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Sample records for synaptic ubiquitin levels

  1. Role of the ubiquitin ligase E6AP/UBE3A in controlling levels of the synaptic protein Arc

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    Kühnle, Simone; Mothes, Benedikt; Matentzoglu, Konstantin; Scheffner, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Inactivation of the ubiquitin ligase E6 associated protein (E6AP) encoded by the UBE3A gene has been associated with development of the Angelman syndrome. Recently, it was reported that in mice, loss of E6AP expression results in increased levels of the synaptic protein Arc and a concomitant impaired synaptic function, providing an explanation for some phenotypic features of Angelman syndrome patients. Accordingly, E6AP has been shown to negatively regulate activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) and it has been suggested that E6AP targets Arc for ubiquitination and degradation. In our study, we provide evidence that Arc is not a direct substrate for E6AP and binds only weakly to E6AP, if at all. Furthermore, we show that down-regulation of E6AP expression stimulates estradiol-induced transcription of the Arc gene. Thus, we propose that Arc protein levels are controlled by E6AP at the transcriptional rather than at the posttranslational level. PMID:23671107

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL regulates synaptic ApoER2 levels and is important for plasticity and learning.

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    Gao, Jie; Marosi, Mate; Choi, Jinkuk; Achiro, Jennifer M; Kim, Sangmok; Li, Sandy; Otis, Klara; Martin, Kelsey C; Portera-Cailliau, Carlos; Tontonoz, Peter

    2017-09-11

    Neuronal ApoE receptors are linked to learning and memory, but the pathways governing their abundance, and the mechanisms by which they affect the function of neural circuits are incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate that the E3 ubiquitin ligase IDOL determines synaptic ApoER2 protein levels in response to neuronal activation and regulates dendritic spine morphogenesis and plasticity. IDOL-dependent changes in ApoER2 abundance modulate dendritic filopodia initiation and synapse maturation. Loss of IDOL in neurons results in constitutive overexpression of ApoER2 and is associated with impaired activity-dependent structural remodeling of spines and defective LTP in primary neuron cultures and hippocampal slices. IDOL-deficient mice show profound impairment in experience-dependent reorganization of synaptic circuits in the barrel cortex, as well as diminished spatial and associative learning. These results identify control of lipoprotein receptor abundance by IDOL as a post-transcriptional mechanism underlying the structural and functional plasticity of synapses and neural circuits.

  3. Ubiquitination-dependent mechanisms regulate synaptic growth and function.

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    DiAntonio, A; Haghighi, A P; Portman, S L; Lee, J D; Amaranto, A M; Goodman, C S

    2001-07-26

    The covalent attachment of ubiquitin to cellular proteins is a powerful mechanism for controlling protein activity and localization. Ubiquitination is a reversible modification promoted by ubiquitin ligases and antagonized by deubiquitinating proteases. Ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms regulate many important processes including cell-cycle progression, apoptosis and transcriptional regulation. Here we show that ubiquitin-dependent mechanisms regulate synaptic development at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction (NMJ). Neuronal overexpression of the deubiquitinating protease fat facets leads to a profound disruption of synaptic growth control; there is a large increase in the number of synaptic boutons, an elaboration of the synaptic branching pattern, and a disruption of synaptic function. Antagonizing the ubiquitination pathway in neurons by expression of the yeast deubiquitinating protease UBP2 (ref. 5) also produces synaptic overgrowth and dysfunction. Genetic interactions between fat facets and highwire, a negative regulator of synaptic growth that has structural homology to a family of ubiquitin ligases, suggest that synaptic development may be controlled by the balance between positive and negative regulators of ubiquitination.

  4. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway and Synaptic Plasticity

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    Hegde, Ashok N.

    2010-01-01

    Proteolysis by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) has emerged as a new molecular mechanism that controls wide-ranging functions in the nervous system, including fine-tuning of synaptic connections during development and synaptic plasticity in the adult organism. In the UPP, attachment of a small protein, ubiquitin, tags the substrates for…

  5. Ubiquitin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther-Jensen, T.; Simonsen, A. H.; Budtz-Jorgensen, E.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Finding early and dynamic biomarkers in Huntington's disease is a key to understanding the early pathology of Huntington's disease and potentially to tracking disease progression. This would benefit the future evaluation of potential neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies......, as well as aid in identifying an optimal time point for initiating a potential therapeutic intervention. METHODS: This explorative proteomics study evaluated cerebrospinal fluid from 94 Huntington's disease gene-expansion carriers (39 premanifest and 55 manifest) and 27 Huntington's disease gene...... and controls. One of them identified as ubiquitin was shown to be dependent on the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale Total Functional Capacity, a pseudo-measure of disease severity (P = 0.001), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (0.04) in manifest and CAG-age product score (P = 0.019) in all gene...

  6. Mechanisms of glycine release, which build up synaptic and extrasynaptic glycine levels: the role of synaptic and non-synaptic glycine transporters.

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    Harsing, Laszlo G; Matyus, Peter

    2013-04-01

    Glycine is an amino acid neurotransmitter that is involved in both inhibitory and excitatory neurochemical transmission in the central nervous system. The role of glycine in excitatory neurotransmission is related to its coagonist action at glutamatergic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. The glycine levels in the synaptic cleft rise many times higher during synaptic activation assuring that glycine spills over into the extrasynaptic space. Another possible origin of extrasynaptic glycine is the efflux of glycine occurring from astrocytes associated with glutamatergic synapses. The release of glycine from neuronal or glial origins exhibits several differences compared to that of biogenic amines or other amino acid neurotransmitters. These differences appear in an external Ca(2+)- and temperature-dependent manner, conferring unique characteristics on glycine as a neurotransmitter. Glycine transporter type-1 at synapses may exhibit neural and glial forms and plays a role in controlling synaptic glycine levels and the spill over rate of glycine from the synaptic cleft into the extrasynaptic biophase. Non-synaptic glycine transporter type-1 regulates extrasynaptic glycine concentrations, either increasing or decreasing them depending on the reverse or normal mode operation of the carrier molecule. While we can, at best, only estimate synaptic glycine levels at rest and during synaptic activation, glycine concentrations are readily measurable via brain microdialysis technique applied in the extrasynaptic space. The non-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor may obtain glycine for activation following its spill over from highly active synapses or from its release mediated by the reverse operation of non-synaptic glycine transporter-1. The sensitivity of non-synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors to glutamate and glycine is many times higher than that of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors making the former type of receptor the primary target for drug action. Synaptic

  7. ρ0 Cells Feature De-Ubiquitination of SLC Transporters and Increased Levels and Fluxes of Amino Acids

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    André Bordinassi Medina

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Solute carrier (SLC transporters are a diverse group of membrane transporter proteins that regulate the cellular flux and distribution of endogenous and xenobiotic compounds. Post-translational modifications (PTMs, such as ubiquitination, have recently emerged as one of the major regulatory mechanisms in protein function and localization. Previously, we showed that SLC amino acid transporters were on average 6-fold de-ubiquitinated and increased amino acid levels were detected in ρ0 cells (lacking mitochondrial DNA, mtDNA compared to parental cells. Here, we elucidated the altered functionality of SLC transporters and their dynamic ubiquitination status by measuring the uptake of several isotopically labeled amino acids in both human osteosarcoma 143B.TK- and ρ0 cells. Our pulse chase analysis indicated that de-ubiquitinated amino acid transporters in ρ0 cells were accompanied by an increased transport rate, which leads to higher levels of amino acids in the cell. Finding SLC transport enhancers is an aim of the pharmaceutical industry in order to compensate for loss of function mutations in these genes. Thus, the ubiquitination status of SLC transporters could be an indicator for their functionality, but evidence for a direct connection between de-ubiquitination and transporter activity has to be further elucidated.

  8. The SOCS2 ubiquitin ligase complex regulates growth hormone receptor levels.

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    Mattias Vesterlund

    Full Text Available Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness to GH is under regulatory control to avoid excessive and off-target effects upon GHR activation. The suppressor of cytokine signalling 2 (SOCS is a key regulator of GHR sensitivity. This is clearly shown in mice where the SOCS2 gene has been inactivated, which show 30-40% increase in body length, a phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated that SOCS2 is part of a multimeric complex with intrinsic ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutational analysis shows that the interaction with Elongin B/C controls SOCS2 protein turnover and affects its molecular activity. Increased GHR levels were observed in livers from SOCS2⁻/⁻ mice and in the absence of SOCS2 in in vitro experiments. We showed that SOCS2 regulates cellular GHR levels through direct ubiquitination and in a proteasomally dependent manner. We also confirmed the importance of the SOCS-box for the proper function of SOCS2. Finally, we identified two phosphotyrosine residues in the GHR to be responsible for the interaction with SOCS2, but only Y487 to account for the effects of SOCS2. The demonstration that SOCS2 is an ubiquitin ligase for the GHR unveils the molecular basis for its physiological actions.

  9. Novel E3 ubiquitin ligases that regulate histone protein levels in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Rakesh Kumar Singh

    Full Text Available Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3

  10. The SOCS2 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Growth Hormone Receptor Levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterlund, Mattias; Zadjali, Fahad; Persson, Torbjörn

    2011-01-01

    Growth Hormone is essential for the regulation of growth and the homeostatic control of intermediary metabolism. GH actions are mediated by the Growth Hormone Receptor; a member of the cytokine receptor super family that signals chiefly through the JAK2/STAT5 pathway. Target tissue responsiveness......, a phenotype that is dependent on endogenous GH secretion. SOCS2 is a GH-stimulated, STAT5b-regulated gene that acts in a negative feedback loop to downregulate GHR signalling. Since the biochemical basis for these actions is poorly understood, we studied the molecular function of SOCS2. We demonstrated...... of SOCS2 in in vitro experiments. We showed that SOCS2 regulates cellular GHR levels through direct ubiquitination and in a proteasomally dependent manner. We also confirmed the importance of the SOCS-box for the proper function of SOCS2. Finally, we identified two phosphotyrosine residues in the GHR...

  11. Linear ubiquitination in immunity.

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    Shimizu, Yutaka; Taraborrelli, Lucia; Walczak, Henning

    2015-07-01

    Linear ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification recently discovered to be crucial for innate and adaptive immune signaling. The function of linear ubiquitin chains is regulated at multiple levels: generation, recognition, and removal. These chains are generated by the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC), the only known ubiquitin E3 capable of forming the linear ubiquitin linkage de novo. LUBAC is not only relevant for activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in various signaling pathways, but importantly, it also regulates cell death downstream of immune receptors capable of inducing this response. Recognition of the linear ubiquitin linkage is specifically mediated by certain ubiquitin receptors, which is crucial for translation into the intended signaling outputs. LUBAC deficiency results in attenuated gene activation and increased cell death, causing pathologic conditions in both, mice, and humans. Removal of ubiquitin chains is mediated by deubiquitinases (DUBs). Two of them, OTULIN and CYLD, are constitutively associated with LUBAC. Here, we review the current knowledge on linear ubiquitination in immune signaling pathways and the biochemical mechanisms as to how linear polyubiquitin exerts its functions distinctly from those of other ubiquitin linkage types. © 2015 The Authors. Immunological Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Epsin 1 Promotes Synaptic Growth by Enhancing BMP Signal Levels in Motoneuron Nuclei.

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    Phillip A Vanlandingham

    Full Text Available Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP retrograde signaling is crucial for neuronal development and synaptic plasticity. However, how the BMP effector phospho-Mother against decapentaplegic (pMad is processed following receptor activation remains poorly understood. Here we show that Drosophila Epsin1/Liquid facets (Lqf positively regulates synaptic growth through post-endocytotic processing of pMad signaling complex. Lqf and the BMP receptor Wishful thinking (Wit interact genetically and biochemically. lqf loss of function (LOF reduces bouton number whereas overexpression of lqf stimulates bouton growth. Lqf-stimulated synaptic overgrowth is suppressed by genetic reduction of wit. Further, synaptic pMad fails to accumulate inside the motoneuron nuclei in lqf mutants and lqf suppresses synaptic overgrowth in spinster (spin mutants with enhanced BMP signaling by reducing accumulation of nuclear pMad. Interestingly, lqf mutations reduce nuclear pMad levels without causing an apparent blockage of axonal transport itself. Finally, overexpression of Lqf significantly increases the number of multivesicular bodies (MVBs in the synapse whereas lqf LOF reduces MVB formation, indicating that Lqf may function in signaling endosome recycling or maturation. Based on these observations, we propose that Lqf plays a novel endosomal role to ensure efficient retrograde transport of BMP signaling endosomes into motoneuron nuclei.

  13. A short motif in Arabidopsis CDK inhibitor ICK1 decreases the protein level, probably through a ubiquitin-independent mechanism.

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    Li, Qin; Shi, Xianzong; Ye, Shengjian; Wang, Sheng; Chan, Ron; Harkness, Troy; Wang, Hong

    2016-09-01

    The ICK/KRP family of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors modulates the activity of plant CDKs through protein binding. Previous work has shown that changing the levels of ICK/KRP proteins by overexpression or downregulation affects cell proliferation and plant growth, and also that the ubiquitin proteasome system is involved in degradation of ICK/KRPs. We show in this study that the region encompassing amino acids 21 to 40 is critical for ICK1 levels in both Arabidopsis and yeast. To determine how degradation of ICK1 is controlled, we analyzed the accumulation of hemagglutinin (HA) epitope-tagged ICK1 proteins in yeast mutants defective for two ubiquitin E3 ligases. The highest level of HA-ICK1 protein was observed when both the N-terminal 1-40 sequence was removed and the SCF (SKP1-Cullin1-F-box complex) function disrupted, suggesting the involvement of both SCF-dependent and SCF-independent mechanisms in the degradation of ICK1 in yeast. A short motif consisting of residues 21-30 is sufficient to render green fluorescent protein (GFP) unstable in plants and had a similar effect in plants regardless of whether it was fused to the N-terminus or C-terminus of GFP. Furthermore, results from a yeast ubiquitin receptor mutant rpn10Δ indicate that protein ubiquitination is not critical in the degradation of GFP-ICK1(1-40) in yeast. These results thus identify a protein-destabilizing sequence motif that does not contain a typical ubiquitination residue, suggesting that it probably functions through an SCF-independent mechanism. © 2016 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. StUbEx PLUS-A Modified Stable Tagged Ubiquitin Exchange System for Peptide Level Purification and In-Depth Mapping of Ubiquitination Sites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Olsen, Louise C B; Hansen, Sten V F

    2018-01-01

    Modulation of protein activities by reversible post-translational modifications (PTMs) is a major molecular mechanism involved in the control of virtually all cellular processes. One of these PTMs is ubiquitination, which regulates key processes including protein degradation, cell cycle, DNA damage...... for exchanging the endogenous ubiquitin with an epitope-tagged version, we created a modified system, StUbEx PLUS, which allows precise mapping of ubiquitination sites by mass spectrometry. Application of StUbEx PLUS to U2OS cells treated with proteasomal inhibitors resulted in the identification of 41 589 sites...

  15. Breaking It Down: The Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Neuronal Morphogenesis

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    Andrew M. Hamilton

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS is most widely known for its role in intracellular protein degradation; however, in the decades since its discovery, ubiquitination has been associated with the regulation of a wide variety of cellular processes. The addition of ubiquitin tags, either as single moieties or as polyubiquitin chains, has been shown not only to mediate degradation by the proteasome and the lysosome, but also to modulate protein function, localization, and endocytosis. The UPS plays a particularly important role in neurons, where local synthesis and degradation work to balance synaptic protein levels at synapses distant from the cell body. In recent years, the UPS has come under increasing scrutiny in neurons, as elements of the UPS have been found to regulate such diverse neuronal functions as synaptic strength, homeostatic plasticity, axon guidance, and neurite outgrowth. Here we focus on recent advances detailing the roles of the UPS in regulating the morphogenesis of axons, dendrites, and dendritic spines, with an emphasis on E3 ubiquitin ligases and their identified regulatory targets.

  16. DFsn collaborates with Highwire to down-regulate the Wallenda/DLK kinase and restrain synaptic terminal growth

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    DiAntonio Aaron

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The growth of new synapses shapes the initial formation and subsequent rearrangement of neural circuitry. Genetic studies have demonstrated that the ubiquitin ligase Highwire restrains synaptic terminal growth by down-regulating the MAP kinase kinase kinase Wallenda/dual leucine zipper kinase (DLK. To investigate the mechanism of Highwire action, we have identified DFsn as a binding partner of Highwire and characterized the roles of DFsn in synapse development, synaptic transmission, and the regulation of Wallenda/DLK kinase abundance. Results We identified DFsn as an F-box protein that binds to the RING-domain ubiquitin ligase Highwire and that can localize to the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. Loss-of-function mutants for DFsn have a phenotype that is very similar to highwire mutants – there is a dramatic overgrowth of synaptic termini, with a large increase in the number of synaptic boutons and branches. In addition, synaptic transmission is impaired in DFsn mutants. Genetic interactions between DFsn and highwire mutants indicate that DFsn and Highwire collaborate to restrain synaptic terminal growth. Finally, DFsn regulates the levels of the Wallenda/DLK kinase, and wallenda is necessary for DFsn-dependent synaptic terminal overgrowth. Conclusion The F-box protein DFsn binds the ubiquitin ligase Highwire and is required to down-regulate the levels of the Wallenda/DLK kinase and restrain synaptic terminal growth. We propose that DFsn and Highwire participate in an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitin ligase complex whose substrates regulate the structure and function of synapses.

  17. The role of 19S proteasome associated deubiquitinases in activity-dependent hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

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    Yun, Di; Zhuang, Yinghan; Kreutz, Michael R; Behnisch, Thomas

    2018-01-31

    Posttranslational modification and degradation of proteins by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is crucial to synaptic transmission. It is well established that 19S proteasome associated deubiquitinases (DUBs) reverse the process of ubiquitination by removing ubiquitin from their substrates. However, their potential contribution to hippocampal synaptic plasticity has not been addressed in detail. Here, we report that inhibition of the 19S proteasome associated DUBs, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase 5 (UCHL5) and ubiquitin-specific peptidase 14 (USP14) by b-AP15 results in an accumulation of polyubiquitinated proteins and a reduction of monomeric ubiquitin without overt effects on 26S proteasome activity. b-AP15 led to a suppression of mTOR-p70S6K signaling and an increase in levels of p-p38 MAPK, two pathways essentially involved in establishing various forms of activity-dependent plasticity. Additionally, b-AP15 impaired the induction of late-phase long-term potentiation (L-LTP), induced the transformation of mGluR-mediated protein synthesis-independent long-term depression (early-LTD) to L-LTD and promoted heterosynaptic stabilization through synaptic tagging/capture (STC) in the hippocampal CA1 region of mice. The activity of 19S proteasome associated DUBs was also required for the enhancement of short-term potentiation (STP) induced by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Altogether, these results indicate an essential role of 19S proteasome associated DUBs in regulating activity-dependent hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Ubiquitination In Plant Nutrient Utilisation

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    Gary eYates

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin is well established as a major modifier of signaling in eukaryotes. However the extent to which plants rely on ubiquitin for regulating nutrient uptake is still in its infancy. The main characteristic of ubiquitination is the conjugation of ubiquitin onto lysine residues of acceptor proteins. In most cases the targeted protein is rapidly degraded by the 26S proteasome, the major proteolysis machinery in eukaryotic cells. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome System is responsible for removing most abnormal peptides and short-lived cellular regulators, which, in turn, control many processes. This allows cells to respond rapidly to intracellular signals and changing environmental conditions. This perspective will discuss how plants utilize ubiquitin conjugation for sensing environmental nutrient levels. We will highlight recent advances in understanding how ubiquitin aids nutrient homeostasis by affecting the trafficking of membrane bound transporters. Given the overrepresentation of genes encoding ubiquitin-metabolizing enzymes in plants, intracellular signaling events regulated by ubiquitin that lead to transcriptional responses due to nutrient starvation is an under explored area ripe for new discoveries.

  19. Is cold the new hot? Elevated ubiquitin-conjugated protein levels in tissues of Antarctic fish as evidence for cold-denaturation of proteins in vivo.

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    Todgham, Anne E; Hoaglund, Elizabeth A; Hofmann, Gretchen E

    2007-11-01

    Levels of ubiquitin (Ub)-conjugated proteins, as an index of misfolded or damaged proteins, were measured in notothenioid fishes, with both Antarctic (Trematomus bernacchii, T. pennellii, Pagothenia borchgrevinki) and non-Antarctic (Notothenia angustata, Bovichtus variegatus) distributions, as well as non-notothenioid fish from the Antarctic (Lycodichthys dearborni, Family Zoarcidae) and New Zealand (Bellapiscis medius, Family Tripterygiidae), in an effort to better understand the effect that inhabiting a sub-zero environment has on maintaining the integrity of the cellular protein pool. Overall, levels of Ub-conjugated proteins in cold-adapted Antarctic fishes were significantly higher than New Zealand fishes in gill, liver, heart and spleen tissues suggesting that life at sub-zero temperatures impacts protein homeostasis. The highest tissue levels of ubiquitinated proteins were found in the spleen of all fish. Ub conjugate levels in the New Zealand N. angustata, more closely resembled levels measured in other Antarctic fishes than levels measured in other New Zealand species, likely reflecting their recent shared ancestry with Antarctic notothenioids.

  20. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation effectively facilitates spatial cognition and synaptic plasticity associated with increasing the levels of BDNF and synaptic proteins in Wistar rats.

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    Shang, Yingchun; Wang, Xin; Shang, Xueliang; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Zhipeng; Yin, Tao; Zhang, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is a non-invasive technique, by which cognitive deficits can be alleviated. Furthermore, rTMS may facilitate learning and memory. However, its underlying mechanism is still little known. The aim of this study was to investigate if the facilitation of spatial cognition and synaptic plasticity, induced by rTMS, is regulated by enhancing pre- and postsynaptic proteins in normal rats. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed to examine the spatial cognition. The synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and depotentiation (DEP), presynaptic plasticity paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), from the hippocampal Schaffer collaterals to CA1 region was subsequently measured using in vivo electrophysiological techniques. The expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), presynaptic protein synaptophysin (SYP) and postsynaptic protein NR2B were measured by Western blot. Our data show that the spatial learning/memory and reversal learning/memory in rTMS rats were remarkably enhanced compared to that in the Sham group. Furthermore, LTP and DEP as well as PPF were effectively facilitated by 5Hz-rTMS. Additionally, the expressions of BDNF, SYP and NR2B were significantly increased via magnetic stimulation. The results suggest that rTMS considerably increases the expressions of BDNF, postsynaptic protein NR2B and presynaptic protein SYP, and thereby significantly enhances the synaptic plasticity and spatial cognition in normal animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of stevia on synaptic plasticity and NADPH oxidase level of CNS in conditions of metabolic disorders caused by fructose.

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    Chavushyan, V A; Simonyan, K V; Simonyan, R M; Isoyan, A S; Simonyan, G M; Babakhanyan, M A; Hovhannisyian, L E; Nahapetyan, Kh H; Avetisyan, L G; Simonyan, M A

    2017-12-19

    isoforms isolated from the central nervous system tissue (amygdala, hippocampus, spinal cord) was revealed. Stevia exhibits an antistress, membrane-stabilizing role reducing the level of total fractions of NOX isoforms from central nervous system tissues and regulates NADPH-dependent O 2 - -producing activity. Generally, in condition of metabolic disorders caused by intensive consumption of dietary fructose Stevia leaves contributes to the control of neuronal synaptic plasticity possibly influencing the conjugated NOX-specific targets.

  2. Isolation and functional characterization of a cotton ubiquitination-related promoter and 5'UTR that drives high levels of expression in root and flower tissues.

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    Viana, Antonio A B; Fragoso, Rodrigo R; Guimarães, Luciane M; Pontes, Naiara; Oliveira-Neto, Osmundo B; Artico, Sinara; Nardeli, Sarah M; Alves-Ferreira, Marcio; Batista, João A N; Silva, Maria C M; Grossi-de-Sa, Maria F

    2011-11-24

    Cotton (Gossypium spp.) is an important crop worldwide that provides raw material to 40% of the textile fiber industry. Important traits have been studied aiming the development of genetically modified crops including resistance to insect and diseases, and tolerance to drought, cold and herbicide. Therefore, the characterization of promoters and regulatory regions is also important to achieve high gene expression and/or a specific expression pattern. Commonly, genes involved in ubiquitination pathways are highly and differentially expressed. In this study, we analyzed the expression of a cotton ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) family member with no previous characterization. Nucleotide analysis revealed high identity with cotton E2 homologues. Multiple alignment showed a premature stop codon, which prevents the encoding of the conserved cysteine residue at the E2 active site, and an intron that is spliced in E2 homologues, but not in GhGDRP85. The GhGDRP85 gene is highly expressed in different organs of cotton plants, and has high transcript levels in roots. Its promoter (uceApro2) and the 5'UTR compose a regulatory region named uceA1.7, and were isolated from cotton and studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. uceA1.7 shows strong expression levels, equaling or surpassing the expression levels of CaMV35S. The uceA1.7 regulatory sequence drives GUS expression 7-fold higher in flowers, 2-fold in roots and at similar levels in leaves and stems. GUS expression levels are decreased 7- to 15-fold when its 5'UTR is absent in uceApro2. uceA1.7 is a strong constitutive regulatory sequence composed of a promoter (uceApro2) and its 5'UTR that will be useful in genetic transformation of dicots, having high potential to drive high levels of transgene expression in crops, particularly for traits desirable in flower and root tissues.

  3. Isolation and functional characterization of a cotton ubiquitination-related promoter and 5'UTR that drives high levels of expression in root and flower tissues

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    Viana Antonio AB

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cotton (Gossypium spp. is an important crop worldwide that provides raw material to 40% of the textile fiber industry. Important traits have been studied aiming the development of genetically modified crops including resistance to insect and diseases, and tolerance to drought, cold and herbicide. Therefore, the characterization of promoters and regulatory regions is also important to achieve high gene expression and/or a specific expression pattern. Commonly, genes involved in ubiquitination pathways are highly and differentially expressed. In this study, we analyzed the expression of a cotton ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2 family member with no previous characterization. Results Nucleotide analysis revealed high identity with cotton E2 homologues. Multiple alignment showed a premature stop codon, which prevents the encoding of the conserved cysteine residue at the E2 active site, and an intron that is spliced in E2 homologues, but not in GhGDRP85. The GhGDRP85 gene is highly expressed in different organs of cotton plants, and has high transcript levels in roots. Its promoter (uceApro2 and the 5'UTR compose a regulatory region named uceA1.7, and were isolated from cotton and studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. uceA1.7 shows strong expression levels, equaling or surpassing the expression levels of CaMV35S. The uceA1.7 regulatory sequence drives GUS expression 7-fold higher in flowers, 2-fold in roots and at similar levels in leaves and stems. GUS expression levels are decreased 7- to 15-fold when its 5'UTR is absent in uceApro2. Conclusions uceA1.7 is a strong constitutive regulatory sequence composed of a promoter (uceApro2 and its 5'UTR that will be useful in genetic transformation of dicots, having high potential to drive high levels of transgene expression in crops, particularly for traits desirable in flower and root tissues.

  4. Fibroblast Growth Factor-21 (FGF21) Regulates Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) Levels in Cells via the E3-ubiquitin Ligase Mylip/Idol and the Canopy2 (Cnpy2)/Mylip-interacting Saposin-like Protein (Msap)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Hai Thi; Tselykh, Timofey V.; Mäkelä, Johanna; Ho, Tho Huu; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Bornhauser, Beat C.; Korhonen, Laura; Zelcer, Noam; Lindholm, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The LDLR is a critical factor in the regulation of blood cholesterol levels that are altered in different human diseases. The level of LDLR in the cell is regulated by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein

  5. Decreased astrocytic thrombospondin-1 secretion after chronic ammonia treatment reduces the level of synaptic proteins: in vitro and in vivo studies.

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    Jayakumar, Arumugam R; Tong, Xiao Y; Curtis, Kevin M; Ruiz-Cordero, Roberto; Shamaladevi, Nagarajarao; Abuzamel, Missa; Johnstone, Joshua; Gaidosh, Gabriel; Rama Rao, Kakulavarapu V; Norenberg, Michael D

    2014-11-01

    Chronic hepatic encephalopathy (CHE) is a major complication in patients with severe liver disease. Elevated blood and brain ammonia levels have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and astrocytes are the principal neural cells involved in this disorder. Since defective synthesis and release of astrocytic factors have been shown to impair synaptic integrity in other neurological conditions, we examined whether thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1), an astrocytic factor involved in the maintenance of synaptic integrity, is also altered in CHE. Cultured astrocytes were exposed to ammonia (NH₄Cl, 0.5-2.5 mM) for 1-10 days, and TSP-1 content was measured in cell extracts and culture media. Astrocytes exposed to ammonia exhibited a reduction in intra- and extracellular TSP-1 levels. Exposure of cultured neurons to conditioned media from ammonia-treated astrocytes showed a decrease in synaptophysin, PSD95, and synaptotagmin levels. Conditioned media from TSP-1 over-expressing astrocytes that were treated with ammonia, when added to cultured neurons, reversed the decline in synaptic proteins. Recombinant TSP-1 similarly reversed the decrease in synaptic proteins. Metformin, an agent known to increase TSP-1 synthesis in other cell types, also reversed the ammonia-induced TSP-1 reduction. Likewise, we found a significant decline in TSP-1 level in cortical astrocytes, as well as a reduction in synaptophysin content in vivo in a rat model of CHE. These findings suggest that TSP-1 may represent an important therapeutic target for CHE. Defective release of astrocytic factors may impair synaptic integrity in chronic hepatic encephalopathy. We found a reduction in the release of the astrocytic matricellular proteins thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) in ammonia-treated astrocytes; such reduction was associated with a decrease in synaptic proteins caused by conditioned media from ammonia-treated astrocytes. Exposure of neurons to CM from ammonia-treated astrocytes, in which TSP-1 is over

  6. UBE3A Regulates Synaptic Plasticity and Learning and Memory by Controlling SK2 Channel Endocytosis

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    Jiandong Sun

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gated solely by activity-induced changes in intracellular calcium, small-conductance potassium channels (SKs are critical for a variety of functions in the CNS, from learning and memory to rhythmic activity and sleep. While there is a wealth of information on SK2 gating, kinetics, and Ca2+ sensitivity, little is known regarding the regulation of SK2 subcellular localization. We report here that synaptic SK2 levels are regulated by the E3 ubiquitin ligase UBE3A, whose deficiency results in Angelman syndrome and overexpression in increased risk of autistic spectrum disorder. UBE3A directly ubiquitinates SK2 in the C-terminal domain, which facilitates endocytosis. In UBE3A-deficient mice, increased postsynaptic SK2 levels result in decreased NMDA receptor activation, thereby impairing hippocampal long-term synaptic plasticity. Impairments in both synaptic plasticity and fear conditioning memory in UBE3A-deficient mice are significantly ameliorated by blocking SK2. These results elucidate a mechanism by which UBE3A directly influences cognitive function.

  7. Ubiquitination in apoptosis signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Kooij, L.W.

    2014-01-01

    The work described in this thesis focuses on ubiquitination and protein degradation, with an emphasis on how these processes regulate apoptosis signaling. More specifically, our aims were: 1. To increase the understanding of ubiquitin-mediated regulation of apoptosis signaling. 2. To identify the E3

  8. Ubiquitin and ubiquitine-like systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Pasch, L.A.L.

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers are small proteins that exist in all eukaryotes, from yeast to humans. Ubiquitin(-like) modifiers can be coupled to other proteins, which is mediated specific combinations of enzymes. The attachment of a ubiquitin(-like) modifier to a protein is important for

  9. Changes in the expression of collapsin response mediator protein-2 during synaptic plasticity in the mouse hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadoyama, Keiichi; Matsuura, Kenji; Nakamura-Hirota, Tooru; Takano, Masaoki; Otani, Mieko; Matsuyama, Shogo

    2015-11-01

    We have previously reported that nicotine application to the adult mouse causing long-term potentiation-like facilitation in vivo in the hippocampus can serve as a model of synaptic plasticity. The present study clarifies the involvement of collapsin response mediator protein-2 (CRMP2) in synaptic plasticity. CRMP2 was detected in hippocampal neurons of adult mice. The levels of CRMP2 mRNA and protein were increased 2-24 hr and 4-24 hr, respectively, after application of nicotine (3 mg/kg, i.p.), finally returning to the basal level by 48 hr. Furthermore, the ratio of phosphorylated CRMP2 (pCRMP2) at Thr514 residue, an inactive form, to total CRMP2 levels was not changed during synaptic plasticity expressed by nicotine, indicating an enhanced level of non-pCRMP2. This increase of CRMP2 was inhibited by blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and required activation of both α4β2 and α7 nAChRs. Although the level of ubiquitinated CRMP2 was increased 8 hr after nicotine treatment, the ratio of ubiquitinated CRMP2 to total CRMP2 protein was similar for nicotine-treated and nontreated mice. This study demonstrates that the expression of CRMP2 increases in hippocampal neurons during synaptic plasticity and that the increment is due mainly to mRNA expression. We propose that CRMP2, particularly non-pCRMP2, could contribute to long-lasting synaptic plasticity. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Synaptic Cell Adhesion

    OpenAIRE

    Missler, Markus; Südhof, Thomas C.; Biederer, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Chemical synapses are asymmetric intercellular junctions that mediate synaptic transmission. Synaptic junctions are organized by trans-synaptic cell adhesion molecules bridging the synaptic cleft. Synaptic cell adhesion molecules not only connect pre- and postsynaptic compartments, but also mediate trans-synaptic recognition and signaling processes that are essential for the establishment, specification, and plasticity of synapses. A growing number of synaptic cell adhesion molecules that inc...

  11. Reduced Levels of the Synaptic Functional Regulator FMRP in Dentate Gyrus of the Aging Sprague-Dawley Rat

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    Roman Smidak

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP encoded by Fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene is a RNA-binding regulator of mRNA translation, transport and stability with multiple targets responsible for proper synaptic function. Epigenetic silencing of FMR1 gene expression leads to the development of Fragile X syndrome (FXS that is characterized by intellectual disability and other behavioral problems including autism. In the rat FXS model, the lack of FMRP caused a deficit in hippocampal-dependent memory. However, the hippocampal changes of FMRP in aging rats are not fully elucidated. The current study addresses the changes in FMRP levels in dentate gyrus (DG from young (17 weeks and aging (22 months Sprague – Dawley rats. The aging animal group showed significant decline in spatial reference memory. Protein samples from five rats per each group were analyzed by quantitative proteomic analysis resulting in 153 significantly changed proteins. FMRP showed significant reduction in aging animals which was confirmed by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, bioinformatic analysis of the differential protein dataset revealed several functionally related protein groups with individual interactions with FMRP. These include high representation of the RNA translation and processing machinery connected to FMRP and other RNA-binding regulators including CAPRIN1, the members of Pumilio (PUM and CUG-BP, Elav-like (CELF family, and YTH N(6-methyladenosine RNA-binding proteins (YTHDF. The results of the current study point to the important role of FMRP and regulation of RNA processing in the rat DG and memory decline during the aging process.

  12. Proteasomal degradation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α is mediated by Homer-3 via the proteasomal S8 ATPase: Signal transduction and synaptic transmission.

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    Rezvani, Khosrow; Baalman, Kelli; Teng, Yanfen; Mee, Maureen P; Dawson, Simon P; Wang, Hongmin; De Biasi, Mariella; Mayer, R John

    2012-07-01

    The metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs) fine-tune the efficacy of synaptic transmission. This unique feature makes mGluRs potential targets for the treatment of various CNS disorders. There is ample evidence to show that the ubiquitin proteasome system mediates changes in synaptic strength leading to multiple forms of synaptic plasticity. The present study describes a novel interaction between post-synaptic adaptors, long Homer-3 proteins, and one of the 26S proteasome regulatory subunits, the S8 ATPase, that influences the degradation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α). We have shown that the two human long Homer-3 proteins specifically interact with human proteasomal S8 ATPase. We identified that mGluR1α and long Homer-3s immunoprecipitate with the 26S proteasome both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that the mGluR1α receptor can be ubiquitinated and degraded by the 26S proteasome and that Homer-3A facilitates this process. Furthermore, the siRNA mediated silencing of Homer-3 led to increased levels of total and plasma membrane-associated mGluR1α receptors. These results suggest that long Homer-3 proteins control the degradation of mGluR1α receptors by shuttling ubiquitinated mGluR-1α receptors to the 26S proteasome via the S8 ATPase which may modulate synaptic transmission. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Neurochemistry © 2012 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  13. EDITORIAL: Synaptic electronics Synaptic electronics

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    Demming, Anna; Gimzewski, James K.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2013-09-01

    Conventional computers excel in logic and accurate scientific calculations but make hard work of open ended problems that human brains handle easily. Even von Neumann—the mathematician and polymath who first developed the programming architecture that forms the basis of today's computers—was already looking to the brain for future developments before his death in 1957 [1]. Neuromorphic computing uses approaches that better mimic the working of the human brain. Recent developments in nanotechnology are now providing structures with very accommodating properties for neuromorphic approaches. This special issue, with guest editors James K Gimzewski and Dominique Vuillaume, is devoted to research at the serendipitous interface between the two disciplines. 'Synaptic electronics', looks at artificial devices with connections that demonstrate behaviour similar to synapses in the nervous system allowing a new and more powerful approach to computing. Synapses and connecting neurons respond differently to incident signals depending on the history of signals previously experienced, ultimately leading to short term and long term memory behaviour. The basic characteristics of a synapse can be replicated with around ten simple transistors. However with the human brain having around 1011 neurons and 1015 synapses, artificial neurons and synapses from basic transistors are unlikely to accommodate the scalability required. The discovery of nanoscale elements that function as 'memristors' has provided a key tool for the implementation of synaptic connections [2]. Leon Chua first developed the concept of the 'The memristor—the missing circuit element' in 1971 [3]. In this special issue he presents a tutorial describing how memristor research has fed into our understanding of synaptic behaviour and how they can be applied in information processing [4]. He also describes, 'The new principle of local activity, which uncovers a minuscule life-enabling "Goldilocks zone", dubbed the

  14. Effects of neonatal exposure to the flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol-A, aluminum diethylphosphinate or zinc stannate on long-term potentiation and synaptic protein levels in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hester S; Koolen, Lucas A E; Dingemans, Milou M L; Viberg, Henrik; Lee, Iwa; Leonards, Pim E G; Ramakers, Geert M J; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants such as tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) may exert (developmental) neurotoxic effects. However, data on (neuro)toxicity of halogen-free flame retardants (HFFRs) are scarce. Recent in vitro studies indicated a high neurotoxic potential for some HFFRs, e.g., zinc stannate (ZS), whereas the neurotoxic potential of other HFFRs, such as aluminum diethylphosphinate (Alpi), appears low. However, the in vivo (neuro)toxicity of these compounds is largely unknown. We therefore investigated effects of neonatal exposure to TBBPA, Alpi or ZS on synaptic plasticity in mouse hippocampus. Male C57bl/6 mice received a single oral dose of 211 µmol/kg bw TBBPA, Alpi or ZS on postnatal day (PND) 10. On PND 17-19, effects on hippocampal synaptic plasticity were investigated using ex vivo extracellular field recordings. Additionally, we measured levels of postsynaptic proteins involved in long-term potentiation (LTP) as well as flame retardant concentrations in brain, muscle and liver tissues. All three flame retardants induced minor, but insignificant, effects on LTP. Additionally, TBBPA induced a minor decrease in post-tetanic potentiation. Despite these minor effects, expression of selected synaptic proteins involved in LTP was not affected. The flame retardants could not be measured in significant amounts in the brains, suggesting low bioavailability and/or rapid elimination/metabolism. We therefore conclude that a single neonatal exposure on PND 10 to TBBPA, Alpi or ZS does affect neurodevelopment and synaptic plasticity only to a small extent in mice. Additional data, in particular on persistence, bioaccumulation and (in vivo) toxicity, following prolonged (developmental) exposure are required for further (human) risk assessment.

  15. Antagonism of brain insulin-like growth factor-1 receptors blocks estradiol effects on memory and levels of hippocampal synaptic proteins in ovariectomized rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Britta S.; Springer, Rachel C.; Daniel, Jill M.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Treatment with estradiol, the primary estrogen produced by the ovaries, enhances hippocampus-dependent spatial memory and increases levels of hippocampal synaptic proteins in ovariectomized rats. Increasing evidence indicates that the ability of estradiol to impact the brain and behavior is dependent upon its interaction with insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1). Objectives The goal of the current experiment was to test the hypothesis that the ability of estradiol to impact hippocampus-dependent memory and levels of hippocampal synaptic proteins is dependent on its interaction with IGF-1. Methods Adult rats were ovariectomized and implanted with estradiol or control capsules and trained on a radial-maze spatial memory task. After training, rats were implanted with intracerebroventricular cannulae attached to osmotic minipumps (flow rate 0.15 μl/hr). Half of each hormone treatment group received continuous delivery of JB1 (300 μg/ml), an IGF-1 receptor antagonist, and half received delivery of aCSF vehicle. Rats were tested on trials in the radial-arm maze during which delays were imposed between the 4th and 5th arm choices. Hippocampal levels of synaptic proteins were measured by western blotting. Results Estradiol treatment resulted in significantly enhanced memory. JB1 blocked that enhancement. Estradiol treatment resulted in significantly increased hippocampal levels of postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95), spinophilin, and synaptophysin. JB1 blocked the estradiol-induced increase of PSD-95 and spinophilin and attenuated the increase of synaptophysin. Conclusions Results support a role for IGF-1 receptor activity in estradiol-induced enhancement of spatial memory that may be dependent on changes in synapse structure in the hippocampus brought upon by estradiol/IGF-1 interactions. PMID:24146138

  16. The Level of Autoantibodies Targeting Eukaryote Translation Elongation Factor 1 α1 and Ubiquitin-Conjugating Enzyme 2L3 in Nondiabetic Young Adults

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    Eunhee G. Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence of novel type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM antibodies targeting eukaryote translation elongation factor 1 alpha 1 autoantibody (EEF1A1-AAb and ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 2L3 autoantibody (UBE2L3-AAb has been shown to be negatively correlated with age in T1DM subjects. Therefore, we aimed to investigate whether age affects the levels of these two antibodies in nondiabetic subjects.MethodsEEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels in nondiabetic control subjects (n=150 and T1DM subjects (n=101 in various ranges of age (18 to 69 years were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The cutoff point for the presence of each autoantibody was determined based on control subjects using the formula: [mean absorbance+3×standard deviation].ResultsIn nondiabetic subjects, there were no significant correlations between age and EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels. However, there was wide variation in EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels among control subjects <40 years old; the prevalence of both EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb in these subjects was 4.4%. When using cutoff points determined from the control subjects <40 years old, the prevalence of both autoantibodies in T1DM subjects was decreased (EEFA1-AAb, 15.8% to 8.9%; UBE2L3-AAb, 10.9% to 7.9% when compared to the prevalence using the cutoff derived from the totals for control subjects.ConclusionThere was no association between age and EEF1A1-AAb or UBE2L3-AAb levels in nondiabetic subjects. However, the wide variation in EEF1A1-AAb and UBE2L3-AAb levels apparent among the control subjects <40 years old should be taken into consideration when determining the cutoff reference range for the diagnosis of T1DM.

  17. Role of Adenosine A2A Receptors in Modulating Synaptic Functions and Brain Levels of BDNF: a Possible Key Mechanism in the Pathophysiology of Huntington's Disease

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    Maria Teresa Tebano

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, accumulating evidence has shown the existence of an important cross-talk between adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF. Not only are A2ARs involved in the mechanism of transactivation of BDNF receptor TrkB, they also modulate the effect of BDNF on synaptic transmission, playing a facilitatory and permissive role. The cAMP-PKA pathway, the main transduction system operated by A2ARs, is involved in such effects. Furthermore, a basal tonus of A2ARs is required to allow the regulation of BDNF physiological levels in the brain, as demonstrated by the reduced protein levels measured in A2ARs KO mice. The crucial role of adenosine A2ARs in the maintenance of synaptic functions and BDNF levels will be reviewed here and discussed in the light of possible implications for Huntington's disease therapy, in which a joint impairment of BDNF and A2ARs seems to play a pathogenetic role.

  18. Isolation of Synaptosomes, Synaptic Plasma Membranes, and Synaptic Junctional Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelis, Mary L; Jiang, Lei; Michaelis, Elias K

    2017-01-01

    Isolation of synaptic nerve terminals or synaptosomes provides an opportunity to study the process of neurotransmission at many levels and with a variety of approaches. For example, structural features of the synaptic terminals and the organelles within them, such as synaptic vesicles and mitochondria, have been elucidated with electron microscopy. The postsynaptic membranes are joined to the presynaptic "active zone" of transmitter release through cell adhesion molecules and remain attached throughout the isolation of synaptosomes. These "post synaptic densities" or "PSDs" contain the receptors for the transmitters released from the nerve terminals and can easily be seen with electron microscopy. Biochemical and cell biological studies with synaptosomes have revealed which proteins and lipids are most actively involved in synaptic release of neurotransmitters. The functional properties of the nerve terminals, such as responses to depolarization and the uptake or release of signaling molecules, have also been characterized through the use of fluorescent dyes, tagged transmitters, and transporter substrates. In addition, isolated synaptosomes can serve as the starting material for the isolation of relatively pure synaptic plasma membranes (SPMs) that are devoid of organelles from the internal environment of the nerve terminal, such as mitochondria and synaptic vesicles. The isolated SPMs can reseal and form vesicular structures in which transport of ions such as sodium and calcium, as well as solutes such as neurotransmitters can be studied. The PSDs also remain associated with the presynaptic membranes during isolation of SPM fractions, making it possible to isolate the synaptic junctional complexes (SJCs) devoid of the rest of the plasma membranes of the nerve terminals and postsynaptic membrane components. Isolated SJCs can be used to identify the proteins that constitute this highly specialized region of neurons. In this chapter, we describe the steps involved

  19. Promoters active in interphase are bookmarked during mitosis by ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Mansi; Zhang, Jie; Heine, George F.; Ozer, Gulcin; Liu, Hui-wen; Huang, Kun; Parvin, Jeffrey D.

    2012-01-01

    We analyzed modification of chromatin by ubiquitination in human cells and whether this mark changes through the cell cycle. HeLa cells were synchronized at different stages and regions of the genome with ubiquitinated chromatin were identified by affinity purification coupled with next-generation sequencing. During interphase, ubiquitin marked the chromatin on the transcribed regions of ∼70% of highly active genes and deposition of this mark was sensitive to transcriptional inhibition. Promoters of nearly half of the active genes were highly ubiquitinated specifically during mitosis. The ubiquitination at the coding regions in interphase but not at promoters during mitosis was enriched for ubH2B and dependent on the presence of RNF20. Ubiquitin labeling of both promoters during mitosis and transcribed regions during interphase, correlated with active histone marks H3K4me3 and H3K36me3 but not a repressive histone modification, H3K27me3. The high level of ubiquitination at the promoter chromatin during mitosis was transient and was removed within 2 h after the cells exited mitosis and entered the next cell cycle. These results reveal that the ubiquitination of promoter chromatin during mitosis is a bookmark identifying active genes during chromosomal condensation in mitosis, and we suggest that this process facilitates transcriptional reactivation post-mitosis. PMID:22941662

  20. Regulation of STIM1 and SOCE by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keil, Jeffrey M; Shen, Zhouxin; Briggs, Steven P; Patrick, Gentry N

    2010-10-18

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) mediates the majority of protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. The UPS has recently emerged as a key degradation pathway involved in synapse development and function. In order to better understand the function of the UPS at synapses we utilized a genetic and proteomic approach to isolate and identify novel candidate UPS substrates from biochemically purified synaptic membrane preparations. Using these methods, we have identified Stromal interacting molecule 1 (STIM1). STIM1 is as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium sensor that has been shown to regulate store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE). We have characterized STIM1 in neurons, finding STIM1 is expressed throughout development with stable, high expression in mature neurons. As in non-excitable cells, STIM1 is distributed in a membranous and punctate fashion in hippocampal neurons. In addition, a population of STIM1 was found to exist at synapses. Furthermore, using surface biotinylation and live-cell labeling methods, we detect a subpopulation of STIM1 on the surface of hippocampal neurons. The role of STIM1 as a regulator of SOCE has typically been examined in non-excitable cell types. Therefore, we examined the role of the UPS in STIM1 and SOCE function in HEK293 cells. While we find that STIM1 is ubiquitinated, its stability is not altered by proteasome inhibitors in cells under basal conditions or conditions that activate SOCE. However, we find that surface STIM1 levels and thapsigargin (TG)-induced SOCE are significantly increased in cells treated with proteasome inhibitors. Additionally, we find that the overexpression of POSH (Plenty of SH3's), an E3 ubiquitin ligase recently shown to be involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) homeostasis, leads to decreased STIM1 surface levels. Together, these results provide evidence for previously undescribed roles of the UPS in the regulation of STIM1 and SOCE function.

  1. Structural propensities of human ubiquitination sites: accessibility, centrality and local conformation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Zhou

    Full Text Available The existence and function of most proteins in the human proteome are regulated by the ubiquitination process. To date, tens of thousands human ubiquitination sites have been identified from high-throughput proteomic studies. However, the mechanism of ubiquitination site selection remains elusive because of the complicated sequence pattern flanking the ubiquitination sites. In this study, we perform a systematic analysis of 1,330 ubiquitination sites in 505 protein structures and quantify the significantly high accessibility and unexpectedly high centrality of human ubiquitination sites. Further analysis suggests that the higher centrality of ubiquitination sites is associated with the multi-functionality of ubiquitination sites, among which protein-protein interaction sites are common targets of ubiquitination. Moreover, we demonstrate that ubiquitination sites are flanked by residues with non-random local conformation. Finally, we provide quantitative and unambiguous evidence that most of the structural propensities contain specific information about ubiquitination site selection that is not represented by the sequence pattern. Therefore, the hypothesis about the structural level of the ubiquitination site selection mechanism has been substantially approved.

  2. Fibroblast growth factor-21 (FGF21) regulates low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) levels in cells via the E3-ubiquitin ligase Mylip/Idol and the Canopy2 (Cnpy2)/Mylip-interacting saposin-like protein (Msap).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hai Thi; Tselykh, Timofey V; Mäkelä, Johanna; Ho, Tho Huu; Olkkonen, Vesa M; Bornhauser, Beat C; Korhonen, Laura; Zelcer, Noam; Lindholm, Dan

    2012-04-13

    The LDLR is a critical factor in the regulation of blood cholesterol levels that are altered in different human diseases. The level of LDLR in the cell is regulated by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein (Mylip)/inducible degrader of the LDL-R (Idol) was shown to induce degradation of LDLR via protein ubiquitination. We have here studied novel factors and mechanisms that may regulate Mylip/Idol in human hepatocyte cells and in mouse macrophages. We observed that FGF21 that is present in serum in different conditions reduced Mylip/Idol at the RNA and protein level, and increased LDLR levels and stability in the cells. FGF21 also enhanced expression of Canopy2 (Cnpy2)/MIR-interacting Saposin-like protein (Msap) that is known to interact with Mylip/Idol. Overexpression of Cnpy2/Msap increased LDLRs, and knockdown experiments showed that Cnpy2/Msap is crucial for the FGF21 effect on LDLRs. Experiments using DiI-labeled LDL particles showed that FGF21 increased lipoprotein uptake and the effect of FGF21 was additive to that of statins. Our results are consistent with an important role of FGF21 and Cnpy2/Msap in the regulation of LDLRs in cultured cells, which warrants further studies using human samples.

  3. Fibroblast Growth Factor-21 (FGF21) Regulates Low-density Lipoprotein Receptor (LDLR) Levels in Cells via the E3-ubiquitin Ligase Mylip/Idol and the Canopy2 (Cnpy2)/Mylip-interacting Saposin-like Protein (Msap)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Hai Thi; Tselykh, Timofey V.; Mäkelä, Johanna; Ho, Tho Huu; Olkkonen, Vesa M.; Bornhauser, Beat C.; Korhonen, Laura; Zelcer, Noam; Lindholm, Dan

    2012-01-01

    The LDLR is a critical factor in the regulation of blood cholesterol levels that are altered in different human diseases. The level of LDLR in the cell is regulated by both transcriptional and post-transcriptional events. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, myosin regulatory light chain-interacting protein (Mylip)/inducible degrader of the LDL-R (Idol) was shown to induce degradation of LDLR via protein ubiquitination. We have here studied novel factors and mechanisms that may regulate Mylip/Idol in human hepatocyte cells and in mouse macrophages. We observed that FGF21 that is present in serum in different conditions reduced Mylip/Idol at the RNA and protein level, and increased LDLR levels and stability in the cells. FGF21 also enhanced expression of Canopy2 (Cnpy2)/MIR-interacting Saposin-like protein (Msap) that is known to interact with Mylip/Idol. Overexpression of Cnpy2/Msap increased LDLRs, and knockdown experiments showed that Cnpy2/Msap is crucial for the FGF21 effect on LDLRs. Experiments using DiI-labeled LDL particles showed that FGF21 increased lipoprotein uptake and the effect of FGF21 was additive to that of statins. Our results are consistent with an important role of FGF21 and Cnpy2/Msap in the regulation of LDLRs in cultured cells, which warrants further studies using human samples. PMID:22378787

  4. Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Parkinson Disease: a keeper or a witness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Branco, Diogo; Esteves, Ana R.; Santos, Daniel; Arduino, Daniela M.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Oliveira, Catarina R.; Januario, Cristina; Cardoso, Sandra M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System (UPS) on mitochondrial-driven alpha-synuclein (aSN) clearance in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo Parkinson disease (PD) cellular models. Method We used SH-SY5Y ndufa2 knock-down (KD) cells, PD cybrids and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients meeting the diagnostic criteria for PD. We quantified aSN aggregation, proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination levels. In PBMC of PD patients population we evaluated aSN levels in plasma and the influence of several demographic characteristics in the above mentioned determinations. Results We found that ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was up-regulated in SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells while a down regulation was observed in PD cybrids and PBMC. Moreover, we observed an increase in protein ubiquitination that correlates with a decrease in ubiquitin-dependent proteasome activity. Accordingly, proteasome inhibition prevented ubiquitin-dependent aSN clearance. Ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was positively correlated with ubiquitination in PBMC. We also report a negative correlation of chymotrypsin-like activity with age in control and late-onset PD groups. Total ubiquitin content is positively correlated with aSN oligomers levels, which leads to an age-dependent increase of aSN ubiquitination in LOPD. Moreover, aSN levels are increased in the plasma of PD patients. Interpretation aSN oligomers are ubiquitinated and we identified an ubiquitin-dependent clearance insufficiency with accumulation of both aSN and ubiquitin. However, SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells showed a significant up-regulation of ubiquitin-independent proteasomal enzymatic activity that could mean a cell rescue attempt. Moreover, we identified that UPS function is age-dependent in PBMC. PMID:22921536

  5. Ubiquitin proteasome system in Parkinson's disease: a keeper or a witness?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins-Branco, Diogo; Esteves, Ana R; Santos, Daniel; Arduino, Daniela M; Swerdlow, Russell H; Oliveira, Catarina R; Januario, Cristina; Cardoso, Sandra M

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this work was to evaluate the role of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) on mitochondrial-driven alpha-synuclein (aSN) clearance in in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo Parkinson's disease (PD) cellular models. We used SH-SY5Y ndufa2 knock-down (KD) cells, PD cybrids and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from patients meeting the diagnostic criteria for PD. We quantified aSN aggregation, proteasome activity and protein ubiquitination levels. In PBMC of PD patient population we evaluated the aSN levels in the plasma and the influence of several demographic characteristics in the above mentioned determinations. We found that ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was up-regulated in SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells while a downregulation was observed in PD cybrids and PBMC. Moreover, we observed an increase in protein ubiquitination that correlates with a decrease in ubiquitin-dependent proteasome activity. Accordingly, proteasome inhibition prevented ubiquitin-dependent aSN clearance. Ubiquitin-independent proteasome activity was positively correlated with ubiquitination in PBMC. We also report a negative correlation of chymotrypsin-like activity with age in control and late-onset PD groups. Total ubiquitin content is positively correlated with aSN oligomer levels, which leads to an age-dependent increase of aSN ubiquitination in LOPD. Moreover, aSN levels are increased in the plasma of PD patients. aSN oligomers are ubiquitinated and we identified a ubiquitin-dependent clearance insufficiency with the accumulation of both aSN and ubiquitin. However, SH-SY5Y ndufa2 KD cells showed a significant up-regulation of ubiquitin-independent proteasomal enzymatic activity that could mean a cell rescue attempt. Moreover, we identified that UPS function is age-dependent in PBMC. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Ubiquitination of the common cytokine receptor γc and regulation of expression by an ubiquitination/deubiquitination machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesbert, Franck; Malarde, Valerie; Dautry-Varsat, Alice

    2005-01-01

    The common cytokine receptor γ c is shared by the interleukin-2, -4, -7, -9, -15, and -21 receptors, and is essential for lymphocyte proliferation and survival. The regulation of γ c receptor expression level is therefore critical for the ability of cells to respond to these cytokines. We previously reported that γ c is efficiently constitutively internalized and addressed towards a degradation endocytic compartment. We show that γ c is ubiquitinated and also associated to ubiquitinated proteins. We report that the ubiquitin-ligase c-Cbl induces γ c down-regulation. In addition, the ubiquitin-hydrolase, DUB-2, counteracts the effect of c-Cbl on γ c expression. We show that an increase in DUB-2 expression correlates with an increased γ c half-life, resulting in the up-regulation of the receptor. Altogether, we show that γ c is the target of an ubiquitination mechanism and its expression level can be regulated through the activities of a couple of ubiquitin-ligase/ubiquitin-hydrolase enzymes, namely c-Cbl/DUB-2

  7. Ubiquitin domain proteins in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Louise Kjær; Schulze, Andrea; Seeger, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The human genome encodes several ubiquitin-like (UBL) domain proteins (UDPs). Members of this protein family are involved in a variety of cellular functions and many are connected to the ubiquitin proteasome system, an essential pathway for protein degradation in eukaryotic cells. Despite...... and cancer. Publication history: Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; http://www.targetedproteinsdb.com)....

  8. The ubiquitin-proteasome system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... the discovery of protein ubiquitination has led to the recognition of cellular proteolysis as a central area of research in biology. Eukaryotic proteins targeted for degradation by this pathway are first 'tagged' by multimers of a protein known as ubiquitin and are later proteolyzed by a giant enzyme known as the proteasome.

  9. Mcl-1 Ubiquitination: Unique Regulation of an Essential Survival Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Mojsa

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Mcl-1 is an anti-apoptotic protein of the Bcl-2 family that is essential for the survival of multiple cell lineages and that is highly amplified in human cancer. Under physiological conditions, Mcl-1 expression is tightly regulated at multiple levels, involving transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational processes. Ubiquitination of Mcl-1, that targets it for proteasomal degradation, allows for rapid elimination of the protein and triggering of cell death, in response to various cellular events. In the last decade, a number of studies have elucidated different pathways controlling Mcl-1 ubiquitination and degradation. Four different E3 ubiquitin-ligases (e.g., Mule, SCFβ-TrCP, SCFFbw7 and Trim17 and one deubiquitinase (e.g., USP9X, that respectively mediate and oppose Mcl-1 ubiquitination, have been formerly identified. The interaction between Mule and Mcl-1 can be modulated by other Bcl-2 family proteins, while recognition of Mcl-1 by the other E3 ubiquitin-ligases and deubiquitinase is influenced by phosphorylation of specific residues in Mcl-1. The protein kinases and E3 ubiquitin-ligases that are involved in the regulation of Mcl-1 stability vary depending on the cellular context, highlighting the complexity and pivotal role of Mcl-1 regulation. In this review, we attempt to recapitulate progress in understanding Mcl-1 regulation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  10. The optimal neural strategy for a stable motor task requires a compromise between level of muscle cocontraction and synaptic gain of afferent feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L; Negro, Francesco; Farina, Dario

    2015-09-01

    Increasing joint stiffness by cocontraction of antagonist muscles and compensatory reflexes are neural strategies to minimize the impact of unexpected perturbations on movement. Combining these strategies, however, may compromise steadiness, as elements of the afferent input to motor pools innervating antagonist muscles are inherently negatively correlated. Consequently, a high afferent gain and active contractions of both muscles may imply negatively correlated neural drives to the muscles and thus an unstable limb position. This hypothesis was systematically explored with a novel computational model of the peripheral nervous system and the mechanics of one limb. Two populations of motor neurons received synaptic input from descending drive, spinal interneurons, and afferent feedback. Muscle force, simulated based on motor unit activity, determined limb movement that gave rise to afferent feedback from muscle spindles and Golgi tendon organs. The results indicated that optimal steadiness was achieved with low synaptic gain of the afferent feedback. High afferent gains during cocontraction implied increased levels of common drive in the motor neuron outputs, which were negatively correlated across the two populations, constraining instability of the limb. Increasing the force acting on the joint and the afferent gain both effectively minimized the impact of an external perturbation, and suboptimal adjustment of the afferent gain could be compensated by muscle cocontraction. These observations show that selection of the strategy for a given contraction implies a compromise between steadiness and effectiveness of compensations to perturbations. This indicates that a task-dependent selection of neural strategy for steadiness is necessary when acting in different environments. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  11. [Effects of transporter Agp1p ubiquitination on nitrogen utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingyu; Lv, Yongkun; Zhou, Jingwen; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2015-05-04

    The purpose of this work is to studythe effects of ubiquitination of key nitrogen transporter Agp1p on nitrogen utilization in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ubiquitination detection vector to examine the ubiquitination process of Agp1p was constructed based on the bimolecular fluorescence complementation technology. The site-directed mutagenesis on the potential ubiquitination sites were performed to verify the effect on its ubiquitination regulation and nitrogen utilization. Agp1p can be ubiquitinated on the medium with glutamine, arginine, proline or ammonium. The fluorescence levels of mutant strains were down-regulated compared to the wild type strain. The quadruple mutant Agp1pK11-14-98-112R achieved the lowest level among all strains. The ubiuitination process could be significantly repressed by removing the potential ubiquitination residues. Furthermore, flask-shaking experiments with nineamino acids or urea as sole nitrogen source showed that the effect of nitrogen utilization efficiencyinthe quadruple mutant was the highest. Ubiquitination was involved in the regulation of Agp1p. Site-directed mutagenesis of potential ubiquitination sites of the transporter could significantly affect the nitrogen utilization process by altering the ubiquitination process.

  12. Cryptochrome Is a Regulator of Synaptic Plasticity in the Visual System of Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Damulewicz

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Drosophila CRYPTOCHROME (CRY is a blue light sensitive protein with a key role in circadian photoreception. A main feature of CRY is that light promotes an interaction with the circadian protein TIMELESS (TIM resulting in their ubiquitination and degradation, a mechanism that contributes to the synchronization of the circadian clock to the environment. Moreover, CRY participates in non-circadian functions such as magnetoreception, modulation of neuronal firing, phototransduction and regulation of synaptic plasticity. In the present study we used co-immunoprecipitation, yeast 2 hybrid (Y2H and in situ proximity ligation assay (PLA to show that CRY can physically associate with the presynaptic protein BRUCHPILOT (BRP and that CRY-BRP complexes are located mainly in the visual system. Additionally, we present evidence that light-activated CRY may decrease BRP levels in photoreceptor termini in the distal lamina, probably targeting BRP for degradation.

  13. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    and phosphatases, specific sets of ubiquitinating/deubiquitinating enzymes control the degree of ubiquitination. A large number of ubiquitin-binding proteins act at different steps in the downstream pathways, followed by the ubiquitinated protein. Different families of ubiquitin-binding proteins have been...... described. UBA (ubiquitin-associated) domain-containing proteins is the largest family and includes members involved in different cell processes. The smaller groups of UIM (ubiquitin-interacting motif), GAT [GGA (Golgi-associated gamma-adaptin homologous) and Tom1 (target of Myb 1)], CUE (coupling...

  14. SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriramachandran, Annie M; Dohmen, R Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Covalent posttranslational modification with SUMO (small ubiquitin-related modifier) modulates functions of a wide range of proteins in eukaryotic cells. Sumoylation affects the activity, interaction properties, subcellular localization and the stability of its substrate proteins. The recent discovery of a novel class of ubiquitin ligases (E3), termed ULS (E3-S) or STUbL, that recognize sumoylated proteins, links SUMO modification to the ubiquitin/proteasome system. Here we review recent insights into the properties and function of these ligases and their roles in regulating sumoylated proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Ubiquitin-Proteasome System. Guest Editors: Thomas Sommer and Dieter H. Wolf. © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. 5-Desmethylnobiletin augments synaptic ACh levels and nicotinic ACh receptor activity: A potential candidate for alleviation of cholinergic dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Shalini; Maurya, Priyanka; Sammi, Shreesh Raj; Gupta, Madan Mohan; Pandey, Rakesh

    2017-09-14

    Cholinergic function is compromised in plethora of neurodegenerative disorders especially Alzheimer's disease. Increasing acetylcholine (ACh) levels has been the mainstay in majority of the therapeutic regimens, accepted for management of disease. The present study investigates the efficacy of 5-Desmethylnobiletin (DN), a polymethoxyflavone in augmenting cholinergic function using Caenorhabditis elegans as a model organism. The studies revealed significant elevation in cholinergic transmission mediated through increased levels of ACh and activity of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChR). Further investigation into the mechanistic aspects indicated that DN enhanced cholinergic function through down modulation of acetylcholinesterase activity at enzyme and transcript level along with upregulation of non alpha subunit, unc-29 which could be linked with enhanced nAChR activity as evident from levamisole assay. Additionally, studies on antioxidant properties, implicated significant potential of DN in curtailing ROS, both in vivo and in vitro. Our studies present DN as a phytomolecule with novel biological activities which could be exploited and researched upon for therapeutic avenues in terms of cholinergic function and antioxidant potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Detection of ubiquitinated huntingtin species in intracellular aggregates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin eJuenemann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein conformation diseases, including polyglutamine diseases, result from the accumulation and aggregation of misfolded proteins. Huntington’s disease is one of nine diseases caused by an expanded polyglutamine repeat within the affected protein and is hallmarked by intracellular inclusion bodies composed of aggregated N-terminal huntingtin fragments and other sequestered proteins. Fluorescence microscopy and filter trap assay are conventional methods to study protein aggregates, but cannot be used to analyze the presence and levels of post-translational modifications of aggregated huntingtin such as ubiquitination. Ubiquitination of proteins can be a signal for degradation and intracellular localization, but also affects protein activity and protein-protein interactions. The function of ubiquitination relies on its mono- and polymeric isoforms attached to protein substrates. Studying the ubiquitination pattern of aggregated huntingtin fragments offers an important possibility to understand huntingtin degradation and aggregation processes within the cell. For the identification of aggregated huntingtin and its ubiquitinated species, solubilization of the cellular aggregates is mandatory. Here we describe methods to identify post-translational modifications such as ubiquitination of aggregated mutant huntingtin. This approach is specifically described for use with mammalian cell culture and is suitable to study other disease-related proteins prone to aggregate.

  17. Influence of Synaptic Depression on Memory Storage Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsubo, Yosuke; Nagata, Kenji; Oizumi, Masafumi; Okada, Masato

    2011-08-01

    Synaptic efficacy between neurons is known to change within a short time scale dynamically. Neurophysiological experiments show that high-frequency presynaptic inputs decrease synaptic efficacy between neurons. This phenomenon is called synaptic depression, a short term synaptic plasticity. Many researchers have investigated how the synaptic depression affects the memory storage capacity. However, the noise has not been taken into consideration in their analysis. By introducing ``temperature'', which controls the level of the noise, into an update rule of neurons, we investigate the effects of synaptic depression on the memory storage capacity in the presence of the noise. We analytically compute the storage capacity by using a statistical mechanics technique called Self Consistent Signal to Noise Analysis (SCSNA). We find that the synaptic depression decreases the storage capacity in the case of finite temperature in contrast to the case of the low temperature limit, where the storage capacity does not change.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Synaptic Transistor Network for Pattern Recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sungho; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-18

    Inspired by the human brain, a neuromorphic system combining complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adjustable synaptic devices may offer new computing paradigms by enabling massive neural-network parallelism. In particular, synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses, are used as the essential building blocks for an information storage and processing system. However, previous synaptic devices based on two-terminal resistive devices remain challenging because of their variability and specific physical mechanisms of resistance change, which lead to a bottleneck in the implementation of a high-density synaptic device network. Here we report that a three-terminal synaptic transistor based on carbon nanotubes can provide reliable synaptic functions that encode relative timing and regulate weight change. In addition, using system-level simulations, the developed synaptic transistor network associated with CMOS circuits can perform unsupervised learning for pattern recognition using a simplified spike-timing-dependent plasticity scheme.

  19. Less means more: The magnitude of synaptic plasticity along the hippocampal dorso-ventral axis is inversely related to the expression levels of plasticity-related neurotransmitter receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovyk, Valentyna; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2018-02-01

    The dorsoventral axis of the hippocampus exhibits functional differentiations with regard to (spatial Vs emotional) learning and information retention (rapid encoding Vs long-term storage), as well as its sensitivity to neuromodulation and information received from extrahippocampal structures. The mechanisms that underlie these differentiations remain unclear. Here, we explored neurotransmitter receptor expression along the dorsoventral hippocampal axis and compared hippocampal synaptic plasticity in the CA1 region of the dorsal (DH), intermediate (IH) and ventral hippocampi (VH). We observed a very distinct gradient of expression of the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor GluN2B subunit in the Stratum radiatum (DH IH > VH). Neurotransmitter release probability was lowest in DH. Surprisingly, identical afferent stimulation conditions resulted in hippocampal synaptic plasticity that was the most robust in the DH, compared with IH and VH. These data suggest that differences in hippocampal information processing and synaptic plasticity along the dorsoventral axis may relate to specific differences in the expression of plasticity-related neurotransmitter receptors. This gradient may support the fine-tuning and specificity of hippocampal synaptic encoding. © 2017 The Authors. Hippocampus Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Expression of TRAF6 and ubiquitin mRNA in skeletal muscle of gastric cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Yuan-Shui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor necrosis factor receptor (TNFR,-associated factor 6 (TRAF6,-and ubiquitin in gastric cancer patients. Methods Biopsies of the rectus abdominis muscle were obtained intra operatively from 102 gastric cancer patients and 29 subjects undergoing surgery for benign abdominal diseases, and muscle TRAF6 and ubiquitin mRNA expression and proteasome proteolytic activities were assessed. Results TRAF6 was significantly upregulated in muscle of gastric cancer compared with the control muscles. TRAF6 was upregulated in 67.65% (69/102 muscle of gastric cancer. Over expression of TRAF6 in muscles of gastric cancer were associated with TNM stage, level of serum albumin and percent of weight loss. Ubiquitin was significantly upregulated in muscle of gastric cancer compared with the control muscles. Ubiquitin was upregulated in 58.82% (60/102 muscles of gastric cancer. Over expression of ubiquitin in muscles of gastric cancer were associated with TNM (Tumor-Node-Metastasis stage and weight loss. There was significant relation between TRAF6 and ubiquitin expression. Conclusions We found a positive correlation between TRAF6 and ubiquitin expression, suggesting that TRAF6 may up regulates ubiquitin activity in cancer cachexia. While more investigations are required to understand its mechanisms of TRAF6 and ubiquitin in skeletal muscle. Correct the catabolic-anabolic imbalance is essential for the effective treatment of cancer cachexia.

  1. Human disorders of ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong-hui; Beaudet, Arthur L

    2004-08-01

    The goal of this review is to provide an overview of rapidly evolving information on a new group of genetic inborn errors affecting ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of proteins and to suggest a classification scheme for these disorders. The relevant genes encode ubiquitin, ubiquitin enzymes (E1 and many E2s and E3s), deubiquitinating enzymes, proteasomal subunits, and substrates undergoing ubiquitination. Since the initial recognition that Angelman syndrome is caused by maternal deficiency of the E6-AP ubiquitin E3 ligase (gene symbol UBE3A), several. other disorders of E3 ligases have been identified, including autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson disease, the APECED form of autoimmune polyendocrinopathy syndrome, von Hippel-Lindau syndrome, and congenital polycythemia. Disorders that disturb ubiquitin regulatory signaling include at least two subtypes of Fanconi anemia, the BRCA1 and BRCA2 forms of breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility, incontinentia pigmenti, and cylindromatosis. Many disorders affect ubiquitin pathways secondarily. The authors propose both a genetic and a functional classification for disorders of ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation, as follows. Genetic classes include mutations in (1) the UBB ubiquitin gene; (2) enzymes of ubiquitination including E1, E2, E3, and related proteins; (3) deubiquitinases; (4) proteasomal subunits; and (5) substrates of ubiquitination. Functional classes include defects in (1) proteolytic degradation, (2) ubiquitin signaling, and (3) subcellular localization of substrates. Additional functional classes are likely to be defined, and individual disorders may involve multiple functional defects.

  2. Linear ubiquitination signals in adaptive immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, Fumiyo

    2015-07-01

    Ubiquitin can form eight different linkage types of chains using the intrinsic Met 1 residue or one of the seven intrinsic Lys residues. Each linkage type of ubiquitin chain has a distinct three-dimensional topology, functioning as a tag to attract specific signaling molecules, which are so-called ubiquitin readers, and regulates various biological functions. Ubiquitin chains linked via Met 1 in a head-to-tail manner are called linear ubiquitin chains. Linear ubiquitination plays an important role in the regulation of cellular signaling, including the best-characterized tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-induced canonical nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) pathway. Linear ubiquitin chains are specifically generated by an E3 ligase complex called the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC) and hydrolyzed by a deubiquitinase (DUB) called ovarian tumor (OTU) DUB with linear linkage specificity (OTULIN). LUBAC linearly ubiquitinates critical molecules in the TNF pathway, such as NEMO and RIPK1. The linear ubiquitin chains are then recognized by the ubiquitin readers, including NEMO, which control the TNF pathway. Accumulating evidence indicates an importance of the LUBAC complex in the regulation of apoptosis, development, and inflammation in mice. In this article, I focus on the role of linear ubiquitin chains in adaptive immune responses with an emphasis on the TNF-induced signaling pathways. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Sperm ubiquitination in epididymal feline semen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vernocchi, Valentina; Morselli, Maria Giorgia; Varesi, Sara; Nonnis, Simona; Maffioli, Elisa; Negri, Armando; Tedeschi, Gabriella; Luvoni, Gaia Cecilia

    2014-09-01

    Ubiquitin is a 8.5-kDa peptide that tags other proteins for proteasomal degradation. It has been proposed that ubiquitination might be responsible for the elimination of defective spermatozoa during transit through the epididymis in humans and cattle, but its exact biological function in seminal plasma has not yet been clarified. In the domestic cat (Felis catus), the percentage of immature, unviable, and abnormal spermatozoa decreases during the epididymal transit, indicating the existence of a mechanism that removes defective spermatozoa. Magnetic cell separation techniques, based on the use of magnetic beads coated with anti-ubiquitin antibodies, may allow the selective capture of ubiquitinated spermatozoa from semen, thus contributing to the identification of a potential correlation between semen quality and ubiquitination process. Moreover, the selective identification of all the ubiquitinated proteins in different epididymal regions could give a better understanding of the ubiquitin role in feline sperm maturation. The aims of this study were as follows: (1) to verify the possibility of separating ubiquitinated spermatozoa with magnetic ubiquitin beads and identify the morphological and acrosomal differences between whole sample and unbound gametes, (2) to characterize all the ubiquitinated proteins in spermatozoa retrieved in the three epididymal regions by a proteomic approach. The data indicated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in cat epididymal semen. However, a correlation between abnormal and ubiquitinated spermatozoa has not been found, and ubiquitin cannot be considered as a biomarker of quality of epididymal feline spermatozoa. To the author's knowledge, this is the first identification of all the ubiquitinated proteins of cat spermatozoa collected from different epididymal regions. The proteomic pattern allows a further characterization of cat epididymal semen and represents a contribute to a better understanding of the ubiquitin role in

  4. Calcineurin mediates homeostatic synaptic plasticity by regulating retinoic acid synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Kristin L; Zhang, Zhenjie; Ganesan, Subhashree; Hintze, Maik; Shin, Maggie M; Tang, Yitai; Cho, Ahryon; Graef, Isabella A; Chen, Lu

    2015-10-20

    Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a form of non-Hebbian plasticity that maintains stability of the network and fidelity for information processing in response to prolonged perturbation of network and synaptic activity. Prolonged blockade of synaptic activity decreases resting Ca(2+) levels in neurons, thereby inducing retinoic acid (RA) synthesis and RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity; however, the signal transduction pathway that links reduced Ca(2+)-levels to RA synthesis remains unknown. Here we identify the Ca(2+)-dependent protein phosphatase calcineurin (CaN) as a key regulator for RA synthesis and homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Prolonged inhibition of CaN activity promotes RA synthesis in neurons, and leads to increased excitatory and decreased inhibitory synaptic transmission. These effects of CaN inhibitors on synaptic transmission are blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of RA synthesis or acute genetic deletion of the RA receptor RARα. Thus, CaN, acting upstream of RA, plays a critical role in gating RA signaling pathway in response to synaptic activity. Moreover, activity blockade-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity is absent in CaN knockout neurons, demonstrating the essential role of CaN in RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Interestingly, in GluA1 S831A and S845A knockin mice, CaN inhibitor- and RA-induced regulation of synaptic transmission is intact, suggesting that phosphorylation of GluA1 C-terminal serine residues S831 and S845 is not required for CaN inhibitor- or RA-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. Thus, our study uncovers an unforeseen role of CaN in postsynaptic signaling, and defines CaN as the Ca(2+)-sensing signaling molecule that mediates RA-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

  5. The BAH domain of BAF180 is required for PCNA ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niimi, Atsuko [Department of Genome Dynamics, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan); Hopkins, Suzanna R; Downs, Jessica A [Genome Damage and Stability Centre, University of Sussex, Falmer, Brighton BN1 9RQ (United Kingdom); Masutani, Chikahide, E-mail: masutani@riem.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Department of Genome Dynamics, Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8601 (Japan)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The expression of BAF180 promotes UV-induced PCNA ubiquitination during S phase. • The BAH domains of BAF180 alone are sufficient to promote PCNA ubiquitination. • The BAH domains are not assembled into the PBAF in the absence of the C-terminus. - Abstract: Monoubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is a critical regulator of post replication repair (PRR). The depletion of BAF180, a unique subunit of the PBAF chromatin remodeling complex in human cells results in reduced PCNA ubiquitination leading to less efficient fork progression following DNA damage, but little is known about the mechanism. Here, we report that the expression of exogenous BAF180 in cells promotes PCNA ubiquitination during S-phase after UV irradiation and it persists for many hours. No correlation was observed between the protein level of ubiquitin-specific protease 1 (USP1) and ubiquitinated PCNA in BAF180 expressing cells. Analysis of cells expressing BAF180 deletion mutants showed that the bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) domains are responsible for this effect. Surprisingly, a deletion construct encoding only the BAH domain region is able to increase the level of ubiquitinated PCNA, even though it is unable to be assembled into the PBAF complex. These results suggest that the ATPase-dependent chromatin remodeling activity of PBAF is not necessary, but instead the BAH domains are sufficient to promote PCNA ubiquitination.

  6. Ubiquitin-binding proteins: similar, but different

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Katrine M; Hofmann, Kay; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    of ubiquitin conjugation to endoplasmic reticulum degradation), UEV [ubiquitin E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme) variant] and NZF (nuclear protein localization gene 4 zinc finger) domain-containing proteins appear to have more specialized functions. Here we discuss functional and structural properties......Covalent modification of proteins with ubiquitin is a common regulatory mechanism in eukaryotic cells. Typically, ubiquitinated proteins are targeted for degradation by the 26 S proteasome. However, more recently the ubiquitin signal has also been connected with many other cell processes, including...... endocytosis, vesicle fusion, DNA repair and transcriptional silencing. Hence ubiquitination may be comparable with phosphorylation in its importance as an intracellular switch, controlling various signal-transduction pathways. Similar to the regulation of the extent of phosphorylation by kinases...

  7. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Aurelia Ball

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  8. Why Ubiquitin Has Not Evolved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas C. Allan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin, discovered less than 50 years ago, tags thousands of diseased proteins for destruction. It is small (only 76 amino acids, and is found unchanged in mammals, birds, fish, and even worms, indicating that ubiquitin is perfect. Key features of its functionality are identified here using critical point thermodynamic scaling theory. These include synchronized pivots and hinges, a stabilizing central pivot, and Fano interference between first- and second-order elements of correlated long-range (allosteric globular surface shape transitions. Comparison with its closest relative, 76 amino acid Nedd8, shows that the latter lacks all these features. A cracked elastic network model is proposed for the common target shared by many diseased proteins.

  9. Paving TRAIL's Path with Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafont, Elodie; Hartwig, Torsten; Walczak, Henning

    2018-01-01

    Despite its name, signalling induced by the tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is versatile. Besides eliciting cell death by both apoptosis and necroptosis, TRAIL can also induce migration, proliferation, and cytokine production in cancerous and non-cancerous cells. Unravelling the mechanisms regulating the intricate balance between these different outputs could therefore facilitate our understanding of the role of TRAIL in tissue homeostasis, immunity, and cancer. Ubiquitination and its reversal, deubiquitination, are crucial modulators of immune receptor signalling. This review discusses recent progress on the orchestration of TRAIL signalling outcomes by ubiquitination of various components of the signalling complexes, our understanding of the molecular switches that decide between cell death and gene activation, and what remains to be discovered. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination by inhibiting histone deubiquitinating enzyme activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ke Qingdong; Ellen, Thomas P.; Costa, Max

    2008-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) compounds are known carcinogens but underlying mechanisms are not clear. Epigenetic changes are likely to play an important role in nickel ion carcinogenesis. Previous studies have shown epigenetic effects of nickel ions, including the loss of histone acetylation and a pronounced increase in dimethylated H3K9 in nickel-exposed cells. In this study, we demonstrated that both water-soluble and insoluble nickel compounds induce histone ubiquitination (uH2A and uH2B) in a variety of cell lines. Investigations of the mechanism by which nickel increases histone ubiquitination in cells reveal that nickel does not affect cellular levels of the substrates of this modification, i.e., ubiquitin, histones, and other non-histone ubiquitinated proteins. In vitro ubiquitination and deubiquitination assays have been developed to further investigate possible effects of nickel on enzymes responsible for histone ubiquitination. Results from the in vitro assays demonstrate that the presence of nickel did not affect the levels of ubiquitinated histones in the ubiquitinating assay. Instead, the addition of nickel significantly prevents loss of uH2A and uH2B in the deubiquitinating assay, suggesting that nickel-induced histone ubiquitination is the result of inhibition of (a) putative deubiquitinating enzyme(s). Additional supporting evidence comes from the comparison of the response to nickel ions with a known deubiquitinating enzyme inhibitor, iodoacetamide (IAA). This study is the first to demonstrate such effects of nickel ions on histone ubiquitination. It also sheds light on the possible mechanisms involved in altering the steady state of this modification. The study provides further evidence that supports the notion that nickel ions alter epigenetic homeostasis in cells, which may lead to altered programs of gene expression and carcinogenesis

  11. CNTNAP2 and NRXN1 are mutated in autosomal-recessive Pitt-Hopkins-like mental retardation and determine the level of a common synaptic protein in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zweier, Christiane; de Jong, Eiko K; Zweier, Markus

    2009-01-01

    Heterozygous copy-number variants and SNPs of CNTNAP2 and NRXN1, two distantly related members of the neurexin superfamily, have been repeatedly associated with a wide spectrum of neuropsychiatric disorders, such as developmental language disorders, autism spectrum disorders, epilepsy...... neuropsychiatric disorders and to severe MR as reported here, evidence for a synaptic role of the CNTNAP2-encoded protein CASPR2 has so far been lacking. Using Drosophila as a model, we now show that, as known for fly Nrx-I, the CASPR2 ortholog Nrx-IV might also localize to synapses. Overexpression of either...

  12. Ubiquitin regulates GGA3-mediated degradation of BACE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene L; Cameron, Andrew N; Piazza, Fabrizio; Walker, Kendall R; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2010-07-30

    BACE1 (beta-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) is a membrane-tethered member of the aspartyl proteases, essential for the production of beta-amyloid, a toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. The BACE1 C-terminal fragment contains a DXXLL motif that has been shown to bind the VHS (VPS27, Hrs, and STAM) domain of GGA1-3 (Golgi-localized gamma-ear-containing ARF-binding proteins). GGAs are trafficking molecules involved in the transport of proteins containing the DXXLL signal from the Golgi complex to endosomes. Moreover, GGAs bind ubiquitin and traffic synthetic and endosomal ubiquitinated cargoes to lysosomes. We have previously shown that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. Here, we report that the accumulation of BACE1 is rescued by the ectopic expression of GGA3 in H4 neuroglioma cells depleted of GGA3. Accordingly, the overexpression of GGA3 reduces the levels of BACE1 and beta-amyloid. We then established that mutations in the GGA3 VPS27, Hrs, and STAM domain (N91A) or in BACE1 di-leucine motif (L499A/L500A), able to abrogate their binding, did not affect the ability of ectopically expressed GGA3 to rescue BACE1 accumulation in cells depleted of GGA3. Instead, we found that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and is mainly monoubiquitinated and Lys-63-linked polyubiquitinated. Finally, a GGA3 mutant with reduced ability to bind ubiquitin (GGA3L276A) was unable to regulate BACE1 levels both in rescue and overexpression experiments. These findings indicate that levels of GGA3 tightly and inversely regulate BACE1 levels via interaction with ubiquitin sorting machinery.

  13. Ubiquitin Regulates GGA3-mediated Degradation of BACE1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene L.; Cameron, Andrew N.; Piazza, Fabrizio; Walker, Kendall R.; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2010-01-01

    BACE1 (β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1) is a membrane-tethered member of the aspartyl proteases, essential for the production of β-amyloid, a toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. The BACE1 C-terminal fragment contains a DXXLL motif that has been shown to bind the VHS (VPS27, Hrs, and STAM) domain of GGA1–3 (Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding proteins). GGAs are trafficking molecules involved in the transport of proteins containing the DXXLL signal from the Golgi complex to endosomes. Moreover, GGAs bind ubiquitin and traffic synthetic and endosomal ubiquitinated cargoes to lysosomes. We have previously shown that depletion of GGA3 results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. Here, we report that the accumulation of BACE1 is rescued by the ectopic expression of GGA3 in H4 neuroglioma cells depleted of GGA3. Accordingly, the overexpression of GGA3 reduces the levels of BACE1 and β-amyloid. We then established that mutations in the GGA3 VPS27, Hrs, and STAM domain (N91A) or in BACE1 di-leucine motif (L499A/L500A), able to abrogate their binding, did not affect the ability of ectopically expressed GGA3 to rescue BACE1 accumulation in cells depleted of GGA3. Instead, we found that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and is mainly monoubiquitinated and Lys-63-linked polyubiquitinated. Finally, a GGA3 mutant with reduced ability to bind ubiquitin (GGA3L276A) was unable to regulate BACE1 levels both in rescue and overexpression experiments. These findings indicate that levels of GGA3 tightly and inversely regulate BACE1 levels via interaction with ubiquitin sorting machinery. PMID:20484053

  14. Auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 Enhances Its Substrate Ubiquitin Ligase Activity*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranaweera, Ruchira S.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    The RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is the master regulator of the tumor suppressor p53. It targets p53 for proteasomal degradation, restraining the potent activity of p53 and enabling cell survival and proliferation. Like most E3 ligases, Mdm2 can also ubiquitinate itself. How Mdm2 auto-ubiquitination may influence its substrate ubiquitin ligase activity is undefined. Here we show that auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 is an activating event. Mdm2 that has been conjugated to polyubiquitin chains, but not to single ubiquitins, exhibits substantially enhanced activity to polyubiquitinate p53. Mechanistically, auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 facilitates the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. This occurs through noncovalent interactions between the ubiquitin chains on Mdm2 and the ubiquitin binding domain on E2s. Mutations that diminish the noncovalent interactions render auto-ubiquitination unable to stimulate Mdm2 substrate E3 activity. These results suggest a model in which polyubiquitin chains on an E3 increase the local concentration of E2 enzymes and permit the processivity of substrate ubiquitination. They also support the notion that autocatalysis may be a prevalent mode for turning on the activity of latent enzymes. PMID:23671280

  15. Rates of ubiquitin conjugation increase when muscles atrophy, largely through activation of the N-end rule pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, V.; Baracos, V.; Sarraf, P.; Goldberg, A. L.

    1998-01-01

    The rapid loss of muscle mass that accompanies many disease states, such as cancer or sepsis, is primarily a result of increased protein breakdown in muscle, and several observations have suggested an activation of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Accordingly, in extracts of atrophying muscles from tumor-bearing or septic rats, rates of 125I-ubiquitin conjugation to endogenous proteins were found to be higher than in control extracts. On the other hand, in extracts of muscles from hypothyroid rats, where overall proteolysis is reduced below normal, the conjugation of 125I-ubiquitin to soluble proteins decreased by 50%, and treatment with triiodothyronine (T3) restored ubiquitination to control levels. Surprisingly, the N-end rule pathway, which selectively degrades proteins with basic or large hydrophobic N-terminal residues, was found to be responsible for most of these changes in ubiquitin conjugation. Competitive inhibitors of this pathway that specifically block the ubiquitin ligase, E3alpha, suppressed most of the increased ubiquitin conjugation in the muscle extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats. These inhibitors also suppressed ubiquitination in normal extracts toward levels in hypothyroid extracts, which showed little E3alpha-dependent ubiquitination. Thus, the inhibitors eliminated most of the differences in ubiquitination under these different pathological conditions. Moreover, 125I-lysozyme, a model N-end rule substrate, was ubiquitinated more rapidly in extracts from tumor-bearing and septic rats, and more slowly in those from hypothyroid rats, than in controls. Thus, the rate of ubiquitin conjugation increases in atrophying muscles, and these hormone- and cytokine-dependent responses are in large part due to activation of the N-end rule pathway.

  16. Toponomics analysis of functional interactions of the ubiquitin ligase PAM (Protein Associated with Myc) during spinal nociceptive processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre, Sandra; Maeurer, Christian; Coste, Ovidiu; Becker, Wiebke; Schmidtko, Achim; Holland, Sabrina; Wittpoth, Claus; Geisslinger, Gerd; Scholich, Klaus

    2008-12-01

    Protein associated with Myc (PAM) is a giant E3 ubiquitin ligase of 510 kDa. Although the role of PAM during neuronal development is well established, very little is known about its function in the regulation of synaptic strength. Here we used multiepitope ligand cartography (MELC) to study protein network profiles associated with PAM during the modulation of synaptic strength. MELC is a novel imaging technology that utilizes biomathematical tools to describe protein networks after consecutive immunohistochemical visualization of up to 100 proteins on the same sample. As an in vivo model to modulate synaptic strength we used the formalin test, a common model for acute and inflammatory pain. MELC analysis was performed with 37 different antibodies or fluorescence tags on spinal cord slices and led to the identification of 1390 PAM-related motifs that distinguish untreated and formalin-treated spinal cords. The majority of these motifs related to ubiquitin-dependent processes and/or the actin cytoskeleton. We detected an intermittent colocalization of PAM and ubiquitin with TSC2, a known substrate of PAM, and the glutamate receptors mGluR5 and GLUR1. Importantly these complexes were detected exclusively in the presence of F-actin. A direct PAM/F-actin interaction was confirmed by colocalization and cosedimentation. The binding of PAM toward F-actin varied strongly between the PAM splice forms found in rat spinal cords. PAM did not ubiquitylate actin or alter actin polymerization and depolymerization. However, F-actin decreased the ubiquitin ligase activity of purified PAM. Because PAM activation is known to involve its translocation, the binding of PAM to F-actin may serve to control its subcellular localization as well as its activity. Taken together we show that defining protein network profiles by topological proteomics analysis is a useful tool to identify previously unknown protein/protein interactions that underlie synaptic processes.

  17. Serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase distinguish mild traumatic brain injury from trauma controls and are elevated in mild and moderate traumatic brain injury patients with intracranial lesions and neurosurgical intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Linda; Lewis, Lawrence M; Silvestri, Salvatore; Falk, Jay L; Giordano, Philip; Brophy, Gretchen M; Demery, Jason A; Liu, Ming Cheng; Mo, Jixiang; Akinyi, Linnet; Mondello, Stefania; Schmid, Kara; Robertson, Claudia S; Tortella, Frank C; Hayes, Ronald L; Wang, Kevin K W

    2012-05-01

    This study compared early serum levels of ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase (UCH-L1) from patients with mild and moderate traumatic brain injury (TBI) with uninjured and injured controls and examined their association with traumatic intracranial lesions on computed tomography (CT) scan (CT positive) and the need for neurosurgical intervention (NSI). This prospective cohort study enrolled adult patients presenting to three tertiary care Level I trauma centers after blunt head trauma with loss of consciousness, amnesia, or disorientation and a Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score 9 to 15. Control groups included normal uninjured controls and nonhead injured trauma controls presenting to the emergency department with orthopedic injuries or motor vehicle crash without TBI. Blood samples were obtained in all trauma patients within 4 hours of injury and measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for UCH-L1 (ng/mL ± standard error of the mean). There were 295 patients enrolled, 96 TBI patients (86 with GCS score 13-15 and 10 with GCS score 9-12), and 199 controls (176 uninjured, 16 motor vehicle crash controls, and 7 orthopedic controls). The AUC for distinguishing TBI from uninjured controls was 0.87 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.82-0.92) and for distinguishing those TBIs with GCS score 15 from controls was AUC 0.87 (95% CI, 0.81-0.93). Mean UCH-L1 levels in patients with CT negative versus CT positive were 0.620 (± 0.254) and 1.618 (± 0.474), respectively (p < 0.001), and the AUC was 0.73 (95% CI, 0.62-0.84). For patients without and with NSI, levels were 0.627 (0.218) versus 2.568 (0.854; p < 0.001), and the AUC was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.76-0.94). UCH-L1 is detectable in serum within an hour of injury and is associated with measures of injury severity including the GCS score, CT lesions, and NSI. Further study is required to validate these findings before clinical application. II, prognostic study.

  18. Alanine scan of core positions in ubiquitin reveals links between dynamics, stability, and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Shirley Y; Pullen, Lester; Virgil, Daniel J; Castañeda, Carlos A; Abeykoon, Dulith; Bolon, Daniel N A; Fushman, David

    2014-04-03

    Mutations at solvent-inaccessible core positions in proteins can impact function through many biophysical mechanisms including alterations to thermodynamic stability and protein dynamics. As these properties of proteins are difficult to investigate, the impacts of core mutations on protein function are poorly understood for most systems. Here, we determined the effects of alanine mutations at all 15 core positions in ubiquitin on function in yeast. The majority (13 of 15) of alanine substitutions supported yeast growth as the sole ubiquitin. Both the two null mutants (I30A and L43A) were less stable to temperature-induced unfolding in vitro than wild type (WT) but were well folded at physiological temperatures. Heteronuclear NMR studies indicated that the L43A mutation reduces temperature stability while retaining a ground-state structure similar to WT. This structure enables L43A to bind to common ubiquitin receptors in vitro. Many of the core alanine ubiquitin mutants, including one of the null variants (I30A), exhibited an increased accumulation of high-molecular-weight species, suggesting that these mutants caused a defect in the processing of ubiquitin-substrate conjugates. In contrast, L43A exhibited a unique accumulation pattern with reduced levels of high-molecular-weight species and undetectable levels of free ubiquitin. When conjugation to other proteins was blocked, L43A ubiquitin accumulated as free ubiquitin in yeast. Based on these findings, we speculate that ubiquitin's stability to unfolding may be required for efficient recycling during proteasome-mediated substrate degradation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Constitutive endocytosis and turnover of the neuronal glycine transporter GlyT2 is dependent on ubiquitination of a C-terminal lysine cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaime de Juan-Sanz

    Full Text Available Inhibitory glycinergic neurotransmission is terminated by sodium and chloride-dependent plasma membrane glycine transporters (GlyTs. The mainly glial glycine transporter GlyT1 is primarily responsible for the completion of inhibitory neurotransmission and the neuronal glycine transporter GlyT2 mediates the reuptake of the neurotransmitter that is used to refill synaptic vesicles in the terminal, a fundamental role in the physiology and pathology of glycinergic neurotransmission. Indeed, inhibitory glycinergic neurotransmission is modulated by the exocytosis and endocytosis of GlyT2. We previously reported that constitutive and Protein Kinase C (PKC-regulated endocytosis of GlyT2 is mediated by clathrin and that PKC accelerates GlyT2 endocytosis by increasing its ubiquitination. However, the role of ubiquitination in the constitutive endocytosis and turnover of this protein remains unexplored. Here, we show that ubiquitination of a C-terminus four lysine cluster of GlyT2 is required for constitutive endocytosis, sorting into the slow recycling pathway and turnover of the transporter. Ubiquitination negatively modulates the turnover of GlyT2, such that increased ubiquitination driven by PKC activation accelerates transporter degradation rate shortening its half-life while decreased ubiquitination increases transporter stability. Finally, ubiquitination of GlyT2 in neurons is highly responsive to the free pool of ubiquitin, suggesting that the deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCHL1, as the major regulator of neuronal ubiquitin homeostasis, indirectly modulates the turnover of GlyT2. Our results contribute to the elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the dynamic trafficking of this important neuronal protein which has pathological relevance since mutations in the GlyT2 gene (SLC6A5 are the second most common cause of human hyperekplexia.

  20. Direct Sensing and Discrimination among Ubiquitin and Ubiquitin Chains Using Solid-State Nanopores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nir, Iftach; Huttner, Diana; Meller, Amit

    2015-05-05

    Nanopore sensing involves an electrophoretic transport of analytes through a nanoscale pore, permitting label-free sensing at the single-molecule level. However, to date, the detection of individual small proteins has been challenging, primarily due to the poor signal/noise ratio that these molecules produce during passage through the pore. Here, we show that fine adjustment of the buffer pH, close to the isoelectric point, can be used to slow down the translocation speed of the analytes, hence permitting sensing and characterization of small globular proteins. Ubiquitin (Ub) is a small protein of 8.5 kDa, which is well conserved in all eukaryotes. Ub conjugates to proteins as a posttranslational modification called ubiquitination. The immense diversity of Ub substrates, as well as the complexity of Ub modification types and the numerous physiological consequences of these modifications, make Ub and Ub chains an interesting and challenging subject of study. The ability to detect Ub and to identify Ub linkage type at the single-molecule level may provide a novel tool for investigation in the Ub field. This is especially adequate because, for most ubiquitinated substrates, Ub modifies only a few molecules in the cell at a given time. Applying our method to the detection of mono- and poly-Ub molecules, we show that we can analyze their characteristics using nanopores. Of particular importance is that two Ub dimers that are equal in molecular weight but differ in 3D structure due to their different linkage types can be readily discriminated. Thus, to our knowledge, our method offers a novel approach for analyzing proteins in unprecedented detail using solid-state nanopores. Specifically, it provides the basis for development of single-molecule sensing of differently ubiquitinated substrates with different biological significance. Finally, our study serves as a proof of concept for approaching nanopore detection of sub-10-kDa proteins and demonstrates the ability of

  1. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-07-22

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. The Endosome-associated Deubiquitinating Enzyme USP8 Regulates BACE1 Enzyme Ubiquitination and Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeates, Eniola Funmilayo Aduke; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2016-01-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of amyloid-β, the toxic peptide that accumulates in the brain of subjects affected by Alzheimer disease. Our previous studies have shown that BACE1 is degraded via the lysosomal pathway and that that depletion of the trafficking molecule Golgi-localized γ-ear-containing ARF-binding protein 3 (GGA3) results in increased BACE1 levels and activity because of impaired lysosomal degradation. We also determined that GGA3 regulation of BACE1 levels requires its ability to bind ubiquitin. Accordingly, we reported that BACE1 is ubiquitinated at lysine 501 and that lack of ubiquitination at lysine 501 produces BACE1 stabilization. Ubiquitin conjugation is a reversible process mediated by deubiquitinating enzymes. The ubiquitin-specific peptidase 8 (USP8), an endosome-associated deubiquitinating enzyme, regulates the ubiquitination, trafficking, and lysosomal degradation of several plasma membrane proteins. Here, we report that RNAi-mediated depletion of USP8 reduced levels of both ectopically expressed and endogenous BACE1 in H4 human neuroglioma cells. Moreover, USP8 depletion increased BACE1 ubiquitination, promoted BACE1 accumulation in the early endosomes and late endosomes/lysosomes, and decreased levels of BACE1 in the recycling endosomes. We also found that decreased BACE1 protein levels were accompanied by a decrease in BACE1-mediated amyloid precursor protein cleavage and amyloid-β levels. Our findings demonstrate that USP8 plays a key role in the trafficking and degradation of BACE1 by deubiquitinating lysine 501. These studies suggest that therapies able to accelerate BACE1 degradation (e.g. by increasing BACE1 ubiquitination) may represent a potential treatment for Alzheimer disease. PMID:27302062

  3. Modulation of synaptic plasticity by stress hormone associates with plastic alteration of synaptic NMDA receptor in the adult hippocampus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiu Chung Tse

    Full Text Available Stress exerts a profound impact on learning and memory, in part, through the actions of adrenal corticosterone (CORT on synaptic plasticity, a cellular model of learning and memory. Increasing findings suggest that CORT exerts its impact on synaptic plasticity by altering the functional properties of glutamate receptors, which include changes in the motility and function of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid subtype of glutamate receptor (AMPAR that are responsible for the expression of synaptic plasticity. Here we provide evidence that CORT could also regulate synaptic plasticity by modulating the function of synaptic N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs, which mediate the induction of synaptic plasticity. We found that stress level CORT applied to adult rat hippocampal slices potentiated evoked NMDAR-mediated synaptic responses within 30 min. Surprisingly, following this fast-onset change, we observed a slow-onset (>1 hour after termination of CORT exposure increase in synaptic expression of GluN2A-containing NMDARs. To investigate the consequences of the distinct fast- and slow-onset modulation of NMDARs for synaptic plasticity, we examined the formation of long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD within relevant time windows. Paralleling the increased NMDAR function, both LTP and LTD were facilitated during CORT treatment. However, 1-2 hours after CORT treatment when synaptic expression of GluN2A-containing NMDARs is increased, bidirectional plasticity was no longer facilitated. Our findings reveal the remarkable plasticity of NMDARs in the adult hippocampus in response to CORT. CORT-mediated slow-onset increase in GluN2A in hippocampal synapses could be a homeostatic mechanism to normalize synaptic plasticity following fast-onset stress-induced facilitation.

  4. Nicotinic mechanisms influencing synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placzek, Andon Nicholas; Zhang, Tao A; Dani, John Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) are expressed throughout the hippocampus, and nicotinic signaling plays an important role in neuronal function. In the context of learning and memory related behaviors associated with hippocampal function, a potentially significant feature of nAChR activity is the impact it has on synaptic plasticity. Synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons has long been considered a contributing cellular mechanism of learning and memory. These same kinds of cellular mechanisms are a factor in the development of nicotine addiction. Nicotinic signaling has been demonstrated by in vitro studies to affect synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons via multiple steps, and the signaling has also been shown to evoke synaptic plasticity in vivo. This review focuses on the nAChRs subtypes that contribute to hippocampal synaptic plasticity at the cellular and circuit level. It also considers nicotinic influences over long-term changes in the hippocampus that may contribute to addiction. PMID:19434057

  5. A presynaptic role for PKA in synaptic tagging and memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Alan Jung; Havekes, Robbert; Choi, Jennifer Hk; Luczak, Vince; Nie, Ting; Huang, Ted; Abel, Ted

    2014-10-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) and other signaling molecules are spatially restricted within neurons by A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs). Although studies on compartmentalized PKA signaling have focused on postsynaptic mechanisms, presynaptically anchored PKA may contribute to synaptic plasticity and memory because PKA also regulates presynaptic transmitter release. Here, we examine this issue using genetic and pharmacological application of Ht31, a PKA anchoring disrupting peptide. At the hippocampal Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, Ht31 treatment elicits a rapid decay of synaptic responses to repetitive stimuli, indicating a fast depletion of the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. The interaction between PKA and proteins involved in producing this pool of synaptic vesicles is supported by biochemical assays showing that synaptic vesicle protein 2 (SV2), Rim1, and SNAP25 are components of a complex that interacts with cAMP. Moreover, acute treatment with Ht31 reduces the levels of SV2. Finally, experiments with transgenic mouse lines, which express Ht31 in excitatory neurons at the Schaffer collateral CA3-CA1 synapse, highlight a requirement for presynaptically anchored PKA in pathway-specific synaptic tagging and long-term contextual fear memory. These results suggest that a presynaptically compartmentalized PKA is critical for synaptic plasticity and memory by regulating the readily releasable pool of synaptic vesicles. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Synaptic Homeostasis and Restructuring across the Sleep-Wake Cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfredo Blanco

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Sleep is critical for hippocampus-dependent memory consolidation. However, the underlying mechanisms of synaptic plasticity are poorly understood. The central controversy is on whether long-term potentiation (LTP takes a role during sleep and which would be its specific effect on memory. To address this question, we used immunohistochemistry to measure phosphorylation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (pCaMKIIα in the rat hippocampus immediately after specific sleep-wake states were interrupted. Control animals not exposed to novel objects during waking (WK showed stable pCaMKIIα levels across the sleep-wake cycle, but animals exposed to novel objects showed a decrease during subsequent slow-wave sleep (SWS followed by a rebound during rapid-eye-movement sleep (REM. The levels of pCaMKIIα during REM were proportional to cortical spindles near SWS/REM transitions. Based on these results, we modeled sleep-dependent LTP on a network of fully connected excitatory neurons fed with spikes recorded from the rat hippocampus across WK, SWS and REM. Sleep without LTP orderly rescaled synaptic weights to a narrow range of intermediate values. In contrast, LTP triggered near the SWS/REM transition led to marked swaps in synaptic weight ranking. To better understand the interaction between rescaling and restructuring during sleep, we implemented synaptic homeostasis and embossing in a detailed hippocampal-cortical model with both excitatory and inhibitory neurons. Synaptic homeostasis was implemented by weakening potentiation and strengthening depression, while synaptic embossing was simulated by evoking LTP on selected synapses. We observed that synaptic homeostasis facilitates controlled synaptic restructuring. The results imply a mechanism for a cognitive synergy between SWS and REM, and suggest that LTP at the SWS/REM transition critically influences the effect of sleep: Its lack determines synaptic homeostasis, its presence causes

  7. Effect of prenatal auditory stimulation on numerical synaptic density and mean synaptic height in the posthatch Day 1 chick hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhury, Sraboni; Nag, Tapas Chandra; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2009-02-01

    Previous studies on prenatal auditory stimulation by species-specific sound or sitar music showed enhanced morphological and biochemical changes in chick hippocampus, which plays an important role in learning and memory. Changes in the efficiency of synapses, synaptic morphology and de novo synapse formation affects learning and memory. Therefore, in the present study, we set out to investigate the mean synaptic density and mean synaptic height at posthatch Day 1 in dorsal and ventral part of chick hippocampus following prenatal auditory stimulation. Fertilized 0 day eggs of domestic chick incubated under normal conditions were exposed to patterned sounds of species-specific and sitar music at 65 dB levels for 15 min/h round the clock (frequency range: 100-6300 Hz) from embryonic Day 10 till hatching. The synapses identified under transmission electron microscope were estimated for their numerical density by physical disector method and also the mean synaptic height calculated. Our results demonstrate a significant increase in mean synaptic density with no alterations in the mean synaptic height following both types of auditory stimulation in the dorsal as well as ventral part of the hippocampus. The observed increase in mean synaptic density suggests enhanced synaptic substrate to strengthen hippocampal function. 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Atg5-independent sequestration of ubiquitinated mycobacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathleen A Collins

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Like several other intracellular pathogens, Mycobacterium marinum (Mm escapes from phagosomes into the host cytosol where it can polymerize actin, leading to motility that promotes spread to neighboring cells. However, only approximately 25% of internalized Mm form actin tails, and the fate of the remaining bacteria has been unknown. Here we show that cytosolic access results in a new and intricate host pathogen interaction: host macrophages ubiquitinate Mm, while Mm shed their ubiquitinated cell walls. Phagosomal escape and ubiquitination of Mm occurred rapidly, prior to 3.5 hours post infection; at the same time, ubiquitinated Mm cell wall material mixed with host-derived dense membrane networks appeared in close proximity to cytosolic bacteria, suggesting cell wall shedding and association with remnants of the lysed phagosome. At 24 hours post-infection, Mm that polymerized actin were not ubiquitinated, whereas ubiquitinated Mm were found within LAMP-1-positive vacuoles resembling lysosomes. Though double membranes were observed which sequestered Mm away from the cytosol, targeting of Mm to the LAMP-1-positive vacuoles was independent of classical autophagy, as demonstrated by absence of LC3 association and by Atg5-independence of their formation. Further, ubiquitination and LAMP-1 association did not occur with mutant avirulent Mm lacking ESX-1 (type VII secretion, which fail to escape the primary phagosome; apart from its function in phagosome escape, ESX-1 was not directly required for Mm ubiquitination in macrophages or in vitro. These data suggest that virulent Mm follow two distinct paths in the cytosol of infected host cells: bacterial ubiquitination is followed by sequestration into lysosome-like organelles via an autophagy-independent pathway, while cell wall shedding may allow escape from this fate to permit continued residence in the cytosol and formation of actin tails.

  9. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  10. Stochastic lattice model of synaptic membrane protein domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yiwei; Kahraman, Osman; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2017-05-01

    Neurotransmitter receptor molecules, concentrated in synaptic membrane domains along with scaffolds and other kinds of proteins, are crucial for signal transmission across chemical synapses. In common with other membrane protein domains, synaptic domains are characterized by low protein copy numbers and protein crowding, with rapid stochastic turnover of individual molecules. We study here in detail a stochastic lattice model of the receptor-scaffold reaction-diffusion dynamics at synaptic domains that was found previously to capture, at the mean-field level, the self-assembly, stability, and characteristic size of synaptic domains observed in experiments. We show that our stochastic lattice model yields quantitative agreement with mean-field models of nonlinear diffusion in crowded membranes. Through a combination of analytic and numerical solutions of the master equation governing the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains, together with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, we find substantial discrepancies between mean-field and stochastic models for the reaction dynamics at synaptic domains. Based on the reaction and diffusion properties of synaptic receptors and scaffolds suggested by previous experiments and mean-field calculations, we show that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic receptors and scaffolds provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the observed single-molecule trajectories, and spatial heterogeneity in the effective rates at which receptors and scaffolds are recycled at the cell membrane. Our work sheds light on the physical mechanisms and principles linking the collective properties of membrane protein domains to the stochastic dynamics that rule their molecular components.

  11. Met1-linked Ubiquitination in Immune Signalling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiil, Berthe Katrine; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads

    2014-01-01

    identification of physiological substrates for Met1-Ub in response to activation of innate immune receptors. These discoveries have significantly advanced our understanding of how non-degradative ubiquitin modifications control pro-inflammatory responses mediated by nuclear factor κB and mitogen......Methionine 1-linked ubiquitin chains (Met1-Ub), or linear ubiquitin, has emerged as a central post-translational modification in innate immune signalling. Molecular machinery that assembles, senses and, more recently, disassembles Met1-Ub has been identified, and technical advances have enabled...

  12. Dynamic Control of Synaptic Adhesion and Organizing Molecules in Synaptic Plasticity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudenko, Gabby (Texas-MED)

    2017-01-01

    Synapses play a critical role in establishing and maintaining neural circuits, permitting targeted information transfer throughout the brain. A large portfolio of synaptic adhesion/organizing molecules (SAMs) exists in the mammalian brain involved in synapse development and maintenance. SAMs bind protein partners, formingtrans-complexes spanning the synaptic cleft orcis-complexes attached to the same synaptic membrane. SAMs play key roles in cell adhesion and in organizing protein interaction networks; they can also provide mechanisms of recognition, generate scaffolds onto which partners can dock, and likely take part in signaling processes as well. SAMs are regulated through a portfolio of different mechanisms that affect their protein levels, precise localization, stability, and the availability of their partners at synapses. Interaction of SAMs with their partners can further be strengthened or weakened through alternative splicing, competing protein partners, ectodomain shedding, or astrocytically secreted factors. Given that numerous SAMs appear altered by synaptic activity, in vivo, these molecules may be used to dynamically scale up or scale down synaptic communication. Many SAMs, including neurexins, neuroligins, cadherins, and contactins, are now implicated in neuropsychiatric and neurodevelopmental diseases, such as autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia, and bipolar disorder and studying their molecular mechanisms holds promise for developing novel therapeutics.

  13. Synaptic Plasticity and Translation Initiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klann, Eric; Antion, Marcia D.; Banko, Jessica L.; Hou, Lingfei

    2004-01-01

    It is widely accepted that protein synthesis, including local protein synthesis at synapses, is required for several forms of synaptic plasticity. Local protein synthesis enables synapses to control synaptic strength independent of the cell body via rapid protein production from pre-existing mRNA. Therefore, regulation of translation initiation is…

  14. Synaptic electronics: materials, devices and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzum, Duygu; Yu, Shimeng; Wong, H-S Philip

    2013-09-27

    In this paper, the recent progress of synaptic electronics is reviewed. The basics of biological synaptic plasticity and learning are described. The material properties and electrical switching characteristics of a variety of synaptic devices are discussed, with a focus on the use of synaptic devices for neuromorphic or brain-inspired computing. Performance metrics desirable for large-scale implementations of synaptic devices are illustrated. A review of recent work on targeted computing applications with synaptic devices is presented.

  15. Spine Calcium Transients Induced by Synaptically-Evoked Action Potentials Can Predict Synapse Location and Establish Synaptic Democracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Rhiannon M.; van Ooyen, Arjen

    2012-01-01

    CA1 pyramidal neurons receive hundreds of synaptic inputs at different distances from the soma. Distance-dependent synaptic scaling enables distal and proximal synapses to influence the somatic membrane equally, a phenomenon called “synaptic democracy”. How this is established is unclear. The backpropagating action potential (BAP) is hypothesised to provide distance-dependent information to synapses, allowing synaptic strengths to scale accordingly. Experimental measurements show that a BAP evoked by current injection at the soma causes calcium currents in the apical shaft whose amplitudes decay with distance from the soma. However, in vivo action potentials are not induced by somatic current injection but by synaptic inputs along the dendrites, which creates a different excitable state of the dendrites. Due to technical limitations, it is not possible to study experimentally whether distance information can also be provided by synaptically-evoked BAPs. Therefore we adapted a realistic morphological and electrophysiological model to measure BAP-induced voltage and calcium signals in spines after Schaffer collateral synapse stimulation. We show that peak calcium concentration is highly correlated with soma-synapse distance under a number of physiologically-realistic suprathreshold stimulation regimes and for a range of dendritic morphologies. Peak calcium levels also predicted the attenuation of the EPSP across the dendritic tree. Furthermore, we show that peak calcium can be used to set up a synaptic democracy in a homeostatic manner, whereby synapses regulate their synaptic strength on the basis of the difference between peak calcium and a uniform target value. We conclude that information derived from synaptically-generated BAPs can indicate synapse location and can subsequently be utilised to implement a synaptic democracy. PMID:22719238

  16. Synaptic devices based on purely electronic memristors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ruobing [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China); Institute of Materials Science, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, Jun; Zhuge, Fei, E-mail: zhugefei@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: h-cao@nimte.ac.cn; Zhu, Liqiang; Liang, Lingyan; Zhang, Hongliang; Gao, Junhua; Cao, Hongtao, E-mail: zhugefei@nimte.ac.cn, E-mail: h-cao@nimte.ac.cn; Fu, Bing; Li, Kang [Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo 315201 (China)

    2016-01-04

    Memristive devices have been widely employed to emulate biological synaptic behavior. In these cases, the memristive switching generally originates from electrical field induced ion migration or Joule heating induced phase change. In this letter, the Ti/ZnO/Pt structure was found to show memristive switching ascribed to a carrier trapping/detrapping of the trap sites (e.g., oxygen vacancies or zinc interstitials) in ZnO. The carrier trapping/detrapping level can be controllably adjusted by regulating the current compliance level or voltage amplitude. Multi-level conductance states can, therefore, be realized in such memristive device. The spike-timing-dependent plasticity, an important Hebbian learning rule, has been implemented in this type of synaptic device. Compared with filamentary-type memristive devices, purely electronic memristors have potential to reduce their energy consumption and work more stably and reliably, since no structural distortion occurs.

  17. Stressing the ubiquitin-proteasome system without 20S proteolytic inhibition selectively kills cervical cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi K Anchoori

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer cells exhibit an increased requirement for ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation associated with an elevated metabolic turnover rate, and for specific signaling pathways, notably HPV E6-targeted degradation of p53 and PDZ proteins. Natural compounds with antioxidant properties including flavonoids and triterpenoids hold promise as anticancer agents by interfering with ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. An increasing body of evidence indicates that their α-β unsaturated carbonyl system is the molecular determinant for inhibition of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation up-stream of the catalytic sites of the 20S proteasome. Herein we report the identification and characterization of a new class of chalcone-based, potent and cell permeable chemical inhibitors of ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation, and a lead compound RAMB1. RAMB1 inhibits ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation without compromising the catalytic activities of the 20S proteasome, a mechanism distinct from that of Bortezomib. Treatment of cervical cancer cells with RAMB1 triggers unfolded protein responses, including aggresome formation and Hsp90 stabilization, and increases p53 steady state levels. RAMB1 treatment results in activation of lysosomal-dependent degradation pathways as a mechanism to compensate for increasing levels of poly-ubiquitin enriched toxic aggregates. Importantly, RAMB1 synergistically triggers cell death of cervical cancer cells when combined with the lysosome inhibitor Chloroquine.

  18. Neuro-inspired computing using resistive synaptic devices

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book summarizes the recent breakthroughs in hardware implementation of neuro-inspired computing using resistive synaptic devices. The authors describe how two-terminal solid-state resistive memories can emulate synaptic weights in a neural network. Readers will benefit from state-of-the-art summaries of resistive synaptic devices, from the individual cell characteristics to the large-scale array integration. This book also discusses peripheral neuron circuits design challenges and design strategies. Finally, the authors describe the impact of device non-ideal properties (e.g. noise, variation, yield) and their impact on the learning performance at the system-level, using a device-algorithm co-design methodology. • Provides single-source reference to recent breakthroughs in resistive synaptic devices, not only at individual cell-level, but also at integrated array-level; • Includes detailed discussion of the peripheral circuits and array architecture design of the neuro-crossbar system; • Focuses on...

  19. Conserved properties of Drosophila Insomniac link sleep regulation and synaptic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuling; Kellner, David A; Hatch, Hayden A M; Yumita, Tomohiro; Sanchez, Sandrine; Machold, Robert P; Frank, C Andrew; Stavropoulos, Nicholas

    2017-05-01

    Sleep is an ancient animal behavior that is regulated similarly in species ranging from flies to humans. Various genes that regulate sleep have been identified in invertebrates, but whether the functions of these genes are conserved in mammals remains poorly explored. Drosophila insomniac (inc) mutants exhibit severely shortened and fragmented sleep. Inc protein physically associates with the Cullin-3 (Cul3) ubiquitin ligase, and neuronal depletion of Inc or Cul3 strongly curtails sleep, suggesting that Inc is a Cul3 adaptor that directs the ubiquitination of neuronal substrates that impact sleep. Three proteins similar to Inc exist in vertebrates-KCTD2, KCTD5, and KCTD17-but are uncharacterized within the nervous system and their functional conservation with Inc has not been addressed. Here we show that Inc and its mouse orthologs exhibit striking biochemical and functional interchangeability within Cul3 complexes. Remarkably, KCTD2 and KCTD5 restore sleep to inc mutants, indicating that they can substitute for Inc in vivo and engage its neuronal targets relevant to sleep. Inc and its orthologs localize similarly within fly and mammalian neurons and can traffic to synapses, suggesting that their substrates may include synaptic proteins. Consistent with such a mechanism, inc mutants exhibit defects in synaptic structure and physiology, indicating that Inc is essential for both sleep and synaptic function. Our findings reveal that molecular functions of Inc are conserved through ~600 million years of evolution and support the hypothesis that Inc and its orthologs participate in an evolutionarily conserved ubiquitination pathway that links synaptic function and sleep regulation.

  20. Ubiquitination in melanoma pathogenesis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinyuan; Guo, Weinan; Li, Chunying

    2017-06-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive skin cancers with fiercely increasing incidence and mortality. Since the progressive understanding of the mutational landscape and immunologic pathogenic factors in melanoma, the targeted therapy and immunotherapy have been recently established and gained unprecedented improvements for melanoma treatment. However, the prognosis of melanoma patients remains unoptimistic mainly due to the resistance and nonresponse to current available drugs. Ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification which plays crucial roles in diverse cellular biological activities and participates in the pathogenesis of various cancers, including melanoma. Through the regulation of multiple tumor promoters and suppressors, ubiquitination is emerging as the key contributor and therefore a potential therapeutic target for melanoma. Herein, we summarize the current understanding of ubiquitination in melanoma, from mechanistic insights to clinical progress, and discuss the prospect of ubiquitination modification in melanoma treatment. © 2017 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Ubiquitination of specific mitochondrial matrix proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, Gilad [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ziv, Tamar [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Braten, Ori [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Admon, Arie [The Smoler Proteomics Center, Faculty of Biology – Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa, 32000 (Israel); Udasin, Ronald G. [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel); Ciechanover, Aaron, E-mail: aaroncie@tx.technion.ac.il [The Janet and David Polak Tumor and Vascular Biology Research Center and the Technion Integrated Cancer Center (TICC), The Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and Research Institute, Haifa, 31096 (Israel)

    2016-06-17

    Several protein quality control systems in bacteria and/or mitochondrial matrix from lower eukaryotes are absent in higher eukaryotes. These are transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA), The N-end rule ATP-dependent protease ClpAP, and two more ATP-dependent proteases, HslUV and ClpXP (in yeast). The lost proteases resemble the 26S proteasome and the role of tmRNA and the N-end rule in eukaryotic cytosol is performed by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). Therefore, we hypothesized that the UPS might have substituted these systems – at least partially – in the mitochondrial matrix of higher eukaryotes. Using three independent experimental approaches, we demonstrated the presence of ubiquitinated proteins in the matrix of isolated yeast mitochondria. First, we show that isolated mitochondria contain ubiquitin (Ub) conjugates, which remained intact after trypsin digestion. Second, we demonstrate that the mitochondrial soluble fraction contains Ub-conjugates, several of which were identified by mass spectrometry and are localized to the matrix. Third, using immunoaffinity enrichment by specific antibodies recognizing digested ubiquitinated peptides, we identified a group of Ub-modified matrix proteins. The modification was further substantiated by separation on SDS-PAGE and immunoblots. Last, we attempted to identify the ubiquitin ligase(s) involved, and identified Dma1p as a trypsin-resistant protein in our mitochondrial preparations. Taken together, these data suggest a yet undefined role for the UPS in regulation of the mitochondrial matrix proteins. -- Highlights: •Mitochondrial matrix contains ubiquitinated proteins. •Ubiquitination occurs most probably in the matrix. •Dma1p is a ubiquitin ligase present in mitochondrial preparations.

  2. Prokaryotic Ubiquitin-Like Protein Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie A.

    2014-01-01

    Prokaryotes form ubiquitin (Ub)-like isopeptide bonds on the lysine residues of proteins by at least two distinct pathways that are reversible and regulated. In mycobacteria, the C-terminal Gln of Pup (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein) is deamidated and isopeptide linked to proteins by a mechanism distinct from ubiquitylation in enzymology yet analogous to ubiquitylation in targeting proteins for destruction by proteasomes. Ub-fold proteins of archaea (SAMPs, small archaeal modifier protein...

  3. Evolution of Plant HECT Ubiquitin Ligases

    OpenAIRE

    Mar?n, Ignacio

    2013-01-01

    HECT ubiquitin ligases are key components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is present in all eukaryotes. In this study, the patterns of emergence of HECT genes in plants are described. Phylogenetic and structural data indicate that viridiplantae have six main HECT subfamilies, which arose before the split that separated green algae from the rest of plants. It is estimated that the common ancestor of all plants contained seven HECT genes. Contrary to what happened in animals, the numb...

  4. Ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in Xenopus extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Gary S; Philpott, Anna

    2016-01-01

    The small protein modifier, ubiquitin, can be covalently attached to proteins in the process of ubiquitylation, resulting in a variety of functional outcomes. In particular, the most commonly-associated and well-studied fate for proteins modified with ubiquitin is their ultimate destruction: degradation by the 26S proteasome via the ubiquitin-proteasome system, or digestion in lysosomes by proteolytic enzymes. From the earliest days of ubiquitylation research, a reliable and versatile "cell-in-a-test-tube" system has been employed in the form of cytoplasmic extracts from the eggs and embryos of the frog Xenopus laevis. Biochemical studies of ubiquitin and protein degradation using this system have led to significant advances particularly in the study of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, while the versatility of Xenopus as a developmental model has allowed investigation of the in vivo consequences of ubiquitylation. Here we describe the use and history of Xenopus extract in the study of ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation, and highlight the versatility of this system that has been exploited to uncover mechanisms and consequences of ubiquitylation and proteolysis.

  5. Proteostasis regulation by the ubiquitin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bett, John S

    2016-10-15

    Cells have developed an evolutionary obligation to survey and maintain proteome fidelity and avoid the possible toxic consequences of protein misfolding and aggregation. Disturbances to protein homoeostasis (proteostasis) can result in severe cellular phenotypes and are closely linked with the accumulation of microscopically visible deposits of aggregated proteins. These include inclusion bodies found in AD (Alzheimer's disease), HD (Huntington's disease) and ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis) patient neurons. Protein aggregation is intimately linked with the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like post-translational modifier system, which manages cellular protein folding stress and promotes the restoration of proteostasis. This is achieved in large part through the action of the UPS (ubiquitin-proteasome system), which is responsible for directing the proteasomal destruction of misfolded and damaged proteins tagged with ubiquitin chains. There are other less well understood ways in which ubiquitin family members can help to maintain proteostasis that complement, but are independent of, the UPS. This article discusses our current understanding of how the ubiquitin family regulates the protein misfolding pathways that threaten proteome fidelity, and how this is achieved by the key players in this process. © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  6. A calcium-dependent plasticity rule for HCN channels maintains activity homeostasis and stable synaptic learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  7. A calcium-dependent plasticity rule for HCN channels maintains activity homeostasis and stable synaptic learning.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suraj Honnuraiah

    Full Text Available Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific

  8. A Calcium-Dependent Plasticity Rule for HCN Channels Maintains Activity Homeostasis and Stable Synaptic Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honnuraiah, Suraj; Narayanan, Rishikesh

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical and computational frameworks for synaptic plasticity and learning have a long and cherished history, with few parallels within the well-established literature for plasticity of voltage-gated ion channels. In this study, we derive rules for plasticity in the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels, and assess the synergy between synaptic and HCN channel plasticity in establishing stability during synaptic learning. To do this, we employ a conductance-based model for the hippocampal pyramidal neuron, and incorporate synaptic plasticity through the well-established Bienenstock-Cooper-Munro (BCM)-like rule for synaptic plasticity, wherein the direction and strength of the plasticity is dependent on the concentration of calcium influx. Under this framework, we derive a rule for HCN channel plasticity to establish homeostasis in synaptically-driven firing rate, and incorporate such plasticity into our model. In demonstrating that this rule for HCN channel plasticity helps maintain firing rate homeostasis after bidirectional synaptic plasticity, we observe a linear relationship between synaptic plasticity and HCN channel plasticity for maintaining firing rate homeostasis. Motivated by this linear relationship, we derive a calcium-dependent rule for HCN-channel plasticity, and demonstrate that firing rate homeostasis is maintained in the face of synaptic plasticity when moderate and high levels of cytosolic calcium influx induced depression and potentiation of the HCN-channel conductance, respectively. Additionally, we show that such synergy between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity enhances the stability of synaptic learning through metaplasticity in the BCM-like synaptic plasticity profile. Finally, we demonstrate that the synergistic interaction between synaptic and HCN-channel plasticity preserves robustness of information transfer across the neuron under a rate-coding schema. Our results establish specific physiological roles

  9. Circadian Regulation of Synaptic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos G. Frank

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms refer to oscillations in biological processes with a period of approximately 24 h. In addition to the sleep/wake cycle, there are circadian rhythms in metabolism, body temperature, hormone output, organ function and gene expression. There is also evidence of circadian rhythms in synaptic plasticity, in some cases driven by a master central clock and in other cases by peripheral clocks. In this article, I review the evidence for circadian influences on synaptic plasticity. I also discuss ways to disentangle the effects of brain state and rhythms on synaptic plasticity.

  10. Ubiquitin: a potential cerebrospinal fluid progression marker in Huntington's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther-Jensen, T; Simonsen, A H; Budtz-Jørgensen, E; Hjermind, L E; Nielsen, J E

    2015-10-01

    Finding early and dynamic biomarkers in Huntington's disease is a key to understanding the early pathology of Huntington's disease and potentially to tracking disease progression. This would benefit the future evaluation of potential neuroprotective and disease-modifying therapies, as well as aid in identifying an optimal time point for initiating a potential therapeutic intervention. This explorative proteomics study evaluated cerebrospinal fluid from 94 Huntington's disease gene-expansion carriers (39 premanifest and 55 manifest) and 27 Huntington's disease gene-expansion negative individuals using surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (SELDI-TOF) mass spectrometry. Differences in peak intensity from SELDI-TOF spectra were evaluated. Levels of 10 peaks were statistically significantly different between manifest gene-expansion carriers and controls. One of them identified as ubiquitin was shown to be dependent on the Unified Huntington Disease Rating Scale Total Functional Capacity, a pseudo-measure of disease severity (P = 0.001), and the Symbol Digit Modalities Test (0.04) in manifest and CAG-age product score (P = 0.019) in all gene-expansion carriers. Multiple studies have shown that the ubiquitin-proteasome system is involved in Huntington's disease pathogenesis and understanding of this involvement may have therapeutic potential in humans. This is the first study on cerebrospinal fluid to confirm the involvement of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in Huntington's disease. Furthermore it is shown that ubiquitin increases with disease progression and CAG-age product score and therefore may have the potential as a Huntington's disease progression marker, also prior to motor onset. © 2015 EAN.

  11. Ubiquitin C-Terminal Hydrolase L1 in Tumorigenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hurst-Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1, aka PGP9.5 is an abundant, neuronal deubiquitinating enzyme that has also been suggested to possess E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase activity and/or stabilize ubiquitin monomers in vivo. Recent evidence implicates dysregulation of UCH-L1 in the pathogenesis and progression of human cancers. Although typically only expressed in neurons, high levels of UCH-L1 have been found in many nonneuronal tumors, including breast, colorectal, and pancreatic carcinomas. UCH-L1 has also been implicated in the regulation of metastasis and cell growth during the progression of nonsmall cell lung carcinoma, colorectal cancer, and lymphoma. Together these studies suggest UCH-L1 has a potent oncogenic role and drives tumor development. Conversely, others have observed promoter methylation-mediated silencing of UCH-L1 in certain tumor subtypes, suggesting a potential tumor suppressor role for UCH-L1. In this paper, we provide an overview of the evidence supporting the involvement of UCH-L1 in tumor development and discuss the potential mechanisms of action of UCH-L1 in oncogenesis.

  12. HUWE1 and TRIP12 Collaborate in Degradation of Ubiquitin-Fusion Proteins and Misframed Ubiquitin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Esben G; Steinhauer, Cornelia; Lees, Michael

    2012-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells an uncleavable ubiquitin moiety conjugated to the N-terminus of a protein signals the degradation of the fusion protein via the proteasome-dependent ubiquitin fusion degradation (UFD) pathway. In yeast the molecular mechanism of the UFD pathway has been well characterized. Rec...

  13. Regulation of DNA double-strand break repair by ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like modifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwertman, Petra; Bekker-Jensen, Simon; Mailand, Niels

    2016-01-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are highly cytotoxic DNA lesions. The swift recognition and faithful repair of such damage is crucial for the maintenance of genomic stability, as well as for cell and organismal fitness. Signalling by ubiquitin, SUMO and other ubiquitin-like modifiers (UBLs...

  14. Agrin and synaptic laminin are required to maintain adult neuromuscular junctions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie A Samuel

    Full Text Available As synapses form and mature the synaptic partners produce organizing molecules that regulate each other's differentiation and ensure precise apposition of pre- and post-synaptic specializations. At the skeletal neuromuscular junction (NMJ, these molecules include agrin, a nerve-derived organizer of postsynaptic differentiation, and synaptic laminins, muscle-derived organizers of presynaptic differentiation. Both become concentrated in the synaptic cleft as the NMJ develops and are retained in adulthood. Here, we used mutant mice to ask whether these organizers are also required for synaptic maintenance. Deletion of agrin from a subset of adult motor neurons resulted in the loss of acetylcholine receptors and other components of the postsynaptic apparatus and synaptic cleft. Nerve terminals also atrophied and eventually withdrew from muscle fibers. On the other hand, mice lacking the presynaptic organizer laminin-α4 retained most of the synaptic cleft components but exhibited synaptic alterations reminiscent of those observed in aged animals. Although we detected no marked decrease in laminin or agrin levels at aged NMJs, we observed alterations in the distribution and organization of these synaptic cleft components suggesting that such changes could contribute to age-related synaptic disassembly. Together, these results demonstrate that pre- and post-synaptic organizers actively function to maintain the structure and function of adult NMJs.

  15. The class II transactivator (CIITA) is regulated by post-translational modification cross-talk between ERK1/2 phosphorylation, mono-ubiquitination and Lys63 ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Julie E; Shanderson, Ronald L; Boyd, Nathaniel H; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F

    2015-06-19

    The class II transactivator (CIITA) is known as the master regulator for the major histocompatibility class II (MHC II) molecules. CIITA is dynamically regulated through a series of intricate post-translational modifications (PTMs). CIITA's role is to initiate transcription of MHC II genes, which are responsible for presenting extracellular antigen to CD4(+) T-cells. In the present study, we identified extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 as the kinase responsible for phosphorylating the regulatory site, Ser(280), which leads to increased levels of mono-ubiquitination and an overall increase in MHC II activity. Further, we identify that CIITA is also modified by Lys(63)-linked ubiquitination. Lys(63) ubiquitinated CIITA is concentrated in the cytoplasm and following activation of ERK1/2, CIITA phosphorylation occurs and Lys=ubiquitinated CIITA translocates to the nucleus. CIITA ubiquitination and phosphorylation perfectly demonstrates how CIITA location and activity is regulated through PTM cross-talk. Identifying CIITA PTMs and understanding how they mediate CIITA regulation is necessary due to the critical role CIITA has in the initiation of the adaptive immune response. © 2015 Authors.

  16. Endocannabinoid signaling and synaptic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Pablo E.; Younts, Thomas J.; Chávez, Andrés E.; Hashimotodani, Yuki

    2012-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are key modulators of synaptic function. By activating cannabinoid receptors expressed in the central nervous system, these lipid messengers can regulate several neural functions and behaviors. As experimental tools advance, the repertoire of known endocannabinoid-mediated effects at the synapse, and their underlying mechanism, continues to expand. Retrograde signaling is the principal mode by which endocannabinoids mediate short- and long-term forms of plasticity at both excitatory and inhibitory synapses. However, growing evidence suggests that endocannabinoids can also signal in a non-retrograde manner. In addition to mediating synaptic plasticity, the endocannabinoid system is itself subject to plastic changes. Multiple points of interaction with other neuromodulatory and signaling systems have now been identified. Synaptic endocannabinoid signaling is thus mechanistically more complex and diverse than originally thought. In this review, we focus on new advances in endocannabinoid signaling and highlight their role as potent regulators of synaptic function in the mammalian brain. PMID:23040807

  17. CBL family E3 ubiquitin ligases control JAK2 ubiquitination and stability in hematopoietic stem cells and myeloid malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Kaosheng; Jiang, Jing; Donaghy, Ryan; Riling, Christopher R; Cheng, Ying; Chandra, Vemika; Rozenova, Krasimira; An, Wei; Mohapatra, Bhopal C; Goetz, Benjamin T; Pillai, Vinodh; Han, Xu; Todd, Emily A; Jeschke, Grace R; Langdon, Wallace Y; Kumar, Suresh; Hexner, Elizabeth O; Band, Hamid; Tong, Wei

    2017-05-15

    Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) is a central kinase in hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs), and its uncontrolled activation is a prominent oncogenic driver of hematopoietic neoplasms. However, molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of JAK2 have remained elusive. Here we report that the Casitas B-cell lymphoma (CBL) family E3 ubiquitin ligases down-regulate JAK2 stability and signaling via the adaptor protein LNK/SH2B3. We demonstrated that depletion of CBL/CBL-B or LNK abrogated JAK2 ubiquitination, extended JAK2 half-life, and enhanced JAK2 signaling and cell growth in human cell lines as well as primary murine HSPCs. Built on these findings, we showed that JAK inhibitor (JAKi) significantly reduced aberrant HSPCs and mitigated leukemia development in a mouse model of aggressive myeloid leukemia driven by loss of Cbl and Cbl-b Importantly, primary human CBL mutated ( CBL mut ) leukemias exhibited increased JAK2 protein levels and signaling and were hypersensitive to JAKi. Loss-of-function mutations in CBL E3 ubiquitin ligases are found in a wide range of myeloid malignancies, which are diseases without effective treatment options. Hence, our studies reveal a novel signaling axis that regulates JAK2 in normal and malignant HSPCs and suggest new therapeutic strategies for treating CBL mut myeloid malignancies. © 2017 Lv et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  18. Experience-dependent homeostatic synaptic plasticity in neocortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitt, Jessica L; Petrus, Emily; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2014-03-01

    The organism's ability to adapt to the changing sensory environment is due in part to the ability of the nervous system to change with experience. Input and synapse specific Hebbian plasticity, such as long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD), are critical for sculpting the nervous system to wire its circuit in tune with the environment and for storing memories. However, these synaptic plasticity mechanisms are innately unstable and require another mode of plasticity that maintains homeostasis to allow neurons to function within a desired dynamic range. Several modes of homeostatic adaptation are known, some of which work at the synaptic level. This review will focus on the known mechanisms of experience-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity in the neocortex and their potential function in sensory cortex plasticity. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Cellular contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Cinnamon

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cellular contractility, essential for cell movement and proliferation, is regulated by microtubules, RhoA and actomyosin. The RhoA dependent kinase ROCK ensures the phosphorylation of the regulatory Myosin II Light Chain (MLC Ser19, thereby activating actomyosin contractions. Microtubules are upstream inhibitors of contractility and their depolymerization or depletion cause cells to contract by activating RhoA. How microtubule dynamics regulates RhoA remains, a major missing link in understanding contractility. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We observed that contractility is inhibited by microtubules not only, as previously reported, in adherent cells, but also in non-adhering interphase and mitotic cells. Strikingly we observed that contractility requires ubiquitin mediated proteolysis by a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase. Inhibition of proteolysis, ubiquitination and neddylation all led to complete cessation of contractility and considerably reduced MLC Ser19 phosphorylation. CONCLUSIONS: Our results imply that cells express a contractility inhibitor that is degraded by ubiquitin mediated proteolysis, either constitutively or in response to microtubule depolymerization. This degradation seems to depend on a Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase and is required for cellular contractions.

  20. Dengue Virus Genome Uncoating Requires Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura A. Byk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The process of genome release or uncoating after viral entry is one of the least-studied steps in the flavivirus life cycle. Flaviviruses are mainly arthropod-borne viruses, including emerging and reemerging pathogens such as dengue, Zika, and West Nile viruses. Currently, dengue virus is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and is responsible for about 390 million infections every year around the world. Here, we examined for the first time molecular aspects of dengue virus genome uncoating. We followed the fate of the capsid protein and RNA genome early during infection and found that capsid is degraded after viral internalization by the host ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, proteasome activity and capsid degradation were not necessary to free the genome for initial viral translation. Unexpectedly, genome uncoating was blocked by inhibiting ubiquitination. Using different assays to bypass entry and evaluate the first rounds of viral translation, a narrow window of time during infection that requires ubiquitination but not proteasome activity was identified. In this regard, ubiquitin E1-activating enzyme inhibition was sufficient to stabilize the incoming viral genome in the cytoplasm of infected cells, causing its retention in either endosomes or nucleocapsids. Our data support a model in which dengue virus genome uncoating requires a nondegradative ubiquitination step, providing new insights into this crucial but understudied viral process.

  1. KCTD5 and Ubiquitin Proteasome Signaling Are Required for Helicobacter pylori Adherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Álvarez, Alhejandra; Uribe, Felipe; Canales, Jimena; Romero, Cristóbal; Soza, Andrea; Peña, María A.; Antonelli, Marcelo; Almarza, Oscar; Cerda, Oscar; Toledo, Héctor

    2017-01-01

    In order to establish infection, bacterial pathogens modulate host cellular processes by using virulence factors, which are delivered from the bacteria to the host cell leading to cellular reprogramming. In this context, several pathogens regulate the ubiquitin proteasome system in order to regulate the cellular effectors required for their successful colonization and persistance. In this study, we investigated how Helicobacter pylori affect the ubiquitination of the host proteins to achieve the adherence to the cells, using AGS gastric epithelial cells cultured with H. pylori strains, H. pylori 26695 and two isogenic mutants H. pylori cag::cat and vacA::apha3, to characterize the ability of H. pylori to reprogram the ubiquitin proteasome systems. The infection assays suggest that the ubiquitination of the total proteins does not change when cells were co-culture with H. pylori. We also found that the proteasome activity is necessary for H. pylori adhesion to AGS cells and the adherence increases when the level of KCTD5, an adaptor of Cullin-3, decrease. Moreover, we found that KCTD5 is ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome system and that CagA and VacA played no role on reducing KCTD5 levels. Furthermore, H. pylori impaired KCTD5 ubiquitination and did not increase global proteasome function. These results suggest that H. pylori affect the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) to facilitate the adhesion of this microorganism to establish stable colonization in the gastric epithelium and improve our understanding of how H. pylori hijack host systems to establish the adherence. PMID:29114497

  2. KCTD5 and Ubiquitin Proteasome Signaling Are Required for Helicobacter pylori Adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alhejandra Álvarez

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In order to establish infection, bacterial pathogens modulate host cellular processes by using virulence factors, which are delivered from the bacteria to the host cell leading to cellular reprogramming. In this context, several pathogens regulate the ubiquitin proteasome system in order to regulate the cellular effectors required for their successful colonization and persistance. In this study, we investigated how Helicobacter pylori affect the ubiquitination of the host proteins to achieve the adherence to the cells, using AGS gastric epithelial cells cultured with H. pylori strains, H. pylori 26695 and two isogenic mutants H. pylori cag::cat and vacA::apha3, to characterize the ability of H. pylori to reprogram the ubiquitin proteasome systems. The infection assays suggest that the ubiquitination of the total proteins does not change when cells were co-culture with H. pylori. We also found that the proteasome activity is necessary for H. pylori adhesion to AGS cells and the adherence increases when the level of KCTD5, an adaptor of Cullin-3, decrease. Moreover, we found that KCTD5 is ubiquitinated and degraded by the proteasome system and that CagA and VacA played no role on reducing KCTD5 levels. Furthermore, H. pylori impaired KCTD5 ubiquitination and did not increase global proteasome function. These results suggest that H. pylori affect the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS to facilitate the adhesion of this microorganism to establish stable colonization in the gastric epithelium and improve our understanding of how H. pylori hijack host systems to establish the adherence.

  3. Heat shock induced change in protein ubiquitination in Chlamydomonas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimogawara, K.; Muto, S.

    1989-01-01

    Ubiquitin was purified from pea (Pisum sativum L.) and its antibody was produced. Western blot analysis showed that the antibody cross-reacted with ubiquitins from a green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, a brown alga Laminaria angustata and a red alga Porphyridium cruentum but not with ubiquitin from a blue-green alga Synechococcus sp. In Chlamydomonas, the antibody also reacted with some ubiquitinated proteins including 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides. The isoelectric points of Chlamydomonas ubiquitin and the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins were 8.0, 8.9 and 10.3, respectively. The ubiquitinated proteins, including the 28- and 31-kDa polypeptides were detected after in vitro ATP-dependent ubiquitination of Chlamydomonas cell extract with l25 I-labeled bovine ubiquitin. Heat treatment of Chlamydomonas cells (>40°C) caused drastic increase of ubiquitinated proteins with high mol wt (>60kDa), and coordinated redistribution or decrease of other ubiquitinated proteins and free ubiquitin. Quantitative analysis revealed that the 28- and 31-kDa ubiquitinated proteins showed different responses against heat stress, i.e. the former being more sensitive than the latter. (author)

  4. Ubiquitin Accumulation on Disease Associated Protein Aggregates Is Correlated with Nuclear Ubiquitin Depletion, Histone De-Ubiquitination and Impaired DNA Damage Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adi Ben Yehuda

    Full Text Available Deposition of ubiquitin conjugates on inclusion bodies composed of protein aggregates is a definitive cytopathological hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. We show that accumulation of ubiquitin on polyQ IB, associated with Huntington's disease, is correlated with extensive depletion of nuclear ubiquitin and histone de-ubiquitination. Histone ubiquitination plays major roles in chromatin regulation and DNA repair. Accordingly, we observe that cells expressing IB fail to respond to radiomimetic DNA damage, to induce gamma-H2AX phosphorylation and to recruit 53BP1 to damaged foci. Interestingly ubiquitin depletion, histone de-ubiquitination and impaired DNA damage response are not restricted to PolyQ aggregates and are associated with artificial aggregating luciferase mutants. The longevity of brain neurons depends on their capacity to respond to and repair extensive ongoing DNA damage. Impaired DNA damage response, even modest one, could thus lead to premature neuron aging and mortality.

  5. Expression and cellular distribution of ubiquitin in response to injury in the developing spinal cord of Monodelphis domestica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noor, Natassya M; Møllgård, Kjeld; Wheaton, Benjamin J

    2013-01-01

    ubiquitin indicated possible post-translational modifications. Cellular distribution demonstrated a developmental shift between earliest (P8) and latest (P35) ages examined, from a predominantly cytoplasmic immunoreactivity to a nuclear expression; staining level and shift to nuclear staining was more...... pronounced following injury, except 7 days after transection at P28. After injury at P7 immunostaining increased in neurons and additionally in oligodendrocytes at P28. Mass spectrometry showed two ubiquitin bands; the heavier was identified as a fusion product, likely to be an ubiquitin precursor. Apparent...

  6. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 D1 (Ube2D1) mediates lysine-independent ubiquitination of the E3 ubiquitin ligase March-I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Lei; Bandola-Simon, Joanna; Roche, Paul A

    2018-02-01

    March-I is a membrane-bound E3 ubiquitin ligase belonging to the membrane-associated RING-CH (March) family. March-I ubiquitinates and down-regulates expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II and cluster of differentiation 86 (CD86) in antigen presenting cells. March-I expression is regulated both transcriptionally and post-translationally and it has been reported that the March-I is ubiquitinated and that this ubiquitination contributes to March-I turnover. However, the molecular mechanism regulating March-I ubiquitination and the importance of March-I's E3 ligase activity for March-I ubiquitination are not fully understood. Here we confirmed that although March-I is ubiquitinated, it is not ubiquitinated on a lysine residue as a lysine-less March-I variant was ubiquitinated similarly to wild-type March-I. We found that March-I E3 ligase activity is not required for its ubiquitination and does not regulate March-I protein expression, suggesting that March-I does not undergo autoubiquitination. Knocking down ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 D1 (Ube2D1) impaired March-I ubiquitination, increased March-I expression, and enhanced March-I-dependent downregulation of MHC class II proteins. Taken together, our results suggest that March-I undergoes lysine-independent ubiquitination by an as yet unidentified E3 ubiquitin ligase that together with Ube2D1 regulates March-I expression. Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Regulation of GPCR Trafficking by Ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Justine E; Marchese, Adriano

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-promoted signaling mediates cellular responses to a variety of stimuli involved in diverse physiological processes. In addition, GPCRs are also the largest class of target for many drugs used to treat a variety of diseases. Despite the role of GPCR signaling in health and disease, the molecular mechanisms governing GPCR signaling remain poorly understanding. Classically, GPCR signaling is tightly regulated by GPCR kinases and β-arrestins, which act in a concerted fashion to govern GPCR desensitization and also GPCR trafficking. Ubiquitination has now emerged as an important posttranslational modification that has multiple roles, either directly or indirectly, in governing GPCR trafficking. Recent studies have revealed a mechanistic link between GPCR phosphorylation, β-arrestins, and ubiquitination. Here, we review recent developments in our understanding of how ubiquitin regulates GPCR trafficking within the endocytic pathway. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Dynamic recruitment of ubiquitin to mutant huntingtin inclusion bodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juenemann, Katrin; Jansen, Anne H. P.; van Riel, Luigi; Merkx, Remco; Mulder, Monique P. C.; An, Heeseon; Statsyuk, Alexander; Kirstein, Janine; Ovaa, Huib; Reits, Eric A.

    2018-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease, are hallmarked by the formation of intracellular inclusion bodies (IBs) that are decorated with ubiquitin, proteasomes and chaperones. The apparent enrichment of ubiquitin and components involved in protein quality control at IBs

  9. Ubiquitin-dependent system controls radiation induced apoptosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delic, J.; Magdelenat, H.; Glaisner, S.; Magdelenat, H.; Maciorowski, Z.

    1997-01-01

    The selective proteolytic pathway, dependent upon 'N-end rule' protein recognition/ubiquitination and on the subsequent proteasome dependent processing of ubiquitin conjugates, operates in apoptosis induced by γ-irradiation. The proteasome inhibitor peptide aldehyde, MG132, efficiently induced apoptosis and was also able (at doses lower than those required for apoptosis induction) to potentiate apoptosis induced by DNA damage. Its specificity is suggested by the induction of the ubiquitin (UbB and UbC) and E1 (ubiquitin activating enzyme) genes and by an altered ubiquitination pattern. More selectively, a di-peptide competitor of the 'N-end rule' of ubiquitin dependent protein processing inhibited radiation induced apoptosis. This inhibition is also followed by an altered ubiquitination pattern and by activation of Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). These data strongly suggest that early apoptosis radiation induced events are controlled by ubiquitin-dependent proteolytic processing. (author)

  10. pVHL interacts with Ceramide kinase like (CERKL) protein and ubiquitinates it for oxygen dependent proteasomal degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiaxiang; Liu, Fei; Li, Hui; Archacki, Stephen; Gao, Meng; Liu, Ying; Liao, Shengjie; Huang, Mi; Wang, Jiuxiang; Yu, Shanshan; Li, Chang; Tang, Zhaohui; Liu, Mugen

    2015-11-01

    Mutations of Ceramide kinase-like (CERKL) gene are associated with retinitis pigmentosa (RP), an inherited degenerative eye disease. CERKL encodes an antioxidant protein which is critical to photoreceptor survival, its deficiency causes retinal degeneration as a result of oxidative damage. However, the regulation of CERKL in response to oxidative stress, and its contribution to photoreceptor survival remain unclear. pVHL, the substrate receptor of RING finger-type SCF like ECV ubiquitin ligase, binds and ubiquitinates a number of hydroxylated proteins for proteasomal degradation. Due to hydroxylated proteins which are modified by PHD1-3, pVHL dependent ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation pathway is blocked by PHD1-3 inhibitors (e.g. hypoxia or oxidative stress). In this study, we identified pVHL as an important regulator of CERKL. Western blot and in vivo ubiquitination assays showed hypoxia up-regulates CERKL at protein level by down-regulating its poly-ubiquitination. By Co-IP and domain mapping studies, we found CERKL complexes with ECV ligase via pVHL. Through overexpression and small RNA interference analysis, we demonstrated pVHL ubiquitinates CERKL for proteasomal degradation. Additionally, our work showed that the oxygen sensors PHD1 and PHD3 are involved in CERKL degradation. Collectively, our results indicated that pVHL interacts with CERKL and ubiquitinates it for oxygen dependent proteasomal degradation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human cytomegalovirus IE1 downregulates Hes1 in neural progenitor cells as a potential E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-Juan Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Congenital human cytomegalovirus (HCMV infection is the leading cause of neurological disabilities in children worldwide, but the mechanisms underlying these disorders are far from well-defined. HCMV infection has been shown to dysregulate the Notch signaling pathway in human neural progenitor cells (NPCs. As an important downstream effector of Notch signaling, the transcriptional regulator Hairy and Enhancer of Split 1 (Hes1 is essential for governing NPC fate and fetal brain development. In the present study, we report that HCMV infection downregulates Hes1 protein levels in infected NPCs. The HCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 protein (IE1 is involved in Hes1 degradation by assembling a ubiquitination complex and promoting Hes1 ubiquitination as a potential E3 ubiquitin ligase, followed by proteasomal degradation of Hes1. Sp100A, an important component of PML nuclear bodies, is identified to be another target of IE1-mediated ubiquitination. A C-terminal acidic region in IE1, spanning amino acids 451 to 475, is required for IE1/Hes1 physical interaction and IE1-mediated Hes1 ubiquitination, but is dispensable for IE1/Sp100A interaction and ubiquitination. Our study suggests a novel mechanism linking downregulation of Hes1 protein to neurodevelopmental disorders caused by HCMV infection. Our findings also complement the current knowledge of herpesviruses by identifying IE1 as the first potential HCMV-encoded E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  12. BDNF-induced local protein synthesis and synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Graciano; Comprido, Diogo; Duarte, Carlos B

    2014-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an important regulator of synaptic transmission and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the hippocampus and in other brain regions, playing a role in the formation of certain forms of memory. The effects of BDNF in LTP are mediated by TrkB (tropomyosin-related kinase B) receptors, which are known to be coupled to the activation of the Ras/ERK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt and phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathways. The role of BDNF in LTP is best studied in the hippocampus, where the neurotrophin acts at pre- and post-synaptic levels. Recent studies have shown that BDNF regulates the transport of mRNAs along dendrites and their translation at the synapse, by modulating the initiation and elongation phases of protein synthesis, and by acting on specific miRNAs. Furthermore, the effect of BDNF on transcription regulation may further contribute to long-term changes in the synaptic proteome. In this review we discuss the recent progress in understanding the mechanisms contributing to the short- and long-term regulation of the synaptic proteome by BDNF, and the role in synaptic plasticity, which is likely to influence learning and memory formation. This article is part of the Special Issue entitled 'BDNF Regulation of Synaptic Structure, Function, and Plasticity'. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cerebellar Synaptic Plasticity and the Credit Assignment Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jörntell, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    The mechanism by which a learnt synaptic weight change can contribute to learning or adaptation of brain function is a type of credit assignment problem, which is a key issue for many parts of the brain. In the cerebellum, detailed knowledge not only of the local circuitry connectivity but also of the topography of different sources of afferent/external information makes this problem particularly tractable. In addition, multiple forms of synaptic plasticity and their general rules of induction have been identified. In this review, we will discuss the possible roles of synaptic and cellular plasticity at specific locations in contributing to behavioral changes. Focus will be on the parts of the cerebellum that are devoted to limb control, which constitute a large proportion of the cortex and where the knowledge of the external connectivity is particularly well known. From this perspective, a number of sites of synaptic plasticity appear to primarily have the function of balancing the overall level of activity in the cerebellar circuitry, whereas the locations at which synaptic plasticity leads to functional changes in terms of limb control are more limited. Specifically, the postsynaptic forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) at the parallel fiber synapses made on interneurons and Purkinje cells, respectively, are the types of plasticity that mediate the widest associative capacity and the tightest link between the synaptic change and the external functions that are to be controlled.

  14. How Chemical Synthesis of Ubiquitin Conjugates Helps To Understand Ubiquitin Signal Transduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Dharjath S; Sapmaz, Aysegul; Ovaa, Huib

    2017-03-15

    Ubiquitin (Ub) is a small post-translational modifier protein involved in a myriad of biochemical processes including DNA damage repair, proteasomal proteolysis, and cell cycle control. Ubiquitin signaling pathways have not been completely deciphered due to the complex nature of the enzymes involved in ubiquitin conjugation and deconjugation. Hence, probes and assay reagents are important to get a better understanding of this pathway. Recently, improvements have been made in synthesis procedures of Ub derivatives. In this perspective, we explain various research reagents available and how chemical synthesis has made an important contribution to Ub research.

  15. Synaptic Determinants of Rett Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boggio, Elena M.; Lonetti, Giuseppina; Pizzorusso, Tommaso; Giustetto, Maurizio

    2010-01-01

    There is mounting evidence showing that the structural and molecular organization of synaptic connections is affected both in human patients and in animal models of neurological and psychiatric diseases. As a consequence of these experimental observations, it has been introduced the concept of synapsopathies, a notion describing brain disorders of synaptic function and plasticity. A close correlation between neurological diseases and synaptic abnormalities is especially relevant for those syndromes including also mental retardation in their symptomatology, such as Rett syndrome (RS). RS (MIM312750) is an X-linked dominant neurological disorder that is caused in the majority of cases by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). This review will focus on the current knowledge of the synaptic alterations produced by mutations of the gene MeCP2 in mouse models of RS and will highlight prospects experimental therapies currently in use. Different experimental approaches have revealed that RS could be the consequence of an impairment in the homeostasis of synaptic transmission in specific brain regions. Indeed, several forms of experience-induced neuronal plasticity are impaired in the absence of MeCP2. Based on the results presented in this review, it is reasonable to propose that understanding how the brain is affected by diseases such as RS is at reach. This effort will bring us closer to identify the neurobiological bases of human cognition. PMID:21423514

  16. Synaptic determinants of Rett syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena M B Boggio

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available There is mounting evidence showing that the structural and molecular organization of synaptic connections are affected both in human patients and in animal models of neurological and psychiatric diseases. As a consequence of these experimental observations, it has been introduced the concept of synapsopathies, a notion describing brain disorders of synaptic function and plasticity. A close correlation between neurological diseases and synaptic abnormalities is especially relevant for those syndromes including also mental retardation in their symptomatology, such as Rett Syndrome (RS. RS (MIM312750 is an X-linked dominant neurological disorder that is caused, in the majority of cases by mutations in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2. This review will focus on the current knowledge of the synaptic alterations produced by mutations of the gene MeCP2 in mouse models of RS and will highlight prospects experimental therapies currently in use. Different experimental approaches have revealed that RS could be the consequence of an impairment in the homeostasis of synaptic transmission in specific brain regions. Indeed, several forms of experience-induced neuronal plasticity are impaired in the absence of MeCP2. Based on the results presented in this review, it is reasonable to propose that understanding how the brain is affected by diseases such as RS is at reach. This effort will bring us closer to identify the neurobiological bases of human cognition.

  17. The San1 Ubiquitin Ligase Functions Preferentially with Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme Ubc1 during Protein Quality Control*

    OpenAIRE

    Ibarra, Rebeca; Sandoval, Daniella; Fredrickson, Eric K.; Gardner, Richard G.; Kleiger, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Protein quality control (PQC) is a critical process wherein misfolded or damaged proteins are cleared from the cell to maintain protein homeostasis. In eukaryotic cells, the removal of misfolded proteins is primarily accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In the ubiquitin-proteasome system, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and ubiquitin ligases append polyubiquitin chains onto misfolded protein substrates signaling for their degradation. The kinetics of protein ubiquitylation are param...

  18. The E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is essential for mouse embryogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masashi Kajiro

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is a post-translational protein modification that regulates many biological conditions. Trip12 is a HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates ARF and APP-BP1. However, the significance of Trip12 in vivo is largely unknown. Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase activity of Trip12 is indispensable for mouse embryogenesis. A homozygous mutation in Trip12 (Trip12(mt/mt that disrupts the ubiquitin ligase activity resulted in embryonic lethality in the middle stage of development. Trip12(mt/mt embryos exhibited growth arrest and increased expression of the negative cell cycle regulator p16. In contrast, Trip12(mt/mt ES cells were viable. They had decreased proliferation, but maintained both the undifferentiated state and the ability to differentiate. Trip12(mt/mt ES cells had increased levels of the BAF57 protein (a component of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex and altered gene expression patterns. These data suggest that Trip12 is involved in global gene expression and plays an important role in mouse development.

  19. A central role for ubiquitination within a circadian clock protein modification code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarina eStojkovic

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Circadian rhythms, endogenous cycles of about 24 h in physiology, are generated by a master clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus and other clocks located in the brain and peripheral tissues. Circadian disruption is known to increase the incidence of various illnesses, such as mental disorders, metabolic syndrome and cancer. At the molecular level, periodicity is established by a set of clock genes via autoregulatory translation-transcription feedback loops. This clock mechanism is regulated by post-translational modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitination, which set the pace of the clock. Ubiquitination in particular has been found to regulate the stability of core clock components, but also other clock protein functions. Mutation of genes encoding ubiquitin ligases can cause either elongation or shortening of the endogenous circadian period. Recent research has also started to uncover roles for deubiquitination in the molecular clockwork. Here we review the role of the ubiquitin pathway in regulating the circadian clock and we propose that ubiquitination is a key element in a clock protein modification code that orchestrates clock mechanisms and circadian behavior over the daily cycle.

  20. Deubiquitinase–based analysis of ubiquitin chain architecture using Ubiquitin Chain Restriction (UbiCRest)

    OpenAIRE

    Hospenthal, Manuela K.; Mevissen, Tycho E.T.; Komander, David

    2015-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a versatile protein modification that regulates virtually all cellular processes. This versatility originates from polyubiquitin chains, which can be linked in eight distinct ways. The combinatorial complexity of eight linkage types in homotypic (one chain type per polymer) and heterotypic (multiple linkage types per polymer) chains poses significant problems for biochemical analysis. Here we describe UbiCRest, in which substrates (ubiquitinated proteins or polyubiqu...

  1. Ubiquitin in signaling and protein quality control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Al-Saoudi, Sofie Vincents

    Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational modification that holds a variety of cellular functions. This Ph.D. thesis is comprised of two studies, of which one focused on ubiquitylation related to inflammatory signaling, and the other on the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system...

  2. KF-1 ubiquitin ligase: anxiety suppressor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Nakagawa, Masanori; Marunaka, Yoshinori

    2011-06-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most popular psychiatric disease in any human societies irrespective of nation, culture, religion, economics or politics. Anxiety expression mediated by the amygdala may be suppressed by signals transmitted from the prefrontal cortex and hippocampus. KF-1 is an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-based E3-ubiquitin (Ub) ligase with a RING-H2 finger motif at the C-terminus. The kf-1 gene expression is up-regulated in the frontal cortex and hippocampus in rats after anti-depressant treatments. The kf-1 null mice show no apparent abnormalities, but exhibit selectively pronounced anxiety-like behaviors or increased timidity-like responses. The kf-1 orthologous genes had been generated after the Poriferan emergence, and are found widely in all animals except insects, arachnids and threadworms such as Drosophila, Ixodes and Caenorhabditis, respectively. This suggests that the kf-1 gene may be relevant to some biological functions characteristic to animals. Based on these observations, the Anxiety Suppressor Model has been proposed, which assumes that KF-1 Ub ligase may suppress the amygdala-mediated anxiety by degrading some anxiety promoting protein(s), such as a neurotransmitter receptor, through the ER-associated degradation pathway in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. According to this model, the emotional sensitivity to environmental stresses may be regulated by the cellular protein level of KF-1 relative to that of the putative anxiety promoter. The kf-1 null mice should be useful in elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the anxiety regulation and for screening novel anxiolytic compounds, which may block the putative anxiety promoter.

  3. Cooperative stochastic binding and unbinding explain synaptic size dynamics and statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shomar, Aseel; Geyrhofer, Lukas; Ziv, Noam E; Brenner, Naama

    2017-07-01

    Synapses are dynamic molecular assemblies whose sizes fluctuate significantly over time-scales of hours and days. In the current study, we examined the possibility that the spontaneous microscopic dynamics exhibited by synaptic molecules can explain the macroscopic size fluctuations of individual synapses and the statistical properties of synaptic populations. We present a mesoscopic model, which ties the two levels. Its basic premise is that synaptic size fluctuations reflect cooperative assimilation and removal of molecules at a patch of postsynaptic membrane. The introduction of cooperativity to both assimilation and removal in a stochastic biophysical model of these processes, gives rise to features qualitatively similar to those measured experimentally: nanoclusters of synaptic scaffolds, fluctuations in synaptic sizes, skewed, stable size distributions and their scaling in response to perturbations. Our model thus points to the potentially fundamental role of cooperativity in dictating synaptic remodeling dynamics and offers a conceptual understanding of these dynamics in terms of central microscopic features and processes.

  4. Cooperative stochastic binding and unbinding explain synaptic size dynamics and statistics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aseel Shomar

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Synapses are dynamic molecular assemblies whose sizes fluctuate significantly over time-scales of hours and days. In the current study, we examined the possibility that the spontaneous microscopic dynamics exhibited by synaptic molecules can explain the macroscopic size fluctuations of individual synapses and the statistical properties of synaptic populations. We present a mesoscopic model, which ties the two levels. Its basic premise is that synaptic size fluctuations reflect cooperative assimilation and removal of molecules at a patch of postsynaptic membrane. The introduction of cooperativity to both assimilation and removal in a stochastic biophysical model of these processes, gives rise to features qualitatively similar to those measured experimentally: nanoclusters of synaptic scaffolds, fluctuations in synaptic sizes, skewed, stable size distributions and their scaling in response to perturbations. Our model thus points to the potentially fundamental role of cooperativity in dictating synaptic remodeling dynamics and offers a conceptual understanding of these dynamics in terms of central microscopic features and processes.

  5. Opposing Effects of Intrinsic Conductance and Correlated Synaptic Input on V-Fluctuations during Network Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolind, Jens; Hounsgaard, Jørn Dybkjær; Berg, Rune W

    2012-01-01

    Neurons often receive massive concurrent bombardment of synaptic inhibition and excitation during functional network activity. This increases membrane conductance and causes fluctuations in membrane potential (V(m)) and spike timing. The conductance increase is commonly attributed to synaptic...... conductance, but also includes the intrinsic conductances recruited during network activity. These two sources of conductance have contrasting dynamic properties at sub-threshold membrane potentials. Synaptic transmitter gated conductance changes abruptly and briefly with each presynaptic action potential...... input we find that the magnitude of the membrane fluctuations uniquely determines the relative contribution of synaptic and intrinsic conductance. We also quantify how V(m)-fluctuations vary with synaptic correlations for fixed ratios of synaptic and intrinsic conductance. Interestingly, the levels of V...

  6. Dengue Virus Genome Uncoating Requires Ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byk, Laura A; Iglesias, Néstor G; De Maio, Federico A; Gebhard, Leopoldo G; Rossi, Mario; Gamarnik, Andrea V

    2016-06-28

    The process of genome release or uncoating after viral entry is one of the least-studied steps in the flavivirus life cycle. Flaviviruses are mainly arthropod-borne viruses, including emerging and reemerging pathogens such as dengue, Zika, and West Nile viruses. Currently, dengue virus is one of the most significant human viral pathogens transmitted by mosquitoes and is responsible for about 390 million infections every year around the world. Here, we examined for the first time molecular aspects of dengue virus genome uncoating. We followed the fate of the capsid protein and RNA genome early during infection and found that capsid is degraded after viral internalization by the host ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, proteasome activity and capsid degradation were not necessary to free the genome for initial viral translation. Unexpectedly, genome uncoating was blocked by inhibiting ubiquitination. Using different assays to bypass entry and evaluate the first rounds of viral translation, a narrow window of time during infection that requires ubiquitination but not proteasome activity was identified. In this regard, ubiquitin E1-activating enzyme inhibition was sufficient to stabilize the incoming viral genome in the cytoplasm of infected cells, causing its retention in either endosomes or nucleocapsids. Our data support a model in which dengue virus genome uncoating requires a nondegradative ubiquitination step, providing new insights into this crucial but understudied viral process. Dengue is the most significant arthropod-borne viral infection in humans. Although the number of cases increases every year, there are no approved therapeutics available for the treatment of dengue infection, and many basic aspects of the viral biology remain elusive. After entry, the viral membrane must fuse with the endosomal membrane to deliver the viral genome into the cytoplasm for translation and replication. A great deal of information has been obtained in the last decade

  7. Synaptic vesicle dynamic changes in a model of fragile X.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broek, Jantine A C; Lin, Zhanmin; de Gruiter, H Martijn; van 't Spijker, Heleen; Haasdijk, Elize D; Cox, David; Ozcan, Sureyya; van Cappellen, Gert W A; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Willemsen, Rob; de Zeeuw, Chris I; Bahn, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is a single-gene disorder that is the most common heritable cause of intellectual disability and the most frequent monogenic cause of autism spectrum disorders (ASD). FXS is caused by an expansion of trinucleotide repeats in the promoter region of the fragile X mental retardation gene (Fmr1). This leads to a lack of fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP), which regulates translation of a wide range of messenger RNAs (mRNAs). The extent of expression level alterations of synaptic proteins affected by FMRP loss and their consequences on synaptic dynamics in FXS has not been fully investigated. Here, we used an Fmr1 knockout (KO) mouse model to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying FXS by monitoring protein expression changes using shotgun label-free liquid-chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS(E)) in brain tissue and synaptosome fractions. FXS-associated candidate proteins were validated using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) in synaptosome fractions for targeted protein quantification. Furthermore, functional alterations in synaptic release and dynamics were evaluated using live-cell imaging, and interpretation of synaptic dynamics differences was investigated using electron microscopy. Key findings relate to altered levels of proteins involved in GABA-signalling, especially in the cerebellum. Further exploration using microscopy studies found reduced synaptic vesicle unloading of hippocampal neurons and increased vesicle unloading in cerebellar neurons, which suggests a general decrease of synaptic transmission. Our findings suggest that FMRP is a regulator of synaptic vesicle dynamics, which supports the role of FMRP in presynaptic functions. Taken together, these studies provide novel insights into the molecular changes associated with FXS.

  8. An in silico model of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that incorporates normal homeostasis and age-related decline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Proctor Carole J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquitin-proteasome system is responsible for homeostatic degradation of intact protein substrates as well as the elimination of damaged or misfolded proteins that might otherwise aggregate. During ageing there is a decline in proteasome activity and an increase in aggregated proteins. Many neurodegenerative diseases are characterised by the presence of distinctive ubiquitin-positive inclusion bodies in affected regions of the brain. These inclusions consist of insoluble, unfolded, ubiquitinated polypeptides that fail to be targeted and degraded by the proteasome. We are using a systems biology approach to try and determine the primary event in the decline in proteolytic capacity with age and whether there is in fact a vicious cycle of inhibition, with accumulating aggregates further inhibiting proteolysis, prompting accumulation of aggregates and so on. A stochastic model of the ubiquitin-proteasome system has been developed using the Systems Biology Mark-up Language (SBML. Simulations are carried out on the BASIS (Biology of Ageing e-Science Integration and Simulation system and the model output is compared to experimental data wherein levels of ubiquitin and ubiquitinated substrates are monitored in cultured cells under various conditions. The model can be used to predict the effects of different experimental procedures such as inhibition of the proteasome or shutting down the enzyme cascade responsible for ubiquitin conjugation. Results The model output shows good agreement with experimental data under a number of different conditions. However, our model predicts that monomeric ubiquitin pools are always depleted under conditions of proteasome inhibition, whereas experimental data show that monomeric pools were depleted in IMR-90 cells but not in ts20 cells, suggesting that cell lines vary in their ability to replenish ubiquitin pools and there is the need to incorporate ubiquitin turnover into the model. Sensitivity

  9. Salbutamol inhibits ubiquitin-mediated survival motor neuron protein degradation in spinal muscular atrophy cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harahap, Nur Imma Fatimah; Nurputra, Dian Kesumapramudya; Ar Rochmah, Mawaddah; Shima, Ai; Morisada, Naoya; Takarada, Toru; Takeuchi, Atsuko; Tohyama, Yumi; Yanagisawa, Shinichiro; Nishio, Hisahide

    2015-12-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a common autosomal recessive neuromuscular disorder that is currently incurable. SMA is caused by decreased levels of the survival motor neuron protein (SMN), as a result of loss or mutation of SMN1 . Although the SMN1 homolog SMN2 also produces some SMN protein, it does not fully compensate for the loss or dysfunction of SMN1 . Salbutamol, a β2-adrenergic receptor agonist and well-known bronchodilator used in asthma patients, has recently been shown to ameliorate symptoms in SMA patients. However, the precise mechanism of salbutamol action is unclear. We treated SMA fibroblast cells lacking SMN1 and HeLa cells with salbutamol and analyzed SMN2 mRNA and SMN protein levels in SMA fibroblasts, and changes in SMN protein ubiquitination in HeLa cells. Salbutamol increased SMN protein levels in a dose-dependent manner in SMA fibroblast cells lacking SMN1 , though no significant changes in SMN2 mRNA levels were observed. Notably, the salbutamol-induced increase in SMN was blocked by a protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor and deubiquitinase inhibitor, respectively. Co-immunoprecipitation assay using HeLa cells showed that ubiquitinated SMN levels decreased in the presence of salbutamol, suggesting that salbutamol inhibited ubiquitination. The results of this study suggest that salbutamol may increase SMN protein levels in SMA by inhibiting ubiquitin-mediated SMN degradation via activating β2-adrenergic receptor-PKA pathways.

  10. Mass spectrometry techniques for studying the ubiquitin system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heap, Rachel E; Gant, Megan S; Lamoliatte, Frederic; Peltier, Julien; Trost, Matthias

    2017-10-15

    Post-translational control of proteins through covalent attachment of ubiquitin plays important roles in all eukaryotic cell functions. The ubiquitin system in humans consists of 2 E1, 35 E2 and >600 E3 ubiquitin ligases as well as hundreds of deubiquitylases, which reverse ubiquitin attachment. Moreover, there are hundreds of proteins with ubiquitin-binding domains that bind one of the eight possible polyubiquitin chains. Dysfunction of the ubiquitin system is associated with many diseases such as cancer, autoimmunity and neurodegeneration, demonstrating the importance of ubiquitylation. Therefore, enzymes of the ubiquitin system are considered highly attractive drug targets. In recent years, mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques have become increasingly important in the deciphering of the ubiquitin system. This short review addresses the state-of-the-art MS techniques for the identification of ubiquitylated proteins and their ubiquitylation sites. We also discuss the identification and quantitation of ubiquitin chain topologies and highlight how the activity of enzymes in the ubiquitin pathway can be measured. Finally, we present current MS tools that can be used for drug discovery in the ubiquitin space. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Roles of Ubiquitination and SUMOylation on Prostate Cancer: Mechanisms and Clinical Implications

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    Zhenbang Chen

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The initiation and progression of human prostate cancer are highly associated with aberrant dysregulations of tumor suppressors and proto-oncogenes. Despite that deletions and mutations of tumor suppressors and aberrant elevations of oncogenes at the genetic level are reported to cause cancers, emerging evidence has revealed that cancer progression is largely regulated by posttranslational modifications (PTMs and epigenetic alterations. PTMs play critical roles in gene regulation, cellular functions, tissue development, diseases, malignant progression and drug resistance. Recent discoveries demonstrate that ubiquitination and SUMOylation are complicated but highly-regulated PTMs, and make essential contributions to diseases and cancers by regulation of key factors and signaling pathways. Ubiquitination and SUMOylation pathways can be differentially modulated under various stimuli or stresses in order to produce the sustained oncogenic potentials. In this review, we discuss some new insights about molecular mechanisms on ubiquitination and SUMOylation, their associations with diseases, oncogenic impact on prostate cancer (PCa and clinical implications for PCa treatment.

  12. Cooperativity of the SUMO and Ubiquitin Pathways in Genome Stability

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    Minghua Nie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Covalent attachment of ubiquitin (Ub or SUMO to DNA repair proteins plays critical roles in maintaining genome stability. These structurally related polypeptides can be viewed as distinct road signs, with each being read by specific protein interaction motifs. Therefore, via their interactions with selective readers in the proteome, ubiquitin and SUMO can elicit distinct cellular responses, such as directing DNA lesions into different repair pathways. On the other hand, through the action of the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase (STUbL family proteins, ubiquitin and SUMO can cooperate in the form of a hybrid signal. These mixed SUMO-ubiquitin chains recruit “effector” proteins such as the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97-Ufd1-Npl4 complex that contain both ubiquitin and SUMO interaction motifs. This review will summarize recent key findings on collaborative and distinct roles that ubiquitin and SUMO play in orchestrating DNA damage responses.

  13. Ubiquitin-proteasome system involvement in Huntington’s disease

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    Zaira eOrtega

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Huntington’s disease (HD is a genetic autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease caused by the expansion of a CAG repeat in the huntingtin (htt gene. This triplet expansion encodes a polyglutamine stretch (polyQ in the N-terminus of the high molecular weight (348-kDa and ubiquitously expressed protein huntingtin (htt. Normal individuals have between 6 and 35 CAG triplets, while expansions longer than 40 repeats lead to HD. The onset and severity of the disease depend on the length of the polyQ tract: the longer the polyQ is, the earlier the disease begins and the more severe the symptoms are. One of the main histopathological hallmarks of HD is the presence of intraneuronal proteinaceous inclusion bodies (IBs, whose prominent and invariant feature is the presence of Ubiquitin (Ub; therefore, they can be detected with anti-ubiquitin and anti-proteasome antibodies. This, together with the observation that mutations in components of the Ubiquitin Proteasome system (UPS give rise to some neurodegenerative diseases, suggests that UPS impairment may be causative of HD. Even though the link between disrupted Ub homeostasis and protein aggregation to HD is undisputed, the functional significance of these correlations and their mechanistic implications remains unresolved. Moreover, there is no consistent evidence documenting an accompanying decrease in levels of free Ub or disruption of Ub pool dynamics in neurodegenerative disease or models thus suggesting that the Ub-conjugate accumulation may be benign and just underlie lesion in 26S function. In this chapter we will elaborate on the different studies that have been performed using different experimental approaches, in order to shed light to this matter.

  14. Optogenetic analysis of synaptic function

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Liewald, Jana F.; Brauner, Martin; Stephens, Greg J.; Bouhours, Magali; Schultheis, Christian; Zhen, Mei; Gottschalk, Alexander

    2008-01-01

    We introduce optogenetic investigation of neurotransmission (OptIoN) for time-resolved and quantitative assessment of synaptic function via behavioral and electrophysiological analyses. We photo-triggered release of acetylcholine or γ-aminobutyric acid at Caenorhabditis elegans neuromuscular

  15. Synaptic AMPA receptor plasticity and behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kessels, Helmut W.; Malinow, Roberto

    2009-01-01

    The ability to change behavior likely depends on the selective strengthening and weakening of brain synapses. The cellular models of synaptic plasticity, long-term potentiation (LTP) and depression (LTD) of synaptic strength, can be expressed by the synaptic insertion or removal of AMPA receptors

  16. Mulberry fruit ameliorates Parkinson's-disease-related pathology by reducing α-synuclein and ubiquitin levels in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Pil Sung; Moon, Minho; Choi, Jin Gyu; Oh, Myung Sook

    2017-01-01

    Mulberry fruit, which has been long used in traditional oriental medicine, was reported to ameliorate motor dysfunction and dopaminergic neuronal degeneration via antioxidant and antiapoptotic effects in an animal model of Parkinson's disease (PD). More than 95% of PD patients exhibit nonmotor problems such as olfactory dysfunction and gastrointestinal constipation, which are generally considered to be early symptoms of PD. However, few studies have actually examined potential drugs to treat early PD symptoms. The present study examined the protective effects of mulberry fruit extract (ME) against neurotoxicity in a 1-methyl-4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine/probenecid (MPTP/p) model of early PD. MPTP/p model was developed by systemic administration with MPTP (25 mg/kg) and probenecid (250 mg/kg) over 5 weeks. The behavioral studies showed that treatment of mice with ME significantly improved PD-related nonmotor symptoms as well as motor impairment, demonstrated by utilizing the olfactory, pole, rotarod and open field tests. In addition, immunohistochemical analysis indicated that ME exhibits the protective effects against dopaminergic neuronal damage induced by MPTP/p in the substantia nigra and striatum. Moreover, by using Western blot analysis, we found that treatment with ME inhibited the up-regulation of α-synuclein and ubiquitin, well known as composition of Lewy bodies in the substantia nigra and striatum of the MPTP/p mice. Taken together, these data suggest that ME may have therapeutic potential for preventing PD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. MPTP-meditated hippocampal dopamine deprivation modulates synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Guoqi; Chen Ying; Huang Yuying; Li Qinglin; Behnisch, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD)-like symptoms including learning deficits are inducible by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Therefore, it is possible that MPTP may disturb hippocampal memory processing by modulation of dopamine (DA)- and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. We demonstrate here that intraperitoneal (i.p.) MPTP injection reduces the number of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-positive neurons in the substantia nigra (SN) within 7 days. Subsequently, the TH expression level in SN and hippocampus and the amount of DA and its metabolite DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus decrease. DA depletion does not alter basal synaptic transmission and changes pair-pulse facilitation (PPF) of field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) only at the 30 ms inter-pulse interval. In addition, the induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) is impaired whereas the duration of long-term depression (LTD) becomes prolonged. Since both LTP and LTD depend critically on activation of NMDA and DA receptors, we also tested the effect of DA depletion on NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. Seven days after MPTP injection, the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSPs are decreased by about 23%. Blocking the NMDA receptor-mediated fEPSP does not mimic the MPTP-LTP. Only co-application of D1/D5 and NMDA receptor antagonists during tetanization resembled the time course of fEPSP potentiation as observed 7 days after i.p. MPTP injection. Together, our data demonstrate that MPTP-induced degeneration of DA neurons and the subsequent hippocampal DA depletion alter NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission and activity-dependent synaptic plasticity. - Highlights: → I.p. MPTP-injection mediates death of dopaminergic neurons. → I.p. MPTP-injection depletes DA and DOPAC in striatum and hippocampus. → I.p. MPTP-injection does not alter basal synaptic transmission. → Reduction of LTP and enhancement of LTD after i.p. MPTP-injection. → Attenuation of NMDA-receptors mediated

  18. Ubiquitin reference technique and its use in ubiquitin-lacking prokaryotes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantin Piatkov

    Full Text Available In a pulse-chase assay, the in vivo degradation of a protein is measured through a brief labeling of cells with, for example, a radioactive amino acid, followed by cessation of labeling and analysis of cell extracts prepared at different times afterward ("chase", using immunoprecipitation, electrophoresis and autoradiography of a labeled protein of interest. A conventional pulse-chase assay is fraught with sources of data scatter, as the efficacy of labeling and immunoprecipitation can vary, and sample volumes can vary as well. The ubiquitin reference technique (URT, introduced in 1996, addresses these problems. In eukaryotes, a DNA-encoded linear fusion of ubiquitin to another protein is cleaved by deubiquitylases at the ubiquitin-protein junction. A URT assay uses a fusion in which the ubiquitin moiety is located between a downstream polypeptide (test protein and an upstream polypeptide (a long-lived reference protein. The cotranslational cleavage of a URT fusion by deubiquitylases after the last residue of ubiquitin produces, at the initially equimolar ratio, a test protein with a desired N-terminal residue and a reference protein containing C-terminal ubiquitin moiety. In addition to being more accurate than pulse-chases without a reference, URT makes it possible to detect and measure the degradation of a test protein during the pulse (before the chase. Because prokaryotes, including Gram-negative bacteria such as, for example, Escherichia coli and Vibrio vulnificus, lack the ubiquitin system, the use of URT in such cells requires ectopic expression of a deubiquitylase. We describe designs and applications of plasmid vectors that coexpress, in bacteria, both a URT-type fusion and Ubp1, a deubiquitylase of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This single-plasmid approach extends the accuracy-enhancing URT assay to studies of protein degradation in prokaryotes.

  19. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-05-24

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner.

  20. The Ubiquitin System and Jasmonate Signaling

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    Astrid Nagels Durand

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin (Ub system is involved in most, if not all, biological processes in eukaryotes. The major specificity determinants of this system are the E3 ligases, which bind and ubiquitinate specific sets of proteins and are thereby responsible for target recruitment to the proteasome or other cellular processing machineries. The Ub system contributes to the regulation of the production, perception and signal transduction of plant hormones. Jasmonic acid (JA and its derivatives, known as jasmonates (JAs, act as signaling compounds regulating plant development and plant responses to various biotic and abiotic stress conditions. We provide here an overview of the current understanding of the Ub system involved in JA signaling.

  1. Synaptic clustering within dendrites: an emerging theory of memory formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastellakis, George; Cai, Denise J; Mednick, Sara C; Silva, Alcino J; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2015-03-01

    It is generally accepted that complex memories are stored in distributed representations throughout the brain, however the mechanisms underlying these representations are not understood. Here, we review recent findings regarding the subcellular mechanisms implicated in memory formation, which provide evidence for a dendrite-centered theory of memory. Plasticity-related phenomena which affect synaptic properties, such as synaptic tagging and capture, synaptic clustering, branch strength potentiation and spinogenesis provide the foundation for a model of memory storage that relies heavily on processes operating at the dendrite level. The emerging picture suggests that clusters of functionally related synapses may serve as key computational and memory storage units in the brain. We discuss both experimental evidence and theoretical models that support this hypothesis and explore its advantages for neuronal function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Aging synaptic mitochondria exhibit dynamic proteomic changes while maintaining bioenergetic function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauch, Kelly L; Purnell, Phillip R; Fox, Howard S

    2014-04-01

    Aging correlates with a progressive impairment of mitochondrial homeostasis and is an influential factor for several forms of neurodegeneration. However, the mechanisms underlying age-related alterations in synaptosomal mitochondria, a neuronal mitochondria population highly susceptible to insults and critical for brain function, remain incompletely understood. Therefore this study investigates the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic and bioenergetic alterations that occur with age. The utilization of a state of the art quantitative proteomics approach allowed for the comparison of protein expression levels in synaptic mitochondria isolated from 5 (mature), 12 (old), and 24 (aged) month old mice. During the process of aging we find that dynamic proteomic alterations occur in synaptic mitochondria. Despite direct (mitochondrial DNA deletions) and indirect (increased antioxidant protein levels) signs of mitochondrial damage in the aged mice, there was an overall maintenance of mitochondrial function. Therefore the synaptic mitochondrial proteomic changes that occur with aging correlate with preservation of synaptic mitochondrial function.

  3. Molecular Recognition within Synaptic Scaffolds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlendsson, Simon

    -length structural model of the PICK1 dimer in-solution. We found the PICK1 BAR dimer to resemble an elongated crescent-shaped structure, spanning ~160 Å, with the PICK1 PDZ domains loosely attached to the BAR domain. This finding is in contrast to previous findings for other BAR domain proteins, where adjacent......Scaffolding proteins are abundant participants and regulators of the extensive intracellular framework required for maintaining cellular functions such as cellular adhesion and signal transduction cascades. In excitatory neuronal synapses these scaffolding proteins often contain one or more PDZ...... domains, responsible for tethering their respective synaptic protein ligands. Therefore, understanding the specificity and binding mechanisms of PDZ domain proteins is essential to understand regulation of synaptic plasticity. PICK1 is a PDZ domain-containing scaffolding protein predominantly expressed...

  4. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner...... this raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some...

  5. Increased gene dosage of Ube3a results in autism traits and decreased glutamate synaptic transmission in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen E P; Zhou, Yu-Dong; Zhang, Guangping; Jin, Zhe; Stoppel, David C; Anderson, Matthew P

    2011-10-05

    People with autism spectrum disorder are characterized by impaired social interaction, reduced communication, and increased repetitive behaviors. The disorder has a substantial genetic component, and recent studies have revealed frequent genome copy number variations (CNVs) in some individuals. A common CNV that occurs in 1 to 3% of those with autism--maternal 15q11-13 duplication (dup15) and triplication (isodicentric extranumerary chromosome, idic15)--affects several genes that have been suggested to underlie autism behavioral traits. To test this, we tripled the dosage of one of these genes, the ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3a, which is expressed solely from the maternal allele in mature neurons, and reconstituted the three core autism traits in mice: defective social interaction, impaired communication, and increased repetitive stereotypic behavior. The penetrance of these autism traits depended on Ube3a gene copy number. In animals with increased Ube3a gene dosage, glutamatergic, but not GABAergic, synaptic transmission was suppressed as a result of reduced presynaptic release probability, synaptic glutamate concentration, and postsynaptic action potential coupling. These results suggest that Ube3a gene dosage may contribute to the autism traits of individuals with maternal 15q11-13 duplication and support the idea that increased E3A ubiquitin ligase gene dosage results in reduced excitatory synaptic transmission.

  6. Activity-Dependent Arc Expression and Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity Are Altered in Neurons from a Mouse Model of Angelman Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pastuzyn, Elissa D.; Shepherd, Jason D.

    2017-01-01

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from deletions or mutations in chromosome 15, which usually includes the UBE3A gene. Ube3A protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates proteins and targets them for degradation. The immediate-early gene Arc, a master regulator of synaptic plasticity, was identified as a putative substrate of Ube3A, but there have been conflicting reports on whether Arc is a bona fide E3 ligase substrate. Using multiple approaches, we found no evidence for a physical interaction between Arc and Ube3A in vivo. Nonetheless, activity-induced subcellular distribution of Arc is altered in brains from Ube3am−/p+ mice, with abnormal concentration of Arc at synapses. Furthermore, although activation of Arc transcription is normal, the stability of Arc protein is enhanced in dendrites of hippocampal neurons cultured from Ube3am−/p+ mice. Finally, homeostatic synaptic scaling of surface AMPA receptors does not occur in Ube3am−/p+ hippocampal neurons, reminiscent of neurons that lack Arc protein. Although Ube3A does not seem to bind Arc in a canonical E3 ligase-substrate interaction, Arc-dependent synaptic plasticity is still altered in Ube3am−/p+ mice, which may underlie the cognitive deficits observed in AS. PMID:28804447

  7. Activity-Dependent Arc Expression and Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity Are Altered in Neurons from a Mouse Model of Angelman Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa D. Pastuzyn

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is a neurodevelopmental disorder that results from deletions or mutations in chromosome 15, which usually includes the UBE3A gene. Ube3A protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitinates proteins and targets them for degradation. The immediate-early gene Arc, a master regulator of synaptic plasticity, was identified as a putative substrate of Ube3A, but there have been conflicting reports on whether Arc is a bona fide E3 ligase substrate. Using multiple approaches, we found no evidence for a physical interaction between Arc and Ube3A in vivo. Nonetheless, activity-induced subcellular distribution of Arc is altered in brains from Ube3am−/p+ mice, with abnormal concentration of Arc at synapses. Furthermore, although activation of Arc transcription is normal, the stability of Arc protein is enhanced in dendrites of hippocampal neurons cultured from Ube3am−/p+ mice. Finally, homeostatic synaptic scaling of surface AMPA receptors does not occur in Ube3am−/p+ hippocampal neurons, reminiscent of neurons that lack Arc protein. Although Ube3A does not seem to bind Arc in a canonical E3 ligase-substrate interaction, Arc-dependent synaptic plasticity is still altered in Ube3am−/p+ mice, which may underlie the cognitive deficits observed in AS.

  8. Role of DHA in aging-related changes in mouse brain synaptic plasma membrane proteome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidhu, Vishaldeep K; Huang, Bill X; Desai, Abhishek; Kevala, Karl; Kim, Hee-Yong

    2016-05-01

    Aging has been related to diminished cognitive function, which could be a result of ineffective synaptic function. We have previously shown that synaptic plasma membrane proteins supporting synaptic integrity and neurotransmission were downregulated in docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-deprived brains, suggesting an important role of DHA in synaptic function. In this study, we demonstrate aging-induced synaptic proteome changes and DHA-dependent mitigation of such changes using mass spectrometry-based protein quantitation combined with western blot or messenger RNA analysis. We found significant reduction of 15 synaptic plasma membrane proteins in aging brains including fodrin-α, synaptopodin, postsynaptic density protein 95, synaptic vesicle glycoprotein 2B, synaptosomal-associated protein 25, synaptosomal-associated protein-α, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit epsilon-2 precursor, AMPA2, AP2, VGluT1, munc18-1, dynamin-1, vesicle-associated membrane protein 2, rab3A, and EAAT1, most of which are involved in synaptic transmission. Notably, the first 9 proteins were further reduced when brain DHA was depleted by diet, indicating that DHA plays an important role in sustaining these synaptic proteins downregulated during aging. Reduction of 2 of these proteins was reversed by raising the brain DHA level by supplementing aged animals with an omega-3 fatty acid sufficient diet for 2 months. The recognition memory compromised in DHA-depleted animals was also improved. Our results suggest a potential role of DHA in alleviating aging-associated cognitive decline by offsetting the loss of neurotransmission-regulating synaptic proteins involved in synaptic function. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  9. Integrated Genomic Analysis of the Ubiquitin Pathway across Cancer Types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongqi Ge

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic and reversible process of adding single ubiquitin molecules or various ubiquitin chains to target proteins. Here, using multidimensional omic data of 9,125 tumor samples across 33 cancer types from The Cancer Genome Atlas, we perform comprehensive molecular characterization of 929 ubiquitin-related genes and 95 deubiquitinase genes. Among them, we systematically identify top somatic driver candidates, including mutated FBXW7 with cancer-type-specific patterns and amplified MDM2 showing a mutually exclusive pattern with BRAF mutations. Ubiquitin pathway genes tend to be upregulated in cancer mediated by diverse mechanisms. By integrating pan-cancer multiomic data, we identify a group of tumor samples that exhibit worse prognosis. These samples are consistently associated with the upregulation of cell-cycle and DNA repair pathways, characterized by mutated TP53, MYC/TERT amplification, and APC/PTEN deletion. Our analysis highlights the importance of the ubiquitin pathway in cancer development and lays a foundation for developing relevant therapeutic strategies. : Ge et al. analyze a cohort of 9,125 TCGA samples across 33 cancer types to provide a comprehensive characterization of the ubiquitin pathway. They detect somatic driver candidates in the ubiquitin pathway and identify a cluster of patients with poor survival, highlighting the importance of this pathway in cancer development. Keywords: ubiquitin pathway, pan-cancer analysis, The Cancer Genome Atlas, tumor subtype, cancer prognosis, therapeutic targets, biomarker, FBXW7

  10. Puromycin induces SUMO and ubiquitin redistribution upon proteasome inhibition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsumoto, Hotaru [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Saitoh, Hisato, E-mail: hisa@kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Course for Biological Sciences, Faculty of Science, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Department of Biological Sciences, Graduate School of Science and Technology, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2016-07-29

    We have previously reported the co-localization of O-propargyl-puromycin (OP-Puro) with SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin at promyelocytic leukemia-nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) in the presence of the proteasome inhibitor MG132, implying a role for the ubiquitin family in sequestering OP-puromycylated immature polypeptides to the nucleus during impaired proteasome activity. Here, we found that as expected puromycin induced SUMO-1/2/3 accumulation with ubiquitin at multiple nuclear foci in HeLa cells when co-exposed to MG132. Co-administration of puromycin and MG132 also facilitated redistribution of PML and the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 concurrently with SUMO-2/3. As removal of the drugs from the medium led to disappearance of the SUMO-2/3-ubiquitin nuclear foci, our findings indicated that nuclear assembly/disassembly of SUMO-2/3 and ubiquitin was pharmacologically manipulable, supporting our previous observation on OP-Puro, which predicted the ubiquitin family function in sequestrating aberrant proteins to the nucleus. -- Highlights: •Puromycin exhibits the O-propargyl-puromycin effect. •Puromycin induces SUMO redistribution upon proteasome inhibition. •Ubiquitin and RNF4 accumulate at PML-nuclear bodies with SUMO-2/3. •The ubiquitin family may function in nuclear sequestration of immature proteins.

  11. The human otubain2-ubiquitin structure provides insights into the cleavage specificity of poly-ubiquitin-linkages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikael Altun

    Full Text Available Ovarian tumor domain containing proteases cleave ubiquitin (Ub and ubiquitin-like polypeptides from proteins. Here we report the crystal structure of human otubain 2 (OTUB2 in complex with a ubiquitin-based covalent inhibitor, Ub-Br2. The ubiquitin binding mode is oriented differently to how viral otubains (vOTUs bind ubiquitin/ISG15, and more similar to yeast and mammalian OTUs. In contrast to OTUB1 which has exclusive specificity towards Lys48 poly-ubiquitin chains, OTUB2 cleaves different poly-Ub linked chains. N-terminal tail swapping experiments between OTUB1 and OTUB2 revealed how the N-terminal structural motifs in OTUB1 contribute to modulating enzyme activity and Ub-chain selectivity, a trait not observed in OTUB2, supporting the notion that OTUB2 may affect a different spectrum of substrates in Ub-dependent pathways.

  12. Synaptic activity regulates AMPA receptor trafficking through different recycling pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Ning; Jeyifous, Okunola; Munro, Charlotte; Montgomery, Johanna M; Green, William N

    2015-01-01

    Changes in glutamatergic synaptic strength in brain are dependent on AMPA-type glutamate receptor (AMPAR) recycling, which is assumed to occur through a single local pathway. In this study, we present evidence that AMPAR recycling occurs through different pathways regulated by synaptic activity. Without synaptic stimulation, most AMPARs recycled in dynamin-independent endosomes containing the GTPase, Arf6. Few AMPARs recycled in dynamin-dependent endosomes labeled by transferrin receptors (TfRs). AMPAR recycling was blocked by alterations in the GTPase, TC10, which co-localized with Arf6 endosomes. TC10 mutants that reduced AMPAR recycling had no effect on increased AMPAR levels with long-term potentiation (LTP) and little effect on decreased AMPAR levels with long-term depression. However, internalized AMPAR levels in TfR-containing recycling endosomes increased after LTP, indicating increased AMPAR recycling through the dynamin-dependent pathway with synaptic plasticity. LTP-induced AMPAR endocytosis is inconsistent with local recycling as a source of increased surface receptors, suggesting AMPARs are trafficked from other sites. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06878.001 PMID:25970033

  13. Molecular and structural insight into lysine selection on substrate and ubiquitin lysine 48 by the ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Suryadinata, Randy; Holien, Jessica K; Yang, George

    2013-01-01

    The attachment of ubiquitin (Ub) to lysines on substrates or itself by ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes results in protein ubiquitination. Lysine selection is important for generating diverse substrate-Ub structures and targeting proteins to different fates; however, t...

  14. Tumor necrosis factor alpha maintains denervation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity of mouse dentate granule cells

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    Denise eBecker

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons which lose part of their input respond with a compensatory increase in excitatory synaptic strength. This observation is of particular interest in the context of neurological diseases, which are accompanied by the loss of neurons and subsequent denervation of connected brain regions. However, while the cellular and molecular mechanisms of pharmacologically induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity have been identified to a certain degree, denervation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity remains not well understood. Here, we employed the entorhinal denervation in vitro model to study the role of tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα on changes in excitatory synaptic strength of mouse dentate granule cells following partial deafferentation. Our experiments disclose that TNFα is required for the maintenance of a compensatory increase in excitatory synaptic strength at 3/4 days postlesion (dpl, but not for the induction of synaptic scaling at 1 - 2 dpl. Furthermore, laser capture microdissection (LMD combined with quantitative PCR (qPCR demonstrates an increase in TNFα-mRNA levels in the denervated zone, which is consistent with our previous finding on a local, i.e., layer-specific increase in excitatory synaptic strength at 3 - 4 dpl. Immunostainings for the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP and TNFα suggest that astrocytes are a source of TNFα in our experimental setting. We conclude that TNFα-signaling is a major regulatory system that aims at maintaining the homeostatic synaptic response of denervated neurons.

  15. Rictor forms a complex with Cullin-1 to promote SGK1 ubiquitination and destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Daming; Wan, Lixin; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Berg, Anders H.; Tseng, Alan; Zhai, Bo; Shaik, Shavali; Bennett, Eric; Tron, Adriana E.; Gasser, Jessica A.; Lau, Alan; Gygi, Steven; Harper, J. Wade; DeCaprio, James A.; Toker, Alex; Wei, Wenyi

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Rictor/mTOR complex (also known as mTORC2) plays a critical role in cellular homeostasis by phosphorylating AGC kinases such as Akt and SGK at their hydrophobic motifs to activate downstream signaling. However, the regulation of mTORC2 and whether it has additional function(s), remains largely unknown. Here we report that Rictor associates with Cullin-1 to form a functional E3 ubiquitin ligase. Rictor, but not Raptor or mTOR alone promotes SGK1 ubiquitination. Loss of Rictor/Cullin-1-mediated ubiquitination leads to increased SGK1 protein levels as detected in Rictor null cells. Moreover, as part of a feedback mechanism, phosphorylation of Rictor at T1135 by multiple AGC kinases disrupts the interaction between Rictor and Cullin-1 to impair SGK1 ubiquitination. These findings indicate that the Rictor/Cullin-1 E3 ligase activity is regulated by a specific signal relay cascade and that misregulation of this mechanism may contribute to the frequent overexpression of SGK1 in various human cancers. PMID:20832730

  16. The study of fkbp and ubiquitin reveals interesting aspects of Artemia stress history.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maniatsi, Stefania; Farmaki, Theodora; Abatzopoulos, Theodore J

    2015-08-01

    Research on stress responses in animals has increased greatly during the last decades. Though most studies focus on the cellular and molecular bases of the stress response mechanisms, the ecological and evolutionary aspects of stress responses gain more and more interest. Here, we use species and parthenogenetic strains of the genus Artemia, an extremophile model organism, to study, for the first time, a protein well known for its chaperone activity and its involvement in stress responses. More specifically, transcription and protein accumulation of an FK506-Binding Protein (FKBP) homologue were investigated under heat and salt stresses. Additionally, the mRNA levels of ubiquitin, a heat-inducible protein related to the proteasomal pathway, were quantitated under these conditions. Biochemical and phylogenetic analyses showed that the studied FKBP orthologue is a typical representative of the family that clusters with other crustacean sequences. The expression was increased in both fkbp and ubiquitin genes after salt and heat stresses. However, our results in combination with the fact that Artemia species and parthenogenetic strains, selected for this study, exhibit different heat or salt tolerance provide useful hints about the evolutionary significance of FKBP and ubiquitin. Regarding FKBP, mRNA expression and protein accumulation seem to depend on the environmental conditions and the evolutionary history of each Artemia population while ubiquitin has a clear and more conserved role under heat shock. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitination and De-Ubiquitination in Signal Transduction and Receptor Trafficking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Critchley

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs are membrane-based sensors that enable rapid communication between cells and their environment. Evidence is now emerging that interdependent regulatory mechanisms, such as membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, proteolysis and gene expression, have substantial effects on RTK signal transduction and cellular responses. Different RTKs exhibit both basal and ligand-stimulated ubiquitination, linked to trafficking through different intracellular compartments including the secretory pathway, plasma membrane, endosomes and lysosomes. The ubiquitin ligase superfamily comprising the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes are increasingly implicated in this post-translational modification by adding mono- and polyubiquitin tags to RTKs. Conversely, removal of these ubiquitin tags by proteases called de-ubiquitinases (DUBs enables RTK recycling for another round of ligand sensing and signal transduction. The endocytosis of basal and activated RTKs from the plasma membrane is closely linked to controlled proteolysis after trafficking and delivery to late endosomes and lysosomes. Proteolytic RTK fragments can also have the capacity to move to compartments such as the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Such mechanistic diversity now provides new opportunities for modulating RTK-regulated cellular responses in health and disease states.

  18. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase Ubiquitination and De-Ubiquitination in Signal Transduction and Receptor Trafficking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Critchley, William R.; Pellet-Many, Caroline; Ringham-Terry, Benjamin; Zachary, Ian C.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2018-01-01

    Receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are membrane-based sensors that enable rapid communication between cells and their environment. Evidence is now emerging that interdependent regulatory mechanisms, such as membrane trafficking, ubiquitination, proteolysis and gene expression, have substantial effects on RTK signal transduction and cellular responses. Different RTKs exhibit both basal and ligand-stimulated ubiquitination, linked to trafficking through different intracellular compartments including the secretory pathway, plasma membrane, endosomes and lysosomes. The ubiquitin ligase superfamily comprising the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes are increasingly implicated in this post-translational modification by adding mono- and polyubiquitin tags to RTKs. Conversely, removal of these ubiquitin tags by proteases called de-ubiquitinases (DUBs) enables RTK recycling for another round of ligand sensing and signal transduction. The endocytosis of basal and activated RTKs from the plasma membrane is closely linked to controlled proteolysis after trafficking and delivery to late endosomes and lysosomes. Proteolytic RTK fragments can also have the capacity to move to compartments such as the nucleus and regulate gene expression. Such mechanistic diversity now provides new opportunities for modulating RTK-regulated cellular responses in health and disease states. PMID:29543760

  19. Ubiquitin-aldehyde: a general inhibitor of ubiquitin-recycling processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hershko, A.; Rose, I.A.

    1987-01-01

    The generation and characterization of ubiquitin (Ub)-aldehyde, a potent inhibitor of Ub-C-terminal hydrolase, has previously been reported. The authors examine the action of this compound on the Ub-mediated proteolytic pathway using the system derived from rabbit reticulocytes. Addition of Ub-aldehyde was found to strongly inhibit breakdown of added 125 I-labeled lysozyme, but inhibition was overcome by increasing concentrations of Ub. The following evidence shows the effect of Ub-aldehyde on protein breakdown to be indirectly caused by its interference with the recycling of Ub, leading to exhaustion of the supply of free Ub: (i) Ub-aldehyde markedly increased the accumulation of Ub-protein conjugates coincident with a much decreased rate of conjugate breakdown; (ii) release of Ub from isolated Ub-protein conjugates in the absence of ATP (and therefore not coupled to protein degradation) is markedly inhibited by Ub-aldehyde. On the other hand, the ATP-dependent degradation of the protein moiety of Ub conjugates, which is an integral part of the proteolytic process, is not inhibited by this agent; (iii) direct measurement of levels of free Ub showed a rapid disappearance caused by the inhibitor. The Ub is found to be distributed in derivatives of a wide range of molecular weight classes. It thus seems that Ub-aldehyde, previously demonstrated to inhibit the hydrolysis of Ub conjugates of small molecules, also inhibits the activity of a series of enzymes that regenerate free Ub from adducts with proteins and intermediates in protein breakdown

  20. Network response synchronization enhanced by synaptic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobov, S.; Simonov, A.; Kastalskiy, I.; Kazantsev, V.

    2016-02-01

    Synchronization of neural network response on spatially localized periodic stimulation was studied. The network consisted of synaptically coupled spiking neurons with spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity (STDP). Network connectivity was defined by time evolving matrix of synaptic weights. We found that the steady-state spatial pattern of the weights could be rearranged due to locally applied external periodic stimulation. A method for visualization of synaptic weights as vector field was introduced to monitor the evolving connectivity matrix. We demonstrated that changes in the vector field and associated weight rearrangements underlay an enhancement of synchronization range.

  1. LXR regulates cholesterol uptake through Idol-dependent ubiquitination of the LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelcer, Noam; Hong, Cynthia; Boyadjian, Rima; Tontonoz, Peter

    2009-07-03

    Cellular cholesterol levels reflect a balance between uptake, efflux, and endogenous synthesis. Here we show that the sterol-responsive nuclear liver X receptor (LXR) helps maintain cholesterol homeostasis, not only through promotion of cholesterol efflux but also through suppression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) uptake. LXR inhibits the LDL receptor (LDLR) pathway through transcriptional induction of Idol (inducible degrader of the LDLR), an E3 ubiquitin ligase that triggers ubiquitination of the LDLR on its cytoplasmic domain, thereby targeting it for degradation. LXR ligand reduces, whereas LXR knockout increases, LDLR protein levels in vivo in a tissue-selective manner. Idol knockdown in hepatocytes increases LDLR protein levels and promotes LDL uptake. Conversely, adenovirus-mediated expression of Idol in mouse liver promotes LDLR degradation and elevates plasma LDL levels. The LXR-Idol-LDLR axis defines a complementary pathway to sterol response element-binding proteins for sterol regulation of cholesterol uptake.

  2. Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-30

    suspected of being the substrate of several forms of memory encoded by synapses in the forebrain of humans and other mammals. Work in the past year...of LTP will enhance the encoding of memory . Aniracetam , as noted, prolongs the open time of the AMPA receptor and in this way facilitates excitatory...121 t Iffw,,a" S. FUNO4NG mUMSERS Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Formation F 49620-92-0307 C (ci) b.q F Gary Lynch 7. Pf(RfO*INN ORGAMIZAMNIO NMMW(S

  3. The ubiquitin ligase SCFFBXW7α promotes GATA3 degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Nan; Cao, Cheng; Tang, Yiman; Bi, Liyuan; Jiang, Yong; Zhou, Yongsheng; Song, Xin; Liu, Ling; Ge, Wenshu

    2018-03-01

    GATA3 is a key transcription factor in cell fate determination and its dysregulation has been implicated in various types of malignancies. However, how the abundance and function of GATA3 are regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that GATA3 is physically associated with FBXW7α, and FBXW7α destabilizes GATA3 through assembly of a SKP1-CUL1-F-box E3 ligase complex. Importantly, we showed that FBXW7α promotes GATA3 ubiquitination and degradation in a GSK3 dependent manner. Furthermore, we demonstrated that FBXW7α inhibits breast cancer cells survival through destabilizing GATA3, and the expression level of FBXW7α is negatively correlated with that of GATA3 in breast cancer samples. This study indicated that FBXW7α is a critical negative regulator of GATA3 and revealed a pathway for the maintenance of GATA3 abundance in breast cancer cells. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. RIM1α SUMOylation Is Required for Fast Synaptic Vesicle Exocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Girach

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The rapid, activity-dependent quantal presynaptic release of neurotransmitter is vital for brain function. The complex process of vesicle priming, fusion, and retrieval is very precisely controlled and requires the spatiotemporal coordination of multiple protein-protein interactions. Here, we show that posttranslational modification of the active zone protein Rab3-interacting molecule 1α (RIM1α by the small ubiquitin-like modifier 1 (SUMO-1 functions as a molecular switch to direct these interactions and is essential for fast synaptic vesicle exocytosis. RIM1α SUMOylation at lysine residue K502 facilitates the clustering of CaV2.1 calcium channels and enhances the Ca2+ influx necessary for vesicular release, whereas non-SUMOylated RIM1α participates in the docking/priming of synaptic vesicles and maintenance of active zone structure. These results demonstrate that SUMOylation of RIM1α is a key determinant of rapid, synchronous neurotransmitter release, and the SUMO-mediated “switching” of RIM1α between binding proteins provides insight into the mechanisms underpinning synaptic function and dysfunction.

  5. Hijacking of the Host Ubiquitin Network by Legionella pneumophila

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiazhang Qiu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein ubiquitination is critical for regulation of numerous eukaryotic cellular processes such as protein homeostasis, cell cycle progression, immune response, DNA repair, and vesicular trafficking. Ubiquitination often leads to the alteration of protein stability, subcellular localization, or interaction with other proteins. Given the importance of ubiquitination in the regulation of host immunity, it is not surprising that many infectious agents have evolved strategies to interfere with the ubiquitination network with sophisticated mechanisms such as functional mimicry. The facultative intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is the causative agent of Legionnaires' disease. L. pneumophila is phagocytosed by macrophages and is able to replicate within a niche called Legionella-containing vacuole (LCV. The biogenesis of LCV is dependent upon the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system which delivers more than 330 effector proteins into host cytosol. The optimal intracellular replication of L. pneumophila requires the host ubiquitin-proteasome system. Furthermore, membranes of the bacterial phagosome are enriched with ubiquitinated proteins in a way that requires its Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, suggesting the involvement of effectors in the manipulation of the host ubiquitination machinery. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of mechanisms exploited by L. pneumophila effector proteins to hijack the host ubiquitination pathway.

  6. Modulating cellular balance of Rps3 mono-ubiquitination by both Hel2 E3 ligase and Ubp3 deubiquitinase regulates protein quality control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Youjin; Kim, Hag Dong; Yang, Hee Woong; Kim, Hye Jin; Jang, Chang-Young; Kim, Joon

    2017-11-17

    When a ribosome complex is stalled during the translation elongation process in eukaryotes, the mono-ubiquitination of Rps3 has recently been shown to be critical to ribosome quality control. We have discovered that the regulatory role of Rps3 mono-ubiquitination is controlled by a deubiquitinase. We also showed that an autophagic signal appears to be coupled to the mono-ubiquitination of Rps3p through the entrance of Ubp3p into the autophagosome in yeasts. The mono-ubiquitination of the Rps3 protein is tightly modulated by reciprocal action between the Hel2p E3 ligase and the Ubp3p deubiquitinase in yeasts and the reciprocal action between the RNF123 E3 ligase and the USP10 deubiquitinase in mammalian cells. We also found that the Ubp3p/USP10 deubiquitinases critically modulate Hel2p/RNF123-mediated Rps3p mono-ubiquitination. In addition, we found that Hel2p/RNF123 and Ubp3p/USP10 appeared to be differently localized in the ribosome complex after ultraviolet irradiation. Together, our results support a model in which coordinated ubiquitination and deubiquitination activities can finely balance the level of regulatory Rps3p mono-ubiquitination in ribosome-associated quality control and autophagy processes.

  7. K63-Linked Ubiquitination in Kinase Activation and Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Guocan; Gao, Yuan; Li, Liren; Jin, Guoxiang; Cai, Zhen; Chao, Jui-I; Lin, Hui-Kuan

    2012-01-01

    Ubiquitination has been demonstrated to play a pivotal role in multiple biological functions, which include cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis, DNA damage response, innate immune response, and neuronal degeneration. Although the role of ubiquitination in targeting proteins for proteasome-dependent degradation have been extensively studied and well-characterized, the critical non-proteolytic functions of ubiquitination, such as protein trafficking and kinase activation, involved in cell survival and cancer development, just start to emerge, In this review, we will summarize recent progresses in elucidating the non-proteolytic function of ubiquitination signaling in protein kinase activation and its implications in human cancers. The advancement in the understanding of the novel functions of ubiquitination in signal transduction pathways downstream of growth factor receptors may provide novel paradigms for the treatment of human cancers.

  8. KF-1 Ubiquitin Ligase: An Anxiety Suppressor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Anxiety is an instinct that may have developed to promote adaptive survival by evading unnecessary danger. However, excessive anxiety is disruptive and can be a basic disorder of other psychiatric diseases such as depression. The KF-1, a ubiquitin ligase located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), may prevent excessive anxiety; kf-1(-/-) mice exhibit selectively elevated anxiety-like behavior against light or heights. It is surmised that KF-1 degrades some target proteins, responsible for promoting anxiety, through the ER-associated degradation pathway, similar to Parkin in Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, another ER-ubiquitin ligase, prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons by degrading the target proteins responsible for PD. Molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the prototype of kf-1 appeared in the very early phase of animal evolution but was lost, unlike parkin, in the lineage leading up to Drosophila. Therefore, kf-1(-/-) mice may be a powerful tool for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in emotional regulation, and for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds.

  9. RYBP Is a K63-Ubiquitin-Chain-Binding Protein that Inhibits Homologous Recombination Repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad A.M. Ali

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Ring1-YY1-binding protein (RYBP is a member of the non-canonical polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1, and like other PRC1 members, it is best described as a transcriptional regulator. However, several PRC1 members were recently shown to function in DNA repair. Here, we report that RYBP preferentially binds K63-ubiquitin chains via its Npl4 zinc finger (NZF domain. Since K63-linked ubiquitin chains are assembled at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, we examined the contribution of RYBP to DSB repair. Surprisingly, we find that RYBP is K48 polyubiquitylated by RNF8 and rapidly removed from chromatin upon DNA damage by the VCP/p97 segregase. High expression of RYBP competitively inhibits recruitment of BRCA1 repair complex to DSBs, reducing DNA end resection and homologous recombination (HR repair. Moreover, breast cancer cell lines expressing high endogenous RYBP levels show increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP inhibition. These data suggest that RYBP negatively regulates HR repair by competing for K63-ubiquitin chain binding. : Ali et al. find that RYBP binds K63-linked ubiquitin chains and is removed from DNA damage sites. This K63-ubiquitin binding allows RYBP to hinder the recruitment of BRCA1 and Rad51 to DNA double-strand breaks, thus inhibiting homologous recombination repair. Accordingly, cancer cells expressing high RYBP are more sensitive to DNA-damaging therapies. Keywords: DNA damage response, homologous recombination, ubiquitylation, RYBP, polycomb proteins, double-strand break repair, chromatin, histone modification

  10. Ubiquitin fusion expression and tissue-dependent targeting of hG-CSF in transgenic tobacco

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (hG-CSF) is an important human cytokine which has been widely used in oncology and infection protection. To satisfy clinical needs, expression of recombinant hG-CSF has been studied in several organisms, including rice cell suspension culture and transient expression in tobacco leaves, but there was no published report on its expression in stably transformed plants which can serve as a more economical expression platform with potential industrial application. Results In this study, hG-CSF expression was investigated in transgenic tobacco leaves and seeds in which the accumulation of hG-CSF could be enhanced through fusion with ubiquitin by up to 7 fold in leaves and 2 fold in seeds, leading to an accumulation level of 2.5 mg/g total soluble protein (TSP) in leaves and 1.3 mg/g TSP in seeds, relative to hG-CSF expressed without a fusion partner. Immunoblot analysis showed that ubiquitin was processed from the final protein product, and ubiquitination was up-regulated in all transgenic plants analyzed. Driven by CaMV 35S promoter and phaseolin signal peptide, hG-CSF was observed to be secreted into apoplast in leaves but deposited in protein storage vacuole (PSV) in seeds, indicating that targeting of the hG-CSF was tissue-dependent in transgenic tobacco. Bioactivity assay showed that hG-CSF expressed in both seeds and leaves was bioactive to support the proliferation of NFS-60 cells. Conclusions In this study, the expression of bioactive hG-CSF in transgenic plants was improved through ubiquitin fusion strategy, demonstrating that protein expression can be enhanced in both plant leaves and seeds through fusion with ubiquitin and providing a typical case of tissue-dependent expression of recombinant protein in transgenic plants. PMID:21985646

  11. How do astrocytes shape synaptic transmission? Insights from electrophysiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn eDallérac

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A major breakthrough in neuroscience has been the realization in the last decades that the dogmatic view of astroglial cells as being merely fostering and buffering elements of the nervous system is simplistic. A wealth of investigations now shows that astrocytes actually participate in the control of synaptic transmission in an active manner. This was first hinted by the intimate contacts glial processes make with neurons, particularly at the synaptic level, and evidenced using electrophysiological and calcium imaging techniques. Calcium imaging has provided critical evidence demonstrating that astrocytic regulation of synaptic efficacy is not a passive phenomenon. However, given that cellular activation is not only represented by calcium signaling, it is also crucial to assess concomitant mechanisms. We and others have used electrophysiological techniques to simultaneously record neuronal and astrocytic activity, thus enabling the study of multiple ionic currents and in depth investigation of neuro-glial dialogues. In the current review, we focus on the input such approach has provided in the understanding of astrocyte-neuron interactions underlying control of synaptic efficacy.

  12. Emerging Link between Alzheimer's Disease and Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Sung-Soo; Chung, Hee Jung

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is an irreversible brain disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and neurodegeneration of brain regions that are crucial for learning and memory. Although intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques, composed of insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides, have been the hallmarks of postmortem AD brains, memory impairment in early AD correlates better with pathological accumulation of soluble Aβ oligomers and persistent weakening of excitatory synaptic strength, which is demonstrated by inhibition of long-term potentiation, enhancement of long-term depression, and loss of synapses. However, current, approved interventions aiming to reduce Aβ levels have failed to retard disease progression; this has led to a pressing need to identify and target alternative pathogenic mechanisms of AD. Recently, it has been suggested that the disruption of Hebbian synaptic plasticity in AD is due to aberrant metaplasticity, which is a form of homeostatic plasticity that tunes the magnitude and direction of future synaptic plasticity based on previous neuronal or synaptic activity. This review examines emerging evidence for aberrant metaplasticity in AD. Putative mechanisms underlying aberrant metaplasticity in AD will also be discussed. We hope this review inspires future studies to test the extent to which these mechanisms contribute to the etiology of AD and offer therapeutic targets. PMID:27019755

  13. A unique deubiquitinase that deconjugates phosphoribosyl-linked protein ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jiazhang; Yu, Kaiwen; Fei, Xiaowen; Liu, Yao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Piehowski, Paul D.; Shaw, Jared B.; Puvar, Kedar; Das, Chittaranjan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2017-05-12

    Ubiquitination regulates many aspects of host immunity and thus is a common target for infectious agents. Recent studies revealed that members of the SidE effector family of the bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila attacked several small GTPases associated with the endoplasmic reticulum by a novel ubiquitination mechanism that does not require the E1 and E2 enzymes of the host ubiquitination machinery. Following ubiquitin activation by ADP- ribosylation via a mono-ADP-ribosylation motif, ADP-ribosylated ubiquitin is cleaved by a phosphodiesterasedomainwithinSdeA,whichisconcomitantwiththelinkof phosphoribosylated ubiquitin to serine residues in the substrate. Here we demonstrate that the activity of SidEs is regulated by SidJ, another effector encoded by a gene situated in the locus coding for three members of the SidE family (SdeC, SdeB and SdeA). SidJ functions to remove ubiquitin from SidEs-modified substrates by cleaving the phosphodiester bond that links phosphoribosylated ubiquitin to protein substrates. Further, the deubiquitinase activity of SidJ is essential for its role in L. pneumophila infection. Finally, the activity of SidJ is required for efficiently reducing the abundance of ubiquitinated Rab33b in infected cells within a few hours after bacterial uptake. Our results establish SidJ as a deubiquitinase that functions to impose temporal regulation of the activity of the SidE effectors. The identification of SidJ may shed light on future study of signaling cascades mediated by this unique ubiquitination that also potentially regulates cellular processes in eukaryotic cells.

  14. Interactions between the quality control ubiquitin ligase CHIP and ubiquitin conjugating enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nix Jay C

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ubiquitin (E3 ligases interact with specific ubiquitin conjugating (E2 enzymes to ubiquitinate particular substrate proteins. As the combination of E2 and E3 dictates the type and biological consequence of ubiquitination, it is important to understand the basis of specificity in E2:E3 interactions. The E3 ligase CHIP interacts with Hsp70 and Hsp90 and ubiquitinates client proteins that are chaperoned by these heat shock proteins. CHIP interacts with two types of E2 enzymes, UbcH5 and Ubc13-Uev1a. It is unclear, however, why CHIP binds these E2 enzymes rather than others, and whether CHIP interacts preferentially with UbcH5 or Ubc13-Uev1a, which form different types of polyubiquitin chains. Results The 2.9 Å crystal structure of the CHIP U-box domain complexed with UbcH5a shows that CHIP binds to UbcH5 and Ubc13 through similar specificity determinants, including a key S-P-A motif on the E2 enzymes. The determinants make different relative contributions to the overall interactions between CHIP and the two E2 enzymes. CHIP undergoes auto-ubiquitination by UbcH5 but not by Ubc13-Uev1a. Instead, CHIP drives the formation of unanchored polyubiquitin by Ubc13-Uev1a. CHIP also interacts productively with the class III E2 enzyme Ube2e2, in which the UbcH5- and Ubc13-binding specificity determinants are highly conserved. Conclusion The CHIP:UbcH5a structure emphasizes the importance of specificity determinants located on the long loops and central helix of the CHIP U-box, and on the N-terminal helix and loops L4 and L7 of its cognate E2 enzymes. The S-P-A motif and other specificity determinants define the set of cognate E2 enzymes for CHIP, which likely includes several Class III E2 enzymes. CHIP's interactions with UbcH5, Ube2e2 and Ubc13-Uev1a are consistent with the notion that Ubc13-Uev1a may work sequentially with other E2 enzymes to carry out K63-linked polyubiquitination of CHIP substrates.

  15. Klotho regulates CA1 hippocampal synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qin; Vo, Hai T; Wang, Jing; Fox-Quick, Stephanie; Dobrunz, Lynn E; King, Gwendalyn D

    2017-04-07

    Global klotho overexpression extends lifespan while global klotho-deficiency shortens it. As well, klotho protein manipulations inversely regulate cognitive function. Mice without klotho develop rapid onset cognitive impairment before they are 2months old. Meanwhile, adult mice overexpressing klotho show enhanced cognitive function, particularly in hippocampal-dependent tasks. The cognitive enhancing effects of klotho extend to humans with a klotho polymorphism that increases circulating klotho and executive function. To affect cognitive function, klotho could act in or on the synapse to modulate synaptic transmission or plasticity. However, it is not yet known if klotho is located at synapses, and little is known about its effects on synaptic function. To test this, we fractionated hippocampi and detected klotho expression in both pre and post-synaptic compartments. We find that loss of klotho enhances both pre and post-synaptic measures of CA1 hippocampal synaptic plasticity at 5weeks of age. However, a rapid loss of synaptic enhancement occurs such that by 7weeks, when mice are cognitively impaired, there is no difference from wild-type controls. Klotho overexpressing mice show no early life effects on synaptic plasticity, but decreased CA1 hippocampal long-term potentiation was measured at 6months of age. Together these data suggest that klotho affects cognition, at least in part, by regulating hippocampal synaptic plasticity. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The developmental stages of synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lohmann, Christian; Kessels, Helmut W.

    2014-01-01

    The brain is programmed to drive behaviour by precisely wiring the appropriate neuronal circuits. Wiring and rewiring of neuronal circuits largely depends on the orchestrated changes in the strengths of synaptic contacts. Here, we review how the rules of synaptic plasticity change during development

  17. EEA1 restores homeostatic synaptic plasticity in hippocampal neurons from Rett syndrome mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2017-08-15

    Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Mecp2 deletion in mice results in an imbalance of excitation and inhibition in hippocampal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' synaptic plasticity. We show that Mecp2-deficient neurons also lack homeostatic synaptic plasticity, likely due to reduced levels of EEA1, a protein involved in AMPA receptor endocytosis. Expression of EEA1 restored homeostatic synaptic plasticity in Mecp2-deficient neurons, providing novel targets of intervention in Rett syndrome. Rett syndrome is a neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in MECP2, the gene encoding the transcriptional regulator methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). Deletion of Mecp2 in mice results in an imbalance of synaptic excitation and inhibition in hippocampal pyramidal neurons, which affects 'Hebbian' long-term synaptic plasticity. Since the excitatory-inhibitory balance is maintained by homeostatic mechanisms, we examined the role of MeCP2 in homeostatic synaptic plasticity (HSP) at excitatory synapses. Negative feedback HSP, also known as synaptic scaling, maintains the global synaptic strength of individual neurons in response to sustained alterations in neuronal activity. Hippocampal neurons from Mecp2 knockout (KO) mice do not show the characteristic homeostatic scaling up of the amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) and of synaptic levels of the GluA1 subunit of AMPA-type glutamate receptors after 48 h silencing with the Na + channel blocker tetrodotoxin. This deficit in HSP is bidirectional because Mecp2 KO neurons also failed to scale down mEPSC amplitudes and GluA1 synaptic levels after 48 h blockade of type A GABA receptor (GABA A R)-mediated inhibition with bicuculline. Consistent with the role of synaptic trafficking of AMPA-type of glutamate receptors in HSP, Mecp2 KO neurons

  18. Pushing synaptic vesicles over the RIM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaeser, Pascal S

    2011-05-01

    In a presynaptic nerve terminal, neurotransmitter release is largely restricted to specialized sites called active zones. Active zones consist of a complex protein network, and they organize fusion of synaptic vesicles with the presynaptic plasma membrane in response to action potentials. Rab3-interacting molecules (RIMs) are central components of active zones. In a recent series of experiments, we have systematically dissected the molecular mechanisms by which RIMs operate in synaptic vesicle release. We found that RIMs execute two critical functions of active zones by virtue of independent protein domains. They tether presyanptic Ca(2+) channels to the active zone, and they activate priming of synaptic vesicles by monomerizing homodimeric, constitutively inactive Munc13. These data indicate that RIMs orchestrate synaptic vesicle release into a coherent process. In conjunction with previous studies, they suggest that RIMs form a molecular platform on which plasticity of synaptic vesicle release can operate.

  19. Targeted ubiquitination and degradation of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 5 by the DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziyan Wu

    Full Text Available The G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs phosphorylate agonist occupied G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs and desensitize GPCR-mediated signaling. Recent studies indicate they also function non-catalytically via interaction with other proteins. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to screen interacting proteins of GRK5 in MDA-MB-231 cells and HUVEC cells. Mass spectrometry analysis reveals several proteins in the GRK5 immunocomplex including damaged DNA-binding protein 1 (DDB1, an adaptor subunit of the CUL4-ROC1 E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the association of GRK5 with DDB1-CUL4 complex, and reveal that DDB1 acts as an adapter to link GRK5 to CUL4 to form the complex. Overexpression of DDB1 promoted, whereas knockdown of DDB1 inhibited the ubiquitination of GRK5, and the degradation of GRK5 was reduced in cells deficient of DDB1. Furthermore, the depletion of DDB1 decreased Hsp90 inhibitor-induced GRK5 destabilization and UV irradiation-induced GRK5 degradation. Thus, our study identified potential GRK5 interacting proteins, and reveals the association of GRK5 with DDB1 in cell and the regulation of GRK5 level by DDB1-CUL4 ubiquitin ligase complex-dependent proteolysis pathway.

  20. The mechanism of OTUB1-mediated inhibition of ubiquitination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiener, Reuven; Zhang, Xiangbin; Wang, Tao; Wolberger, Cynthia (JHU)

    2013-04-08

    Histones are ubiquitinated in response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), promoting recruitment of repair proteins to chromatin. UBC13 (also known as UBE2N) is a ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) that heterodimerizes with UEV1A (also known as UBE2V1) and synthesizes K63-linked polyubiquitin (K63Ub) chains at DSB sites in concert with the ubiquitin ligase (E3), RNF168 (ref. 3). K63Ub synthesis is regulated in a non-canonical manner by the deubiquitinating enzyme, OTUB1 (OTU domain-containing ubiquitin aldehyde-binding protein 1), which binds preferentially to the UBC13-Ub thiolester. Residues amino-terminal to the OTU domain, which had been implicated in ubiquitin binding, are required for binding to UBC13-Ub and inhibition of K63Ub synthesis. Here we describe structural and biochemical studies elucidating how OTUB1 inhibits UBC13 and other E2 enzymes. We unexpectedly find that OTUB1 binding to UBC13-Ub is allosterically regulated by free ubiquitin, which binds to a second site in OTUB1 and increases its affinity for UBC13-Ub, while at the same time disrupting interactions with UEV1A in a manner that depends on the OTUB1 N terminus. Crystal structures of an OTUB1-UBC13 complex and of OTUB1 bound to ubiquitin aldehyde and a chemical UBC13-Ub conjugate show that binding of free ubiquitin to OTUB1 triggers conformational changes in the OTU domain and formation of a ubiquitin-binding helix in the N terminus, thus promoting binding of the conjugated donor ubiquitin in UBC13-Ub to OTUB1. The donor ubiquitin thus cannot interact with the E2 enzyme, which has been shown to be important for ubiquitin transfer. The N-terminal helix of OTUB1 is positioned to interfere with UEV1A binding to UBC13, as well as with attack on the thiolester by an acceptor ubiquitin, thereby inhibiting K63Ub synthesis. OTUB1 binding also occludes the RING E3 binding site on UBC13, thus providing a further component of inhibition. The general features of the inhibition mechanism explain how OTUB1

  1. A novel role of the N terminus of budding yeast histone H3 variant Cse4 in ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Au, Wei Chun; Dawson, Anthony R; Rawson, David W; Taylor, Sara B; Baker, Richard E; Basrai, Munira A

    2013-06-01

    Regulating levels of centromeric histone H3 (CenH3) variant is crucial for genome stability. Interaction of Psh1, an E3 ligase, with the C terminus of Cse4 has been shown to contribute to its proteolysis. Here, we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination of the N terminus of Cse4 in regulating Cse4 proteolysis for faithful chromosome segregation and a role for Doa1 in ubiquitination of Cse4.

  2. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in the response of the ligninolytic fungus Trametes versicolor to nitrogen deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staszczak, Magdalena

    2008-03-01

    The white rot fungus Trametes versicolor is an efficient lignin degrader with ecological significance and industrial applications. Lignin-modifying enzymes of white rot fungi are mainly produced during secondary metabolism triggered in these microorganisms by nutrient deprivation. Selective ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolysis is known to play a crucial role in the response of cells to various stresses such as nutrient limitation, heat shock, and heavy metal exposure. Previous studies from our laboratory demonstrated that proteasomal degradation of intracellular proteins is involved in the regulation of laccase, a major ligninolytic enzyme of T. versicolor, in response to cadmium. In the present study, it was found that the 6-h nitrogen starvation leads to depletion of intracellular free ubiquitin pool in T. versicolor. The difference in the intracellular level of free monomeric ubiquitin observed between the mycelium extract from the nitrogen-deprived and that from the nitrogen-sufficient culture was accompanied by the different pattern of ubiquitin-dependent degradation. Furthermore, it was found that nitrogen deprivation affected 26S proteasome activities of T. versicolor. Proteasome inhibition by lactacystin beta-lactone, a highly specific agent, increased laccase activity in nitrogen-deprived cultures, but not in nitrogen-sufficient cultures. The present study implicates the ubiquitin/proteasome-mediated proteolytic pathway in the response of T. versicolor to nitrogen deprivation.

  3. Mass spectrometric and mutational analyses reveal Lys-6-linked polyubiquitin chains catalyzed by BRCA1-BARD1 ubiquitin ligase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Ooka, Seido; Sato, Ko; Arima, Kei; Okamoto, Joji; Klevit, Rachel E; Fukuda, Mamoru; Ohta, Tomohiko

    2004-02-06

    The breast and ovarian cancer suppressor BRCA1 acquires significant ubiquitin ligase activity when bound to BARD1 as a RING heterodimer. Although the activity may well be important for the role of BRCA1 as a tumor suppressor, the biochemical consequence of the activity is not yet known. Here we report that BRCA1-BARD1 catalyzes Lys-6-linked polyubiquitin chain formation. K6R mutation of ubiquitin dramatically reduces the polyubiquitin products mediated by BRCA1-BARD1 in vitro. BRCA1-BARD1 preferentially utilizes ubiquitin with a single Lys residue at Lys-6 or Lys-29 to mediate autoubiquitination of BRCA1 in vivo. Furthermore, mass spectrometry analysis identified the Lys-6-linked branched ubiquitin fragment from the polyubiquitin chain produced by BRCA1-BARD1 using wild type ubiquitin. The BRCA1-BARD1-mediated Lys-6-linked polyubiquitin chains are deubiquitinated by 26 S proteasome in vitro, whereas autoubiquitinated CUL1 through Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains is degraded. Proteasome inhibitors do not alter the steady state level of the autoubiquitinated BRCA1 in vivo. Hence, the results indicate that BRCA1-BARD1 mediates novel polyubiquitin chains that may be distinctly edited by 26 S proteasome from conventional Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains.

  4. Dp71 is regulated by phosphorylation and ubiquitin-proteasome system in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takahiro; Yaoi, Takeshi; Fushiki, Shinji; Itoh, Kyoko

    2017-10-21

    The Dystrophin (Dp) gene is responsible for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), which is characterized by progressive muscular degeneration and variable degrees of cognitive impairment. Although Dp71 is the most abundant among the Dp isoforms in the brain, the regulatory mechanisms of the related expression levels have not been elucidated. In this study, we found that the constitutive expression levels of Dp71 in PC12 cells were sensitive to proteasomal inhibition. The ectopic expression of FLAG-tagged ubiquitin revealed that Dp71 was ubiquitinated intracellularly. Interestingly, proteasomal inhibition was accompanied by a posttranslational accumulation of modified Dp71, which was restored by protein phosphatase treatment in vitro, indicating that phosphorylation is responsible for the modification and affects the proteasome-dependent degradation of Dp71. Proteasomal activity-sensitive phosphorylated Dp71 is closely associated with syntrophin, a well-known binding partner of Dp71, and syntrophin is also regulated by proteasomal activity in a similar way to Dp71, suggesting that the posttranslational regulatory machinery for Dp71 level is coupled with Dp71-syntrophin molecular complex. Taken together, our results indicated that the expression levels of Dp71 are posttranslationally regulated by the phosphorylation-ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, which may indicate the presence of regulatory mechanisms underlying the proteostasis of both Dp and its molecular complex, which may lead to better therapeutic approaches for the treatment of Dp-related diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ubiquitin expression in muscle from horses with polysaccharide storage myopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, B A; Flint, T H; Fischer, K A

    2006-05-01

    Serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded muscle biopsy specimens from 28 Quarter Horse, Paint, and draft-related breeds, aged 0.5-23 years, were treated with periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) stain for glycogen and were immunostained to detect ubiquitin expression. On the basis of findings in PAS-stained sections, a diagnosis of equine polysaccharide storage myopathy (EPSSM) was made in 22 horses aged 2-23 years (mean, 9.4 years); samples from 6 horses aged 0.5-15 years (mean, 7.3 years) had a normal PAS staining pattern, with no relevant lesions. Ubiquitin expression was detected in all but a 2-year-old EPSSM-affected horse and was not detected in the non-EPSSM-affected horses. Ubiquitin expression was greater than the degree of PAS-positive, amylase-resistant material, and ubiquitin was detected in aggregates of amylase-sensitive glycogen as well as in aggregates of amylase-resistant material. Results suggest that glycogen aggregates develop and are ubiquitinated prior to development of amylase-resistant inclusions. Ubiquitin immunostaining may be most useful for confirming the diagnosis of EPSSM in horses with only amylase-sensitive glycogen aggregates and in horses with early amylase-resistant inclusions. However, ubiquitin immunostaining is no more sensitive than is PAS staining for diagnosis of EPSSM.

  6. Degradation signals for ubiquitin system proteolysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilon, T; Chomsky, O; Kulka, R G

    1998-01-01

    Combinations of different ubiquitin-conjugating (Ubc) enzymes and other factors constitute subsidiary pathways of the ubiquitin system, each of which ubiquitinates a specific subset of proteins. There is evidence that certain sequence elements or structural motifs of target proteins are degradation signals which mark them for ubiquitination by a particular branch of the ubiquitin system and for subsequent degradation. Our aim was to devise a way of searching systematically for degradation signals and to determine to which ubiquitin system subpathways they direct the proteins. We have constructed two reporter gene libraries based on the lacZ or URA3 genes which, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, express fusion proteins with a wide variety of C-terminal extensions. From these, we have isolated clones producing unstable fusion proteins which are stabilized in various ubc mutants. Among these are 10 clones whose products are stabilized in ubc6, ubc7 or ubc6ubc7 double mutants. The C-terminal extensions of these clones, which vary in length from 16 to 50 amino acid residues, are presumed to contain degradation signals channeling proteins for degradation via the UBC6 and/or UBC7 subpathways of the ubiquitin system. Some of these C-terminal tails share similar sequence motifs, and a feature common to almost all of these sequences is a highly hydrophobic region such as is usually located inside globular proteins or inserted into membranes. PMID:9582269

  7. E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Neurobiological Mechanisms: Development to Degeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arun Upadhyay

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old or damaged proteins. Deposition of various aberrant proteins in specific brain regions leads to neurodegeneration and aging. The cellular protein quality control system develop various defense mechanisms against the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins. The mechanisms underlying the selective recognition of specific crucial protein or misfolded proteins are majorly governed by quality control E3 ubiquitin ligases mediated through ubiquitin-proteasome system. Few known E3 ubiquitin ligases have shown prominent neurodevelopmental functions, but their interactions with different developmental proteins play critical roles in neurodevelopmental disorders. Several questions are yet to be understood properly. How E3 ubiquitin ligases determine the specificity and regulate degradation of a particular substrate involved in neuronal proliferation and differentiation is certainly the one, which needs detailed investigations. Another important question is how neurodevelopmental E3 ubiquitin ligases specifically differentiate between their versatile range of substrates and timing of their functional modulations during different phases of development. The premise of this article is to understand how few E3 ubiquitin ligases sense major molecular events, which are crucial for human brain development from its early embryonic stages to throughout adolescence period. A better understanding of these few E3 ubiquitin ligases and their interactions with other potential proteins will provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms to approach toward therapeutic interventions.

  8. P62/Ubiquitin IHC expression in gastrointestinal carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr eMohamed

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available P62 and ubiquitin are small regulatory proteins demonstrated to have implications in the prognosis and survival of various malignancies including: hepatocellular, breast, ovarian, and some gastrointestinal carcinomas. Several trials studied the link of their activity to the extrinsic apoptosis pathway and showed that their autophagy modification has a critical stand point in tumorigenesis. These findings explain their vital role in controlling the process of cell death and survival. It has been shown recently that p62 and ubiquitin overexpression in different types of cancers, such as triple negative breast and ovarian cancers, have directly correlated with incidence of distant metastases. We aim to evaluate p62/ubiquitin expression in gastrointestinal carcinomas of gastric, colonic and pancreatic origin. In gastric carcinoma (45, positive p62 nuclear expression was noted in 53% and cytoplasmic in 57%, while positive ubiquitin was nuclear expressed in 80%, and cytoplasmic in 24%. In colon carcinoma (70, positive p62 nuclear expression was noted in 41% and cytoplasmic in 68.5%, while positive ubiquitin was nuclear in 57% and cytoplasmic in 42%. In pancreatic cancer, positive p62 nuclear expression was noted in 86% and cytoplasmic in 60%, while positive ubiquitin was nuclear in 100% and cytoplasmic in 80%. Normal gastric (6, colon (4 and pancreatic (4 tissues were negative for both P62 and ubiquitin (nuclear and cytoplasmic staining <20%. The results suggest that p62 and ubiquitin are highly expressed in nuclei and cytoplasm of gastric, colonic and pancreatic carcinomas. More studies are needed to correlate IHC expression of p62/ubiquitin with clinicopathologic parameters and overall survival in GI carcinomas.

  9. Simulated pressure denaturation thermodynamics of ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ploetz, Elizabeth A; Smith, Paul E

    2017-12-01

    Simulations of protein thermodynamics are generally difficult to perform and provide limited information. It is desirable to increase the degree of detail provided by simulation and thereby the potential insight into the thermodynamic properties of proteins. In this study, we outline how to analyze simulation trajectories to decompose conformation-specific, parameter free, thermodynamically defined protein volumes into residue-based contributions. The total volumes are obtained using established methods from Fluctuation Solution Theory, while the volume decomposition is new and is performed using a simple proximity method. Native and fully extended ubiquitin are used as the test conformations. Changes in the protein volumes are then followed as a function of pressure, allowing for conformation-specific protein compressibility values to also be obtained. Residue volume and compressibility values indicate significant contributions to protein denaturation thermodynamics from nonpolar and coil residues, together with a general negative compressibility exhibited by acidic residues. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The ubiquitin-selective segregase VCP/p97 orchestrates the response to DNA double-strand breaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meerang, Mayura; Ritz, Danilo; Paliwal, Shreya

    2011-01-01

    Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signalling and repair proteins to the site of lesion. Protein modification with ubiquitin is crucial for the signalling ...... factor in ubiquitin-governed DNA-damage response, highlighting its importance in guarding genome stability.......Unrepaired DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) cause genetic instability that leads to malignant transformation or cell death. Cells respond to DSBs with the ordered recruitment of signalling and repair proteins to the site of lesion. Protein modification with ubiquitin is crucial for the signalling...... proper association of 53BP1, BRCA1 and RAD51, three factors critical for DNA repair and genome surveillance mechanisms. Impairment of p97 activity decreases the level of DSB repair and cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation. These findings identify the p97-UFD1-NPL4 complex as an essential...

  11. Phosphorylation of AMPA receptors is required for sensory deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anubhuti Goel

    Full Text Available Sensory experience, and the lack thereof, can alter the function of excitatory synapses in the primary sensory cortices. Recent evidence suggests that changes in sensory experience can regulate the synaptic level of Ca(2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a process have not been determined. We found that binocular visual deprivation, which is a well-established in vivo model to produce multiplicative synaptic scaling in visual cortex of juvenile rodents, is accompanied by an increase in the phosphorylation of AMPAR GluR1 (or GluA1 subunit at the serine 845 (S845 site and the appearance of CP-AMPARs at synapses. To address the role of GluR1-S845 in visual deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity, we used mice lacking key phosphorylation sites on the GluR1 subunit. We found that mice specifically lacking the GluR1-S845 site (GluR1-S845A mutants, which is a substrate of cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA, show abnormal basal excitatory synaptic transmission and lack visual deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. We also found evidence that increasing GluR1-S845 phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to produce normal multiplicative synaptic scaling. Our study provides concrete evidence that a GluR1 dependent mechanism, especially S845 phosphorylation, is a necessary pre-requisite step for in vivo homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

  12. Phosphorylation of AMPA receptors is required for sensory deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goel, Anubhuti; Xu, Linda W; Snyder, Kevin P; Song, Lihua; Goenaga-Vazquez, Yamila; Megill, Andrea; Takamiya, Kogo; Huganir, Richard L; Lee, Hey-Kyoung

    2011-03-31

    Sensory experience, and the lack thereof, can alter the function of excitatory synapses in the primary sensory cortices. Recent evidence suggests that changes in sensory experience can regulate the synaptic level of Ca(2+)-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying such a process have not been determined. We found that binocular visual deprivation, which is a well-established in vivo model to produce multiplicative synaptic scaling in visual cortex of juvenile rodents, is accompanied by an increase in the phosphorylation of AMPAR GluR1 (or GluA1) subunit at the serine 845 (S845) site and the appearance of CP-AMPARs at synapses. To address the role of GluR1-S845 in visual deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity, we used mice lacking key phosphorylation sites on the GluR1 subunit. We found that mice specifically lacking the GluR1-S845 site (GluR1-S845A mutants), which is a substrate of cAMP-dependent kinase (PKA), show abnormal basal excitatory synaptic transmission and lack visual deprivation-induced homeostatic synaptic plasticity. We also found evidence that increasing GluR1-S845 phosphorylation alone is not sufficient to produce normal multiplicative synaptic scaling. Our study provides concrete evidence that a GluR1 dependent mechanism, especially S845 phosphorylation, is a necessary pre-requisite step for in vivo homeostatic synaptic plasticity.

  13. Synaptic plasticity modulation by circulating peptides and metaplasticity: Involvement in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peineau, Stéphane; Rabiant, Kevin; Pierrefiche, Olivier; Potier, Brigitte

    2018-02-06

    Synaptic plasticity is a cellular process involved in learning and memory whose alteration in its two main forms (Long Term Depression (LTD) and Long Term Potentiation (LTP)), is observed in most brain pathologies, including neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). In humans, AD is associated at the cellular level with neuropathological lesions composed of extracellular deposits of β-amyloid (Aβ) protein aggregates and intracellular neurofibrillary tangles, cellular loss, neuroinflammation and a general brain homeostasis dysregulation. Thus, a dramatic synaptic environment perturbation is observed in AD patients, involving changes in brain neuropeptides, cytokines, growth factors or chemokines concentration and diffusion. Studies performed in animal models demonstrate that these circulating peptides strongly affect synaptic functions and in particular synaptic plasticity. Besides this neuromodulatory action of circulating peptides, other synaptic plasticity regulation mechanisms such as metaplasticity are altered in AD animal models. Here, we will review new insights into the study of synaptic plasticity regulatory/modulatory mechanisms which could influence the process of synaptic plasticity in the context of AD with a particular attention to the role of metaplasticity and peptide dependent neuromodulation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing protein 1 (Tmub1/HOPS facilitates surface expression of GluR2-containing AMPA receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjeong Yang

    Full Text Available Some ubiquitin-like (UBL domain-containing proteins are known to play roles in receptor trafficking. Alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptors (AMPARs undergo constitutive cycling between the intracellular compartment and the cell surface in the central nervous system. However, the function of UBL domain-containing proteins in the recycling of the AMPARs to the synaptic surface has not yet been reported.Here, we report that the Transmembrane and ubiquitin-like domain-containing 1 (Tmub1 protein, formerly known as the Hepatocyte Odd Protein Shuttling (HOPS protein, which is abundantly expressed in the brain and which exists in a synaptosomal membrane fraction, facilitates the recycling of the AMPAR subunit GluR2 to the cell surface. Neurons transfected with Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi plasmids showed a significant reduction in the AMPAR current as compared to their control neurons. Consistently, the synaptic surface expression of GluR2, but not of GluR1, was significantly decreased in the neurons transfected with the Tmub1/HOPS-RNAi and increased in the neurons overexpressing EGFP-Tmub1/HOPS. The altered surface expression of GluR2 was speculated to be due to the altered surface-recycling of the internalized GluR2 in our recycling assay. Eventually, we found that GluR2 and glutamate receptor interacting protein (GRIP were coimmunoprecipitated by the anti-Tmub1/HOPS antibody from the mouse brain. Taken together, these observations show that the Tmub1/HOPS plays a role in regulating basal synaptic transmission; it contributes to maintain the synaptic surface number of the GluR2-containing AMPARs by facilitating the recycling of GluR2 to the plasma membrane.

  15. Regulation of lipid droplet turnover by ubiquitin ligases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rotin Daniela

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Mutation of the protein spartin is a cause of one form of spastic paraplegia. Spartin interacts with ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family, and a recent report in BMC Biology now shows that it acts as an adaptor to recruit and activate the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 onto lipid droplets, leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of droplet-associated proteins. A deficiency of spartin apparently causes lipid droplets to accumulate. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/72/

  16. Water Evaporation and Conformational Changes from Partially Solvated Ubiquitin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saravana Prakash Thirumuruganandham

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the evaporation of water molecules off partially solvated ubiquitin. The evaporation and cooling rates are determined for a molecule at the initial temperature of 300 K. The cooling rate is found to be around 3 K/ns, and decreases with water temperature in the course of the evaporation. The conformation changes are monitored by studying a variety of intermediate partially solvated ubiquitin structures. We find that ubiquitin shrinks with decreasing hydration shell and exposes more of its hydrophilic surface area to the surrounding.

  17. Water evaporation and conformational changes from partially solvated ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thirumuruganandham, Saravana Prakash; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2010-01-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulation, we study the evaporation of water molecules off partially solvated ubiquitin. The evaporation and cooling rates are determined for a molecule at the initial temperature of 300 K. The cooling rate is found to be around 3 K/ns, and decreases with water temperature in the course of the evaporation. The conformation changes are monitored by studying a variety of intermediate partially solvated ubiquitin structures. We find that ubiquitin shrinks with decreasing hydration shell and exposes more of its hydrophilic surface area to the surrounding.

  18. Interplay of multiple synaptic plasticity features in filamentary memristive devices for neuromorphic computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Barbera, Selina; Vincent, Adrien F.; Vuillaume, Dominique; Querlioz, Damien; Alibart, Fabien

    2016-12-01

    Bio-inspired computing represents today a major challenge at different levels ranging from material science for the design of innovative devices and circuits to computer science for the understanding of the key features required for processing of natural data. In this paper, we propose a detail analysis of resistive switching dynamics in electrochemical metallization cells for synaptic plasticity implementation. We show how filament stability associated to joule effect during switching can be used to emulate key synaptic features such as short term to long term plasticity transition and spike timing dependent plasticity. Furthermore, an interplay between these different synaptic features is demonstrated for object motion detection in a spike-based neuromorphic circuit. System level simulation presents robust learning and promising synaptic operation paving the way to complex bio-inspired computing systems composed of innovative memory devices.

  19. Emergent spatial synaptic structure from diffusive plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Yann; Clopath, Claudia

    2017-04-01

    Some neurotransmitters can diffuse freely across cell membranes, influencing neighbouring neurons regardless of their synaptic coupling. This provides a means of neural communication, alternative to synaptic transmission, which can influence the way in which neural networks process information. Here, we ask whether diffusive neurotransmission can also influence the structure of synaptic connectivity in a network undergoing plasticity. We propose a form of Hebbian synaptic plasticity which is mediated by a diffusive neurotransmitter. Whenever a synapse is modified at an individual neuron through our proposed mechanism, similar but smaller modifications occur in synapses connecting to neighbouring neurons. The effects of this diffusive plasticity are explored in networks of rate-based neurons. This leads to the emergence of spatial structure in the synaptic connectivity of the network. We show that this spatial structure can coexist with other forms of structure in the synaptic connectivity, such as with groups of strongly interconnected neurons that form in response to correlated external drive. Finally, we explore diffusive plasticity in a simple feedforward network model of receptive field development. We show that, as widely observed across sensory cortex, the preferred stimulus identity of neurons in our network become spatially correlated due to diffusion. Our proposed mechanism of diffusive plasticity provides an efficient mechanism for generating these spatial correlations in stimulus preference which can flexibly interact with other forms of synaptic organisation. © 2016 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. E2 enzyme inhibition by stabilization of a low-affinity interface with ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Hao; Ceccarelli, Derek F; Orlicky, Stephen; St-Cyr, Daniel J; Ziemba, Amy; Garg, Pankaj; Plamondon, Serge; Auer, Manfred; Sidhu, Sachdev; Marinier, Anne; Kleiger, Gary; Tyers, Mike; Sicheri, Frank

    2014-02-01

    Weak protein interactions between ubiquitin and the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) enzymes that mediate its covalent attachment to substrates serve to position ubiquitin for optimal catalytic transfer. We show that a small-molecule inhibitor of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34A, called CC0651, acts by trapping a weak interaction between ubiquitin and the E2 donor ubiquitin-binding site. A structure of the ternary CC0651-Cdc34A-ubiquitin complex reveals that the inhibitor engages a composite binding pocket formed from Cdc34A and ubiquitin. CC0651 also suppresses the spontaneous hydrolysis rate of the Cdc34A-ubiquitin thioester without decreasing the interaction between Cdc34A and the RING domain subunit of the E3 enzyme. Stabilization of the numerous other weak interactions between ubiquitin and UPS enzymes by small molecules may be a feasible strategy to selectively inhibit different UPS activities.

  1. Models of Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso-Flores, Janet; Herrera-Valdez, Marco A; Galarraga, Elvira; Bargas, José

    2017-01-01

    We focus on dynamical descriptions of short-term synaptic plasticity. Instead of focusing on the molecular machinery that has been reviewed recently by several authors, we concentrate on the dynamics and functional significance of synaptic plasticity, and review some mathematical models that reproduce different properties of the dynamics of short term synaptic plasticity that have been observed experimentally. The complexity and shortcomings of these models point to the need of simple, yet physiologically meaningful models. We propose a simplified model to be tested in synapses displaying different types of short-term plasticity.

  2. In situ simultaneous profiling of phosphorylation and ubiquitination by single excitation-duplexed luminescence resonance energy transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Fengjiao; Zhang, Lei; Wong, Bernardino J Córdova; Lei, Jianping

    2018-03-26

    A dual luminescence resonance energy transfer system is developed based on aptamer-functionalized upconversion nanoparticles as the energy donor and a synthetic dye derivative as the acceptor, which can be applied in the simultaneous profiling and relative quantification of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on a specific protein, even at low levels of protein expression.

  3. A role for PCNA ubiquitination in immunoglobulin hypermutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Arakawa

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA is a DNA polymerase cofactor and regulator of replication-linked functions. Upon DNA damage, yeast and vertebrate PCNA is modified at the conserved lysine K164 by ubiquitin, which mediates error-prone replication across lesions via translesion polymerases. We investigated the role of PCNA ubiquitination in variants of the DT40 B cell line that are mutant in K164 of PCNA or in Rad18, which is involved in PCNA ubiquitination. Remarkably, the PCNA(K164R mutation not only renders cells sensitive to DNA-damaging agents, but also strongly reduces activation induced deaminase-dependent single-nucleotide substitutions in the immunoglobulin light-chain locus. This is the first evidence, to our knowledge, that vertebrates exploit the PCNA-ubiquitin pathway for immunoglobulin hypermutation, most likely through the recruitment of error-prone DNA polymerases.

  4. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marriott Susan J

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS. We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. Results We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284 within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. Conclusion This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284

  5. Ubiquitination of HTLV-I Tax in response to DNA damage regulates nuclear complex formation and nuclear export.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatza, Michael L; Dayaram, Tajhal; Marriott, Susan J

    2007-12-14

    The HTLV-I oncoprotein, Tax, is a pleiotropic protein whose activity is partially regulated by its ability to interact with, and perturb the functions of, numerous cellular proteins. Tax is predominantly a nuclear protein that localizes to nuclear foci known as Tax Speckled Structures (TSS). We recently reported that the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins are altered in response to various forms of genotoxic and cellular stress. The level of cytoplasmic Tax increases in response to stress and this relocalization depends upon the interaction of Tax with CRM1. Cellular pathways and signals that regulate the subcellular localization of Tax remain to be determined. However, post-translational modifications including sumoylation and ubiquitination are known to influence the subcellular localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. The sumoylated form of Tax exists predominantly in the nucleus while ubiquitinated Tax exists predominantly in the cytoplasm. Therefore, we hypothesized that post-translational modifications of Tax that occur in response to DNA damage regulate the localization of Tax and its interactions with cellular proteins. We found a significant increase in mono-ubiquitination of Tax in response to UV irradiation. Mutation of specific lysine residues (K280 and K284) within Tax inhibited DNA damage-induced ubiquitination. In contrast to wild-type Tax, which undergoes transient nucleocytoplasmic shuttling in response to DNA damage, the K280 and K284 mutants were retained in nuclear foci following UV irradiation and remained co-localized with the cellular TSS protein, sc35. This study demonstrates that the localization of Tax, and its interactions with cellular proteins, are dynamic following DNA damage and depend on the post-translational modification status of Tax. Specifically, DNA damage induces the ubiquitination of Tax at K280 and K284. Ubiquitination of these residues facilitates the dissociation of Tax

  6. Cellular Ubc2/Rad6 E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme facilitates tombusvirus replication in yeast and plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Imura, Yoshiyuki, E-mail: imura@brs.nihon-u.ac.jp; Molho, Melissa; Chuang, Chingkai; Nagy, Peter D., E-mail: pdnagy2@uky.edu

    2015-10-15

    Mono- and multi-ubiquitination alters the functions and subcellular localization of many cellular and viral proteins. Viruses can co-opt or actively manipulate the ubiquitin network to support viral processes or suppress innate immunity. Using yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) model host, we show that the yeast Rad6p (radiation sensitive 6) E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and its plant ortholog, AtUbc2, interact with two tombusviral replication proteins and these E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes could be co-purified with the tombusvirus replicase. We demonstrate that TBSV RNA replication and the mono- and bi-ubiquitination level of p33 is decreased in rad6Δ yeast. However, plasmid-based expression of AtUbc2p could complement both defects in rad6Δ yeast. Knockdown of UBC2 expression in plants also decreases tombusvirus accumulation and reduces symptom severity, suggesting that Ubc2p is critical for virus replication in plants. We provide evidence that Rad6p is involved in promoting the subversion of Vps23p and Vps4p ESCRT proteins for viral replicase complex assembly. - Highlights: • Tombusvirus p33 replication protein interacts with cellular RAD6/Ubc2 E2 enzymes. • Deletion of RAD6 reduces tombusvirus replication in yeast. • Silencing of UBC2 in plants inhibits tombusvirus replication. • Mono- and bi-ubiquitination of p33 replication protein in yeast and in vitro. • Rad6p promotes the recruitment of cellular ESCRT proteins into the tombusvirus replicase.

  7. Molecular mechanisms of synaptic remodeling in alcoholism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyzar, Evan J; Pandey, Subhash C

    2015-08-05

    Alcohol use and alcohol addiction represent dysfunctional brain circuits resulting from neuroadaptive changes during protracted alcohol exposure and its withdrawal. Alcohol exerts a potent effect on synaptic plasticity and dendritic spine formation in specific brain regions, providing a neuroanatomical substrate for the pathophysiology of alcoholism. Epigenetics has recently emerged as a critical regulator of gene expression and synaptic plasticity-related events in the brain. Alcohol exposure and withdrawal induce changes in crucial epigenetic processes in the emotional brain circuitry (amygdala) that may be relevant to the negative affective state defined as the "dark side" of addiction. Here, we review the literature concerning synaptic plasticity and epigenetics, with a particular focus on molecular events related to dendritic remodeling during alcohol abuse and alcoholism. Targeting epigenetic processes that modulate synaptic plasticity may yield novel treatments for alcoholism. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  8. Quantitative Proteomics of Synaptic and Nonsynaptic Mitochondria: Insights for Synaptic Mitochondrial Vulnerability

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synaptic mitochondria are essential for maintaining calcium homeostasis and producing ATP, processes vital for neuronal integrity and synaptic transmission. Synaptic mitochondria exhibit increased oxidative damage during aging and are more vulnerable to calcium insult than nonsynaptic mitochondria. Why synaptic mitochondria are specifically more susceptible to cumulative damage remains to be determined. In this study, the generation of a super-SILAC mix that served as an appropriate internal standard for mouse brain mitochondria mass spectrometry based analysis allowed for the quantification of the proteomic differences between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria isolated from 10-month-old mice. We identified a total of 2260 common proteins between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria of which 1629 were annotated as mitochondrial. Quantitative proteomic analysis of the proteins common between synaptic and nonsynaptic mitochondria revealed significant differential expression of 522 proteins involved in several pathways including oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondrial fission/fusion, calcium transport, and mitochondrial DNA replication and maintenance. In comparison to nonsynaptic mitochondria, synaptic mitochondria exhibited increased age-associated mitochondrial DNA deletions and decreased bioenergetic function. These findings provide insights into synaptic mitochondrial susceptibility to damage. PMID:24708184

  9. Inter-Synaptic Lateral Diffusion of GABAA Receptors Shapes Inhibitory Synaptic Currents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Luca, Emanuela; Ravasenga, Tiziana; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Polenghi, Alice; Nieus, Thierry; Guazzi, Stefania; Barberis, Andrea

    2017-07-05

    The lateral mobility of neurotransmitter receptors has been shown to tune synaptic signals. Here we report that GABAA receptors (GABAARs) can diffuse between adjacent dendritic GABAergic synapses in long-living desensitized states, thus laterally spreading "activation memories" between inhibitory synapses. Glutamatergic activity limits this inter-synaptic diffusion by trapping GABAARs at excitatory synapses. This novel form of activity-dependent hetero-synaptic interplay is likely to modulate dendritic synaptic signaling. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Short-term synaptic plasticity and heterogeneity in neural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejias, J. F.; Kappen, H. J.; Longtin, A.; Torres, J. J.

    2013-01-01

    We review some recent results on neural dynamics and information processing which arise when considering several biophysical factors of interest, in particular, short-term synaptic plasticity and neural heterogeneity. The inclusion of short-term synaptic plasticity leads to enhanced long-term memory capacities, a higher robustness of memory to noise, and irregularity in the duration of the so-called up cortical states. On the other hand, considering some level of neural heterogeneity in neuron models allows neural systems to optimize information transmission in rate coding and temporal coding, two strategies commonly used by neurons to codify information in many brain areas. In all these studies, analytical approximations can be made to explain the underlying dynamics of these neural systems.

  11. Synaptic Bistability Due to Nucleation and Evaporation of Receptor Clusters

    KAUST Repository

    Burlakov, V. M.

    2012-01-10

    We introduce a bistability mechanism for long-term synaptic plasticity based on switching between two metastable states that contain significantly different numbers of synaptic receptors. One state is characterized by a two-dimensional gas of mobile interacting receptors and is stabilized against clustering by a high nucleation barrier. The other state contains a receptor gas in equilibrium with a large cluster of immobile receptors, which is stabilized by the turnover rate of receptors into and out of the synapse. Transitions between the two states can be initiated by either an increase (potentiation) or a decrease (depotentiation) of the net receptor flux into the synapse. This changes the saturation level of the receptor gas and triggers nucleation or evaporation of receptor clusters. © 2012 American Physical Society.

  12. Regulation of G Protein-Coupled Receptors by Ubiquitination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Skieterska

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs comprise the largest family of membrane receptors that control many cellular processes and consequently often serve as drug targets. These receptors undergo a strict regulation by mechanisms such as internalization and desensitization, which are strongly influenced by posttranslational modifications. Ubiquitination is a posttranslational modification with a broad range of functions that is currently gaining increased appreciation as a regulator of GPCR activity. The role of ubiquitination in directing GPCRs for lysosomal degradation has already been well-established. Furthermore, this modification can also play a role in targeting membrane and endoplasmic reticulum-associated receptors to the proteasome. Most recently, ubiquitination was also shown to be involved in GPCR signaling. In this review, we present current knowledge on the molecular basis of GPCR regulation by ubiquitination, and highlight the importance of E3 ubiquitin ligases, deubiquitinating enzymes and β-arrestins. Finally, we discuss classical and newly-discovered functions of ubiquitination in controlling GPCR activity.

  13. Activity Dependent Synaptic Plasticity Mimicked on Indium-Tin-Oxide Electric-Double-Layer Transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Juan; Zhu, Li Qiang; Fu, Yang Ming; Xiao, Hui; Guo, Li Qiang; Wan, Qing

    2017-10-25

    Ion coupling has provided an additional method to modulate electric properties for solid-state materials. Here, phosphorosilicate glass (PSG)-based electrolyte gated protonic/electronic coupled indium-tin-oxide electric-double-layer (EDL) transistors are fabricated. The oxide transistor exhibits good electrical performances due to an extremely strong proton gating behavior for the electrolyte. With interfacial electrochemical doping, channel conductances of the oxide EDL transistor can be regulated to different levels, corresponding to different initial synaptic weights. Thus, activity dependent synaptic responses such as excitatory postsynaptic current, paired-pulse facilitation, and high-pass filtering are discussed in detail. The proposed proton conductor gated oxide EDL synaptic transistors with activity dependent synaptic plasticities may act as fundamental building blocks for neuromorphic system applications.

  14. AMPA Receptor Trafficking in Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity: Functional Molecules and Signaling Cascades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan Wang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic synaptic plasticity is a negative-feedback response employed to compensate for functional disturbances in the nervous system. Typically, synaptic activity is strengthened when neuronal firing is chronically suppressed or weakened when neuronal activity is chronically elevated. At both the whole cell and entire network levels, activity manipulation leads to a global up- or downscaling of the transmission efficacy of all synapses. However, the homeostatic response can also be induced locally at subcellular regions or individual synapses. Homeostatic synaptic scaling is expressed mainly via the regulation of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptor (AMPAR trafficking and synaptic expression. Here we review the recently identified functional molecules and signaling pathways that are involved in homeostatic plasticity, especially the homeostatic regulation of AMPAR localization at excitatory synapses.

  15. Synaptic state matching: a dynamical architecture for predictive internal representation and feature detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavazoie, Saeed

    2013-01-01

    Here we explore the possibility that a core function of sensory cortex is the generation of an internal simulation of sensory environment in real-time. A logical elaboration of this idea leads to a dynamical neural architecture that oscillates between two fundamental network states, one driven by external input, and the other by recurrent synaptic drive in the absence of sensory input. Synaptic strength is modified by a proposed synaptic state matching (SSM) process that ensures equivalence of spike statistics between the two network states. Remarkably, SSM, operating locally at individual synapses, generates accurate and stable network-level predictive internal representations, enabling pattern completion and unsupervised feature detection from noisy sensory input. SSM is a biologically plausible substrate for learning and memory because it brings together sequence learning, feature detection, synaptic homeostasis, and network oscillations under a single unifying computational framework.

  16. Torsin A Localization in the Mouse Cerebellar Synaptic Circuitry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Puglisi

    Full Text Available Torsin A (TA is a ubiquitous protein belonging to the superfamily of proteins called "ATPases associated with a variety of cellular activities" (AAA(+ ATPase. To date, a great deal of attention has been focused on neuronal TA since its mutant form causes early-onset (DYT1 torsion dystonia, an inherited movement disorder characterized by sustained muscle contractions and abnormal postures. Interestingly, it has been proposed that TA, by interacting with the cytoskeletal network, may contribute to the control of neurite outgrowth and/or by acting as a chaperone at synapses could affect synaptic vesicle turnover and neurotransmitter release. Accordingly, both its peculiar developmental expression in striatum and cerebellum and evidence from DYT1 knock-in mice suggest that TA may influence dendritic arborization and synaptogenesis in the brain. Therefore, to better understand TA function a detailed description of its localization at synaptic level is required. Here, we characterized by means of rigorous quantitative confocal analysis TA distribution in the mouse cerebellum at postnatal day 14 (P14, when both cerebellar synaptogenesis and TA expression peak. We observed that the protein is broadly distributed both in cerebellar cortex and in the deep cerebellar nuclei (DCN. Of note, Purkinje cells (PC express high levels of TA also in the spines and axonal terminals. In addition, abundant expression of the protein was found in the main GABA-ergic and glutamatergic inputs of the cerebellar cortex. Finally, TA was observed also in glial cells, a cellular population little explored so far. These results extend our knowledge on TA synaptic localization providing a clue to its potential role in synaptic development.

  17. Lateral regulation of synaptic transmission by astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelo, A; Araque, A

    2016-05-26

    Fifteen years ago the concept of the "tripartite synapse" was proposed to conceptualize the functional view that astrocytes are integral elements of synapses. The signaling exchange between astrocytes and neurons within the tripartite synapse results in the synaptic regulation of synaptic transmission and plasticity through an autocrine form of communication. However, recent evidence indicates that the astrocyte synaptic regulation is not restricted to the active tripartite synapse but can be manifested through astrocyte signaling at synapses relatively distant from active synapses, a process termed lateral astrocyte synaptic regulation. This phenomenon resembles the classical heterosynaptic modulation but is mechanistically different because it involves astrocytes and its properties critically depend on the morphological and functional features of astrocytes. Therefore, the functional concept of the tripartite synapse as a fundamental unit must be expanded to include the interaction between tripartite synapses. Through lateral synaptic regulation, astrocytes serve as an active processing bridge for synaptic interaction and crosstalk between synapses with no direct neuronal connectivity, supporting the idea that neural network function results from the coordinated activity of astrocytes and neurons. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Ubiquitin E3 Ligase TRAF6 Exacerbates Ischemic Stroke by Ubiquitinating and Activating Rac1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Qin, Juan-Juan; Yang, Xia; Ji, Yan-Xiao; Guo, Fangliang; Cheng, Wen-Lin; Wu, Xiaolin; Gong, Fu-Han; Hong, Ying; Zhu, Xue-Yong; Gong, Jun; Wang, Zhihua; Huang, Zan; She, Zhi-Gang; Li, Hongliang

    2017-12-13

    Stroke is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Inflammation, oxidative stress, apoptosis, and excitotoxicity contribute to neuronal death during ischemic stroke; however, the mechanisms underlying these complicated pathophysiological processes remain to be fully elucidated. Here, we found that the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) was markedly increased after cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) in mice. TRAF6 ablation in male mice decreased the infarct volume and neurological deficit scores and decreased proinflammatory signaling, oxidative stress, and neuronal death after cerebral I/R, whereas transgenic overexpression of TRAF6 in male mice exhibited the opposite effects. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that TRAF6 induced Rac1 activation and consequently promoted I/R injury by directly binding and ubiquitinating Rac1. Either functionally mutating the TRAF6 ubiquitination site on Rac1 or inactivating Rac1 with a specific inhibitor reversed the deleterious effects of TRAF6 overexpression during I/R injury. In conclusion, our study demonstrated that TRAF6 is a key promoter of ischemic signaling cascades and neuronal death after cerebral I/R injury. Therefore, the TRAF6/Rac1 pathway might be a promising target to attenuate cerebral I/R injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Stroke is one of the most severe and devastating neurological diseases globally. The complicated pathophysiological processes restrict the translation of potential therapeutic targets into medicine. Further elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury may open a new window for pharmacological interventions to promote recovery from stroke. Our study revealed that ischemia-induced tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) upregulation binds and ubiquitinates Rac1 directly, which promotes neuron death through neuroinflammation and neuro-oxidative signals. Therefore, precisely targeting

  19. Synaptic pathology in the cerebellar dentate nucleus in chronic multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Monika; Barrantes-Freer, Alonso; Lohrberg, Melanie; Antel, Jack P; Prineas, John W; Palkovits, Miklós; Wolff, Joachim R; Brück, Wolfgang; Stadelmann, Christine

    2017-11-01

    In multiple sclerosis, cerebellar symptoms are associated with clinical impairment and an increased likelihood of progressive course. Cortical atrophy and synaptic dysfunction play a prominent role in cerebellar pathology and although the dentate nucleus is a predilection site for lesion development, structural synaptic changes in this region remain largely unexplored. Moreover, the mechanisms leading to synaptic dysfunction have not yet been investigated at an ultrastructural level in multiple sclerosis. Here, we report on synaptic changes of dentate nuclei in post-mortem cerebella of 16 multiple sclerosis patients and eight controls at the histological level as well as an electron microscopy evaluation of afferent synapses of the cerebellar dentate and pontine nuclei of one multiple sclerosis patient and one control. We found a significant reduction of afferent dentate synapses in multiple sclerosis, irrespective of the presence of demyelination, and a close relationship between glial processes and dentate synapses. Ultrastructurally, we show autophagosomes containing degradation products of synaptic vesicles within dendrites, residual bodies within intact-appearing axons and free postsynaptic densities opposed to astrocytic appendages. Our study demonstrates loss of dentate afferent synapses and provides, for the first time, ultrastructural evidence pointing towards neuron-autonomous and neuroglia-mediated mechanisms of synaptic degradation in chronic multiple sclerosis. © 2016 International Society of Neuropathology.

  20. E6-AP/UBE3A Protein Acts as a Ubiquitin Ligase toward SOX9 Protein*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Takako; Kishino, Tetsuya; Stephen, Shelley; Eberspaecher, Heidi; Maki, Sayumi; Takigawa, Masaharu; de Crombrugghe, Benoit; Yasuda, Hideyo

    2013-01-01

    SOX9 is a transcription factor that acts as a key regulator at various stages of cartilage differentiation. There is ample evidence that intracellular SOX9 protein levels are tightly regulated both by sumoylation and by degradation through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. Using a proteomics approach, here we report the identification of a SOX9-binding protein, E6-AP/UBE3A, that may act as a ubiquitin ligase toward Sox9. E6-AP bound SOX9 through the region consisting mostly of its high mobility group domain in vitro. In nuclear lysates, FLAG-tagged E6-AP coprecipitated with Sox9 and its high mobility group domain. This finding was estimated using nuclear lysates from a chondrocytic cell line that endogenously expresses E6-AP and SOX9. Accordingly, ectopically expressed E6-AP and SOX9 colocalized in the nucleus. We show that E6-AP ubiquitinates SOX9 in vitro and in vivo and that SOX9 levels are enhanced after addition of the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib. Similar, siRNA knockdown of E6-AP and the E2 ligase Ubc9 increased cellular SOX9 amounts, supporting the notion that SOX9 may be ubiquitinated in hypertrophic chondrocytes by E6-AP and degraded by proteasomes. This is in accordance with the distribution of SOX9 levels, which are high in proliferating and prehypertrophic chondrocytes but low in hypertrophic chondrocytes, whereas E6-AP levels are high in hypertrophic chondrocytes and low in prehypertrophic chondrocytes. Furthermore, E6-AP-deficient mice showed SOX9 accumulation in chondrocytes and the brain. These findings support the concept that E6-AP regulates SOX9 levels in developing cartilage by acting as a ubiquitin ligase. PMID:24155239

  1. All for One But Not One for All: Excitatory Synaptic Scaling and Intrinsic Excitability Are Coregulated by CaMKIV, Whereas Inhibitory Synaptic Scaling Is Under Independent Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Annelise; Turrigiano, Gina G

    2017-07-12

    preventing circuit disorders, and is accomplished through a set of negative feedback mechanisms that sense and compensate for perturbations in activity. These "homeostatic" mechanisms can target synaptic excitation, synaptic inhibition, and intrinsic excitability, but whether they are independently controlled is not known. We find that synaptic excitation and intrinsic excitability are coregulated in individual neurons through CaMKIV signaling, which is tightly controlled by neuronal activity. In contrast, synaptic inhibition is unaffected by changes in firing or CaMKIV signaling in individual neurons. These results show that circuit stability is controlled both through cell-autonomous mechanisms that regulate some aspects of excitability, as well as circuit-level mechanisms that adjust inhibition. Copyright © 2017 the authors 0270-6474/17/376778-08$15.00/0.

  2. The San1 Ubiquitin Ligase Functions Preferentially with Ubiquitin-conjugating Enzyme Ubc1 during Protein Quality Control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibarra, Rebeca; Sandoval, Daniella; Fredrickson, Eric K; Gardner, Richard G; Kleiger, Gary

    2016-09-02

    Protein quality control (PQC) is a critical process wherein misfolded or damaged proteins are cleared from the cell to maintain protein homeostasis. In eukaryotic cells, the removal of misfolded proteins is primarily accomplished by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. In the ubiquitin-proteasome system, ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes and ubiquitin ligases append polyubiquitin chains onto misfolded protein substrates signaling for their degradation. The kinetics of protein ubiquitylation are paramount as a balance must be achieved between the rapid removal of misfolded proteins versus providing sufficient time for protein chaperones to attempt refolding. To uncover the molecular basis for how PQC substrate ubiquitylation rates are controlled, the reaction catalyzed by nuclear ubiquitin ligase San1 was reconstituted in vitro Our results demonstrate that San1 can function with two ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes, Cdc34 and Ubc1. Although Cdc34 and Ubc1 are both sufficient for promoting San1 activity, San1 functions preferentially with Ubc1, including when both Ubc1 and Cdc34 are present. Notably, a homogeneous peptide that mimics a misfolded PQC substrate was developed and enabled quantification of the kinetics of San1-catalyzed ubiquitylation reactions. We discuss how these results may have broad implications for the regulation of PQC-mediated protein degradation. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Altered ubiquitin causes perturbed calcium homeostasis, hyperactivation of calpain, dysregulated differentiation, and cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ke; Lyu, Lei; Chin, David; Gao, Junyuan; Sun, Xiurong; Shang, Fu; Caceres, Andrea; Chang, Min-Lee; Rowan, Sheldon; Peng, Junmin; Mathias, Richard; Kasahara, Hideko; Jiang, Shuhong; Taylor, Allen

    2015-01-27

    Although the ocular lens shares many features with other tissues, it is unique in that it retains its cells throughout life, making it ideal for studies of differentiation/development. Precipitation of proteins results in lens opacification, or cataract, the major blinding disease. Lysines on ubiquitin (Ub) determine fates of Ub-protein substrates. Information regarding ubiquitin proteasome systems (UPSs), specifically of K6 in ubiquitin, is undeveloped. We expressed in the lens a mutant Ub containing a K6W substitution (K6W-Ub). Protein profiles of lenses that express wild-type ubiquitin (WT-Ub) or K6W-Ub differ by only ∼2%. Despite these quantitatively minor differences, in K6W-Ub lenses and multiple model systems we observed a fourfold Ca(2+) elevation and hyperactivation of calpain in the core of the lens, as well as calpain-associated fragmentation of critical lens proteins including Filensin, Fodrin, Vimentin, β-Crystallin, Caprin family member 2, and tudor domain containing 7. Truncations can be cataractogenic. Additionally, we observed accumulation of gap junction Connexin43, and diminished Connexin46 levels in vivo and in vitro. These findings suggest that mutation of Ub K6 alters UPS function, perturbs gap junction function, resulting in Ca(2+) elevation, hyperactivation of calpain, and associated cleavage of substrates, culminating in developmental defects and a cataractous lens. The data show previously unidentified connections between UPS and calpain-based degradative systems and advance our understanding of roles for Ub K6 in eye development. They also inform about new approaches to delay cataract and other protein precipitation diseases.

  4. XIAP inhibits mature Smac-induced apoptosis by degrading it through ubiquitination in NSCLC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Sida; Yang, Chengcheng; Zhang, Boxiang; Li, Xiang; Sun, Xin; Li, Gang; Zhang, Jing; Xiao, Guodong; Gao, Xiao; Huang, Guanghong; Wang, Peili; Ren, Hong

    2016-10-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) and second mitochondrial-derived activator of caspase (Smac) are two important prognostic biomarkers for cancer. They are negatively correlated in many types of cancer. However, their relationship is still unknown in lung cancer. In the present study, we found that there was a negative correlation between Smac and XIAP at the level of protein but not mRNA in NSCLC patients. However, XIAP overexpression had no effect on degrading endogenous Smac in lung cancer cell lines. Therefore, we constructed plasmids with full length of Smac (fSmac) and mature Smac (mSmac) which located in cytoplasm instead of original mitochondrial location, and was confirmed by immunofluorescence. Subsequently, we found that mSmac rather than fSmac was degraded by XIAP and inhibited cell viability. CHX chase assay and ubiquitin assay were performed to illustrate XIAP degraded mSmac through ubiquitin pathway. Overexpression of XIAP partially reverted apoptotic induction and cell viability inhibition by mSmac, which was due to inhibiting caspase-3 activation. In nude mouse xenograft experiments, mSmac inhibited Ki-67 expression and slowed down lung cancer growth, while XIAP partially reversed the effect of mSmac by degrading it. In conclusion, XIAP inhibits mature Smac-induced apoptosis by degrading it through ubiquitination in NSCLC.

  5. Regulation of the retinoblastoma-E2F pathway by the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Satyaki; Henry, R William

    2015-10-01

    The retinoblastoma tumor suppressor (RB) and its related family members p107 and p130 regulate cell proliferation through the transcriptional repression of genes involved in cellular G1 to S phase transition. However, RB proteins are functionally versatile, and numerous genetic and biochemical studies point to expansive roles in cellular growth control, pluripotency, and apoptotic response. For the vast majority of genes, RB family members target the E2F family of transcriptional activators as an integral component of its gene regulatory mechanism. These interactions are regulated via reversible phosphorylation by Cyclin/Cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) complexes, a major molecular mechanism that regulates transcriptional output of RB/E2F target genes. Recent studies indicate an additional level of regulation involving the ubiquitin-proteasome system that renders pervasive control over each component of the RB pathway. Disruption of the genetic circuitry for proteasome-mediated targeting of the RB pathway has serious consequences on development and cellular transformation, and is associated with several forms of human cancer. In this review, we discuss the role of the ubiquitin-proteasome system in proteolytic control of RB-E2F pathway components, and recent data that points to surprising non-proteolytic roles for the ubiquitin-proteasome system in novel transcriptional regulatory mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. The ubiquitin-proteasome system and autophagy are defective in the taurine-deficient heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jong, Chian Ju; Ito, Takashi; Schaffer, Stephen W

    2015-12-01

    Taurine depletion leads to impaired mitochondrial function, as characterized by reduced ATP production and elevated superoxide generation. These defects can fundamentally alter cardiomyocyte function and if left unchanged can result in cell death. To protect against these stresses, cardiomyocytes possess quality control processes, such as the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy, which can rejuvenate cells through the degradation of damaged proteins and organelles. Hence, the present study tested the hypothesis that reactive oxygen species generated by damaged mitochondria initiates UPS and autophagy in the taurine-deficient heart. Using transgenic mice lacking the taurine transporter (TauTKO) as a model of taurine deficiency, it was shown that the levels of ubiquitinated protein were elevated, an effect associated with a decrease in ATP-dependent 26S β5 proteasome activity. Treating the TauTKO mouse with the mitochondria-specific antioxidant, mitoTEMPO, largely abolished the increase in ubiquitinated protein content. The TauTKO heart was also associated with impaired autophagy, characterized by an increase in the initiator, Beclin-1, and autophagosome content, but a defect in the generation of active autophagolysosomes. Although mitoTEMPO treatment only restores the oxidative balance within the mitochondria, it appeared to completely disrupt the crosstalk between the damaged mitochondria and the quality control processes. Thus, mitochondrial oxidative stress is the main trigger initiating the quality control systems in the taurine-deficient heart. We conclude that the activation of the UPS and autophagy is another fundamental function of mitochondria.

  7. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2017-10-15

    Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  8. The Regulation of Tumor Suppressor p63 by the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Armstrong

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The protein p63 has been identified as a homolog of the tumor suppressor protein p53 and is capable of inducing apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, or senescence. p63 has at least six isoforms, which can be divided into two major groups: the TAp63 variants that contain the N-terminal transactivation domain and the ΔNp63 variants that lack the N-terminal transactivation domain. The TAp63 variants are generally considered to be tumor suppressors involved in activating apoptosis and suppressing metastasis. ΔNp63 variants cannot induce apoptosis but can act as dominant negative inhibitors to block the function of TAp53, TAp73, and TAp63. p63 is rarely mutated in human tumors and is predominately regulated at the post-translational level by phosphorylation and ubiquitination. This review focuses primarily on regulation of p63 by the ubiquitin E-3 ligase family of enzymes via ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation, and introduces a new key regulator of the p63 protein.

  9. Ubiquitination of basal VEGFR2 regulates signal transduction and endothelial function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gina A. Smith

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell surface receptors can undergo recycling or proteolysis but the cellular decision-making events that sort between these pathways remain poorly defined. Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2 regulate signal transduction and angiogenesis, but how signaling and proteolysis is regulated is not well understood. Here, we provide evidence that a pathway requiring the E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme UBA1 controls basal VEGFR2 levels, hence metering plasma membrane receptor availability for the VEGF-A-regulated endothelial cell response. VEGFR2 undergoes VEGF-A-independent constitutive degradation via a UBA1-dependent ubiquitin-linked pathway. Depletion of UBA1 increased VEGFR2 recycling from endosome-to-plasma membrane and decreased proteolysis. Increased membrane receptor availability after UBA1 depletion elevated VEGF-A-stimulated activation of key signaling enzymes such as PLCγ1 and ERK1/2. Although UBA1 depletion caused an overall decrease in endothelial cell proliferation, surviving cells showed greater VEGF-A-stimulated responses such as cell migration and tubulogenesis. Our study now suggests that a ubiquitin-linked pathway regulates the balance between receptor recycling and degradation which in turn impacts on the intensity and duration of VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction and the endothelial response.

  10. Regulation of mitophagy by the ubiquitin pathway in neurodegenerative diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Shyamal; Juncker, Meredith; Kim, Catherine

    2018-03-01

    Mitophagy is a cellular process by which dysfunctional mitochondria are degraded via autophagy. Increasing empirical evidence proposes that this mitochondrial quality-control mechanism is defective in neurons of patients with various neurodegenerative diseases such as Ataxia Telangiectasia, Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Accumulation of defective mitochondria and the production of reactive oxygen species due to defective mitophagy have been identified as causes underlying neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. However, the reason mitophagy is defective in most neurodegenerative diseases is unclear. Like mitophagy, defects in the ubiquitin/26S proteasome pathway have been linked to neurodegeneration, resulting in the characteristic protein aggregates often seen in neurons of affected patients. Although initiation of mitophagy requires a functional ubiquitin pathway, whether defects in the ubiquitin pathway are causally responsible for defective mitophagy is not known. In this mini-review, we introduce mitophagy and ubiquitin pathways and provide a summary of our current understanding of the regulation of mitophagy by the ubiquitin pathway. We will then briefly review empirical evidence supporting mitophagy defects in neurodegenerative diseases. The review will conclude with a discussion of the constitutively elevated expression of ubiquitin-like protein Interferon-Stimulated Gene 15 (ISG15), an antagonist of the ubiquitin pathway, as a potential cause of defective mitophagy in neurodegenerative diseases. Impact statement Neurodegenerative diseases place an enormous burden on patients and caregivers globally. Over six million people in the United States alone suffer from neurodegenerative diseases, all of which are chronic, incurable, and with causes unknown. Identifying a common molecular mechanism underpinning neurodegenerative disease pathology is urgently needed to aid in the design of effective therapies to ease

  11. Opposing Synaptic Regulation of Amyloid-β Metabolism by NMDA Receptors In Vivo

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    Verges, Deborah K.; Restivo, Jessica L.; Goebel, Whitney D.; Holtzman, David M.; Cirrito, John R.

    2012-01-01

    The concentration of amyloid-β (Aβ) within the brain extracellular space is one determinant of whether the peptide will aggregate into toxic species that are important in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) pathogenesis. Some types of synaptic activity can regulate Aβ levels. Here we demonstrate two distinct mechanisms that are simultaneously activated by NMDA receptors and regulate brain interstitial fluid (ISF) Aβ levels in opposite directions in the living mouse. Depending on the dose of NMDA administered locally to the brain, ISF Aβ levels either increase or decrease. Low doses of NMDA increase action potentials and synaptic transmission which leads to an elevation in synaptic Aβ generation. In contrast, high doses of NMDA activate signaling pathways that lead to ERK (extracellular-regulated kinase) activation, which reduces processing of APP into Aβ. This depression in Aβ via APP processing occurs despite dramatically elevated synaptic activity. Both of these synaptic mechanisms are simultaneously active, with the balance between them determining whether ISF Aβ levels will increase or decrease. NMDA receptor antagonists increase ISF Aβ levels, suggesting that basal activity at these receptors normally suppresses Aβ levels in vivo. This has implications for understanding normal Aβ metabolism as well as AD pathogenesis. PMID:21813692

  12. Rewiring of neuronal networks during synaptic silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrosch, Jana Katharina; Einem, Vicky von; Breininger, Katharina; Dahlmanns, Marc; Maier, Andreas; Kornhuber, Johannes; Groemer, Teja Wolfgang

    2017-09-15

    Analyzing the connectivity of neuronal networks, based on functional brain imaging data, has yielded new insight into brain circuitry, bringing functional and effective networks into the focus of interest for understanding complex neurological and psychiatric disorders. However, the analysis of network changes, based on the activity of individual neurons, is hindered by the lack of suitable meaningful and reproducible methodologies. Here, we used calcium imaging, statistical spike time analysis and a powerful classification model to reconstruct effective networks of primary rat hippocampal neurons in vitro. This method enables the calculation of network parameters, such as propagation probability, path length, and clustering behavior through the measurement of synaptic activity at the single-cell level, thus providing a fuller understanding of how changes at single synapses translate to an entire population of neurons. We demonstrate that our methodology can detect the known effects of drug-induced neuronal inactivity and can be used to investigate the extensive rewiring processes affecting population-wide connectivity patterns after periods of induced neuronal inactivity.

  13. Intrinsic cellular and molecular properties of in vivo hippocampal synaptic plasticity are altered in the absence of key synaptic matrix molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Stephan; Gottschling, Christine; Faissner, Andreas; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2017-08-01

    Hippocampal synaptic plasticity comprises a key cellular mechanism for information storage. In the hippocampus, both long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) are triggered by synaptic Ca 2+ -elevations that are typically mediated by the opening of voltage-gated cation channels, such as N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors (NMDAR), in the postsynaptic density. The integrity of the post-synaptic density is ensured by the extracellular matrix (ECM). Here, we explored whether synaptic plasticity is affected in adult behaving mice that lack the ECM proteins brevican, neurocan, tenascin-C, and tenascin-R (KO). We observed that the profiles of synaptic potentiation and depression in the dentate gyrus (DG) were profoundly altered compared to plasticity profiles in wild-type littermates (WT). Specifically, synaptic depression was amplified in a frequency-dependent manner and although late-LTP (>24 hr) was expressed following strong afferent tetanization, the early component of LTP (4 hr) elicited by weaker tetanization was equivalent in WT and KO animals. Furthermore, this latter form of LTP was NMDAR-dependent in WT but not KO mice. Scrutiny of DG receptor expression revealed significantly lower levels of both the GluN2A and GluN2B subunits of the N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor, of the metabotropic glutamate receptor, mGlu5 and of the L-type calcium channel, Ca v 1.3 in KO compared to WT animals. Homer 1a and of the P/Q-type calcium channel, Ca v 1.2 were unchanged in KO mice. Taken together, findings suggest that in mice that lack multiple ECM proteins, synaptic plasticity is intact, but is fundamentally different. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Evolution of the aging brain transcriptome and synaptic regulation.

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    Patrick M Loerch

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative disorders of aging are characterized by clinical and pathological features that are relatively specific to humans. To obtain greater insight into how brain aging has evolved, we compared age-related gene expression changes in the cortex of humans, rhesus macaques, and mice on a genome-wide scale. A small subset of gene expression changes are conserved in all three species, including robust age-dependent upregulation of the neuroprotective gene apolipoprotein D (APOD and downregulation of the synaptic cAMP signaling gene calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4. However, analysis of gene ontology and cell type localization shows that humans and rhesus macaques have diverged from mice due to a dramatic increase in age-dependent repression of neuronal genes. Many of these age-regulated neuronal genes are associated with synaptic function. Notably, genes associated with GABA-ergic inhibitory function are robustly age-downregulated in humans but not in mice at the level of both mRNA and protein. Gene downregulation was not associated with overall neuronal or synaptic loss. Thus, repression of neuronal gene expression is a prominent and recently evolved feature of brain aging in humans and rhesus macaques that may alter neural networks and contribute to age-related cognitive changes.

  15. STDP with adaptive synaptic delay for robot navigation control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Paolo; Patané, Luca; Distefano, Francesco; Bucolo, Sebastiano; Aiello, Orazio

    2007-05-01

    In this work a biologically inspired network of spiking neurons is used for robot navigation control. The two tasks taken into account are obstacle avoidance and landmark-based navigation. The system learns the correlation among unconditioned stimuli (pre-wired sensors) and conditioned stimuli (high level sensors) through Spike Timing Dependent Plasticity (STDP). In order to improve the robot behaviours not only the synaptic weight but also the synaptic delay is subject to learning. Modulating the synaptic delay the robot is able to store the landmark position, like in a short time memory, and to use this information to smooth the turning actions prolonging the landmark effects also when it is no more visible. Simulations are carried out in a dynamic simulation environment and the robotic system considered is a cockroach-inspired hexapod robot. The locomotion signals are generated by a Central Pattern Generator and the spiking network is devoted to control the heading of the robot acting on the amplitude of the leg steps. Several scenarios have been proposed, for instance a T-shaped labyrinth, used in laboratory experiments with mice to demonstrate classical and operant conditioning, has been considered. Finally the proposed adaptive navigation control structure can be extended in a modular way to include other features detected by new sensors included in the correlation-based learning process.

  16. Long-Term Synaptic Plasticity Emulated in Modified Graphene Oxide Electrolyte Gated IZO-Based Thin-Film Transistors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Wen, Juan; Guo, Liqiang; Wan, Xiang; Du, Peifu; Feng, Ping; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2016-11-09

    Emulating neural behaviors at the synaptic level is of great significance for building neuromorphic computational systems and realizing artificial intelligence. Here, oxide-based electric double-layer (EDL) thin-film transistors were fabricated using 3-triethoxysilylpropylamine modified graphene oxide (KH550-GO) electrolyte as the gate dielectrics. Resulting from the EDL effect and electrochemical doping between mobile protons and the indium-zinc-oxide channel layer, long-term synaptic plasticity was emulated in our devices. Synaptic functions including long-term memory, synaptic temporal integration, and dynamic filters were successfully reproduced. In particular, spike rate-dependent plasticity (SRDP), one of the basic learning rules of long-term plasticity in the neural network where the synaptic weight changes according to the rate of presynaptic spikes, was emulated in our devices. Our results may facilitate the development of neuromorphic computational systems.

  17. Synaptic adhesion molecule IgSF11 regulates synaptic transmission and plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Hyewon; van Riesen, Christoph; Whitcomb, Daniel; Warburton, Julia M.; Jo, Jihoon; Kim, Doyoun; Kim, Sun Gyun; Um, Seung Min; Kwon, Seok-kyu; Kim, Myoung-Hwan; Roh, Junyeop Daniel; Woo, Jooyeon; Jun, Heejung; Lee, Dongmin; Mah, Won; Kim, Hyun; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Cho, Kwangwook; Rhee, Jeong-Seop; Choquet, Daniel; Kim, Eunjoon

    2016-01-01

    Summary Synaptic adhesion molecules regulate synapse development and plasticity through mechanisms including trans-synaptic adhesion and recruitment of diverse synaptic proteins. We report here that the immunoglobulin superfamily member 11 (IgSF11), a homophilic adhesion molecule preferentially expressed in the brain, is a novel and dual-binding partner of the postsynaptic scaffolding protein PSD-95 and AMPAR glutamate receptors (AMPARs). IgSF11 requires PSD-95 binding for its excitatory synaptic localization. In addition, IgSF11 stabilizes synaptic AMPARs, as shown by IgSF11 knockdown-induced suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission and increased surface mobility of AMPARs, measured by high-throughput, single-molecule tracking. IgSF11 deletion in mice leads to suppression of AMPAR-mediated synaptic transmission in the dentate gyrus and long-term potentiation in the CA1 region of the hippocampus. IgSF11 does not regulate the functional characteristics of AMPARs, including desensitization, deactivation, or recovery. These results suggest that IgSF11 regulates excitatory synaptic transmission and plasticity through its tripartite interactions with PSD-95 and AMPARs. PMID:26595655

  18. Cryo-electron tomography reveals a critical role of RIM1α in synaptic vesicle tethering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Busnadiego, Rubén; Asano, Shoh; Oprisoreanu, Ana-Maria; Sakata, Eri; Doengi, Michael; Kochovski, Zdravko; Zürner, Magdalena; Stein, Valentin; Schoch, Susanne; Baumeister, Wolfgang; Lucić, Vladan

    2013-05-27

    Synaptic vesicles are embedded in a complex filamentous network at the presynaptic terminal. Before fusion, vesicles are linked to the active zone (AZ) by short filaments (tethers). The identity of the molecules that form and regulate tethers remains unknown, but Rab3-interacting molecule (RIM) is a prominent candidate, given its central role in AZ organization. In this paper, we analyzed presynaptic architecture of RIM1α knockout (KO) mice by cryo-electron tomography. In stark contrast to previous work on dehydrated, chemically fixed samples, our data show significant alterations in vesicle distribution and AZ tethering that could provide a structural basis for the functional deficits of RIM1α KO synapses. Proteasome inhibition reversed these structural defects, suggesting a functional recovery confirmed by electrophysiological recordings. Altogether, our results not only point to the ubiquitin-proteasome system as an important regulator of presynaptic architecture and function but also show that the tethering machinery plays a critical role in exocytosis, converging into a structural model of synaptic vesicle priming by RIM1α.

  19. Short-Term Synaptic Plasticity at Interneuronal Synapses Could Sculpt Rhythmic Motor Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yan; Parker, David

    2016-01-01

    The output of a neuronal network depends on the organization and functional properties of its component cells and synapses. While the characterization of synaptic properties has lagged cellular analyses, a potentially important aspect in rhythmically active networks is how network synapses affect, and are in turn affected by, network activity. This could lead to a potential circular interaction where short-term activity-dependent synaptic plasticity is both influenced by and influences the network output. The analysis of synaptic plasticity in the lamprey locomotor network was extended here to characterize the short-term plasticity of connections between network interneurons and to try and address its potential network role. Paired recordings from identified interneurons in quiescent networks showed synapse-specific synaptic properties and plasticity that supported the presence of two hemisegmental groups that could influence bursting: depression in an excitatory interneuron group, and facilitation in an inhibitory feedback circuit. The influence of activity-dependent synaptic plasticity on network activity was investigated experimentally by changing Ringer Ca(2+) levels, and in a simple computer model. A potential caveat of the experimental analyses was that changes in Ringer Ca(2+) (and compensatory adjustments in Mg(2+) in some cases) could alter several other cellular and synaptic properties. Several of these properties were tested, and while there was some variability, these were not usually significantly affected by the Ringer changes. The experimental analyses suggested that depression of excitatory inputs had the strongest influence on the patterning of network activity. The simulation supported a role for this effect, and also suggested that the inhibitory facilitating group could modulate the influence of the excitatory synaptic depression. Short-term activity-dependent synaptic plasticity has not generally been considered in spinal cord models. These

  20. Synaptic Ribbons Require Ribeye for Electron Density, Proper Synaptic Localization, and Recruitment of Calcium Channels

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    Caixia Lv

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic ribbons are structures made largely of the protein Ribeye that hold synaptic vesicles near release sites in non-spiking cells in some sensory systems. Here, we introduce frameshift mutations in the two zebrafish genes encoding for Ribeye and thus remove Ribeye protein from neuromast hair cells. Despite Ribeye depletion, vesicles collect around ribbon-like structures that lack electron density, which we term “ghost ribbons.” Ghost ribbons are smaller in size but possess a similar number of smaller vesicles and are poorly localized to synapses and calcium channels. These hair cells exhibit enhanced exocytosis, as measured by capacitance, and recordings from afferent neurons post-synaptic to hair cells show no significant difference in spike rates. Our results suggest that Ribeye makes up most of the synaptic ribbon density in neuromast hair cells and is necessary for proper localization of calcium channels and synaptic ribbons.

  1. Characterization of emergent synaptic topologies in noisy neural networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron James

    Learned behaviors are one of the key contributors to an animal's ultimate survival. It is widely believed that the brain's microcircuitry undergoes structural changes when a new behavior is learned. In particular, motor learning, during which an animal learns a sequence of muscular movements, often requires precisely-timed coordination between muscles and becomes very natural once ingrained. Experiments show that neurons in the motor cortex exhibit precisely-timed spike activity when performing a learned motor behavior, and constituent stereotypical elements of the behavior can last several hundred milliseconds. The subject of this manuscript concerns how organized synaptic structures that produce stereotypical spike sequences emerge from random, dynamical networks. After a brief introduction in Chapter 1, we begin Chapter 2 by introducing a spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) rule that defines how the activity of the network drives changes in network topology. The rule is then applied to idealized networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons (LIF). These neurons are not subjected to the variability that typically characterize neurons in vivo. In noiseless networks, synapses develop closed loops of strong connectivity that reproduce stereotypical, precisely-timed spike patterns from an initially random network. We demonstrate the characteristics of the asymptotic synaptic configuration are dependent on the statistics of the initial random network. The spike timings of the neurons simulated in Chapter 2 are generated exactly by a computationally economical, nonlinear mapping which is extended to LIF neurons injected with fluctuating current in Chapter 3. Development of an economical mapping that incorporates noise provides a practical solution to the long simulation times required to produce asymptotic synaptic topologies in networks with STDP in the presence of realistic neuronal variability. The mapping relies on generating numerical solutions to the dynamics

  2. Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors in homeostatic synaptic plasticity

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    Hey-Kyoung eLee

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Neurons possess diverse mechanisms of homeostatic adaptation to overall changes in neural and synaptic activity, which are critical for proper brain functions. Homeostatic regulation of excitatory synapses has been studied in the context of synaptic scaling, which allows neurons to adjust their excitatory synaptic gain to maintain their activity within a dynamic range. Recent evidence suggests that one of the main mechanisms underlying synaptic scaling is by altering the function of postsynaptic AMPA receptors (AMPARs, including synaptic expression of Ca2+-permeable (CP- AMPARs. CP-AMPARs endow synapses with unique properties, which may benefit adaptation of neurons to periods of inactivity as would occur when a major input is lost. This review will summarize how synaptic expression of CP-AMPARs is regulated during homeostatic synaptic plasticity in the context of synaptic scaling, and will address the potential functional consequences of altering synaptic CP-AMPAR content.

  3. Diacylglycerol Kinases in the Coordination of Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwon; Kim, Eunjoon; Tanaka-Yamamoto, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity is activity-dependent modification of the efficacy of synaptic transmission. Although, detailed mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity are diverse and vary at different types of synapses, diacylglycerol (DAG)-associated signaling has been considered as an important regulator of many forms of synaptic plasticity, including long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). Recent evidences indicate that DAG kinases (DGKs), which phosphorylate DAG to phosphatidic acid to terminate DAG signaling, are important regulators of LTP and LTD, as supported by the results from mice lacking specific DGK isoforms. This review will summarize these studies and discuss how specific DGK isoforms distinctly regulate different forms of synaptic plasticity at pre- and postsynaptic sites. In addition, we propose a general role of DGKs as coordinators of synaptic plasticity that make local synaptic environments more permissive for synaptic plasticity by regulating DAG concentration and interacting with other synaptic proteins.

  4. The Ubiquitin-associated (UBA) 1 Domain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp23 Is Essential for the Recognition of Ubiquitin-proteasome System Substrates Both in Vitro and in Vivo*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Bethan; Paraskevopoulos, Konstantinos; Boehringer, Jonas; Sznajder, Anna; Robertson, Morag; Endicott, Jane; Gordon, Colin

    2012-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system is essential for maintaining a functional cell. Not only does it remove incorrectly folded proteins, it also regulates protein levels to ensure their appropriate spatial and temporal distribution. Proteins marked for degradation by the addition of Lys48-linked ubiquitin (Ub) chains are recognized by shuttle factors and transported to the 26 S proteasome. One of these shuttle factors, Schizosaccharomyces pombe Rhp23, has an unusual domain architecture. It comprises an N-terminal ubiquitin-like domain that can recognize the proteasome followed by two ubiquitin-associated (UBA) domains, termed UBA1 and UBA2, which can bind Ub. This architecture is conserved up to humans, suggesting that both domains are important for Rhp23 function. Such an extent of conservation raises the question as to why, in contrast to all other shuttle proteins, does Rhp23 require two UBA domains? We performed in vitro Ub binding assays using domain swap chimeric proteins and mutated domains in isolation as well as in the context of the full-length protein to reveal that the Ub binding properties of the UBA domains are context-dependent. In vivo, the internal Rhp23 UBA1 domain provides sufficient Ub recognition for the protein to function without UBA2. PMID:23038266

  5. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada); Bezsonova, Irina, E-mail: bezsonova@uchc.edu [University of Connecticut Health Center, Department of Molecular Microbial and Structural Biology (United States); Dhe-Paganon, Sirano, E-mail: sirano.dhepaganon@utoronto.ca [University of Toronto, Structural Genomics Consortium (Canada); Arrowsmith, Cheryl H., E-mail: carrow@uhnresearch.ca [University of Toronto, and Northeast Structural Genomics Consortium, Ontario Cancer Institute, Campbell Family Cancer Research Institute and Department of Medical Biophysics (Canada)

    2011-09-15

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 4}-Cys-X{sub 28}-Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two {alpha}-helicies.

  6. Zn-binding AZUL domain of human ubiquitin protein ligase Ube3A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lemak, Alexander; Yee, Adelinda; Bezsonova, Irina; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-01-01

    Ube3A (also referred to as E6AP for E6 Associated Protein) is a E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase implicated in the development of Angelman syndrome by controlling degradation of synaptic protein Arc and oncogenic papilloma virus infection by controlling degradation of p53. This article describe the solution NMR structure of the conserved N-terminal domain of human Ube3A (residues 24-87) that contains two residues (Cys44 and Arg62) found to be mutated in patients with Angelman syndrome. The structure of this domain adopts a novel Zn-binding fold we called AZUL (Amino-terminal Zn-finger of Ube3a Ligase). The AZUL domain has a helix-loop-helix architecture with a Zn ion coordinated by four Cys residues arranged in Cys-X 4 -Cys-X 4 -Cys-X 28 -Cys motif. Three of the Zn-bound residues are located in a 23-residue long and well structured loop that connects two α-helicies.

  7. Metabolic Turnover of Synaptic Proteins: Kinetics, Interdependencies and Implications for Synaptic Maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Laurie D.; Zuchman, Rina; Sorokina, Oksana; Müller, Anke; Dieterich, Daniela C.; Armstrong, J. Douglas; Ziv, Tamar; Ziv, Noam E.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical synapses contain multitudes of proteins, which in common with all proteins, have finite lifetimes and therefore need to be continuously replaced. Given the huge numbers of synaptic connections typical neurons form, the demand to maintain the protein contents of these connections might be expected to place considerable metabolic demands on each neuron. Moreover, synaptic proteostasis might differ according to distance from global protein synthesis sites, the availability of distributed protein synthesis facilities, trafficking rates and synaptic protein dynamics. To date, the turnover kinetics of synaptic proteins have not been studied or analyzed systematically, and thus metabolic demands or the aforementioned relationships remain largely unknown. In the current study we used dynamic Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC), mass spectrometry (MS), Fluorescent Non–Canonical Amino acid Tagging (FUNCAT), quantitative immunohistochemistry and bioinformatics to systematically measure the metabolic half-lives of hundreds of synaptic proteins, examine how these depend on their pre/postsynaptic affiliation or their association with particular molecular complexes, and assess the metabolic load of synaptic proteostasis. We found that nearly all synaptic proteins identified here exhibited half-lifetimes in the range of 2–5 days. Unexpectedly, metabolic turnover rates were not significantly different for presynaptic and postsynaptic proteins, or for proteins for which mRNAs are consistently found in dendrites. Some functionally or structurally related proteins exhibited very similar turnover rates, indicating that their biogenesis and degradation might be coupled, a possibility further supported by bioinformatics-based analyses. The relatively low turnover rates measured here (∼0.7% of synaptic protein content per hour) are in good agreement with imaging-based studies of synaptic protein trafficking, yet indicate that the metabolic load

  8. Synaptic and non-synaptic mitochondria in hippocampus of adult rats differ in their sensitivity to hypothyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuravliova, E; Barbakadze, T; Jojua, N; Zaalishvili, E; Shanshiashvili, L; Natsvlishvili, N; Kalandadze, I; Narmania, N; Chogovadze, I; Mikeladze, D

    2012-11-01

    Hypothyroidism in humans provokes various neuropsychiatric disorders, movement, and cognitive abnormalities that may greatly depend on the mitochondrial energy metabolism. Brain cells contain at least two major populations of mitochondria that include the non-synaptic mitochondria, which originate from neuronal and glial cell bodies (CM), and the synaptic (SM) mitochondria, which primarily originate from the nerve terminals. Several parameters of oxidative stress and other parameters in SM and CM fractions of hippocampus of adult rats were compared among euthyroid (control), hypothyroid (methimazol-treated), and thyroxine (T4)-treated hypothyroid states. nNOS translocation to CM was observed with concomitant increase of mtNOS's activity in hypothyroid rats. In parallel, oxidation of cytochrome c oxidase and production of peroxides with substrates of complex I (glutamate + malate) were enhanced in CM, whereas the activity of aconitase and mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) were decreased. Furthermore, the elevation of mitochondrial hexokinase activity in CM was also found. No differences in these parameters between control and hypothyroid animals were observed in SM. However, in contrast to CM, hypothyroidism increases the level of pro-apoptotic K-Ras and Bad in SM. Our results suggest that hypothyroidism induces moderate and reversible oxidative/nitrosative stress in hippocampal CM, leading to the compensatory elevation of hexokinase activity and aerobic glycolysis. Such adaptive activation in glycolytic metabolism does not occur in SM, suggesting that synaptic mitochondria differ in their sensitivity to the energetic disturbance in hypothyroid conditions.

  9. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  10. Sculpting ion channel functional expression with engineered ubiquitin ligases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanner, Scott A; Morgenstern, Travis

    2017-01-01

    The functional repertoire of surface ion channels is sustained by dynamic processes of trafficking, sorting, and degradation. Dysregulation of these processes underlies diverse ion channelopathies including cardiac arrhythmias and cystic fibrosis. Ubiquitination powerfully regulates multiple steps in the channel lifecycle, yet basic mechanistic understanding is confounded by promiscuity among E3 ligase/substrate interactions and ubiquitin code complexity. Here we targeted the catalytic domain of E3 ligase, CHIP, to YFP-tagged KCNQ1 ± KCNE1 subunits with a GFP-nanobody to selectively manipulate this channel complex in heterologous cells and adult rat cardiomyocytes. Engineered CHIP enhanced KCNQ1 ubiquitination, eliminated KCNQ1 surface-density, and abolished reconstituted K+ currents without affecting protein expression. A chemo-genetic variation enabling chemical control of ubiquitination revealed KCNQ1 surface-density declined with a ~ 3.5 hr t1/2 by impaired forward trafficking. The results illustrate utility of engineered E3 ligases to elucidate mechanisms underlying ubiquitin regulation of membrane proteins, and to achieve effective post-translational functional knockdown of ion channels. PMID:29256394

  11. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua [Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Duan, Changzhu, E-mail: duanchzhu@cqmu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Clinical Laboratory Diagnostics of Ministry of Education, Faculty of Laboratory Medicine, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Department of Cell Biology and Medical Genetics, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  12. High performance liquid chromatography resolution of ubiquitin pathway enzymes from wheat germ

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, M.L.; Callis, J.; Vierstra, R.D.

    1990-01-01

    The highly conserved protein ubiquitin is involved in several cellular processes in eukaryotes as a result of its covalent ligation to a variety of target proteins. Here, we describe the purification of several enzymatic activities involved in ubiquitin-protein conjugate formation and disassembly from wheat germ (Triticum vulgare) by a combination of ubiquitin affinity chromatography and anion-exchange high performance liquid chromatography. Using this procedure, ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1), several distinct ubiquitin carrier proteins (E2s) with molecular masses of 16, 20, 23, 23.5, and 25 kilodaltons, and a ubiquitin-protein hydrolase (isopeptidase) were isolated. Purified E1 formed a thiol ester linkage with 125 I-ubiquitin in an ATP-dependent manner and transferred bound ubiquitin to the various purified E2s. The ubiquitin protein hydrolase fraction was sensitive to hemin, and in an ATP-independent reaction, was capable of removing the ubiquitin moiety from both ubiquitin 125 I-lysozyme conjugates (ε-amino or isopeptide linkage) and the ubiquitin 52-amino acid extension protein fusion (α-amino or peptide linkage). Using this procedure, wheat germ represents an inexpensive source from which enzymes involved in the ubiquitin pathway may be isolated

  13. TRIM39 is a MOAP-1-binding protein that stabilizes MOAP-1 through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, San San; Fu, Nai Yang; Sukumaran, Sunil K; Wan, Kah Fei; Wan, Qian; Yu, Victor C

    2009-04-15

    Bax, a multi-domain pro-apoptotic Bcl-2 family member, is a key regulator for the release of apoptogenic factors from mitochondria. MOAP-1, which was first isolated from a screen for Bax-associating proteins, interacts with Bax upon apoptotic induction. MOAP-1 is a short-lived protein that is constitutively degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Apoptotic stimuli upregulate MOAP-1 rapidly through inhibition of its poly-ubiquitination process. However, cellular factors that regulate the stability of MOAP-1 have not yet been identified. In this study, we report the identification of TRIM39 as a MOAP-1-binding protein. TRIM39 belongs to a family of proteins characterized by a Tripartite Motif (TRIM), consisting of RING domain, B-box and coiled-coil domain. Several TRIM family members are known to demonstrate E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. Surprisingly, TRIM39 significantly extends the half-life of MOAP-1 by inhibiting its poly-ubiquitination process. In agreement with its effect on enhancing MOAP-1 stability, TRIM39 sensitizes cells to etoposide-induced apoptosis. Conversely, knockdown of TRIM39 reduces the sensitivity of cells to etoposide-stimulated apoptosis. Furthermore, TRIM39 elevates the level of MOAP-1 in mitochondria and promotes cytochrome c release from isolated mitochondria stimulated by recombinant Bax. Together, these data suggest that TRIM39 can promote apoptosis signalling through stabilization of MOAP-1.

  14. Tight regulation of ubiquitin-mediated DNA damage response by USP3 preserves the functional integrity of hematopoietic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancini, Cesare; van den Berk, Paul C M; Vissers, Joseph H A; Gargiulo, Gaetano; Song, Ji-Ying; Hulsman, Danielle; Serresi, Michela; Tanger, Ellen; Blom, Marleen; Vens, Conchita; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Jacobs, Heinz; Citterio, Elisabetta

    2014-08-25

    Histone ubiquitination at DNA breaks is required for activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. How the dynamic removal of this modification by deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) impacts genome maintenance in vivo is largely unknown. To address this question, we generated mice deficient for Ub-specific protease 3 (USP3; Usp3Δ/Δ), a histone H2A DUB which negatively regulates ubiquitin-dependent DDR signaling. Notably, USP3 deletion increased the levels of histone ubiquitination in adult tissues, reduced the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) reserves over time, and shortened animal life span. Mechanistically, our data show that USP3 is important in HSC homeostasis, preserving HSC self-renewal, and repopulation potential in vivo and proliferation in vitro. A defective DDR and unresolved spontaneous DNA damage contribute to cell cycle restriction of Usp3Δ/Δ HSCs. Beyond the hematopoietic system, Usp3Δ/Δ animals spontaneously developed tumors, and primary Usp3Δ/Δ cells failed to preserve chromosomal integrity. These findings broadly support the regulation of chromatin ubiquitination as a key pathway in preserving tissue function through modulation of the response to genotoxic stress. © 2014 Lancini et al.

  15. The Prader-Willi syndrome proteins MAGEL2 and necdin regulate leptin receptor cell surface abundance through ubiquitination pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijesuriya, Tishani Methsala; De Ceuninck, Leentje; Masschaele, Delphine; Sanderson, Matthea R; Carias, Karin Vanessa; Tavernier, Jan; Wevrick, Rachel

    2017-11-01

    In Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS), obesity is caused by the disruption of appetite-controlling pathways in the brain. Two PWS candidate genes encode MAGEL2 and necdin, related melanoma antigen proteins that assemble into ubiquitination complexes. Mice lacking Magel2 are obese and lack leptin sensitivity in hypothalamic pro-opiomelanocortin neurons, suggesting dysregulation of leptin receptor (LepR) activity. Hypothalamus from Magel2-null mice had less LepR and altered levels of ubiquitin pathway proteins that regulate LepR processing (Rnf41, Usp8, and Stam1). MAGEL2 increased the cell surface abundance of LepR and decreased their degradation. LepR interacts with necdin, which interacts with MAGEL2, which complexes with RNF41 and USP8. Mutations in the MAGE homology domain of MAGEL2 suppress RNF41 stabilization and prevent the MAGEL2-mediated increase of cell surface LepR. Thus, MAGEL2 and necdin together control LepR sorting and degradation through a dynamic ubiquitin-dependent pathway. Loss of MAGEL2 and necdin may uncouple LepR from ubiquitination pathways, providing a cellular mechanism for obesity in PWS. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. Synaptic Correlates of Working Memory Capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Yuanyuan; Katkov, Mikhail; Tsodyks, Misha

    2017-01-18

    Psychological studies indicate that human ability to keep information in readily accessible working memory is limited to four items for most people. This extremely low capacity severely limits execution of many cognitive tasks, but its neuronal underpinnings remain unclear. Here we show that in the framework of synaptic theory of working memory, capacity can be analytically estimated to scale with characteristic time of short-term synaptic depression relative to synaptic current time constant. The number of items in working memory can be regulated by external excitation, enabling the system to be tuned to the desired load and to clear the working memory of currently held items to make room for new ones. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Astrocytes optimize the synaptic transmission of information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhita Nadkarni

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Chemical synapses transmit information via the release of neurotransmitter-filled vesicles from the presynaptic terminal. Using computational modeling, we predict that the limited availability of neurotransmitter resources in combination with the spontaneous release of vesicles limits the maximum degree of enhancement of synaptic transmission. This gives rise to an optimal tuning that depends on the number of active zones. There is strong experimental evidence that astrocytes that enwrap synapses can modulate the probabilities of vesicle release through bidirectional signaling and hence regulate synaptic transmission. For low-fidelity hippocampal synapses, which typically have only one or two active zones, the predicted optimal values lie close to those determined by experimentally measured astrocytic feedback, suggesting that astrocytes optimize synaptic transmission of information.

  18. Nitric oxide signaling is recruited as a compensatory mechanism for sustaining synaptic plasticity in Alzheimer's disease mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakroborty, Shreaya; Kim, Joyce; Schneider, Corinne; West, Anthony R; Stutzmann, Grace E

    2015-04-29

    Synaptic plasticity deficits are increasingly recognized as causing the memory impairments which define Alzheimer's disease (AD). In AD mouse models, evidence of abnormal synaptic function is present before the onset of cognitive deficits, and presents as increased synaptic depression revealed only when synaptic homeostasis is challenged, such as with suppression of ryanodine receptor (RyR)-evoked calcium signaling. Otherwise, at early disease stages, the synaptic physiology phenotype appears normal. This suggests compensatory mechanisms are recruited to maintain a functionally normal net output of the hippocampal circuit. A candidate calcium-regulated synaptic modulator is nitric oxide (NO), which acts presynaptically to boost vesicle release and glutamatergic transmission. Here we tested whether there is a feedforward cycle between the increased RyR calcium release seen in presymptomatic AD mice and aberrant NO signaling which augments synaptic plasticity. Using a combination of electrophysiological approaches, two-photon calcium imaging, and protein biochemistry in hippocampal tissue from presymptomatic 3xTg-AD and NonTg mice, we show that blocking NO synthesis results in markedly augmented synaptic depression mediated through presynaptic mechanisms in 3xTg-AD mice. Additionally, blocking NO reduces the augmented synaptically evoked dendritic calcium release mediated by enhanced RyR calcium release. This is accompanied by increased nNOS levels in the AD mice and is reversed upon normalization of RyR-evoked calcium release with chronic dantrolene treatment. Thus, recruitment of NO is serving a compensatory role to boost synaptic transmission and plasticity during early AD stages. However, NO's dual role in neuroprotection and neurodegeneration may convert to maladaptive functions as the disease progresses. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/356893-10$15.00/0.

  19. Heterosynaptic Plasticity Prevents Runaway Synaptic Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jen-Yung; Lonjers, Peter; Lee, Christopher; Chistiakova, Marina; Volgushev, Maxim

    2013-01-01

    Spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) and other conventional Hebbian-type plasticity rules are prone to produce runaway dynamics of synaptic weights. Once potentiated, a synapse would have higher probability to lead to spikes and thus to be further potentiated, but once depressed, a synapse would tend to be further depressed. The runaway synaptic dynamics can be prevented by precisely balancing STDP rules for potentiation and depression; however, experimental evidence shows a great variety of potentiation and depression windows and magnitudes. Here we show that modifications of synapses to layer 2/3 pyramidal neurons from rat visual and auditory cortices in slices can be induced by intracellular tetanization: bursts of postsynaptic spikes without presynaptic stimulation. Induction of these heterosynaptic changes depended on the rise of intracellular calcium, and their direction and magnitude correlated with initial state of release mechanisms. We suggest that this type of plasticity serves as a mechanism that stabilizes the distribution of synaptic weights and prevents their runaway dynamics. To test this hypothesis, we develop a cortical neuron model implementing both homosynaptic (STDP) and heterosynaptic plasticity with properties matching the experimental data. We find that heterosynaptic plasticity effectively prevented runaway dynamics for the tested range of STDP and input parameters. Synaptic weights, although shifted from the original, remained normally distributed and nonsaturated. Our study presents a biophysically constrained model of how the interaction of different forms of plasticity—Hebbian and heterosynaptic—may prevent runaway synaptic dynamics and keep synaptic weights unsaturated and thus capable of further plastic changes and formation of new memories. PMID:24089497

  20. E1AF degradation by a ubiquitin-proteasome pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Akiko; Higashino, Fumihiro; Aoyagi, Mariko; Yoshida, Koichi; Itoh, Miyuki; Kobayashi, Masanobu; Totsuka, Yasunori; Kohgo, Takao; Shindoh, Masanobu

    2005-01-01

    E1AF is a member of the ETS family of transcription factors. In mammary tumors, overexpression of E1AF is associated with tumorigenesis, but E1AF protein has hardly been detected and its degradation mechanism is not yet clear. Here we show that E1AF protein is stabilized by treatment with the 26S protease inhibitor MG132. We found that E1AF was modified by ubiquitin through the C-terminal region and ubiquitinated E1AF aggregated in nuclear dots, and that the inhibition of proteasome-activated transcription from E1AF target promoters. These results suggest that E1AF is degraded via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which has some effect on E1AF function

  1. The ubiquitin proteasome system in glia and its role in neurodegenerative diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Anne H. P.; Reits, Eric A. J.; Hol, Elly M.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) is crucial for intracellular protein homeostasis and for degradation of aberrant and damaged proteins. The accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's,

  2. Characterization of ubiquitination dependent dynamics in growth factor receptor signaling by quantitative proteomics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akimov, Vyacheslav; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Nielsen, Mogens M

    2011-01-01

    Protein ubiquitination is a dynamic reversible post-translational modification that plays a key role in the regulation of numerous cellular processes including signal transduction, endocytosis, cell cycle control, DNA repair and gene transcription. The conjugation of the small protein ubiquitin...... investigating ubiquitination on a proteomic scale, mainly due to the inherited complexity and heterogeneity of ubiquitination. We describe here a quantitative proteomics strategy based on the specificity of ubiquitin binding domains (UBDs) and Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC...... as ubiquitination-dependent events in signaling pathways. In addition to a detailed seven time-point profile of EGFR ubiquitination over 30 minutes of ligand stimulation, our data determined prominent involvement of Lysine-63 ubiquitin branching in EGF signaling. Furthermore, we found two centrosomal proteins, PCM1...

  3. Extracellular ATP hydrolysis inhibits synaptic transmission by increasing ph buffering in the synaptic cleft.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozan Vroman

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal computations strongly depend on inhibitory interactions. One such example occurs at the first retinal synapse, where horizontal cells inhibit photoreceptors. This interaction generates the center/surround organization of bipolar cell receptive fields and is crucial for contrast enhancement. Despite its essential role in vision, the underlying synaptic mechanism has puzzled the neuroscience community for decades. Two competing hypotheses are currently considered: an ephaptic and a proton-mediated mechanism. Here we show that horizontal cells feed back to photoreceptors via an unexpected synthesis of the two. The first one is a very fast ephaptic mechanism that has no synaptic delay, making it one of the fastest inhibitory synapses known. The second one is a relatively slow (τ≈200 ms, highly intriguing mechanism. It depends on ATP release via Pannexin 1 channels located on horizontal cell dendrites invaginating the cone synaptic terminal. The ecto-ATPase NTPDase1 hydrolyses extracellular ATP to AMP, phosphate groups, and protons. The phosphate groups and protons form a pH buffer with a pKa of 7.2, which keeps the pH in the synaptic cleft relatively acidic. This inhibits the cone Ca²⁺ channels and consequently reduces the glutamate release by the cones. When horizontal cells hyperpolarize, the pannexin 1 channels decrease their conductance, the ATP release decreases, and the formation of the pH buffer reduces. The resulting alkalization in the synaptic cleft consequently increases cone glutamate release. Surprisingly, the hydrolysis of ATP instead of ATP itself mediates the synaptic modulation. Our results not only solve longstanding issues regarding horizontal cell to photoreceptor feedback, they also demonstrate a new form of synaptic modulation. Because pannexin 1 channels and ecto-ATPases are strongly expressed in the nervous system and pannexin 1 function is implicated in synaptic plasticity, we anticipate that this novel form

  4. Synaptic proteome changes in the hypothalamus of mother rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udvari, Edina Brigitta; Völgyi, Katalin; Gulyássy, Péter; Dimén, Diána; Kis, Viktor; Barna, János; Szabó, Éva Rebeka; Lubec, Gert; Juhász, Gábor; Kékesi, Katalin Adrienna; Dobolyi, Árpád

    2017-04-21

    To establish synaptic proteome changes associated with motherhood, we isolated synaptosome fractions from the hypothalamus of mother rats and non-maternal control females at the 11th postpartum day. Proteomic analysis by two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis combined with mass spectrometric protein identification established 26 significant proteins, 7 increasing and 19 decreasing protein levels in the dams. The altered proteins are mainly involved in energy homeostasis, protein folding, and metabolic processes suggesting the involvement of these cellular processes in maternal adaptations. The decrease in a significantly altered protein, complement component 1q subcomponent-binding protein (C1qbp) was validated with Western blotting. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry showed its presence in hypothalamic fibers and terminals in agreement with its presence in synaptosomes. We also found the expression of C1qbp in different hypothalamic nuclei including the preoptic area and the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus at the protein and at the mRNA level using immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization histochemistry, respectively. Bioinformatical network analysis revealed that cytokines, growth factors, and protein kinases are common regulators, which indicates a complex regulation of the proteome change in mothers. The results suggest that maternal responsiveness is associated with synaptic proteins level changes in the hypothalamus, and that growth factors and cytokines may govern these alterations. The period of motherhood is accompanied with several behavioral, neuroendocrine, emotional and metabolic adaptations in the brain. Although it is established that various hypothalamic networks participate in the maternal adaptations of the rodent brain, our knowledge on the molecular background of these alterations remains seriously limited. In the present study, we first determined that the functional alterations of the maternal brain can be detected at the

  5. Motor unit recruitment strategies and muscle properties determine the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dideriksen, Jakob L.; Negro, Francesco; Enoka, Roger M.

    2012-01-01

    Motoneurons receive synaptic inputs from tens of thousands of connections that cause membrane potential to fluctuate continuously (synaptic noise), which introduces variability in discharge times of action potentials. We hypothesized that the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness during voluntary contractions is limited to low muscle forces. The hypothesis was examined with an analytical description of transduction of motor unit spike trains into muscle force, a computational model of motor unit recruitment and rate coding, and experimental analysis of interspike interval variability during steady contractions with the abductor digiti minimi muscle. Simulations varied contraction force, level of synaptic noise, size of motor unit population, recruitment range, twitch contraction times, and level of motor unit short-term synchronization. Consistent with the analytical derivations, simulations and experimental data showed that force variability at target forces above a threshold was primarily due to low-frequency oscillations in neural drive, whereas the influence of synaptic noise was almost completely attenuated by two low-pass filters, one related to convolution of motoneuron spike trains with motor unit twitches (temporal summation) and the other attributable to summation of single motor unit forces (spatial summation). The threshold force above which synaptic noise ceased to influence force steadiness depended on recruitment range, size of motor unit population, and muscle contractile properties. This threshold was low (motor unit recruitment and muscle properties of a typical muscle are tuned to limit the influence of synaptic noise on force steadiness to low forces and that the inability to produce a constant force during stronger contractions is mainly attributable to the common low-frequency oscillations in motoneuron discharge rates. PMID:22423000

  6. In silico analysis of ubiquitin/ubiquitin-like modifiers and their conjugating enzymes in Entamoeba species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arya, Shweta; Sharma, Gaurav; Gupta, Preeti; Tiwari, Swati

    2012-07-01

    Covalent modification of proteins by ubiquitin (Ub) and ubiquitin-like modifiers (Ubls) regulates many cellular functions in eukaryotes. These modifications are likely to be associated with pathogenesis, growth, and development of many protozoan parasites but molecular details about this pathway are unavailable for most protozoa. This study presents an analysis of the Ub pathway in three members of the Entamoeba species. Using bioinformatics tools we have identified all Ub and Ubl genes along with their corresponding activating, conjugating, and ligating enzymes (E1, E2s, and E3s) in three Entamoeba species, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba invadens. Phylogenetic trees were established for the identified E2s and RING finger E3s using maximum-likelihood method to infer the relationship among these proteins. In silico co-domain analysis of RING finger E3s implicates these proteins in a variety of functions. Several known and putative regulatory motifs were identified in the upstream regions of RING finger domain containing E3 genes. All E2 and E3 genes were analyzed in genomic context in E. histolytica and E. dispar. Most E2s and E3s were in syntenic positions in the two genomes. Association of these genes with transposable elements (TEs) was compared between E. histolytica and E. dispar. A closer association was found between RING finger E3s with TEs in E. histolytica. In summary, our analyses suggests that the complexity of the Ub pathway in Entamoeba species is close to that observed in higher eukaryotes. This study provides important data for further understanding the role of Ub pathway in the biology of these organisms.

  7. Dysregulation of Ubiquitin-Proteasome System in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiuyang; Huang, Timothy; Zhang, Lishan; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Hong; Xu, Huaxi; Wang, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is one of the major protein degradation pathways, where abnormal UPS function has been observed in cancer and neurological diseases. Many neurodegenerative diseases share a common pathological feature, namely intracellular ubiquitin-positive inclusions formed by aggregate-prone neurotoxic proteins. This suggests that dysfunction of the UPS in neurodegenerative diseases contributes to the accumulation of neurotoxic proteins and to instigate neurodegeneration. Here, we review recent findings describing various aspects of UPS dysregulation in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, and Huntington’s disease. PMID:28018215

  8. The Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Huntington's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddhartha Mitra

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The accumulation of mutant protein is a common feature of neurodegenerative disease. In Huntington's disease, a polyglutamine expansion in the huntingtin protein triggers neuronal toxicity. Accompanying neuronal death, mutant huntingtin aggregates in large macromolecular structures called inclusion bodies. The function of the machinery for intracellular protein degradation is linked to huntingtin toxicity and components of this machinery colocalize with inclusion bodies. An increasing body of evidence implicates the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in the failure of cells to degrade mutant huntingtin. A number of potential mechanisms that link compromised ubiquitin-proteasome pathway function and neurodegeneration have been proposed and may offer opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  9. ROLE OF UBIQUITIN PROTEASOME SYSTEM IN GASTRIC CANCER PATHOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Ivanova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The review presents data on the ubiquitin-proteasome system participation in pathogenesis of gastric cancer. The role of proteasome system in regulation of cell cycle, angiogenesis and tumor metastasis has been shown. The aspects of the participation of ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic system in the pathogenesis of intensive muscle protein degradation in cancer cachexia are analyzed. The role of proteasome system in the development of H. Pylori-induced gastric cancer is discussed. The clinical assessment of selective proteasome inhibitor (bortezomib is a promising area of research for metastatic gastric cancer.

  10. Flexible Proton-Gated Oxide Synaptic Transistors on Si Membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li Qiang; Wan, Chang Jin; Gao, Ping Qi; Liu, Yang Hui; Xiao, Hui; Ye, Ji Chun; Wan, Qing

    2016-08-24

    Ion-conducting materials have received considerable attention for their applications in fuel cells, electrochemical devices, and sensors. Here, flexible indium zinc oxide (InZnO) synaptic transistors with multiple presynaptic inputs gated by proton-conducting phosphorosilicate glass-based electrolyte films are fabricated on ultrathin Si membranes. Transient characteristics of the proton gated InZnO synaptic transistors are investigated, indicating stable proton-gating behaviors. Short-term synaptic plasticities are mimicked on the proposed proton-gated synaptic transistors. Furthermore, synaptic integration regulations are mimicked on the proposed synaptic transistor networks. Spiking logic modulations are realized based on the transition between superlinear and sublinear synaptic integration. The multigates coupled flexible proton-gated oxide synaptic transistors may be interesting for neuroinspired platforms with sophisticated spatiotemporal information processing.

  11. Systemic insulin sensitivity is regulated by GPS2 inhibition of AKT ubiquitination and activation in adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cederquist, Carly T; Lentucci, Claudia; Martinez-Calejman, Camila; Hayashi, Vanessa; Orofino, Joseph; Guertin, David; Fried, Susan K; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Cardamone, M Dafne; Perissi, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    Insulin signaling plays a unique role in the regulation of energy homeostasis and the impairment of insulin action is associated with altered lipid metabolism, obesity, and Type 2 Diabetes. The main aim of this study was to provide further insight into the regulatory mechanisms governing the insulin signaling pathway by investigating the role of non-proteolytic ubiquitination in insulin-mediated activation of AKT. The molecular mechanism of AKT regulation through ubiquitination is first dissected in vitro in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and then validated in vivo using mice with adipo-specific deletion of GPS2, an endogenous inhibitor of Ubc13 activity (GPS2-AKO mice). Our results indicate that K63 ubiquitination is a critical component of AKT activation in the insulin signaling pathway and that counter-regulation of this step is provided by GPS2 preventing AKT ubiquitination through inhibition of Ubc13 enzymatic activity. Removal of this negative checkpoint, through GPS2 downregulation or genetic deletion, results in sustained activation of insulin signaling both in vitro and in vivo . As a result, the balance between lipid accumulation and utilization is shifted toward storage in the adipose tissue and GPS2-AKO mice become obese under normal laboratory chow diet. However, the adipose tissue of GPS2-AKO mice is not inflamed, the levels of circulating adiponectin are elevated, and systemic insulin sensitivity is overall improved. Our findings characterize a novel layer of regulation of the insulin signaling pathway based on non-proteolytic ubiquitination of AKT and define GPS2 as a previously unrecognized component of the insulin signaling cascade. In accordance with this role, we have shown that GPS2 presence in adipocytes modulates systemic metabolism by restricting the activation of insulin signaling during the fasted state, whereas in absence of GPS2, the adipose tissue is more efficient at lipid storage, and obesity becomes uncoupled from inflammation and insulin

  12. Ubiquitin and ubiquitin-modified proteins activate the Pseudomonas aeruginosa T3SS cytotoxin, ExoU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David M; Schmalzer, Katherine M; Sato, Hiromi; Casey, Monika; Terhune, Scott S; Haas, Arthur L; Feix, Jimmy B; Frank, Dara W

    2011-12-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic Gram-negative pathogen that possesses a type III secretion system (T3SS) critical for evading innate immunity and establishing acute infections in compromised patients. Our research has focused on the structure-activity relationships of ExoU, the most toxic and destructive type III effector produced by P. aeruginosa. ExoU possesses phospholipase activity, which is detectable in vitro only when a eukaryotic cofactor is provided with membrane substrates. We report here that a subpopulation of ubiquitylated yeast SOD1 and other ubiquitylated mammalian proteins activate ExoU. Phospholipase activity was detected using purified ubiquitin of various chain lengths and linkage types; however, free monoubiquitin is sufficient in a genetically engineered dual expression system. The use of ubiquitin by a bacterial enzyme as an activator is unprecedented and represents a new aspect in the manipulation of the eukaryotic ubiquitin system to facilitate bacterial replication and dissemination. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Interplays between Sumoylation, SUMO-Targeted Ubiquitin Ligases, and the Ubiquitin-Adaptor Protein Ufd1 in Fission Yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Køhler, Julie Bonne

    their conformation or interactions with other macromolecules. Though, whereas the downstream consequence of ubiquitin conjugation is often protein degradation, the functional outcomes of sumoylation are less unifiable. A class of ubiquitin E3 ligases able to target sumoylated proteins for degradation by the 26S...... proteasome mediates direct cross-talk between the two modification systems. By contributing to the dynamic turnover of SUMO conjugated species these SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligases (STUbLs) fulfills essential roles in both yeast and man. However, the specific sumoylated proteins affected by STUbL activity...... and the specific molecular interactions and sequence of events linking sumoylation, ubiquitylation and substrate degradation, has been largely uncovered. Using the fission yeast model organism I here present evidence for a role of the Ufd1 (ubiquitinfusion degradation 1) protein, and by extension of the Cdc48-Ufd1...

  14. Regulation Mechanisms of the Ubiquitin C-terminal Hydrolases UCH-L5 and BAP1

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.D. Sahtoe (Danny)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractThe covalent attachment of the small protein ubiquitin to target proteins, ubiquitination, is a major type of modification in cells. This modification can have a vast array of outcomes that allow cells to tightly control processes. Ubiquitination is reversed by deubiquitinating

  15. Ubiquitination independent of E1 and E2 enzymes by bacterial effectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qiu, Jiazhang; Sheedlo, Michael J.; Yu, Kaiwen; Tan, Yunhao; Nakayasu, Ernesto S.; Das, Chittaranjan; Liu, Xiaoyun; Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2016-04-06

    Signaling by ubiquitination regulates virtually every cellular process in eukaryotes. Covalent attachment of ubiquitin to a substrate is catalyzed by the E1, E2 and E3 three-enzyme cascade 1, which links the C terminus of ubiquitin via an isopeptide bond mostly to the ε-amino group of a lysine of the substrate. Given the essential roles of ubiquitination in the regulation of the immune system, it is not surprising that the ubiquitination network is a common target for diverse infectious agents 2. For example, many bacterial pathogens exploit ubiquitin signaling using virulence factors that function as E3 ligases, deubiquitinases 3 or as enzymes that directly attack ubiquitin 4. The bacterial pathogen Legionella pneumophila utilizes approximately 300 effectors that modulate diverse host processes to create a niche permissive for its replication in phagocytes 5. Here we demonstrate that members of the SidE effector family (SidEs) of L. pneumophila ubiquitinate multiple Rab small GTPases associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Moreover, we show that these proteins are capable of catalyzing ubiquitination without the need for the E1 and E2 enzymes. The E1/E2-independent ubiquitination catalyzed by these enzymes requires NAD but not ATP and Mg2+. A putative mono ADP-ribosyltransferase (mART) motif critical for the ubiquitination activity is also essential for the role of SidEs in intracellular bacterial replication in a protozoan host. These results establish that ubiquitination can be catalyzed by a single enzyme.

  16. A disulphide bond in the E2 enzyme Pex4p modulates ubiquitin-conjugating activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Williams, Chris; van den Berg, Marlene; Stanley, Will A.; Wilmanns, Matthias; Distel, Ben

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Pex4p together with its binding partner, the peroxisomal membrane protein Pex22p, co-ordinates cysteine-dependent ubiquitination of the cycling receptor protein Pex5p. Unusually for an ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, Saccharomyces cerevisiae Pex4p can form a disulphide

  17. RNF115/BCA2 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Promotes Breast Cancer Cell Proliferation through Targeting p21Waf1/Cip1 for Ubiquitin-Mediated Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehua Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The E3 ubiquitin ligase RING finger protein 115 (RNF115, also known as breast cancer-associated gene 2 (BCA2, has previously been reported to be overexpressed in estrogen receptor α (ERα-positive breast tumors and to promote breast cell proliferation; however, its mechanism is unknown. In this study, we demonstrated that silencing of BCA2 by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs in two ERα-positive breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and T47D, decreases cell proliferation and increases the protein levels of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p21Waf/Cip1. The protein stability of p21 was negatively regulated by BCA2. BCA2 directly interacts with p21 and promotes p21 ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation. Knockdown of p21 partially rescues the cell growth arrest induced by the BCA2 siRNA. These results suggest that BCA2 promotes ERα-positive breast cancer cell proliferation at least partially through downregulating the expression of p21.

  18. Dysregulation of Elongation Factor 1A Expression is Correlated with Synaptic Plasticity Impairments in Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckelman, Brenna C; Day, Stephen; Zhou, Xueyan; Donohue, Maggie; Gouras, Gunnar K; Klann, Eric; Keene, C Dirk; Ma, Tao

    2016-09-06

    Synaptic dysfunction may represent an early and crucial pathophysiology in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent studies implicate a connection between synaptic plasticity deficits and compromised capacity of de novo protein synthesis in AD. The mRNA translational factor eukaryotic elongation factor 1A (eEF1A) is critically involved in several forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity. By examining postmortem human brain samples, a transgenic mouse model, and application of synthetic human Aβ42 on mouse hippocampal slices, we demonstrated that eEF1A protein levels were significantly decreased in AD, particularly in the hippocampus. In contrast, brain levels of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 were unaltered in AD. Further, upregulation of eEF1A expression by the adenylyl cyclase activator forskolin, which induces long-lasting synaptic plasticity, was blunted in hippocampal slices derived from Tg2576 AD model mice. Finally, Aβ-induced hippocampal long-term potentiation defects were alleviated by upregulation of eEF1A signaling via brain-specific knockdown of the gene encoding tuberous sclerosis 2. In summary, our findings suggest a strong correlation between the dysregulation of eEF1A synthesis and AD-associated synaptic failure. These findings provide insights into the understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying AD etiology and may aid in identification of novel biomarkers and therapeutic targets.

  19. Input significance analysis: feature selection through synaptic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work is interested in ISA methods that can manipulate synaptic weights namely. Connection Weights (CW) and Garson's Algorithm (GA) and the classifier selected is. Evolving Fuzzy Neural Networks (EFuNNs). Firstly, it test FS method on a dataset selected from the UCI Machine Learning Repository and executed in an ...

  20. Synaptic plasticity and the warburg effect

    KAUST Repository

    Magistretti, Pierre J.

    2014-01-01

    Functional brain imaging studies show that in certain brain regions glucose utilization exceeds oxygen consumption, indicating the predominance of aerobic glycolysis. In this issue, Goyal et al. (2014) report that this metabolic profile is associated with an enrichment in the expression of genes involved in synaptic plasticity and remodeling processes. © 2014 Elsevier Inc.

  1. P2X Receptors and Synaptic Plasticity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pankratov, Y.; Lalo, U.; Krishtal, A.; Verkhratsky, Alexei

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 158, č. 1 (2009), s. 137-148 ISSN 0306-4522 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : ATP * P2X receptors * synaptic plasticity Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2009

  2. Neuronal cytoskeleton in synaptic plasticity and regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon-Weeks, Phillip R; Fournier, Alyson E

    2014-04-01

    During development, dynamic changes in the axonal growth cone and dendrite are necessary for exploratory movements underlying initial axo-dendritic contact and ultimately the formation of a functional synapse. In the adult central nervous system, an impressive degree of plasticity is retained through morphological and molecular rearrangements in the pre- and post-synaptic compartments that underlie the strengthening or weakening of synaptic pathways. Plasticity is regulated by the interplay of permissive and inhibitory extracellular cues, which signal through receptors at the synapse to regulate the closure of critical periods of developmental plasticity as well as by acute changes in plasticity in response to experience and activity in the adult. The molecular underpinnings of synaptic plasticity are actively studied and it is clear that the cytoskeleton is a key substrate for many cues that affect plasticity. Many of the cues that restrict synaptic plasticity exhibit residual activity in the injured adult CNS and restrict regenerative growth by targeting the cytoskeleton. Here, we review some of the latest insights into how cytoskeletal remodeling affects neuronal plasticity and discuss how the cytoskeleton is being targeted in an effort to promote plasticity and repair following traumatic injury in the central nervous system. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  3. Ubiquitination and sumoylation of the HTLV-2 Tax-2B protein regulate its NF-κB activity: a comparative study with the HTLV-1 Tax-1 protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Retroviruses HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 have homologous genomic structures but differ significantly in pathogenicity. HTLV-1 is associated with Adult T cell Leukemia (ATL), whereas infection by HTLV-2 has no association with neoplasia. Transformation of T lymphocytes by HTLV-1 is linked to the capacity of its oncoprotein Tax-1 to alter cell survival and cell cycle control mechanisms. Among these functions, Tax-1-mediated activation of cellular gene expression via the NF-κB pathway depends on Tax-1 post-translational modifications by ubiquitination and sumoylation. The Tax-2 protein of HTLV-2B (Tax-2B) is also modified by ubiquitination and sumoylation and activates the NF-κB pathway to a level similar to that of Tax-1. The present study aims to understand whether ubiquitination and sumoylation modifications are involved in Tax-2B-mediated activation of the NF-κB pathway. Results The comparison of Tax-1 and Tax-2B lysine to arginine substitution mutants revealed conserved patterns and levels of ubiquitination with notable difference in the lysine usage for sumoylation. Neither Tax-1 nor Tax-2B ubiquitination and sumoylation deficient mutants could activate the NF-κB pathway and fusion of ubiquitin or SUMO-1 to the C-terminus of the ubiquitination and sumoylation deficient Tax-2B mutant strikingly restored transcriptional activity. In addition, ubiquitinated forms of Tax-2B colocalized with RelA and IKKγ in prominent cytoplasmic structures associated with the Golgi apparatus, whereas colocalization of Tax-2B with the RelA subunit of NF-κB and the transcriptional coactivator p300 in punctate nuclear structures was dependent on Tax-2B sumoylation, as previously observed for Tax-1. Conclusions Both Tax-1 and Tax-2 activate the NF-κB pathway via similar mechanisms involving ubiquitination and sumoylation. Therefore, the different transforming potential of HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 is unlikely to be related to different modes of activation of the canonical NF-κB pathway

  4. The Spacing Effect for Structural Synaptic Plasticity Provides Specificity and Precision in Plastic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Martin, Alvaro; Rela, Lorena; Gelb, Bruce; Pagani, Mario Rafael

    2017-05-10

    In contrast to trials of training without intervals (massed training), training trials spaced over time (spaced training) induce a more persistent memory identified as long-term memory (LTM). This phenomenon, known as the spacing effect for memory, is poorly understood. LTM is supported by structural synaptic plasticity; however, how synapses integrate spaced stimuli remains elusive. Here, we analyzed events of structural synaptic plasticity at the single-synapse level after distinct patterns of stimulation in motoneurons of Drosophila We found that the spacing effect is a phenomenon detected at synaptic level, which determines the specificity and the precision in structural synaptic plasticity. Whereas a single pulse of stimulation (massed) induced structural synaptic plasticity, the same amount of stimulation divided in three spaced stimuli completely prevented it. This inhibitory effect was determined by the length of the interstimulus intervals. The inhibitory effect of the spacing was lost by suppressing the activity of Ras or mitogen-activated protein kinase, whereas the overexpression of Ras-WT enhanced it. Moreover, dividing the same total time of stimulation into five or more stimuli produced a higher precision in the number of events of plasticity. Ras mutations associated with intellectual disability abolished the spacing effect and led neurons to decode distinct stimulation patterns as massed stimulation. This evidence suggests that the spacing effect for memory may result from the effect of the spacing in synaptic plasticity, which appears to be a property not limited to neurons involved in learning and memory. We propose a model of spacing-dependent structural synaptic plasticity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Long-term memory (LTM) induced by repeated trials spaced over time is known as the spacing effect, a common property in the animal kingdom. Altered mechanisms in the spacing effect have been found in animal models of disorders with intellectual

  5. SMN requirement for synaptic vesicle, active zone and microtubule postnatal organization in motor nerve terminals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Torres-Benito

    Full Text Available Low levels of the Survival Motor Neuron (SMN protein produce Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA, a severe monogenetic disease in infants characterized by muscle weakness and impaired synaptic transmission. We report here severe structural and functional alterations in the organization of the organelles and the cytoskeleton of motor nerve terminals in a mouse model of SMA. The decrease in SMN levels resulted in the clustering of synaptic vesicles (SVs and Active Zones (AZs, reduction in the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP, and the recycling pool (RP of synaptic vesicles, a decrease in active mitochondria and limiting of neurofilament and microtubule maturation. We propose that SMN is essential for the normal postnatal maturation of motor nerve terminals and that SMN deficiency disrupts the presynaptic organization leading to neurodegeneration.

  6. Basic mechanisms for recognition and transport of synaptic cargos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.A. Schlager (Max); C.C. Hoogenraad (Casper)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSynaptic cargo trafficking is essential for synapse formation, function and plasticity. In order to transport synaptic cargo, such as synaptic vesicle precursors, mitochondria, neurotransmitter receptors and signaling proteins to their site of action, neurons make use of molecular motor

  7. Brief environmental enrichment elicits metaplasticity of hippocampal synaptic potentiation in vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise eManahan-Vaughan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Long-term environmental enrichment (EE elicits enduring effects on the adult brain, including altered synaptic plasticity. Synaptic plasticity may underlie memory formation and includes robust (>24h and weak (<2h forms of long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. Most studies of the effect of EE on synaptic efficacy have examined the consequences of very prolonged EE-exposure. It is unclear whether brief exposure to EE can alter synaptic plasticity. Clarifying this issue could help develop strategies to address cognitive deficits arising from neglect in children or adults.We assessed whether short-term EE elicits alterations in hippocampal synaptic plasticity and if social context may play a role. Adult mice were exposed to EE for 14 consecutive days. We found that robust late-LTP (>24h and short-term depression (<2h at Schaffer-collateral-CA1 synapses in freely behaving mice were unaltered, whereas early-LTP (E-LTP, <2h was significantly enhanced by EE. Effects were transient: E-LTP returned to control levels 1 week after cessation of EE. Six weeks later animals were re-exposed to EE for 14d. Under these conditions, E-LTP was facilitated into L-LTP (>24h, suggesting that metaplasticity was induced during the first EE experience and that EE-mediated modifications are cumulative. Effects were absent in mice that underwent solitary enrichment or were group-housed without EE. These data suggest that EE in naïve animals strengthens E-LTP, and also promotes L-LTP in animals that underwent EE in the past. This indicates that brief exposure to EE, particularly under social conditions can elicit lasting positive effects on synaptic strength that may have beneficial consequences for cognition that depends on synaptic plasticity.

  8. Nanoscale Molecular Reorganization of the Inhibitory Postsynaptic Density Is a Determinant of GABAergic Synaptic Potentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennacchietti, Francesca; Vascon, Sebastiano; Nieus, Thierry; Rosillo, Christian; Das, Sabyasachi; Tyagarajan, Shiva K; Diaspro, Alberto; Del Bue, Alessio; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Barberis, Andrea; Cella Zanacchi, Francesca

    2017-02-15

    Gephyrin is a key scaffold protein mediating the anchoring of GABAA receptors at inhibitory synapses. Here, we exploited superresolution techniques combined with proximity-based clustering analysis and model simulations to investigate the single-molecule gephyrin reorganization during plasticity of inhibitory synapses in mouse hippocampal cultured neurons. This approach revealed that, during the expression of inhibitory LTP, the increase of gephyrin density at postsynaptic sites is associated with the promoted formation of gephyrin nanodomains. We demonstrate that the gephyrin rearrangement in nanodomains stabilizes the amplitude of postsynaptic currents, indicating that, in addition to the number of synaptic GABAA receptors, the nanoscale distribution of GABAA receptors in the postsynaptic area is a crucial determinant for the expression of inhibitory synaptic plasticity. In addition, the methodology implemented here clears the way to the application of the graph-based theory to single-molecule data for the description and quantification of the spatial organization of the synapse at the single-molecule level. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The mechanisms of inhibitory synaptic plasticity are poorly understood, mainly because the size of the synapse is below the diffraction limit, thus reducing the effectiveness of conventional optical and imaging techniques. Here, we exploited superresolution approaches combined with clustering analysis to study at unprecedented resolution the distribution of the inhibitory scaffold protein gephyrin in response to protocols inducing LTP of inhibitory synaptic responses (iLTP). We found that, during the expression of iLTP, the increase of synaptic gephyrin is associated with the fragmentation of gephyrin in subsynaptic nanodomains. We demonstrate that such synaptic gephyrin nanodomains stabilize the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic responses, thus identifying the nanoscale gephyrin rearrangement as a key determinant for inhibitory

  9. Coexistence of Multiple Types of Synaptic Plasticity in Individual Hippocampal CA1 Pyramidal Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelmann, Elke; Cepeda-Prado, Efrain; Leßmann, Volkmar

    2017-01-01

    Understanding learning and memory mechanisms is an important goal in neuroscience. To gain insights into the underlying cellular mechanisms for memory formation, synaptic plasticity processes are studied with various techniques in different brain regions. A valid model to scrutinize different ways to enhance or decrease synaptic transmission is recording of long-term potentiation (LTP) or long-term depression (LTD). At the single cell level, spike timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) protocols have emerged as a powerful tool to investigate synaptic plasticity with stimulation paradigms that also likely occur during memory formation in vivo . Such kind of plasticity can be induced by different STDP paradigms with multiple repeat numbers and stimulation patterns. They subsequently recruit or activate different molecular pathways and neuromodulators for induction and expression of STDP. Dopamine (DA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been recently shown to be important modulators for hippocampal STDP at Schaffer collateral (SC)-CA1 synapses and are activated exclusively by distinguishable STDP paradigms. Distinct types of parallel synaptic plasticity in a given neuron depend on specific subcellular molecular prerequisites. Since the basal and apical dendrites of CA1 pyramidal neurons are known to be heterogeneous, and distance-dependent dendritic gradients for specific receptors and ion channels are described, the dendrites might provide domain specific locations for multiple types of synaptic plasticity in the same neuron. In addition to the distinct signaling and expression mechanisms of various types of LTP and LTD, activation of these different types of plasticity might depend on background brain activity states. In this article, we will discuss some ideas why multiple forms of synaptic plasticity can simultaneously and independently coexist and can contribute so effectively to increasing the efficacy of memory storage and processing capacity of the

  10. The F-box protein FBXO44 mediates BRCA1 ubiquitination and degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunzhe; Li, Jiezhi; Cheng, Dongmei; Parameswaran, Balaji; Zhang, Shaohua; Jiang, Zefei; Yew, P Renee; Peng, Junmin; Ye, Qinong; Hu, Yanfen

    2012-11-30

    BRCA1 mutations account for a significant proportion of familial breast and ovarian cancers. In addition, reduced BRCA1 protein is associated with sporadic cancer cases in these tissues. At the cellular level, BRCA1 plays a critical role in multiple cellular functions such as DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Its protein level is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. However, regulation of BRCA1 protein stability is not fully understood. Our earlier study showed that the amino terminus of BRCA1 harbors a degron sequence that is sufficient and necessary for conferring BRCA1 degradation. In the current study, we used mass spectrometry to identify Skp1 that regulates BRCA1 protein stability. Small interfering RNA screening that targets all human F-box proteins uncovered FBXO44 as an important protein that influences BRCA1 protein level. The Skp1-Cul1-F-box-protein44 (SCF(FBXO44)) complex ubiquitinates full-length BRCA1 in vitro. Furthermore, the N terminus of BRCA1 mediates the interaction between BRCA1 and FBXO44. Overexpression of SCF(FBXO44) reduces BRCA1 protein level. Taken together, our work strongly suggests that SCF(FBXO44) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for BRCA1 degradation. In addition, FBXO44 expression pattern in breast carcinomas suggests that SCF(FBXO44)-mediated BRCA1 degradation might contribute to sporadic breast tumor development.

  11. The F-box Protein FBXO44 Mediates BRCA1 Ubiquitination and Degradation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yunzhe; Li, Jiezhi; Cheng, Dongmei; Parameswaran, Balaji; Zhang, Shaohua; Jiang, Zefei; Yew, P. Renee; Peng, Junmin; Ye, Qinong; Hu, Yanfen

    2012-01-01

    BRCA1 mutations account for a significant proportion of familial breast and ovarian cancers. In addition, reduced BRCA1 protein is associated with sporadic cancer cases in these tissues. At the cellular level, BRCA1 plays a critical role in multiple cellular functions such as DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control. Its protein level is regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. However, regulation of BRCA1 protein stability is not fully understood. Our earlier study showed that the amino terminus of BRCA1 harbors a degron sequence that is sufficient and necessary for conferring BRCA1 degradation. In the current study, we used mass spectrometry to identify Skp1 that regulates BRCA1 protein stability. Small interfering RNA screening that targets all human F-box proteins uncovered FBXO44 as an important protein that influences BRCA1 protein level. The Skp1-Cul1-F-box-protein44 (SCFFBXO44) complex ubiquitinates full-length BRCA1 in vitro. Furthermore, the N terminus of BRCA1 mediates the interaction between BRCA1 and FBXO44. Overexpression of SCFFBXO44 reduces BRCA1 protein level. Taken together, our work strongly suggests that SCFFBXO44 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase responsible for BRCA1 degradation. In addition, FBXO44 expression pattern in breast carcinomas suggests that SCFFBXO44-mediated BRCA1 degradation might contribute to sporadic breast tumor development. PMID:23086937

  12. Bilinearity in spatiotemporal integration of synaptic inputs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songting Li

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurons process information via integration of synaptic inputs from dendrites. Many experimental results demonstrate dendritic integration could be highly nonlinear, yet few theoretical analyses have been performed to obtain a precise quantitative characterization analytically. Based on asymptotic analysis of a two-compartment passive cable model, given a pair of time-dependent synaptic conductance inputs, we derive a bilinear spatiotemporal dendritic integration rule. The summed somatic potential can be well approximated by the linear summation of the two postsynaptic potentials elicited separately, plus a third additional bilinear term proportional to their product with a proportionality coefficient [Formula: see text]. The rule is valid for a pair of synaptic inputs of all types, including excitation-inhibition, excitation-excitation, and inhibition-inhibition. In addition, the rule is valid during the whole dendritic integration process for a pair of synaptic inputs with arbitrary input time differences and input locations. The coefficient [Formula: see text] is demonstrated to be nearly independent of the input strengths but is dependent on input times and input locations. This rule is then verified through simulation of a realistic pyramidal neuron model and in electrophysiological experiments of rat hippocampal CA1 neurons. The rule is further generalized to describe the spatiotemporal dendritic integration of multiple excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs. The integration of multiple inputs can be decomposed into the sum of all possible pairwise integration, where each paired integration obeys the bilinear rule. This decomposition leads to a graph representation of dendritic integration, which can be viewed as functionally sparse.

  13. Effect of ionizing radiation exposure on Trypanosoma cruzi ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Paula G; Passos-Silva, Danielle G; Vieira-da-Rocha, João P; Mendes, Isabela Cecilia; de Oliveira, Karla A; Oliveira, Camila F B; Vilela, Liza F F; Nagem, Ronaldo A P; Cardoso, Joseane; Nardelli, Sheila C; Krieger, Marco A; Franco, Glória R; Macedo, Andrea M; Pena, Sérgio D J; Schenkman, Sérgio; Gomes, Dawidson A; Guerra-Sá, Renata; Machado, Carlos R

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, proteasome involvement in the damage response induced by ionizing radiation (IR) became evident. However, whether proteasome plays a direct or indirect role in IR-induced damage response still unclear. Trypanosoma cruzi is a human parasite capable of remarkable high tolerance to IR, suggesting a highly efficient damage response system. Here, we investigate the role of T. cruzi proteasome in the damage response induced by IR. We exposed epimastigotes to high doses of gamma ray and we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of several components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system. We show that proteasome inhibition increases IR-induced cell growth arrest and proteasome-mediated proteolysis is altered after parasite exposure. We observed nuclear accumulation of 19S and 20S proteasome subunits in response to IR treatments. Intriguingly, the dynamic of 19S particle nuclear accumulation was more similar to the dynamic observed for Rad51 nuclear translocation than the observed for 20S. In the other hand, 20S increase and nuclear translocation could be related with an increase of its regulator PA26 and high levels of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in vitro. The intersection between the opposed peaks of 19S and 20S protein levels was marked by nuclear accumulation of both 20S and 19S together with Ubiquitin, suggesting a role of ubiquitin-proteasome system in the nuclear protein turnover at the time. Our results revealed the importance of proteasome-mediated proteolysis in T. cruzi IR-induced damage response suggesting that proteasome is also involved in T. cruzi IR tolerance. Moreover, our data support the possible direct/signaling role of 19S in DNA damage repair. Based on these results, we speculate that spatial and temporal differences between the 19S particle and 20S proteasome controls proteasome multiple roles in IR damage response. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential regulation of synaptic AP-2/clathrin vesicle uncoating in synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candiello, Ermes; Mishra, Ratnakar; Schmidt, Bernhard; Jahn, Olaf; Schu, Peter

    2017-11-17

    AP-1/σ1B-deficiency causes X-linked intellectual disability. AP-1/σ1B -/- mice have impaired synaptic vesicle recycling, fewer synaptic vesicles and enhanced endosome maturation mediated by AP-1/σ1A. Despite defects in synaptic vesicle recycling synapses contain two times more endocytic AP-2 clathrin-coated vesicles. We demonstrate increased formation of two classes of AP-2/clathrin coated vesicles. One which uncoats readily and a second with a stabilised clathrin coat. Coat stabilisation is mediated by three molecular mechanisms: reduced recruitment of Hsc70 and synaptojanin1 and enhanced μ2/AP-2 phosphorylation and activation. Stabilised AP-2 vesicles are enriched in the structural active zone proteins Git1 and stonin2 and synapses contain more Git1. Endocytosis of the synaptic vesicle exocytosis regulating Munc13 isoforms are differentially effected. Regulation of synaptic protein endocytosis by the differential stability of AP-2/clathrin coats is a novel molecular mechanism of synaptic plasticity.

  15. Heat Shock Protein 70 and CHIP Promote Nox4 Ubiquitination and Degradation within the Losartan Antioxidative Effect in Proximal Tubule Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil Lorenzo, Andrea F; Costantino, Valeria V; Appiolaza, Martin López; Cacciamani, Valeria; Benardon, Maria E; Bocanegra, Victoria; Vallés, Patricia G

    2015-01-01

    Angiotensin II/Angiotensin II type 1 receptor (AT1R) effects are dependent on ROS production stimulated by NADPH oxidase activation. Hsp70 regulates a diverse set of signaling pathways through their interactions with proteins. CHIP is a E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets proteins for polyubiquitination and degradation. We study whether Hsp70/CHIP contribute to the negative regulation of Nox4 after AT1R blockage. Primary culture of proximal tubule epithelial cells (PTCs) from SHR and WKY were stimulated with Angiotensin II (AII) or treated with Losartan (L) or Losartan plus Angiotensin II (L+AII). Losartan decreased AT1R and Nox4 while enhancing caveolin-1 and Hsp70 protein expression in SHR PTCs. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence proved interaction and colocalization of increased Hsp70/CHIP with decreased Nox4 in SHR PTCs (L) vs (All). Hsp72 knockdown resulted in enhanced Nox4 protein levels, NADPH oxidase activity and ROS generation in (L+AII) revealing that Losartan was unable to abrogate AII effects on Nox4 expression and oxidative activity. Moreover, MG132 exposed PTCs (L) demostrated blocked ubiquitinated Nox4 degradation and increased colocalization of Nox4/Ubiquitin by inmunofluorescence. Conversely, Hsp72 depletion reduced Nox4/Ubiquitin colocalization causing Nox4 upregulation due to proteosomal degradation inhibition, although Losartan treatment. Our study demonstrates that Hsp70 and CHIP mediates the ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation of Nox4 as part of the antioxidative effect of Losartan in SHR. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Ubiquitination of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DM by different membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) protein family E3 ligases targets different endocytic pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P

    2012-03-02

    HLA-DM plays an essential role in the peptide loading of classical class II molecules and is present both at the cell surface and in late endosomal peptide-loading compartments. Trafficking of DM within antigen-presenting cells is complex and is, in part, controlled by a tyrosine-based targeting signal present in the cytoplasmic tail of DMβ. Here, we show that DM also undergoes post-translational modification through ubiquitination of a single lysine residue present in the cytoplasmic tail of the α chain, DMα. Ubiquitination of DM by MARCH1 and MARCH9 induced loss of DM molecules from the cell surface by a mechanism that cumulatively involved both direct attachment of ubiquitin chains to DMα and a functional tyrosine-based signal on DMβ. In contrast, MARCH8-induced loss of surface DM was entirely dependent upon the tyrosine signal on DMβ. In the absence of this tyrosine residue, levels of DM remained unchanged irrespective of whether DMα was ubiquitinated by MARCH8. The influence of MARCH8 was indirect and may have resulted from modification of components of the endocytic machinery by ubiquitination.

  17. Ubiquitination of Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DM by Different Membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) Protein Family E3 Ligases Targets Different Endocytic Pathways*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, Martin; Trowsdale, John; Kelly, Adrian P.

    2012-01-01

    HLA-DM plays an essential role in the peptide loading of classical class II molecules and is present both at the cell surface and in late endosomal peptide-loading compartments. Trafficking of DM within antigen-presenting cells is complex and is, in part, controlled by a tyrosine-based targeting signal present in the cytoplasmic tail of DMβ. Here, we show that DM also undergoes post-translational modification through ubiquitination of a single lysine residue present in the cytoplasmic tail of the α chain, DMα. Ubiquitination of DM by MARCH1 and MARCH9 induced loss of DM molecules from the cell surface by a mechanism that cumulatively involved both direct attachment of ubiquitin chains to DMα and a functional tyrosine-based signal on DMβ. In contrast, MARCH8-induced loss of surface DM was entirely dependent upon the tyrosine signal on DMβ. In the absence of this tyrosine residue, levels of DM remained unchanged irrespective of whether DMα was ubiquitinated by MARCH8. The influence of MARCH8 was indirect and may have resulted from modification of components of the endocytic machinery by ubiquitination. PMID:22247549

  18. Periodic forces trigger a complex mechanical response in ubiquitin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymczak, Piotr; Janovjak, Harald

    2009-07-17

    Mechanical forces govern physiological processes in all living organisms. Many cellular forces, for example, those generated in cyclic conformational changes of biological machines, have repetitive components. In apparent contrast, little is known about how dynamic protein structures respond to periodic mechanical information. Ubiquitin is a small protein found in all eukaryotes. We developed molecular dynamics simulations to unfold single and multimeric ubiquitins with periodic forces. By using a coarse-grained representation, we were able to model forces with periods about 2 orders of magnitude longer than the protein's relaxation time. We found that even a moderate periodic force weakened the protein and shifted its unfolding pathways in a frequency- and amplitude-dependent manner. A complex dynamic response with secondary structure refolding and an increasing importance of local interactions was revealed. Importantly, repetitive forces with broadly distributed frequencies elicited very similar molecular responses compared to fixed-frequency forces. When testing the influence of pulling geometry on ubiquitin's mechanical stability, it was found that the linkage involved in the mechanical degradation of cellular proteins renders the protein remarkably insensitive to periodic forces. We also devised a complementary kinetic energy landscape model that traces these observations and explains periodic-force, single-molecule measurements. In turn, this analytical model is capable of predicting dynamic protein responses. These results provide new insights into ubiquitin mechanics and a potential mechanical role during protein degradation, as well as first frameworks for dynamic protein stability and the modeling of repetitive mechanical processes.

  19. Ubiquitin expression in coeliac disease | Yeboah | Journal of the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biopsy-sections of the small intestine of established coeliac patients were investigated by immunoperoxidase procedures, using monoclonal antibodies to detect the presence of ubiquitin, a heat shock protein, to find out the role, if any, of this protein in the pathogenesis of coeliac disease. Sections from each case stained ...

  20. Redox control of the ubiquitin-proteasome system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kriegenburg, Franziska; Poulsen, Esben G; Koch, Annett

    2011-01-01

    is characteristic of many diseases and during aging. To counter the adverse effects of oxidative stress, cells can initiate an antioxidative response in an attempt to repair the damage, or rapidly channel the damaged proteins for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS). Recent studies have shown...

  1. UbiGate: a synthetic biology toolbox to analyse ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowarschik, Kathrin; Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Marillonnet, Sylvestre; Trujillo, Marco

    2018-03-01

    Ubiquitination is mediated by an enzymatic cascade that results in the modification of substrate proteins, redefining their fate. This post-translational modification is involved in most cellular processes, yet its analysis faces manifold obstacles due to its complex and ubiquitous nature. Reconstitution of the ubiquitination cascade in bacterial systems circumvents several of these problems and was shown to faithfully recapitulate the process. Here, we present UbiGate - a synthetic biology toolbox, together with an inducible bacterial expression system - to enable the straightforward reconstitution of the ubiquitination cascades of different organisms in Escherichia coli by 'Golden Gate' cloning. This inclusive toolbox uses a hierarchical modular cloning system to assemble complex DNA molecules encoding the multiple genetic elements of the ubiquitination cascade in a predefined order, to generate polycistronic operons for expression. We demonstrate the efficiency of UbiGate in generating a variety of expression elements to reconstitute autoubiquitination by different E3 ligases and the modification of their substrates, as well as its usefulness for dissecting the process in a time- and cost-effective manner. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Exploring the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Protein Degradation Pathway in Yeast

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    Will, Tamara J.; McWatters, Melissa K.; McQuade, Kristi L.

    2006-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate biochemistry laboratory investigating the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway in yeast. In this exercise, the enzyme beta-galactosidase (beta-gal) is expressed in yeast under the control of a stress response promoter. Following exposure to heat stress to induce beta-gal expression, cycloheximide is added to halt…

  3. Cytochrome P450 ubiquitination: branding for the proteolytic slaughter?

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    Correia, Maria Almira; Sadeghi, Sheila; Mundo-Paredes, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    The hepatic cytochromes P450 (P450s) are monotopic endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchored hemoproteins engaged in the enzymatic oxidation of a wide variety of endo- and xenobiotics. In the course of these reactions, the enzymes generate reactive O(2) species and/or reactive metabolic products that can attack the P450 heme and/or protein moiety and structurally and functionally damage the enzyme. The in vivo conformational unraveling of such a structurally damaged P450 signals its rapid removal via the cellular sanitation system responsible for the proteolytic disposal of structurally aberrant, abnormal, and/or otherwise malformed proteins. A key player in this process is the ubiquitin (Ub)-dependent 26S proteasome system. Accordingly, the structurally deformed P450 protein is first branded for recognition and proteolytic removal by the 26S proteasome with an enzymatically incorporated polyUb tag. P450s of the 3A subfamily such as the major human liver enzyme CYP3A4 are notorious targets for this process, and they represent excellent prototypes for the understanding of integral ER protein ubiquitination. Not all the participants in hepatic CYP3A ubiquitination and subsequent proteolytic degradation have been identified. The following discussion thus addresses the various known and plausible events and/or cellular participants involved in this multienzymatic P450 ubiquitination cascade, on the basis of our current knowledge of other eukaryotic models. In addition, because the detection of ubiquitinated P450s is technically challenging, the critical importance of appropriate methodology is also discussed.

  4. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  5. The Roles of Cortical Slow Waves in Synaptic Plasticity and Memory Consolidation

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    Daisuke Miyamoto

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Sleep plays important roles in sensory and motor memory consolidation. Sleep oscillations, reflecting neural population activity, involve the reactivation of learning-related neurons and regulate synaptic strength and, thereby affect memory consolidation. Among sleep oscillations, slow waves (0.5–4 Hz are closely associated with memory consolidation. For example, slow-wave power is regulated in an experience-dependent manner and correlates with acquired memory. Furthermore, manipulating slow waves can enhance or impair memory consolidation. During slow wave sleep, inter-areal interactions between the cortex and hippocampus (HC have been proposed to consolidate declarative memory; however, interactions for non-declarative (HC-independent memory remain largely uninvestigated. We recently showed that the directional influence in a slow-wave range through a top-down cortical long-range circuit is involved in the consolidation of non-declarative memory. At the synaptic level, the average cortical synaptic strength is known to be potentiated during wakefulness and depressed during sleep. Moreover, learning causes plasticity in a subset of synapses, allocating memory to them. Sleep may help to differentiate synaptic strength between allocated and non-allocated synapses (i.e., improving the signal-to-noise ratio, which may facilitate memory consolidation. Herein, we offer perspectives on inter-areal interactions and synaptic plasticity for memory consolidation during sleep.

  6. Mapping synaptic pathology within cerebral cortical circuits in subjects with schizophrenia

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    Robert Sweet

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Converging lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia is characterized by impairments of synaptic machinery within cerebral cortical circuits. Efforts to localize these alterations in brain tissue from subjects with schizophrenia have frequently been limited to the quantification of structures that are non-selectively identified (e.g. dendritic spines labeled in Golgi preparations, axon boutons labeled with synaptophysin, or to quantification of proteins using methods unable to resolve relevant cellular compartments. Multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy represents a means to circumvent many of these limitations, by concurrently extracting information regarding the number, morphology, and relative protein content of synaptic structures. An important adaptation required for studies of human disease is coupling this approach to stereologic methods for systematic random sampling of relevant brain regions. In this review article we consider the application of multiple label fluorescence confocal microscopy to the mapping of synaptic alterations in subjects with schizophrenia and describe the application of a novel, readily automated, iterative intensity/morphological segmentation algorithm for the extraction of information regarding synaptic structure number, size, and relative protein level from tissue sections obtained using unbiased stereological principles of sampling. In this context, we provide examples of the examination of pre- and post-synaptic structures within excitatory and inhibitory circuits of the cerebral cortex.

  7. Operant conditioning of synaptic and spiking activity patterns in single hippocampal neurons.

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    Ishikawa, Daisuke; Matsumoto, Nobuyoshi; Sakaguchi, Tetsuya; Matsuki, Norio; Ikegaya, Yuji

    2014-04-02

    Learning is a process of plastic adaptation through which a neural circuit generates a more preferable outcome; however, at a microscopic level, little is known about how synaptic activity is patterned into a desired configuration. Here, we report that animals can generate a specific form of synaptic activity in a given neuron in the hippocampus. In awake, head-restricted mice, we applied electrical stimulation to the lateral hypothalamus, a reward-associated brain region, when whole-cell patch-clamped CA1 neurons exhibited spontaneous synaptic activity that met preset criteria. Within 15 min, the mice learned to generate frequently the excitatory synaptic input pattern that satisfied the criteria. This reinforcement learning of synaptic activity was not observed for inhibitory input patterns. When a burst unit activity pattern was conditioned in paired and nonpaired paradigms, the frequency of burst-spiking events increased and decreased, respectively. The burst reinforcement occurred in the conditioned neuron but not in other adjacent neurons; however, ripple field oscillations were concomitantly reinforced. Neural conditioning depended on activation of NMDA receptors and dopamine D1 receptors. Acutely stressed mice and depression model mice that were subjected to forced swimming failed to exhibit the neural conditioning. This learning deficit was rescued by repetitive treatment with fluoxetine, an antidepressant. Therefore, internally motivated animals are capable of routing an ongoing action potential series into a specific neural pathway of the hippocampal network.

  8. Analysis of synaptic growth and function in Drosophila with an extended larval stage.

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    Miller, Daniel L; Ballard, Shannon L; Ganetzky, Barry

    2012-10-03

    The Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ) is a powerful system for the genetic and molecular analysis of neuronal excitability, synaptic transmission, and synaptic development. However, its use for studying age-dependent processes, such as maintenance of neuronal viability and synaptic stability, are temporally limited by the onset of pupariation and metamorphosis. Here we characterize larval NMJ growth, growth regulation, structure, and function in a developmental variant with an extended third instar (ETI). RNAi-knockdown of the prothoracicotropic hormone receptor, torso, in the ring gland of developing larvae leaves the timing of first and second instar molts largely unchanged, but triples duration of the third instar from 3 to 9.5 d (McBrayer et al., 2007; Rewitz et al., 2009). During this ETI period, NMJs undergo additional growth (adding >50 boutons/NMJ), and this growth remains under the control of the canonical regulators Highwire and the TGFβ/BMP pathway. NMJ growth during the ETI period occurs via addition of new branches, satellite boutons, and interstitial boutons, and continues even after muscle growth levels off. Throughout the ETI, organization of synapses and active zones remains normal, and synaptic transmission is unchanged. These results establish the ETI larval system as a viable model for studying motor neuron diseases and for investigating time-dependent effects of perturbations that impair mechanisms of neuroprotection, synaptic maintenance, and response to neural injury.

  9. Ubiquitination regulation of inflammatory responses through NF-κB pathway.

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    Wu, Yunbing; Kang, Jingjing; Zhang, Lu; Liang, Zhaofeng; Tang, Xudong; Yan, Yongmin; Qian, Hui; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Wenrong; Mao, Fei

    2018-01-01

    The development of inflammation is mutually affected with damaged DNA and the abnormal expression of protein modification. Ubiquitination, a way of protein modification, plays a key role in regulating various biological functions including inflammation responses. The ubiquitin enzymes and deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) jointly control the ubiquitination. The fact that various ubiquitin linkage chains control the fate of the substrate suggests that the regulatory mechanisms of ubiquitin enzymes are central for ubiquitination. In inflammation diseases, the pro-inflammatory transcription factor NF-κB regulates transcription of pro-labour mediators in response to inflammatory stimuli and expression of numerous genes that control inflammation which is associated with ubiquitination. The ubiquitination regulates NF-κB signaling pathway with many receptor families, including NOD-like receptors (NLR), Toll-like receptors (TLR) and RIG-I-like receptors (RLR), mainly by K63-linked polyubiquitin chains. In this review, we highlight the study of ubiquitination in the inflammatory signaling pathway including NF-κB signaling regulated by ubiquitin enzymes and DUBs. Furthermore, it is emphasized that the interaction of ubiquitin-mediated inflammatory signaling system accurately regulates the inflammatory responses.

  10. The deubiquitylating enzyme USP44 counteracts the DNA double-strand break response mediated by the RNF8 and RNF168 ubiquitin ligases

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    Mosbech, Anna; Lukas, Claudia; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Protein recruitment to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) relies on ubiquitylation of the surrounding chromatin by the RING finger ubiquitin ligases RNF8 and RNF168. Flux through this pathway is opposed by several deubiquitylating enzymes (DUBs), including OTUB1 and USP3. By analyzing the effect...... of individually overexpressing the majority of human DUBs on RNF8/RNF168-mediated 53BP1 retention at DSB sites, we found that USP44 and USP29 powerfully inhibited this response at the level of RNF168 accrual. Both USP44 and USP29 promoted efficient deubiquitylation of histone H2A, but unlike USP44, USP29...... considerable functional redundancy among cellular DUBs that restrict ubiquitin-dependent protein assembly at DSBs. Our findings implicate USP44 in negative regulation of the RNF8/RNF168 pathway and illustrate the usefulness of DUB overexpression screens for identification of antagonizers of ubiquitin...

  11. Structural transformation of the tandem ubiquitin-interacting motifs in ataxin-3 and their cooperative interactions with ubiquitin chains.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ai-Xin Song

    Full Text Available The ubiquitin-interacting motif (UIM is a short peptide with dual function of binding ubiquitin (Ub and promoting ubiquitination. We elucidated the structures and dynamics of the tandem UIMs of ataxin-3 (AT3-UIM12 both in free and Ub-bound forms. The solution structure of free AT3-UIM12 consists of two α-helices and a flexible linker, whereas that of the Ub-bound form is much more compact with hydrophobic contacts between the two helices. NMR dynamics indicates that the flexible linker becomes rigid when AT3-UIM12 binds with Ub. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR titration demonstrate that AT3-UIM12 binds diUb with two distinct affinities, and the linker plays a critical role in association of the two helices in diUb binding. These results provide an implication that the tandem UIM12 interacts with Ub or diUb in a cooperative manner through an allosteric effect and dynamics change of the linker region, which might be related to its recognitions with various Ub chains and ubiquitinated substrates.

  12. The role of the ubiquitin-proteasome proteolytic pathway in the anabolic drive of nutrition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kee, A.J.; Attaix, D.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is largely responsible for the increased muscle proteolysis in many muscle wasting conditions. However, the influence of nutrition on this pathway has been poorly described. Thus, the aim of this study was to measure the short-term affect of nutrient intake on proteasome-dependent proteolysis in skeletal muscle and the small intestine. Simultaneous measurements of protein synthesis and proteolysis were performed ex vivo in muscles (extensor digitorum longus and soleus) from 48h starved, 48h starved-refed and 48h starved-amino-acid-infused (AA) (4h IV, standard parenteral nutrition solution) male Wistar rats (95-100g). Intact muscles were incubated at resting length in an oxygenated (95% O 2 :5% CO 2 ) physiological Krebs medium. Protein synthesis was measured as uptake of 14 C-phenylalanine into muscle protein and tyrosine release (corrected for reutilisation for protein synthesis) was used as an indicator of protein breakdown. Proteasome-dependent proteolysis was measured using the specific proteasome inhibitor MG132. The mRNA content of ubiquitin-proteasome pathway components in tibialis anterior muscles and whole jejunum was measured by Northern blot. ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc analysis were used to assess statistical significance between groups (a-Level = 0.05). Four-hours of refeeding or AA-infusion increased plasma AA and insulin concentrations (P<0.001), stimulated muscle protein synthesis (P<0.001), but had no effect on either total or proteasome-dependent proteolysis, despite the decrease in plasma corticosterone concentrations (P<0.01). Enhanced muscle proteasome-dependent proteolysis was not suppressed until 10h of refeeding, and only correlated with normalised expression of 14-kDa E2 (a critical enzyme in protein ubiquitinylation) and the MSS1 subunit of the 19S complex (the regulator of 26S proteasome activities). In contrast, the starvation-induced increase in mRNA levels for ubiquitin and 20S

  13. Changes in mGlu5 receptor-dependent synaptic plasticity and coupling to homer proteins in the hippocampus of Ube3A hemizygous mice modeling angelman syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Marco; Piccinin, Sonia; Molinaro, Gemma; Di Menna, Luisa; Riozzi, Barbara; Cannella, Milena; Motolese, Marta; Vetere, Gisella; Catania, Maria Vincenza; Battaglia, Giuseppe; Nicoletti, Ferdinando; Nisticò, Robert; Bruno, Valeria

    2014-03-26

    Angelman syndrome (AS) is caused by the loss of Ube3A, an ubiquitin ligase that commits specific proteins to proteasomal degradation. How this defect causes autism and other pathological phenotypes associated with AS is unknown. Long-term depression (LTD) of excitatory synaptic transmission mediated by type 5 metabotropic glutamate (mGlu5) receptors was enhanced in hippocampal slices of Ube3A(m-/p+) mice, which model AS. No changes were found in NMDA-dependent LTD induced by low-frequency stimulation. mGlu5 receptor-dependent LTD in AS mice was sensitive to the protein synthesis inhibitor anisomycin, and relied on the same signaling pathways as in wild-type mice, e.g., the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, the phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K)/mammalian target of rapamycine pathway, and protein tyrosine phosphatase. Neither the stimulation of MAPK and PI3K nor the increase in Arc (activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein) levels in response to mGlu5 receptor activation were abnormal in hippocampal slices from AS mice compared with wild-type mice. mGlu5 receptor expression and mGlu1/5 receptor-mediated polyphosphoinositide hydrolysis were also unchanged in the hippocampus of AS mice. In contrast, AS mice showed a reduced expression of the short Homer protein isoform Homer 1a, and an increased coupling of mGlu5 receptors to Homer 1b/c proteins in the hippocampus. These findings support the link between Homer proteins and monogenic autism, and lay the groundwork for the use of mGlu5 receptor antagonists in AS.

  14. Tripartite synapses: astrocytes process and control synaptic information.

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    Perea, Gertrudis; Navarrete, Marta; Araque, Alfonso

    2009-08-01

    The term 'tripartite synapse' refers to a concept in synaptic physiology based on the demonstration of the existence of bidirectional communication between astrocytes and neurons. Consistent with this concept, in addition to the classic 'bipartite' information flow between the pre- and postsynaptic neurons, astrocytes exchange information with the synaptic neuronal elements, responding to synaptic activity and, in turn, regulating synaptic transmission. Because recent evidence has demonstrated that astrocytes integrate and process synaptic information and control synaptic transmission and plasticity, astrocytes, being active partners in synaptic function, are cellular elements involved in the processing, transfer and storage of information by the nervous system. Consequently, in contrast to the classically accepted paradigm that brain function results exclusively from neuronal activity, there is an emerging view, which we review herein, in which brain function actually arises from the coordinated activity of a network comprising both neurons and glia.

  15. Generation and Validation of Intracellular Ubiquitin Variant Inhibitors for USP7 and USP10

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Wei; Sartori, Maria A.; Makhnevych, Taras; Federowicz, Kelly E.; Dong, Xiaohui; Liu, Li; Nim, Satra; Dong, Aiping; Yang, Jingsong; Li, Yanjun; Haddad, Dania; Ernst, Andreas; Heerding, Dirk; Tong, Yufeng; Moffat, Jason; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2017-11-01

    Post-translational modification of the p53 signaling pathway plays an important role in cell cycle progression and stress-induced apoptosis. Indeed, a large body of work has shown that dysregulation of p53 and its E3 ligase MDM2 by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) promotes carcinogenesis and malignant transformation. Thus, drug discovery efforts have focused on the restoration of wild-type p53 activity or inactivation of oncogenic mutant p53 by targeted inhibition of UPS components, particularly key deubiquitinases (DUBs) of the ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) class. However, development of selective small-molecule USP inhibitors has been challenging, partly due to the highly conserved structural features of the catalytic sites across the class. To tackle this problem, we devised a protein engineering strategy for rational design of inhibitors for DUBs and other UPS proteins. We employed a phage-displayed ubiquitin variant (UbV) library to develop inhibitors targeting the DUBs USP7 and USP10, which are involved in regulating levels of p53 and MDM2. We were able to identify UbVs that bound USP7 or USP10 with high affinity and inhibited deubiquitination activity. We solved the crystal structure of UbV.7.2 and rationalized the molecular basis for enhanced affinity and specificity for USP7. Finally, cell death was increased significantly by UbV.7.2 expression in a colon cancer cell line that was treated with the chemotherapy drug cisplatin, demonstrating the therapeutic potential of inhibiting USP7 by this approach

  16. NBR1-mediated selective autophagy targets insoluble ubiquitinated protein aggregates in plant stress responses.

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    Jie Zhou

    Full Text Available Plant autophagy plays an important role in delaying senescence, nutrient recycling, and stress responses. Functional analysis of plant autophagy has almost exclusively focused on the proteins required for the core process of autophagosome assembly, but little is known about the proteins involved in other important processes of autophagy, including autophagy cargo recognition and sequestration. In this study, we report functional genetic analysis of Arabidopsis NBR1, a homolog of mammalian autophagy cargo adaptors P62 and NBR1. We isolated two nbr1 knockout mutants and discovered that they displayed some but not all of the phenotypes of autophagy-deficient atg5 and atg7 mutants. Like ATG5 and ATG7, NBR1 is important for plant tolerance to heat, oxidative, salt, and drought stresses. The role of NBR1 in plant tolerance to these abiotic stresses is dependent on its interaction with ATG8. Unlike ATG5 and ATG7, however, NBR1 is dispensable in age- and darkness-induced senescence and in resistance to a necrotrophic pathogen. A selective role of NBR1 in plant responses to specific abiotic stresses suggest that plant autophagy in diverse biological processes operates through multiple cargo recognition and delivery systems. The compromised heat tolerance of atg5, atg7, and nbr1 mutants was associated with increased accumulation of insoluble, detergent-resistant proteins that were highly ubiquitinated under heat stress. NBR1, which contains an ubiquitin-binding domain, also accumulated to high levels with an increasing enrichment in the insoluble protein fraction in the autophagy-deficient mutants under heat stress. These results suggest that NBR1-mediated autophagy targets ubiquitinated protein aggregates most likely derived from denatured or otherwise damaged nonnative proteins generated under stress conditions.

  17. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  18. Microanatomy of dendritic spines: emerging principles of synaptic pathology in psychiatric and neurological disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanpied, Thomas A; Ehlers, Michael D

    2004-06-15

    Psychiatric and neurologic disorders ranging from mental retardation to addiction are accompanied by structural and functional alterations of synaptic connections in the brain. Such alterations include abnormal density and morphology of dendritic spines, synapse loss, and aberrant synaptic signaling and plasticity. Recent work is revealing an unexpectedly complex biochemical and subcellular organization of dendritic spines. In this review, we highlight the molecular interplay between functional domains of the spine, including the postsynaptic density, the actin cytoskeleton, and membrane trafficking domains. This research points to an emerging level of analysis--a microanatomical understanding of synaptic physiology--that will be critical for discerning how synapses operate in normal physiologic states and for identifying and reversing microscopic changes in psychiatric and neurologic disease. Copyright 2004 Society of Biological Psychiatry

  19. Early synaptic dysfunction induced by alpha-synuclein in a rat model of Parkinson's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phan, Jenny-Ann; Stokholm, Kathrine; Zareba-Paslawska, Justyna

    2017-01-01

    Evidence suggests that synapses are affected first in Parkinson’s disease (PD). Here, we tested the claim that pathological accumulation of α-synuclein, and subsequent synaptic disruption, occur in absence of dopaminergic neuron loss in PD. We determined early synaptic changes in rats...... that overexpress human α-synuclein by local injection of viral-vectors in midbrain. We aimed to achieve α-synuclein levels sufficient to induce terminal pathology without significant loss of nigral neurons. We tested synaptic disruption in vivo by analyzing motor defects and binding of a positron emission...... tomography (PET) radioligand to the vesicular monoamine transporter 2, (VMAT2), [11C]dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ). Animals overexpressing α-synuclein had progressive motor impairment and, 12 weeks post-surgery, showed asymmetric in vivo striatal DTBZ binding. The PET images matched ligand binding in post...

  20. The penumbra of learning: a statistical theory of synaptic tagging and capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershman, Samuel J

    2014-01-01

    Learning in humans and animals is accompanied by a penumbra: Learning one task benefits from learning an unrelated task shortly before or after. At the cellular level, the penumbra of learning appears when weak potentiation of one synapse is amplified by strong potentiation of another synapse on the same neuron during a critical time window. Weak potentiation sets a molecular tag that enables the synapse to capture plasticity-related proteins synthesized in response to strong potentiation at another synapse. This paper describes a computational model which formalizes synaptic tagging and capture in terms of statistical learning mechanisms. According to this model, synaptic strength encodes a probabilistic inference about the dynamically changing association between pre- and post-synaptic firing rates. The rate of change is itself inferred, coupling together different synapses on the same neuron. When the inputs to one synapse change rapidly, the inferred rate of change increases, amplifying learning at other synapses.

  1. Cortactin Is a Regulator of Activity-Dependent Synaptic Plasticity Controlled by Wingless.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alicea, Daniel; Perez, Marizabeth; Maldonado, Carolina; Dominicci-Cotto, Carihann; Marie, Bruno

    2017-02-22

    Major signaling molecules initially characterized as key early developmental regulators are also essential for the plasticity of the nervous system. Previously, the Wingless (Wg)/Wnt pathway was shown to underlie the structural and electrophysiological changes during activity-dependent synaptic plasticity at the Drosophila neuromuscular junction. A challenge remains to understand how this signal mediates the cellular changes underlying this plasticity. Here, we focus on the actin regulator Cortactin, a major organizer of protrusion, membrane mobility, and invasiveness, and define its new role in synaptic plasticity. We show that Cortactin is present presynaptically and postsynaptically at the Drosophila NMJ and that it is a presynaptic regulator of rapid activity-dependent modifications in synaptic structure. Furthermore, animals lacking presynaptic Cortactin show a decrease in spontaneous release frequency, and presynaptic Cortactin is necessary for the rapid potentiation of spontaneous release frequency that takes place during activity-dependent plasticity. Most interestingly, Cortactin levels increase at stimulated synaptic terminals and this increase requires neuronal activity, de novo transcription and depends on Wg/Wnt expression. Because it is not simply the presence of Cortactin in the presynaptic terminal but its increase that is necessary for the full range of activity-dependent plasticity, we conclude that it probably plays a direct and important role in the regulation of this process. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT In the nervous system, changes in activity that lead to modifications in synaptic structure and function are referred to as synaptic plasticity and are thought to be the basis of learning and memory. The secreted Wingless/Wnt molecule is a potent regulator of synaptic plasticity in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Understanding the molecular mechanisms that underlie these plastic changes is a major gap in our knowledge. Here, we identify a

  2. Coordinated regulation of nuclear receptor CAR by CCRP/DNAJC7, HSP70 and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoav E Timsit

    Full Text Available The constitutive active/androstane receptor (CAR plays an important role as a coordinate transcription factor in the regulation of various hepatic metabolic pathways for chemicals such as drugs, glucose, fatty acids, bilirubin, and bile acids. Currently, it is known that in its inactive state, CAR is retained in the cytoplasm in a protein complex with HSP90 and the tetratricopeptide repeat protein cytosoplasmic CAR retention protein (CCRP. Upon activation by phenobarbital (PB or the PB-like inducer 1,4-bis[2-(3,5-dichloropyridyloxy]-benzene (TCPOBOP, CAR translocates into the nucleus. We have identified two new components to the cytoplasmic regulation of CAR: ubiquitin-dependent degradation of CCRP and protein-protein interaction with HSP70. Treatment with the proteasome inhibitor MG132 (5 µM causes CAR to accumulate in the cytoplasm of transfected HepG2 cells. In the presence of MG132, TCPOBOP increases CCRP ubiquitination in HepG2 cells co-expressing CAR, while CAR ubiquitination was not detected. MG132 treatment of HepG2 also attenuated of TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation on reporter constructs which contain CAR-binding DNA elements derived from the human CYP2B6 gene. The elevation of cytoplasmic CAR protein with MG132 correlated with an increase of HSP70, and to a lesser extent HSP60. Both CCRP and CAR were found to interact with endogenous HSP70 in HepG2 cells by immunoprecipitation analysis. Induction of HSP70 levels by heat shock also increased cytoplasmic CAR levels, similar to the effect of MG132. Lastly, heat shock attenuated TCPOBOP-induced CAR transcriptional activation, also similar to the effect of MG132. Collectively, these data suggest that ubiquitin-proteasomal regulation of CCRP and HSP70 are important contributors to the regulation of cytoplasmic CAR levels, and hence the ability of CAR to respond to PB or PB-like inducers.

  3. Dopamine or biopterin deficiency potentiates phosphorylation at (40)Ser and ubiquitination of tyrosine hydroxylase to be degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahata, Ichiro; Ohtaku, Shiori; Tomioka, Yoshihisa; Ichinose, Hiroshi; Yamakuni, Tohru

    2015-09-11

    The protein amount of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), that is the rate-limiting enzyme for the biosynthesis of dopamine (DA), should be tightly regulated, whereas its degradation pathway is largely unknown. In this study, we analyzed how the TH protein is chemically modified and subsequently degraded under deficiencies of DA and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4), a cofactor for TH, by using pharmacological agents in PC12D cells and cultured mesencephalic neurons. When inhibition of DA- or BH4-synthesizing enzymes greatly reduced the DA contents in PC12D cells, a marked and persistent increase in phosphorylated TH at (40)Ser (p40-TH) was concomitantly observed. This phosphorylation was mediated by D2 dopamine auto-receptor and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). Our immunoprecipitation experiments showed that the increase in the p40-TH level was accompanied with its poly-ubiquitination. Treatment of PC12D cells with cycloheximide showed that total-TH protein level was reduced by the DA- or BH4-depletion. Notably, this reduction in the total-TH protein level was sensitive not only to a 26S proteasomal inhibitor, MG-132, but also to a PKA inhibitor, H-89. These data demonstrated that DA deficiency should induce compensatory activation of TH via phosphorylation at (40)Ser through D2-autoreceptor and PKA-mediated pathways, which in turn give a rise to its degradation through an ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, resulting in a negative spiral of DA production when DA deficiency persists. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Ultrafast Synaptic Events in a Chalcogenide Memristor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Zhong, Yingpeng; Xu, Lei; Zhang, Jinjian; Xu, Xiaohua; Sun, Huajun; Miao, Xiangshui

    2013-04-01

    Compact and power-efficient plastic electronic synapses are of fundamental importance to overcoming the bottlenecks of developing a neuromorphic chip. Memristor is a strong contender among the various electronic synapses in existence today. However, the speeds of synaptic events are relatively slow in most attempts at emulating synapses due to the material-related mechanism. Here we revealed the intrinsic memristance of stoichiometric crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 that originates from the charge trapping and releasing by the defects. The device resistance states, representing synaptic weights, were precisely modulated by 30 ns potentiating/depressing electrical pulses. We demonstrated four spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) forms by applying programmed pre- and postsynaptic spiking pulse pairs in different time windows ranging from 50 ms down to 500 ns, the latter of which is 105 times faster than the speed of STDP in human brain. This study provides new opportunities for building ultrafast neuromorphic computing systems and surpassing Von Neumann architecture.

  5. Molecular Signatures Underlying Synaptic Vesicle Cargo Retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Yasunori; Takamori, Shigeo

    2018-01-01

    Efficient retrieval of the synaptic vesicle (SV) membrane from the presynaptic plasma membrane, a process called endocytosis, is crucial for the fidelity of neurotransmission, particularly during sustained neural activity. Although multiple modes of endocytosis have been identified, it is clear that the efficient retrieval of the major SV cargos into newly formed SVs during any of these modes is fundamental for synaptic transmission. It is currently believed that SVs are eventually reformed via a clathrin-dependent pathway. Various adaptor proteins recognize SV cargos and link them to clathrin, ensuring the efficient retrieval of the cargos into newly formed SVs. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the molecular signatures within individual SV cargos that underlie efficient retrieval into SV membranes, as well as discuss possible contributions of the mechanisms under physiological conditions. PMID:29379416

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 facilitates RUNX2 protein transactivation in a mono-ubiquitination manner during osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; He, Xinyu; Hua, Yue; Li, Qian; Wang, Jiyong; Gan, Xiaoqing

    2017-07-07

    Poly-ubiquitination-mediated RUNX2 degradation is an important cause of age- and inflammation-related bone loss. NEDD4 family E3 ubiquitin protein ligases are thought to be the major regulators of RUNX2 poly-ubiquitination. However, we observed a mono-ubiquitination of RUNX2 that was catalyzed by WWP2, a member of the NEDD4 family of E3 ubiquitin ligases. WWP2 has been reported to catalyze the mono-ubiquitination of Goosecoid in chondrocytes, facilitating craniofacial skeleton development. In this study, we found that osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells promoted WWP2 expression and nuclear accumulation. Knockdown of Wwp2 in mesenchymal stem cells and osteoblasts led to significant deficiencies of osteogenesis, including decreased mineral deposition and down-regulation of osteogenic marker genes. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments showed the interaction of WWP2 with RUNX2 in vitro and in vivo Mono-ubiquitination by WWP2 leads to RUNX2 transactivation, as evidenced by the wild type of WWP2, but not its ubiquitin ligase-dead mutant, augmenting RUNX2-reponsive reporter activity. Moreover, deletion of WWP2-dependent mono-ubiquitination resulted in striking defects of RUNX2 osteoblastic activity. In addition, ectopic expression of the constitutively active type 1A bone morphogenetic protein receptor enhanced WWP2-dependent RUNX2 ubiquitination and transactivation, demonstrating a regulatory role of bone morphogenetic protein signaling in the WWP2-RUNX2 axis. Taken together, our results provide evidence that WWP2 serves as a positive regulator of osteogenesis by augmenting RUNX2 transactivation in a non-proteolytic mono-ubiquitination manner. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Altered synaptic plasticity in Tourette's syndrome and its relationship to motor skill learning.

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    Valerie Cathérine Brandt

    Full Text Available Gilles de la Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by motor and phonic tics that can be considered motor responses to preceding inner urges. It has been shown that Tourette patients have inferior performance in some motor learning tasks and reduced synaptic plasticity induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation. However, it has not been investigated whether altered synaptic plasticity is directly linked to impaired motor skill acquisition in Tourette patients. In this study, cortical plasticity was assessed by measuring motor-evoked potentials before and after paired associative stimulation in 14 Tourette patients (13 male; age 18-39 and 15 healthy controls (12 male; age 18-33. Tic and urge severity were assessed using the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale and the Premonitory Urges for Tics Scale. Motor learning was assessed 45 minutes after inducing synaptic plasticity and 9 months later, using the rotary pursuit task. On average, long-term potentiation-like effects in response to the paired associative stimulation were present in healthy controls but not in patients. In Tourette patients, long-term potentiation-like effects were associated with more and long-term depression-like effects with less severe urges and tics. While motor learning did not differ between patients and healthy controls 45 minutes after inducing synaptic plasticity, the learning curve of the healthy controls started at a significantly higher level than the Tourette patients' 9 months later. Induced synaptic plasticity correlated positively with motor skills in healthy controls 9 months later. The present study confirms previously found long-term improvement in motor performance after paired associative stimulation in healthy controls but not in Tourette patients. Tourette patients did not show long-term potentiation in response to PAS and also showed reduced levels of motor skill consolidation after 9 months compared to healthy controls. Moreover

  8. Fragile X mental retardation protein regulates trans-synaptic signaling in Drosophila

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    Samuel H. Friedman

    2013-11-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS, the most common inherited determinant of intellectual disability and autism spectrum disorders, is caused by loss of the fragile X mental retardation 1 (FMR1 gene product (FMRP, an mRNA-binding translational repressor. A number of conserved FMRP targets have been identified in the well-characterized Drosophila FXS disease model, but FMRP is highly pleiotropic in function and the full spectrum of FMRP targets has yet to be revealed. In this study, screens for upregulated neural proteins in Drosophila fmr1 (dfmr1 null mutants reveal strong elevation of two synaptic heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs: GPI-anchored glypican Dally-like protein (Dlp and transmembrane Syndecan (Sdc. Our recent work has shown that Dlp and Sdc act as co-receptors regulating extracellular ligands upstream of intracellular signal transduction in multiple trans-synaptic pathways that drive synaptogenesis. Consistently, dfmr1 null synapses exhibit altered WNT signaling, with changes in both Wingless (Wg ligand abundance and downstream Frizzled-2 (Fz2 receptor C-terminal nuclear import. Similarly, a parallel anterograde signaling ligand, Jelly belly (Jeb, and downstream ERK phosphorylation (dpERK are depressed at dfmr1 null synapses. In contrast, the retrograde BMP ligand Glass bottom boat (Gbb and downstream signaling via phosphorylation of the transcription factor MAD (pMAD seem not to be affected. To determine whether HSPG upregulation is causative for synaptogenic defects, HSPGs were genetically reduced to control levels in the dfmr1 null background. HSPG correction restored both (1 Wg and Jeb trans-synaptic signaling, and (2 synaptic architecture and transmission strength back to wild-type levels. Taken together, these data suggest that FMRP negatively regulates HSPG co-receptors controlling trans-synaptic signaling during synaptogenesis, and that loss of this regulation causes synaptic structure and function defects characterizing the FXS disease state.

  9. Cellular Cholesterol Regulates Ubiquitination and Degradation of the Cholesterol Export Proteins ABCA1 and ABCG1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Victar; Kim, Mi-Jurng; Gelissen, Ingrid C.; Brown, Andrew J.; Sandoval, Cecilia; Hallab, Jeannette C.; Kockx, Maaike; Traini, Mathew; Jessup, Wendy; Kritharides, Leonard

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of cholesterol in post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein expression. Using CHO cell lines stably expressing human ABCA1 or ABCG1, we observed that the abundance of these proteins is increased by cell cholesterol loading. The response to increased cholesterol is rapid, is independent of transcription, and appears to be specific for these membrane proteins. The effect is mediated through cholesterol-dependent inhibition of transporter protein degradation. Cell cholesterol loading similarly regulates degradation of endogenously expressed ABCA1 and ABCG1 in human THP-1 macrophages. Turnover of ABCA1 and ABCG1 is strongly inhibited by proteasomal inhibitors and is unresponsive to inhibitors of lysosomal proteolysis. Furthermore, cell cholesterol loading inhibits ubiquitination of ABCA1 and ABCG1. Our findings provide evidence for a rapid, cholesterol-dependent, post-translational control of ABCA1 and ABCG1 protein levels, mediated through a specific and sterol-sensitive mechanism for suppression of transporter protein ubiquitination, which in turn decreases proteasomal degradation. This provides a mechanism for acute fine-tuning of cholesterol transporter activity in response to fluctuations in cell cholesterol levels, in addition to the longer term cholesterol-dependent transcriptional regulation of these genes. PMID:24500716

  10. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus.

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    Wan Yin Lee

    Full Text Available The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC's regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC's action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase.

  11. Hippocampal synaptic plasticity, spatial memory and anxiety

    OpenAIRE

    Bannerman, David M.; Sprengel, Rolf; Sanderson, David J.; McHugh, Stephen B.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas P.; Monyer, Hannah; Seeburg, Peter H.

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies using transgenic mice lacking NMDA receptors in the hippocampus challenge the long-standing hypothesis that hippocampal long-term potentiation-like mechanisms underlie the encoding and storage of associative long-term spatial memories. However, it may not be the synaptic plasticity-dependent memory hypothesis that is wrong; instead, it may be the role of the hippocampus that needs to be re-examined. We present an account of hippocampal function that explains its role in both me...

  12. Direct observation of a single nanoparticle-ubiquitin corona formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Feng; Radic, Slaven; Chen, Ran; Chen, Pengyu; Geitner, Nicholas K.; Brown, Jared M.; Ke, Pu Chun

    2013-09-01

    The advancement of nanomedicine and the increasing applications of nanoparticles in consumer products have led to administered biological exposure and unintentional environmental accumulation of nanoparticles, causing concerns over the biocompatibility and sustainability of nanotechnology. Upon entering physiological environments, nanoparticles readily assume the form of a nanoparticle-protein corona that dictates their biological identity. Consequently, understanding the structure and dynamics of a nanoparticle-protein corona is essential for predicting the fate, transport, and toxicity of nanomaterials in living systems and for enabling the vast applications of nanomedicine. Here we combined multiscale molecular dynamics simulations and complementary experiments to characterize the silver nanoparticle-ubiquitin corona formation. Notably, ubiquitins competed with citrates for the nanoparticle surface, governed by specific electrostatic interactions. Under a high protein/nanoparticle stoichiometry, ubiquitins formed a multi-layer corona on the particle surface. The binding exhibited an unusual stretched-exponential behavior, suggesting a rich binding kinetics. Furthermore, the binding destabilized the α-helices while increasing the β-sheet content of the proteins. This study revealed the atomic and molecular details of the structural and dynamic characteristics of nanoparticle-protein corona formation.The advancement of nanomedicine and the increasing applications of nanoparticles in consumer products have led to administered biological exposure and unintentional environmental accumulation of nanoparticles, causing concerns over the biocompatibility and sustainability of nanotechnology. Upon entering physiological environments, nanoparticles readily assume the form of a nanoparticle-protein corona that dictates their biological identity. Consequently, understanding the structure and dynamics of a nanoparticle-protein corona is essential for predicting the fate

  13. Synaptic theory of Replicator-like melioration

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    Yonatan Loewenstein

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the theory of Melioration, organisms in repeated choice settings shift their choice preference in favor of the alternative that provides the highest return. The goal of this paper is to explain how this learning behavior can emerge from microscopic changes in the efficacies of synapses, in the context of two-alternative repeated-choice experiment. I consider a large family of synaptic plasticity rules in which changes in synaptic efficacies are driven by the covariance between reward and neural activity. I construct a general framework that predicts the learning dynamics of any decision-making neural network that implements this synaptic plasticity rule and show that melioration naturally emerges in such networks. Moreover, the resultant learning dynamics follows the Replicator equation which is commonly used to phenomenologically describe changes in behavior in operant conditioning experiments. Several examples demonstrate how the learning rate of the network is affected by its properties and by the specifics of the plasticity rule. These results help bridge the gap between cellular physiology and learning behavior.

  14. Characterization and extraction of the synaptic apposition surface for synaptic geometry analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Juan; Rodríguez, Angel; Rodríguez, José-Rodrigo; DeFelipe, Javier; Merchán-Pérez, Angel

    2013-01-01

    Geometrical features of chemical synapses are relevant to their function. Two critical components of the synaptic junction are the active zone (AZ) and the postsynaptic density (PSD), as they are related to the probability of synaptic release and the number of postsynaptic receptors, respectively. Morphological studies of these structures are greatly facilitated by the use of recent electron microscopy techniques, such as combined focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM), and software tools that permit reconstruction of large numbers of synapses in three dimensions. Since the AZ and the PSD are in close apposition and have a similar surface area, they can be represented by a single surface—the synaptic apposition surface (SAS). We have developed an efficient computational technique to automatically extract this surface from synaptic junctions that have previously been three-dimensionally reconstructed from actual tissue samples imaged by automated FIB/SEM. Given its relationship with the release probability and the number of postsynaptic receptors, the surface area of the SAS is a functionally relevant measure of the size of a synapse that can complement other geometrical features like the volume of the reconstructed synaptic junction, the equivalent ellipsoid size and the Feret's diameter. PMID:23847474

  15. Characterization and extraction of the synaptic apposition surface for synaptic geometry analysis.

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    Juan eMorales

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Geometrical features of chemical synapses are relevant to their function. Two critical components of the synaptic junction are the active zone and the postsynaptic density, as they are related to the probability of synaptic release and the number of postsynaptic receptors, respectively. Morphological studies of these structures are greatly facilitated by the use of recent electron microscopy techniques, such as combined focused ion beam milling and scanning electron microscopy (FIB/SEM, and software tools that permit reconstruction of large numbers of synapses in three dimensions. Since the active zone and the postsynaptic density are in close apposition and have a similar surface area, they can be represented by a single surface — the synaptic apposition surface (SAS. We have developed an efficient computational technique to automatically extract this surface from synaptic junctions that have previously been three-dimensionally reconstructed from actual tissue samples imaged by automated FIB/SEM. Given its relationship with the release probability and the number of postsynaptic receptors, the surface area of the SAS is a functionally relevant measure of the size of a synapse that can complement other geometrical features like the volume of the reconstructed synaptic junction, the equivalent ellipsoid size and the Feret’s diameter.

  16. The E3 Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL Induces the Degradation of the Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Family Members VLDLR and ApoER2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hong, Cynthia; Duit, Sarah; Jalonen, Pilvi; Out, Ruud; Scheer, Lilith; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Boyadjian, Rima; Rodenburg, Kees C. W.; Foley, Edan; Korhonen, Laura; Lindholm, Dan; Nimpf, Johannes; van Berkel, Theo J. C.; Tontonoz, Peter; Zelcer, Noam

    2010-01-01

    We have previously identified the E3-ubiquitin ligase Inducible Degrader of the LDLR (Idol)1 as a post-translational modulator of LDLR levels. Idol is a direct target for regulation by Liver X Receptors (LXRs) and its expression is responsive to cellular sterol status independent of the

  17. Exaggerated translation causes synaptic and behavioural aberrations associated with autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santini, Emanuela; Huynh, Thu N; MacAskill, Andrew F; Carter, Adam G; Pierre, Philippe; Ruggero, Davide; Kaphzan, Hanoch; Klann, Eric

    2013-01-17

    Autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are an early onset, heterogeneous group of heritable neuropsychiatric disorders with symptoms that include deficits in social interaction skills, impaired communication abilities, and ritualistic-like repetitive behaviours. One of the hypotheses for a common molecular mechanism underlying ASDs is altered translational control resulting in exaggerated protein synthesis. Genetic variants in chromosome 4q, which contains the EIF4E locus, have been described in patients with autism. Importantly, a rare single nucleotide polymorphism has been identified in autism that is associated with increased promoter activity in the EIF4E gene. Here we show that genetically increasing the levels of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E (eIF4E) in mice results in exaggerated cap-dependent translation and aberrant behaviours reminiscent of autism, including repetitive and perseverative behaviours and social interaction deficits. Moreover, these autistic-like behaviours are accompanied by synaptic pathophysiology in the medial prefrontal cortex, striatum and hippocampus. The autistic-like behaviours displayed by the eIF4E-transgenic mice are corrected by intracerebroventricular infusions of the cap-dependent translation inhibitor 4EGI-1. Our findings demonstrate a causal relationship between exaggerated cap-dependent translation, synaptic dysfunction and aberrant behaviours associated with autism.

  18. Emerging Links between Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity and Neurological Disease

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    Dion eDickman

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Homeostatic signaling systems are ubiquitous forms of biological regulation, having been studied for hundreds of years in the context of diverse physiological processes including body temperature and osmotic balance. However, only recently has this concept been brought to the study of excitatory and inhibitory electrical activity that the nervous system uses to establish and maintain stable communication. Synapses are a primary target of neuronal regulation with a variety of studies over the past 15 years demonstrating that these cellular junctions are under bidirectional homeostatic control. Recent work from an array of diverse systems and approaches has revealed exciting new links between homeostatic synaptic plasticity and a variety of seemingly disparate neurological and psychiatric diseases. These include autism spectrum disorders, intellectual disabilities, schizophrenia, and Fragile X Syndrome. Although the molecular mechanisms through which defective homeostatic signaling may lead to disease pathogenesis remain unclear, rapid progress is likely to be made in the coming years using a powerful combination of genetic, imaging, electrophysiological, and next generation sequencing approaches. Importantly, understanding homeostatic synaptic plasticity at a cellular and molecular level may lead to developments in new therapeutic innovations to treat these diseases. In this review we will examine recent studies that demonstrate homeostatic control of postsynaptic protein translation, retrograde signaling, and presynaptic function that may contribute to the etiology of complex neurological and psychiatric diseases.

  19. Local Order within Global Disorder: Synaptic Architecture of Visual Space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Benjamin; Wilson, Daniel E; Fitzpatrick, David

    2017-12-06

    Substantial evidence at the subcellular level indicates that the spatial arrangement of synaptic inputs onto dendrites could play a significant role in cortical computations, but how synapses of functionally defined cortical networks are arranged within the dendrites of individual neurons remains unclear. Here we assessed one-dimensional spatial receptive fields of individual dendritic spines within individual layer 2/3 neuron dendrites. Spatial receptive field properties of dendritic spines were strikingly diverse, with no evidence of large-scale topographic organization. At a fine scale, organization was evident: neighboring spines separated by less than 10 μm shared similar spatial receptive field properties and exhibited a distance-dependent correlation in sensory-driven and spontaneous activity patterns. Fine-scale dendritic organization was supported by the fact that functional groups of spines defined by dimensionality reduction of receptive field properties exhibited non-random dendritic clustering. Our results demonstrate that functional synaptic clustering is a robust feature existing at a local spatial scale. VIDEO ABSTRACT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Synaptic Homeostasis and Its Immunological Disturbance in Neuromuscular Junction Disorders

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    Masaharu Takamori

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the neuromuscular junction, postsynaptic nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR clustering, trans-synaptic communication and synaptic stabilization are modulated by the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. The synaptic functions are based presynaptically on the active zone architecture, synaptic vesicle proteins, Ca2+ channels and synaptic vesicle recycling. Postsynaptically, they are based on rapsyn-anchored nAChR clusters, localized sensitivity to ACh, and synaptic stabilization via linkage to the extracellular matrix so as to be precisely opposed to the nerve terminal. Focusing on neural agrin, Wnts, muscle-specific tyrosine kinase (a mediator of agrin and Wnts signalings and regulator of trans-synaptic communication, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 4 (the receptor of agrin and Wnts and participant in retrograde signaling, laminin-network (including muscle-derived agrin, extracellular matrix proteins (participating in the synaptic stabilization and presynaptic receptors (including muscarinic and adenosine receptors, we review the functional structures of the synapse by making reference to immunological pathogenecities in postsynaptic disease, myasthenia gravis. The synapse-related proteins including cortactin, coronin-6, caveolin-3, doublecortin, R-spondin 2, amyloid precursor family proteins, glia cell-derived neurotrophic factor and neurexins are also discussed in terms of their possible contribution to efficient synaptic transmission at the neuromuscular junction.

  1. Synaptic transmission and plasticity in an active cortical network.

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    Ramon Reig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The cerebral cortex is permanently active during both awake and sleep states. This ongoing cortical activity has an impact on synaptic transmission and short-term plasticity. An activity pattern generated by the cortical network is a slow rhythmic activity that alternates up (active and down (silent states, a pattern occurring during slow wave sleep, anesthesia and even in vitro. Here we have studied 1 how network activity affects short term synaptic plasticity and, 2 how synaptic transmission varies in up versus down states. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Intracellular recordings obtained from cortex in vitro and in vivo were used to record synaptic potentials, while presynaptic activation was achieved either with electrical or natural stimulation. Repetitive activation of layer 4 to layer 2/3 synaptic connections from ferret visual cortex slices displayed synaptic augmentation that was larger and longer lasting in active than in silent slices. Paired-pulse facilitation was also significantly larger in an active network and it persisted for longer intervals (up to 200 ms than in silent slices. Intracortical synaptic potentials occurring during up states in vitro increased their amplitude while paired-pulse facilitation disappeared. Both intracortical and thalamocortical synaptic potentials were also significantly larger in up than in down states in the cat visual cortex in vivo. These enhanced synaptic potentials did not further facilitate when pairs of stimuli were given, thus paired-pulse facilitation during up states in vivo was virtually absent. Visually induced synaptic responses displayed larger amplitudes when occurring during up versus down states. This was further tested in rat barrel cortex, where a sensory activated synaptic potential was also larger in up states. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results imply that synaptic transmission in an active cortical network is more secure and efficient due to larger amplitude of

  2. Cell fate determination by ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Achim; Iwasaki, Shintaro; McGourty, Colleen; Medina-Ruiz, Sofia; Teerikorpi, Nia; Fedrigo, Indro; Ingolia, Nicholas T.; Rape, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Metazoan development depends on accurate execution of differentiation programs that allow pluripotent stem cells to adopt specific fates 1. Differentiation requires changes to chromatin architecture and transcriptional networks, yet whether other regulatory events support cell fate determination is less well understood. Here, we have identified the vertebrate-specific ubiquitin ligase CUL3KBTBD8 as an essential regulator of neural crest specification. CUL3KBTBD8 monoubiquitylates NOLC1 and its paralog TCOF1, whose mutation underlies the neurocristopathy Treacher Collins Syndrome 2,3. Ubiquitylation drives formation of a TCOF1-NOLC1 platform that connects RNA polymerase I with ribosome modification enzymes and remodels the translational program of differentiating cells in favor of neural crest specification. We conclude that ubiquitin-dependent regulation of translation is an important feature of cell fate determination. PMID:26399832

  3. Role of the Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Regulating Skin Pigmentation

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    Hideya Ando

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Pigmentation of the skin, hair and eyes is regulated by tyrosinase, the critical rate-limiting enzyme in melanin synthesis by melanocytes. Tyrosinase is degraded endogenously, at least in part, by the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS. Several types of inherited hypopigmentary diseases, such as oculocutaneous albinism and Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome, involve the aberrant processing and/or trafficking of tyrosinase and its subsequent degradation which can occur due to the quality-control machinery. Studies on carbohydrate modifications have revealed that tyrosinase in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER is proteolyzed via ER-associated protein degradation and that tyrosinase degradation can also occur following its complete maturation in the Golgi. Among intrinsic factors that regulate the UPS, fatty acids have been shown to modulate tyrosinase degradation in contrasting manners through increased or decreased amounts of ubiquitinated tyrosinase that leads to its accelerated or decelerated degradation by proteasomes.

  4. Regulating the 20S Proteasome Ubiquitin-Independent Degradation Pathway

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    Gili Ben-Nissan

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years, the ubiquitin-26S proteasome degradation pathway was considered the primary route for proteasomal degradation. However, it is now becoming clear that proteins can also be targeted for degradation by the core 20S proteasome itself. Degradation by the 20S proteasome does not require ubiquitin tagging or the presence of the 19S regulatory particle; rather, it relies on the inherent structural disorder of the protein being degraded. Thus, proteins that contain unstructured regions due to oxidation, mutation, or aging, as well as naturally, intrinsically unfolded proteins, are susceptible to 20S degradation. Unlike the extensive knowledge acquired over the years concerning degradation by the 26S proteasome, relatively little is known about the means by which 20S-mediated proteolysis is controlled. Here, we describe our current understanding of the regulatory mechanisms that coordinate 20S proteasome-mediated degradation, and highlight the gaps in knowledge that remain to be bridged.

  5. Protein homeostasis and aging: role of ubiquitin protein ligases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jana, Nihar Ranjan

    2012-04-01

    Protein homeostasis is fundamental in normal cellular function and cell survival. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) plays a central role in maintaining the protein homeostasis network through selective elimination of misfolded and damaged proteins. Impaired function of UPS is implicated in normal aging process and also in several age-related neurodegenerative disorders that are characterized by increased accumulation oxidatively modified proteins and protein aggregates. Growing literature also indicate the potential role of various ubiquitin protein ligases in the regulation of aging process by enhancing the degradation of either central lifespan regulators or abnormally folded and damaged proteins. This review mainly focuses on our current understanding of the importance of UPS function in the regulation of normal aging process. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Brain-like associative learning using a nanoscale non-volatile phase change synaptic device array

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    Sukru Burc Eryilmaz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in neuroscience together with nanoscale electronic device technology have resulted in huge interests in realizing brain-like computing hardwares using emerging nanoscale memory devices as synaptic elements. Although there has been experimental work that demonstrated the operation of nanoscale synaptic element at the single device level, network level studies have been limited to simulations. In this work, we demonstrate, using experiments, array level associative learning using phase change synaptic devices connected in a grid like configuration similar to the organization of the biological brain. Implementing Hebbian learning with phase change memory cells, the synaptic grid was able to store presented patterns and recall missing patterns in an associative brain-like fashion. We found that the system is robust to device variations, and large variations in cell resistance states can be accommodated by increasing the number of training epochs. We illustrated the tradeoff between variation tolerance of the network and the overall energy consumption, and found that energy consumption is decreased significantly for lower variation tolerance.

  7. Dysregulated Expression of Neuregulin-1 by Cortical Pyramidal Neurons Disrupts Synaptic Plasticity

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    Amit Agarwal

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Neuregulin-1 (NRG1 gene variants are associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia. It is unclear whether risk haplotypes cause elevated or decreased expression of NRG1 in the brains of schizophrenia patients, given that both findings have been reported from autopsy studies. To study NRG1 functions in vivo, we generated mouse mutants with reduced and elevated NRG1 levels and analyzed the impact on cortical functions. Loss of NRG1 from cortical projection neurons resulted in increased inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, and hypoactivity. Neuronal overexpression of cysteine-rich domain (CRD-NRG1, the major brain isoform, caused unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, abnormal spine growth, altered steady-state levels of synaptic plasticity-related proteins, and impaired sensorimotor gating. We conclude that an “optimal” level of NRG1 signaling balances excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cortex. Our data provide a potential pathomechanism for impaired synaptic plasticity and suggest that human NRG1 risk haplotypes exert a gain-of-function effect.

  8. Dysregulated expression of neuregulin-1 by cortical pyramidal neurons disrupts synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Amit; Zhang, Mingyue; Trembak-Duff, Irina; Unterbarnscheidt, Tilmann; Radyushkin, Konstantin; Dibaj, Payam; Martins de Souza, Daniel; Boretius, Susann; Brzózka, Magdalena M; Steffens, Heinz; Berning, Sebastian; Teng, Zenghui; Gummert, Maike N; Tantra, Martesa; Guest, Peter C; Willig, Katrin I; Frahm, Jens; Hell, Stefan W; Bahn, Sabine; Rossner, Moritz J; Nave, Klaus-Armin; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Zhang, Weiqi; Schwab, Markus H

    2014-08-21

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) gene variants are associated with increased genetic risk for schizophrenia. It is unclear whether risk haplotypes cause elevated or decreased expression of NRG1 in the brains of schizophrenia patients, given that both findings have been reported from autopsy studies. To study NRG1 functions in vivo, we generated mouse mutants with reduced and elevated NRG1 levels and analyzed the impact on cortical functions. Loss of NRG1 from cortical projection neurons resulted in increased inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, and hypoactivity. Neuronal overexpression of cysteine-rich domain (CRD)-NRG1, the major brain isoform, caused unbalanced excitatory-inhibitory neurotransmission, reduced synaptic plasticity, abnormal spine growth, altered steady-state levels of synaptic plasticity-related proteins, and impaired sensorimotor gating. We conclude that an "optimal" level of NRG1 signaling balances excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmission in the cortex. Our data provide a potential pathomechanism for impaired synaptic plasticity and suggest that human NRG1 risk haplotypes exert a gain-of-function effect. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha regulates the Hypocretin system via mRNA degradation and ubiquitination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Shuqin; Cai, Guo-Qiang; Zheng, Anni; Wang, Yuping; Jia, Jianping; Fang, Haotian; Yang, Youfeng; Hu, Meng; Ding, Qiang

    2011-04-01

    Recent studies recognize that Hypocretin system (also known as Orexin) plays a critical role in sleep/wake disorders and feeding behaviors. However, little is known about the regulation of the Hypocretin system. It is also known that tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is involved in the regulation of sleep/wake cycle. Here, we test our hypothesis that the Hypocretin system is regulated by TNF-α. Prepro-Hypocretin and Hypocretin receptor 2 (HcrtR2) can be detected at a very low level in rat B35 neuroblastoma cells. In response to TNF-α, Prepro-Hypocretin mRNA and protein levels are down-regulated, and also HcrtR2 protein level is down-regulated in B35 cells. To investigate the mechanism, exogenous rat Prepro-Hypocretin and rat HcrtR2 were overexpressed in B35 cells. In response to TNF-α, protein and mRNA of Prepro-Hypocretin are significantly decreased (by 93% and 94%, respectively), and the half-life of Prepro-Hypocretin mRNA is decreased in a time- and dose-dependent manner. The level of HcrtR2 mRNA level is not affected by TNF-α treatment; however, HcrtR2 protein level is significantly decreased (by 86%) through ubiquitination in B35 cells treated with TNF-α. Downregulation of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis protein-1 and -2 (cIAP-1 and -2) abrogates the HcrtR2 ubiquitination induced by TNF-α. The control green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression is not affected by TNF-α treatment. These studies demonstrate that TNF-α can impair the function of the Hypocretin system by reducing the levels of both Prepro-Hypocretin and HcrtR2. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Label-free quantitative proteomic profiling identifies disruption of ubiquitin homeostasis as a key driver of Schwann cell defects in spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghamaleky Sarvestany, Arwin; Hunter, Gillian; Tavendale, Amy; Lamont, Douglas J; Llavero Hurtado, Maica; Graham, Laura C; Wishart, Thomas M; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2014-11-07

    Low levels of survival of motor neuron (SMN) protein cause the neuromuscular disease spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), characterized by degeneration of lower motor neurons and atrophy of skeletal muscle. Recent work demonstrated that low levels of SMN also trigger pathological changes in Schwann cells, leading to abnormal axon myelination and disrupted deposition of extracellular matrix proteins in peripheral nerve. However, the molecular pathways linking SMN depletion to intrinsic defects in Schwann cells remained unclear. Label-free proteomics analysis of Schwann cells isolated from SMA mouse peripheral nerve revealed widespread changes to the Schwann cell proteome, including disruption to growth/proliferation, cell death/survival, and molecular transport pathways. Functional clustering analyses revealed significant disruption to a number of proteins contributing to ubiquitination pathways, including reduced levels of ubiquitin-like modifier activating enzyme 1 (Uba1). Pharmacological suppression of Uba1 in Schwann cells was sufficient to reproduce the defective myelination phenotype seen in SMA. These findings demonstrate an important role for SMN protein and ubiquitin-dependent pathways in maintaining Schwann cell homeostasis and provide significant additional experimental evidence supporting a key role for ubiquitin pathways and, Uba1 in particular, in driving SMA pathogenesis across a broad range of cells and tissues.

  11. The SCF ubiquitin ligase Slimb controls Nerfin-1 turnover in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Xiaohui; Wang, Feng; Li, Yuanpei; Zhai, Chaojun; Wang, Guiping; Zhang, Xiaoting; Gao, Yang; Yi, Tao; Sun, Dan; Wu, Shian

    2018-01-01

    The C2H2 type zinc-finger transcription factor Nerfin-1 expresses dominantly in Drosophila nervous system and plays an important role in early axon guidance decisions and preventing neurons dedifferentiation. Recently, increasing reports indicated that INSM1 (homologue to nerfin-1 in mammals) is a useful marker for prognosis of neuroendocrine tumors. The dynamic expression of Nerfin-1 is regulated post-transcriptionally by multiple microRNAs; however, its post-translational regulation is still unclear. Here we showed that the protein turnover of Nerfin-1 is regulated by Slimb, the substrate adaptor of SCF Slimb ubiquitin ligase complex. Mechanistically, Slimb associates with Nerfin-1 and promotes it ubiquitination and degradation in Drosophila S2R + cells. Furthermore, we determined that the C-terminal half of Nerfin-1 (Nerfin-1 CT ) is required for its binding to Slimb. Genetic epistasis assays showed that Slimb misexpression antagonizes, while knock-down enhances the activity of Nerfin-1 CT in Drosophila eyes. Our data revealed a new link to understand the underlying mechanism for Nerfin-1 turnover in post-translational level, and provided useful insights in animal development and disease treatment by manipulating the activity of Slimb and Nerfin-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Camptothecin resistance is determined by the regulation of topoisomerase I degradation mediated by ubiquitin proteasome pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Koji; Shah, Ankur K; Sachdev, Vibhu; Kleinstiver, Benjamin P; Taylor-Parker, Julian; Welch, Moira M; Hu, Yiheng; Salgia, Ravi; White, Forest M; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Ozonoff, Al; Rameh, Lucia E; Joung, J Keith; Bharti, Ajit K

    2017-07-04

    Proteasomal degradation of topoisomerase I (topoI) is one of the most remarkable cellular phenomena observed in response to camptothecin (CPT). Importantly, the rate of topoI degradation is linked to CPT resistance. Formation of the topoI-DNA-CPT cleavable complex inhibits DNA re-ligation resulting in DNA-double strand break (DSB). The degradation of topoI marks the first step in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP) dependent DNA damage response (DDR). Here, we show that the Ku70/Ku80 heterodimer binds with topoI, and that the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) phosphorylates topoI on serine 10 (topoI-pS10), which is subsequently ubiquitinated by BRCA1. A higher basal level of topoI-pS10 ensures rapid topoI degradation leading to CPT resistance. Importantly, PTEN regulates DNA-PKcs kinase activity in this pathway and PTEN deletion ensures DNA-PKcs dependent higher topoI-pS10, rapid topoI degradation and CPT resistance.

  13. Determinants of functionality in the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winn, Peter J; Religa, Tomasz L; Battey, James N D; Banerjee, Amit; Wade, Rebecca C

    2004-09-01

    The E2 enzymes are key enzymes in the ubiquitin and ubiquitin-like protein ligation pathways. To understand the functionality of the different E2 enzymes, we analyzed 190 protein sequences and 211 structures and electrostatic potentials. Key findings include: The ScUbc1 orthologs are defined by a C-terminal UBA domain. An N-terminal sequence motif that is highly conserved in all E2s except for Cdc34 orthologs is important for the stabilization of the L7 loop and is likely to be involved in E1 binding. ScUbc11p has a different electrostatic potential from E2-Cp and other proteins with which it has high sequence similarity but different functionality. All the E2s known to ubiquitinate histones have a negative potential. The members of the NCUBE family have a positive electrostatic potential, although its form is different from that of the SUMO conjugating E2s. The specificities of only the ScUbc4/Ubc5 and ScUbc1p orthologs are reflected in their L4 and L7 loops.

  14. Viral Mimicry to Usurp Ubiquitin and SUMO Host Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Wimmer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Posttranslational modifications (PTMs of proteins include enzymatic changes by covalent addition of cellular regulatory determinants such as ubiquitin (Ub and small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO moieties. These modifications are widely used by eukaryotic cells to control the functional repertoire of proteins. Over the last decade, it became apparent that the repertoire of ubiquitiylation and SUMOylation regulating various biological functions is not restricted to eukaryotic cells, but is also a feature of human virus families, used to extensively exploit complex host-cell networks and homeostasis. Intriguingly, besides binding to host SUMO/Ub control proteins and interfering with the respective enzymatic cascade, many viral proteins mimic key regulatory factors to usurp this host machinery and promote efficient viral outcomes. Advanced detection methods and functional studies of ubiquitiylation and SUMOylation during virus-host interplay have revealed that human viruses have evolved a large arsenal of strategies to exploit these specific PTM processes. In this review, we highlight the known viral analogs orchestrating ubiquitin and SUMO conjugation events to subvert and utilize basic enzymatic pathways.

  15. LTD-like molecular pathways in developmental synaptic pruning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piochon, Claire; Kano, Masanobu; Hansel, Christian

    2016-01-01

    In long-term depression (LTD) at synapses in the adult brain, synaptic strength is reduced in an experience-dependent manner. LTD thus provides a cellular mechanism for information storage in some forms of learning. A similar activity-dependent reduction in synaptic strength also occurs in the developing brain and there provides an essential step in synaptic pruning and the postnatal development of neural circuits. Here we review evidence suggesting that LTD and synaptic pruning share components of their underlying molecular machinery and may thus represent two developmental stages of the same type of synaptic modulation that serve different, but related, functions in neural circuit plasticity. We also assess the relationship between LTD and synaptic pruning in the context of recent findings of LTD dysregulation in several mouse models of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and discuss whether LTD deficits can indicate impaired pruning processes that are required for proper brain development. PMID:27669991

  16. Potentiation of electrical and chemical synaptic transmission mediated by endocannabinoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachope, Roger; Mackie, Ken; Triller, Antoine; O’Brien, John; Pereda, Alberto E.

    2009-01-01

    SUMMARY Endocannabinoids are well established as inhibitors of chemical synaptic transmission via presynaptic activation of the cannabinoid type 1 receptor (CB1R). Contrasting this notion, we show that dendritic release of endocannabinoids mediates potentiation of synaptic transmission at mixed (electrical and chemical) synaptic contacts on the goldfish Mauthner cell. Remarkably, the observed enhancement was not restricted to the glutamatergic component of the synaptic response but also included a parallel increase in electrical transmission. This novel effect involved the activation of CB1 receptors and was indirectly mediated via the release of dopamine from nearby varicosities, which in turn led to potentiation of the synaptic response via a cAMP-dependent protein kinase-mediated postsynaptic mechanism. Thus, endocannabinoid release can potentiate synaptic transmission and its functional roles include the regulation of gap junction-mediated electrical synapses. Similar interactions between endocannabinoid and dopaminergic systems may be widespread and potentially relevant for the motor and rewarding effects of cannabis derivatives. PMID:18093525

  17. Electrophysiological Techniques for Studying Synaptic Activity In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeggo, Ross; Zhao, Fei-Yue; Spanswick, David

    2014-03-03

    Understanding the physiology, pharmacology, and plasticity associated with synaptic function is a key goal of neuroscience research and is fundamental to identifying the processes involved in the development and manifestation of neurological disease. A diverse range of electrophysiological methodologies are used to study synaptic function. Described in this unit is a technique for recording electrical activity from a single component of the central nervous system that is used to investigate pre- and post-synaptic elements of synaptic function. A strength of this technique is that it can be used on live animals, although the effect of anesthesia must be taken into consideration when interpreting the results. This methodology can be employed not only in naïve animals for studying normal physiological synaptic function, but also in a variety of disease models, including transgenic animals, to examine dysfunctional synaptic plasticity associated with neurological pathologies. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Astrocytes and microglia: active players in synaptic plasticity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronzano, Rémi

    2017-12-01

    Synaptic plasticity consists in a change in structure and composition of presynaptic and postsynaptic compartments. For a long time, synaptic plasticity had been thought as a neuronal mechanism only under the control of neural network activity. However, recently, with the growing knowledge about glial physiology, plasticity has been reviewed as a mechanism influenced by the synaptic environment. Thus, it appears that astrocytes and microglia modulate these mechanisms modifying neural environment by clearance of neurotransmitters, releasing essential factors and modulating inflammation. Moreover, glia can change its own activity and the expression pattern of many factors that modulate synaptic plasticity according to the environment. Hence, these populations of "non-neuronal" cells in the central nervous system seem to be active players in synaptic plasticity. This review discusses how glia modulates synaptic plasticity focusing on long-term potentiation and depression, and questions the role of the signaling processes between astrocytes and microglia in these mechanisms. © 2017 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  19. Astrocytes and synaptic plasticity in health and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, A; Abraham, Wickliffe C

    2017-06-01

    Activity-dependent synaptic plasticity phenomena such as long-term potentiation and long-term depression are candidate mechanisms for storing information in the brain. Regulation of synaptic plasticity is critical for healthy cognition and learning and this is provided in part by metaplasticity, which can act to maintain synaptic transmission within a dynamic range and potentially prevent excitotoxicity. Metaplasticity mechanisms also allow neurons to integrate plasticity-associated signals over time. Interestingly, astrocytes appear to be critical for certain forms of synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity mechanisms. Synaptic dysfunction is increasingly viewed as an early feature of AD that is correlated with the severity of cognitive decline, and the development of these pathologies is correlated with a rise in reactive astrocytes. This review focuses on the contributions of astrocytes to synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity in normal tissue, and addresses whether astroglial pathology may lead to aberrant engagement of these mechanisms in neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's disease.

  20. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2010-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic ...

  1. The stressed cytoskeleton: How actin dynamics can shape stress-related consequences on synaptic plasticity and complex behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kooij, Michael A; Masana, Mercè; Rust, Marco B; Müller, Marianne B

    2016-03-01

    Stress alters synaptic plasticity but the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which environmental stimuli modulate synaptic function remain to be elucidated. Actin filaments are the major structural component of synapses and their rearrangements by actin-binding proteins (ABPs) are critical for fine-tuning synaptic plasticity. Accumulating evidence suggests that some ABPs are specifically regulated by stress and stress-related effectors such as glucocorticoids and corticotropin releasing hormone. ABPs may thus be central in stress-induced perturbations at the level of synaptic plasticity, leading to impairments in behavioral domains including cognitive performance and social behavior. Identified stress-responsive ABPs include: tumor suppressor down-regulated in renal cell carcinoma 1 (DRR1), ADF/cofilin, LIMK1, caldesmon and myosin VI. Here we discuss how stress may impact synaptic plasticity through specific effects on these ABPs and how these adaptations might modulate complex behavior, predisposing individuals at genetic risk for the development of mental dysfunctions. We argue that a precise understanding of the mechanisms underlying stress-associated changes in synaptic function could stimulate the development of innovative treatment strategies against stress-related mental disorders. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Replacement of asymmetric synaptic profiles in the molecular layer of dentate gyrus following cycloheximide in the pilocarpine model in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone eBittencourt

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Mossy fiber sprouting is among the best-studied forms of post-lesional synaptic plasticity and is regarded by many as contributory to seizures in both humans and animal models of epilepsy. It is not known whether mossy fiber sprouting increases the number of synapses in the molecular layer or merely replaces lost contacts. Using the pilocarpine model of status epilepticus to induce mossy fiber sprouting, and cycloheximide to block this sprouting, we evaluated at the ultrastructural level the number and type of asymmetric synaptic contacts in the molecular layer of the dentate gyrus. As expected, whereas pilocarpine-treated rats had dense silver grain deposits in the inner molecular layer (reflecting mossy fiber sprouting, pilocarpine+cycloheximide-treated animals did not differ from controls. Both groups of treated rats (Pilo group and CHX+Pilo group had reduced density of asymmetric synaptic profiles (putative excitatory synaptic contacts, which was greater for cycloheximide-treated animals. For both treated groups the loss of excitatory synaptic contacts was even greater in the outer molecular layer than in the best studied inner molecular layer (in which mossy fiber sprouting occurs. These results indicate that mossy fiber sprouting tends to replace lost synaptic contacts rather than increase the absolute number of contacts. We speculate that the overall result is more consistent with restored rather than with increased excitability.

  3. Different effects of bisphenol-A on memory behavior and synaptic modification in intact and estrogen-deprived female mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaohong; Gu, Ting; Shen, Qiaoqiao

    2015-03-01

    Bisphenol-A (BPA) has the capability of interfering with the effects of estrogens on modulating brain function. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of BPA on memory and synaptic modification in the hippocampus of female mice under different levels of cycling estrogen. BPA exposure (40, 400 μg/kg/day) for 8 weeks did not affect spatial memory and passive avoidance task of gonadally intact mice but improved ovariectomy (Ovx)-induced memory impairment, whereas co-exposure of BPA with estradiol benzoate (EB) diminished the rescue effect of EB on memory behavior of Ovx mice. The results of morphometric measurement showed that BPA positively modified the synaptic interface structure and increased the synaptic density of CA1 pyramidal cell in the hippocampus of Ovx females, but inhibited the enhancement of EB on synaptic modification and synaptogenesis of Ovx mice. Furthermore, BPA up-regulated synaptic proteins synapsin I and PSD-95 and NMDA receptor NR2B but inhibited EB-induced increase in PSD-95 and NR2B in the hippocampus of Ovx mice. These results suggest that BPA interfered with normal hormonal regulation in synaptic plasticity and memory of female mice as a potent estrogen mimetic and as a disruptor of estrogen under various concentrations of cycling estrogen. © 2014 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  4. Electroacupuncture Regulates Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity via miR-134-Mediated LIMK1 Function in Rats with Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weilin; Wu, Jie; Huang, Jia; Zhuo, Peiyuan; Lin, Yunjiao; Wang, Lulu; Lin, Ruhui; Chen, Lidian; Tao, Jing

    2017-01-01

    MircoRNAs (miRs) have been implicated in learning and memory, by regulating LIM domain kinase (LIMK1) to induce synaptic-dendritic plasticity. The study aimed to investigate whether miRNAs/LIMK1 signaling was involved in electroacupuncture- (EA-) mediated synaptic-dendritic plasticity in a rat model of middle cerebral artery occlusion induced cognitive deficit (MICD). Compared to untreatment or non-acupoint-EA treatment, EA at DU20 and DU24 acupoints could shorten escape latency and increase the frequency of crossing platform in Morris water maze test. T2-weighted imaging showed that the MICD rat brain lesions were located in cortex, hippocampus, corpus striatum, and thalamus regions and injured volumes were reduced after EA. Furthermore, we found that the density of dendritic spine and the number of synapses in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells were obviously reduced at Day 14 after MICD. However, synaptic-dendritic loss could be rescued after EA. Moreover, the synaptic-dendritic plasticity was associated with increases of the total LIMK1 and phospho-LIMK1 levels in hippocampal CA1 region, wherein EA decreased the expression of miR-134, negatively regulating LIMK1 to enhance synaptic-dendritic plasticity. Therefore, miR-134-mediated LIMK1 was involved in EA-induced hippocampal synaptic plasticity, which served as a contributor to improving learning and memory during the recovery stage of ischemic stroke.

  5. The ubiquitin-conjugating system: multiple roles in viral replication and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calistri, Arianna; Munegato, Denis; Carli, Ilaria; Parolin, Cristina; Palù, Giorgio

    2014-05-06

    Through the combined action of ubiquitinating and deubiquitinating enzymes, conjugation of ubiquitin to a target protein acts as a reversible post-translational modification functionally similar to phosphorylation. Indeed, ubiquitination is more and more recognized as a central process for the fine regulation of many cellular pathways. Due to their nature as obligate intracellular parasites, viruses rely on the most conserved host cell machineries for their own replication. Thus, it is not surprising that members from almost every viral family are challenged by ubiquitin mediated mechanisms in different steps of their life cycle and have evolved in order to by-pass or exploit the cellular ubiquitin conjugating system to maximize their chance to establish a successful infection. In this review we will present several examples of the complex interplay that links viruses and the ubiquitin conjugation machinery, with a special focus on the mechanisms evolved by the human immunodeficiency virus to escape from cellular restriction factors and to exit from infected cells.

  6. VEGFR2 Trafficking, Signaling and Proteolysis is Regulated by the Ubiquitin Isopeptidase USP8.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Gina A; Fearnley, Gareth W; Abdul-Zani, Izma; Wheatcroft, Stephen B; Tomlinson, Darren C; Harrison, Michael A; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan

    2016-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) regulates many aspects of vascular function. VEGF-A binding to vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 (VEGFR2) stimulates endothelial signal transduction and regulates multiple cellular responses. Activated VEGFR2 undergoes ubiquitination but the enzymes that regulate this post-translational modification are unclear. In this study, the de-ubiquitinating enzyme, USP8, is shown to regulate VEGFR2 trafficking, de-ubiquitination, proteolysis and signal transduction. USP8-depleted endothelial cells displayed altered VEGFR2 ubiquitination and production of a unique VEGFR2 extracellular domain proteolytic fragment caused by VEGFR2 accumulation in the endosome-lysosome system. In addition, perturbed VEGFR2 trafficking impaired VEGF-A-stimulated signal transduction in USP8-depleted cells. Thus, regulation of VEGFR2 ubiquitination and de-ubiquitination has important consequences for the endothelial cell response and vascular physiology. © 2015 The Authors. Traffic published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. The ubiquitin system and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira eAshizawa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification in which one or more ubiquitin molecules are covalently linked to lysine residues of target proteins. The ubiquitin system plays a key role in the regulation of protein degradation, including cell signaling, endocytosis, vesicle trafficking, apoptosis, and immune responses. Bacterial and viral pathogens exploit the cellular ubiquitin system by encoding their own proteins to serve their survival and replication in infected cells. Recent studies have revealed that Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV manipulates the ubiquitin system of infected cells to facilitate cell proliferation, anti-apoptosis, and evasion from immunity. This review summarizes recent developments in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by KSHV to interact with the cellular ubiquitin machinery.

  8. Alterations of ubiquitin related proteins in the pathology and development of schizophrenia: Evidence from human and animal studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Jessica L; Goodfellow, Frederic J; Matosin, Natalie; Snelling, Mollie K; Newell, Kelly A; Huang, Xu-Feng; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2017-07-01

    Gene expression analyses in post-mortem schizophrenia brains suggest that a number of ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) genes are associated with schizophrenia; however the status of UPS proteins in the schizophrenia brain is largely unknown. Ubiquitin related proteins are inherently involved in memory, neuronal survival and morphology, which are processes implicated in neurodevelopmental disorders such as schizophrenia. We examined levels of five UPS proteins (Protein Inhibitor of Activated STAT2 [PIAS2], F-Box and Leucine rich repeat protein 21 [FBXL21], Mouse Double Minute 2 homolog [MDM2], Ubiquitin Carboxyl-Terminal Hydrolase-L1 [UCHL1] and Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzyme E2D1 [UBE2D1]) involved in these neuronal processes, within the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of post-mortem schizophrenia subjects and matched controls (n = 30/group), in addition to across neurodevelopmental time-points (juvenile, adolescent and adult stages of life), utilizing a well-established neurodevelopmental phencyclidine (PCP) animal model of schizophrenia. We observed significant reductions in PIAS2, FBXL21 and MDM2 in schizophrenia subjects compared to controls (p-values ranging from 0.002 to 0.004). In our developmental PCP model, MDM2 protein was significantly reduced in adult PCP-treated rats compared to controls (p = 0.034). Additionally, FBXL21 (p = 0.022) and UCHL1 (p = 0.022) were significantly decreased, whilst UBE2D1 was increased (p = 0.022), in juvenile phencyclidine-treated rats compared to controls. This is the first study reporting alterations of UPS proteins in post-mortem human schizophrenia subjects and in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia. The findings from this study provide strong support for a role of these UPS proteins in the pathology and development of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase CHIP and NBR1-Mediated Selective Autophagy Protect Additively against Proteotoxicity in Plant Stress Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Jingxia; Chi, Yingjin; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but complementary anti

  10. Relevance of Simultaneous Mono-Ubiquitinations of Multiple Units of PCNA Homo-Trimers in DNA Damage Tolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanao, Rie; Masuda, Yuji; Deguchi, Saori; Yumoto-Sugimoto, Mayumi; Hanaoka, Fumio; Masutani, Chikahide

    2015-01-01

    DNA damage tolerance (DDT) pathways, including translesion synthesis (TLS) and additional unknown mechanisms, enable recovery from replication arrest at DNA lesions. DDT pathways are regulated by post-translational modifications of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) at its K164 residue. In particular, mono-ubiquitination by the ubiquitin ligase RAD18 is crucial for Polη-mediated TLS. Although the importance of modifications of PCNA to DDT pathways is well known, the relevance of its homo-trimer form, in which three K164 residues are present in a single ring, remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that multiple units of a PCNA homo-trimer are simultaneously mono-ubiquitinated in vitro and in vivo. RAD18 catalyzed sequential mono-ubiquitinations of multiple units of a PCNA homo-trimer in a reconstituted system. Exogenous PCNA formed hetero-trimers with endogenous PCNA in WI38VA13 cell transformants. When K164R-mutated PCNA was expressed in these cells at levels that depleted endogenous PCNA homo-trimers, multiple modifications of PCNA complexes were reduced and the cells showed defects in DDT after UV irradiation. Notably, ectopic expression of mutant PCNA increased the UV sensitivities of Polη-proficient, Polη-deficient, and REV1-depleted cells, suggesting the disruption of a DDT pathway distinct from the Polη- and REV1-mediated pathways. These results suggest that simultaneous modifications of multiple units of a PCNA homo-trimer are required for a certain DDT pathway in human cells. PMID:25692884

  11. E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP and NBR1-mediated selective autophagy protect additively against proteotoxicity in plant stress responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Qi, Jingxia; Chi, Yingjin; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2014-01-01

    Plant stress responses require both protective measures that reduce or restore stress-inflicted damage to cellular structures and mechanisms that efficiently remove damaged and toxic macromolecules, such as misfolded and damaged proteins. We have recently reported that NBR1, the first identified plant autophagy adaptor with a ubiquitin-association domain, plays a critical role in plant stress tolerance by targeting stress-induced, ubiquitinated protein aggregates for degradation by autophagy. Here we report a comprehensive genetic analysis of CHIP, a chaperone-associated E3 ubiquitin ligase from Arabidopsis thaliana implicated in mediating degradation of nonnative proteins by 26S proteasomes. We isolated two chip knockout mutants and discovered that they had the same phenotypes as the nbr1 mutants with compromised tolerance to heat, oxidative and salt stresses and increased accumulation of insoluble proteins under heat stress. To determine their functional interactions, we generated chip nbr1 double mutants and found them to be further compromised in stress tolerance and in clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates, indicating additive roles of CHIP and NBR1. Furthermore, stress-induced protein aggregates were still ubiquitinated in the chip mutants. Through proteomic profiling, we systemically identified heat-induced protein aggregates in the chip and nbr1 single and double mutants. These experiments revealed that highly aggregate-prone proteins such as Rubisco activase and catalases preferentially accumulated in the nbr1 mutant while a number of light-harvesting complex proteins accumulated at high levels in the chip mutant after a relatively short period of heat stress. With extended heat stress, aggregates for a large number of intracellular proteins accumulated in both chip and nbr1 mutants and, to a greater extent, in the chip nbr1 double mutant. Based on these results, we propose that CHIP and NBR1 mediate two distinct but complementary anti

  12. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) influences spatial cognition and modulates hippocampal structural synaptic plasticity in aging mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Zhanchi; Kang, Lin; Geng, Dandan; Wang, Yanyong; Wang, Mingwei; Cui, Huixian

    2014-10-01

    Normal aging is characteristic with the gradual decline in cognitive function associated with the progressive reduction of structural and functional plasticity in the hippocampus. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) has developed into a novel neurological and psychiatric tool that can be used to investigate the neurobiology of cognitive function. Recent studies have demonstrated that low-frequency rTMS (≤1Hz) affects synaptic plasticity in rats with vascular dementia (VaD), and it ameliorates the spatial cognitive ability in mice with Aβ1-42-mediated memory deficits, but there are little concerns about the effects of rTMS on normal aging related cognition and synaptic plasticity changes. Thus, the current study investigated the effects of rTMS on spatial memory behavior, neuron and synapse morphology in the hippocampus, and synaptic protein markers and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) in normal aging mice, to illustrate the mechanisms of rTMS in regulating cognitive capacity. Relative to adult animals, aging caused hippocampal-dependent cognitive impairment, simultaneously inhibited the activation of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway, reduced the transcription and expression of synaptic protein markers: synaptophysin (SYN), growth associated protein 43 (GAP43) and post-synaptic density protein 95 (PSD95), as well as decreased synapse density and PSD (post-synaptic density) thickness. Interestingly, rTMS with low intensity (110% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, LIMS) triggered the activation of BDNF and TrkB, upregulated the level of synaptic protein markers, and increased synapse density and thickened PSD, and further reversed the spatial cognition dysfunction in aging mice. Conversely, high-intensity magnetic stimulation (150% average resting motor threshold intensity, 1Hz, HIMS) appeared to be detrimental, inducing thinning of PSDs, disordered synaptic structure, and a large number of

  13. Anesthetic action on extra-synaptic receptors: effects in neural population models of EEG activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meysam eHashemi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The role of extra-synaptic receptors in the regulation of excitation and inhibition in the brainhas attracted increasing attention. Because activity in the extra-synaptic receptors plays a role inregulating the level of excitation and inhibition in the brain, they may be important in determiningthe level of consciousness. This paper reviews briefly the literature on extra-synaptic GABAand NMDA receptors and their affinity to anesthetic drugs. We propose a neural populationmodel that illustrates how the effect of the anesthetic drug propofol on GABAergic extra-synapticreceptors results in changes in neural population activity and the electroencephalogram (EEG. Our results show that increased tonic inhibition in inhibitory cortical neurons cause a dramaticincrease in the power of both delta and alpha bands. Conversely, the effects of increased tonicinhibition in cortical excitatory neurons and thalamic relay neurons have the opposite effect anddecrease the power in these bands. The increased delta activity is in accord with observed datafor deepening propofol anesthesia; but is absolutely dependent on the inclusion of extra synaptic(tonic GABA action in the model.

  14. Neurotrophin receptor p75NTR mediates Huntington’s disease–associated synaptic and memory dysfunction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, Verónica; Giralt, Albert; Enriquez-Barreto, Lilian; Puigdellívol, Mar; Suelves, Nuria; Zamora-Moratalla, Alfonsa; Ballesteros, Jesús J.; Martín, Eduardo D.; Dominguez-Iturza, Nuria; Morales, Miguel; Alberch, Jordi; Ginés, Sílvia

    2014-01-01

    Learning and memory deficits are early clinical manifestations of Huntington’s disease (HD). These cognitive impairments have been mainly associated with frontostriatal HD pathology; however, compelling evidence provided by several HD murine models suggests that the hippocampus may contribute to synaptic deficits and memory dysfunction in HD. The neurotrophin receptor p75NTR negatively regulates spine density, which is associated with learning and memory; therefore, we explored whether disturbed p75NTR function in the hippocampus could contribute to synaptic dysfunction and memory deficits in HD. Here, we determined that levels of p75NTR are markedly increased in the hippocampus of 2 distinct mouse models of HD and in HD patients. Normalization of p75NTR levels in HD mutant mice heterozygous for p75NTR prevented memory and synaptic plasticity deficits and ameliorated dendritic spine abnormalities, likely through normalization of the activity of the GTPase RhoA. Moreover, viral-mediated overexpression of p75NTR in the hippocampus of WT mice reproduced HD learning and memory deficits, while knockdown of p75NTR in the hippocampus of HD mice prevented cognitive decline. Together, these findings provide evidence of hippocampus-associated memory deficits in HD and demonstrate that p75NTR mediates synaptic, learning, and memory dysfunction in HD. PMID:25180603

  15. A pivotal role of GSK-3 in synaptic plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarrisa A Bradley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3 has many cellular functions. Recent evidence suggests that it plays a key role in certain types of synaptic plasticity, in particular a form of long-term depression (LTD that is induced by the synaptic activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors. In the present article we summarise what is currently known concerning the roles of GSK-3 in synaptic plasticity at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. We summarise its role in cognition and speculate on how alterations in the synaptic functioning of GSK-3 may be a major factor in certain neurodegenerative disorders.

  16. Mild hypoxia affects synaptic connectivity in cultured neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeijer, Jeannette; Mulder, Alex T B; Farinha, Ana C; van Putten, Michel J A M; le Feber, Joost

    2014-04-04

    Eighty percent of patients with chronic mild cerebral ischemia/hypoxia resulting from chronic heart failure or pulmonary disease have cognitive impairment. Overt structural neuronal damage is lacking and the precise cause of neuronal damage is unclear. As almost half of the cerebral energy consumption is used for synaptic transmission, and synaptic failure is the first abrupt consequence of acute complete anoxia, synaptic dysfunction is a candidate mechanism for the cognitive deterioration in chronic mild ischemia/hypoxia. Because measurement of synaptic functioning in patients is problematic, we use cultured networks of cortical neurons from new born rats, grown over a multi-electrode array, as a model system. These were exposed to partial hypoxia (partial oxygen pressure of 150Torr lowered to 40-50Torr) during 3 (n=14) or 6 (n=8) hours. Synaptic functioning was assessed before, during, and after hypoxia by assessment of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses to electrical stimulation. Action potential heights and shapes and non-synaptic stimulus responses were used as measures of individual neuronal integrity. During hypoxia of 3 and 6h, there was a statistically significant decrease of spontaneous network activity, functional connectivity, and synaptically driven network responses, whereas direct responses and action potentials remained unchanged. These changes were largely reversible. Our results indicate that in cultured neuronal networks, partial hypoxia during 3 or 6h causes isolated disturbances of synaptic connectivity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Statistical mechanics of attractor neural network models with synaptic depression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Igarashi, Yasuhiko; Oizumi, Masafumi; Otsubo, Yosuke; Nagata, Kenji; Okada, Masato

    2009-01-01

    Synaptic depression is known to control gain for presynaptic inputs. Since cortical neurons receive thousands of presynaptic inputs, and their outputs are fed into thousands of other neurons, the synaptic depression should influence macroscopic properties of neural networks. We employ simple neural network models to explore the macroscopic effects of synaptic depression. Systems with the synaptic depression cannot be analyzed due to asymmetry of connections with the conventional equilibrium statistical-mechanical approach. Thus, we first propose a microscopic dynamical mean field theory. Next, we derive macroscopic steady state equations and discuss the stabilities of steady states for various types of neural network models.

  18. A pivotal role of GSK-3 in synaptic plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Clarrisa A.; Peineau, Stéphane; Taghibiglou, Changiz; Nicolas, Celine S.; Whitcomb, Daniel J.; Bortolotto, Zuner A.; Kaang, Bong-Kiun; Cho, Kwangwook; Wang, Yu Tian; Collingridge, Graham L.

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3) has many cellular functions. Recent evidence suggests that it plays a key role in certain types of synaptic plasticity, in particular a form of long-term depression (LTD) that is induced by the synaptic activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors (NMDARs). In the present article we summarize what is currently known concerning the roles of GSK-3 in synaptic plasticity at both glutamatergic and GABAergic synapses. We summarize its role in cognition and speculate on how alterations in the synaptic functioning of GSK-3 may be a major factor in certain neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:22363262

  19. Functional interchangeability of late domains, late domain cofactors and ubiquitin in viral budding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Zhadina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The membrane scission event that separates nascent enveloped virions from host cell membranes often requires the ESCRT pathway, which can be engaged through the action of peptide motifs, termed late (L- domains, in viral proteins. Viral PTAP and YPDL-like L-domains bind directly to the ESCRT-I and ALIX components of the ESCRT pathway, while PPxY motifs bind Nedd4-like, HECT-domain containing, ubiquitin ligases (e.g. WWP1. It has been unclear precisely how ubiquitin ligase recruitment ultimately leads to particle release. Here, using a lysine-free viral Gag protein derived from the prototypic foamy virus (PFV, where attachment of ubiquitin to Gag can be controlled, we show that several different HECT domains can replace the WWP1 HECT domain in chimeric ubiquitin ligases and drive budding. Moreover, artificial recruitment of isolated HECT domains to Gag is sufficient to stimulate budding. Conversely, the HECT domain becomes dispensable if the other domains of WWP1 are directly fused to an ESCRT-1 protein. In each case where budding is driven by a HECT domain, its catalytic activity is essential, but Gag ubiquitination is dispensable, suggesting that ubiquitin ligation to trans-acting proteins drives budding. Paradoxically, however, we also demonstrate that direct fusion of a ubiquitin moiety to the C-terminus of PFV Gag can also promote budding, suggesting that ubiquitination of Gag can substitute for ubiquitination of trans-acting proteins. Depletion of Tsg101 and ALIX inhibits budding that is dependent on ubiquitin that is fused to Gag, or ligated to trans-acting proteins through the action of a PPxY motif. These studies underscore the flexibility in the ways that the ESCRT pathway can be engaged, and suggest a model in which the identity of the protein to which ubiquitin is attached is not critical for subsequent recruitment of ubiquitin-binding components of the ESCRT pathway and viral budding to proceed.

  20. How a disordered ubiquitin ligase maintains order in nuclear protein homeostasis

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenbaum, Joel C; Gardner, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Cells use protein quality control (PQC) systems to protect themselves from potentially harmful misfolded proteins. Many misfolded proteins are repaired by molecular chaperones, but irreparably damaged proteins must be destroyed. Eukaryotes predominantly destroy these abnormally folded proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which requires compartment-specific ubiquitin ligase complexes that mark substrates with ubiquitin for proteasome degradation. In the yeast nucleus, misfolded p...

  1. Autophagy mediates the degradation of synaptic vesicles: A potential mechanism of synaptic plasticity injury induced by microwave exposure in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Yanhui; Li, Wenchao; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Yu, Chao; Tan, Shengzhi; Wang, Haoyu; Xu, Xinping; Dong, Ji; Yao, Binwei; Zhou, Hongmei; Zhao, Li; Peng, Ruiyun

    2018-02-03

    To explore how autophagy changes and whether autophagy is involved in the pathophysiological process of synaptic plasticity injury caused by microwave radiation, we established a 30 mW/cm 2 microwave-exposure in vivo model, which caused reversible injuries in rat neurons. Microwave radiation induced cognitive impairment in rats and synaptic plasticity injury in rat hippocampal neurons. Autophagy in rat hippocampal neurons was activated following microwave exposure. Additionally, we observed that synaptic vesicles were encapsulated by autophagosomes, a phenomenon more evident in the microwave-exposed group. Colocation of autophagosomes and synaptic vesicles in rat hippocampal neurons increased following microwave exposure. microwave exposure led to the activation of autophagy in rat hippocampal neurons, and excessive activation of autophagy might damage synaptic plasticity by mediating synaptic vesicle degradation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Ubiquitin Conjugation Probed by Inflammation in Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cell Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Katherine R; Chauhan, Sitara; Patel, Divya B; Clements, Virginia K; Wang, Yan; Jay, Steven M; Edwards, Nathan J; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne; Fenselau, Catherine

    2018-01-05

    Ubiquitinated proteins carried by the extracellular vesicles (EV) released by myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have been investigated using proteomic strategies to examine the effect of tumor-associated inflammation. EV were collected from MDSC directly following isolation from tumor-bearing mice with low and high inflammation. Among the 1092 proteins (high inflammation) and 925 proteins (low inflammation) identified, more than 50% were observed as ubiquitinated proteoforms. More than three ubiquitin-attachment sites were characterized per ubiquitinated protein, on average. Multiple ubiquitination sites were identified in the pro-inflammatory proteins S100 A8 and S100 A9, characteristic of MDSC and in histones and transcription regulators among other proteins. Spectral counting and pathway analysis suggest that ubiquitination occurs independently of inflammation. Some ubiquitinated proteins were shown to cause the migration of MDSC, which has been previously connected with immune suppression and tumor progression. Finally, MDSC EV are found collectively to carry all the enzymes required to catalyze ubiquitination, and the hypothesis is presented that a portion of the ubiquitinated proteins are produced in situ.

  3. Stealing the spotlight: CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase docks WD40-repeat proteins to destroy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Hui

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Recent investigation of Cullin 4 (CUL4 has ushered this class of multiprotein ubiquitin E3 ligases to center stage as critical regulators of diverse processes including cell cycle regulation, developmental patterning, DNA replication, DNA damage and repair, and epigenetic control of gene expression. CUL4 associates with DNA Damage Binding protein 1 (DDB1 to assemble an ubiquitin E3 ligase that targets protein substrates for ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis. CUL4 ligase activity is also regulated by the covalent attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to CUL4, or neddylation, and the COP9 signalosome complex (CSN that removes this important modification. Recently, multiple WD40-repeat proteins (WDR were found to interact with DDB1 and serve as the substrate-recognition subunits of the CUL4-DDB1 ubiquitin ligase. As more than 150–300 WDR proteins exist in the human genome, these findings impact a wide array of biological processes through CUL4 ligase-mediated proteolysis. Here, we review the recent progress in understanding the mechanism of CUL4 ubiquitin E3 ligase and discuss the architecture of CUL4-assembled E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes by comparison to CUL1-based E3s (SCF. Then, we will review several examples to highlight the critical roles of CUL4 ubiquitin ligase in genome stability, cell cycle regulation, and histone lysine methylation. Together, these studies provide insights into the mechanism of this novel ubiquitin ligase in the regulation of important biological processes.

  4. Genome-wide identification and expression analysis of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in tomato.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Bhaskar; Bhatt, Tarun Kumar

    2017-08-17

    The ubiquitin-proteasomal degradation mechanism has gained the attention over the past decade. The E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes are the crucial part of ubiquitination mechanism and they are believed to hold imperative association for plant development. It accepts ubiquitin from the E1 enzyme and interacts with the E3 ligase to transfer ubiquitin or directly transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. The functional aspects of E2 ubiquitin enzymes in plant systems are unclear. Tomato is being used as a model plant and rarely explored to study E2 ubiquitin enzyme. We have utilized in-silico methods to analyze E2 enzymes in Solanum lycopersicum and 59 genes were identified with UBC family domains. The physio-chemical properties, chromosomal localization, structural organization, gene duplication, promoter analysis, gene ontology and conserved motifs were investigated along with phylogenetic analysis of tomato E2 genes exploring evolutionary relations. The gene expression analysis of RNA sequencing data revealed expression profile of tomato E2 genes in seedling, root, leaf, seed, fruit, and flower tissues. Our study aid in the understanding of distribution, expansion, evolutionary relation and probable participation in plant biological processes of tomato E2 enzymes that will facilitate strong base for future research on ubiquitin-mediated regulations in tomato and other plant systems.

  5. Radix Puerariae modulates glutamatergic synaptic architecture and potentiates functional synaptic plasticity in primary hippocampal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Mohammad Maqueshudul Haque; Haque, Md Nazmul; Mohibbullah, Md; Kim, Yung Kyu; Moon, Il Soo

    2017-09-14

    Neurologic disorders are frequently characterized by synaptic pathology, including abnormal density and morphology of dendritic spines, synapse loss, and aberrant synaptic signaling and plasticity. Therefore, to promote and/or protect synapses by the use of natural molecules capable of modulating neurodevelopmental events, such as, spinogenesis and synaptic plasticity, could offer a preventive and curative strategy for nervous disorders associated with synaptic pathology. Radix Puerariae, the root of Pueraria monatana var. lobata (Willd.) Sanjappa&Pradeep, is a Chinese ethnomedicine, traditionally used for the treatment of memory-related nervous disorders including Alzheimer's disease. In the previous study, we showed that the ethanolic extracts of Radix Puerariae (RPE) and its prime constituent, puerarin induced neuritogenesis and synapse formation in cultured hippocampal neurons, and thus could improve memory functions. In the present study, we specifically investigated the abilities of RPE and puerarin to improve memory-related brain disorders through modulating synaptic maturation and functional potentiation. Rat embryonic (E19) brain neurons were cultured in the absence or presence of RPE or puerarin. At predetermined times, cells were live-stained with DiO or fixed and immunostained to visualize neuronal morphologies, or lysed for protein harvesting. Morphometric analyses of dendritic spines and synaptogenesis were performed using Image J software. Functional pre- and postsynaptic plasticity was measured by FM1-43 staining and whole-cell patch clamping, respectively. RPE or puerarin-mediated changes in actin-related protein 2 were assessed by Western blotting. Neuronal survivals were measured using propidium iodide exclusion assay. RPE and puerarin both: (1) promoted a significant increase in the numbers, and maturation, of dendritic spines; (2) modulated the formation of glutamatergic synapses; (3) potentiated synaptic transmission by increasing the sizes of

  6. The Host E3-Ubiquitin Ligase TRIM6 Ubiquitinates the Ebola Virus VP35 Protein and Promotes Virus Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharaj, Preeti; Atkins, Colm; Luthra, Priya; Giraldo, Maria Isabel; Dawes, Brian E; Miorin, Lisa; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Krogan, Nevan J; Basler, Christopher F; Freiberg, Alexander N; Rajsbaum, Ricardo

    2017-09-15

    Ebola virus (EBOV), a member of the Filoviridae family, is a highly pathogenic virus that causes severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and is responsible for epidemics throughout sub-Saharan, central, and West Africa. The EBOV genome encodes VP35, an important viral protein involved in virus replication by acting as an essential cofactor of the viral polymerase as well as a potent antagonist of the host antiviral type I interferon (IFN-I) system. By using mass spectrometry analysis and coimmunoprecipitation assays, we show here that VP35 is ubiquitinated on lysine 309 (K309), a residue located on its IFN antagonist domain. We also found that VP35 interacts with TRIM6, a member of the E3-ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif (TRIM) family. We recently reported that TRIM6 promotes the synthesis of unanchored K48-linked polyubiquitin chains, which are not covalently attached to any protein, to induce efficient antiviral IFN-I-mediated responses. Consistent with this notion, VP35 also associated noncovalently with polyubiquitin chains and inhibited TRIM6-mediated IFN-I induction. Intriguingly, we also found that TRIM6 enhances EBOV polymerase activity in a minigenome assay and TRIM6 knockout cells have reduced replication of infectious EBOV, suggesting that VP35 hijacks TRIM6 to promote EBOV replication through ubiquitination. Our work provides evidence that TRIM6 is an important host cellular factor that promotes EBOV replication, and future studies will focus on whether TRIM6 could be targeted for therapeutic intervention against EBOV infection. IMPORTANCE EBOV belongs to a family of highly pathogenic viruses that cause severe hemorrhagic fever in humans and other mammals with high mortality rates (40 to 90%). Because of its high pathogenicity and lack of licensed antivirals and vaccines, EBOV is listed as a tier 1 select-agent risk group 4 pathogen. An important mechanism for the severity of EBOV infection is its suppression of innate immune responses. The EBOV VP35

  7. GABA Metabolism and Transport: Effects on Synaptic Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabian C. Roth

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available GABAergic inhibition is an important regulator of excitability in neuronal networks. In addition, inhibitory synaptic signals contribute crucially to the organization of spatiotemporal patterns of network activity, especially during coherent oscillations. In order to maintain stable network states, the release of GABA by interneurons must be plastic in timing and amount. This homeostatic regulation is achieved by several pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms and is triggered by various activity-dependent local signals such as excitatory input or ambient levels of neurotransmitters. Here, we review findings on the availability of GABA for release at presynaptic terminals of interneurons. Presynaptic GABA content seems to be an important determinant of inhibitory efficacy and can be differentially regulated by changing synthesis, transport, and degradation of GABA or related molecules. We will discuss the functional impact of such regulations on neuronal network patterns and, finally, point towards pharmacological approaches targeting these processes.

  8. Synaptic Democracy and Vesicular Transport in Axons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Levien, Ethan

    2015-04-01

    Synaptic democracy concerns the general problem of how regions of an axon or dendrite far from the cell body (soma) of a neuron can play an effective role in neuronal function. For example, stimulated synapses far from the soma are unlikely to influence the firing of a neuron unless some sort of active dendritic processing occurs. Analogously, the motor-driven transport of newly synthesized proteins from the soma to presynaptic targets along the axon tends to favor the delivery of resources to proximal synapses. Both of these phenomena reflect fundamental limitations of transport processes based on a localized source. In this Letter, we show that a more democratic distribution of proteins along an axon can be achieved by making the transport process less efficient. This involves two components: bidirectional or "stop-and-go" motor transport (which can be modeled in terms of advection-diffusion), and reversible interactions between motor-cargo complexes and synaptic targets. Both of these features have recently been observed experimentally. Our model suggests that, just as in human societies, there needs to be a balance between "efficiency" and "equality".

  9. Emerging Link between Alzheimer’s Disease and Homeostatic Synaptic Plasticity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Soo Jang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is an irreversible brain disorder characterized by progressive cognitive decline and neurodegeneration of brain regions that are crucial for learning and memory. Although intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular senile plaques, composed of insoluble amyloid-β (Aβ peptides, have been the hallmarks of postmortem AD brains, memory impairment in early AD correlates better with pathological accumulation of soluble Aβ oligomers and persistent weakening of excitatory synaptic strength, which is demonstrated by inhibition of long-term potentiation, enhancement of long-term depression, and loss of synapses. However, current, approved interventions aiming to reduce Aβ levels have failed to retard disease progression; this has led to a pressing need to identify and target alternative pathogenic mechanisms of AD. Recently, it has been suggested that the disruption of Hebbian synaptic plasticity in AD is due to aberrant metaplasticity, which is a form of homeostatic plasticity that tunes the magnitude and direction of future synaptic plasticity based on previous neuronal or synaptic activity. This review examines emerging evidence for aberrant metaplasticity in AD. Putative mechanisms underlying aberrant metaplasticity in AD will also be discussed. We hope this review inspires future studies to test the extent to which these mechanisms contribute to the etiology of AD and offer therapeutic targets.

  10. The Krebs Cycle Enzyme Isocitrate Dehydrogenase 3A Couples Mitochondrial Metabolism to Synaptic Transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugur, Berrak; Bao, Huan; Stawarski, Michal; Duraine, Lita R; Zuo, Zhongyuan; Lin, Yong Qi; Neely, G Gregory; Macleod, Gregory T; Chapman, Edwin R; Bellen, Hugo J

    2017-12-26

    Neurotransmission is a tightly regulated Ca 2+ -dependent process. Upon Ca 2+ influx, Synaptotagmin1 (Syt1) promotes fusion of synaptic vesicles (SVs) with the plasma membrane. This requires regulation at multiple levels, but the role of metabolites in SV release is unclear. Here, we uncover a role for isocitrate dehydrogenase 3a (idh3a), a Krebs cycle enzyme, in neurotransmission. Loss of idh3a leads to a reduction of the metabolite, alpha-ketoglutarate (αKG), causing defects in synaptic transmission similar to the loss of syt1. Supplementing idh3a flies with αKG suppresses these defects through an ATP or neurotransmitter-independent mechanism. Indeed, αKG, but not glutamate, enhances Syt1-dependent fusion in a reconstitution assay. αKG promotes interaction between the C2-domains of Syt1 and phospholipids. The data reveal conserved metabolic regulation of synaptic transmission via αKG. Our studies provide a synaptic role for αKG, a metabolite that has been proposed as a treatment for aging and neurodegenerative disorders. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regulation of synaptic scaling by action potential-independent miniature neurotransmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Islas, Carlos; Bülow, Pernille; Wenner, Peter

    2018-03-01

    Synaptic scaling represents a homeostatic adjustment in synaptic strength that was first identified as a cell-wide mechanism to achieve firing rate homeostasis after perturbations to spiking activity levels. In this review, we consider a form of synaptic scaling that is triggered by changes in action potential-independent neurotransmitter release. This plasticity appears to be both triggered and expressed locally at the dendritic site of the synapse that experiences a perturbation. A discussion of different forms of scaling triggered by different perturbations is presented. We consider work from multiple groups supporting this form of scaling, which we call neurotransmission-based scaling. This class of homeostatic synaptic plasticity is compared in studies using hippocampal and cortical cultures, as well as in vivo work in the embryonic chick spinal cord. Despite differences in the tissues examined, there are clear similarities in neurotransmission-based scaling, which appear to be molecularly distinct from the originally described spike-based scaling. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Hippocampal testosterone relates to reference memory performance and synaptic plasticity in male rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina eSchulz

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Steroids are important neuromodulators influencing cognitive performance and synaptic plasticity. While the majority of literature concerns adrenal- and gonadectomized animals, very little is known about the natural endogenous release of hormones during learning. Therefore, we measured blood and brain (hippocampus, prefrontal cortex testosterone, estradiol, and corticosterone concentrations of intact male rats undergoing a spatial learning paradigm which is known to reinforce hippocampal plasticity. We found significant modulations of all investigated hormones over the training course. Corticosterone and testosterone were correlated manifold with behaviour, while estradiol expressed fewer correlations. In the recall session, testosterone was tightly coupled to reference memory performance, which is crucial for reinforcement of synaptic plasticity in the dentate gyrus. Intriguingly, prefrontal cortex and hippocampal levels related differentially to reference memory performance. Correlations of testosterone and corticosterone switched from unspecific activity to specific cognitive functions over training. Correspondingly, exogenous application of testosterone revealed different effects on synaptic and neuronal plasticity in trained versus untrained animals. While hippocampal long-term potentiation (LTP of the field excitatory postsynaptic potential (fEPSP was prolonged in untrained rats, both the fEPSP- and the population spike amplitude-LTP was impaired in trained rats. Behavioural performance was unaffected, but correlations of hippocampal field potentials with behaviour were decoupled in treated rats. The data provide important evidence that besides adrenal, also gonadal steroids play a mechanistic role in linking synaptic plasticity to cognitive performance.

  13. Altered gene regulation and synaptic morphology in Drosophila learning and memory mutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Zhuo; Buhl, Lauren K.; Quinn, William G.; Littleton, J. Troy

    2011-01-01

    Genetic studies in Drosophila have revealed two separable long-term memory pathways defined as anesthesia-resistant memory (ARM) and long-lasting long-term memory (LLTM). ARM is disrupted in radish (rsh) mutants, whereas LLTM requires CREB-dependent protein synthesis. Although the downstream effectors of ARM and LLTM are distinct, pathways leading to these forms of memory may share the cAMP cascade critical for associative learning. Dunce, which encodes a cAMP-specific phosphodiesterase, and rutabaga, which encodes an adenylyl cyclase, both disrupt short-term memory. Amnesiac encodes a pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating peptide homolog and is required for middle-term memory. Here, we demonstrate that the Radish protein localizes to the cytoplasm and nucleus and is a PKA phosphorylation target in vitro. To characterize how these plasticity pathways may manifest at the synaptic level, we assayed synaptic connectivity and performed an expression analysis to detect altered transcriptional networks in rutabaga, dunce, amnesiac, and radish mutants. All four mutants disrupt specific aspects of synaptic connectivity at larval neuromuscular junctions (NMJs). Genome-wide DNA microarray analysis revealed ∼375 transcripts that are altered in these mutants, suggesting defects in multiple neuronal signaling pathways. In particular, the transcriptional target Lapsyn, which encodes a leucine-rich repeat cell adhesion protein, localizes to synapses and regulates synaptic growth. This analysis provides insights into the Radish-dependent ARM pathway and novel transcriptional targets that may contribute to memory processing in Drosophila. PMID:21422168

  14. Synaptic effects of low molecular weight components from Chilean Black Widow spider venom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parodi, Jorge; Romero, Fernando

    2008-11-01

    alpha-Latrotoxin is the principal component of the venom from the euroasiatic Black Widow spider and has been studied for its pharmacological use as a synaptic modulator. Interestingly, smaller molecular weight fractions have been found to be associated with this toxin, but their cellular actions have not been studied in detail. The venom from the Chilean Black Widow spider (Latrodectus mactans) does not produce alpha-latrotoxin, however it does contain several small polypeptides. We have recently demonstrated cellular effects of these peptides at the synaptic level using whole-cell patch clamp techniques. Purified venom from the glands of L. mactans was studied in 12 DIV rat hippocampal neuronal cultures. Venom at a concentration of 10nM was able to decrease neuronal conductance thereby increasing membrane resistance. This effect on the passive properties of the neurons induced a change in action potential kinetics simulating the action of classic potassium channel blockers. These changes produced an increase in spontaneous synaptic activity in rat hippocampal cultures in the presence of the venom in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. These results indicate that venom from Chilean spider L. mactans is capable of increasing cell membrane resistance, prolonging the action potential and generating an increase in synaptic activity demonstrating an interesting pharmacological effect of these low molecular weight fragments.

  15. Bacterial cytolysin during meningitis disrupts the regulation of glutamate in the brain, leading to synaptic damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Wippel

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcal meningitis is a common bacterial infection of the brain. The cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin represents a key factor, determining the neuropathogenic potential of the pneumococci. Here, we demonstrate selective synaptic loss within the superficial layers of the frontal neocortex of post-mortem brain samples from individuals with pneumococcal meningitis. A similar effect was observed in mice with pneumococcal meningitis only when the bacteria expressed the pore-forming cholesterol-dependent cytolysin pneumolysin. Exposure of acute mouse brain slices to only pore-competent pneumolysin at disease-relevant, non-lytic concentrations caused permanent dendritic swelling, dendritic spine elimination and synaptic loss. The NMDA glutamate receptor antagonists MK801 and D-AP5 reduced this pathology. Pneumolysin increased glutamate levels within the mouse brain slices. In mouse astrocytes, pneumolysin initiated the release of glutamate in a calcium-dependent manner. We propose that pneumolysin plays a significant synapto- and dendritotoxic role in pneumococcal meningitis by initiating glutamate release from astrocytes, leading to subsequent glutamate-dependent synaptic damage. We outline for the first time the occurrence of synaptic pathology in pneumococcal meningitis and demonstrate that a bacterial cytolysin can dysregulate the control of glutamate in the brain, inducing excitotoxic damage.

  16. Synaptic plasticity through activation of GluA3-containing AMPA-receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Castellanos, Nicolas; Reinders, Niels R; van Huijstee, Aile N; Xiong, Hui; Lodder, Tessa R

    2017-01-01

    Excitatory synaptic transmission is mediated by AMPA-type glutamate receptors (AMPARs). In CA1 pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus two types of AMPARs predominate: those that contain subunits GluA1 and GluA2 (GluA1/2), and those that contain GluA2 and GluA3 (GluA2/3). Whereas subunits GluA1 and GluA2 have been extensively studied, the contribution of GluA3 to synapse physiology has remained unclear. Here we show in mice that GluA2/3s are in a low-conductance state under basal conditions, and although present at synapses they contribute little to synaptic currents. When intracellular cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels rise, GluA2/3 channels shift to a high-conductance state, leading to synaptic potentiation. This cAMP-driven synaptic potentiation requires the activation of both protein kinase A (PKA) and the GTPase Ras, and is induced upon the activation of β-adrenergic receptors. Together, these experiments reveal a novel type of plasticity at CA1 hippocampal synapses that is expressed by the activation of GluA3-containing AMPARs. PMID:28762944

  17. Transcriptional and post-translational regulation of Arc in synaptic plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Ruth E; Henley, Jeremy M

    2017-09-07

    One of the most interesting features of Arc-dependent synaptic plasticity is how multiple types of synaptic activity can converge to alter Arc transcription and then diverge to induce different plasticity outcomes, ranging from AMPA receptor internalisation that promotes long-term depression (LTD), to actin stabilisation that promotes long-term potentiation (LTP). This diversity suggests that there must be numerous levels of control to ensure the temporal profile, abundance, localisation and function of Arc are appropriately regulated to effect learning and memory in the correct contexts. The activity-dependent transcription and post-translational modification of Arc are crucial regulators of synaptic plasticity, fine-tuning the function of this key protein depending on the specific situation. The extensive cross-talk between signalling pathways and the numerous routes of Arc regulation provide a complex interplay of processes in which Arc-mediated plasticity can be broadly induced, but specifically tailored to synaptic activity. Here we provide an overview what is currently known about these processes and potential future directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Synaptic Impairment and Robustness of Excitatory Neuronal Networks with Different Topologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzakhalili, Ehsan; Gourgou, Eleni; Booth, Victoria; Epureanu, Bogdan

    2017-01-01

    Synaptic deficiencies are a known hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases, but the diagnosis of impaired synapses on the cellular level is not an easy task. Nonetheless, changes in the system-level dynamics of neuronal networks with damaged synapses can be detected using techniques that do not require high spatial resolution. This paper investigates how the structure/topology of neuronal networks influences their dynamics when they suffer from synaptic loss. We study different neuronal network structures/topologies by specifying their degree distributions. The modes of the degree distribution can be used to construct networks that consist of rich clubs and resemble small world networks, as well. We define two dynamical metrics to compare the activity of networks with different structures: persistent activity (namely, the self-sustained activity of the network upon removal of the initial stimulus) and quality of activity (namely, percentage of neurons that participate in the persistent activity of the network). Our results show that synaptic loss affects the persistent activity of networks with bimodal degree distributions less than it affects random networks. The robustness of neuronal networks enhances when the distance between the modes of the degree distribution increases, suggesting that the rich clubs of networks with distinct modes keep the whole network active. In addition, a tradeoff is observed between the quality of activity and the persistent activity. For a range of distributions, both of these dynamical metrics are considerably high for networks with bimodal degree distribution compared to random networks. We also propose three different scenarios of synaptic impairment, which may correspond to different pathological or biological conditions. Regardless of the network structure/topology, results demonstrate that synaptic loss has more severe effects on the activity of the network when impairments are correlated with the activity of the neurons.

  19. Structural changes induced by L50P and I61T single mutations of ubiquitin affect cell cycle progression while impairing its regulatory and degradative functions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Ankita; Sharma, Mrinal; Prabha, C Ratna

    2017-06-01

    Posttranslational conjugation of ubiquitin to proteins either regulates their function directly or concentration through ubiquitination dependent degradation. High degree of conservation of ubiquitin's sequence implies structural and functional importance of the conserved residues. Ubiquitin gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was evolved in vitro by us to study the significance of conserved residues. Present study investigates the structural changes in the protein resulting from the single mutations UbS20F, UbA46S, UbL50P, UbI61T and their functional consequences in the SUB60 strain of S. cerevisiae. Expression of UbL50P and UbI61T decreased Cdc28 protein kinase, enhanced Fus3 levels, caused dosage dependent lethality and at sublethal level produced drastic effects on stress tolerance, protein sorting, protein degradation by ubiquitin fusion degradation pathway and by lysosomes. UbS20F and UbA46S produced insignificant effects over the cells. All four mutations of ubiquitin were incorporated into polyubiquitin. However, polyubiquitination with K63 linkage decreased significantly in cells expressing UbL50P and UbI61T. Structural studies on UbL50P and UbI61T revealed distorted structure with greatly reduced α-helical and elevated β-sheet contents, while UbS20F and UbA46S show mild structural alterations. Our results on functional efficacy of ubiquitin in relation to structural integrity may be useful for designing inhibitors to investigate and modulate eukaryotic cellular dynamics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The regulation of glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in bovine mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lily; Jiang, Li; Ding, Xiang-dong; Liu, Jian-feng; Zhang, Qin

    2015-09-11

    Glucose as one of the nutrition factors plays a vital role in the regulation of milk fat synthesis. Ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) is a vital proteolytic pathway in all eukaryotic cells through timely marking, recognizing and degrading the poly-ubiquitinated protein substrates. Previous studies indicated that UPS plays a considerable role in controlling the triglyceride (TG) synthesis. Therefore, the aim of this study is to confirm the link between high-glucose and UPS and its regulation mechanism on milk fat synthesis in BMEC (bovine mammary epithelial cells). We incubated BMEC with normal (17.5 mm/L) and high-glucose (25 mm/L) with and without proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin and found that, compared with the control (normal glucose and without proteasome inhibitor), both high-glucose concentration and proteasome inhibitor epoxomicin could increase the accumulation of TG and poly-ubiquitinated proteins, and reduce significantly three proteasome activities (chymotrypsin-like, caspase-like, and trypsin-like). In addition, high-glucose concentration combined with proteasome inhibitor further enhanced the increase of the poly-ubiquitinated protein level and the decrease of proteasome activities. Our results suggest that the regulation of high-glucose on milk fat synthesis is mediated by UPS in BMEC, and high-glucose exposure could lead to a hypersensitization of BMEC to UPS inhibition which in turn results in increased milk fat synthesis. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Covalent ISG15 conjugation to CHIP promotes its ubiquitin E3 ligase activity and inhibits lung cancer cell growth in response to type I interferon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Lang; Yoon, A-Rum; Yun, Chae-Ok; Chung, Kwang Chul

    2018-01-24

    The carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP) acts as a ubiquitin E3 ligase and a link between the chaperones Hsp70/90 and the proteasome system, playing a vital role in maintaining protein homeostasis. CHIP regulates a number of proteins involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes, but the underlying mechanism of action via posttranslational modification has not been extensively explored. In this study, we investigated a novel modulatory mode of CHIP and its effect on CHIP enzymatic activity. ISG15, an ubiquitin-like modifier, is induced by type I interferon (IFN) stimulation and can be conjugated to target proteins (ISGylation). Here we demonstrated that CHIP may be a novel target of ISGylation in HEK293 cells stimulated with type I IFN. We also found that Lys143/144/145 and Lys287 residues in CHIP are important for and target residues of ISGylation. Moreover, ISGylation promotes the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity of CHIP, subsequently causing a decrease in levels of oncogenic c-Myc, one of its many ubiquitination targets, in A549 lung cancer cells and inhibiting A549 cell and tumor growth. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that covalent ISG15 conjugation produces a novel CHIP regulatory mode that enhances the tumor-suppressive activity of CHIP, thereby contributing to the antitumor effect of type I IFN.

  2. Protein–Protein Interactions Modulate the Docking-Dependent E3-Ubiquitin Ligase Activity of Carboxy-Terminus of Hsc70-Interacting Protein (CHIP)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, Vikram; Landré, Vivien; Ning, Jia; Hernychova, Lenka; Muller, Petr; Verma, Chandra; Walkinshaw, Malcolm D.; Blackburn, Elizabeth A.; Ball, Kathryn L.

    2015-01-01

    CHIP is a tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) domain protein that functions as an E3-ubiquitin ligase. As well as linking the molecular chaperones to the ubiquitin proteasome system, CHIP also has a docking-dependent mode where it ubiquitinates native substrates, thereby regulating their steady state levels and/or function. Here we explore the effect of Hsp70 on the docking-dependent E3-ligase activity of CHIP. The TPR-domain is revealed as a binding site for allosteric modulators involved in determining CHIP's dynamic conformation and activity. Biochemical, biophysical and modeling evidence demonstrate that Hsp70-binding to the TPR, or Hsp70-mimetic mutations, regulate CHIP-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and IRF-1 through effects on U-box activity and substrate binding. HDX-MS was used to establish that conformational-inhibition-signals extended from the TPR-domain to the U-box. This underscores inter-domain allosteric regulation of CHIP by the core molecular chaperones. Defining the chaperone-associated TPR-domain of CHIP as a manager of inter-domain communication highlights the potential for scaffolding modules to regulate, as well as assemble, complexes that are fundamental to protein homeostatic control. PMID:26330542

  3. Post-transcriptional regulation of lipoprotein receptors by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Zelcer, Noam

    2012-06-01

    The hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) pathway is essential for clearing circulating LDL and is an important therapeutic target for treating cardiovascular disease. Abundance of the LDLR is subject to both transcriptional and nontranscriptional control. Here, we highlight a new post-transcriptional mechanism for controlling LDLR function via ubiquitination of the receptor by the E3-ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL). IDOL is a recently identified transcriptional target of the liver X receptors. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase IDOL promotes ubiquitination of the LDLR, thereby marking it for lysosomal degradation. The determinants required for degradation of the LDLR by IDOL have been largely identified. IDOL also targets two related lipoprotein receptors, the very low-density lipoprotein receptor and apolipoprotein E receptor 2. Despite several similarities, the IDOL, and PCSK9 pathways for controlling LDLR abundance seem independent of each other. Genome-wide association studies have recently identified IDOL as a locus influencing variability in circulating levels of LDL, thereby highlighting the possible role of IDOL in human lipoprotein metabolism. Transcriptional induction of IDOL by liver X receptor defines a new post-transcriptional pathway for controlling LDLR abundance and LDL uptake independent of sterol regulatory element binding proteins. Targeting IDOL activity may offer a novel therapeutic approach complementary to statins for treating cardiovascular disease.

  4. Crosstalk Between the Autophagy-Lysosome Pathway and the Ubiquitin-Proteasome Pathway in Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, J; He, J; Zhou, Y; Wu, M; Liu, Y; Shang, F; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    The accumulation of damaged or misfolded proteins in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells was considered a contributing factor for RPE dysfunction in age-related macular degeneration (AMD). The ubiquitinproteasome pathway (UPP) and the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) are the two major proteolytic systems for clearance of misfolded or damaged proteins. The aim is to investigate how these two systems communicate and coordinate with each other in RPE cells for eliminating intracellular misfolded and damaged proteins. Cultured ARPE-19 cells were treated with proteasome inhibitor MG132 and lysosomotropic agent chloroquine (CQ), respectively. The levels and cellular distributions of ubiquitinated proteins, LC3-I, LC3-II, LAMP1 and p62 were analyzed by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Proteasome activity was determined using Suc-LLVY-AMC as a substrate. The level of ubiquitinated protein aggregations was significantly increased after the treatment of MG132 in RPE cells. The levels of LC3-I, LC3-II and LAMP1 increased in MG132 treated cells. The levels of γ-tubulin and p62 also increased in MG132 treated cells, suggesting that inhibition of the UPP up-regulates autophagy-lysosome pathway. Inhibition of lysosomal activity with CQ also increased the levels of high mass ubiquitin conjugates, LC3-II and p62. In addition, proteasome activity was compromised upon prolonged lysosomal inhibition. These data indicate that the UPP and the ALP are interrelated and that dysfunction of the ALP would also result in dysfunction of the UPP and severely compromise the capacity of eliminating misfolded and other forms of damaged proteins.

  5. Synaptic Tagging, Evaluation of Memories, and the Distal Reward Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papper, Marc; Kempter, Richard; Leibold, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity exhibits distinct phases. The synaptic tagging hypothesis suggests an early phase in which synapses are prepared, or "tagged," for protein capture, and a late phase in which those proteins are integrated into the synapses to achieve memory consolidation. The synapse specificity of the tags is consistent with…

  6. Impaired synaptic plasticity in RASopathies: a mini-review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mainberger, Florian; Langer, Susanne; Mall, Volker; Jung, Nikolai H

    2016-10-01

    Synaptic plasticity in the form of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD) is considered to be the neurophysiological correlate of learning and memory. Impairments are discussed to be one of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms of developmental disorders. In so-called RASopathies [e.g., neurofibromatosis 1 (NF1)], neurocognitive impairments are frequent and are affected by components of the RAS pathway which lead to impairments in synaptic plasticity. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) provides a non-invasive method to investigate synaptic plasticity in humans. Here, we review studies using TMS to evaluate synaptic plasticity in patients with RASopathies. Patients with NF1 and Noonan syndrome (NS) showed reduced cortical LTP-like synaptic plasticity. In contrast, increased LTP-like synaptic plasticity has been shown in Costello syndrome. Notably, lovastatin normalized impaired LTP-like plasticity and increased intracortical inhibition in patients with NF1. TMS has been shown to be a safe and efficient method to investigate synaptic plasticity and intracortical inhibition in patients with RASopathies. Deeper insights in impairments of synaptic plasticity in RASopathies could help to develop new options for the therapy of learning deficits in these patients.

  7. The discovery of GluA3-dependent synaptic plasticity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renner, M.C.

    2016-01-01

    AMPA receptors (AMPARs) are responsible for fast excitatory synaptic transmission. GluA1-containing AMPARs have been extensively studied and play a key role in several forms of synaptic plasticity and memory. In contrast, GluA3-containing AMPARs have historically been ignored because they have

  8. Role of MicroRNA in Governing Synaptic Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Yuqin; Xu, Hongyu; Su, Xinhong; He, Xiaosheng

    2016-01-01

    Although synaptic plasticity in neural circuits is orchestrated by an ocean of genes, molecules, and proteins, the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, it is well acknowledged that miRNA exerts widespread regulation over the translation and degradation of target gene in nervous system. Increasing evidence suggests that quite a few specific miRNAs play important roles in various respects of synaptic plasticity including synaptogenesis, synaptic morphology alteration, and synaptic function modification. More importantly, the miRNA-mediated regulation of synaptic plasticity is not only responsible for synapse development and function but also involved in the pathophysiology of plasticity-related diseases. A review is made here on the function of miRNAs in governing synaptic plasticity, emphasizing the emerging regulatory role of individual miRNAs in synaptic morphological and functional plasticity, as well as their implications in neurological disorders. Understanding of the way in which miRNAs contribute to synaptic plasticity provides rational clues in establishing the novel therapeutic strategy for plasticity-related diseases.

  9. Glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the mesocorticolimbic system in addiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Huijstee, Aile N.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.

    2015-01-01

    Addictive drugs remodel the brain’s reward circuitry, the mesocorticolimbic dopamine (DA) system, by inducing widespread adaptations of glutamatergic synapses. This drug-induced synaptic plasticity is thought to contribute to both the development and the persistence of addiction. This review highlights the synaptic modifications that are induced by in vivo exposure to addictive drugs and describes how these drug-induced synaptic changes may contribute to the different components of addictive behavior, such as compulsive drug use despite negative consequences and relapse. Initially, exposure to an addictive drug induces synaptic changes in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). This drug-induced synaptic potentiation in the VTA subsequently triggers synaptic changes in downstream areas of the mesocorticolimbic system, such as the nucleus accumbens (NAc) and the prefrontal cortex (PFC), with further drug exposure. These glutamatergic synaptic alterations are then thought to mediate many of the behavioral symptoms that characterize addiction. The later stages of glutamatergic synaptic plasticity in the NAc and in particular in the PFC play a role in maintaining addiction and drive relapse to drug-taking induced by drug-associated cues. Remodeling of PFC glutamatergic circuits can persist into adulthood, causing a lasting vulnerability to relapse. We will discuss how these neurobiological changes produced by drugs of abuse may provide novel targets for potential treatment strategies for addiction. PMID:25653591

  10. Fine structure of long-term changes in the cochlear nucleus after acoustic overstimulation: chronic degeneration and new growth of synaptic endings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J J; Gross, J; Potashner, S J; Morest, D K

    2004-09-15

    The companion study showed that acoustic overstimulation of adult chinchillas, with a noise level sufficient to damage the cochlea, led to cytological changes and degeneration of synaptic endings in the cochlear nucleus within 1-16 weeks. In the present study, the same stimulus was used to study the long-term effects on the fine structure of synaptic endings in the cochlear nucleus. For periods of 6 and 8 months after a single exposure to a damaging noise level, there ensued a chronic, continuing process of neurodegeneration involving excitatory and inhibitory synaptic endings. Electron microscopic observations demonstrated freshly occurring degeneration even as late as 8 months. Degeneration was widespread in the neuropil and included the synapses on the globular bushy cell, which forms part of the main ascending auditory pathway. Neurodegeneration was accompanied by newly formed synaptic endings, which repopulated some of the sites vacated previously by axosomatic endings on globular bushy cells. Many of these synaptic endings must arise from central interneurons. The findings suggest that overstimulation can induce a self-sustaining condition of progressive neurodegeneration accompanied by a new growth of synaptic endings. Noise-induced hearing loss thus may progress as a neurodegenerative disease with the capacity for synaptic reorganization within the cochlear nucleus.

  11. Ataxia, Dementia, and Hypogonadotropism Caused by Disordered Ubiquitination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margolin, David H.; Kousi, Maria; Chan, Yee-Ming

    2013-01-01

    affected patients. Neurologic and reproductive endocrine phenotypes were characterized in detail. The effects of sequence variants and the presence of an epistatic interaction were tested in a zebrafish model. RESULTS Digenic homozygous mutations in RNF216 and OTUD4, which encode a ubiquitin E3 ligase...... in zebrafish embryos induced defects in the eye, optic tectum, and cerebellum; combinatorial suppression of both genes exacerbated these phenotypes, which were rescued by nonmutant, but not mutant, human RNF216 or OTUD4 messenger RNA. All patients had progressive ataxia and dementia. Neuronal loss was observed...

  12. Configuration interaction of hydropathic waves enables ubiquitin functionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, Douglas C.; Phillips, J. C.

    2018-02-01

    Ubiquitin, discovered less than 50 years ago, tags thousands of diseased proteins for destruction. It is small (only 76 amino acids), and is found unchanged in mammals, birds, fish and even worms. Key features of its functionality are identified here using critical point thermodynamic scaling theory. These include Fano interference between first- and second-order elements of correlated long-range globular surface shape transitions. Comparison with its closest relative, 76 amino acid Nedd8, shows that the latter lacks these features. A cracked elastic network model is proposed for the common target shared by many diseased proteins.

  13. Soft-bound synaptic plasticity increases storage capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark C W van Rossum

    Full Text Available Accurate models of synaptic plasticity are essential to understand the adaptive properties of the nervous system and for realistic models of learning and memory. Experiments have shown that synaptic plasticity depends not only on pre- and post-synaptic activity patterns, but also on the strength of the connection itself. Namely, weaker synapses are more easily strengthened than already strong ones. This so called soft-bound plasticity automatically constrains the synaptic strengths. It is known that this has important consequences for the dynamics of plasticity and the synaptic weight distribution, but its impact on information storage is unknown. In this modeling study we introduce an information theoretic framework to analyse memory storage in an online learning setting. We show that soft-bound plasticity increases a variety of performance criteria by about 18% over hard-bound plasticity, and likely maximizes the storage capacity of synapses.

  14. [Involvement of aquaporin-4 in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xin; Gao, Jian-Feng

    2017-06-25

    Aquaporin-4 (AQP-4) is the predominant water channel in the central nervous system (CNS) and primarily expressed in astrocytes. Astrocytes have been generally believed to play important roles in regulating synaptic plasticity and information processing. However, the role of AQP-4 in regulating synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, cognitive function is only beginning to be investigated. It is well known that synaptic plasticity is the prime candidate for mediating of learning and memory. Long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD) are two forms of synaptic plasticity, and they share some but not all the properties and mechanisms. Hippocampus is a part of limbic system that is particularly important in regulation of learning and memory. This article is to review some research progresses of the function of AQP-4 in synaptic plasticity, learning and memory, and propose the possible role of AQP-4 as a new target in the treatment of cognitive dysfunction.

  15. Synaptic Plasticity onto Dopamine Neurons Shapes Fear Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignatelli, Marco; Umanah, George Kwabena Essien; Ribeiro, Sissi Palma; Chen, Rong; Karuppagounder, Senthilkumar Senthil; Yau, Hau-Jie; Eacker, Stephen; Dawson, Valina Lynn; Dawson, Ted Murray; Bonci, Antonello

    2017-01-18

    Fear learning is a fundamental behavioral process that requires dopamine (DA) release. Experience-dependent synaptic plasticity occurs on DA neurons while an organism is engaged in aversive experiences. However, whether synaptic plasticity onto DA neurons is causally involved in aversion learning is unknown. Here, we show that a stress priming procedure enhances fear learning by engaging VTA synaptic plasticity. Moreover, we took advantage of the ability of the ATPase Thorase to regulate the internalization of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) in order to selectively manipulate glutamatergic synaptic plasticity on DA neurons. Genetic ablation of Thorase in DAT + neurons produced increased AMPAR surface expression and function that lead to impaired induction of both long-term depression (LTD) and long-term potentiation (LTP). Strikingly, animals lacking Thorase in DAT + neurons expressed greater associative learning in a fear conditioning paradigm. In conclusion, our data provide a novel, causal link between synaptic plasticity onto DA neurons and fear learning. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Bioinformatic investigation of the role of ubiquitins in cucumber flower morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawełkowicz, Magdalena; Osipowski, Paweł; Wojcieszek, Michał; Kowalczuk, Cezary; PlÄ der, Wojciech; Przybecki, Zbigniew

    2016-09-01

    Three cDNA clones were used to screen cucumber genome in order to find genes and proteins. Functional annotation reveals that they are correlated with ubiquitination pathways. Various bioinformatics tools were used to screen and check protein sequences features such as: the presence of specific domains, transmembrane regions, cleavage site and cellular placement. The computational analysis for promotor region shows many binding sites for transcription factors, which could regulate the expression of genes. In order to check gene expression levels in developing flower buds of monoecious (B10) and gynoecious (2gg) cucumber lines, the real - time PCR technique was applied. The expression was checked for the whole buds and only for the 3rd and 4th whorls of bud when generative organ are form which were obtained by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM) technique.

  17. DMPD: Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. [Dynamic Macrophage Pathway CSML Database

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available 16982211 Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. Wullaer...vg) (.html) (.csml) Show Ubiquitin: tool and target for intracellular NF-kappaB inhibitors. PubmedID 16982211 Title Ubiq

  18. CCL2-ethanol interactions and hippocampal synaptic protein expression in a transgenic mouse model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna eGruol

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to ethanol produces a number of detrimental effects on behavior. Neuroadaptive changes in brain structure or function underlie these behavioral changes and may be transient or persistent in nature. Central to the functional changes are alterations in the biology of neuronal and glial cells of the brain. Recent data show that ethanol induces glial cells of the brain to produce elevated levels of neuroimmune factors including CCL2, a key innate immune chemokine. Depending on the conditions of ethanol exposure, the upregulated levels of CCL2 can be transient or persistent and outlast the period of ethanol exposure. Importantly, results indicate that the upregulated levels of CCL2 may lead to CCL2-ethanol interactions that mediate or regulate the effects of ethanol on the brain. Glial cells are in close association with neurons and regulate many neuronal functions. Therefore, effects of ethanol on glial cells may underlie some of the effects of ethanol on neurons. To investigate this possibility, we are studying the effects of chronic ethanol on hippocampal synaptic function in a transgenic mouse model that expresses elevated levels of CCL2 in the brain through enhanced glial expression, a situation know to occur in alcoholics. Both CCL2 and ethanol have been reported to alter synaptic function in the hippocampus. In the current study, we determined if interactions are evident between CCL2 and ethanol at level of hippocampal synaptic proteins. Two ethanol exposure paradigms were used; the first involved ethanol exposure by drinking and the second involved ethanol exposure in a paradigm that combines drinking plus ethanol vapor. The first paradigm does not produce dependence on ethanol, whereas the second paradigm is commonly used to produce ethanol dependence. Results show modest effects of both ethanol exposure paradigms on the level of synaptic proteins in the hippocampus of CCL2 transgenic mice compared with their non

  19. SUMO and ubiquitin-dependent XPC exchange drives nucleotide excision repair

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van Cuijk, Loes; Van Belle, Gijsbert J.; Turkyilmaz, Yasemin

    2015-01-01

    XPC recognizes UV-induced DNA lesions and initiates their removal by nucleotide excision repair (NER). Damage recognition in NER is tightly controlled by ubiquitin and SUMO modifications. Recent studies have shown that the SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF111 promotes K63-linked ubiquitylation o...

  20. Label-Free and Real-Time Detection of Protein Ubiquitination with a Biological Nanopore

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wloka, Carsten; Van Meervelt, Veerle; van Gelder, Dewi; Danda, Natasha; Jager, Nienke; Williams, Chris P; Maglia, Giovanni

    The covalent addition of ubiquitin to target proteins is a key post-translational modification that is linked to a myriad of biological processes. Here, we report a fast, single-molecule, and label-free method to probe the ubiquitination of proteins employing an engineered Cytolysin A (ClyA)

  1. Inhibitors of ubiquitin E3 ligase as potential new antimalarial drug leads

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is the principal system for degradation of proteins in eukaryotes. Ubiquitin is a highly conserved polypeptide that covalently attaches to target proteins through the combined action ofubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1), conjugating enzyme (E2) and a protein ligase (E...

  2. Both K63 and K48 ubiquitin linkages signal lysosomal degradation of the LDL receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Xu, Ming; Scotti, Elena; Chen, Zhijian J; Tontonoz, Peter

    2013-05-01

    Linkage-specific ubiquitination often leads to distinct cellular events. It has been difficult to establish definitively the requirement for a particular linkage in mammalian degradation pathways due to the inability to deplete endogenous ubiquitin while maintaining cell viability. The E3 ubiquitin ligase inducible degrader of the LDL receptor (IDOL) targets the low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) for degradation. The nature of the linkages employed to signal lysosomal degradation of the LDLR, and to signal proteasomal autodegradation of IDOL, have not been determined. We used an inducible RNAi strategy to replace endogenous ubiquitin with mutants lacking K48 or K63. We found that IDOL catalyzes the transfer of ubiquitin chains to itself and to the LDLR that do not contain exclusively K48 or K63 linkages. Thus, LDLR can be targeted to the lysosome by either K48 or K63 linkages. We further demonstrate that although both ubiquitin conjugating enzyme E2 (UBE2)Ds and UBE2N/V1 can catalyze LDLR ubiquitination in a cell-free system, UBE2Ds appear to be the major E2 enzymes employed by IDOL in cells, consistent with their ability to catalyze both K48 and K63 linkages. The results reveal mechanistic insight into the posttranscriptional control of lipoprotein uptake and provide a test of the requirement of linkage-specific ubiquitination for specific lysosomal and proteasomal degradation pathways in mammalian cells.

  3. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ubiquitin which has the function of selective protein degradation may play an important role in the regulation of insect growth and development. The coding sequence of an ubiquitin gene from the larvae of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) named CsUB (GenBank Accession No.

  4. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... The coding sequence of an ubiquitin gene from the larvae of the rice stem borer, Chilo suppressalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae) named CsUB (GenBank. Accession No. GU238420) was cloned by RT-PCR and sequenced in this study, with primers according to the sequences of ubiquitin genes from ...

  5. Expression of ovine ubiquitin C-terminal hydroxylase 1, pH and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydroxylase (UCH-L1) has been identified in few transcriptome studies as a biomarker coding for trauma and perception of pain in non-meat species. For the first time, real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was used to quantitate the expression of ovine ubiquitin C-terminal hydroxylase 1 ...

  6. Accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in mouse neuronal cells induced by oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo-Pereira, M E; Yakushin, S; Cohen, G

    1997-03-01

    Ubiquitin protein conjugates are commonly detected in neuronal brain inclusions of patients with neurodegenerative disorders. The failure to eliminate the ubiquitin-protein deposits in the degenerating neurons may result from changes in the activity of the ubiquitin/ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway. This proteolytic pathway plays a major role in the degradation of short lived, abnormal and denatured proteins. Cadmium is a potent cell poison and is known to affect the ubiquitin pathway and to cause oxidative stress. Increases in protein mixed-disulfides (Pr-SSG) and decreases in glutathione (GSH) are often used as markers of oxidative stress. To investigate the relationship between the ubiquitin pathway and cellular glutathione (GSH), we treated HT4 cells (a mouse neuronal cell line) and rat mesencephalic primary cultures with different concentrations of the heavy metal. We observed marked increases in Pr-SSG as well as decreases in GSH, after exposure of HT4 cells or primary mesencephalic cultures to Cd2+. Furthermore, our results show that Cd2+ induced the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins. Detection was by Western blotting of total cell extracts probed with antibodies that recognize ubiquitin-protein conjugates. These results suggest that the ubiquitin-pathway is closely involved in the cell response to cadmium-mediated oxidative stress.

  7. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBE2C is highly expressed in breast microcalcification lesions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen-Pin Chou

    Full Text Available Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 2C (UBE2C contributes to ubiquitin-mediated proteasome degradation of cell cycle progression in breast cancer. Microcalcification (MC is the most common mammographic feature of early breast cancer. In this study, we evaluated whether UBE2C could be a tumor marker of early breast cancer with MC found on screening mammography. UBE2C protein and mRNA expression were measured in breast core biopsy pairs of MC and adjacent non-MC breast tissue from each subject. Immunohistochemistry revealed UBE2C positivity in 69.4% of MC samples and 77.6% negativity in non-MC samples (p<0.0001. On RT-qPCR, 56.1% of malignant MC lesion samples showed high mRNA level of UBE2C and 80% of benign MC lesion samples showed a low level of UBE2C (p = 0.1766. We investigated the carcinogenic role of UBE2C in MCF-7 breast cancer cells with UBE2C knockdown; UBE2C knockdown downregulated cell proliferation and activated the cellular apoptosis pathway to inhibit cell colony formation. Furthermore, UBE2C expression was associated with that of carcinogenic genes human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2, cellular c-Ki-ras2 proto-oncogene (KRAS, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4, C-C motif chemokine 5 (CCL5, neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally downregulated 9 (NEDD9 and Ras homolog family member C (RhoC. UBE2C may be a marker for diagnosis of nonpalpable breast lesions but not benign or malignant tumors in mammography core biopsies. Suppression of UBE2C may be a potential therapy target in breast cancer.

  8. Leucine-rich repeat-containing synaptic adhesion molecules as organizers of synaptic specificity and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Anna; de Wit, Joris

    2018-04-09

    The brain harbors billions of neurons that form distinct neural circuits with exquisite specificity. Specific patterns of connectivity between distinct neuronal cell types permit the transfer and computation of information. The molecular correlates that give rise to synaptic specificity are incompletely understood. Recent studies indicate that cell-surface molecules are important determinants of cell type identity and suggest that these are essential players in the specification of synaptic connectivity. Leucine-rich repeat (LRR)-containing adhesion molecules in particular have emerged as key organizers of excitatory and inhibitory synapses. Here, we discuss emerging evidence that LRR proteins regulate the assembly of specific connectivity patterns across neural circuits, and contribute to the diverse structural and functional properties of synapses, two key features that are critical for the proper formation and function of neural circuits.

  9. Epigenetic mechanisms in memory and synaptic function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Faraz A; Day, Jeremy J

    2011-01-01

    Although the term ‘epigenetics’ was coined nearly seventy years ago, its critical function in memory processing by the adult CNS has only recently been appreciated. The hypothesis that epigenetic mechanisms regulate memory and behavior was motivated by the need for stable molecular processes that evade turnover of the neuronal proteome. In this article, we discuss evidence that supports a role for neural epigenetic modifications in the formation, consolidation and storage of memory. In addition, we will review the evidence that epigenetic mechanisms regulate synaptic plasticity, a cellular correlate of memory. We will also examine how the concerted action of multiple epigenetic mechanisms with varying spatiotemporal profiles influence selective gene expression in response to behavioral experience. Finally, we will suggest key areas for future research that will help elucidate the complex, vital and still mysterious, role of epigenetic mechanisms in neural function and behavior. PMID:22122279

  10. Alzheimer's disease: synaptic dysfunction and Abeta

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shankar, Ganesh M

    2009-11-23

    Abstract Synapse loss is an early and invariant feature of Alzheimer\\'s disease (AD) and there is a strong correlation between the extent of synapse loss and the severity of dementia. Accordingly, it has been proposed that synapse loss underlies the memory impairment evident in the early phase of AD and that since plasticity is important for neuronal viability, persistent disruption of plasticity may account for the frank cell loss typical of later phases of the disease. Extensive multi-disciplinary research has implicated the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) in the aetiology of AD and here we review the evidence that non-fibrillar soluble forms of Aβ are mediators of synaptic compromise. We also discuss the possible mechanisms of Aβ synaptotoxicity and potential targets for therapeutic intervention.

  11. Pax3 stimulates p53 ubiquitination and degradation independent of transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Dan Wang

    Full Text Available Pax3 is a developmental transcription factor that is required for neural tube and neural crest development. We previously showed that inactivating the p53 tumor suppressor protein prevents neural tube and cardiac neural crest defects in Pax3-mutant mouse embryos. This demonstrates that Pax3 regulates these processes by blocking p53 function. Here we investigated the mechanism by which Pax3 blocks p53 function.We employed murine embryonic stem cell (ESC-derived neuronal precursors as a cell culture model of embryonic neuroepithelium or neural crest. Pax3 reduced p53 protein stability, but had no effect on p53 mRNA levels or the rate of p53 synthesis. Full length Pax3 as well as fragments that contained either the DNA-binding paired box or the homeodomain, expressed as GST or FLAG fusion proteins, physically associated with p53 and Mdm2 both in vitro and in vivo. In contrast, Splotch Pax3, which causes neural tube and neural crest defects in homozygous embryos, bound weakly, or not at all, to p53 or Mdm2. The paired domain and homeodomain each stimulated Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination of p53 and p53 degradation in the absence of the Pax3 transcription regulatory domains, whereas Splotch Pax3 did not stimulate p53 ubiquitination or degradation.Pax3 inactivates p53 function by stimulating its ubiquitination and degradation. This process utilizes the Pax3 paired domain and homeodomain but is independent of DNA-binding and transcription regulation. Because inactivating p53 is the only required Pax3 function during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development, and inactivating p53 does not require Pax3-dependent transcription regulation, this indicates that Pax3 is not required to function as a transcription factor during neural tube closure and cardiac neural crest development. These findings further suggest novel explanations for PAX3 functions in human diseases, such as in neural crest-derived cancers and Waardenburg syndrome types 1 and 3.

  12. The Role of RUB (related to ubiquitin) Family of Proteins in the Hormone Response. Final Report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Callis, Judy [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States). Dept. of Molecular and Cellular Biology

    2013-03-22

    The Rub pathway is a conserved protein modification pathway. RUB (called Rubp1 in budding yeast, Nedd8 in animals and RUB in plants) is a ubiquitin-like 76-amino acid protein. It covalently attaches to protein using an enzymatic machinery analogous to the enzymes that attach ubiquitin to its substrate proteins. However, the nature of the complement of Rub-modified proteins in organisms was not clear. From bioinformatics analyses, one can identify a Rub activating enzymes and Rub conjugating enzymes. However, in many cases, their biochemical properties were not described. In DOE-funded work, we made major advances in our understanding of the Rub pathway in yeast and plants, work that is applicable to other organisms as well. There is a multi-subunit enzyme called SCF in all eukaryotes. The SCF consists of several subunits that serve as a scaffold (the cullin, SKP and RBX subunits) and one subunit that interacts with the substrate. This cullin protein (called Cdc53p in yeast and CULLIN 1 in plants and animals) was a known Rub target. In this work, we identified additional Rub targets in yeast as the other cullin-like proteins Cul3p and Rtt101p. Additionally we described the conservation of the Rub pathway because plant RUB1 can conjugated to yeast Cdc53p- in yeast. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, we characterized the Rub activating enzymes and showed that they are not biochemically equivalent. We also showed that the Rub pathway is essential in plants and characterized plants with reduced levels of rub proteins. These plants are affected in multiple developmental processes. We discovered that they over-produce ethylene as dark-grown seedlings. We characterized a mutant allele of CULLIN1 in Arabidopsis with impaired interaction with RBX and showed that it is unstable in vivo. We used our knowledge of monitoring protein degradation to map the degradation determinants in a plant transcription factor. Finally, we took a mass spectrometric approach to identify

  13. When ubiquitin meets NF-κB: a trove for anti-cancer drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhao-Hui; Shi, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    During the last two decades, the studies on ubiquitination in regulating transcription factor NF-κB activation have elucidated the expanding role of ubiquitination in modulating cellular events by non-proteolytic mechanisms, as well as by proteasomal degradation. The significance of ubiquitination has also been recognized in regulating gene transcription, epigenetic modifications, kinase activation, DNA repair and subcellular translocation. This progress has been translated into novel strategies for developing anti-cancer therapeutics, exemplified by the success of the first FDA-approved proteasome inhibitor drug Bortezomib. Here we discuss the current understanding of the ubiquitin-proteasome system and how it is involved in regulating NF-κB signaling pathways in response to a variety of stimuli. We also focus on the recent progress of anti-cancer drug development targeting various steps of ubiquitination process, and the potential of these drugs in cancer treatment as related to their impact on NF-κB activation.

  14. A small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin activating enzyme for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, Marc L; Milhollen, Michael A; Ciavarri, Jeff; Fleming, Paul; Traore, Tary; Sappal, Darshan; Huck, Jessica; Shi, Judy; Gavin, James; Brownell, Jim; Yang, Yu; Stringer, Bradley; Griffin, Robert; Bruzzese, Frank; Soucy, Teresa; Duffy, Jennifer; Rabino, Claudia; Riceberg, Jessica; Hoar, Kara; Lublinsky, Anya; Menon, Saurabh; Sintchak, Michael; Bump, Nancy; Pulukuri, Sai M; Langston, Steve; Tirrell, Stephen; Kuranda, Mike; Veiby, Petter; Newcomb, John; Li, Ping; Wu, Jing Tao; Powe, Josh; Dick, Lawrence R; Greenspan, Paul; Galvin, Katherine; Manfredi, Mark; Claiborne, Chris; Amidon, Benjamin S; Bence, Neil F

    2018-02-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) comprises a network of enzymes that is responsible for maintaining cellular protein homeostasis. The therapeutic potential of this pathway has been validated by the clinical successes of a number of UPS modulators, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory imide drugs (IMiDs). Here we identified TAK-243 (formerly known as MLN7243) as a potent, mechanism-based small-molecule inhibitor of the ubiquitin activating enzyme (UAE), the primary mammalian E1 enzyme that regulates the ubiquitin conjugation cascade. TAK-243 treatment caused depletion of cellular ubiquitin conjugates, resulting in disruption of signaling events, induction of proteotoxic stress, and impairment of cell cycle progression and DNA damage repair pathways. TAK-243 treatment caused death of cancer cells and, in primary human xenograft studies, demonstrated antitumor activity at tolerated doses. Due to its specificity and potency, TAK-243 allows for interrogation of ubiquitin biology and for assessment of UAE inhibition as a new approach for cancer treatment.

  15. How a disordered ubiquitin ligase maintains order in nuclear protein homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenbaum, Joel C; Gardner, Richard G

    2011-01-01

    Cells use protein quality control (PQC) systems to protect themselves from potentially harmful misfolded proteins. Many misfolded proteins are repaired by molecular chaperones, but irreparably damaged proteins must be destroyed. Eukaryotes predominantly destroy these abnormally folded proteins through the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway, which requires compartment-specific ubiquitin ligase complexes that mark substrates with ubiquitin for proteasome degradation. In the yeast nucleus, misfolded proteins are targeted for degradation by the ubiquitin ligase San1, which binds misfolded nuclear proteins directly and does not appear to require chaperones for substrate binding. San1 is also remarkably adaptable, as it is capable of ubiquitinating a structurally diverse assortment of abnormally folded substrates. We attribute this adaptability to San1's high degree of structural disorder, which provides flexibility and allows San1 to conform to differently shaped substrates. Here we review our recent work characterizing San1's distinctive mode of substrate recognition and the associated implications for PQC in the nucleus.

  16. Shank synaptic scaffold proteins: keys to understanding the pathogenesis of autism and other synaptic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, Carlo; Vicidomini, Cinzia; Bigi, Ilaria; Mossa, Adele; Verpelli, Chiara

    2015-12-01

    Shank/ProSAP proteins are essential to synaptic formation, development, and function. Mutations in the family of SHANK genes are strongly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, such as intellectual disability (ID), and schizophrenia. Thus, the term 'Shankopathies' identifies a number of neuronal diseases caused by alteration of Shank protein expression leading to abnormal synaptic development. With this review we want to summarize the major genetic, molecular, behavior and electrophysiological studies that provide new clues into the function of Shanks and pave the way for the discovery of new therapeutic drugs targeted to treat patients with SHANK mutations and also patients affected by other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders. Shank/ProSAP proteins are essential to synaptic formation, development, and function. Mutations in the family of SHANK genes are strongly associated with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and other neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders, such as intellectual disability (ID), and schizophrenia (SCZ). With this review we want to summarize the major genetic, molecular, behavior and electrophysiological studies that provide new clues into the function of Shanks and pave the way for the discovery of new therapeutic drugs targeted to treat patients with SHANK mutations. © 2015 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  17. plantsUPS: a database of plants' Ubiquitin Proteasome System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Zhen

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ubiquitin 26S/proteasome system (UPS, a serial cascade process of protein ubiquitination and degradation, is the last step for most cellular proteins. There are many genes involved in this system, but are not identified in many species. The accumulating availability of genomic sequence data is generating more demands in data management and analysis. Genomics data of plants such as Populus trichocarpa, Medicago truncatula, Glycine max and others are now publicly accessible. It is time to integrate information on classes of genes for complex protein systems such as UPS. Results We developed a database of higher plants' UPS, named 'plantsUPS'. Both automated search and manual curation were performed in identifying candidate genes. Extensive annotations referring to each gene were generated, including basic gene characterization, protein features, GO (gene ontology assignment, microarray probe set annotation and expression data, as well as cross-links among different organisms. A chromosome distribution map, multi-sequence alignment, and phylogenetic trees for each species or gene family were also created. A user-friendly web interface and regular updates make plantsUPS valuable to researchers in related fields. Conclusion The plantsUPS enables the exploration and comparative analysis of UPS in higher plants. It now archives > 8000 genes from seven plant species distributed in 11 UPS-involved gene families. The plantsUPS is freely available now to all users at http://bioinformatics.cau.edu.cn/plantsUPS.

  18. Ubc13: the Lys63 ubiquitin chain building machine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodge, Curtis D; Spyracopoulos, Leo; Glover, J N Mark

    2016-09-27

    Ubc13 is an ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme that participates with many different E3 ligases to form lysine 63-linked (Lys63) ubiquitin chains that are critical to signaling in inflammatory and DNA damage response pathways. Recent studies have suggested Ubc13 as a potential therapeutic target for intervention in various human diseases including several different cancers, alleviation of anti-cancer drug resistance, chronic inflammation, and viral infections. Understanding a potential therapeutic target from different angles is important to assess its usefulness and potential pitfalls. Here we present a global review of Ubc13 from its structure, function, and cellular activities, to its natural and chemical inhibition. The aim of this article is to review the literature that directly implicates Ubc13 in a biological function, and to integrate structural and mechanistic insights into the larger role of this critical E2 enzyme. We discuss observations of multiple Ubc13 structures that suggest a novel mechanism for activation of Ubc13 that involves conformational change of the active site loop.

  19. Linear ubiquitin chain induces apoptosis and inhibits tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhoushuai; Jiang, Wandong; Wang, Guifen; Sun, Ying; Xiao, Wei

    2018-01-01

    Ubiquitination of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) plays an important role in DNA damage response. Ectopic expression of PCNA fused at either terminus with ubiquitin (Ub) lacking two C-terminal glycine residues induces translesion DNA synthesis which resembles synthesis mediated by PCNA monoubiquitination. PCNA fused with Ub containing the C-terminal Gly residues at the C-terminus can be further polyubiquitinated in a Gly-dependent manner, which inhibits cell proliferation and induces ATR-dependent replication checkpoint. In this study, we surprisingly found that PCNA fused to a head-to-tail linear Ub chain induces apoptosis in a Ub chain length-dependent manner. Further investigation revealed that the apoptotic effect is actually induced by the linear Ub chain independently from PCNA, as the Ub chain fused to GFP or an epitope tag still efficiently induces apoptosis. It is revealed that the artificial linear Ub chain differs from endogenously encoded linear Ub chains in that its Ubs contain a Ub-G76S substitution, making the Ub chain resistant to cleavage by deubiquitination enzymes. We demonstrated in this study that ectopic expression of the artificial Ub chain alone in cultured human cancer cells is sufficient to inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft mouse model, making the linear Ub chain a putative anti-cancer agent.

  20. BACE1 protein endocytosis and trafficking are differentially regulated by ubiquitination at lysine 501 and the Di-leucine motif in the carboxyl terminus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene L; Biscaro, Barbara; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-12-14

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a membrane-tethered member of the aspartyl proteases that has been identified as β-secretase. BACE1 is targeted through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane and then is internalized to endosomes. Sorting of membrane proteins to the endosomes and lysosomes is regulated by the interaction of signals present in their carboxyl-terminal fragment with specific trafficking molecules. The BACE1 carboxyl-terminal fragment contains a di-leucine sorting signal ((495)DDISLL(500)) and a ubiquitination site at Lys-501. Here, we report that lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 (BACE1K501R) does not affect the rate of endocytosis but produces BACE1 stabilization and accumulation of BACE1 in early and late endosomes/lysosomes as well as at the cell membrane. In contrast, the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA) greatly impairs BACE1 endocytosis and produces a delayed retrograde transport of BACE1 to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and a delayed delivery of BACE1 to the lysosomes, thus decreasing its degradation. Moreover, the combination of the lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA/KR) produces additive effects on BACE1 stabilization and defective internalization. Finally, BACE1LLAA/KR accumulates in the TGN, while its levels are decreased in EEA1-positive compartments indicating that both ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the di-leucine motif are necessary for the trafficking of BACE1 from the TGN to early endosomes. Our studies have elucidated a differential role for the di-leucine motif and ubiquitination at Lys-501 in BACE1 endocytosis, trafficking, and degradation and suggest the involvement of multiple adaptor molecules.

  1. BACE1 Protein Endocytosis and Trafficking Are Differentially Regulated by Ubiquitination at Lysine 501 and the Di-leucine Motif in the Carboxyl Terminus*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Eugene L.; Biscaro, Barbara; Piazza, Fabrizio; Tesco, Giuseppina

    2012-01-01

    β-Site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme (BACE1) is a membrane-tethered member of the aspartyl proteases that has been identified as β-secretase. BACE1 is targeted through the secretory pathway to the plasma membrane and then is internalized to endosomes. Sorting of membrane proteins to the endosomes and lysosomes is regulated by the interaction of signals present in their carboxyl-terminal fragment with specific trafficking molecules. The BACE1 carboxyl-terminal fragment contains a di-leucine sorting signal (495DDISLL500) and a ubiquitination site at Lys-501. Here, we report that lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 (BACE1K501R) does not affect the rate of endocytosis but produces BACE1 stabilization and accumulation of BACE1 in early and late endosomes/lysosomes as well as at the cell membrane. In contrast, the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA) greatly impairs BACE1 endocytosis and produces a delayed retrograde transport of BACE1 to the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and a delayed delivery of BACE1 to the lysosomes, thus decreasing its degradation. Moreover, the combination of the lack of ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the disruption of the di-leucine motif (BACE1LLAA/KR) produces additive effects on BACE1 stabilization and defective internalization. Finally, BACE1LLAA/KR accumulates in the TGN, while its levels are decreased in EEA1-positive compartments indicating that both ubiquitination at Lys-501 and the di-leucine motif are necessary for the trafficking of BACE1 from the TGN to early endosomes. Our studies have elucidated a differential role for the di-leucine motif and ubiquitination at Lys-501 in BACE1 endocytosis, trafficking, and degradation and suggest the involvement of multiple adaptor molecules. PMID:23109336

  2. Niclosamide prevents the formation of large ubiquitin-containing aggregates caused by proteasome inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esther Gies

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Protein aggregation is a hallmark of many neurodegenerative diseases and has been linked to the failure to degrade misfolded and damaged proteins. In the cell, aberrant proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin proteasome system that mainly targets short-lived proteins, or by the lysosomes that mostly clear long-lived and poorly soluble proteins. Both systems are interconnected and, in some instances, autophagy can redirect proteasome substrates to the lysosomes.To better understand the interplay between these two systems, we established a neuroblastoma cell population stably expressing the GFP-ubiquitin fusion protein. We show that inhibition of the proteasome leads to the formation of large ubiquitin-containing inclusions accompanied by lower solubility of the ubiquitin conjugates. Strikingly, the formation of the ubiquitin-containing aggregates does not require ectopic expression of disease-specific proteins. Moreover, formation of these focused inclusions caused by proteasome inhibition requires the lysine 63 (K63 of ubiquitin. We then assessed selected compounds that stimulate autophagy and found that the antihelmintic chemical niclosamide prevents large aggregate formation induced by proteasome inhibition, while the prototypical mTORC1 inhibitor rapamycin had no apparent effect. Niclosamide also precludes the accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins and of p62 upon proteasome inhibition. Moreover, niclosamide induces a change in lysosome distribution in the cell that, in the absence of proteasome activity, may favor the uptake into lysosomes of ubiquitinated proteins before they form large aggregates.Our results indicate that proteasome inhibition provokes the formation of large ubiquitin containing aggregates in tissue culture cells, even in the absence of disease specific proteins. Furthermore our study suggests that the autophagy-inducing compound niclosamide may promote the selective clearance of ubiquitinated proteins in the absence

  3. Pannexin 1 Regulates Bidirectional Hippocampal Synaptic Plasticity in Adult Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro O. Ardiles

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca2+ concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1, a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP, it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory.

  4. Synapse geometry and receptor dynamics modulate synaptic strength.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominik Freche

    Full Text Available Synaptic transmission relies on several processes, such as the location of a released vesicle, the number and type of receptors, trafficking between the postsynaptic density (PSD and extrasynaptic compartment, as well as the synapse organization. To study the impact of these parameters on excitatory synaptic transmission, we present a computational model for the fast AMPA-receptor mediated synaptic current. We show that in addition to the vesicular release probability, due to variations in their release locations and the AMPAR distribution, the postsynaptic current amplitude has a large variance, making a synapse an intrinsic unreliable device. We use our model to examine our experimental data recorded from CA1 mice hippocampal slices to study the differences between mEPSC and evoked EPSC variance. The synaptic current but not the coefficient of variation is maximal when the active zone where vesicles are released is apposed to the PSD. Moreover, we find that for certain type of synapses, receptor trafficking can affect the magnitude of synaptic depression. Finally, we demonstrate that perisynaptic microdomains located outside the PSD impacts synaptic transmission by regulating the number of desensitized receptors and their trafficking to the PSD. We conclude that geometrical modifications, reorganization of the PSD or perisynaptic microdomains modulate synaptic strength, as the mechanisms underlying long-term plasticity.

  5. Arc protein: a flexible hub for synaptic plasticity and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaienko, Oleksii; Patil, Sudarshan; Eriksen, Maria Steene; Bramham, Clive R

    2017-09-07

    Mammalian excitatory synapses express diverse types of synaptic plasticity. A major challenge in neuroscience is to understand how a neuron utilizes different types of plasticity to sculpt brain development, function, and behavior. Neuronal activity-induced expression of the immediate early protein, Arc, is critical for long-term potentiation and depression of synaptic transmission, homeostatic synaptic scaling, and adaptive functions such as long-term memory formation. However, the molecular basis of Arc protein function as a regulator of synaptic plasticity and cognition remains a puzzle. Recent work on the biophysical and structural properties of Arc, its protein-protein interactions and post-translational modifications have shed light on the issue. Here, we present Arc protein as a flexible, multifunctional and interactive hub. Arc interacts with specific effector proteins in neuronal compartments (dendritic spines, nuclear domains) to bidirectionally regulate synaptic strength by distinct molecular mechanisms. Arc stability, subcellular localization, and interactions are dictated by synaptic activity and post-translational modification of Arc. This functional versatility and context-dependent signaling supports a view of Arc as a highly specialized master organizer of long-term synaptic plasticity, critical for information storage and cognition. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Pannexin 1 regulates bidirectional hippocampal synaptic plasticity in adult mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardiles, Alvaro O; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Toro-Ayala, Gabriela; Cárdenas, Ana M; Palacios, Adrian G; Muñoz, Pablo; Fuenzalida, Marco; Sáez, Juan C; Martínez, Agustín D

    2014-01-01

    The threshold for bidirectional modification of synaptic plasticity is known to be controlled by several factors, including the balance between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, postsynaptic free Ca(2+) concentration and NMDA receptor (NMDAR) composition of GluN2 subunits. Pannexin 1 (Panx1), a member of the integral membrane protein family, has been shown to form non-selective channels and to regulate the induction of synaptic plasticity as well as hippocampal-dependent learning. Although Panx1 channels have been suggested to play a role in excitatory long-term potentiation (LTP), it remains unknown whether these channels also modulate long-term depression (LTD) or the balance between both types of synaptic plasticity. To study how Panx1 contributes to excitatory synaptic efficacy, we examined the age-dependent effects of eliminating or blocking Panx1 channels on excitatory synaptic plasticity within the CA1 region of the mouse hippocampus. By using different protocols to induce bidirectional synaptic plasticity, Panx1 channel blockade or lack of Panx1 were found to enhance LTP, whereas both conditions precluded the induction of LTD in adults, but not in young animals. These findings suggest that Panx1 channels restrain the sliding threshold for the induction of synaptic plasticity and underlying brain mechanisms of learning and memory.

  7. The Trim39 ubiquitin ligase inhibits APC/CCdh1-mediated degradation of the Bax activator MOAP-1

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Nai-Jia; Zhang, Liguo; Tang, Wanli; Chen, Chen; Yang, Chih-Sheng; Kornbluth, Sally

    2012-01-01

    Proapoptotic Bcl-2 family members, such as Bax, promote release of cytochrome c from mitochondria, leading to caspase activation and cell death. It was previously reported that modulator of apoptosis protein 1 (MOAP-1), an enhancer of Bax activation induced by DNA damage, is stabilized by Trim39, a protein of unknown function. In this paper, we show that MOAP-1 is a novel substrate of the anaphase-promoting complex (APC/CCdh1) ubiquitin ligase. The influence of Trim39 on MOAP-1 levels stems f...

  8. Synaptic Mechanisms of Memory Consolidation during Sleep Slow Oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yina; Krishnan, Giri P; Bazhenov, Maxim

    2016-04-13

    Sleep is critical for regulation of synaptic efficacy, memories, and learning. However, the underlying mechanisms of how sleep rhythms contribute to consolidating memories acquired during wakefulness remain unclear. Here we studied the role of slow oscillations, 0.2-1 Hz rhythmic transitions between Up and Down states during stage 3/4 sleep, on dynamics of synaptic connectivity in the thalamocortical network model implementing spike-timing-dependent synaptic plasticity. We found that the spatiotemporal pattern of Up-state propagation determines the changes of synaptic strengths between neurons. Furthermore, an external input, mimicking hippocampal ripples, delivered to the cortical network results in input-specific changes of synaptic weights, which persisted after stimulation was removed. These synaptic changes promoted replay of specific firing sequences of the cortical neurons. Our study proposes a neuronal mechanism on how an interaction between hippocampal input, such as mediated by sharp wave-ripple events, cortical slow oscillations, and synaptic plasticity, may lead to consolidation of memories through preferential replay of cortical cell spike sequences during slow-wave sleep. Sleep is critical for memory and learning. Replay during sleep of temporally ordered spike sequences related to a recent experience was proposed to be a neuronal substrate of memory consolidation. However, specific mechanisms of replay or how spike sequence replay leads to synaptic changes that underlie memory consolidation are still poorly understood. Here we used a detailed computational model of the thalamocortical system to report that interaction between slow cortical oscillations and synaptic plasticity during deep sleep can underlie mapping hippocampal memory traces to persistent cortical representation. This study provided, for the first time, a mechanistic explanation of how slow-wave sleep may promote consolidation of recent memory events. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/364231-17$15.00/0.

  9. The Deubiquitylase USP2 Regulates the LDLR Pathway by Counteracting the E3-Ubiquitin Ligase IDOL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jessica Kristine; Sorrentino, Vincenzo; Avagliano Trezza, Rossella; Heride, Claire; Urbe, Sylvie; Distel, Ben; Zelcer, Noam

    2016-02-05

    The low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) is a central determinant of circulating LDL-cholesterol and as such subject to tight regulation. Recent studies and genetic evidence implicate the inducible degrader of the LDLR (IDOL) as a regulator of LDLR abundance and of circulating levels of LDL-cholesterol in humans. Acting as an E3-ubiquitin ligase, IDOL promotes ubiquitylation and subsequent lysosomal degradation of the LDLR. Consequently, inhibition of IDOL-mediated degradation of the LDLR represents a potential strategy to increase hepatic LDL-cholesterol clearance. To establish whether deubiquitylases counteract IDOL-mediated ubiquitylation and degradation of the LDLR. Using a genetic screening approach, we identify the ubiquitin-specific protease 2 (USP2) as a post-transcriptional regulator of IDOL-mediated LDLR degradation. We demonstrate that both USP2 isoforms, USP2-69 and USP2-45, interact with IDOL and promote its deubiquitylation. IDOL deubiquitylation requires USP2 enzymatic activity and leads to a marked stabilization of IDOL protein. Paradoxically, this also markedly attenuates IDOL-mediated degradation of the LDLR and the ability of IDOL to limit LDL uptake into cells. Conversely, loss of USP2 reduces LDLR protein in an IDOL-dependent manner and limits LDL uptake. We identify a tri-partite complex encompassing IDOL, USP2, and LDLR and demonstrate that in this context USP2 promotes deubiquitylation of the LDLR and prevents its degradation. Our findings identify USP2 as a novel regulator of lipoprotein clearance owing to its ability to control ubiquitylation-dependent degradation of the LDLR by IDOL. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Prenatal ethanol exposure alters synaptic plasticity in the dorsolateral striatum of rat offspring via changing the reactivity of dopamine receptor.

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    Rong Zhou

    Full Text Available Prenatal exposure to high-level ethanol (EtOH has been reported to produce hyperlocomotion in offspring. Previous studies have demonstrated synaptic plasticity in cortical afferent to the dorsolateral (DL striatum is involved in the pathogensis of hyperlocomotion. Here, prenatal EtOH-exposed rat offspring were used to investigate whether maternal EtOH exposure affected synaptic plasticity in the DL striatum. We found high-frequency stimulation (HFS induced a weaker long-term potentiation (LTP in EtOH rats than that in control rats at postnatal day (PD 15. The same protocol of HFS induced long-term depression (LTD in control group but still LTP in EtOH group at PD 30 or PD 40. Furthermore, enhancement of basal synaptic transmission accompanied by the decrease of pair-pulse facilitation (PPF was observed in PD 30 EtOH offspring. The perfusion with D1-type receptors (D1R antagonist SCH23390 recovered synaptic transmission and blocked the induction of abnormal LTP in PD 30 EtOH offspring. The perfusion with D2-type receptors (D2R agonist quinpirole reversed EtOH-induced LTP into D1R- and metabotropic glutamate receptor-dependent LTD. The data provide the functional evidence that prenatal ethanol exposure led to the persistent abnormal synaptic plasticity in the DL striatum via disturbing the balance between D1R and D2R.

  11. Syncrip/hnRNP Q influences synaptic transmission and regulates BMP signaling at the Drosophila neuromuscular synapse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James M. Halstead

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity involves the modulation of synaptic connections in response to neuronal activity via multiple pathways. One mechanism modulates synaptic transmission by retrograde signals from the post-synapse that influence the probability of vesicle release in the pre-synapse. Despite its importance, very few factors required for the expression of retrograde signals, and proper synaptic transmission, have been identified. Here, we identify the conserved RNA binding protein Syncrip as a new factor that modulates the efficiency of vesicle release from the motoneuron and is required for correct synapse structure. We show that syncrip is required genetically and its protein product is detected only in the muscle and not in the motoneuron itself. This unexpected non-autonomy is at least partly explained by the fact that Syncrip modulates retrograde BMP signals from the muscle back to the motoneuron. We show that Syncrip influences the levels of the Bone Morphogenic Protein ligand Glass Bottom Boat from the post-synapse and regulates the pre-synapse. Our results highlight the RNA-binding protein Syncrip as a novel regulator of synaptic output. Given its known role in regulating translation, we propose that Syncrip is important for maintaining a balance between the strength of presynaptic vesicle release and postsynaptic translation.

  12. Serum concentration of ubiquitin c-terminal hydrolase-L1 in detecting severity of traumatic brain injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siahaan, A. M. P.; Japardi, I.; Hakim, A. A.

    2018-03-01

    One of the main problems with ahead injury is assessing the severity. While physical examination and imaging had limitations, neuronal damage markers, ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), released in theblood may provide valuable information about diagnosis the traumatic brain injury (TBI).Analyzing the concentrations of serum ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-L1 (UCH-L1), there must have a neuronal injury biomarker, in theTBI patients serum and their association with clinical characteristics and outcome. There were 80 TBI subjects, and there are mild, moderate, and severe involved in this study of case- control. By using ELISA, we studied the profile of serum UCH-L1 levels for TBI patients. TheUCH-L1 serum level of moderate and severe head injury is higher than in mild head injury (p<.001), but we didn’t find aspecific difference between moderate and severe head injury patients. There is no particular correlation found between serum UCH-L1 level and outcome. Serum levels of UCH-L1 appear to have potential clinical utility in diagnosing TBI but do not correlate with outcome.

  13. A Voltage Mode Memristor Bridge Synaptic Circuit with Memristor Emulators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Chua

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available A memristor bridge neural circuit which is able to perform signed synaptic weighting was proposed in our previous study, where the synaptic operation was verified via software simulation of the mathematical model of the HP memristor. This study is an extension of the previous work advancing toward the circuit implementation where the architecture of the memristor bridge synapse is built with memristor emulator circuits. In addition, a simple neural network which performs both synaptic weighting and summation is built by combining memristor emulators-based synapses and differential amplifier circuits. The feasib