophies. We have also investigated the repercussion of these deficiencies on the APP metabolism. Our data demonstrated the existence of an increase in the amyloidogenic pathway, which was reflected by the accumulation of hAPPfl, C99 fragment, intracellular Abeta in parallel with an increase in BACE and gamma-secretase activities. In vitro experiments, using APPswe transfected N2a cells, demonstrated that any imbalance on the proteolytic systems reproduced the in vivo alterations in APP metabolism. Finally, our data also demonstrated that Abeta peptides were preferentially accumulated in isolated synaptosomes. Conclusion A progressive age-dependent cytoskeletal pathology along with a reduction of

  18. Presynaptic Dopamine D2 Receptors Modulate [3H]GABA Release at StriatoPallidal Terminals via Activation of PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin and Inhibition of AC → cAMP → PKA Signaling Cascades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jijón-Lorenzo, Rafael; Caballero-Florán, Isaac Hiram; Recillas-Morales, Sergio; Cortés, Hernán; Avalos-Fuentes, José Arturo; Paz-Bermúdez, Francisco Javier; Erlij, David; Florán, Benjamín

    2018-02-21

    Striatal dopamine D2 receptors activate the PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin-signaling pathway to modulate the neural excitability of En+ Medium-sized Spiny GABAergic neurons (MSN) through the regulation of L-type Ca 2+ channels. Presynaptic dopaminergic D2 receptors modulate GABA release at striatopallidal terminals through L-type Ca 2+ channels as well, but their signaling pathway is still undetermined. Since D2 receptors are Gi/o-coupled and negatively modulate adenylyl cyclase (AC), we investigated whether presynaptic D2 receptors modulate GABA release through the same signaling cascade that controls excitability in the striatum or by the inhibition of AC and decreased PKA activity. Activation of D2 receptors stimulated formation of [ 3 H]IP 1 and decreased Forskolin-stimulated [ 3 H]cAMP accumulation in synaptosomes from rat Globus Pallidus. D2 receptor activation with Quinpirole in the presence of L 745,870 decreased, in a dose-dependent manner, K + -induced [ 3 H]GABA release in pallidal slices. The effect was prevented by the pharmacological blockade of Gi/o βγ subunit effects with Gallein, PLC with U 73122, IP3 receptor activation with 4-APB, Calcineurin with FK506. In addition, when release was stimulated with Forskolin to activate AC, D2 receptors also decreased K + -induced [ 3 H]GABA release, an effect occluded with the effect of the blockade of PKA with H89 or stimulation of release with the cAMP analog 8-Br-cAMP. These data indicate that D2 receptors modulate [ 3 H]GABA release at striatopallidal terminals by activating the PLC → IP3 → Calcineurin-signaling cascade, the same one that modulates excitability in soma. Additionally, D2 receptors inhibit release when AC is active. Both mechanisms appear to converge to regulate the activity of presynaptic L-type Ca 2+ channels. Copyright © 2018 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The Role of Cysteine String Protein α Phosphorylation at Serine 10 and 34 by Protein Kinase Cγ for Presynaptic Maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Toshihiko; Ueyama, Takehiko; Adachi, Naoko; Yoshino, Ken-Ichi; Sotomaru, Yusuke; Uwada, Junsuke; Kaneoka, Azumi; Ueda, Taro; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2018-01-10

    Protein kinase Cγ (PKCγ) knock-out (KO) animals exhibit symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD), including dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantia nigra. However, the PKCγ substrates responsible for the survival of dopaminergic neurons in vivo have not yet been elucidated. Previously, we found 10 potent substrates in the striatum of PKCγ-KO mice. Here, we focused on cysteine string protein α (CSPα), a protein from the heat shock protein (HSP) 40 cochaperone families localized on synaptic vesicles. We found that in cultured cells, PKCγ phosphorylates CSPα at serine (Ser) 10 and Ser34. Additionally, apoptosis was found to have been enhanced by the overexpression of a phosphorylation-null mutant of CSPα, CSPα(S10A/S34A). Compared with wild-type (WT) CSPα, the CSPα(S10A/S34A) mutant had a weaker interaction with HSP70. However, in sharp contrast, a phosphomimetic CSPα(S10D/S34D) mutant, compared with WT CSPα, had a stronger interaction with HSP70. In addition, total levels of synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP) 25, a main downstream target of the HSC70/HSP70 chaperone complex, were found to have decreased by the CSPα(S10A/S34A) mutant through increased ubiquitination of SNAP25 in PC12 cells. In the striatum of 2-year-old male PKCγ-KO mice, decreased phosphorylation levels of CSPα and decreased SNAP25 protein levels were observed. These findings indicate the phosphorylation of CSPα by PKCγ may protect the presynaptic terminal from neurodegeneration. The PKCγ-CSPα-HSC70/HSP70-SNAP25 axis, because of its role in protecting the presynaptic terminal, may provide a new therapeutic target for the treatment of PD. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cysteine string protein α (CSPα) is a protein belonging to the heat shock protein (HSP) 40 cochaperone families localized on synaptic vesicles, which maintain the presynaptic terminal. However, the function of CSPα phosphorylation by protein kinase C (PKC) for neuronal cell survival remains unclear. The experiments

  20. A case of paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia which exhibited the phenotype of anxiety disorder

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    Kunii Y

    2017-08-01

    levels, and the recent advances in the molecular understanding of PKD suggested slight, but widespread alterations to the neurotransmitter systems in the brain. Keywords: paroxysmal kinesigenic dyskinesia, anxiety disorder, proline-rich transmembrane protein 2, synaptosomal-associated protein 25

  1. Long-term hippocampal glutamate synapse and astrocyte dysfunctions underlying the altered phenotype induced by adolescent THC treatment in male rats.

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    Zamberletti, Erica; Gabaglio, Marina; Grilli, Massimo; Prini, Pamela; Catanese, Alberto; Pittaluga, Anna; Marchi, Mario; Rubino, Tiziana; Parolaro, Daniela

    2016-09-01

    Cannabis use has been frequently associated with sex-dependent effects on brain and behavior. We previously demonstrated that adult female rats exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) during adolescence develop long-term alterations in cognitive performances and emotional reactivity, whereas preliminary evidence suggests the presence of a different phenotype in male rats. To thoroughly depict the behavioral phenotype induced by adolescent THC exposure in male rats, we treated adolescent animals with increasing doses of THC twice a day (PND 35-45) and, at adulthood, we performed a battery of behavioral tests to measure affective- and psychotic-like symptoms as well as cognition. Poorer memory performance and psychotic-like behaviors were present after adolescent THC treatment in male rats, without alterations in the emotional component. At cellular level, the expression of the NMDA receptor subunit, GluN2B, as well as the levels of the AMPA subunits, GluA1 and GluA2, were significantly increased in hippocampal post-synaptic fractions from THC-exposed rats compared to controls. Furthermore, increases in the levels of the pre-synaptic marker, synaptophysin, and the post-synaptic marker, PSD95, were also present. Interestingly, KCl-induced [(3)H]D-ASP release from hippocampal synaptosomes, but not gliosomes, was significantly enhanced in THC-treated rats compared to controls. Moreover, in the same brain region, adolescent THC treatment also resulted in a persistent neuroinflammatory state, characterized by increased expression of the astrocyte marker, GFAP, increased levels of the pro-inflammatory markers, TNF-α, iNOS and COX-2, as well as a concomitant reduction of the anti-inflammatory cytokine, IL-10. Notably, none of these alterations was observed in the prefrontal cortex (PFC). Together with our previous findings in females, these data suggest that the sex-dependent detrimental effects induced by adolescent THC exposure on adult behavior may rely on its

  2. GsSNAP33, a novel Glycine soja SNAP25-type protein gene: Improvement of plant salt and drought tolerances in transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nisa, Zaib-Un; Mallano, Ali Inayat; Yu, Yang; Chen, Chao; Duan, Xiangbo; Amanullah, Sikandar; Kousar, Abida; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sun, Xiaoli; Tabys, Dina; Zhu, Yanming

    2017-10-01

    The N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) superfamily, specifically the SNAP25-type proteins and t-SNAREs, have been proposed to regulate cellular processes and plant resistance mechanisms. However, little is known about the role of SNAP25-type proteins in combating abiotic stresses, specifically in wild soybean. In the current study, the isolation and functional characterization of the putative synaptosomal-associated SNAP25-type protein gene GsSNAP33 from wild soybean (Glycine soja) were performed. GsSNAP33 has a molecular weight of 33,311 Da and comprises 300 amino acid residues along with Qb-Qc SNARE domains. Multiple sequence alignment revealed the highest similarity of the GsSNAP33 protein to GmSNAP33 (91%), VrSNAP33 (89%), PvSNAP33 (86%) and AtSNAP33 (63%). Phylogenetic studies revealed the abundance of SNAP33 proteins mostly in dicotyledons. Quantitative real-time PCR assays confirmed that GsSNAP33 expression can be induced by salt, alkali, ABA and PEG treatments and that GsSNAP33 is highly expressed in the pods, seeds and roots of Glycine soja. Furthermore, the overexpression of the GsSNAP33 gene in WT Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in increased germination rates, greater root lengths, improved photosynthesis, lower electrolyte leakage, higher biomass production and up-regulated expression levels of various stress-responsive marker genes, including KINI, COR15A, P5Cs, RAB18, RD29A and COR47 in transgenic lines compared with those in WT lines. Subcellular localization studies revealed that the GsSNAP33-eGFP fusion protein was localized to the plasma membrane, while eGFP was distributed throughout whole cytoplasm of onion epidermal cells. Collectively, our findings suggest that GsSNAP33, a novel plasma membrane protein gene of Glycine soja, might be involved in improving plant responses to salt and drought stresses in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  3. Involvement of nicotinic receptors in methamphetamine- and MDMA-induced neurotoxicity: pharmacological implications.

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    Escubedo, E; Camarasa, J; Chipana, C; García-Ratés, S; Pubill, D

    2009-01-01

    During the last years, we have focused on the study of the neurotoxic effects of 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) and methamphetamine (METH) on the central nervous system (CNS) and their pharmacological prevention methods. In the process of this research, we have used a semipurified synaptosomal preparation from striatum of mice or rats as a reliable in vitro model to study reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by these amphetamine derivatives, which is well-correlated with their dopaminergic injury in in vivo models. Using this preparation, we have demonstrated that blockade of alpha7 nicotinic receptors with methyllycaconitine (MLA) prevents ROS production induced by MDMA and METH. Consequently, in vivo, MLA significantly prevents MDMA- and METH-induced neurotoxicity at dopaminergic level (mouse striatum), without affecting hyperthermia induced by these amphetamines. Additionally, when neuroprotection was assayed with memantine (MEM), a dual antagonist of NMDA and alpha7 receptors, an effective neuroprotection was obtained also ahead of serotonergic injury induced by MDMA in rats. MEM also prevents MDMA effect on serotonin transporter functionality and METH effect on dopamine transporter (DAT), suggesting that behavioral effects of these psychostimulants can also be modulated by MEM. Finally, we have demonstrated that MEM prevents the impaired memory function induced by MDMA, and also, using binding studies with radioligands, we have characterized the interaction of these substances with nicotinic receptors. Studies at molecular level showed that both MDMA and METH displaced competitively the binding of radioligands with homomeric alpha7 and heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), indicating that they can directly interact with them. In all the cases, MDMA displayed higher affinity than METH and it was higher for heteromeric than for alpha7 subtype. Pre-incubation of differentiated PC12 cells with MDMA or METH induces nAChR upregulation

  4. Coralsnake Venomics: Analyses of Venom Gland Transcriptomes and Proteomes of Six Brazilian Taxa

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    Steven D. Aird

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes of six Micrurus taxa (M. corallinus, M. lemniscatus carvalhoi, M. lemniscatus lemniscatus, M. paraensis, M. spixii spixii, and M. surinamensis were investigated, providing the most comprehensive, quantitative data on Micrurus venom composition to date, and more than tripling the number of Micrurus venom protein sequences previously available. The six venomes differ dramatically. All are dominated by 2–6 toxin classes that account for 91–99% of the toxin transcripts. The M. s. spixii venome is compositionally the simplest. In it, three-finger toxins (3FTxs and phospholipases A2 (PLA2s comprise >99% of the toxin transcripts, which include only four additional toxin families at levels ≥0.1%. Micrurus l. lemniscatus venom is the most complex, with at least 17 toxin families. However, in each venome, multiple structural subclasses of 3FTXs and PLA2s are present. These almost certainly differ in pharmacology as well. All venoms also contain phospholipase B and vascular endothelial growth factors. Minor components (0.1–2.0% are found in all venoms except that of M. s. spixii. Other toxin families are present in all six venoms at trace levels (<0.005%. Minor and trace venom components differ in each venom. Numerous novel toxin chemistries include 3FTxs with previously unknown 8- and 10-cysteine arrangements, resulting in new 3D structures and target specificities. 9-cysteine toxins raise the possibility of covalent, homodimeric 3FTxs or heterodimeric toxins with unknown pharmacologies. Probable muscarinic sequences may be reptile-specific homologs that promote hypotension via vascular mAChRs. The first complete sequences are presented for 3FTxs putatively responsible for liberating glutamate from rat brain synaptosomes. Micrurus C-type lectin-like proteins may have 6–9 cysteine residues and may be monomers, or homo- or heterodimers of unknown pharmacology. Novel KSPIs, 3× longer than any seen

  5. Distinct Localization of SNAP47 Protein in GABAergic and Glutamatergic Neurons in the Mouse and the Rat Hippocampus

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    Agnieszka Münster-Wandowski

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Synaptosomal-associated protein of 47 kDa (SNAP47 isoform is an atypical member of the SNAP family, which does not contribute directly to exocytosis and synaptic vesicle (SV recycling. Initial characterization of SNAP47 revealed a widespread expression in nervous tissue, but little is known about its cellular and subcellular localization in hippocampal neurons. Therefore, in the present study we applied multiple-immunofluorescence labeling, immuno-electron microscopy and in situ hybridization (ISH and analyzed the localization of SNAP47 in pre- and postsynaptic compartments of glutamatergic and GABAergic neurons in the mouse and rat hippocampus. While the immunofluorescence signal for SNAP47 showed a widespread distribution in both mouse and rat, the labeling pattern was complementary in the two species: in the mouse the immunolabeling was higher over the CA3 stratum radiatum, oriens and cell body layer. In contrast, in the rat the labeling was stronger over the CA1 neuropil and in the CA3 stratum lucidum. Furthermore, in the mouse high somatic labeling for SNAP47 was observed in GABAergic interneurons (INs. On the contrary, in the rat, while most INs were positive, they blended in with the high neuropil labeling. ISH confirmed the high expression of SNAP47 RNA in INs in the mouse. Co-staining for SNAP47 and pre- and postsynaptic markers in the rat revealed a strong co-localization postsynaptically with PSD95 in dendritic spines of pyramidal cells and, to a lesser extent, presynaptically, with ZnT3 and vesicular glutamate transporter 1 (VGLUT1 in glutamatergic terminals such as mossy fiber (MF boutons. Ultrastructural analysis confirmed the pre- and postsynaptic localization at glutamatergic synapses. Furthermore, in the mouse hippocampus SNAP47 was found to be localized at low levels to dendritic shafts and axon terminals of putative INs forming symmetric synapses, indicating that this protein could be trafficked to both post- and presynaptic

  6. Synaptic Tau Seeding Precedes Tau Pathology in Human Alzheimer's Disease Brain

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    Sarah L. DeVos

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is defined by the presence of intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs composed of hyperphosphorylated tau aggregates as well as extracellular amyloid-beta plaques. The presence and spread of tau pathology through the brain is classified by Braak stages and thought to correlate with the progression of AD. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have examined the ability of tau pathology to move from one neuron to the next, suggesting a “prion-like” spread of tau aggregates may be an underlying cause of Braak tau staging in AD. Using the HEK293 TauRD-P301S-CFP/YFP expressing biosensor cells as a highly sensitive and specific tool to identify the presence of seed competent aggregated tau in brain lysate—i.e., tau aggregates that are capable of recruiting and misfolding monomeric tau—, we detected substantial tau seeding levels in the entorhinal cortex from human cases with only very rare NFTs, suggesting that soluble tau aggregates can exist prior to the development of overt tau pathology. We next looked at tau seeding levels in human brains of varying Braak stages along six regions of the Braak Tau Pathway. Tau seeding levels were detected not only in the brain regions impacted by pathology, but also in the subsequent non-pathology containing region along the Braak pathway. These data imply that pathogenic tau aggregates precede overt tau pathology in a manner that is consistent with transneuronal spread of tau aggregates. We then detected tau seeding in frontal white matter tracts and the optic nerve, two brain regions comprised of axons that contain little to no neuronal cell bodies, implying that tau aggregates can indeed traverse along axons. Finally, we isolated cytosolic and synaptosome fractions along the Braak Tau Pathway from brains of varying Braak stages. Phosphorylated and seed competent tau was significantly enriched in the synaptic fraction of brain regions that did not have extensive cellular tau

  7. Surface activity of thymol: implications for an eventual pharmacological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Mariela E; Turina, Anahí del V; García, Daniel A; Nolan, M Verónica; Perillo, María A

    2004-03-15

    In the present work, we studied the ability of thymol to affect the organization of model membranes and the activity of an intrinsic membrane protein, the GABA(A) receptor (GABA(A)-R). In this last aspect, we tried to elucidate if the action mechanism of this terpene at the molecular level, involves its binding to the receptor protein, changes in the organization of the receptor molecular environment, or both. The self-aggregation of thymol in water with a critical micellar concentration approximately = 4 microM and its ability to penetrate in monomolecular layers of soybean phosphatidylcholine (sPC) at the air-water interface, even at surface pressures above the equilibrium, lateral pressure of natural bilayers were demonstrated. Thymol affected the self-aggregation of Triton X-100 and the topology of sPC vesicles. It also increased the polarity of the membrane environment sensed by the electrochromic dye merocyanine. A dipolar moment of 1.341 Debye was calculated from its energy-minimized structure. Its effect on the binding of [3H]-flunitrazepam ([3H]-FNZ) to chick brain synaptosomal membranes changed qualitatively from a tendency to the inhibition to a clear activatory regime, up on changing the phase state of the terpene (from a monomeric to a self-aggregated state). Above its CMC, thymol increased the affinity of the binding of [3H]-FNZ (K(d-control)= 2.9, K(d-thymol)= 1.7 nM) without changing the receptor density (B(max-control)= 910, B(max-thymol)= 895 fmol/mg protein). The activatory effect of thymol on the binding of [ [3H]-FNZ was observed even in the presence of the allosteric activator gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) at a concentration of maximal activity, and was blocked by the GABA antagonist bicuculline. Changes in the dipolar arrangement and in the molecular packing of GABA(A)-R environment are discussed as possible mediators of the action mechanism of thymol.

  8. A novel radioligand for glycine transporter 1: characterization and use in autoradiographic and in vivo brain occupancy studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeng Zhizhen [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)], E-mail: zhizhen_zeng@merck.com; O' Brien, Julie A. [Sleep and Psychiatric Disorders, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Lemaire, Wei [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); O' Malley, Stacey S.; Miller, Patricia J. [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Zhao Zhijian [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Wallace, Michael A. [Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, Rahway, NJ 07065 (United States); Raab, Conrad [Drug Metabolism, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Lindsley, Craig W. [Medicinal Chemistry, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States); Departments of Pharmacology and Chemistry, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Sur, Cyrille; Williams, David L. [Imaging, Merck Research Laboratories, West Point, PA 19486 (United States)

    2008-04-15

    Introduction: In an effort to develop agents to test the NMDA hypofunction hypothesis of schizophrenia, benchmark compounds from a program to discover potent, selective, competitive glycine transporter 1 (GlyT1) inhibitors were radiolabeled in order to further study the detailed pharmacology of these inhibitors and the distribution of GlyT1 in brain. We here report the in vitro characterization of [{sup 35}S](S)-2-amino-4-chloro-N-(1-(4-phenyl-1-(propylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl) ethyl)benzamide ([{sup 35}S]ACPPB), a radiotracer developed from a potent and selective non-sarcosine-derived GlyT1 inhibitor, its use in autoradiographic studies to localize (S)-2-amino-6-chloro-N-(1-(4-phenyl-1-(propylsulfonyl)piperidin-4-yl)ethyl) benzamide (ACPPB) binding sites in rat and rhesus brain and for in vivo occupancy assays of competitive GlyT1 inhibitors. Methods: Functional potencies of unlabeled compounds were characterized by [{sup 14}C]glycine uptake into JAR (human placental choriocarcinoma) cells and synaptosomes. Radioligand binding studies were performed with tissue homogenates. Autoradiographic studies were performed on tissue slices. Results: ACPPB is a potent (K{sub d}=1.9 nM), selective, GlyT1 inhibitor that, when radiolabeled with [{sup 35}S], is a well-behaved radioligand with low nondisplaceable binding. Autoradiographic studies of rat and rhesus brain slices with this ligand showed that specific binding sites were plentiful and nonhomogeneously distributed, with high levels of binding in the brainstem, cerebellar white matter, thalamus, cortical white matter and spinal cord gray matter. In vivo studies demonstrate displaceable binding of [{sup 35}S]ACPPB in rat brain tissues following iv administration of this radioligand. Conclusions: This is the first report of detailed anatomical localization of GlyT1 using direct radioligand binding, and the first demonstration that an in vivo occupancy assay is feasible, suggesting that it may also be feasible to develop

  9. A Multilevel Functional Study of a SNAP25 At-Risk Variant for Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houenou, Josselin; Boisgontier, Jennifer; Henrion, Annabelle; d'Albis, Marc-Antoine; Dumaine, Anne; Linke, Julia; Wessa, Michèle; Daban, Claire; Hamdani, Nora; Delavest, Marine; Llorca, Pierre-Michel; Lançon, Christophe; Schürhoff, Franck; Szöke, Andrei; Le Corvoisier, Philippe; Barau, Caroline; Poupon, Cyril; Etain, Bruno; Leboyer, Marion; Jamain, Stéphane

    2017-10-25

    The synaptosomal-associated protein SNAP25 is a key player in synaptic vesicle docking and fusion and has been associated with multiple psychiatric conditions, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. We recently identified a promoter variant in SNAP25 , rs6039769 , that is associated with early-onset bipolar disorder and a higher gene expression level in human prefrontal cortex. In the current study, we showed that this variant was associated both in males and females with schizophrenia in two independent cohorts. We then combined in vitro and in vivo approaches in humans to understand the functional impact of the at-risk allele. Thus, we showed in vitro that the rs6039769 C allele was sufficient to increase the SNAP25 transcription level. In a postmortem expression analysis of 33 individuals affected with schizophrenia and 30 unaffected control subjects, we showed that the SNAP25b / SNAP25a ratio was increased in schizophrenic patients carrying the rs6039769 at-risk allele. Last, using genetics imaging in a cohort of 71 subjects, we showed that male risk carriers had an increased amygdala-ventromedial prefrontal cortex functional connectivity and a larger amygdala than non-risk carriers. The latter association has been replicated in an independent cohort of 121 independent subjects. Altogether, results from these multilevel functional studies are bringing strong evidence for the functional consequences of this allelic variation of SNAP25 on modulating the development and plasticity of the prefrontal-limbic network, which therefore may increase the vulnerability to both early-onset bipolar disorder and schizophrenia. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Functional characterization of disease-associated variants is a key challenge in understanding neuropsychiatric disorders and will open an avenue in the development of personalized treatments. Recent studies have accumulated evidence that the SNARE complex, and more specifically

  10. Crystal structure of the receptor binding domain of the botulinum C-D mosaic neurotoxin reveals potential roles of lysines 1118 and 1136 in membrane interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yanfeng; Buchko, Garry W.; Qin, Ling; Robinson, Howard; Varnum, Susan M.

    2011-01-07

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C (~two-thirds) and BoNT/D (~one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 Å resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal β-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR

  11. A role for α4(non-α6)* nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in motor behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soll, Lindsey G; Grady, Sharon R; Salminen, Outi; Marks, Michael J; Tapper, Andrew R

    2013-10-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) containing either the α4 and/or α6 subunit are robustly expressed in dopaminergic nerve terminals in dorsal striatum where they are hypothesized to modulate dopamine (DA) release via acetylcholine (ACh) stimulation from cholinergic interneurons. However, pharmacological blockade of nAChRs or genetic deletion of individual nAChR subunits, including α4 and α6, in mice, yields little effect on motor behavior. Based on the putative role of nAChRs containing the α4 subunit in modulation of DA in dorsal striatum, we hypothesized that mice expressing a single point mutation in the α4 nAChR subunit, Leu9'Ala, that renders nAChRs hypersensitive to agonist, would exhibit exaggerated differences in motor behavior compared to WT mice. To gain insight into these differences, we challenged WT and Leu9'Ala mice with the α4β2 nAChR antagonist dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE). Interestingly, in Leu9'Ala mice, DHβE elicited a robust, reversible motor impairment characterized by hypolocomotion, akinesia, catalepsy, clasping, and tremor; whereas the antagonist had little effect in WT mice at all doses tested. Pre-injection of nicotine (0.1 mg/kg) blocked DHβE-induced motor impairment in Leu9'Ala mice confirming that the phenotype was mediated by antagonism of nAChRs. In addition, SKF82958 (1 mg/kg) and amphetamine (5 mg/kg) prevented the motor phenotype. DHβE significantly activated more neurons within striatum and substantia nigra pars reticulata in Leu9'Ala mice compared to WT animals, suggesting activation of the indirect motor pathway as the circuit underlying motor dysfunction. ACh evoked DA release from Leu9'Ala striatal synaptosomes revealed agonist hypersensitivity only at α4(non-α6)* nAChRs. Similarly, α6 nAChR subunit deletion in an α4 hypersensitive nAChR (Leu9'Ala/α6 KO) background had little effect on the DHβE-induced phenotype, suggesting an α4(non-α6)* nAChR-dependent mechanism. Together, these data indicate

  12. Deletion of lynx1 reduces the function of α6* nicotinic receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rell L Parker

    Full Text Available The α6 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR subunit is an attractive drug target for treating nicotine addiction because it is present at limited sites in the brain including the reward pathway. Lynx1 modulates several nAChR subtypes; lynx1-nAChR interaction sites could possibly provide drug targets. We found that dopaminergic cells from the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc express lynx1 mRNA transcripts and, as assessed by co-immunoprecipitation, α6 receptors form stable complexes with lynx1 protein, although co-transfection with lynx1 did not affect nicotine-induced currents from cell lines transfected with α6 and β2. To test whether lynx1 is important for the function of α6 nAChRs in vivo, we bred transgenic mice carrying a hypersensitive mutation in the α6 nAChR subunit (α6L9'S with lynx1 knockout mice, providing a selective probe of the effects of lynx1 on α6* nAChRs. Lynx1 removal reduced the α6 component of nicotine-mediated rubidium efflux and dopamine (DA release from synaptosomal preparations with no effect on numbers of α6β2 binding sites, indicating that lynx1 is functionally important for α6* nAChR activity. No effects of lynx1 removal were detected on nicotine-induced currents in slices from SNc, suggesting that lynx1 affects presynaptic α6* nAChR function more than somatic function. In the absence of agonist, lynx1 removal did not alter DA release in dorsal striatum as measured by fast scan cyclic voltammetry. Lynx1 removal affected some behaviors, including a novel-environment assay and nicotine-stimulated locomotion. Trends in 24-hour home-cage behavior were also suggestive of an effect of lynx1 removal. Conditioned place preference for nicotine was not affected by lynx1 removal. The results show that some functional and behavioral aspects of α6-nAChRs are modulated by lynx1.

  13. Immunohistochemical evidence suggests repeated intravesical application of botulinum toxin A injections may improve treatment efficacy of interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shie, Jia-Heng; Liu, Hsin-Tzu; Wang, Yu-Syuan; Kuo, Hann-Chorng

    2013-04-01

    D synaptosomal-associated protein also decreased after BoNT-A treatments, which confirmed the therapeutic effect of repeated BoNT-A injections. Chronic inflammation and apoptotic signalling molecules were significantly reduced after repeated BoNT-A injections in patients with IC/BPS. The IHC improvement was associated with clinical symptom improvement. Repeated BoNT-A injections are necessary to achieve a greater success rate in the treatment of IC/BPS. © 2012 BJU International.

  14. The effects of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine neurotransmission in rat brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagai, Fumiko; Nonaka, Ryouichi; Satoh Hisashi Kamimura, Kanako

    2007-03-22

    We developed a reproducible, simple, and small-scale method for determining the re-uptake and release of monoamines (dopamine, serotonin (5-HT) and norepinephrine) using rat brain synaptosomes. These assays were then applied to study the effects of different kinds of non-medically used psychoactive drugs on monoamine re-uptake and release. The phenethylamine derivatives, 4-fluoroamphetamine, 2-methylamino-3,4-methylene-dioxy-propiophenone (methylone), 1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (BDB), and N-methyl-1-(1,3-benzodioxol-5-yl)-2-butanamine (MBDB), had strong inhibitory effects on the re-uptake of dopamine, 5-HT and norepinephrine. 4-Fluoroamphetamine, methylone and BDB also strongly increased the release of the three monoamines, but MBDB increased 5-HT and norepinephrine release, but had little effect on dopamine release. However, 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenethylamine (2C-I), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-ethylphenethylamine (2C-E), 2,5-dimethoxy-4-chlorophenethylamine (2C-C), 2,4,5-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-2) and 2,4,6-trimethoxyamphetamine (TMA-6), which are methoxylated phenethylamine derivatives, slightly influenced the re-uptake and release of monoamines. Alpha-metyltryptamine (AMT), a tryptamine derivative, was one of the strongest re-uptake inhibitors and releasers of the three monoamines. The tryptamine derivative, 5-methoxy-alpha-methyltryptamine (5-MeO-AMT), also strongly inhibited re-uptake and increased the release of the three monoamines. N,N-dipropyltryptamine (DPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-diisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-DIPT), 5-methoxy-N,N-methylisopropyltryptamine (5-MeO-MIPT), and 5-methoxy-N,N-dimethyltryptamine (5-MeO-DMT) inhibited monoamine re-uptake, but had a few effects on monoamine release. 1-(3-Chlorophenyl)piperazine (3CPP) and 1-(methoxyphenyl)piperazine (4MPP), which are piperazine derivatives, inhibited monoamine re-uptake and accelerated their release. The results suggest that some designer drugs strongly act on the central nerve system to the same

  15. (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine binding as a probe for the study of adenosine uptake sites in brain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marangos, P.J.; Patel, J.; Clark-Rosenberg, R.; Martino, A.M.

    1982-07-01

    The binding of the potent adenosine uptake inhibitor (/sup 3/H)nitrobenzylthioinosine ((/sup 3/H)NBI) to brain membrane fractions was investigated. Reversible, saturable, specific, high-affinity binding was demonstrated in both rat and human brain. The KD in both was 0.15 nM with Bmax values of 140-200 fmol/mg protein. Linear Scatchard plots were routinely obtained, indicating a homogeneous population of binding sites in brain. The highest density of binding sites was found in the caudate and hypothalamus in both species. The binding site was heat labile and trypsin sensitive. Binding was also decreased by incubation of the membranes in 0.05% Triton X-100 and by treatment with dithiothreitol and iodoacetamide. Of the numerous salt and metal ions tested, only copper and zinc had significant effects on (/sup 3/H)NBI binding. The inhibitory potencies of copper and zinc were IC50 . 160 microM and 6 mM, respectively. Subcellular distribution studies revealed a high percentage of the (/sup 3/H)NBI binding sites on synaptosomes, indicating that these sites were present in the synaptic region. A study of the tissue distribution of the (/sup 3/H)NBI sites revealed very high densities of binding in erythrocyte, lung, and testis, with much lower binding densities in brain, kidney, liver, muscle, and heart. The binding affinity in the former group was approximately 1.5 nM, whereas that in the latter group was 0.15 nM, suggesting two types of binding sites. The pharmacologic profile of (/sup 3/H)NBI binding was consistent with its function as the adenosine transport site, distinct from the adenosine receptor, since thiopurines were very potent inhibitors of binding whereas adenosine receptor ligands, such as cyclohexyladenosine and 2-chloroadenosine, were three to four orders of magnitude less potent. (/sup 3/H)NBI binding in brain should provide a useful probe for the study of adenosine transport in the brain.

  16. Crystal Structure of the Receptor Binding Domain of the botulinum C-D Mosiac Neurotoxin Reveals Potential Roles of Lysines 1118 and 1136 in Membrane Interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Y Zhang; G Buchko; L Qin; H Robinson; S Varnum

    2011-12-31

    The botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) produced by different strains of the bacterium Clostridium botulinum are responsible for the disease botulism and include a group of immunologically distinct serotypes (A, B, E, and F) that are considered to be the most lethal natural proteins known for humans. Two BoNT serotypes, C and D, while rarely associated with human infection, are responsible for deadly botulism outbreaks afflicting animals. Also associated with animal infections is the BoNT C-D mosaic protein (BoNT/CD), a BoNT subtype that is essentially a hybrid of the BoNT/C ({approx}two-third) and BoNT/D ({approx}one-third) serotypes. While the amino acid sequence of the heavy chain receptor binding (HCR) domain of BoNT/CD (BoNT/CD-HCR) is very similar to the corresponding amino acid sequence of BoNT/D, BoNT/CD-HCR binds synaptosome membranes better than BoNT/D-HCR. To obtain structural insights for the different membrane binding properties, the crystal structure of BoNT/CD-HCR (S867-E1280) was determined at 1.56 {angstrom} resolution and compared to previously reported structures for BoNT/D-HCR. Overall, the BoNT/CD-HCR structure is similar to the two sub-domain organization observed for other BoNT HCRs: an N-terminal jellyroll barrel motif and a C-terminal {beta}-trefoil fold. Comparison of the structure of BoNT/CD-HCR with BoNT/D-HCR indicates that K1118 has a similar structural role as the equivalent residue, E1114, in BoNT/D-HCR, while K1136 has a structurally different role than the equivalent residue, G1132, in BoNT/D-HCR. Lysine-1118 forms a salt bridge with E1247 and may enhance membrane interactions by stabilizing the putative membrane binding loop (K1240-N1248). Lysine-1136 is observed on the surface of the protein. A sulfate ion bound to K1136 may mimic a natural interaction with the negatively changed phospholipid membrane surface. Liposome-binding experiments demonstrate that BoNT/CD-HCR binds phosphatidylethanolamine liposomes more tightly than BoNT/D-HCR.

  17. Structural basis for recognition of synaptic vesicle protein 2C by botulinum neurotoxin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoit, Roger M.; Frey, Daniel; Hilbert, Manuel; Kevenaar, Josta T.; Wieser, Mara M.; Stirnimann, Christian U.; McMillan, David; Ceska, Tom; Lebon, Florence; Jaussi, Rolf; Steinmetz, Michel O.; Schertler, Gebhard F. X.; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Capitani, Guido; Kammerer, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin A (BoNT/A) belongs to the most dangerous class of bioweapons. Despite this, BoNT/A is used to treat a wide range of common medical conditions such as migraines and a variety of ocular motility and movement disorders. BoNT/A is probably best known for its use as an antiwrinkle agent in cosmetic applications (including Botox and Dysport). BoNT/A application causes long-lasting flaccid paralysis of muscles through inhibiting the release of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine by cleaving synaptosomal-associated protein 25 (SNAP-25) within presynaptic nerve terminals. Two types of BoNT/A receptor have been identified, both of which are required for BoNT/A toxicity and are therefore likely to cooperate with each other: gangliosides and members of the synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2 (SV2) family, which are putative transporter proteins that are predicted to have 12 transmembrane domains, associate with the receptor-binding domain of the toxin. Recently, fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 (FGFR3) has also been reported to be a potential BoNT/A receptor. In SV2 proteins, the BoNT/A-binding site has been mapped to the luminal domain, but the molecular details of the interaction between BoNT/A and SV2 are unknown. Here we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of the BoNT/A receptor-binding domain (BoNT/A-RBD) in complex with the SV2C luminal domain (SV2C-LD). SV2C-LD consists of a right-handed, quadrilateral β-helix that associates with BoNT/A-RBD mainly through backbone-to-backbone interactions at open β-strand edges, in a manner that resembles the inter-strand interactions in amyloid structures. Competition experiments identified a peptide that inhibits the formation of the complex. Our findings provide a strong platform for the development of novel antitoxin agents and for the rational design of BoNT/A variants with improved therapeutic properties.

  18. Coralsnake Venomics: Analyses of Venom Gland Transcriptomes and Proteomes of Six Brazilian Taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aird, Steven D; da Silva, Nelson Jorge; Qiu, Lijun; Villar-Briones, Alejandro; Saddi, Vera Aparecida; Pires de Campos Telles, Mariana; Grau, Miguel L; Mikheyev, Alexander S

    2017-06-08

    Venom gland transcriptomes and proteomes of six Micrurus taxa ( M. corallinus , M. lemniscatus carvalhoi , M. lemniscatus lemniscatus , M. paraensis , M. spixii spixii , and M. surinamensis ) were investigated, providing the most comprehensive, quantitative data on Micrurus venom composition to date, and more than tripling the number of Micrurus venom protein sequences previously available. The six venomes differ dramatically. All are dominated by 2-6 toxin classes that account for 91-99% of the toxin transcripts. The M. s. spixii venome is compositionally the simplest. In it, three-finger toxins (3FTxs) and phospholipases A₂ (PLA₂s) comprise >99% of the toxin transcripts, which include only four additional toxin families at levels ≥0.1%. Micrurus l. lemniscatus venom is the most complex, with at least 17 toxin families. However, in each venome, multiple structural subclasses of 3FTXs and PLA₂s are present. These almost certainly differ in pharmacology as well. All venoms also contain phospholipase B and vascular endothelial growth factors. Minor components (0.1-2.0%) are found in all venoms except that of M. s. spixii . Other toxin families are present in all six venoms at trace levels (venom components differ in each venom. Numerous novel toxin chemistries include 3FTxs with previously unknown 8- and 10-cysteine arrangements, resulting in new 3D structures and target specificities. 9-cysteine toxins raise the possibility of covalent, homodimeric 3FTxs or heterodimeric toxins with unknown pharmacologies. Probable muscarinic sequences may be reptile-specific homologs that promote hypotension via vascular mAChRs. The first complete sequences are presented for 3FTxs putatively responsible for liberating glutamate from rat brain synaptosomes. Micrurus C-type lectin-like proteins may have 6-9 cysteine residues and may be monomers, or homo- or heterodimers of unknown pharmacology. Novel KSPIs, 3× longer than any seen previously, appear to have arisen in three

  19. Ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 3 in the ventral and lateral hypothalamic area of female rats: morphological characterization and functional implications

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    Kiss David S

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Based on its distribution in the brain, ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 3 (NTPDase3 may play a role in the hypothalamic regulation of homeostatic systems, including feeding, sleep-wake behavior and reproduction. To further characterize the morphological attributes of NTPDase3-immunoreactive (IR hypothalamic structures in the rat brain, here we investigated: 1. The cellular and subcellular localization of NTPDase3; 2. The effects of 17β-estradiol on the expression level of hypothalamic NTPDase3; and 3. The effects of NTPDase inhibition in hypothalamic synaptosomal preparations. Methods Combined light- and electron microscopic analyses were carried out to characterize the cellular and subcellular localization of NTPDase3-immunoreactivity. The effects of estrogen on hypothalamic NTPDase3 expression was studied by western blot technique. Finally, the effects of NTPDase inhibition on mitochondrial respiration were investigated using a Clark-type oxygen electrode. Results Combined light- and electron microscopic analysis of immunostained hypothalamic slices revealed that NTPDase3-IR is linked to ribosomes and mitochondria, is predominantly present in excitatory axon terminals and in distinct segments of the perikaryal plasma membrane. Immunohistochemical labeling of NTPDase3 and glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD indicated that γ-amino-butyric-acid- (GABA ergic hypothalamic neurons do not express NTPDase3, further suggesting that in the hypothalamus, NTPDase3 is predominantly present in excitatory neurons. We also investigated whether estrogen influences the expression level of NTPDase3 in the ventrobasal and lateral hypothalamus. A single subcutaneous injection of estrogen differentially increased NTPDase3 expression in the medial and lateral parts of the hypothalamus, indicating that this enzyme likely plays region-specific roles in estrogen-dependent hypothalamic regulatory mechanisms. Determination of

  20. Loss of endophilin-B1 exacerbates Alzheimer’s disease pathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, David B.; Kinoshita, Yoshito; Kinoshita, Chizuru; Uo, Takuma; Sopher, Bryce L.; Cudaback, Eiron; Keene, C. Dirk; Bilousova, Tina; Gylys, Karen; Case, Amanda; Jayadev, Suman; Wang, Hong-Gang; Garden, Gwenn A.

    2015-01-01

    Endophilin-B1, also known as Bax-interacting factor 1 (Bif-1, and encoded by SH3GLB1), is a multifunctional protein involved in apoptosis, autophagy and mitochondrial function. We recently described a unique neuroprotective role for neuron-specific alternatively spliced isoforms of endophilin-B1. To examine whether endophilin-B1-mediated neuroprotection could be a novel therapeutic target for Alzheimer’s disease we used a double mutant amyloid precursor protein and presenilin 1 (APPswe/PSEN1dE9) mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease and observed that expression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms declined with disease progression. To determine if this reduction in endophilin-B1 has a functional role in Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis, we crossed endophilin-B1−/− mice with APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. Deletion of endophilin-B1 accelerated disease onset and progression in 6-month-old APPswe/PSEN1dE9/endophilin-B1−/− mice, which showed more plaques, astrogliosis, synaptic degeneration, cognitive impairment and mortality than APPswe/PSEN1dE9 mice. In mouse primary cortical neuron cultures, overexpression of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms protected against amyloid-β-induced apoptosis and mitochondrial dysfunction. Additionally, protein and mRNA levels of neuron-specific endophilin-B1 isoforms were also selectively decreased in the cerebral cortex and in the synaptic compartment of patients with Alzheimer’s disease. Flow sorting of synaptosomes from patients with Alzheimer’s disease demonstrated a negative correlation between amyloid-β and endophilin-B1 levels. The importance of endophilin-B1 in neuronal function was further underscored by the development of synaptic degeneration and cognitive and motor impairment in endophilin-B1−/− mice by 12 months. Our findings suggest that endophilin-B1 is a key mediator of a feed-forward mechanism of Alzheimer’s disease pathogenesis where amyloid-β reduces neuron-specific endophilin-B1, which in turn

  1. Spermidine decreases Na⁺,K⁺-ATPase activity through NMDA receptor and protein kinase G activation in the hippocampus of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fabiano B; Mello, Carlos F; Marisco, Patricia C; Tonello, Raquel; Girardi, Bruna A; Ferreira, Juliano; Oliveira, Mauro S; Rubin, Maribel A

    2012-06-05

    Spermidine is an endogenous polyamine with a polycationic structure present in the central nervous system of mammals. Spermidine regulates biological processes, such as Ca(2+) influx by glutamatergic N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDA receptor), which has been associated with nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and cGMP/PKG pathway activation and a decrease of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in rats' cerebral cortex synaptosomes. Na(+),K(+)-ATPase establishes Na(+) and K(+) gradients across membranes of excitable cells and by this means maintains membrane potential and controls intracellular pH and volume. However, it has not been defined whether spermidine modulates Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in the hippocampus. In this study we investigated whether spermidine alters Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in slices of hippocampus from rats, and possible underlying mechanisms. Hippocampal slices and homogenates were incubated with spermidine (0.05-10 μM) for 30 min. Spermidine (0.5 and 1 μM) decreased Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity in slices, but not in homogenates. MK-801 (100 and 10 μM), a non-competitive antagonist of NMDA receptor, arcaine (0.5μM), an antagonist of the polyamine binding site at the NMDA receptor, and L-NAME (100μM), a NOS inhibitor, prevented the inhibitory effect of spermidine (0.5 μM). ODQ (10 μM), a guanylate cyclase inhibitor, and KT5823 (2 μM), a protein kinase G inhibitor, also prevented the inhibitory effect of spermidine on Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity. Spermidine (0.5 and 1.0 μM) increased NO(2) plus NO(3) (NOx) levels in slices, and MK-801 (100 μM) and arcaine (0.5 μM) prevented the effect of spermidine (0.5 μM) on the NOx content. These results suggest that spermidine-induced decrease of Na(+),K(+)-ATPase activity involves NMDA receptor/NOS/cGMP/PKG pathway. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Adenosine A₂A receptors in striatal glutamatergic terminals and GABAergic neurons oppositely modulate psychostimulant action and DARPP-32 phosphorylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Shen

    Full Text Available Adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR are located postsynaptically in striatopallidal GABAergic neurons, antagonizing dopamine D2 receptor functions, and are also located presynaptically at corticostriatal terminals, facilitating glutamate release. To address the hypothesis that these two A2AR populations differently control the action of psychostimulants, we characterized A2AR modulation of cocaine-induced effects at the level of DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75, c-Fos expression, and psychomotor activity using two lines of cell-type selective A2AR knockout (KO mice with selective A2AR deletion in GABAergic neurons (striatum-A2AR-KO mice, or with A2AR deletion in both striatal GABAergic neurons and projecting cortical glutamatergic neurons (forebrain-A2AR-KO mice. We demonstrated that striatum-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs exclusively in striatal GABAergic terminals whereas forebrain-A2AR KO mice lacked A2ARs in both striatal GABAergic and glutamatergic terminals leading to a blunted A2AR-mediated facilitation of synaptosomal glutamate release. The inactivation of A2ARs in GABAergic neurons reduced striatal DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and increased its phosphorylation at Thr-75. Conversely, the additional deletion of corticostriatal glutamatergic A2ARs produced opposite effects on DARPP-32 phosphorylation at Thr-34 and Thr-75. This distinct modulation of DARPP-32 phosphorylation was associated with opposite responses to cocaine-induced striatal c-Fos expression and psychomotor activity in striatum-A2AR KO (enhanced and forebrain-A2AR KO mice (reduced. Thus, A2ARs in glutamatergic corticostriatal terminals and in GABAergic striatal neurons modulate the action of psychostimulants and DARPP-32 phosphorylation in opposite ways. We conclude that A2ARs in glutamatergic terminals prominently control the action of psychostimulants and define a novel mechanism by which A2ARs fine-tune striatal activity by integrating GABAergic, dopaminergic and

  3. Atomoxetine affects transcription/translation of the NMDA receptor and the norepinephrine transporter in the rat brain – an in vivo study

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    Udvardi PT

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Patrick T Udvardi,1,2 Karl J Föhr,3 Carolin Henes,1,2 Stefan Liebau,2 Jens Dreyhaupt,4 Tobias M Boeckers,2 Andrea G Ludolph11Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Psychotherapy, 2Institute of Anatomy and Cell Biology, 3Department of Anaesthesiology, 4Institute of Epidemiology and Medical Biometry, University of Ulm, Ulm, GermanyAbstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is the most frequently diagnosed neurodevelopmental disorder. The norepinephrine transporter (NET inhibitor atomoxetine, the first nonstimulant drug licensed for ADHD treatment, also acts as an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR antagonist. The compound's effects on gene expression and protein levels of NET and NMDAR subunits (1, 2A, and 2B are unknown. Therefore, adolescent Sprague Dawley rats were treated with atomoxetine (3 mg/kg, intraperitoneal injection [ip] or saline (0.9%, ip for 21 consecutive days on postnatal days (PND 21–41. In humans, atomoxetine's earliest clinical therapeutic effects emerge after 2–3 weeks. Material from prefrontal cortex, striatum (STR, mesencephalon (MES, and hippocampus (HC was analyzed either directly after treatment (PND 42 or 2 months after termination of treatment (PND 101 to assess the compound's long-term effects. In rat brains analyzed immediately after treatment, protein analysis exhibited decreased levels of the NET in HC, and NMDAR subunit 2B in both STR and HC; the transcript levels were unaltered. In rat brains probed 2 months after final atomoxetine exposure, messenger RNA analysis also revealed significantly reduced levels of genes coding for NMDAR subunits in MES and STR. NMDAR protein levels were reduced in STR and HC. Furthermore, the levels of two SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor proteins, synaptophysin and synaptosomal-associated protein 25, were also significantly altered in both treatment groups. This in vivo study detected atomoxetine's effects

  4. Long-term changes in brain cholinergic system and behavior in rats following gestational exposure to lead: protective effect of calcium supplement

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    Basha Chand D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Our earlier studies showed that lactational exposure to lead (Pb caused irreversible neurochemical alterations in rats. The present study was carried out to examine whether gestational exposure to Pb can cause long-term changes in the brain cholinergic system and behavior of rats. The protective effect of calcium (Ca supplementation against Pb toxicity was also examined. Pregnant rats were exposed to 0.2% Pb (Pb acetate in drinking water from gestational day (GD 6 to GD 21. The results showed decrease in body weight gain (GD 6–21 of dams, whereas no changes were observed in offspring body weight at different postnatal days following Pb exposure. Male offspring treated with Pb showed marginal alterations in developmental landmarks such as unfolding of pinnae, lower and upper incisor eruption, fur development, eye slit formation and eye opening on postnatal day (PND 1, whereas significant alterations were found in the righting reflex (PNDs 4–7, slant board behavior (PNDs 8–10 and forelimb hang performance (PNDs 12–16. Biochemical analysis showed decrease in synaptosomal acetylcholinesterase (AChE activity and an increase in acetylcholine (ACh levels in the cortex, cerebellum and hippocampus on PND 14, PND 21, PND 28 and in the four-month age group of rats following Pb exposure. Significant deficits were also observed in total locomotor activity, exploratory behavior and open field behavior in selected age groups of Pb-exposed rats. These alterations were found to be maximal on PND 28, corresponding with the greater blood lead levels observed on PND 28. Addition of 0.02% Ca to Pb reversed the Pb-induced impairments in the cholinergic system as well as in behavioral parameters of rats. In conclusion, these data suggest that gestational exposure to Pb is able to induce long-term changes in neurological functions of offspring. Maternal Ca administration reversed these neurological effects of Pb later in life, suggesting a protective effect of

  5. Specificity of the activation of ( sup 3 H)hemicholinium-3 binding by phospholipase A2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, K.; Saltarelli, M.D.; Coyle, J.T. (Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-06-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) treatment has been shown previously to stimulate the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake system as assessed by both the specific binding of (3H)hemicholinium-3 (( 3H)HCh-3) and the uptake of (3H)choline. In the present study, the specificity of PLA2-induced stimulation upon (3H)HCh-3 binding has been examined. PLA2, as well as phospholipase C (PLC), treatment of synaptic membranes produced a dose-dependent increase in the specific binding of (3H)HCh-3 whereas neither phospholipase B nor phospholipase D had any effect. PLC-induced stimulation of (3H)HCh-3 binding resulted from a significant decrease in the Kd without a change in the maximum binding of (3H)HCh-3 binding. PLC treatment of synaptosomes resulted in an inhibition of (3H)choline uptake accompanied by an inhibition of Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase activity. In contrast to the increase of (3H)HCh-3 binding, the specific binding of both (3H)desipramine and (3H)mazindol was decreased by PLA2 treatment. After PLA2 treatment, (3H)HCh-3 binding was increased about 2.5-fold over basal levels in different regions of the brain. Electrolytic lesions of the medial septal nucleus and kainic acid-induced lesions of the striatum resulted in a marked reduction of (3H)HCh-3 binding in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively. Residual (3H)HCh-3 binding in the denervated hippocampus and lesioned striatum was increased by PLA2 treatment but remained lower than that in PLA2-treated controls. Finally, atropine-induced up-regulation of (3H)HCh-3 binding in vivo was not additive with PLA2-induced stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that PLA2 might be involved in the regulation of the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake.

  6. Specificity of the activation of [3H]hemicholinium-3 binding by phospholipase A2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, K.; Saltarelli, M.D.; Coyle, J.T.

    1989-01-01

    Phospholipase A2 (PLA2) treatment has been shown previously to stimulate the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake system as assessed by both the specific binding of [3H]hemicholinium-3 ([ 3H]HCh-3) and the uptake of [3H]choline. In the present study, the specificity of PLA2-induced stimulation upon [3H]HCh-3 binding has been examined. PLA2, as well as phospholipase C (PLC), treatment of synaptic membranes produced a dose-dependent increase in the specific binding of [3H]HCh-3 whereas neither phospholipase B nor phospholipase D had any effect. PLC-induced stimulation of [3H]HCh-3 binding resulted from a significant decrease in the Kd without a change in the maximum binding of [3H]HCh-3 binding. PLC treatment of synaptosomes resulted in an inhibition of [3H]choline uptake accompanied by an inhibition of Na+, K+-adenosine triphosphatase activity. In contrast to the increase of [3H]HCh-3 binding, the specific binding of both [3H]desipramine and [3H]mazindol was decreased by PLA2 treatment. After PLA2 treatment, [3H]HCh-3 binding was increased about 2.5-fold over basal levels in different regions of the brain. Electrolytic lesions of the medial septal nucleus and kainic acid-induced lesions of the striatum resulted in a marked reduction of [3H]HCh-3 binding in the hippocampus and the striatum, respectively. Residual [3H]HCh-3 binding in the denervated hippocampus and lesioned striatum was increased by PLA2 treatment but remained lower than that in PLA2-treated controls. Finally, atropine-induced up-regulation of [3H]HCh-3 binding in vivo was not additive with PLA2-induced stimulation. These results support the hypothesis that PLA2 might be involved in the regulation of the sodium-dependent high-affinity choline uptake

  7. Ethanol activation of protein kinase A regulates GABA-A receptor subunit expression in the cerebral cortex and contributes to ethanol-induced hypnosis

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    Sandeep eKumar

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Protein kinases are implicated in neuronal cell functions such as modulation of ion channel function, trafficking and synaptic excitability. Both protein kinase C (PKC and A (PKA are involved in regulation of γ-aminobutyric acid type A (GABA-A receptors through phosphorylation. However, the role of PKA in regulating GABA-A receptors following acute ethanol exposure is not known. The present study investigated the role of PKA in ethanol effects on GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression in the P2 synaptosomal fraction of the rat cerebral cortex. Additionally, GABA-related behaviors were also examined. Rats were administered ethanol (2.0 – 3.5 g/kg or saline and PKC, PKA and GABA-A receptor α1 subunit levels were measured by Western blot analysis. Ethanol (3.5 g/kg transiently increased GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression and PKA RIIβ subunit expression at similar time points whereas PKA RIIα was increased at later time points. In contrast, PKC isoform expression remained unchanged. Notably, the moderate ethanol dose (2.0g/kg had no effect on GABA-A α1 subunit levels although PKA RIIα and RIIβ were increased at 10 and 60 minutes, when PKC isozymes are also known to be elevated. To determine if PKA activation was responsible for the ethanol-induced elevation of GABA-A α1 subunits, the PKA antagonist H89 was administered to rats prior to ethanol exposure. H89 administration prevented ethanol-induced increases in GABA-A receptor α1 subunit expression. Moreover, increasing PKA activity intracerebroventricularly with Sp-cAMP prior to a hypnotic dose of ethanol increased ethanol-induced loss of righting reflex duration. This effect appears to be mediated in part by GABA-A receptors as increasing PKA activity also increased the duration of muscimol-induced loss of righting reflex. Overall these data suggest that PKA mediates ethanol-induced GABA-A receptor expression and contributes to ethanol behavioral effects involving GABA-A receptors.

  8. Concurrent hippocampal induction of MHC II pathway components and glial activation with advanced aging is not correlated with cognitive impairment

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    Sonntag William E

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Age-related cognitive dysfunction, including impairment of hippocampus-dependent spatial learning and memory, affects approximately half of the aged population. Induction of a variety of neuroinflammatory measures has been reported with brain aging but the relationship between neuroinflammation and cognitive decline with non-neurodegenerative, normative aging remains largely unexplored. This study sought to comprehensively investigate expression of the MHC II immune response pathway and glial activation in the hippocampus in the context of both aging and age-related cognitive decline. Methods Three independent cohorts of adult (12-13 months and aged (26-28 months F344xBN rats were behaviorally characterized by Morris water maze testing. Expression of MHC II pathway-associated genes identified by transcriptomic analysis as upregulated with advanced aging was quantified by qPCR in synaptosomal fractions derived from whole hippocampus and in hippocampal subregion dissections (CA1, CA3, and DG. Activation of astrocytes and microglia was assessed by GFAP and Iba1 protein expression, and by immunohistochemical visualization of GFAP and both CD74 (Ox6 and Iba1. Results We report a marked age-related induction of neuroinflammatory signaling transcripts (i.e., MHC II components, toll-like receptors, complement, and downstream signaling factors throughout the hippocampus in all aged rats regardless of cognitive status. Astrocyte and microglial activation was evident in CA1, CA3 and DG of intact and impaired aged rat groups, in the absence of differences in total numbers of GFAP+ astrocytes or Iba1+ microglia. Both mild and moderate microglial activation was significantly increased in all three hippocampal subregions in aged cognitively intact and cognitively impaired rats compared to adults. Neither induction of MHCII pathway gene expression nor glial activation correlated to cognitive performance. Conclusions These data demonstrate a

  9. TC299423, a Novel Agonist for Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teagan R. Wall

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available (E-5-(Pyrimidin-5-yl-1,2,3,4,7,8-hexahydroazocine (TC299423 is a novel agonist for nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs. We examined its efficacy, affinity, and potency for α6β2∗ (α6β2-containing, α4β2∗, and α3β4∗ nAChRs, using [125I]-epibatidine binding, whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, synaptosomal 86Rb+ efflux, [3H]-dopamine release, and [3H]-acetylcholine release. TC299423 displayed an EC50 of 30–60 nM for α6β2∗ nAChRs in patch-clamp recordings and [3H]-dopamine release assays. Its potency for α6β2∗ in these assays was 2.5-fold greater than that for α4β2∗, and much greater than that for α3β4∗-mediated [3H]-acetylcholine release. We observed no major off-target binding on 70 diverse molecular targets. TC299423 was bioavailable after intraperitoneal or oral administration. Locomotor assays, measured with gain-of-function, mutant α6 (α6L9′S nAChR mice, show that TC299423 elicits α6β2∗ nAChR-mediated responses at low doses. Conditioned place preference assays show that low-dose TC299423 also produces significant reward in α6L9′S mice, and modest reward in WT mice, through a mechanism that probably involves α6(non-α4β2∗ nAChRs. However, TC299423 did not suppress nicotine self-administration in rats, indicating that it did not block nicotine reinforcement in the dosage range that was tested. In a hot-plate test, TC299423 evoked antinociceptive responses in mice similar to those of nicotine. TC299423 and nicotine similarly inhibited mouse marble burying as a measure of anxiolytic effects. Taken together, our data suggest that TC299423 will be a useful small-molecule agonist for future in vitro and in vivo studies of nAChR function and physiology.

  10. Tumor necrosis factor-mediated downregulation of spinal astrocytic connexin43 leads to increased glutamatergic neurotransmission and neuropathic pain in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morioka, Norimitsu; Zhang, Fang Fang; Nakamura, Yoki; Kitamura, Tomoya; Hisaoka-Nakashima, Kazue; Nakata, Yoshihiro

    2015-10-01

    Spinal cord astrocytes are critical in the maintenance of neuropathic pain. Connexin 43 (Cx43) expressed on spinal dorsal horn astrocytes modulates synaptic neurotransmission, but its role in nociceptive transduction has yet to be fully elaborated. In mice, Cx43 is mainly expressed in astrocytes, not neurons or microglia, in the spinal dorsal horn. Hind paw mechanical hypersensitivity was observed beginning 3days after partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL), but a persistent downregulation of astrocytic Cx43 in ipsilateral lumbar spinal dorsal horn was not observed until 7days post-PSNL, suggesting that Cx43 downregulation mediates the maintenance and not the initiation of nerve injury-induced hypersensitivity. Downregulation of Cx43 expression by intrathecal treatment with Cx43 siRNA also induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Conversely, restoring Cx43 by an adenovirus vector expressing Cx43 (Ad-Cx43) ameliorated PSNL-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. The sensitized state following PSNL is likely maintained by dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission, as Cx43 siRNA-induced mechanical hypersensitivity was attenuated with intrathecal treatment of glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and CNQX, but not neurokinin-1 receptor antagonist CP96345 or the Ca(2+) channel subunit α2δ1 blocker gabapentin. The source of this dysfunctional glutamatergic neurotransmission is likely decreased clearance of glutamate from the synapse rather than increased glutamate release into the synapse. Astrocytic expression of glutamate transporter GLT-1, but not GLAST, and activity of glutamate transport were markedly decreased in mice intrathecally injected with Cx43-targeting siRNA but not non-targeting siRNA. Glutamate release from spinal synaptosomes prepared from mice treated with either Cx43-targeting siRNA or non-targeting siRNA was unchanged. Intrathecal injection of Ad-Cx43 in PSNL mice restored astrocytic GLT-1 expression. The cytokine tumor necrosis factor (TNF) has been

  11. Pharmacogenetic Associations of Antipsychotic Drug-Related Weight Gain: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jian-Ping; Lencz, Todd; Zhang, Ryan X.; Nitta, Masahiro; Maayan, Lawrence; John, Majnu; Robinson, Delbert G.; Fleischhacker, W. Wolfgang; Kahn, Rene S.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Kane, John M.; Malhotra, Anil K.; Correll, Christoph U.

    2016-01-01

    Although weight gain is a serious but variable adverse effect of antipsychotics that has genetic underpinnings, a comprehensive meta-analysis of pharmacogenetics of antipsychotic-related weight gain is missing. In this review, random effects meta-analyses were conducted for dominant and recessive models on associations of specific single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) with prospectively assessed antipsychotic-related weight or body mass index (BMI) changes (primary outcome), or categorical increases in weight or BMI (≥7%; secondary outcome). Published studies, identified via systematic database search (last search: December 31, 2014), plus 3 additional cohorts, including 222 antipsychotic-naïve youth, and 81 and 141 first-episode schizophrenia adults, each with patient-level data at 3 or 4 months treatment, were meta-analyzed. Altogether, 72 articles reporting on 46 non-duplicated samples (n = 6700, mean follow-up = 25.1wk) with 38 SNPs from 20 genes/genomic regions were meta-analyzed (for each meta-analysis, studies = 2–20, n = 81–2082). Eleven SNPs from 8 genes were significantly associated with weight or BMI change, and 4 SNPs from 2 genes were significantly associated with categorical weight or BMI increase. Combined, 13 SNPs from 9 genes (Adrenoceptor Alpha-2A [ADRA2A], Adrenoceptor Beta 3 [ADRB3], Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor [BDNF], Dopamine Receptor D2 [DRD2], Guanine Nucleotide Binding Protein [GNB3], 5-Hydroxytryptamine (Serotonin) Receptor 2C [HTR2C], Insulin-induced gene 2 [INSIG2], Melanocortin-4 Receptor [MC4R], and Synaptosomal-associated protein, 25kDa [SNAP25]) were significantly associated with antipsychotic-related weight gain (P-values antipsychotic exposure (pediatric or first episode patients) and short follow-up (1–2 mo) were associated with larger effect sizes. Individual antipsychotics did not significantly moderate effect sizes. In conclusion, antipsychotic-related weight gain is polygenic and associated with specific genetic

  12. Has active immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone any effect on testis innervation in the pig? An immunohistochemical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sienkiewicz, W; Molenaar, G J; Kaleczyc, J; Falkowski, J; Lakomy, M

    2000-08-01

    The innervation of porcine testes was studied in intact animals and in boars undergoing active immunization against gonadotrophin-releasing hormone (GnRH) by means of immunohistochemistry using antibodies to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H), vasoactive intestinal polypolypeptide (VIP), neuropeptide Y (NPY), synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Moreover, the distribution of luteinizing hormone (LH) receptors in clusters of Leydig cells was also investigated. To identify these cells easily, either the NADPH-diaphorase histochemical technique or the Mayer counter-staining procedure was applied. Differences in the distribution pattern and relative density of particular subsets of intratesticular nerve fibres were observed in immunized boars as compared to those found in the intact animals. In the testes of non-treated animals, only single TH-immunoreactive (TH-IR) nerve fibres were observed. However, many D beta H-IR nerve terminals surrounded blood vessels in the tunica albuginea and parenchyma. Very scarce VIP-IR nerves occurred only in the tunica albuginea, mainly in close vicinity to blood vessels. Immunoreactivity to NPY occurred in single nerve fibres. Immunoreactivity to SNAP-25 and PGP 9.5 was found in single nerve fibres distributed mainly in the tunica albuginea. The interstitial cells were heavily stained for LH-receptors and NADPH-diaphorase. In the testes of immunized animals, only single TH-IR nerve fibres, scattered mainly in the tunica albuginea, were observed. Some TH-IR nerve terminals were also encountered in the parenchyma of the organ, where they were always associated with blood vessels. D beta H-IR nerve fibres formed a dense network distributed throughout the testis in association with the capsule, vasculature and interstitium. Some fibres were observed to run between seminiferous tubules. VIP-IR nerve fibres were located in the neighbourhood of blood vessels in

  13. Effects of testosterone and its metabolites on aromatase-immunoreactive cells in the quail brain: relationship with the activation of male reproductive behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balthazart, J; Foidart, A; Absil, P; Harada, N

    1996-01-01

    locally formed estrogens cannot control the behavior and the aromatase synthesis in an autocrine fashion in the cells where they were formed. Multi-neuronal networks need therefore to be considered. The behavioral activation could result from the action of estrogens in ER-positive cells located in the vicinity of the ARO-ir cells where they were produced (paracrine action). Alternatively, actions that do not involve the nuclear ER could be important. Immunocytochemical studies at the electron microscope level and biochemical assays of AA in purified synaptosomes indicate the presence of aromatase in presynaptic boutons. Estrogens formed at this level could directly affect the pre-and post-synaptic membrane or could directly modulate neurotransmission namely through their metabolization into catecholestrogens (CE) which are known to be powerful inhibitors of the catechol- omicron - methyl transferase (COMT). The inhibition of COMT should increase the catecholaminergic transmission. It is significant to note, in this respect, that high levels of 2-hydroxylase activity, the enzyme that catalyzes the transformation of estrogens in CE, are found in all brain areas that contain aromatase. On the other hand, the synthesis of aromatase should also be controlled by estrogens in an indirect, transynaptic manner very reminiscent of the way in which steroids indirectly control the production of LHRH. Fibers that are immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (synthesis of dopamine), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (synthesis of norepinephrine) or vasotocine have been identified in the close vicinity of ARO-ir cells in the POM and retrograde tracing has identified the origin of the dopaminergic and noradrenergic innervation of these areas. A few preliminary physiological experiments suggest that these catecholaminergic inputs regulate AA and presumably synthesis.