WorldWideScience

Sample records for symptomatic hypoglycemia related

  1. Symptomatic Hypoglycemia Related to Inappropriately High IGF-II Serum Levels in a Patient with Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams Fernandes Barra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A 45-year old man was diagnosed with desmoplastic small round cell tumor (DSRCT with involvement of the peritoneum and pelvis. Disease progression was observed despite systemic chemotherapy. Six months after diagnosis, he developed severe hypoglycemia presented with seizures. He received intravenous glucose infusion and hydrocortisone with poor glycemic control, but with seizures resolution. The investigation excluded insulinoma, adrenal, liver and GH deficiencies. Laboratory showed slight rise of IGF-II and significant increase of the ratio IGF-II : IGF-I, which is pathognomonic of non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH. He received the diagnoses of NICTH related to IGF-II inappropriate production by DSRCT. Despite the attempt to control tumor mass and hypoglycemia, the patient died 9 months after diagnosis. NICTH related to inappropriate IGF-II secretion should be investigated in all cancer patients with refractory hypoglycemia whom insulinoma and other metabolic abnormalities were excluded from.

  2. KCNQ1 long QT syndrome patients have hyperinsulinemia and symptomatic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torekov, Signe S; Iepsen, Eva; Christiansen, Michael; Linneberg, Allan; Pedersen, Oluf; Holst, Jens J; Kanters, Jørgen K; Hansen, Torben

    2014-04-01

    Patients with loss-of-function mutations in KCNQ1 have KCNQ1 long QT syndrome (LQTS). KCNQ1 encodes a voltage-gated K(+) channel located in both cardiomyocytes and pancreatic β-cells. Inhibition of KCNQ1 in β-cells increases insulin secretion. Therefore KCNQ1 LQTS patients may exhibit increased insulin secretion. Fourteen patients, from six families, diagnosed with KCNQ1 LQTS were individually matched to two randomly chosen BMI-, age-, and sex-matched control participants and underwent an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT), a hypoglycemia questionnaire, and continuous glucose monitoring. KCNQ1 mutation carriers showed increased insulin release (area under the curve 45.6 ± 6.3 vs. 26.0 ± 2.8 min ⋅ nmol/L insulin) and β-cell glucose sensitivity and had lower levels of plasma glucose and serum potassium upon oral glucose stimulation and increased hypoglycemic symptoms. Prolonged OGTT in four available patients and matched control subjects revealed hypoglycemia in carriers after 210 min (range 1.4-3.6 vs. 4.1-5.3 mmol/L glucose), and 24-h glucose profiles showed that the patients spent 77 ± 18 min per 24 h in hypoglycemic states (KCNQ1 LQTS, caused by mutations in KCNQ1, includes, besides long QT, hyperinsulinemia, clinically relevant symptomatic reactive hypoglycemia, and low potassium after an oral glucose challenge, suggesting that KCNQ1 mutations may explain some cases of "essential" reactive hypoglycemia.

  3. The economic impact of insulin-related hypoglycemia in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoskins, Nicki; Tikkanen, Christian Klyver; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the direct cost of hypoglycemia in insulin-treated adults with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) and type 2 diabetes (T2DM) in Denmark. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The Local Impact of Hypoglycemia Tool (LIHT) was used to estimate the costs associated with insulin-related hypoglycemia. Average u...

  4. Incidence and risk factors for severe and symptomatic hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. Results of the HYPOS-1 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorda, Carlo B; Ozzello, Alessandro; Gentile, Sandro; Aglialoro, Alberto; Chiambretti, Anna; Baccetti, Fabio; Gentile, Francesco M; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Nicolucci, Antonio; Rossi, Maria Chiara

    2015-10-01

    Hypoglycemia is common in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). We aimed to update the incidence of severe and symptomatic hypoglycemia and investigate several correlated factors. In this multicenter, observational retrospective study, the data of 206 T1DM patients from a sample of 2,229 consecutive patients seen at 18 diabetes clinics were analyzed. Sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, severe hypoglycemia in the past 12 months, and symptomatic hypoglycemia in the past 4 weeks were recorded with a self-report questionnaire and a clinical form during a routine visit. Poisson multivariate models were applied. A minority of patients accounted for the majority of both severe and symptomatic episodes. The incidence rate (IR) of severe hypoglycemia was 0.49 (0.40-0.60) events/person-years. The incidence rate ratio (IRR) was higher in patients with previous severe hypoglycemia (3.71; 2.28-6.04), neuropathy (4.16; 2.14-8.05), long duration (>20 years, 2.96; 1.60-5.45), and on polypharmacy (1.24; 1.13-1.36), but it was lower when a complication was present. The IR of symptomatic hypoglycemia was 53.3 events/person-years, with an IRR significantly higher among women or patients with better education, or shorter duration or on pumps. The IRR was lower in patients with higher BMI or neuropathy or aged more than 50 years. Fewer than 20 % of T1DM patients are free from hypoglycemia, with one in six having experienced at least one severe episode in the last year. The distribution is uneven, with a tendency of episodes to cluster in some patients. Severe and symptomatic episodes have different correlates and reflect different conditions.

  5. Recurrent Hypoglycemia in a Hemodialysis Patient Related to Propoxyphene Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Ting Lee

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available There are various etiologies for hypoglycemia in patients with chronic renal failure, and its pathogenesis is complex. Concomitant use of medications is the most common cause. We report a rare case of an 82-year-old woman with type 2 diabetes mellitus in end-stage renal disease undergoing maintenance hemodialysis, who experienced recurrent symptomatic hypoglycemia during treatment with propoxyphene for pain relief. Hypoglycemia occurred simultaneously with elevated levels of serum immunoreactive insulin and C-peptide. After discontinuing propoxyphene, hypoglycemia mitigated and the level of insulin returned to normal range. Our case reminds us that propoxyphene-induced hypoglycemia should not be ignored, especially in hemodialysis patients with cold sweats, agitation and depressed consciousness.

  6. [Metabolic control in the critically ill patient an update: hyperglycemia, glucose variability hypoglycemia and relative hypoglycemia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Calatayud, Ángel Augusto; Guillén-Vidaña, Ariadna; Fraire-Félix, Irving Santiago; Anica-Malagón, Eduardo Daniel; Briones Garduño, Jesús Carlos; Carrillo-Esper, Raúl

    Metabolic changes of glucose in critically ill patients increase morbidity and mortality. The appropriate level of blood glucose has not been established so far and should be adjusted for different populations. However concepts such as glucose variability and relative hypoglycemia of critically ill patients are concepts that are changing management methods and achieving closer monitoring. The purpose of this review is to present new data about the management and metabolic control of patients in critical areas. Currently glucose can no longer be regarded as an innocent element in critical patients; both hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia increase morbidity and mortality of patients. Protocols and better instruments for continuous measurement are necessary to achieve the metabolic control of our patients. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  7. The impact of severe hypoglycemia and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia on relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Hanne V; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Ase K

    2003-01-01

    of relatives. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: A cross-sectional paired questionnaire survey on hypoglycemia and the state of awareness was used in our study comprising 284 unselected adult patients with type 1 diabetes and their closest cohabitant. The cohabitant questionnaires also addressed involvement...... and concern. RESULTS: The agreement between assessments of rates of severe hypoglycemia and state of awareness made by patients and cohabitants was weak (kappa 0.404 and 0.442, respectively; P Cohabitants recalled more episodes of severe hypoglycemia than patients (2.7 vs. 1.6 episodes.......01). CONCLUSIONS: Cohabitants of patients with type 1 diabetes recall significantly more episodes of severe hypoglycemia than the patients. The rate of severe hypoglycemia and state of hypoglycemic awareness are the principal determinants of degree of cohabitants' involvement in their partners' disease....

  8. Does Reducing Basal Insulin During Ramadan Fasting by Children and Adolescents with Type 1 Diabetes Decrease the Risk of Symptomatic Hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeb, Asma; Al Qahtani, Nabras; Attia, Salima; Al Suwaidi, Hana; Nagelkerke, Nico

    2016-09-01

    Ramadan fasting by patients with type 1 diabetes might predispose them to hypoglycemia. There are no data on the optimal way of adjusting basal insulin during fasting. We aim at studying whether reducing basal insulin during Ramadan reduces the frequency of symptomatic hypoglycemia. We enrolled children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes who intended to fast during Ramadan. Logbooks were given to subjects to mark days fasted, symptomatic hypoglycemia, and dose of basal insulin on all days of Ramadan. Logbooks were examined. Glucometers and insulin pumps were downloaded. Seventy-five patients were enrolled. The age was 10.2-18.9 (14.5) years. Sixty-eight patients had results analyzed. Forty-one patients were on pumps, and 27 patients were on multiple daily injections (MDI). Mean HbA1c was 7.9 (1.2) and 8.4 (1.3) for the pump and the MDI, respectively (P = 0.007). Thirty-nine patients had hypoglycemia leading to breaking fast. The mean number of episodes of breaking fast was 3 (1-8). Thirty-five of the 68 patients had reduced basal insulin. The difference in the frequency of hypoglycemia in those who reduced/did not reduce insulin was not statistically significant (P > 0.10). Fifteen patients on MDI and 24 patients on pumps had at least one episode of breaking fast. Six and 18 of the patients on MDI and pumps, respectively, reduced basal insulin (P > 0.10). This is the first study examining the impact of reduction of basal insulin on hypoglycemia in adolescents. Reducing basal insulin during Ramadan fasting does not decrease the risk of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Use of the insulin pump does not appear to be different from MDI in the frequency of occurrence of hypoglycemia.

  9. Impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, patient satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walz L

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Lotta Walz,1,3 Billie Pettersson,2,3 Ulf Rosenqvist,4 Anna Deleskog,3,5 Gunilla Journath,6 Per Wändell7 1Department of Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 2Center for Medical Technology Assessment, Linköping University, Linköping, 3Merck Sharp and Dohme (Sweden AB, Sollentuna, 4Department of Internal Medicine, Motala Hospital, Motala, 5Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, 6Department of Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, 7Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Centre for Family Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of symptomatic hypoglycemia on medication adherence, satisfaction with treatment, and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes based on the treatment goals stated in the Swedish national guidelines. Methods: This cross-sectional, multicenter study was carried out between January and August 2009 in 430 consecutive primary health care patients on stable doses of metformin and sulfonylureas for at least 6 months. The patients completed questionnaires covering their experiences of low blood glucose and adherence, as well as barriers to and satisfaction with drug treatment (using the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication. Physicians collected the data from medical records. Results: Patients who experienced moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia reported poorer adherence to medication (46% versus 67%; P<0.01 and were more likely to perceive barriers such as “bothered by medication side effects” (36% versus 14%; P<0.001 compared with patients with no or mild symptoms. Patients with moderate or worse symptoms of hypoglycemia were less satisfied with their treatment than those with no or mild symptoms as determined by the Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication-Global satisfaction (67.0 versus 71.2; P<0.05. Overall, achievement of target glycated hemoglobin

  10. Sleep-related hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure in type 1 diabetes: reduced awakening from sleep during hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banarer, Salomon; Cryer, Philip E

    2003-05-01

    Given that iatrogenic hypoglycemia often occurs during the night in people with type 1 diabetes, we tested the hypothesis that physiological, and the resulting behavioral, defenses against developing hypoglycemia-already compromised by absent glucagon and attenuated epinephrine and neurogenic symptom responses-are further compromised during sleep in type 1 diabetes. To do so, we studied eight adult patients with uncomplicated type 1 diabetes and eight matched nondiabetic control subjects with hyperinsulinemic stepped hypoglycemic clamps (glucose steps of approximately 85, 75, 65, 55, and 45 mg/dl) in the morning (0730-1230) while awake and at night (2100-0200) while awake throughout and while asleep from 0000 to 0200 in random sequence. Plasma epinephrine (P = 0.0010), perhaps norepinephrine (P = 0.0838), and pancreatic polypeptide (P = 0.0034) responses to hypoglycemia were reduced during sleep in diabetic subjects (the final awake versus asleep values were 240 +/- 86 and 85 +/- 47, 205 +/- 24 and 148 +/- 17, and 197 +/- 45 and 118 +/- 31 pg/ml, respectively), but not in the control subjects. The diabetic subjects exhibited markedly reduced awakening from sleep during hypoglycemia. Sleep efficiency (percent time asleep) was 77 +/- 18% in the diabetic subjects, but only 26 +/- 8% (P = 0.0109) in the control subjects late in the 45-mg/dl hypoglycemic steps. We conclude that autonomic responses to hypoglycemia are reduced during sleep in type 1 diabetes, and that, probably because of their reduced sympathoadrenal responses, patients with type 1 diabetes are substantially less likely to be awakened by hypoglycemia. Thus both physiological and behavioral defenses are further compromised during sleep. This sleep-related hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, in the context of imperfect insulin replacement, likely explains the high frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes.

  11. Hypoglycemia-Related Electroencephalogram Changes Assessed by Multiscale Entropy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabris, C.; Sparacino, G.; Sejling, A. S.

    2014-01-01

    physiopathological conditions have never been assessed in hypoglycemia. The present study investigates if properties of the EEG signal measured by nonlinear entropy-based algorithms are altered in a significant manner when a state of hypoglycemia is entered. Subjects and Methods: EEG was acquired from 19 patients...... derivation in the two glycemic intervals was assessed using the multiscale entropy (MSE) approach, obtaining measures of sample entropy (SampEn) at various temporal scales. The comparison of how signal irregularity measured by SampEn varies as the temporal scale increases in the two glycemic states provides...

  12. The impact of severe hypoglycemia and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia on relatives of patients with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Hanne V; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Rasmussen, Ase K

    2003-01-01

    .01). CONCLUSIONS: Cohabitants of patients with type 1 diabetes recall significantly more episodes of severe hypoglycemia than the patients. The rate of severe hypoglycemia and state of hypoglycemic awareness are the principal determinants of degree of cohabitants' involvement in their partners' disease....

  13. Hypoglycemia-related information seeking among informal caregivers of type 2 diabetes patients: Implications for health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reifegerste, Doreen; Hartleib, Sarah

    2016-06-01

    To examine information seeking and knowledge about hypoglycemia among partners and family of type 2 diabetes patients and to identify associations between information seeking, knowledge and demographic, and disease-related characteristics. Caregivers of adults with type 2 diabetes (N = 488) completed surveys assessing information seeking, knowledge of hypoglycemia symptoms and treatment, perceived competence, demographic information, and diabetes-related characteristics. Hierarchical and logistic regressions were used for data analysis. Nearly two thirds of family members and friends actively sought information about hypoglycemia, while health professionals and print media were reported as the main sources. Many respondents (74.5%) were able to identify at least one correct warning sign. But 32% could not state any correct treatment measures. Health professionals were the main and most helpful source of their knowledge. Education, past experience with hypoglycemia, and comprehension of information were associated with knowledge about treatment. Caregivers' perceived competence about hypoglycemia correlated with medical education, information-seeking, and comprehension of information. Our results indicate the importance of the hypoglycemia-related information seeking of caregivers in managing incidents of hypoglycemia. These findings suggest the need to consider caregivers' health knowledge when developing health education programs in diabetes care. More attention must be focused on providing interventions that motivate information seeking and improve the comprehension of information. Interventions should inform caregivers about hypoglycemia to enhance their knowledge.

  14. Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malabu, Usman H; Vangaveti, Venkat N; Kennedy, Richard Lee

    2014-01-01

    A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review, the risk factors of falls associated with hypoglycemia in elderly diabetics were highlighted and management plans were suggested. A target hemoglobin A1c level between 7% and 8% seems to be more appropriate for this population. In addition, the first-choice drugs should have good safety profiles and have the lowest probability of causing hypoglycemia - such as metformin (in the absence of significant renal impairment) and incretin enhancers - while other therapies that may cause more frequent hypoglycemia should be avoided.

  15. Health-related quality of life and utility values associated to hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus treated in the Brazilian Public Health System: a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahia, Luciana; Kupfer, Rosane; Momesso, Denise; Cabral, Debora A P; Tschiedel, Balduino; Puñales, Marcia; Lavigne, Suzana; Façanha, Cristina F S; Forti, Adriana C; Mendes, Angela D N; Tura, Bernardo R

    2017-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a critical and limiting factor of a good metabolic control and can adversely affect the quality of life of diabetic patients. The aim of the study was to evaluate the health-related quality of life and calculate utilities values associated with hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). A multicenter, cross-sectional and observational study with T1DM patients from reference centers of the Brazilian public health system was conducted in three cities. Demographic and clinical data were collected, besides details on the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia. Health-related quality of life was assessed using EQ-5D instrument and utility values generated. 221 patients (107 women, 114 men), aged 29.8 ± 11.6 and disease duration of 14.2 ± 9.1 years were included. Most patients (n = 214, 96.8%) reported at least one symptomatic hypoglycemia in the last three months, 68% (n = 150) reported nocturnal episodes and 34.8% (n = 77) reported severe episodes. High frequency (daily or weekly) was observed in 38.6 and 26% of those reporting nocturnal or severe hypoglycemia, respectively. The median visual analog scale was 70 [60-85] for all patients, with differences between those with and without severe hypoglycemia (70 [60-80] vs 80 [61-90]; p = 0.006) and those with high and low frequency (62.5 [50-72.25] vs 70 [60-80]; p = 0.007). The median utility values was 0.801 [0.756-1.000] for all patients, with difference between those with high and low frequency of severe episodes (0.737 [0.628-1.000] vs 0.801 [0.756-1.000]; p = 0.02). This study shows the high frequency of hypoglycemia in a sample of T1DM patients treated in three reference centers of the Brazilian public health system and the impact of severe episodes on health-related quality of life. Utility values were generated and can be used in economic analysis for treatments that could decrease hypoglycemia and consequently improve quality of life.

  16. Cerebral blood flow response to hypoglycemia is altered in patients with type 1 diabetes and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiegers, Evita C; Becker, Kirsten M; Rooijackers, Hanne M; von Samson-Himmelstjerna, Federico C; Tack, Cees J; Heerschap, Arend; de Galan, Bastiaan E; van der Graaf, Marinette

    2017-06-01

    It is unclear whether cerebral blood flow responses to hypoglycemia are altered in people with type 1 diabetes and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of hypoglycemia on both global and regional cerebral blood flow in type 1 diabetes patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, type 1 diabetes patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls ( n = 7 per group). The subjects underwent a hyperinsulinemic euglycemic-hypoglycemic glucose clamp in a 3 T MR system. Global and regional changes in cerebral blood flow were determined by arterial spin labeling magnetic resonance imaging, at the end of both glycemic phases. Hypoglycemia generated typical symptoms in patients with type 1 diabetes and normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls, but not in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. Conversely, hypoglycemia increased global cerebral blood flow in patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, which was not observed in the other two groups. Regionally, hypoglycemia caused a redistribution of cerebral blood flow towards the thalamus of both patients with normal awareness of hypoglycemia and healthy controls, consistent with activation of brain regions associated with the autonomic response to hypoglycemia. No such redistribution was found in the patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. An increase in global cerebral blood flow may enhance nutrient supply to the brain, hence suppressing symptomatic awareness of hypoglycemia. Altogether these results suggest that changes in cerebral blood flow during hypoglycemia contribute to impaired awareness of hypoglycemia.

  17. Utilization of the Zucker Diabetic Fatty (ZDF) Rat Model for Investigating Hypoglycemia-related Toxicities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tirmenstein, Mark; Horvath, Joseph; Graziano, Michael; Mangipudy, Raja; Dorr, Thomas; Colman, Karyn; Zinker, Bradley; Kirby, Mark; Cheng, Peter T W; Patrone, Laura; Kozlosky, John; Reilly, Timothy P; Wang, Victor; Janovitz, Evan

    2015-08-01

    Glucokinase (GK) catalyzes the initial step in glycolysis and is a key regulator of glucose homeostasis. Therefore, glucokinase activators (GKa) have potential benefit in treating type 2 diabetes. Administration of a Bristol-Myers Squibb GKa (BMS-820132) to healthy euglycemic Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats and beagle dogs in 1 mo toxicology studies resulted in marked and extended hypoglycemia with associated clinical signs of toxicity and degenerative histopathological changes in the stomach, sciatic nerve, myocardium, and skeletal muscles at exposures comparable to those expected at therapeutic clinical exposures. To investigate whether these adverse effects were secondary to exaggerated pharmacology (prolonged hypoglycemia), BMS-820132 was administered daily to male Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats for 1 mo. ZDF rats are markedly hyperglycemic and insulin resistant. BMS-820132 did not induce hypoglycemia, clinical signs of hypoglycemia, or any of the histopathologic adverse effects observed in the 1 mo toxicology studies at exposures that exceeded those observed in SD rats and dogs. This indicates that the toxicity observed in euglycemic animals was secondary to the exaggerated pharmacology of potent GK activation. This study indicates that ZDF rats, with conventional toxicity studies, are a useful disease model for testing antidiabetic agents and determining toxicities that are independent of prolonged hypoglycemia. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  18. Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding and Hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid Bairdain

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is commonplace, and surgical treatment usually includes Roux-en-Y gastric bypasses (RYGBs. RYGBs have the most documented side effects including vitamin deficiencies, rebound weight gain, and symptomatic hypoglycemia; fewer series exist describing hypoglycemia following other bariatric operations. We reviewed all patients undergoing laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB at our institution between 2008 and 2012. Three patients were identified to have symptomatic hypoglycemia following LAGB. Mean time from surgery was 33 months (range 14–45 months, and mean weight loss was 32.7 kg (range 15.9–43.1 kg. None of the patients had preexisting diabetes. Therefore, symptomatic hypoglycemia should be investigated irrespective of bariatric operation.

  19. Disease burden evaluation of fall-related events in the elderly due to hypoglycemia and other diabetic complications: a clinical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malabu UH

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Usman H Malabu,1 Venkat N Vangaveti,1 Richard Lee Kennedy2 1School of Medicine and Dentistry, James Cook University, QLD, Australia; 2Department of Medicine, Deakin University, VIC, Australia Abstract: A hypoglycemia-induced fall is common in older persons with diabetes. The etiology of falls in this population is usually multifactorial, and includes microvascular and macrovascular complications and age-related comorbidities, with hypoglycemia being one of the major precipitating causes. In this review, we systematically searched the literature that was available up to March 31, 2014 from MEDLINE/PubMed, Embase, and Google Scholar using the following terms: hypoglycemia; insulin; diabetic complications; and falls in elderly. Hypoglycemia, defined as blood glucose <4.0 mmol/L (70 mg/dL requiring external assistance, occurs in one-third of elderly diabetics on glucose-lowering therapies. It represents a major barrier to the treatment of diabetes, particularly in the elderly population. Patients who experience hypoglycemia are at a high risk for adverse outcomes, including falls leading to bone fracture, seizures, cognitive dysfunction, and prolonged hospital stays. An increase in mortality has been observed in patients who experience any one of these events. Paradoxically, rational insulin therapy, dosed according to a patient's clinical status and the results of home blood glucose monitoring, so as to achieve and maintain recommended glycemic goals, can be an effective method for the prevention of hypoglycemia and falls in the elderly. Contingencies, such as clinician-directed hypoglycemia treatment protocols that guide the immediate treatment of hypoglycemia, help to limit both the duration and severity of the event. Older diabetic patients with or without underlying renal insufficiency or other severe illnesses represent groups that are at high risk for hypoglycemia-induced falls and, therefore, require lower insulin dosages. In this review

  20. Hypoketonemia and age-related fasting hypoglycemia in growth hormone deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfsdorf, J I; Sadeghi-Nejad, A; Senior, B

    1983-05-01

    Body fuels were measured in 45 normal children and 17 growth hormone-deficient patients after 24 hours of fasting. After three months of therapy with human Growth Hormone (hGH) 16 of the patients were restudied. In all groups, beta-hydroxybutyrate (BOHB) concentrations correlated inversely with age and with glucose concentrations. When adjusted for these factors, the concentrations of BOHB were significantly lower in the growth hormone-deficient patients than in the control children, before (P less than 0.01) as well as after therapy (P less than 0.01). Only the five youngest patients became hypoglycemic. During fasting, ketones, which serve as an alternative fuel for the brain, spare glucose. Thus, a shortage of ketones would compromise the ability of the patient to conserve glucose and predispose the patient to fasting hypoglycemia. Accordingly, we propose that hypoketonemia is a critical factor in the genesis of fasting hypoglycemia in growth hormone deficiency.

  1. The current status of treatment-related severe hypoglycemia in Japanese patients with diabetes mellitus: A report from the committee on a survey of severe hypoglycemia in the Japan Diabetes Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namba, Mitsuyoshi; Iwakura, Toshio; Nishimura, Rimei; Akazawa, Kohei; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Atsumi, Yoshihito; Satoh, Jo; Yamauchi, Toshimasa

    2018-03-02

    ,962 annually, of which those with severe hypoglycemia accounted for 0.34% (17). The respondent facilities accommodated a total of 2,237 patients with severe hypoglycemia annually, with the number of patients thus accommodated being 6.5 patients per site. A total of 1,171 patients were admitted for severe hypoglycemia, with the number of patients thus admitted being 4.0 per site, who accounted for 52.3% of all patients visiting annually for severe hypoglycemia. A review of the 798 case reports collected during the survey revealed that 240, 480 and 78 patients had type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and other types of diabetes, respectively; those with type 2 diabetes were shown to be significantly older (median [interquartile range], 77.0 [68.0-83.0]) than those with type 1 diabetes (54.0 [41.0-67.0]) (P higher for those with type 2 diabetes (22.0 [19.5-24.8] kg/m 2 ) than for those with type 1 diabetes (21.3 [18.9-24.0] kg/m 2 ) (P = 0.003). It was also found that the median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was significantly lower among those with type 2 diabetes (50.6 mL [31.8-71.1]/min/1.73 m 2 ) than among those with type 1 diabetes (73.3 [53.5-91.1] mL/min/1.73 m 2 ) (P value at onset of severe hypoglycemia was shown to be 7.0 (6.3-8.1)% among all patients examined, 7.5 (6.9-8.6)% among those with type 1 diabetes, and 6.8 (6.1-7.6)% among those with type 2 diabetes, with the HbA1c value at onset of hypoglycemia being significantly lower among those with type 2 diabetes (P services for severe hypoglycemia before. Thus, the survey revealed, for the first time, the current status of treatment-related severe hypoglycemia in Japan and clearly highlights the acute need for implementing preventive measures against hypoglycemia not only through education on hypoglycemia but through optimization of antidiabetic therapy for those at high risk of severe hypoglycemia or those with a history of severe hypoglycemia. © 2018 Japan Diabetes Society (JDS). Journal of

  2. Severe hypoglycemia, impaired awareness of hypoglycemia, and self-monitoring in adults with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hendrieckx, Crystal; Jenkins, A; Hagger, Virginia

    2017-01-01

    AIMS: To assess prevalence of severe hypoglycemia, awareness and symptoms of hypoglycemia, and their associations with self-monitoring of blood glucose. METHODS: Diabetes MILES-Australia Study participants completed validated questionnaires and study-specific items. RESULTS: Of 642 adults with type...... autonomic symptoms, perceived at relatively low glucose levels. Frequent self-monitoring of blood glucose prompted early recognition and treatment of hypoglycemia, suggesting severe hypoglycemia risk can be minimized....

  3. Low Blood Glucose (Hypoglycemia)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you up if you have hypoglycemia during sleep. Eat regular meals and snacks Your meal plan is key to preventing hypoglycemia. Eat regular meals and snacks with the correct amount of carbohydrates ...

  4. Cross-cultural variation in symptom perception of hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Kalra

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: Significant cross-cultural differences related to the symptomatology of hypoglycemia are noted. Indian diabetologists should be aware of the varying presentation of hypoglycemia based on language and ethnic background.

  5. Benign prostatic hyperplasia presenting with profound hypoglycemia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Approximately 90% of patients with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia ... Clinical case: We report the case of a man aged 85 years followed for type 2 diabetes and hypertension. ... Neurological disorders related to hypoglycemia were agitation, delirium, impaired higher functions and sleep disorders.

  6. Hydrothermally modified slow release corn starch: a potential new therapeutic option for treating hypoglycemia in autoimmune hypoglycemia (Hirata's disease).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechner, K; Aulinger, B; Brand, S; Waldmann, E; Parhofer, K G

    2015-12-01

    We report the successful treatment of autoimmune hypoglycemia in an 82-year-old non-diabetic Caucasian male with hydrothermally modified slow release corn starch, a product which is used in other conditions associated with hypoglycemia, most typically glycogen storage disease type I. An 82-year-old-Caucasian male presented with recurrent spontaneous hypoglycemia as low as 30 mg/dl following in-patient treatment for community acquired pneumonia. During a fasting-test, symptomatic hypoglycemia occurred. Plasma concentrations of c-peptide and insulin were considerably elevated. Autoimmune hypoglycemia was confirmed by the presence of insulin autoantibodies. While dietary restriction alone did not result in sufficient glucose control in this patient with autoimmune hypoglycemia, treatment with hydrothermally modified slow release corn starch led to stable euglycemia. This easy, well tolerated and non-invasive treatment may constitute a new therapeutic option for hypoglycemia in patients with autoimmune hypoglycemia who do not achieve sufficient control of hypoglycemia by dietary restriction alone.

  7. Effect of Insulin Analogs on Frequency of Non-Severe Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes Prone to Severe Hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agesen, Rikke Mette; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Beck-Nielsen, Henning

    2018-01-01

    report results from the HypoAna trial comparing all-analog-insulin therapy (aspart/detemir) with all-human-insulin therapy (neutral protamine Hagedorn/regular) on non-severe hypoglycemia (symptomatic and asymptomatic hypoglycemia) as assessed by blinded CGM and compared with data obtained by self-monitoring......Background: Hypoglycemia is an increasingly important endpoint in clinical diabetes trials. The assessment of hypoglycemia should therefore be as complete as possible. Blinded continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) provides an improved opportunity to capture asymptomatic and nocturnal events. Here we...

  8. Hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetes: Standpoint of an experts′ committee (India hypoglycemia study group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohan Viswanathan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemic of type 2 diabetes and the recognition that achieving specific glycemic goals can substantially reduce morbidity have made the effective treatment of hyperglycemia a top priority. Despite compelling evidence that tight glycemic control is crucial for delaying disease progression, increased risk of hypoglycemia associated with such control underscore the complexity of diabetes management. In most cases, hypoglycemia results from an excess of insulin, either absolute or relative to the available glucose substrate and the factors perhaps exacerbating the risk are pharmacokinetic imperfections, behavioral, co-morbidities etc. Additionally, many patients remain undiagnosed, and many diagnosed patients are not treated appropriately. In this article, the challenges of hypoglycemia, confronting health care providers and their patients with diabetes, are discussed for making treatment decisions that will help minimize risk of hypoglycemia and eventually overcome formidable barriers to optimal diabetes management. Strategies to treat and minimize the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia without compromising on glycemic goals are also presented.

  9. Hypoglycemia is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, J.; Bosman, R.J.; Vriesendorp, T.M.; Dotsch, R.; Rosendaal, F.R.; Zandstra, D.F.; Hoekstra, J.B.L.; DeVries, J.H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The implementation of intensive insulin therapy in the intensive care unit is accompanied by an increase in hypoglycemia. We studied the relation between hypoglycemia on intensive care unit mortality, because the evidence on this subject is conflicting. Design: Retrospective database

  10. Hypoglycemia is associated with intensive care unit mortality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hermanides, Jeroen; Bosman, Robert J.; Vriesendorp, Titia M.; Dotsch, Ron; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Zandstra, Durk F.; Hoekstra, Joost B. L.; DeVries, J. Hans

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The implementation of intensive insulin therapy in the intensive care unit is accompanied by an increase in hypoglycemia. We studied the relation between hypoglycemia on intensive care unit mortality, because the evidence on this subject is conflicting. DESIGN: Retrospective database

  11. Urinary Prothrombin Fragment 1+2 in relation to Development of Non-Symptomatic and Symptomatic Venous Thromboembolic Events following Total Knee Replacement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borris, Lars Carl; Breindahl, Morten; Rud-Lassen, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Prothrombin fragment 1+2 is excreted in urine (uF1+2) as a result of in vivo thrombin generation and can be a marker of coagulation status after an operative procedure. This study compared uF1+2 levels in patients with symptomatic and non-symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) after total knee ...

  12. Neurophysiological Evidence of Compensatory Brain Mechanisms Underlying Attentional-Related Processes in Symptomatically Remitted Patients with Schizophrenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yansong Li

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available A recent electrophysiological study suggests existing compensatory brain activity as a mechanism for functional recovery of visual attention detection (the capacity for detecting external cues in symptomatically remitted schizophrenia patients. Despite such evidence, little is known about other aspects of attentional-related processes in schizophrenia during clinical remission, such as their capacity to concentrate on the task at hands without being interfered by distracting information. To this end, we recorded event-related brain potentials (ERPs from 20 symptomatically remitted schizophrenia patients and 20 healthy controls while they engaged in a classic Stroop task. Symptomatically remitted patients showed comparable Stroop interference to healthy controls, indicating a degree of functional recovery of such a capacity in these patients. On the neural level, the N450 over the fronto-central and central regions, a component of the ERPs related to conflict detection, was found across both groups, although patients presented a reduced N450 relative to healthy controls. By contrast, the amplitude of the sustained potential (SP (600–800 ms over the parieto-central and parietal regions, a component of the ERPs related to conflict resolution, was significantly increased in patients relative to healthy controls. Furthermore, such increased SP amplitude correlated positively with improved behavioral accuracy in symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia. These findings reveal that symptomatically remitted patients with schizophrenia increasingly recruited the parietal activity involving successful conflict resolution to offset reduced conflict detection. Therefore, this provides further insight into compensatory mechanisms potentially involving a degree of functional recovery of attentional-related processes in schizophrenia during clinical remission.

  13. Comparison of the oral health-related quality of life and dental pain in symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and pericoronitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hale Cimilli

    2012-09-01

    Conclusion: The DePaQ gives detailed information about clinical conditions related to pain and the OHRQoL status in both symptomatic irreversible pulpitis and pericoronitis. VAS scores differed between the groups according to the DePaQ items.

  14. Impact of hypoglycemia on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Janice Ms; Annunziata, Kathy; Bailey, Robert A; Rupnow, Marcia Ft; Morisky, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that correlate with greater risk of hypoglycemia and determine the impact of hypoglycemia on health-related quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence from a patient perspective. Data from a large web-based survey were retrospectively analyzed. Adults with a diagnosis of T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents were included in the analysis. Participants with knowledge of their hypoglycemic history were divided into three groups: those experiencing recent hypoglycemia (previous 3 months), those experiencing nonrecent hypoglycemia, and those never experiencing hypoglycemia. Of the participants with T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents who were knowledgeable of their hypoglycemia history, 55.7% had ever experienced hypoglycemia. Of those, 52.7% had recent hypoglycemia. Compared with those who never experienced hypoglycemia, those who experienced hypoglycemia tended to: be younger; be more aware of their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels; have higher HbA1c levels; have a higher body mass index; have higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores; be on insulin, sulfonylureas, and/or glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists; and be less adherent to their antihyperglycemic agents. Hypoglycemia interfered with social activities, caused more missed work (absenteeism), more impairment while at work (presenteeism), and decreased overall work productivity compared with patients who had never experienced hypoglycemia. Overall health-related quality of life, as determined by the Short Form-36 health questionnaire, was negatively impacted by hypoglycemia. Both Physical and Mental Summary scores were significantly lower for the recent hypoglycemia and nonrecent hypoglycemia groups compared with the never hypoglycemia group. Hypoglycemia can negatively impact many aspects of life. Greater awareness of those who are at risk for developing hypoglycemia can lead to the

  15. Evaluation of FreeStyle Libre Flash Glucose Monitoring System on Glycemic Control, Health-Related Quality of Life, and Fear of Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A Al Hayek

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background/objectives: In the current era of modern technology and the development of smart devices such as the flash glucose monitoring (FGM systems, patients can easily monitor their glucose levels more frequently without any inconvenience. In this study, we evaluate the effect of FreeStyle Libre FGM system on glycemic control, hypoglycemia, health-related quality of life (QoL, and the fear of hypoglycemia (FOH among children and young people with type 1 diabetes (T1D. Design and methods: A prospective study was conducted at the Diabetes Treatment Center, Prince Sultan Military Medical City, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, between January 2017 and May 2017 on 47 (aged 13-19 years registered patients with T1D who used conventional finger-pricking method for self-testing the glucose. At baseline visit, the FGM sensors were placed on each participant by a trained diabetes educator. The data collected from the sensors were computed to generate the respective ambulatory glucose profiles so as to determine the total number of scans conducted during the study period. At the baseline and at 3 months of the experiment, a trained interviewer administered the questionnaire Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-Child Version (HFS-C and PedsQL 3.0 (QoL questionnaire to each patient. The age, sex, weight, height, adjusted body mass index, duration of diabetes, treatment modality, and glycosylated hemoglobin A 1c (HbA 1c levels of each patient were recorded. Results: As compared with the baseline, a significant improvement was noted in the behavior of FOH ( P = .0001, worry ( P = .0001, QoL ( P = .002, HbA 1c level ( P = .008, and hypoglycemia ( P = .023 at 3 months. Significant improvement was noted in the behavior ( P = .0001, worry ( P = .0001, QoL ( P = .003, HbA 1c level ( P = .014, and hypoglycemia ( P = .001 among the multiple-dose insulin injection–treated patients as compared with baseline. Significant improvement was noted in the behavior ( P = .0001, worry ( P = .0001

  16. Relation between ABO blood groups and Helicobacter pylori infection in symptomatic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaff MS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mohamad Salih Jaff Pathology Department, College of Medicine, Hawler Medical University (formerly Salahuddin University, Erbil, Kurdistan Region, Iraq Abstract: Epidemiological studies have demonstrated higher frequencies of the O blood group and the nonsecretor phenotype of ABH antigens among patients suffering from peptic ulcers. Since Helicobacter pylori has been established as the main etiological factor in this disease, controversies about the associations of the ABO and Lewis blood group phenotypes and secretor and nonsecretor phenotypes in relation to susceptibility towards infection by this bacillus have been presented. The aim of this study was to verify the frequencies of ABO and Rhesus (Rh blood groups in H. pylori seropositive symptomatic patients. The study included (n = 1108 patients with dyspepsia symptoms referred from an outpatient clinic in Erbil city for investigation. Age, sex, and residency were recorded as a routine laboratory framework. Patients underwent SD Bioline (Standard Diagnostics Inc, Kyonggi-do, South Korea and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay serologic tests for H. pylori. ABO blood group phenotypes were determined by a standard hemagglutination test. Results showed that 64.8% of patients (n = 718/1108 were seropositive for H. pylori infection, and (35.2% (n = 390/1108 were seronegative. Of the seropositive patients, 40.8% (n = 293/718 were male and 59.2% (n = 425/718 were female; while of the seronegative patients, 46.7% (n = 182/390 were male and 53.3% (n = 208/390 were female. The mean age for seropositives and seronegatives was (38.0 ± 14.6 years and (37.6 ± 15.7 years respectively. The frequency of the ABO and Rh-positive (Rh+ blood groups among seropositive patients was (A = 32.0%, B = 19.5%, AB = 6.7%, O = 41.8%, and Rh+ = 92.5% and was (A = 32.3%, B = 28.2%, AB = 8.0%, O = 31.5%, and Rh+ = 92.5% in seronegatives. The results of this study suggest that ABO blood groups, age, and gender influence

  17. Hypoglycemia in noncritically ill patients receiving total parenteral nutrition: a multicenter study. (Study group on the problem of hyperglycemia in parenteral nutrition; Nutrition area of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olveira, Gabriel; Tapia, María José; Ocón, Julia; Cabrejas-Gómez, Carmen; Ballesteros-Pomar, María D; Vidal-Casariego, Alfonso; Arraiza-Irigoyen, Carmen; Olivares, Josefina; Conde-García, Maria Carmen; García-Manzanares, Álvaro; Botella-Romero, Francisco; Quílez-Toboso, Rosa P; Matía, Pilar; Rubio, Miguel Ángel; Chicharro, Luisa; Burgos, Rosa; Pujante, Pedro; Ferrer, Mercedes; Zugasti, Ana; Petrina, Estrella; Manjón, Laura; Diéguez, Marta; Carrera, Ma José; Vila-Bundo, Anna; Urgelés, Juan Ramón; Aragón-Valera, Carmen; Sánchez-Vilar, Olga; Bretón, Irene; García-Peris, Pilar; Muñoz-Garach, Araceli; Márquez, Efren; Del Olmo, Dolores; Pereira, José Luis; Tous, María C

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a common problem among hospitalized patients. Treatment of hyperglycemia with insulin is potentially associated with an increased risk for hypoglycemia. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence and predictors of hypoglycemia (capillary blood glucose nutrition (TPN). This prospective multicenter study involved 19 Spanish hospitals. Noncritically ill adults who were prescribed TPN were included, thus enabling us to collect data on capillary blood glucose and insulin dosage. The study included 605 patients of whom 6.8% (n = 41) had at least one capillary blood glucose <70 mg/dL and 2.6% (n = 16) had symptomatic hypoglycemia. The total number of hypoglycemic episodes per 100 d of TPN was 0.82. In univariate analysis, hypoglycemia was significantly associated with the presence of diabetes, a lower body mass index (BMI), and treatment with intravenous (IV) insulin. Patients with hypoglycemia also had a significantly longer hospital length of stay, PN duration, higher blood glucose variability, and a higher insulin dose. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that a lower BMI, high blood glucose variability, and TPN duration were risk factors for hypoglycemia. Use of IV insulin and blood glucose variability were predictors of symptomatic hypoglycemia. The occurrence of hypoglycemia in noncritically ill patients receiving PN is low. A lower BMI and a greater blood glucose variability and TPN duration are factors associated with the risk for hypoglycemia. IV insulin and glucose variability were predictors of symptomatic hypoglycemia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Symptomatic medial humeral epicondylar fracture non-union- rare presentation of a relatively common injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Vidisha S; Arora, Nitish; Gehlot, Harshit; Saxena, Sagar; Kulkarni, Sunil G; Bajwa, Supreet

    2017-08-01

    Symptomatic non-union of medial humeral epicondylar fractures is a limited entity. Some studies recommend surgical excision of the fragment, but the results are controversial. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of open reduction and internal fixation of a medial epicondyle non-union fragment. A retrospective study was conducted in all the patients, who were operated in our hospital between the year 2010 and 2015 for symptomatic medial humeral epicondyle non-union. Inclusion criteria were open reduction and internal fixation of symptomatic medial epicondyle non-union and minimum one year of follow-up from time of surgery. Exclusion criteria included other associated musculoskeletal disorders of the affected limb. Open reduction and internal fixation of the fragment was done in all patients and the ulnar nerve was decompressed and anteriorly transposed in cases where symptomatology was present. Outcome was assessed with radiograph, range/arc of motion, Visual analogue pain scoring and two functional outcome tools. Study sample consisted of 14 patients, with mean age at presentation of 14.9 years (range 6 to 50 years) with mean time since injury of 7.7 months (range 3 to 24 months). Patients presented with medial elbow pain and prominence, limited range of motion, valgus instability, and ulnar nerve compression. After open reduction and internal fixation, at a mean of three years after surgery (range 1.5 to 5 years), patients reported an improvement in visual analogue pain score from a mean of 7.29±1.3 to 0.21±0.4, and the difference was statistically significant (p=0.001). Mean postoperative Quick DASH (Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand) score was 5.21±7.2. Mean Mayo Elbow Performance Score was 96.7±6.1. Improvement in arc of motion was statistically significant (p=0.001). Radiographic union was achieved in all patients except one who had fibrous union. Functional elbow range of motion was achieved in 13 out of 14 cases (92.8%) and ulnar

  19. Cerebral glycogen in humans following acute and recurrent hypoglycemia: Implications on a role in hypoglycemia unawareness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Öz, Gülin; DiNuzzo, Mauro; Kumar, Anjali; Moheet, Amir; Khowaja, Ameer; Kubisiak, Kristine; Eberly, Lynn E; Seaquist, Elizabeth R

    2017-08-01

    Supercompensated brain glycogen levels may contribute to the development of hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) following recurrent hypoglycemia (RH) by providing energy for the brain during subsequent periods of hypoglycemia. To assess the role of glycogen supercompensation in the generation of HAAF, we estimated the level of brain glycogen following RH and acute hypoglycemia (AH). After undergoing 3 hyperinsulinemic, euglycemic and 3 hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic clamps (RH) on separate occasions at least 1 month apart, five healthy volunteers received [1- 13 C]glucose intravenously over 80+ h while maintaining euglycemia. 13 C-glycogen levels in the occipital lobe were measured by 13 C magnetic resonance spectroscopy at ∼8, 20, 32, 44, 56, 68 and 80 h at 4 T and glycogen levels estimated by fitting the data with a biophysical model that takes into account the tiered glycogen structure. Similarly, prior 13 C-glycogen data obtained following a single hypoglycemic episode (AH) were fitted with the same model. Glycogen levels did not significantly increase after RH relative to after euglycemia, while they increased by ∼16% after AH relative to after euglycemia. These data suggest that glycogen supercompensation may be blunted with repeated hypoglycemic episodes. A causal relationship between glycogen supercompensation and generation of HAAF remains to be established.

  20. Gender-related risk factors for perioperative stroke after carotid endarterectomy in symptomatic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelągowski, Mirosław; Kasielska-Trojan, Anna; Bogusiak, Katarzyna; Timler, Dariusz; Łysakowski, Marek; Kaźmierski, Piotr; Pająk, Michał; Szostek, Małgorzata

    2017-11-01

    Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is a surgical procedure used in ischemic brain stroke prevention in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic severe carotid artery stenosis. This study compares perioperative stroke or death rate after carotid endarterectomy (CEA) in male and female patients, and determines risk factors for perioperative incidents in women and men. The outcome of surgical treatment of 269 consecutive symptomatic patients (181 men and 88 women) treated from January 2004 to August 2008 in the Department of Vascular, General and Oncologic Surgery was analyzed. Perioperative stroke-death rate (within 30 days after the surgery) in women was 6.8% (6/88) and 3.3% (6/181) in men (p > 0.05). In the female group, none of the analyzed risk factors were associated with a higher risk of periprocedural incident, while in men, only hypercholesterolemia was a significant predictor of perioperative stroke (TC > 240 vs 240 vs 200-240: OR = 6.59; 95% CI: 1.12-38.97; p = 0.0375). In men, hypercholesterolemia significantly increased the risk of perioperative stroke or death, while in females, none of the analyzed factors were determined as the predictors of the incident. The fact that plaque type VI by AHA was significantly more frequent in women and men more frequently were suffering from ischemic heart disease and peripheral artery occlusive disease appeared not to influence the outcome of CEA.

  1. Plasma glucagon and glucose recovery after hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Holst, Janett

    1991-01-01

    ) and of isolated alpha-adrenergic blockade on hormonal responses to hypoglycemia and on blood glucose recovery after hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. Neither of the pharmacological blockades had any significant effects on plasma glucagon responses to hypoglycemia nor had they any effect on the rate of blood...... glucose recovery after hypoglycemia. We conclude that the autonomic nervous system has no major influence on the glucagon response to hypoglycemia in healthy man. Changes in autonomic nervous activity are not essential for blood glucose recovery after hypoglycemia in healthy man....

  2. Retrospective evaluation of a national guideline to prevent neonatal hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annett Helleskov Rasmussen

    2017-10-01

    Conclusion: Stratification of hypoglycemia risk in a hypoglycemia prevention guideline was followed by decreased estimated hypoglycemia incidence, but no causative conclusion could be drawn. Prospective studies with risk stratification for hypoglycemia prevention are encouraged.

  3. Reporting Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe potential factors influencing reporting of severe hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 1 diabetes and to analyze their effect on reported rates of severe hypoglycemia. RECENT FINDINGS: Reported rates of severe hypoglycemia defined as need for third party...... by partners report higher rates of severe hypoglycemia. There is a large variation between studies reporting incidence and prevalence of severe hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes, mainly explained by definition of severity, methods of reporting, and patient selection. These findings call...... hypoglycemia are 0.02-0.5 events per patient-year and 1-29%, respectively. When subjects with recurrent severe hypoglycemia in the past or suffering from impaired hypoglycemia awareness are excluded from participation in studies, lower rates are reported. Studies applying anonymous reporting or reporting...

  4. The importance of hypoglycemia in diabetic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafiee Gita

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoglycemia is one of the most important complications of diabetes treatment. The risk of severe hypoglycemia is higher in elderly patients, those having comorbidities such as vascular disease or renal failure, pregnant women and in children with type 1diabetes. Moreover, in type 2 diabetes, progressive insulin deficiency, longer duration of diabetes, and tight glycemic control increase the risk of hypoglycemia as much as type 1 diabetes.Episodes hypoglycemia may lead to impairment of counter-regulatory system, with the potential of development of hypoglycemia unawareness. So, hypoglycemia may increase the vascular events even death in addition to other possible detrimental effects. Glycemic control should be individualized based on patient characteristics with some degree of safety. Recognition of hypoglycemia risk factors, blood glucose monitoring, selection of appropriate regimens and educational programs for healthcare professionals and patients with diabetes are the major issues to maintain good glycemic control, minimize the risk of hypoglycemia, and prevent long- term complications.

  5. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsubasa Omi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism.

  6. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose m...

  7. Adult female with symptomatic AVPR2-related nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Hague

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Activating mutations in AVPR2 are associated with nephrogenic syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (NSIAD. NSIAD causes hyponatremia, decreased serum osmolality and clinical symptoms, which may present from birth or in infancy and include hypotonia, irritability, vomiting and/or seizures. Symptoms in later life are often less specific and include malaise, dizziness, confusion, tiredness and headache. NSIAD is a rare X-linked condition, which is associated with a variable phenotype in males, of whom some present in infancy but others do not become symptomatic until adulthood, or occasionally, never. Female carriers may present with episodes of hyponatremia, usually found incidentally. Literature in this field is limited; namely, two clinical reports describing a female proband, both diagnosed in infancy. We describe, for the first time, the case of an adult female proband with NSIAD, who had longstanding associated symptoms of tiredness, headache, temporary memory loss and mood changes as well as hyponatremia and decreased serum osmolality. A water load test demonstrated an inability to dilute urine and gene sequencing confirmed a recurrent activating mutation in AVPR2. The variant was inherited from the proband’s mother who had had longstanding episodes of transient asymptomatic hyponatremia. This is the third report of a female proband with NSIAD and is the first female reported who sought medical treatment for chronic symptoms from adulthood. This case acts as a reminder of the importance of considering NSIAD as a diagnosis in females of all ages with unexplained hyponatremia.

  8. Plasma glucagon and glucose recovery after hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Holst, Janett

    1991-01-01

    ) and of isolated alpha-adrenergic blockade on hormonal responses to hypoglycemia and on blood glucose recovery after hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. Neither of the pharmacological blockades had any significant effects on plasma glucagon responses to hypoglycemia nor had they any effect on the rate of blood...

  9. Hypoglycemia in Coffin-Siris syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imaizumi, K; Nakamura, M; Masuno, M; Makita, Y; Kuroki, Y

    1995-10-23

    We describe a further patient with the Coffin-Siris syndrome who presented at 4 months with recurrent hypoglycemia attacks. Detailed examination was undertaken at 7 months but the cause of hypoglycemia was not detected. Hypoglycemia seems to be a previously undescribed finding in the Coffin-Siris syndrome.

  10. Norepinephrine kinetics during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1985-01-01

    Norepinephrine (NE) kinetics (plasma appearance rate, clearance, and forearm extraction) were measured during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in six healthy subjects. NE clearance did not change during hypoglycemia, indicating that the increase in plasma NE during hypoglycemia is due to an increased...

  11. Glycogen storage disease type IX and growth hormone deficiency presenting as severe ketotic hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodax, Juanita K; Uysal, Serife; Quintos, Jose Bernardo; Phornphutkul, Chanika

    2017-02-01

    Glycogen storage disease (GSD) type IX and growth hormone (GH) deficiency cause ketotic hypoglycemia via different mechanisms and are not known to be associated. We describe a patient presenting with severe ketotic hypoglycemia found to have both GSD IX and isolated GH deficiency. A 3-year-and-11-month-old boy with a history of prematurity, autism, developmental delay, seizures, and feeding difficulty was admitted for poor weight gain and symptomatic hypoglycemia. He was nondysmorphic, with a height of 93.8 cm (2%, -1.97 SDS), and has no hepatomegaly. He developed symptomatic hypoglycemia, with a serum glucose level of 37 mg/dL after 14 h of fasting challenge. Critical sample showed a GH of 0.24 ng/mL. GH provocative stimulation testing was done with a peak GH of 2.8 ng/mL. Brain magnetic resonance imaging showed a hypoplastic pituitary gland. Given the clinical symptoms, suspicion for mitochondrial disease was high. Dual Genome Panel by Massively Parallel Sequencing revealed a hemizygous variant c.721A>G (p1241V) in the X-linked PHKA2 gene, a causative gene for GSD IX. Red blood cell PhK enzyme activity testing was low, supporting the diagnosis. Given the patient's developmental delays that were not explained by GH deficiency alone, further investigation showed two unrelated conditions resulting in deranged metabolic adaptation to fasting leading to severe hypoglycemia.

  12. Octreotide therapy and restricted fetal growth: pregnancy in familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Geilswijk

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia during pregnancy can have serious health implications for both mother and fetus. Although not generally recommended in pregnancy, synthetic somatostatin analogues are used for the management of blood glucose levels in expectant hyperinsulinemic mothers. Recent reports suggest that octreotide treatment in pregnancy, as well as hypoglycemia in itself, may pose a risk of fetal growth restriction. During pregnancy, management of blood glucose levels in familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia thus forms a medical dilemma. We report on pregnancy outcomes in a woman with symptomatic familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, type 3. During the patient’s first pregnancy with a viable fetus octreotide treatment was instituted in gestational age 23 weeks to prevent severe hypoglycemic incidences. Fetal growth velocity declined, and at 37 weeks of gestation, intrauterine growth retardation was evident. During the second pregnancy with a viable fetus, blood glucose levels were managed through dietary intervention alone. Thus, the patient was advised to take small but frequent meals high in fiber and low in carbohydrates. Throughout pregnancy, no incidences of severe hypoglycemia occurred and fetal growth velocity was normal. We conclude that octreotide treatment during pregnancy may pose a risk of fetal growth restriction and warrants careful consideration. In some cases of familial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia, blood glucose levels can be successfully managed through diet only, also during pregnancy.

  13. Impact of hypoglycemia on patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus and their quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lopez JMS

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Janice MS Lopez,1 Kathy Annunziata,2 Robert A Bailey,1 Marcia FT Rupnow,1 Donald E Morisky31Janssen Scientific Affairs, LLC, Raritan, NJ, 2Kantar Health, Princeton, NJ, 3University of California at Los Angeles Fielding School of Public Health, Los Angeles, CA, USABackground: The purpose of this study was to determine the characteristics of adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM that correlate with greater risk of hypoglycemia and determine the impact of hypoglycemia on health-related quality of life, work productivity, and medication adherence from a patient perspective.Methods: Data from a large web-based survey were retrospectively analyzed. Adults with a diagnosis of T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents were included in the analysis. Participants with knowledge of their hypoglycemic history were divided into three groups: those experiencing recent hypoglycemia (previous 3 months, those experiencing nonrecent hypoglycemia, and those never experiencing hypoglycemia.Results: Of the participants with T2DM taking antihyperglycemic agents who were knowledgeable of their hypoglycemia history, 55.7% had ever experienced hypoglycemia. Of those, 52.7% had recent hypoglycemia. Compared with those who never experienced hypoglycemia, those who experienced hypoglycemia tended to: be younger; be more aware of their glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels; have higher HbA1c levels; have a higher body mass index; have higher Charlson Comorbidity Index scores; be on insulin, sulfonylureas, and/or glucagon-like peptide-1 agonists; and be less adherent to their antihyperglycemic agents. Hypoglycemia interfered with social activities, caused more missed work (absenteeism, more impairment while at work (presenteeism, and decreased overall work productivity compared with patients who had never experienced hypoglycemia. Overall health-related quality of life, as determined by the Short Form-36 health questionnaire, was negatively impacted by hypoglycemia. Both

  14. Hypoglycemia-Associated EEG Changes Following Antecedent Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sejling, Anne-Sophie; Kjaer, Troels W; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2017-01-01

    of hypoglycemia. METHODS: Twenty-four patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (10 with normal hypoglycemia awareness, 14 with hypoglycemia unawareness) were studied on 2 consecutive days by hyperinsulinemic glucose clamp at hypoglycemia (2.0-2.5 mmol/L) during a 1-h period. EEG was recorded, cognitive function...... function between the two groups on day 2. The symptom response was higher in the aware group on both days, while only subtle differences were seen in the counterregulatory hormonal response. CONCLUSION: Antecedent hypoglycemia does not affect hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes in patients with type 1...... diabetes mellitus....

  15. Issues related to symptomatic and disease-modifying treatments affecting cognitive and neuropsychiatric comorbidities of epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks-Kayal, Amy R.; Bath, Kevin G.; Berg, Anne T.; Galanopoulou, Aristea S.; Holmes, Gregory L.; Jensen, Frances E.; Kanner, Andres M.; O’Brien, Terence J.; Whittemore, Vicky H.; Winawer, Melodie R.; Patel, Manisha; Scharfman, Helen E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many symptoms of neurologic or psychiatric illness—such as cognitive impairment, depression, anxiety, attention deficits, and migraine—occur more frequently in people with epilepsy than in the general population. These diverse comorbidities present an underappreciated problem for people with epilepsy and their caregivers because they decrease quality of life, complicate treatment, and increase mortality. In fact, it has been suggested that comorbidities can have a greater effect on quality of life in people with epilepsy than the seizures themselves. There is increasing recognition of the frequency and impact of cognitive and behavioral comorbidities of epilepsy, highlighted in the 2012 Institute of Medicine report on epilepsy. Comorbidities have also been acknowledged, as a National Institutes of Health (NIH) Benchmark area for research in epilepsy. However, relatively little progress has been made in developing new therapies directed specifically at comorbidities. On the other hand, there have been many advances in understanding underlying mechanisms. These advances have made it possible to identify novel targets for therapy and prevention. As part of the International League Against Epilepsy/American Epilepsy Society workshop on preclinical therapy development for epilepsy, our working group considered the current state of understanding related to terminology, models, and strategies for therapy development for the comorbidities of epilepsy. Herein we summarize our findings and suggest ways to accelerate development of new therapies. We also consider important issues to improve research including those related to methodology, nonpharmacologic therapies, biomarkers, and infrastructure. PMID:23909853

  16. Review of Hypoglycemia in the Older Adult: Clinical Implications and Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sircar, Mousumi; Bhatia, Ashmeet; Munshi, Medha

    2016-02-01

    The aging of the population is a worldwide phenomenon. The prevalence of diabetes rises with increasing age, so the personal and financial costs of diabetes in the aging population have become significant burdens. In 2012, 104 billion (59%) of the estimated $176 billion in United States healthcare expenditures attributable to diabetes were utilized by patients older than 65 years of age [American Diabetes Association (1)]. With improvement in diabetes management and better glycemic control in the general population, there is an increase in the prevalence of hypoglycemia, which is the complication of the treatment of diabetes. Older adults with diabetes have a higher risk for hypoglycemia due to altered adaptive physiologic responses to low glucose levels. These patients also have comorbidities, such as cognitive and functional loss, that interfere with prompt identification and/or appropriate treatment of hypoglycemia. Older adults who suffer from hypoglycemia also have increased risk for falls, fall-related fractures, seizures and comas and exacerbation of chronic conditions, such as cognitive dysfunction and cardiac events. Thus, hypoglycemia in the older adult must be proactively avoided to decrease significant morbidity and mortality. Education of the patients and caregivers is important in prevention and treatment of hypoglycemia. In this article, we discuss the important aspects and unique challenges pertaining to hypoglycemia in older population. We also highlight the risks, consequences and prevention and management strategies for hypoglycemia that can be used by healthcare providers caring for older populations. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Early-Phase 11C-PiB PET in Amyloid Angiopathy-Related Symptomatic Cerebral Hemorrhage: Potential Diagnostic Value?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farid, Karim; Hong, Young T; Aigbirhio, Franklin I; Fryer, Tim D; Menon, David K; Warburton, Elizabeth A; Baron, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Although late-phase (>35min post-administration) 11C-PiB-PET has good sensitivity in cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA), its specificity is poor due to frequently high uptake in healthy aged subjects. By detecting perfusion-like abnormalities, early-phase 11C-PiB-PET might add diagnostic value. Early-frame (1-6min) 11C-PiB-PET was obtained in 11 non-demented patients with probable CAA-related symptomatic lobar intracerebral haemorrhage (70±7yrs), 9 age-matched healthy controls (HCs) and 10 HCs PiB data did not change the sensitivity and specificity of late-phase PiB, but combined early- and late-phase positivity entails a very high suspicion of underlying Aβ-related clinical disorder, i.e., CAA or Alzheimer disease (AD). In order to clarify this ambiguity, we then show that the occipital/posterior cingulate ratio is markedly lower in CAA than in AD (N = 7). These pilot data suggest that early-phase 11C-PiB-PET may not only add to late-phase PiB-PET with respect to the unclear situation of late-phase positivity, but also help differentiate CAA from AD.

  18. Roux en Y gastric bypass hypoglycemia resolves with gastric feeding or reversal: Confirming a non-pancreatic etiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dawn Belt Davis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Postprandial hypoglycemia is an infrequent but disabling complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB surgery. Controversy still exists as to whether the postprandial hyperinsulinemia observed is due to inherent changes in pancreatic β-cell mass or function or to reversible alterations caused by RYGB anatomy. We aimed to determine if gastric feeding or reversal of RYGB would normalize postprandial glucose and hormone excursions in patients with symptomatic hypoglycemia. Methods: We completed a prospective study of six patients with severe symptomatic RYGB hypoglycemia who underwent RYGB reversal. An additional subject without hypoglycemia who underwent RYGB reversal was also studied prospectively. Mixed meal tolerance testing (MTT was done orally (RYGB anatomy, via gastrostomy tube in the excluded stomach in the setting of RYGB, and several months after RYGB reversal. Results: All subjects reported symptomatic improvement of hypoglycemia after reversal of RYGB. Weight gain after reversal was moderate and variable. Postprandial glucose, insulin, and GLP-1 excursions were significantly diminished with gastric feeding and after reversal. Insulin secretion changed proportional to glucose levels and insulin clearance increased after reversal. Glucagon/insulin ratios were similar throughout study. We further compared the impact of modified sleeve gastrectomy reversal surgery to those with restoration of complete stomach and found no significant differences in weight regain or in postprandial glucose or hormone levels. Conclusions: Reversal of RYGB is an effective treatment option for severe postprandial hypoglycemia. The pathophysiology of this disorder is primarily due to RYGB anatomy resulting in altered glucose, gut, and pancreatic hormone levels and decreased insulin clearance, rather than inherent β-cell hyperplasia or hyperfunction. Keywords: Hypoglycemia, Insulin, Glucagon-like peptide 1, Roux en Y gastric bypass, Gastric bypass

  19. Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... body breaks down carbohydrates from foods — such as bread, rice, pasta, vegetables, fruit and milk products — into ... which is used to treat malaria. Excessive alcohol consumption. Drinking heavily without eating can block your liver ...

  20. Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... fall too low, the body releases the hormone adrenaline, which helps get stored glucose into the bloodstream ... heart rate are early warning signs of this adrenaline release. More severe symptoms — such as confusion, drowsiness, ...

  1. Postprandial Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Bariatric Surgery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Heide, L. J.M.; Emous, M.; van Beek, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (PHH) is a complication of bariatric surgery, especially Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The true incidence is not known as the definition of PHH is not clear. Continuous glucose monitoring shows a prevalence of hypoglycemia in 75% of patients, with only 1 in 5

  2. Evaluation of glycogen storage disease as a cause of ketotic hypoglycemia in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Laurie M; Corrado, Michelle M; van der Ende, Rixt M; Derks, Terry G J; Chen, Margaret A; Siegel, Sara; Hoyt, Kate; Correia, Catherine E; Lumpkin, Christopher; Flanagan, Theresa B; Carreras, Caroline T; Weinstein, David A

    2015-05-01

    Ketone formation is a normal response when hypoglycemia occurs. Since the majority of children with recurrent hypoglycemia cannot be diagnosed with a known endocrine or metabolic disorder on a critical sample, ketotic hypoglycemia has been described as the most common cause of low blood glucose concentrations in children. Critical samples, however, will miss the ketotic forms of glycogen storage disease (GSD), which present with elevated ketones, hypoglycemia, and normal hormonal concentrations. A total of 164 children (96 boys, 68 girls) were enrolled in the study. Prediction of pathogenicity of DNA changes using computer modeling confirmed pathology in 20 individuals [four GSD 0, two GSD VI, 12 GSD IX alpha, one GSD IX beta, one GSD IX gamma] (12%). Boys were most likely to have changes in the PHKA2 gene, consistent with GSD IX alpha, an X-linked disorder. Mutations in genes involved in glycogen synthesis and degradation were commonly found in children with idiopathic ketotic hypoglycemia. GSD IX is likely an unappreciated cause of ketotic hypoglycemia in children, while GSD 0 and VI are relatively uncommon. GSD IX alpha should particularly be considered in boys with unexplained hypoglycemia.

  3. A retrospective study on epidemiology of hypoglycemia in Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvva Gowtham Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoglycemia is one among the leading causes for Emergency Department (ED visits and is the most common and easily preventable endocrine emergency. This study is aimed at assessing the incidence and elucidating the underlying causes of hypoglycemia. Materials and Methods: A retrospective, observational study which included patients registering in ED with a finger prick blood glucose ≤60 mg/dl at the time of arrival. All patients aged above 15 years with the above inclusion criteria during the period of August 2010 to July 2013 were selected. The study group was categorized based on diabetic status into diabetic and nondiabetic groups. Results: A total of 1196 hypoglycemic episodes encountered at the ED during the study period were included, and of which 772 with complete data were analyzed. Underlying causes for hypoglycemia in the diabetic group (535 mainly included medication related 320 (59.81%, infections 108 (20.19%, and chronic kidney disease 61 (11.40%. Common underlying causes of hypoglycemia in nondiabetic group (237, 30.69% included infections 107 (45.15%, acute/chronic liver disease 42 (17.72%, and malignancies 22 (9.28%. Among diabetic subjects on antidiabetic medications (n = 320, distribution over 24 h duration clearly reported two peaks at 8th and 21st h. The incidence of hypoglycemia and death per 1000 ED visits were 16.41 and 0.73 in 2011, 16.19 and 0.78 in 2012, 17.20 and 1.22 in 2013 with an average of 16.51 and 0.91, respectively. Conclusion: Bimodal distribution with peaks in incidences of hypoglycemic attacks at 8th and 21st h based on hourly distribution in a day can be correlated with the times just before next meal. None of the patients should leave ED without proper evaluation of the etiology of hypoglycemia and the problem should be addressed at each individual level. Increasing incidence of death over the years is alarming, and further studies are needed to conclude the root cause.

  4. Actual Therapeutic Indication of an Old Drug: Urea for Treatment of Severely Symptomatic and Mild Chronic Hyponatremia Related to SIADH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Decaux

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Oral urea has been used in the past to treat various diseases like gastric ulcers, liver metastases, sickle cell disease, heart failure, brain oedema, glaucoma, Meniere disease, etc. We have demonstrated for years, the efficacy of urea to treat euvolemic (SIADH or hypervolemic hyponatremia. We briefly describe the indications of urea use in symptomatic and paucisymptomatic hyponatremic patients. Urea is a non-toxic, cheap product, and protects against osmotic demyelinating syndrome (ODS in experimental studies. Prospective studies showing the benefit to treat mild chronic hyponatremia due to SIADH and comparing water restriction, urea, high ceiling diuretics, and antivasopressin antagonist antagonist should be done.

  5. Starvation of cancer via induced ketogenesis and severe hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelner, Adam; Vorsanger, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Neoplasms are highly dependent on glucose as their substrate for energy production and are generally not able to catabolize other fuel sources such as ketones and fatty acids. Thus, removing access to glucose has the potential to starve cancer cells and induce apoptosis. Unfortunately, other body tissues are also dependent on glucose for energy under normal conditions. However, in human starvation (or in the setting of diet-induced ketogenesis), the body "keto-adapts" and glucose requirements of most tissues drop to almost nil. Exceptions include the central nervous system (CNS) and various other tissues which have a small but obligatory requirement of glucose. Our hypothesized treatment takes keto-adaptation as a prerequisite. We then propose the induction of severe hypoglycemia by depressing gluconeogenesis while administering glucose to the brain. Although severe hypoglycemia normally produces adverse effects such as seizure and coma, it is relatively safe following keto-adaptation. We hypothesize that our therapeutic hypoglycemia treatment has potential to rapidly induce tumor cell necrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Relation of symptomatic heart failure and psychological status to persistent depression in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Susanne S.; Hoogwegt, Madelein T; Jordaens, Luc

    2011-01-01

    .71), diuretics (OR 2.41; 95% CI 1.26 to 4.61), and psychotropic medication (OR 3.58; 95% CI 1.86 to 6.90) were all significant univariate correlates of persistent depression at 3 months. No effect was found for ICD shock during follow-up (OR 1.59; 95% CI 0.57 to 4.41). In adjusted analysis, New York Heart...... Association class III-IV (OR 2.95; 95% CI 1.47 to 5.89), Type D personality (OR 7.98; 95% CI 3.98 to 16.04), and the use of psychotropic medication (OR 2.73; 95% CI 1.27 to 5.84) were independent correlates of persistent depression. In conclusion, symptomatic heart failure, psychological status......, and psychotropic medication use predicted persistent depression after ICD implantation....

  7. Severe Hypoglycemia Accompanied with Thyroid Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuki Nakatani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a 32-year-old Japanese women with severe hypoglycemia accompanied with thyroid crisis. She complained of dyspnea, general fatigue, and leg edema. She was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism with congestive heart failure and liver dysfunction. Soon after admission, sudden cardiopulmonary arrest occurred. She was then transferred to the intensive care unit. Her serum glucose level was 7 mg/dl. Intravenous glucose, hydrocortisone, diuretics, and continuous hemodiafiltration (CHDF saved her. We considered that hypoglycemia occurred due to heart failure and liver dysfunction due to thyroid crisis.

  8. Baroreflex Sensitivity Impairment During Hypoglycemia: Implications for Cardiovascular Control

    OpenAIRE

    Rao, Ajay D.; Bonyhay, Istvan; Dankwa, Joel; Baimas-George, Maria; Kneen, Lindsay; Ballatori, Sarah; Freeman, Roy; Adler, Gail K.

    2015-01-01

    Studies have shown associations between exposure to hypoglycemia and increased mortality, raising the possibility that hypoglycemia has adverse cardiovascular effects. In this study, we determined the acute effects of hypoglycemia on cardiovascular autonomic control. Seventeen healthy volunteers were exposed to experimental hypoglycemia (2.8 mmol/L) for 120 min. Cardiac vagal baroreflex function was assessed using the modified Oxford method before the initiation of the hypoglycemic-hyperinsul...

  9. Development of a New Fear of Hypoglycemia Scale: FH-15

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anarte Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Caballero, Francisco Felix; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Rondan, Rosa Maria; Carreira, Monica; Dominguez-Lopez, Marta; Machado, Alberto; Gonzalo-Marin, Montserrat; Tapia, Maria Jose; Valdes, Sergio; Gonzalez-Romero, Stella; Soriguer, Federico C.

    2011-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse event associated with insulin treatment in diabetes. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite aversive and potentially life threatening. The physical sequelae provide ample reason for patients to fear hypoglycemia and avoid episodes. For these reasons, our purpose in this study was to develop a new…

  10. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome: a specific neurologic syndrome following neonatal hypoglycemia?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karimzadeh, Parvaneh; Tabarestani, Sepideh; Ghofrani, Mohammad

    2011-02-01

    This study attempted to elaborate the existence of a specific neurologic pattern observed in children who experienced neonatal hypoglycemia. Twenty-seven patients with seizure and history of neonatal hypoglycemia were compared with 28 children suffering from idiopathic occipital epilepsy. In both groups the most common type of seizure activities included eye movements and impaired consciousness responding well to treatment; however, ictal vomiting was more common in controls. Subjects were in epileptic and nonepileptic groups. Ninety percent of cases showed abnormal signal of the posterior head region on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A large number showed posterior abnormalities on electroencephalography (EEG). Visual loss with abnormal visual evoked potential was the most frequent visual finding. Fifty-five percent showed mild psychomotor retardation. This study demonstrates that neonatal hypoglycemia can induce a syndrome with a specific clinical spectrum consisting of epilepsy, visual disturbances, and psychomotor retardation. Hypoglycemia-occipital syndrome is an entity without statistically significant semiologic differences from the idiopathic type.

  11. Individual and societal consequences of hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dømgaard, Mikala; Bagger, Malene; Rhee, Nicolai Alexander

    2015-01-01

    -sectional survey of Danish Diabetes Association members was conducted to investigate individual and societal consequences of hypoglycemia. RESULTS: A total of 3117/9951 individuals with type 1 diabetes (T1DM) (32.2%) or type 2 diabetes (T2DM) (67.8%) completed the survey. The calculated incidence rates of self...

  12. Metabolic responses to hypoglycemia in juvenile diabetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T

    1980-01-01

    /or orthostatic hypotension) and in seven control patients of similar age and duration of diabetes with out neuropathy. Before the hypoglycaemic episode, normoglycemia had been maintained for at least 10 hours. Following hypoglycemia, a slight but significant and similar increase in plasma glucagon was found...

  13. Rituximab induced hypoglycemia in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lali V

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hypoglycemia is a vary rare toxicity of rituximab. The exact mechanism of rituximab induced hypoglycemia is not clear. Case presentation A 50 year old female presented with a left tonsillar non Hodgkin's lymphoma and was started on R-CHOP chemotherapy. Twenty four hours after the first rituximab infusion, she developed hypoglycemia which was managed by IV glucose infusion. Conclusion Hypoglycemia following rituximab administration is rare. Possibilities of hypoglycemia should be kept in mind in patients developing symptoms like fatigue, restlessness, and sweating while on rituximab therapy.

  14. The impact of parents' sleep quality and hypoglycemia worry on diabetes self-efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2015-01-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality, possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships among parents' sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ≤ age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; one third of parents reported their overall sleep quality was "fairly bad" or "very bad." Hypoglycemia worry and parents' sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents' sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children's hypoglycemia.

  15. The Impact of Parents’ Sleep Quality and Hypoglycemia Worry on Diabetes Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbert, Linda Jones; Monaghan, Maureen; Cogen, Fran; Streisand, Randi

    2014-01-01

    Parents of young children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) may experience poor sleep quality possibly impacting their confidence in T1D management. This study investigated sleep characteristics among parents of children with T1D and relationships amongst parents’ sleep quality, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. As part of baseline assessment for a randomized clinical trial (RCT) to promote parental management of T1D, 134 parents of children ≤ age 6 reported on demographics, parent sleep characteristics, hypoglycemia worry, and diabetes self-efficacy. Parents reported they slept less time than recommended by the National Sleep Foundation and endorsed greater global sleep problems than standardized norms of healthy adults; 1/3 of parents reported their overall sleep quality was “fairly bad” or “very bad.” Hypoglycemia worry and parents’ sleep quality were both significantly related to diabetes self-efficacy, but parents’ sleep quality did not mediate the relationship of hypoglycemia worry and diabetes self-efficacy. Many parents experience disrupted sleep that impacts their perceived ability to perform T1D management. Interventions designed to improve parental T1D self-efficacy should consider sleep and concerns about children’s hypoglycemia. PMID:24738994

  16. Severe paraneoplastic hypoglycemia in a patient with a gastrointestinal stromal tumor with an exon 9 mutation: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escobar, Guillermo A; Robinson, William A; Nydam, Trevor L; Heiple, Drew C; Weiss, Glen J; Buckley, Linda; Gonzalez, Rene; McCarter, Martin D

    2007-01-01

    Non-islet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia (NICTH) is a very rare phenomenon, but even more so in gastrointestinal stromal tumors. It tends to present in large or metastatic tumors, and can appear at any time in the progression of the disease. We present herein a case of NICTH in a GIST tumor and report an exon 9 mutation associated to it. A thirty nine year-old man with a recurrent, metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumor presented to the hospital with nausea, dizziness, loss of consciousness, and profound hypoglycemia (20 mg/dL). There was no evidence of factitious hypoglycemia. He was stabilized with a continuous glucose infusion and following selective vascular embolization, the patient underwent debulking of a multicentric 40 cm × 25 cm × 10 cm gastrointestinal stromal tumor. After resection, the patient became euglycemic and returned to his normal activities. Tumor analysis confirmed excessive production of insulin-like growth factor II m-RNA and the precursor protein, 'big' insulin-like growth factor II. Mutational analysis also identified a rare, 6 bp tandem repeat insert (gcctat) at position 1530 in exon 9 of KIT. Optimal management of gastrointestinal stromal tumor-induced hypoglycemia requires a multidisciplinary approach, and surgical debulking is the treatment of choice to obtain immediate symptom relief. Imatinib or combinations of glucocorticoids and growth hormone are alternative palliative strategies for symptomatic hypoglycemia. In addition, mutations in exon 9 of the tyrosine kinase receptor KIT occur in 11–20% of GIST and are often associated with poor patient outcomes. The association of this KIT mutation with non-islet cell tumor induced hypoglycemia has yet to be established

  17. Short communication: Cow- and herd-level prevalence of hypoglycemia in hyperketonemic postpartum dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubuc, J; Buczinski, S

    2018-02-07

    The objective of this study was to quantify the prevalence of hypoglycemia in hyperketonemic dairy cows during the early postpartum period. A prospective observational study was conducted in 100 dairy herds selected by convenience. Within all participating herds, 40 cows (or the entire herd if smaller than 40 cows) were enrolled in the study (total of 3,776 enrolled cows). Herds were visited every 2 wk by an animal health technician. Cows were bled from their coccygeal vessels once between 1 and 14 d in milk, and cow-side testing was performed for ketonemia and glycemia using a device validated in cattle (Precision Xtra, Abbott, Mississauga, ON, Canada). Hyperketonemia was defined as β-hydroxybutyrate ≥1.4 mmol/L, and hypoglycemia was defined as glucose ≤2.2 mmol/L. Descriptive statistics were computed at the cow and herd levels. The cow-level prevalence of hyperketonemia, hypoglycemia, and simultaneous hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia was 20.0% (757/3,776), 13.8% (642/3,776), and 6.2% (235/3,776), respectively. Within the subset of hyperketonemic cows only, the prevalence of hypoglycemia was 31.0% (235/757). At the herd level, the median prevalence was 17.5% (minimum: 5.0%, first quartile: 10.0%, third quartile: 22.5%, maximum: 77.5%) for hyperketonemia, 15.0% (minimum: 5.0%, first quartile: 12.5%, third quartile: 20.0%, maximum: 47.5%) for hypoglycemia, and 7.5% (minimum: 2.5%, first quartile: 5.0%, third quartile: 12.5%, maximum: 17.5%) for simultaneous hypoglycemia and hyperketonemia. The herd-level median prevalence of hypoglycemia within the subset of hyperketonemic cows only was 30.6% (minimum: 2.5%, first quartile: 20.0%, third quartile: 39.1%, maximum: 63.0%). The results from this study show that the prevalence of simultaneous hyperketonemia and hypoglycemia is relatively low in the overall early postpartum cow population but also that approximately one third of hyperketonemic cows are hypoglycemic, which might represent an opportunity to improve

  18. Hypoglycemia, S-ACE and ACE genotypes in a Danish nationwide population of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Jesper; Svensson, Jannet; Bergholdt, Regine

    2011-01-01

    High S-ACE levels have been shown to predispose to increased risk of hypoglycemia, however; some inconsistency relates to the risk of the ACE genotype. We investigated the association between S-ACE level at diagnosis and ACE genotype to long-term risk of severe hypoglycemia in more than 1000 chil...... children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes being part of the Danish Registry of Childhood diabetes over a 10-yr period....

  19. Wireless capsule endoscopy for evaluation of phenotypic expression of small-bowel polyps in patients with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome and in symptomatic first-degree relatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, J; Lopes, L; Vilas Boas, G; Pinho, C

    2004-12-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is an inherited gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyposis disorder. Small-bowel intussusception and bleeding are the most common complications, and malignancy may also occur. Survey of the gastrointestinal tract, particularly of the small bowel, is difficult and current recommendations for management syndrome are ambiguous. We evaluated the feasibility of capsule endoscopy for identifying phenotypic expression of small-bowel polyps in patients with full-blown PJS and a previous diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyposis, and in symptomatic kindred of PJS patients with no previous diagnosis of gastrointestinal polyposis. Two groups were studied: group A consisted of 14 patients with gastrointestinal polyposis, eight of whom had undergone previous small-intestine surgery; group B consisted of six symptomatic first-degree relatives of PJS patients; these patients had previous negative gastrointestinal endoscopic examinations. Numerous polyps were detected in all patients in group A. Most polyps were sessile, but the larger polyps tended to be pedunculated. Polyp density was highest in the jejunum (greater than in the ileum and duodenum). Seven patients had at least one large polyp (> 11 mm) and five of these patients subsequently underwent enteroscopy, which revealed that capsule endoscopy had correctly identified all the patients with large polyps, but had missed 20 % of the total number of large polyps in these patients. No polyps were detected by capsule endoscopy in group B patients, despite the excellent visualization of the small intestine. In all patients, the capsules were expelled within 24 hours, without complications, and the procedure was well tolerated. Capsule endoscopy is an effective and well-tolerated method for evaluating small-bowel pathology in patients with PJS.

  20. [Hypoglycemia as a cause of traffic accidents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metter, D

    1989-05-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most important subsidiary effect of insulin therapy, where traffic medicine is concerned. A study has been made of 8 motor car drivers each dependent on insulin and involved in road accidents. The evidence was issued during the trial. The questions set out to prove if there was a state of hypoglycemia and if the afflicted could have foreseen this condition. In 5 cases the driving conduct before the accidents was evident in cordinatory disturbances, which resulted in sinuous driving. The accidents all happened in every-day traffic conditions, namely counter traffic (3), front-end collision (3) and through disregard of right-of-way at cross-roads (1). A further accident was conditioned by an alcoholic state while parking in a car-park. The disturbances in consciousness conditioned by hypoglycemia occurred without warning. In 3 cases the predictability (in legal terms Actio libera in causa) had to be conceded, because the drivers had set out on their routes despite warning signals or insufficient intake of nourishment beforehand.

  1. Methadone Use and the Risk of Hypoglycemia for Inpatients With Cancer Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flory, James H; Wiesenthal, Alison C; Thaler, Howard T; Koranteng, Lauren; Moryl, Natalie

    2016-01-01

    Methadone is an important drug in the management of both cancer-related and non-cancer-related pain and is the main pharmacologic agent used in the treatment of opioid addiction. Unexpected hypoglycemia has been observed in patients receiving methadone, prompting a more detailed investigation. To evaluate the incidence of hypoglycemia in a cohort of inpatients receiving methadone versus other opioids including fentanyl, hydromorphone, and morphine. Retrospective observational cohort of inpatients in a tertiary cancer center admitted for more than 48 hours from November 1, 2011 to October 30, 2013. The main outcomes were lowest measured daily blood glucose (in mg/dL) and incidence of hypoglycemia (defined as blood glucose methadone doses compared with other non-methadone opioids. Of the 641 eligible patients admitted during the study period who received at least one dose of methadone during admission, multivariable logistic regression showed significant associations between methadone and hypoglycemia at doses greater than 40 mg oral equivalents per day or with patient-controlled analgesia use. A dose-response relationship was observed, with an odds ratio of 3.1 (95% confidence interval 2.5, 3.6) when doses greater than 80 mg/day were used. No evidence of increased risk of hypoglycemia or of a dose-response curve was seen for the other opioids. The risk of hypoglycemia is increased for patients taking more than 40 mg oral methadone equivalents per day. When starting methadone at or more than 40 mg/day, we recommend blood glucose monitoring. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Symptomatic epilepsy in children

    OpenAIRE

    Еlaginykh E.S.

    2014-01-01

    Research goals were to evaluate the etiological structure of symptomatic epilepsy in children, age structure of period of disease manifestation, average length of latent period among children with different characters of lesions, dependence between frequency of seizures and character of lesion. Material and methods. A total of 180 case-records of patients with symptomatic epilepsy were analyzed by the next criteria: anamnesis, materials of electroencephalogram and neurovisualization. Results....

  3. Detection of hypoglycemia associated EEG changes during sleep in type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Folkestad, Lars; Elsborg, Rasmus

    2012-01-01

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a feared complication to insulin treated diabetes. Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. EEG changes are demonstrated during daytime hypoglycemia. In this explorative study, we test the hypothesis that specific hypoglycemia......-associated EEG-changes occur during sleep and are detectable in time for the patient to take action....

  4. Hypoglycemia-associated electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram changes appear simultaneously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anine Poulsen; Højlund, Kurt; Poulsen, Mikael Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Tight glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may be accomplished only if severe hypoglycemia can be prevented. Biosensor alarms based on the body's reactions to hypoglycemia have been suggested. In the present study, we analyzed three lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and single-channel e......Tight glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may be accomplished only if severe hypoglycemia can be prevented. Biosensor alarms based on the body's reactions to hypoglycemia have been suggested. In the present study, we analyzed three lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and single...

  5. Acute Hypoglycemia Induces Painful Neuropathy and the Treatment of Coenzyme Q10

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Ping Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic neuropathic pain is reduced with tight glycemic control. However, strict control increases the risk of hypoglycemic episodes, which are themselves linked to painful neuropathy. This study explored the effects of hypoglycemia-related painful neuropathy. Pretreatment with coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10 was performed to explore the preventive effect of CoQ10 on hypoglycemia-related acute neuropathic pain. Two strains of mice were used and 1 unit/kg of insulin was given to induce hypoglycemia. Mechanical sensitivity of hindpaw withdrawal thresholds was measured using von Frey filaments. Blood glucose levels were clamped at normal levels by joint insulin and glucose injection to test whether insulin itself induced hypersensitivity. Results suggest that the increased mechanical sensitivity after insulin injection is related to decreased blood glucose levels. When blood glucose levels remained at a normal level by the linked administration of insulin and glucose, mice demonstrated no significant change in mechanical sensitivity. Pretreatment with CoQ10 prevented neuropathic pain and the expression of the stress factor c-Fos. These results support the concept that pain in the diabetic scenario can be the result of hypoglycemia and not insulin itself. Additionally, pretreatment with CoQ10 may be a potent preventive method for the development of neuropathic pain.

  6. KCNQ1 long QT syndrome patients have hyperinsulinemia and symptomatic hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Torekov, Signe S; Iepsen, Eva; Christiansen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    mutation carriers showed increased insulin release (area under the curve 45.6 +/- 6.3 vs. 26.0 +/- 2.8 min $nmol/L insulin) and beta-cell glucose sensitivity and had lower levels of plasma glucose and serum potassium upon oral glucose stimulation and increased hypoglycemic symptoms. Prolonged OGTT in four...

  7. Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetic Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Simon; Damm, Peter; Mersebach, Henriette; Skjøth, Trine Vang; Kaaja, Risto; Hod, Moshe; Durán-García, Santiago; McCance, David; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE A recent randomized trial compared prandial insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin in type 1 diabetic pregnancy. The aim of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the incidence of severe hypoglycemia during pregnancy and compare women enrolled preconception with women enrolled during early pregnancy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS IAsp administered immediately before each meal was compared with human insulin administered 30 min before each meal in 99 subjects (44 to IAsp and 55 to human insulin) randomly assigned preconception and in 223 subjects (113 for IAsp and 110 for human insulin) randomly assigned in early pregnancy (IAsp versus human insulin were 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.3 versus 1.2, and 0.2 versus 2.2 episodes per patient per year, respectively (NS). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that initiation of insulin analog treatment preconception rather than during early pregnancy may result in a lower risk of severe hypoglycemia in women with type 1 diabetes. PMID:20007944

  8. Retrospective Evaluation of a National Guideline to Prevent Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Annett Helleskov; Wehberg, Sonja; Fenger-Groen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia is common in neonates and may cause adverse neurological outcomes. Guidelines should aim to prevent repeated hypoglycemic episodes in risk groups, but they are not usually stratified according to the severity of hypoglycemia risk, which may lead to inappropriate and redun...

  9. Hypoglycemia-associated electroencephalogram and electrocardiogram changes appear simultaneously

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anine Poulsen; Højlund, Kurt; Poulsen, Mikael Kjær

    2013-01-01

    Tight glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may be accomplished only if severe hypoglycemia can be prevented. Biosensor alarms based on the body's reactions to hypoglycemia have been suggested. In the present study, we analyzed three lead electrocardiogram (ECG) and single-channel e...

  10. Profound postanesthetic hypoglycemia attributable to glucocorticoid deficiency in 2 dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Lane, I F; Matwichuk, C L; Carpenter, L G; Behrend, E N

    1999-01-01

    Glucocorticoid deficiency was diagnosed as the cause of severe postanesthetic hypoglycemia in 2 dogs. Prior signs of systemic illness were not described in either dog; however, preoperative hematologic findings were consistent with glucocorticoid deficiency. Fasting hypoglycemia is a possible complication of chronic adrenal insufficiency primarily because of impaired gluconeogenesis.

  11. Severe hypoglycemia and risks of vascular events and death.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoungas, S.; Patel, A.; Chalmers, J.; Galan, B.E. de; Li, Q.; Billot, L.; Woodward, M.; Ninomiya, T.; Neal, B.; MacMahon, S; Grobbee, D.E.; Kengne, A.P.; Marre, M.; Heller, S.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Severe hypoglycemia may increase the risk of a poor outcome in patients with type 2 diabetes assigned to an intensive glucose-lowering intervention. We analyzed data from a large study of intensive glucose lowering to explore the relationship between severe hypoglycemia and adverse

  12. QT measurement and heart rate correction during hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Toke Folke; Randløv, Jette; Christensen, Leif Engmann

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Several studies show that hypoglycemia causes QT interval prolongation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of QT measurement methodology, heart rate correction, and insulin types during hypoglycemia. Methods. Ten adult subjects with type 1 diabetes had hypoglycemia...... induced by intravenous injection of two insulin types in a cross-over design. QT measurements were done using the slope-intersect (SI) and manual annotation (MA) methods. Heart rate correction was done using Bazett's (QTcB) and Fridericia's (QTcF) formulas. Results. The SI method showed significant...... a significant impact on the prolongation of QT during hypoglycemia. Heart rate correction may also influence the QT during hypoglycemia while the type of insulin is insignificant. Prolongation of QTc in this study did not reach pathologic values suggesting that QTc prolongation cannot fully explain the dead...

  13. Stepwise Approach to Problematic Hypoglycemia in Korea: Educational, Technological, and Transplant Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Man Jin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia has been found to be prevalent in 20% to 40% of people with type 1 diabetes. If a similar prevalence exists in Koreans with type 1 diabetes, at a minimum, thousands of people with type 1 diabetes suffer at least one unpredicted episode of severe hypoglycemia per year in Korea. For patients with problematic hypoglycemia, an evidence-based stepwise approach was suggested in 2015. The first step is structured education regarding multiple daily injections of an insulin analog, and the second step is adding a technological intervention, such as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion or real-time continuous glucose monitoring. The next step is a sensor-augmented pump, preferably with a low glucose suspension feature or very frequent contact, and the final step is islet or pancreas transplantation. In Korea, however, none of these treatments are reimbursed by the National Health Insurance, and thus have not been widely implemented. The low prevalence of type 1 diabetes means that Korean physicians are relatively unfamiliar with the new technologies in this field. Therefore, the roles of new technologies and pancreas or islet transplantation in the treatment of problematic hypoglycemia need to be defined in the current clinical setting of Korea.

  14. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia associated with insulin antibodies caused by exogenous insulin analog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Ting Su

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Insulin antibodies (IA associated with exogenous insulin administration seldom caused hypoglycemia and had different characteristics from insulin autoantibodies (IAA found in insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS, which was first described by Dr Hirata in 1970. The characteristic of IAS is the presence of insulin-binding autoantibodies and related fasting or late postprandial hypoglycemia. Here, we report a patient with type 1 diabetes mellitus under insulin glargine and insulin aspart treatment who developed recurrent spontaneous post-absorptive hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with the cause probably being insulin antibodies induced by exogenous injected insulin. Examinations of serial sera disclosed a high titre of insulin antibodies (33%, normal <5%, high insulin concentration (111.9 IU/mL and undetectable C-peptide when hypoglycemia occurred. An oral glucose tolerance test revealed persistent high serum levels of total insulin and undetectable C-peptide. Image studies of the pancreas were unremarkable, which excluded the diagnosis of insulinoma. The patient does not take any of the medications containing sulfhydryl compounds, which had been reported to cause IAS. After administering oral prednisolone for 3 weeks, hypoglycemic episodes markedly improved, and he was discharged smoothly.

  15. Effectiveness of a nurse-managed protocol to prevent hypoglycemia in hospitalized patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marelli, Giuseppe; Avanzini, Fausto; Iacuitti, Giuseppe; Planca, Enrico; Frigerio, Ilaria; Busi, Giovanna; Carlino, Liliana; Cortesi, Laura; Roncaglioni, Maria Carla; Riva, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia due to inadequate carbohydrate intake is a frequent complication of insulin treatment of diabetic in-patients. Objective. To assess the effectiveness of a nurse-managed protocol to prevent hypoglycemia during subcutaneous insulin treatment. Prospective pre-post-intervention study. In 350 consecutive diabetic in-patients the incidence of hypoglycemia (blood glucose food to integrate incomplete carbohydrate intake in the meal; (2) in case of lack of appetite or repeatedly partial intake of the planned food, prandial insulin administered at the end of the meal to be related to the actual amount of carbohydrates eaten; (3) intravenous infusion of glucose during prolonged fasting. Eighty-four patients in phase A and 266 in phase B received subcutaneous insulin for median periods of, respectively, 7 (Q1-Q3 6-12) and 6 days (Q1-Q3 4-9). Hypoglycemic events declined significantly from 0.34 ± 0.33 per day in phase A to 0.19 ± 0.30 in phase B (P > 0.001). A nurse-managed protocol focusing on carbohydrate intake reduced the incidence of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes receiving subcutaneous insulin in hospital.

  16. Successful pulpal anesthesia for symptomatic irreversible pulpitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drum, Melissa; Reader, Al; Nusstein, John; Fowler, Sara

    2017-04-01

    Profound pulpal anesthesia after a successful inferior alveolar nerve block can be difficult to achieve when the clinical condition is a pulpal diagnosis of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors reviewed the literature as it relates to the anesthesia necessary for endodontic therapy of patients with painful, vital, mandibular teeth diagnosed with symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. Supplemental anesthetic techniques and medications are available that can be used to improve pulpal anesthesia for patients with the clinical condition of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis. The authors identified treatment recommendations for anesthesia in the case of symptomatic irreversible pulpitis based on a review of the available evidence. Copyright © 2017 American Dental Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Hypoglycemia and Medical Expenses in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: An Analysis Based on the Korea National Diabetes Program Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Sang Youl; Hong, Soo Min; Chon, Suk; Ahn, Kyu Jeung; Kim, Sung Hoon; Baik, Sei Hyun; Park, Yong Soo; Nam, Moon Suk; Lee, Kwan Woo; Woo, Jeong-Taek; Kim, Young Seol

    2016-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is one of the most important adverse events in individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, hypoglycemia-related events are usually overlooked and have been documented less in clinical practice. We evaluated the incidence, clinical characteristics, and medical expenses of hypoglycemia related events in T2DM patients based on the Korea National Diabetes Program (KNDP), which is the largest multi-center, prospective cohort in Korea (n = 4,350). For accurate outcomes, the KNDP data were merged with claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service (HIRA) of Korea. During a median follow-up period of 3.23 years (95% CI: 3.14, 3.19), 88 subjects (2.02%) were newly diagnosed with hypoglycemia, and the incidence of hypoglycemia was 6.44 cases per 1,000 person-years (PY). Individuals with hypoglycemia were significantly older (59.7±10.7 vs. 53.3±10.4 years, p < 0.001), had more hospital visits (121.94±126.88 days/PY, p < 0.001), had a longer hospital stays (16.13±29.21 days/PY, p < 0.001), and incurred greater medical costs ($2,447.56±4,056.38 vs. $1,336.37±3,403.39 /PY, p < 0.001) than subjects without hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia-related events were infrequently identified among the medical records of T2DM subjects. However, they were associated significantly with poor clinical outcomes, and thus, hypoglycemia could have a substantial burden on the Korean national healthcare system.

  18. Symptomatic management in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pushkar Shah

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiple sclerosis (MS is the commonest cause of disability in young adults. While there is increasing choice and better treatments available for delaying disease progression, there are still, very few, effective symptomatic treatments. For many patients such as those with primary progressive MS (PPMS and those that inevitably become secondary progressive, symptom management is the only treatment available. MS related symptoms are complex, interrelated, and can be interdependent. It requires good understanding of the condition, a holistic multidisciplinary approach, and above all, patient education and empowerment.

  19. Baroreflex Sensitivity Impairment During Hypoglycemia: Implications for Cardiovascular Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Ajay D.; Bonyhay, Istvan; Dankwa, Joel; Baimas-George, Maria; Kneen, Lindsay; Ballatori, Sarah; Adler, Gail K.

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown associations between exposure to hypoglycemia and increased mortality, raising the possibility that hypoglycemia has adverse cardiovascular effects. In this study, we determined the acute effects of hypoglycemia on cardiovascular autonomic control. Seventeen healthy volunteers were exposed to experimental hypoglycemia (2.8 mmol/L) for 120 min. Cardiac vagal baroreflex function was assessed using the modified Oxford method before the initiation of the hypoglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp protocol and during the last 30 min of hypoglycemia. During hypoglycemia, compared with baseline euglycemic conditions, 1) baroreflex sensitivity decreases significantly (19.2 ± 7.5 vs. 32.9 ± 16.6 ms/mmHg, P baroreflex activation increases significantly (the baroreflex function shifts to the right; 120 ± 14 vs. 112 ± 12 mmHg, P < 0.005), and 3) the maximum R-R interval response (1,088 ± 132 vs. 1,496 ± 194 ms, P < 0.001) and maximal range of the R-R interval response (414 ± 128 vs. 817 ± 183 ms, P < 0.001) decrease significantly. These findings indicate reduced vagal control and impaired cardiovascular homeostasis during hypoglycemia. PMID:26438610

  20. Spontaneous Hypoglycemia After Islet Autotransplantation for Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yu Kuei; Faiman, Charles; Johnston, Philip C; Walsh, R Matthew; Stevens, Tyler; Bottino, Rita; Hatipoglu, Betul A

    2016-10-01

    Spontaneous hypoglycemia has been reported in patients after total pancreatectomy (TP) and islet autotransplantation (IAT) with maintained insulin independence. Details surrounding these events have not been well described. The objective of the study was to determine the frequency and characteristics of spontaneous hypoglycemia in patients undergoing TP-IAT and/or to ascertain predictive or protective factors of its development. This was an observational cohort study in 40 patients who underwent TP-IAT from August 2008 to May 2014, with a median follow-up of 34 months. The study was conducted at a single institution (Cleveland Clinic). Patients included recipients of TP-IAT. The intervention included small, frequent meals in those patients who developed spontaneous hypoglycemia. Incidence of spontaneous hypoglycemia development, characteristics of the patients developing hypoglycemia, and their response to small, frequent meals were measured. Six of 12 patients, who maintained insulin independence, developed spontaneous hypoglycemia. The episodes could be fasting, postprandial, and/or exercise associated, with the frequency ranging from two to three times daily to once every 1-2 weeks. All patients experienced at least one episode that required external assistance, glucagon administration, and/or emergent medical attention. Patients who developed hypoglycemia had a lower median age and tended to have a lower median islet equivalent/kg body weight but a higher median total islet equivalent, body mass index, and homeostatic model assessment for insulin resistance score. All patients who received small, frequent meal intervention had improvement in severity and/or frequency of the hypoglycemic episodes. Spontaneous hypoglycemia is prevalent after TP-IAT. Although the underlying pathophysiology responsible for these hypoglycemia events remains to be elucidated, small, frequent meal intervention is helpful in ameliorating this condition.

  1. Predictors of the Clinical Outcome After Arthroscopic Partial Meniscectomy for Acute Trauma-Related Symptomatic Medial Meniscal Tear in Patients More Than 60 Years of Age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofu, Hakan; Oner, Ali; Camurcu, Yalkin; Gursu, Sarper; Ucpunar, Hanifi; Sahin, Vedat

    2016-06-01

    To determine predictors of the clinical outcome after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy performed for acute trauma-related medial meniscal tear leading to mechanical symptoms in patients more than 60 years of age. In this retrospective study with 4.1 years' follow-up, the clinical data of 154 arthroscopic partial medial meniscectomies were evaluated. The body mass index (BMI), duration of symptoms, the hip-knee-ankle angle, type of the meniscal tear, presence of any chondral lesions, degenerative changes in the patellofemoral joint, the status of the cruciate ligaments and lateral meniscus, and the presence of any plica or synovitis were the independent variables. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) and Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale were the instruments used as outcome measures. Multivariate analysis was performed to determine the major predictors. The mean VAS score for 154 knees evaluated in this study improved from 5.6 points preoperatively to 2.3 points at the latest follow-up. The mean Lysholm score improved from 43 points to 72.7 points. VAS and Lysholm scores at the latest follow-up were significantly worse in patients with a preoperative BMI ≥ 26 kg/m(2), hip-knee-ankle angle > 5°, grade III or IV chondral lesion of the medial compartment according to Outerbridge classification, degenerative changes in patellofemoral joint surfaces, and an anterior cruciate ligament that was either partially ruptured or degenerative with increased laxity. A preoperative BMI ≥ 26 kg/m(2), Outerbridge grade III or IV chondral lesion of the medial compartment of the operated knee joint diagnosed during arthroscopic intervention, degenerative changes in patellofemoral joint surfaces, and the presence of an anterior cruciate ligament either partially ruptured or degenerative with increased laxity should be considered as the major predictors of the clinical outcome after arthroscopic partial meniscectomy performed for acute trauma-related symptomatic medial meniscal tear in patients

  2. Cotrimoxazole-Induced Hypoglycemia in an HIV-Infected Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine A Hughes

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available A case of cotrimoxazole-induced hypoglycemia is described in a male patient infected with HIV. Ten days after initiating high dose cotrimoxazole for suspected Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia, the patient developed neuroglycopenic symptoms and diaphoresis. Blood glucose levels were repeatedly low, with elevated insulin and C-peptide levels despite multiple intravenous bolus doses and infusions of dextrose. Hypoglycemia resolved after approximately 36 h of treatment with dextrose and discontinuation of cotrimoxazole. A review of reported cases of hypoglycemia associated with cotrimoxazole is provided, including information about onset, risk factors and possible mechanism.

  3. Incidence of hypoglycemia in newborns at risk and an audit of the 2011 American academy of pediatrics guideline for hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosagasi, Nihan Hilal; Aydin, Mustafa; Zenciroglu, Aysegul; Ustun, Nuran; Beken, Serdar

    2017-11-15

    Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose level that may negatively affect neurological and developmental prognosis. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), Committee on Fetus and Newborn defined the safe glucose concentrations in the 2011 guideline for newborns at risk for hypoglycemia. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and associated risk factors for hypoglycemia in newborn infants having risk and to assess compliance with the AAP guideline. According to 2011 AAP guideline for hypoglycemia, the newborns at risk for hypoglycemia included in this study were divided to four groups [infant of diabetic mother (IDM), large-for-gestational-age (LGA) infants, small-for-gestational-age (SGA) infants, and late preterm infants (LPI)]. Of the 207 newborn infants, there were 12 cases in IDM group (5.7%), 79 cases in LGA group (38.1%), 66 cases in SGA group (31.8%) and 50 cases in LPI group (24.1%). The incidences of hypoglycemia in these four groups were 2 (16.6%), 10 (12.7%), 8 (12.2%) and 17 (34%), respectively. Although the gender, delivery method, birth weight and 5-min Apgar score at 5-min were not found to be associated with hypoglycemia (P > 0.05), lower gestational age was determined to be associated with higher incidence of hypoglycemia (P = 0.02). Median first feeding time was 55 min and time between first nutrition and blood glucose measurement was 30 min in all cases. Highest risk for hypoglycemia in early postnatal period was present especially in LPI group. Our compliance levels with the AAP guideline was found to be satisfactory. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Glucose levels in late preterm and term newborns at one hour of life and frequency of hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afzal, M.; Yaqoob, A.

    2015-01-01

    To determine glucose levels in late preterm and term newborns at one hour of life in our population, along with the frequency of symptomatic hypoglycemia and it's known risk factors. Study Design: Descriptive study Place and Duration of Study: Quaid-e-Azam International Hospital (QIH) Islamabad from July 2012 to September 2013. Material and Methods: Two hundred and seventy newborns were selected by consecutive purposive non probability sampling who were born at QIH either by spontaneous vaginal delivery or cesarean section. Only healthy neonates were included. Gestational age, weight, fetal and maternal risk factors were assessed. Glucose level was measured by glucometer at 1 hour of life after first feed. Neonates that became symptomatic with low glucose levels were thoroughly studied, readings reconfirmed from laboratory and were promptly managed. Results: Thirty (11%) babies showed sugar level < 30 mg/dl at 1 hour of life. Out of them 18(60%) were late preterm and 12(40%) were term babies. Out of them 12(40%) babies weighed <2kg, 8(26%) were between 2-2.5 kg and 6(20%) were 2.5-4.0 kg while 4(14%) babies were between 4.0 to 4.6 kg. Only 6(2.2%) newborns became symptomatic with low sugar level. Among symptomatic newnates, 4 mothers had gestational diabetes and other two were with pregnancy induced hypertension (PIH). Important risk factors were gestational diabetes, PIH, fetal distress and SGA babies. Safest lower glucose level was found to be 30 mg/dl at 1 hour after birth. Conclusion: Plasma glucose levels measured at 1 hour of life in late preterm and term newborns in our population are consistent with international studies. Frequency of ymptomatic hypoglycemia is quite low and normal newborns without risk factors do not need screening. However one needs to be vigilant in babies with risk factors. (author)

  5. Comparison of SPECT/CT and MRI in diagnosing symptomatic lesions in ankle and foot pain patients: diagnostic performance and relation to lesion type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Seunggyun; Hong, Sung Hwan; Paeng, Jin Chul; Lee, Dong Yeon; Cheon, Gi Jeong; Arya, Amitabh; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo; Kang, Keon Wook

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the diagnostic performance of SPECT/CT and MRI in patients with ankle and foot pain, with regard to the lesion types. Fifty consecutive patients with ankle and foot pain, who underwent 99mTc-MDP SPECT/CT and MRI, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. Symptomatic lesions were determined based on clinical examination and response to treatment. On MRI and SPECT/CT, detected lesions were classified as bone, ligament/tendon, and joint lesions. Uptake on SPECT/CT was assessed using a 4-grade system. Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) of SPECT/CT and MRI were evaluated in all detected lesions and each lesion type. Diagnostic value of uptake grade was analyzed using receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and diagnostic performance was compared using Chi-square or McNemar tests. In overall lesions, the sensitivity, PPV and NPV of SPECT/CT for symptomatic lesions were 93%, 56%, 91%, and they were 98%, 48%, 95% for MRI. There was no significant difference between SPECT/CT and MRI. However, the specificity of SPECT/CT was significantly higher than that of MRI (48% versus 24%, P = 0.016). Uptake grade on SPECT/CT was significantly higher in symptomatic lesions (P diagnostic performance for symptomatic lesions in ankle and foot pain patients. SPECT/CT and MRI exhibit different diagnostic specificity in different lesion types. SPECT/CT may be used as a complementary imaging method to MRI for enhancing diagnostic specificity.

  6. Neonatal hypoglycemia: prevalence and clinical manifestations in tehran children's hospital

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dashti, N.; Einollahi, N.; Abbasi, S.

    2007-01-01

    To measure the prevalence of hypoglycemia among newborn infants in Children Hospital using a standard laboratory glucose method and to evaluate the evidence of clinical manifestations of hypoglycemia, designing appropriate strategies for prevention and treatment. The study population consisted of 673 neonates in Tehran Children's Hospital and was conducted between June 2004 and March 2005. The incidence of neonatal hypoglycemia in the present study group was 15.15% live births. The clinical features which remained significantly associated with the hypoglycemic neonates were refusal of feeding (45%), hyporeflexia (36.2%), irritability (30%), cyanosis (28.4%), tackypnea (24.5%), seizure (16.6%), weak cry (15.8%), apneic spels (9.8%), pallor (1.9%), cardiac arrest (9.1%) and sweating (1%). Hypoglycemia does occur frequently in newborn infants and requires careful monitoring and therapy of serum glucose. (author)

  7. Overestimation of hypoglycemia in infants with a high hematocrit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemperman, Hans; van Solinge, Wouter W; de Vooght, Karen MK

    Background: In neonates, hypoglycemia is an emergency condition requiring urgent treatment. Therefore, rapid and reliable blood glucose measurements are necessary. However, this step has been proven difficult because of both analytical and preanalytical variables. In our children's hospital, we

  8. Sleep disturbances in IDDM patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtson, I; Gade, J; Thomsen, C E

    1992-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied to evaluate sleep patterns during normoglycemia and spontaneous and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two channels of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram and actooculogram were recorded. The signals were analyzed off-line, using...... a polygraphic sleep analysis system. The scoring was mainly based on the color density spectral array of the EEG. Blood glucose and growth hormone were measured serially. Asymptomatic, spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred in 38% of the nights. Conventional sleep analysis showed a tendency toward...

  9. Refractory hypoglycemia in a patient with functional adrenal cortical carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katia Regina Marchetti

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Adrenacarcinomas are rare, and hypoglycemic syndrome resulting from the secretion of insulin-like growth factor II (IGF-II by these tumors have been described infrequently. This study describes the case of a young woman with severe persistent hypoglycemia and a large adrenal tumor and discusses the physiopathological mechanisms involved in hypoglycemia. The case is described as a 21-year-old woman who presented with 8 months of general symptoms and, in the preceding 3 months, with episodes of mental confusion and visual blurring secondary to hypoglycemia. A functional assessment of the adrenal cortex revealed ACTH-independent hypercortisolism and hyperandrogenism. Hypoglycemia, hypoinsulinemia, low C-peptide and no ketones were also detected. An evaluation of the GH–IGF axis revealed GH blockade (0.03; reference: up to 4.4 ng/mL, greatly reduced IGF-I levels (9.0 ng/mL; reference: 180–780 ng/mL, slightly reduced IGF-II levels (197 ng/mL; reference: 267–616 ng/mL and an elevated IGF-II/IGF-I ratio (21.9; reference: ~3. CT scan revealed a large expansive mass in the right adrenal gland and pulmonary and liver metastases. During hospitalization, the patient experienced frequent difficult-to-control hypoglycemia and hypokalemia episodes. Octreotide was ineffective in controlling hypoglycemia. Due to unresectability, chemotherapy was tried, but after 3 months, the patient’s condition worsened and progressed to death. In conclusion, our patient presented with a functional adrenal cortical carcinoma, with hyperandrogenism associated with hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia and blockage of the GH–IGF-I axis. Patient’s data suggested a diagnosis of hypoglycemia induced by an IGF-II or a large IGF-II-producing tumor (low levels of GH, greatly decreased IGF-I, slightly decreased IGF-II and an elevated IGF-II/IGF-I ratio.

  10. Short-term cost-effectiveness of insulin detemir and insulin aspart in people with type 1 diabetes who are prone to recurrent severe hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Based on the data of the HypoAna trial (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00346996), a short-term cost–effectiveness analysis was conducted comparing an all insulin analogue regimen with an all human insulin regimen in people with type 1 diabetes who are prone to recurrent severe hypoglycemia....... Methods: Clinical data from the HypoAna trial and Danish cost data related to the treatment of severe hypoglycemia were used to populate a 1-year cost–effectiveness analysis. Hypoglycemia quality-of-life data were based on previously published utility values, used to calculate the quality-adjusted life...... diabetes who are prone to recurrent severe hypoglycemia with an insulin analogue regimen is cost-effective compared with a human insulin regimen....

  11. Continuous Glucose Monitoring After Gastric Bypass to Evaluate the Glucose Variability After a Low-Carbohydrate Diet and to Determine Hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Joan Bach; Abild, Caroline Bruun; Pedersen, Ane Mathilde; Pedersen, Steen Bønløkke; Richelsen, Bjørn

    2016-09-01

    Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) alters glucose metabolism and can cause postprandial hypoglycemia. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) has been proposed as an evaluation tool in hypoglycemic RYGB individuals. The objective of this study is to investigate the use of CGM in clinical decision-making including diagnosing hypoglycemia and evaluating treatment effects. Furthermore, we aim to assess its accuracy in RYGB-operated individuals. Thirteen RYGB individuals with symptomatic hypoglycemia and 13 asymptomatic RYGB individuals underwent CGM for 5 days. During this period, a mixed-meal test with concomitant plasma glucose (PG) measurements was performed. Furthermore, the RYGB individuals followed a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD) for 1 day and maintained their ordinary diet (OD) for the rest of the period. LCD reduced the CGM-determined glycemic variability of the mean interstitial fluid glucose (IFG) significantly compared to OD (p RYGB individuals and for displaying dietary effects on reducing this glycemic variability, including hypoglycemic events. In RYGB individuals, CGM-measured IFG overestimated the real glucose value by about 1 mmol/l in the hypoglycemic range. This should be taken into consideration if CGM is used to diagnose hypoglycemia after RYGB.

  12. Symptomatic Outcomes in Relation to Tumor Expansion After Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: Single-Institutional Long-Term Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aoyama, Hidefumi, E-mail: h-aoyama@med.niigata-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Department of Radiology, Division of Radiation Oncology, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata (Japan); Onodera, Shunsuke [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Takeichi, Norihito [Department of Otolaryngology, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Terasaka, Shunsuke; Sawamura, Yutaka [Department of Neurosurgery, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan); Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo (Japan)

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: The effect of transient tumor expansion after conventionally fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (SRT) on the symptomatic outcomes is not well-known. Methods and Materials: This study enrolled 201 consecutive patients who received SRT for vestibular schwannoma. A conventional fractionation schedule was applied in 194 patients (97%), and 142 (71%) received a total dose of 50 Gy. The median follow-up time was 72 months. Results: The maximum diameter was 9 mm or less in 13 patients, 10-19 mm in 79 patients, 20-29 mm in 87 patients, and 30 mm or greater in 22 patients. At presentation, tumor size of 20 mm or greater was significantly associated with loss of serviceable hearing and trigeminal neuropathy. After SRT, tumor expansion was observed in 42 patients (21%). By tumor size, tumor expansion was observed in 0%, 11.4%, 25.6%, and 50% of patients with tumors of 9 mm or less, 10-19 mm, 20-29 mm, and 30 mm or greater, respectively, in diameter. The tumor expansion was significantly associated with an increased risk of hydrocephalus requiring shunt placement (P=.004), loss of serviceable hearing (P=.0064), and worsening of facial (P<.0001) and trigeminal nerve (P<.0001) functions. Spontaneous tumor shrinkage was observed in 29 of those 42 patients, mostly within 2 years after the expansion, and the majority of the worsened symptoms except for hearing resolved once the tumor had shrunk. As a result, salvage surgical resection for symptomatic relief was required in only 5% of patients. Conclusions: Fractionated SRT could be safely applied even for medium- to large-sized ({>=}20 mm) tumors. However, greater knowledge of the risks and consequences, including transient symptomatic worsening, and the time span of expansion will be required for the follow-up of patients after SRT to avoid unnecessary surgical intervention.

  13. Accuracy evaluation of a new real-time continuous glucose monitoring algorithm in hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmoudi, Zeinab; Jensen, Morten Hasselstrøm; Johansen, Mette Dencker

    2014-01-01

    UNLABELLED: Abstract Background: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the performance of a new continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) calibration algorithm and to compare it with the Guardian(®) REAL-Time (RT) (Medtronic Diabetes, Northridge, CA) calibration algorithm in hypoglycemia. SUBJECTS...... AND METHODS: CGM data were obtained from 10 type 1 diabetes patients undergoing insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Data were obtained in two separate sessions using the Guardian RT CGM device. Data from the same CGM sensor were calibrated by two different algorithms: the Guardian RT algorithm and a new calibration...... algorithm. The accuracy of the two algorithms was compared using four performance metrics. RESULTS: The median (mean) of absolute relative deviation in the whole range of plasma glucose was 20.2% (32.1%) for the Guardian RT calibration and 17.4% (25.9%) for the new calibration algorithm. The mean (SD...

  14. Recurrent hypoglycemia increases anxiety and amygdala norepinephrine release during subsequent hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewan eMcNay

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent hypoglycemia (RH is a common and debilitating side effect of therapy in patients with both type 1 and, increasingly, type 2 diabetes. Previous studies in rats have shown marked effects of RH on subsequent hippocampal behavioral, metabolic, and synaptic processes. In addition to impaired memory, patients experiencing RH report alterations in cognitive processes that include mood and anxiety, suggesting that RH may also affect amygdala function. We tested the impact of RH on amygdala function using an elevated plus-maze test of anxiety together with in vivo amygdala microdialysis for norepinephrine (NEp, a widely used marker of basolateral amygdala cognitive processes. In contrast to findings in the hippocampus and pre-frontal cortex, neither RH nor acute hypoglycemia alone significantly affected plus-maze performance or NEp release. However, animals tested when hypoglycemic who had previously experienced RH had elevated amygdala NEp during plus-maze testing, accompanied by increased anxiety (i.e. less time spent in the open arms of the plus-maze. The results show that RH has widespread effects on subsequent brain function, which vary by neural system.

  15. Functional Connectivity of Insula, Basal Ganglia, and Prefrontal Executive Control Networks during Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolo, Nicolas R; Musen, Gail; Simonson, Donald C; Nickerson, Lisa D; Flores, Veronica L; Siracusa, Tamar; Hager, Brandon; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Renshaw, Perry F; Jacobson, Alan M

    2015-08-05

    Human brain networks mediating interoceptive, behavioral, and cognitive aspects of glycemic control are not well studied. Using group independent component analysis with dual-regression approach of functional magnetic resonance imaging data, we examined the functional connectivity changes of large-scale resting state networks during sequential euglycemic-hypoglycemic clamp studies in patients with type 1 diabetes and nondiabetic controls and how these changes during hypoglycemia were related to symptoms of hypoglycemia awareness and to concurrent glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels. During hypoglycemia, diabetic patients showed increased functional connectivity of the right anterior insula and the prefrontal cortex within the executive control network, which was associated with higher HbA1c. Controls showed decreased functional connectivity of the right anterior insula with the cerebellum/basal ganglia network and of temporal regions within the temporal pole network and increased functional connectivity in the default mode and sensorimotor networks. Functional connectivity reductions in the right basal ganglia were correlated with increases of self-reported hypoglycemic symptoms in controls but not in patients. Resting state networks that showed different group functional connectivity during hypoglycemia may be most sensitive to glycemic environment, and their connectivity patterns may have adapted to repeated glycemic excursions present in type 1 diabetes. Our results suggest that basal ganglia and insula mediation of interoceptive awareness during hypoglycemia is altered in type 1 diabetes. These changes could be neuroplastic adaptations to frequent hypoglycemic experiences. Functional connectivity changes in the insula and prefrontal cognitive networks could also reflect an adaptation to changes in brain metabolic pathways associated with chronic hyperglycemia. The major factor limiting improved glucose control in type 1 diabetes is the significant increase

  16. Clinical Features and Causes of Endogenous Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Yun Woo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundEndogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (EHH is characterized by an inappropriately high plasma insulin level, despite a low plasma glucose level. Most of the EHH cases are caused by insulinoma, whereas nesidioblastosis and insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS are relatively rare.MethodsTo evaluate the relative frequencies of various causes of EHH in Korea, we retrospectively analyzed 84 patients who were diagnosed with EHH from 1998 to 2012 in a university hospital.ResultsAmong the 84 EHH patients, 74 patients (88%, five (6%, and five (6% were diagnosed with insulinoma, nesidioblastosis or IAS, respectively. The most common clinical manifestation of EHH was neuroglycopenic symptoms. Symptom duration before diagnosis was 14.5 months (range, 1 to 120 months for insulinoma, 1.0 months (range, 6 days to 7 months for nesidioblastosis, and 2.0 months (range, 1 to 12 months for IAS. One patient, who was diagnosed with nesidioblastosis in 2006, underwent distal pancreatectomy but was later determined to be positive for insulin autoantibodies. Except for one patient who was diagnosed in 2007, the remaining three patients with nesidioblastosis demonstrated severe hyperinsulinemia (157 to 2,719 µIU/mL, which suggests that these patients might have had IAS, rather than nesidioblastosis.ConclusionThe results of this study suggest that the prevalence of IAS may be higher in Korea than previously thought. Therefore, measurement of insulin autoantibody levels is warranted for EHH patients, especially in patients with very high plasma insulin levels.

  17. Factors Affecting the Ability of People With Diabetes to Avoid Hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fei-Ling; Wu, En-Chang; Chang, Yue-Cune; Hu, Wen-Yu; Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Yeh, Mei Chang

    2018-02-01

    Hypoglycemia is recognized as a limiting factor in diabetes management. Fear of experiencing hypoglycemia may lead to lower quality of life, impaired glycemic control, and emotional distress, all of which impair the ability of patients to self-manage their diabetes effectively. Problem solving is central to diabetes self-management and may help patients achieve effective self-care of their disease. The aim of this study was to investigate the ability of people with diabetes to avoid hypoglycemia and to explore associated factors. A cross-sectional, descriptive design was used for the study. Data were collected using a demographic and disease characteristics datasheet, the Hypoglycemic Problem Solving Scale, and the Disease-Associated Negative Mood Scale. Three hundred thirteen participants were recruited, with a mean age of 55.49 years. The average item score for the questions on hypoglycemic problem-solving ability was 2.43 (SD = 0.75). In comparing Hypoglycemic Problem Solving Scale subscales, participants scored highest on the problem orientation subscales and lowest on the problem-solving skills subscales. Multiple regression analysis revealed that being younger and unmarried and having a higher level of education, a diagnosis of Type 1 diabetes, and a lower negative mood score were each significantly associated with greater problem-solving ability as regards hypoglycemic events. We suggest that patients with diabetes, especially those who are older or with lower levels of education, receive disease-related psychological interventions and that healthcare professionals teach problem-solving abilities in conjunction with hypoglycemia management.

  18. Hypoglycemia Prevention and User Acceptance of an Insulin Pump System with Predictive Low Glucose Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudhary, Pratik; Olsen, Birthe S; Conget, Ignacio; Welsh, John B; Vorrink, Linda; Shin, John J

    2016-05-01

    The MiniMed 640G sensor-augmented insulin pump system (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) can automatically suspend insulin delivery in advance of predicted hypoglycemia and restart it upon recovery. The aims of this analysis were to determine the rate at which predicted hypoglycemia was avoided with this strategy, as well as to assess user acceptance of the system and its insulin management features. Forty subjects with type 1 diabetes used the system for 4 weeks. We retrospectively evaluated performance of the system, using downloaded pump and sensor data, and evaluated user acceptance via questionnaires. There were 2,322 suspend before low events (2.1 per subject-day). The mean (± SD) duration of pump suspension events was 56.4 ± 9.6 min, and the mean subsequent sensor glucose (SG) nadir was 71.8 ± 5.2 mg/dL. SG values following 1,930 (83.1%) of the predictive suspensions did not reach the preset low limit. Nadir SG values of ≤50 and ≤60 mg/dL were seen in 207 (8.9%) and 356 (15.3%) of the predictive suspensions, respectively. Blood glucose (BG) and SG values before and during the study were comparable (P > 0.05). The mean absolute relative difference between paired SG and BG values was 10.9 ± 13.8%. Subjects felt confident using the system, agreed that it helped protect them from hypoglycemia, and wished to continue using it. Automatic insulin pump suspension as implemented in the MiniMed 640G system can help patients avoid hypoglycemia, without significantly increasing hyperglycemia.

  19. An uncommon cause of hypoglycemia: insulin autoimmune syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savas-Erdeve, Senay; Yılmaz Agladioglu, Sebahat; Onder, Asan; Peltek Kendirci, Havva Nur; Bas, Veysel Nijat; Sagsak, Elif; Cetinkaya, Semra; Aycan, Zehra

    2014-01-01

    Insulin autoimmune syndrome (IAS) is a condition characterized by hypoglycemia associated with the presence of autoantibodies to insulin in patients who have not been injected with insulin. A female patient (aged 16 years and 3 months) presented with the complaint of being overweight. Physical examination revealed a body weight of 78.2 kg (+2.6 SD) and a height of 167 cm (+0.73 SD). While the patient's fasting blood glucose level was found to be 40 mg/dl, blood ketone was negative and the serum insulin level was determined as 379 mIU/ml. The patient was diagnosed with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Abdominal ultrasound, pancreas MRI and endoscopic ultrasound were normal. The daily blood glucose profile revealed postprandial hyperglycemia and reactive hypoglycemia in addition to fasting hypoglycemia. The results of anti-insulin antibody measurements were as high as 41.8% (normal range 0-7%). A 1,600-calorie diet containing 40% carbohydrate and divided into 6 meals a day was given to the patient. Simple sugars were excluded from the diet. Hypoglycemic episodes were not observed, but during 2 years of observation, serum levels of insulin and anti-insulin antibodies remained elevated. In all hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia cases, IAS should be considered in the differential diagnosis and insulin antibody measurements should be carried out. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  20. Symptomatic mesodiverticular bands in children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and methods A computer-assisted (PubMed) search of the literature to identify all cases of symptomatic. MDB reported in English with patients' age ranging from. 0 to 14 years was performed. Results Eight cases of symptomatic MBD in pediatric age. (0–14 years) were found in the literature in the last. 50 years.

  1. Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy in 38 children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bin-Abbas, Bassam S.; Al-Mulhim, Abdulmohsin N.; Sakati, Nadia A.; Al-Ashwal, Abdullah A.

    2003-01-01

    To describe the clinical, biochemical,radiological and electrophysiological features of 38 Saudi children with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia(PHH) that have been followed sine 1983. Data from 38 patients followed at King Faisal Specialist Hospital,Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia 1983-2002 were analyzed. PHH of infancy was diagnosed on the basis of high intravenous glucose requirement,high insulin to glucose ratio, negative urinary ketones and normal tandem mass spectrometry. Patients were assessed radiologically by brain magnetic resonance imaging and computerized tomography. Patients were severely hypoglycaemic and intolerance to fast hypoglycaemic convulsion was the most commonly presenting complaint. 18 patients were developmentally delayed and 14 of them had brain atrophy.All patients except 9 did not respond to medical treatment and had surgery. Four of the pancreatectomized patients developed diabetes and 2 had malabsorption. PHH of infancy is relatively common and serious disease in Saudi children. Early medical intervention is necessary to avoid neurological damage. Surgically and probably medically treated patients are at a high risk of developing diabetes that could be the natural outcome of this disease. (author)

  2. Surgical aspects of symptomatic cholecystolithiasis and acute cholecystitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keus, F.; Broeders, I. A. M. J.; van Laarhoven, C. J. H. M.

    2006-01-01

    Indications for cholecystectomy are limited to clearly symptomatic gallstones. Relatively high failure rates of pain relief are probably caused by incorrect selection of patients for the operation. Contraindications for (laparoscopic) cholecystectomy are related to anaesthesiological considerations.

  3. Sleep disturbances in IDDM patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtson, I; Gade, J; Thomsen, C E

    1992-01-01

    Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied to evaluate sleep patterns during normoglycemia and spontaneous and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two channels of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram and actooculogram were recorded. The signals were analyzed off-line, using a polygrap......Eight insulin-dependent diabetic patients were studied to evaluate sleep patterns during normoglycemia and spontaneous and insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Two channels of electroencephalogram (EEG), electromyogram and actooculogram were recorded. The signals were analyzed off-line, using...... a polygraphic sleep analysis system. The scoring was mainly based on the color density spectral array of the EEG. Blood glucose and growth hormone were measured serially. Asymptomatic, spontaneous nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred in 38% of the nights. Conventional sleep analysis showed a tendency toward...

  4. Hypoglycemia associated with refeeding syndrome in a cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAvilla, Marisa D; Leech, Elizabeth B

    2016-11-01

    To describe the clinical presentation and biochemical abnormalities occurring during the successful treatment of refeeding syndrome in a cat. A 2-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented after having been missing for 12 weeks. The cat had clinical signs of severe starvation. Common complications developed during refeeding (eg, hypophosphatemia, hypokalemia, and hemolytic anemia). The cat also developed hypoglycemia, a complication common in people but not previously reported in a cat. Hypoglycemia and electrolyte deficiencies were managed with intravenous supplementation. The cat was successfully treated and was discharged alive 7 days after presentation. Hypoglycemia has not been reported previously as a complication of refeeding in a cat. Frequent monitoring of electrolyte, mineral, and blood glucose concentrations is essential to successful management of refeeding syndrome. The ideal refeeding strategy is unknown at this time. Evidence suggests that a diet low in carbohydrate decreases the likelihood of metabolic derangements commonly associated with refeeding. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  5. Brain injuries due to neonatal hypoglycemia: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dae Bong; Song, Chang Joon; Chang, Mae Young; Youn, Hyae Won

    2003-01-01

    Although hypoglycemia may be common among neonates, brain injuries resulting from isolated neonatal hypoglycemia are rare. The condition may cause neurological symptoms such as stupor, jitteriness, and seizures, though in their absence, diagnosis delayed or difficult. Hypoglycemia was diagnosed in a three-day-old neonate after he visited the emergency department with loose stool, poor oral intake, and decreased activity, first experienced two days earlier. Two days after his visity, several episodes of seizure occurred. T2 and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) scanning, performed at 11 days of age, revealed bilateral and symmetrical high signal intensity lesions in occipital, parietal, and temporal lobes. We report the MR findings of hypoglycemic encephalopathy in a neonate

  6. Risk of Hospitalization for Hypoglycemia in Older Patients with Diabetes Using Antipsychotic Drugs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Keulen, Kris; van der Linden, Paul D; Souverein, Patrick C; Heerdink, Eibert R; Egberts, Toine; Knol, Wilma

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Antipsychotics may disrupt metabolic regulation in patients with diabetes mellitus. The risk of hypoglycemia in older users of antipsychotics with diabetes is largely unknown. Therefore, we investigated the association between the use of antipsychotic drugs and hypoglycemia requiring

  7. Hypoglycemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes: predictors and role of metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Ringholm; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2008-01-01

    In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated occurrence of mild and severe hypoglycemia and analyzed the influence of strict metabolic control, nausea, vomiting, and other potential predictors of occurrence of severe hypoglycemia....

  8. Bolus Calculator Reduces Hypoglycemia in the Short Term and Fear of Hypoglycemia in the Long Term in Subjects with Type 1 Diabetes (CBMDI Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallejo Mora, María Del Rosario; Carreira, Mónica; Anarte, María Teresa; Linares, Francisca; Olveira, Gabriel; González Romero, Stella

    2017-07-01

    In a previous study we demonstrated improvement in metabolic control and reduction in hypoglycemia in people with type 1 diabetes on multiple daily injections, after having used a bolus calculator for 4 months. To demonstrate whether (1) extending its use (2) or introducing it in the control group, previously subjected to treatment intensification, could further improve metabolic control and related psychological issues. After the previous clinical trial, in which the subjects were randomized either to treatment with the calculator or to control group for 4 months, both groups used the calculator during an additional 4-month period. In the previous control group, after using the device, HbA1c did not improve (7.86% ± 0.87% vs. 8.01% ± 0.93%, P 0.215), although a significant decrease in postprandial hypoglycemia was observed (2.3 ± 2 vs. 1.1 ± 1.2/2 weeks, P 0.002). In the group in which the treatment was extended from 4 to 8 months, HbA1c did not improve either (7.61 ± 0.58 vs. 7.73 ± 0.65, P 0.209); however this group had a greater perceived treatment satisfaction (12.03 ± 4.26 vs. 13.71 ± 3.75, P 0.007) and a significant decrease in fear of hypoglycemia (28.24 ± 8.18 basal vs. 25.66 ± 8.02 at 8 months, P 0.026). The extension in the use of the calculator or its introduction in a previously intensified control group did not improve metabolic control, although it did confirm a decrease in hypoglycemic episodes in the short term, while the extension of its use to 8 months was associated with a reduction in fear of hypoglycemia and greater treatment satisfaction.

  9. Changes in 125I-insulin binding antibodies in diabetic pregnant women on insulin therapy and hypoglycemia in newborns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohama, Tomoko; Omori, Yasue; Minei, Satomi; Akihisa, Rima; Honda, Masashi; Hirata, Yukimasa

    1982-01-01

    To elucidate whether insulin antibodies in pregnant diabetics are related to changes in insulin requirement during pregnancy, and whether hypoglycemia in newborns of diabetic mothers is influenced by insulin antibodies transferred through the placenta, changes in 125 I-insulin percent binding to insulin antibodies were measured at the first, second and third trimesters of pregnancy and at delivery, in 20 deliveries by 17 diabetics treated with insulin. The free insulin levels in the same serum were also measured for each patient in whom the 125 I-insulin binding was decreased more than 5% in the third trimester. The mean percent of 125 I-insulin binding in the 20 diabetic pregnancies was unchanged in the first (21.2%) and second trimester (21.1%), but tended to decrease to 17.6% in the third trimester and to increase to 24.6% after delivery. The 125 I-insulin percent binding of 5 patients with neonatal hypoglycemia was significantly higher than that of the other patients without hypoglycemia (p 125 I-insulin percent binding was decreased in the third trimester in contrast with an increased insulin dosage. The finding that hypoglycemia tended to occur in the newborns of diabetic mothers with high insulin percent binding to insulin antibody during the third trimester, suggests that maternal insulin antibodies may affect the fetal pancreas. (author)

  10. Hypoglycemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes - Predictors and role of metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.R.; Johansen, M.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.

    2008-01-01

    hypoglycemia. A1C, median SMPG, and fluctuations in SMPG decreased during pregnancy, with no differences between women with and without severe hypoglycemia. Logistic regression analysis identified history of severe hypoglycemia the year preceding pregnancy (odds ratio 3.3 [95% CI 1.2-9.2]) and impaired...

  11. Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Programming after Recurrent Hypoglycemia during Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Rao

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Permanent brain injury is a complication of recurrent hypoglycemia during development. Recurrent hypoglycemia also has adverse consequences on the neuroendocrine system. Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure, characterized by ineffective glucose counterregulation during hypoglycemia, is well described in children and adults on insulin therapy for diabetes mellitus. Whether recurrent hypoglycemia also has a programming effect on the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal cortex (HPA axis has not been well studied. Hypoglycemia is a potent stress that leads to increased glucocorticoid secretion in all age groups, including the perinatal period. Other conditions associated with exposure to excess glucocorticoid in the perinatal period have a programming effect on the HPA axis activity. Limited animal data suggest the possibility of similar programming effect after recurrent hypoglycemia in the postnatal period. The age at exposure to hypoglycemia likely determines the HPA axis response in adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia in the early postnatal period likely leads to a hyperresponsive HPA axis, whereas recurrent hypoglycemia in the late postnatal period lead to a hyporesponsive HPA axis in adulthood. The age-specific programming effects may determine the neuroendocrine response during hypoglycemia and other stressful events in individuals with history of recurrent hypoglycemia during development.

  12. Factors associated with hypoglycemia episodes in hospitalized type ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the factors associated with severity of hypoglycemia in hospitalized type 2 diabetes mellitus patients in a tertiary health facility in Malaysia. Methods: This retrospective study involved 207 hospitalised T2DM patients with hypoglycaemia episodes from January 2008 to December 2012 and was ...

  13. Hypoglycemia-Induced Changes in the Electroencephalogram: An Overview

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blaabjerg, Lykke; Juhl, Claus Bogh

    2016-01-01

    to the brain, where glucose is the primary metabolic fuel. The brain is one of the first organs to be affected by hypoglycemia. Shortage of glucose in the brain, or neuroglycopenia, results in a gradual loss of cognitive functions causing slower reaction time, blurred speech, loss of consciousness, seizures...

  14. A Rare Case of Noninsulinoma Pancreatogenous Hypoglycemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey Nadelson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available As the obesity pandemic continues to worsen and medical interventions remain only moderately effective, bariatric surgery remains an important option for patients. In certain instances, patients who have undergone the procedure experience postprandial symptoms of neuroglycopenia caused by noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS. NIPHS is a recently described syndrome and is also very rare, and therapeutic approaches are still under debate. We report the case of a 51-year-old female who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and presented with episodic postprandial hypoglycemia 2 years after surgery. An insulinoma was absent from all abdominal imaging. Fasting C-peptide, insulin, and glucose were normal. Due to the possibility of NIPHS, clinical treatment was commenced with acarbose, leading to a significant reduction of hypoglycemic episodes. NIPHS occurs in approximately 0.5% to 7% of patients with hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Sporadic hypoglycemia postgastric bypass is an important entity that should be understood by all surgeons and internists who are involved in postgastric bypass care.

  15. Postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Øhrstrøm, Caroline Christfort; Worm, Dorte; Hansen, Dorte Lindqvist

    2017-01-01

    of developing hypoglycemia. Known risk factors are female sex, longer time since surgery, and lack of prior diabetes. Management of the hypoglycemic episodes is difficult, and only dietary modifications consisting of frequent and less carbohydrate-rich meals seem to be efficient. Medical treatments and surgical...

  16. Persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy: long-term ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim The aim of this study was to investigate the long-term outcome of six children with persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia of infancy (PHHI) after pancreatectomy who have been followed since 1990 at the Riyadh Military Hospital, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. Patients and methods Data from six patients were ...

  17. Impact of screening and monitoring of capillary blood glucose in the detection of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia in non-critical inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio Silicani Ribeiro

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the impact of screening hyper and hypoglycemia measured by capillary glycemia and standard monitorization of  hyperglycemic patients hospitalized in regular care units of Hospital Israelita Albert Einstein. Methods: The capillary glycemia was  measured by the Precision PCx (Abbott glucosimeter, using the PrecisionWeb (Abbott software. The detection of hyper and hypoglycemia during the months of May/June were compared to those of March/April in 2009 and to the frequency of the diagnosis of diabetes in 2007. Rresults: There was an increase in the glycemia screening from 27.7 to 77.5% of hospitalized patients (p < 0.001, of hyperglycemia detection (from 9.3 to 12.2%; p < 0.001 and of hypoglycemia (from 1.5 to 3.3%; p < 0.001 during  the months of May/June  2009. According to this action 14 patients for each additional case of hyperglycemia and 26 cases for each case of hypoglycemia were identified. The detection of hyperglycemia was significantly higher (p < 0.001 than the frequency of registered diagnosis related do diabetes in the year of 2007. Cconclusions: the adoption of an institutional program of glycemia monitorization improves the detection of hyper and hypoglycemia and glycemia control in hospitalized patients in regular care units.

  18. HEART FAILURE, DIABETES, BETA-BLOCKERS AND RISK OF HYPOGLYCEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Aleksandrov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To evaluate an influence of carvedilol on risk of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes type 2 (D2 and chronic heart failure (CHF treated with angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE inhibitors.Material and methods. 13 patients (10 men, 3 women; aged 59,8±6,7 y.o. with D2 and CHF caused by ischemic heart disease were included in the study. Before inclusion all patients were treated with ACE inhibitors and various beta-blockers (atenolol, metoprolol, bisoprolol. These beta-blockers were changed for carvedilol. Heart ultrasonography, blood pressure control, glycemia monitoring, HbA1c level determination were performed before, during and after carvedilol therapy.Results. Carvedilol reduces frequency and duration of hypoglycaemia episodes. There were not episodes of severe hypoglycaemia during carvedilol therapy.Conclusion. Carvedilol reduces risk of hypoglycemia when it is used in combination with ACE inhiditors in diabetic patients with CHF.

  19. Recognition and management of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sarah; Mitchell, James E; Steffen, Kristine; Engel, Scott; Wiisanen, Ron; Garcia, Luis; Malik, Shahbaz Ali

    2016-01-01

    Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia is an increasingly recognized complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) due to the changes in gut hormonal milieu. Physicians should be aware of this complication to ensure timely and effective treatment of post-RYGB patients, who present to them with hypoglycemic symptoms. Possible causes of hypoglycemia in these patients include late dumping syndrome, nesidioblastosis and rarely insulinoma. Systematic evaluation including history, biochemical analysis, and diagnostic testing might help in distinguishing among these diagnoses. Continuous glucose monitoring is also a valuable tool, revealing the episodes in the natural environment and can also be used to monitor treatment success. Treatment should begin with strict low carbohydrate diet, followed by medication therapy. Therapy with diazoxide, acarbose, calcium channel blockers and octreotide have been proven to be beneficial, but the response apparently is highly variable. When other treatment options fail, surgical options can be considered. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. [Neonatal cholestasis and hypoglycemia like form of congenital hypopituitarism presentation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Maren K; Bernardini, Alejandra; Giachetto, Gustavo

    2011-06-01

    Congenital hypopituitarism is a rare disease, of variable clinic. The neonatal hypoglycemia is one of the habitual forms of presentation; the cholestasis is a rare symptom of this disease. This is the case of a 2-months-old infant hospitalized for cholestatic jaundice. He added repeated episodes of severe hypoglycemia. We investigated metabolic and endocrine causes. The etiology was clarified by obtaining a critical sample that demonstrated the counterregulatory hormone deficiency. The diagnosis of congenital hypopituitarism was completed with confirmation of thyroid hormone and growth hormone deficiencies. It was confirmed the neuro-anatomical defect of “syndrome of pituitary stalk section” determined by pituitary stalk agenesis, pituitary hipoplasia, and ectopic neurohypophysis. Hormone replacement therapy was started with good response and outcome.

  1. Raspberry Leaf and Hypoglycemia in Gestational Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheang, Kai I; Nguyen, Thanh T; Karjane, Nicole W; Salley, Kelsey E S

    2016-12-01

    Raspberry leaf is commonly consumed by pregnant women. Hypoglycemic effects have been documented with other species within the plant family. Whether raspberry leaf affects glycemic control in gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is unknown. A 38-year-old nulliparous woman with GDM developed hypoglycemia requiring lowered insulin dose after consuming raspberry leaf tea at 32 weeks of gestation. The temporal relationship was confirmed by the patient's self-withdrawal and reintroduction of the herb. Fetal surveillance and growth were reassuring. A cesarean delivery was performed at 39 weeks of gestation. The neonate did not experience hypoglycemia or other complications. Placental biopsy revealed normal findings. Consumption of raspberry leaf may lead to reduced insulin requirements in GDM. Women with GDM should be cautioned about its use and their glucose levels more closely monitored.

  2. Insulinoma: A rare cause of hypoglycemia in a young female

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fnu Kelash

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Insulinoma is an exceedingly uncommon pancreatic islet cell neuroendocrine tumor. The estimated incidence is approximately four cases per million individuals per year and accounts for 60% of islets cell tumors. It causes glycopenic symptoms which includes headache, feeling irritable, confused, seizure or coma and leads to catecholamine excess which includes rapid heartbeat, sweating, palpitations and feelings of hunger. Early detection of the tumor prevents recurrent episodes of lethal hypoglycemia.

  3. Exercise and deficient carbohydrate storage and intake as causes of hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, J B

    1989-03-01

    Exercise is associated with a marked increase in glucose uptake by muscle, which is initially supported by breakdown of hepatic glycogen and subsequently by increased gluconeogenesis. If hepatic glucose production is inadequate, hypoglycemia results. During exercise there is decreased plasma insulin and increased catecholamines, glucagon, cortisol, and growth hormone, which contribute to but are not essential for the increased hepatic output of glucose. Although insulin concentrations fall, insulin sensitivity is increased. However, the augmented glucose uptake by muscle is due to other factors. The symptoms of exhaustion during exercise are not due to hypoglycemia, and prevention of hypoglycemia may not prolong the time of exercise to exhaustion. During severe caloric restriction, hepatic glucose production decreases and free fatty acids and ketone bodies become important sources of calories. Although under these circumstances hepatic gluconeogenesis is usually sufficient to prevent hypoglycemia, with very severe caloric restriction hypoglycemia can result. With starvation, insulin concentrations fall while growth hormone and glucagon increase. Frequently the usual symptoms of hypoglycemia are absent in individuals with hypoglycemia from severe caloric restriction. Hypoglycemia from severe caloric restriction has not been totally restricted to underdeveloped areas of the world. In such patients no endocrine abnormalities have been found, and hypoglycemia has persisted despite administration of large amounts of carbohydrate. Pregnancy and lactation could predispose to hypoglycemia in the face of inadequate caloric intake.

  4. Glycogen Supercompensation in the Rat Brain After Acute Hypoglycemia is Independent of Glucose Levels During Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, João M N; Morgenthaler, Florence D; Gruetter, Rolf

    2017-06-01

    Patients with diabetes display a progressive decay in the physiological counter-regulatory response to hypoglycemia, resulting in hypoglycemia unawareness. The mechanism through which the brain adapts to hypoglycemia may involve brain glycogen. We tested the hypothesis that brain glycogen supercompensation following hypoglycemia depends on blood glucose levels during recovery. Conscious rats were submitted to hypoglycemia of 2 mmol/L for 90 min and allowed to recover at different glycemia, controlled by means of i.v. glucose infusion. Brain glycogen concentration was elevated above control levels after 24 h of recovery in the cortex, hippocampus and striatum. This glycogen supercompensation was independent of blood glucose levels in the post-hypoglycemia period. In the absence of a preceding hypoglycemia insult, brain glycogen concentrations were unaltered after 24 h under hyperglycemia. In the hypothalamus, which controls peripheral glucose homeostasis, glycogen levels were unaltered. Overall, we conclude that post-hypoglycemia glycogen supercompensation occurs in several brain areas and its magnitude is independent of plasma glucose levels. By supporting brain metabolism during recurrent hypoglycemia periods, glycogen may have a role in the development of hypoglycemia unawareness.

  5. Detection of hypoglycemia associated EEG changes during sleep in type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snogdal, Lena Sønder; Folkestad, Lars; Elsborg, Rasmus; Remvig, Line Sofie; Beck-Nielsen, Henning; Thorsteinsson, Birger; Jennum, Poul; Gjerstad, Michaela; Juhl, Claus B

    2012-10-01

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a feared complication to insulin treated diabetes. Impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH) increases the risk of severe hypoglycemia. EEG changes are demonstrated during daytime hypoglycemia. In this explorative study, we test the hypothesis that specific hypoglycemia-associated EEG-changes occur during sleep and are detectable in time for the patient to take action. Ten patients with type 1 diabetes (duration 23.7 years) with IAH were exposed to insulin-induced hypoglycemia during the daytime and during sleep. EEG was recorded and analyzed real-time by an automated multi-parameter algorithm. Participants received an auditory alarm when EEG changes met a predefined threshold, and were instructed to consume a meal. Seven out of eight participants developed hypoglycemia-associated EEG changes during daytime. During sleep, nine out of ten developed EEG changes (mean BG 2.0 mmol/l). Eight were awakened by the alarm. Four corrected hypoglycemia (mean BG 2.2 mmol/l), while four (mean BG 1.9 mmol/l) received glucose infusion. Two had false alarms. EEG-changes occurred irrespective of sleep stage. Post hoc improvement indicates the possibility of earlier detection of hypoglycemia. Continuous EEG monitoring and automated real-time analysis may constitute a novel technique for a hypoglycemia alarm in patients with IAH. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Glycemic Control, Self-Efficacy and Fear of Hypoglycemia Among Iranian Children with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Fatemehsadat; Vafa, Mohammadreza; Gonder-Frederick, Linda

    2015-08-01

    This study was designed to test the reliability of a Persian version of 2 questionnaires to assess the level of fear of hypoglycemia (FoH) and self-efficacy in diabetes management and their association with glycated hemoglobin (A1C) and parents' demographic characteristics in a sample of children with type 1 diabetes. We assessed 61 children with type 1 diabetes (35 boys and girls, 6.0 to 12.7 years of age) using the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey-Child version (HFS-C) and Self-Efficacy for Diabetes Scale-Child version (SED-C). Their glycemic control was evaluated by A1C levels. The internal consistency of the Persian version of HFS-C and SED-C were very good. Our results showed that children older than 10 years of age report lower levels of FoH, which are related to higher levels of self-efficacy (r=-.30, p=0.025 and r=-.30, p=0.02, respectively). Of the children, 42.3% of girls and 31.4% of boys reported that low blood sugar is a big problem for them. These findings suggest that FoH is a significant concern for this target group. Only 19.7% of children had controlled diabetes based on A1C levels. There was no significant association between higher A1C levels and other variables, including HFS-C, SED-C and parents' demographic characteristics. The Persian version of HFS-C and SED-C are reliable and valid measures of the fear of hypoglycemia and of self-efficacy in children with type 1 diabetes, and these questionnaires could be used in our country for identifying those children who may need diabetes education and other supports. The association between greater self-efficacy and lower fear of hypoglycemia suggests that addressing self-efficacy in diabetes education courses may be effective in helping to overcome FoH. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. All rights reserved.

  7. Hypoglycemia Following Bariatric Surgery: Our 31-Year Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaels, Alex D; Hunter Mehaffey, J; Brenton French, W; Schirmer, Bruce D; Kirby, Jennifer L; Hallowell, Peter T

    2017-12-01

    The purposes of this study are to identify the cumulative incidence of post-bariatric surgery hypoglycemia (PBSH), describe its symptomatology, and characterize treatment patterns at a large academic institution. All patients who underwent bariatric surgery at a single institution from 1985 to 2015 were identified using a clinical database, administrative billing data identified patients who were treated for hypoglycemia, and chart reviews were performed to make a diagnosis of PBSH based on Whipple's triad. PBSH cases were reviewed including patient diabetes history, symptomatology, and treatment measures. Univariate analyses were performed to identify correlations based on symptomatology, laboratory values, and treatments utilized. Ninety (2.6%) of 3487 patients were diagnosed with PBSH with preoperative median age of 43 years, mean BMI of 50.0 kg/m 2 , and median glycated hemoglobin of 6.0%. Median time-to-first hypoglycemic event was 40.6 months. No factors were identified which predict symptom severity or resolution. The 24 (27%) patients who received pharmacotherapy to treat hypoglycemia were younger, had lower nadir blood glucose levels, and more frequent symptoms. Sixty-nine (79%) cases eventually resolved. PBSH onset and severity are highly variable. Successful management of these patients can prove difficult and should include dietary therapy, the selective use of pharmacotherapy and surgery, and the use of a multidisciplinary team including bariatric surgeons and endocrinologists.

  8. Renal lactate metabolism and gluconeogenesis during insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cersosimo, E; Molina, P E; Abumrad, N N

    1998-07-01

    The contribution of gluconeogenic precursors to renal glucose production (RGP) during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was assessed in conscious dogs. Ten days after surgical placement of sampling catheters in the right and left renal veins and femoral artery and an infusion catheter in the left renal artery, systemic and renal glucose and glycerol kinetics were measured with peripheral infusions of [6-3H]glucose and [2-13C]glycerol. Renal blood flow was determined with a flowprobe, and the renal balance of lactate, alanine, and glycerol was calculated by arteriovenous difference. After baseline, six dogs received 2-h simultaneous infusions of peripheral insulin (4 mU x kg(-1) x min(-1)) and left intrarenal [6,6-2H]dextrose (14 micromol x kg(-1) x min(-1)) to achieve and maintain left renal normoglycemia during systemic hypoglycemia. Arterial glucose decreased from 5.3 +/- 0.1 to 2.2 +/- 0.1 mmol/l; insulin increased from 46 +/- 5 to 1,050 +/- 50 pmol/l; epinephrine, from 130 +/- 8 to 1,825 +/- 50 pg/ml; norepinephrine, from 129 +/- 6 to 387 +/- 15 pg/ml; and glucagon, from 52 +/- 2 to 156 +/- 12 pg/ml (all P gluconeogenesis induced by hypoglycemia.

  9. Social vulnerability and hypoglycemia among patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waitman, Jorge; Caeiro, Gabriela; Romero Gonzalez, Silvana A; Ré, Danila P; Daghero, Andrea; Gonzalez, Claudio D; Umpierrez, Guillermo E

    2017-02-01

    Lower-income populations are hit harder by the diabetes epidemic as regards both prevalence and the risk of complications. Food Insecurity is one of the mechanisms through which poverty may predispose people with low socio-economic status to poorer control and higher complication rates. The United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization defined food security as "the right to have access to sufficient nutritional and culturally acceptable food choices." Adults suffering from diabetes with limited income have a 40% greater chance of having food insecurity and an inadequate blood glucose control. Such patients have a two-fold greater risk of developing severe hypoglycemia. In addition, several studies have shown that social vulnerability resulting from food insecurity, low socioeconomic status, low educational levels, and poor health education is an independent risk factor for hypoglycemia, even after conventional predictors are controlled. This review analyzes the literature available on social vulnerability as a non-conventional risk factor for development of hypoglycemia in diabetic subjects. Copyright © 2017 SEEN. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. A Novel Algorithm in the Management of Hypoglycemia in Newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Naveen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Study Objective. To evaluate the safety of a new protocol in comparison to the standard protocol for managing hypoglycemia in neonates. Methods. Open label RCT-pilot study. Neonates admitted to NICU with hypoglycemia and requiring intravenous fluids were included. Fifty-seven eligible neonates were randomly allocated to either intervention group (starting fluids with 10% dextrose and increments of 1.5% or standard protocol group (GIR of 6 mg/kg/min with increments of 2 mg/kg/min till control of hypoglycemia. Primary outcome of the study was to know proportion of infants with subsequent hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia after enrolment. Results. The initial GIR (6 ± 0 mg/kg/min versus 4.8 ± 1.4 mg/kg/min, P < 0.001, the mean maximum GIR (6.7 ± 1.6 mg/kg/min versus 5.6 ± 2 mg/kg/min, P = 0.03, the maximum concentration of glucose infused (13.8 ± 2.9% versus 10.9 ± 1.9%, P < 0.001, and the total amount of glucose infused were significantly lower in the intervention group. The mean maximum blood sugar was significantly higher (129 ± 57 mg/dL versus 87 ± 30 mg/dL, P = 0.001 and there was a trend towards high proportion of infants with Hyperglycemia in the standard protocol group (n = 10, 39% versus n = 5, 16%, P = 0.07. The median difference between the highest and the lowest recorded sugar for any infant was significantly higher in the standard protocol group (median 93 mg/dL, IQR 52 to 147 mg/dL versus median 50 mg/dL, IQR 38 to 62.5 mg/dL, P = 0.03. Conclusion. A new and novel algorithm in the management of hypoglycemia in neonates is as safe as the standard protocol and requires further testing before routine implementation.

  11. Evaluation of carbohydrate restriction as primary treatment for post-gastric bypass hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Meijeren, Jorick; Timmer, Ilse; Brandts, Hans; Janssen, Ignace; Boer, Hans de

    2017-03-01

    Up to 15% of patients who have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery may eventually develop symptoms of hypoglycemia. To evaluate the daily life efficacy of a carbohydrate (carb)-restricted dietary advice (CRD) of 6 meals per day with a 30 g carb maximum per meal in patients with documented post-RYGB hypoglycemia. Teaching hospital, the Netherlands. Frequency and severity of hypoglycemic events before and after CRD were assessed retrospectively in 41 patients with documented post-RYGB hypoglycemia, based on medical records and telephone questionnaires. Hypoglycemia was defined as a blood glucose leveltreatment of hypoglycemia, decreased from 23 to 6 (Pmeals per day with up to 30 g carbs each, is an effective treatment of post-RYGB hypoglycemia in the majority of patients. Additional medication is needed in about a third of patients. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcome at 2 Years after Dextrose Gel Treatment for Neonatal Hypoglycemia: Follow-Up of a Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Deborah L; Alsweiler, Jane M; Ansell, Judith M; Gamble, Gregory D; Thompson, Benjamin; Wouldes, Trecia A; Yu, Tzu-Ying; Harding, Jane E

    2016-03-01

    To determine neurodevelopmental outcome at 2 years' corrected age in children randomized to treatment with dextrose gel or placebo for hypoglycemia soon after birth (The Sugar Babies Study). This was a follow-up study of 184 children with hypoglycemia (cognitive, language, behavior, and motor skills (Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition), executive function (clinical assessment and Behaviour Rating Inventory of Executive Function-Preschool Edition), and vision (clinical examination and global motion perception). Coprimary outcomes were neurosensory impairment (cognitive, language or motor score below -1 SD or cerebral palsy or blind or deaf) and processing difficulty (executive function or global motion perception worse than 1.5 SD from the mean). Statistical tests were two sided with 5% significance level. Mean (± SD) birth weight was 3093 ± 803 g and mean gestation was 37.7 ± 1.6 weeks. Sixty-six children (36%) had neurosensory impairment (1 severe, 6 moderate, 59 mild) with similar rates in both groups (dextrose 38% vs placebo 34%, relative risk 1.11, 95% CI 0.75-1.63). Processing difficulty also was similar between groups (dextrose 10% vs placebo 18%, relative risk 0.52, 95% CI 0.23-1.15). Dextrose gel is safe for the treatment of neonatal hypoglycemia, but neurosensory impairment is common among these children. Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry: ACTRN 12608000623392. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Validation of ICD-9-CM coding algorithm for improved identification of hypoglycemia visits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lieberman Rebecca M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accurate identification of hypoglycemia cases by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM codes will help to describe epidemiology, monitor trends, and propose interventions for this important complication in patients with diabetes. Prior hypoglycemia studies utilized incomplete search strategies and may be methodologically flawed. We sought to validate a new ICD-9-CM coding algorithm for accurate identification of hypoglycemia visits. Methods This was a multicenter, retrospective cohort study using a structured medical record review at three academic emergency departments from July 1, 2005 to June 30, 2006. We prospectively derived a coding algorithm to identify hypoglycemia visits using ICD-9-CM codes (250.3, 250.8, 251.0, 251.1, 251.2, 270.3, 775.0, 775.6, and 962.3. We confirmed hypoglycemia cases by chart review identified by candidate ICD-9-CM codes during the study period. The case definition for hypoglycemia was documented blood glucose 3.9 mmol/l or emergency physician charted diagnosis of hypoglycemia. We evaluated individual components and calculated the positive predictive value. Results We reviewed 636 charts identified by the candidate ICD-9-CM codes and confirmed 436 (64% cases of hypoglycemia by chart review. Diabetes with other specified manifestations (250.8, often excluded in prior hypoglycemia analyses, identified 83% of hypoglycemia visits, and unspecified hypoglycemia (251.2 identified 13% of hypoglycemia visits. The absence of any predetermined co-diagnosis codes improved the positive predictive value of code 250.8 from 62% to 92%, while excluding only 10 (2% true hypoglycemia visits. Although prior analyses included only the first-listed ICD-9 code, more than one-quarter of identified hypoglycemia visits were outside this primary diagnosis field. Overall, the proposed algorithm had 89% positive predictive value (95% confidence interval, 86–92 for

  14. Influence of GLP-1 on myocardial glucose metabolism in healthy men during normo- or hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gejl, Michael; Lerche, Susanne; Mengel, Annette

    2014-01-01

    ) = 0.64, respectively) and changes in MGU correlated positively with the level of insulin resistance (HOMA 2IR) during hypoglycemia, P = 0.04, r(2) = 0.54. GLP-1 mediated an increase in circulating glucagon levels at PG levels below 3.5 mM and increased glucose infusion rates during the hypoglycemia....... GLP-1 preserves MGU during hypoglycemia in insulin resistant subjects. ClinicalTrials.gov registration numbers: NCT00418288: (hypoglycemia) and NCT00256256: (normoglycemia)....

  15. Risk of cardiac arrhythmias during hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Elaine; Bernjak, Alan; Williams, Scott; Fawdry, Robert A; Hibbert, Steve; Freeman, Jenny; Sheridan, Paul J; Heller, Simon R

    2014-05-01

    Recent trials of intensive glycemic control suggest a possible link between hypoglycemia and excess cardiovascular mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes. Hypoglycemia might cause arrhythmias through effects on cardiac repolarization and changes in cardiac autonomic activity. Our aim was to study the risk of arrhythmias during spontaneous hypoglycemia in type 2 diabetic patients with cardiovascular risk. Twenty-five insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes and a history of cardiovascular disease or two or more risk factors underwent simultaneous continuous interstitial glucose and ambulatory electrocardiogram monitoring. Frequency of arrhythmias, heart rate variability, and markers of cardiac repolarization were compared between hypoglycemia and euglycemia and between hyperglycemia and euglycemia matched for time of day. There were 134 h of recording at hypoglycemia, 65 h at hyperglycemia, and 1,258 h at euglycemia. Bradycardia and atrial and ventricular ectopic counts were significantly higher during nocturnal hypoglycemia compared with euglycemia. Arrhythmias were more frequent during nocturnal versus daytime hypoglycemia. Excessive compensatory vagal activation after the counterregulatory phase may account for bradycardia and associated arrhythmias. QT intervals, corrected for heart rate, >500 ms and abnormal T-wave morphology were observed during hypoglycemia in some participants. Hypoglycemia, frequently asymptomatic and prolonged, may increase the risk of arrhythmias in patients with type 2 diabetes and high cardiovascular risk. This is a plausible mechanism that could contribute to increased cardiovascular mortality during intensive glycemic therapy.

  16. Correlation between measures of hypoglycemia and glycemic improvement in sulfonylurea treated patients with type 2 diabetes in India: Results from the OBSTACLE hypoglycemia study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kalra

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study aimed to assess correlation between measures of hypoglycemia and glycemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM treated with sulfonylureas. Materials and Methods: T2DM patients being initiated on a sulfonylurea (SU on background of a failing oral antihyperglycemic regimen were followed up for 12 weeks. (HbA1c was measured at baseline and end of follow-up. Hypoglycemia was assessed using Stanford Hypoglycemia Questionnaire at week 12. Results: Of the total 1069 patients enrolled, 950 were considered evaluable. A weak negative correlation was observed between end of follow-up HbA1c values and hypoglycemia score, using both linear regression analysis (correlation coefficient -0.12; P = 0.0002 and negative binomial regression (β slope -0.09; P = 0.0010. A similar correlation was also observed between change in HbA1c from baseline and hypoglycemia score (β slope -0.07; P = 0.0048. Mean HbA1c reduction was lowest (0.65 ± 2.27% in patients not reporting any hypoglycemia and highest (1.28 ± 2.40% in patients with hypoglycemia score greater than median of 2 (P = 0.0031. There was no correlation between hypoglycemia frequency and end of follow-up HbA1c values (P = 0.4111. Conclusion: With addition of SU on a background of a failing oral anti-hyperglycemic regimen, the extent of glycemic control correlates directly with measures of patient reported hypoglycemia.

  17. MR Imaging in symptomatic osteochondromas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Chun, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the MR findings of symptomatic osteochondromas. We evaluated 31 patients who between July, 1994 and May, 1997 underwent MR imaging for symptomatic osteochondroma. Fourteen were males and 17 were females, and their ages ranged from 8 to 49 (mean, 23) years. Using T1WI, T2WI and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, images were analysed according to signal intensity in the osseous component of the osteochondroma, thickness of the cartilage cap, and associated change in surrounding soft tissue. Clinical manifestation included a palpable mass or tendency to grow (n=22) and pain on movement (n=9). Complications were of three types : that which followed change in the osseous component of the tumor, associated change in surrounding soft tissue, and malignant transformation. In the osseous component, bone marrow edema or contusion was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), and in two (65%), fracture was observed. In surrounding soft tissue, muscle impingement was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), bursitis was in 7 cases (22.6 %), tenosynovitis in seven (22.6 %), and vascular compression in five (16.1 %). In three cases (9.7%), transformation to chondrosarcoma had occurred; two of these were derived from osteochondromatosis and one from a single osteochondroma. The thickness of the cartilage cap was as follow : 10 mm (n=3). In patients with symptomatic osteochondroma, MR imaging is useful for detecting both complications and malignant transformation. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs

  18. Is testing for postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after gastric bypass necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasser, Michèle; Meier, Claudia; Herren, Sylvia; Aubry, Emilie; Steffen, Rudolf; Stanga, Zeno

    2017-11-23

    Postprandial hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (pHH) is an increasingly reported complication after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB). As pHH can cause life-threatening emergencies if occurring without warning symptoms, challenge testing may detect patients at risk. The study objective was to determine the frequency of occurrence of pHH with or without symptoms of hypoglycemia after RYGB. We undertook an observational cohort study of consecutive, unselected patients approximately one year after uncomplicated RYGB. To simulate normal habits, all patients received a standardized carbohydrate-rich solid mixed meal. Plasma glucose and insulin were measured at 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 min thereafter. Symptoms were classified as autonomous or neuroglycopenic. Patients with hypoglycemia (plasma glucose meal. 113 patients were included. Total weight loss at the first follow-up check (14 ± 0.4 months) was 33.97 ± 9.3%. After the carbohydrate-rich meal, glucose dropped to meal. The pHH occurred in 11.5% (n = 13) of patients. Asymptomatic patients (5.3%, n = 6) carried an increased risk (p = 0.008) for pHH. One patient needed emergency treatment after sudden loss of consciousness after the carbohydrate-rich meal. The occurrence of pHH was quite high in our study population with 11.5% thereof 5.3% asymptomatic. We therefore suggest that detection of these patients warrants a screening of patients after RYGB. At-risk patients should than be adequately advised to avoid carbohydrate-rich meals in order to optimize risk management. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  19. Replacing Insulin Glargine with Neutral Protamine Hagedorn (NPH) Insulin in a Subpopulation of Study Subjects in the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD): Effects on Blood Glucose Levels, Hypoglycemia and Patient Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berard, Lori; Cameron, Brett; Woo, Vincent; Stewart, John

    2015-08-01

    To ensure patient safety when replacing insulin glargine (IG) with neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH) insulin and to determine differences in blood glucose control, frequency of hypoglycemia, insulin dosing, health resource utilization and quality of life between users of IG and NPH insulin. A single-site, open-label, randomized, 6-month comparative study of 66 patients from the Action to Control Cardiovascular Risk in Diabetes (ACCORD) trial. Randomization was 1:1 to receive IG or NPH insulin. Data regarding blood glucose control, insulin dosage adjustment and recording of hypoglycemia episodes were obtained through telephone calls; office visits were conducted to measure weight, glycated hemoglobin, fasting plasma glucose and blood glucose profile. The Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ) was used to measure patients' satisfaction with their diabetes treatment. Rates of symptomatic hypoglycemia did not differ significantly between groups: 37.5±2.2 for the IG group and 31.1±2.1 for the NPH group. However, patients treated with NPH insulin had higher frequencies of severe hypoglycemia (6.1±0.9) compared with 2.7±0.6 for the IG group. A significant difference in changes in glycated hemoglobin (A1C) was observed between the groups: the mean ± standard error A1C decreases from baseline were -0.34%±0.11 for the IG group, vs -0.01%±0.10 for the NPH insulin group. The data obtained from the DTSQ showed greater treatment satisfaction in the IG group compared with the NPH insulin group. Switching from IG to NPH insulin resulted in more than double the rate of severe hypoglycemias and led to decreased metabolic control. Greater treatment satisfaction was observed with IG, compared with NPH insulin, as measured by change from baseline in the DTSQ scores. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kushner P

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Pamela KushnerUniversity of California, Irvine College of Medicine, California, USAAbstract: Hypoglycemia is a major barrier to achieving glycemic goals in patients with diabetes. Both acute and chronically recurrent hypoglycemic events appear to have long-term consequences for patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM. Chronically recurrent hypoglycemia may lead to an impairment of the counterregulatory system, with the potential for the development of hypoglycemia unawareness syndrome, increased severe hypoglycemia-associated hospitalization, and increased mortality. Hypoglycemic events may also have negative implications in cardiovascular disease and/or dementia. Avoidance of hypoglycemia by treating with appropriate, individualized regimens for patients with T2DM should be a primary focus of physicians. Utilizing traditional agents (eg, metformin and thiazolidinediones that do not promote hypoglycemia, in combination with newer agents such as dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors and incretin mimetics, could offer a therapeutic advantage when trying to help patients reach their hemoglobin A1c goal without the added risk of hypoglycemia.Keywords: hypoglycemia, type 2 diabetes mellitus, incretin, dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors, diabetes management

  1. Neurodevelopment after neonatal hypoglycemia: a systematic review and design of an optimal future study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boluyt, Nicole; van Kempen, Anne; Offringa, Martin

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Our goal was to assess the effect of episodes of neonatal hypoglycemia on subsequent neurodevelopment. METHODS: We searched Medline and Embase for cohort studies on subsequent neurodevelopment after episodes of hypoglycemia in the first week of life. Reference lists of available studies

  2. Glucose turnover during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in liver-denervated rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikines, K J; Sonne, B; Richter, Erik

    1985-01-01

    The role of hepatic autonomic nerves in glucose production during hypoglycemia was studied. Selective, surgical denervation of the liver was performed in rats, which reduced hepatic norepinephrine concentrations by 96%. Hypoglycemia was induced by 250 mU of insulin intra-arterially in anesthetize...

  3. MR Imaging in symptomatic osteochondromas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Soo Young; Kim, Jee Young; Kim, Sang Heum; Chun, Kyung Ah; Park, Young Ha [Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1998-06-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the MR findings of symptomatic osteochondromas. We evaluated 31 patients who between July, 1994 and May, 1997 underwent MR imaging for symptomatic osteochondroma. Fourteen were males and 17 were females, and their ages ranged from 8 to 49 (mean, 23) years. Using T1WI, T2WI and gadolinium-DTPA-enhanced T1WI, images were analysed according to signal intensity in the osseous component of the osteochondroma, thickness of the cartilage cap, and associated change in surrounding soft tissue. Clinical manifestation included a palpable mass or tendency to grow (n=22) and pain on movement (n=9). Complications were of three types : that which followed change in the osseous component of the tumor, associated change in surrounding soft tissue, and malignant transformation. In the osseous component, bone marrow edema or contusion was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), and in two (65%), fracture was observed. In surrounding soft tissue, muscle impingement was seen in 21 cases (67.7%), bursitis was in 7 cases (22.6 %), tenosynovitis in seven (22.6 %), and vascular compression in five (16.1 %). In three cases (9.7%), transformation to chondrosarcoma had occurred; two of these were derived from osteochondromatosis and one from a single osteochondroma. The thickness of the cartilage cap was as follow : < 5 mm (n=16), 5-10 mm (n=12), and > 10 mm (n=3). In patients with symptomatic osteochondroma, MR imaging is useful for detecting both complications and malignant transformation. (author). 21 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  4. Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology after Posterior Lumbar Interbody Fusion for Adult Low-Grade Isthmic Spondylolisthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified s...

  5. Hypoglycemia-Associated EEG Changes in Prepubertal Children With Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Grith Lærkholm; Foli-Andersen, Pia; Fredheim, Siri

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to explore the possible difference in the electroencephalogram (EEG) pattern between euglycemia and hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes (T1D) during daytime and during sleep. The aim is to develop a hypoglycemia alarm based on continuous EEG...... measurement and real-time signal processing. METHOD: Eight T1D patients aged 6-12 years were included. A hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp was performed to induce hypoglycemia both during daytime and during sleep. Continuous EEG monitoring was performed. For each patient, quantitative EEG (qEEG) measures...... in specific bands comparing hypoglycemia to euglycemia both during daytime and during sleep. In daytime the EEG-based algorithm identified hypoglycemia in all children on average at a blood glucose (BG) level of 2.5 ± 0.5 mmol/l and 18.4 (ranging from 0 to 55) minutes prior to blood glucose nadir. During...

  6. Hypoglycemia in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes - Predictors and role of metabolic control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, L.R.; Johansen, M.; Pedersen-Bjergaard, U.

    2008-01-01

    observational study of 108 consecutive pregnant women with type 1 diabetes was conducted. At 8, 14, 21, 27, and 33 weeks of gestation, patients performed self-monitored plasma glucose (SMPG) (eight/day) for 3 days and completed a questionnaire on nausea, vomiting, hypoglycemia awareness, and history of mild...... awareness or unawareness (3.2 [1.2-8.2]) as independent predictors for severe hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS - In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of mild and severe hypoglycemia was highest in early pregnancy, although metabolic control was tighter in the last part of pregnancy. Predictors......OBJECTIVE- In pregnancy with type 1 diabetes, we evaluated occurrence of mild and severe hypoglycemia and analyzed the influence of strict metabolic control, nausea, Vomiting, and other potential predictors of occurrence of severe hypoglycemia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS- A prospective...

  7. Radiological features of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thompson, S.E.; Walsh, E.A.; Cramer, B.C.; Pushpanathan, C.C.; Hollett, P.; Ingram, L.; Price, D.

    1996-01-01

    Symptomatic splenic hamartomas are rare in the pediatric age group, with only four previous reports in the literature. Splenic hamartoma has been reported as a solid homogeneous mass without calcification on CT and ultrasound (US), and only one previous report of the findings on MRI has been published. We report a case of a large symptomatic splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old girl who presented with splenomegaly, pancytopenia and growth retardation. A solid mass with multiple punctate foci resembling calcifications was seen on US. The mass was heterogeneous and better demarcated on enhanced CT. Radiocolloid scintigraphy demonstrated uptake within the lesion, but less than that of normal spleen. The mass was isointense relative to normal splenic tissue on T1-weighted MRI (0.5 T) and of increased intensity with T2 weighting. At splenectomy, a red pulp hamartoma was identified, which contained nodules of hyalinization and necrosis thought to account for the punctate foci seen on US. (orig.). With 4 figs

  8. Radiological features of a symptomatic splenic hamartoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thompson, S.E. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Walsh, E.A. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Cramer, B.C. [Department of Radiology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, Janeway Place, St. John`s, NF A1A 1R8 (Canada); Pushpanathan, C.C. [Department of Pathology, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Hollett, P. [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Health Sciences Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Ingram, L. [Department of Pediatrics, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada); Price, D. [Department of Surgery, Janeway Child Health Centre and Memorial University of Newfoundland, St. John`s, NF (Canada)

    1996-09-01

    Symptomatic splenic hamartomas are rare in the pediatric age group, with only four previous reports in the literature. Splenic hamartoma has been reported as a solid homogeneous mass without calcification on CT and ultrasound (US), and only one previous report of the findings on MRI has been published. We report a case of a large symptomatic splenic hamartoma in a 14-year-old girl who presented with splenomegaly, pancytopenia and growth retardation. A solid mass with multiple punctate foci resembling calcifications was seen on US. The mass was heterogeneous and better demarcated on enhanced CT. Radiocolloid scintigraphy demonstrated uptake within the lesion, but less than that of normal spleen. The mass was isointense relative to normal splenic tissue on T1-weighted MRI (0.5 T) and of increased intensity with T2 weighting. At splenectomy, a red pulp hamartoma was identified, which contained nodules of hyalinization and necrosis thought to account for the punctate foci seen on US. (orig.). With 4 figs.

  9. Association of Hypoglycemia With Subsequent Dementia in Older Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Hemalkumar B; Mehta, Vinay; Goodwin, James S

    2017-08-01

    Studies have found conflicting evidence regarding the association of hypoglycemia with dementia. We evaluated an association of hypoglycemia with subsequent dementia in patients with type 2 diabetes. This retrospective longitudinal cohort study used the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, an electronic medical records data from the United Kingdom, from 2003 to 2012. We included patients aged >65 years diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, with no prior diagnosis of dementia. Dementia was defined using diagnosis codes from medical records. All patients were followed from the date of initial diabetes diagnosis. To account for competing risk of death, we used Fine and Gray's competing risk model to determine the association of hypoglycemia with dementia while adjusting for potential confounders. Hypoglycemia was modeled as a time-dependent covariate. Of 53,055 patients, 5.7% (n = 3,018) had at least one hypoglycemia episodes. The overall incidence rate of dementia was 12.7 per 1,000 person-years. In the fully adjusted model that controlled for all confounders, the occurrence of at least one hypoglycemia episode was associated with 27% higher odds of subsequent dementia (hazard ratio = 1.27; 95% confidence interval = 1.06-1.51). The risk increased with the number of hypoglycemia episodes: one episode (hazard ratio = 1.26; 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.54); two or more episodes (hazard ratio = 1.50; 95% confidence interval = 1.09-2.08). Hypoglycemia is associated with a higher risk of dementia and may be responsible in part for the higher risk of dementia in patients with diabetes. Alternatively, hypoglycemia may be a marker for undiagnosed cognitive impairment, and we cannot rule out the possibility of reverse causation between hypoglycemia and dementia. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Clinical analysis of 34 cases symptomatic epilepsy secondary to cerebrovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeng Mingyu; Liu Chunfeng

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the relation between cerebrovascular disease and symptomatic epilepsy. Method: 786 patients suffered cerebrovascular disease were retrospectively analyzed. Result: The occurrence rate of Secondary to Cerebrovascular Disease symptomatic epilepsy Secondary to Cerebrovascular Disease was 4.3%. Those older than 60 are prone to develop Acrodynia symptomatic epilepsy. Generalized epileptic seizure were often seen. Secondary to Cerebrovascular Disease epilepsy die to cortical lesion are more easily seem than subcortical lesion. Early epilepsy is more than late epilepsy. Conclusion: The cause of symptomatic epilepsy after cerebrovascular disease is not same in different types and course of CVD. Those who developed epilepsy particularly epilepsy continua would have bad prognosis

  11. MRI findings of brain damage due to neonatal hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Lu; Fan Guoguang; Ji Xu; Sun Baohai; Guo Qiyong

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To report the MRI findings of brain damage observed in neonatal patients who suffered from isolated hypoglycemia and to explore the value of diffusion-weighted imaging(DWI) in early detection of neonatal hypoglycemic brain injury. Methods: Twelve neonates with isolated hypoglycemia (10 of the 12 were diagnosed to suffer from hypoglycemic encephalopathy) were enrolled in this study. They were first scanned at age from 3 days to 10 days with T 1 WI, T 2 WI and DWI(b is 0 s/mm 2 , 1000 s/mm 2 ), and 4 of them were then scanned from 7 days to 10 days following the initial scan. All acquired MR images were retrospectively analysed. Results: First series of DWI images showed distinct hyperintense signal in 11 cases in several areas including bilateral occipital cortex (2 cases), right occipital cortex (1 case), left occipital cortex and subcortical white matter(1 case), bilateral occipital cortex and subcortical white matter (2 cases), bilateral parieto-occipital cortex (2 cases), bilateral parieto-occipital cortex and subcortical white matter(2 cases), the splenium of corpus callosum (4 cases), bilateral corona radiata( 2 cases), left caudate nucleus and globus pallidus (1 case), bilateral thalamus (1 case), bilaterally posterior limb of internal capsule (1 case). In the initial T 1 WI and T 2 WI images, there were subtle hypointensity in the damaged cortical areas (3 cases), hyperintensity in the bilaterally affected occipital cortex( 1 case) on T 1 weighted images, and hyperintensity in the affected cortex and subcortical white matter with poor differentiation on T 2 weighted images. The followed-up MRI of 4 cases showed regional encephalomalacia in the affected occipital lobes(4 cases), slightly hyperintensity on T 2 weighted images in the damaged occipital cortex (2 cases), extensive demyelination (1 case), disappearance of hyperintensity of the splenium of corpus callosum (1 case), and persistent hyperintensity in the splenium of corpus callosum (1 case

  12. One-Anastomosis Jejunal Interposition with Gastric Remnant Resection (Branco-Zorron Switch) for Severe Recurrent Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia after Gastric Bypass for Morbid Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorron, Ricardo; Branco, Alcides; Sampaio, Jose; Bothe, Claudia; Junghans, Tido; Rasim, Gyurdzhan; Pratschke, Johann; Guel-Klein, Safak

    2017-04-01

    The anatomical and physiological changes after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass for morbid obesity can lead to severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia with neuroglycopenia in a small percentage of patients. The exact physiologic mechanism is not completely understood. Surgical reversal to the original anatomy and distal or total pancreatectomy are current therapeutic options to reverse the hypoglycemic effect, with substantial associated morbidity. Our group reports a pilot clinical series of a novel surgical technique using one-anastomosis jejunal interposition with gastric remnant resection (Branco-Zorron Switch). Patients with severe symptomatic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia refractory to conservative therapy were treated using the technique. The procedure started with resection of the remnant stomach close to pylorus. The alimentary limb was sectioned at 20 cm from the gastrojejunal anastomosis, and the rest of the alimentary limb was resected until the Y-Roux anastomosis. A hand-sutured anastomosis was then performed with the proximal alimentary limb and the remnant antrum. Four patients were successfully submitted to the procedure with reversal of the symptomatology and normalization of insulin levels, postprandial glucose levels, and oral glucose tolerance test, with a mean follow-up of 24.3 months. Mean operative time was 188 min, and patients recovered without postoperative complications. Patients suffering from severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after gastric bypass may be efficiently treated by this innovative procedure, avoiding extreme surgical therapy such as pancreatectomy or restoring the gastric anatomy, while still maintaining sustained weight loss. Studies with larger series and longer follow-up are still needed to define the role of this therapy in managing this entity.

  13. Impact of the "Diabetes Interactive Diary" telemedicine system on metabolic control, risk of hypoglycemia, and quality of life: a randomized clinical trial in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Maria Chiara; Nicolucci, Antonio; Lucisano, Giuseppe; Pellegrini, Fabio; Di Bartolo, Paolo; Miselli, Valerio; Anichini, Roberto; Vespasiani, Giacomo

    2013-08-01

    Telemedicine systems based on mobile phones represent new promising educational tools. The "Diabetes Interactive Diary" (DID) is a carbohydrate/bolus calculator promoting the patient-physician communication via short message service. This study aimed to compare the efficacy of the DID versus usual care on metabolic control, hypoglycemia, and quality of life. Patients with type 1 diabetes on a basal:bolus regimen with insulin glargine and insulin glulisine, not previously educated on carbohydrate (CHO) counting, were randomized to DID (Group A; n=63) or traditional education (Group B; n=64). Generalized hierarchical linear regression models for repeated measures were applied to compare changes between groups. Incidence of hypoglycemia was compared using Poisson regression models. Of 127 patients (age, 36.9±10.5 years; diabetes duration, 16.3±9.3 years), 15 (11.8%) dropped out. After 6 months, hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels decreased by -0.49±0.11 in Group A and -0.48±0.11 in Group B (P=0.73). Group A showed a 86% lower risk of grade 2 hypoglycemia than Group B. Compared with usual care, DID improved the "perceived frequency of hyperglycemic episodes" scale of the Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire and the "social relations" and the "fear of hypoglycemia" dimensions of the Diabetes Specific Quality of Life Scale. Results obtained with DID markedly differ among patients and centers. DID is no more effective than traditional CHO counting education in reducing HbA1c levels. DID reduces the risk of moderate/severe hypoglycemia and improves quality of life. A better understanding of patients' and healthcare professionals' attitudes associated with an effective care supported by technology is essential to avoid waste of resources.

  14. Maternal glycemic control and hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathiesen, Elisabeth R; Kinsley, Brendan; Amiel, Stephanie A

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the safety and efficacy of insulin aspart (IAsp) versus regular human insulin (HI) in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Subjects (n = 322) who were pregnant or planning pregnancy were randomized to IAsp...... in basal-bolus therapy with NPH insulin in pregnant women with type 1 diabetes and may potentially offer some benefits in terms of postprandial glucose control and preventing severe hypoglycemia....... with IAsp than HI (P = 0.003 and P = 0.044, respectively), as were mean plasma glucose levels 90 min after breakfast (P = 0.044 and P = 0.001, respectively). Maternal safety profiles and pregnancy outcomes were similar between treatments. CONCLUSIONS: IAsp is at least as safe and effective as HI when used...

  15. Nationwide reduction in the frequency of severe hypoglycemia by half

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fredheim, S.; Johansen, A.; Thorsen, S. U.

    2015-01-01

    -years. The incidence rate peaked with 16.0 per 100 person-years in 2008 reaching a nadir of 4.9 in 2011. Overall, insulin pump reduced the rate of SH with 27 % compared to any pen treatment (P = 0.003). When stratifying pen treatment, premixed insulin increased the rate of SH by 1.9-fold (P = 0.0015) and NPH increased...... the rate by 1.6-fold (P = 0.003) versus pump treatment, whereas long-acting insulin analogues were comparable with pump treatment (P = 0.1485). We found no association of SH with glycemic control (P > 0.05). Conclusions: A nationwide halving in rates of severe hypoglycemia was observed during the study...

  16. Intrasellar Symptomatic Salivary Gland Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chen

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic salivary gland tissue in sellar turcica is frequently observed in microscopic examination at autopsy. This tissue is considered clinically silent. Only 2 symptomatic cases have been previously reported. Here we report a 28-year-old woman presenting with galactorrhea and hyperprolactinemia. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a 6×5-mm nodule in the posterior aspect of the pituitary gland. This nodule showed isointensity on T1- and T2-weighted images and less enhancement on post-contrast T1-weighted images. Transsphenoidal exploration revealed a cystic lesion within the pituitary gland, which consisted of a grayish gelatinous content. The pathologic examination confirmed the diagnosis of salivary gland rest.

  17. Desired Diversity and Symptomatic Anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Friis Christensen, Jannick; Muhr, Sara Louise

    2018-01-01

    This paper conceptualises organisational diversity as constituted by psychoanalytic lack. Empirically, we show how diversity as Lacanian lack is understood as nothing in or of itself, but as an empty signifier with no signified. The lack of diversity becomes a catalyst for desiring particular ideas...... of diversity that, however, constantly change due to the empty form of diversity. Anxiety manifests itself in the obsession of unobtainable idealised forms of diversity as well as in the uncertainty associated with the traumatic experience of always falling short of what is desired in an object...... – the experience of failed diversity. Conclusively, we discuss the productive potential of the power of lack. The impossibility of diversity is what, at once, conditions the possibility of diversity. We therefore suggest that the symptomatic anxiety provoked by the lack should be enjoyed in order to engage...

  18. Symptomatic outcome after laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niranjan, B; Chumber, S; Kriplani, A K

    2000-01-01

    Patients with gallstones often present with multiple complaints. We wanted to study the major complaints of our patients undergoing laparoscopic cholecystectomy and the symptomatic relief afforded by the operation. We studied 113 patients with symptomatic gallstone disease who underwent laparoscopic cholecystectomy in a single surgical unit. Patients with proven common bile duct stones, obstructive jaundice, cholangitis, present or past associated abdominal pathology or cholecystoenteric fistula were excluded from the study. The mean follow up period was 18 months (range 10-22 months). A detailed account of the symptoms of gallstones, length of post-operative stay, persistence of symptoms, development of fresh symptoms and resumption of fat containing diet were assessed. The male to female ratio was 1:4. Common presenting symptoms were abdominal pain (96%), flatulence or feeling of fullness of abdomen (85%), heartburn (66%), belching (62%), sour eructation (52%), vomiting (48%) and nausea (45%). Mean postoperative hospital stay was 28 hours (range 9-68 hours). Biliary pain was relieved in 99% of patients after laparoscopic cholecystectomy (p cholecystectomy. Fresh symptoms that developed after laparoscopic cholecystectomy were heart-burn (6%), belching (3.5%), sour eructation (1%) and vomiting (0.5%). Post-cholecystectomy post-prandial diarrhoea occurred in 20% of the patients. The patients' appreciation of a satisfactory cosmetic result of operation scars was 100 percent. Fifteen female patients (13.5%) complained of increased weight gain of more than 5 kg after laparoscopic cholecystectomy [(p > 0.05; not significant (NS)]. Laparoscopic cholecystectomy significantly relieved symptoms of gall stone disease. Biliary pain, nausea, vomiting and sour eructations had better outcome compared to belching, flatulence and heartburn, which are also relieved in majority. Postcholecystectomy post-prandial diarrhea was a significant new symptom after cholecystectomy. Pre

  19. QT Measurement and Heart Rate Correction during Hypoglycemia: Is There a Bias?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toke Folke Christensen

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Several studies show that hypoglycemia causes QT interval prolongation. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of QT measurement methodology, heart rate correction, and insulin types during hypoglycemia. Methods. Ten adult subjects with type 1 diabetes had hypoglycemia induced by intravenous injection of two insulin types in a cross-over design. QT measurements were done using the slope-intersect (SI and manual annotation (MA methods. Heart rate correction was done using Bazett’s (QTcB and Fridericia’s (QTcF formulas. Results. The SI method showed significant prolongation at hypoglycemia for QTcB (42(6 ms; P<.001 and QTcF (35(6 ms; P<.001. The MA method showed prolongation at hypoglycemia for QTcB (7(2 ms, P<.05 but not QTcF. No difference in ECG variables between the types of insulin was observed. Discussion. The method for measuring the QT interval has a significant impact on the prolongation of QT during hypoglycemia. Heart rate correction may also influence the QT during hypoglycemia while the type of insulin is insignificant. Prolongation of QTc in this study did not reach pathologic values suggesting that QTc prolongation cannot fully explain the dead-in-bed syndrome.

  20. Evaluation and management of diabetic and non-diabetic hypoglycemia in end-stage renal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosmanov, Aidar R; Gosmanova, Elvira O; Kovesdy, Csaba P

    2016-01-01

    Patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD) regardless of diabetes status are at increased risk of hypoglycemia with a resultant array of adverse clinical outcomes. Therefore, hypoglycemia should be thoroughly evaluated in ESRD patients. In diabetic dialysis patients, hypoglycemic agents and nutritional alterations can trigger hypoglycemia in the background of diminished gluconeogenesis, reduced insulin clearance by the kidney and improved insulin sensitivity following initiation of renal replacement therapy. Detailed evaluation of antidiabetic regimen and nutritional patterns, patient education on self-monitoring of blood glucose and/or referral to a diabetes specialist may reduce risk of subsequent hypoglycemia. In certain situations, it is important to recognize the possibility of non-diabetic causes of hypoglycemia in patients with diabetes and to avoid treating pseudo-hyperglycemia caused by glucose- non-specific glucometers in patients utilizing icodextrin-based solutions for peritoneal dialysis. Adrenal insufficiency, certain medications, malnutrition and/or infection are among the most common causes of hypoglycemia in non-diabetic ESRD patients, and they should be suspected after exclusion of inadvertent use of hypoglycemic agents. The goal of this review article is to summarize approaches and recommendations for the work up and treatment of hypoglycemia in ESRD. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of ERA-EDTA. All rights reserved.

  1. Hypoglycemia: Role of Hypothalamic Glucose-Inhibited (GI Neurons in Detection and Correction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxue Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Hypoglycemia is a profound threat to the brain since glucose is its primary fuel. As a result, glucose sensors are widely located in the central nervous system and periphery. In this perspective we will focus on the role of hypothalamic glucose-inhibited (GI neurons in sensing and correcting hypoglycemia. In particular, we will discuss GI neurons in the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH which express neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS and in the perifornical hypothalamus (PFH which express orexin. The ability of VMH nNOS-GI neurons to depolarize in low glucose closely parallels the hormonal response to hypoglycemia which stimulates gluconeogenesis. We have found that nitric oxide (NO production in low glucose is dependent on oxidative status. In this perspective we will discuss the potential relevance of our work showing that enhancing the glutathione antioxidant system prevents hypoglycemia associated autonomic failure (HAAF in non-diabetic rats whereas VMH overexpression of the thioredoxin antioxidant system restores hypoglycemia counterregulation in rats with type 1 diabetes.We will also address the potential role of the orexin-GI neurons in the arousal response needed for hypoglycemia awareness which leads to behavioral correction (e.g., food intake, glucose administration. The potential relationship between the hypothalamic sensors and the neurocircuitry in the hindbrain and portal mesenteric vein which is critical for hypoglycemia correction will then be discussed.

  2. NOCTURNAL HYPOGLYCEMIA--THE MAIN INDICATION FOR INSULIN PUMP THERAPY IN ADULTHOOD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baretić, Maja; Kraljević, Ivana; Renar, Ivana Pavlić

    2016-03-01

    The aim was to determine which adult type 1 diabetic patient receiving multiple daily injection therapy is the most appropriate candidate for insulin pump therapy, while taking into consideration limited insulin pump affordability in Croatia. A total of 145 type 1 diabetic patients (52% diagnosed in adult age) were monitored at the Department of Endocrinology, Clinical Department of Internal Medicine, Zagreb University Hospital Center from 2009 to 2014. Twenty-one patients started insulin pump therapy in adulthood (seven men and 14 women, median age 27). Five patients had chronic complications (retinopathy in two, polyneuropathy in one, and both nephropathy and retinopathy in two patients). The median HbA1c at the initiation of pump therapy was 6.95% versus 6.5% after 1 year of pump therapy. Patients were stratified according to indications for insulin pump therapy (frequent and/or severe hypoglycemia, specific lifestyle, having not reached glycemic goals despite adherence/labile diabetes, and preconception). Patients could meet more than one criterion. Initially, the occurrence of hypoglycemia was analyzed by 6-day continuous glucose monitoring, while re-evaluation was done after collecting history data at 1 year ± 3 months. Initially, all patients had a median of 5 hypoglycemias/6 days (30% nocturnal) versus 1 hypoglycemia/6 days (without nocturnal) after 1 year. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test yielded a statistically significant difference in hypoglycemic events, nocturnal hypoglycemia and HbA1c. Patients commencing insulin pump therapy due to hypoglycemia initially had median HbA1c of 6.7% with 7 hypoglycemia/6 days (50% nocturnal). After one year, median HbA1c was 6% with 1 hypoglycemia/6 days (without nocturnal). In conclusion, the main indication for insulin pump therapy in adults is the frequency of hypoglycemia, especially nocturnal ones.

  3. Hypoglycemia does not change the threshold for arousal from sleep in adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Trang T; Jones, Timothy W; Griffiths, Amanda; Dart, Julie; Davis, Elizabeth A; Stick, Stephen; Wilson, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Nocturnal hypoglycemia is a significant problem for children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes. The counterregulatory hormone response to hypoglycemia is blunted in both patients with type 1 diabetes and healthy subjects during sleep. It is not known whether the threshold for arousal from sleep is also modified by hypoglycemia. To address this question we compared the acoustic arousal threshold from sleep during hypoglycemia and euglycemia in adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Adolescents with type 1 diabetes were studied on two occasions: under hypoglycemic and euglycemic conditions. During the hypoglycemia night, subjects underwent a hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic clamp with nadir glucose level of 2.8 mmol/L. Hypoglycemia was initiated during stage 2 sleep and maintained during slow-wave sleep. During the euglycemia night, blood glucose was maintained at 5.5 mmol/L using the same clamp technique. The acoustic arousal threshold was determined during the first cycle of slow-wave sleep. Seven subjects (mean±SE, 14.2±0.8 years old, mean glycosylated hemoglobin 8.1±0.3%, duration of diagnosis 2.5±0.5 years) completed both study nights. Arousal was only noted during acoustic testing and did not occur during hypoglycemia alone. The acoustic arousal threshold during slow-wave sleep was similar under both conditions: 79±8 dB during euglycemia and 71±6 dB (P=0.353) during hypoglycemia. In adolescents with type 1 diabetes, hypoglycemia does not impair arousal from slow-wave sleep induced by an external auditory stimulus.

  4. Factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia in at-risk adolescents and young adults with type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Darrell M; Calhoun, Peter M; Maahs, David M; Chase, H Peter; Messer, Laurel; Buckingham, Bruce A; Aye, Tandy; Clinton, Paula K; Hramiak, Irene; Kollman, Craig; Beck, Roy W

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia remains an impediment to good glycemic control, with nocturnal hypoglycemia being particularly dangerous. Information on major contributors to nocturnal hypoglycemia remains critical for understanding and mitigating risk. Continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) data for 855 nights were studied, generated by 45 subjects 15-45 years of age with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels of ≤8.0% who participated in a larger randomized study. Factors assessed for potential association with nocturnal hypoglycemia (CGM measurement of snack, insulin on board, day of the week, previous daytime hypoglycemia, age, gender, HbA1c level, diabetes duration, daily basal insulin, and daily insulin dose. Hypoglycemia occurred during 221 of 885 (25%) nights and was more frequent with younger age (Psnack, before bedtime insulin bolus, weekend versus weekday, gender, and daily basal and bolus insulin were not associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia. Awareness that HbA1c level, exercise, bedtime BG level, and daytime hypoglycemia are all modifiable factors associated with nocturnal hypoglycemia may help patients and providers decrease the risk of hypoglycemia at night. Risk for nocturnal hypoglycemia increased in a linear fashion across the range of variables, with no clear-cut thresholds to guide clinicians or patients for any particular night.

  5. Deep-vein thrombosis and the incidence of subsequent symptomatic cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prandoni, P.; Lensing, A. W.; Büller, H. R.; Cogo, A.; Prins, M. H.; Cattelan, A. M.; Cuppini, S.; Noventa, F.; ten Cate, J. W.

    1992-01-01

    In contrast to the established relation between overt cancer and subsequent venous thromboembolism, it is unclear whether symptomatic deep-vein thrombosis is associated with a risk of subsequent overt malignant disease. Two hundred sixty consecutive patients with symptomatic, venographically proved

  6. Nonislet Cell Tumor Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Adrenal Cortical Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Won Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonislet cell tumor hypoglycemia (NICTH is a rare but serious paraneoplastic syndrome in which a tumor secretes incompletely processed precursors of insulin-like growth factor-II (IGF-II, causing hypoglycemia. Here, we report an exceptional case of NICTH caused by nonfunctioning adrenocortical carcinoma in a 39-year-old male with recurrent hypoglycemia. The patient’s serum IGF-II/IGF-I ratio had increased to 27.8. The serum level of the IGF-II/IGF-I ratio was normalized after removal of the tumor, and the hypoglycemic attacks no longer occurred after the operation.

  7. No response of pancreatic hormones to hypoglycemia in diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Madsbad, S; Krarup, T

    1982-01-01

    The responses of pancreatic hormones (i.e. glucagon, pancreatic polypeptide, and somatostatin) to insulin-induced hypoglycemia were investigated in 18 insulin-dependent diabetics without residual beta-cell function and in 6 normal subjects. Nine of the diabetics had autonomic neuropathy, and 9 had...... no neuropathy. After hypoglycemia, no significant increase in any of the 3 pancreatic hormones was found in the diabetics with autonomic neuropathy, whereas significant increments were found in the diabetics without neuropathy and in the normal subjects. These results suggest that autonomic nervous activity...... is of major importance for pancreatic hormone release during hypoglycemia in man....

  8. Theophylline enhances glucose recovery after hypoglycemia in healthy man and in type I diabetic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidberg, A; Rasmussen, M H; Christensen, N J

    1994-01-01

    after insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Eleven healthy subjects and nine type I (insulin-dependent) diabetic patients each participated in two experiments in randomized order, receiving on both days an insulin bolus of 0.15 IU/kg soluble insulin. On one day, theophylline (intravenous [IV] bolus of 220 mg...... followed by IV infusion of 1 mg/kg/h) was administered from 1 hour before induction of hypoglycemia until the end of the study period. On the other day, NaCl was administered. Plasma glucose before induction of hypoglycemia was equal on the 2 study days. The plasma glucose area under the curve (AUC...

  9. Prevalence of Cyclospora cayetanensis among symptomatic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Naguib M. Massoud

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... There was no sig- nificant difference between symptomatic Cyclospora infected and noninfected cases as regards the duration of diarrhea and clinical presentations. Conclusion: Cyclospora infection in immune-competent symptomatic and asymptomatic children in Alexandria is common. Physicians should ...

  10. Symptomatic mesodiverticular bands in children | Bertozzi | Annals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symptomatic mesodiverticular bands in children. ... Abstract. Objective: The aim of this study was to review the English literature about a rare condition such as symptomatic mesodiverticular bands (MDBs) in children. Background: The MDB is an ... All cases reported an intestinal occlusion as clinical picture. Internal hernia ...

  11. Symptomatic splenomegaly and palliative radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yaneva, M.; Vlaikova, M.

    2005-01-01

    We analysed the effect of irradiation of an enlarged spleen in some hematologic diseases: chronic myelaemia, osteomyelophybrosis and chronic lymphadenosis, where splenectomy had been contraindicated and where pain has been a leading symptom and also the discomfort because of an enlarged spleen. For 20 years in the Clinic of Radiotherapy have been treated 23 patients with the above mentioned diseases. We have irradiated all patients using X-ray and later- Co-60. To reach a palliative effect we have irradiated patients with single doses from 50 cGy to 100 cGy with an interval of 2-3 days between each fraction, but the total doses have been different- from 400 cGy to 1500 cGy. The enlarged spleen has reached the pelvis in 3 cm to 17 cm below the costal margin, and in some patients has crossed the median line of the body going in some centimetres on the other side. The reduction of splenic size and volume is as follows: full reduction in 6 patients (26.1%) and partial in 17 (73.9%). All patients resulted in decreases in pain and tension in abdomen and the total discomfort. No serious side haematologic effects were encountered. Our experience indicates that cautious splenic irradiation can be a safe and useful therapeutic alternative. The symptomatic palliation in patients, where splenectomy is not an option, is effective and is an additional alternative for an improvement of their general condition

  12. Neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia in a patient with 9p deletion syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bayat, Allan; Kirchhoff, Maria; Madsen, Camilla Gøbel

    2018-01-01

    We report the clinical and neuroradiological findings in a young boy harboring the 9p deletion syndrome including the novel findings of thalamic infarction and germinal matrix haemorrhage and neonatal hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. Both the hypoglycemic events and the ventriculomegaly found...

  13. Reversible hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after gastric bypass: a consequence of altered nutrient delivery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McLaughlin, Tracey; Peck, Marcia; Holst, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Severe hypoglycemia after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB) is an increasingly recognized condition, characterized by neuroglycopenia and inappropriately elevated insulin concentrations that occur primarily in the postprandial state. Both pathophysiology and treatment of this disorder remain...

  14. Influence of erythropoietin on cognitive performance during experimental hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Peter Lommer; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Kjær, Troels Wesenberg

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes has not decreased over the past decades. New treatment modalities minimizing the risk of hypoglycemic episodes and attenuating hypoglycemic cognitive dysfunction are needed. We studied if treatment with the neuroprotective hormone...

  15. Hypoglycemia Prevention and User Acceptance of an Insulin Pump System with Predictive Low Glucose Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Choudhary, Pratik; Olsen, Birthe S; Conget, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    was avoided with this strategy, as well as to assess user acceptance of the system and its insulin management features. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Forty subjects with type 1 diabetes used the system for 4 weeks. We retrospectively evaluated performance of the system, using downloaded pump and sensor data...... between paired SG and BG values was 10.9 ± 13.8%. Subjects felt confident using the system, agreed that it helped protect them from hypoglycemia, and wished to continue using it. CONCLUSIONS: Automatic insulin pump suspension as implemented in the MiniMed 640G system can help patients avoid hypoglycemia......BACKGROUND: The MiniMed 640G sensor-augmented insulin pump system (Medtronic, Inc., Northridge, CA) can automatically suspend insulin delivery in advance of predicted hypoglycemia and restart it upon recovery. The aims of this analysis were to determine the rate at which predicted hypoglycemia...

  16. Blood electrolyte disturbances during severe hypoglycemia in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi Yeon

    2015-09-01

    To investigate abnormalities in blood electrolyte levels during severe hypoglycemia in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) in a clinical setting. Blood electrolyte levels in adult T2DM patients during severe hypoglycemia were collected from January 1, 2008 to December 31, 2012. Patients who maintained normal serum creatinine and blood urea nitrogen levels were utilized in the study. Severe hypoglycemia was defined as a condition requiring medical assistance, such as administering carbohydrates when serum glucose levels less than 70 mg/dL were observed, in conjunction with other symptoms of hypoglycemia. A total of 1,068 patients who visited the emergency room with severe hypoglycemia were screened, of which 219 patients were included in this study. The incidence of abnormal levels for any electrolyte was 47%. Hypokalemia (type of electrolyte disturbance observed at 21.9%. A decrease in serum potassium levels was associated with decreases in blood glucose levels (r = 0.151, p = 0.025). During severe hypoglycemia, median blood glucose levels, incidence of tachycardia (> 100 beats per minute) and severe hypertension (≥ 180/120 mmHg) were 30 mg/dL (range, 14 to 62) and 35 mg/dL (range, 10 to 69; p = 0.04), 18.8% and 7.2% (p = 0.02), and 20.8% and 10.2% (p = 0.05) in the hypokalemia and normokalemia groups, respectively. During severe hypoglycemia, hypokalemia occurred in 21.9% of T2DM patients and was associated with tachycardia and severe hypertension. Therefore, the results suggest that severe hypoglycemia may increase cardiovascular events in T2DM.

  17. Reversible Adrenal Insufficiency in Three Patients With Post–Roux-en-Y Gastric Bypass Noninsulinoma Pancreatogenous Hypoglycemia Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelly Mathur MD

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective . Noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS is a disorder of endogenous hyperinsulinemia that is clinically distinguishable from insulinoma, with a greater preponderance after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYBG. Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia can predispose to attenuation of counterregulatory hormone responses to hypoglycemia, and consequent suppression of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA axis. This case series describes 3 individuals who were diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency (AI after undergoing RYGB, complicated by NIPHS. Methods . A retrospective chart review was performed for each individual. Chart review applied particular attention to the onset of hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia following bariatric surgery and the dynamic testing leading to the diagnoses of NIPHS and AI. Results . In each case, reactive hypoglycemia ensued within months to years after RYGB. Cosyntropin stimulation testing confirmed the diagnosis of AI. Hydrocortisone therapy reduced the frequency and severity of hypoglycemia and was continued until successful medical and/or surgical management of hyperinsulinism occurred. Follow-up testing of the HPA axis demonstrated resolution of AI. In all cases, hydrocortisone therapy was finally discontinued without incident. Conclusion . We speculate that transient AI is a potential complication in patients who experience recurrent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after RYGB. The putative mechanism for this observation may be attenuation of the HPA axis after prolonged exposure to severe, recurrent hypoglycemia. We conclude that biochemical screening for AI should be considered in individuals who develop post-RYGB hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. If AI is diagnosed, supportive treatment should be maintained until hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia has been managed effectively.

  18. A Single Bout of High-Intensity Interval Training Reduces Awareness of Subsequent Hypoglycemia in Patients With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooijackers, Hanne M; Wiegers, Evita C; van der Graaf, Marinette; Thijssen, Dick H; Kessels, Roy P C; Tack, Cees J; de Galan, Bastiaan E

    2017-07-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) has gained increasing popularity in patients with diabetes. HIIT acutely increases plasma lactate levels. This may be important, since the administration of lactate during hypoglycemia suppresses symptoms and counterregulation while preserving cognitive function. We tested the hypothesis that, in the short term, HIIT reduces awareness of hypoglycemia and attenuates hypoglycemia-induced cognitive dysfunction. In a randomized crossover trial, patients with type 1 diabetes and normal awareness of hypoglycemia (NAH), patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia (IAH), and healthy participants ( n = 10 per group) underwent a hyperinsulinemic-hypoglycemic (2.6 mmol/L) clamp, either after a HIIT session or after seated rest. Compared with rest, HIIT reduced symptoms of hypoglycemia in patients with NAH but not in healthy participants or patients with IAH. HIIT attenuated hypoglycemia-induced cognitive dysfunction, which was mainly driven by changes in the NAH subgroup. HIIT suppressed cortisol and growth hormone responses, but not catecholamine responses to hypoglycemia. The present findings demonstrate that a single HIIT session rapidly reduces awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes and NAH, but does not in patients with IAH, and attenuates hypoglycemia-induced cognitive dysfunction. The role of exercise-induced lactate in mediating these effects, potentially serving as an alternative fuel for the brain, should be further explored. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  19. β1-Adrenergic receptor deficiency in ghrelin-expressing cells causes hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani, Bharath K; Osborne-Lawrence, Sherri; Vijayaraghavan, Prasanna; Hepler, Chelsea; Zigman, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    Ghrelin is an orexigenic gastric peptide hormone secreted when caloric intake is limited. Ghrelin also regulates blood glucose, as emphasized by the hypoglycemia that is induced by caloric restriction in mouse models of deficient ghrelin signaling. Here, we hypothesized that activation of β1-adrenergic receptors (β1ARs) localized to ghrelin cells is required for caloric restriction-associated ghrelin release and the ensuing protective glucoregulatory response. In mice lacking the β1AR specifically in ghrelin-expressing cells, ghrelin secretion was markedly blunted, resulting in profound hypoglycemia and prevalent mortality upon severe caloric restriction. Replacement of ghrelin blocked the effects of caloric restriction in β1AR-deficient mice. We also determined that treating calorically restricted juvenile WT mice with beta blockers led to reduced plasma ghrelin and hypoglycemia, the latter of which is similar to the life-threatening, fasting-induced hypoglycemia observed in infants treated with beta blockers. These findings highlight the critical functions of ghrelin in preventing hypoglycemia and promoting survival during severe caloric restriction and the requirement for ghrelin cell-expressed β1ARs in these processes. Moreover, these results indicate a potential role for ghrelin in mediating beta blocker-associated hypoglycemia in susceptible individuals, such as young children.

  20. Outcome of endovascular treatment in symptomatic intracranial vascular stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suh, Dae Chul; Kim, Sang Joon; Lee, Duk Hee; Kim, Won; Choi, Choong Gon; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Kwon, Sun Uck; Kim, Jong Sung; Kim, Hyun Jeong

    2005-01-01

    The outcome evaluation for the revascularization of intracranial vascular stenoses has not been fully described due to the highly technical nature of the procedure. We report here on the early and late clinical outcome of angioplasty and/or stenting of symptomatic severe intracranial vascular stenoses at a single institute. Since 1995, we have treated 35 patients with symptomatic intracranial vascular stenosis (more than 70% stenosis, mean stenosis: 78.6% ± 6.2%). Angioplasty (n = 19) was performed for the horizontal segment of the middle cerebral artery (M1) (n = 16) and the basilar artery (BA) (n = 1), the intradural vertebral artery (VA) (n = 1), and the cavernous internal carotid artery (ICA) (n = 1). Stenting (n = 16) was performed for the cavernous or petrous ICAs (n = 9), the intradural VA (n = 3), BA (n = 2), and M1 (n = 2) artery. We assessed the angiographic success (defined as residual stenosis < 50%) rate, the periprocedural complications during the 30-day periprocedural period, the symptomatic recurrence and restenosis during a mean 22-month follow-up (FU) period. The Kaplan-Meier estimate of the cumulative even-free rate of the major cerebrovascular events, i.e. death, stroke or restenosis, was also done. Angiographic success was achieved in 97% of our patients (34/35). There were four procedure-related complications (11%) including a death and a minor stroke. During the mean 22-month FU, the asymptomatic restenosis rate was 9% and the symptomatic restenosis rate was 6% in the target lesion and 9% in all the vascular territories. The Kaplan-Meier estimate was 70.6% (95% confidence interval = 46.5-94.7) after 33 month of FU. In addition to a high angiographic success rate and an acceptable periprocedural complication rate, intracranial angioplasty and/or stenting revealed a relatively low symptomatic recurrence rate. Hemorrhage is a rare, but the physician must aware that potentially fatal periprocedural complications can occur

  1. Diabetes Management and Hypoglycemia in Safety Sensitive Jobs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    See-Muah Lee

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The majority of people diagnosed with diabetes mellitus are in the working age group in developing countries. The interrelationship of diabetes and work, that is, diabetes affecting work and work affecting diabetes, becomes an important issue for these people. Therapeutic options for the diabetic worker have been developed, and currently include various insulins, insulin sensitizers and secretagogues, incretin mimetics and enhancers, and alpha glucosidase inhibitors. Hypoglycemia and hypoglycaemic unawareness are important and unwanted treatment side effects. The risk they pose with respect to cognitive impairment can have safety implications. The understanding of the therapeutic options in the management of diabetic workers, blood glucose awareness training, and self-monitoring blood glucose will help to mitigate this risk. Employment decisions must also take into account the extent to which the jobs performed by the worker are safety sensitive. A risk assessment matrix, based on the extent to which a job is considered safety sensitive and based on the severity of the hypoglycaemia, may assist in determining one's fitness to work. Support at the workplace, such as a provision of healthy food options and arrangements for affected workers will be helpful for such workers. Arrangements include permission to carry and consume emergency sugar, flexible meal times, self-monitoring blood glucose when required, storage/disposal facilities for medicine such as insulin and needles, time off for medical appointments, and structured self-help rogams.

  2. The effect of ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and ‘Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus’ (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. Results This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. Conclusions This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on

  3. The effect of 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' infection on the proteomic profiles and nutritional status of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic grapefruit (Citrus paradisi) plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nwugo, Chika C; Lin, Hong; Duan, Yongping; Civerolo, Edwin L

    2013-04-11

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is a highly destructive citrus disease which threatens citrus production worldwide and 'Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus' (Las), a non-culturable phloem-limited bacterium, is an associated causal agent of the disease. To better understand the physiological and molecular processes involved in host responses to Las, 2-DE and mass spectrometry analyses, as well as ICP spectroscopy analysis were employed to elucidate the global protein expression profiles and nutrient concentrations in leaves of Las-infected grapefruit plants at pre-symptomatic or symptomatic stages for HLB. This study identified 123 protein spots out of 191 spots that showed significant changes in the leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection and all identified spots matched to 69 unique proteins/peptides. A down-regulation of 56 proteins including those associated with photosynthesis, protein synthesis, and metabolism was correlated with significant reductions in the concentrations of Ca, Mg, Fe, Zn, Mn, and Cu in leaves of grapefruit plants in response to Las infection, particularly in symptomatic plants. Oxygen-evolving enhancer (OEE) proteins, a PSI 9 kDa protein, and a Btf3-like protein were among a small group of proteins that were down-regulated in both pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants in response to Las infection. Furthermore, a Las-mediated up-regulation of 13 grapefruit proteins was detected, which included Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase, chitinases, lectin-related proteins, miraculin-like proteins, peroxiredoxins and a CAP 160 protein. Interestingly, a Las-mediated up-regulation of granule-bound starch synthase was correlated with an increase in the K concentrations of pre-symptomatic and symptomatic plants. This study constitutes the first attempt to characterize the interrelationships between protein expression and nutritional status of Las-infected pre-symptomatic or symptomatic grapefruit plants and sheds light on the physiological and molecular

  4. Symptomatic pericardial cyst: a case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najib, Mohammad Q; Chaliki, Hari P; Raizada, Amol; Ganji, Jhansi L; Panse, Prasad M; Click, Roger L

    2011-11-01

    Pericardial cysts are most commonly located at the cardiophrenic angle or, rarely, in the posterior or anterior superior mediastinum. The majority of pericardial cysts are asymptomatic and are found incidentally. Symptomatic pericardial cysts present with dyspnoea, chest pain, or persistent cough. We describe four patients with symptomatic pericardial cysts who were treated with either echocardiographically guided percutaneous aspiration or video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery, or both; thoracotomy; or conservative therapy.

  5. Critical role for GLP-1 in symptomatic post-bariatric hypoglycaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craig, Colleen M; Liu, Li-Fen; Deacon, Carolyn F

    2017-01-01

    AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: Post-bariatric hypoglycaemia (PBH) is a rare, but severe, metabolic disorder arising months to years after bariatric surgery. It is characterised by symptomatic postprandial hypoglycaemia, with inappropriately elevated insulin concentrations. The relative contribution...

  6. Severe Hypoglycemia Following Acute Aluminum Phosphide (Rice Tablet Poisoning; A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omid Mehrpour

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Aluminum phosphide (AlP as 3 g tablet is widely used in Iran to protect stored food grains from pests. Hyperglycemia following its ingestion has been already reported in the recent years but severe hypoglycemia is uncommon. Here, we report a 19 year old male who attempted suicide with one tablet of AlP and demonstrated severe hypoglycemia. Despite restoration of blood glucose concentration to normal, he failed to respond to supportive treatment and died. The possible mechanisms leading to severe hypoglycemia are discussed. Though severe hypoglycemia is rare following AlP poisoning, physicians managing such patients should be aware of it.

  7. Severe hypoglycemia following acute aluminum phosphide (rice tablet) poisoning; a case report and review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrpour, Omid; Aghabiklooei, Abbas; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Singh, Surjit

    2012-01-01

    Aluminum phosphide (AlP) as 3 g tablet is widely used in Iran to protect stored food grains from pests. Hyperglycemia following its ingestion has been already reported in the recent years but severe hypoglycemia is uncommon. Here, we report a 19 year old male who attempted suicide with one tablet of AlP and demonstrated severe hypoglycemia. Despite restoration of blood glucose concentration to normal, he failed to respond to supportive treatment and died. The possible mechanisms leading to severe hypoglycemia are discussed. Though severe hypoglycemia is rare following AlP poisoning, physicians managing such patients should be aware of it.

  8. Diagnostic challenges of symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremon, Cesare; Bellacosa, Lara; Barbaro, Maria R; Cogliandro, Rosanna F; Stanghellini, Vincenzo; Barbara, Giovanni

    2017-06-01

    Colonic diverticulosis is a common condition in Western industrialized countries occurring in up to 65% of people over the age of 60 years. Only a minority of these subjects (about 10-25%) experience symptoms, fulfilling Rome III Diagnostic Criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) diagnosis (IBS-like symptoms) in 10% to 66% of cases. Symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease (SUDD) is a syndrome characterized by recurrent abdominal symptoms attributed to diverticula in the absence of macroscopically evident alterations other than the presence of diverticula. Due to the different peak of incidence, the overlap between SUDD and IBS is predominantly present in middle-aged or older patients. In these cases, it is very complex to establish if the symptoms are related to the presence of diverticula or due to an overlapping IBS. In fact, the link between gastrointestinal symptoms and diverticula is unclear, and the mechanism by which diverticula may induce the development of IBS-like symptoms remains to be elucidated. Currently, the etiology and pathophysiology of SUDD, particularly when IBS-like symptoms are present, are not completely understood, and thus these two entities remain a diagnostic challenge not only for the general practitioner but also for the gastroenterologist. Although many issues remain open and unresolved, some minimize the importance of a distinction of these two entities as dietary and pharmacological management may be largely overlapping.

  9. Acute symptomatic hyponatremia in a flight attendant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madero, Magdalena; Monares, Enrique; Domínguez, Aurelio Méndez; Ayus, Juan Carlos

    2015-08-01

    Acute symptomatic hyponatremia after thiazide diuretic initiation is a medical emergency. Here we describe the case of a flight attendant who developed acute hyponatremia during a flight and the potential risk factors for developing this condition. A 57-year-old flight attendant with history of essential hypertension was recently started on a thiazide diuretic. As she did routinely when working, she increased her water intake during a flight from London to Mexico City. She complained of nausea and headache during the flight. Upon arrival, she developed severe disorientation and presented to the hospital emergency room (ER) with a Glasgow scale of 12, hypoxia, and a generalized tonic clonic seizure. Her laboratory results on arrival were consistent with severe hyponatremia (serum Na 116 mEql/L) and severe cerebral edema by CT scan. She was treated with hypertonic saline, with complete resolution of the neurologic symptoms. We describe high water intake and hypoxia related to decreased partial pressure of oxygen in the cabin as the two main risk factors for thiazide-induced acute hyponatremia in this case.

  10. Symptomatic colonic polyps in childhood: not so benign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffenberg, E J; Sauaia, A; Maltzman, T; Knoll, K; Ahnen, D J

    1999-02-01

    The clinical spectrum of symptomatic polyps and the frequency of familial polyposis is not well defined in children. In the present study, a series of children with juvenile polyposis coli (JPC) and non-JPC polyps were studied. Children with symptomatic colonic polyps and negative family history of polyps were ascertained by review of endoscopic records. Juvenile polyposis coli was defined as 10 or more juvenile polyps or any juvenile polyp in a relative of an index case of JPC. Polyps were tested for Ki-ras mutations, p53 overexpression, and aneuploidy. Seventy-eight children (age range, 0.4-18 years) were identified, all evaluated for lower gastrointestinal bleeding. Nine (12%) had JPC, 66 (84%) had isolated juvenile polyps, and 3 (4%) had other types of polyps. The JPC and non-JPC groups were similar in age (p = 0.4) and symptom duration (p = 0.3). The JPC group had more polyps (p = 0.0001), and greater likelihood of anemia (p = 0.01), polyps with adenomatous change (p = 0.03), and right-colon polyps (p = 0.001). In three of eight JPC families, polyps were identified in asymptomatic first-degree relatives. No abnormalities in Ki-ras, p53, or aneuploidy were identified. Juvenile polyposis coli is common in children with symptomatic polyps, and is associated with anemia, right-colon polyps, and adenomas. The risk of polyps and of colorectal cancer in relatives of persons with JPC requires further study.

  11. Identification of risk factors for suffering fear of hypoglycemia in type 1 Diabetes Mellitus patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anarte, María Teresa; Carreira, Mónica; Machado, Alberto; Domínguez, Marta; Tapia, María José; Valdés, Sergio; Ruiz de Adana, María Soledad; Soriguer, Federico

    2014-12-01

    Hypoglycemia is one of the main burdens for type I Diabetes Mellitus (DM I) patients. The consequences of hypoglycemia can be quite unpleasant due to the variety of disagreeable physical and psychological symptoms it triggers. The patient's previous experience with hypoglycemia episodes will condition his psychological reaction to future episodes, promoting behavioral modifications that associate with poor glycemic control and worse prognosis, and even with developing psychological disorders, leading to fear of hypoglycemia (FH). To be able to provide tailored prevention and treatment of patients with FH it is necessary to identify the risk factors in DM I patients. We developed and validated the FH-15 scale, a novel instrument to assess FH, which showed good concurrent and predictive validity in DM I patients. In this work we aim to identify the risk factors for suffering FH by detecting DM I patients with FH using the FH-15 scale and then analyzing the association of clinical and sociodemographic variables. We found that age, needing help to resolve an episode of hypoglycemia, and a perceived lack of social support are risk factors for suffering FH. © 2014 Scandinavian Psychological Associations and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Post-Gastric Bypass Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia: Fructose is a Carbohydrate Which Can Be Safely Consumed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bantle, Anne E; Wang, Qi; Bantle, John P

    2015-08-01

    Postprandial hypoglycemia after gastric bypass surgery is a serious problem. Available treatments are often ineffective. The objective was to test the hypotheses that injection of rapid-acting insulin before a high-carbohydrate meal or replacement of other carbohydrates with fructose in the meal would prevent hypoglycemia. This was a randomized, crossover trial comparing a high-carbohydrate meal with premeal saline injection (control), a high-carbohydrate meal with premeal insulin injection, and a high-fructose meal with total carbohydrate content similar to the control meal. The setting was an academic medical center. Ten patients with post-gastric bypass hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia participated. Interventions included lispro insulin injected before test meals and replacement of other carbohydrates with fructose in test meals. The main outcome measure was plasma glucose meals. After the control meal, mean peak glucose and insulin were 173 ± 47 mg/dL and 134 ± 55 mU/L, respectively; mean glucose nadir was 44 ± 15 mg/dL; and eight of 10 subjects demonstrated glucose meal, mean peak postprandial glucose and insulin were 117 ± 20 mg/dL and 45 ± 31 mU/L, respectively (both P meal sweetened with fructose with little risk of hypoglycemia. Treatment with rapid-acting insulin before a carbohydrate-containing meal did not prevent hypoglycemia.

  13. Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia after Bariatric Surgery: Diagnosis and Management Experience from a Spanish Multicenter Registry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Vilarrasa

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Severe postprandial hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery is a rare but invalidating complication. Our aim was to describe the different tests performed for its diagnosis and their outcomes as well as the response to the prescribed pharmacological and surgical treatments. Methods: Multicenter, retrospective systematic review of cases with recurrent severe postprandial hypoglycemia. Results: Over 11 years of follow-up, 22 patients were identified. The test most used to provoke hypoglycemia was the oral glucose load test followed by the mixed meal test which was the least standardized test. With pharmacological treatment, 3 patients were symptom-free (with octreotide and in 12 patients hypoglycemic episodes were attenuated. Seven patients had persistent hypoglycemic episodes and underwent surgery. Partial pancreatectomy was performed in 3 patients who had positive selective arterial calcium stimulation, and nesidioblastosis was confirmed in 2 patients. Reconversion to normal anatomy was performed in 3 patients, and 1 patient underwent a resection of the ‘candy cane' roux limb, with resolution of hypoglycemia in all cases. Conclusions: There is high heterogeneity in the evaluation and treatment options for postoperative hypoglycemia. In patients that do not respond to pharmacological treatment, reconstruction of gastrojejunal continuity may be the safest and most successful procedure.

  14. β-Receptor-mediated increase in cerebral blood flow during hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollinger, B.R.; Bryan, R.M.

    1987-01-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that β-adrenergic receptor stimulation is involved with the increase in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) during hypoglycemia. Rats were surgically prepared with the use of halothane-nitrous oxide anesthesia. A plaster restraining cast was placed around the hindquarters, and anesthesia was discontinued. Hypoglycemia was produced by an intravenous injection of insulin; normoglycemic control rates were given saline. Propranolol was administered to some control and some hypoglycemic rats to block the β-adrenergic receptors. Regional CBF was measured using 4-[N-methyl- 14 C]iodoantipyrine. Regional CBF increased during hypoglycemia in rats that were not treated with propranolol. The increase varied from ∼60 to 200% depending on the brain region. During hypoglycemia, propranolol abolished the increase in rCBF in the hypothalamus, cerebellum, and pyramidal tract. In other regions the increase in rCBF was only 33-65% of the increase in hypoglycemic rats that were not treated with propranolol. They conclude that β-receptor stimulation plays a major role in the increase in rCBF during hypoglycemia

  15. Brain Glycogen Decreases During Intense Exercise Without Hypoglycemia: The Possible Involvement of Serotonin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Takashi; Soya, Shingo; Kawanaka, Kentaro; Soya, Hideaki

    2015-07-01

    Brain glycogen stored in astrocytes, a source of lactate as a neuronal energy source, decreases during prolonged exercise with hypoglycemia. However, brain glycogen dynamics during exercise without hypoglycemia remain unknown. Since intense exercise increases brain noradrenaline and serotonin as known inducers for brain glycogenolysis, we hypothesized that brain glycogen decreases with intense exercise not accompanied by hypoglycemia. To test this hypothesis, we employed a well-established acute intense exercise model of swimming in rats. Rats swam for fourteen 20 s bouts with a weight equal to 8 % of their body mass and were sacrificed using high-power (10 kW) microwave irradiation to inactivate brain enzymes for accurate detection of brain glycogen and monoamines. Intense exercise did not alter blood glucose, but did increase blood lactate levels. Immediately after exercise, brain glycogen decreased and brain lactate increased in the hippocampus, cerebellum, cortex, and brainstem. Simultaneously, serotonin turnover in the hippocampus and brainstem mutually increased and were associated with decreased brain glycogen. Intense swimming exercise that does not induce hypoglycemia decreases brain glycogen associated with increased brain lactate, implying an importance of glycogen in brain energetics during intense exercise even without hypoglycemia. Activated serotonergic regulation is a possible underlying mechanism for intense exercise-induced glycogenolysis at least in the hippocampus and brainstem.

  16. Lack of remorse in antisocial personality disorder: sociodemographic correlates, symptomatic presentation, and comorbidity with Axis I and Axis II disorders in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Risë B; Grant, Bridget F; Huang, Boji; Smith, Sharon M; Stinson, Frederick S; Dawson, Deborah A; Chou, S Patricia

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare sociodemographic and family history correlates, symptomatic presentation, and comorbidity with Axis I and Axis II disorders, in an epidemiologic sample of adults with DSM-IV antisocial personality disorder (ASPD) who lacked, vs those who did not lack, remorse. This study is based on a nationally representative sample of adults. Lifetime prevalences of each ASPD diagnostic criterion and each comorbid mood, anxiety, substance use, and personality disorder were estimated. Logistic regression was used to examine associations of lack of remorse with ASPD symptom patterns and comorbid disorders. Diagnoses were made using the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism Alcohol Use Disorder and Associated Disabilities Interview Schedule-DSM-IV Version. Among the 1422 respondents with ASPD, 728 (51%) lacked remorse. Respondents who lacked remorse were younger and more often reported a family history of drug problems than those who did not. More often than remorse-positive respondents, those who were remorse-negative met diagnostic criteria involving violence against persons and less often met criteria involving offenses against property. Remorse was not associated with cruelty to animals, nor with most nonviolent antisocial behaviors. Remorse-negative respondents endorsed more total lifetime violent behaviors than those who were remorse-positive. Lack of remorse was not associated with any lifetime comorbid Axis I or Axis II disorder. Patterns of findings were generally similar between men and women. Lack of remorse appears to identify at best a modestly more symptomatically severe and violent form of ASPD in nonclinical populations.

  17. Rasagiline-induced severe recurrent hypoglycemia in a young woman without diabetes: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Fawzi A Bachet; Rashid, Fauzia; Hussain, Azza A Bin; Alawadi, Fatheya; Bashier, A

    2017-02-02

    We report a case of a patient with recurrent severe hypoglycemia after initiating the drug rasagiline (Azilect) for Parkinson disease. A 25-year-old Emirati woman who had been diagnosed with Parkinson disease due to a genetic mutation since the age of 18 years presented to our hospital. She had been treated with a rotigotine patch 2 mg per day along with carbidopa + levodopa + entacapone 25 mg/100 mg/200 mg (Stalevo) over these years. Recently, her Stalevo had been changed to rasagiline (a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor). Soon after this change, she started experiencing recurrent documented severe hypoglycemia requiring hospitalization. Her hypoglycemic symptoms completely disappeared after 5-7 days of drug withdrawal. Despite detailed evaluation, no other causal relationship was documented except for rasagiline. To the best of our knowledge, this case report documents an unknown association between rasagiline and hypoglycemia.

  18. Hypoglycemia Alert Dogs: A Novel, Cost-effective Approach for Diabetes Monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Cervellin, Gianfranco; Dondi, Maurizio; Targher, Giovanni

    2016-11-01

    The recent publication of the results of 3 small trials, and as many as 5 case reports on dogs producing clear and intelligible alerts in the presence of their owners' hypoglycemia, opens an intriguing clinical scenario for management of diabetes. The skill seems attributable to the ability of dogs to identify patterns in skin and breath odors as well as to understand and interpret visual cues from humans during hypoglycemia. Provided that further trials can confirm the findings, the use of diabetes alert dogs that are trained to detect the onset of hypoglycemia can be regarded as a fast, versatile, reliable, and cost-effective approach for safeguarding the health of individuals with diabetes.

  19. Prevalence of nocturnal hypoglycemia in first trimester of pregnancy in patients with insulin treated diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellmuth, Ellinor Adelheid; Damm, P; Mølsted-Pedersen, L

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Excellent metabolic control before conception and during diabetic pregnancies is the aim in order to avoid malformations and perinatal morbidity. Since an inverse correlation between median blood glucose concentration (BG) and hypoglycemia as well as a high prevalence of nocturnal...... hypoglycemia have been described, we investigated the frequency of nocturnal hypoglycemia and the predictive value of bedtime blood glucose concentration for development of this condition in insulin treated diabetic patients. METHODS: During hospitalization, with no other changes in the patients' normal...... the night, caused by either discomfort or cannula problems. Of the remaining 43 patients, 16 (37%) had at least one blood glucose prevalence at 05 h. Only one patient felt hypoglycemic during the night. Hemoglobin A1c was similar...

  20. Changes of cognition and regional cerebral activity during acute hypoglycemia in normal subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie-Olsen, Lise G; Kjaer, Troels W; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik

    2009-01-01

    counterregulatory response. During the low cognitive load, rCBF decreased in response to hypoglycemia in a large bilateral area in the posterior part of the temporal lobe, and rCBF increased bilaterally in the anterior cingulate gyrus, the right frontal gyrus, the fusiform gyrus, thalamus, and the left inferior...... part of the frontal gyrus. During the high cognitive load, rCBF decreased bilaterally in a large region in the posterior part of the temporal gyrus and increased in the left and right anterior cingulate gyrus, left and right frontal gyrus, right parahippocampal and lingual gyrus, and left superior...... temporal gyrus. Visual impairment during hypoglycemia was associated with deactivation in the ventral visual stream. The anterior cingulate gyrus was activated during hypoglycemia in a load-dependent manner. Areas on the frontal convexity were differentially activated in response to the cognitive load...

  1. Real-time detection of nocturnal hypoglycemic episodes using a novel non-invasive hypoglycemia monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung T; Ghevondian, Nejhdeh; Jones, Timothy W

    2009-01-01

    Hypoglycemia or low blood glucose is a common and serious side effect of insulin therapy in patients with diabetes. Hypoglycemia is unpleasant and can result in unconsciousness, seizures and even death. HypoMon is a realtime non-invasive monitor that measures relevant physiological parameters continuously to provide detection of hypoglycemic episodes in Type 1 diabetes mellitus patients (T1DM). Based on heart rate and corrected QT interval of the ECG signal, we have continued to develop effective algorithms for early detection of nocturnal hypoglycemia. From a clinical study of 24 children with T1DM, associated with natural occurrence of hypoglycemic episodes at night, their heart rates increased (1.021+/-0.264 vs. 1.068+/-0.314, PBayesian neural network which was derived from the training set with the highest log evidence, the estimated blood glucose profiles produced a significant correlation (P<0.02) against measured values in the test set.

  2. Effect of bilateral carotid body resection on cardiac baroreflex control of blood pressure during hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limberg, Jacqueline K; Taylor, Jennifer L; Mozer, Michael T; Dube, Simmi; Basu, Ananda; Basu, Rita; Rizza, Robert A; Curry, Timothy B; Joyner, Michael J; Wehrwein, Erica A

    2015-06-01

    Hypoglycemia results in a reduction in cardiac baroreflex sensitivity and a shift in the baroreflex working range to higher heart rates. This effect is mediated, in part, by the carotid chemoreceptors. Therefore, we hypothesized hypoglycemia-mediated changes in baroreflex control of heart rate would be blunted in carotid body-resected patients when compared with healthy controls. Five patients with bilateral carotid body resection for glomus tumors and 10 healthy controls completed a 180-minute hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic (≈3.3 mmol/L) clamp. Changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and spontaneous cardiac baroreflex sensitivity were assessed. Baseline baroreflex sensitivity was not different between groups (P>0.05). Hypoglycemia resulted in a reduction in baroreflex sensitivity in both the groups (main effect of time, P<0.01) and responses were lower in resected patients when compared with controls (main effect of group, P<0.05). Hypoglycemia resulted in large reductions in systolic (-17±7 mm Hg) and mean (-14±5 mm Hg) blood pressure in resected patients that were not observed in controls (interaction of group and time, P<0.05). Despite lower blood pressures, increases in heart rate with hypoglycemia were blunted in resected patients (interaction of group and time, P<0.01). Major novel findings from this study demonstrate that intact carotid chemoreceptors are essential for increasing heart rate and maintaining arterial blood pressure during hypoglycemia in humans. These data support a contribution of the carotid chemoreceptors to blood pressure control and highlight the potential widespread effects of carotid body resection in humans. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  3. Hypoglycemia: a review of definitions used in clinical trials evaluating antihyperglycemic drugs for diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balijepalli C

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Chakrapani Balijepalli,1,2 Eric Druyts,2 Gaye Siliman,2 Michel Joffres,1 Kristian Thorlund,2,3 Edward J Mills3 1Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, 2Precision Health Economics, Vancouver, BC, 3Department of Health Research Methods, Evidence, and Impact, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada Objective: To understand the severity and potential impact of heterogeneity in definitions of hypoglycemia used in diabetes research, we aimed to review the hypoglycemia definitions adopted in randomized controlled trials (RCTs.Methods: We reviewed 109 RCTs included in the Canadian Agency for Drugs and Technologies in Health reports for the second- and third-line therapy for the patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D.Results: Nearly 60% (n=66 of the studies reviewed presented the definitions for overall hypoglycemia, and another 20% (n=22 of the studies reported the results for hypoglycemia but did not report a definition. Among these 66 studies, only 9 (14% followed the American Diabetes Association/European Medicines Agency specified guidelines to define hypoglycemia, with an exact threshold of plasma glucose ≤3.9 mmol/L. Fifty-two of the 66 studies (79% used a threshold considerably lower than the recommended ≤3.9 mmol/L, and 16 studies used a threshold between 3.8 and 4.0 mmol/L. The proportion of the trials that used a cutoff value of <3.1 mmol/L appeared to be slightly similar among the more commonly used non-insulin treatments, GLP-1s (7 of 18 [39%], thiazolidinediones (TZDs; 6 of 11 [55%], DPP-4s (12 of 19 [64%], and sulfonylureas (11 of 20 [55%]. Among trials with intermediate-long-acting insulins (neutral protamine Hagedorn insulin, detemir, glargine, 7 of 26 trials (27% used a cutoff of <3.1 mmol/L. The definition of severe hypoglycemia was also subject to substantial heterogeneity, in both the utilized threshold and accompanying soft definitions.Conclusion: This review demonstrates

  4. Sensor-Augmented Insulin Pumps and Hypoglycemia Prevention in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steineck, Isabelle; Ranjan, Ajenthen; Nørgaard, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    prevention. We present evidence from randomized trials, observational studies, and meta-analyses including nonpregnant individuals with type 1 diabetes mellitus. We also outline concerns regarding SAPs with and without automated insulin suspension. There is evidence that SAP treatment reduces episodes......Hypoglycemia can lead to seizures, unconsciousness, or death. Insulin pump treatment reduces the frequency of severe hypoglycemia compared with multiple daily injections treatment. The addition of a continuous glucose monitor, so-called sensor-augmented pump (SAP) treatment, has the potential...

  5. Gcg-XTEN: an improved glucagon capable of preventing hypoglycemia without increasing baseline blood glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan C Geething

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available While the majority of current diabetes treatments focus on reducing blood glucose levels, hypoglycemia represents a significant risk associated with insulin treatment. Glucagon plays a major regulatory role in controlling hypoglycemia in vivo, but its short half-life and hyperglycemic effects prevent its therapeutic use for non-acute applications. The goal of this study was to identify a modified form of glucagon suitable for prophylactic treatment of hypoglycemia without increasing baseline blood glucose levels.Through application of the XTEN technology, we report the construction of a glucagon fusion protein with an extended exposure profile (Gcg-XTEN. The in vivo half-life of the construct was tuned to support nightly dosing through design and testing in cynomolgus monkeys. Efficacy of the construct was assessed in beagle dogs using an insulin challenge to induce hypoglycemia. Dose ranging of Gcg-XTEN in fasted beagle dogs demonstrated that the compound was biologically active with a pharmacodynamic profile consistent with the designed half-life. Prophylactic administration of 0.6 nmol/kg Gcg-XTEN to dogs conferred resistance to a hypoglycemic challenge at 6 hours post-dose without affecting baseline blood glucose levels. Consistent with the designed pharmacokinetic profile, hypoglycemia resistance was not observed at 12 hours post-dose. Importantly, the solubility and stability of the glucagon peptide were also significantly improved by fusion to XTEN.The data show that Gcg-XTEN is effective in preventing hypoglycemia without the associated hyperglycemia expected for unmodified glucagon. While the plasma clearance of this Gcg-XTEN has been optimized for overnight dosing, specifically for the treatment of nocturnal hypoglycemia, constructs with significantly longer exposure profiles are feasible. Such constructs may have multiple applications such as allowing for more aggressive insulin treatment regimens, treating hypoglycemia due to insulin

  6. Symptomatic adjacent segment pathology after posterior lumbar interbody fusion for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaura, Hironobu; Yamashita, Tomoya; Miwa, Toshitada; Ohzono, Kenji; Ohwada, Tetsuo

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment pathology (ASP) after fusion surgery for adult low-grade isthmic spondylolisthesis (IS) has been reported to be relatively low compared with other lumbar disease entities. However, there has been no study of symptomatic ASP incidence using posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) with pedicle screw instrumentation. We investigated the incidence of symptomatic ASP after PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation for adult low-grade IS and identified significant risk factors for symptomatic ASP. We retrospectively studied records of 40 consecutive patients who underwent PLIF with pedicle screw instrumentation at the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Kansai Rosai Hospital, Amagasaki, Japan. The patients were followed for ≥ 4 years. Patients' medical records were retrospectively examined for evidence of symptomatic ASP. Age at time of surgery, sex, fusion level, whole lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, preexisting laminar inclination angle, and facet tropism at the cranial fusion segment were analyzed to identify risk factors for symptomatic ASP. Four patients (ASP group) developed symptomatic ASP at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion. There were no significant differences in age, sex, fusion level, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, or facet tropism at the cranial segment adjacent to the fusion between the ASP and the non-ASP groups. In contrast, laminar inclination angle at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was significantly higher in the ASP group than in the non-ASP group. Four patients (10%) developed symptomatic ASP after PLIF with transpedicular fixation for adult low-grade IS. Preexisting laminar horizontalization at the cranial vertebra adjacent to the fusion was a significant risk factor for symptomatic ASP.

  7. [Symptomatic remission and its relationship to social functioning in Tunisian out-patients with schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Gharbi, I; Chhoumi, M; Mechri, A

    2017-11-28

    (SOFAS) and the Social Autonomy Scale (SAS) exploring personal care, management of daily life, resource management, the relationship with the outside and the emotional life and relationships social. A multivariate analysis using a binary logistic regression was conducted with as a dependent variable "symptomatic remission" and as explanatory variables the associated variables with symptomatic remission in bivariate analysis with age and gender. The symptomatic remission was observed in 50.4% of patients. The items corresponding to positive dimension (P1, P3 and G9) and the item P2 "conceptual disorganization" had a better predictive value of symptomatic remission. After multivariate analysis, the associated factors of symptomatic remission were the acute of onset (P=0.026), the low score of negative symptoms during the last hospitalization (P=0.017) and the episodic course (P<0.0001). However, age or gender of the patients, educational or socioeconomic level, psychiatric family history, age of onset, duration of untreated psychosis, number and duration of previous hospitalizations, antipsychotic treatment dosage were not associated with symptomatic remission in our sample. The mean score of the SOFAS was 48.47±14.44, and the mean score of the SAS was 56.6±16.84. A significant association was shown between the SOFAS score and the symptomatic remission (P<0.0001) and between the SAS score and the symptomatic remission (P<0.0001). Moreover, a significant association was found between symptomatic remission and occupational activity (P=0.03). The frequency of symptomatic remission according the PANSS criteria in our sample is above the average of the reported rates in literature (30 to 60%). This can be explained by the frequency of symptomatic remission in outpatient versus inpatients, or in relation to the notion of a more favorable course of schizophrenia in developing countries, although this notion is controversial. Remitter patients had significantly

  8. Wingspan stent for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Xinbin; Zhang Jianning; Li Xudong; Huang Ying; Fan Yimu

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of Wingspan stent for patients with symptomatic M1 stenosis of middle cerebral artery (MCA). Methods: Thirty-two cases with recurrent symptomatic MCA stenosis resistant to medical therapy treated by self-expanding stent were reviewed retrospectively [average (49 ± 19) years old, 13 women]. All patients underwent angioplasty and stenting with the Gateway balloon-Wingspan stent system. After 6 months, all patients were followed up by telephone or clinic, and advised followed up with DSA or TCD. Results: Thirty-two patients were successfully stented during the first treatment session. The mean degree of stenosis reduced from (76.5 ± 15.4)% to (19.3 ± 9.2)%. The number of complicating subarachnoid hemorrhage was one, and occlusion occurred on one patients related to balloon angioplasty. During a follow-up of 6 months, there was no recurrence of transient ischemic attack or stroke in 32 available patients. Cerebral hemodynamics using transcranial Doppler monitoring were normal in 19 follow-up patients. Six-month angiographic follow-up was obtained in 5 patients, demonstrating good patency in 5 stenting vessels. The other patients refused to perform TCD or DSA. Conclusions: Wingspan stent for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery appears to be a safe and feasible under strict control of periperformeral project. However further study is needed to evaluate the long-term effect. (authors)

  9. The effect of training on responses of beta-endorphin and other pituitary hormones to insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikines, K J; Kjær, Michael; Hagen, C

    1985-01-01

    We studied whether the previously reported intensified beta-endorphin response to exercise after training might result from a training-induced general increase in anterior pituitary secretory capacity. Identical hypoglycemia was induced by insulin infusion in 7 untrained (VO2max 49 +/- 4 ml X (kg X...... min)-1, mean and SE) and 8 physically trained (VO2max 65 +/- 4 ml X (kg X min)-1) subjects. In response to hypoglycemia, levels of beta-endorphin and prolactin immunoreactivity in serum increased similarly in trained (from 41 +/- 2 pg X ml-1 and 6 +/- 1 pg X ml-1 before hypoglycemia to 103 +/- 11 pg X...... to hypoglycemia neither in trained nor in untrained subjects. Finally, differences in beta-endorphin responses to exercise between trained and untrained subjects cannot be ascribed to differences in responsiveness to hypoglycemia....

  10. A social media intervention to improve hypoglycemia management at a multicenter hospital: a quality improvement pilot for clinical nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Sousa, Filomena; Jackson, Jennifer; Knight, Ruth; Cloutier, Edith; Basa, Rosemary; Fourney, Anne; Devecseri, Kathleen

    2018-02-01

    Hypoglycemia poses significant risk to inpatients. Nursing management of hypoglycemia is a challenge, despite established best practice guidelines. Social media is an effective tool for sharing information and could overcome barriers to clinical education at a multicenter hospital. The purpose of this quality improvement intervention was to create and disseminate social media posts about best practices in hypoglycemia management. An unmatched pre-and post-survey assessed nursing knowledge of hypoglycemia management. Social media posts were created to visually outline the steps for hypoglycemia management over 2 weeks, across a nursing social media platform. We assessed the reach of the posts via Facebook and a survey. The posts reached 2962 users during the first week, and 1491 users the second week. A social media intervention can have a substantial reach and distribute information across a multicenter hospital. Additional study is needed to determine what factors could support an increase in nursing knowledge through a social media campaign.

  11. Effects of Alcohol on Plasma Glucose and Prevention of Alcohol-induced Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes - A Systematic Review with GRADE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tetzschner, R; Nørgaard, K; Ranjan, A

    2018-01-01

    on their suggested prevention strategies. RESULTS: We included 13 studies. Eight studies reported that ethanol, regardless of administration intravenously or orally, were associated with an increased risk of hypoglycemia due to decrease in plasma glucose, impaired counter-regulatory response, awareness...... of hypoglycemia and cognitive function. Five studies did not report an increased risk of hypoglycemia. None of the studies investigated prevention strategies for ethanol-induced hypoglycemia. Recommendations from 13 diabetes associations were included. All associations recommend combining ethanol with food intake...

  12. Surgically Treated Symptomatic Prolapsed Lumbar and Sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The intention of this study is to share the experience of the author in the occurrence, possible causative factors, and treatment of surgically symptomatic prolapsed lumbar and sacral intervertebral discs in females, and to compare this experience in Switzerland, Nigeria, and Jamaica using surgery records for a period of over ...

  13. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed I Hussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  14. Prevalence of Cyclospora cayetanensis among symptomatic and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Microsporidia, Giardia lamblia and Hymenolepis nana were also detected in the symptomatic group. There was no significant difference as regards age and residency of Cyclospora positive and negative cases in both groups. In asymptomatic group, Cyclospora infected cases were males while in negative cases, 50% were ...

  15. Prevalence and incidence of symmetrical symptomatic peripheral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Symptomatic symmetrical peripheral neuropathy (SSPN) is common in patients with HIV infection. It is also a common adverse event associated with both tuberculosis (TB) treatment and antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly stavudine. While tenofovir is the one of recommended first-line nucleotide reverse ...

  16. Constipation, diarrhea, and symptomatic hemorrhoids during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wald, Arnold

    2003-03-01

    Constipation, diarrhea, and symptomatic hemorrhoids are disorders common in the general population, particularly in women. These conditions, if mild, often are self-treated with various home remedies or nonprescription preparations. Few of these patients, moreover, are referred to gastroenterologists, as primary care providers generally are confident managing these conditions, unless they are severe, refractory to conventional management, or require additional diagnostic studies.

  17. The role of hypoglycemia in the burden of living with diabetes among adults with diabetes and family members

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nefs, Giesje; Pouwer, François

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To examine the relation between self-reported hypoglycemic events, worries about these episodes, and the burden of diabetes in adults with diabetes and family members from The Netherlands. METHODS: As part of the second multinational Diabetes Attitudes, Wishes and Needs (DAWN2) study......, 412 Dutch adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes and 86 family members completed questions about the burden of living with diabetes, the frequency of hypoglycemia, worries about these events, and several demographic and clinical factors. Analyses included hierarchical logistic regression. RESULTS......: In total, 41% of people with diabetes and 56% of family members considered diabetes at least somewhat of a burden. In people with diabetes, diabetes burden was independently associated with self-reported current insulin use (fully adjusted OR = 2.75, 95% CI 1.49-5.10), self-reported frequent non...

  18. Treatment of Hypoglycemia in Adult Patients with Type 1 Diabetes: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savard, Valérie; Gingras, Véronique; Leroux, Catherine; Bertrand, Amélie; Desjardins, Katherine; Mircescu, Hortensia; Rabasa-Lhoret, Rémi

    2016-08-01

    1) To characterize the nutritional treatment of hypoglycemia in adult patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and 2) to compare the characteristics of participants who follow the recommendations with the characteristics of those who do not. A total of 121 adults with type 1 diabetes were included in this cross-sectional analysis. Participants completed a food record and a glycemia and insulin doses logbook to collect data on mild to moderate hypoglycemic events (glycemia 20g of carbohydrates for correction. Self-administered questionnaires about fear of hypoglycemia were completed, and cardiometabolic profile variables were measured (glycated hemoglobin, blood pressure, lipid profile and body mass indexes). Of the 121 participants, 94 (78%) reported at least 1 hypoglycemic event, for a total of 271 events (2.2±2.1 episodes per patient). Of these events, 64% were treated within 15 minutes, and they were treated primarily with fruit juice or sweet beverages (39%) or mixed snacks (29%). Average carbohydrate intake for treatment was 32±24 grams. Of the participants, 73% overtreated their episodes. They were significantly younger and had greater fear of hypoglycemia than those who treated the episodes adequately. No difference was observed for cardiometabolic variables. The majority of patients in our cohort overtreated their hypoglycemic episodes. These results suggest that hypoglycemia-correction education needs to be reinforced. Copyright © 2016 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Hypoglycemia-Induced Decrease of EEG Coherence in Patients with Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubega, Maria; Sparacino, Giovanni; Sejling, A. S.

    2016-01-01

    investigated. The aim of the present work is to use a coherence approach to quantitatively assess how hypoglycemia affects mutual connectivity of different brain areas. MATERIALS AND METHODS: EEG multichannel data were obtained from 19 patients with T1D (58% males; mean age, 55 ± 2.4 years; diabetes duration...

  20. Frequency and risk factors of severe hypoglycemia in insulin-treated type 2 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Akram, Kamran; Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Borch-Johnsen, Knut

    2006-01-01

    Intensive treatment regimens including early initiation of insulin treatment are important to prevent late complications in type 2 diabetes. The assumed risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH) is a major barrier to initiation of insulin treatment. To assess the relevance of this risk we evaluated the fr...

  1. Could Continuous Glucose Monitoring Facilitate Identifying Diabetes Patients with a Higher Risk of Hypoglycemia during Driving?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Doničová, V.; Brabec, Marek; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Polák, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2013), s. 1644-1645 ISSN 1932-2968 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : continuous glucose monitoring * driving * hypoglycemia * insulin pump * prevention * type 1 diabetes mellitus Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3876343/

  2. Optimal management of type 2 diabetes in patients with increased risk of hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anderson M

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Morgan Anderson,1 Jason Powell,2 Kendall M Campbell,3 James R Taylor2 1North Florida/South Georgia Veterans Health System, Malcom Randall VAMC, 2University of Florida, College of Pharmacy, Gainesville, 3The Center for Underrepresented Minorities in Academic Medicine, The Florida State University College of Medicine Tallahassee, FL, USA Abstract: With the number of individuals diagnosed with type 2 diabetes on the rise, it has become more important to ensure these patients are effectively treated. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated that 8.3% of all Americans were diagnosed with diabetes in 2011 and this number will likely continue to rise. With lifestyle interventions, such as proper diet and exercise, continuing to be an essential component of diabetes treatment, more patients are requiring medication therapy to help them reach their therapeutic goals. It is important for the clinician, when determining the treatment strategy for these individuals, to find a balance between reaching treatment goals and limiting the adverse effects of the treatments themselves. Of all the adverse events associated with treatment of diabetes, the risk of hypoglycemia is one that most therapies have in common. This risk is often a limiting factor when attempting to aggressively treat diabetic patients. This manuscript will review how hypoglycemia is defined and categorized, as well as discuss the prevalence of hypoglycemia among the many different treatment options. Keywords: type 2 diabetes, hypoglycemia

  3. Autoimmune Hypoglycemia in a Patient with Characterization of Insulin Receptor Autoantibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suk Chon

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundType B insulin resistance syndrome is a manifestation of autoantibodies to the insulin receptor that results in severe hyperglycemia and acanthosis nigricans. However, the mechanisms by which these autoantibodies induce hypoglycemia are largely unknown. In this paper, we report the case of patient with type B insulin resistance syndrome who presented with frequent severe fasting hypoglycemia and acanthosis nigricans.MethodsTo evaluate the mechanism of hypoglycemia, we measured the inhibition of insulin binding to erythrocytes and IM9 lymphocytes in a sample of the patient's dialyzed serum before and after immunosuppressive therapy.ResultsIn the patient's pre-treatment serum IgG, the binding of 125I-insulin to erythrocytes was markedly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner until the cold insulin level reached 10-9 mol/L. We also observed dose-dependent inhibition of insulin binding to IM9 lymphocytes, which reached approximately 82% inhibition and persisted even when diluted 1:20. After treatment with glucocorticoids, insulin-erythrocyte binding activity returned to between 70% and 80% of normal, while the inhibition of insulin-lymphocyte binding was reduced by 17%.ConclusionWe treated a patient with type B insulin resistance syndrome showing recurrent fasting hypoglycemia with steroids and azathioprine. We characterized the patient's insulin receptor antibodies by measuring the inhibition of insulin binding.

  4. Hypoglycemia in falciparum malaria: is fasting an unrecognized and insufficiently emphasized risk factor?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thien, Huynh V.; Kager, Piet A.; Sauerwein, Hans P.

    2006-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is a frequently encountered complication in falciparum malaria that is usually ascribed to increased glucose use and impaired glucose production caused by the inhibition of gluconeogenesis. Here, in light of recent data showing that glucose production and gluconeogenesis are often

  5. Effects of repetitive hypoglycemia on neuroendocrine response and brain tyrosine hydroxylase activity in the rat.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Figlewicz, D. P.; Van Dijk, G.; Wilkinson, C. W.; Gronbeck, P.; Higgins, M.; Zavosh, A.

    2002-01-01

    Hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure (HAAF) is a syndrome of acute adaptation to a metabolic stressor, in which neuroendocrine responses to repetitive hypoglycemic bouts are blunted. The CNS mechanisms that contribute to HAAF are unknown. In the present study, we modeled HAAF in the rat and

  6. Prevalence and possible mechanisms of reactive hypoglycemia in polycystic ovary syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mumm, Hanne; Altinok, Magda Lambaa; Henriksen, Jan Erik

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION: What is the prevalence of reactive hypoglycemia (RH) in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) versus age- and body mass index (BMI)-matched healthy controls. SUMMARY ANSWER: The prevalence of RH was increased in PCOS versus controls. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY: Previous studies suggested...

  7. Interactions between hypoglycemia and sleep architecture in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillar, Giora; Schuscheim, Guy; Weiss, Ram; Malhotra, Atul; McCowen, Karen C; Shlitner, Arie; Peled, Nir; Shehadeh, Naim

    2003-02-01

    To assess the interactions between nocturnal hypoglycemia and sleep in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM). Children with DM (n = 15) and 15 matched control children underwent full night polysomnographic recordings. Blood glucose levels were measured in the diabetic children by means of the MiniMed Continuous Glucose Monitoring System. Six of the diabetic children were also studied by peripheral arterial tonometry (an indirect indicator of sympathetic responses). Five children with DM (33%) had profound nocturnal hypoglycemia, which was associated with increased sleep efficiency, increased slow wave sleep, and increased Delta power in spectral analysis of the electroencephalogram. Hypoglycemic episodes were not associated with sympathetic activation. Rapid decline in glucose levels (>25 mg/dL/hour) but not the absolute degree of hypoglycemia were associated with awakenings from sleep. We conclude that sleep may inhibit sympathetic and arousal response to hypoglycemia. Rapid changes in glucose levels, independent of absolute glucose levels, may result in awakening from sleep. Continuous measurement of glucose levels during sleep may add important features in the treatment of children with DM.

  8. Diminished epinephrine response to hypoglycemia despite enlarged adrenal medulla in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Kjaer, M; Mikines, K J

    1990-01-01

    )]. Cold stress or sham swim training did not increase adrenal weight or volume of adrenal medulla (P greater than 0.05). To stimulate adrenal medulla secretion, rats had an insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Insulin dose needed to suppress plasma glucose below 4.0 mM was four times greater in sedentary...

  9. The GOAT-Ghrelin System Is Not Essential for Hypoglycemia Prevention during Prolonged Calorie Restriction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yi, Chun-Xia; Heppner, Kristy M.; Kirchner, Henriette; Tong, Jenny; Bielohuby, Maximillian; Gaylinn, Bruce D.; Müller, Timo D.; Bartley, Erin; Davis, Harold W.; Zhao, Yongmei; Joseph, Anupama; Kruthaupt, Traci; Ottaway, Nickki; Kabra, Dhiraj; Habegger, Kirk M.; Benoit, Stephen C.; Bidlingmaier, Martin; Thorner, Michael O.; Perez-Tilve, Diego; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Pfluger, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Ghrelin acylation by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT) has recently been reported to be essential for the prevention of hypoglycemia during prolonged negative energy balance. Using a unique set of four different genetic loss-of-function models for the GOAT/ghrelin/growth hormone

  10. Histopathological nerve and skeletal muscle changes in rats subjected to persistent insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Vivi Flou Hjorth; Mølck, Anne-Marie; Heydenreich, Annette

    2016-01-01

    femoris muscle tissue, as little is known about the response to persistent hypoglycemia in these tissues. Histopathologic changes in insulin-infused animals included axonal degeneration and myofibre degeneration. To our knowledge, this is the first study to show that persistent IIH provokes peripheral...

  11. Could Continuous Glucose Monitoring Facilitate Identifying Diabetes Patients with a Higher Risk of Hypoglycemia during Driving?

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brož, J.; Doničová, V.; Brabec, Marek; Janíčková Žďárská, D.; Polák, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2013), s. 1644-1645 ISSN 1932-2968 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : continuous glucose monitoring * driving * hypoglycemia * insulin pump * prevention * type 1 diabetes mellitus Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/ articles /PMC3876343/

  12. Defective awakening response to nocturnal hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schultes

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nocturnal hypoglycemia frequently occurs in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. It can be fatal and is believed to promote the development of the hypoglycemia-unawareness syndrome. Whether hypoglycemia normally provokes awakening from sleep in individuals who do not have diabetes, and whether this awakening response is impaired in T1DM patients, is unknown. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We tested two groups of 16 T1DM patients and 16 healthy control participants, respectively, with comparable distributions of gender, age, and body mass index. In one night, a linear fall in plasma glucose to nadir levels of 2.2 mmol/l was induced by infusing insulin over a 1-h period starting as soon as polysomnographic recordings indicated that stage 2 sleep had been reached. In another night (control, euglycemia was maintained. Only one of the 16 T1DM patients, as compared to ten healthy control participants, awakened upon hypoglycemia (p = 0.001. In the control nights, none of the study participants in either of the two groups awakened during the corresponding time. Awakening during hypoglycemia was associated with increased hormonal counterregulation. In all the study participants (from both groups who woke up, and in five of the study participants who did not awaken (three T1DM patients and two healthy control participants, plasma epinephrine concentration increased with hypoglycemia by at least 100% (p < 0.001. A temporal pattern was revealed such that increases in epinephrine in all participants who awakened started always before polysomnographic signs of wakefulness (mean +/- standard error of the mean: 7.5 +/- 1.6 min. CONCLUSIONS: A fall in plasma glucose to 2.2 mmol/l provokes an awakening response in most healthy control participants, but this response is impaired in T1DM patients. The counterregulatory increase in plasma epinephrine that we observed to precede awakening suggests that awakening forms part of a central nervous system

  13. Insulin Delivery Into the Peripheral Circulation: A Key Contributor to Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraft, Guillaume; Scott, Melanie F.; Neal, Doss W.; Farmer, Ben; Smith, Marta S.; Hastings, Jon R.; Allen, Eric J.; Donahue, E. Patrick; Rivera, Noelia; Winnick, Jason J.; Edgerton, Dale S.; Nishimura, Erica; Fledelius, Christian; Brand, Christian L.; Cherrington, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoglycemia limits optimal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM), making novel strategies to mitigate it desirable. We hypothesized that portal (Po) vein insulin delivery would lessen hypoglycemia. In the conscious dog, insulin was infused into the hepatic Po vein or a peripheral (Pe) vein at a rate four times of basal. In protocol 1, a full counterregulatory response was allowed, whereas in protocol 2, glucagon was fixed at basal, mimicking the diminished α-cell response to hypoglycemia seen in T1DM. In protocol 1, glucose fell faster with Pe insulin than with Po insulin, reaching 56 ± 3 vs. 70 ± 6 mg/dL (P = 0.04) at 60 min. The change in area under the curve (ΔAUC) for glucagon was similar between Pe and Po, but the peak occurred earlier in Pe. The ΔAUC for epinephrine was greater with Pe than with Po (67 ± 17 vs. 36 ± 14 ng/mL/180 min). In protocol 2, glucose also fell more rapidly than in protocol 1 and fell faster in Pe than in Po, reaching 41 ± 3 vs. 67 ± 2 mg/dL (P < 0.01) by 60 min. Without a rise in glucagon, the epinephrine responses were much larger (ΔAUC of 204 ± 22 for Pe vs. 96 ± 29 ng/mL/180 min for Po). In summary, Pe insulin delivery exacerbates hypoglycemia, particularly in the presence of a diminished glucagon response. Po vein insulin delivery, or strategies that mimic it (i.e., liver-preferential insulin analogs), should therefore lessen hypoglycemia. PMID:26085570

  14. Increasing Trend in the Number of Severe Hypoglycemia Patients in Korea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Taek Kim

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundTo investigate whether the number of subjects with severe hypoglycemia who are brought to a hospital emergency department is increasing and to identify whether there have been changes in the demographic and clinical characteristics of those subjects.MethodsWe analyzed data from the Emergency Departments of two general hospitals in Seoul, Korea. We included data from all adult subjects with type 2 diabetes who presented to an emergency department with severe hypoglycemia between January 1, 2004 and December 30, 2009.ResultsA total of 740 cases of severe hypoglycemia were identified. The mean subject age was 69±12 years, mean duration of diabetes was 13.8±9.3 years, and 53.2% of subjects were receiving insulin therapy. We observed a sharp rise in the number of cases between 2006 and 2007. Stages 3-5 chronic kidney disease was diagnosed in 31.5% of subjects, and low C-peptide levels (<0.6 ng/mL were found in 25.5%. The mean subject age, duration of diabetes, HbA1c level, and renal and insulin secretory function values did not change significantly during the study period. The proportion of glimepiride use increased, while use of gliclazide decreased among sulfonylurea users. Use of insulin analogues increased, while use of NPH/RI decreased among insulin users.ConclusionWe identified a sharp increase in the number of subjects with severe hypoglycemia presenting to an emergency room since 2006. The clinical characteristics of these subjects did not change markedly during the study period. Nationwide studies are warranted to further clarify this epidemic of severe hypoglycemia.

  15. Clinical meaning of hot uptake on bone scan in symptomatic accessory navicular bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chong, Ari; Ha, Jung Min; Lee, Jun Young [Chosun University Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    We analyzed clinical factors related to uptake on a Tc-99 m HDP bone scan of the accessory navicular (AN). We retrospectively reviewed patients who had been examined by an orthopedic surgeon and underwent bone scan due to suspected symptomatic AN. A three-point grading system was used to evaluate uptake on bone scan. Relationships between grade, symptoms, age, gender, symptom duration, and bone size were analyzed. In total, 73 ANs (30 asymptomatic, 43 symptomatic) were enrolled. The majority of asymptomatic ANs had no uptake but some had grade 1 (n = 8) or 2 (n = 2) uptake. All asymptomatic ANs with uptake remained asymptomatic during follow-up. For the asymptomatic ANs, larger bones showed a higher grade. With a cut-off value of size ≤6.8 mm, there is no chance of uptake. All symptomatic ANs showed uptake on bone scan. For symptomatic ANs, larger size and shorter pain duration were related to a higher grade. Age, gender, and left-/right-sideness were not related to grade. Multiple regressions revealed that only uptake grade, not size or symptom duration, was the significant risk factor for a symptomatic AN. With a cut-off value of grade <1, a symptomatic AN could be ruled out with a negative predictive value of 100 %. Bone scanning is useful for symptomatic ANs with a high negative predictive value. Higher grade is related to larger size and shorter pain duration. For asymptomatic ANs, grade was related to size but did not predict symptom development.

  16. The Use of Gastrostomy Tube for the Long-Term Remission of Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia After Roux-en-y Gastric Bypass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Craig, CM; Lamendola, C; Holst, Jens Juul

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is an increasingly reported complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), for which there is currently no acceptable treatment. We present a case of the reversal of severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia through gastrostomy tube (GT) feeding to th...... as an effective and durable treatment for severe refractory hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia after RYGB. (AACE Clinical Case Rep. 2015;1:e84-e87)......Objective: Hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia is an increasingly reported complication of Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (RYGB), for which there is currently no acceptable treatment. We present a case of the reversal of severe hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia through gastrostomy tube (GT) feeding...

  17. Maternal diabetes and neonatal macrosomia. I. Postpartum maternal hemoglobin A1c levels and neonatal hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brans, Y W; Huff, R W; Shannon, D L; Hunter, M A

    1982-10-01

    Hemoglobin A1c (HgbA1c) levels were determined within 24 hours after delivery in 88 nondiabetic and 73 diabetic women belonging to White's classes A to D. Diet-controlled gestational diabetic women had mean (+/- SE) Hgb A1c levels similar to those of nondiabetics (5.8 +/- 0.18% vs 5.7 +/- 0.08%). Mean Hgb A1c levels were higher in insulin-requiring gestational (6.4 +/- 0.20%, P less than .05) and permanent (6.5 +/- 0.27%, P less than .05) diabetics than in nondiabetics. The proportions of subjects with levels above the normal range were also larger in the insulin-requiring groups. Mean Hgb A1c levels and the proportions of abnormally high levels were similar for mothers of macrosomic and of normally grown neonates in the nondiabetic as well as in the various diabetes groups. There was no correlation between maternal Hgb A1c level and neonatal birth weight, either real or relative. There were also no statistically significant differences in mean Hgb A1c levels between mothers of neonates with or without hypoglycemia within four hours of birth. Hgb A1c measurement did not permit differentiation between those mothers of macrosomic neonates who were diabetic and those who were not. In conclusion, although Hgb A1c level has been shown to reflect diabetic control, our data suggest that it may not be reliable as an indicator of fine tuning during the third trimester of pregnancy or as a predictor of the effects of diabetes on the fetus.

  18. Temporal dynamics of host molecular responses differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic influenza a infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongsheng Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Exposure to influenza viruses is necessary, but not sufficient, for healthy human hosts to develop symptomatic illness. The host response is an important determinant of disease progression. In order to delineate host molecular responses that differentiate symptomatic and asymptomatic Influenza A infection, we inoculated 17 healthy adults with live influenza (H3N2/Wisconsin and examined changes in host peripheral blood gene expression at 16 timepoints over 132 hours. Here we present distinct transcriptional dynamics of host responses unique to asymptomatic and symptomatic infections. We show that symptomatic hosts invoke, simultaneously, multiple pattern recognition receptors-mediated antiviral and inflammatory responses that may relate to virus-induced oxidative stress. In contrast, asymptomatic subjects tightly regulate these responses and exhibit elevated expression of genes that function in antioxidant responses and cell-mediated responses. We reveal an ab initio molecular signature that strongly correlates to symptomatic clinical disease and biomarkers whose expression patterns best discriminate early from late phases of infection. Our results establish a temporal pattern of host molecular responses that differentiates symptomatic from asymptomatic infections and reveals an asymptomatic host-unique non-passive response signature, suggesting novel putative molecular targets for both prognostic assessment and ameliorative therapeutic intervention in seasonal and pandemic influenza.

  19. Relative risks and population attributable fraction of incident HIV associated with symptoms of sexually transmitted diseases and treatable symptomatic sexually transmitted diseases in Rakai District, Uganda. Rakai Project Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, R H; Wawer, M J; Sewankambo, N K; Serwadda, D; Li, C; Moulton, L H; Lutalo, T; Wabwire-Mangen, F; Meehan, M P; Ahmed, S; Paxton, L A; Kiwanuka, N; Nalugoda, F; Korenromp, E L; Quinn, T C

    1999-10-22

    To assess the linkage of sexually transmitted disease (STD) symptoms and treatable STD to HIV incidence. Analysis of a randomized trial of STD control for HIV prevention, Rakai, Uganda. Consenting adults 15-59 years of age were seen at 10-monthly home visits, interviewed regarding STD symptoms, and asked to provide samples for HIV and STD diagnoses. HIV incidence was determined in 8089 HIV-negative subjects over 10 457 person years. Adjusted rate ratios (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of HIV acquisition associated with genital ulcer disease (GUD) and discharge/dysuria were used to estimate the population attributable fraction (PAF) of HIV acquisition. HIV transmission risks associated with STD symptoms in HIV-positive partners of 167 HIV discordant couples and the numbers of sexual partners reported by HIV-positive subjects were used to estimate the PAF of HIV transmission attributable to STD. HIV prevalence was 16%. The risk of HIV acquisition was increased with GUD (RR 3.14; CI 1.98-4.98) and in males with discharge/dysuria (RR 2.44; CI 1.17-5.12), but not in females with discharge/dysuria. The PAF of HIV acquisition was 9.5% (CI 2.8-15.8%) with any of the three STD symptoms. The PAF for GUD was 8.8% (CI 3.7-13.8), but only 8.2% of reported GUD was caused by treatable syphilis or chancroid . The PAF for discharge/dysuria in males was 6.7% (CI 1.1-13.8), but only 25% of symptomatic males had concurrent gonorrhea or chlamydial infection. No significant differences were seen in PAF between study treatment arms. The PAF of HIV transmission associated with STD symptoms in HIV-positive persons was indirectly estimated to be 10.4%. In this mature, generalized HIV epidemic setting, most HIV seroconversion occurs without recognized STD symptoms or curable STD detected by screening. Therefore, syndromic management or other strategies of STD treatment are unlikely to substantially reduce HIV incidence in this population. However, STD is associated with significant

  20. [Hypoglycemia induced by a solitary fibrous tumor of the lung or Doege-Potter syndrome: Report of one case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soutelo, Jimena; Moldes, Sofía; Martin, Ayelén; Lutfi, Rubén; Leal Reyna, Mariela

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 75-year-old man who was admitted to the hospital with symptoms of severe hypoglycemia. He had a history of solitary fibrous tumor diagnosed by Pathology after its complete surgical resection eight years before. The laboratory examination reported hypoglycemia with inhibited Insulin secretion. A computed tomography of the thorax revealed a large solid heterogeneous mass in the left hemithorax. Solitary fibrous tumor is a rare neoplasm. The association of solitary fibrous tumor and paraneoplastic hypoglycemia is known as Doege-Potter syndrome and occurs in less than 5% of all solitary fibrous tumors.

  1. Are changes in heart rate variability during hypoglycemia confounded by the presence of cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy in patients with diabetes?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cichosz, Simon Lebech; Frystyk, Jan; Tarnow, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have recently shown how the combination of information from continuous glucose monitor (CGM) and heart rate variability (HRV) measurements can be used to construct an algorithm for prediction of hypoglycemia in both bedbound and active patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Questions...... remain on how cardiovascular autonomic neuropathy (CAN) influences these measurable changes. This study aims to examine if changes in HRV during hypoglycemia are confounded by the presence of CAN. METHODS: Twenty-one adults (hereof 13 men) with T1D prone to hypoglycemia were recruited and monitored...

  2. Analysis of multi-factors affecting symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in intraarterial thrombolysis with urokinase for acute ischemic stroke

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qiao Qianlin; Zhou Shi; Wang Xuejian; Wu Qinghua; Song Jie

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To explore the causes and preventive measures of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage in 217 patients with acute cerebral ischemic stroke treated with local intra-arterial urokinase. Methods: From February 1999 to June 2004, 217 patients were treated for acute ischemic stroke with local intra-arterial urokinase in our hospital. Factors associated with symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage of intra-arterial thrombolysis were analyzed by Stepwise logistic regression to identify some factors relating the prediction symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage. Results: Symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage occurred in 8 cases (3.7%). Predictors of the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage were the elevated systolic blood pressure before therapy (odds ratio, 1.096; 95% CI, 1.006 to 1.194) and urokinase (UK) treatment (odds ratio, 1.068 ; 95% CL, 1.053 to 1.247). Risk of secondary symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage was increased with elevated systolic blood pressure. Other factors like age, initial treating time, NIHSS, diabetes and collateral circulation did not predict the symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage respectively. Conclusions: Predictors of symptomatic intracranial hemorrhage after local intra-arterial infusion of urokinase for acute ischemic stroke were the elevated systolic blood pressure before therapy and urokinase (UK) treatment. (authors)

  3. Current perspectives on neonatal hypoglycemia, its management, and cerebral injury risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chandran S

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Suresh Chandran,1–4 Victor Samuel Rajadurai,1–3 Abdul Alim Abdul Haium,1–3 Khalid Hussain5,6 1Department of Neonatology, KK Women’s and Children’s Hospital, Singapore; 2Duke-NUS Graduate School of Medicine, Singapore; 3Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 4Lee Kong Chian School of Medicine, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore; 5Department of Paediatric Endocrinology, Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children, NHS Foundation Trust, London, 6The Institute of Child Health, University College London, London, UK Abstract: Glucose is an essential substrate for mammalian cells; in particular, the brain needs glucose continuously as a primary source of energy. Hypoglycemia is the most common biochemical finding in the neonatal period. However, despite the common occurrence, there is still controversy on the definition of hypoglycemia in the newborn period. This has led to the development of guidelines designed to identify infants “at-risk” and the implementation of an “operational threshold” for physicians to consider intervention. In healthy term infants, the optimal hormonal and metabolic adaptations during the immediate neonatal period ensure an adequate energy substrate for the vital organs, whereas the abnormal glucose homeostasis observed in preterm and growth-retarded infants is multifactorial in origin. For these high-risk infants, it is important to identify, screen, and prevent significant hypoglycemia. Detailed investigations are warranted in infants with severe and persistent hypoglycemia. Neonatal hypoglycemia is a major cause of brain injury. The speculated mechanisms of cellular injury include excitatory neurotoxins active at N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors, increased mitochondrial free radical generation with initiation of apoptosis and altered cerebral energetic characteristics. This hypoglycemic brain injury predominantly affects parieto-occipital regions causing

  4. Symptomatic portal vein occlusion: treated by interventional radiological techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Maoqiang; Gu Xiaofang; Guan Jun; Wang Zhongpu; Liu Fengyong; Wang Zhiqiang

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of the interventional radiological techniques for management of symptomatic portal vein (PV) occlusion. Methods: Nine patients with PV trunk occlusion were treated using interventional procedures. Four patients presented with abdominal pain, distention, and malabsorption; five presented with portal hypertension and repeated bleeding from esophagogastric varices. The etiologic factors were identified in all 9 patients, including post-transplantation of the liver in 2, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) associated with PV tumor thrombus in 3, post abdominal operative state in 1, and PV thrombosis in 3 cases. The portal access was established via a percutaneous transhepatic route in 4, and via a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt ( TIPS) approach in 5 patients. The interventional procedures included stent placement in 4, balloon angioplasty in 6, and catheter directed pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis in 7 patients. Results: The technical success was achieved in all cases. No complications related to the procedure occurred. Portal flow was reestablished in all patients after the procedures. Clinical improvement was seen in 3 patients with symptomatic PV thrombosis, characterized by progressive reduction of abdominal pain, distention, and diarrhea. Follow-up time ranged from 4 to 36 months. One patient with HCC died of multiple organs metastases at 11 months after the treatment . One patient died of intraabdominal sepsis and multiple organs failure 12 days after the procedure even though the antegrade flow was re-established in the main trunk of the PV. Patency of the PV trunk was confirmed by follow-up color Doppler ultrasound scan in the rest 7 patients, without recurrence of variceal bleeding or PV thrombus. Conclusions: Interventional minimally invasive procedures, including balloon angioplasty, stent placement, catheter directed local pharmacologic and mechanical thrombolysis, are safe and effective in

  5. Numerical and clinical precision of continuous glucose monitoring in Colombian patients treated with insulin infusion pump with automated suspension in hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Ana M; Marín Sánchez, Alejandro; Muñoz, Oscar M; Colón Peña, Christian Alejandro

    2015-12-01

    Insulin pump therapy associated with continuous glucose monitoring has shown a positive clinical impact on diabetes control and reduction of hypoglycemia episodes. There are descriptions of the performance of this device in other populations, but its precision and accuracy in Colombia and Latin America are unknown, especially in the routine outpatient setting. Data from 33 type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients with sensor-augmented pump therapy with threshold suspend automation, MiniMed Paradigm® Veo™ (Medtronic, Northridge, California), managed at Hospital Universitario San Ignacio (Bogotá, Colombia) and receiving outpatient treatment, were analyzed. Simultaneous data from continuous glucose monitoring and capillary blood glucose were compared, and their precision and accuracy were calculating with different methods, including Clarke error grid. Analyses included 2,262 continuous glucose monitoring -reference paired glucose values. A mean absolute relative difference of 20.1% was found for all measurements, with a value higher than 23% for glucose levels ≤75mg/dL. Global compliance with the ISO criteria was 64.9%. It was higher for values >75mg/dl (68.3%, 1,308 of 1,916 readings), than for those ≤ 75mg/dl (49.4%, 171 of 346 readings). Clinical accuracy, as assessed by the Clarke error grid, showed that 91.77% of data were within the A and B zones (75.6% in hypoglycemia). A good numerical accuracy was found for continuous glucose monitoring in normo and hyperglycemia situations, with low precision in hypoglycemia. The clinical accuracy of the device was adequate, with no significant safety concerns for patients. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Hypoglycemia is associated with increased worry and lower quality of life among patients with type 2 diabetes treated with oral antihyperglycemic agents in the Asia-Pacific region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, Wayne H-H; Ji, Li-Nong; Nitiyanant, Wannee; Baik, Sei Hyun; Yin, Donald; Mavros, Panagiotis; Chan, Siew-Pheng

    2012-05-01

    We examined the relationship of hypoglycemic symptoms with health-related quality of life and worry about hypoglycemia among type 2 diabetic patients using oral antihyperglycemic agents (AHA) in the Asia-Pacific region. A total of 2257 type 2 diabetic patients with at least 6 months of oral AHA were enrolled in China, Korea, Malaysia, Thailand, and Taiwan. Quality of life was measured with the EuroQol Visual Analog Scale (EQ-VAS) and EuroQol-5 Dimensions questionnaire (EQ-5D), and worry about hypoglycemia with the worry subscale of the Hypoglycemic Fear Survey-II (HFS). The mean (SD) age was 58.7 (10.2) years and HbA(1c) was 7.5% (1.5). The proportion of patients with an HbA(1c) <6.5% and <7% was 24.9% and 41.8%, respectively. Hypoglycemic symptoms in the prior 6 months were reported by 35.8% of patients. Mean scores on the EQ-VAS and the EQ-5D were significantly lower for patients who had hypoglycemic symptoms compared to those who did not (73.6 vs. 76.9, p<0.001; 0.88 vs. 0.90, p<0.0001, respectively), whereas mean score on the HFS was significantly higher (12.5 vs. 6.3, p<0.001). In multivariate models, hypoglycemic symptoms were independently associated with scores on the EQ-5D, EQ-VAS, and HFS (all p ≤ 0.01-0.001). Symptom severity was positively associated with fear of hypoglycemia (all p ≤ 0.001). Hypoglycemic symptoms were associated with reduced quality of life and increased patient worry in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with AHA. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  7. Recurrent hypoglycemia in a patient of neurofibromatosis type 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus: Munchausen′s syndrome mimicking Insulinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mubaraq Naqash

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 35-year-old widow having neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF 1 and type 1 diabetes mellitus (DM was admitted for abdominal pain, vomiting and recent onset low blood sugars. During hospitalization, the patient developed recurrent episodes of hypoglycemia despite stopping insulin. A possibility of insulinoma was made due to the presence of abdominal pain, vomiting, hypoglycemia, and association of insulinoma with NF 1. However, surprisingly c-peptide was very low and plasma insulin levels were high. A detailed psychiatric evaluation of the patient revealed Munchausen′s syndrome as a cause of recurrent hypoglycemia. Unrecognized psychiatric illnesses in type 1 DM may lead to overzealous investigation. In conclusion, the clinical presentations of persons with factitious disorder are varied and impact every area of medicine, factitious causes should always be considered in unclarified recurrent hypoglycemia, especially in cases presented with dramatic but inconsistent medical history, and an unusual personal behavior.

  8. Combining genetic algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm in training neural network for hypoglycemia detection using EEG signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Lien B; Nguyen, Anh V; Ling, Sai Ho; Nguyen, Hung T

    2013-01-01

    Hypoglycemia is the most common but highly feared complication induced by the intensive insulin therapy in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Nocturnal hypoglycemia is dangerous because sleep obscures early symptoms and potentially leads to severe episodes which can cause seizure, coma, or even death. It is shown that the hypoglycemia onset induces early changes in electroencephalography (EEG) signals which can be detected non-invasively. In our research, EEG signals from five T1DM patients during an overnight clamp study were measured and analyzed. By applying a method of feature extraction using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and classification using neural networks, we establish that hypoglycemia can be detected efficiently using EEG signals from only two channels. This paper demonstrates that by implementing a training process of combining genetic algorithm and Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm, the classification results are improved markedly up to 75% sensitivity and 60% specificity on a separate testing set.

  9. A single bout of high-intensity interval training reduces awareness of subsequent hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rooijackers, H.M.M.; Wiegers, E.C.; Graaf, M. van der; Thijssen, D.H.J.; Kessels, R.P.C.; Tack, C.J.J.; Galan, B.E. de

    2017-01-01

    High-intensity interval training (HIIT) gains increasing popularity in patients with diabetes. HIIT acutely increases plasma lactate levels. This may be important, since administration of lactate during hypoglycemia suppresses symptoms and counterregulation, whilst preserving cognitive function. We

  10. Endoscopic Excision of Symptomatic Os Trigonum in Professional Dancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morelli, Federico; Mazza, Daniele; Serlorenzi, Pierluigi; Guidi, Marco; Camerucci, Emanuela; Calderaro, Cosma; Iorio, Raffaele; Guzzini, Matteo; Ferretti, Andrea

    The present study reports the clinical results of excision of a symptomatic os trigonum using an endoscopic procedure in professional ballet dancers. The hypothesis was that posterior endoscopic excision of the os trigonum would be safe and effective in treating posterior ankle impingement syndrome related to the os trigonum. Twelve professional dancers underwent excision of a symptomatic os trigonum for PAIS using a posterior endoscopic technique after failure of conservative treatment. The patients were evaluated pre- and postoperatively according to the American Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Society hindfoot scale score, the Tegner activity scale score, and the visual analog scale score. The surgical time, timing of a return to sports, patient satisfaction, and any complications related to the procedure were recorded. The average postoperative follow-up duration was 38.9 ± 20.6 (range 12 to 72) months. The mean Tegner activity scale score increased from 4.3 ± 0.8 (range 3 to 5) preoperatively to 9 ± 0.2 postoperatively (p os trigonum using a 2-portal technique after failure of conservative treatment is characterized by excellent results with low morbidity. Copyright © 2016 American College of Foot and Ankle Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prevalence and predictors of severe hypoglycemia in Danish children and adolescents with diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Anders; Kanijo, B; Fredheim, S

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of severe hypoglycemia in Danish children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes and to pinpoint predictors of this acute complication in children on modern treatment modalities. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: The study is based on data from Dan...... had a 31% (95% CI: 17; 49) reduced risk of severe hypoglycemia compared to patients on fewer daily injections (p = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: Despite improvements in metabolic control over a decade the prevalence of severe hypoglycemic events remained unchanged. More intensive treatments such as insulin......DiabKids, a national diabetes register for children and adolescents. The register contains data on patients with type 1 diabetes with an ascertainment rate of 99%. Data from 3320 patients aged 0-18 yr was included in the study period from 1998 to 2009 and analyzed using a negative binomial model. RESULTS: One thousand...

  12. The Impact of Nocturnal Hypoglycemia on Sleep in Subjects With Type 2 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jennum, Poul; Stender-Petersen, Kirstine; Rabøl, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this trial was to investigate the impact of nocturnal hypoglycemia on sleep patterns (assessed by polysomnography) and counterregulatory hormones. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: In this single-blinded, crossover trial, 26 subjects with type 2 diabetes attended two experimental...... night visits (one normoglycemic and one hypoglycemic) in randomized order. Plasma glucose (PG) levels were controlled by hyperinsulinemic glucose clamping. On the hypoglycemic night, hypoglycemia was induced after reaching sleep stage N2 by turning off glucose infusion until the PG target of 2.......7-2.8 mmol/L was reached and maintained for 15 min. Thereafter, subjects were brought back to normoglycemia for the rest of the night. On the normoglycemic night, PG was maintained at 5.0-7.0 mmol/L throughout the night. RESULTS: During the first 4 h of sleep (0-4 h; after reaching sleep stage N2...

  13. Optimizing glycemic control and minimizing the risk of hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley S Schwartz

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Diabetic microvascular and macrovascular complications arise from hyperglycemia, presenting an increasing healthcare burden as the diabetic population continues to grow. Clinical trial evidence indicates that antihyperglycemic medications are beneficial with regard to microvascular disease (retinopathy, renal impairment, and perhaps neuropathy; however, the benefit of aggressive use of these medications with regard to cardiovascular risk has been less clear in recent studies. These studies were confounded by the propensity of the antihyperglycemic medications involved to cause hypoglycemia, which itself presents cardiovascular risk. This article presents additional context for these seemingly discordant results and maintains that the achievement of glycemic targets is warranted in most patients and provides cardiovascular benefit, provided that hypoglycemia is avoided and the treatment regimen is tailored to the needs of the individual patient. A treatment approach that is driven by these principles and emphasizes diet and exercise, a combination of noninsulin antidiabetic agents, not including sulfonylureas and glinides, and judicious use of insulin is also presented.

  14. Rat liver responsiveness to gluconeogenic substrates during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.M. de Souza

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Hepatic responsiveness to gluconeogenic substrates during insulin-induced hypoglycemia was investigated. For this purpose, livers were perfused with a saturating concentration of 2 mM glycerol, 5 mM L-alanine or 5 mM L-glutamine as gluconeogenic substrates. All experiments were performed 1 h after an ip injection of saline (CN group or 1 IU/kg of insulin (IN group. The IN group showed higher (P<0.05 hepatic glucose production from glycerol, L-alanine and L-glutamine and higher (P<0.05 production of L-lactate, pyruvate and urea from L-alanine and L-glutamine. In addition, ip injection of 100 mg/kg glycerol, L-alanine and L-glutamine promoted glucose recovery. The results indicate that the hepatic capacity to produce glucose from gluconeogenic precursors was increased during insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

  15. Major Increases between Pre- and Post-breakfast Glucose Levels May Predict Nocturnal Hypoglycemia in Type 2 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeishi, Soichi; Mori, Akihiro; Kawai, Miyuka; Yoshida, Yohei; Hachiya, Hiroki; Yumura, Takayuki; Ito, Shun; Shibuya, Takashi; Fushimi, Nobutoshi; Ohashi, Noritsugu; Kawai, Hiromi

    Objective The aim of this study was to determine whether nocturnal hypoglycemia may be predicted according to morning glucose levels. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 106 patients with type 2 diabetes who underwent continuous glucose monitoring during admission. The pre-breakfast glucose level (Pre-breakfast level), highest postprandial glucose level within 3 hours after breakfast (Highest level), time from the start of breakfast to the highest postprandial glucose level (Highest time), difference between the pre-breakfast and highest postprandial breakfast glucose levels (Increase), area under the glucose curve (≥180 mg/dL) within 3 hours after breakfast (Morning AUC), post-breakfast glucose gradient (Gradient), and the increase-to-pre-breakfast ratio (Increase/Pre-breakfast) were calculated. The subjects were divided into hypoglycemic and non-hypoglycemic patients and compared for the above parameters using the t-test. A receiver operating characteristic analysis was used to determine the optimal cut-off values to predict nocturnal hypoglycemia (Hypoglycemia). Results Twenty-eight patients (26.4%) had hypoglycemia. The Pre-breakfast levels were significantly lower in patients with hypoglycemia than those without (p=0.03). The Increases were significantly higher in patients with hypoglycemia than those without (p=0.047). The Increase/Pre-breakfast ratio were significantly larger in patients with hypoglycemia than those without (p=0.0002). Their cut-off values were as follows (level, sensitivity, specificity, and area under the curve): 123 mg/dL, 0.89, 0.55, and 0.78 (pbreakfast glucose levels may predict nocturnal hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  16. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    OpenAIRE

    Se Young Kim

    2015-01-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies shoul...

  17. Trends in Antihyperglycemic Medication Prescriptions and Hypoglycemia in Older Adults: 2002-2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin K Clemens

    Full Text Available Over the last decade, several new antihyperglycemic medications have been introduced including those associated with a lower hypoglycemia risk. We aimed to investigate how these medications are being prescribed to older adults in our region.We conducted population-based cross-sectional analyses of older adults (mean age 75 years with treated diabetes in Ontario, Canada from 2002 until 2013, to examine the percentage prescribed insulin, sulphonylureas, alpha-glucosidase inhibitors, metformin, thiazolidinediones, meglitinides, and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors. Over the study period, we also examined their hospital encounters for hypoglycemia (emergency room or inpatient encounter.The mean age of treated patients increased slightly over the study quarters and the proportion that were women declined. With the exception of chronic kidney disease, cancer, dementia, and neuropathy, the percentage with a comorbidity appeared to decline. The percentage of treated patients prescribed metformin, gliclazide and dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors increased as did combination therapy. Glyburide and thiazolidinedione prescriptions declined, and insulin use remained stable. In those with newly treated diabetes, the majority were prescribed metformin, with smaller percentages prescribed insulin and other oral agents. Although the absolute number of treated patients with a hypoglycemia encounter increased until mid-2006 and then decreased, the overall percentage with an encounter declined over the study period (0.8% with an event in the first quarter, 0.4% with an event in the last quarter.Antihyperglycemic medications with safer profiles are being increasingly prescribed to older adults. In this setting there has been a decrease in the percentage of treated patients with a hospital encounter for hypoglycemia.

  18. [Therapy of polyneuropathies. Causal and symptomatic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Felber, W

    2001-05-28

    In the first instance, polyneuropathies are treated causally. The most common underlying cause is diabetes mellitus or alcohol abuse. In a large number of patients with polyneuropathy, however, the underlying cause cannot be definitively identified. For these--but equally for patients with etiologically clear polyneuropathy--a stock-taking of clinical symptoms should be carried out and, where indicated, symptomatic treatment initiated. In addition to medication aimed at combating pain, muscular spasm, autonomic functional disorders, and for the prevention of thrombosis, physical measures (physiotherapy, foot care, orthopedic shoes) are of primary importance.

  19. Long-Term Prediction of Severe Hypoglycemia in Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Marie Moth; Færch, Louise; Thorsteinsson, Birger

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Prediction of risk of severe hypoglycemia (SH) in patients with type 1 diabetes is important to prevent future episodes, but it is unknown if it is possible to predict the long-term risk of SH. The aim of the study is to assess if long-term prediction of SH is possible in type 1...... diabetes. METHODS: A follow-up study was performed with 98 patients with type 1 diabetes. At baseline and at follow-up, the patients filled in a questionnaire about diabetes history and complications, number of SH in the preceding year and state of awareness, and HbA1c and C-peptide levels were measured......-up. CONCLUSIONS: Long-term prediction of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes was not possible, although baseline hypoglycemia unawareness tended to remain a predictor for risk of SH at follow-up. Therefore, it is important repeatedly to assess the different risk factors of SH to determine the actual risk....

  20. Ocular Myasthenia Gravis, Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, Iron Deficiency Anemia, and Reactive Hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Füsun Mayda Domaç

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Myasthenia gravis (MG may occur in association with other organ- specific or nonspecific autoimmune diseases. In our study, we present a patient with ocular myasthenia, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and iron deficiency anemia who later developed reactive hypoglycemia. A 25-year-old woman with complaints of fluctuating extraocular muscle weakness, ptosis, and diplopia was examined. MG, type I (ocular MG, was confirmed by an elevated titer of anti-acetylcholine receptor antibodies in serum (7 nmol/l, normal <0.6 and positive edrophonium test. Nerve conduction studies, needle electromyography, repetitive stimulation tests, and mediasten MRI were normal. The coexistence of Hashimoto's thyroiditis was diagnosed by the presence of a diffuse thyroid enlargement, elevated titers of anti-thyroglobulin antibodies (211.8 IU/ml, normal 0-115, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (356.4 IU/ml, normal 0-34, thyroid stimulating hormone (8.21 uIU/ml, normal 0.27-4.2, and a decreased titer of free-T4 (1.03ng/dl normal 1.8-4.6. Diplopia and ptosis have regressed with 180 mg/day pyridostigmine bromide. On her follow-up period, 8 months later, reactive hypoglycemia has been diagnosed. The coexistence of myastenia gravis, Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and reactive hypoglycemia was not found in the literature. We should take into consideration the association and the importance of recognizing and treating these pathologies in myastenia gravis. Turk Jem 2009; 13: 31-3

  1. Potential link between post-acute ischemic stroke exposure to hypoglycemia and hemorrhagic transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingbeil, Kyle D; Koch, Sebastian; Dave, Kunjan R

    2017-01-01

    Hemorrhagic transformation is a severe complication of acute ischemic stroke owing to its limited treatment options and poor prognosis. In the last decade, the rates of hemorrhagic transformation incidence have been associated with blood glucose levels. In particular, hyperglycemia at the time of admission has been associated with increased rates of hemorrhagic transformation in acute ischemic stroke patients. Recent pilot clinical trials have attempted to use intensive insulin therapy during stroke treatment to reduce the severity of cerebral infarction and possibly alleviate the risk of hemorrhagic transformation. However, the results of these studies have shown no clear clinical benefit. In addition, intensive insulin therapy has increased rates of hypoglycemia which may be associated with larger infarct growth. We hypothesize that hypoglycemia, similarly to hyperglycemia, is a risk factor for worse outcomes in acute ischemic stroke by promoting hemorrhagic transformation. This review serves to call attention to patterns present within intensive insulin therapy trials and shed light into the pathophysiological effects of hypoglycemia. It is critical that efforts be directed toward the prevention of hemorrhagic transformation by optimizing insulin therapy during the treatment of acute ischemic stroke.

  2. Diminished epinephrine response to hypoglycemia despite enlarged adrenal medulla in trained rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stallknecht, B; Kjaer, M; Mikines, K J

    1990-01-01

    Studies in humans have indicated that trained athletes compared with sedentary subjects have an increased capacity to secrete epinephrine. To investigate whether this is due to an adaptation induced by physical training or a selection phenomenon, rats were swim trained (T) 10 wk for 6 h/day or se...... nervous system to reduced blood glucose levels induced by repeated exercise bouts, the epinephrine response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia is markedly diminished after training.......)]. Cold stress or sham swim training did not increase adrenal weight or volume of adrenal medulla (P greater than 0.05). To stimulate adrenal medulla secretion, rats had an insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Insulin dose needed to suppress plasma glucose below 4.0 mM was four times greater in sedentary...... compared with trained rats. During hypoglycemia the epinephrine response was much smaller in trained than in untrained rats (P less than 0.05). In conclusion, in rats strenuous endurance training causes an enlargement of the adrenal medulla. However, possibly reflecting an adaptation within the central...

  3. Incidence and risk factors of hypoglycemia among Type 2 diabetic patients in a South Indian hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikas Pv; Chandrakumar, Abin; Dilip, C; Suriyaprakash, T N K; Thomas, Levin; Surendran, Reshma

    2016-01-01

    The study was aimed at assessing the cumulative incidence of hypoglycemia and precipitating risk factors among type 2 diabetes mellitus in-patients of a tertiary care hospital in South India. The prospective cross sectional study spanning 14 months was conducted in a tertiary care hospital in Kerala. All T2DM patients who were administered any form of insulin during the length of hospital stay was monitored for assessing the hypoglycemic episodes. Any patient with a GRBS value less than 70mg/dL was defined to be hypoglycemic as per the ADA guidelines. The statistical analysis of collected data was performed using SPSS 18 for windows version. Of the 1650 subjects enrolled in the study, 204 subjects developed hypoglycemia. The sample composed of 60.8% females and 39.2% males and the difference was significant with p=0.02. A significant positive correlation was observed between HbA1c values and GRBS value, with a 2 tailed Pearson correlation coefficient of 0.027. On stratifying as per the modality of insulin dose prescribed, 72.5% of the hypoglycemic patients were found to have been administered fixed dose insulin. The cumulative incidence of institutional hypoglycemia among type 2 diabetic inpatients was gauged as 12.36%; among which, 26.96% had asymptomatic episodes. Copyright © 2016 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast presenting with hypoglycemia: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pacioles T

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Toni Pacioles,1 Rahul Seth,2,3 Cesar Orellana,3 Ivy John,4 Veera Panuganty,3 Ruban Dhaliwal3,5 1Department of Hematology and Oncology, Edwards Comprehensive Cancer Center, Marshall University, Huntington, WV, USA; 2Division of Hematology and Oncology, 3Department of Medicine, 4Department of Pathology, 5Division of Endocrinology, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY, USA Abstract: Phyllodes tumors are rare fibroepithelial neoplasms that account for less than 1% of all breast tumors and are typically found in middle-aged women. Phyllodes tumors that present with hypoglycemia are even rarer. No one morphologic finding is reliable in predicting the clinical behavior of this tumor. Surgery has been the primary mode of treatment to date. However, the extent of resection and the role of adjuvant radiotherapy or chemotherapy are still controversial. Here, we present a challenging case of malignant phyllodes tumor of the breast associated with hypoglycemia, and review the literature regarding clinical findings, pathologic risk factors for recurrence, and treatment recommendations. Keywords: breast cancer, fibroepithelial neoplasm, neuroendocrine tumor, adjuvant treatment, non-islet cell tumor-induced hypoglycemia

  5. Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Disease After Anterior Cervical Discectomy for Single-level Degenerative Disk Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donk, Roland D; Verhagen, Wim I M; Hosman, Allard J F; Verbeek, Andre; Bartels, Ronald H M A

    2018-02-01

    A prospective cohort of 142 patients underwent either anterior cervical discectomy alone, anterior cervical discectomy with fusion by cage stand-alone, or anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty. We then followed up on their condition for a mean of 9.1±1.9 years (5.6-12.2 y) later. We aimed to evaluate the annual rate of clinically symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) and to analyze predictive factors. Until recent, ASD has been predominantly evaluated radiologically. It is not known whether all patients had complaints. A frequent cited annual rate of ASD is 2.9%, but a growing number of studies report a lower annual rate. Furthermore, maintaining motion to prevent ASD is one reason for implanting a cervical disk prosthesis. However, the results of studies contradict one another. Participants took part in a randomized controlled trial that ended prematurely because of the publication of evidence that did not justify continuation of the trial. The patients were randomly allocated to 3 groups, each of which received one of the abovementioned treatments. We defined symptomatic ASD as signs and symptoms caused by degeneration of an intervertebral disk adjacent to a level of previous anterior cervical disk surgery. At the last follow-up, we were able to ascertain whether clinically symptomatic ASD was present in any of the participants. The overall annual rate of symptomatic ASD was 0.7%. We found no statistically significant correlations between any of the investigated factors and symptomatic ASD except for the surgical method used. Symptomatic ASD was seen less often in anterior cervical discectomy solely or anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty than in anterior cervical discectomy with fusion by plate fixation. The annual rate of symptomatic ASD after an anterior cervical discectomy procedure was estimated to be 0.7%. This seems to be related to the procedure, although firm conclusions cannot be drawn. Level 2-prospective cohort.

  6. Symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslankoylu, Ali Ertug; Kuyucu, Necdet; Yilmaz, Berna Seker; Erdogan, Semra

    2011-11-21

    This study aimed to examine the incidence, epidemiology, and clinical characteristics of symptomatic and asymptomatic candidiasis in a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU), and to determine the risk factors associated with symptomatic candidiasis. This retrospective study included 67 patients from a 7-bed PICU in a tertiary care hospital that had Candida-positive cultures between April 2007 and July 2009. Demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients, Candida isolates, antimicrobial and antifungal treatments, and previously identified risk factors for symptomatic candidiasis were recorded, and symptomatic and asymptomatic patients were compared. In all, 36 (53.7%) of the patients with Candida-positive cultures had asymptomatic candidiasis and 31 (46.3%) had symptomatic candidiasis. Candida albicans was the most common Candida sp. in the asymptomatic patients (n = 20, 55.6%), versus Candida parapsilosis in the symptomatic patients (n = 15, 48.4%). The incidence of central venous catheter indwelling, blood transfusion, parenteral nutrition, and surgery was higher in the symptomatic patient group than in the asymptomatic patient group (P candidiasis according to forward stepwise multivariate logistic regression analysis (OR: 6.1; 95% CI: 1.798-20.692). Surgery was the only risk factor significantly associated with symptomatic candidiasis and non-albicans Candida species were more common among the patients with symptomatic candidiasis. While treating symptomatic candidiasis in any PICU an increase in the incidence of non-albicans candidiasis should be considered.

  7. Palliative radiotherapy for symptomatic osseous metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shigematsu, Naoyuki; Ito, Hisao; Toya, Kazuhito; Ko, Weijey; Kutsuki, Shouji; Tsukamoto, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Atsushi; Dokiya, Takushi; Yorozu, Atsunori.

    1995-01-01

    Bone matastases are one of the most common and serious conditions requiring radiotherapy, but there is still a considerable lack of agreement on optimal radiation schedule. We analyzed patients with symptomatic osseous matastases from lung (72 patients) and breast (63 patients) carcinoma treated by palliative radiotherapy between 1983 and 1992. In this series, the incidences of symptomatic bone metastases appearing within 2 years after the first diagnosis of the primary lesion were 96% and 36% for lung and breast carcinomas, respectively. Thirty percent of bone metastases from breast carcinoma were diagnosed more than 5 years after the first diagnosis. Thus careful follow-up must be carried out for a prolonged period. Pain relief was achieved at almost the same rate for bone metastases from lung and breast carcinomas (81% and 85%, respectively), an the rapid onset of pain relief (15 Gy or less) was obtained in about half the patients for both diseases. The rapid onset of pain relief and the lack of association between the onset of pain relief and primary tumor argued against the conventional theory that tumor shrinkage is a component of the initial response. In contrast to the fact that almost all lung carcinoma patients had very poor prognoses, one third of the breast carcinoma patients were alive more than 2 years after palliative radiotherapy. Thust, the late effects of radiation, such as radiation myelopathy, must be always considered especially in breast carcinoma patients even when it is 'just' palliative radiotherapy for bone metastases. (author)

  8. Review of acute symptomatic urolithiasis in Auckland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeff, Stephanie; Saluja, Manmeet; Rice, Michael

    2018-02-02

    To evaluate the incidence of acute symptomatic urolithiasis in the Auckland region. Associated epidemiological factors and stone characteristics were also studied and compared to previous research conducted in order to analyse trends. All patients that presented acutely with symptomatic urolithiasis to the Auckland District Health Board (AHDB) between July 2014 and June 2015 were studied. Clinical data was obtained from medical records and population data was based on estimates provided by the Ministry of Health. Two-tailed tests and the Pearson Chi-Square tests were used for analysis. Overall, 1,125 patients (1,328 events) presented with an incidence of 85 per 100,000 per year, which was lower than that reported in 2006. The highest incidence was found among the Middle Eastern ethnic subgroup (0.130 %), followed by Māori (0.102%), Asian (0.087%), European (0.084%) and Pacific (0.041%) ethnicity. Males were more likely to be affected than females. Urolithiasis was most common in the fifth decade of life (25%). Forty-seven percent of the study population presented with multiple stones and 64% had recurrent urolithiasis or were 'high risk' stone formers. Distal ureteric stones Auckland. This deviation could be attributed to the large influx of Asian immigrants observed in this period of time. A caucasian male, between 40-49 years, with a calculus <5mm in the distal ureter with a history of a previous urolithiasis has the highest chance to present with renal colic.

  9. Arrhythmogenic effects of hypoglycemia in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitriy Nikitich Laptev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To determine the effects of hypoglycemia on the duration of QT interval, heart rate variability (HRV and frequency of arrhythmic events, as well as to closer investigate the factors associated with the development of various heart rhythm disorders in children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM.Materials and methods. The study included 150 children and adolescents with T1DM at the age of 6–18 years. All participants underwent Holter monitoring and continuous glucose monitoring (CGM for 24 hours. QTc and HRV parameters (SDNN, RMSSD, SVVR were calculated automatically. Data was averaged for 5’-interval and juxtaposed with CGM. Patients identified with hypoglycemic events (blood glucose <3.5 mmol/L during the day (7:00–23:00 and nighttime (23:00–7:00 were selected for further study. In these patients length of QTc and RR intervals, HRV parameters and arrhythmic events were analyzed and collated with CGM data.Results. We observed 39 episodes of nocturnal hypoglycaemia in 32 patients (21.3% and 89 episodes of daytime hypoglycaemia in 46 patients (30.7%. Marked prolongation of QTc (hypo- vs. normoglycemia, respectively: 431 vs. 420 ms; p<0.05 and reduced HRV (hypo- vs. normoglycemia, respectively: SDNN 68 and 90 ms; RMSSD 56 and 61 ms; p <0.05 occurred during episodes of nocturnal hypoglycemia. The same pattern was observed during the day (hypo- vs. normoglycemia, respectively: SDNN 58 and 63 ms; RMSSD 32 and 36 ms; p<0.05. Eleven subjects with nocturnal hypoglycemia demonstrated either ventricular or supraventricular premature complexes. Thirty of subjects with diurnal hypoglycemia also had either ventricular or supraventricular premature complexes. Hypoglycemic episodes vs. normoglycemia were characterized by an increase in ventricular and supraventricular ectopic beats, ST segment and T-wave amplitude depression. Various rhythm abnormalities were associated with cardiovascular autonomic and peripheral neuropathy

  10. Asymptomatic versus symptomatic episodes in patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation via long-term monitoring with implantable loop recorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simantirakis, E N; Papakonstantinou, P E; Chlouverakis, G I; Kanoupakis, E M; Mavrakis, H E; Kallergis, E M; Arkolaki, E G; Vardas, P E

    2017-03-15

    The presentation of atrial fibrillation (AF) varies remarkably, from totally asymptomatic to symptomatic patients, while the same individual may present symptomatic and asymptomatic episodes. We aimed to identify electrocardiographic differences between symptomatic and asymptomatic episodes and to find parameters related to the appearance of symptoms. Thirty consecutive patients (age 66.9±10years) with paroxysmal AF received an implantable loop recorder. Three types of episodes were defined: asymptomatic (ASx), symptomatic (Sx), and mixed asymptomatic-symptomatic (AS-Sx). The heart rate (HR) and heart rate variability (HRV) were recorded during the first 2min of each ASx or Sx episode, and during the first 2min of both the symptomatic and asymptomatic periods in AS-Sx. Eighty-two episodes from twenty-five patients were evaluated. Mean HR was 142.48±25.84bpm for Sx and 95.71±19.29bpm for ASx (pASx (pASx were characterized by a lower HR and higher HRV compared to Sx. In As-Sx, the asymptomatic period was characterized by a lower HR and higher HRV compared to the symptomatic. These findings suggest a possible contribution of variations in the autonomic nervous system activity to the perception of the arrhythmia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The influence of baseline risk on the relation between HbA1c and risk for new cardiovascular events and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and symptomatic cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bots, Sophie H; van der Graaf, Yolanda; Nathoe, Hendrik M W; de Borst, Gert Jan; Kappelle, Jaap L; Visseren, Frank L J; Westerink, Jan

    2016-07-19

    Strict glycaemic control in patients with type 2 diabetes has proven to have microvascular benefits while the effects on CVD and mortality are less clear, especially in high risk patients. Whether strict glycaemic control would reduce the risk of future CVD or mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and pre-existing CVD, is unknown. This study aims to evaluate whether the relation between baseline HbA1c and new cardiovascular events or mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and pre-existing cardiovascular disease (CVD) is modified by baseline vascular risk. A cohort of 1096 patients with type 2 diabetes and CVD from the Second Manifestations of ARTerial Disease (SMART) study was followed. The relation between HbA1c at baseline and future vascular events (composite of myocardial infarction, stroke and vascular mortality) and all-cause mortality was evaluated with Cox proportional hazard analyses in a population that was stratified for baseline risk for vascular events as calculated with the SMART risk score. The mean follow-up duration was 6.9 years for all-cause mortality and 6.4 years for vascular events, in which period 243 and 223 cases were reported, respectively. A 1 % increase in HbA1c was associated with a higher risk for all-cause mortality (HR 1.18, 95 % CI 1.06-1.31). This association was also found in the highest SMART risk quartile (HR 1.33, 95 % CI 1.11-1.60). There was no relation between HbA1c and the occurrence of cardiovascular events during follow-up (HR 1.03, 95 % CI 0.91-1.16). The interaction term between HbA1c and SMART risk score was not significantly related to any of the outcomes. In patients with type 2 diabetes and CVD, HbA1c is related to the risk of all-cause mortality, but not to the risk of cardiovascular events. The relation between HbA1c and all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes and vascular disease is not dependent on baseline vascular risk.

  12. Interpersonal problems as predictors of alliance, symptomatic improvement and premature termination in treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinger, Ulrike; Zilcha-Mano, Sigal; McCarthy, Kevin S; Barrett, Marna S; Barber, Jacques P

    2013-11-01

    Previous studies reported inconsistent findings regarding the association of interpersonal problems with therapy outcome. The current study investigates if interpersonal problems predict process and outcome of three different treatments for depression. The data originate from a randomized clinical trial comparing supportive-expressive psychotherapy, antidepressant medication and pill-placebo for treatment of depression. Interpersonal problems were used as predictors of alliance, symptomatic improvement and premature termination of treatment. Interpersonal problems related to communion predicted better alliances, but slower symptomatic improvement. Low agency predicted slower symptomatic improvement in supportive-expressive psychotherapy, but not in the medication or placebo condition. Lower interpersonal distress was associated with an increased likelihood to terminate treatment prematurely. The sample size did not allow the detection of small effects within the treatment groups. Interpersonal problems are influential for the treatment of depression, but parts of their effects depend on the type of treatment. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Removal of symptomatic craniofacial titanium hardware following craniotomy: Case series and review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheri K. Palejwala

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Titanium craniofacial hardware has become commonplace for reconstruction and bone flap fixation following craniotomy. Complications of titanium hardware include palpability, visibility, infection, exposure, pain, and hardware malfunction, which can necessitate hardware removal. We describe three patients who underwent craniofacial reconstruction following craniotomies for trauma with post-operative courses complicated by medically intractable facial pain. All three patients subsequently underwent removal of the symptomatic craniofacial titanium hardware and experienced rapid resolution of their painful parasthesias. Symptomatic plates were found in the region of the frontozygomatic suture or MacCarty keyhole, or in close proximity with the supraorbital nerve. Titanium plates, though relatively safe and low profile, can cause local nerve irritation or neuropathy. Surgeons should be cognizant of the potential complications of titanium craniofacial hardware and locations that are at higher risk for becoming symptomatic necessitating a second surgery for removal.

  14. Tissue Velocities and Myocardial Deformation in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic Aortic Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carstensen, Helle Gervig; Larsen, Linnea Hornbech; Hassager, Christian

    2015-01-01

    was to compare velocity (color Doppler tissue imaging) and deformation (two-dimensional speckle-tracking echocardiography) in relation to global and regional longitudinal function in asymptomatic and severe symptomatic aortic stenosis. METHODS: In a cross-sectional design, 231 patients with aortic stenosis were...... divided into four groups: asymptomatic moderate aortic stenosis (aortic valve area, 1.0-1.5 cm(2); n = 38), asymptomatic severe aortic stenosis (aortic valve area reduced (... to be symptomatic (odds ratio, 4.97; 95% CI, 2.6-9.4; P velocity...

  15. [Laparoscopic cleavage in splenic symptomatic cyst].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-López, Antonio-José; Candel-Arenas, Marifé; González-Valverde, Francisco-Miguel; Luján-Martínez, Delia; Medina-Manuel, Esther; Albarracín Marín-Blázquez, Antonio

    2017-12-01

    Splenic cysts are rare diseases that are diagnosed incidentally during imaging studies. When cysts are recognized, surgical treatment is recommended adapted to the particular case, depending on the size and location of the cyst and the age of the patient in order to avoid dangerous complications such as spleen rupture or cyst infection with abscess. We report 2patients with symptomatic splenic epidermoid cyst treated by laparoscopic cleavage. Laparoscopic cleavage is a surgical option for splenic cyst, with the goal of reducing postoperative complications while preserving splenic function. Copyright © 2016 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D and symptomatic ischemic stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndum-Jacobsen, Peter; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Schnohr, Peter

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that low plasma concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D are associated with increased risk of symptomatic ischemic stroke in the general population. METHODS: We measured plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D in 10,170 individuals from the general population, the Copenhagen...... City Heart Study. During 21 years of follow-up, 1,256 and 164 persons developed ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke, respectively. In a meta-analysis of ischemic stroke, we included 10 studies, 58,384 participants, and 2,644 events. RESULTS: Stepwise decreasing plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D concentrations...... were associated with stepwise increasing risk of ischemic stroke both as a function of seasonally adjusted percentile categories and as a function of clinical categories of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (p for trend ≤ 2 × 10(-3) ). In a Cox regression model comparing individuals with plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D...

  17. Symptomatic Primary (AL Amyloidosis of the Stomach and Duodenum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reidar Fossmark

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary (AL amyloidosis of the gastrointestinal tract is relatively rare, and symptomatic amyloidosis of the stomach is even more seldom. We present the case of a patient who was referred to upper endoscopy because of weight loss, nausea, and vomiting. Large areas of intramucosal hemorrhages were seen, and biopsies resulted in profuse bleeding stopped with endoscopic clips. The biopsies showed amyloid depositions and further workup revealed that the patient also had cardiac and neuropathic involvements. The patient started treatment with dexamethasone, melphalan and bortezomib. After treatment was started the nausea and epigastric discomfort improved, and a reduction in the biochemical markers troponin T, NT-proBNP, and M-component was observed. Gastric amyloidosis is rarely seen at upper endoscopy in patients without a previously established diagnosis, but the unusual endoscopic findings and bleeding tendency after biopsy should be kept in mind by gastroenterologists.

  18. Descriptions of health states associated with increasing severity and frequency of hypoglycemia: a patient-level perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harris SB

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Stewart B Harris,1 Kamlesh Khunti,2 Mona Landin-Olsson,3 Claus B Galbo-Jørgensen,4 Mette Bøgelund,4 Barrie Chubb,5 Jens Gundgaard,6 Marc Evans71Schulich School of Medicine and Dentistry, Western University, London, ON, Canada; 2Diabetes Research Unit, University of Leicester, Leicester, UK; 3Department of Medicine, Helsingborg Hospital, Lund University, Lund, Sweden; 4Incentive, Holte Stationsvej, Holte, Denmark; 5EU Health Economics and Outcomes Research, Novo Nordisk Ltd, Crawley, UK; 6Health Economics and HTA, Novo Nordisk A/S, Søborg, Denmark; 7Department of Diabetes, University Hospital Llandough, Cardiff, UKAims: We sought to develop descriptions of health states associated with daytime and nocturnal hypoglycemia in a structured fashion from the patient's perspective under different combinations of severity and frequency of hypoglycemic events.Methods: An expert meeting followed by two patient focus groups was used to develop comprehensive descriptions of acute consequences of severe and non-severe, daytime and nocturnal hypoglycemia. Patients with diabetes (type 1 = 85, type 2 = 162 from a survey panel then validated these descriptions and assessed how often they worried and took different actions to prevent hypoglycemia. Severity and frequency of hypoglycemia were compared with respect to how often people worried and took actions to prevent an event. The effect of hypoglycemia on 35 different life activities was quantitatively compared for patients who had and had not experienced a severe hypoglycemic event.Results: At least 95% of respondents agreed that the detailed patient-level descriptions of health states accurately reflected their experience of severe and non-severe, daytime and nocturnal hypoglycemia, thereby validating these descriptions. Respondents who had experienced a severe hypoglycemic event were generally more adversely affected in their worries and actions and life events than those who experienced only non

  19. Effects of Sleep Deprivation on Hypoglycemia-Induced Cognitive Impairment and Recovery in Adults With Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkster, Berit E; Zammitt, Nicola N; Ritchie, Stuart J; Deary, Ian J; Morrison, Ian; Frier, Brian M

    2016-05-01

    To ascertain whether hypoglycemia in association with sleep deprivation causes greater cognitive dysfunction than hypoglycemia alone and protracts cognitive recovery after normoglycemia is restored. Fourteen adults with type 1 diabetes underwent a hyperinsulinemic, hypoglycemic clamp on two separate occasions. Before one glucose clamp, the participants stayed awake overnight to induce sleep deprivation. Participants were randomized and counterbalanced to the experimental condition. Cognitive function tests were performed before and during hypoglycemia and for 90 min after restoration of normoglycemia. Cognitive impairment during hypoglycemia did not differ significantly between the sleep-deprived and non-sleep-deprived conditions. However, in the sleep-deprived state, digit symbol substitution scores and choice reaction times were significantly poorer during recovery (P sleep deprivation, such as tiredness, were removed. Hypoglycemia per se produced a significant decrement in cognitive function; coexisting sleep deprivation did not have an additive effect. However, after restoration of normoglycemia, preceding sleep deprivation was associated with persistence of hypoglycemic symptoms and greater and more prolonged cognitive dysfunction during the recovery period. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  20. Management of Refractory Noninsulinoma Pancreatogenous Hypoglycemia Syndrome with Gastric Bypass Reversal: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhavana B. Rao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB is a commonly performed, effective bariatric procedure; however, rarely, complications such as postprandial hypoglycemia due to noninsulinoma pancreatogenous hypoglycemia syndrome (NIPHS may ensue. Management of refractory NIPHS is challenging. We report a case that was successfully treated with RYGB reversal. Case Report. A 58-year-old male with history of RYGB nine months earlier for morbid obesity presented for evaluation of postprandial, hypoglycemic seizures. Testing for insulin level, insulin antibodies, oral hypoglycemic agents, pituitary axis hormone levels, and cortisol stimulation was unrevealing. Computed tomography (CT scan of the abdomen was unremarkable. A 72-hour fast was completed without hypoglycemia. Mixed meal testing demonstrated endogenous hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (EHH and selective arterial calcium stimulation testing (SACST was positive. Strict dietary modifications, maximal medical therapy, gastrostomy tube feeding, and stomal reduction failed to alleviate symptoms. Ultimately, he underwent laparoscopic reversal of RYGB. Now, 9 months after reversal, he has markedly reduced hypoglycemia burden. Discussion. Hyperfunctioning islets secondary to exaggerated incretin response and altered intestinal nutrient delivery are hypothesized to be causative in NIPHS. For refractory cases, there is increasing skepticism about the safety and efficacy of pancreatic resection. RYGB reversal may be successful.

  1. Enhanced 911/global position system wizard: a telemedicine application for the prevention of severe hypoglycemia--monitor, alert, and locate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dassau, Eyal; Jovanovic, Lois; Doyle, Francis J; Zisser, Howard C

    2009-11-01

    Intensive insulin therapy has an inherent risk of hypoglycemia that can lead to loss of consciousness, cardiac arrhythmia, seizure, and death ("dead-in-bed syndrome"). This risk of hypoglycemia is a major concern for patients, families, and physicians. The need for an automated system that can alert in the event of severe hypoglycemia is evident. In engineering systems, where there is a risk of malfunction of the primary control system, alert and safety mechanisms are implemented in layers of protection. This concept has been adopted in the proposed system that integrates a hypoglycemia prediction algorithm with a global position system (GPS) locator and short message service such that the current glucose value with the rate of change (ROC) and the location of the subject can be communicated to a predefined list. Furthermore, if the system is linked to the insulin pump, it can suspend the pump or decrease the basal insulin infusion rate to prevent the pending event. The system was evaluated on clinical datasets of glucose tracings from the DexCom Seven system. Glucose tracings were analyzed for hypoglycemia events and then a text message was broadcast to a predefined list of people who were notified with the glucose value, ROC, GPS coordinates, and a Google map of the location. In addition to providing a safety layer to a future artificial pancreas, this system also can be easily implemented in current continuous glucose monitors to help provide information and alerts to people with diabetes.

  2. The incidence and risk factors associated with developing symptoms of hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Clare J; Brown, Todd T; Schweitzer, Michael; Magnuson, Thomas; Clark, Jeanne M

    2018-01-31

    Hypoglycemia after bariatric surgery is an increasingly recognized metabolic complication associated with exaggerated secretion of insulin and gut hormones. We sought to determine the incidence of hypoglycemic symptoms (hypo-sx) after bariatric surgery and characteristics of those affected compared with those unaffected. University hospital. We collected retrospective survey data from the patients who underwent bariatric surgery at a single center. Based on number and severity of postprandial hypo-sx in Edinburgh hypoglycemia questionnaire postoperatively, patients without preoperative hypo-sx were grouped into high versus low suspicion for hypoglycemia. We used multivariable logistic regression to examine potential baseline and operative risk factors for the development of hypo-sx after surgery. Among the 1119 patients who had undergone bariatric surgery who received the questionnaire, 464 (40.6%) responded. Among the 341 respondents without preexisting hypo-sx, 29% (n = 99) had new-onset hypo-sx, and most were severe cases (n = 92) with neuroglycopenic symptoms. Compared with the low suspicion group, the high suspicion group consisted of more female patients, younger patients, patients without diabetes, and those who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass with a longer time since surgery and more weight loss. In multivariate analysis, factors independently associated with incidence of hypo-sx after bariatric surgery were female sex (P = .003), Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (P = .001), and absence of preexisting diabetes (P = .011). New onset postprandial hypoglycemic symptoms after bariatric surgery are common, affecting up to a third of those who underwent bariatric surgery. Many affected individuals reported neuroglycopenic symptoms and were more likely to be female and nondiabetic and to have undergone Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Severe Hypoglycemia Is a Serious Complication and Becoming an Economic Burden in Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Chul Ha

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundThe prevalence of hypoglycemia is increasing due to the growing incidence of diabetes and the latest strict guidelines for glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c levels under 7%. This study examined the clinical characteristics, causal factors, and medical costs of severely hypoglycemic patients in an emergency room (ER of Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital.MethodsThe study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the characteristics, risk factors, and medical costs of 320 severely hypoglycemic patients with diabetes who presented to an ER of Uijeongbu St. Mary's Hospital from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2009.ResultsMost hypoglycemic patients (87.5%, 280/320 were over 60 years old with a mean age of 69.5±10.9 years and a mean HbA1c level of 6.95±1.46%. Mean serum glucose as noted in the ER was 37.9±34.5 mg/dL. Renal function was decreased, serum creatinine was 2.0±2.1 mg/dL and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR was 48.0±33.6 mL/min/1.73 m2. In addition, hypoglycemic patients typically were taking sulfonylureas or insulin and a variety of other medications, and had a long history of diabetes.ConclusionSevere hypoglycemia is frequent in older diabetic patients, subjects with low HbA1c levels, and nephropathic patients. Therefore, personalized attention is warranted, especially in long-term diabetics with multiple comorbidities who may not have been properly educated or may need re-education for hypoglycemia.

  4. Role of glucagon in countering hypoglycemia induced by insulin infusion in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbins, R L; Connolly, C C; Neal, D W; Palladino, L J; Parlow, A F; Cherrington, A D

    1991-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to characterize the role of glucagon in countering the prolonged hypoglycemia resulting from insulin infusion and to determine whether its effect is manifest through glycogenolysis and/or gluconeogenesis. Two groups of 18-h fasted somatostatin-treated dogs were given intraportal insulin at 5 mU.kg-1.min-1. In one group (SimGGN; n = 6), glucagon was infused intraportally so as to mimic the normal response to hypoglycemia. In a second group (BasGGN; n = 6), glucagon was infused at a basal rate. Glucose turnover and gluconeogenesis were assessed by combining tracer and hepatic balance techniques. Exogenous glucose was infused as needed to maintain equivalent hypoglycemia at approximately 45 mg/dl in the two groups. Although glucagon concentrations were significantly different, the levels of other counterregulatory hormones were equivalent in both experimental protocols. Endogenous glucose production (EGP) in SimGGN doubled from 2.4 +/- 0.2 to 5.4 +/- 0.8 mg.kg-1.min-1 by 1 h before dropping to 4.5 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 in the 3rd h of insulin infusion. EGP in BasGGN was initially 2.5 +/- 0.1 mg.kg-1.min-1, unchanged by 1 h, and increased to 3.9 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1 by the 3rd h of insulin infusion. In the 1st h of insulin infusion, the rise in gluconeogenesis in both groups was equal and represented only a small part of total EGP. By the 3rd h, gluconeogenesis was the major contributor to total EGP, and gluconeogenic efficiency increased significantly more in SimGGN than BasGGN (261 vs. 140%, P less than 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  5. The GOAT-ghrelin system is not essential for hypoglycemia prevention during prolonged calorie restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Xia Yi

    Full Text Available Ghrelin acylation by ghrelin O-acyltransferase (GOAT has recently been reported to be essential for the prevention of hypoglycemia during prolonged negative energy balance. Using a unique set of four different genetic loss-of-function models for the GOAT/ghrelin/growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR system, we thoroughly tested the hypothesis that lack-of-ghrelin activation or signaling would lead to hypoglycemia during caloric deprivation.Male and female knockout (KO mice for GOAT, ghrelin, GHSR, or both ghrelin and GHSR (dKO were subjected to prolonged calorie restriction (40% of ad libitum chow intake. Body weight, fat mass, and glucose levels were recorded daily and compared to wildtype (WT controls. Forty-eight hour blood glucose profiles were generated for each individual mouse when 2% or less body fat mass was reached. Blood samples were obtained for analysis of circulating levels of acyl- and desacyl-ghrelin, IGF-1, and insulin.Chronic calorie restriction progressively decreased body weight and body fat mass in all mice regardless of genotype. When fat mass was depleted to 2% or less of body weight for 2 consecutive days, random hypoglycemic events occurred in some mice across all genotypes. There was no increase in the incidence of hypoglycemia in any of the four loss-of-function models for ghrelin signaling including GOAT KO mice. Furthermore, no differences in insulin or IGF-1 levels were observed between genotypes.The endogenous GOAT-ghrelin-GHSR system is not essential for the maintenance of euglycemia during prolonged calorie restriction.

  6. Threshold-based insulin-pump interruption for reduction of hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergenstal, Richard M; Klonoff, David C; Garg, Satish K; Bode, Bruce W; Meredith, Melissa; Slover, Robert H; Ahmann, Andrew J; Welsh, John B; Lee, Scott W; Kaufman, Francine R

    2013-07-18

    The threshold-suspend feature of sensor-augmented insulin pumps is designed to minimize the risk of hypoglycemia by interrupting insulin delivery at a preset sensor glucose value. We evaluated sensor-augmented insulin-pump therapy with and without the threshold-suspend feature in patients with nocturnal hypoglycemia. We randomly assigned patients with type 1 diabetes and documented nocturnal hypoglycemia to receive sensor-augmented insulin-pump therapy with or without the threshold-suspend feature for 3 months. The primary safety outcome was the change in the glycated hemoglobin level. The primary efficacy outcome was the area under the curve (AUC) for nocturnal hypoglycemic events. Two-hour threshold-suspend events were analyzed with respect to subsequent sensor glucose values. A total of 247 patients were randomly assigned to receive sensor-augmented insulin-pump therapy with the threshold-suspend feature (threshold-suspend group, 121 patients) or standard sensor-augmented insulin-pump therapy (control group, 126 patients). The changes in glycated hemoglobin values were similar in the two groups. The mean AUC for nocturnal hypoglycemic events was 37.5% lower in the threshold-suspend group than in the control group (980 ± 1200 mg per deciliter [54.4 ± 66.6 mmol per liter] × minutes vs. 1568 ± 1995 mg per deciliter [87.0 ± 110.7 mmol per liter] × minutes, Ppump was stopped for 2 hours, the mean sensor glucose value was 92.6 ± 40.7 mg per deciliter (5.1 ± 2.3 mmol per liter). Four patients (all in the control group) had a severe hypoglycemic event; no patients had diabetic ketoacidosis. This study showed that over a 3-month period the use of sensor-augmented insulin-pump therapy with the threshold-suspend feature reduced nocturnal hypoglycemia, without increasing glycated hemoglobin values. (Funded by Medtronic MiniMed; ASPIRE ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01497938.).

  7. Symptomatic relapse of HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. Cryptococcal meningitis is the most common cause of adult meningitis in southern Africa. Much of this disease burden is thought to be due to symptomatic relapse of previously treated infection. We studied the contribution of inadequate secondary fluconazole prophylaxis to symptomatic relapses of cryptococcal ...

  8. Severe hypoglycemia identifies vulnerable patients with type 2 diabetes at risk for premature death and all-site cancer: the Hong Kong diabetes registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Alice P S; Yang, Xilin; Luk, Andrea; Ma, Ronald C W; So, Wing Yee; Ozaki, Risa; Ting, Rose; Cheung, Kitty; Ho, Chung Shun; Chan, Michael H M; Chow, Chun Chung; Chan, Juliana C N

    2014-04-01

    OBJECTIVE We examined the associations of clinical profiles in type 2 diabetic patients who developed severe hypoglycemia and their clinical outcomes, including death and all-site cancer. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A consecutive cohort of 8,767 type 2 diabetic patients with and without severe hypoglycemia in the 12 months before enrollment were recruited between 1995 and 2007, with follow-up until 2009. Severe hypoglycemia was defined by ICD-9 codes as hospitalizations resulting from hypoglycemia. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to calculate the hazard ratio (HR) and 95% CIs of clinical factors collected at enrollment for severe hypoglycemia. RESULTS In this cohort, mean age was 57.4 (SD 13.2) years and median disease duration of diabetes was 5 (interquartile range [IQR] 1-11) years. During a median follow-up of 6.71 (IQR 3.47-10.38) years, 235 patients had severe hypoglycemia (incidence 3.96 [95% CI 3.45-4.46] per 1,000 patient-years). At enrollment, patients with and without severe hypoglycemia had similar cancer rates. During follow-up, patients with severe hypoglycemia had a higher incidence of all-site cancer (13.4 vs. 6.4%, P < 0.0001) and mortality (32.8 vs. 11.2%, P < 0.0001) than those without severe hypoglycemia. After adjusting for confounders, old age, low BMI, high glycated hemoglobin, low triglyceride (TG), low LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), albuminuria, and chronic kidney disease were independent predictors for severe hypoglycemia. CONCLUSIONS In type 2 diabetes, severe hypoglycemia is associated with advanced age, renal dysfunction, poor glycemic control, and cancer subphenotypes (low BMI, low LDL-C, and low TG).

  9. Overnight Glucose Control with Dual- and Single-Hormone Artificial Pancreas in Type 1 Diabetes with Hypoglycemia Unawareness: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitbol, Alexander; Rabasa-Lhoret, Remi; Messier, Virginie; Legault, Laurent; Smaoui, Mohamad; Cohen, Nathan; Haidar, Ahmad

    2018-03-01

    The dual-hormone (insulin and glucagon) artificial pancreas may be justifiable in some, but not all, patients. We sought to compare dual- and single-hormone artificial pancreas systems in patients with hypoglycemia unawareness and documented nocturnal hypoglycemia. We conducted a randomized crossover trial comparing the efficacy of dual- and single-hormone artificial pancreas systems in controlling plasma glucose levels over the course of one night's sleep. We recruited 18 adult participants with hypoglycemia unawareness and 17 participants with hypoglycemia awareness, all of whom had documented nocturnal hypoglycemia during 2 weeks of screening. Outcomes were calculated using plasma glucose. In participants with hypoglycemia unawareness, the median (interquartile range [IQR]) percentage of time that plasma glucose was below 4.0 mmol/L was 0% (0-0) on dual-hormone artificial pancreas nights and 0% (0-10) on single-hormone artificial pancreas nights (P = 0.20). Additionally, participants with hypoglycemia unawareness experienced two hypoglycemic events (dual-hormone artificial pancreas nights and three hypoglycemic events on single-hormone artificial pancreas nights. In participants with hypoglycemia awareness, the median (IQR) percentage of time that plasma glucose was below 4.0 mmol/L was 0% (0-0) on both dual- and single-hormone artificial pancreas nights. Hypoglycemia awareness participants experienced zero hypoglycemic events on dual-hormone artificial pancreas nights and one event on single-hormone artificial pancreas nights. In this study, dual-hormone and single-hormone systems performed equally well in preventing nocturnal hypoglycemia in participants with hypoglycemia unawareness. Longer studies over the course of multiple days and nights may be needed to explore possible specific benefits in this population. ClinicalTrials.gov No. NCT02282254.

  10. An international survey on hypoglycemia among insulin-treated type I and type II diabetes patients: Turkey cohort of the non-interventional IO HAT study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emral, Rıfat; Tetiker, Tamer; Sahin, Ibrahim; Sari, Ramazan; Kaya, Ahmet; Yetkin, İlhan; Cil, Sefika Uslu; Tütüncü, Neslihan Başcıl

    2018-02-13

    Limited real-world data are currently available on hypoglycemia in diabetes patients. The International Operations Hypoglycemia Assessment Tool (IO HAT) study was designed to estimate hypoglycemia in insulin-treated type I (T1DM) and type II (T2DM) diabetes mellitus patients from 9 countries. The data from Turkey cohort are presented here. A non-interventional study to determine the hypoglycemia incidence, retrospectively and prospectively, in Turkish T1DM and T2DM patients using a 2-part self-assessment questionnaire. Overall, 2348 patients were enrolled in the Turkey cohort (T1DM = 306 patients, T2DM = 2042 patients). In T1DM patients, 96.8% patients reported hypoglycemic events (Incidence rate [IR]: 68.6 events per patient-year [ppy]), prospectively, while 74.0% patients reported hypoglycemic events (IR: 51.7 events ppy), retrospectively. In T2DM patients, 95.9% patients (IR: 28.3 events ppy) reported hypoglycemic events, prospectively, while 53.6% patients (IR: 23.0 events ppy) reported hypoglycemic events, retrospectively. Nearly all patients reported hypoglycemia during the prospective period. This is a first patient-reported dataset on hypoglycemia in Turkish, insulin-treated diabetes patients. A high incidence of patient-reported hypoglycemia confirms that hypoglycemia remains under-estimated. Hypoglycemia increased healthcare utilization impacting patients' quality of life. Hypoglycemia remains a common side effect with insulin-treatment and strategies to optimize therapy and reduce hypoglycemia occurrence in diabetes patients are required. Clinicaltrials.gov, NCT02306681 (Date of registration: 12 Nov 2014; retrospectively registered).

  11. Symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. Features and surgical outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Date, Isao

    2010-01-01

    Development of less invasive imaging studies, such as magnetic resonance angiography, has increased the chances that unruptured cerebral aneurysms are found. The rupture risk of 'symptomatic' aneurysms is higher than for 'asymptomatic' aneurysms; so 'symptomatic' aneurysms are more often surgically treated. Many reviews examine 'asymptomatic' unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but few evaluate 'symptomatic' aneurysms. The author has treated many patients with symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms and found that improved cranial nerve signs can be expected if the surgical treatment is performed before the symptoms become irreversible; the critical period is approximately 3 months. It is important to suppress the pulsation of the aneurysms compressing the cranial nerves; both a clipping procedure and endovascular coiling are effective. Cranial nerve signs are more commonly the symptoms of unruptured cerebral aneurysms, but large to giant aneurysms can also be the causes of hemiparesis, hydrocephalus, epilepsy, or even cerebral infarction. This review summarizes the features and surgical outcome of symptomatic unruptured cerebral aneurysms. (author)

  12. Acute symptomatic hypocalcemia from immune checkpoint therapy-induced hypoparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Myint Aung; Thein, Kyaw Zin; Qdaisat, Aiham; Yeung, Sai-Ching Jim

    2017-07-01

    Ipilimumab (a monoclonal antibody against CTLA-4) and nivolumab (a humanized antibody against PD-1) target these immune checkpoint pathways and are used for treatment of melanoma and an increasing number of other cancers. However, they may cause immune-related adverse effects (IRAEs). Although many endocrinopathies are known to be IRAEs, primary hypoparathyroidism with severe hypocalcemia has never been reported. This is the first case of hypoparathyroidism as an IRAE presenting to an Emergency Department with acute hypocalcemia. A 73-year-old man with metastatic melanoma presented to the Emergency Department for the chief complaints of imbalance, general muscle weakness, abdominal pain and tingling in extremities. He had wide spread metastasis, and begun immunotherapy with concurrent ipilimumab and nivolumab 1.5months ago. At presentation, he had ataxia, paresthesia in the hands and feet, and abdominal cramping. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was unremarkable. He was found to be hypocalcemic with undetectable plasma parathyroid hormone. He was admitted for treatment of symptomatic hypocalcemia and was diagnosed with primary hypoparathyroidism. Shortly afterwards, he had thyrotoxicosis manifesting as tachycardia and anxiety, followed by development of primary hypothyroidism. At 4months after the Emergency Department visit, his parathyroid function and thyroid function had not recovered, and required continued thyroid hormone replacement and calcium and vitamin D treatment for hypocalcemia. Primary hypoparathyroidism caused by ipilimumab and nivolumab may acute manifest with severe symptomatic hypocalcemia. Emergency care providers should be aware of hypoparathyroidism as a new IRAE in this new era of immuno-oncology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. A Comparative Study of Blood Glucose Measurements Using Glucometer Readings and the Standard Method in the Diagnosis of Neonatal Hypoglycemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Torkaman

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hypoglycemia is one of the most common neonatal disorders, associated with severe complications. There has been a great deal of controversy regarding the definition and screening of hypoglycemia. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine a cut-off value for blood glucose level in glucometer readings. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 238 newborns at risk of hypoglycemia, admitted to Baqiyatallah Hospital of Tehran, Iran in 2012; the subjects were selected via simple sampling. After obtaining informed consents from the newborns’ parents, 1 cc blood samples were sent to the laboratory for measuring the blood glucose level. Moreover, venous blood samples, as well as heel-stick blood samples, were obtained for glucometer measurements. Blood glucose measurements were used to determine the cut-off value by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve and make comparisons with the diagnostic criteria for hypoglycemia in the literature. Results: A total of 238 infants with the mean weight of 2869±821.9 g were enrolled in this study. The mean (±SD blood glucose levels were 65.1±22.9, 82.9±24.7, and 84.4±24.8 mg/dl, based on the standard laboratory method, glucometer reading of venous blood samples, and glucometer reading of heel-stick capillary blood samples, respectively. The optimal cut-off point for hypoglycemia was determined as 65 mg/dl, using glucometer-based assessment of heel-stick blood samples. Conclusion: The significant difference in blood glucose levels measured by the laboratory method and outpatient glucometer readings highlights the importance of a cut-off value for rapid assessment and control of blood glucose and timely detection of hypoglycemia. In fact, the cut-off value introduced in the present study could facilitate such measurements.

  14. [Laparoscopic management of symptomatic urachal anomalies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Ismayel, Alexis; Cruz-González, Germán; Sánchez, Renata; Sánchez-Salas, Rodolfo; Rodríguez, Omaira; Sanabria, Erasmo; Sotelo, Rene; Sánchez-Salas, Rafael E

    2009-03-01

    Acquired urachal anomalies are a rare pathology. Gold-standard treatment for this clinical situation remains the resection of the urachus in its entire tract with or without partial resection of the bladder. Our aim is to up-date authors's experience in the minimally invasive surgical treatment of acquired urachal disease. From 2001 to 2007, 14 patients were operated for acquired urachal disease at our institution. A three portal technique previously described by the authors was employed. The diagnosis of acquired uracal disease was confirmed in all cases and the resection of the urachus in its entire tract performed in cephalocaudal direction onto the bladder. Operative and demographic data was prospectively collected and analysis retrospectively performed. Mean operative time was 63 minutes (45,110), minimal blood loss, and no conversions to open surgery or perioperative complications were verified. The majority of the patients were discharged in the first 24 hours. At a follow-up of 22 months no recurrences of urachal pathology recurrences have been verified. Laparoscopy plays a significant role in the management of symptomatic urachus anomalies. It allows objective confirmation of clinical diagnosis and adequate resection of the urachus in a safe and efficient fashion, while providing the well-known advantages of minimally acces surgery. Preoperative evaluation work-up has minimal impact of therapeutical decision.

  15. Neonatal management of symptomatic transplacental cryoglobulinaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laugel, V; Goetz, J; Wolff, S; Beladdale, J; Sibilia, J; Messer, J

    2004-04-01

    This study reports the first case of symptomatic placental transfer of cryoglobulins and discusses the potential pathogenic processes and the basic guidelines for neonatal management. A 32-y-old woman was affected by essential type I cryoglobulinaemia and displayed the cold-triggered cutaneous symptoms of the disease due to a monoclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) cryoglobulin. She gave birth to healthy dizygotic twins who were placed in incubators immediately after birth and did not show any cutaneous or visceral lesion in the first 2 d. Cyanotic macules appeared on the hand and foot of one of the newborns when they were removed from the incubators. The same monoclonal IgG-lambda cryoglobulin was identified in the two newborns' cord blood and in the mother's serum. The skin lesions disappeared within 1 wk as both twins were transiently replaced in incubators. No recurrence of skin lesions was observed even at room temperature and, 6 mo later, both twins were healthy and their clinical examination was normal. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of placental transfer of cryoglobulins and the first description of any neonatal effect. Neonates born to mothers suffering from IgG cryoglobulinaemia should be protected against cold to avoid precipitation of the pathogenic cryoglobulins, until spontaneous resolution.

  16. Nondiabetic Hypoglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Center Pacientes y Cuidadores Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ... an Endocrinologist Clinical Trials Hormones and Health The Endocrine System Hormones Endocrine Disrupting Chemicals (EDCs) Steroid and Hormone ...

  17. Glucose and amino acid metabolism in rat brain during sustained hypoglycemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, K.L.; Tyce, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    The metabolism of glucose in brains during sustained hypoglycemia was studied. [U- 14 C]Glucose (20 microCi) was injected into control rats, and into rats at 2.5 hr after a bolus injection of 2 units of insulin followed by a continuous infusion of 0.2 units/100 g rat/hr. This regimen of insulin injection was found to result in steady-state plasma glucose levels between 2.5 and 3.5 mumol per ml. In the brains of control rats carbon was transferred rapidly from glucose to glutamate, glutamine, gamma-aminobutyric acid and aspartate and this carbon was retained in the amino acids for at least 60 min. In the brains of hypoglycemic rats, the conversion of carbon from glucose to amino acids was increased in the first 15 min after injection. After 15 min, the specific activity of the amino acids decreased in insulin-treated rats but not in the controls. The concentrations of alanine, glutamate, and gamma-amino-butyric acid decreased, and the concentration of aspartate increased, in the brains of the hypoglycemic rats. The concentration of pyridoxal-5'-phosphate, a cofactor in many of the reactions whereby these amino acids are formed from tricarboxylic acid cycle intermediates, was less in the insulin-treated rats than in the controls. These data provide evidence that glutamate, glutamine, aspartate, and GABA can serve as energy sources in brain during insulin-induced hypoglycemia

  18. Hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetic pregnancy: role of preconception insulin aspart treatment in a randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Simon; Damm, Peter; Mersebach, Henriette; Skjøth, Trine Vang; Kaaja, Risto; Hod, Moshe; Durán-García, Santiago; McCance, David; Mathiesen, Elisabeth R

    2010-03-01

    OBJECTIVE A recent randomized trial compared prandial insulin aspart (IAsp) with human insulin in type 1 diabetic pregnancy. The aim of this exploratory analysis was to investigate the incidence of severe hypoglycemia during pregnancy and compare women enrolled preconception with women enrolled during early pregnancy. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS IAsp administered immediately before each meal was compared with human insulin administered 30 min before each meal in 99 subjects (44 to IAsp and 55 to human insulin) randomly assigned preconception and in 223 subjects (113 for IAsp and 110 for human insulin) randomly assigned in early pregnancy (IAsp versus human insulin were 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.9 versus 2.4, 0.3 versus 1.2, and 0.2 versus 2.2 episodes per patient per year, respectively (NS). CONCLUSIONS These data suggest that initiation of insulin analog treatment preconception rather than during early pregnancy may result in a lower risk of severe hypoglycemia in women with type 1 diabetes.

  19. Smoking and the Risk of Hospitalization for Symptomatic Diverticular Disease: A Population-Based Cohort Study from Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, David J; Ludvigsson, Jonas F; Jarvholm, Bengt

    2016-02-01

    Current studies reporting on the risk of smoking and development of symptomatic diverticular disease have reported conflicting results. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between smoking and symptomatic diverticular disease. This is a cohort study : Information was derived from the Swedish Construction Workers Cohort 1971-1993. Patients were selected from construction workers in Sweden. The primary outcome measured was the development of symptomatic diverticular disease and complicated diverticular disease (abscess and perforation) as identified in the Swedish Hospital Discharge Register. Adjusted relative risks of symptomatic diverticular disease according to smoking status were estimated by using negative binomial regression analysis. In total, the study included 232,685 men and 14,592 women. During follow-up, 3891 men and 318 women had a diagnosis of later symptomatic diverticular disease. In men, heavy smokers (≥15 cigarettes a day) had a 1.6-fold increased risk of developing symptomatic diverticular disease compared with nonsmokers (adjusted relative risk, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.42-1.72). There was evidence of a dose-response relationship, because moderate and ex-smokers had a 1.4- and 1.2-fold increased risk compared with nonsmokers (adjusted relative risk, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.27-1.52 and adjusted relative risk, 1.14; 95% CI, 1.04-1.27). These relationships were similar in women, but the risk estimates were less precise owing to smaller numbers. Male ever-smokers had a 2.7-fold increased risk of developing complicated diverticular disease (perforation/abscess) compared with nonsmokers (adjusted relative risks, 2.73; 95% CI, 1.69-4.41). We were unable to account for other confounding variables such as comorbidity, prescription medication, or lifestyle factors. Smoking is associated with symptomatic diverticular disease in both men and women and with an increased risk of developing complicated diverticular disease.

  20. I.c.v. administration of the nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, CP-472555, prevents exacerbated hypoglycemia during repeated insulin administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kale, A Y; Paranjape, S A; Briski, K P

    2006-06-30

    Hypoglycemia elicits an integrated array of CNS-mediated counterregulatory responses, including activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The role of antecedent adrenocortical hypersecretion in impaired glucose counterregulation remains controversial. The present studies utilized the selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, CP-472555, as a pharmacological tool to investigate the hypothesis that hypoglycemic hypercorticosteronemia modulates CNS efferent autonomic and neuroendocrine motor responses to recurring insulin-induced hypoglycemia via glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms. Groups of adult male rats were injected s.c. with either one or four doses of the intermediate-acting insulin, Humulin neutral protamine Hagedorn (NPH), on as many days, while controls were injected with diluent alone. Animals injected with four doses of insulin were pretreated by i.c.v. administration of graded doses of the glucocorticoid receptor antagonist or vehicle alone prior to the first three doses of insulin. Repeated daily injection of NPH exacerbated hypoglycemia, attenuated patterns of glucagon and epinephrine secretion, and diminished neuronal transcriptional activation in discrete CNS metabolic loci, including the lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus, and nucleus of the solitary tract. While i.c.v. delivery of 25 or 100 ng doses of CP-472555 did not alter any of these parameters, animals treated with 500 ng exhibited circulating glucose, glucagon, and epinephrine levels that were similar to those in rats injected with one dose of insulin, as well as a reversal of recurring insulin-induced hypoglycemia-associated reductions in Fos immunolabeling in the lateral hypothalamic area, dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus, and paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus. These results provide unique pharmacological evidence that antecedent activation of central glucocorticoid receptor is required

  1. Pediatric patient with hyperketotic hypoglycemia diagnosed with glycogen synthase deficiency due to the novel homozygous mutation in GYS2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edyta Szymańska

    2015-09-01

    A random, asymptomatic hypoglycemia with ketonuria was found in this patient at the age of 7. His developmental parameters were within normal ranges. Oral glucose tolerance test showed normal baseline blood levels of glucose, insulin and lactate, and their increase following glucose intake. Eight-hour fasting plasma glucose test, revealed glucose blood level of 34 mg/dl with no clinical symptoms. The results of these tests suggested GSD 0. Molecular analysis of the GYS2 gene was not feasible, but this particular gene was included in the panel of hypoglycemia of whole exome sequencing (WES which was at our disposal.

  2. Vegetarian diet as a risk factor for symptomatic gallstone disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, T J; Appleby, P N; Key, T J

    2017-06-01

    Previous small studies have shown either no difference or a lower risk of symptomatic gallstone disease in vegetarians than in non-vegetarians. This study examined the incidence of symptomatic gallstone disease in a cohort of British vegetarians and non-vegetarians, and investigated the associations between nutrient intake and risk of symptomatic gallstone disease. The data were analysed from 49 652 adults enroled in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC)-Oxford study, one-third of whom were vegetarian. The linked databases of hospital records were used to identify incident cases. Risk by diet group was estimated using Cox proportional hazards models. Further analysis quantified risk by intakes of selected macronutrients. There were 1182 cases of symptomatic gallstone disease during 687 822 person-years of follow-up (mean=13.85 years). There was a large significant association between increasing body mass index (BMI) and risk of developing symptomatic gallstone disease (overall trend Pvegetarians had a moderately increased risk compared with non-vegetarians (HR: 1.22; 95% CI: 1.06-1.41; P=0.006). Although starch consumption was positively associated with gallstones risk (P=0.002 for trend), it did not explain the increased risk in vegetarians. There is a highly significant association of increased BMI with risk of symptomatic gallstone disease. After adjusting for BMI, there is a small but statistically significant positive association between vegetarian diet and symptomatic gallstone disease.

  3. Pediatric intracerebral hemorrhage: acute symptomatic seizures and epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beslow, Lauren A; Abend, Nicholas S; Gindville, Melissa C; Bastian, Rachel A; Licht, Daniel J; Smith, Sabrina E; Hillis, Argye E; Ichord, Rebecca N; Jordan, Lori C

    2013-04-01

    Seizures are believed to be common presenting symptoms in neonates and children with spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). However, few data are available on the epidemiology of acute symptomatic seizures or the risk for later epilepsy. To define the incidence of and explore risk factors for seizures and epilepsy in children with spontaneous ICH. Our a priori hypotheses were that younger age at presentation, cortical involvement of ICH, acute symptomatic seizures after presentation, ICH due to vascular malformation, and elevated intracranial pressure requiring urgent intervention would predict remote symptomatic seizures and epilepsy. Prospective cohort study conducted between March 1, 2007, and January 1, 2012. Three tertiary care pediatric hospitals. Seventy-three pediatric subjects with spontaneous ICH including 20 perinatal (≥37 weeks' gestation to 28 days) and 53 childhood subjects (>28 days to Acute symptomatic seizures (clinically evident and electrographic-only seizures within 7 days), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy. Acute symptomatic seizures occurred in 35 subjects (48%). Acute symptomatic seizures as a presenting symptom of ICH occurred in 12 perinatal (60%) and 19 childhood (36%) subjects (P = .07). Acute symptomatic seizures after presentation occurred in 7 children. Electrographic-only seizures were present in 9 of 32 subjects (28%) with continuous electroencephalogram monitoring. One-year and 2-year remote symptomatic seizure-free survival rates were 82% (95% CI, 68-90) and 67% (95% CI, 46-82), respectively. One-year and 2-year epilepsy-free survival rates were 96% (95% CI, 83-99) and 87% (95% CI, 65-95), respectively. Elevated intracranial pressure requiring acute intervention was a risk factor for seizures after presentation (P = .01; Fisher exact test), remote symptomatic seizures, and epilepsy (P = .03, and P = .04, respectively; log-rank test). Presenting seizures are common in perinatal and childhood ICH. Continuous

  4. Design and rationale of the IN CONTROL trial: the effects of real-time continuous glucose monitoring on glycemia and quality of life in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and impaired awareness of hypoglycemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Beers, C.A.J.; Kleijer, S.J.; Serne, E.H.; Geelhoed-Duijvestijn, P.H.; Snoek, F.J.; Kramer, M.H.H.; Diamant, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hypoglycemia is the main side effect of intensified insulin therapy in type 1 diabetes and recognized as a limitation in achieving glycemic targets. Patients with impaired awareness of hypoglycemia have a threefold to sixfold increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. Real-time continuous

  5. Placental histopathology lesions and pregnancy outcome in pregnancies complicated with symptomatic vs. non-symptomatic placenta previa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiner, Eran; Miremberg, Hadas; Grinstein, Ehud; Schreiber, Letizia; Ginath, Shimon; Bar, Jacob; Kovo, Michal

    2016-10-01

    The mechanisms involved in bleeding in cases of placenta previa (PP) and the effect on pregnancy outcome is unclear. We aimed to compare pregnancy outcome and placental histopathology in pregnancies complicated with symptomatic (bleeding) vs. non-symptomatic PP, and to study the effects of the co-existence of histopathological retro-placental hemorrhage (RPH) in cases of symptomatic PP on neonatal and maternal outcomes. Labor and maternal characteristics, neonatal outcome and placental histopathology lesions of pregnancies with PP, delivered between 24 and 42weeks, during 2009-2015, were reviewed. Results were compared between PP who had elective cesarean delivery (CD) (previa group) and PP with bleeding necessitating emergent CD (symptomatic previa group). Placental lesions were classified to lesions consistent with maternal malperfusion or fetal thrombo-occlusive disease (vascular and villous changes), and inflammatory lesions. Compared to the previa group (n=63), the symptomatic previa group (n=74) was characterized by older patients (pPlacentas within the symptomatic previa group were smaller, with higher rates of weightplacenta previa is associated with increased placental malperfusion lesions suggesting an association of maternal malperfusion with abnormal placental separation. The coexisting finding of RPH with symptomatic placenta previa can be seen as a marker for more extensive/severe placental separation, hence the association with maternal transfusion requirements and poorer fetal outcome. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Genetic variation and activity of the renin-angiotensin system and severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, Ulrik; Dhamrait, Sukhbir S.; Sethi, Amar A

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The deletion-allele of the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) gene and elevated ACE activity are associated with increased risk of severe hypoglycemia in type 1 diabetes. We explored whether genetic and phenotypic variations in other components of the renin-angiotensin system are sim...

  7. Hypoglycemia, S-ACE and ACE genotypes in a Danish nationwide population of children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesen, Jesper; Svensson, Jannet; Bergholdt, Regine

    2011-01-01

    complications (hypoglycemia and DKA). A BioBank coupled to the Registry comprised serum for measuring S-ACE levels and DNA for ACE genotyping. RESULTS: A total of 1037 individuals were included, aged 9.97 yr (SD 3.84). A total of 622 severe hypoglycemic episodes were observed in 270 individuals. Associations...

  8. A novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia linked to a mutation in the human insulin receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højlund, Kurt; Hansen, Torben; Lajer, Maria

    2004-01-01

    a missense mutation (Arg1174Gln) in the tyrosine kinase domain of the insulin receptor gene that cosegregated with the disease phenotype (logarithm of odds [LOD] score 3.21). In conclusion, we report a novel syndrome of autosomal-dominant hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia. The findings demonstrate...

  9. Analysis of clinical manifestations of symptomatic acquired jejunoileal diverticular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Chia-Yuan; Chang, Wen-Hsiung; Lin, Shee-Chan; Chu, Cheng-Hsin; Wang, Tsang-En; Shih, Shou-Chuan

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To analyze systematically our experience over 22 years with symptomatic acquired diverticular disease of the jejunum and ileum, exploring the clinical manifestations and diagnosis of this rare but life-threatening disease.

  10. ACUTE NEUROINFECTIONS AND SYMPTOMATIC EPILEPSY IN CHILDREN: CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP (review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Yu. Gorelik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Convulsions in case of acute neuroinfections can both complicate the disease course and transfer to symptomatic epilepsy which is one of the most important medical and social problems. The review article presents the data on epidemiology of convulsive disorder and symptomatic epilepsy in case of neuroinfections in children. There are considered the current immune and biochemical aspects of epileptogenesis in case of infectious pathology. There is given the information on neurophysiological and radial features of symptomatic epilepsy developed in case of neuroinfections of different etiology. There is underlined the practical significance of timely complex etio-pathogenetic therapy for neuroinfections complicated by convulsion that allows to reduce the frequency of symptomatic epilepsy development. There are presented the data on the results of transcranial magnetic stimulation in case of refractory epilepsy.

  11. Radionuclide scintigraphy in the evaluation of gastroesophageal reflux in symptomatic and asymptomatic pre-term infants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morigeri, C.; Mukhopadhyay, K.; Narang, A. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Division of Neonatology, Department of Paediatrics, Chandigarh (India); Bhattacharya, A.; Mittal, B.R. [Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER), Department of Nuclear Medicine, Chandigarh (India)

    2008-09-15

    Gastroesophageal reflux (GER) is very common in pre-term infants. The diagnosis based on symptoms is always questionable. The incidence of GER in symptomatic babies varies from 22% to 85%, but literature regarding the incidence of reflux in asymptomatic pre-term infants is lacking. We used radionuclide scintigraphy to evaluate the incidence of GER in symptomatic as well as asymptomatic pre-term neonates and to assess whether symptoms have any relation with positive scintigraphy. We studied 106 pre-term infants (52 symptomatic, 54 asymptomatic) of less than 34 weeks of gestation, who fulfilled the eligibility criteria. Babies were considered symptomatic in the presence of vomiting, regurgitation, apnea, de-saturations, unexplained bradycardia and recurrent lung collapses. Radionuclide scintigraphy was conducted at post-conceptional age of 32-34 weeks when they were clinically stable for 72 h. Feeding was avoided for 2 h preceding the study. {sup 99m}Tc sulphur colloid was administered in a dose of 1.85 MBq (0.05 mCi) in 1 ml, followed by milk (full feed) through an orogastric tube, prior to imaging under a gamma camera. Reflux was graded as low or high, and reflux episodes during the study were counted. The incidence of GER in the symptomatic group was 71.2% and in asymptomatic babies 61.1% (p=0.275). High-grade reflux was more common (71.4%) than low-grade (28.6%) in both groups (p=0.449). Mean number of reflux episodes in 20 min was 4.4{+-}2.4 in symptomatic babies and 4.9 {+-}2.2 in asymptomatic babies (p=0.321). Babies with positive scintigraphy were similar in birth weight, gestation, time to achieve full feeds, weight and age at discharge to those with negative scintigraphy. GER is common in pre-term infants of less than 34 weeks gestation. The incidence of positive scintigraphy and grade of reflux is not significantly different in symptomatic vs. asymptomatic babies. Though radionuclide scintigraphy is a simple, quick and non-invasive investigation in

  12. Hypoglycemia and diabetes: a report of a workgroup of the American Diabetes Association and the Endocrine Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Anderson, John; Childs, Belinda; Cryer, Philip; Dagogo-Jack, Samuel; Fish, Lisa; Heller, Simon R; Rodriguez, Henry; Rosenzweig, James; Vigersky, Robert

    2013-05-01

    To review the evidence about the impact of hypoglycemia on patients with diabetes that has become available since the past reviews of this subject by the American Diabetes Association and The Endocrine Society and to provide guidance about how this new information should be incorporated into clinical practice. Five members of the American Diabetes Association and five members of The Endocrine Society with expertise in different aspects of hypoglycemia were invited by the Chair, who is a member of both, to participate in a planning conference call and a 2-day meeting that was also attended by staff from both organizations. Subsequent communications took place via e-mail and phone calls. The writing group consisted of those invitees who participated in the writing of the manuscript. The workgroup meeting was supported by educational grants to the American Diabetes Association from Lilly USA, LLC and Novo Nordisk and sponsorship to the American Diabetes Association from Sanofi. The sponsors had no input into the development of or content of the report. The writing group considered data from recent clinical trials and other studies to update the prior workgroup report. Unpublished data were not used. Expert opinion was used to develop some conclusions. Consensus was achieved by group discussion during conference calls and face-to-face meetings, as well as by iterative revisions of the written document. The document was reviewed and approved by the American Diabetes Association's Professional Practice Committee in October 2012 and approved by the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors in November 2012 and was reviewed and approved by The Endocrine Society's Clinical Affairs Core Committee in October 2012 and by Council in November 2012. The workgroup reconfirmed the previous definitions of hypoglycemia in diabetes, reviewed the implications of hypoglycemia on both short- and long-term outcomes, considered the implications of hypoglycemia on treatment outcomes

  13. Urinary nitrite in symptomatic and asymptomatic urinary infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Powell, H R; McCredie, D A; Ritchie, M A

    1987-01-01

    The dipstrip test for urinary nitrite is fairly unreliable in symptomatic urinary infections and only 104 (52%) of 200 symptomatic children with urinary infection attending an emergency department had a positive result. The test yielded positive results, however, in 83 of 100 outpatients with largely asymptomatic urinary infection attending a follow up clinic because of known predisposition to urinary infection. This difference was highly significant. The finding of urinary nitrite is highly ...

  14. The incidence of symptomatic malrotation post gastroschisis repair.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Abdelhafeez, A

    2011-12-01

    Gastroschisis is known to be associated with abnormal bowel rotation. Currently, the broadly accepted practice is not to perform Ladd\\'s procedure routinely at the time of closure of gastroschisis defects. However the incidence of symptomatic malrotation and volvulus post gastroschisis repair is unknown; this incidence is important in view of the current practice of bedside gastroschisis closure. This study examined the incidence of symptomatic malrotation and volvulus following gastroschisis repair.

  15. Mechanisms of symptomatic spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Eggebrecht, Holger; Sodeck, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR).......To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR)....

  16. Symptomatic Diverticulosis Is Characterized By Loose Stools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Järbrink-Sehgal, M Ellionore; Andreasson, Anna; Talley, Nicholas J; Agréus, Lars; Song, Jeong-Yeop; Schmidt, Peter T

    2016-12-01

    Symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease is considered to be a discreet clinical entity distinct from irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but population-based data are unavailable. We aimed to investigate the prevalence and location of diverticulosis in the general population, and its association with colonic symptoms and mental health. We propose that individuals with diverticulosis would report more constipation and IBS. We performed a population-based study of randomly selected adults born in Sweden (age, 18-70 y; 57.2% women); 745 received a gastroenterology consultation, completed validated abdominal symptom and mental health questionnaires, and were examined by colonoscopy. Logistic regression was used to calculate the associations between diverticulosis and age, sex, gastrointestinal symptoms, anxiety, depression, and self-rated health. Among the 742 participants (54.6% women), 130 (17.5%) had diverticulosis. Age was the strongest predictor of diverticulosis (P diverticulosis was rare in participants younger than 40 years (0.7%). All participants with diverticulosis had sigmoid involvement. Participants with diverticulosis were more likely to report loose stools (odds ratio [OR], 1.88; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.20-2.96), urgency (OR, 1.64; 95% CI, 1.02-2.63), passing mucus (OR, 2.26; 95% CI, 1.08-4.72), and a high stool frequency (OR, 2.02; 95% CI, 1.11-3.65). Diverticulosis was associated with abdominal pain (OR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.01-4.36; P = .047) and diarrhea-predominant IBS (OR, 9.55; 95% CI, 1.08-84.08; P = .04) in participants older than 60 years. The presence of anxiety and depression and self-rated health were similar in participants with and without diverticulosis. The prevalence of diverticulosis is age-dependent. Diverticulosis is associated with diarrhea in subjects across all age ranges. In subjects older than age 60, diverticulosis is associated with abdominal pain and diarrhea-predominant IBS. Copyright © 2016 AGA Institute

  17. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se Young Kim

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection. At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

  18. Endocrine and metabolic emergencies in children: hypocalcemia, hypoglycemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Se Young

    2015-12-01

    It is important to fast diagnosis and management of the pediatric patients of the endocrine metabolic emergencies because the signs and symptoms of these disorders are nonspecific. Delayed diagnosis and treatment may lead to serious consequences of the pediatric patients, for example, cerebral dysfunction leading to coma or death of the patients with hypoglycemia, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, or diabetic ketoacidosis. The index of suspicion of the endocrine metabolic emergencies should be preceded prior to the starting nonspecific treatment. Importantly, proper diagnosis depends on the collection of blood and urine specimen before nonspecific therapy (intravenous hydration, electrolytes, glucose or calcium injection). At the same time, the taking of precise history and searching for pathognomonic physical findings should be performed. This review was described for fast diagnosis and proper management of hypoglycemic emergencies, hypocalcemia, adrenal insufficiency, and metabolic acidosis including diabetic ketoacidosis.

  19. Development and validation of a prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathioudakis, Nestoras Nicolas; Everett, Estelle; Routh, Shuvodra; Pronovost, Peter J; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Golden, Sherita Hill; Saria, Suchi

    2018-01-01

    To develop and validate a multivariable prediction model for insulin-associated hypoglycemia in non-critically ill hospitalized adults. We collected pharmacologic, demographic, laboratory, and diagnostic data from 128 657 inpatient days in which at least 1 unit of subcutaneous insulin was administered in the absence of intravenous insulin, total parenteral nutrition, or insulin pump use (index days). These data were used to develop multivariable prediction models for biochemical and clinically significant hypoglycemia (blood glucose (BG) of ≤70 mg/dL and model development and validation, respectively. Using predictors of age, weight, admitting service, insulin doses, mean BG, nadir BG, BG coefficient of variation (CV BG ), diet status, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease (CKD), liver disease, and digestive disease, our model achieved a c-statistic of 0.77 (95% CI 0.75 to 0.78), positive likelihood ratio (+LR) of 3.5 (95% CI 3.4 to 3.6) and negative likelihood ratio (-LR) of 0.32 (95% CI 0.30 to 0.35) for prediction of biochemical hypoglycemia. Using predictors of sex, weight, insulin doses, mean BG, nadir BG, CV BG , diet status, type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, CKD stage, and steroid use, our model achieved a c-statistic of 0.80 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.82), +LR of 3.8 (95% CI 3.7 to 4.0) and -LR of 0.2 (95% CI 0.2 to 0.3) for prediction of clinically significant hypoglycemia. Hospitalized patients at risk of insulin-associated hypoglycemia can be identified using validated prediction models, which may support the development of real-time preventive interventions.

  20. Presentations for hypoglycemia associated with diabetes mellitus to emergency departments in a Canadian province: A database and epidemiological analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexiu, Chris J; Chuck, Anderson; Jelinski, Susan E; Rowe, Brian H

    2017-08-01

    The prevalence of diabetes mellitus was reportedly 9% in 2014, making it one of the most common global chronic conditions. Hypoglycemia is an important complication of diabetes treatment. The objective of this study was to quantify and characterize hypoglycemia presentations associated with type 1 or 2 diabetes made to emergency departments (EDs) by adults in a Canadian province. A retrospective cohort study was conducted using reliable administrative data from Alberta for a five-year period (2010/11-2014/15). Records of interest were those with an ICD-10-CA diagnosis of diabetes-associated hypoglycemia (e.g., E10.63). A descriptive analysis was conducted. Data extraction yielded 7835 presentations by 5884 patients. The majority (56.2%) of presentations were made by males, median patient age was 62, and 60.5% had type 2 diabetes. These episodes constituted 0.08% of presentations to Alberta EDs. The annual rate of presentations decreased by 11.8% during the five-year period. Most presentations (63.4%) involved transportation to ED via ambulance. Median length-of-stay was four hours. For 27.5% of presentations, an X-ray was obtained. Most hypoglycemic episodes (65.2%) were considered to be moderate, while 34.3% were considered to be severe. Diabetes-associated hypoglycemia presentations to Alberta EDs are more commonly made by patients with type 2 diabetes, who are more likely to be transported via ambulance and also admitted. Each year, approximately one percent of Albertans with diabetes presented with a hypoglycemia episode; however, knowledge of the variation across regions can guide a strategy for improved care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Paradoxical insulin-induced increase in gluconeogenesis in response to prolonged hypoglycemia in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S N; Dobbins, R; Tarumi, C; Jacobs, J; Neal, D; Cherrington, A D

    1995-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effects of differing insulin concentrations on the gluconeogenic response to equivalent prolonged hypoglycemia. Insulin was infused intraportally, for 3 h, into normal 18-h fasted conscious dogs at 2 (lower, n = 6) or 8 mU.kg-1.min-1 (high, n = 7) on separate occasions. This resulted in steady-state arterial insulin levels of 80 +/- 8 and 610 +/- 55 microU/ml, respectively. Glucose was infused during high dose to maintain the hypoglycemic plateau (50 +/- 1 mg/dl) equivalent to lower. Epinephrine (806 +/- 180 vs. 2,589 +/- 260 pg/ml), norepinephrine (303 +/- 55 vs. 535 +/- 60 pg/ml), cortisol (5.8 +/- 1.2 vs. 12.1 +/- 1.5 micrograms/dl), and pancreatic polypeptide (598 +/- 250 vs. 1,198 +/- 150 pg/ml) were all increased (P gluconeogenesis accounted for between 42 and 100% of glucose production during high-dose infusion but only 22-52% during lower-dose insulin. Intrahepatic gluconeogenic efficiency, however, increased similarly during both protocols. Lipolysis, as indicated by arterial blood glycerol levels, increased by a greater amount during high- compared with lower-dose insulin infusion. Six hyperinsulinemic euglycemic control experiments (2 or 8 mU.kg-1.min-1, n = 3 in each) provided baseline data. Gluconeogenesis remained similar to basal levels, but lipolysis was significantly suppressed during both series of hyperinsulinemic euglycemic studies. In summary, these data suggest that 1) the important counterregulatory processes of gluconeogenesis and lipolysis can be significantly increased during prolonged hypoglycemia despite an eightfold increase in circulating insulin levels and 2) the amplified gluconeogenic rate present during the hypoglycemic high-dose insulin infusions was caused by enhanced substrate delivery to the liver rather than an increase in intrahepatic gluconeogenic efficiency.

  2. Amino acids as substrates in children with growth hormone deficiency and hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaFranchi, S; Buist, N R; Jhaveri, B; Klevit, H

    1981-08-01

    In order to investigate the role of amino acid (AA) substrates in the hypoglycemia associated with human growth hormone (hGH) deficiency, we measured 12-hour fasting blood glucose and total quantitative AA concentrations in 11 children with hGH deficiency during three study periods: (1) before hGH replacement; (2) after 12 months of hGH treatment; and (3) after discontinuation of hGH for three months. The results were compared to studies in 16 control subjects. Fasting blood glucose concentrations were significantly (P less than .05) lower in the hGH-deficient children prior to hGH treatment as compared to the control subjects (67.0 +/- 5.3 vs 80.7 +/- 5.3 mg/100 ml, mean +/- SE). Fasting total serum AA concentrations were similar in the patients and in the control subjects; however, after 12 months of hGH replacement, there was a significant (P less than .01) elevation of serum AA (2,750 +/- 170 vs 2,283 micromoles/liter). Fasting serum concentrations of alanine, glycine, arginine, and tryptophan were also significantly elevated (P less than .01) with hGH treatment; ornithine, tyrosine, lysine, methionine, and phenylalanine showed lesser elevations (P less than 0.5), whereas threonine decreased significantly (P less than 0.01). The fasting hypoglycemia seen with isolated hGH deficiency is not an AA substrate-limited disorder. The finding of increased concentrations of AA with hGH replacement suggests increased retention of nitrogen and synthesis of AA for gluconeogenesis due to availability of other substrates.

  3. Severe hypoglycemia and diabetic ketoacidosis in young persons with preschool onset of type 1 diabetes mellitus: An analysis of three nationwide population-based surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindner, Lena M E; Gontscharuk, Veronika; Bächle, Christina; Castillo, Katty; Stahl-Pehe, Anna; Tönnies, Thaddäus; Yossa, Rhuphine; Holl, Reinhard W; Rosenbauer, Joachim

    2018-03-02

    To describe incidence rates and temporal trends of severe hypoglycemia (SH) and of hospitalizations for SH or diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) in persons with early-onset, long-term type 1 diabetes (T1D) and associations of these short-term complications with potential risk factors. This study includes data of 1,875 persons 11.2 to 21.9 years of age with early-onset (10 years) T1D from 3 cross-sectional nationwide, population-based surveys conducted in 2009/2010, 2012/2013 and 2015/2016 using standardized questionnaires. Negative binomial regression was used to estimate incidence rates per 100 person-years (py), temporal trends and associations between potential risk factors and outcomes. The crude incidence rate of SH showed a decreasing trend over time (P for trend = .004), disappearing after adjustment for confounders (P for trend = .341). In contrast, adjusted rates of SH- and DKA-associated hospitalizations did not change significantly between 2009 and 2016 (P for trend = .306 and .774, respectively). Associations between sex, diabetes duration, insulin treatment regimen, hypoglycemia awareness as well as physical activity and SH were found, while family structure was associated with hospitalizations for SH. Family structure, socioeconomic status (SES), diabetes duration, and hemoglobin A1c values showed associations with DKA-related hospitalizations. After adjustment, rates of SH and SH- or DKA-associated hospitalization showed no significant changes in recent years. Structured education programs focusing on high-risk groups as, for example, persons with T1D living with 1 biological parent and the parents' partner or those with a low SES, should be implemented to reduce incidence rates of hospitalizations. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Attenuation of Brain Hyperbaric Oxygen Toxicity of Fasting is Not Related to Ketosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chavko, M

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine if protection from HBO2 seizures by acute, short fasting is related to the ketosis or to the mild hypoglycemia resulting from this treatment, or to both...

  5. High incidence of hypoglycemia in stable insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus: continuous glucose monitoring vs. self-monitored blood glucose. Observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos-Couselo, Marcos; García-López, Jose Manuel; González-Rodríguez, Maria; Gude, Francisco; Mayán-Santos, Jose Manuel; Rodríguez-Segade, Santiago; Rodríguez-García, Javier; Casanueva, Felipe

    2015-10-01

    Hypoglycemia is a limiting factor in the achievement of strict glycemic control. The primary objective of this 9-week study was to determine the frequency of hypoglycemia in patients with stable insulin-treated type 2 diabetes mellitus by comparing self-monitored blood glucose (SMBG) measurement with continuous glucose monitoring (CGM). This was an observational prospective study. Included in the study were 63 stable, insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes. They were instructed to record 2 daily capillary blood glucose readings, pre- and/or postprandial, in a sequential way during 8 consecutive weeks. A CGM system was worn during an additional week. We evaluated the frequency of hypoglycemia using the 8-week SMBG profile and the 1 CGM week. SMBG revealed that 50% of the patients had experienced hypoglycemia. CGM found hypoglycemia in 59% of patients. Significantly higher percentages of hyperglycemic and hypoglycemic episodes were detected by CGM than by capillary blood glucose measurements (61.1% vs. 50.8%; p=0.047) and (3.8% vs. 1.7%; p=0.016); 33% of patients experienced nocturnal hypoglycemia, and 19% of patients who had no data concerning hypoglycemia recorded in the capillary blood glucose diary had experienced hypoglycemia as measured by CGM, and the hypoglycemia occurred mainly during the nocturnal period. In stable well-controlled, insulin-treated patients with type 2 diabetes, CGM showed higher numbers of hypoglycemic events than did SMBG, especially at night. CGM is a useful tool that provides clinically valuable information about glucose control in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Diabetes Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Predictors of symptomatic improvement in eating disorders. Preliminary analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cygankiewicz, Patrycja; Solecka, Dorota; Pilecki, Maciej Wojciech; Józefik, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The article discusses the preliminary results of a follow-up study carried out in 2009-2010 on former patients with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa, first seen in 2001-2004 at the Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, the Jagiellonian University Medical College in Krakow. At that time they had been taking part in a research project, whose aim was to define the relationships among the psychopathological picture of eating disorders, self-image and family relations and also the influence of socio-cultural factors. The aim of the current study is to attempt to define factors influencing the course and prognosis of eating disorders in the studied group. Results from the Eating Disorder Inventory Questionnaire (EDI) and the Polish version of Family Assessment Measure (KOR) in the first study were juxtaposed with the clinical state and parameters of psychosocial functioning of the studied women assessed on the basis of the follow-up study. In the studied group, 13 girls suffered from anorexia nervosa--restricting type, 6 from anorexia nervosa binge-eating/purging type, and 6 from bulimia. In the studied group, there was complete symptomatic improvement in 12 persons (48%), subclinical symptoms continued to be observed in 9 persons (36%), and 4 persons (16%) met full diagnostic criteria for eating disorders. The most favourable course was observed in the group with a diagnosis of anorexia nervosa restricting type. The least favourable was observed in the group with a diagnosis of bulimia. Results. In the studied group, 13 girls suffered from anorexia nervosa - restricting type, 6 from anorexia nervosa binge-eating/purging type, and 6 from bulimia. In the studied group, there was complete symptomatic improvement in 12 persons (48%), subclinical symptoms continued to be observed in 9 persons (36%), and 4 persons (16%) met full diagnostic criteria for eating disorders. The most favourable course was observed in the group with a diagnosis of

  7. Management of symptomatic thrombocytopenia associated with dengue haemorrhagic fever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jameel, T.; Saleem, I.U.; Mehmood, K.; Tanvir, I.; Saadia, A.

    2010-01-01

    results in reducing the morbidity of patients in a relatively serious stage but large scale double blinded randomized controlled studies are needed before making recommendations on use of steroids in symptomatic thrombocytopenic patients with dengue haemorrhagic fever. (author)

  8. Successful conservative management of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects presenting with cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema: MRI findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwee, Thomas C. [University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Utrecht (Netherlands); Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Sonneveld, Heleen [Meander Medical Center, Department of Orthopaedics, Amersfoort (Netherlands); Nix, Maarten [Meander Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Amersfoort (Netherlands)

    2016-05-15

    The dorsal patellar defect is a relatively rare entity that involves the superolateral quadrant of the patella. It is usually considered to represent a delayed ossification process, although its exact origin remains unclear. Because of its usually innocuous nature and clinical course, invasive interventions are generally deemed unnecessary, although curretage has been successfully performed on symptomatic cases. This case report presents a rather unusual case of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects with cartilage involvement and widespread surrounding bone marrow edema as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema should be considered part of the spectrum of associated MRI findings that can be encountered in this entity. Furthermore, the presented case shows that symptomatic dorsal patellar defects can be treated conservatively with success and that (decrease of) pain symptoms are likely related to (decrease of) bone marrow edema. (orig.)

  9. Successful conservative management of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects presenting with cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema: MRI findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwee, Thomas C.; Sonneveld, Heleen; Nix, Maarten

    2016-01-01

    The dorsal patellar defect is a relatively rare entity that involves the superolateral quadrant of the patella. It is usually considered to represent a delayed ossification process, although its exact origin remains unclear. Because of its usually innocuous nature and clinical course, invasive interventions are generally deemed unnecessary, although curretage has been successfully performed on symptomatic cases. This case report presents a rather unusual case of symptomatic bilateral dorsal patellar defects with cartilage involvement and widespread surrounding bone marrow edema as demonstrated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Both cartilage involvement and bone marrow edema should be considered part of the spectrum of associated MRI findings that can be encountered in this entity. Furthermore, the presented case shows that symptomatic dorsal patellar defects can be treated conservatively with success and that (decrease of) pain symptoms are likely related to (decrease of) bone marrow edema. (orig.)

  10. Symptomatic Intraoral Submuscular Lipoma Located Nearby Mental Foramen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hwan Jun; Byeon, Je Yeon

    2016-07-01

    This report describes and discusses the clinical investigations available for the investigation of intraoral fatty tumors of the chin, with a focus on lipomas. Lipomas are relatively uncommon tumors in the oral cavity; only 1% to 4% of cases occur at this site. The presence of lipoma in the head and neck area may raise problems in surgical resection. Treatment of lipoma needs wide excision to reduce recurrence. But there are important structures on mental foramen, especially mental nerve. So careful dissection must be done to avoid nerve injury. Importantly, the development of sarcomatous change within the lipoma cannot be ruled out at imaging and requires a histologic specimen. Because of the histologic similarity between normal adipose tissue and lipoma, accurate clinical and surgical information is very important in making a definitive diagnosis. Thus, a clinician sending a surgical specimen for microscopic analysis must provide the oral pathologist with all available clinical and surgical information. The treatment of oral lipomas, including all the histologic variants, is simple surgical excision. No recurrence is observed. Although the growth of oral lipomas is usually limited, they can reach great dimensions, interfering with speech and mastication and reinforcing the need for excision. In this study, the authors describe the clinical and histopathologic features of symptomatic 2 patients of oral lipomas.

  11. No hypoglycemia after subcutaneous administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 in lean type 2 diabetic patients and in patients with diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina; Larsen, Steen

    2003-01-01

    administration of GLP-1 concomitant with intravenous glucose results in hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. Because GLP-1 is also effective in type 2 diabetic patients and is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic agent, it is important to investigate whether GLP-1 may cause hypoglycemia in such patients. We...... have previously shown that GLP-1 does not cause hypoglycemia in obese type 2 diabetic patients with insulin resistance amounting to 5.4 +/- 1.1 according to homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). In this study, we investigated diabetic patients with normal or close to normal insulin sensitivity....

  12. One-hour PTH after thyroidectomy predicts symptomatic hypocalcemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael G; James, Benjamin C; Nocon, Cheryl; Nagar, Sapna; Kaplan, Edwin L; Angelos, Peter; Grogan, Raymon H

    2016-04-01

    A major morbidity after total thyroidectomy is hypocalcemia. Although many clinical factors and laboratory studies have been correlated with both biochemical and symptomatic hypocalcemia, the ideal use and timing of these tests remain unclear. We hypothesize 1-h (PACU) parathyroid hormone (PTH) will identify patients at risk for symptomatic hypocalcemia. This prospective study evaluated 196 patients undergoing total thyroidectomy. Serum calcium and PTH levels were measured 1 h after surgery and on postoperative day 1 (POD1). Performance of a central compartment lymph node dissection, parathyroid autotransplantation, indication for procedure, pathology, and presence of parathyroid tissue in the pathology specimen were recorded. Of 196 patients, nine (4.6%) developed symptomatic hypocalcemia. Thirty four (17.3%) had a 1-h PACU PTH ≤10 pg/dL, whereas 31 (15.8%) had a POD1 PTH of ≤10. Five (56%) of the nine symptomatic patients underwent central compartment lymph node dissection, four (44%) had parathyroid autotransplantation, and four (44%) had a PACU PTH ≤10. PACU and POD1 PTH levels were correlated (R(2) = 0.682). Multivariate regression identified central compartment dissection, autotransplantation, and PACU or POD1 PTH correlated with symptomatic hypocalcemia. PACU PTH, POD1 PTH, PACU Ca, malignant final pathology, and age ≤45 y correlated with biochemical hypocalcemia. A 1-h postoperative PACU PTH is equivalent to POD1 PTH in predicting the development of symptomatic hypocalcemia. Biochemical hypocalcemia was not predictive of symptoms in the immediate postoperative period. Lymph node dissection and parathyroid autotransplantation correlated with symptomatic hypocalcemia and improve the sensitivity of biochemical screening alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Physical activity and exercise performance in symptomatic Cambodia veterans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, M; Soetekouw, P M M B; Van Der Meer, J W M; Folgering, H; Bleijenberg, G

    2002-02-01

    Dutch (ex-)servicemen who encounter health problems since return from the 1992-3 peace operation UNTAC, commonly complain of reduced activity levels, decreases in physical fitness and aggravation of symptoms after strenuous exercise. To evaluate these symptoms. A prospective study of 26 symptomatic Cambodia veterans and 26 matched controls (healthy Cambodia veterans). Using an actometer and diaries, both groups were followed for a 12-day baseline period prior to an incremental maximal exercise test on a bicycle ergometer, followed by 7 days of post-ergometer data. During baseline, symptomatic Cambodia veterans reported more symptoms, had lower levels of physical activity and took longer periods of rest after high activity periods. Symptomatic veterans did not perceive the exercise test needing more exertion than healthy veterans did, although their physical fitness was decreased. Post-ergometer, daily observed symptoms did not aggravate in symptomatic veterans. Four days post-ergometer, actometer and daily observed activity scores were lowered in both groups. As compared to baseline, one day post-ergometer, levels of physical activity were changed in healthy veterans, but not in controls. Complaints about reduced activity levels and decreases in physical fitness in symptomatic Cambodia veterans were confirmed. Post-exertion malaise was not found. The observed post-exertion effects were traced back to weekday patterns.

  14. Functional Connectivity Networks in Asymptomatic and Symptomatic DYT1 Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premi, Enrico; Diano, Matteo; Gazzina, Stefano; Cauda, Franco; Gualeni, Vera; Tinazzi, Michele; Fiorio, Mirta; Liberini, Paolo; Lazzarini, Clara; Archetti, Silvana; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Turla, Marinella; Bertasi, Valeria; Cotelli, Maria; Gasparotti, Roberto; Padovani, Alessandro; Borroni, Barbara

    2016-11-01

    DYT1 mutation is characterized by focal to generalized dystonia and incomplete penetrance. To explore the complex perturbations in the different neural networks and the mutual interactions among them, we studied symptomatic and asymptomatic DTY1 mutation carriers by resting-state functional MRI. A total of 7 symptomatic DYT1, 10 asymptomatic DYT1, and 26 healthy controls were considered. Resting-state functional MRI (Oxford Centre for Functional MRI of the Brain) [FMRIB] Software Library) (FSL) MELODIC, dual regression, (as a toolbox of FSL, with Nets is referred to "networks") (FSLNets) (http://fsl.fmrib.ox.ac.uk/fsl/fslwiki/FSLNets) was performed on 9 resting-state neural networks. DYT1 mutation signature (symptomatic DYT1 and asymptomatic DYT1) was characterized by increased connectivity in the dorsal attention network and in the left fronto-parietal network. Functional correlates of symptomatic DYT1 patients (symptomatic DYT1 vs healthy controls) showed increased connectivity in the sensorimotor network. This study argues that DYT1 dystonia is a network disorder, with crucial nodes in sensory-motor integration of posterior parietal structures. A better characterization of cortical networks involved in dystonia is crucial for possible neurophysiological therapeutic interventions. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society. © 2016 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  15. Hemodynamic Characteristics in Significant Symptomatic and Asymptomatic Primary Mitral Valve Regurgitation at Rest and During Exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakkestrøm, Rine; Banke, Ann Bøcher Secher; Christensen, Nicolaj L

    2018-01-01

    : Symptoms in patients with severe mitral valve regurgitation relate to congestion (pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and PAP), but not to peak oxygen consumption, which is determined by forward left ventricular stroke volume. Exercise testing reveals a higher mitral valve regurgitation burden in apparently......BACKGROUND: In severe asymptomatic primary mitral valve regurgitation without risk factors, surgery strategy is controversial. We sought to clarify whether being symptomatic corresponds to the hemodynamic burden and reduced exercise capacity. A better understanding of this may contribute......, exercise testing revealed a systolic PAP >60 mm Hg in 34%. Also the reverse response with minimal increase in pulmonary capillary wedge pressure and mean PAP during exercise was seen, especially in asymptomatic subjects. Among symptomatic subjects, we found a significant inverse correlation between resting...

  16. Enterprise stent for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis: an initial experience of 44 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhengzhe; Duan, Guoli; Zhang, Ping; Chen, Lei; Xu, Yi; Hong, Bo; Zhao, Wenyuan; Liu, Jianmin; Huang, Qinghai

    2015-10-08

    Wingspan stenting for the treatment of complex intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis (ICAS), i.e., that involving tortuous vascular pathways, long (>15 mm) lesions or arterial bifurcations, has a relatively high risk of complications. This retrospective study assessed the safety and efficacy of undersized balloon angioplasty followed by deployment of the more flexible Enterprise stent for the treatment of complex symptomatic ICAS. Forty-four patients on combined antiplatelet therapy and intensive risk factor management and a symptomatic 70-99% stenosis of a major intracranial artery in complex settings that was treated with balloon angioplasty and Enterprise stent deployment between July 2009 and August 2013 were enrolled. Primary outcome was occurrence of ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke or death within 30 days after intervention. Secondary outcomes included procedural success (defined as achievement of 50% in-stent restenosis after mean 22 months follow-up. In this retrospective, single-center experience, undersized balloon angioplasty followed by Enterprise stent deployment appears technically feasible with a relatively low rate of complications for the treatment of complex symptomatic ICAS. Prospective, multicenter, randomized controlled trials against optimal medical management are warranted.

  17. Incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism in oncological oral and maxillofacial operations: retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodders, J N; Parmar, S; Stienen, N L M; Martin, T J; Karagozoglu, K H; Heymans, M W; Forouzanfar, T

    2015-03-01

    We retrospectively analysed the incidence of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (VTE) and associated risk factors in operations under general anaesthesia for cancer of the oral cavity. To identify symptoms related to deep venous thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE), together with associated risk factors, we reviewed medical records of patients operated on in the department of oral and maxillofacial surgery at the Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Birmingham, United Kingdom, between June 2007 and October 2012. All patients were categorised according to their level of risk of VTE. The incidence of VTE was calculated with univariate associations and odds ratios with related 95% confidence intervals, where possible. In total, 233 patients were included, comprising 244 operations (mean (SD) age at operation 60.9 (13) years). Almost all patients (97%) were classified as having the highest risk of VTE. Swelling of an extremity, expectoration of blood, and tightness of the chest were the most common symptoms for suspected cases. An incidence of 0.41% was found for symptomatic VTE; one man developed a PE 2 days after operation. Associations between the analysed factors and symptomatic VTE were not significant. The development of the complication in oncological oral and maxillofacial operations seems to be rare, even in patients with a high risk. We cannot recommend the use of routine thromboprophylaxis, but it could be advocated in patients with obvious serious risk factors. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Symptomatic Response of the Elderly with Cardiovascular Disease during the Heat Wave in Slovenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Rok; Eržen, Ivan; Medved, Sašo

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to analyse the symptomatic response of elderly people to heat burden and indoor air quality exposure, and to create an index, the basis on which healthcare workers could react and prevent heat-related illnesses when the first symptoms appear. The impact of the indoor thermal environment was studied with regards to Humidex and indoor air quality by CO2 concentrations on elderly people's symptomatic response. It was a natural experiment in which two different groups of elderly people (>65 years) were observed: the first group had a diagnosed cardiovascular disease, and the second group did not have the disease. The results show that the expression and aggravation of symptoms are related to an increase of heat burden and low indoor air quality. The symptoms under analysis do not have the same frequency distribution of intensity and, therefore, cannot be interpreted as a single universal symptom index. Instead, two indices must be created separately for both general and specific symptoms. Healthcare workers should be educated about the interactive influences of the thermal environment and the air quality on health. Unsuitable conditions could be ascertained by the nursing home occupants' symptomatic response. Copyright© by the National Institute of Public Health, Prague 2017

  19. Transcatheter uterine arterial embolization for treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids: preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhongpu; Wang Maoqiang; Wu Chaoyang

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of uterine arterial embolization (UAE) in the management of symptomatic uterine fibroids (UF). Methods: Ten patients with refractory vaginal bleeding, pelvic pain; and/or pelvic compression related to UF underwent UAE. The UF was diagnosed by radiological imaging and gynecological examination. 11 times of UAE were done in the ten patients, including bilateral uterine arterial embolization in 9 patients and un-bilateral embolization in 1 patient. The embolic materials used in this study was polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles. Results: All 10 patients underwent technically successful embolization. No serious complications related to the procedure have occurred. Follow-up data was available in 9 patients. Eight of the patients were experienced symptomatic relief after the treatment. One woman (the only patient undergoing un-bilateral UAE) exhibited no clinical response. The volume of dominant UF showed a mean 42% reduction 2 months after the treatment. Conclusions: Transcatheter uterine arterial embolization is a safe and effective method for the management of symptomatic UF. Longer follow-up is needed to evaluate the long term effects

  20. Clinical and neurocognitive outcome in symptomatic isovaleric acidemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünert Sarah C

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its first description over 40 years ago, knowledge of the clinical course of isovaleric acidemia (IVA, a disorder predisposing to severe acidotic episodes during catabolic stress, is still anecdotal. We aimed to investigate the phenotypic presentation and factors determining the neurological and neurocognitive outcomes of patients diagnosed with IVA following clinical manifestation. Methods Retrospective data on 21 children and adults with symptomatic IVA diagnosed from 1976 to 1999 were analyzed for outcome determinants including age at diagnosis and number of catabolic episodes. Sixteen of 21 patients were evaluated cross-sectionally focusing on the neurological and neurocognitive status. Additionally, 155 cases of patients with IVA published in the international literature were reviewed and analyzed for outcome parameters including mortality. Results 57% of study patients (12/21 were diagnosed within the first weeks of life and 43% (9/21 in childhood. An acute metabolic attack was the main cause of diagnostic work-up. 44% of investigated study patients (7/16 showed mild motor dysfunction and only 19% (3/16 had cognitive deficits. No other organ complications were found. The patients' intelligence quotient was not related to the number of catabolic episodes but was inversely related to age at diagnosis. In published cases, mortality was high (33% if associated with neonatal diagnosis, following manifestation at an average age of 7 days. Conclusions Within the group of "classical" organic acidurias, IVA appears to be exceptional considering its milder neuropathologic implications. The potential to avoid neonatal mortality and to improve neurologic and cognitive outcome under early treatment reinforces IVA to be qualified for newborn screening.

  1. A Case of Inoperable Malignant Insulinoma with Resistant Hypoglycemia Who Experienced the Most Significant Clinical Improvement with Everolimus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emre Bozkirli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic insulinomas may sometimes present with recurrent life-threatening hypoglycemia episodes. Such patients usually fail to respond to various therapeutic agents which causes constant dextrose infusion requirement. Herein, we present a resistant case of inoperable malignant insulinoma who was treated with many therapeutic agents and interventions including somatostatin analogues, Yttrium-90 radioembolization, everolimus, radiotherapy, and chemoembolization. Close blood sugar monitorization during these therapies showed the most favourable response with everolimus. Everolimus treatment resulted in rapid improvement of hypoglycemia episodes, letting us discontinue dextrose infusion and discharge the patient. However, experience with everolimus in such patients is still limited, and more precise data can be obtained with the increasing use of this agent for neuroendocrine tumours.

  2. Severe Hypoglycemia due to Isolated ACTH Deficiency in Children: A New Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Y. Torchinsky

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Isolated ACTH deficiency causes life-threatening severe hypoglycemia. A 7-year-old girl with hypoglycemia due to this rare disorder is described. Our patient had undetectable plasma ACTH repeatedly and cortisol 0 mcg/dl before and after ACTH 1-24 stimulation. There was no evidence of other pituitary hormone deficiency. Glucocorticoid replacement therapy resulted in resolution of all symptoms and normalization of blood glucose. Previously published data on isolated ACTH deficiency in children is summarized. Review of the literature showed that the prevalence of this condition could be underestimated in the neonatal period and in Prader-Willi syndrome. Isolated ACTH deficiency occurs in older children as well as in neonates.

  3. Spanish translation, adaptation and validation of the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey in adults with type 1 diabetes in the Community of Madrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasende, Clara; Rubio, José Antonio; Álvarez, Julia

    2018-03-07

    The negative impact of hypoglycemia on patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) may lead to development of fear of hypoglycemia. In this study, the original Hypoglycemia Fear Survey (HFS) questionnaire was translated into Spanish, adapted and validated, and variables associated to fear of hypoglycemia in T1DM were analyzed. The HFS was translated and adapted to Spanish using the forward-backward translation method. The resulting questionnaire, EsHFS, was administrated to a population with T1DM. The following parameters of the questionnaire were analyzed: feasibility, reliability (Cronbach's alpha), content validity (correlating EsHFS and EsDQOL [Diabetes Quality of Life] questionnaire), and stability (by means of test-retest correlation). The EsHFS questionnaire consists of 24 items and three subscales including: subscale 1 on worry; subscale 2 on hypoglycemia-avoidant behavior, and subscale 3 on hyperglycemia-influenced behavior. 163 subjects, with a mean aged (SD) of 36 (10.5) years, 24% on continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion. Of these, 99.8% completed the EsHFS questionnaire in less than 10minutes. Cronbach's alpha for global EsHFS was 0.92. EsHFS and its subscales correlated with EsDQOL. Test-retest correlation (Pearson) was r=0.92. Age, female sex, lower educational level, living alone, frequency of daily self-monitoring and non-severe hypoglycemia, and history of severe and/or asymptomatic hypoglycemia were independently associated to the result of EsHFS. The Spanish version of the HFS, EsHFS, has good psychometric properties and may be a useful tool to assess fear of hypoglycemia in Spanish-speaking patients with T1DM. Copyright © 2018 SEEN y SED. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Symptomatic retention of the Agile® patency capsule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea Valenzuela, Juan; Estrella Díez, Esther; Alberca de Las Parras, Fernando

    2017-06-01

    The Agile® capsule has shown to be useful when evaluating the patency of the small bowel in patients prior to capsule endoscopy studies. It is a safe tool and a low rate of complications have been reported, highlighting symptomatic retention, although references in literature are scarce and it is only observed in 1.2% of the procedures. We present the case of a symptomatic retention of this device in a patient with previously known colonic Crohn's disease in who a small bowel study was indicated and was sent for prior patency test.

  5. Identifying the eating disorder symptomatic in China: the role of sociocultural factors and culturally defined appearance concerns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Todd; Chen, Hong

    2007-02-01

    This study evaluated the extent to which eating disorder symptomatic Chinese adolescents and young adults could be differentiated from demographically similar peers on the basis of their sociocultural experiences and appearance perceptions. Forty-two students who endorsed all criteria for a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition eating disorder diagnosis on the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale [Stice E, Telch CF, Rizvi SL. Development and validation of the Eating Disorder Diagnostic Scale: a brief self-report measure of anorexia, bulemia, and binge-eating disorder. Psychol Assess 2000;12:123-31] and 42 less symptomatic classmates completed measures of perceived social pressure, teasing, social comparison, negative affect, and concern with facial features. Symptomatic participants reported significantly more social pressure/teasing, appearance comparison, and concern with facial appearance than their less symptomatic peers, although groups did not differ in average levels of negative affect. In a jackknife discriminant classification analysis using these five predictors, 76.2% of the symptomatic group and 81.0% of the comparison group were correctly classified. Within the symptomatic group, 95% of respondents who reported either full or partial criteria for bulimia nervosa or binge-eating disorder were correctly identified compared to 59.10% of those who endorsed all criteria for eating disorders not otherwise specified related to anorexia nervosa. This is the first study to link appearance-related social pressure and social comparison as well as appearance concerns not directly reflecting body size or weight with increased eating disorder symptomatology among young people from the People's Republic of China.

  6. Chromium modulates expressions of neuronal plasticity markers and glial fibrillary acidic proteins in hypoglycemia-induced brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Kazim; Tuzcu, Mehmet; Orhan, Cemal; Ali, Shakir; Sahin, Nurhan; Gencoglu, Hasan; Ozkan, Yusuf; Hayirli, Armagan; Gozel, Nevzat; Komorowski, James R

    2013-12-18

    This experiment investigated if chromium (Cr) as Cr-histidinate (CrHis) and Cr29 picolinate (CrPic) have a protective role in rats with hypoglycemia-induced brain injury, assessed by neuronal plasticity and regeneration potential. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were prospectively divided into 2 groups: control and hypoglycemic (induced by insulin administration, 15U/kg, i.p., n=56). Hypoglycemic rats were then received randomly 1) none, 2) dextrose (on the day of sampling), 3) CrHis, or 4) CrPic. Cr-chelates were delivered via drinking water (providing 8μg elemental Cr per day) for one week prior to the hypoglycemia induction. The expressions of neuroplasticity markers [neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), growth-associated protein-43 (GAP-43), glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)], glucose transporters (GLUT), and nuclear transcription proteins [nuclear factor-kappa (NF-κB), nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2), and 4-hydroxyl nonenal (HNE)] were determined using Western blot. Hypoglycemia caused increases in the expressions of GLUT-1, GLUT-3, GFAP, NF-κB and HNE and decreases in the expression of NCAM's, GAP-43 and Nrf2 in the hippocampus, cerebellum, and cortex. Cr-chelates suppressed expressions of GLUTs, GFAP, NF-κB and HNE expressions and enhanced expressions of NCAM, GAP-43 and Nrf2, which were more notable for CrHis than for CrPic. In conclusion, hypoglycemia leads to cerebral injury and Cr-chelates, particularly CrHis have protective and regeneration potential in cerebral tissues through modulating neuroplasticity markers and nuclear transcription proteins as well as facilitating glucose transporters. © 2013.

  7. Chronic fetal hypoglycemia inhibits the later steps of stimulus-secretion coupling in pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozance, Paul J; Limesand, Sean W; Zerbe, Gary O; Hay, William W

    2007-05-01

    We measured the impact of chronic late gestation hypoglycemia on pancreatic islet structure and function to determine the cause of decreased insulin secretion in this sheep model of fetal nutrient deprivation. Late gestation hypoglycemia did not decrease pancreas weight, insulin content, beta-cell area, beta-cell mass, or islet size. The pancreatic islet isolation procedure selected a group of islets that were larger and had an increased proportion of beta-cells compared with islets measured in pancreatic sections, but there were no morphologic differences between islets isolated from control and hypoglycemic fetuses. The rates of glucose-stimulated pancreatic islet glucose utilization (126.2 +/- 25.3 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), hypoglycemic, vs. 93.5 +/- 5.5 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), control, P = 0.47) and oxidation (10.5 +/- 1.7 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), hypoglycemic, vs. 10.6 +/- 1.6 pmol glucose.islet(-1).h(-1), control) were not different in hypoglycemic fetuses compared with control fetuses. Chronic late gestation hypoglycemia decreased insulin secretion in isolated pancreatic islets by almost 70% in response to direct nonnutrient membrane depolarization and in response to increased extracellular calcium entry. beta-Cell ultrastructure was abnormal with markedly distended rough endoplasmic reticulum in three of the seven hypoglycemic fetuses studied, but in vitro analysis of hypoglycemic control islets showed no evidence that these changes represented endoplasmic reticulum stress, as measured by transcription of glucose regulatory protein-78 and processing of X-box binding protein-1. In conclusion, these studies show that chronic hypoglycemia in late gestation decreases insulin secretion by inhibiting the later steps of stimulus-secretion coupling after glucose metabolism, membrane depolarization, and calcium entry.

  8. Role of gluconeogenesis in sustaining glucose production during hypoglycemia caused by continuous insulin infusion in conscious dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frizzell, R T; Hendrick, G K; Biggers, D W; Lacy, D B; Donahue, D P; Green, D R; Carr, R K; Williams, P E; Stevenson, R W; Cherrington, A D

    1988-06-01

    The roles of glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis in sustaining glucose production during insulin-induced hypoglycemia were assessed in overnight-fasted conscious dogs. Insulin was infused intraportally for 3 h at 5 mU.kg-1.min-1 in five animals, and glycogenolysis and gluconeogenesis were measured by using a combination of tracer [( 3-3H]glucose and [U-14C]alanine) and hepatic arteriovenous difference techniques. In response to the elevated insulin level (263 +/- 39 microU/ml), plasma glucose level fell (41 +/- 3 mg/dl), and levels of the counterregulatory hormones glucagon, epinephrine, norepinephrine, and cortisol increased (91 +/- 29 to 271 +/- 55 pg/ml, 83 +/- 26 to 2356 +/- 632 pg/ml, 128 +/- 31 to 596 +/- 81 pg/ml, and 1.5 +/- 0.4 to 11.1 +/- 1.0 micrograms/dl, respectively; for all, P less than .05). Glucose production fell initially and then doubled (3.1 +/- 0.3 to 6.1 +/- 0.5 mg.kg-1.min-1; P less than .05) by 60 min. Net hepatic gluconeogenic precursor uptake increased approximately eightfold by the end of the hypoglycemic period. By the same time, the efficiency with which the liver converted the gluconeogenic precursors to glucose rose twofold. Five control experiments in which euglycemia was maintained by glucose infusion during insulin administration (5.0 mU.kg-1.min-1) provided baseline data. Glycogenolysis accounted for 69-88% of glucose production during the 1st h of hypoglycemia, whereas gluconeogenesis accounted for 48-88% of glucose production during the 3rd h of hypoglycemia. These data suggest that gluconeogenesis is the key process for the normal counterregulatory response to prolonged and marked hypoglycemia.

  9. Glucose autoregulation is the dominant component of the hormone-independent counterregulatory response to hypoglycemia in the conscious dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Justin M; Rivera, Noelia; Kraft, Guillaume; Winnick, Jason J; Farmer, Ben; Allen, Eric J; Donahue, E Patrick; Smith, Marta S; Edgerton, Dale S; Williams, Phillip E; Cherrington, Alan D

    2017-09-01

    The contribution of hormone-independent counterregulatory signals in defense of insulin-induced hypoglycemia was determined in adrenalectomized, overnight-fasted conscious dogs receiving hepatic portal vein insulin infusions at a rate 20-fold basal. Either euglycemia was maintained ( group 1 ) or hypoglycemia (≈45 mg/dl) was allowed to occur. There were three hypoglycemic groups: one in which hepatic autoregulation against hypoglycemia occurred in the absence of sympathetic nervous system input ( group 2 ), one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of norepinephrine (NE) signaling to fat and muscle ( group 3 ), and one in which autoregulation occurred in the presence of NE signaling to fat, muscle, and liver ( group 4 ). Average net hepatic glucose balance (NHGB) during the last hour for groups 1-4 was -0.7 ± 0.1, 0.3 ± 0.1 ( P gluconeogenesis. Lowering glucose per se decreased nonhepatic glucose uptake by 8.9 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 , and the addition of increased neural efferent signaling to muscle and fat blocked glucose uptake further by 3.2 mg·kg -1 ·min -1 The addition of increased neural efferent input to liver did not affect NHGB or nonhepatic glucose uptake significantly. In conclusion, even in the absence of increases in counterregulatory hormones, the body can defend itself against hypoglycemia using glucose autoregulation and increased neural efferent signaling, both of which stimulate hepatic glucose production and limit glucose utilization. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Intensive Individualized Reinforcement Education Is Important for the Prevention of Hypoglycemia in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun-Mi Yong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated whether an intensive individualized reinforcement education program could influence the prevention of hypoglycemic events in patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsFrom March 2013 to September 2013, patients aged 35 to 75 years with type 2 diabetes who had not previously participated in diabetes education, and treated with insulin or a sulfonylurea-containing regimen were included in the study. After structured group education, the patients assigned to the intensive individualized education group (IT were requested to visit for reinforcement. All subjects in the IT were encouraged to self-manage dose adjustments. Participants in both groups (control group [CG, group education only; n=22] and IT [n=24] attended follow-up visits at 2, 8, 12, and 24 weeks. At each visit, all patients were asked whether they had experienced hypoglycemia.ResultsThe total study population consisted of 20 men (43.5%; mean age and diabetic duration of 55.9±11.0 and 5.1±7.3 years, respectively. At 24 weeks, there were no significant differences in hemoglobin A1c values between the CG and IT. The total number of hypoglycemic events per patient was 5.26±6.5 in the CG and 2.58±2.3 times in the IT (P=0.004. Adherence to lifestyle modification including frequency of exercise, self-monitoring of blood glucose, or dietary habit was not significantly different between the groups. However, adherence to hypoglycemia management, especially the dose adjustment of medication, was significantly higher in the IT compared with the CG.ConclusionCompared with the structured group education, additional IT resulted in additional benefits in terms of avoidance of hypoglycemia and treating hypoglycemia in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  11. Recurrent Moderate Hypoglycemia Suppresses Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Expression in the Prefrontal Cortex and Impairs Sensorimotor Gating in the Posthypoglycemic Period in Young Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Raghavendra; Ennis, Kathleen; Mitchell, Eugena P; Tran, Phu V; Gewirtz, Jonathan C

    2016-01-01

    Recurrent hypoglycemia is common in infants and children. In developing rat models, recurrent moderate hypoglycemia leads to neuronal injury in the medial prefrontal cortex. To understand the effects beyond neuronal injury, 3-week-old male rats were subjected to 5 episodes of moderate hypoglycemia (blood glucose concentration, approx. 30 mg/dl for 90 min) once daily from postnatal day 24 to 28. Neuronal injury was determined using Fluoro-Jade B histochemistry on postnatal day 29. The effects on brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its cognate receptor, tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) expression, which is critical for prefrontal cortex development, were determined on postnatal day 29 and at adulthood. The effects on prefrontal cortex-mediated function were determined by assessing the prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex on postnatal day 29 and 2 weeks later, and by testing for fear-potentiated startle at adulthood. Recurrent hypoglycemia led to neuronal injury confined primarily to the medial prefrontal cortex. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex was suppressed on postnatal day 29 and was accompanied by lower prepulse inhibition, suggesting impaired sensorimotor gating. Following the cessation of recurrent hypoglycemia, the prepulse inhibition had recovered at 2 weeks. BDNF/TrkB expression in the prefrontal cortex had normalized and fear-potentiated startle was intact at adulthood. Recurrent moderate hypoglycemia during development has significant adverse effects on the prefrontal cortex in the posthypoglycemic period. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. A low-glycemic index meal and bedtime snack prevents postprandial hyperglycemia and associated rises in inflammatory markers, providing protection from early but not late nocturnal hypoglycemia following evening exercise in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Matthew D; Walker, Mark; Trenell, Michael I; Stevenson, Emma J; Turner, Daniel; Bracken, Richard M; Shaw, James A; West, Daniel J

    2014-07-01

    To examine the influence of the glycemic index (GI) of foods consumed after evening exercise on postprandial glycemia, metabolic and inflammatory markers, and nocturnal glycemic control in type 1 diabetes. On two evenings (∼1700 h), 10 male patients (27 ± 5 years of age, HbA1c 6.7 ± 0.7% [49.9 ± 8.1 mmol/mol]) were administered a 25% rapid-acting insulin dose with a carbohydrate bolus 60 min before 45 min of treadmill running. At 60 min postexercise, patients were administered a 50% rapid-acting insulin dose with one of two isoenergetic meals (1.0 g carbohdyrate/kg body mass [BM]) matched for macronutrient content but of either low GI (LGI) or high GI (HGI). At 180 min postmeal, the LGI group ingested an LGI snack and the HGI group an HGI snack (0.4 g carbohdyrate/kg BM) before returning home (∼2300 h). Interval samples were analyzed for blood glucose and lactate; plasma glucagon, epinephrine, interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α); and serum insulin, cortisol, nonesterified fatty acid, and β-hydroxybutyrate concentrations. Interstitial glucose was recorded for 20 h postlaboratory attendance through continuous glucose monitoring. Following the postexercise meal, an HGI snack induced hyperglycemia in all patients (mean ± SD glucose 13.5 ± 3.3 mmol/L) and marked increases in TNF-α and IL-6, whereas relative euglycemia was maintained with an LGI snack (7.7 ± 2.5 mmol/L, P types protected all patients from early hypoglycemia. Overnight glycemia was comparable, with a similar incidence of nocturnal hypoglycemia (n = 5 for both HGI and LGI). Consuming LGI food with a reduced rapid-acting insulin dose following evening exercise prevents postprandial hyperglycemia and inflammation and provides hypoglycemia protection for ∼8 h postexercise; however, the risk of late nocturnal hypoglycemia remains. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association.

  13. Demographic And Histopathological Characteristics Of Colorectal Polyps: A Descriptive Study Based On Samples Obtained From Symptomatic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cekodhima Genta

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Colorectal polyps (CP are common among individuals older than 50 years. Some polyp types can precede colorectal cancer (CRC. This study aimed at describing histopathological characteristics of colorectal polyps in relation to age and gender among symptomatic patients referred for a colonoscopy examination during 2011-2014 in Tirana, Albania.

  14. The coronary calcium score is a more accurate predictor of significant coronary stenosis than conventional risk factors in symptomatic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoll, R; Wiklund, U; Zhao, Y

    2016-01-01

    AIMS: In this retrospective study we assessed the predictive value of the coronary calcium score for significant (>50%) stenosis relative to conventional risk factors. METHODS AND RESULTS: We investigated 5515 symptomatic patients from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain and the USA. All had r...

  15. First molecular identification and phylogeny of a Babesia sp. from a symptomatic sow (Sus scrofa Linnaeus 1758).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zobba, Rosanna; Parpaglia, Maria Luisa Pinna; Spezzigu, Antonio; Pittau, Marco; Alberti, Alberto

    2011-06-01

    Porcine babesiosis is a widespread yet overlooked disease causing economic losses in many regions of the world. To date, the etiological agent of porcine babesiosis has not been molecularly characterized. Here, we provide the first molecular characterization of a piroplasm detected in a symptomatic sow, phylogenetically closely related to the Ungulibabesids. Results pave the way for future molecular epidemiology studies.

  16. Local radiotherapy for palliation in multiple myeloma patients with symptomatic bone lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jeong Won; Lee, Jeong Eun [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-03-15

    To evaluate the clinical outcomes of symptomatic bone lesions in patients with multiple myeloma (MM) who received local radiotherapy (LRT). Fifty-one patients with 87 symptomatic bone lesions treated via LRT were analyzed. LRT was delivered at a median total dose of 21 Gy (range, 12 to 40 Gy) in a median of 7 fractions (range, 4 to 20 fractions). The clinical outcomes of LRT and the factors affecting treatment response were assessed. After a median follow-up time of 66.7 weeks, symptom relief was achieved for 85 of 87 lesions (97.7%). The median time to symptom relief was 7 days from the start of LRT (range, 1 to 67 days). The duration of in-field failure-free survival ranged from 1.1 to 450.9 weeks (median, 66.7 weeks). The radiation dose or use of previous and concurrent chemotherapy was not significantly associated with in-field failure for LRT (p = 0.354, 0.758, and 0.758, respectively). Symptomatic bone lesions in patients with MM can be successfully treated with LRT. A higher radiation dose or the use of concurrent chemotherapy may not influence the in-field disease control. A relatively low radiation dose could achieve remission of symptoms in patients with MM.

  17. Participatory design in Parkinson's research with focus on the symptomatic domains to be measured.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, J Artur; Larsen, Frank; Isaacs, Tom; Matthews, Helen; Duffen, Joy; Riggare, Sara; Capitanio, Fulvio; Ferreira, Joaquim J; Domingos, Josefa; Maetzler, Walter; Graessner, Holm

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing interest in the objective assessment of health related outcomes using technology providing quality measurements to be applied not only in daily clinical practice, but also in scientific research. Differences in the understandings of the condition and the terminology used between people with Parkinson's (PwPs), clinicians and technical developers may influence the progress of a participatory design process. This paper reports on a participatory design process to achieve a consensus among PwPs, clinicians and technologists over the selection of a set of symptomatic domains to be continuously assessed, in order to provide results relevant to both PwPs and clinicians. The methods used were a Web based user survey, end-user focus groups, ranking by combined methods, a Delphi process performed among clinicians and scientists, and prioritization of the results in a concertation workshop for PwPs, clinicians and technologists. The following symptomatic domains were commonly agreed by PwPs and clinicians to be of central importance in a system of continuous assessment: hypokinesia/bradykinesia, tremor, sway, gait, sleep and cognition. This list satisfied both the needs of the PwPs and the concerns of the clinicians regarding the means of advancing new strategies in assessment and interventions in PD. A participatory design strategy allowed the definition of a consensual list of symptomatic domains. Both the strategy and the achieved results may be of relevance for similar interdisciplinary approaches in the field of PD using a participatory design involving patients, clinicians and technologists.

  18. Evaluation of a quantitative fetal fibronectin test for spontaneous preterm birth in symptomatic women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Danielle S; Radford, Samara K; Seed, Paul T; Tribe, Rachel M; Shennan, Andrew H

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether quantification of cervicovaginal fluid fetal fibronectin (fFN) improves diagnostic accuracy of spontaneous preterm birth (sPTB) in symptomatic women. A prospective blinded predefined secondary analysis of a larger study of cervicovaginal fluid fFN concentration (nanograms per milliliter) in women symptomatic of preterm labor (n =300 women; 22-35 weeks' gestation) with a Hologic 10Q system (Hologic, Marlborough, MA). Clinicians were blinded to the result until after the delivery, but the qualitative Hologic TLI(IQ) fFN result was made available. The positive predictive value for sPTB (<34 weeks' gestation) increased from 19%, 32%, 61%, and 75% with increasing thresholds (10, 50, 200, and 500 ng/mL, respectively). Compared with <10 ng/mL fFN, the relative risk of delivery was 5.6 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.05-29.57), 7.9 (95% CI, 1.38-45.0), 22.8 (95% CI, 3.84-135.5), and 51.3 (95% CI, 12.49-211.2; P < .01). Quantitative fFN provides thresholds (10 and 200 ng/mL) in addition to the qualitative method (50 ng/mL) to discriminate the risk of sPTB in symptomatic women. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Childhood trauma and cortisol awakening response in symptomatic patients with anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteleone, Alessio Maria; Monteleone, Palmiero; Serino, Ismene; Scognamiglio, Pasquale; Di Genio, Monica; Maj, Mario

    2015-09-01

    Exposure to trauma during childhood is a risk factor for eating disorders (EDs) in adulthood. The biological mechanisms underlying such increased risk seem to involve the endogenous stress response system (i.e., the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal [HPA] axis), which undergoes trauma-induced functional changes that may persist later in life. In the present study, we examined the effects of childhood trauma experiences on HPA-axis activity, comparing saliva cortisol awakening response (CAR) in adult patients with anorexia nervosa (AN) or bulimia nervosa (BN) with CAR in adult healthy controls. Twenty-three patients with symptomatic AN, 21 patients with symptomatic BN, and 29 healthy women collected saliva samples at awakening and again after 15, 30, and 60 min. Participants also completed the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire and eating-related psychopathological rating scales. According to the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire, 13 individuals with AN and 12 individuals with BN, but none of the healthy women, reported childhood maltreatment. Compared with the control group, the non-maltreated AN patient group exhibited an enhanced CAR, whereas the group of non-maltreated BN patients showed a normal CAR. Moreover, both AN and BN patient groups with childhood maltreatment exhibited statistically significant blunting of CAR compared with non-maltreated groups. The present findings add to the evidence supporting the concept that there is a dysregulation of HPA-axis activity in symptomatic patients with EDs and suggest that childhood trauma exposure may contribute to such dysregulation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Cerebral and extracerebral vasoreactivity in symptomatic lacunar stroke patients: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deplanque, Dominique; Lavallee, Philippa C; Labreuche, Julien; Gongora-Rivera, Fernando; Jaramillo, Arturo; Brenner, David; Abboud, Halim; Klein, Isabelle F; Touboul, Pierre-Jean; Vicaut, Eric; Amarenco, Pierre

    2013-08-01

    Whether cerebral artery endothelial dysfunction is a key factor of symptomatic lacunar stroke and cerebral small vessel disease remains unclear. Cerebral and extracerebral vasoreactivity were measured in 81 patients with recent symptomatic lacunar stroke and in 81 control subjects matched for main vascular risk factors. Cerebral vasoreactivity and carotid endothelial-dependent vasodilation were measured after five-minutes of carbon dioxide-induced hypercapnia. Brachial endothelial-dependent vasodilation was assessed after hyperemia induced by deflating a cuff around the forearm previously inflated to 200 mmHg for four-minutes. Carotid and brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation were measured five-minutes after administration of sublingual nitroglycerin 300 μg. Brain magnetic resonance imaging were analyzed in lacunar stroke patients. One-month after stroke onset, patients had more severely impaired cerebral vasoreactivitys than matched controls (mean ± standard deviation, 14·4 ± 12·1% vs. 19·4 ± 17·4%; P = 0·049). Severe alterations of both carotid and brachial endothelial-dependent and at a lesser degree of carotid and brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation were observed in both groups. After adjustment for confounders, subjects with a cerebral vasoreactivity value in the two lower tertiles (≤19·6%) were more likely to have had a symptomatic lacunar stroke (adjusted odds ratio, 3·78; 95% confidence interval, 1·42 to 10·08; P = 0·008). Only alteration of brachial endothelial-independent vasodilation correlated with parenchymal abnormalities, namely microbleeds and leukoaraiosis. While abnormalities in extracerebral vasoreactivity seem related to vascular risk factors, the severity of endothelial dysfunction in cerebral arteries may be determinant in the occurrence of symptomatic lacunar stroke in patients with small vessel disease. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Stroke © 2012 World Stroke

  1. Surgically Treated Symptomatic Prolapsed Lumbar and Sacral ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nigerian Journal of Surgery. Jul-Dec 2012 | Volume 18 | Issue 2. Address for correspondence: Dr. M. O. N. Ibe,. Central Medicare, 43 Okigwe Road, Box 453, Owerri,. Imo State, Nigeria. E-mail: snowwhyte_hosp@yahoo.com. INTRODUCTION. Sciatica is a relatively common condition with a lifetime incidence varying from ...

  2. Eucaloric Ketogenic Diet Reduces Hypoglycemia and Inflammation in Mice with Endotoxemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandivada, Prathima; Fell, Gillian L; Pan, Amy H; Nose, Vania; Ling, Pei-Ra; Bistrian, Bruce R; Puder, Mark

    2016-06-01

    Dietary strategies to alter the immune response to acute inflammation have the potential to improve outcomes in critically ill patients. A eucaloric ketogenic diet (EKD), composed predominantly of fat with very small amounts of carbohydrate, can provide adequate caloric support while minimizing spikes in blood glucose and reducing oxidative stress. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of an EKD on glycemic control and the inflammatory response after acute endotoxemia in mice. Mice received either an EKD or a carbohydrate-based control diet (CD) for 4 weeks. Animals subsequently underwent either a 2-h fast (postprandial) or an overnight fast (postabsorptive), and half of the animals in each diet group were randomized to receive either intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide (1 mg/kg) or an equivalent volume of saline. Glycemic response, insulin resistance, inflammatory cytokine levels, and the expression of key inflammatory and metabolic genes were measured. After endotoxin challenge, hypoglycemia was more frequent in mice fed a CD than an EKD in the postprandial period. This was due in part to the preservation of hepatic glycogen stores despite endotoxin exposure and prolonged fasting in mice fed an EKD. Furthermore, mice fed the CD had higher levels of IL-6 and TNF-α in the postabsorptive period, with a fivefold higher expression of hepatic NFκB compared to mice fed the EKD in both fasting periods. These results suggest that the unique metabolic state induced by an EKD can alter the response to acute inflammation in mice.

  3. Metabolic acidosis, hypoglycemia, and severe myalgias: an attempt to mask urine drug screen results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcinegas-Rodriguez, Silvana; Gaspers, Mary Glas; Lowe, Merlin Channing

    2011-04-01

    Adolescent use of illicit substances remains a significant problem. In attempts to hide their use of these substances, some are using Internet-recommended methods of masking these drugs on drug screens, potentially exposing the adolescent to severe and possibly dangerous adverse effects. We report a 16-year-old patient who ingested approximately 13 g (twenty-six 500-mg tablets) of niacin during a 48-hour period in an attempt to mask his use of tetrahydrocannabinol on an upcoming drug screen. He subsequently developed severe chest and abdominal pain as well as extreme diffuse myalgias (previously unreported in association with niacin use). In addition, he developed severe hypoglycemia, acidosis, transaminitis, and coagulopathy. He required significant fluid resuscitation and bicarbonate infusion. Over approximately 5 days his symptoms resolved and he ultimately did well. Given increasingly available home drug screens and the abundance of false information readily available to adolescents via the Internet regarding "masking" of drug use, it is likely that cases such as ours will become more prevalent. Pediatric emergency physicians and pediatricians should maintain a high suspicion for use of niacin or other substances to obscure detection of illicit substances when patients present with symptoms similar to those of our patient. Copyright © 2011 by Lippincott Williams & Wilkins

  4. Conundrum of elevated HbA1C and hypoglycemia-a rare cause.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanda, Sudip; Sharma, Shree Gopal; Bhatt, Surya Prakash; Pamula, John; Arastu, Mohammad I

    2008-05-01

    A white diabetic patient on insulin therapy presented with recurrent hypoglycemia despite very high glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) values. Hemoglobin (Hb) variants, chemically modified Hb, and abnormalities of red cell turnover cause errors in HbA1c measurement. Widely prevalent Hb variants affecting HbA1c estimation include HbS and HbC in African Americans, HbE in southeast Asians, and carbamyl-Hb in uremic patients. In addition, there are at least 893 other Hb variants as of 2005, many of which affect HbA1c estimation. HbA1c values are also affected by methodology of estimation. Our patient had HbJ, which is rare amongst whites. The relationship between HbA1c values and mean plasma glucose allows estimation of expected HbA1c. Significant discrepancy between expected and measured HbA1c should be evaluated. Considering Hb variants, evaluating for the same and estimating HbA1c with the appropriate method under such circumstances are described. Numerous new or rare Hb variants will be diagnosed if suspicion is appropriately entertained.

  5. Association of Lumbar Spondylolisthesis With Low Back Pain and Symptomatic Lumbar Spinal Stenosis in a Population-based Cohort: The Wakayama Spine Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimoto, Yuyu; Yoshimura, Noriko; Muraki, Shigeyuki; Yamada, Hiroshi; Nagata, Keiji; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Takiguchi, Noboru; Minamide, Akihito; Oka, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Sakae; Kawaguchi, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kozo; Akune, Toru; Yoshida, Munehito

    2017-06-01

    Cross-sectional study. To determine the association between lumbar spondylolisthesis and low back pain and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) in a population-based cohort. The basic epidemiology of lumbar spondylolisthesis is not well known. There is little information regarding the association between lumbar spondylolisthesis and clinical symptoms such as low back pain and LSS symptoms. This cross-sectional study included data from 938 participants (308 males, 630 females; mean age, 67.3 years; range, 40-93 years). Lumbar spondylolisthesis was defined as a slip of ≥5%. Diagnostic criteria for symptomatic LSS required the presence of both leg symptoms and radiographic LSS findings on magnetic resonance imaging. The prevalence of low back pain and symptomatic LSS was compared between those with or without spondylolisthesis. Furthermore, we determined the association between the amount of slippage and presence of symptomatic LSS. The prevalence of spondylolisthesis at any level was 15.8% in the total sample, 13.0% in males, and 17.1% in females; the prevalence was not significantly different between males and females (P = 0.09). In both, males and females, symptomatic LSS was related to spondylolisthesis [odds ratio (OR): 2.07; 95% CI: 1.20-3.44]; however, no such association was found for spondylolisthesis and presence of low back pain. The amount of slippage was not related to the presence of symptomatic LSS (P = 0.93). This population-based cohort study revealed that lumbar spondylolisthesis had a closer association with leg symptoms than with low back pain. There was a significant difference in the presence of symptomatic LSS between participants with and without spondylolisthesis. However, the amount of slippage was not related to the presence of symptomatic LSS. 3.

  6. Mammographic profiles of women with symptomatic breast diseases ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: This was a prospective descriptive analytical study of women with symptomatic breast diseases who had mammography between January 2012 and December 2016 at our health facilities. Data sheet was developed to record the patients' biodata, indication for referral, and mammographic findings. Results: During ...

  7. Symptomatic Neuroma Following Initial Amputation for Traumatic Digital Amputation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlot, Margot A; Wilkens, Suzanne C; Chen, Neal C; Eberlin, Kyle R

    2018-01-01

    We tested the null hypothesis that no factors are independently associated with the development of symptomatic neuroma after traumatic digital amputation. We performed a retrospective review of 1,083 patients who underwent revision amputation for traumatic digital amputation; we excluded those undergoing replantation or revascularization. Patients who developed a painful neuroma during follow-up were identified with a minimum follow-up of 1 week and a median of 3.3 months. We calculated the rate of developing a painful neuroma as a proportion of the total number of patients and performed multivariable logistic regression analysis to identify factors independently associated with its development. Of 1,083 patients, 71 (6.6%) developed a symptomatic neuroma. Mean time to diagnosis was 6.4 months. A total of 47 patients (66%) underwent surgery for painful neuroma. Mean time to surgical intervention was 11 months. Index finger injury and avulsion injury mechanism were significantly associated with a higher risk for symptomatic neuroma. Approximately 1 in 15 patients will develop a symptomatic neuroma after traumatic digital amputation and more than half of these patients will undergo revision surgery for neuroma, with a mean time to operative intervention of 11 months. Prognostic II. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evaluation of prognostic value of albumin and iron in symptomatic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background & objectives: This study was designed to assess the prognostic value of albumin and iron in symptomatic HIV subjects on ART with or without malaria infection. Methods: 150 participants (male, n=65, female, n=85) aged between 17 and 70 years were recruited for the study at the HIV clinic of Nnamdi Azikiwe ...

  9. Symptomatic rubella re-infection in early pregnancy and subsequent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A case of serologically proven symptomatic rubella re-infection in early pregnancy in a healthy multigravida who had been successfully vaccinated is reported to illustrate that the risk to the fetus is considerably less than with primary infection. The infant was infected, as evidenced by specific IgM in cord blood, but had no ...

  10. Symptomatic Tarlov Cysts: Surgical Treatment by Subcutaneous Infusion Port.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Zhu, Tong; Lin, Hongyi; Li, Jing; Zeng, Tao; Lin, Jian

    2018-05-01

    The treatment of Tarlov cysts is challenging and difficult. The objective of our study was to describe the security and efficacy of the subcutaneous infusion port for drainage of symptomatic Tarlov cysts. The authors executed a retrospective review of data from 5 symptomatic Tarlov cysts patients who were treated using a subcutaneous infusion port from June 2014 to July 2017. Numerical Rating Scale scores and the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores of back pain were analyzed. Complications and adverse effects on postoperative days 1, 7, 14, and 28 were also analyzed. The mean follow-up was 12.6 months. Five adults (3 females and 2 males) who had been symptomatic received a subcutaneous infusion port. After treatment, all patients experienced pain relief and pain alleviation lasted from 1 day to 3 years without complications and adverse effects. A subcutaneous infusion port is a useful treatment option for symptomatic Tarlov cysts. When the patients' symptoms returned and the cysts repressurized, we quickly and simply drained the cysts by using the infusion port. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Delayed treatment of symptomatic breast cancer: The experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. A cross-sectional study carried out at a teaching hospital in Kaduna, Nigeria, to investigate the extent and reasons for the delay between onset of symptoms and admission for treatment of symptomatic breast cancer. Methods. The patients had histologically proven breast cancer and had been admitted for ...

  12. urinary tract infections in symptomatic pregnant women attending

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    cause urinary tract infections. Several factors are known to predispose an individual to developing urinary tract infections; one of the factors is pregnancy. Therefore, this research set out to determine the bacteriologic profile of urinary tract infection and the susceptibility pattern among symptomatic pregnant women in Abuja.

  13. Symptomatic Bochdalek Hernia in Pregnancy: A Rare Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Yetkinel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Symptomatic Bochdalek hernia in pregnancy is quite rare. To the best of our knowledge, there are a total of 44 cases reported in the literature between 1959 and 2016 (Hernández-Aragon et al., 2015; Koca et al., 2016. Difficulty and delay in diagnosis may lead to life-threatening complications. Case Report. We report a case of Bochdalek hernia during the 30 gestational weeks’ pregnancy in whom pregnancy continued after surgical repair which resulted in term birth. Discussion. Bochdalek hernia is diagnosed with an incidence of 1 in 2200–12500 live births, while symptomatic diaphragm hernia is much less in adults. The actual incidence of diaphragmatic hernias during pregnancy is still unknown. Symptoms may include abdominal distension, recurrent abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, inability to defecate, dyspnea, and chest pain. The patient with diaphragmatic hernia may be asymptomatic until the late weeks of gestation, as in our case, or herniation may occur during advanced gestational weeks with increased intraabdominal pressure. Conclusion. In conclusion, diagnosis of the diaphragm hernia during pregnancy is very rare. Diagnosis is rarer in symptomatic patients due to its rarity and the duration of diagnosis may, therefore, be delayed. Diaphragm hernia should be kept in mind in symptomatic patients due to its high maternal and fetal mortality rates.

  14. Symptomatic Non-parasitic benign hepatic cyst: Evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Purpose: Solitary non-parasitic cysts of the liver are commonly asymptomatic and do not require treatment. Rarely, however, the cysts become symptomatic and are then best treated surgically. The optimal surgical treatment is debatable. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of deroofing as a safe and ...

  15. Symptomatic HIV infection in infancy - clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To investigate the usefulness of immunological tests in the diagnosis of HIV infection in young symptomatic children < 15 months of age). Design. Tests were evaluated in HIV-infected ... The test detected 16 of 19 infected infants (sensitivity 84%, negative predictive value 98%). With the exception of the finding of ...

  16. Symptomatic Raccoon Dogs and Sarcoptic Mange Along an Urban Gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Masayuki U; Sonoda, Yoichi

    2017-06-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the effects of landscape factors on the distribution of symptomatic raccoon dogs with sarcoptic mange along an urban gradient. We used 246 camera traps (182 traps from April 2005 to December 2006; 64 traps from September 2009 to October 2010) to record the occurrence of asymptomatic and symptomatic raccoon dogs at 21 survey sites along an urban-rural gradient in the Tama Hills area of Tokyo. Each occurrence was explained in terms of the surrounding forest, agricultural, and grassland areas and additional factors (i.e., seasonal variations and survey methods) at various spatial scales using a generalized additive mixed model (GAMM). In our analysis, a 1000-m radius was identified as the important spatial scale for asymptomatic and symptomatic raccoon dog occurrence. The peak of the predicted occurrence probability of asymptomatic raccoon dogs appeared in the intermediate forest landscape as opposed to non-forest and forest landscapes. However, a high occurrence probability of symptomatic raccoon dogs was detected in non-forest and intermediate forest landscapes (i.e., urban and suburban) as opposed to a forest landscape, presumably because of animals occurring at much higher densities in more urbanized areas. Therefore, our results suggest that human-modified landscapes play an important role in the high occurrence of sarcoptic mange in raccoon dogs.

  17. Symptomatic Uterine Leiomyoma in a 65-year old Postmenopausal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    She presented with constipation suggestive of intestinal obstruction with no history of previous surgery, and investigations confirmed a calcified uterine leiomyoma. She had exploratory ... Symptomatic uterine leiomyoma in an elderly postmenopausal woman is rare, and its coexistence with CIN III in a virgin, is even rarer.

  18. Symptomatic pelvic organ prolapse: Experience at a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To determine the demographic characteristics in patients presenting with symptomatic POP to a tertiary urogynaecology .... regarding their vaginal symptoms, namely: 1. Are you aware of a dragging pain in your lower abdomen? 2. Are you aware of soreness in your vagina? 3. ... for each question on a scale from 1 to 10.

  19. Plasmodium falciparum multiplicity correlates with anaemia in symptomatic malaria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mockenhaupt, Frank P.; Ehrhardt, Stephan; Eggelte, Teunis A.; Markert, Miriam; Anemana, Sylvester; Otchwemah, Rowland; Bienzle, Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    In 366 Ghanaian children with symptomatic Plasmodium falciparum malaria, low haemoglobin levels and severe anaemia were associated with a high multiplicity of infection (MOI) and with distinct merozoite surface protein alleles. High MOI not only reflects premunition but may also contribute to

  20. Symptomatic HIV infection in infancy - clinical and laboratory ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in infancy - clinical and laboratory markers of infection. M P Meyer, Z Latief, C Haworlh, 5 Salie,. A van Dyk. Objective. To investigate the usefulness of immunological tests in the diagnosis of HIV infection in young symptomatic children « 15 months of age). Design. Tests were evaluated in HIV-infected (HIV antibody- and ...

  1. Prevalence and associations of symptomatic renal papillary necrosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To assess the prevalence and associations of symptomatic renal papillary necrosis (RPN) in sickle cell anemia patients. Patients and Methods: The case notes of homozygous hemoglobin (Hb) S patients diagnosed with RPN were retrospectively assessed. Diagnosis was based on microscopic hematuria and positive ...

  2. Relationship between longitudinal strain and symptomatic status in aortic stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attias, David; Macron, Laurent; Dreyfus, Julien; Monin, Jean-Luc; Brochet, Eric; Lepage, Laurent; Hekimian, Guillaume; Iung, Bernard; Vahanian, Alec; Messika-Zeitoun, David

    2013-08-01

    Global longitudinal strain (GLS) and basal longitudinal strain (BLS) assessed using two-dimensional speckle-tracking imaging have been proposed as subtle markers of left ventricular (LV) systolic dysfunction with potential prognostic value in patients with aortic stenosis (AS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between longitudinal strain and symptomatic status in patients with AS. GLS and BLS were measured in 171 patients with pure, isolated, at least mild AS prospectively enrolled at two institutions. The population was divided into four groups: asymptomatic nonsevere AS (n = 55), asymptomatic severe AS with preserved LV ejection fraction (LVEF; ≥50%) (n = 37), symptomatic severe AS with preserved LVEF (n = 60), and severe AS with reduced LVEF (<50%) (n = 19). GLS was significantly different among the four groups (P < .0001), but the difference was due mainly to patients with reduced LVEFs. In addition, there was an important overlap among the groups, and in multivariate analysis, after adjustment for age, gender, AS severity, and LVEF, GLS was not an independent predictor of symptomatic status (P = .07). BLS was also significantly different among the four groups (P < .0001) but in contrast was independently associated with symptomatic status (P < .0001). However, as for GLS, there was an important overlap between groups and differences were close to intraobserver or interobserver variability (1.3 ± 1.1% and 2.0 ± 1.6%, respectively). In this prospective multicenter cohort of patients with wide ranges of AS severity, symptoms, and LVEFs, BLS but not GLS was independently associated with symptomatic status. However, there was an important overlap among groups, and differences were close to measurements' reproducibility, raising caution regarding the use of longitudinal strain, at least as a single criterion, in the decision-making process for patients with severe asymptomatic AS. Copyright © 2013. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  3. Symptomatic bilateral xanthogranuloma of the choroid plexus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Tural Emon

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Xanthogranulomas (XGRs of the choroid plexus are rare, asymptomatic, and benign lesions usually found incidentally. Here, we present a case of a 47-year-old male with bilateral XGR of the choroid plexus with periventricular edema and discuss our case in relation to a review of existing literature pertaining to the radiology of XGRs. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first reported case of bilateral trigonal XGR causing brain edema without ventricular dilatation. Despite the fact that they can cause hydrocephalus, XGRs are silent and benign lesions. Although the etiopathology of XGRs remains poorly understood, enhanced imaging analyses may provide additional information regarding edema and focal white matter signal changes.

  4. Does highly symptomatic class membership in the acute phase predict highly symptomatic classification in victims 6 months after traumatic exposure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Maj; Hyland, Philip; Armour, Cherie

    2016-05-01

    Recently studies have indicated the existence of both posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and acute stress disorder (ASD) subtypes but no studies have investigated their mutual association. Although ASD may not be a precursor of PTSD per se, there are potential benefits associated with early identification of victims at risk of developing PTSD subtypes. The present study investigates ASD and PTSD subtypes using latent class analysis (LCA) following bank robbery (N=371). Moreover, we assessed if highly symptomatic ASD and selected risk factors increased the probability of highly symptomatic PTSD. The results of LCA revealed a three class solution for ASD and a two class solution for PTSD. Negative cognitions about self (OR=1.08), neuroticism (OR=1.09) and membership of the 'High symptomatic ASD' class (OR=20.41) significantly increased the probability of 'symptomatic PTSD' class membership. Future studies are needed to investigate the existence of ASD and PTSD subtypes and their mutual relationship. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Heterogeneity of schizophrenia: Genetic and symptomatic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Sakae

    2013-10-01

    Schizophrenia may have etiological heterogeneity, and may reflect common symptomatology caused by many genetic and environmental factors. In this review, we show the potential existence of heterogeneity in schizophrenia based on the results of our previous studies. In our study of the NOTCH4 gene, there were no significant associations between any single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of NOTCH4 and schizophrenia. However, exploratory analyses suggested that the SNP, rs3134928 may be associated with early-onset schizophrenia, and that rs387071 may be associated with schizophrenia characterized by negative symptoms. In our highly familial schizophrenia study, the African-American cohort without environmental exposure showed a possible linkage at marker 8p23.1 in the dominant model and in the European-American cohort, a marker at 22q13.32 showed a probable linkage in the recessive model. In the less familial schizophrenia families, these linkages were not shown. Based on our eye movement study, a putative subtype of schizophrenia with severe symptoms related to excitement/hostility, negative symptoms and disorganization may be associated with chromosome 22q11. We consider that a sample stratification approach may clarify the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. Therefore, this approach may lead to a more straightforward way of identifying susceptibility genes of schizophrenia. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Paradoxical increase in liver ketogenesis during long-term insulin-induced hypoglycemia in diabetic rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiavon, Fabiana P M; Gazola, Vilma A F G; Furlan, Maria M D P; Barrena, Helenton C; Bazotte, Roberto B

    2011-02-01

    It is well established that insulin inhibits liver ketogenesis. However, during insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) the release of counterregulatory hormones could overcome the insulin effect on ketogenesis. To clarify this question the ketogenic activity in livers from alloxan-diabetic rats submitted to long-term IIH was investigated. Moreover, liver glycogenolysis, gluconeogensis, ureagenesis and the production of L-lactate were measured, and its correlation with blood levels of ketone bodies (KB), L-lactate, glucose, urea and ammonia was investigated. For this purpose, overnight fasted alloxan-diabetic rats (DBT group) were compared with control non-diabetic rats (NDBT group). Long-term IIH was obtained with an intraperitoneal injection of Detemir insulin (1 U/kg), and KB, glucose, L-lactate, ammonia and urea were evaluated at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 h after insulin injection. Because IIH was well established two hours after insulin injection this time was used for liver perfusion experiments. The administration of Detemir insulin decreased (P < 0.05) blood KB and glucose levels, but there was an increase in the blood L-lactate levels and a rebound increase in blood KB during the glucose recovery phase of IIH. In agreement with these results, the capacity to produce KB from octanoate was increased in the livers of DBT rats. Moreover, the elevated blood L-lactate levels in DBT rats could be attributed to the higher (P < 0.05) glycogenolysis when part of glucose from glycogenolysis enters glycolysis, producing L-lactate. In contrast, except glycerol, gluconeogenesis was negligible in the livers of DBT rats. Therefore, during long-term IIH the higher liver ketogenic capacity of DBT rats increased the risk of hyperketonemia. In addition, in spite of the fact that the insulin injection decreased blood KB, there was a risk of worsening lactic acidosis.

  7. Severe Hypoglycemia and Cardiovascular or All-Cause Mortality in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seon-Ah Cha

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe investigated the association between severe hypoglycemia (SH and the risk of cardiovascular (CV or all-cause mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes.MethodsThe study included 1,260 patients aged 25 to 75 years with type 2 diabetes from the Vincent Type 2 Diabetes Resgistry (VDR, who consecutively enrolled (n=1,260 from January 2000 to December 2010 and were followed up until May 2015 with a median follow-up time of 10.4 years. Primary outcomes were death from any cause or CV death. We investigated the association between the CV or all-cause mortality and various covariates using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis.ResultsAmong the 906 participants (71.9% who completed follow-up, 85 patients (9.4% had at least one episode of SH, and 86 patients (9.5% died (9.1 per 1,000 patient-years. Patients who had died were older, had a longer duration of diabetes and hypertension, received more insulin, and had more diabetic microvascular complications at baseline, as compared with surviving patients. The experience of SH was significantly associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality (hazard ratio [HR], 2.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.39 to 5.02; P=0.003 and CV mortality (HR, 6.34; 95% CI, 2.02 to 19.87; P=0.002 after adjusting for sex, age, diabetic duration, hypertension, mean glycosylated hemoglobin levels, diabetic nephropathy, lipid profiles, and insulin use.ConclusionWe found a strong association between SH and increased risk of all-cause and CV mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes.

  8. Resveratrol ameliorates mitochondrial dysfunction but increases the risk of hypoglycemia following hemorrhagic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hao; Guan, Yuxia; Widlund, Anne Lykkegaard; Becker, Lance B; Baur, Joseph A; Reilly, Patrick M; Sims, Carrie A

    2014-12-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) may contribute to organ failure, by profoundly altering mitochondrial function. Resveratrol (RSV), a naturally occurring polyphenol, has been shown to promote mitochondrial function and regulate glucose homeostasis in diabetes. We hypothesized that RSV during resuscitation would ameliorate HS-induced mitochondrial dysfunction and improve hyperglycemia following acute blood loss. With the use a decompensated HS model, male Long-Evans rats (n = 6 per group) were resuscitated with lactated Ringer's solution with or without RSV (30 mg/kg) and were killed before hemorrhage (sham), at severe shock, following resuscitation, and 18 hours after resuscitation. At each time point, the liver and kidney mitochondria were isolated to assess individual respiratory complexes (CI, CII, and CIV) and the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Blood samples were assayed for glucose, insulin, corticosterone, total glucagon-like peptide (GLP-1), glucagon, and serum cytokine levels. The Homeostatic Model Assessment-Insulin Resistance index was used to quantify insulin resistance. RSV supplementation following HS significantly improved mitochondrial function and decreased mitochondrial ROS production in both liver and kidney. RSV-treated animals had significantly lower blood glucose levels following resuscitation when compared with sham animals (116.0 ± 20.2 mg/dL vs. 227.7 ± 8.3 mg/dL, p GLP-1 levels (385.8 ± 56.6 ng/mL vs. 187.3 ± 11.1 ng/mL, p effect on plasma corticosterone, glucagon, or cytokine levels. Resuscitation with RSV restores mitochondrial function and decreases insulin resistance but may be associated with increased hypoglycemia. The observed antiglycemic effects of RSV may be mediated by decreased mitochondrial ROS and increased GLP-1 secretion.

  9. Coronary heart disease risk assessment and characterization of coronary artery disease using coronary CT angiography: comparison of asymptomatic and symptomatic groups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hwang, Y.; Kim, Y.; Chung, I.-M.; Ryu, J.; Park, H.

    2010-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the prevalence of coronary artery disease (CAD) in relation to risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and assess plaque characteristics from coronary computed tomography (CT) angiography in asymptomatic and symptomatic patients. Materials and methods: Three hundred and ninety consecutive patients [asymptomatic group, n = 138; symptomatic group (atypical or non-anginal chest pain), n = 252] were retrospectively enrolled. They were subsequently classified into three CHD risk categories, based on the National Cholesterol Education Program guidelines, and 10 year risks of coronary events were calculated using Framingham risk score. CT was evaluated for stenosis, plaque composition, and coronary calcium scores. Results: CAD was observed in 42% of the asymptomatic group and 62% of the symptomatic group. In the former, the prevalence of CAD in low-, moderate- and high-risk subgroups was 21.4, 47.4 and 65%, respectively, and was 33.3, 74.4, and 72.4% in the symptomatic group. Framingham 10-year risks of coronary events were significantly higher in patients with CAD than in normal participants, and receiver operating characteristics curves showed that discriminatory power was poor in the asymptomatic group and symptomatic men, and good in symptomatic women. Of the participants in the asymptomatic group, 12% exhibited only non-calcified plaques and of the symptomatic group, 7% exhibited only non-calcified plaques. The coronary calcium score was significantly higher for significant stenosis than for non-significant stenosis in both groups. Conclusions: The prevalence of CAD was not negligible even in subgroups with low-to-moderate CHD risk. Additionally, the Framingham risk score was effective for predicting CAD only in symptomatic women. Coronary calcium scores correlated with significant stenosis; however, a sizeable percentage of both groups had only non-calcified plaques.

  10. Urine sampling techniques in symptomatic primary-care patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anne; Aabenhus, Rune

    2016-01-01

    in primary care. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of urine culture from different sampling-techniques in symptomatic non-pregnant women in primary care. Methods: A systematic review was conducted by searching Medline and Embase for clinical studies conducted in primary care using...... a randomized or paired design to compare the result of urine culture obtained with two or more collection techniques in adult, female, non-pregnant patients with symptoms of urinary tract infection. We evaluated quality of the studies and compared accuracy based on dichotomized outcomes. Results: We included...... seven studies investigating urine sampling technique in 1062 symptomatic patients in primary care. Mid-stream-clean-catch had a positive predictive value of 0.79 to 0.95 and a negative predictive value close to 1 compared to sterile techniques. Two randomized controlled trials found no difference...

  11. Doege-Potter syndrome presenting with hypoinsulinemic hypoglycemia in a patient with a malignant extrapleural solitary fibrous tumor: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schutt Robert C

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Doege-Potter syndrome is a paraneoplastic syndrome characterized by non-islet cell tumor hypoglycemia secondary to a solitary fibrous tumor. This tumor causes hypoglycemia by the secretion of a prohormone form of insulin-like growth factor II. We describe the diagnosis and management of Doege-Potter syndrome and the use of transarterial chemoembolization in a patient with a malignant extrapleural solitary fibrous tumor. Case presentation Our patient was a 64-year-old Caucasian woman who initially presented with urinary incontinence and was found to have a 14.5×9.0×9.0cm retroperitoneal solitary fibrous tumor compressing her bladder. Her tumor was surgically resected but recurred with multiple hepatic metastatic lesions. The hepatic metastases progressed despite systemic chemotherapy and treatment with doxorubicin transarterial chemoembolization. Her course was complicated by the development of recurrent fasting hypoglycemia, most likely secondary to Doege-Potter syndrome. Her hypoglycemia was managed with corticosteroid therapy and frequent scheduled nutrient intake overnight. Conclusions The rarity of hepatic solitary fibrous tumors and consequent lack of controlled trials make this report significant in that it describes the diagnostic approach to Doege-Potter syndrome, describes our experience with the use of doxorubicin transarterial chemoembolization, and presents management options for tumor-associated hypoglycemia in the case of extensive disease not amenable to surgical resection.

  12. Prevalence of nutritional rickets among symptomatic children and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: The prevalence of NR among symptomatic children aged 0-3 yearswas615 (95.35%). Males were 330 (53.7%), females were 285 (46.3%) with age ranging from 0 to three years. The prevalence of NR in the 6-12 months age group was 39.2% and 37.7% in the 1-1.5 year's age group. Exclusive breastfeeding rate at ...

  13. Plaque Characteristics of Patients with Symptomatic Mild Carotid Artery Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, Hiroki; Uemura, Juniti; Yagita, Yoshiki; Ogawa, Yukari; Kinoshita, Keita; Hirai, Satoshi; Ishihara, Manabu; Hara, Keijirou; Toi, Hiroyuki; Matsubara, Shunji; Nishimura, Hirotake; Uno, Masaaki

    2018-03-20

    Carotid revascularization may be considered for severe stenosis, but its use for symptomatic mild stenosis (<50%) with vulnerable plaque or ulcer remains uncertain. The characteristics of patients with symptomatic mild stenosis who underwent revascularization are reviewed. The subjects of this study were 18 patients with symptomatic mild stenosis (<50%) on angiography from among 175 patients who underwent revascularization in our department. The plaques were evaluated by black-blood magnetic resonance imaging (BB-MRI) and ultrasonography (US) and classified into 2 types: type 1 (n = 15), a lesion with an ulcer or mobile plaque or thrombosis on angiography or US; and type 2 (n = 3), a lesion without any of the above. Fourteen patients underwent carotid endarterectomy (CEA), and 4 patients underwent carotid artery stenting. The stenosis on angiography was 27.2% ± 10.7 (5%-41%), and the area carotid artery stenosis rate on US was 69.8 ± 14.5% (44.5%-97%). The stenosis rate of these 2 methods was not at all correlated. In type 1 plaque that underwent CEA, 10 of 11 patients had vulnerable plaque by histopathology, and 1 patient had thrombus on the plaque by operative findings. In type 2 plaque that underwent CEA, all patients had vulnerable plaque by histopathology. During the follow-up period, none of the patients had restenosis or stroke. The findings of US and BB-MRI in patients with symptomatic mild stenosis (<50%) on angiography are important for determining treatment. If BB-MRI or US shows the findings of vulnerable plaque in mild stenosis, surgical treatment may be considered for these patients. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality Assurance Standards for Symptomatic Breast Disease Services

    OpenAIRE

    Department of Health (Ireland)

    2007-01-01

    Quality Assurance Standards for Symptomatic Breast Disease Services People in Ireland have a right to expect that medical care be of good quality. They expect that standards of care are consistently high. They expect that access to care is easy, speedy, effective and efficient. Society expects quality of care to measure up to international norms of good practice. Such assurance can be given by auditing the quality of activity. Click here to download PDF 606kb

  15. Percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy of symptomatic renal calculi in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Pfister, R.C.; Yoder, I.C.; Young, H.H. II; Herrin, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy of upper urinary tract lithiasis is a well-established procedure in adults. We successfully applied this technique to completely remove symptomatic renal calculi in two children with idiopathic hypercalciuria. The procedure was well tolerated and no complications occurred. Both patients were discharged within 4 days of the lithotripsy. This method is an alternative to surgery for the removal of large or impacted calculi from the upper urinary tracts of pediatric patients. (orig.).

  16. Percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy of symptomatic renal calculi in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papanicolaou, N.; Pfister, R.C.; Yoder, I.C.; Young, H.H. II; Herrin, J.T.

    1986-01-01

    Percutaneous ultrasonic lithotripsy of upper urinary tract lithiasis is a well-established procedure in adults. We successfully applied this technique to completely remove symptomatic renal calculi in two children with idiopathic hypercalciuria. The procedure was well tolerated and no complications occurred. Both patients were discharged within 4 days of the lithotripsy. This method is an alternative to surgery for the removal of large or impacted calculi from the upper urinary tracts of pediatric patients. (orig.)

  17. Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection Is Underdiagnosed in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorichetti, Brendan; Goshen, Oran; Pauwels, Julie; Kozak, Frederick K; Tilley, Peter; Krajden, Mel; Gantt, Soren

    2016-02-01

    Records were reviewed from all infants tested for congenital cytomegalovirus infection in British Columbia, Canada from 2006 to June 2014. Fourteen of 701 infants, or approximately 4.2 per 100,000 live births, had a positive test, indicating that >90% of expected symptomatic congenital cytomegalovirus infection cases were not diagnosed using clinician-initiated testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Arthroscopic Excision of a Symptomatic Meso-acromiale

    OpenAIRE

    Stetson, William B.; McIntyre, J. Alex; Mazza, Genevieve R.

    2017-01-01

    The surgical technique for the management of a symptomatic os acromiale remains unclear. Several operative techniques have been described including open excision, open reduction?internal fixation (ORIF), arthroscopic acromioplasty or subacromial decompression, and arthroscopic excision. There are 4 types of os acromiale, with the meso-acromion being the most common and difficult to treat. The excision of a pre-acromion arthroscopically or in an open manner usually produces satisfactory result...

  19. Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in Children of Seropositive Women

    OpenAIRE

    Ines Mack; Marie-Anne Burckhardt; Marie-Anne Burckhardt; Ulrich Heininger; Friederike Prüfer; Sven Schulzke; Sven Wellmann

    2017-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is the most frequent congenital virus infection worldwide. The risk of congenital CMV (cCMV) transmission is highest in seronegative women who acquire primary CMV infection during pregnancy. A growing body of evidence indicates that secondary CMV infections in pregnant women with preconceptual immunity (either through reactivation of latent virus or re-infection with a new strain of CMV) contribute to a much greater proportion of symptomatic cCMV than was previously thou...

  20. Trial Readiness in Cavernous Angiomas With Symptomatic Hemorrhage (CASH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polster, Sean P; Cao, Ying; Carroll, Timothy; Flemming, Kelly; Girard, Romuald; Hanley, Daniel; Hobson, Nicholas; Kim, Helen; Koenig, James; Koskimäki, Janne; Lane, Karen; Majersik, Jennifer J; McBee, Nichol; Morrison, Leslie; Shenkar, Robert; Stadnik, Agnieszka; Thompson, Richard E; Zabramski, Joseph; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Awad, Issam A

    2018-04-11

    Brain cavernous angiomas with symptomatic hemorrhage (CASH) are uncommon but exact a heavy burden of neurological disability from recurrent bleeding, for which there is no proven therapy. Candidate drugs to stabilize the CASH lesion and prevent rebleeding will ultimately require testing of safety and efficacy in multisite clinical trials. Much progress has been made in understanding the epidemiology of CASH, and novel biomarkers have been linked to the biological mechanisms and clinical activity in lesions. Yet, the ability to enroll and risk-stratify CASH subjects has never been assessed prospectively at multiple sites. Biomarkers and other outcomes have not been evaluated for their sensitivity and reliability, nor have they been harmonized across sites. To address knowledge gaps and establish a research network as infrastructure for future clinical trials, through the Trial Readiness grant mechanism, funded by National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/National Institutes of Health. This project includes an observational cohort study to assess (1) the feasibility of screening, enrollment rates, baseline disease categorization, and follow-up of CASH using common data elements at multiple sites, (2) the reliability of imaging biomarkers including quantitative susceptibility mapping and permeability measures that have been shown to correlate with lesion activity, and (3) the rates of recurrent hemorrhage and change in functional status and biomarker measurements during prospective follow-up. We propose a harmonized multisite assessment of enrollment rates of CASH, baseline features relevant to stratification in clinical trials, and follow-up assessments of functional outcomes in relation to clinical bleeds. We introduce novel biomarkers of vascular leak and hemorrhage, with firm mechanistic foundations, which have been linked to clinical disease activity. We shall test their reliability and validity at multiple sites, and assess their changes over time

  1. Rheumatoid arthritis: A major symptom and symptomatic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuri Aleskandrovich Olyunin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is a major problem in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. It produces a serious psychological discomfort, causes sleep disorders, and drastically limits physical activity. Pain is one of the main signs of inflammation and its intensity correlates with inflammatory activity. The early use of disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs, regular monitoring, and timely correction of therapy in accordance with the treat-to-target principle make it possible to effectively monitor the activity of RA and to delay its progression. However, despite a marked decrease in RA activity, pain does not go away completely and may increase with time in a number of cases. Pain occurring in patients with RA is always far short of being caused by arthritis. It may be also related to comorbidity, osteoarthritis or fibromyalgia in particular. Pain induced by comorbidity may seriously distort the result of assessment of inflammatory activity and a physician's decision made to correct drug therapy in accordance with the treat-to-target principle.Nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs (NSAIDs are in most common use for the symptomatic therapy of RA. In spite of a significant reduction in pain and stiffness during therapy with NSAIDs, they do not affect the progression of X-ray changes. Virtually all NSAIDs may relieve pain when used in doses substantially smaller than those required to suppress inflammation. NSAIDs are an essential component of combination therapy for RA. They are given just at the early stage of the disease, by taking into account the gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and cardiovascular system. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the United Kingdom proposes to administer analgesics (paracetamol and codeine to reduce needs for NSAIDs in RA. For the time being, the use of analgesics in RA has, however, a weak evidence base.Different trials have also studied the efficiency of monotherapy with weak opioids, but it has proven to be

  2. Contemporary management of symptomatic primary aortic mural thrombus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Himanshu; Meda, Narendranadh; Vora, Simit; George, Robbie K; Tripathi, Ramesh K

    2014-12-01

    Primary aortic mural thrombus (PAMT) is an uncommon condition but an important source of noncardiogenic emboli with a difficult diagnosis and a high rate of complications, including high mortality. We report our experience of thromboembolic disease from PAMT and review its contemporary management. Retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of all patients who presented with acute occlusion of a limb or visceral vessels between January 2011 and September 2013 was performed. A total of 88 patients presented with acute occlusion of the extremities or visceral arteries. All underwent extensive evaluation for the possible source of the embolism. Of these 88 patients, 19 patients (mean age, 41.2 years; male:female ratio, 1:2.1) were found to have aortic mural thrombus as the source of distal embolism. Thrombus was located in the thoracic aorta in 10 patients, in the perivisceral aorta in three patients, and in the infrarenal aorta in six patients. Thrombus in the thoracic aorta was treated with stent grafts in four patients, bare metal stents in three patients, and anticoagulation alone in two patients. In the suprarenal abdominal aorta, all three patients underwent trapdoor aortic thrombectomy. Infrarenal aortic thrombus was managed by aortobifemoral embolectomy in two patients, aortic stenting in two patients, surgical thrombectomy in one patient, and anticoagulation alone in one patient. Successful treatment, defined as freedom from further embolic events or recurrence of thrombus, was achieved in 14 of 19 patients (76.4%) with a mean follow-up period of 16.2 months (range, 2-28 months). There were four (21%) thrombus-related deaths, all due to primary thromboembolic insults. One patient needed a below-knee amputation because of a recurrent thrombotic episode. Symptomatic PAMT is an uncommon but important source of noncardiogenic embolus. It appears to occur more frequently in young women. Endovascular coverage of the aortic thrombus, when feasible

  3. Screening for hypoglycemia at the bedside in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU with the Abbott PCx glucose meter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismaila Afisi

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Point of care (POC glucose meters are routinely used as a screening tool for hypoglycemia in a neonatal setting. Glucose meters however, lack the same accuracy as laboratory instruments for glucose measurement. In this study we investigated potential reasons for this inaccuracy and established a cut off value for confirmatory testing. Methods In this prospective study, all patients in the neonatal intensive care unit who had a plasma glucose test ordered were eligible to participate. Demographic information, sample collection information (nine variables and a recent hematocrit value were recorded for each sample. Glucose measurements were taken at the bedside on the glucose meter (RN PCx as well as in the laboratory on both the glucose meter (LAB PCx and the laboratory analyzer (PG. Data were analyzed by simple and mixed-effects regression analysis and by analysis of a receiver operator characteristics (ROC curve. Results There were 475 samples analyzed from 132 patients. RN PCx values were higher than PG values (mean = 4.9%, while LAB PCx results were lower (mean = -5.2% than PG values. Only 31% of the difference between RN PCx – PG and 46% of the difference for LAB PCx – PG could be accounted for by the variables tested. The largest proportion of variance between PCx and PG measurements was explained by hematocrit (about 30% with a greater effect seen at glucose concentrations ≤4.0 mmol/L (≤72 mg/dL(48% and 40% for RN PCx and LAB PCx, respectively. The ROC analysis showed that for detection of all cases of hypoglycemia (PG Conclusion The large difference between glucose results obtained by PCx glucose meter compared to the laboratory analyzer can be explained in part by hematocrit and low glucose concentration. These results emphasize that the glucose meter is useful only as a screening device for neonatal hypoglycemia and that a screening cut off value must be established.

  4. Clinical-pathomorphological correlation in patients with symptomatic dystonias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivanović Nataša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Symptomatic dystonia can be the result of various metabolic, degenerative diseases, the consumption of certain medications or exposure to toxic agents. However, only symptomatic dystonia with focal structural lesion provides a significant "window" for, at least indirect, perception of aetiopa-thogenesis and pathomorphological substratum of idiopathic dystonia. Our study included 57 patients with symptomatic dystonia, which as a base had focal or multifocal lesions, of whom 7 patients had generalized dystonia, 18 hemidystonia, 6 segmental dystonia, 7 torticollis, 6 blepharospasm, 7 hand dystonia, 3 spasmodic dysphonia, and 3 had oromandibular dystonia. Stroke was highly statistically the most frequent cause of structural lesions (33/57 or 58%. Relevant pathomorphological changes were present in 50/57 (88% patients, of whom 25 (50% had lesion in the lenticular nucleus (including individual damage of the putamen and globus pallidus, 12/50 (24% had damage of the thalamus and 6/50 (12% had damage of the brainstem. Generalized dystonia was most frequently associated with bilateral lesion of the putamen, hemidystonia with lesion of contralateral putamen, torticollis with damage of the caudate nucleus, hand dystonia with lesion of the thalamus and blepharospasm with lesion of the upper brainstem.

  5. Sonographically determined clues to the symptomatic or silent cholelithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saba, S.; Iqbal, Z.

    2007-01-01

    To determine an association between sonographically determined contractility with the symptomatic or silent nature of gallstone. Adult gallstone patients without (group I) and with biliary symptoms (group II) were compared with age and gender-matched controls. Demographic data, body mass index, risk factors, size, number and mobility of gallstone, gallbladder wall thickness (GBWT), volume and Ejection Fraction (EF) were determined on ultrasound before and after a standardized fatty meal (BFM and AFM). Demographic data, risk factors and gallstone characteristics were analyzed by Pearson Chi-square test and the gallbladder characteristics were analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Post Hoc tests by multiple comparisons on SPSS 11 with significance p=0.05. The gallbladder contractility as measured by changes in wall thickness and volume changes BFM and AFM, and ejection fraction was similar in controls and asymptomatic cholelithiasis groups and significantly reduced in symptomatic patients (p<.001). Multiparity (p=0.002), female gender (p=0.018), age less than 50 years (0.05), impacted calculi (p=0.001), multiple calculi (<.001) and calculi 5 mm (p<0.001) were associated with pain. A sluggishly emptying gallbladder was more significantly associated with symptomatic cholelithiasis compared to controls and asymptomatic cholelithiasis state in this series. Consideration of age, gender, impaction of calculi, number and size of calculi is important in causing symptom state and management options. (author)

  6. Factors that influence therapeutic outcomes in symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Quigley, Eamonn M M

    2012-02-03

    The term "symptomatic gastroesophageal reflux disease" (GERD) refers to those patients who present with the typical GERD symptoms of heartburn and regurgitation, yet do not have endoscopic evidence of esophagitis. The primary goals of managing symptomatic GERD are to control symptoms and improve quality of life. A clinical assessment of the GERD patient can identify important clinical features, such as atypical and extraesophageal symptoms for which acid-suppressive agents tend to be less effective. Performing an endoscopy can further identify the patient as having nonerosive reflux disease, erosive esophagitis, or Barrett\\'s esophagus-diagnoses which can help determine treatment but may not prove predictive of therapeutic response. Determining acid exposure through pH testing can predict therapeutic response, with those revealing an abnormal acid exposure time being more responsive to acid-suppressive therapy. However, the performance of an endoscopy and pH testing on each patient is clearly not practical. Whereas the natural history of symptomatic GERD is still largely undefined, acid-suppressive therapy appears to be the best approach available for both the short-term and long-term management of this disease.

  7. Symptomatic isolated middle cerebral artery dissection: High resolution MR findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byon, Jung Hee; Kwak, Hyo Sung; Chung, Gyung Ho; Hwang, Seung Bae [Dept. of Radiology, Chonbuk National University Medical School, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-11-15

    To perform high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (HRMRI) and determine clinical features of patients with acute symptomatic middle cerebral artery (MCA) dissection. Thirteen patients with acute symptomatic MCA dissection underwent HRMRI within 3 days after initial clinical onset. They also underwent routine brain MR imaging. HRMRI examinations included time-of-flight MR angiography (MRA), T2-weighted, T1-weighted, proton-density-weighted, and three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid acquisition gradient-echo (MPRAGE) sequences. Conventional angiography and MRA were used as reference standard to establish the diagnosis of MCA dissection. The angiographic findings and HRMRI findings such as intimal flap, double lumen, and intramural hematoma were analyzed in this study. All patients presented cerebral ischemia (median National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score = 4, range = 0-18). String sign was seen on MRA in seven patients. However, double lumen was seen in all patients on HRMRI by intimal flap. High signal lesion on MPRAGE sequences around the dissection lumen due to intramural hematoma was seen in three patients. HRMRI can be used to easily detect the wall structure of MCA such as the intimal flap and double lumen in patients with acute symptomatic MCA dissection. MPRAGE can detect hemorrhage in false lumen of MCA dissection.

  8. Anastomotic pseudoaneurysms after surgical reconstruction: Outcomes after endovascular repair of symptomatic versus asymptomatic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nolz, Richard; Gschwendtner, Manfred; Jülg, Gregor; Plank, Christina; Beitzke, Dietrich; Teufelsbauer, Harald; Wibmer, Andreas; Kretschmer, Georg; Lammer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To compare perioperative and follow-up outcomes of symptomatic versus asymptomatic patients following endovascular repair of anastomotic pseudoaneurysms (APAs) of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries. Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 17 patients (two women), with a mean age of 66.2 years (range 30–83 years). Endovascular treatment was performed in ten symptomatic, and seven asymptomatic patients electively. Data included technical success, perioperative (within 30 days) mortality and morbidity, as well as stent graft-related complications, reinterventions, and survival in follow-up. Results: Bifurcated (n = 13), aortomonoiliac (n = 3) endoprosthesis and one aortic cuff were implanted with a primary technical success rate of 100%. The overall in-hospital mortality and morbidity rate was 11.8% and 35.3%. The mean survival was 36.5 (range 0–111) months. There was a clear trend toward a lower overall survival within hospital and at one and three years for symptomatic patients compared to asymptomatic patients. (47.7 (CI: 0–138.8) versus 52.6 (CI: 28.5–76.8) months (p = 0.274)). During follow-up, late stent graft related complications were observed in six patients (35.3%) necessitating eight endovascular reinterventions. Additional three patients with primary fistulas between the APA and the intestine were treated by late surgical revision. Conclusion: Endovascular therapy of APAs represents a considerable alternative to open surgical repair. Short proximal anchoring zones still pose a risk for endoleaks and unintentional overstenting of side branches with commercially available devices, but this might be overcome by use of fenestrated and branched stent grafts in elective cases.

  9. Subcutaneous glucagon infusion and continuous glucose monitoring enable effective management of hypoglycemia in a patient with IGF-2-producing hemangiopericytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Buras, Eric D.; Weatherup, Emily; Wyckoff, Jennifer

    2018-01-01

    Background Ectopic insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-2 production is a rare complication of an array of epithelial and mesenchymal tumors, and can clinically manifest as life-threatening hypoglycemia. Case presentation A 49-year-old woman with 13-year history of metastatic hemangiopericytoma, previously treated with multiple rounds of chemotherapy and palliative radiation, presented to the emergency department after a hypoglycemic seizure. On arrival, glucose was 18 mg/dL (1.0 mmol/L) and requ...

  10. Decreased hyperintense vessels on FLAIR images after endovascular recanalization of symptomatic internal carotid artery occlusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenhua; Yin Qin; Yao Lingling; Zhu Shuanggen; Xu Gelin; Zhang Renliang; Ke Kaifu; Liu Xinfeng

    2012-01-01

    Background and purpose: Hyperintense vessels (HV) on fluid-attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images were assumed to be explained by slow antegrade or retrograde leptomeningeal collateral flow related to extracranial or intracranial artery steno-occlusion. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of recanalization after endovascular therapy of symptomatic internal carotid artery (ICA) occlusion on the presence of HV. Methods: Eleven patients with symptomatic ICA occlusion were retrospectively enrolled. Changes in the HV on FLAIR images were examined in affected hemisphere of each patient after successful treatment with endovascular recanalization (angioplasty, n = 3; stent-assisted angioplasty, n = 8). The relationship between postoperative changes in the HV and Thrombolysis In Cerebral Ischemia (TICI) scale (I-III) was assessed. Results: After operation, HV of the 11 affected hemispheres were showed to be decreased (n = 3) or disappeared (n = 8) in treated side. The median interval between pre- and postoperative MRI examinations was 97.0 h (range, from 69. to 48.7 h). Of the 8 patients with disappeared HV, 7 achieved high TICI grade flow (III) and 1 had relatively low TICI grade flow (IIc) in treated side. However, all the 3 patients with decreased HV were found to be relatively low TICI grade flow (IIc). Conclusion: Our data indicate that endovascular recanalization of ICA occlusion was effective for decreasing HV. Postoperative decrease in HV can be considered as a marker for hemodynamic improvement.

  11. Symptomatic Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection in Children of Seropositive Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Mack

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is the most frequent congenital virus infection worldwide. The risk of congenital CMV (cCMV transmission is highest in seronegative women who acquire primary CMV infection during pregnancy. A growing body of evidence indicates that secondary CMV infections in pregnant women with preconceptual immunity (either through reactivation of latent virus or re-infection with a new strain of CMV contribute to a much greater proportion of symptomatic cCMV than was previously thought. Here, we describe a case of symptomatic cCMV infection in the newborn of a woman with proven immunity prior to pregnancy. Diagnosis was confirmed by CMV PCR from amniotic fluid and fetal MR imaging. The newborn presented with typical cCMV symptoms including jaundice, hepatosplenomegaly, cholestasis, petechiae, small head circumference, and sensorineural hearing loss, the most common neurologic sequela. CMV was detected in infant blood and urine by PCR, and intravenous ganciclovir was initiated and continued orally for 6 weeks totally. Apart from persisting right-sided deafness, the child exhibited normal neurological development up through the last follow-up at 4.5 years. To date, the most effective strategy to prevent vertical CMV transmission is hygiene counseling for women of childbearing age, which, in our case, and in concordance with recent literature, applies to seronegative, as well as seropositive, women. Once an expecting mother shows seroconversion or signs of an active CMV infection, there are no established procedures to reduce the risk of transmission, or therapeutic options for the fetus with signs of infection. After birth, symptomatic infants can be treated with ganciclovir to inhibit viral replication and improve hearing ability and neurodevelopmental outcome. A comprehensive review of the literature, including our case study, reveals the most current and significant diagnostic and treatment options available. In conclusion, the triad

  12. Conditional Tissue-Specific Foxa2 Ablation in Mouse Pancreas Causes Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia: RETRACTED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zengbin; Fei, Aihua; Liu, Yingbin; Pan, Shuming

    The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxa2 is a major upstream regulator of Pdx1, a transcription factor necessary for pancreatic development. In the present study, we conditionally knocked out Foxa2 in Pdx1-expressing domain and further analyzed the contribution of Foxa2 to α- and β-cell development and the effect of Foxa2 deletion on plasma insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels. Homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice were generated by homologous recombination using a Foxa2 gene-targeting vector. α- and β-cell mass was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Plasma glucose, insulin, and plasma were measured at postnatal day 10. For pdx1 lineage tracing studies, heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 EYFP and homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 EYFP mice were used. Our immunofluorescence analysis revealed that in the pancreas sections of the homozygous mutant mice, Foxa2 was virtually absent from non-β cells and its expression almost exclusively coincided with remnant β cells. The density of both α and β cells apparently decreased in the pancreas of the heterozygous mutant mice and in the pancreas of the homozygous mutant mice, α cells lost its predominance and β cells increased proportionally. Direct Pdx1 cell lineage tracing revealed that, on embryonic day 18.5, in the homozygous mutant mice, Pdx1 expression coincided almost exclusively with that of insulin-secreting β cells. Chemiluminescence assays revealed that heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice had significantly lower insulin levels than control mice (P Foxa2 mice and control mice (P > 0.05). Chemiluminescence assays also showed that Foxa2 deletion significantly depressed plasma glucagon levels in both homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice (P Foxa2 mice compared with control mice (P Foxa2 ablation leads to an imbalance in β/α ratio, profound hypoglucagonemia, inappropriate hyperinsulinemia, and hypoglycemia in mice. Our conditional tissue-specific Foxa2 ablation mouse model

  13. Conditional Tissue-Specific Foxa2 Ablation in Mouse Pancreas Causes Hyperinsulinemic Hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zengbin; Fei, Aihua; Liu, Yingbin; Pan, Shuming

    The forkhead/winged helix transcription factor Foxa2 is a major upstream regulator of Pdx1, a transcription factor necessary for pancreatic development. In the present study, we conditionally knocked out Foxa2 in Pdx1-expressing domain and further analyzed the contribution of Foxa2 to α- and β-cell development and the effect of Foxa2 deletion on plasma insulin, glucagon, and glucose levels. Homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice were generated by homologous recombination using a Foxa2 gene-targeting vector. α- and β-cell mass was examined by immunofluorescence microscopy. Plasma glucose, insulin, and plasma were measured at postnatal day 10. For pdx1 lineage tracing studies, heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 EYFP and homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 EYFP mice were used. Our immunofluorescence analysis revealed that in the pancreas sections of the homozygous mutant mice, Foxa2 was virtually absent from non-β cells and its expression almost exclusively coincided with remnant β cells. The density of both α and β cells apparently decreased in the pancreas of the heterozygous mutant mice and in the pancreas of the homozygous mutant mice, α cells lost its predominance and β cells increased proportionally. Direct Pdx1 cell lineage tracing revealed that, on embryonic day 18.5, in the homozygous mutant mice, Pdx1 expression coincided almost exclusively with that of insulin-secreting β cells. Chemiluminescence assays revealed that heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice had significantly lower insulin levels than control mice (P Foxa2 mice and control mice (P > 0.05). Chemiluminescence assays also showed that Foxa2 deletion significantly depressed plasma glucagon levels in both homozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice and heterozygous pdx1 Foxa2 mice (P Foxa2 mice compared with control mice (P Foxa2 ablation leads to an imbalance in β/α ratio, profound hypoglucagonemia, inappropriate hyperinsulinemia, and hypoglycemia in mice. Our conditional tissue-specific Foxa2 ablation mouse model

  14. Dogs Can Be Successfully Trained to Alert to Hypoglycemia Samples from Patients with Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, Dana S; Anderson, Wesley; Cattet, Jennifer

    2015-12-01

    Hypoglycemia (Hypo) is the most common side effect of insulin therapy in people with type 1 diabetes (T1D). Over time, patients with T1D become unaware of signs and symptoms of Hypo. Hypo unawareness leads to morbidity and mortality. Diabetes alert dogs (DADs) represent a unique way to help patients with Hypo unawareness. Our group has previously presented data in abstract form which demonstrates the sensitivity and specificity of DADS. The purpose of our current study is to expand evaluation of DAD sensitivity and specificity using a method that reduces the possibility of trainer bias. We evaluated 6 dogs aging 1-10 years old who had received an average of 6 months of training for Hypo alert using positive training methods. Perspiration samples were collected from patients during Hypo (BG 46-65 mg/dL) and normoglycemia (BG 85-136 mg/dl) and were used in training. These samples were placed in glass vials which were then placed into 7 steel cans (1 Hypo, 2 normal, 4 blank) randomly placed by roll of a dice. The dogs alerted by either sitting in front of, or pushing, the can containing the Hypo sample. Dogs were rewarded for appropriate recognition of the Hypo samples using a food treat via a remote control dispenser. The results were videotaped and statistically evaluated for sensitivity (proportion of lows correctly alerted, "true positive rate") and specificity (proportion of blanks + normal samples not alerted, "true negative rate") calculated after pooling data across all trials for all dogs. All DADs displayed statistically significant (p value <0.05) greater sensitivity (min 50.0%-max 87.5%) to detect the Hypo sample than the expected random correct alert of 14%. Specificity ranged from a min of 89.6% to a max of 97.9% (expected rate is not defined in this scenario). Our results suggest that properly trained DADs can successfully recognize and alert to Hypo in an in vitro setting using smell alone.

  15. Potentiation of Hormonal Responses to Hemorrhage and Fasting, but not Hypoglycemia in Conscious Adrenalectomized Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darlington, Daniel N.; Keil, Lanny C.; Dallman, Mary F.

    1989-01-01

    Bilateral adrenalectomy (ADRX) in rats removes the source of two major stress-responsive hormones, corticosterone and epinephrine. To test how ADRX rats with-stand stress, we performed the following experiments in adult male rats provided with indwelling femoral arterial and venous cannulae and either ADRX or sham-adrenalectomized (Sham) 3 days later and given 0.5% NaCl to drink. Five to 6 days after adrenal surgery the rats were studied after either a 15 ml/kg.5 min hemorrhage or after an overnight fast followed by insulin-induced hypoglycemia. In fed unstressed ADRX rats, basal mean arterial blood pressure was slightly decreased; heart rate was increased; blood volume, vasopressin, and oxytocin concentrations were not different from sham values; and renin and norepinephrine were significantly elevated. The recovery of arterial pressure after hemorrhage in the ADRX rats was similar to that in the sham group over a 5-h period; however, the responses of vasopressin and oxytocin were significantly greater, and those of renin and norepinephrine were markedly potentiated in the ADRX group. Heart rate recovered faster in the ADRX group and was elevated, compared to the sham value, for most of the 5-h period. Restitution of blood volume was attenuated in the ADRX group, although the restitution of plasma protein was not different between the groups. A significant difference in the change in plasma osmolality between groups after hemorrhage may account for the attenuated restitution of blood volume. After an overnight fast, which reduced blood volume in both groups of rats, the plasma renin concentration rose still further in ADRX rats; the differences in other measured variables observed between fed ADRX and sham groups remained the same. The insulin-induced 50% decrease in glucose caused minor effects on arterial blood pressure and heart rate and occasioned responses in renin and norepinephrine of similar magnitudes in the two groups. We conclude that in the absence of

  16. Beta-blocker use and risk of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias: a hospital-based case-control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Hou Tee; Kam, Jiyen; Nordin, Rusli Bin; Khelae, Surinder Kaur; Wang, Jing Mein; Choy, Chun Ngok; Lee, Chuey Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the risk factors of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias in relation to β-blockers use. Methods A hospital-based case-control study [228 patients: 108 with symptomatic bradyarrhythmias (cases) and 120 controls] was conducted in Sultanah Aminah Hospital, Malaysia between January 2011 and January 2014. Results The mean age was 61.1 ± 13.3 years with a majority of men (68.9%). Cases were likely than control to be older, hypertensive, lower body mass index and concomitant use of rate-controlling drugs (such as digoxin, verapamil, diltiazem, ivabradine or amiodarone). Significantly higher level of serum potassium, urea, creatinine and lower level of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were observed among cases as compared to controls. On univariate analysis among patients on β-blockers, older age (crude OR: 1.07; 95% CI: 1.03–1.11, P = 0.000), hypertension (crude OR: 5.6; 95% CI: 1.51–20.72, P = 0.010), lower sodium (crude OR: 0.04; 95% CI: 0.81–0.99, P = 0.036), higher potassium (crude OR: 2.36; 95% CI: 1.31–4.26, P = 0.004) and higher urea (crude OR: 1.23; 95% CI: 1.11–1.38, P = 0.000) were associated with increased risk of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias; eGFR was inversely and significantly associated with symptomatic bradyarrhythmias in both ‘β-blockers’ (crude OR: 0.97; 95% CI: 0.96–0.98, P = 0.000) and ‘non-β-blockers’ (crude OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.97–0.99, P = 0.023) arms. However, eGFR was not significantly associated with symptomatic bradyarrhythmias in the final model of both ‘β-blockers’ (adjusted OR: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.96–0.98, P = 0.103) and ‘non-β-blockers’ (adjusted OR: 0.99; 95% CI: 0.97–1.01, P = 0.328) arms. Importantly, older age was a significant predictor of symptomatic bradyarrhythmias in the ‘β-blockers’ as compared to the ‘non-β-blockers’ arms (adjusted OR: 1.09; 95% CI: 1.03–1.15, P = 0.003 vs. adjusted OR: 1.03; 95% CI: 0.98–1.09, P = 0.232, respectively). Conclusion Older

  17. No hypoglycemia after subcutaneous administration of glucagon-like peptide-1 in lean type 2 diabetic patients and in patients with diabetes secondary to chronic pancreatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knop, Filip K; Vilsbøll, Tina; Larsen, Steen

    2003-01-01

    have previously shown that GLP-1 does not cause hypoglycemia in obese type 2 diabetic patients with insulin resistance amounting to 5.4 +/- 1.1 according to homeostasis model assessment (HOMA). In this study, we investigated diabetic patients with normal or close to normal insulin sensitivity.......Glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) is a proglucagon derivative secreted primarily from the L-cells of the small intestinal mucosa in response to the ingestion of meals. GLP-1 stimulates insulin secretion and inhibits glucagon secretion. It has previously been shown that intravenous or subcutaneous...... administration of GLP-1 concomitant with intravenous glucose results in hypoglycemia in healthy subjects. Because GLP-1 is also effective in type 2 diabetic patients and is currently being evaluated as a therapeutic agent, it is important to investigate whether GLP-1 may cause hypoglycemia in such patients. We...

  18. PEPCK-C reexpression in the liver counters neonatal hypoglycemia in Pck1 del/del mice, unmasking role in non-gluconeogenic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semakova, Jana; Hyroššová, Petra; Méndez-Lucas, Andrés; Cutz, Ernest; Bermudez, Jordi; Burgess, Shawn; Alcántara, Soledad; Perales, José C

    2017-02-01

    Whole body cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase knockout (PEPCK-C KO) mice die early after birth with profound hypoglycemia therefore masking the role of PEPCK-C in adult, non-gluconeogenic tissues where it is expressed. To investigate whether PEPCK-C deletion in the liver was critically responsible for the hypoglycemic phenotype, we reexpress this enzyme in the liver of PEPCK-C KO pups by early postnatal administration of PEPCK-C-expressing adenovirus. This maneuver was sufficient to partially rescue hypoglycemia and allow the pups to survive and identifies the liver as a critical organ, and hypoglycemia as the critical pathomechanism, leading to early postnatal death in the whole-body PEPCK-C knockout mice. Pathology assessment of survivors also suggest a possible role for PEPCK-C in lung maturation and muscle metabolism.

  19. Enhanced Pain Sensitivity Among Individuals With Symptomatic Knee Osteoarthritis: Potential Sex Differences in Central Sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Emily J; King, Christopher D; Sibille, Kimberly T; Cruz-Almeida, Yenisel; Riley, Joseph L; Glover, Toni L; Goodin, Burel R; Sotolongo, Adriana S; Herbert, Matthew S; Bulls, Hailey W; Staud, Roland; Fessler, Barri J; Redden, David T; Bradley, Laurence A; Fillingim, Roger B

    2016-04-01

    Symptomatic knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a condition commonly associated with increased pain, disability, and functional limitations. Given the poor correspondence between radiographic evidence and clinical pain, central sensitization has been implicated as a potential mechanism underlying pain facilitation in knee OA. Sex may be a moderator of centrally mediated changes in knee OA pain; however, few studies have systematically assessed this. Therefore, the aim of this study was to examine differences in peripheral and central sensitization in men and women with symptomatic knee OA, as well as to determine whether these differences vary across age (middle age versus older age). Participants (n = 288) between the ages of 45 and 85 years completed a battery of quantitative sensory pain procedures assessing sensitivity to contact heat, cold pressor, mechanical pressure, and punctate stimuli. Differences in temporal summation (TS) were examined, as well as measures of clinical pain and functional performance. When compared to men, women exhibited greater sensitivity to multiple pain modalities (i.e., lower heat, cold, pressure thresholds/tolerances, greater TS of pain); however, there were no sex differences in clinical pain, with the exception of greater widespread pain observed in women. Although there were select age-related differences in pain sensitivity, sex differences in pain varied minimally across the age cohort. Overall, these findings provide evidence for greater overall sensitivity to experimental pain in women with symptomatic knee OA compared to men, suggesting that enhanced central sensitivity may be an important contributor to pain in this group. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  20. Effect of Three Interventions on Contact Lens Comfort in Symptomatic Wearers: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Navascues-Cornago

    Full Text Available To investigate whether carrying out various interventions part way through the day influences comfort in symptomatic daily disposable (DD contact lens wearers.A subject-masked, randomized, controlled clinical trial was conducted in thirty symptomatic soft lens wearers who wore their habitual DD contact lenses bilaterally for 12 h on two separate days. Five hours after lens application, one of the following three interventions or a control was performed on each eye: replacing the existing lens with a new lens; removing and reapplying the same lens; performing a 'scleral swish'; and no action (control. Comfort scores were recorded using SMS text messages every hour following lens application using a 0 (causes pain to 100 (excellent comfort scale. Comfort scores before lens application, at 6 mins post-application, and at 6 mins post-intervention were also recorded.There was a significant reduction in comfort from pre-lens application to 6 mins post-application for all groups (all p0.05. After the intervention, comfort continued to decline (p<0.0001 with slightly lower mean scores for the control group compared to the new lens group (p = 0.003. Change in comfort relative to pre-intervention (5 h was similar for all groups (p = 0.81. There was no difference in comfort at 12 h between groups (p = 0.83.This work has confirmed that comfort shows a continual and significant decline over a 12-h wearing period in symptomatic DD contact lens wearers. None of the interventions investigated had any significant impact on end-of-day comfort. These data suggest discomfort in lens wearers is more heavily influenced by changes to the ocular environment rather than to the lens itself.Controlled-Trials.com ISRCTN10419752 http://www.controlled-trials.com/ISRCTN10419752.

  1. Symptomatic cavernous malformations of the brainstem: functional outcome after microsurgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Christoph; Grillhösl, Andreas; Schichor, Christian; Suchorska, Bogdana; Romagna, Alexander; Tonn, Jörg-Christian; Zausinger, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Brainstem cavernous malformations are associated with a considerable risk of hemorrhage and subsequent morbidity. This study provides a detailed work-up of clinical and radiological outcome as well as identification of prognostic factors in patients who had suffered from symptomatic hemorrhages. Patients who had undergone surgery of symptomatic BSCMs were evaluated pre- and postoperatively both neurologically and neuroradiologically supplemented by telephone interviews. Additionally, patients were scored according to the Scandinavian Stroke Scale. Multiple uni- and multivariate analyses of possible clinical and radiological prognostic factors were conducted. The study population comprised 35 patients. Mean age at operation was 39.3 ± 13.0 years with microsurgical resection of a total of 37 different BSCMs between 2002 and 2011. Median clinical follow-up was 44.0 months (range 8-116 months). Postoperative MRI showed eventually complete resection of all BSCMs. Postoperative overall outcome revealed complete resolution of neurological symptoms for 5/35 patients, 14/35 improved and 9/35 remained unchanged. 7/35 suffered from a postoperative new and permanent neurological deficit, mostly affecting the facial nerve or hemipareses with mild impairment. Pre- and postoperative Scandinavian Stroke Scale scores were 11.0 ± 2.4 and 11.4 ± 2.2 (p = 0.55). None of the analyzed factors were found to significantly correlate with patients' clinical outcome. Complete resection of brainstem cavernous malformations can be achieved with an acceptable risk for long-term morbidity and surgery-related new deficits (~20 %). Neurological outcome is mainly determined within the first 6 months after surgery. Surgical treatment of brainstem cavernous malformations is recommended in symptomatic patients, in whom the lesion is accessible for surgery.

  2. Symptomatic and asymptomatic Campylobacter infections associated with reduced growth in Peruvian children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Gwenyth; Pan, William; Peñataro Yori, Pablo; Paredes Olortegui, Maribel; Tilley, Drake; Gregory, Michael; Oberhelman, Richard; Burga, Rosa; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Kosek, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    Although diarrheal illnesses are recognized as both a cause and effect of undernutrition, evidence for the effect of specific enteropathogens on early childhood growth remains limited. We estimated the effects of undernutrition as a risk factor for campylobacteriosis, as well as associations between symptomatic and asymptomatic Campylobacter infections and growth. Using data from a prospective cohort of 442 children aged 0-72 months, the effect of nutritional status on the incidence of Campylobacter infection was estimated using uni- and multivariate Poisson models. Multivariate regression models were developed to evaluate the effect of Campylobacter infection on weight gain and linear growth. Overall, 8.3% of diarrheal episodes were associated with Campylobacter (crude incidence rate = 0.37 episodes/year) and 4.9% of quarterly asymptomatic samples were Campylobacter positive. In univariate models, the incidence of Campylobacter infection was marginally higher in stunted than non-stunted children (IRR 1.270, 95% CI (0.960, 1.681)(p = 0.095). When recent diarrheal burdens were included in the analysis, there was no difference in risk between stunted and unstunted children. Asymptomatic and symptomatic Campylobacter infections were associated with reduced weight gain over a three-month period (65.5 g (95% CI: -128.0, -3.0)(p = 0.040) and 43.9 g (95% CI:-87.6, -1.0)(p = 0.049) less weight gain, respectively). Symptomatic Campylobacter infections were only marginally associated with reduced linear growth over a nine month period (-0.059 cm per episode, 95% CI: -0.118, 0.001)(p = 0.054), however relatively severe episodes were associated with reduced linear growth (-0.169 cm/episode, 95% CI -0.310, -0.028)(p = 0.019). Our findings suggest that Campylobacter is not as benign as commonly assumed, and that there is evidence to support expanding the indications for antibiotic therapy in campylobacteriosis in children.

  3. Acute Stressors Reduce Neural and Behavioral Inhibition to Food Cues among Binge Eating Disorder Symptomatic Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenyong Lyu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Stressors can trigger binge-eating but researchers have yet to consider their effects on both neural responses to food cues and food consumption among those at risk. In this experiment, we examined the impact of acute stressors on neural activation to food images and subsequent food consumption within binge-eating disorder (BED and non-eating disordered control groups. Eighteen women meeting DSM-IV BED criteria and 26 women serving as non-eating disordered controls were randomly assigned to unpleasant stressor (painful cold pressor test followed by negative performance feedback or less unpleasant stressor (non-painful sensory discrimination task followed by positive performance feedback conditions. Subsequently, they were scanned with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI while viewing food and neutral images. After the scans, participants completed a self-report battery in an environment conducive to snacking. During exposure to food images, BED-symptomatic women in the unpleasant stressor condition reported more liking of high calorie food images and showed less activation in one inhibitory area, the hippocampus, compared to controls in this condition. BED-symptomatic women exposed to unpleasant stressors also consumed more chocolate than any other group during the post-scan questionnaire completion. Crucially, reduced hippocampal activation to high calorie food images predicted more chocolate consumption following fMRI scans within the entire sample. This experiment provides initial evidence suggesting unpleasant acute stressors contribute to reduced inhibitory region responsiveness in relation to external food cues and later food consumption among BED-symptomatic women.

  4. Platelet-Derived MRP-14 Induces Monocyte Activation in Patients With Symptomatic Peripheral Artery Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dann, Rebecca; Hadi, Tarik; Montenont, Emilie; Boytard, Ludovic; Alebrahim, Dornaszadat; Feinstein, Jordyn; Allen, Nicole; Simon, Russell; Barone, Krista; Uryu, Kunihiro; Guo, Yu; Rockman, Caron; Ramkhelawon, Bhama; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2018-01-02

    Peripheral artery disease (PAD), a diffuse manifestation of atherothrombosis, is a major cardiovascular threat. Although platelets are primary mediators of atherothrombosis, their role in the pathogenesis of PAD remains unclear. The authors sought to investigate the role of platelets in a cohort of symptomatic PAD. The authors profiled platelet activity, mRNA, and effector roles in patients with symptomatic PAD and in healthy controls. Patients with PAD and carotid artery stenosis were recruited into ongoing studies (NCT02106429 and NCT01897103) investigating platelet activity, platelet RNA, and cardiovascular disease. Platelet RNA sequence profiling mapped a robust up-regulation of myeloid-related protein (MRP)-14 mRNA, a potent calcium binding protein heterodimer, in PAD. Circulating activated platelets were enriched with MRP-14 protein, which augmented the expression of the adhesion mediator, P-selectin, thereby promoting monocyte-platelet aggregates. Electron microscopy confirmed the firm interaction of platelets with monocytes in vitro and colocalization of macrophages with MRP-14 confirmed their cross talk in atherosclerotic manifestations of PAD in vivo. Platelet-derived MRP-14 was channeled to monocytes, thereby fueling their expression of key PAD lesional hallmarks and increasing their directed locomotion, which were both suppressed in the presence of antibody-mediated blockade. Circulating MRP-14 was heightened in the setting of PAD, significantly correlated with PAD severity, and was associated with incident limb events. The authors identified a heightened platelet activity profile and unraveled a novel immunomodulatory effector role of platelet-derived MRP-14 in reprograming monocyte activation in symptomatic PAD. (Platelet Activity in Vascular Surgery and Cardiovascular Events [PACE]; NCT02106429; and Platelet Activity in Vascular Surgery for Thrombosis and Bleeding [PIVOTAL]; NCT01897103). Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation

  5. Polyhydramnios, megalencephaly and symptomatic epilepsy caused by a homozygous 7-kilobase deletion in LYK5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffenberger, Erik G; Strauss, Kevin A; Ramsey, Keri E; Craig, David W; Stephan, Dietrich A; Robinson, Donna L; Hendrickson, Christine L; Gottlieb, Steven; Ramsay, David A; Siu, Victoria M; Heuer, Gregory G; Crino, Peter B; Morton, D Holmes

    2007-07-01

    We used single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) microarrays to investigate the cause of a symptomatic epilepsy syndrome in a group of seven distantly related Old Order Mennonite children. Autozygosity mapping was inconclusive, but closer inspection of the data followed by formal SNP copy number analyses showed that all affected patients had homozygous deletions of a single SNP (rs721575) and their parents were hemizygous for this marker. The deleted SNP marked a larger deletion encompassing exons 9-13 of LYK5, which encodes STE20-related adaptor protein, a pseudokinase necessary for proper localization and function of serine/threonine kinase 11 (a.k.a. LKB1). Homozygous LYK5 deletions were associated with polyhydramnios, preterm labour and distinctive craniofacial features. Affected children had large heads, infantile-onset intractable multifocal seizures and severe psychomotor retardation. We designated this condition PMSE syndrome (polyhydramnios, megalencephaly and symptomatic epilepsy). Thirty-eight percent (N = 16) of affected children died during childhood (ages 7 months to 6 years) from medical complications of the disorder, which included status epilepticus, congestive heart failure due to atrial septal defect and hypernatremic dehydration due to diabetes insipidus. A single post-mortem neuropathological study revealed megalencephaly, ventriculomegaly, cytomegaly and extensive vacuolization and astrocytosis of white matter. There was abundant anti-phospho-ribosomal S6 labelling of large cells within the frontal cortex, basal ganglia, hippocampus and spinal cord, consistent with constitutive activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling pathway in brain.

  6. Low-Carbohydrate Diet Impairs the Effect of Glucagon in the Treatment of Insulin-Induced Mild Hypoglycemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Schmidt, Signe; Damm-Frydenberg, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study compared the ability of glucagon to restore plasma glucose (PG) after mild hypoglycemia in patients with type 1 diabetes on an isocaloric high-carbohydrate diet (HCD) versus a low-carbohydrate diet (LCD). RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: Ten patients with insulin pump-treated type...... 1 diabetes randomly completed 1 week of the HCD (≥250 g/day) and 1 week of the LCD (≤50 g/day). After each week, mild hypoglycemia was induced by a subcutaneous insulin bolus in the fasting state. When PG reached 3.9 mmol/L, 100 µg glucagon was given subcutaneously, followed by 500 µg glucagon 2 h...... later. RESULTS: Compared with the HCD, the LCD resulted in lower incremental rises in PG after the first (mean ± SEM: 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 2.7 ± 0.4 mmol/L, P = 0.002) and second glucagon bolus (4.1 ± 0.2 vs. 5.6 ± 0.5 mmol/L, P = 0.002). No differences were observed between the diets regarding concentrations...

  7. Treatment of symptomatic uterine fibroids with green tea extract: a pilot randomized controlled clinical study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roshdy, Eman; Rajaratnam, Veera; Maitra, Sarbani; Sabry, Mohamed; Allah, Abdou S Ait; Al-Hendy, Ayman

    2013-01-01

    Background Uterine fibroids (UFs, also known as leiomyoma) affect 70% of reproductive-age women. Imposing a major burden on health-related quality-of-life (HRQL) of premenopausal women, UF is a public health concern. There are no effective medicinal treatment options currently available for women with symptomatic UF. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy and safety of green tea extract (epigallocatechin gallate [EGCG]) on UF burden and quality of life in women with symptomatic UF, in a double-blinded, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial. Methods A total of 39 reproductive-age women (age 18–50 years, day 3 serum follicle-stimulating hormone <10 \\U/mL) with symptomatic UF were recruited for this study. All subjects had at least one fibroid lesion 2 cm3 or larger, as confirmed by transvaginal ultrasonography. The subjects were randomized to oral daily treatment with either 800 mg of green tea extract (45% EGCG) or placebo (800 mg of brown rice) for 4 months, and UF volumes were measured at the end, also by transvaginal ultrasonography. The fibroid-specific symptom severity and HRQL of these UF patients were scored at each monthly visit, using the symptom severity and quality-of-life questionnaires. Student’s t-test was used to evaluate statistical significance of treatment effect between the two groups. Results Of the final 39 women recruited for the study, 33 were compliant and completed all five visits of the study. In the placebo group (n = 11), fibroid volume increased (24.3%) over the study period; however, patients randomized to green tea extract (n = 22, 800 mg/day) treatment showed significant reduction (32.6%, P = 0.0001) in total UF volume. In addition, EGCG treatment significantly reduced fibroid-specific symptom severity (32.4%, P = 0.0001) and induced significant improvement in HRQL (18.53%, P = 0.01) compared to the placebo group. Anemia also significantly improved by 0.7 g/dL (P = 0.02) in the EGCG treatment group, while average blood loss

  8. Treatment of symptomatic macromastia in a breast unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider José

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia are usually underserved, as they have to put up with very long waiting lists and are usually selected under restrictive criteria. The Oncoplastic Breast Surgery subspeciality requires a cross-specialty training, which is difficult, in particular, for trainees who have a background in general surgery, and not easily available. The introduction of reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit as treatment for symptomatic macromastia could have a synergic effect, making the scarce therapeutic offer at present available to these patients, who are usually treated in Plastic Departments, somewhat larger, and accelerating the uptake of oncoplastic training as a whole and, specifically, the oncoplastic breast conserving procedures based on the reduction mammaplasty techniques such as displacement conservative techniques and onco-therapeutic mammaplasty. This is a retrospective study analyzing the outcome of reduction mammaplasty for symptomatic macromastia in our Breast Cancer Unit. Methods A cohort study of 56 patients who underwent bilateral reduction mammaplasty at our Breast Unit between 2005 and 2009 were evaluated; morbidity and patient satisfaction were considered as end points. Data were collected by reviewing medical records and interviewing patients. Results Eight patients (14.28% presented complications in the early postoperative period, two of them being reoperated on. The physical symptoms disappeared or significantly improved in 88% of patients and the degree of satisfaction with the care process and with the overall outcome were really high. Conclusion Our experience of the introduction of reduction mammaplasty in our Breast Cancer Unit has given good results, enabling us to learn the use of different reduction mammaplasty techniques using several pedicles which made it posssible to perform oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. In our opinion, this management policy

  9. Perinatal Outcomes with Tamsulosin Therapy for Symptomatic Urolithiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, George; Vaughan, Lisa; Rose, Carl; Krambeck, Amy

    2016-01-01

    Medical expulsive therapy represents an effective adjunctive treatment for nonpregnant patients with symptomatic urolithiasis. Tamsulosin is classified by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration) as a category B medication. However, to our knowledge no published data exist for human pregnancy. We explored the safety and efficacy of tamsulosin therapy for symptomatic urolithiasis occurring during pregnancy. We retrospectively identified patients treated with tamsulosin for stone disease during pregnancy at the Mayo Clinic during 2000 to 2014. This medical expulsive therapy cohort was matched 2:1 to pregnant women with symptomatic urolithiasis during pregnancy who did not receive medical expulsive therapy. Groups were compared using linear mixed models for continuous variables and exact conditional logistic regression models for nominal variables to take into account correlation due to matching. A total of 27 patients receiving medical expulsive therapy comprised the study cohort. Median duration of antepartum tamsulosin exposure was 3 days (range 1 to 110), occurring during the first, second and third trimester in 3 (11%), 11 (40.7%) and 18 (67%) patients, respectively. Mean gestational age at delivery was 38.1 weeks (SD 2.4) and 6 (22%) infants were born preterm. All infant birthweights were considered appropriate for gestational age, and no cases of spontaneous abortion, intrauterine demise or neonatal congenital anomalies were encountered. Comparison between the medical expulsive therapy and control groups demonstrated no significant differences in maternal or infant outcomes for any of the examined variables. Tamsulosin medical expulsive therapy does not appear to be associated with adverse maternal or fetal outcomes and may be considered as adjunctive therapy for urolithiasis during pregnancy. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Treatment of symptomatic macromastia in a breast unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients suffering from symptomatic macromastia are usually underserved, as they have to put up with very long waiting lists and are usually selected under restrictive criteria. The Oncoplastic Breast Surgery subspeciality requires a cross-specialty training, which is difficult, in particular, for trainees who have a background in general surgery, and not easily available. The introduction of reduction mammaplasty into a Breast Cancer Unit as treatment for symptomatic macromastia could have a synergic effect, making the scarce therapeutic offer at present available to these patients, who are usually treated in Plastic Departments, somewhat larger, and accelerating the uptake of oncoplastic training as a whole and, specifically, the oncoplastic breast conserving procedures based on the reduction mammaplasty techniques such as displacement conservative techniques and onco-therapeutic mammaplasty. This is a retrospective study analyzing the outcome of reduction mammaplasty for symptomatic macromastia in our Breast Cancer Unit. Methods A cohort study of 56 patients who underwent bilateral reduction mammaplasty at our Breast Unit between 2005 and 2009 were evaluated; morbidity and patient satisfaction were considered as end points. Data were collected by reviewing medical records and interviewing patients. Results Eight patients (14.28%) presented complications in the early postoperative period, two of them being reoperated on. The physical symptoms disappeared or significantly improved in 88% of patients and the degree of satisfaction with the care process and with the overall outcome were really high. Conclusion Our experience of the introduction of reduction mammaplasty in our Breast Cancer Unit has given good results, enabling us to learn the use of different reduction mammaplasty techniques using several pedicles which made it posssible to perform oncoplastic breast conserving surgery. In our opinion, this management policy could bring clear advantages

  11. Predictors of acute symptomatic seizures after intracranial hemorrhage in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Seema; Kebede, Tewodros; Dean, Nathan P; Carpenter, Jessica L

    2014-10-01

    To determine the prevalence of acute symptomatic seizures in infants with supratentorial intracranial hemorrhage, to identify potential risk factors, and to determine the effect of acute seizures on long-term morbidity and mortality. Children less than 24 months with intracranial hemorrhage were identified from a neurocritical care database. All patients who received seizure prophylaxis beginning at admission were included in the study. Risk factors studied were gender, etiology, location of hemorrhage, seizure(s) on presentation, and the presence of parenchymal injury. Acute clinical and electrographic seizures were identified from hospital medical records. Subsequent development of late seizures was determined based on clinical information from patients' latest follow-up. Patients with idiopathic neonatal intracranial hemorrhage, premature infants, and those with prior history of seizures were excluded from analysis. Seventy-two infants met inclusion criteria. None. Forty percent of infants had acute symptomatic seizures. The prevalence was similar regardless of whether etiology of hemorrhage was traumatic or nontraumatic. Seizures on presentation and parenchymal injury were independent risk factors of acute seizures (p = 0.001 and p = 0.006, respectively). Younger children and women were also at higher risk (p Acute seizures were not predictive of mortality, but nearly twice as many patients with acute seizures developed late seizures when compared with those without. Electrographic seizures and parenchymal injury were also predictive of development of late seizures (p hemorrhage are at high risk for acute symptomatic seizures. This is regardless of the etiology of hemorrhage. Younger patients, women, patients with parenchymal injury, and patients presenting with seizure are most likely to develop acute seizures. Although the benefits of seizure prophylaxis have not been studied in this specific population, these results suggest that it is an important component

  12. [Endovascular interventional treatment for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Xiao, Li-ping; Li, Bao-min; Wang, Jun; Cao, Xiang-yu; Liu, Xin-feng; Ge, Ai-li; Zhang, A-lan

    2009-04-15

    To study the feasibility, security and validity of percutaneous angioplasty (PTA) or percutaneous angioplasty and stenting (PTAS) for symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery. The results of treatment and follow-up of 39 cases with symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery who had either recurrent transient ischemic attacks (TIAs) or resistant to medical therapy and were performed PTA or PTAS were studied retrospectively. Among the 39 cases with stenosis of middle cerebral artery (23 in left, 13 in right, 3 in bilateral side and 5 cases combining with stenosis of carotid artery) PTA were successfully performed in 9 cases and PTAS in 30 (whose post-operative residual stenosis were less than 10%). After operation the patients were administrated with antiplatelet drugs. The clinic symptom and sign of ischemia were improved obviously after operation. During the procedure the contrast could be seen outside the vessel in 2 cases, the patients had no obvious symptom of hemorrhage and got well rapidly. But in another case her consciousness changed 1 h after PTAS and the limbs could not move in right side. Emergency CT scan showed cerebral hemorrhage in left basic node area. The patient suffered language barrier and incomplete hemiplegy in right side. No complication was occurred in the others. During 5 to 60 months follow-up, the symptom of weakness in right arm reoccurred but lighter than before in only one case. TCD rechecked in 26 cases and demonstrated the blood beam speed was faster than normal in two case. DSA rechecked in 14 cases showed restenosis in-stent in the 2 cases and they were treated by medicine. PTA and PTAS is a feasible, safe and effective therapeutic method for the patients with symptomatic stenosis of middle cerebral artery. Further study in large number of patients is needed for long-term outcome.

  13. Pre-symptomatic transcriptome changes during cold storage of chilling sensitive and resistant peach cultivars to elucidate chilling injury mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    Puig, Clara Pons; Dagar, Anurag; Marti Ibanez, Cristina; Singh, Vikram; Crisosto, Carlos H; Friedman, Haya; Lurie, Susan; Granell, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cold storage induces chilling injury (CI) disorders in peach fruit (woolliness/mealiness, flesh browning and reddening/bleeding) manifested when ripened at shelf life. To gain insight into the mechanisms underlying CI, we analyzed the transcriptome of 'Oded' (high tolerant) and 'Hermoza' (relatively tolerant to woolliness, but sensitive to browning and bleeding) peach cultivars at pre-symptomatic stages. The expression profiles were compared and validated with two previously analy...

  14. Tibial tuberosity excision for symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, M J; Bhadreshwar, D R

    1995-01-01

    A modified Ferciot procedure was used to excise the tibial tubercle in patients with persistently symptomatic Osgood-Schlatter disease. Forty-two knees in 35 patients were reviewed at a mean follow-up of 5 years to assess outcome. The results revealed relief of pain in 95% of patients and reduction of prominence in 85.5% with minimal complication, in particular no evidence of genu recurvatum. The pathogenesis of the condition is outlined, and some of the theories and treatment modalities discussed. Tibial tubercle excision is recommended as the treatment of choice in those few cases that fail with conservative treatment.

  15. Symptomatic endometriosis of the colon - a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leutloff, U.C.; Roeren, T.; Feldmann, K.; Sillem, M.; Rabe, T.; Kauffmann, G.

    1996-01-01

    The intestinal endometriosis in need of treatment is a rare case in the surgical department. Preoperative diagnosis is very difficult and in any case must be based on histologic findings; endoscopy-guided biopsy very frequently yields negative results. Dual-contrast scanning of the colon still is a major examination method, but the findings make it difficult to rule out malignomas. Cyclic, recurrent abdominal complaints reported in the case history strongly indicate the possibility of endometriosis. Typing can be done in general only after surgery. The article reports the clinical and diagnostic parameters of a symptomatic endometriosis of the colon. (orig.) [de

  16. Case report of a symptomatic giant renal oncocytoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahmad, Sarfraz

    2011-01-01

    Renal oncocytomas are benign tumours, often asymptomatic, and picked incidentally on radiological imaging. We present a case report of a symptomatic giant renal oncocytoma in a 61-year old man having lower back\\/right flank pain. A large right renal mass was identified on abdominal CT scan. Radiological features were not sufficient to differentiate this lesion from renal cancer. Right radical nephrectomy was performed. Typical features of oncocytoma, without evidence of malignancy, were seen on histological examination of the specimen. In this report, we discuss literature review of radiological, genetic, and pathological characteristics of renal oncocytoma.

  17. Pathogenesis and symptomatics of the acute radiation syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fliedner, T.M.; Haen, M.; Carbonell, F.

    1980-01-01

    The pathogenesis and symptomatics of the acute radiation syndrome are discussed. Diagnosis and therapy would be impossible without detailed knowledge in these fields. The concept of acute radiation syndrome is explained, and a pathophysiological analysis of the various forms of radiation syndrome - haematological, intestinal and affecting the central nervous system is attempted. The developments in the diagnosis and therapy of acute radiation syndrome since its first description - 35 years ago - are reviewed. Today, whole-body doses of 100 rd and more can be treated by radiotherapy. (orig./MG) [de

  18. Delayed presentation of symptomatic breast cancers in Hong Kong: experience in a public cancer centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yau, T K; Choi, C W; Ng, Esther; Yeung, Rebecca; Soong, Inda S; Lee, Anne W M

    2010-10-01

    Delayed presentation is an important obstacle to improving cancer treatment outcomes. We aimed to study the magnitude of this problem in Hong Kong and the factors associated with delayed presentation of patients with symptomatic breast cancers. Retrospective study using self-administered questionnaires. Clinical Oncology Department in a regional public hospital in Hong Kong. A total of 158 Chinese women with breast cancer referred to our hospital between October 2006 and December 2007 consented to participate in this study. Among these, 59 (37%) patients were referred after having surgery in private sector. The mean total delay (from first symptom to treatment) was 22 weeks. The mean patient delay (from first symptom to first consultation) was 13 weeks, constituting the largest component (60%) of the total delay. After symptom onset, the delay exceeded 12 weeks for consulting a doctor in 29%, and for receipt of treatment in 52% of them. Low family income (income (P=0.005) were the only predictors of doctor/system delay and total delay, respectively. Delayed presentation and treatment of symptomatic breast cancer remains an important issue in Hong Kong. Apart from socio-economic factors, limited access to public medical care was likely an important contributing factor in delays related to patients as well as to doctor/system.

  19. Pulmonary fibrosis secondary to siderosis causing symptomatic respiratory disease: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McCormick Liam M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Pulmonary siderosis secondary to the inhalation of iron compounds is a rare condition which, despite striking radiological and histopathological features, has not traditionally been associated with symptoms or functional impairment. Although not the first of its kind, we present an unusual case of pulmonary siderosis with symptomatic respiratory disease, most likely secondary to associated fibrosis. Case presentation A 66-year-old Caucasian man was referred to the outpatient clinic with a 2-year history of exertional breathlessness. He had worked as an engineer for 20 years where he did a significant amount of welding but always wore a face shield. Clinical, radiological and histological features were consistent with a diagnosis of pulmonary siderosis, with associated fibrosis, most likely related to his occupational welding history. Conclusion Our report illustrates that symptomatic respiratory disease due to mild peribronchiolar fibrosis can occur with pulmonary siderosis despite wearing a mask. Furthermore, it reinforces the need for all clinicians to compile a detailed occupational history in individuals presenting with breathlessness.

  20. [Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in patients with symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habegger de Sorrentino, A; Motta, P; Iliovich, E; Sorrentino, A P

    1997-01-01

    The cytopathic effect of HIV on CD4 T cells, as well as the active autoimmune mechanism occurring during infection, have been documented. Of the cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of AIDS, the main one produced by the monocyte-macrophage series is tumor necrosis factor alfa (TNF alpha). This cytokine induces antigens such as proteinase 3 (Pr 3) or mieloperoxidase (MPO). Anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) are directed against this type of PMN antigens. In the present paper, the role of anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) in HIV infected patients as responsible for autoimmune phenomena in relation to opportunistic infections, was studied. A total of 88 serum samples belonging to 49 asymptomatic and 39 symptomatic HIV infected patients were tested for ANCA by an indirect immunofluorescence (IIF) test over a neutrophil substrate. ANCA were detected in 53.8% of symptomatic patients as compared to 4.1% in asymptomatic cases (p tuberculosis is a frequent finding in HIV infected patients from Northeastern Argentina. When the presence of ANCA in TB(+) HIV(+) and TB(+) HIV(-) patients was studied, it was seen that positive-ANCA significantly correlated with the first group (p pulmonar TB, could indicate that the virus may not be responsible for the induction of these antibodies.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging biomarkers indicate a central venous hypertension syndrome in patients with symptomatic pineal cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eide, Per Kristian; Pripp, Are Hugo; Ringstad, Geir A

    2016-04-15

    While most pineal cysts (PCs) are asymptomatic, some PCs are accompanied with symptoms of variable severity. We suggested that symptom severity in symptomatic patients with non-hydrocephalic PCs relates to venous compression causing central venous hypertension. This study explored whether possible magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) biomarkers of central venous hypertension could differentiate the severity of symptoms in individuals with non-hydrocephalic PCs. The study included all individuals with PCs and MRI available for analysis followed conservatively within the department from 2003 to 2014. Severity of symptoms at follow-up were assessed from a questionnaire. Suggested MRI biomarkers indicative of central venous hypertension were explored, in addition to MRI measures of cyst size, aqueduct stenosis, and tectal compression. The study included 66 patients. As compared to the 27/66 patients (41%) with "None-Moderate" symptoms at follow-up, the 39/66 patients (59%) with "Much-Severe" symptoms presented with significantly altered indices of central venous hypertension (tectum-splenium-cyst ratio and indices of thalamic and periventricular edema). PC grading based on MRI biomarkers of central venous hypertension differentiated the severity of symptoms. The results indicate an association between severity of symptoms and MRI biomarkers of central venous hypertension in symptomatic individuals with non-hydrocephalic PCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Percutaneous vertebroplasty for symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture adjacent to lumbar instrumented circumferential fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Chieh; Chen, Hung-Shu; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Ma, Ching-Hou; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Chung, Kao-Chi

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of percutaneous vertebroplasty for patients with symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures adjacent to lumbar instrumented circumferential fusion. Between January 2005 and June 2010, eighteen patients in the authors' institution with lumbar instrumented circumferential fusion had adjacent symptomatic osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures. The patients received percutaneous vertebroplasty using polymethylmethacrylate bone cement augmentation. Radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging were used. The visual analog pain scale and modified Brodsky's criteria were used to compare clinical outcomes pre- and postoperatively. Minimum follow-up was 18 months. Dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry scan confirmed osteoporosis in all patients. The average interval between fusion surgery and sustaining osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures was 24.8 months. The average interval between sustaining osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures and undergoing percutaneous vertebroplasty was 49.3 days. One-level percutaneous vertebroplasty was performed in 13 patients, and 2 levels were performed in 5 patients. The patients' visual analog pain scale scores improved by an average of 53 points postoperatively. Fifteen patients returned to preinjury activities of daily living. The average restoration of the fractured vertebral body height was 12.1%. No major surgery-related complications, occurred except asymptomatic cement leakage in 3 patients. Elderly patients undergoing lumbar instrumented fusion surgery should be aware of the possibility of adjacent vertebral compression fractures. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a minimally invasive and effective procedure to treat such adjacent segment disease. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  3. Quality of life in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder: The impact of symptomatic remission and resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, A; Mizuno, Y; Wartelsteiner, F; Wolfgang Fleischhacker, W; Frajo-Apor, B; Kemmler, G; Mimura, M; Pardeller, S; Sondermann, C; Suzuki, T; Welte, A; Uchida, H

    2017-10-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQOL) is significantly affected in individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar I disorder (BD-I). The current study investigated whether symptomatic remission and resilience might differently impact HRQOL in these patients. Fifty-two patients with schizophrenia and 60 patients suffering from BD-I from outpatient mental health services as well as 77 healthy control subjects from the general community were included into a cross-sectional study. HRQOL and resilience were assessed using the WHOQOL-BREF and the Resilience Scale. In patients, psychopathology was quantified by the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale or the Montgomery Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Young Mania Rating Scale, respectively. Notably, both patient groups showed lower HRQOL and resilience compared to control subjects, non-remitted patients indicated lower HRQOL than remitted ones. The effect of remission on HRQOL was significantly larger in patients with BD-I than in those with schizophrenia but did not explain the difference in HRQOL between groups. Resilience predicted HRQOL in all three groups. When accounting for the effect of resilience among remitted patients, only the difference in HRQOL between schizophrenia patients and control subjects was significant. These findings demonstrate the impact of symptomatic remission and resilience on HRQOL of both patients suffering from schizophrenia and BD-I and indicate that these factors are especially relevant for HRQOL of patients with BD-I. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Family history of atrial fibrillation is associated with earlier-onset and more symptomatic atrial fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gundlund, Anna; Fosbøl, Emil Loldrup; Kim, Sunghee

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We addressed whether patients with a family history of atrial fibrillation (AF) were diagnosed as having AF earlier in life, were more symptomatic, and had worse outcomes compared with those without a family history of AF. METHODS: Using the ORBIT-AF, we compared symptoms and disease......, and had more severe AF-related symptoms. No differences were found between the 2 groups in the risk of AF progression (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 0.98, 95% CI 0.85-1.14), stroke, non-central nervous system embolism, or transient ischemic attack (adjusted HR 0.95, 95% CI 0.67-1.34), all......-cause hospitalization (adjusted HR 1.03, 95% CI 0.94-1.12), and all-cause death (adjusted HR 1.05, 95% CI 0.86-1.27). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with a family history of AF developed AF at a younger age, had less comorbidity, and were more symptomatic. Once AF developed, no significantly increased risks of AF progression...

  5. Symptomatic improvement reported after receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Dawn A; Blazek-O'Neill, Betsy; Kopar, Jennifer L

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate patient-perceived benefits from receiving Reiki at a cancer infusion center. During a 6-month period, adults at a university hospital receiving Reiki through volunteer services were invited to complete a survey asking about perceived changes after Reiki. Changes in pain, mood, distress, sleep, and appetite were rated on a 5-point scale from no benefit to great benefit. Surveys were distributed after completing treatment and were returned in postage-paid envelops. A total of 145 surveys were completed (34.5% response rate), with 47 participants seen in the cancer infusion center and 98 in other areas of the hospital. Reiki was rated as a positive experience by 94% at the cancer center and 93% of others, with 92% at the cancer center and 86% of others interested in receiving additional Reiki sessions. Symptomatic improvement was similar for people at the cancer center and others, respectively, with much to great improvement for 89% and 86% for relaxation, 75% and 75% for anxiety/worry, 81% and 78% for improved mood, 43% and 35% for improved sleep, 45% and 49% for reduced pain, 38% and 43% for reduced isolation/loneliness, 75% and 63% for improved attitude, and 30% and 30% for improved appetite. Response was unaffected by previous exposure to Reiki, massage, or other touch therapy. Reiki results in a broad range of symptomatic benefits, including improvements in common cancer-related symptoms.

  6. Fractionated half body irradiation for palliation of multiple symptomatic bone metastases from solid tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Hayashi, Shinya; Sunagawa, Yoshimitsu; Sougawa, Mitsuharu; Nakazawa, Masanori; Yamashita, Takashi (Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan). Hospital)

    1992-06-01

    This was a phase I-II nonrandomized study that explored the toxicity and response of fractionated half-body irradiation (F-HBI) in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The patients had no premedication and received 10 Gy in 5 fractions with a dose rate of 15 cGy/min. At the Cancer Institute Hospital, 9 patients were treated by this technique (1 upper and lower F-HBI, 6 upper F-HBI, 2 lower F-HBI). All patients were female and had adenocarcinomas (8 breast and 1 lung). Adverse effects were myelosuppression, vomiting and partial alopecia. But hematologic toxicity was treated with blood transfusion or G-CSF. All toxicity was transient, and no pneumonitis nor radiation-related deaths occurred. When given as palliation, F-HBI was found to relieve pain in 80% of the patients. In 10% of the patients the pain relief was complete. The mean time to achieve pain relief in responders after F-HBI was 9 days. The pain relief was long-lasting and continued without need of reirradiation for 40% of the remaining patient's life. This treatment modality appears to be well tolerated and effective in patients with multiple symptomatic osseous metastases. The optimal indications, dose and fractionation for F-HBI should be further explored in randomized trials. (author).

  7. Clinical and symptom scores are significantly correlated with fecal microbiota features in patients with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvasnovsky, Charlotte L; Leong, Lex E X; Choo, Jocelyn M; Abell, Guy C J; Papagrigoriadis, Savvas; Bruce, Kenneth D; Rogers, Geraint B

    2018-01-01

    There is growing consensus that symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease is a chronic inflammatory condition, and that alterations in the fecal microbiota may contribute to its pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to relate the fecal microbiota composition in symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease to measures of inflammation, symptoms, and history of previous acute diverticulitis. Fecal microbiota composition in 28 individuals with symptomatic uncomplicated diverticular disease was characterized by 16S RNA gene amplicon sequencing. Microbiota composition was related to clinical history, symptom and inflammation measures, and demographic variables. Previous acute diverticulitis was associated with higher relative abundance of Pseudobutyrivibrio, Bifidobacterium, Christensenellaceae family, and Mollicutes RF9 order (P=0.004, 0.006, 0.010, and 0.019, respectively), but not microbiota alpha or beta diversity. A higher bloating severity score was significantly correlated with a higher relative abundance of Ruminococcus (P=0.032), and significantly inversely correlated with the relative abundance of the Roseburia (P=0.002). Fecal calprotectin levels were positively correlated with alpha diversity (Shannon index, P=0.005) and the relative abundance of Lactobacillus (P=0.004). Pain score was positively correlated with the relative abundance of Cyanobacterium (adjusted P=0.032). Patient symptoms in symptomatic diverticular disease are significantly correlated with features of the fecal microbiota. Our findings suggest the potential utility of therapies that target intestinal microbiology, such as dietary prebiotic supplements.

  8. Symptomatic fructose malabsorption in irritable bowel syndrome: A prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Chloé; Gourcerol, Guillaume; Déchelotte, Pierre; Leroi, Anne-Marie; Ducrotté, Philippe

    2014-04-01

    Fructose can trigger or worsen symptoms in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of symptomatic fructose malabsorption in IBS patients and to test whether the patient's characteristics can help to detect a fructose malabsorption. Ninety Rome III IBS patients (predominant diarrhoea (IBS-D): 31%, predominant constipation (IBS-C): 18%, mixed type (IBS-M): 51%) were included prospectively. After exclusion of a small intestinal bacterial overgrowth by a glucose breath test, fructose malabsorption was assessed by a five-hour breath test, with symptom monitoring, after a 25 g load of fructose. An increase of more than 20 ppm of hydrogen (H2) or methane (CH4) levels in the exhaled air led to the diagnosis of malabsorption. Fructose test was abnormal in 20/90 patients among whom only 35% were intolerant, with a simultaneous rise of H2/CH4 levels and the onset of abdominal discomfort or diarrhoea. IBS characteristics were not predictive even if young (p = 0.031) and male IBS patients (p = 0.029) were at higher risk of malabsorption. At variance, 18 additional patients experienced intestinal symptoms during the test despite normal fructose absorption. After a 25 g fructose load, symptomatic fructose malabsorption and intolerance without malabsorption were detected in 22% and 28% of IBS patients respectively.

  9. Late spontaneous recanalization of symptomatic atheromatous internal carotid artery occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Montserrat G; Vega, Pedro P; Lahoz, Carlos H; Calleja, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    Definitive treatment of symptomatic atheromatous internal carotid artery occlusion remains controversial, as far as in rare cases, late spontaneous recanalization has been seen. We consecutively studied 182 patients (January 2003 to August 2012) with an ischemic stroke in the internal carotid artery territory and diagnosis of atheromatous internal carotid artery occlusion during hospitalization. Seven patients presented a late spontaneous recanalization (>3 months) of the internal carotid artery. We described therapeutic attitude according to usual care in these patients. The authors attempt to highlight the unusual condition of recanalization after a symptomatic atheromatous chronic internal carotid artery occlusion. If these patients can be treated similar to patients with asymptomatic carotid pathology, then this needs to be clarified. However, due to the risk of ipsi- and contralateral ischemic strokes, revascularization techniques should be considered in certain cases. More studies are needed to establish the most appropriate therapeutical approach in order to avoid arbitrary treatment of these patients. © The Author(s) 2014 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  10. Electrocardiographically and symptomatically silent myocardial ischemia during exercise testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurata, Chinori; Tawarahara, Kei; Sakata, Kazuyuki; Taguchi, Takahisa; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Kobayashi, Akira; Yamazaki, Noboru; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    1991-01-01

    Certain patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) may have neither ST depression nor chest pain during exercise despite the presence of myocardial ischemia. The frequency and characteristics of such electrocardiographically and symptomatically silent ischemia were studied in 171 patients with both angiographically documented CAD and scintigraphically documented ischemia. Fifty-six (33%) of 171 patients had neither ST depression nor chest pain (Group N), and 115 (67%) had ST depression and/or chest pain (Group P). The two groups were similar with respect to age, gender, the prevalence of prior infarction, and peak systolic blood pressure. Group N patients, however, had a higher mean peak heart rate and rate-pressure product, less severe scintigraphic ischemia, a lower lung thallium-201 uptake, and a smaller number of diseased vessels. Stepwise discriminant analysis showed a history of effort angina, lung thallium-201 uptake, and scintigraphic severity of ischemia to be significant discriminators between Groups N and P. In conclusion, electrocardiographically and symptomatically silent ischemia may be common during exercise in patients with CAD, and less severe ischemia may be one of important determinants. (author)

  11. Acute symptomatic neonatal seizures in preterm neonates: etiologies and treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisani, Francesco; Spagnoli, Carlotta

    2017-12-15

    Acute symptomatic neonatal seizures in preterm newborns are a relevant clinical challenge due to the presence of many knowledge gaps. Etiology-wise, acute symptomatic seizures have an age-specific epidemiology, with intraventricular hemorrhage and its complications representing the first cause in extremely and very preterm neonates, whereas other etiologies have similar occurrence rates as in full-term infants. Specific treatment strategies for the premature neonates are not yet available. Studies suggest a similarly low response rate with even more unfavorable prognosis than in full-term infants. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic changes are likely under way during the preterm period, with the potential to affect both effectiveness and safety of antiepileptic drugs in these patients. However, due to the lack of clear evidence to guide prioritization of second-line drugs, off-label medications are frequently indicated by review papers and flow-charts, and are prescribed in clinical practice. We therefore conclude by exploring potential future lines of research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of symptomatic pelvic varices by ovarian vein embolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capasso, Patrizio; Simons, Christine; Trotteur, Genevieve; Dondelinger, Robert F.; Henroteaux, Denis; Gaspard, Ulysse

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. Pelvic congestion syndrome is a common cause of chronic pelvic pain in women and its association with venous congestion has been described in the literature. We evaluated the potential benefits of lumboovarian vein embolization in the treatment of lower abdominal pain in patients presenting with pelvic varicosities. Methods. Nineteen patients were treated. There were 13 unilateral embolizations, 6 initial bilateral treatments and 5 treated recurrences (a total of 30 procedures). All embolizations were performed with either enbucrilate and/or macrocoils, and there was an average clinical and Doppler duplex follow-up of 15.4 months. Results. The initial technical success rate was 96.7%. There were no immediate or long-term complications. Variable symptomatic relief was observed in 73.7% of cases with complete responses in 57.9%. All 8 patients who had partial or no pain relief complained of dyspareunia. The direct relationship between varices and chronic pelvic pain was difficult to ascertain in a significant number of clinical failures. Conclusion. Transcatheter embolization of lumboovarian varices is a safe technique offering symptomatic relief of pelvic pain in the majority of cases. The presence of dyspareunia seemed to be a poor prognostic factor, indicating that other causes of pelvic pain may coexist with pelvic varicosities

  13. The Benefit of Arthroscopy for Symptomatic Total Knee Arthroplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiu-Peng Teng

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available Thirty-one knees with symptomatic total knee arthroplasty were diagnosed and treated arthroscopically. There were 18 knees with soft tissue impingement and 13 knees without. There were 16 knees with painful arthroplasty and range of motion (ROM greater than 90°. Hypertrophied synovitis with or without impingement was more easily found by arthroscopy in this group than in the other 15 knees with the chief complaint of limited ROM, where more remarkable fibrotic tissue with intra-articular adhesion was found. Overall, the average improvement in ROM was 43.1° immediately after arthroscopy, and 20° at the final follow-up. Symptoms improved in 90.3% of patients, and 58.1% were satisfied with the outcome of their surgery. Arthroscopy is helpful for intra-articular diagnosis, obtaining a specimen for histopathologic analysis, culture for subclinical infection, and better improvement in ROM. In our experience, arthros-copy for symptomatic knee arthroplasty is reliable, safe and effective.

  14. Symptomatic thoracic spinal cord herniation: case series and technical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Ray, Wilson Z; Wright, Neill M

    2014-09-01

    Idiopathic spinal cord herniation (ISCH) is an uncommon condition located predominantly in the thoracic spine and often associated with a remote history of a major traumatic injury. ISCH has an incompletely described presentation and unknown etiology. There is no consensus on the treatment algorithm and surgical technique, and there are few data on clinical outcomes. In this case series and technical report, we describe the atypical myelopathy presentation, remote history of traumatic injury, radiographic progression, treatment, and outcomes of 5 patients treated at Washington University for symptomatic ISCH. A video showing surgical repair is presented. In contrast to classic compressive myelopathy symptomatology, ISCH patients presented with an atypical myelopathy, characterized by asymmetric motor and sensory deficits and early-onset urinary incontinence. Clinical deterioration correlated with progressive spinal cord displacement and herniation observed on yearly spinal imaging in a patient imaged serially because of multiple sclerosis. Finally, compared with compressive myelopathy in the thoracic spine, surgical treatment of ISCH led to rapid improvement despite a long duration of symptoms. Symptomatic ISCH presents with atypical myelopathy and slow temporal progression and can be successfully managed with surgical repair.

  15. A Symptomatic Spinal Extradural Arachnoid Cyst with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshinori Kadono

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal epidural arachnoid cyst (EAC is a rare, usually asymptomatic condition of unknown origin, which typically involves the lower thoracic spine. We report a case of posttraumatic symptomatic EAC with lumbar disc herniation. A 22-year-old man experienced back pain and sciatica after a traffic accident. Neurological examination revealed a right L5 radiculopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cystic lesion at the L3 to L5 level and an L4-5 disc herniation; computed tomography myelography showed that the right L5 root was sandwiched between the cyst and the herniation. A dural defect was identified during surgery. The cyst was excised completely and the defect was repaired. A herniation was excised beside the dural sac. Histology showed that the cyst wall consisted of collagen and meningothelial cells. Postoperatively the symptoms resolved. Lumbar spinal EACs are rare; such cysts may arise from a congenital dural crack and grow gradually. The 6 cases of symptomatic lumbar EAC reported in the literature were not associated with disc herniation or trauma. In this case, the comorbid disc herniation was involved in symptom progression. Although many EACs are asymptomatic, comorbid spinal disorders such as disc herniation or trauma can result in symptom progression.

  16. Radiation therapy for symptomatic hepatomegaly in myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tefferi, A.; Jimenez, T.; Gray, L.A.; Mesa, R.A. [Division of Hematology and Internal Medicine, Rochester, MN (United States); Chen, M.G. [Division of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic and Mayo Foundation, MN (United States)

    2001-07-01

    Objective: To describe the experience with liver irradiation in advanced cases of myelofibrosis with myeloid metaplasia (MMM). Methods: Over a 20-yr period, 14 patients with MMM were treated with a total of 25 courses of liver, abdominal, or abdominal and pelvic irradiation for symptomatic hepatomegaly with (5 patients) or without (9 patients) ascites. All 14 patients had advanced disease and 11 (79%) had previous splenectomy. The median radiation therapy (RT) dose per course was 150 cGy (range 50-1000) administered at a median of six fractions. Four patients received two to six courses. Results. Twelve of the 14 patients (86%) had a transient (median 3 months) subjective response from RT. However, in only 35% of these was there a transient (median 3 months) decrease in palpable liver size. Four of the five patients with ascites experienced a short-term response from RT. Eight of the 13 patients suitable for evaluation (62%) had treatment-associated cytopenia, often in the form of anemia and/or thrombocytopenia. At last follow-up, 10 patients (71%) had died after a median of 7 months (range 0.1-23) and 4 were alive at 3, 20, 33, and 57 months after RT. Conclusions: Low-dose abdominal RT for symptomatic hepatomegaly or ascites associated with advanced-stage MMM is myelosuppressive and provides only temporary and mainly subjective and short-lived relief. (au)

  17. Microbiology of bile in symptomatic uncomplicated gallstone disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmad, M.; Akhtar, M.R.; Akhtar, M.R.

    2015-01-01

    To determine the microbiology of the bile culture and antimicrobial susceptibility in patients with symptomatic gallstone disease in our setup. Study Design: A descriptive study. Place and Duration of Study: Surgical Department Combined Military Hospital (CMH) Kharian from Oct, 2010 to Jun, 2011. Patients and Methods: A total of 106 patients underwent cholecystectomy due to symptomatic gallstones and their bile was cultured for aerobic and anaerobic bacteria and culture sensitivity was performed. Data was analysed by using statistical package for social sciences (SPSS) version 13. Results: Bile culture was negative in 81 patients (76.4%) and was positive in only 25 patients (23.6%). Escheria Coli was the most common cultured organism in 10 (40%) patients, Klebsiella in 5 (20%) patients, Pseudomonas in 5 (20%) patients, Proteus in 2 (8%) patients, Staphlococcus aureus in 2 (8%) patients and mixed organisms were cultured in 1 patient (4%). Cefoperazone with sulbactum and Amikacin were the most effective prophylactic antibiotics. Conclusion: Bile in majority of patients with symtomatic uncomplicated gallstone disease is sterile. E. coli is the most commonly cultured organism and cefoperazone with sulbactum and amikacin are the most appropriate antibiotics in our setup. (author)

  18. Uterine artery embolisation for symptomatic adenomyosis-Mid-term results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bratby, M.J.; Walker, W.J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of uterine artery embolisation (UAE) in the treatment of adenomyosis. Materials and methods: 27 women with symptomatic adenomyosis diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent UAE between 1998 and 2004. Clinical evaluation using a standardised questionnaire was made at regular intervals after embolisation to assess patient outcome. Results: The diagnosis of adenomyosis was confirmed histologically by transvaginal biopsy in 5 women. There were 14 women with associated uterine fibroids. Diffuse adenomyosis was identified in 18 women. A focal adenomyoma was present in another 8 women. In 1 patient adenomyosis was not classified. All patients except one underwent bilateral uterine artery embolisation. There was an initial favourable clinical response, with improvement of menorrhagia in 79% (13/16) of patients at 12 months. Follow-up data was available on a total of 14 patients at 2 and 3 years after embolisation. 45.5% (5/11) reported a deterioration in menorrhagia symptoms at 2 years. Conclusion: UAE for symptomatic adenomyosis is effective in the short-term but there is a high rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms 2 year following treatment.

  19. Uterine artery embolisation for symptomatic adenomyosis-Mid-term results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bratby, M.J. [Radiology Department, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Egerton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XX (United Kingdom); Walker, W.J. [Radiology Department, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Egerton Road, Guildford, Surrey GU2 7XX (United Kingdom)], E-mail: wjwalker@doctors.org.uk

    2009-04-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the role of uterine artery embolisation (UAE) in the treatment of adenomyosis. Materials and methods: 27 women with symptomatic adenomyosis diagnosed on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) underwent UAE between 1998 and 2004. Clinical evaluation using a standardised questionnaire was made at regular intervals after embolisation to assess patient outcome. Results: The diagnosis of adenomyosis was confirmed histologically by transvaginal biopsy in 5 women. There were 14 women with associated uterine fibroids. Diffuse adenomyosis was identified in 18 women. A focal adenomyoma was present in another 8 women. In 1 patient adenomyosis was not classified. All patients except one underwent bilateral uterine artery embolisation. There was an initial favourable clinical response, with improvement of menorrhagia in 79% (13/16) of patients at 12 months. Follow-up data was available on a total of 14 patients at 2 and 3 years after embolisation. 45.5% (5/11) reported a deterioration in menorrhagia symptoms at 2 years. Conclusion: UAE for symptomatic adenomyosis is effective in the short-term but there is a high rate of recurrence of clinical symptoms 2 year following treatment.

  20. Immediate versus delayed treatment for recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Vasconcelos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND: The timing of surgery for recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis remains controversial. Early cerebral revascularization may prevent a disabling or fatal ischemic recurrence, but it may also increase the risk of hemorrhagic transformation, or of dislodging a thrombus. This review examined the randomized controlled evidence that addressed whether the increased risk of recurrent events outweighed the increased benefit of an earlier intervention. OBJECTIVES: To assess the risks and benefits of performing very early cerebral revascularization (within two days compared with delayed treatment (after two days for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. METHODS: Search methods: We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register in January 2016, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL; The Cochrane Library 2016, issue 1, MEDLINE (1948 to 26 January 2016, EMBASE (1974 to 26 January 2016, LILACS (1982 to 26 January 2016, and trial registers (from inception to 26 January 2016. We also handsearched conference proceedings and journals, and searched reference lists. There were no language restrictions. We contacted colleagues and pharmaceutical companies to identify further studies and unpublished trials Selection criteria: All completed, truly randomized trials (RCT that compared very early cerebral revascularization (within two days with delayed treatment (after two days for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. Data collection and analysis: We independently selected trials for inclusion according to the above criteria, assessed risk of bias for each trial, and performed data extraction. We utilized an intention-to-treat analysis strategy. MAIN RESULTS: We identified one RCT that involved 40 participants, and addressed the timing of surgery for people with recently symptomatic carotid artery stenosis. It compared very early surgery with surgery performed after 14 days of

  1. Insulin pumps in pediatric routine care improve long-term metabolic control without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanas, Ragnar; Adolfsson, Peter

    2006-02-01

    Although continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) has been used in pediatric practice for >20 yr, the technique is not widely used in many countries. The aim of this non-randomized population-based study was to evaluate CSII in routine pediatric care. In a 1-yr cross-sectional evaluation, 27/89 patients (30.3%, age 7-21 yr) used pumps (two during the night only), the others 4-6 injections/day. In patients with >2 yr of diabetes, pump users had higher HbA1c (8.9+/-1.0 vs. 8.2+/-1.6%, p=0.04), less insulin/24 h (0.9+/-0.1 vs. 1.0+/-0.2 U/kg, p=0.002), and longer diabetes duration (p=0.02). The higher HbA1c is explained by 67% of pump patients having high HbA1c (>8.5%) as the major indication for CSII. The overall incidence of severe hypoglycemia was 31.5/100 patient years, 40.3 for injection therapy, and 11.1 for pump therapy (p=not significant). The incidence of severe hypoglycemia with unconsciousness was 12.9/100 patient years and with seizures 9.7 for injection therapy, whereas no children on pumps experienced these complications during the cross-sectional study year. We had no admissions for ketoacidosis in either group during this year. The pump patients were followed for 5 yr after pump start. Two stopped using the pump after 2 and 3 yr. For the patients with high HbA1c as indication, mean HbA1c the year before pump was 9.5%. Mean HbA1c during the first year with pump was lowered to 8.9% (p=0.019), the second year 8.6% (p=0.017), the third year 8.6 (p=0.012), the fourth year 8.7 (p=0.062), and the fifth year 8.9% (p=0.28). We found six cases of ketoacidosis corresponding to 4.7/100 patient years. In conclusion, we found a long-term lowering of HbA1c after starting CSII in a pediatric population, decreased frequency of severe hypoglycemia, and a low risk of ketoacidosis.

  2. A liver-specific defect of Acyl-CoA degradation produces hyperammonemia, hypoglycemia and a distinct hepatic Acyl-CoA pattern.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Gauthier

    Full Text Available Most conditions detected by expanded newborn screening result from deficiency of one of the enzymes that degrade acyl-coenzyme A (CoA esters in mitochondria. The role of acyl-CoAs in the pathophysiology of these disorders is poorly understood, in part because CoA esters are intracellular and samples are not generally available from human patients. We created a mouse model of one such condition, deficiency of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA lyase (HL, in liver (HLLKO mice. HL catalyses a reaction of ketone body synthesis and of leucine degradation. Chronic HL deficiency and acute crises each produced distinct abnormal liver acyl-CoA patterns, which would not be predictable from levels of urine organic acids and plasma acylcarnitines. In HLLKO hepatocytes, ketogenesis was undetectable. Carboxylation of [2-(14C] pyruvate diminished following incubation of HLLKO hepatocytes with the leucine metabolite 2-ketoisocaproate (KIC. HLLKO mice also had suppression of the normal hyperglycemic response to a systemic pyruvate load, a measure of gluconeogenesis. Hyperammonemia and hypoglycemia, cardinal features of many inborn errors of acyl-CoA metabolism, occurred spontaneously in some HLLKO mice and were inducible by administering KIC. KIC loading also increased levels of several leucine-related acyl-CoAs and reduced acetyl-CoA levels. Ultrastructurally, hepatocyte mitochondria of KIC-treated HLLKO mice show marked swelling. KIC-induced hyperammonemia improved following administration of carglumate (N-carbamyl-L-glutamic acid, which substitutes for the product of an acetyl-CoA-dependent reaction essential for urea cycle function, demonstrating an acyl-CoA-related mechanism for this complication.

  3. Metabolic and Neurologic Sequelae in a Patient with Long-Standing Anorexia Nervosa Who Presented with Septic Shock and Deep Hypoglycemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jager, Corine M.; Hoekstra, Miriam; Nijsten, Maarten W. N.; Oude Lansink, Annemieke; Ismael, Farouq

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To report the case of a 48-year female with chronic remitting anorexia nervosa who was found comatose at home and admitted to our hospital with a deep hypoglycemia (glucose level 0.6 mmol/L; 11 mg/dL) and septic shock secondary to a bilateral pneumonia. Method: Case report. Results: After

  4. Maintenance of high-energy brain phosphorous compounds during insulin-induced hypoglycemia in men. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, Jannik; Jensen, K E; Thomsen, C

    1988-01-01

    -induced hypoglycemia, 31P NMR spectra were obtained before and after intravenous injection of insulin (0.15 IU/kg body wt) in six men. Compared with prehypoglycemic measurements, no significant changes were found in brain content of Pi, sugar phosphates, phosphocreatine, phosphodiesters, and ATP, and brain pH remained...

  5. Incidence of MRI intensity changes in the knee meniscus. Comparing asymptomatic and symptomatic knees without meniscal lesion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Hiroyuki; Iso, Yoshinori; Furufu, Teruo; Suguro, Toru

    2004-01-01

    MRI has become the most frequently used imaging technique in diagnosing knee joint diseases. However, a number of factors may change the intensity of the meniscus on MR images, even in normal knees. The question remains when and to what degree the change in intensity appears with age, how aging is related to MR image grades, and how the development of symptoms is related to a change in intensity. To answer these questions, the present study investigated MR images of the menisci of asymptomatic volunteers and patients with knee diseases other than meniscal lesions to determine intrameniscal intensity changes. 163 knees in 133 subjects who underwent MRI for the knee joint (s) were examined. The coronal and the sagittal planes were imaged with T1 weighted imaging and GE slice thickness of 5 mm. MR images were classified as Grade 0 to 4. In knees of patients under 40 years of age, a change in intensity was only rarely observed in the menisci of normal knees, though it was frequently observed in those of symptomatic knees. By contrast, in the knees of patients 40 years or older, a change in intensity was frequently observed in the menisci of both normal and symptomatic knees. MRI is useful because of its convenience, low invasiveness, and high diagnostic ability. However, MR images of the meniscus should be read carefully, because the incidence of changes in intensity increases with aging or inflammation, and in symptomatic knees, the intensity change is occasionally exaggerated resulting in incorrect diagnosis. (author)

  6. Symptomatic and asymptomatic accessory navicular bones: Findings of Tc-99m MDP bone scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiu, N.-T.; Jou, I.-M.; Lee, B.-F.; Yao, W.-J.; Tu, D.-G.; Wu, P.-S.

    2000-01-01

    AIM: The accuracy of bone scintigraphy in diagnosing symptomatic accessory navicular bones has not been well studied. We conducted a retrospective study to explore the results and use of scintigraphy in symptomatic and asymptomatic accessory navicular bones. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Thirteen patients with a total of 13 symptomatic and 10 asymptomatic accessory navicular bones were included in the study. We used a scoring system to grade the scintigraphic abnormalities. The patients' symptoms and scintigraphic findings were recorded. RESULTS: Though focally increased radiopharmaceutical uptake was observed in all symptomatic accessory naviculars, half of the asymptomatic accessory navicular bones had the same manifestations. The scoring system was of no value in differentiating symptomatic from asymptomatic accessory navicular bones. CONCLUSION: Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive but not a specific tool for diagnosing a symptomatic accessory navicular. Chiu, N.-T. (2000)

  7. Hallazgos electroencefalográficos e hipoglucemia severa en niños con diabetes mellitus tipo 1 Electroencephalographic findings and severe hypoglycemia in children with type 1 diabetes mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro González Fernández

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Los episodios de hipoglucemia severa (HS constituyen un riesgo por ocasionar alteraciones de la función cerebral y del trazado electroencefalográfico (EEG en pacientes con diabetes. El presente estudio tiene como objetivo determinar la frecuencia de alteraciones del EEG después del diagnóstico de diabetes en un grupo de niños y su posible relación con HS, edad, control metabólico y tiempo de evolución de la diabetes. Se estudiaron retrospectivamente 40 niños con edades comprendidas entre 1 y 17 años (media de 12 años con diagnóstico de diabetes mellitus tipo 1 atendidos en el servicio de endocrinología del Hospital Pediátrico Docente "William Soler", en el período comprendido entre abril de 1990 y abril de 1998. Se tomaron los resultados de la hemoglobina glucosilada, así como los episodios referidos de HS. Se realizó EEG al diagnóstico de la diabetes y anualmente. Se clasificaron los EEG anormales de acuerdo con el tipo de trazado. Se encontraron EEG anormales en aproximadamente la mitad de los pacientes (45 % con predominio del trazado con descargas focales, los que fueron significativamente mayor en los pacientes con 2 ó más HS y con una edad menor al diagnóstico de la diabetes. No se encontró relación entre el EEG anormal y el control metabólico ni con el tiempo de evolución de la diabetes. La frecuencia hallada en este estudio enfatiza la importancia de realizar EEG al diagnóstico de DM y posteriormente, sobre todo en aquellos pacientes con HS y edad menor de 6 años.Episodes of severe hypoglycemia (SH constitute a risk because it causes brain function and electroencephalographic recording (EEG disturbances in patients with diabetes. This study was aimed at determining the frequency of EEG alterations after the diagnosis of diabetes in a group of children and their possible relation with SH, age, metabolic control and progression of diabetes. Forty children aged 1 to 17 years (average 12 years diagnosed with type 1

  8. Genetic characterization in symptomatic female DMD carriers: lack of relationship between X-inactivation, transcriptional DMD allele balancing and phenotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brioschi Simona

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, X-linked recessive myopathies, predominantly affect males, a clinically significant proportion of females manifesting symptoms have also been reported. They represent an heterogeneous group characterized by variable degrees of muscle weakness and/or cardiac involvement. Though preferential inactivation of the normal X chromosome has long been considered the principal mechanism behind disease manifestation in these females, supporting evidence is controversial. Methods Eighteen females showing a mosaic pattern of dystrophin expression on muscle biopsy were recruited and classified as symptomatic (7 or asymptomatic (11, based on the presence or absence of muscle weakness. The causative DMD gene mutations were identified in all cases, and the X-inactivation pattern was assessed in muscle DNA. Transcriptional analysis in muscles was performed in all females, and relative quantification of wild-type and mutated transcripts was also performed in 9 carriers. Dystrophin protein was quantified by immunoblotting in 2 females. Results The study highlighted a lack of relationship between dystrophic phenotype and X-inactivation pattern in females; skewed X-inactivation was found in 2 out of 6 symptomatic carriers and in 5 out of 11 asymptomatic carriers. All females were characterized by biallelic transcription, but no association was found between X-inactivation pattern and allele transcriptional balancing. Either a prevalence of wild-type transcript or equal proportions of wild-type and mutated RNAs was observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic females. Moreover, very similar levels of total and wild-type transcripts were identified in the two groups of carriers. Conclusions This is the first study deeply exploring the DMD transcriptional behaviour in a cohort of female carriers. Notably, no relationship between X-inactivation pattern and transcriptional behaviour of DMD gene was

  9. Genetic characterization in symptomatic female DMD carriers: lack of relationship between X-inactivation, transcriptional DMD allele balancing and phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brioschi, Simona; Gualandi, Francesca; Scotton, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Bovolenta, Matteo; Falzarano, Maria S; Sabatelli, Patrizia; Selvatici, Rita; D'Amico, Adele; Pane, Marika; Ricci, Giulia; Siciliano, Gabriele; Tedeschi, Silvana; Pini, Antonella; Vercelli, Liliana; De Grandis, Domenico; Mercuri, Eugenio; Bertini, Enrico; Merlini, Luciano; Mongini, Tiziana; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2012-08-16

    Although Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies, X-linked recessive myopathies, predominantly affect males, a clinically significant proportion of females manifesting symptoms have also been reported. They represent an heterogeneous group characterized by variable degrees of muscle weakness and/or cardiac involvement. Though preferential inactivation of the normal X chromosome has long been considered the principal mechanism behind disease manifestation in these females, supporting evidence is controversial. Eighteen females showing a mosaic pattern of dystrophin expression on muscle biopsy were recruited and classified as symptomatic (7) or asymptomatic (11), based on the presence or absence of muscle weakness. The causative DMD gene mutations were identified in all cases, and the X-inactivation pattern was assessed in muscle DNA. Transcriptional analysis in muscles was performed in all females, and relative quantification of wild-type and mutated transcripts was also performed in 9 carriers. Dystrophin protein was quantified by immunoblotting in 2 females. The study highlighted a lack of relationship between dystrophic phenotype and X-inactivation pattern in females; skewed X-inactivation was found in 2 out of 6 symptomatic carriers and in 5 out of 11 asymptomatic carriers. All females were characterized by biallelic transcription, but no association was found between X-inactivation pattern and allele transcriptional balancing. Either a prevalence of wild-type transcript or equal proportions of wild-type and mutated RNAs was observed in both symptomatic and asymptomatic females. Moreover, very similar levels of total and wild-type transcripts were identified in the two groups of carriers. This is the first study deeply exploring the DMD transcriptional behaviour in a cohort of female carriers. Notably, no relationship between X-inactivation pattern and transcriptional behaviour of DMD gene was observed, suggesting that the two mechanisms are regulated

  10. Factors Predictive of Symptomatic Radiation Injury After Linear Accelerator-Based Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Intracerebral Arteriovenous Malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); McKenzie, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Redekop, Gary [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Hsu, Fred [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Abbotsford, BC (Canada); Gete, Ermias; Gill, Brad; Lee, Richard; Luchka, Kurt [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Haw, Charles [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Lee, Andrew [Department of Neurosurgery, Royal Columbian Hospital, New Westminster, BC (Canada); Toyota, Brian [Division of Neurosurgery, Vancouver General Hospital, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Martin, Montgomery [Department of Medical Imaging, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To investigate predictive factors in the development of symptomatic radiation injury after treatment with linear accelerator-based stereotactic radiosurgery for intracerebral arteriovenous malformations and relate the findings to the conclusions drawn by Quantitative Analysis of Normal Tissue Effects in the Clinic (QUANTEC). Methods and Materials: Archived plans for 73 patients who were treated at the British Columbia Cancer Agency were studied. Actuarial estimates of freedom from radiation injury were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of incidence of radiation injury. Log-rank test was used to search for dosimetric parameters associated with freedom from radiation injury. Results: Symptomatic radiation injury was exhibited by 14 of 73 patients (19.2%). Actuarial rate of symptomatic radiation injury was 23.0% at 4 years. Most patients (78.5%) had mild to moderate deficits according to Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 4.0. On univariate analysis, lesion volume and diameter, dose to isocenter, and a V{sub x} for doses {>=}8 Gy showed statistical significance. Only lesion diameter showed statistical significance (p < 0.05) in a multivariate model. According to the log-rank test, AVM volumes >5 cm{sup 3} and diameters >30 mm were significantly associated with the risk of radiation injury (p < 0.01). The V{sub 12} also showed strong association with the incidence of radiation injury. Actuarial incidence of radiation injury was 16.8% if V{sub 12} was <28 cm{sup 3} and 53.2% if >28 cm{sup 3} (log-rank test, p = 0.001). Conclusions: This study confirms that the risk of developing symptomatic radiation injury after radiosurgery is related to lesion diameter and volume and irradiated volume. Results suggest a higher tolerance than proposed by QUANTEC. The widely differing findings reported in the literature, however, raise considerable uncertainties.

  11. Ketogenesis evaluation in perfused liver of diabetic rats submitted to short-term insulin-induced hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrena, Helenton Cristhian; Gazola, Vilma Aparecida Ferreira Godoi; Furlan, Maria Montserrat Diaz Pedrosa; Garcia, Rosângela Fernandes; de Souza, Helenir Medri; Bazotte, Roberto Barbosa

    2009-08-01

    Ketogenesis, inferred by the production of acetoacetate plus ss-hydroxybutyrate, in isolated perfused livers from 24-h fasted diabetic rats submitted to short-term insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) was investigated. For this purpose, alloxan-diabetic rats that received intraperitoneal regular insulin (IIH group) or saline (COG group) injection were compared. An additional group of diabetic rats which received oral glucose (gavage) (100 mg kg(-1)) 15 min after insulin administration (IIH + glucose group) was included. The studies were performed 30 min after insulin (1.0 U kg(-1)) or saline injection. The ketogenesis before octanoate infusion was diminished (p ketogenesis, livers from diabetic rats submitted to short-term IIH which received insulin or insulin plus glucose showed maintained capacity to produce acetoacetate and ss-hydroxybutyrate from octanoate. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. The effect of house dust mite sensitization on lung size and airway caliber in symptomatic and nonsymptomatic preadolescent children: A community-based study in Poland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jedrychowski, W.; Maugeri, U.; Jedrychowska-Bianchi, I.; Mroz, E. [Jagiellonian University, Krakow (Poland)

    2002-06-01

    There are conflicting reports on the effects of atopy on lung function. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of house mite (HM) atopy on lung function in subsamples of 12-year-old symptomatic and nonsymptomatic preadolescent children taken from the community sample. An additional objective of this study was to identify possible environmental determinants of HM skin reaction. HM sensitization was significantly associated with mother's atopy. It occurred predominantly in boys and was related to the use of coal or gas for house heating. The effect of allergen sensitization on lung size and air-way caliber confined to symptomatic subjects may reflect the inflammatory status of bronchial airways in the symptomatic subjects.

  13. Anemia causes hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients due to error in single-channel glucometers: methods of reducing patient risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidcoke, Heather F; Wade, Charles E; Mann, Elizabeth A; Salinas, Jose; Cohee, Brian M; Holcomb, John B; Wolf, Steven E

    2010-02-01

    Intensive insulin therapy in the critically ill reduces mortality but carries the risk of increased hypoglycemia. Point-of-care blood glucose analysis is standard; however, anemia causes falsely high values and potentially masks hypoglycemia. Permissive anemia is practiced routinely in most intensive care units. We hypothesized that point-of-care glucometer error due to anemia is prevalent, can be corrected mathematically, and correction uncovers occult hypoglycemia during intensive insulin therapy. The study has both retrospective and prospective phases. We reviewed data to verify the presence of systematic error, determine the source of error, and establish the prevalence of anemia. We confirmed our findings by reproducing the error in an in vitro model. Prospective data were used to develop a correction formula validated by the Monte Carlo method. Correction was implemented in a burn intensive care unit and results were evaluated after 9 mos. Burn and trauma intensive care units at a single research institution. Samples for in vitro studies were taken from healthy volunteers. Samples for formula development were from critically ill patients who received intensive insulin therapy. Insulin doses were calculated based on predicted serum glucose values from corrected point-of-care glucometer measurements. Time-matched point-of-care glucose, laboratory glucose, and hematocrit values. We previously found that anemia (hematocrit error in glucometer measurements. The error was correctible with a mathematical formula developed and validated, using prospectively collected data. Error of uncorrected point-of-care glucose ranged from 19% to 29% (p < .001), improving to < or = 5% after mathematical correction of prospective data. Comparison of data pairs before and after correction formula implementation demonstrated a 78% decrease in the prevalence of hypoglycemia in critically ill and anemic patients treated with insulin and tight glucose control (p < .001). A mathematical

  14. Characterization of symptomatic hip impingement in butterfly ice hockey goalies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, James R; Bedi, Asheesh; Stone, Rebecca M; Sibilsky Enselman, Elizabeth; Kelly, Bryan T; Larson, Christopher M

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to characterize the radiographic deformity observed in a consecutive series of butterfly goalies with symptomatic mechanical hip pain and to use computer-based software analysis to identify the location of impingement and terminal range of motion. We also compared these analyses to a matched group of positional hockey players with symptomatic femoroacetabular impingement (FAI). A consecutive series of 68 hips in 44 butterfly-style hockey goalies and a matched group of 34 hips in 26 positional hockey players who underwent arthroscopic correction for symptomatic FAI were retrospectively analyzed. Each patient underwent preoperative anteroposterior (AP) and modified Dunn lateral radiographs and computed tomography (CT) of the affected hips. Common FAI measurements were assessed on plain radiographs. Patient-specific, CT-based 3-dimensional (3D) models of the hip joint were developed, and the femoral version, alpha angles at each radial clock face position, and femoral head coverage were calculated. Maximum hip flexion, abduction, internal rotation in 90° flexion (IRF), flexion/adduction/internal rotation (FADIR), and butterfly position were determined, and the areas of bony collision were defined. Butterfly goalies had an elevated mean alpha angle on both AP (61.3°) and lateral radiographs (63.4°) and a diminished beta angle (26.0°). The mean lateral center-edge angle (LCEA) measured 27.3° and acetabular inclination was 6.1°. A crossover sign was present in 59% of the hips. The maximum alpha angle on the radial reformatted computed tomographic scan was significantly higher among the butterfly goalies (80.9° v 68.6°; P hockey goalies have a high prevalence of FAI, characterized by a unique femoral cam-type deformity and noted by an elevated alpha angle and loss of offset, which is greater in magnitude and more lateral when compared with that in positional hockey players. Associated acetabular dysplasia is also common among hockey goalies. Level

  15. Treatment of symptomatic intracranial arterial stenosis with Wingspan stent system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luo Wangchi; Li Guifu; Li Tielin; Zhu Jixiang; You Jinsong; Ma Zhaohui; Huang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the safety of Gateway-Wingspan stent system in treating symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis and its effect of preventing and treating cerebral ischemic events. Methods: Interventional treatment by using Gateway-Wingspan sent system was carried out in 36 patients with symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic arterial stenosis (a total of 38 lesions) who had failed to response the medication. Of the 32 cases, elective surgery was performed in 32 and emergent surgery in 4. Of the total 38 stenotic sites, 22 were located at the posterior cerebral blood circulation region, while 16 at the anterior circulation region. Results: The average degree of stenosis before stenting procedure was 72.6%±12.6%, the residual stenosis degree after balloon dilatation and stenting was 33.8%±15.2% and 23.6%±13.9%, respectively. The successful rate of treatment was 97.4%. Perioperative complications occurred in 4 patients, two from 32 cases who received elective surgery and other two from 4 cases who received emergent stent implantation. In cases receiving elective surgery, one suffered from perforating arterial branch occlusion and one occurred cerebral bleeding due to the rupture of middle cerebral artery caused by guide-wire. In patients receiving emergent stent implantation, acute stent thrombosis occurred in 2 cases during the interventional management (n=1) or 24 hours after stent placement (n=1). The overall complication rate was 11.1% (4/36). The 30-day composite ipsilateral stroke rate was 5.5% and the frequency of ipsilateral stroke within 30 days or ipsilateral stroke between 30 days and 12 months was 11.1% (4/36) during a mean follow-up time of 9.6 months (ranged between 1-24 months). DSA check-up was conducted in 10 cases and restenosis at the middle cerebral artery was detected in 2 cases. Conclusion: It is quite safe to use Gateway-Wingspan stent system for the treatment of symptomatic intracranial stenosis and its short-term clinical

  16. Identification of outliers and positive deviants for healthcare improvement: looking for high performers in hypoglycemia safety in patients with diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigid Wilson

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study objectives were to determine: (1 how statistical outliers exhibiting low rates of diabetes overtreatment performed on a reciprocal measure – rates of diabetes undertreatment; and (2 the impact of different criteria on high performing outlier status. Methods The design was serial cross-sectional, using yearly Veterans Health Administration (VHA administrative data (2009–2013. Our primary outcome measure was facility rate of HbA1c overtreatment of diabetes in patients at risk for hypoglycemia. Outlier status was assessed by using two approaches: calculating a facility outlier value within year, comparator group, and A1c threshold while incorporating at risk population sizes; and examining standardized model residuals across year and A1c threshold. Facilities with outlier values in the lowest decile for all years of data using more than one threshold and comparator or with time-averaged model residuals in the lowest decile for all A1c thresholds were considered high performing outliers. Results Using outlier values, three of the 27 high performers from 2009 were also identified in 2010–2013 and considered outliers. There was only modest overlap between facilities identified as top performers based on three thresholds: A1c  9% than VA average in the population of patients at high risk for hypoglycemia. Conclusions Statistical identification of positive deviants for diabetes overtreatment was dependent upon the specific measures and approaches used. Moreover, because two facilities may arrive at the same results via very different pathways, it is important to consider that a “best” practice may actually reflect a separate “worst” practice.

  17. Identification of outliers and positive deviants for healthcare improvement: looking for high performers in hypoglycemia safety in patients with diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brigid; Tseng, Chin-Lin; Soroka, Orysya; Pogach, Leonard M; Aron, David C

    2017-11-16

    The study objectives were to determine: (1) how statistical outliers exhibiting low rates of diabetes overtreatment performed on a reciprocal measure - rates of diabetes undertreatment; and (2) the impact of different criteria on high performing outlier status. The design was serial cross-sectional, using yearly Veterans Health Administration (VHA) administrative data (2009-2013). Our primary outcome measure was facility rate of HbA1c overtreatment of diabetes in patients at risk for hypoglycemia. Outlier status was assessed by using two approaches: calculating a facility outlier value within year, comparator group, and A1c threshold while incorporating at risk population sizes; and examining standardized model residuals across year and A1c threshold. Facilities with outlier values in the lowest decile for all years of data using more than one threshold and comparator or with time-averaged model residuals in the lowest decile for all A1c thresholds were considered high performing outliers. Using outlier values, three of the 27 high performers from 2009 were also identified in 2010-2013 and considered outliers. There was only modest overlap between facilities identified as top performers based on three thresholds: A1c performing facilities for overtreatment had higher rates of undertreatment (A1c > 9%) than VA average in the population of patients at high risk for hypoglycemia. Statistical identification of positive deviants for diabetes overtreatment was dependent upon the specific measures and approaches used. Moreover, because two facilities may arrive at the same results via very different pathways, it is important to consider that a "best" practice may actually reflect a separate "worst" practice.

  18. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennie, W.J.; Saifuddin, A.

    2005-01-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  19. Pes anserine bursitis: incidence in symptomatic knees and clinical presentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennie, W.J. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); Saifuddin, A. [Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust, Department of Radiology, Stanmore, Middlesex (United Kingdom); University College London, Institute of Orthopaedics and Musculoskeletal Sciences (United Kingdom)

    2005-07-01

    To determine the prevalence and associated clinical symptoms of pes anserine bursitis in symptomatic adult knees. A retrospective review was performed of the reports of 509 knee MRI studies obtained from July 1998 to June 2004 on 488 patients presenting to an orthopaedic clinic with knee pain suspected to be due to internal derangement. The MRI studies and case histories of all patients reported to have pes anserine bursitis were reviewed. The management of these patients was also noted. The prevalence of pes anserine bursitis as detected on MRI is 2.5%. The commonest clinical presentation was pain along the medial joint line mimicking a medial meniscal tear. We suggest that an accurate diagnosis of pes anserine bursitis on MRI will help prevent unnecessary arthroscopy and possibly initiate early treatment of the condition. Axial imaging is important in these cases to differentiate the bursa from other medial fluid collections. (orig.)

  20. Memory in children with symptomatic temporal lobe epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina A. Guimarães

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In children with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE, memory deficit is not so well understood as it is in adults. The aim of this study was to identify and describe memory deficits in children with symptomatic TLE, and to verify the influence of epilepsy variables on memory. We evaluated 25 children with TLE diagnosed on clinical, EEG and MRI findings. Twenty-five normal children were compared with the patients. All children underwent a neuropsychological assessment to estimate intellectual level, attention, visual perception, handedness, and memory processes (verbal and visual: short-term memory, learning, and delayed recall. The results allowed us to conclude: besides memory deficits, other neuropsychological disturbances may be found in children with TLE such as attention, even in the absence of overall cognitive deficit; the earlier onset of epilepsy, the worse verbal stimuli storage; mesial lesions correlate with impairment in memory storage stage while neocortical temporal lesions correlate with retrieval deficits.