WorldWideScience

Sample records for symbiotic light water

  1. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shropshire, D.E.

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program's understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power's cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-irradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  2. Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. E. Shropshire

    2009-01-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Economic Analysis of Symbiotic Light-Water Reactor and Fast Burner Reactor Systems, prepared to support the U.S. Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) systems analysis, provides a technology-oriented baseline system cost comparison between the open fuel cycle and closed fuel cycle systems. The intent is to understand their overall cost trends, cost sensitivities, and trade-offs. This analysis also improves the AFCI Program’s understanding of the cost drivers that will determine nuclear power’s cost competitiveness vis-a-vis other baseload generation systems. The common reactor-related costs consist of capital, operating, and decontamination and decommissioning costs. Fuel cycle costs include front-end (pre-irradiation) and back-end (post-iradiation) costs, as well as costs specifically associated with fuel recycling. This analysis reveals that there are large cost uncertainties associated with all the fuel cycle strategies, and that overall systems (reactor plus fuel cycle) using a closed fuel cycle are about 10% more expensive in terms of electricity generation cost than open cycle systems. The study concludes that further U.S. and joint international-based design studies are needed to reduce the cost uncertainties with respect to fast reactor, fuel separation and fabrication, and waste disposition. The results of this work can help provide insight to the cost-related factors and conditions needed to keep nuclear energy (including closed fuel cycles) economically competitive in the U.S. and worldwide. These results may be updated over time based on new cost information, revised assumptions, and feedback received from additional reviews.

  3. Water and energy: A symbiotic marriage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mageed, Y.A.

    1977-01-01

    The long time symbiosis between energy and water in power production carries over into the atomic power field. Nuclear reactors are both users of water on a gigantic scale and, potentially at least, important sources of new and much needed additions to the total fresh water supply of the world. According to the article, discussing various aspects of this symbiosis the demand for the nuclear energy community are: to improve the efficiency of heat cycles so that generating units can cut down on the amount of water they need for cooling purposes; encourage the utilization of take-off heat of nuclear power stations and its use in industry, agriculture and/or municipal heating systems in the vicinity of the generating plant. This will reduce the need of water as a coolant; moreover it will serve as an example of efficient use of our scarce resources. It will be possible in the future to plan and construct nuclear facilities increasingly in such a way that they form a part of comprehensive area or river valley development schemes in which the total investment is addressed to the area's total needs - for community, agricultural and industrial, recreational and other development - and incidentally, to the need for the economical use of water and its intelligent allocation to meet the real needs of the people. It is concluded that if the United Nations Water Conference at Mar del Plata can be instrumental in the adoption of programmes such as these, it will have amply repaid the efforts that have gone into its planning

  4. Light & Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Natividad Puig

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The proposal explores the Caos Theories, specifically, how applicable they are on local architectural interventions. It compiles a short study about possible variations of a same piece, in order to create difeerent ruled surfaces. Those pieces are distributed around a fractal attractor. The cores of these attractors are the ones responsible of collecting all the water flowing through the system. Once built, the project will enclose an open but covered space. Within this space, many different activities can be embraced, which allows its adaptability to each community where it?s placed. An open market will be the most common use though. It will allow selling agricultural products developed among the same community. Products irrigated with the extra water source collected by the cores of the fractal attractors.

  5. Arabitol provided by lichenous fungi enhances ability to dissipate excess light energy in a symbiotic green alga under desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Makiko; Miyake, Hirohisa; Yamakawa, Hisanori; Shibata, Yutaka; Miyazawa, Atsuo; Sugimura, Takashi; Satoh, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Shigeru; Kashino, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-01

    Lichens are drought-resistant symbiotic organisms of mycobiont fungi and photobiont green algae or cyanobacteria, and have an efficient mechanism to dissipate excess captured light energy into heat in a picosecond time range to avoid photoinhibition. This mechanism can be assessed as drought-induced non-photochemical quenching (d-NPQ) using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. A green alga Trebouxia sp., which lives within a lichen Ramalina yasudae, is one of the most common green algal photobionts. This alga showed very efficient d-NPQ under desiccation within the lichen thallus, whereas it lost d-NPQ ability when isolated from R. yasudae, indicating the importance of the interaction with the mycobiont for d-NPQ ability. We analyzed the water extracts from lichen thalli that enhanced d-NPQ in Trebouxia. Of several sugar compounds identified in the water extracts by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS) and gas chromatography (GC) analyses, only d-arabitol recovered d-NPQ in isolated Trebouxia to a level similar to that detected for R. yasudae thallus. Other sugar compounds did not help the expression of d-NPQ at the same concentrations. Thus, arabitol is essential for the expression of d-NPQ to dissipate excess captured light energy into heat, protecting the photobiont from photoinhibition. The relationship between mycobionts and photobionts is, therefore, not commensalism, but mutualism with each other, as shown by d-NPQ expression.

  6. Light water reactor safety

    CERN Document Server

    Pershagen, B

    2013-01-01

    This book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of light water reactors, combining a historical approach with an up-to-date account of the safety, technology and operating experience of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The introductory chapters set out the basic facts upon which the safety of light water reactors depend. The central section is devoted to the methods and results of safety analysis. The accidents at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl are reviewed and their implications for light wate

  7. Lights Off for Arbuscular Mycorrhiza: On Its Symbiotic Functioning under Light Deprivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUNE (2016), s. 782 ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mycorrhizal symbiosis * costs and benefits * light intensity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  8. Lights Off for Arbuscular Mycorrhiza: On Its Symbiotic Functioning under Light Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Plants are often exposed to shade over different time scales and this may substantially affect not only their own growth, but also development and functioning of the energetically dependent organisms. Among those, the root symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobia represent particularly important cases—on the one hand, they consume a significant share of plant carbon (C) budget and, on the other, they generate a number of important nutritional feedbacks on their plant hosts, often resulting in a net positive effect on their host growth and/or fitness. Here we discuss our previous results comparing mycorrhizal performance under different intensities and durations of shade (Konvalinková et al., 2015) in a broader context of previously published literature. Additionally, we review publicly available knowledge on the root colonization and mycorrhizal growth responses in AM plants under light deprivation. Experimental evidence shows that sudden and intensive decrease of light availability to a mycorrhizal plant triggers rapid deactivation of phosphorus transfer from the AM fungus to the plant already within a few days, implying active and rapid response of the AM fungus to the energetic status of its plant host. When AM plants are exposed to intensive shading on longer time scales (weeks to months), positive mycorrhizal growth responses (MGR) are often decreasing and may eventually become negative. This is most likely due to the high C cost of the symbiosis relative to the C availability, and failure of plants to fully compensate for the fungal C demand under low light. Root colonization by AM fungi often declines under low light intensities, although the active role of plants in regulating the extent of root colonization has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated. Quantitative information on the rates and dynamics of C transfer from the plant to the fungus is mostly missing, as is the knowledge on the involved molecular mechanisms. Therefore

  9. Acclimatization of symbiotic corals to mesophotic light environments through wavelength transformation by fluorescent protein pigments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Edward G; D'Angelo, Cecilia; Sharon, Yoni; Tchernov, Dan; Wiedenmann, Joerg

    2017-07-12

    The depth distribution of reef-building corals exposes their photosynthetic symbionts of the genus Symbiodinium to extreme gradients in the intensity and spectral quality of the ambient light environment. Characterizing the mechanisms used by the coral holobiont to respond to the low intensity and reduced spectral composition of the light environment in deeper reefs (greater than 20 m) is fundamental to our understanding of the functioning and structure of reefs across depth gradients. Here, we demonstrate that host pigments, specifically photoconvertible red fluorescent proteins (pcRFPs), can promote coral adaptation/acclimatization to deeper-water light environments by transforming the prevalent blue light into orange-red light, which can penetrate deeper within zooxanthellae-containing tissues; this facilitates a more homogeneous distribution of photons across symbiont communities. The ecological importance of pcRFPs in deeper reefs is supported by the increasing proportion of red fluorescent corals with depth (measured down to 45 m) and increased survival of colour morphs with strong expression of pcRFPs in long-term light manipulation experiments. In addition to screening by host pigments from high light intensities in shallow water, the spectral transformation observed in deeper-water corals highlights the importance of GFP-like protein expression as an ecological mechanism to support the functioning of the coral- Symbiodinium association across steep environmental gradients. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Chemical composition of water buffalo milk and its low-fat symbiotic yogurt development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Han

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Water buffalos are the second most widely available milk source in countries around the world. While typical average milk compositions are readily available, information on seasonal variation in chemical composition of buffalo milk is limited -especially in the Northeastern region of the United States. Data collected in this study can be useful for the manufacture of a wide variety of specialty dairy products such as symbiotic buffalo milk yogurt. To analyze functionality, symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt prototypes (plain and blueberry were developed using a commercial starter containing probiotics. Methods: During a one-year cycle, physicochemical and mineral contents of buffalo milk were analyzed. Prototype yogurts were manufactured commercially and samples of the yogurt prototypes were analyzed for physicochemical and microbiological properties and for the survivability of probiotics during ten weeks of storage.Results: Average contents of total solids, fat, lactose, crude protein, ash, specific gravity, and conjugated linoleic acid in the milk ranged from 16.39-18.48%, 6.57-7.97%, 4.49-4.73%, 4.59-5.37%, 0.91-0.92%, 1.0317-1.0380%, and 4.4-7.6 mg/g fat, respectively. The average mineral contents of calcium, phosphorous, potassium, magnesium, sodium, and zinc in the milk were 1798.89, 1216.76, 843.72, 337.20 and 7.48 mg/kg, respectively, and remained steady throughout the year. The symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurts evaluated in this study contained higher amounts of protein, carbohydrates, and calcium than similar yogurts manufactured with cows’ milk. During refrigerated storage, the probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus was viable (>1×106CFU/g for the first two weeks, while Bifidobacterium spp.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:86-106 and Lactobacillus casei remained viable during the entire ten weeks. Reducing the acidity and enhancing the flavor of the yogurts could improve the overall acceptability

  11. Light water lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1962-01-01

    The panel was attended by prominent physicists from most of the well-known laboratories in the field of light-water lattices, who exchanged the latest information on the status of work in their countries and discussed both the theoretical and the experimental aspects of the subjects. The supporting papers covered most problems, including criticality, resonance absorption, thermal utilization, spectrum calculations and the physics of plutonium bearing systems. Refs, figs and tabs

  12. Balancing the organic load and light supply in symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilm reactors treating synthetic municipal wastewater

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boelee, N.C.; Temmink, B.G.; Janssen, M.; Buisman, C.J.N.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    Symbiotic microalgal–bacterial biofilms can be very attractive for municipal wastewater treatment. Microalgae remove nitrogen and phosphorus and simultaneously produce the oxygen that is required for the aerobic, heterotrophic degradation of organic pollutants. For the application of these biofilms

  13. Neutron thermalization in light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbate, M.J.; Lolich, J.V.

    1975-05-01

    Investigations related to neutron thermalization in light water have been made. Neutron spectra under quasi-infinite-medium conditions have been measured by the time-of-flight technique and calculations were performed with different codes. Through the use of improved experimental techniques and the best known calculational techniques available, the known discrepancies between experimentals and theoretical values were below from 40% to 16%. The present disagreement is believed to be due the scattering model used (ENDF-GASKET, based on the modified Haywood II frequency spectra), that shows to be very satisfactory for poisoned light water cases. Moreover, previous experiments were completed and differential, integral and pulse-source experimental techniques were improved. Also a second step of a neutron and reactor calculation system was completed. (author)

  14. LIGHT WATER MODERATED NEUTRONIC REACTOR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christy, R.F.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1957-09-17

    A uranium fuel reactor designed to utilize light water as a moderator is described. The reactor core is in a tank at the bottom of a substantially cylindrical cross-section pit, the core being supported by an apertured grid member and comprised of hexagonal tubes each containing a pluralily of fuel rods held in a geometrical arrangement between end caps of the tubes. The end caps are apertured to permit passage of the coolant water through the tubes and the fuel elements are aluminum clad to prevent corrosion. The tubes are hexagonally arranged in the center of the tank providing an amulus between the core and tank wall which is filled with water to serve as a reflector. In use, the entire pit and tank are filled with water in which is circulated during operation by coming in at the bottom of the tank, passing upwardly through the grid member and fuel tubes and carried off near the top of the pit, thereby picking up the heat generated by the fuel elements during the fission thereof. With this particular design the light water coolant can also be used as the moderator when the uranium is enriched by fissionable isotope to an abundance of U/sup 235/ between 0.78% and 2%.

  15. Advanced light water reactor plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giedraityte, Zivile

    2008-01-01

    For nuclear power to be competitive with the other methods of electrical power generation the economic performance should be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on line generating electricity relative to time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described which is used to resolve maintenance related operating cycle length barriers. Advanced light water nuclear power plant is designed with the purpose to maximize online generating time by increasing operating cycle length. (author)

  16. Outbursts of symbiotic novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, S.J.; Truran, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    We discuss possible conditions under which thermonuclear burning episodes in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of accreting white dwarfs give rise to outbursts similar in nature to those observed in the symbiotic stars AG Peg, RT Ser, RR Tel, AS 239, V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, and HM Sge. In principle, thermonuclear runaways involving low-luminosity white dwarfs accreting matter at low rates produce configurations that evolve into A--F supergiants at maximum visual light and which resemble the outbursts of RR Tel, RT Ser, and AG peg. Very weak, nondegenerage hydrogen shell flashes on white dwarfs accreting matter at high rates (M> or approx. =10 -8 M/sub sun/ yr -1 ) do not produce cool supergiants at maximum, and may explain the outbursts in V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, and HM Sge. The low accretion rates demanded for systems developing strong hydrogen shell flashes on low-luminsoity white dwarfs are not compatible with observations of ''normal'' quiescent symbiotic stars. The extremely slow outbursts of symbiotic novae appear to be typical of accreting white dwarfs in wide binaries, which suggests that the outbursts of classical novae may be accelerated by the interaction of the expanding white dwarf envelope with its close binary companion

  17. High performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Squarer, D.; Schulenberg, T.; Struwe, D.; Oka, Y.; Bittermann, D.; Aksan, N.; Maraczy, C.; Kyrki-Rajamaeki, R.; Souyri, A.; Dumaz, P.

    2003-01-01

    The objective of the high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) project is to assess the merit and economic feasibility of a high efficiency LWR operating at thermodynamically supercritical regime. An efficiency of approximately 44% is expected. To accomplish this objective, a highly qualified team of European research institutes and industrial partners together with the University of Tokyo is assessing the major issues pertaining to a new reactor concept, under the co-sponsorship of the European Commission. The assessment has emphasized the recent advancement achieved in this area by Japan. Additionally, it accounts for advanced European reactor design requirements, recent improvements, practical design aspects, availability of plant components and the availability of high temperature materials. The final objective of this project is to reach a conclusion on the potential of the HPLWR to help sustain the nuclear option, by supplying competitively priced electricity, as well as to continue the nuclear competence in LWR technology. The following is a brief summary of the main project achievements:-A state-of-the-art review of supercritical water-cooled reactors has been performed for the HPLWR project.-Extensive studies have been performed in the last 10 years by the University of Tokyo. Therefore, a 'reference design', developed by the University of Tokyo, was selected in order to assess the available technological tools (i.e. computer codes, analyses, advanced materials, water chemistry, etc.). Design data and results of the analysis were supplied by the University of Tokyo. A benchmark problem, based on the 'reference design' was defined for neutronics calculations and several partners of the HPLWR project carried out independent analyses. The results of these analyses, which in addition help to 'calibrate' the codes, have guided the assessment of the core and the design of an improved HPLWR fuel assembly. Preliminary selection was made for the HPLWR scale

  18. Cell cycle propagation is driven by light-dark stimulation in a cultured symbiotic dinoflagellate isolated from corals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, L.-H.; Liu, Y.-H.; Ju, Y.-M.; Hsiao, Y.-Y.; Fang, L.-S.; Chen, C.-S.

    2008-12-01

    Endosymbiosis is an intriguing plant-animal interaction in the dinoflagellate-Cnidaria association. Throughout the life span of the majority of corals, the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium sp. is a common symbiont residing inside host gastrodermal cells. The mechanism of regulating the cell proliferation of host cells and their intracellular symbionts is critical for a stable endosymbiotic association. In the present study, the cell cycle of a cultured Symbiodinium sp. (clade B) isolated from the hermatypic coral Euphyllia glabrescens was investigated using flow cytometry. The results showed that the external light-dark (L:D) stimulation played a pivotal role in regulating the cell cycle process. The sequential light (40-100 μmol m-2 s-1 ~ 12 h) followed by dark (0 μmol m-2 s-1 ~ 12 h) treatment entrained a single cell cycle from the G1 to the S phase, and then to the G2/M phase, within 24 h. Blue light (~450 nm) alone mimicked regular white light, while lights of wavelengths in the red and infrared area of the spectrum had little or no effect in entraining the cell cycle. This diel pattern of the cell cycle was consistent with changes in cell motility, morphology, and photosynthetic efficiency ( F v / F m ). Light treatment drove cells to enter the growing/DNA synthesis stage (i.e., G1 to S to G2/M), accompanied by increasing motility and photosynthetic efficiency. Inhibition of photosynthesis by 3-(3, 4-dichlorophenyl)-1, 1-dimethyl-urea (DCMU) treatment blocked the cell proliferation process. Dark treatment was required for the mitotic division stage, where cells return from G2/M to G1. Two different pools of adenylyl cyclase (AC) activities were shown to be involved in the growing/DNA synthesis and mitotic division states, respectively.

  19. The Radio Light Curve of the Gamma-Ray Nova in V407 CYG: Thermal Emission from the Ionized Symbiotic Envelope, Devoured from Within by the Nova Blast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chomiuk, Laura; Krauss, Miriam I.; Rupen, Michael P.; Nelson, Thomas; Roy, Nirupam; Sokoloski, Jennifer L.; Mukai, Koji; Munari, Ulisse; Mioduszewski, Amy; Weston, Jeninfer; hide

    2012-01-01

    We present multi-frequency radio observations of the 2010 nova event in the symbiotic binary V407 Cygni, obtained with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) and spanning 1.45 GHz and 17.770 days following discovery. This nova.the first ever detected in gamma rays.shows a radio light curve dominated by the wind of the Mira giant companion, rather than the nova ejecta themselves. The radio luminosity grewas the wind became increasingly ionized by the nova outburst, and faded as the wind was violently heated from within by the nova shock. This study marks the first time that this physical mechanism has been shown to dominate the radio light curve of an astrophysical transient. We do not observe a thermal signature from the nova ejecta or synchrotron emission from the shock, due to the fact that these components were hidden behind the absorbing screen of the Mira wind. We estimate a mass-loss rate for the Mira wind of .Mw approximately equals 10(exp -6) Solar mass yr(exp -1). We also present the only radio detection of V407 Cyg before the 2010 nova, gleaned from unpublished 1993 archival VLA data, which shows that the radio luminosity of the Mira wind varies by a factor of 20 even in quiescence. Although V407 Cyg likely hosts a massive accreting white dwarf, making it a candidate progenitor system for a Type Ia supernova, the dense and radially continuous circumbinary material surrounding V407 Cyg is inconsistent with observational constraints on the environments of most Type Ia supernovae.

  20. Supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2014-01-01

    This book focuses on the latest reactor concepts, single pass core and experimental findings in thermal hydraulics, materials, corrosion, and water chemistry. It highlights research on supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors (SCWRs), one of the Generation IV reactors that are studied around the world. This book includes cladding material development and experimental findings on heat transfer, corrosion and water chemistry. The work presented here will help readers to understand the fundamental elements of reactor design and analysis methods, thermal hydraulics, materials and water

  1. Advances in light water reactor technologies

    CERN Document Server

    Saito, Takehiko; Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki

    2010-01-01

    ""Advances in Light Water Reactor Technologies"" focuses on the design and analysis of advanced nuclear power reactors. This volume provides readers with thorough descriptions of the general characteristics of various advanced light water reactors currently being developed worldwide. Safety, design, development and maintenance of these reactors is the main focus, with key technologies like full MOX core design, next-generation digital I&C systems and seismic design and evaluation described at length. This book is ideal for researchers and engineers working in nuclear power that are interested

  2. Equations of state for light water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rubin, G.A.; Granziera, M.R.

    1983-01-01

    The equations of state for light water were developed, based on the tables of Keenan and Keyes. Equations are presented, describing the specific volume, internal energy, enthalpy and entropy of saturated steam, superheated vapor and subcooled liquid as a function of pressure and temperature. For each property, several equations are shown, with different precisions and different degress of complexity. (Author) [pt

  3. Facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, E.B. Jr.

    1979-12-01

    Information on design features, special equipment, and construction methods useful in the facilitation of decommissioning light water reactors is presented. A wide range of facilitation methods - from improved documentation to special decommissioning tools and techniques - is discussed. In addition, estimates of capital costs, cost savings, and radiation dose reduction associated with these facilitation methods are given

  4. Light-water reactor accident classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Washburn, B.W.

    1980-02-01

    The evolution of existing classifications and definitions of light-water reactor accidents is considered. Licensing practice and licensing trends are examined with respect to terms of art such as Class 8 and Class 9 accidents. Interim definitions, consistent with current licensing practice and the regulations, are proposed for these terms of art

  5. Developmental Light-Water Reactor Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1989-12-01

    This report summarizes the progress of the Developmental Light-Water Reactor (DLWR) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory in FY 1989. It also includes (1) a brief description of the program, (2) definition of goals, (3) earlier achievements, and (4) proposed future activities

  6. Steam explosions in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The report deals with a postulated accident caused by molten fuel falling into the lower plenum of the containment of a reactor. The analysis which is presented in the report shows that the thermal energy released in the resulting steam explosion is not enough to destroy the pressure vessel or the containment. The report was prepared for the Swedish Governmental Committee on steam explosion in light water reactors. It includes statements issued by internationally well-known specialists. (G.B.)

  7. A report of symbiotic Siphonostomatoida (Copepoda) infecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collected copepod specimens were fixed and preserved in 70% ethanol and studied with the stereo- and light microscopes. Most of the examined hosts (38) were infected with symbiotic siphonostomatoids. Ten different species representing five families were identified. Of these, seven represent new host records while four ...

  8. Penn State advanced light water reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borkowski, J.A.; Smith, K.A.; Edwards, R.M.; Robinson, G.E.; Schultz, M.A.; Klevans, E.H.

    1987-01-01

    The accident at Three Mile Island heightened concerns over the safety of nuclear power. In response to these concerns, a research group at the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) undertook the conceptual design of an advanced light water reactor (ALWR) under sponsorship of the US Dept. of Energy (DOE). The design builds on the literally hundreds of years worth of experience with light water reactor technology. The concept is a reconfigured pressurized water reactor (PWR) with the capability of being shut down to a safe condition simply by removing all ac power, both off-site and on-site. Using additional passively activated heat sinks and replacing the pressurizer with a pressurizing pump system, the concept essentially eliminates the concerns of core damage associated with a total station blackout. Evaluation of the Penn State ALWR concept has been conducted using the EPRI Modular Modeling System (MMS). Results show that a superior response to normal operating transients can be achieved in comparison to the response with a conventional PWR pressurizer. The DOE-sponsored Penn State ALWR concept has evolved into a significant reconfiguration of a PWR leading to enhanced safety characteristics. The reconfiguration has touched a number of areas in overall plant design including a shutdown turbine in the secondary system, additional passively activated heat sinks, a unique primary side pressurizing concept, a low pressure cleanup system, reactor building layout, and a low power density core design

  9. Is light water reactor technology sustainable?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothwell, G.; Van der Zwaan, B.

    2001-01-01

    This paper proposes criteria for determining ''intermediate sustainability'' over a 500-year horizon. We apply these criteria to Light Water Reactor (LWR) technology and the LWR industry. We conclude that LWR technology does not violate intermediate sustainability criteria for (1) environmental externalities, (2) worker and public health and safety, or (3) accidental radioactive release. However, it does not meet criteria to (1) efficiently use depleted uranium and (2) avoid uranium enrichment technologies that can lead to nuclear weapons proliferation. Finally, current and future global demand for LWR technology might be below the minimum needed to sustain the current global LWR industry. (author)

  10. Materials for high performance light water reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, K.; Konys, J.; Heikinheimo, L.

    2004-05-01

    A state-of-the-art study was performed to investigate the operational conditions for in-core and out-of-core materials in a high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) and to evaluate the potential of existing structural materials for application in fuel elements, core structures and out-of-core components. In the conventional parts of a HPLWR-plant the approved materials of supercritical fossil power plants (SCFPP) can be used for given temperatures (⩽600 °C) and pressures (≈250 bar). These are either commercial ferritic/martensitic or austenitic stainless steels. Taking the conditions of existing light water reactors (LWR) into account an assessment of potential cladding materials was made, based on existing creep-rupture data, an extensive analysis of the corrosion in conventional steam power plants and available information on material behaviour under irradiation. As a major result it is shown that for an assumed maximum temperature of 650 °C not only Ni-alloys, but also austenitic stainless steels can be used as cladding materials.

  11. Light-water reactor research and development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-05-01

    This report on the national program of research and development on light water reactors is the second of two reports requested in 1982 by W. Kenneth Davis, Deputy Secretary of the Department of Energy. A first report, published in September 1983, treated the needs for safety-related R and D. In this second report, the Energy Research Advisory Board finds that, although many light water reactors are providing reliable and economic electricity, it appears unlikely that U.S. utilities will order additional reactors until the currently unacceptable economic risk, created by the regulatory climate and uncertain demand, is reduced. Thus it is unlikely that the private sector alone will fund major LWR design improvements. However, nuclear power will continue on its current course of expansion overseas. DOE participation is vitally needed to support the national interest in LWR technology. The report outlines R and D needs for a program to improve the safety, reliability, and economics of the present generation of plants; to develop evolutionary improved designs to be ready when needed; and to explore innovative longer-term concepts for deployment after the year 2000. The respective roles of government and the private sector are discussed

  12. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289 degrees C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy

  13. Effect of free and symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacterial co-inoculation on seed and seedling of soybean seeds produced under deficit water condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Hadi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Effect of free and symbiotic nitrogen fixing bacteria on seed and seedling produced seeds under deficit irrigation was conducted in laboratory and field experiments in 2006. In laboratory of karaj’s Seed and Plant Research and Certificate Institute an experiment was conducted based on factorial in form of completely randomized design with four replications and in field’s of Islamic Azad University, Varamin Branch were split factorial in form of randomized completely block design with three replications. Treatments included water stress [Irrigation after 50 (Normal irrigation, 100 (Middle stress, 150 (Severe stress mm evaporation from pan class A], Cultivar [Manokin & Williams and SRF×T3 Line] and inoculation [Inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum, Bradyrhizobium japonicum co-inoculated with Azotobacter chroococcum, No seed inoculation]. Results showed that drought stress decreased the uniformity and germination speed and seedling emergence. Bacteria increased leaf dry weight, stem dry weight, leaf area and seedling vigor index but had no effect on emergence. In irrigation levels inoculated treatments had higher seedling length, leaf, stem, seedling dry weight and seedling vigor. Severs stress seeds inoculated with Bradyrhizobium japonicum had higher root dry weight than control. Therefore in seeds which were produced under deficit irrigation conditions, bacteria increased seedlings vigor.

  14. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence. If most symbiotic stars undergo thermonuclear eruptions, then symbiotics are probably poor candidates for type I supernovae. However, they can then provide approx. 10% of the material which stars recycle back into the interstellar medium. If disk instabilities are the dominant eruption mechanism, symbiotics are promising type Ia candidates but recycle less material into the interstellar medium.

  15. Attosecond light sources in the water window

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaoming; Li, Jie; Yin, Yanchun; Zhao, Kun; Chew, Andrew; Wang, Yang; Hu, Shuyuan; Cheng, Yan; Cunningham, Eric; Wu, Yi; Chini, Michael; Chang, Zenghu

    2018-02-01

    As a compact and burgeoning alternative to synchrotron radiation and free-electron lasers, high harmonic generation (HHG) has proven its superiority in static and time-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectroscopy for the past two decades and has recently gained many interests and successes in generating soft x-ray emissions covering the biologically important water window spectral region. Unlike synchrotron and free-electron sources, which suffer from relatively long pulse width or large time jitter, soft x-ray sources from HHG could offer attosecond time resolution and be synchronized with their driving field to investigate time-resolved near edge absorption spectroscopy, which could reveal rich structural and dynamical information of the interrogated samples. In this paper, we review recent progresses on generating and characterizing attosecond light sources in the water window region. We show our development of an energetic, two-cycle, carrier-envelope phase stable laser source at 1.7 μm and our achievement in producing a 53 as soft x-ray pulse covering the carbon K-edge in the water window. Such source paves the ways for the next generation x-ray spectroscopy with unprecedented temporal resolution.

  16. Radiation Protection at Light Water Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Prince, Robert

    2012-01-01

    This book is aimed at Health Physicists wishing to gain a better understanding of the principles and practices associated with a light water reactor (LWR) radiation protection program. The role of key program elements is presented in sufficient detail to assist practicing radiation protection professionals in improving and strengthening their current program. Details related to daily operation and discipline areas vital to maintaining an effective LWR radiation protection program are presented. Programmatic areas and functions important in preventing, responding to, and minimizing radiological incidents and the importance of performing effective incident evaluations and investigations are described. Elements that are integral in ensuring continuous program improvements are emphasized throughout the text.

  17. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)] [and others

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response.

  18. Light water reactor lower head failure analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.; Thinnes, G.L.

    1993-10-01

    This document presents the results from a US Nuclear Regulatory Commission-sponsored research program to investigate the mode and timing of vessel lower head failure. Major objectives of the analysis were to identify plausible failure mechanisms and to develop a method for determining which failure mode would occur first in different light water reactor designs and accident conditions. Failure mechanisms, such as tube ejection, tube rupture, global vessel failure, and localized vessel creep rupture, were studied. Newly developed models and existing models were applied to predict which failure mechanism would occur first in various severe accident scenarios. So that a broader range of conditions could be considered simultaneously, calculations relied heavily on models with closed-form or simplified numerical solution techniques. Finite element techniques-were employed for analytical model verification and examining more detailed phenomena. High-temperature creep and tensile data were obtained for predicting vessel and penetration structural response

  19. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [and others

    1996-07-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) from April 1995 to December 1995. Topics that have been investigated include fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in simulated LWR environments. Effects of fluoride-ion contamination on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial- purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-tensile tests at 288 degrees Centigrade. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  20. Visible Light Activated Photocatalytic Water Polishing System, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This proposal targets development of a LED light activated photocatalytic water polishing system that enables reduction of organic impurities (TOC and...

  1. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shack, W.J.

    1983-01-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop an independent capability for the detection and control of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in light-water reactor (LWR) systems and to evaluate of the technical merits of proposed remedies for the problem. The experimental work is initially concentrated on problems related to intergranular SCC in BWR piping systems. The BWR utilities, the reactor vendors, and related research organizations have developed remedies for the pipe cracking problems and have begun to develop the crack-growth-rate data base which is needed to assure the integrity of degraded piping and to develop an adequate plan for the inspection and monitoring of such piping. The performance of the remedies in laboratory tests is quite encouraging, but there are still technical questions which must be addressed to ensure that the laboratory results will accurately reflect performance in-reactor. For existing plants even with the assurance of leak-before-break it is important to upgrade the capability to detect leaks rather than completely relying on periodic in-service inspection. Although other leak detection system (e.g., moisture-sensitive tapes) will be considered, acoustic leak detection systems seem to offer the best combination of sensitivity, ability to locate a leak, and leak-rate measurement. The assessment and development of a practical leak detection system is another important objective of this program

  2. Nuclear fuel for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etemad, A.

    1976-01-01

    The goal of the present speech is to point out some of the now-a-day existing problems related to the fuel cycle of light water reactors and to foresee their present and future solutions. Economical aspects of nuclear power generation have been considerably improving, partly through technological advancements and partly due to the enlargement of unit capacity. The fuel cycle, defined in the course of this talk, discusses the exploration, mining, ore concentration, purification, conversion, enrichment, manufacturing of fuel elements, their utilization in a reactor, their discharge and subsequent storage, reprocessing, and their re-use or disposal. Uranium market in the world and the general policy of several uranium owning countries are described. The western world requirement for uranium until the year 2000, uranium resources and the nuclear power programs in the United States, Australia, Canada, South Africa, France, India, Spain, and Argentina are discussed. The participation of Iran in a large uranium enrichment plant based on French diffusion technology is mentioned

  3. Photoelectrochemical water splitting: optimizing interfaces and light absorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Park, Sun-Young

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis several photoelectrochemical water splitting devices based on semiconductor materials were investigated. The aim was the design, characterization, and fabrication of solar-to-fuel devices which can absorb solar light and split water to produce hydrogen.

  4. A perforated gastrovascular cavity in the symbiotic deep-water coral Leptoseris fragilis: A new strategy to optimize heterotrophic nutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichter, Dietrich

    1991-12-01

    The organization of the zooxanthellate scleractinian coral Leptoseris fragilis was studied. The architecture of the corallite and the histology of the polyparium were analysed for adaptations that enable efficient capture and retention of suspended particles which would increase energy supply. The data indicate that the gastrovascular system of L. fragilis is not a blind but a flowthrough system. Water entering the coelenteron through the mouth leaves the body not only through the mouth but also through microscopic pores (≂ 1 2 μm) which are located near the crests of the sclerosepta in the oral epithelia. Irrigation is achieved by flagellar and probably also by muscular activity. This type of filtration enables L. fragilis, which lacks tentacles, to utilize suspended organic material including bacteria. The supposed suspension feeding in combination with effective photoadaptations (presented in former communications) seems to be the basis for the survival of L. fragilis in an extreme habitat (between-95 and-145 m) and for its, successful competion with other scleractinian species provided with larger catching surfaces, and with other invertebrates depending on filter feeding.

  5. Light scattering by particles in water theoretical and experimental foundations

    CERN Document Server

    Jonasz, Miroslaw

    2007-01-01

    Light scattering-based methods are used to characterize small particles suspended in water in a wide range of disciplines ranging from oceanography, through medicine, to industry. The scope and accuracy of these methods steadily increases with the progress in light scattering research. This book focuses on the theoretical and experimental foundations of the study and modeling of light scattering by particles in water and critically evaluates the key constraints of light scattering models. It begins with a brief review of the relevant theoretical fundamentals of the interaction of light with condensed matter, followed by an extended discussion of the basic optical properties of pure water and seawater and the physical principles that explain them. The book continues with a discussion of key optical features of the pure water/seawater and the most common components of natural waters. In order to clarify and put in focus some of the basic physical principles and most important features of the experimental data o...

  6. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Accomplishments Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-02-01

    Welcome to the 2014 Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program Accomplishments Report, covering research and development highlights from 2014. The LWRS Program is a U.S. Department of Energy research and development program to inform and support the long-term operation of our nation’s commercial nuclear power plants. The research uses the unique facilities and capabilities at the Department of Energy national laboratories in collaboration with industry, academia, and international partners. Extending the operating lifetimes of current plants is essential to supporting our nation’s base load energy infrastructure, as well as reaching the Administration’s goal of reducing greenhouse gas emissions to 80% below 1990 levels by the year 2050. The purpose of the LWRS Program is to provide technical results for plant owners to make informed decisions on long-term operation and subsequent license renewal, reducing the uncertainty, and therefore the risk, associated with those decisions. In January 2013, 104 nuclear power plants operated in 31 states. However, since then, five plants have been shut down (several due to economic reasons), with additional shutdowns under consideration. The LWRS Program aims to minimize the number of plants that are shut down, with R&D that supports long-term operation both directly (via data that is needed for subsequent license renewal), as well indirectly (with models and technology that provide economic benefits). The LWRS Program continues to work closely with the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to ensure that the body of information needed to support SLR decisions and actions is available in a timely manner. This report covers selected highlights from the three research pathways in the LWRS Program: Materials Aging and Degradation, Risk-Informed Safety Margin Characterization, and Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies, as well as a look-ahead at planned activities for 2015. If you

  7. Can light water reactors be proliferation resistant?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abushady, Yousry

    2001-01-01

    During the last decade several questions were raised concerning the proliferation issues of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) in comparison with other types of power reactors, particularly Gas Cooled Reactors (GCRs) and Heavy Water Reactors (HWRs). These questions were strongly highlighted when the Agreed Framework between the United States and the DPRK was signed in October 1994 and following the formation of KEDO organization to provide two LWRs to DPRK in replacement of all its GCRs in its nuclear program. One might summarize the main questions into three groups, mainly: 1. Can LWRs produce weapon-grade Plutonium (Pu)? 2. Why is the LWR type considered as a better option with regard to non-proliferation compared to other power reactors - particularly GCR and HWR types? 3. How could LWRs be more resistant to proliferation? This paper summarizes the effort to answer these questions. Included tables present numerical parameters for Pu production capability of the three main reactor types (LWRs, GCRs and HWRs) of a 400 MWe power reactor unit, during normal operation, and during abnormal operation to produce weapon grade Pu. Can LWRs produce weapon-grade Pu? It is seen from the available data that weapon-grade Pu could be produced in LWR fuel, as in the fuel of most other power reactor types, by limiting fuel irradiation to two or three months only. However, such production, though possible, is exceptional. In a recent study 5% of LWRs under IAEA safeguards have spent fuel inventory containing limited amount of high-grade Pu. The equilibrium burnup of discharged fuel is in the order of 33,000 MWD/T. However and due to lower enrichment of initial inventory almost half of that burnup is produced. In normal situations the discharged initial inventory has a Pu grade which is less than weapon grade and is unlikely to be used for weapon production. Why LWR the type is considered as a better option for non-proliferation Referring to tables, one can conclude that LWRs make less Pu

  8. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  9. LIGHT-REGULATED PHOTOSYNTHETIC GENE EXPRESSION AND PHOSPHORIBULOKINASE ENZYME ACTIVITY IN THE HETEROKONT ALGA VAUCHERIA LITOREA (XANTHOPHYCEAE) AND ITS SYMBIOTIC MOLLUSKAN PARTNER ELYSIA CHLOROTICA (GASTROPODA)(1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soule, Kara M; Rumpho, Mary E

    2012-04-01

    Photosynthesis is composed of tightly coupled reactions requiring finely tuned nucleocytosolic-plastid interaction. Herein, we examined the influence of light on select photosynthetic gene expression and enzyme activity in the plastid-containing mollusk (sea slug) Elysia chlorotica and its heterokont algal prey Vaucheria litorea C. Agardh. Transcript levels of nuclear photosynthetic genes (psbO and prk) were significantly lower in E. chlorotica compared with V. litorea, whereas plastid photosynthesis genes (psaA and rbcL) were more comparable, although still lower in the animal. None of the genes responded similarly to changes in light conditions over a 24 h period in the sea slug compared with the alga. Activity of the nuclear-encoded photosynthetic enzyme phosphoribulokinase (PRK) exhibited redox regulation in vitro in crude extracts of both organisms sequentially treated with oxidizing and reducing agents. However, PRK was differentially affected in vivo by redox and light versus dark treatment in V. litorea, but not in E. chlorotica. Overall, these results support the active transcription of algal nuclear and plastid genes in E. chlorotica, as well as sustained activity of a nuclear-encoded plastid enzyme, even after several months of starvation (absence of algal prey). The apparent absence of tight transcriptional regulation and redox control suggests that essential nuclear-encoded regulatory factors in V. litorea are probably not present in the sea slug. These findings are discussed relative to light regulation of photosynthetic gene expression in the green and red algal lineages and in the context of the sea slug/algal plastid kleptoplastic association. © 2012 Phycological Society of America.

  10. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Chung, H.M.; Hicks, P.D.; Hins, A.G.; Park, J.Y.; Soppet, W.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1992-03-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in high water reactors during the six months from April 1991 through September 1991. Topics that have been investigated during this period include (1) fatigue and stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of low-alloy steel used in piping and in steam generator and reactor pressure vessels; (2) role of chromate and sulfate in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water on SCC of sensitized Type 304 SS; and (3) radiation-induced segregation (RIS) and irradiation-assisted SCC of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence. Fatigue data were obtained on medium-S-content A533-Gr B and A106-Gr B steels in high-purity (HP) deoxygenated water, in simulated pressurized water reactor (PWR) water, and in air. Crack-growth-rates (CGRs) of composite specimens of A533-Gr B/Inconel-182/Inconel-600 (plated with nickel) and homogeneous specimens of A533-Gr B were determined under small- amplitude cyclic loading in HP water with ∼ 300 ppb dissolved oxygen. CGR tests on sensitized Type 304 SS indicate that low chromate concentrations in BWR water (25--35 ppb) may actually have a beneficial effect on SCC if the sulfate concentration is below a critical level. Microchemical and microstructural changes in HP and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes used in two operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy, and slow-strain,rate- tensile tests were conducts on tubular specimens in air and in simulated BWR water at 289 degrees C

  11. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  12. The safety of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pershagen, B.

    1986-04-01

    The book describes the principles and practices of reactor safety as applied to the design, regulation and operation of both pressurized water reactors and boiling water reactors. The central part of the book is devoted to methods and results of safety analysis. Some significant events are described, notably the Three Mile Island accident. The book concludes with a chapter on the PIUS principle of inherent reactor safety as applied to the SECURE type of reactor developed in Sweden. (G.B.)

  13. Passive systems for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adinolfi, R.; Noviello, L.

    1990-01-01

    The paper reviews the most original concepts that have been considered in Italy for the back-fitting of the nuclear power plants in order to reduce the probability and the importance of the release to the environment in case of a core melt. With reference either to BWR or PWR, passive concepts have been considered for back-fitting in the following areas: pump seals damage prevention and ECCS passive operation; reactor passive depressurization; molten reactor core passive cooling; metal containment passive water cooling through a water tank located at high level; containment isolation improvement through a sealing system; containment leaks control and limitation of environmental release. In addition some considerations will be made on the protection against external events introduced from the beginning on the PUN design either on building and equipment lay-out either on structure design. (author). 5 figs

  14. Light induced degradation of testosterone in waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vulliet, Emmanuelle, E-mail: e.vulliet@sca.cnrs.fr [Service Central d' Analyse du CNRS - USR59, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France); Falletta, Marine; Marote, Pedro [Laboratoire des Sciences Analytiques - UMR 5180, Universite Claude Bernard, 43 bd du 11 Novembre 1918, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lomberget, Thierry [Laboratoire de Chimie Therapeutique, Universite de Lyon, Universite Lyon 1, Faculte de Pharmacie-ISPB, EA 4443 Biomolecules, Cancer et Chimioresistances, INSERM U863 Hormones steroides et proteines de liaison, IFR 62, 8 avenue Rockefeller, F-69373, Lyon Cedex 08 (France); Paisse, Jean-Olivier; Grenier-Loustalot, Marie-Florence [Service Central d' Analyse du CNRS - USR59, Chemin du Canal, F-69360 Solaize (France)

    2010-08-01

    The degradation of testosterone under simulated irradiations was studied in phosphate buffers and in natural waters at various excitation wavelengths. The quantum yield of photolysis was significantly lower at 313 nm (2.4 x 10{sup -3}) than at 254 nm (0.225). The formation of several photoproducts was observed, some of them being rapidly transformed in turn while others show higher stability towards subsequent irradiations. The nature of the main products was tentatively identified, both deduced from their spectral and spectrometric data and by comparison with synthesised standard compounds. Among the obtained photoproducts, the main one is possibly a spiro-compound, hydroxylated derivative of testosterone originating from the photohydratation of the enone group. The photodegradation pathway includes also photorearrangements. One of them leads to (1,5,10)-cyclopropyl-17{beta}-hydroxyandrostane-2-one. The pH of the water does not seem to affect the rate of phototransformation and the nature of the by-products.

  15. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hannerz, K

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification.

  16. Towards intrinsically safe light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannerz, K.

    1983-07-01

    Most of the present impediments to the rational use of the nuclear option have their roots in the reactor safety issue. The approach taken to satisfy the escalating safety concerns has resulted in excessively complex and expensive plant designs but has failed to create public confidence. This paper describes a new approach based on the principle of Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS). With the PIUS principle, ultimate safety is obtained by guaranteeing core integrity under all credible conditions. This is accomplished on the basis of the laws of gravity and thermohydraulics alone, interacting with the heat extraction process in an intact or damaged primary circuit, without recourse to engineered safety systems that may fail or dependence on error-prone human intervention. Application of the PIUS principle to the pressurized water reactor involves a substantial redesign of the reactor and primary system but builds on established PWR technology where long-term operation is needed for verification

  17. Corrosion problems in light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berry, W.E.

    1984-01-01

    The corrosion problems encountered during the author's career are reviewed. Attention is given to the development of Zircaloys and attendant factors that affect corrosion; the caustic and chloride stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic stainless steel steam generator tubing; the qualification of Inconel Alloy 600 for steam generator tubing and the subsequent corrosion problem of secondary side wastage, caustic SCC, pitting, intergranular attack, denting, and primary side SCC; and SCC in weld and furnace sensitized stainless steel piping and internals in boiling water reactor primary coolants. Also mentioned are corrosion of metallic uranium alloy fuels; corrosion of aluminum and niobium candidate fuel element claddings; crevice corrosion and seizing of stainless steel journal-sleeve combinations; SCC of precipitation hardened and martensitic stainless steels; low temperature SCC of welded austenitic stainless steels by chloride, fluoride, and sulfur oxy-anions; and corrosion problems experienced by condensers

  18. Optimum refuelling strategy in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermansky, B.

    1977-01-01

    The flow sheets are presented of refuelling schedules aimed at obtaining deep average fuel burnup with levelling up the output along the reactor radius in large PWR reactors. The zone refuelling is described in which only 1/3 of the fuel element number is replaced. The elements are placed in the outer zone of the core. Also described is the distributed refuelling in which fuel elements with different burnups are evenly spaced. A modified refuelling schedule is shown involving the replacement from the outside to the inside where a uniform radial distribution of thermal output is achieved. Calculation methods are shown of determining the optimum refuelling strategy. Dynamic programming is one of the prospective computer methods. Its general algorithm is indicated. A survey is made of some studies on the optimum refuelling strategy in pressurized water reactors. (J.B.)

  19. Safety aspects of water chemistry in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-12-01

    The goals of the water chemistry control programmes are to maximize operational safety and the availability and operating life of primary system components, to maximize fuel integrity, and to control radiation buildup. To achieve these goals an effective corporate policy should be developed and implemented. Essential management responsibilities are: Recognizing of the long-term benefits of avoiding or minimizing: a) system corrosion; b) fuel failure; and c) radiation buildup. The following control or diagnostic parameters are suitable performance indicators: for PWR primary coolant circuits: pH of reactor water (by operating temperature); Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Hydrogen (or oxygen) in reactor water. For PWR secondary coolant circuits: pH in feedwater; Cation productivity in steam generator blowdown; Iron concentration in feedwater; Oxygen concentration in condensate. And BWR coolant circuits: Conductivity of reactor water; Concentration of chlorides in reactor water; Iron concentration in feedwater; Copper concentration in feedwater. The present document represents a review of the developments in some Member States on how to implement a reasonable water chemistry programme and how to assess its effectiveness through numerical indicators. 12 figs, 20 tabs

  20. Neutron fluence determination for light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.

    1994-01-01

    A general description of limitations that exist in pressure vessel neutron fluence determinations for commercial light water reactors is presented. Complexity factors that arise in light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence calculations are identified and used to analyze calculational limitations. Two broad categories of calculational limitations are introduced, namely benchmark field limitations and deep penetration limitations. Explicit examples of limitations that can arise in each of these two broad categories are presented. These limitations are used to show that the recent draft regulatory guide for the determination of pressure vessel neutron fluence, developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, is based upon procedures and assumptions that are not valid. To eliminate the complexity and limitations of calculational methods, it is recommended that the determination of light water reactor pressure vessel neutron fluence be based upon experiment. Recommendations for improved methods of pressure vessel surveillance neutron dosimetry are advanced

  1. Ultraviolet light: sterile water without chlorine smell and taste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    The use of chlorine and hypochlorite is necessary in larger waterworks, but it is a disadvantage in smaller plants, where overtreatment easily leads to smell and taste of chlorine in the water. Ultraviolet light with a wavelength of 2535 Angstrom gives 100% disinfection with a dose of 10 mWs/cm 2 for all known bacteria. In practice a dose of 40 mWs/cm 2 and an irradiation time of 15 minutes is desireable. A standard unit utilising six UV light tubes arranged concentrically around a quartz tube, through which the water flows, is described briefly. (JIW)

  2. Loose parts monitoring in light water reactor cooling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, A.; Alma, B.J.

    1982-01-01

    The work related to loose monitoring system for light water reactor, developed at GRS - Munique, are described. The basic problems due to the exact localization and detection of the loose part as well the research activities and development necessary aiming to obtain the best techniques in this field. (E.G.) [pt

  3. Overview of environmental materials degradation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaaban, H.I.; Wu, P.

    1986-08-01

    This report provides a brief overview of analyses and conclusions reported in published literature regarding environmentally induced degradation of materials in operating light-water reactors. It is intended to provide a synopsis of subjects of concern rather than to address a licensing basis for any newly discovered problems related to reactor materials

  4. European community light water reactor safety research projects. Experimental issue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Research programs on light water reactor safety currently carried out in the European Community are presented. They cover: accident conditions (LOCA, ECCS, core meltdown, external influences, etc...), fault and accident prevention and means of mitigation, normal operation conditions, on and off site implications and equipment under severe accident conditions, and miscellaneous subjects

  5. Tritium formation and elimination in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Briec, M.; Miquel, P.

    1976-01-01

    Light-water reactors have a tritium balance which should be considered from both the working constraint and environmental pollution aspects. The formation of tritium in the primary circuit and in the fuel, the elimination and enrichment processes are considered [fr

  6. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Futahashi

    Full Text Available The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  7. Biodiversity and studies of marine symbiotic siphonostomatoids off ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current knowledge of the biodiversity of the symbiotic marine siphonostomatoids from South African waters (136 species) is sparse compared to that globally (1 388 species). The difference is especially apparent when taking into account the diversity of fish (more than 2 000 species) and invertebrates (approximately 12 ...

  8. Predicting spectral and PAR light attenuation in Greenlandic coastal waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murray, Ciarán; Markager, Stiig; Stedmon, Colin

    The spectral quality and penetration of light are key parameters controlling the productivity of Greenlandic fjords. Solar elevation and sea ice play an important role, but during the increasing ice free period and summer months in particular, light is also regulated by water constituents. We...... (CDOM), phytoplankton pigments and inorganic particles. These differences are due in part to hydrography and to the sources of meltwater: respectively, fjord-terminating and land-terminating glaciers. We present a model to explain the variation in spectral and PAR irradiance in terms of the variation...

  9. Assessment of the high performance light water reactor concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J. [Univ. of Stuttgart, IKE, (Germany); Schulenberg, T. [Karlsruhe Inst. of Tech., Karlsruhe (Germany); Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Andreani, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst., Villigen (Switzerland); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary)

    2011-07-01

    From 2006-2010, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) was investigated within a European Funded project called HPLWR Phase 2. Operated at 25MPa with a heat-up rate in the core from 280{sup o}C to 500{sup o}C, this reactor concept provides a technological challenge in the fields of design, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics and heat transfer, materials, and safety. The assessment of the concept with respect to the goals of the technology roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors of the Generation IV International Forum shows that the HPLWR has a potential to fulfil the goals of economics, safety and proliferation resistance and physical protection. In terms of sustainability, the HPLWR with a thermal neutron spectrum investigated within this project, does not differ from existing Light Water Reactors in terms of usage of fuel and waste production. (author)

  10. Assessment of light water reactor accident management programs and experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammersley, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    The objective of this report is to provide an assessment of the current light water reactor experience regarding accident management programs and associated technology developments. This assessment for light water reactor (LWR) designs is provided as a resource and reference for the development of accident management capabilities for the production reactors at the Savannah River Site. The specific objectives of this assessment are as follows: 1. Perform a review of the NRC, utility, and industry (NUMARC, EPRI) accident management programs and implementation experience. 2. Provide an assessment of the problems and opportunities in developing an accident management program in conjunction or following the Individual Plant Examination process. 3. Review current NRC, utility, and industry technological developments in the areas of computational tools, severe accident predictive tools, diagnostic aids, and severe accident training and simulation

  11. Light water breeder reactor using a uranium-plutonium cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radkowsky, A.; Chen, R.

    1990-01-01

    This patent describes a light water receptor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: a prebreeder section having plutonium fuel containing a Pu-241 component, the prebreeder section being operable to produce enriched plutonium having an increased Pu-241 component; and a breeder section for receiving the enriched plutonium from the prebreeder section, the breeder section being operable for breeding fissile material from the enriched plutonium fuel. This patent describes a method of operating a light water nuclear reactor (LWR) for breeding fissile material using a uranium-plutonium cycle. It comprises: operating the prebreeder to produce enriched plutonium fuel having an increased Pu-241 component; fueling a breeder section with the enriched plutonium fuel to breed the fissile material

  12. Analysis of an accelerator-driven subcritical light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kruijf, W.J.M. de; Wakker, P.H.; Wetering, T.F.H. van de; Verkooijen, A.H.M.

    1997-01-01

    An analysis of the basic characteristics of an accelerator-driven light water reactor has been made. The waste in the nuclear fuel cycle is considerably less than in the light water reactor open fuel cycle. This is mainly caused by the use of equilibrium nuclear fuel in the reactor. The accelerator enables the use of a fuel composition with infinite multiplication factor k ∞ < 1. The main problem of the use of this type of fuel is the strongly peaked flux distribution in the reactor core. A simple analytical model shows that a large core is needed with a high peak power factor in order to generate net electric energy. The fuel in the outer regions of the reactor core is used very poorly. 7 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  13. Uranium utilization of light water cooled reactors and fast breeders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stojadinovic, Timm

    1991-08-01

    The better uranium utilization of fast breeder reactors as compared with water cooled reactors is one argument in favour of the breeder introduction. This report tries to quantify this difference. It gives a generally valid formalism for the uranium utilization as a function of the fuel burnup, the conversion rate, fuel cycle losses and the fuel enrichment. On the basis of realistic assumptions, the ratio between the utilizations of breeder reactors to that of light water cooled reactors (LWR) amounts to 180 for the open LWR cycle and 100 in case of plutonium recycling in LWRs

  14. Nuclear Data Libraries for Hydrogen in Light Water Ice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, L; Gillette, V.H

    2000-01-01

    Nuclear data libraries were produced for hydrogen (H) in light water ice at different temperatures, 20, 30, 50, 77, 112, 180, 230 K.These libraries were produced using the NJOY nuclear data processing system.With this code we produce pointwise cross sections and related quantities, in the ENDF format, and in the ACE format for MCNP.Experimental neutron spectra at such temperatures were compared with MCNP4B simulations, based on the locally produced libraries, leading to satisfactory results

  15. Coatings used in light-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1981-01-01

    The guide is intended to provide a common basis in the selection of test methods which may be required to evaluate and qualify protective coatings (paints) to be used in a light-water nuclear power plant. Standard test methods for the determination of fire resistance, chemical resistance, physical properties, effects of radiation, decontaminability, thermal conductivity, repairability, and for evaluation under accident conditions are included

  16. Design concept of the high performance light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schulenberg, Thomas; Starflinger, Joerg [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear and Energy Technologies; Bittermann, Dietmar [AREVA NP GmbH, Erlangen (Germany). NEP-G Process

    2009-04-15

    The 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor operating with supercritical water as coolant. At a pressure of 25 MPa in the core, water is heated up from 280 to 500 C. For these conditions, the envisaged net plant efficiency is 43.5%. The core design concept is based on a so-called '3-pass-core' in which the coolant is heated up in three subsequent steps. After each step, the coolant is mixed avoiding hot streaks possibly leading to unacceptable wall temperatures. The design of such a core comprises fuel assemblies containing 40 fuel rods and an inner and outer box for a better neutron moderation. Nine of these are assembled to a cluster with common head- and foot piece. The coolant is mixed inside an upper and inside a lower mixing chamber and leaves the reactor pressure vessel through a co-axial pipe, which protects the vessel wall against too high temperatures. (orig.)

  17. Dual-purpose light water reactor supplying heat for desalination

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waplington, G.; Fichtner, H.

    1978-01-01

    The technical as well as the economic aspects of using a large commercial light water reactor for the production of both electricity and potable water have been examined. For the basis of the study, the multistage flash distillation process was selected, in conjunction with a reactor rated at not less than 2100 MW (thermal). Combined use of a condensing and a back-pressure turbine (the latter matched to distillation plant steam requirements) represents a convenient method for supplying process heat. Overall costs can be fairly allocated to the two products using the ''power credit'' method. A sample economic evaluation indicates highly favorable water costs as compared with more conventional distillation schemes based on fossil fuel

  18. Critical heat flux experiments in a circular tube with heavy water and light water. (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, C.L.; Beus, S.G.

    1980-05-01

    Experiments were performed to establish the critical heat flux (CHF) characteristics of heavy water and light water. Testing was performed with the up-flow of heavy and of light water within a 0.3744 inch inside diameter circular tube with 72.3 inches of heated length. Comparisons were made between heavy water and light water critical heat flux levels for the same local equilibrium quality at CHF, operating pressure, and nominal mass velocity. Results showed that heavy water CHF values were, on the average, 8 percent below the light water CHF values

  19. Aging management of major light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, V.N.; Sinha, U.P.; Ware, A.G.

    1992-01-01

    Review of technical literature and field experience has identified stress corrosion cracking as one of the major degradation mechanisms for the major light water reactor components. Three of the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms of current concern are (a) primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) in pressurized water reactors, and (b) intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC) and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in boiling water reactors. Effective aging management of stress corrosion cracking mechanisms includes evaluation of interactions between design, materials, stressors, and environment; identification and ranking of susceptible sites; reliable inspection of any damage; assessment of damage rate; mitigation of damage; and repair and replacement using corrosion-resistant materials. Management of PWSCC includes use of lower operating temperatures, reduction in residual tensile stresses, development of reliable inspection techniques, and use of Alloy 690 as replacement material. Management of IGSCC of nozzle and attachment welds includes use of Alloy 82 as weld material, and potential use of hydrogen water chemistry. Management of IASCC also includes potential use of hydrogen water chemistry

  20. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of light water reactor flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzanos, C.P.; Weber, D.P.

    1999-01-01

    Advances in computational fluid dynamics (CFD), turbulence simulation, and parallel computing have made feasible the development of three-dimensional (3-D) single-phase and two-phase flow CFD codes that can simulate fluid flow and heat transfer in realistic reactor geometries with significantly reduced reliance, especially in single phase, on empirical correlations. The objective of this work was to assess the predictive power and computational efficiency of a CFD code in the analysis of a challenging single-phase light water reactor problem, as well as to identify areas where further improvements are needed

  1. Nuclear safety in light water reactors severe accident phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Sehgal, Bal Raj

    2011-01-01

    This vital reference is the only one-stop resource on how to assess, prevent, and manage severe nuclear accidents in the light water reactors (LWRs) that pose the most risk to the public. LWRs are the predominant nuclear reactor in use around the world today, and they will continue to be the most frequently utilized in the near future. Therefore, accurate determination of the safety issues associated with such reactors is central to a consideration of the risks and benefits of nuclear power. This book emphasizes the prevention and management of severe accidents to teach nuclear professionals

  2. Automated ultrasonic examination of light water reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walter, J.H.

    1975-01-01

    An automated ultrasonic examination system has been developed to meet the pre- and inservice inspection requirements of light water reactors. This system features remotely-controlled travelling instrument carriers, computerized collection and storage or inspection data in a manner providing real time comparison against code standards, and computer control over the positioning of the instrument carriers to provide precise location data. The system is currently being utilized in the field for a variety of reactor inspections. The principal features of the system and the recent inspection experience are discussed. (author)

  3. Spent fuel data base: commercial light water reactors. [PWR; BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hauf, M.J.; Kniazewycz, B.G.

    1979-12-01

    As a consequence of this country's non-proliferation policy, the reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel has been delayed indefinitely. This has resulted in spent light water reactor (LWR) fuel being considered as a potential waste form for disposal. Since the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is currently developing methodologies for use in the regulation of the management and disposal of high-level and transuranic wastes, a comprehensive data base describing LWR fuel technology must be compiled. This document provides that technology baseline and, as such, will support the development of those evaluation standards and criteria applicable to spent nuclear fuel.

  4. Properties of light water reactor spent fuel cladding. Interim report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farwick, D.G.; Moen, R.A.

    1979-08-01

    The Commercial Waste and Spent Fuel Packaging Program will provide containment packages for the safe storage or disposal of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel. Maintaining containment of radionuclides during transportation, handling, processing and storage is essential, so the best understanding of the properties of the materials to be stored is necessary. This report provides data collection, assessment and recommendations for spent LWR fuel cladding materials properties. Major emphasis is placed on mechanical properties of the zircaloys and austenitic stainless steels. Limited information on elastic constants, physical properties, and anticipated corrosion behavior is also provided. Work is in progress to revise these evaluations as the program proceeds

  5. Comparative evaluation of recent water hammer events in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    House, R.K.; Sursock, J.P.; Kim, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Water hammer events that occurred in commercial U.S. light water reactors in the five-year period from 1981 to 1985 were surveyed, and a preliminary evaluation of the events was conducted. The information developed supplements a previous study which evaluated water hammer events in the twelve-year period from 1969 to 1981. The current study of water hammer events in the 1980's confirms that the rate of events remains relatively constant (less than 0.25 events per plant year) in both PWRs and BWRs. Although water hammer events are not normally considered a safety issue, the economic impact of the events on plant operations can be significant. One particular severe water hammer event is estimated to have cost the plant owner $10 million for repair and evaluation alone. A variety of key characteristics of the recent water hammer events are summarized to establish a basis for further study of preventative methods

  6. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor - Rev. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olson, Gail Lynn; Mc Cardell, Richard Keith; Illum, Douglas Brent

    2002-09-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was developed by Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to demonstrate the potential of a water-cooled, thorium oxide fuel cycle breeder reactor. The LWBR core operated from 1977-82 without major incident. The fuel and fuel components suffered minimal damage during operation, and the reactor testing was deemed successful. Extensive destructive and nondestructive postirradiation examinations confirmed that the fuel was in good condition with minimal amounts of cladding deformities and fuel pellet cracks. Fuel was placed in wet storage upon arrival at the Expended Core Facility, then dried and sent to the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center for underground dry storage. It is likely that the fuel remains in good condition at its current underground dry storage location at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center. Reports show no indication of damage to the core associated with shipping, loading, or storage.

  7. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anglart, H. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Nuclear Reactor Technology; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Kernenergetik und Energiesysteme; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH Technik und Umwelt (Germany). Inst. fuer Kern- und Energietechnik

    2008-06-15

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4{sup th} generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6{sup th} Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  8. International students workshop on innovative light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anglart, H.; Laurien, E.; Schulenberg, T.

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactor design is still one of the most fascinating subjects of mechanical engineering. Thirty students from 10 worldwide nations demonstrated this impressively in a recent workshop on supercritical water cooled reactors of the 4 th generation, held from March 31 to April 3, 2008, in Karlsruhe, Germany, hosted by the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Bachelor and master students as well as young scientists working on their doctorate presented their own particular contribution to design and analyses of innovative reactor components, including its safety systems and other plant design. Their presentations were accompanied by lectures of leading scientists working in the European project of the 'High Performance Light Water Reactor' which is sponsored by the European Commission as part of its 6 th Framework Programme. The workshop is an initiative of the Generation IV International Forum. (orig.)

  9. Toward visible light response: Overall water splitting using heterogeneous photocatalysts

    KAUST Repository

    Takanabe, Kazuhiro

    2011-01-01

    Extensive energy conversion of solar energy can only be achieved by large-scale collection of solar flux. The technology that satisfies this requirement must be as simple as possible to reduce capital cost. Overall water splitting by powder-form photocatalysts directly produces a mixture of H 2 and O2 (chemical energy) in a single reactor, which does not require any complicated parabolic mirrors and electronic devices. Because of its simplicity and low capital cost, it has tremendous potential to become the major technology of solar energy conversion. Development of highly efficient photocatalysts is desired. This review addresses why visible light responsive photocatalysts are essential to be developed. The state of the art for the photocatalysts for overall water splitting is briefly described. Moreover, various fundamental aspects for developing efficient photocatalysts, such as particle size of photocatalysts, cocatalysts, and reaction kinetics are discussed. Copyright © 2011 De Gruyter.

  10. Multi-Applications Small Light Water Reactor - NERI Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. Michale Modro; James E. Fisher; Kevan D. Weaver; Jose N. Reyes, Jr.; John T. Groome; Pierre Babka; Thomas M. Carlson

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle.

  11. Mechanical design of a light water breeder reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauth, Jr., William L.; Jones, Daniel S.; Kolsun, George J.; Erbes, John G.; Brennan, John J.; Weissburg, James A.; Sharbaugh, John E.

    1976-01-01

    In a light water reactor system using the thorium-232 -- uranium-233 fuel system in a seed-blanket modular core configuration having the modules arranged in a symmetrical array surrounded by a reflector blanket region, the seed regions are disposed for a longitudinal movement between the fixed or stationary blanket region which surrounds each seed region. Control of the reactor is obtained by moving the inner seed region thus changing the geometry of the reactor, and thereby changing the leakage of neutrons from the relatively small seed region into the blanket region. The mechanical design of the Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core includes means for axially positioning of movable fuel assemblies to achieve the neutron economy required of a breeder reactor, a structure necessary to adequately support the fuel modules without imposing penalties on the breeding capability, a structure necessary to support fuel rods in a closely packed array and a structure necessary to direct and control the flow of coolant to regions in the core in accordance with the heat transfer requirements.

  12. Qualification issues for advanced light-water reactor protection systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korsah, K.; Clark, R.L.; Antonescu, C.

    1993-01-01

    The instrumentation and control (I ampersand C) systems in advanced reactors will make extensive use of digital controls, microprocessors, multiplexing, and fiber optic transmission. Elements of these advances in I ampersand C have been implemented on some current operating plants. However, the widespread use of the above technologies, as well as the use of artificial intelligence with minimum reliance on human operator control of reactors, highlights the need to develop standards for qualifying the I ampersand C used in the next generation of nuclear power plants. As a first step in this direction, the protection system I ampersand C for present-day plants was compared to that proposed for advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs). An evaluation template was developed by assembling a configuration of a safety channel instrument string for a generic ALWR, then comparing the impact of environmental stressors on that string to their effect on an equivalent instrument string from an existing light-water reactor. The template was then used to suggest a methodology for the qualification of microprocessor-based protection systems. The methodology identifies standards/regulatory guides (or lack thereof) for the qualification of microprocessor-based safety I ampersand C systems. This approach addresses in part issues raised in NRC policy document SECY-91-292, which recognizes that advanced I ampersand C systems for the nuclear industry are ''being developed without consensus standards. as the technology available for design is ahead of the technology that is well understood through experience and supported by application standards.''

  13. Ultraviolet light in the use of water disinfection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dabbagh, R.

    1999-01-01

    Ultraviolet light is an effective method in the use of water disinfection for swimming pools, potable water and industry required water. For many reasons UV light and UV compounded with chlorine (UV/chlorine) has been brought to attention in resent years. In this research, a swimming pool water disinfection was carried out by means of a system with the use of a reactor which was made of stainless steel (SS-304) and with many another standards required. Operation of system was carried out at first in the pilot plant and then installation in essential water treatment integrated. Inactivation of pollution index, E. Coli or Total coliform and Pseudomonas aeroginosa studied with 6000,16000 and 30000 μW.s/cm 2 UV dose and then in presence of 0.3,0.6,0.9 and 1.2 mg/1 free chlorine (UV/chlorine). In swimming pools minimum free chlorine residual usually is 1.5 mg/1. Optimum UV dose was 16000 μW.s/cm 2 attention to 50 percent UV absorption caused to TSS,TDS and turbidity. In the UV/chlorine system suitable rate was 16000μW.s/cm 2 UV dose /0.6 mg/1 chlorine in the 2.4 * 10 5 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 3600CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Most probable number(MPN) estimated multiple tube fermentation technique. In this way the flow rate for system indicated about 240 cm 3 /s or 0.9 m 3 /h. The samples polluted for secondary pollution with 54000 CFU/100 ml for E.Coli and 1800 CFU/100ml Pseudomonas aeroginosa. The number of microbes decreased to zero duration after 45 minutes contact time in presence of free chlorine residual in samples. In practical conditions which that disinfectant system was installed in essential water treatment circuit under 1.4 atm hydraulic pressure no growth was seen for pollution index in disinfected water with UV in microbial density about 840 CFU/100 ml for Total coliform and 12CFU/100 ml for Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Attention to lower turbidity, TSS and TDS in tap water, higher flow rate about 560 cm 3 /s or 2 m 3 /h acessesed

  14. Discovery of optical flickering from the symbiotic star EF Aquilae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanov, R. K.; Boeva, S.; Nikolov, Y. M.; Petrov, B.; Bachev, R.; Latev, G. Y.; Popov, V. A.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Martí, J.; Tomov, T.; Antonova, A.

    2017-07-01

    We report optical CCD photometry of the recently identified symbiotic star EF Aql. Our observations in Johnson V and B bands clearly show the presence of stochastic light variations with an amplitude of about 0.2 mag on a time scale of minutes. The observations point toward a white dwarf (WD) as the hot component in the system. It is the 11-th object among more than 200 symbiotic stars known with detected optical flickering. Estimates of the mass accretion rate onto the WD and the mass loss rate in the wind of the Mira secondary star lead to the conclusion that less than 1 per cent of the wind is captured by the WD. Eight further candidates for the detection of flickering in similar systems are suggested.

  15. Design of water rod cores of a direct cycle supercritical-pressure light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okano, Yasushi; Koshizuka, Sei-Ichi; Oka, Yoshiaki

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual design of a direct-cycle supercritical-pressure light water reactor with water rods is presented. Three types of water rods are analyzed: single, semi-double and full-double tubes. A water rod replaces seven fuel rods in a triangular lattice. The coolant density change in the water rods and the fuel channel is calculated using a code developed in the present study. The full double tube is most superior in terms of the distribution of the moderator. The number of fuel rods to water rods is 198:19, which makes optimum moderation. The average enrichment becomes 4.13%. The axial power flattening is finally achieved by partial length fuel rods and enrichment split of 0.25%. The discharge burnup is 45 GWd/t. (author)

  16. Status of advanced technology and design for water cooled reactors: Light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-10-01

    Water reactors represent a high level of performance and safety. They are mature technology and they will undoubtedly continue to be the main stream of nuclear power. There are substantial technological development programmes in Member States for further improving the technology and for the development of new concepts in water reactors. Therefore the establishment of an international forum for the exchange of information and stimulation of international co-operation in this field has emerged. In 1987 the IAEA established the International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Water-Cooled Reactors (IWGATWR). Within the framework of IWGATWR the IAEA Technical Report on Status of Advanced Technology and Design for Water Cooled Reactors, Part I: Light Water Reactors and Part II: Heavy Water Reactors has been undertaken to document the major current activities and different trends of technological improvements and developments for future water reactors. Part I of the report dealing with LWRs has now been prepared and is based mainly on submissions from Member States. It is hoped that this part of the report, containing the status of advanced light water reactor design and technology of the year 1987 and early 1988 will be useful for disseminating information to Agency Member States and for stimulating international cooperation in this subject area. 93 refs, figs and tabs

  17. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749.

  18. Fuel Summary Report: Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illum, D.B.; Olson, G.L.; McCardell, R.K.

    1999-01-01

    The Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was a small water cooled, U-233/Th-232 cycle breeder reactor developed by the Pittsburgh Naval Reactors to improve utilization of the nation's nuclear fuel resources in light water reactors. The LWBR was operated at Shippingport Atomic Power Station (APS), which was a Department of Energy (DOE) (formerly Atomic Energy Commission)-owned reactor plant. Shippingport APS was the first large-scale, central-station nuclear power plant in the United States and the first plant of such size in the world operated solely to produce electric power. The Shippingport LWBR was operated successfully from 1977 to 1982 at the APS. During the five years of operation, the LWBR generated more than 29,000 effective full power hours (EFPH) of energy. After final shutdown, the 39 core modules of the LWBR were shipped to the Expended Core Facility (ECF) at Naval Reactors Facility at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). At ECF, 12 of the 39 modules were dismantled and about 1000 of more than 17,000 rods were removed from the modules of proof-of-breeding and fuel performance testing. Some of the removed rods were kept at ECF, some were sent to Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho and some to ANL-East in Chicago for a variety of physical, chemical and radiological examinations. All rods and rod sections remaining after the experiments were shipped back to ECF, where modules and loose rods were repackaged in liners for dry storage. In a series of shipments, the liners were transported from ECF to Idaho Nuclear Technology Engineering Center (INTEC), formerly the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP). The 47 liners containing the fully-rodded and partially-derodded core modules, the loose rods, and the rod scraps, are now stored in underground dry wells at CPP-749

  19. The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ronaldo Szilard; Hongbin Zhang; Doug Kothe; Paul Turinsky

    2011-10-01

    The Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is a DOE Energy Innovation Hub for modeling and simulation of nuclear reactors. It brings together an exceptionally capable team from national labs, industry and academia that will apply existing modeling and simulation capabilities and develop advanced capabilities to create a usable environment for predictive simulation of light water reactors (LWRs). This environment, designated as the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA), will incorporate science-based models, state-of-the-art numerical methods, modern computational science and engineering practices, and uncertainty quantification (UQ) and validation against data from operating pressurized water reactors (PWRs). It will couple state-of-the-art fuel performance, neutronics, thermal-hydraulics (T-H), and structural models with existing tools for systems and safety analysis and will be designed for implementation on both today's leadership-class computers and the advanced architecture platforms now under development by the DOE. CASL focuses on a set of challenge problems such as CRUD induced power shift and localized corrosion, grid-to-rod fretting fuel failures, pellet clad interaction, fuel assembly distortion, etc. that encompass the key phenomena limiting the performance of PWRs. It is expected that much of the capability developed will be applicable to other types of reactors. CASL's mission is to develop and apply modeling and simulation capabilities to address three critical areas of performance for nuclear power plants: (1) reduce capital and operating costs per unit energy by enabling power uprates and plant lifetime extension, (2) reduce nuclear waste volume generated by enabling higher fuel burnup, and (3) enhance nuclear safety by enabling high-fidelity predictive capability for component performance.

  20. Light requirements of water lobelia (Lobelia dortmanna L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borowiak Dariusz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Maximum depth of colonization (zC and total area covered by a population of Lobelia dortmanna, as well as underwater light regime were studied in 25 soft water lobelia lakes in north-western Poland. Variations in underwater light conditions among the lakes were described by Secchi disc depths (zSD, and by attenuation coefficients of irradiance within photosynthetically active radiation range (Kd,PAR, and euphotic zone depths (zEU derived from photometric measurements conducted twice a year (in midspring and midsummer during the period 2014–2015. Maximum depth of colonization of water lobelia ranged from 0.1 to 2.2 m (median zC = 0.8 m; mean zC = 1.0 m. Nine lakes showed the relative coverage of the littoral zone (RCLZ by L. dortmanna to be greater than the mean value, which was 4.8%. Studies showed that light requirements of water lobelia increase when the maximum depth of colonization also increases. This pattern could be partially related to the greater energy needs of deeper growing individuals due to enlarged seed production and their incubation, and for the creation of much heavier inflorescences. Assessment of the light requirements of L. dortmanna along the depth gradient indicates that relative irradiance (percentage of subsurface irradiance of PAR should be at the level of: (i 47–50% (annual total of quantum irradiance 3083–3280 mol m−2 yr−2 for plants growing within a depth range of 2.0–2.5 m; (ii 44–47% (2886–3083 mol m−2yr−1 for plants growing within a depth range of 1.5–2.0 m; (iii 41–44% (2690–2886 mol m−2yr−2 for plants growing within a depth range of 1.0–1.5 m; and (iv 34–41% (2230–2690 mol m−1 yr−1 for those growing in the littoral zone at a depth of between 0.5 and 1.0 m. In average conditions in the Pomeranian lakes, the maximum depth of colonization by L. dortmanna accounts for approximately a third of the Secchi disc depth and a fifth of the depth of the euphotic zone with irradiance

  1. Host range, symbiotic effectiveness and nodulation competitiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... This symbiotic interaction is of agronomic and ecological importance because of its significant amount of nitrogen to the total nitrogen budget in terrestrial ecosystems (Postgate,. 1998). An important characteristic of this symbiotic interaction is host specificity, where defined species of rhizobia forms nodules ...

  2. New Developments in Actinides Burning with Symbiotic LWR-HTR-GCFR Fuel Cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomboni, Eleonora

    2008-01-01

    The long-term radiotoxicity of the final waste is currently the main drawback of nuclear power production. Particularly, isotopes of Neptunium and Plutonium along with some long-lived fission products are dangerous for more than 100000 years. 96% of spent Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel consists of actinides, hence it is able to produce a lot of energy by fission if recycled. Goals of Generation IV Initiative are reduction of long-term radiotoxicity of waste to be stored in geological repositories, a better exploitation of nuclear fuel resources and proliferation resistance. Actually, all these issues are intrinsically connected with each other. It is quite clear that these goals can be achieved only by combining different concepts of Gen. IV nuclear cores in a 'symbiotic' way. Light-Water Reactor - (Very) High Temperature Reactor ((V)HTR) - Fast Reactor (FR) symbiotic cycles have good capabilities from the viewpoints mentioned above. Particularly, HTR fuelled by Plutonium oxide is able to reach an ultra-high burn-up and to burn Neptunium and Plutonium effectively. In contrast, not negligible amounts of Americium and Curium build up in this core, although the total mass of Heavy Metals (HM) is reduced. Americium and Curium are characterised by an high radiological hazard as well. Nevertheless, at least Plutonium from HTR (rich in non-fissile nuclides) and, if appropriate, Americium can be used as fuel for Fast Reactors. If necessary, dedicated assemblies for Minor Actinides (MA) burning can be inserted in Fast Reactors cores. This presentation focuses on combining HTR and Gas Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) concepts, fuelled by spent LWR fuel and depleted uranium if need be, to obtain a net reduction of total mass and radiotoxicity of final waste. The intrinsic proliferation resistance of this cycle is highlighted as well. Additionally, some hints about possible Curium management strategies are supplied. Besides, a preliminary assessment of different chemical forms of

  3. High-level radioactive waste from light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, B.L.

    1977-01-01

    The production of radioactive nuclei during the operation of a light-water reactor is traced, and their decay history is followed. The potential environmental impacts of this waste are calculated and shown to be comparable to those of other materials we produce. Assuming deep burial, it is shown that there are important time delays which prevent the waste from reaching the biosphere in the first few hundred years while its toxicity is decreasing by several orders of magnitude. In the long term,,the most important pathway to man was found to be through groundwater into food and water supplies, with consequences calculated t to be 0.4 fatalities in 10 6 years from each year of all-nuclear power in U.S. Other pathways considered and found to be less important include meteorites, volcanism, release through ground water to airborne particulate, and human intrusion by drilling and mining for unspecified materials and for salt. For time scales longer than 10 6 years, nuclear power is shown to reduce man's exposure to radiation by consuming uranium. A cost-benefit analysis is developed for surveillance of buried waste. It is shown that buried high-level waste is environmentally much less dangerous than uranium mill tailings

  4. Multiangular hyperspectral investigation of polarized light in case 2 waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonizzo, A.; Zhou, J.; Gilerson, A.; Chowdhary, J.; Gross, B.; Moshary, F.; Ahmed, S.

    2009-09-01

    The focus of this work is on the dependence of in situ hyperspectral and multiangular polarized data on the size distribution and refractive index of the suspended particles. Underwater polarization measurements were obtained using a polarimeter developed at the Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory of the City College of New York, NY. The degree of polarization (DOP) of the underwater light field in coastal environments was measured and the water-leaving polarized radiance was derived. In-water optical properties were also measured with an ac-9 (WET Labs). Absorption and attenuation spectra are then used to derive information on the dissolved and suspend components in the water medium which are used in a vector radiative transfer code which provides the upwelling radiance. The model was run for various values of the refractive index of mineral particles until the modeled DOP matched the measured one. The relationship between the intensity of the maximum of the DOP and both the refractive index of the mineral particles and the shapes of their size distributions is analyzed in detail.

  5. Status of advanced light water reactor designs 2004

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-05-01

    The report is intended to be a source of reference information for interested organizations and individuals. Among them are decision makers of countries considering implementation of nuclear power programmes. Further, the report is addressed to government officials with an appropriate technical background and to research institutes of countries with existing nuclear programmes that wish to be informed on the global status in order to plan their nuclear power programmes including both research and development efforts and means for meeting future. The future utilization of nuclear power worldwide depends primarily on the ability of the nuclear community to further improve the economic competitiveness of nuclear power plants while meeting stringent safety requirements. The IAEA's activities in nuclear power technology development include the preparation of status reports on advanced reactor designs to provide all interested IAEA Member States with balanced and objective information on advances in nuclear plant technology. In the field of light water reactors, the last status report published by the IAEA was 'Status of Advanced Light Water Cooled Reactor Designs: 1996' (IAEA-TECDOC-968). Since its publication, quite a lot has happened: some designs have been taken into commercial operation, others have achieved significant steps toward becoming commercial products, including certification from regulatory authorities, some are in a design optimization phase to reduce capital costs, development for other designs began after 1996, and a few designs are no longer pursued by their promoters. With this general progress in mind, on the advice and with the support of the IAEA Department of Nuclear Energy's Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (LWRs), the IAEA has prepared this new status report on advanced LWR designs that updates IAEA-TECDOC-968, presenting the various advanced LWR designs in a balanced way according to a common outline

  6. Japanese simplified light water reactors using passive safety systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Naitoh, M.; Kiyose, R.

    1991-01-01

    Concepts fo small and medium-sized light water reactors for the next generation have been developed by Japanese nuclear plant vendors. These are called HSBWR and MSPWR. The basic design philosophy was (1) to improve economy to avoid scale demerits mainly by decreasing the capital costs of construction and (2) to improve safety margin by incorporating passive safety systems. Both HSBWR and MSPWR utilize active components as part of safety systems, but their role is greatly limited, whereas passive components are widely incorporated. The grace period of HSBWR is one day of infinite as an option for emergency core cooling, and three days for residual heat removal. As for MSPWR, it is three days for both events. For both HSBWR and MSPWR, improvement of economy is largely contributed by short construction period less than three years, continuous operation period of two years, and periodical inspection time required less than 40 days. (author)

  7. Power generation versus fuel production in light water hybrid reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.

    1977-06-01

    The economic potentials of fissile-fuel-producing light-water hybrid reactors (FFP-LWHR) and of fuel-self-sufficient (FSS) LWHR's are compared. A simple economic model is constructed that gives the capital investment allowed for the hybrid reactor so that the cost of electricity generated in the hybrid based energy system equals the cost of electricity generated in LWR's. The power systems considered are LWR, FSS-LWHR, and FFP-LWHR plus LWR, both with and without plutonium recycling. The economic potential of FFP-LWHR's is found superior to that of FSS-LWHR's. Moreover, LWHR's may compete, economically, with LWR's. Criteria for determining the more economical approach to hybrid fuel or power production are derived for blankets having a linear dependence between F and M. The examples considered favor the power generation rather than fuel production

  8. Standard Guide for Benchmark Testing of Light Water Reactor Calculations

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers general approaches for benchmarking neutron transport calculations in light water reactor systems. A companion guide (Guide E2005) covers use of benchmark fields for testing neutron transport calculations and cross sections in well controlled environments. This guide covers experimental benchmarking of neutron fluence calculations (or calculations of other exposure parameters such as dpa) in more complex geometries relevant to reactor surveillance. Particular sections of the guide discuss: the use of well-characterized benchmark neutron fields to provide an indication of the accuracy of the calculational methods and nuclear data when applied to typical cases; and the use of plant specific measurements to indicate bias in individual plant calculations. Use of these two benchmark techniques will serve to limit plant-specific calculational uncertainty, and, when combined with analytical uncertainty estimates for the calculations, will provide uncertainty estimates for reactor fluences with ...

  9. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation

  10. Non-linear analysis in Light Water Reactor design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rashid, Y.R.; Sharabi, M.N.; Nickell, R.E.; Esztergar, E.P.; Jones, J.W.

    1980-03-01

    The results obtained from a scoping study sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) under the Light Water Reactor (LWR) Safety Technology Program at Sandia National Laboratories are presented. Basically, this project calls for the examination of the hypothesis that the use of nonlinear analysis methods in the design of LWR systems and components of interest include such items as: the reactor vessel, vessel internals, nozzles and penetrations, component support structures, and containment structures. Piping systems are excluded because they are being addressed by a separate study. Essentially, the findings were that nonlinear analysis methods are beneficial to LWR design from a technical point of view. However, the costs needed to implement these methods are the roadblock to readily adopting them. In this sense, a cost-benefit type of analysis must be made on the various topics identified by these studies and priorities must be established. This document is the complete report by ANATECH International Corporation.

  11. Commercial Light Water Reactor Tritium Extraction Facility Geotechnical Summary Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, M R

    2000-01-11

    A geotechnical investigation program has been completed for the Circulating Light Water Reactor - Tritium Extraction Facility (CLWR-TEF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The program consisted of reviewing previous geotechnical and geologic data and reports, performing subsurface field exploration, field and laboratory testing and geologic and engineering analyses. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the subsurface conditions for the CLWR-TEF in terms of subsurface stratigraphy and engineering properties for design and to perform selected engineering analyses. The objectives of the evaluation were to establish site-specific geologic conditions, obtain representative engineering properties of the subsurface and potential fill materials, evaluate the lateral and vertical extent of any soft zones encountered, and perform engineering analyses for slope stability, bearing capacity and settlement, and liquefaction potential. In addition, provide general recommendations for construction and earthwork.

  12. Safety considerations concerning light water reactors in Sweden

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsson, T.

    1977-01-01

    In 1975 the Swedish Nuclear Power Inspectorate was commissioned by the Government to perform a Reactor Safety Study concerning commercial light water reactors. The study will contain an account of: - rules and regulations for reactor designs; - operation experience of the Swedish nuclear power plants with international comparisons; - the development of reactor designs during the last 10 years; - demands and conditions for inspection and inspection methods; - nuclear power plant operation organization; - training of operators; and - the results of research into nuclear safety. The study is scheduled for completion by July 1st, 1977, however, this paper gives a summary of the results of the Reactor Safety Study already available. The paper contains detailed statistics concerning safety related occurrences and reactor scrams in Sweden from July 1st, 1974 until the beginning of 1977

  13. The United States Advanced Light Water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, Jr.J.C.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind. (author)

  14. Isotopic correlations in fission gases applied to light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, Pierre.

    1978-01-01

    The study of stable fission gases, released from irradiated fuel elements, allows not only the kinetics of release to be determined as a function of the irradiation conditions, but also very useful experimental correlations to be laid down in view of specifying irradiation parameters: specific burn-up and linear power. The LECI (Laboratoire d'Etude des Combustibles Irradies) at Saclay has effected for many years qualitative and quantitative analysis of the stable fission gases released from enriched UO 2 based fuels in the framework of quality control of the fuels for light water reactors (especially PWR). The use of the numerous results obtained in various conditions allowed a detail study of the isotope ratio for Xe and Kr, which may be applied to test elements and power assemblies [fr

  15. Nuclide inventories of spent fuels from light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Okamoto, Tsutomu

    2012-02-01

    Accurate information on nuclide inventories of spent fuels from Light Water Reactors (LWRs) is important for evaluations of criticality, decay heat, radioactivity, toxicity, and so on, in the safety assessments of storage, transportation, reprocessing and waste disposal of the spent fuels. So, a lot of lattice burn-up calculations were carried out for the possible fuel specifications and irradiation conditions in Japanese commercial LWRs by using the latest nuclear data library JENDL-4.0 and a sophisticated lattice burn-up calculation code MOSRA-SRAC. As a result, burn-up changes of nuclide inventories and their possible ranges were clarified for 21 heavy nuclides and 118 fission products, which are important from the viewpoint of impacts to nuclear characteristics and nuclear fuel cycle and environment. (author)

  16. The United States advanced light water reactor (USALWR) development program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stahlkopf, K.E.; Noble, D.M.; Devine, J.C. Jr.; Sugnet, W.R.

    1987-01-01

    For the United States Nuclear Power industry to remain viable, it must be prepared to meet the expected need for a new generation capacity in the late 90s with an improved reactor system. The best hope of meeting this requirement is with revolutionary changes to current LWR systems through simplification and re-evaluation of safety and operational design margins. In addition, the grid characteristics and the difficulty in raising capital for large projects indicate the smaller light water reactors (600 MWe) may play an important role in the next generation. A cooperative and coordinated program between EPRI, U.S. DOE, the major architect engineers, nuclear steam supply vendors, and the NRC in the U.S. has been undertaken with four major goals in mind

  17. Conceptual design study of high conversion light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, Keisuke; Akie, Hiroshi; Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Ishiguro, Yukio

    1990-06-01

    Since 1984, R and D work has been made for high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs), at JAERI, to improve the natural uranium saving and effective plutonium utilization by the use of conventional or extended LWR technology. This report summarizes the results of the feasibility study made mainly from the viewpoint of nuclear design in the Phase-I Program (1985∼1989). Until now, the following various types of HCLWR core concepts have been investigated; 1) homogeneous core with tight pitch lattice of fuel rods, 2) homogeneous core with semi-tight pitch lattice, 3) spectral shift core using fertile rod with semi-tight pitch lattice, 4) flat-core, 5) axial heterogeneous core. The core burnup and thermohydraulic analyses during normal operations have been performed to clear up the burnup performances and feasibility for each core. Based on the analysis results, the axial heterogeneous HCLWR core was selected as the JAERI reference core. (author)

  18. Materials Inventory Database for the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kazi Ahmed; Shannon M. Bragg-Sitton

    2013-08-01

    Scientific research involves the purchasing, processing, characterization, and fabrication of many sample materials. The history of such materials can become complicated over their lifetime – materials might be cut into pieces or moved to various storage locations, for example. A database with built-in functions to track these kinds of processes facilitates well-organized research. The Material Inventory Database Accounting System (MIDAS) is an easy-to-use tracking and reference system for such items. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program (LWRS), which seeks to advance the long-term reliability and productivity of existing nuclear reactors in the United States through multiple research pathways, proposed MIDAS as an efficient way to organize and track all items used in its research. The database software ensures traceability of all items used in research using built-in functions which can emulate actions on tracked items – fabrication, processing, splitting, and more – by performing operations on the data. MIDAS can recover and display the complete history of any item as a simple report. To ensure the database functions suitably for the organization of research, it was developed alongside a specific experiment to test accident tolerant nuclear fuel cladding under the LWRS Advanced Light Water Reactor Nuclear Fuels Pathway. MIDAS kept track of materials used in this experiment from receipt at the laboratory through all processes, test conduct and, ultimately, post-test analysis. By the end of this process, the database proved to be right tool for this program. The database software will help LWRS more efficiently conduct research experiments, from simple characterization tests to in-reactor experiments. Furthermore, MIDAS is a universal tool that any other research team could use to organize their material inventory.

  19. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C.; Lunt, D.L.J.

    1991-01-01

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and mid-period error. We will briefly describe out improved version of the Long Trace Profiler, and its importance to out metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of Peter Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously

  20. A new book : 'light-water reactor materials'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olander, Donald R.; Motta, Arthur T.

    2005-01-01

    The contents of a new book currently in preparation are described. The dearth of books in the field of nuclear materials has left both students in nuclear materials classes and professionals in the same field without a resource for the broad fundamentals of this important sub-discipline of nuclear engineering. The new book is devoted entirely to materials problems in the core of light-water reactors, from the pressure vessel into the fuel. Key topics deal with the UO 2 fuel, zircaloy cladding, stainless steel, and of course, water. The restriction to LWR materials does not mean a short monograph; the enormous quantity of experimental and theoretical work over the past 50 years on these materials presents a challenge of culling the most important features and explaining them in the simplest quantitative fashion. Moreover, LWRs will probably be the sole instrument of the return of nuclear energy in electric power production for the next decade or so. By that time, a new book will be needed

  1. Tritium separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramey, D.W.; Petek, M.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.; Ramey, J.; Sampson, C.A.

    1979-10-01

    Use of bipolar electrolysis with countercurrent electrolyte flow to separate hydrogen isotopes was investigated for the removal of tritium from light water effluents or from heavy water moderator. Deuterium-tritium and protium-tritium separation factors occurring on a Pd-25% Ag bipolar electrode were measured to be 2.05 to 2.16 and 11.6 to 12.4 respectively, at current densities between 0.21 and 0.50 A cm -2 , and at 35 to 90 0 C. Current densities up to 0.3 A cm -2 have been achieved in continuous operation, at 80 to 90 0 C, without significant gas formation on the bipolar electrodes. From the measured overvoltage at the bipolar electrodes and the electrolyte conductivity the power consumption per stage was calculated to be 3.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.2 A cm -2 and 5.0 kwh/kg H 2 O at 0.5 A cm -2 current density, compared to 6.4 and 8.0 kwh/kg H 2 O for normal electrolysis. A mathematical model derived for hydrogen isotope separation by bipolar electrolysis, i.e., for a square cascade, accurately describes the results for protium-tritium separation in two laboratory scale, multistage experiments with countercurrent electrolyte flow; the measured tiritum concentration gradient through the cascade agreed with the calculated values

  2. Water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, W.R.; Irick, S.C.; Lunt, D.L.J.

    1992-01-01

    The program for providing water cooled metal optics for the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley is reviewed with respect to fabrication and metrology of the surfaces. Materials choices, surface figure and smoothness specifications, and metrology systems for measuring the plated metal surfaces are discussed. Results from prototype mirrors and grating blanks will be presented, which show exceptionally low microroughness and midperiod error. We will briefly describe our improved version of the long trace profiler, and its importance to our metrology program. We have completely redesigned the mechanical, optical and computational parts of the profiler system with the cooperation of P. Takacs of Brookhaven, Continental Optical, and Baker Manufacturing. Most important is that one of our profilers is in use at the vendor to allow testing during fabrication. Metrology from the first water cooled mirror for an ALS beamline is presented as an example. This 15 in. long Glidcop T M mirror is coated with electroless nickel from Acteron Corporation in Redwood City, CA. The preplating processing and grinding and polishing were done by Tucson Optical. We will show significantly better surface microroughness on electroless nickel, over large areas, than has been reported previously. (orig.)

  3. Water chemistry control to meet the advanced design and operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shirai, Hiroshi; Uchida, Shunsuke; Naitoh, Masanori; Okada, Hidetoshi; Sato, Masatoshi

    2014-01-01

    Water chemistry control is one of the key technologies to establish safe and reliable operation of nuclear power plants. The road maps on R and D plans for water chemistry of nuclear power systems in Japan have been proposed along with promotion of R and D related water chemistry improvement for the advanced application of light water reactors (LWRs). The technical trends were divided into four categories, dose rate reduction, structural integrity, fuel integrity and radioactive waste reduction, and latest technical break through for each category was shown for the advanced application of LWRs. At the same time, the technical break through and the latest movements for regulation of water chemistry were introduced for each of major organizations related to nuclear engineering in the world. The conclusions were summarized as follows; 1. Water chemistry improvements might contribute to achieve the advanced application of LWRs, while water chemistry should be often changed to achieve the advanced application of LWRs. 2. Only one solution for water chemistry control was not obtained for achieving the advanced application of LWRs, but miscellaneous solutions were possible for achieving one. Optimal water chemistry control was desired for having the good practices for satisfying multi-targets at the same time and it was much affected by the plant unique systems and operational history. 3. That meant it was difficult to determine water chemistry regulation targets for achieving application of LWRs but it was necessary to prepare suitable guideline for good achievement of application of LWRs. That meant the guideline should be recommendation for good practice in the plant. 4. The water chemistry guide line should be modified along with progress of plant operation and water chemistry and related technologies. (author)

  4. 77 FR 55877 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-11

    ... Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide; issuance... Systems for Boiling Water Reactor Power Plants.'' This regulatory guide is being revised to: (1) Expand... for the condensate and feedwater systems in all types of light water reactor facilities; and (2) to...

  5. Plant Control of the High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlagenhaufer, Marc; Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen, Baden-Wuertemberg 76344 (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    The latest design concept of the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) includes a thermal core in which supercritical water at 25 MPa inlet pressure is heated up from 280 deg. C reactor inlet temperature to 500 deg. C core exit temperature in three steps with intermediate coolant mixing to minimize peak cladding temperatures of the fuel rods. A direct supercritical steam cycle of the HPLWR has been designed with high, intermediate and low pressure turbines with a single reheat to 441 deg. C at 4.04 MPa pressure. Three low pressure pre-heaters and four high pressure pre-heaters are foreseen to achieve the envisaged reactor inlet temperature of 280 deg. C at full load. A feedwater tank of 603 m{sup 3} at 0.55 MPa pressure serves as an accumulator for normal and accidental conditions. The steam cycle has been modelled with APROS, developed by VTT Finland, to provide thermodynamic data and cycle efficiency values under full load and part load operation conditions as well as the transient response to load changes. A plant control system has been designed in which the reactor inlet pressure is controlled by the turbine valve, the reactor power is controlled by the feedwater pumps while the life steam temperature is controlled by control rods, and the reheat temperature is controlled by the reheater valve. Neglecting the reactivity control, the core power can also be treated as input parameter such that the life steam temperature is directly controlled by the feedwater mass flow. The plant control can handle all loading and de-loading cycles including complete shut down. A constant pressure at reactor inlet is foreseen for all load cases. Peak temperatures of the fuel pins are checked with a simplified core model. Two shut down procedures starting at 50% load are presented. A reactor scram with turbine states the safe shut down of the whole plant. To avoid hard material temperature changes, a controlled shut down procedure is designed. The rotational speed of the

  6. A collection of publications and articles for a light water ultra-safe plant concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klevans, E.H.

    1988-01-01

    This collection contains reports titled: ''The Penn State Ultra-Safe Reactor Concept; '' ''Ultra Safe Nuclear Power; '' ''Use of the Modular Modeling System, in the Design of the Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor; '' ''Use of the Modular Modeling System in Severe Transient Analysis of Penn State Advanced Light Water Reactor; '' ''PSU Engineers' Reactor Design May Stop a Future TMI; '' and ''The Penn State Advanced Light Water reactor Concept.''

  7. Application of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuels in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehin, Jess C.

    2012-01-01

    This study aims to perform a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). In particular pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor. Using uranium-based fuel and transuranic (TRU) based fuel in TRistructural ISOtropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher physical density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a color-set array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the TRU based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, feasibility of core designs fully loaded with TRU FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator.

  8. Application of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuels in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gentry, C.; George, N.; Maldonado, I.; Godfrey, A.; Terrani, K.; Gehin, J.

    2012-01-01

    This study performs a preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of incorporation of Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated (FCM) fuels in light water reactors (LWRs). In particular, pin cell, lattice, and full core analyses are carried out on FCM fuel in a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Using uranium-based fuel and Pu/Np-based fuel in TRistructural isotropic (TRISO) particle form, each fuel design was examined using the SCALE 6.1 analytical suite. In regards to the uranium-based fuel, pin cell calculations were used to determine which fuel material performed best when implemented in the fuel kernel as well as the size of the kernel and surrounding particle layers. The higher fissile material density of uranium mononitride (UN) proved to be favorable, while the parametric studies showed that the FCM particle fuel design with 19.75% enrichment would need roughly 12% additional fissile material in comparison to that of a standard UO 2 rod in order to match the lifetime of an 18-month PWR cycle. As part of the fuel assembly design evaluations, fresh feed lattices were modeled to analyze the within-assembly pin power peaking. Also, a 'color-set' array of assemblies was constructed to evaluate power peaking and power sharing between a once-burned and a fresh feed assembly. In regards to the Pu/Np-based fuel, lattice calculations were performed to determine an optimal lattice design based on reactivity behavior, pin power peaking, and isotopic content. After obtaining a satisfactory lattice design, the feasibility of core designs fully loaded with Pu/Np FCM lattices was demonstrated using the NESTLE three-dimensional core simulator. (authors)

  9. Capital costs of light water reactors: the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKerron, G.

    1979-10-01

    The cost of building a modern nuclear power plant is greater than that of almost any other single civilian project - costs of individual plants are reckoned in hundreds of millions of pounds in the UK, and up to a billion dollars or more in the USA. Hence, depending on the size of nuclear programmes and their funding, escalation of nuclear capital costs may have important economic and social consequences through its effects on overall resource allocation. It is therefore important to analyse the extent and, as far as possible, the sources of cost increases and escalation, in order to see if the experience yields implications for technology policy. The USA has much the greatest experience in nuclear construction: it also has by far the largest amount of published information on the subject of capital costs. As all other countries lack either sufficient experience and/or adequate published cost information, it is impossible to conduct a genuine international comparison, and this paper is confined to an examination of US experience. This paper therefore assembles and evaluates currently available data on light water reactor (PWR and BWR) capital costs in the USA. (author)

  10. Light water reactor pressure isolation valve performance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, H.H.; Jeanmougin, N.M.; Corugedo, J.J.

    1990-07-01

    The Light Water Reactor Valve Performance Testing Program was initiated by the NRC to evaluate leakage as an indication of valve condition, provide input to Section XI of the ASME Code, evaluate emission monitoring for condition and degradation and in-service inspection techniques. Six typical check and gate valves were purchased for testing at typical plant conditions (550F at 2250 psig) for an assumed number of cycles for a 40-year plant lifetime. Tests revealed that there were variances between the test results and the present statement of the Code; however, the testing was not conclusive. The life cycle tests showed that high tech acoustic emission can be utilized to trend small leaks, that specific motor signature measurement on gate valves can trend and indicate potential failure, and that in-service inspection techniques for check valves was shown to be both feasible and an excellent preventive maintenance indicator. Life cycle testing performed here did not cause large valve leakage typical of some plant operation. Other testing is required to fully understand the implication of these results and the required program to fully implement them. (author)

  11. Controlling radiation fields in siemans designed light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riess, R.; Marchl, T. [Siemens Power Generation Group, Erlangen (Germany)

    1995-03-01

    An essential item for the control of radiation fields is the minimization of the use of satellites in the reactor systems of Light Water Reactors (LWRs). A short description of the qualification of Co-replacement materials will be followed by an illustration of the locations where these materials were implemented in Siemens designed LWRs. Especially experiences in PWRs show the immense influence of reduction of cobalt sources on dose rate buildup. The corrosion and the fatique and wear behavior of the replacement materials has not created concern up to now. A second tool to keep occupational radiation doses at a low level in PWRs is the use of the modified B/Li-chemistry. This is practized in Siemens designed plants by keeping the Li level at a max. value of 2 ppm until it reaches a pH (at 300{degrees}C) of {approximately}7.4. This pH is kept constant until the end of the cycle. The substitution of cobalt base alloys and thus the removal of the Co-59 sources from the system had the largest impact on the radiation levels. Nonetheless, the effectiveness of the coolant chemistry should not be neglected either. Several years of successful operation of PWRs with the replacement materials resulted in an occupational radiation exposure which is below 0.5 man-Sievert/plant and year.

  12. Studies of severe accidents in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    From 10 to 12 November 1986 some 80 delegates met under the auspices of the CEC working group on the safety of light-water reactors. The participants from EC Member States were joined by colleagues from Sweden, Finland and the USA and met to discuss the subject of severe accidents in LWRs. Although this seminar had been planned well before Chernobyl, the ''severe-accident-that-really-happened'' made its mark on the seminar. The four main seminar topics were: (i) high source-term accident sequences identified in PSAs, (ii) containment performance, (iii) mitigation of core melt consequences, (iv) severe accident management in LWRs. In addition to the final panel discussion there was also a separate panel discussion on lessons learned from the Chernobyl accident. These proceedings include the papers presented during the seminar and they are arranged following the seminar programme outline. The presentations and discussions of the two panels are not included in the proceedings. The general conclusions and directions following from these two panels were, however, considered in a seminar review paper which was published in the March 1987 issue of Nuclear Engineering International

  13. Technologies for Upgrading Light Water Reactor Outlet Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel S. Wendt; Piyush Sabharwall; Vivek Utgikar

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear energy could potentially be utilized in hybrid energy systems to produce synthetic fuels and feedstocks from indigenous carbon sources such as coal and biomass. First generation nuclear hybrid energy system (NHES) technology will most likely be based on conventional light water reactors (LWRs). However, these LWRs provide thermal energy at temperatures of approximately 300°C, while the desired temperatures for many chemical processes are much higher. In order to realize the benefits of nuclear hybrid energy systems with the current LWR reactor fleets, selection and development of a complimentary temperature upgrading technology is necessary. This paper provides an initial assessment of technologies that may be well suited toward LWR outlet temperature upgrading for powering elevated temperature industrial and chemical processes during periods of off-peak power demand. Chemical heat transformers (CHTs) are a technology with the potential to meet LWR temperature upgrading requirements for NHESs. CHTs utilize chemical heat of reaction to change the temperature at which selected heat sources supply or consume thermal energy. CHTs could directly utilize LWR heat output without intermediate mechanical or electrical power conversion operations and the associated thermodynamic losses. CHT thermal characteristics are determined by selection of the chemical working pair and operating conditions. This paper discusses the chemical working pairs applicable to LWR outlet temperature upgrading and the CHT operating conditions required for providing process heat in NHES applications.

  14. Job-related doses in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schnuer, K.

    1993-01-01

    The Treaty of 1957 establishing the European Atomic Energy Community, (EURATOM) was an essential prerequisite for the development of a strong nuclear industry in Europe. Among other things the Treaty provides that the Community shall lay down Basic Safety Standards for the protection of the health of workers and the general public against the dangers arising from ionizing radiation and ensure that they are applied. Following adoption of the Council Directive of 1980, the European Commission defined the basic principles of Justification, Optimization and Limitation to be applied in order to ensure the greatest possible protection of workers and the general public. Subsequently the Commission took initiatives in order to find ways of implementing these three basic principles in practical radiation protection. In 1980 the Commission in close collaboration with the leading nuclear power station operators, set up its own system of 'occupational radiation dose statistics from light water reactors operating in Western Europe'. This was designed for PWRs and BWRs, and the Commission benefited from the experience of neighbouring non-EC countries such as Sweden, Finland, Switzerland and Spain (not yet a member) operating nuclear power stations made by different manufacturers. The paper provides some general information on developments and trends in collective and individual doses to workers in nuclear power stations, based on a unique European databank of approximately 1000 operating reactor years. 9 figs

  15. Radiation-induced embrittlement in light water reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gold, R.; McElroy, W.N.

    1987-01-01

    In operating light water reactor (LWR) commercial power plants, neutron radiation induces embrittlement of the pressure vessel (PV) and its support structures. As a consequence, LWR-PV integrity is a primary safety consideration. LWR-PV integry is a significant economic consideration because the PV and its support structures are nonreplaceable power plant components and embrittlement of these components can therefore limit the effective operating lifetime of the plant. In addition to plant life considerations, LWR-PV embrittlement creates significant cycle-to-cycle impact through the restriction of normal heat-up and cool-down reactor operations. Recent LWR-PV benchmark experiments are analyzed. On this bases, it is established that an exponential representation accurately describes the spatial dependence of neutron exposure in LWR-PV. Implications produced by simple exponental behavior are explained and trend-curve models for the predictions of PV embrittelment are derived. These derivations provide for a clearer understanding and assessment of the assumptions underlying these trend-curve models. It is demonstrated that LWR-PV embrittlement possesses significant material dependence. (orig.)

  16. Universal Long-Range Nanometric Bending of Water by Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Gopal; Singh, Kamal P.

    2015-10-01

    Resolving mechanical effects of light on fluids has fundamental importance with wide applications. Most experiments to date on optofluidic interface deformation exploited radiation forces exerted by normally incident lasers. However, the intriguing effects of photon momentum for any configuration, including the unique total internal reflection regime, where an evanescent wave leaks above the interface, remain largely unexplored. A major difficulty in resolving nanomechanical effects has been the lack of a sensitive detection technique. Here, we devise a simple setup whereby a probe laser produces high-contrast Newton-ring-like fringes from a sessile water drop. The mechanical action of the photon momentum of a pump beam modulates the fringes, thus allowing us to perform a direct noninvasive measurement of a nanometric bulge with sub-5-nm precision. Remarkably, a laser polarizations and nonlinear enhancement in the bulge near total internal reflection is isolated. In addition, the nanometric bulge is shown to extend far longer, 100 times beyond the pump spot. Our high precision data validate the century-old Minkowski theory for a general angle and offer potential for novel optofluidic devices and noncontact nanomanipulation strategies.

  17. Study on unstable fracture characteristics of light water reactor piping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurihara, Ryoichi

    1998-08-01

    Many testing studies have been conducted to validate the applicability of the leak before break (LBB) concept for the light water reactor piping in the world. It is especially important among them to clarify the condition that an inside surface crack of the piping wall does not cause an unstable fracture but ends in a stable fracture propagating only in the pipe thickness direction, even if the excessive loading works to the pipe. Pipe unstable fracture tests performed in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute had been planned under such background, and clarified the condition for the cracked pipe to cause the unstable fracture under monotonous increase loading or cyclic loading by using test pipes with the inside circumferential surface crack. This paper examines the pipe unstable fracture by dividing it into two parts. One is the static unstable fracture that breaks the pipe with the inside circumferential surface crack by increasing load monotonously. Another is the dynamic unstable fracture that breaks the pipe by the cyclic loading. (author). 79 refs

  18. Some critical corrosion issues and mitigation strategies affecting light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.L.

    1996-01-01

    Recent corrosion experience in US light water reactor nuclear power plants is reviewed with emphasis on mitigation strategies to control the cost of corrosion to light water reactor operators. The most costly issues have been stress corrosion cracking of stainless steel coolant piping in boiling water reactors and corrosion damage to steam generator tubes in pressurized water reactors. Other significant corrosion problems for both reactor types are briefly reviewed

  19. Water cooled breeder program summary report (LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) development program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-10-01

    The purpose of the Department of Energy Water Cooled Breeder Program was to demonstrate pratical breeding in a uranium-233/thorium fueled core while producing electrical energy in a commercial water reactor generating station. A demonstration Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) was successfully operated for more than 29,000 effective full power hours in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. The reactor operated with an availability factor of 76% and had a gross electrical output of 2,128,943,470 kilowatt hours. Following operation, the expended core was examined and no evidence of any fuel element defects was found. Nondestructive assay of 524 fuel rods determined that 1.39 percent more fissile fuel was present at the end of core life than at the beginning, proving that breeding had occurred. This demonstrates the existence of a vast source of electrical energy using plentiful domestic thorium potentially capable of supplying the entire national need for many centuries. To build on the successful design and operation of the Shippingport Breeder Core and to provide the technology to implement this concept, several reactor designs of large breeders and prebreeders were developed for commercial-sized plants of 900--1000 Mw(e) net. This report summarizes the Water Cooled Breeder Program from its inception in 1965 to its completion in 1987. Four hundred thirty-six technical reports are referenced which document the work conducted as part of this program. This work demonstrated that the Light Water Breeder Reactor is a viable alternative as a PWR replacement in the next generation of nuclear reactors. This transition would only require a minimum of change in design and fabrication of the reactor and operation of the plant.

  20. Stability analysis of the high performance light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega Gomez, Tino

    2009-03-15

    In the Generation IV international advanced nuclear reactor development program, the High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is one of the most promising candidates. Important features are its inherently high thermodynamic efficiency (of approximately 45 %) and the ability to use existing supercritical water technology which previously has been developed and deployed for fossil fired power plants. Within a HPLWR core, the fluid experiences a drastic change in thermal and transport properties such as density, dynamic viscosity, specific heat and thermal conductivity, as the supercritical water is heated from 280 C to 500 C. The density change substantially exceeds that in a Boiling Water Reactor (i.e., HPLWR: density changes from 780 kg/m{sup 3} to 90 kg/m{sup 3}; BWR: density changes from 750 kg/m{sup 3} to 198 kg/m3). Due to this density change, the HPLWR can be - under certain operation parameters - susceptible to various thermal-hydraulic flow instabilities, which have to be avoided. In this thesis a stability analysis for the HPLWR is presented. This analysis is based on analytical considerations and numerical results, which were obtained by a computer code developed by the author. The heat-up stages of the HPLWR three-pass core are identified in respect to the relevant flow instability phenomena. The modeling approach successfully used for BWR stability analysis is extended to supercritical pressure operation conditions. In particular, a one-dimensional equation set representing the coolant flow of HPLWR fuel assemblies has been implemented in a commercial software named COMSOL to perform steady-state, time-dependent, and modal analyses. An investigation of important static instabilities (i.e., Ledinegg instabilities, flow maldistribution) and Pressure Drop Oscillations (PDO) have been carried out and none were found under operation conditions of the HPLWR. Three types of Density Wave Oscillation (DWO) modes have been studied: the single channel DWO, the

  1. Techniques for detecting the Cherenkov light from cascade showers in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomyakov, V. A.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Kindin, V. V.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Petrukhin, A. A.; Khokhlov, S. S.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    2018-01-01

    The NEVOD Cherenkov water detector (CWD) features a denser lattice of sensitive elements than the existing large-scale CWDs, whereby the spatial distribution of Cherenkov light from cascade showers is sampled with a superior resolution of 0.5 m, which is close to one radiation length for water (36 cm). The experimental techniques for investigating the Cherenkov light generated by particle cascades in water is proposed. The dependence of light intensity on the depth of shower development is for the first time measured at different distances from the shower axis. The results are compared with the Cherenkov light distributions predicted by various model descriptions for the scattering of cascade particles.

  2. Revised accident source terms for light-water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soffer, L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-02-01

    This paper presents revised accident source terms for light-water reactors incorporating the severe accident research insights gained in this area over the last 15 years. Current LWR reactor accident source terms used for licensing date from 1962 and are contained in Regulatory Guides 1.3 and 1.4. These specify that 100% of the core inventory of noble gases and 25% of the iodine fission products are assumed to be instantaneously available for release from the containment. The chemical form of the iodine fission products is also assumed to be predominantly elemental iodine. These assumptions have strongly affected present nuclear air cleaning requirements by emphasizing rapid actuation of spray systems and filtration systems optimized to retain elemental iodine. A proposed revision of reactor accident source terms and some im implications for nuclear air cleaning requirements was presented at the 22nd DOE/NRC Nuclear Air Cleaning Conference. A draft report was issued by the NRC for comment in July 1992. Extensive comments were received, with the most significant comments involving (a) release fractions for both volatile and non-volatile species in the early in-vessel release phase, (b) gap release fractions of the noble gases, iodine and cesium, and (c) the timing and duration for the release phases. The final source term report is expected to be issued in late 1994. Although the revised source terms are intended primarily for future plants, current nuclear power plants may request use of revised accident source term insights as well in licensing. This paper emphasizes additional information obtained since the 22nd Conference, including studies on fission product removal mechanisms, results obtained from improved severe accident code calculations and resolution of major comments, and their impact upon the revised accident source terms. Revised accident source terms for both BWRS and PWRS are presented.

  3. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCarthy, Kathryn A. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Busby, Jeremy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Hallbert, Bruce [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Barnard, Cathy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  4. Reliability assurance programme guidebook for advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    To facilitate the implementation of reliability assurance programmes (RAP) within future advanced reactor programmes and to ensure that the next generation of commercial nuclear reactors achieves the very high levels of safety, reliability and economy which are expected of them, in 1996, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) established a task to develop a guidebook for reliability assurance programmes. The draft RAP guidebook was prepared by an expert consultant and was reviewed/modified at an Advisory Group meeting (7-10 April 1997) and at a consults meeting (7-10 October 1997). The programme for the RAP guidebook was reported to and guided by the Technical Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (TWG-LWR). This guidebook will demonstrate how the designers and operators of future commercial nuclear plants can exploit the risk, reliability and availability engineering methods and techniques developed over the past two decades to augment existing design and operational nuclear plant decision-making capabilities. This guidebook is intended to provide the necessary understanding, insights and examples of RAP management systems and processes from which a future user can derive his own plant specific reliability assurance programmes. The RAP guidebook is intended to augment, not replace, specific reliability assurance requirements defined by the utility requirements documents and by individual nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) designers. This guidebook draws from utility experience gained during implementation of reliability and availability improvement and risk based management programmes to provide both written and diagrammatic 'how to' guidance which can be followed to assure conformance with the specific requirements outlined by utility requirements documents and in the development of a practical and effective plant specific RAP in any IAEA Member State

  5. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kathryn McCarthy; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Shannon Bragg-Sitton; Curtis Smith; Cathy Barnard

    2013-04-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline—even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration’s energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans.

  6. Factors in the economic viability of advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matzie, R.A.; Bagnal, C.W.; Rohde, K.R.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear power currently produces over 20% of the electricity generated in the United States, and a similar number for the entire world. Electricity generated from these nuclear power plants is typically some of the most economical of all sources, and is becoming even more economical with time as utilities focus on reducing production costs. Nevertheless, with the exception of the Asia Pacific region, no new nuclear orders have been placed in many years, and none are planned for the forseeable future. Two reasons for this demise for nuclear power in the western world are usually put forward: the current price of alternative means of electric power generation and the political climate, which tends to be anti-nuclear. The first of these reasons is founded in the low price of natural gas, which has been the preferred fuel for recent power generation additions. These additions have principally been used as peaking units, which are required only at the highest demand periods and not as base load units. The second reason stems from some bad experiences in the post-TMI era, when projects experienced a rapidly changing regulatory environment, long schedule stretchouts, and huge cost overruns. In spite of this relatively poor environment for new nuclear power plants, major programs to develop advanced light water reactors are continuing to keep the nuclear option alive, both in the United States and Europe. These programs are aimed at capturing the lessons learned from past experience, to ensure the success of future nuclear projects. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  7. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George Griffith; Robert Youngblood; Jeremy Busby; Bruce Hallbert; Cathy Barnard; Kathryn McCarthy

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear power has safely, reliably, and economically contributed almost 20% of electrical generation in the United States over the past two decades. It remains the single largest contributor (more than 70%) of non-greenhouse-gas-emitting electric power generation in the United States. Domestic demand for electrical energy is expected to experience a 31% growth from 2009 to 2035. At the same time, most of the currently operating nuclear power plants will begin reaching the end of their initial 20-year extension to their original 40-year operating license for a total of 60 years of operation. Figure E-1 shows projected nuclear energy contribution to the domestic generating capacity. If current operating nuclear power plants do not operate beyond 60 years, the total fraction of generated electrical energy from nuclear power will begin to decline - even with the expected addition of new nuclear generating capacity. The oldest commercial plants in the United States reached their 40th anniversary in 2009. The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy's Research and Development Roadmap (Nuclear Energy Roadmap) organizes its activities around four objectives that ensure nuclear energy remains a compelling and viable energy option for the United States. The four objectives are as follows: (1) develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of the current reactors; (2) develop improvements in the affordability of new reactors to enable nuclear energy to help meet the Administration's energy security and climate change goals; (3) develop sustainable nuclear fuel cycles; and (4) understand and minimize the risks of nuclear proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans.

  8. 77 FR 15812 - Initial Test Program of Condensate and Feedwater Systems for Light-Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-16

    ... Systems for Light-Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide... Feedwater Systems for Light- Water Reactors.'' DG-1265 is proposed revision 2 of Regulatory Guide 1.68.1... Plants,'' dated January 1977. This regulatory guide is being revised to: (1) expand the scope of the...

  9. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snead, Lance Lewis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Worrall, Andrew [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Robb, Kevin R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Snead, Mary A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  10. Technology Implementation Plan. Fully Ceramic Microencapsulated Fuel for Commercial Light Water Reactor Application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snead, Lance Lewis; Terrani, Kurt A.; Powers, Jeffrey J.; Worrall, Andrew; Robb, Kevin R.; Snead, Mary A.

    2015-01-01

    This report is an overview of the implementation plan for ORNL's fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) light water reactor fuel. The fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel consists of tristructural isotropic (TRISO) particles embedded inside a fully dense SiC matrix and is intended for utilization in commercial light water reactor application.

  11. The effect of soil carbon on symbiotic nitrogen fixation and symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the main attribute of high-quality soil. The amount of nitrogen fixed by Rhizobium symbiotically with Trifolium repens (white clover) is ultimately determined by the quality of the soil environment. The effect of SOC on the total number of symbiotic and saprophytic rhizobia was determined.

  12. Neutronic study of a light water core reflected with heavy water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golinelli, C.; Tellier, H.

    1967-01-01

    For the design of the high flux reactor with extracted beams, we have performed an experimental study on a light water and highly enriched uranium core surrounded by a thick heavy water reflector. This study was made with a critical facility specially designed. The scope of the measurements was double: i) to check the calculation methods then available ii) to evaluate effects not easily calculated owing to the reactor geometry. The main experiments were the following - criticality measurements for various core geometries - measurement of void and temperature coefficients - distribution of neutron density and fission sources - study of kinetic parameters and calibration of control elements - measurements of spectral indices and of flux perturbations due to the presence in the reflector of channels for the neutron beam extraction. The primary analysis of the experimental results gives generally a satisfactory agreement with calculations and shows that in some cases better hypotheses should be taken. (authors) [fr

  13. Light Reflection from Water Surfaces Perturbed by Falling Rain Droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molesini, Giuseppe; Vannoni, Maurizio

    2009-01-01

    An account of peculiar light patterns produced by reflection in a pool under falling rain droplets was recently reported by Molesini and Vannoni (2008 Eur. J. Phys. 29 403-11). The mathematical approach, however, only covered the case of a symmetrical location of a light source and the observer's eyes with respect to the vertical of the falling…

  14. Ecology of planktonic foraminifera and their symbiotic algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrich, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of symbiotic algae occurred abundantly and persistently in the cytoplasm of several species of planktonic Foraminifera over a ten year period in different tropical and subtropical areas of the North Atlantic Ocean. These planktonic Foraminifera host species consistently harbored either dinoflagellates or a newly described minute coccoid algal type. There appeared to be a specific host-symbiont relationship in these species regardless of year, season or geographic locality. The larger ovoid dinoflagellates (Pyrrhophycophyta) occur in the spinose species Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, G. conglobatus and Orbulina universa. The smaller alga, from 1.5 to 3.5 um in diameter, occurs in one spinose species Globigerinella aequilateralis and also in the non-spinose species Globigerinita glutinata, Globoquadrina dutertrei, Globorotalia menardii, Globorotalia cristata, Globorotalia inflata, Candeina nitida, in various juvenile specimens and at all seasons except the winter months in Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalial hirsuta. Controlled laboratory studies indicated a significant C incorporation into the host cytoplasm and inorganic calcium carbonate test of Globigerinoides ruber. During incubation for up to two hours, the 14 C uptake into the cytoplasm and test in the light was significantly greater than uptake in the dark by living specimens or by dead foraminifers. There appears to be light-enhanced uptake of 14 C into the test with dinoflagellate photosynthesis contributing to host calcification. In culture, symbiotic algae were observed to survive for the duration of the lifespan of their hosts

  15. Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Modro, S.M.; Fisher, J.E.; Weaver, K.D.; Reyes, J.N.; Groome, J.T.; Babka, P.; Carlson, T.M.

    2003-12-01

    The Multi-Application Small Light Water Reactor (MASLWR) project was conducted under the auspices of the Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The primary project objectives were to develop the conceptual design for a safe and economic small, natural circulation light water reactor, to address the economic and safety attributes of the concept, and to demonstrate the technical feasibility by testing in an integral test facility. This report presents the results of the project. After an initial exploratory and evolutionary process, as documented in the October 2000 report, the project focused on developing a modular reactor design that consists of a self-contained assembly with a reactor vessel, steam generators, and containment. These modular units would be manufactured at a single centralized facility, transported by rail, road, and/or ship, and installed as a series of self-contained units. This approach also allows for staged construction of an NPP and ''pull and replace'' refueling and maintenance during each five-year refueling cycle. Development of the baseline design concept has been sufficiently completed to determine that it complies with the safety requirements and criteria, and satisfies the major goals already noted. The more significant features of the baseline single-unit design concept include: (1) Thermal Power--150 MWt; (2) Net Electrical Output--35 MWe; (3) Steam Generator Type--Vertical, helical tubes; (4) Fuel UO{sub 2}, 8% enriched; (5) Refueling Intervals--5 years; (6) Life-Cycle--60 years. The economic performance was assessed by designing a power plant with an electric generation capacity in the range of current and advanced evolutionary systems. This approach allows for direct comparison of economic performance and forms a basis for further evaluation, economic and technical, of the proposed design and for the design evolution towards a more cost competitive concept

  16. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  17. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Digital Architecture Requirements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Kenneth [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Oxstrand, Johanna [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Digital Architecture effort is a part of the Department of Energy (DOE) sponsored Light-Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program conducted at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The LWRS program is performed in close collaboration with industry research and development (R&D) programs that provides the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of current nuclear power plants (NPPs). One of the primary missions of the LWRS program is to help the U.S. nuclear industry adopt new technologies and engineering solutions that facilitate the continued safe operation of the plants and extension of the current operating licenses. Therefore, a major objective of the LWRS program is the development of a seamless digital environment for plant operations and support by integrating information from plant systems with plant processes for nuclear workers through an array of interconnected technologies. In order to get the most benefits of the advanced technology suggested by the different research activities in the LWRS program, the nuclear utilities need a digital architecture in place to support the technology. A digital architecture can be defined as a collection of information technology (IT) capabilities needed to support and integrate a wide-spectrum of real-time digital capabilities for nuclear power plant performance improvements. It is not hard to imagine that many processes within the plant can be largely improved from both a system and human performance perspective by utilizing a plant wide (or near plant wide) wireless network. For example, a plant wide wireless network allows for real time plant status information to easily be accessed in the control room, field workers’ computer-based procedures can be updated based on the real time plant status, and status on ongoing procedures can be incorporated into smart schedules in the outage command center to allow for more accurate planning of critical tasks. The goal

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program's plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  19. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Integrated Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2017-05-01

    proliferation and terrorism. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is the primary programmatic activity that addresses Objective 1. This document summarizes the LWRS Program’s plans. For the LWRS Program, sustainability is defined as the ability to maintain safe and economic operation of the existing fleet of nuclear power plants for a longer-than-initially-licensed lifetime. It has two facets with respect to long-term operations: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the industry to implement technology to exceed the performance of the current labor-intensive business model.

  20. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air & Water Purification

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective for this project was to investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated titanium dioxide (TiO2) catalyst visible light...

  1. Light penetration in the coastal waters off Goa

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Varadachari, V.V.R.

    Observations of light penetration have been carried out at 6 stations along the Goa Coast, India, for different periods during 1975-76, using a submarine photometer. Seasonal and spatial variations in the values of irradiance attenuation coefficient...

  2. Visible Light Responsive Catalyst for Air Water Purification Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Raymond M.

    2014-01-01

    Investigate and develop viable approaches to render the normally UV-activated TIO2 catalyst visible light responsive (VLR) and achieve high and sustaining catalytic activity under the visible region of the solar spectrum.

  3. Lighting

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Lighting Systems Test Facilities aid research that improves the energy efficiency of lighting systems. • Gonio-Photometer: Measures illuminance from each portion of...

  4. Control of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor with water rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Yuki; Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi

    2003-01-01

    The plant system of a supercritical pressure light water reactor (SCR) is once-through direct cycle. The whole coolant from the feedwater pumps is driven to the turbines. The core flow rate is less than 1/7 of that of a boiling water reactor. In the present design of the high temperature thermal reactor (SCLWR-H), the fuel assemblies contain many water rods in which the coolant flows downward. The stepwise responses of the SCLWR-H are analyzed against perturbations without a control system. Based on these analyses, a control system of the SCLWR-H is designed. The pressure is controlled by the turbine control valves. The main steam temperature is controlled by the feedwater pumps. The reactor power is controlled by the control rods. The control parameters are optimized by the test calculations to satisfy the criteria of both fast convergence and stability. The reactor is controlled stably with the designed control systems against various perturbations, such as setpoint change of the pressure, the main steam temperature and the core power, decrease in the feedwater temperature, and decrease in the feedwater flow rate. (author)

  5. Light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prescott, N.B.; Kristensen, Helle Halkjær; Wathes, C.M.

    2004-01-01

    This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality......This chapter presents the effect of artificial light environments (light levels, colour, photoperiod and flicker) on the welfare of broilers in terms of vision, behaviour, lameness and mortality...

  6. Symbiots: Conceptual Interventions Into Urban Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Jenny; Mazé, Ramia; Redströmand, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Symbiots set out to examine values such as ease-of-use, comfort, and rationality assumed within conventions of ‘good design’, in order to expose issues related to energy consumption and current human- (versus eco-) centered design paradigms. Exploring re-interpretations of graphical patterns......, architectural configura- tions and electrical infrastructure typical in Swedish cities, Symbiots takes the form of a photo series in the genre of contemporary hy- per-real art photography. Painting a vivid pic- ture of alternatives to current local priorities around energy consumption, the three design concepts...

  7. Removal of fluorescence and ultraviolet absorbance of dissolved organic matter in reclaimed water by solar light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qianyuan; Li, Chao; Wang, Wenlong; He, Tao; Hu, Hongying; Du, Ye; Wang, Ting

    2016-05-01

    Storing reclaimed water in lakes is a widely used method of accommodating changes in the consumption of reclaimed water during wastewater reclamation and reuse. Solar light serves as an important function in degrading pollutants during storage, and its effect on dissolved organic matter (DOM) was investigated in this study. Solar light significantly decreased the UV254 absorbance and fluorescence (FLU) intensity of reclaimed water. However, its effect on the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) value of reclaimed water was very limited. The decrease in the UV254 absorbance intensity and FLU excitation-emission matrix regional integration volume (FLU volume) of reclaimed water during solar light irradiation was fit with pseudo-first order reaction kinetics. The decrease of UV254 absorbance was much slower than that of the FLU volume. Ultraviolet light in solar light had a key role in decreasing the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity during solar light irradiation. The light fluence-based removal kinetic constants of the UV254 and FLU intensity were independent of light intensity. The peaks of the UV254 absorbance and FLU intensity with an apparent molecular weight (AMW) of 100Da to 2000Da decreased after solar irradiation, whereas the DOC value of the major peaks did not significantly change. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Solar light irradiation significantly reduced cytotoxicity and disinfection byproducts in chlorinated reclaimed water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Tong; Zhang, Xue; Du, Ye; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Lu, Yun; Hu, Hong-Ying

    2017-11-15

    Chlorinated reclaimed water is widely used for landscaping and recreational purposes, resulting in human exposure to toxic disinfection byproducts. Although the quality of chlorinated reclaimed water might be affected by sunlight during storage, the effects of solar light irradiation on the toxicity remain unknown. This study investigated the changes in cytotoxicity and total organic halogen (TOX) of chlorinated reclaimed water exposed to solar light. Irradiation with solar light for 12 h was found to significantly reduce the cytotoxicity of chlorinated reclaimed water by about 75%, with ultraviolet light being responsible for the majority of this reduction. Chlorine residual in reclaimed water tended to increase the cytotoxicity, and the synergy between solar light and free chlorine could not enhance the reduction of cytotoxicity. Adding hydroxyl radical scavengers revealed that the contribution of hydroxyl radical to cytotoxicity reduction was limited. Solar light irradiation concurrently reduced TOX. The low molecular weight (cytotoxicity and TOX in chlorinated reclaimed water. Detoxification of the low molecular weight fraction by light irradiation was mainly a result of TOX dehalogenation, while detoxification of the high molecular weight (>1 kDa) fraction was probably caused by photoconversion from high toxic TOX to low toxic TOX. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Critical behavior of 2,6-dimethylpyridine-water: Measurements of specific heat, dynamic light scattering, and shear viscosity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirzaev, S. Z.; Behrends, R.; Heimburg, Thomas Rainer

    2006-01-01

    2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April......2,6-dimethylpyridine-water, specific heat, dynamic light scattering, shear viscosity Udgivelsesdato: 14 April...

  10. Water cooling of high power light emitting diode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The development in light technologies for entertainment is moving towards LED based solutions. This progress is not without problems, when more than a single LED is used. The amount of generated heat is often in the same order as in a conventional discharge lamp, but the allowable operating...

  11. Development of infrared water sensors based on novel light sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohue, John R.; Masterson, Hugh J.; Maze, Gwenael; O'Dwyer, Kieran; MacCraith, Brian D.

    2003-03-01

    The detection and measurement of vapour-phase or liquid-phase water is important in many industrial and chemical processes. Water exhibits strong absorption bands compared to other substances in the near infrared (NIR), and for this reason NIR spectroscopy is especially well suited to moisture determination. A lack of suitable sources in the NIR, however, has impeded the application of optical sensors to water detection. We have developed a modulatable IR source for use in a moisture sensor. In the system, the luminescent emission from optically pumped rare earth doped glasses is used. Thulium doped zirconium fluoride glass, which luminesces at 1.83 mm was the material chosen. The spectral overlap with the water absorption band is significant, and the output stability matches that of the pump source, which is typically an internally modulated diode laser emitting at 685nm. The detection system uses a reference beam and a probe beam to monitor changes in absorption due to moisture or water vapour. Results illustrating the effectiveness of the novel IR source in a sensor platform to measure trace amounts of liquid water and water vapor will be presented.

  12. Catalogue and classification of technical safety rules for light-water reactors and reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bloser, M.; Fichtner, N.; Neider, R.

    1975-08-01

    This report on the cataloguing and classification of technical rules for land-based light-water reactors and reprocessing plants contains a list of classified rules. The reasons for the classification system used are given and discussed

  13. 10 CFR 50.46 - Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... light-water nuclear power reactors. 50.46 Section 50.46 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION DOMESTIC... Approvals § 50.46 Acceptance criteria for emergency core cooling systems for light-water nuclear power reactors. (a)(1)(i) Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide...

  14. Position Of Light And Water In Architecture And Philosophy Of Art

    OpenAIRE

    Yurtyapan Salimi, Aysegul; Salimi, Amineddin; Kara Pilehvarian, Nuran

    2016-01-01

    Light and water re key elements and indicators are in human life. Water as a lifeblood is important in views, philosophies and cultures in the world and its role is considered beyond its functional role as a symbol of purity, birth and beauty. In ancient Persia, water was a sign of lighting and purity and was so valuable. Architects have always tried to make the best possible use of the environmental resources and water that was an important element to use all the beauty and perfe...

  15. 10-fold enhancement in light-driven water splitting using niobium oxynitride microcone array films

    KAUST Repository

    Shaheen, Basamat

    2016-03-26

    We demonstrate, for the first time, the synthesis of highly ordered niobium oxynitride microcones as an attractive class of materials for visible-light-driven water splitting. As revealed by the ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), photoelectrochemical and transient photocurrent measurements, the microcones showed enhanced performance (~1000% compared to mesoporous niobium oxide) as photoanodes for water splitting with remarkable stability and visible light activity. © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Recent advances of ultraviolet light technologies in water treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Traksel, D.; Vinnicombe, D.A.

    2001-05-01

    UV light is part of the electromagnetic spectrum, situated between X-rays and visible light, with a wavelength between 100 and 400 nm. The UV spectrum is split into a number of bands; each band is used in specific applications. UV-C and parts of UV-B band are used for disinfection purposes (between 200 and 315 nm). Vacuum UV is associated with the oxidation of organic carbon. UV disinfection technology has been around for a long time, but major advances have been made only in the last few decades. These advances include lamp manufacture technology with respect to output, wavelength spread and operating life, configuration design and monitoring. The use of specialized medium pressure lamps, as well as the combination of medium pressure and low pressure lamps has shown a number of advantages. (orig.)

  17. Learning fair play in industrial symbiotic relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazan, Devrim Murat; Yazdanpanah, Vahid; Fraccascia, Luca; Mancuso, Erika; Fantin, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide practical decision support to managers in firms involved in Industrial Symbiotic Relations (ISRs) in terms of strategy development and test the hypothesis that in the long-term, playing a fair strategy for sharing obtainable ISR-related benefits is dominant. We employ

  18. Screening for symbiotically effective and ecologically competitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was initiated to isolate and characterize chickpea rhizobia for their symbiotic effectiveness adapted to local environmental conditions. A total of seventy root nodule bacteria were isolated from different sampling sites in central and northern Ethiopia of which only 52% were rhizobia and the remaining were ...

  19. Clade identification of symbiotic zooxanthellae of dominant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tidal pools have harsh conditions due to lack of nutrients, food and pronounced changes in physical conditions such as pH, salinity and temperature, hence the study of symbiotic zooxanthellae on coral reefs of tidal pool seems to be necessary. Samples of five coral species that include Siderastrea savignyana, ...

  20. Screening soybean genotypes for promiscuous symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted at Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute, Kabanyolo (MUARIK) with the aim of screening of soybean germplasm for promiscuous symbiotic association with Bradyrhizobium sp. in order to identify genotypes with potential to be used as parents to initiate a breeding ...

  1. Seawater desalination using small and medium light water reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimamura, Kazuo [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Yokohama, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-01

    Water is an essential substance for sustaining human life. As Japan is an island country, surrounded by the sea and having abundant rainfall, there is no scarcity of water in daily life except during abnormally dry summers or after disasters such as earthquakes. Consequently, there is hardly any demand for seawater desalination plants except on remote islands, Okinawa and a part of Kyushu. However, the IAEA has forecast a scarcity of drinking water in developing countries at the beginning of the 21st century. Further, much more irrigation water will be required every year to prevent cultivated areas from being lost by desertification. If developing countries were to produce such water by seawater desalination using current fossil fuel energy technology, it would cause increased air pollution and global warming. This paper explains the concept of seawater desalination plants using small and medium water reactors (hereinafter called 'nuclear desalination'), as well as important matters regarding the export nuclear desalination plants to developing countries. (author)

  2. The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Observatory: First Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisgarber, Thomas

    2013-04-01

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Observatory is under construction at Sierra Negra in the state of Puebla in Mexico. Operation began in September 2012, with the first 30 out of the final 300 water Cherenkov detectors deployed and in data acquisition. The HAWC Observatory is designed to record particle air showers from gamma rays and cosmic rays with TeV energies. Though the detector is only 10% complete, HAWC is already the world's largest water Cherenkov detector in the TeV band. In this presentation, I will summarize the performance of the detector to date and discuss preliminary observations of cosmic-ray and gamma-ray sources. I will also describe deployment plans for the remainder of the detector and outline prospects for TeV observations in the coming year.

  3. Light water cooled, high temperature and high performance nuclear power plants concept of once-through coolant cycle, supercritical-pressure, light water cooled nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oka, Yoshiaki; Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ.,Tokai Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    2002-08-01

    Supercritical-pressure, light water cooled nuclear reactors corresponding to nuclear reactors of once-through boilers, are of theoretical development from LWR. Under supercritical pressure, a steam turbine can be driven directly with cooled water with high enthalpy, as not seen boiling and required for recycling. The reactor has no steam-water separation and recycling systems on comparison with the boiling water type LWR, and is the same once-through type as supercritical-pressure thermal power generation plants. Then, all of cooling water at reactor core are sent to turbine. The reactor has no steam generator, and pressurizer, on comparison with PWR. As it requires no steam-water separator, steam drier, and recycling system on comparison with BWR, it becomes of smaller size and has shape and size nearly equal to those of PWR. And, its control bars can be inserted from upper direction like PWR, and can use its driving system. Here was introduced some concepts on high-temperature and high-performance light water reactor, nuclear power generation using a technology on supercritical-pressure thermal power generation. (G.K.)

  4. Visible-light-induced water splitting on a chip

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zoontjes, M.G.C.

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, a photoelectrochemical water splitting cell concept is discussed, based on a combination of semiconductors comprising a Z-scheme. The motivation for the development of the cell is that in the future a transition will take place from a fossil fuel-based economy, to an economy based on

  5. Conclusions drawn of tritium balance in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolle, L.; Bazin, J.

    1978-01-01

    In the tritium balance of pressurized water reactors, using boric acid and lithium in the cooling water, contribution of the tritium produced by fission, diffusing through the zircalloy of the fuel cladding estimated to 0.1%, was not in agreement with quantities measured in reactors. It is still difficult to estimate what percentage is represented by the tritium formed by fission in the fuel, owing to diffusion through cladding. The tritium balance in different working nuclear power stations is consequently of interest. The tritium balance method in the water of the cooling circuit of PWR is fast and experimentally simple. It is less sensitive to errors originating from fission yields than balance of tritium produced by fission in the fuel. A tritium balance in the water of the cooling circuit of Biblis-A, with a specific burn-up of 18000 MWd/t gives a better precision. Diffusion rate of tritium produced by fission was less than 0.2%. So low a contribution is a justification to the use of lithium with an isotopic purity of 99.9% of lithium 7 to limit at a low value the residual lithium 6 [fr

  6. Study of the light emitted in the moderation of a heavy-water pile

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breton, D.

    1958-06-01

    During the running of a reactor which uses water as a neutron moderator, a bluish light is seen to appear inside the liquid. A detailed study of this radiation, undertaken on the Fontenay-aux-Roses pile, has shown that the spectrum is identical with that which characterises the light produced by the Cerenkov effect. The light intensity as a function of the pile power grows exponentially as a function of time when the pile diverges, with a lifetime equal to that of the rise in power. An examination of the various particles present in the pile has led to the conclusion that only electrons with an energy greater than 260 keV con produce the Cerenkov light. The light source thus produced is about 2.10 6 photons/cm 2 of water, when the pile power equals 1 watt. (author) [fr

  7. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torchigin, V.P., E-mail: v_torchigin@mail.r [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278, Moscow (Russian Federation); Torchigin, A.V. [Institute of Informatics Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences, Nakhimovsky prospect 36/1, 119278, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2010-01-11

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  8. On phenomenon of light radiation from miniature balls immersed in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torchigin, V. P.; Torchigin, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A phenomenon of light radiation from miniature silicon balls produced at arc discharge and immersed in water is described. Video film showing shining balls in a vessel with water is presented. An explanation of this phenomenon is considered. Similarities and differences of this phenomenon with a phenomenon of ball lightning are analyzed.

  9. Petal abscission in rose flowers: effects of water potential, light intensity and light quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doorn, van W.G.; Vojinovic, A.

    1996-01-01

    Petal abscission was studied in roses (Rosa hybrida L.), cvs. Korflapei (trade name Frisco), Sweet Promise (Sonia) and Cara Mia (trade name as officially registered cultivar name). Unlike flowers on plants in greenhouses, cut flowers placed in water in the greenhouse produced visible symptoms of

  10. Design and Fluid Dynamic Investigations for a High Performance Light Water Reactor Fuel Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmeister, Jan; Laurin, Eckart; Class, Andreas G.

    2005-11-01

    Within the 5th Framework Program of the European Commission a nuclear light water reactor with supercritical steam conditions has been investigated called High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR). This reactor concept is distinct from conventional light water reactor concepts by the fact, that supercritical water is used to achieve higher core outlet temperatures. The reactor operates with a high system pressure, high heat-up of the coolant within the core, and high outlet temperatures of the coolant resulting in a thermal efficiency of up to 44%. We present the design concept proposed by IKET, and a fluid dynamic problem in the foot piece of the fuel assembly, where unacceptable temperature variations must be omitted.

  11. Effect of water chemistry improvement on flow accelerated corrosion in light-water nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugino, Wataru; Ohira, Taku; Nagata, Nobuaki; Abe, Ayumi; Takiguchi, Hideki

    2009-01-01

    Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of Carbon Steel (CS) piping has been one of main issues in Light-Water Nuclear Reactor (LWRs). Wall thinning of CS piping due to FAC increases potential risk of pipe rupture and cost for inspection and replacement of damaged pipes. In particular, corrosion products generated by FAC of CS piping brought steam generator (SG) tube corrosion and degradation of thermal performance, when it intruded and accumulated in secondary side of PWR. To preserve SG integrity by suppressing the corrosion of CS, High-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH9.8±0.2) has been adopted to Tsuruga-2 (1160 MWe PWR, commercial operation in 1987) in July 2005 instead of conventional Low-AVT chemistry (Feedwater pH 9.3). By the High-AVT adoption, the accumulation rate of iron in SG was reduced to one-quarter of that under conventional Low-AVT. As a result, a tendency to degradation of the SG thermal efficiency was improved. On the other hand, it was clarified that High-AVT is ineffective against Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) at the region where the flow turbulence is much larger. By contrast, wall thinning of CS feed water pipes due to FAC has been successfully controlled by oxygen treatment (OT) for long time in BWRs. Because Magnetite film formed on CS surface under AVT chemistry has higher solubility and porosity in comparison with Hematite film, which is formed under OT. In this paper, behavior of the FAC under various pH and dissolved oxygen concentration are discussed based on the actual wall thinning rate of BWR and PWR plant and experimental results by FAC test-loop. And, it is clarified that the FAC is suppressed even under extremely low DO concentration such as 2ppb under AVT condition in PWR. Based on this result, we propose the oxygenated water chemistry (OWC) for PWR secondary system which can mitigate the FAC of CS piping without any adverse effect for the SG integrity. Furthermore, the applicability and effectiveness of this concept developed for FAC

  12. Bioassay using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian Light Crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Summary: A 96-hour bioassay was conducted using the water soluble fraction of a Nigerian light crude oil sample on Clarias gariepinus fingerlings. 0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 and 10 mls of water soluble fractions (WSF) of the oil were added to 1000 litres of de-chlorinated tap water to form 0, 25, 50 , 75 and 100 parts per million ...

  13. New model for counter-current flow during reflood in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbajo, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Counter-current flow (CCF) of steam and water may occur at the upper core plate of a light water reactor (LWR) under reflood conditions. This paper describes a new model for CCF and flooding at the upper core plate of a LWR. The model assumes separate paths for the water draining through some open area of the upper core plate and the steam rising up through the remaining open area. Condensation of steam is not considered

  14. Characterization of 14C in Swedish light water reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Asa; Aronsson, Per-Olof; Lundgren, Klas; Stenström, Kristina

    2008-08-01

    This paper presents the results of a 4-y investigation of 14C in different waste streams of both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Due to the potential impact of 14C on human health, minimizing waste and releases from the nuclear power industry is of considerable interest. The experimental data and conclusions may be implemented to select appropriate waste management strategies and practices at reactor units and disposal facilities. Organic and inorganic 14C in spent ion exchange resins, process water systems, ejector off-gas and replaced steam generator tubes were analyzed using a recently developed extraction method. Separate analysis of the chemical species is of importance in order to model and predict the fate of 14C within process systems as well as in dose calculations for disposal facilities. By combining the results of this investigation with newly calculated production rates, mass balance assessments were made of the 14C originating from production in the coolant. Of the 14C formed in the coolant of BWRs, 0.6-0.8% was found to be accumulated in the ion exchange resins (core-specific production rate in the coolant of a 2,500 MWth BWR calculated to be 580 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The corresponding value for PWRs was 6-10% (production rate in a 2,775 MWth PWR calculated to be 350 GBq GW(e)(-1) y(-1)). The 14C released with liquid discharges was found to be insignificant, constituting less than 0.5% of the production in the coolant. The stack releases, routinely measured at the power plants, were found to correspond to 60-155% of the calculated coolant production, with large variations between the BWR units.

  15. Emergency action levels for light water reactors. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-10-01

    United States nuclear power plants are currently preparing revised radiological emergency response plans. As part of these plans, each licensee is establishing plant-specific instrumentation readings, called emergency action levels (EALs), that indicate the presence of a problem and the need to declare one of four classes of emergency as designated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In this report, the EALs prepared for a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor are assessed to determine whether they meet the requirements of NUREG-0654, Rev. 1 Appendix 1. In addition, five recent nuclear incidents are studied to determine how their outcomes might have been affected by the new emergency response plans. Most of the EALs reviewed were judged adequate. In some cases, alternate EALs or sets of generic EALs are proposed to meet the intent of NUREG-0654 Rev 1 Appendix 1, and the wording of some of the initiating conditions for the four emergency classes is clarified. For three of the five incidents reviewed, the new emergency response plans probably would not have affected the outcome; in one case, the plans would probably have prevented core damage; and any effect on the outcome of the last incident is uncertain

  16. Experimental studies on catalytic hydrogen recombiners for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drinovac, P.

    2006-01-01

    In the course of core melt accidents in nuclear power plants a large amount of hydrogen can be produced and form an explosive or even detonative gas mixture with aerial oxygen in the reactor building. In the containment atmosphere of pressurized water reactors hydrogen combines a phlogistically with the oxygen present to form water vapor even at room temperature. In the past, experimental work conducted at various facilities has contributed little or nothing to an understanding of the operating principles of catalytic recombiners. Hence, the purpose of the present study was to conduct detailed investigations on a section of a recombiner essentially in order to deepen the understanding of reaction kinetics and heat transport processes. The results of the experiments presented in this dissertation form a large data base of measurements which provides an insight into the processes taking place in recombiners. The reaction-kinetic interpretation of the measured data confirms and deepens the diffusion theory - proposed in an earlier study. Thus it is now possible to validate detailed numeric models representing the processes in recombiners. Consequently the present study serves to broaden and corroborate competence in this significant area of reactor technology. In addition, the empirical knowledge thus gained may be used for a critical reassessment of previous numeric model calculations. (orig.)

  17. SYMBIOTIC STAR BLOWS BUBBLES INTO SPACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A tempestuous relationship between an unlikely pair of stars may have created an oddly shaped, gaseous nebula that resembles an hourglass nestled within an hourglass. Images taken with Earth-based telescopes have shown the larger, hourglass-shaped nebula. But this picture, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, reveals a small, bright nebula embedded in the center of the larger one (close-up of nebula in inset). Astronomers have dubbed the entire nebula the 'Southern Crab Nebula' (He2-104), because, from ground-based telescopes, it looks like the body and legs of a crab. The nebula is several light-years long. The possible creators of these shapes cannot be seen at all in this Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image. It's a pair of aging stars buried in the glow of the tiny, central nebula. One of them is a red giant, a bloated star that is exhausting its nuclear fuel and is shedding its outer layers in a powerful stellar wind. Its companion is a hot, white dwarf, a stellar zombie of a burned-out star. This odd duo of a red giant and a white dwarf is called a symbiotic system. The red giant is also a Mira Variable, a pulsating red giant, that is far away from its partner. It could take as much as 100 years for the two to orbit around each other. Astronomers speculate that the interaction between these two stars may have sparked episodic outbursts of material, creating the gaseous bubbles that form the nebula. They interact by playing a celestial game of 'catch': as the red giant throws off its bulk in a powerful stellar wind, the white dwarf catches some of it. As a result, an accretion disk of material forms around the white dwarf and spirals onto its hot surface. Gas continues to build up on the surface until it sparks an eruption, blowing material into space. This explosive event may have happened twice in the 'Southern Crab.' Astronomers speculate that the hourglass-shaped nebulae represent two separate outbursts that occurred several thousand years apart

  18. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Katie J; Pressel, Silvia; Duckett, Jeffrey G; Rimington, William R; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2015-08-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Impact of different moderator ratios with light and heavy water cooled reactors in equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permana, Sidik; Takaki, Naoyuki; Sekimoto, Hiroshi

    2006-01-01

    As an issue of sustainable development in the world, energy sustainability using nuclear energy may be possible using several different ways such as increasing breeding capability of the reactors and optimizing the fuel utilization using spent fuel after reprocessing as well as exploring additional nuclear resources from sea water. In this present study the characteristics of light and heavy water cooled reactors for different moderator ratios in equilibrium states have been investigated. The moderator to fuel ratio (MFR) is varied from 0.1 to 4.0. Four fuel cycle schemes are evaluated in order to investigate the effect of heavy metal (HM) recycling. A calculation method for determining the required uranium enrichment for criticality of the systems has been developed by coupling the equilibrium fuel cycle burn-up calculation and cell calculation of SRAC 2000 code using nuclear data library from the JENDL 3.2. The results show a thermal spectrum peak appears for light water coolant and no thermal peak for heavy water coolant along the MFR (0.1 ≤ MFR ≤ 4.0). The plutonium quality can be reduced effectively by increasing the MFR and number of recycled HM. Considering the effect of increasing number of recycled HM; it is also effective to reduce the uranium utilization and to increase the conversion ratio. trans-Plutonium production such as americium (Am) and curium (Cm) productions are smaller for heavy water coolant than light water coolant. The light water coolant shows the feasibility of breeding when HM is recycled with reducing the MFR. Wider feasible area of breeding has been obtained when light water coolant is replaced by heavy water coolant

  20. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land

    OpenAIRE

    Field, KJ; Pressel, S; Duckett, JG; Rimington, WR; Bidartondo, MI

    2015-01-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed iden...

  1. Analysis of alternative light water reactor (LWR) fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Aaberg, R.L.; Boegel, A.J.; Jenquin, U.P.; Kottwitz, D.A.; Lewallen, M.A.; Merrill, E.T.; Nolan, A.M.

    1979-12-01

    Nine alternative LWR fuel cycles are analyzed in terms of the isotopic content of the fuel material, the relative amounts of primary and recycled material, the uranium and thorium requirements, the fuel cycle costs and the fraction of energy which must be generated at secured sites. The fuel materials include low-enriched uranium (LEU), plutonium-uranium (MOX), highly-enriched uranium-thorium (HEU-Th), denatured uranium-thorium (DU-Th) and plutonium-thorium (Pu-Th). The analysis is based on tracing the material requirements of a generic pressurized water reactor (PWR) for a 30-year period at constant annual energy output. During this time period all the created fissile material is recycled unless its reactivity worth is less than 0.2% uranium enrichment plant tails

  2. Advanced steam cycles for light water reactors. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, R.C.

    1975-07-01

    An appraisal of the potential of adding superheat to improve the overall LWR plant cycle performance is presented. The study assesses the economic and technical problems associated with the addition of approximately 500 0 F of superheat to raise the steam temperature to 1000 0 F. The practicality of adding either nuclear or fossil superheat to LWR's is reviewed. The General Electric Company Boiling Water Reactor (BWR) model 238-732 (BWR/6) is chosen as the LWR starting point for this evaluation. The steam conditions of BWR/6 are representative of LWR's. The results of the fossil superheat portion of the evaluation are considered directly applicable to all LWR's. In spite of the potential of a nuclear superheater to provide a substantial boost to the LWR cycle efficiency, nuclear superheat offers little promise of development at this time. There are difficult technical problems to resolve in the areas of superheat fuel design and emergency core cooling. The absence of a developed high integrity, high temperature fuel for operation in the steam/water environment is fundamental to this conclusion. Fossil superheat offers the potential opportunity to utilize fossil fuel supplies more efficiently than in any other mode of central station power generation presently available. Fossil superheat topping cycles evaluated included atmospheric fluidized beds (AFB), pressurized fluidized beds, pressurized furnaces, conventional furnaces, and combined gas/steam turbine cycles. The use of an AFB is proposed as the preferred superheat furnace. Fossil superheat provides a cycle efficiency improvement for the LWR of two percentage points, reduces heat rejection by 15 percent per kWe generated, increases plant electrical output by 54 percent, and burns coal with an incremental net efficiency of approximately 40 percent. This compares with a net efficiency of 36--37 percent which might be achieved with an all-fluidized bed fossil superheat plant design

  3. Environmentally assisted cracking of light-water reactor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Kassner, T.F.; Shack, W.J.

    1996-02-01

    Environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) of lightwater reactor (LWR) materials has affected nuclear reactors from the very introduction of the technology. Corrosion problems have afflicted steam generators from the very introduction of pressurized water reactor (PWR) technology. Shippingport, the first commercial PWR operated in the United States, developed leaking cracks in two Type 304 stainless steel (SS) steam generator tubes as early as 1957, after only 150 h of operation. Stress corrosion cracks were observed in the heat-affected zones of welds in austenitic SS piping and associated components in boiling-water reactors (BRWs) as early as 1965. The degradation of steam generator tubing in PWRs and the stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of austenitic SS piping in BWRs have been the most visible and most expensive examples of EAC in LWRs, and the repair and replacement of steam generators and recirculation piping has cost hundreds of millions of dollars. However, other problems associated with the effects of the environment on reactor structures and components am important concerns in operating plants and for extended reactor lifetimes. Cast duplex austenitic-ferritic SSs are used extensively in the nuclear industry to fabricate pump casings and valve bodies for LWRs and primary coolant piping in many PWRs. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase in cast duplex SS may occur after 10 to 20 years at reactor operating temperatures, which could influence the mechanical response and integrity of pressure boundary components during high strain-rate loading (e.g., seismic events). The problem is of most concern in PWRs where slightly higher temperatures are typical and cast SS piping is widely used

  4. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Robertson, William C

    2003-01-01

    Why is left right and right left in the mirror? Baffled by the basics of reflection and refraction? Wondering just how the eye works? If you have trouble teaching concepts about light that you don t fully grasp yourself, get help from a book that s both scientifically accurate and entertaining with Light. By combining clear explanations, clever drawings, and activities that use easy-to-find materials, this book covers what science teachers and parents need to know to teach about light with confidence. It uses ray, wave, and particle models of light to explain the basics of reflection and refraction, optical instruments, polarization of light, and interference and diffraction. There s also an entire chapter on how the eye works. Each chapter ends with a Summary and Applications section that reinforces concepts with everyday examples. Whether you need a deeper understanding of how light bends or a good explanation of why the sky is blue, you ll find Light more illuminating and accessible than a college textbook...

  5. Sound intensity probe for ultrasonic field in water using light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xi; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2017-12-01

    The sound intensity vector provides useful information on the state of an ultrasonic field in water, since sound intensity is a vector quantity expressing the direction and magnitude of the sound field. In the previous studies on sound intensity measurement in water, conventional piezoelectric sensors and metal cables were used, and the transmission distance was limited. A new configuration of a sound intensity probe suitable for ultrasonic measurement in water is proposed and constructed for trial in this study. The probe consists of light-emitting diodes and piezoelectric elements, and the output signals are transmitted through fiber optic cables as intensity-modulated light. Sound intensity measurements of a 26 kHz ultrasonic field in water are demonstrated. The difference in the intensity vector state between the water tank with and without sound-absorbing material on its walls was successfully observed.

  6. Investigation into the use of water based brake fluid for light loads ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The actual test of the formulated brake fluid was carried out with a Nissan Sunny vehicle model 1.5 within the speed range of 20km/hr to 80km/hr at the permanent campus· of University of Uyo and the· braking effiqiency obtained at test to its suitability for light loads. Keywords·: Water-based, Brake fluid properties, Light loads ...

  7. A Co(II)-Ru(II) dyad relevant to light-driven water oxidation catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Alejandro Montellano; Natali, Mirco; Pizzolato, Erica; Chiorboli, Claudio; Bonchio, Marcella; Sartorel, Andrea; Scandola, Franco

    2014-06-28

    Artificial photosynthesis aims at efficient water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen, by exploiting solar light. As a priority requirement, this process entails the integration of suitable multi-electron catalysts with light absorbing units, where charge separation is generated in order to drive the catalytic routines. The final goal could be the transposition of such an asset into a photoelectrocatalytic cell, where the two half-reactions, proton reduction to hydrogen and water oxidation to oxygen, take place at two appropriately engineered photoelectrodes. We herein report a covalent approach to anchor a Co(II) water oxidation catalyst to a Ru(II) polypyridine photosensitizer unit; photophysical characterisation and the catalytic activity of such a dyad in a light activated cycle are reported, and implications for the development of regenerative systems are discussed.

  8. Programme of research and development on plutonium recycling in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    This is the third annual progress report concerning the programme on plutonium recycling in light-water reactors (indirect action) of the Commission of the European Communities. It covers the year 1978 and follows the annual reports for 1977 (EUR 6002 EN) and 1976 (EUR 5780). The preliminary results obtained under the 1975-79 programme indicate that: (a) assuming that plutonium recycling in light-water reactors is industrially developed by the end of the century, the foreseeable radiological impact on both workers and the general public can be maintained within the limits of current radiation protection standards; (b) on the whole, there is a good knowledge and mastery of the specific aspects involved in the plutonium recycling in light-water reactors and in particular they indicate that plutonium fuels have a similar behaviour to uranium fuels

  9. A role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water: acceleration of the reaction under ultraviolet light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagase, Hiroyasu; Tsujino, Hidekazu; Kurihara, Daisuke; Saito, Hiroshi; Kawase, Masaya

    2014-04-01

    Organic environmental pollutants are now being detected with remarkably high frequency in the aquatic environment. Photodegradation by ultraviolet light is sometimes used as a method for removing organic chemicals from water; however, this method is relatively inefficient because of the low degradation rates involved, and more efficient methods are under development. Here we show that the removal of various organic pollutants can be assisted by calcined dolomite in aqueous solution under irradiation with ultraviolet light. It was possible to achieve substantial removal of bisphenol A, chlorophenols, alkylphenols, 1-naphthol and 17β-estradiol. The major component of dolomite responsible for the removal was calcium hydroxide. Our results demonstrate that the use of calcium hydroxide with ultraviolet light irradiation can be a very effective method of rapidly removing organic environmental pollutants from water. This is a new role for calcium hydroxide and dolomite in water treatment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Thermohydraulics of emergency core cooling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-10-01

    This report, by a group of experts of the OECD-NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations, reviews the current state-of-knowledge in the field of emergency core cooling (ECC) for design-basis, loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCA) and core uncover transients in pressurized- and boiling-water reactors. An overview of the LOCA scenarios and ECC phenomenology is provided for each type of reactor, together with a brief description of their ECC systems. Separate-effects and integral-test facilities, which contribute to understanding and assessing the phenomenology, are reviewed together with similarity and scaling compromises. All relevant LOCA phenomena are then brought together in the form of tables. Each phenomenon is weighted in terms of its importance to the course of a LOCA, and appraised for the adequacy of its data base and analytical modelling. This qualitative procedure focusses attention on the modelling requirements of dominant LOCA phenomena and the current capabilities of the two-fluid models in two-phase flows. This leads into the key issue with ECC: quantitative code assessment and the application of system codes to predict with a well defined uncertainty the behaviour of a nuclear power plant. This issue, the methodologies being developed for code assessment and the question of how good is good enough are discussed in detail. Some general conclusions and recommendations for future research activities are provided

  11. Coastdown in light water reactors as a fuel management strategy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobo, L.G.

    1980-12-01

    Improved uranium utilization by means of extended burnup via routine end-of-cycle coastdown has been analyzed, with a specific focus on pressurided water reactors. Both computer and simple analytic models have been developed to determine the optimal coastdown length. Coastdown has been compared with the use of higher fuel-enrichment to achieve comparable burnup values. Temperature and Power coastdown modes were analyzed and changes in the plant thermodynamic efficiency determined. Effects on fuel integrity due to coastdown were examined using a fuel reliability code (SPEAR). Finally the effects on coastdown duration of major parameters involved in charaterizing reactor operation and the economic enviroment were examined. It was found that natural uranium savings up to 7% could be achieved in a typical application by the use of routine pre-planned coast down up to the economic optimun. If coastdown is carried out all the way up to the economic breakeven point yellowcake savings sum up to 16%. Coastdown is substantially more effective than increasing enrichment to extend cycle length without coastdown. Thermodynamic efficiency does not change appreciably during coastdown, a circumstance which greatly simplifies modeling. Coastdown was found to have no statistically significant effect on predicted fuel failure rates. Finally, simple back-of-the evenlope analytic models were found to give an excellent estimate of coastdown duration to both the optimum and breakeven points, and to correctly track the functional behavior induced by all major variables

  12. Study of plutonium recycling physics in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuss, Paul

    1979-10-01

    A stock of plutonium from the reprocessing of thermal neutron reactor fuel is likely to appear in the next few years. The use of this plutonium as fuel replacing 235 U in thermal reactors is probably more interesting than simple stock-piling storage: immobilization of a capital which moreover would deteriorate by radioactive decay of isotope 241 also fissile and present to an appreciable extend in plutonium from reprocessing (half-life 15 years); recycling, on the other hand, will supply energy without complete degradation of the stock for fast neutron reactor loads, the burned matter having been partially renewed by conversion; furthermore the use of plutonium will meet the needs created by a temporary pressure on the naturel and/or enriched uranium market. For these two reasons the recycling of plutonium in thermal neutron reactors is being considered seriously today. The present work is confined to neutronic aspects and centres mainly on pressurized water-moderated reactors, the most highly developed at present in France. Four aspects of the problem are examined: 1. the physics of a plutonium-recycling reactor special features of neutronic phenomena with respect to the 'conventional' scheme of the 235 U burning reactor; 2. calculation of a plutonium-recycling reactor: adaptation of standard methods; 3. qualification of these calculations from the viewpoint of both data and inevitable approximations; 4. the fuel cycle and particularly the equivalence of fissile matters [fr

  13. Study of Pu consumption in Advanced Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-01-01

    Timely disposal of the weapons plutonium is of paramount importance to permanently safeguarding this material. GE's 1300 MWe Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) has been designed to utilize fill] core loading of mixed uranium-plutonium oxide fuel. Because of its large core size, a single ABWR reactor is capable of disposing 100 metric tons of plutonium within 15 years of project inception in the spiking mode. The same amount of material could be disposed of in 25 years after the start of the project as spent fuel, again using a single reactor, while operating at 75 percent capacity factor. In either case, the design permits reuse of the stored spent fuel assemblies for electrical energy generation for the remaining life of the plant for another 40 years. Up to 40 percent of the initial plutonium can also be completely destroyed using ABWRS, without reprocessing, either by utilizing six ABWRs over 25 years or by expanding the disposition time to 60 years, the design life of the plants and using two ABWRS. More complete destruction would require the development and testing of a plutonium-base fuel with a non-fertile matrix for an ABWR or use of an Advanced Liquid Metal Reactor (ALMR). The ABWR, in addition, is fully capable of meeting the tritium target production goals with already developed target technology

  14. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Rivera, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Light is all around us. Learn how it is used in art, technology, and engineering. Five easy-to-read chapters explain the science behind light, as well as its real-world applications. Vibrant, full-color photos, bolded glossary words, and a key stats section let readers zoom in even deeper. Aligned to Common Core Standards and correlated to state standards. Abdo Zoom is a division of ABDO.

  15. Physical Structure of Four Symbiotic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Disk accretion powers many astronomical objects, including pre-main sequence stars, interacting binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, models developed to explain the behavior of disks and their surroundings - boundary layers, jets, and winds - lack much predictive power, because the physical mechanism driving disk evolution - the viscosity - is not understood. Observations of many types of accreting systems are needed to constrain the basic physics of disks and provide input for improved models. Symbiotic stars are an attractive laboratory for studying physical phenomena associated with disk accretion. These long period binaries (P(sub orb) approx. 2-3 yr) contain an evolved red giant star, a hot companion, and an ionized nebula. The secondary star usually is a white dwarf accreting material from the wind of its red giant companion. A good example of this type of symbiotic is BF Cygni: our analysis shows that disk accretion powers the nuclear burning shell of the hot white dwarf and also manages to eject material perpendicular to the orbital plane (Mikolajewska, Kenyon, and Mikolajewski 1989). The hot components in other symbiotic binaries appear powered by tidal overflow from a very evolved red giant companion. We recently completed a study of CI Cygni and demonstrated that the accreting secondary is a solar-type main sequence star, rather than a white dwarf (Kenyon et aL 1991). This project continued our study of symbiotic binary systems. Our general plan was to combine archival ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry with high quality optical radial velocity observations to determine the variation of line and continuum sources as functions of orbital phase. We were very successful in generating orbital solutions and phasing UV+optical spectra for five systems: AG Dra, V443 Her, RW Hya, AG Peg, and AX Per. Summaries of our main results for these systems appear below. A second goal of our project was to consider general models for the

  16. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. General application of system event tree analysis to light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asselin, S.V.; Carlson, D.D.

    1977-01-01

    The system event tree is a key element in the comparison of light water reactors when considering Reactor Safety Study (RSS) factors such as risk and dominant accident sequences. The development of system event trees involves drawing on the RSS experience and adapting the methodology to reactor plants that may differ considerably, in system functions and interactions, from the RSS plants. This paper describes the methods for the general application of system event trees to light water reactors and is based on work done by Sandia Laboratories for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission on the Reactor Safety Study Methodology Applications Program

  18. Flow-induced vibration for light-water reactors. Progress report, April 1978-December 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schardt, J.F.

    1980-03-01

    Flow-Induced vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from April 1978 to December 1979

  19. Investigation into the Use of Water Based Brake Fluid for Light Loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. A. Akpan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the possibility of using water based fluid as a brake fluid for light loads. Characterization of both standard and water based braked fluids formulated was carried out. The properties of the latter were compared with that of a standard commercial brake fluid. The actual test of the formulated brake fluid was carried out with a Nissan Sunny vehicle model 1.5 within the speed range of 20km/hr to 80km/hr at the permanent campus of University of Uyo and the braking efficiency obtained attest to its suitability for light loads.

  20. Light Refraction by Water as a Rationale for the Poggendorff Illusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2017-01-01

    The Poggendorff illusion in its classical form of parallel lines interrupting a transversal is viewed from the perspective of being related to the everyday experience of observing the light refraction in water. It is argued that if one considers a transversal to be a light ray in air...... and the parallel lines to form an occluding strip of a medium with the refractive index being between that of air and water, then one should be able to account, both qualitatively and quantitatively, for most of the features associated with the Poggendorff illusion. Statistical treatment of the visual experiments...

  1. 78 FR 64029 - Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ...-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Regulatory guide... (RG) 1.110, ``Cost-Benefit Analysis for Radwaste Systems for Light-Water-Cooled Nuclear Power Reactors... components for light water nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES: Please refer to Docket ID NRC-2013-0237 when...

  2. Rapid water disinfection using vertically aligned MoS2 nanofilms and visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chong; Kong, Desheng; Hsu, Po-Chun; Yuan, Hongtao; Lee, Hyun-Wook; Liu, Yayuan; Wang, Haotian; Wang, Shuang; Yan, Kai; Lin, Dingchang; Maraccini, Peter A.; Parker, Kimberly M.; Boehm, Alexandria B.; Cui, Yi

    2016-12-01

    Solar energy is readily available in most climates and can be used for water purification. However, solar disinfection of drinking water mostly relies on ultraviolet light, which represents only 4% of the total solar energy, and this leads to a slow treatment speed. Therefore, the development of new materials that can harvest visible light for water disinfection, and so speed up solar water purification, is highly desirable. Here we show that few-layered vertically aligned MoS2 (FLV-MoS2) films can be used to harvest the whole spectrum of visible light (∼50% of solar energy) and achieve highly efficient water disinfection. The bandgap of MoS2 was increased from 1.3 to 1.55 eV by decreasing the domain size, which allowed the FLV-MoS2 to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) for bacterial inactivation in the water. The FLV-MoS2 showed a ∼15 times better log inactivation efficiency of the indicator bacteria compared with that of bulk MoS2, and a much faster inactivation of bacteria under both visible light and sunlight illumination compared with the widely used TiO2. Moreover, by using a 5 nm copper film on top of the FLV-MoS2 as a catalyst to facilitate electron-hole pair separation and promote the generation of ROS, the disinfection rate was increased a further sixfold. With our approach, we achieved water disinfection of >99.999% inactivation of bacteria in 20 min with a small amount of material (1.6 mg l-1) under simulated visible light.

  3. Boreal Tree Light- and Water-Use: Asynchronous, Diverging, yet Complementary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappas, C.; Baltzer, J. L.; Barr, A.; Black, T. A.; Bohrer, G.; Detto, M.; Maillet, J.; Matheny, A. M.; Roy, A.; Sonnentag, O.; Stephens, J.

    2017-12-01

    Water stress has been suggested as a key mechanism behind the contemporary increase in tree mortality rates in northwestern North America. However, a detailed analysis of boreal tree light- and water-use strategies as well as their interspecific differences are still lacking. Here, we examine the tree hydraulic behaviour of co-occurring larch (Larix laricina) and black spruce (Picea mariana), two characteristic boreal tree species, near the southern limit of the boreal ecozone in central Canada. Sap flux density (Js) and concurrently recorded stem radius fluctuations and meteorological conditions are used to quantify tree hydraulic functioning and to scrutinize tree light- and water-use strategies. Our analysis reveals an asynchrony in the diel hydrodynamics of the two species with the initial rise in Js occurring two hours earlier in larch than in black spruce. Structural differences in the crown architecture of larch and black spruce lead to interspecific differences in light harvesting that can explain the observed asynchrony in their hydraulic function. Furthermore, the two species exhibit diverging stomatal regulation strategies with larch employing relatively isohydric whereas black spruce anisohydric behaviour. Such asynchronous and diverging tree-level light- and water-use strategies provide new insights into the ecosystem-level complementarity of tree form and function, with implications for understanding boreal forests' water and carbon dynamics and resilience to environmental stress.

  4. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,???

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Feng, Zhili [ORNL; Naus, Dan J [ORNL

    2008-04-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  5. Materials Degradation in Light Water Reactors: Life After 60,

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Busby, Jeremy T; Nanstad, Randy K; Stoller, Roger E; Feng, Zhili; Naus, Dan J

    2008-01-01

    Nuclear reactors present a very harsh environment for components service. Components within a reactor core must tolerate high temperature water, stress, vibration, and an intense neutron field. Degradation of materials in this environment can lead to reduced performance, and in some cases, sudden failure. A recent EPRI-led study interviewed 47 US nuclear utility executives to gauge perspectives on long-term operation of nuclear reactors. Nearly 90% indicated that extensions of reactor lifetimes to beyond 60 years were likely. When polled on the most challenging issues facing further life extension, two-thirds cited plant reliability as the key issue with materials aging and cable/piping as the top concerns for plant reliability. Materials degradation within a nuclear power plant is very complex. There are many different types of materials within the reactor itself: over 25 different metal alloys can be found with can be found within the primary and secondary systems, not to mention the concrete containment vessel, instrumentation and control, and other support facilities. When this diverse set of materials is placed in the complex and harsh environment coupled with load, degradation over an extended life is indeed quite complicated. To address this issue, the USNRC has developed a Progressive Materials Degradation Approach (NUREG/CR-6923). This approach is intended to develop a foundation for appropriate actions to keep materials degradation from adversely impacting component integrity and safety and identify materials and locations where degradation can reasonably be expected in the future. Clearly, materials degradation will impact reactor reliability, availability, and potentially, safe operation. Routine surveillance and component replacement can mitigate these factors, although failures still occur. With reactor life extensions to 60 years or beyond or power uprates, many components must tolerate the reactor environment for even longer times. This may increase

  6. [Impact of Light Polarization on the Measurement of Water Particulate Backscattering Coefficient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jia; Gong, Fang; He, Xian-qiang; Zhu, Qian-kun; Huang, Hai-qing

    2016-01-01

    Particulate backscattering coefficient is a main inherent optical properties (IOPs) of water, which is also a determining factor of ocean color and a basic parameter for inversion of satellite ocean color remote sensing. In-situ measurement with optical instruments is currently the main method for obtaining the particulate backscattering coefficient of water. Due to reflection and refraction by the mirrors in the instrument optical path, the emergent light source from the instrument may be partly polarized, thus to impact the measurement accuracy of water backscattering coefficient. At present, the light polarization of measuring instruments and its impact on the measurement accuracy of particulate backscattering coefficient are still poorly known. For this reason, taking a widely used backscattering coefficient measuring instrument HydroScat6 (HS-6) as an example in this paper, the polarization characteristic of the emergent light from the instrument was systematically measured, and further experimental study on the impact of the light polarization on the measurement accuracy of the particulate backscattering coefficient of water was carried out. The results show that the degree of polarization(DOP) of the central wavelength of emergent light ranges from 20% to 30% for all of the six channels of the HS-6, except the 590 nm channel from which the DOP of the emergent light is slightly low (-15%). Therefore, the emergent light from the HS-6 has significant polarization. Light polarization has non-neglectable impact on the measurement of particulate backscattering coefficient, and the impact degree varies with the wave band, linear polarization angle and suspended particulate matter (SPM) concentration. At different SPM concentrations, the mean difference caused by light polarization can reach 15.49%, 11.27%, 12.79%, 14.43%, 13.76%, and 12.46% in six bands, 420, 442, 470, 510, 590, and 670 nm, respectively. Consequently, the impact of light polarization on the

  7. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Program final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Corr, J.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Flow-Induced Vibrations for Light Water Reactors Program was a five-year effort to develop basic knowledge and understanding needed to improve the flow-induced vibration design of light water reactors. Major tasks included analytical and test investigations of the flow-induced vibration of cylinders in isolation and arrays in smooth and turbulent single-vibration testing of reactor components including reactor inlet plenum components, jet pumps, low-pressure coolant injection coupling, and fuel rods. Cases of self-excited limit cycle response were encountered which required design modifications. The fuel rod tests were made in axially flowing water and steam/water mixtures under adiabatic and boiling conditions

  8. Light-dependent changes in outer retinal water diffusion in rats in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, David; Berkowitz, Bruce A

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that in rats, intraretinal light-dependent changes on diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in vivo are consistent with known retinal layer-specific physiology. In male Sprague-Dawley rats, retinal morphology (thickness, extent, surface area, volume) and intraretinal profiles of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, i.e., water mobility) parallel and perpendicular to the optic nerve were measured in vivo using quantitative MRI methods during light and dark stimulation. The parallel ADC in the posterior half of the avascular, photoreceptor-dominated outer retina was significantly higher in light than dark, and this pattern was reversed (dark>light) in the anterior outer retina. The perpendicular ADC in the posterior outer retina was similar in light and dark, but was significantly higher in dark than light in the anterior outer retina. No light-dark changes in the inner retina were noted. We identified light-dependent intraretinal diffusion changes that reflected established stimulation-based changes in outer retinal hydration. These findings are expected to motivate future applications of functional diffusion-based MRI in blinding disorders of the outer retina.

  9. Water hammer caused by rapid gas production in a severe accident in a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inasaka, Fujio; Adachi, Masaki; Aya, Izuo; Nariai, Hideki; Shiozaki, Kohki

    2005-01-01

    We investigated the water hammer caused by striking of water mass pushed up by a rapidly growing bubble and its scale effects using two cylindrical model containment vessels of 1.0 and 0.428 m diameters. We also closely observed the movement of water mass and the growing bubble in the vessels. In these experiments, rapid bubble growth was simulated by injecting high-pressure air into a water pool. It was clarified that the water mass was pushed up without any air penetration until the water level reached a certain elevation. On the basis of all data, experimental correlations for estimating the height and striking velocity of the water mass with coherency were proposed, and the water hammer pressure for exerting large forces on the structures was quantitatively evaluated. (author)

  10. Light

    CERN Document Server

    Ditchburn, R W

    1963-01-01

    This classic study, available for the first time in paperback, clearly demonstrates how quantum theory is a natural development of wave theory, and how these two theories, once thought to be irreconcilable, together comprise a single valid theory of light. Aimed at students with an intermediate-level knowledge of physics, the book first offers a historical introduction to the subject, then covers topics such as wave theory, interference, diffraction, Huygens' Principle, Fermat's Principle, and the accuracy of optical measurements. Additional topics include the velocity of light, relativistic o

  11. Self-propagating solar light reduction of graphite oxide in water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Todorova, N.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Boukos, N.; Vermisoglou, E. [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece); Lekakou, C. [Division of Mechanical, Medical, and Aerospace Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Trapalis, C., E-mail: c.trapalis@inn.demokritos.gr [Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, NCSR “Demokritos”, 153 41 Attikis (Greece)

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Graphite oxide was partially reduced by solar light irradiation in water media. • No addition of catalysts nor reductive agent were used for the reduction. • Specific capacitance increased stepwise with increase of irradiation time. • Self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide by solar light is suggested. - Abstract: Graphite Oxide (GtO) is commonly used as an intermediate material for preparation of graphene in the form of reduced graphene oxide (rGO). Being a semiconductor with tunable band gap rGO is often coupled with various photocatalysts to enhance their visible light activity. The behavior of such rGO-based composites could be affected after prolonged exposure to solar light. In the present work, the alteration of the GtO properties under solar light irradiation is investigated. Water dispersions of GtO manufactured by oxidation of natural graphite via Hummers method were irradiated into solar light simulator for different periods of time without addition of catalysts or reductive agent. The FT-IR analysis of the treated dispersions revealed gradual reduction of the GtO with the increase of the irradiation time. The XRD, FT-IR and XPS analyses of the obtained solid materials confirmed the transition of GtO to rGO under solar light irradiation. The reduction of the GtO was also manifested by the CV measurements that revealed stepwise increase of the specific capacitance connected with the restoration of the sp{sup 2} domains. Photothermal self-propagating reduction of graphene oxide in aqueous media under solar light irradiation is suggested as a possible mechanism. The self-photoreduction of GtO utilizing solar light provides a green, sustainable route towards preparation of reduced graphene oxide. However, the instability of the GtO and partially reduced GO under irradiation should be considered when choosing the field of its application.

  12. Recent progress in oxynitride photocatalysts for visible-light-driven water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takata, Tsuyoshi; Pan, Chengsi; Domen, Kazunari

    2015-06-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen is a method to directly convert light energy into storable chemical energy, and has received considerable attention for use in large-scale solar energy utilization. Particulate semiconductors are generally used as photocatalysts, and semiconductor properties such as bandgap, band positions, and photocarrier mobility can heavily impact photocatalytic performance. The design of active photocatalysts has been performed with the consideration of such semiconductor properties. Photocatalysts have a catalytic aspect in addition to a semiconductor one. The ability to control surface redox reactions in order to efficiently produce targeted reactants is also important for photocatalysts. Over the past few decades, various photocatalysts for water splitting have been developed, and a recent main concern has been the development of visible-light sensitive photocatalysts for water splitting. This review introduces the study of water-splitting photocatalysts, with a focus on recent progress in visible-light induced overall water splitting on oxynitride photocatalysts. Various strategies for designing efficient photocatalysts for water splitting are also discussed herein.

  13. Light Illuminated α−Fe2O3/Pt Nanoparticles as Water Activation Agent for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Zemin; Chen, Lulu; Cheng, Jianli; Ni, Wei; Wang, Bin; Xie, Erqing

    2015-01-01

    The photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting is hampered by strong bonds of H2O molecules and low ionic conductivity of pure water. The photocatalysts dispersed in pure water can serve as a water activation agent, which provides an alternative pathway to overcome such limitations. Here we report that the light illuminated α−Fe2O3/Pt nanoparticles may produce a reservoir of reactive intermediates including H2O2, ·OH, OH− and H+ capable of promoting the pure water reduction/oxidation half−reactions at cathode and highly photocatalytic−active TiO2/In2S3/AgInS2 photoanode, respectively. Remarkable photocurrent enhancement has been obtained with α−Fe2O3/Pt as water activation agent. The use of α−Fe2O3/Pt to promote the reactivity of pure water represents a new paradigm for reproducible hydrogen fuel provision by PEC water splitting, allowing efficient splitting of pure water without adding of corrosive chemicals or sacrificial agent. PMID:25773684

  14. Light illuminated α-Fe2O3/Pt nanoparticles as water activation agent for photoelectrochemical water splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaodong; Wang, Zhi; Zhang, Zemin; Chen, Lulu; Cheng, Jianli; Ni, Wei; Wang, Bin; Xie, Erqing

    2015-03-16

    The photoelectrochemical (PEC) water splitting is hampered by strong bonds of H2O molecules and low ionic conductivity of pure water. The photocatalysts dispersed in pure water can serve as a water activation agent, which provides an alternative pathway to overcome such limitations. Here we report that the light illuminated α-Fe2O3/Pt nanoparticles may produce a reservoir of reactive intermediates including H2O2, ·OH, OH(-) and H(+) capable of promoting the pure water reduction/oxidation half-reactions at cathode and highly photocatalytic-active TiO2/In2S3/AgInS2 photoanode, respectively. Remarkable photocurrent enhancement has been obtained with α-Fe2O3/Pt as water activation agent. The use of α-Fe2O3/Pt to promote the reactivity of pure water represents a new paradigm for reproducible hydrogen fuel provision by PEC water splitting, allowing efficient splitting of pure water without adding of corrosive chemicals or sacrificial agent.

  15. European research activities within the project: High Performance Light Water Reactor phase 2 (HPLWR phase 2)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Starflinger, J.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe GmbH, Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, Karlsruhe (Germany); Marsault, P. [CEA Cadarache (DER/SESI), 13 - Saint Paul lez Durance (France). Dept. d' Etudes des Reacteurs; Bittermann, D. [AREVA NP, NEPR-G, Erlangen (Germany); Maraczy, C. [AEKI-KFKI, Budapest (Hungary); Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. IKE (Germany); Lycklama, J.A. [NRG Petten, NL (Netherlands); Anglart, H. [KTH Energy Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Aksan, N. [Paul Scherrer Institut CH, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Ruzickova, M. [UJV Rez plc, Husinec-Rez c.p. (Czech Republic); Heikinheimo, L. [VTT, FIN (Finland)

    2007-07-01

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is a Light Water Reactor (LWR) operating at supercritical pressure (25 MPa). It belongs to the six reactors currently being investigated under the framework of the Generation IV International Forum. The most visible advantage of the HPLWR shall be the low construction costs in the order of 1000 Euro/kWe, because of size reduction of components and buildings compared to current Light Water Reactors, and the low electricity production costs which are targeted at 3-4 cents/kWh. In Europe, investigations on the HPLWR have been integrated into a joint research project, called High Performance Light Water Reactor Phase 2 (HPLWR Phase 2), which is co-funded by the European Commission. Within 42 months, ten partners from eight European countries working on critical scientific issues shall show the feasibility of the HPLWR concept. This paper reports on 5 points relevant for HPLWR: 1) design and integration, 2) core design, 3) safety, 4) materials, and 5) heat transfer. The final goal is to assess the future potential of this reactor in the electricity market.

  16. Pigment specific in vivo light absorption of phytoplankton from estuarine, coastal and oceanic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, A.; Markager, S.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2004-01-01

    -chemical environment from estuaries, over coastal, to oceanic waters, no clear relationships were found between a* ph and the prevailing light, temperature, salinity and nutrient concentrations, indicating that short-term cellular acclimation was of minor importance for the observed variability in a* ph. The clear...

  17. Generic environmental impact statement on handling and storage of spent light water power reactor fuel. Appendices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    Detailed appendices are included with the following titles: light water reactor fuel cycle, present practice, model 1000MW(e) coal-fired power plant, increasing fuel storage capacity, spent fuel transshipment, spent fuel generation and storage data (1976-2000), characteristics of nuclear fuel, and ''away-from-reactor'' storage concept

  18. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Constellation Pilot Project FY11 Summary Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansen, R.

    2011-01-01

    Summary report for Fiscal Year 2011 activities associated with the Constellation Pilot Project. The project is a joint effor between Constellation Nuclear Energy Group (CENG), EPRI, and the DOE Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. The project utilizes two CENG reactor stations: R.E. Ginna and Nine Point Unit 1. Included in the report are activities associate with reactor internals and concrete containments.

  19. GENERIC, COMPONENT FAILURE DATA BASE FOR LIGHT WATER AND LIQUID SODIUM REACTOR PRAs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S. A. Eide; S. V. Chmielewski; T. D. Swantz

    1990-02-01

    A comprehensive generic component failure data base has been developed for light water and liquid sodium reactor probabilistic risk assessments (PRAs) . The Nuclear Computerized Library for Assessing Reactor Reliability (NUCLARR) and the Centralized Reliability Data Organization (CREDO) data bases were used to generate component failure rates . Using this approach, most of the failure rates are based on actual plant data rather than existing estimates .

  20. A light water excess heat reaction suggests that cold fusion may be alkali-hydrogen fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bush, R.T.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports that Mills and Kneizys presented data in support of a light water excess heat reaction obtained with an electrolytic cell highly reminiscent of the Fleischmann-Pons cold fusion cell. The claim of Mills and Kneizys that their excess heat reaction can be explained on the basis of a novel chemistry, which supposedly also explains cold fusion, is rejected in favor of their reaction being, instead, a light water cold fusion reaction. It is the first known light water cold fusion reaction to exhibit excess heat, it may serve as a prototype to expand our understanding of cold fusion. From this new reactions are deduced, including those common to past cold fusion studies. This broader pattern of nuclear reactions is typically seen to involve a fusion of the nuclides of the alkali atoms with the simplest of the alkali-type nuclides, namely, protons, deuterons, and tritons. Thus, the term alkali-hydrogen fusion seems appropriate for this new type of reaction with three subclasses: alkali-hydrogen fusion, alkali-deuterium fusion, and alkali-tritium fusion. A new three-dimensional transmission resonance model (TRM) is sketched. Finally, preliminary experimental evidence in support of the hypothesis of a light water nuclear reaction and alkali-hydrogen fusion is reported. Evidence is presented that appears to strongly implicate the transmission resonance phenomenon of the new TRM

  1. Investigating Tactile Stimulation in Symbiotic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orso, Valeria; Mazza, Renato; Gamberini, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The core characteristics of tactile stimuli, i.e., recognition reliability and tolerance to ambient interference, make them an ideal candidate to be integrated into a symbiotic system. The selection of the appropriate stimulation is indeed important in order not to hinder the interaction from...... the user’s perspective. Here we present the process of selecting the most adequate tactile stimulation delivered by a tactile vest while users were engaged in an absorbing activity, namely playing a video-game. A total of 20 participants (mean age 24.78; SD= 1.57) were involved. Among the eight tactile...

  2. Process of collecting tritium produced in light or heavy water moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tachikawa, Enzo; Aratono, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Tsuneo.

    1973-01-01

    Purpose: To collect effectively tritium produced by nuclear reaction in coolant water of reactor, by means of transferring tritium to gaseous phase as tritium hydride, in the presence of compound comprising hydrogen whose combining energy is less than 95 Kcal/mol. Constitution: Process of collecting tritium produced by nuclear reaction in light or heavy water moderated and cooled reactor, including a step of adding compound comprising hydrogen atom, the combining energy of said hydrogen atom is less than 95 Kcal/mol, and a step of collecting tritium in the form of tritium hydride from coolant water. (M. K.)

  3. Electric Field-Assisted Photochemical Water Splitting Should Operate with 287 nm Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachler, Vinzenz; Gärtner, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The major photoreaction of water is the homolytic splitting of one O-H bond starting from the 1(1) B1 excited state (λmax = 167 nm). This reaction produces H• and •OH radicals. The combination of two H• atoms leads to the potential energy carrier dihydrogen. However, the energy required to obtain the photoreactive 1(1) B1 electronic state is about 7.4 eV, which cannot be effectively provided by solar radiation. The sun light spectrum on earth comprises the visible and ultraviolet region, but shows vanishing intensity near 7 eV (177.1 nm). This work provides theoretical evidence that the photoreactive 1(1) B1 state of water can be shifted into the ultraviolet (UV-B) light region (≈287 nm) by including explicitly an electric field in the calculations of the water absorption spectrum. To accomplish such bathochromic shift, a large field strength of 3.08 VÅ(-1) is required. The field-dependent excitation energies were calculated by applying the symmetry-adapted cluster configuration interaction (SAC-CI) procedure. Based on this theoretical analysis, we propose that photochemical water splitting can be accomplished by means of 287 nm light provided the water molecule is favorably oriented by an external electric field and is subsequently activated by a reversal of the field orientation. © 2016 The American Society of Photobiology.

  4. Disinfection of Spacecraft Potable Water Systems by Photocatalytic Oxidation Using UV-A Light Emitting Diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birmele, Michele N.; O'Neal, Jeremy A.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light has long been used in terrestrial water treatment systems for photodisinfection and the removal of organic compounds by several processes including photoadsorption, photolysis, and photocatalytic oxidation/reduction. Despite its effectiveness for water treatment, UV has not been explored for spacecraft applications because of concerns about the safety and reliability of mercury-containing UV lamps. However, recent advances in ultraviolet light emitting diodes (UV LEDs) have enabled the utilization of nanomaterials that possess the appropriate optical properties for the manufacture of LEDs capable of producing monochromatic light at germicidal wavelengths. This report describes the testing of a commercial-off-the-shelf, high power Nichia UV-A LED (250mW A365nnJ for the excitation of titanium dioxide as a point-of-use (POD) disinfection device in a potable water system. The combination of an immobilized, high surface area photocatalyst with a UV-A LED is promising for potable water system disinfection since toxic chemicals and resupply requirements are reduced. No additional consumables like chemical biocides, absorption columns, or filters are required to disinfect and/or remove potentially toxic disinfectants from the potable water prior to use. Experiments were conducted in a static test stand consisting of a polypropylene microtiter plate containing 3mm glass balls coated with titanium dioxide. Wells filled with water were exposed to ultraviolet light from an actively-cooled UV-A LED positioned above each well and inoculated with six individual challenge microorganisms recovered from the International Space Station (ISS): Burkholderia cepacia, Cupriavidus metallidurans, Methylobacterium fujisawaense, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Sphingomonas paucimobilis and Wautersia basilensis. Exposure to the Nichia UV-A LED with photocatalytic oxidation resulted in a complete (>7-log) reduction of each challenge bacteria population in <180 minutes of contact

  5. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  6. Eco-physiological responses and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-01

    Nov 1, 2010 ... Nitrogen nutrition of Hedysarum carnosum, a pastoral legume common in Tunisian central and southern rangelands ... Despite the fact that Na+ accumulation decreased plant growth, both nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation capacity of H. ... of the symbiotic interaction as well as nodule development.

  7. Symbiotic effectiveness of acid-tolerant Bradyrhizobium strains with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further, symbiotic effectiveness of these strains was determined under the polyhouse conditions in sterilized soil (pH 4.5). Highest and lowest symbiotic characters, dry matter production and nitrogen improvement per plant were observed in PSR001 and NSR008 inoculated plants, respectively. All the examined isolates ...

  8. The optical properties of greenlandic coastal waters: Modelling light penetration in a changing climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stedmon, Colin; Markager, S.S.; Pedersen, T.J.

    of these waters. Although solar elevation and sea ice cover play an important role, during the summer month’s light is also regulated by water constituents such as dissolved and particulate organic matter, phytoplankton and suspended sediments. The relative importance of each of these constituents varies...... depending on the influence of shelf water entering the fjords, extent of glacial ice melt and the size and vertical distribution of the phytoplankton biomass. In this study the data from two contrasting sites are compared: Young Sound, a fjord system in Northeast Greenland that imports shelf waters...... with a considerable amount of terrestrial dissolved organic matter (DOM) from the Arctic Ocean; and Godthåbsfjord a fjord in Southwest Greenland where strong tides ensure a regular supply of warm shelf water which melt glacial ice before it can leave the fjord...

  9. [Metabolic integration of organisms within symbiotic systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Dolgikh, E A

    2006-01-01

    Adaptation of organisms to coexisence in symbiotic systems is usually related to significant metabolic changes resulting in the integration of the biochemical pathways of the partners. In the symbioses between plants and nitrogen-fixing organisms, between heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms, as well as between animals and microorganisms providing the consumption of plant biomass, the systems of C- and N-metabolism, controlling the utilization of various sources of nitrogen (N2, organic and inorganic compounds, metabolic waste of the host) and carbon (CO2, plant polymers), of the partners are tightly integrated. Bilateral biochemical links between partners are typical to mutualistic symbioses (wherein biotrophic nutrition predominates, in some cases including necrotrophy of secondary origin). In antagonistic symbioses, unilateral links predominate, though active assimilation of the pathogen's secondary metabolites by the host is also possible. In most mutualistic symbioses, integrated metabolic ties have derived from trophic chains in biocenoses (syntrophic consortia, "predator-prey" systems), but not from the systems where the pathogens consume host metabolites. At the same time, molecular analysis of symbiotic interactions has shown that symbioses considerably differ from biocenoses, where the cycling of nutrients and energy implies no functional integration of the partner's genes.

  10. CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL FORMATION IN SYMBIOTIC RECURRENT NOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We present models of spherically symmetric recurrent nova shells interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) in a symbiotic system composed of a red giant (RG) expelling a wind and a white dwarf accreting from this material. Recurrent nova eruptions periodically eject material at high velocities ({approx}> 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) into the RG wind profile, creating a decelerating shock wave as CSM is swept up. High CSM densities cause the shocked wind and ejecta to have very short cooling times of days to weeks. Thus, the late-time evolution of the shell is determined by momentum conservation instead of energy conservation. We compute and show evolutionary tracks of shell deceleration, as well as post-shock structure. After sweeping up all the RG wind, the shell coasts at a velocity {approx}100 km s{sup -1}, depending on system parameters. These velocities are similar to those measured in blueshifted CSM from the symbiotic nova RS Oph, as well as a few Type Ia supernovae that show evidence of CSM, such as 2006X, 2007le, and PTF 11kx. Supernovae occurring in such systems may not show CSM interaction until the inner nova shell gets hit by the supernova ejecta, days to months after the explosion.

  11. Developing symbiotic consortia for lignocellulosic biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuroff, Trevor R.; Curtis, Wayne R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-02-15

    The search for petroleum alternatives has motivated intense research into biological breakdown of lignocellulose to produce liquid fuels such as ethanol. Degradation of lignocellulose for biofuel production is a difficult process which is limited by, among other factors, the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and biological toxicity of the products. Consolidated bioprocessing has been suggested as an efficient and economical method of producing low value products from lignocellulose; however, it is not clear whether this would be accomplished more efficiently with a single organism or community of organisms. This review highlights examples of mixtures of microbes in the context of conceptual models for developing symbiotic consortia for biofuel production from lignocellulose. Engineering a symbiosis within consortia is a putative means of improving both process efficiency and stability relative to monoculture. Because microbes often interact and exist attached to surfaces, quorum sensing and biofilm formation are also discussed in terms of consortia development and stability. An engineered, symbiotic culture of multiple organisms may be a means of assembling a novel combination of metabolic capabilities that can efficiently produce biofuel from lignocellulose. (orig.)

  12. Monogamy in a Hyper-Symbiotic Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Antonio Baeza

    Full Text Available Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in resource-specialist symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in Pontonia manningi, a hyper-symbiotic shrimp that dwells in the mantle cavity of the Atlantic winged oyster Pteria colymbus that, in turn, infects gorgonians from the genus Pseudopterogorgia in the Caribbean Sea. In agreement with theory, P. manningi were found dwelling as heterosexual pairs in oysters more frequently than expected by chance alone. Males and females also inhabited the same host individual independent of the female gravid condition or of the developmental stage of brooded embryos. While the observations above argue in favor of monogamy in P. manningi, there is evidence to suggest that males of the studied species are moderately promiscuous. That females found living solitary in oysters most often brooded embryos, and that males allocated more to weaponry (major claw size than females at any given size suggest that males might be roaming among host individuals in search of and, fighting for, receptive females. All available information depicts a rather complex mating system in P. manningi: primarily monogamous but with moderately promiscuous males.

  13. Light pollution offshore: Zenithal sky glow measurements in the mediterranean coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ges, Xavier; Bará, Salvador; García-Gil, Manuel; Zamorano, Jaime; Ribas, Salvador J.; Masana, Eduard

    2018-05-01

    Light pollution is a worldwide phenomenon whose consequences for the natural environment and the human health are being intensively studied nowadays. Most published studies address issues related to light pollution inland. Coastal waters, however, are spaces of high environmental interest, due to their biodiversity richness and their economical significance. The elevated population density in coastal regions is accompanied by correspondingly large emissions of artificial light at night, whose role as an environmental stressor is increasingly being recognized. Characterizing the light pollution levels in coastal waters is a necessary step for protecting these areas. At the same time, the marine surface environment provides a stage free from obstacles for measuring the dependence of the skyglow on the distance to the light polluting sources, and validating (or rejecting) atmospheric light propagation models. In this work we present a proof-of-concept of a gimbal measurement system that can be used for zenithal skyglow measurements on board both small boats and large vessels under actual navigation conditions. We report the results obtained in the summer of 2016 along two measurement routes in the Mediterranean waters offshore Barcelona, travelling 9 and 31.7 km away from the coast. The atmospheric conditions in both routes were different from the ones assumed for the calculation of recently published models of the anthropogenic sky brightness. They were closer in the first route, whose results approach better the theoretical predictions. The results obtained in the second route, conducted under a clearer atmosphere, showed systematic differences that can be traced back to two expected phenomena, which are a consequence of the smaller aerosol content: the reduction of the anthropogenic sky glow at short distances from the sources, and the slower decay rate of brightness with distance, which gives rise to a relative excess of brightness at large distances from the

  14. 78 FR 41436 - Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-10

    ..., ``Regulatory Treatment of Non- Safety Systems (RTNSS) for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors.'' This area... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION [NRC-2013-0150] Proposed Revision to Treatment of Non-Safety Systems for Passive Advanced Light Water Reactors AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Standard...

  15. Stress analysis of the reactor pressure vessel of the high performance light water reactors (HPLWR); Festigkeitsanalyse fuer den Reaktordruckbehaelter des High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guelton, E.; Fischer, K.

    2006-12-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR) is one of the concepts of the Generation IV program. The main difference compared to current Light Water Reactors (LWR) results from the supercritical steam condition of the coolant. Due to the supercritical pressure of 25 MPa, water, used as moderator and coolant, flows as a single phase through the core. The temperatures at the outlet are above 500 C. These conditions have a major impact on the design of the Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV). For the modelling a RPV concept is proposed, which resembles the design of current LWR and allows the use of approved materials on one side and also meets the additional demands on the other side. A first dimensioning of the RPV wall thicknesses and the geometrical proportions has been performed using the german KTA-guidelines. To verify these results, a stress analysis using the finite element method has been performed with the program ANSYS. The combined mechanical and thermal calculations provide the primary, secondary and peak stresses which are evaluated using the KTA-guidelines design loading (Level 0) and service loading level A for the different components. The results confirm the wall thicknesses estimated by Fischer et al. (2006), but there are peak stresses in the vicinity of the inlet and outlet flanges, which are very close to the allowed design limit. For larger diameters of the RPV those regions will become critical and the stresses might exceed the design limits. Design optimizations for those regions are proposed and evaluated. A readjusted geometry of the inlet flange reduces those stresses by 65%. (orig.)

  16. Safety analysis of a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled and moderated reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishiwatari, Y.; Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2002-01-01

    A safety analysis code for a high temperature supercritical pressure light water cooled reactor (SCLWR-H) with water rods cooled by descending flow, SPRAT-DOWN, is developed. The hottest channel, a water rod, down comer, upper and lower plenums, feed pumps, etc. are modeled as junction of nodes. Partial of the feed water flows downward from the upper dome of the reactor pressure vessel to the water rods. The accidents analyzed here are total loss of feed water flow, feed water pump seizure, and control rods ejection. All the accidents satisfy the criteria. The accident event at which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is total loss of feedwater flow. The transients analyzed here are loss of feed water heating, inadvertent start-up of an auxiliary water supply system, partial loss of feed water flow, loss of offsite power, loss of load, and abnormal withdrawal of control rods. All the transients satisfied the criteria. The transient event for which the maximum cladding temperature is the highest is control rod withdrawal at normal operation. The behavior of loss of load transient is different from that of BWR. The power does not increase because loss of flow occurs and the density change is small. The sensitivities of the system behavior to various parameters during transients and accidents are analyzed. The parameters having strong influence are the capacity of the auxiliary water supply system, the coast down time of the main feed water pumps, and the time delay of the main feed water pumps trip. The control rod reactivity also has strong influence. (authors)

  17. Modeling the electrochemistry of the primary circuits of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertuch, A.; Macdonald, D.D.; Pang, J.; Kriksunov, L.; Arioka, K.

    1994-01-01

    To model the corrosion behaviors of the heat transport circuits of light water reactors, a mixed potential model (NTM) has been developed and applied to both boiling water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Using the data generated by the GE/UKEA-Harwell radiolysis model, electrochemical potentials (ECPs) have been calculated for the heat transport circuits of eight BWRs operating under hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). By modeling the corrosion behaviors of these reactors, the effectiveness of HWC at limiting IGSCC and IASCC can be determined. For simulating PWR primary circuits, a chemical-radiolysis model (developed by the authors) was used to generate input parameters for the MPM. Corrosion potentials of Type 304 and 316 SSs in PWR primary environments were calculated using the NTM and were found to be in good agreement with the corrosion potentials measured in the laboratory for simulated PWR primary environments

  18. 111 oriented gold nanoplatelets on multilayer graphene as visible light photocatalyst for overall water splitting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, Diego; Esteve-Adell, Iván; Albero, Josep; Royo, Juan F. Sánchez; Primo, Ana; Garcia, Hermenegildo

    2016-06-01

    Development of renewable fuels from solar light appears as one of the main current challenges in energy science. A plethora of photocatalysts have been investigated to obtain hydrogen and oxygen from water and solar light in the last decades. However, the photon-to-hydrogen molecule conversion is still far from allowing real implementation of solar fuels. Here we show that 111 facet-oriented gold nanoplatelets on multilayer graphene films deposited on quartz is a highly active photocatalyst for simulated sunlight overall water splitting into hydrogen and oxygen in the absence of sacrificial electron donors, achieving hydrogen production rate of 1.2 molH2 per gcomposite per h. This photocatalytic activity arises from the gold preferential orientation and the strong gold-graphene interaction occurring in the composite system.

  19. Interaction between licensing and light water reactor research in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahns, A.

    1977-01-01

    The organization of the licensing procedure for nuclear power plants and of the light water reactor safety research in the Federal Republic of Germany will be described. Special emphasis will be given to the role of the Reactor Safety Committee (RSK). The well organized interacting process between regulatory authorities, licensing review bodies, applicants and system vendors assures that the safety problems arising from the use of nuclear energy have been solved during the licensing procedure. Where uncertainties on partial phenomena had to be bridged by conservative assumptions, it is--among others--the goal of the extensive safety research program to improve the understanding of those phenomena and quantify the safety margins. Experience with the operation of light water reactors has shown that the methods of reactor safety have proved to be satisfactory

  20. Evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the NRC to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1986 through September 1987. (author)

  1. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geraskin, N I; Glebov, V B

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network. (paper)

  2. Removal of Nerve Agent Simulants from Water Using Light-Responsive Molecular Baskets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Border, Sarah E; Pavlović, Radoslav Z; Zhiquan, Lei; Badjić, Jovica D

    2017-12-27

    We found that molecular baskets 1-3, with amino acids at their rim, undergo photoinduced decarboxylations to give baskets 4-6 forming a solid precipitate in water. Furthermore, organophosphonates 7-9 (OP), akin in size and shape to G-type nerve agents, form inclusion complexes with baskets 1-3 (K = 6-2243 M -1 ). Light irradiation (300 nm) of an aqueous solution of 1-3⊂OP led to the formation of precipitate containing an OP compound thereby amounting to a novel strategy for light-induced sequestration of nerve agents or, perhaps, other targeted compounds. Importantly, the stability of basket⊂OP complexes in addition to functional groups at the basket's rim play a role in the efficiency (up to 98%) by which OPs are removed from water.

  3. International academic program in technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. Phases of development and implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geraskin, N. I.; Glebov, V. B.

    2017-01-01

    The results of implementation of European educational projects CORONA and CORONA II dedicated to preserving and further developing nuclear knowledge and competencies in the area of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors are analyzed. Present article addresses issues of design and implementation of the program for specialized training in the branch of technologies of light-water nuclear reactors. The systematic approach has been used to construct the program for students of nuclear specialties, which corresponding to IAEA standards and commonly accepted nuclear principles recognized in the European Union. Possibilities of further development of the international cooperation between countries and educational institutions are analyzed. Special attention is paid to e-learning/distance training, nuclear knowledge preservation and interaction with European Nuclear Education Network.

  4. Radioactivity, radiation protection and monitoring during dismantling of light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hummel, L.; Zech, J.B.

    2005-01-01

    Based on the radioactivity inventory in the systems and components of light-water reactors observed during operation, the impact of actions during plant emptying after the conclusion of power operation and possible subsequent long-term safe enclosure concerning the composition of the nuclide inventory of the plant to be dismantled will be described. Derived from this will be the effects on radioactivity monitoring in the plant, physical radiation protection monitoring, and the measured characterization of the residual materials resulting from the dismantling. The impact of long-term interim storage will also be addressed in the discussion. The talk should provide an overview of the interrelationships between source terms, decay times and the radioactivity monitoring requirements of the various dismantling concepts for commercial light-water reactors. (orig.)

  5. Technical specification: Mixed-oxide pellets for the light-water reactor irradiation demonstration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowell, B.S.

    1997-06-01

    This technical specification is a Level 2 Document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. It is patterned after the pellet specification that was prepared by Atomic Energy of Canada, Limited, for use by Los Alamos National Laboratory in fabrication of the test fuel for the Parallex Project, adjusted as necessary to reflect the differences between the Canadian uranium-deuterium reactor and light-water reactor fuels. This specification and the associated engineering drawing are to be utilized only for preparation of test fuel as outlined in the accompanying Request for Quotation and for additional testing as directed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the Department of Energy

  6. Meeting Summary Advanced Light Water Reactor Fuels Industry Meeting Washington DC October 27 - 28, 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Not Listed

    2011-11-01

    The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group first met in November of 2010 with the objective of looking 20 years ahead to the role that advanced fuels could play in improving light water reactor technology, such as waste reduction and economics. When the group met again in March 2011, the Fukushima incident was still unfolding. After the March meeting, the focus of the program changed to determining what we could do in the near term to improve fuel accident tolerance. Any discussion of fuels with enhanced accident tolerance will likely need to consider an advanced light water reactor with enhanced accident tolerance, along with the fuel. The Advanced LWR Fuel Working Group met in Washington D.C. on October 72-18, 2011 to continue discussions on this important topic.

  7. Evaluation and improvement in nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1988-01-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactor (NDE Reliability) program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the NRC to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1986 through September 1987

  8. Contribution to the interpretation of explosive phenomena in research light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Berre, Francois.

    1975-08-01

    The study allows the prediction of the transient behavior of a light-water reactor that undergoes a power excursion due to a step reactivity insertion. In particular, a film-model for boiling is developed, which takes into account fast heat transfers, and permits the description of the water-hammer phenomena. The latter is due to the sudden contact between the liquid coolant and the fuel plates, which results from the vanishing of the vapor film. It is shown in which conditions this phenomena may initiate a reactor explosion [fr

  9. DOE/NNSA perspective safeguard by design: GEN III/III+ light water reactors and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Paul Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-12-10

    An overview of key issues relevant to safeguards by design (SBD) for GEN III/IV nuclear reactors is provided. Lessons learned from construction of typical GEN III+ water reactors with respect to SBD are highlighted. Details of SBD for safeguards guidance development for GEN III/III+ light water reactors are developed and reported. This paper also identifies technical challenges to extend SBD including proliferation resistance methodologies to other GEN III/III+ reactors (except HWRs) and GEN IV reactors because of their immaturity in designs.

  10. A calibrated UV-LED based light source for water purification and characterisation of photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergejevs, A; Clarke, C T; Allsopp, D W E; Marugan, J; Jaroenworaluck, A; Singhapong, W; Manpetch, P; Timmers, R; Casado, C; Bowen, C R

    2017-11-08

    Photocatalysis has a potential to become a cost effective industrial process for water cleaning. One of the most studied photocatalysts is titanium dioxide which, as a wide band gap semiconductor, requires ultraviolet (UV) light for its photoactivation. This is at the wavelengths where the efficiency of present-day light emitting diodes (LEDs) decreases rapidly, which presents a challenge in the use of UV-LEDs for commercially viable photocatalysis. There is also a need for accurate photocatalysis measurement of remediation rates of water-borne contaminants for determining optimum exposure doses in industrial applications. In response to these challenges, this paper describes a UV-LED based photocatalytic test reactor that provides a calibrated adjustable light source and pre-defined test conditions to remove as many sources of uncertainty in photocatalytic analysis as possible and thereby improve data reliability. The test reactor provides a selectable intensity of up to 1.9 kW m -2 at the photocatalyst surface. The comparability of the results is achieved through the use of pre-calibration and control electronics that minimize the largest sources of uncertainty; most notably variations in the intensity and directionality of the UV light emission of LEDs and in LED device heating.

  11. Wastes and waste management in the uranium fuel cycle for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costello, J.M.

    1975-08-01

    The manufacturing processes in the uranium fuel cycle for light water reactors have been described with particular reference to the chemical and radiological wastes produced and the waste management procedures employed. The problems and possible solutions of ultimate disposal of high activity fission products and transuranium elements from reprocessing of irradiated fuel have been reviewed. Quantities of wastes arising in each stage of the fuel cycle have been summarised. Wastes arising from reactor operation have been described briefly. (author)

  12. Measurement of the group velocity of light in sea water at the ANTARES site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adrián-Martínez, S.; Al Samarai, I.; Albert, A.; André, M.; Anghinolfi, M.; Anton, G.; Anvar, S.; Ardid, M.; Assis Jesus, A. C.; Astraatmadja, T.; Aubert, J.-J.; Baret, B.; Basa, S.; Bertin, V.; Biagi, S.; Bigi, A.; Bigongiari, C.; Bogazzi, C.; Bou-Cabo, M.; Bouhou, B.; Bouwhuis, M. C.; Brunner, J.; Busto, J.; Camarena, F.; Capone, A.; Cârloganu, C.; Carminati, G.; Carr, J.; Cecchini, S.; Charif, Z.; Charvis, Ph.; Chiarusi, T.; Circella, M.; Costantini, H.; Coyle, P.; Curtil, C.; De Bonis, G.; Decowski, M. P.; Dekeyser, I.; Deschamps, A.; Distefano, C.; Donzaud, C.; Dornic, D.; Dorosti, Q.; Drouhin, D.; Eberl, T.; Emanuele, U.; Enzenhöfer, A.; Ernenwein, J.-P.; Escoffier, S.; Fermani, P.; Ferri, M.; Flaminio, V.; Folger, F.; Fritsch, U.; Fuda, J.-L.; Galatà, S.; Gay, P.; Geyer, K.; Giacomelli, G.; Giordano, V.; Gómez-González, J. P.; Graf, K.; Guillard, G.; Halladjian, G.; Hallewell, G.; van Haren, H.; Hartman, J.; Heijboer, A. J.; Hello, Y.; Hernández-Rey, J. J.; Herold, B.; Hößl, J.; Hsu, C. C.; de Jong, M.; Kadler, M.; Kalekin, O.; Kappes, A.; Katz, U.; Kavatsyuk, O.; Kooijman, P.; Kopper, C.; Kouchner, A.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Kulikovskiy, V.; Lahmann, R.; Lamare, P.; Larosa, G.; Lattuada, D.; Lefèvre, D.; Lim, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Loehner, H.; Loucatos, S.; Mangano, S.; Marcelin, M.; Margiotta, A.; Martínez-Mora, J. A.; McMillan, J. E.; Meli, A.; Montaruli, T.; Moscoso, L.; Motz, H.; Neff, M.; Nezri, E.; Palioselitis, D.; Păvălaş, G. E.; Payet, K.; Payre, P.; Petrovic, J.; Piattelli, P.; Picot-Clemente, N.; Popa, V.; Pradier, T.; Presani, E.; Racca, C.; Reed, C.; Riccobene, G.; Richardt, C.; Richter, R.; Rivière, C.; Robert, A.; Roensch, K.; Rostovtsev, A.; Ruiz-Rivas, J.; Rujoiu, M.; Russo, G. V.; Salesa, F.; Samtleben, D. F. E.; Sapienza, P.; Schöck, F.; Schuller, J.-P.; Schüssler, F.; Seitz, T.; Shanidze, R.; Simeone, F.; Spies, A.; Spurio, M.; Steijger, J. J. M.; Stolarczyk, Th.; Sánchez-Losa, A.; Taiuti, M.; Tamburini, C.; Thompson, L. F.; Toscano, S.; Vallage, B.; Van Elewyck, V.; Vannoni, G.; Vecchi, M.; Vernin, P.; Wagner, S.; Wijnker, G.; Wilms, J.; de Wolf, E.; Yepes, H.; Zaborov, D.; Zornoza, J. D.; Zúñiga, J.

    2012-04-01

    The group velocity of light has been measured at eight different wavelengths between 385 nm and 532 nm in the Mediterranean Sea at a depth of about 2.2 km with the ANTARES optical beacon systems. A parametrisation of the dependence of the refractive index on wavelength based on the salinity, pressure and temperature of the sea water at the ANTARES site is in good agreement with these measurements.

  13. Advanced Light Water Reactor Program: Program management and staff review methodology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, D.H.

    1986-12-01

    This report summarizes the NRC/EPRI coordinated effort to develop design requirements for a standardized advanced light water reactor (ALWR) and the procedures for screening and applying new generic safety issues to this program. The end-product will be an NRC-approved ALWR Requirements Document for use by the nuclear industry in generating designs of LWRs to be constructed for operation in the 1990s and beyond

  14. Study on the Use of Hydride Fuel in High-Performance Light Water Reactor Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Haileyesus Tsige-Tamirat; Luca Ammirabile

    2015-01-01

    Hydride fuels have features which could make their use attractive in future advanced power reactors. The potential benefit of use of hydride fuel in HPLWR without introducing significant modification in the current core design concept of the high-performance light water reactor (HPLWR) has been evaluated. Neutronics and thermal hydraulic analyses were performed for a single assembly model of HPLWR with oxide and hydride fuels. The hydride assembly shows higher moderation with softer neutron s...

  15. Analysis of enriched UO2 light water moderated lattices using CAROL code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, H.K.; Thaker, K.

    1978-01-01

    An analysis of uniform lattice experiments for enriched UO 2 rods in light water moderator using CAROL code is presented. The experiments selected have four different enrichments and moderator to fuel volume ratio varying between 1 to 4. The deviation of ksub(eff) has been observed to lie between +- 0.01 over the important range of moderator to fuel volume ratio. In addition to reactivity prediction, the calculated and measured relative reaction rates have also been compared. (author)

  16. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sample, C R [comp.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL.

  17. A design study of high electric power for fast reactor cooled by supercritical light water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshizuka, Seiichi [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab

    2000-03-01

    In order to evaluate the possibility to achieve high electric power by a fast reactor with supercritical light water, the design study was carried out on a large fast reactor core with high coolant outlet temperature (SCFR-H). Since the reactor coolant circuit uses once-through direct cycle where all feedwater flows through the core to the turbine at supercritical pressure, it is possible to design much simpler and more compact reactor systems and to achieve higher thermal efficiency than those of current light water reactors. The once-through direct cycle system is employed in current fossil-fired power plants. In the present study, three types of core were designed. The first is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by ascending flow, the second is SCFR-H with blankets cooled by descending flow and the third is SCFR-H with high thermal power. Every core was designed to achieve the thermal efficiency over 43%, positive coolant density reactivity coefficient and electric power over 1600 MW. Core characteristics of SCFR-Hs were compared with those of SCLWR-H (electric power: 1212 MW), which is a thermal neutron spectrum reactor cooled and moderated by supercritical light water, with the same diameter of the reactor pressure vessel. It was shown that SCFR-H could increase the electric power about 1.7 times maximally. From the standpoint of the increase of a reactor thermal power, a fast reactor has advantages as compared with a thermal neutron reactor, because it can increase the power density by adopting tight fuel lattices and eliminating the moderator region. Thus, it was concluded that a reactor cooled by supercritical light water could further improve the cost competitiveness by using a fast neutron spectrum and achieving a higher thermal power. (author)

  18. Evaluation of actinide partitioning and transmutation in light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collins, Emory D.; Renier, John-Paul

    2004-01-01

    Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) studies were made to evaluate the feasibility of multicycle transmutation of plutonium and the minor actinides (MAs) in light-water reactors (LWRs). Results showed that significant repository benefits, cost reductions, proliferation resistance, and effective use of facilities can be obtained. Key advantages are shown to be made possible by processing 30-year-decayed spent fuel rather than the more traditional 5-year-decayed fuel. (authors)

  19. Literature search on Light Water Reactor (LWR) fuel and absorber rod fabrication, 1960--1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sample, C.R.

    1977-02-01

    A literature search was conducted to provide information supporting the design of a conceptual Light Water Reactor (LWR) Fuel Fabrication plant. Emphasis was placed on fuel processing and pin bundle fabrication, effects of fuel impurities and microstructure on performance and densification, quality assurance, absorber and poison rod fabrication, and fuel pin welding. All data have been taken from publicly available documents, journals, and books. This work was sponsored by the Finishing Processes-Mixed Oxide (MOX) Fuel Fabrication Studies program at HEDL

  20. [Physiological and agrochemical properties of different symbiotic genotypes of pea (Pisum sativum L.)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazariuk, V M; Sidorova, K K; Shumny, V K; Kallimullina, F R; Klenova M I

    2006-01-01

    Physiological characters of symbiotic mutants of pea were studied: nodulation, activities of nitrogenase and nitrate reductase, chlorophyll content in leaves and their water-holding capacity, biomass accumulation, and nitrogen forms. The parameters reflecting the genotype state of the macrosymbiont under soil conditions considerably varied. Supernodulation mutants stood out against symbiotic pea genotypes by high contents of chlorophyll and nonprotein nitrogen compounds, high nitrogenase activity, and low nitrate reductase activity. The efficiency of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis was largely mediated by the macrosymbiont genotype. The highest atmospheric nitrogen fixation (50-80%) was observed in the parental pea varieties. Despite the highest nitrogenase activity in the nodules, the supernodulation mutants were inferior to the parental varieties by the nitrogen fixation capacity (40-60%), which was due to their low productivity.

  1. Research and development program for plutonium recycling in light water power plants: indirect nuclear action

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report describes the state of advancement - 31/12/1976 - of the Community research and development programme on plutonium recycling in light-water power stations. The first part of the programme includes the forecast of the plutonium industry around 1990 and the assessment of the environmental impact due to the plutonium recycling in light-water power stations at this period. The forward study is available now, whereas the assessment studies concerning the environmental aspects have been the subject of a tender procedure among various European organizations. The improvement of scientific and technical knowledge which constitutes the second part of the programme, consists of three actions. The first one, practically achieved, collects the studies relating to the cross sections of higher plutonium isotopes and actinides and to the comparison of computer codes. The second one, relating to the safety and control of light-water reactors comprises seventeen projects which are under negociation with the contracting parties. The third one is composed of thirteen projects including post-irradiation examinations and isotopic analysis on plutonium fuels irradiated in L.W.R.'s; the available results are briefly described

  2. End-of-life destructive examination of light water breeder reactor fuel rods (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, K.D.

    1987-10-01

    Destructive examination of 12 representative Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods was performed following successful operation in the Shippingport Atomic Power Station for 29,047 effective full power hours, about five years. Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rods were unique in that the thorium oxide and uranium-233 oxide fuel was contained within Zircaloy-4 cladding. Destructive examinations included analysis of released fission gas; chemical analysis of the fuel to determine depletion, iodine, and cesium levels; chemical analysis of the cladding to determine hydrogen, iodine, and cesium levels; metallographic examination of the cladding, fuel, and other rod components to determine microstructural features and cladding corrosion features; and tensile testing of the irradiated cladding to determine mechanical strength. The examinations confirmed that Light Water Breeder Reactor fuel rod performance was excellent. No evidence of fuel rod failure was observed, and the fuel operating temperature was low (below 2580 0 F at which an increased percentage of fission gas is released). 21 refs., 80 figs., 20 tabs

  3. Overview of the US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCarthy, K.A.; Williams, D.L.; Reister, R.

    2012-01-01

    The US Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program is focused on enabling the long-term operation of US commercial power plants. Decisions on life extension will be made by commercial power plant owners - the information provided by the research and development activities in the LWRS Program will reduce the uncertainty (and therefore the risk) associated with making those decisions. The LWRS Program encompasses two facets of long-term operation: (1) manage the aging of plant systems, structures, and components so that nuclear power plant lifetimes can be extended and the plants can continue to operate safely, efficiently, and economically; and (2) provide science-based solutions to the nuclear industry that support implementation of performance improvement technologies. An important aspect of the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program is partnering with industry and the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to support and conduct the long-term research needed to inform major component refurbishment and replacement strategies, performance enhancements, plant license extensions, and age-related regulatory oversight decisions. The Department of Energy research, development, and demonstration role focuses on aging phenomena and issues that require long-term research and/or unique Department of Energy laboratory expertise and facilities and are applicable to all operating reactors. This paper provides an overview of the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program, including vision, goals, and major deliverables. (author)

  4. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core

  5. Installation of the Light-Water Breeder Reactor at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station (LWBR Development Program)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Massimino, R.J.; Williams, D.A.

    1983-05-01

    This report summarizes the refueling operations performed to install a Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR) core into the existing pressurized water reactor vessel at the Shippingport Atomic Power Station. Detailed descriptions of the major installation operations (e.g., primary system preconditioning, fuel installation, pressure boundary seal welding) are included as appendices to this report; these operations are of technical interest to any reactor servicing operation, whether the reactor is a breeder or a conventional light water non-breeder core.

  6. Oak Ridge National Laboratory Support of Non-light Water Reactor Technologies: Capabilities Assessment for NRC Near-term Implementation Action Plans for Non-light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Belles, Randy [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Jain, Prashant K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Powers, Jeffrey J. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2017-04-01

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has a rich history of support for light water reactor (LWR) and non-LWR technologies. The ORNL history involves operation of 13 reactors at ORNL including the graphite reactor dating back to World War II, two aqueous homogeneous reactors, two molten salt reactors (MSRs), a fast-burst health physics reactor, and seven LWRs. Operation of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been ongoing since 1965. Expertise exists amongst the ORNL staff to provide non-LWR training; support evaluation of non-LWR licensing and safety issues; perform modeling and simulation using advanced computational tools; run laboratory experiments using equipment such as the liquid salt component test facility; and perform in-depth fuel performance and thermal-hydraulic technology reviews using a vast suite of computer codes and tools. Summaries of this expertise are included in this paper.

  7. Kinematics of the symbiotic system R Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, S.; Corral, L. J.; Steffen, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of the kinematical analysis of the symbiotic system R Aqr. We obtained high dispersion spectra with the MES spectrograph at the 2.1 m telescope of San Pedro Mártir (MEZCAL). The used filter were Ha + [NII], (λc = 6575Å, Δλ = 90Å). We analyse the [NII] λλ6583 line. When the observations are compared with previous ones by Solf (1992) we detected an important change in the projected velocities of the observed knots, supporting the idea of a precessing jet. We are working also in a 3-D kinematic model for the object using the measured velocities and the state of the model is presented.

  8. Influence of Type of Electric Bright Light on the Attraction of the African Giant Water Bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Chinaru Nwosu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of type of electric bright light (produced by fluorescent light tube and incandescent light bulb on the attraction of the African giant water bug, Lethocerus indicus (Hemiptera: Belostomatidae. Four fluorescent light tubes of 15 watts each, producing white-coloured light and four incandescent light bulbs of 60 watts each, producing yellow-coloured light, but both producing the same amount of light, were varied and used for the experiments. Collections of bugs at experimental house were done at night between the hours of 8.30 pm and 12 mid-night on daily basis for a period of four months per experiment in the years 2008 and 2009. Lethocerus indicus whose presence in any environment has certain implications was the predominant belostomatid bug in the area. Use of incandescent light bulbs in 2009 significantly attracted more Lethocerus indicus 103 (74.6% than use of fluorescent light tubes 35 (25.41% in 2008 [4.92=0.0001]. However, bug’s attraction to light source was not found sex dependent [>0.05; (>0.18=0.4286 and >0.28=0.3897]. Therefore, this study recommends the use of fluorescent light by households, campgrounds, and other recreational centres that are potentially exposed to the nuisance of the giant water bugs. Otherwise, incandescent light bulbs should be used when it is desired to attract the presence of these aquatic bugs either for food or scientific studies.

  9. Distinguishing between symbiotic stars and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iłkiewicz, K.; Mikołajewska, J.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The number of known symbiotic stars (SySt) is still significantly lower than their predicted population. One of the main problems in finding the total population of SySt is the fact that their spectrum can be confused with other objects, such as planetary nebulae (PNe) or dense H II regions. This problem is reinforced by the fact that in a significant fraction of established SySt the emission lines used to distinguish them from other objects are not present. Aims: We aim at finding new diagnostic diagrams that could help separate SySt from PNe. Additionally, we examine a known sample of extragalactic PNe for candidate SySt. Methods: We employed emission line fluxes of known SySt and PNe from the literature. Results: We found that among the forbidden lines in the optical region of spectrum, only the [O III] and [N II] lines can be used as a tool for distinguishing between SySt and PNe, which is consistent with the fact that they have the highest critical densities. The most useful diagnostic that we propose is based on He I lines, which are more common and stronger in SySt than forbidden lines. All these useful diagnostic diagrams are electron density indicators that better distinguish PNe and ionized symbiotic nebulae. Moreover, we found six new candidate SySt in the Large Magellanic Cloud and one in M 81. If confirmed, the candidate in M 81 would be the farthest known SySt thus far.

  10. Symbiote transmission and maintenance of extra-genomic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Minault Fitzpatrick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotes can be transmitted from parents to offspring or horizontally from unrelated hosts or the environment. A key question is whether symbiote transmission is similar enough to Mendelian gene transmission to generate and maintain coevolutionary associations between host and symbiote genes. Recent papers come to opposite conclusions, with some suggesting that any horizontal transmission eliminates genetic association. These studies are hard to compare owing to arbitrary differences in modeling approach, parameter values, and assumptions about selection. I show that associations between host and symbiote genes (extra-genomic associations can be described by the same dynamic model as conventional linkage disequilibria between genes in the same genome. Thus, covariance between host and symbiote genomes depends on population history, geographic structure, selection, and co-transmission rate, just as covariance between genes within a genome. The conclusion that horizontal transmission rapidly erodes extra-genomic associations is equivalent to the conclusion that recombination rapidly erodes associations between genes within a genome. The conclusion is correct in the absence of population structure or selection. However, population structure can maintain spatial associations between host and symbiote traits, and non-additive selection (interspecific epistasis can generate covariances between host and symbiote genotypes. These results can also be applied to cultural or other nongenetic traits. This work contributes to a growing consensus that genomic, symbiotic, and gene-culture evolution can be analyzed under a common theoretical framework. In terms of coevolutionary potential, symbiotes can be viewed as lying on a continuum between the intimacy of genes and the indifference of casually co-occuring species.

  11. Competition for light and water in a coupled soil-plant system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manoli, Gabriele; Huang, Cheng-Wei; Bonetti, Sara; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Marani, Marco; Katul, Gabriel

    2017-10-01

    It is generally accepted that resource availability shapes the structure and function of many ecosystems. Within the soil-plant-atmosphere (SPA) system, resource availability fluctuates in space and time whereas access to resources by individuals is further impacted by plant-to-plant competition. Likewise, transport and transformation of resources within an individual plant is governed by numerous interacting biotic and abiotic processes. The work here explores the co-limitations on water losses and carbon uptake within the SPA arising from fluctuating resource availability and competition. In particular, the goal is to unfold the interplay between plant access and competition for water and light, as well as the impact of transport/redistribution processes on leaf-level carbon assimilation and water fluxes within forest stands. A framework is proposed that couples a three-dimensional representation of soil-root exchanges with a one-dimensional description of stem water flow and storage, canopy photosynthesis, and transpiration. The model links soil moisture redistribution, root water uptake, xylem water flow and storage, leaf potential and stomatal conductance as driven by supply and demand for water and carbon. The model is then used to investigate plant drought resilience of overstory-understory trees simultaneously competing for water and light. Simulation results reveal that understory-overstory interactions increase ecosystem resilience to drought (i.e. stand-level carbon assimilation rates and water fluxes can be sustained at lower root-zone soil water potentials). This resilience enhancement originates from reduced transpiration (due to shading) and hydraulic redistribution in soil supporting photosynthesis over prolonged periods of drought. In particular, the presence of different rooting systems generates localized hydraulic redistribution fluxes that sustain understory transpiration through overstory-understory interactions. Such complex SPA dynamics

  12. Dynamic Response of Plant Chlorophyll Fluorescence to Light, Water and Nutrient Availability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendrero Mateo, M. D. P.; Moran, S. M.; Porcar-Castell, A.; Carmo-Silva, A. E.; Papuga, S. A.; Matveeva, M.; Wieneke, S.; Rascher, U.

    2014-12-01

    Photosynthesis is the most important exchange process of CO2 between the atmosphere and the land-surface. Spatial and temporal patterns of photosynthesis depend on dynamic plant-specific adaptation strategies to highly variable environmental conditions e.g. light, water, and nutrient availability. Chlorophyll fluorescence (ChF) has been proposed as a direct indicator of photosynthesis, and several studies have demonstrated its relationship with vegetation functioning at leaf and canopy level. In this study, two overarching questions about ChF were addressed: Q1) How water, nutrient and ambient light conditions determine the relationships between photosynthesis and ChF? Which is the optimum irradiance level for detecting water and nutrient deficit conditions with ChF?; Q2) What is the seasonal relationship between photosynthesis and ChF when nitrogen is the limiting factor? The results of this study indicated that when the differences between treatments (water or nitrogen) drive the relationship between photosynthesis and ChF, ChF has a direct relationship with photosynthesis. This study demonstrates that the light level at which plants were grown was optimum for detecting water and nutrient deficit with ChF. Further, the seasonal relation between photosynthesis and ChF with nitrogen stress was not a simple linear function due to the complex physiological relation between photosynthesis and ChF. Our study showed that at times in the season when nitrogen was sufficient and photosynthesis was highest, ChF decreased because these two processes compete for available energy. The results from this study demonstrated that ChF is a reliable indicator of plant stress and has great potential as a tool for better understand where, when, and how CO2 is exchanged between the land and atmosphere.

  13. Volumetric dimensional changes of dental light-cured dimethacrylate resins after sorption of water or ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sideridou, Irini D; Karabela, Maria M; Vouvoudi, Evagelia Ch

    2008-08-01

    This study evaluated the influence of water and ethanol sorption on the volumetric dimensional changes of resins prepared by light curing of Bis-GMA, Bis-EMA, UDMA, TEGDMA or D(3)MA. The resin specimens (15mm diameterx1mm height) were immersed in water or ethanol 37+/-1 degrees C for 30 days. Volumetric changes of specimens were obtained via accurate mass measurements using Archimedes principle. The specimens were reconditioned by dry storage in an oven at 37+/-1 degrees C until constant mass was obtained and then immersed in water or ethanol for 30 days. The volumetric changes of specimens were determined and compared to those obtained from the first sorption. Resins showed similar volume increase during the first and second sorptions of water or ethanol. The volume increase due to water absorption is in the following order: poly-TEGDMA>poly-Bis-GMA>poly-UDMA>poly-Bis-EMA>poly-D(3)MA. On the contrary, the order in ethanol is poly-Bis-GMA>poly-UDMA>poly-TEGDMA>poly-Bis-EMA approximately poly-D(3)MA. The volume increase was found to depend linearly on the amount of water or ethanol absorbed. In the choice of monomers for preparation of composite resin matrix the volume increase in the resin after immersion in water or ethanol must be taken into account. Resins of Bis-EMA and D(3)MA showed the lowest values.

  14. Gas-liquid-liquid equilibria in mixtures of water, light gases, and hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chao, K.C.

    1990-01-01

    Phase equilibrium in mixtures of water + light gases and water + heavy hydrocarbons has been investigated with the development of new local composition theory, new equations of state, and new experimental data. The preferential segregation and orientation of molecules due to different energies of molecular interaction has been simulated with square well molecules. Extensive simulation has been made for pure square well fluids and mixtures to find the local composition at wide ranges of states. A theory of local composition has been developed and an equation of state has been obtained for square well fluids. The new local composition theory has been embedded in several equations of state. The pressure of water is decoupled into a polar pressure and non-polar pressure according to the molecular model of water of Jorgensen et al. The polar pressure of water is combined with the BACK equation for the general description of polar fluids and their mixtures. Being derived from the steam table, the Augmented BACK equation is particularly suited for mixtures of water + non-polar substances such as the hydrocarbons. The hydrophobic character of the hydrocarbons had made their mixtures with water a special challenge. A new group contribution equation of state is developed to describe phase equilibrium and volumetric behavior of fluids while requiring only to know the molecular structure of the components. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  15. Analysis on Radioactive Waste Transmutation in Light Water cooled Hyb-WT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Seonghee; Kim, Myung Hyun

    2014-01-01

    A feasibility of realization is much higher in FFHR compared with pure fusion. A combination of plasma fusion source for neutrons with a subcritical reactor at the blanket side has much higher capability in transmutation of waste as well as reactor safety compared with fission reactor options. Fusion-Fission Hybrid Reactor (FFHR) uses various coolants depending on the purpose. It is important that coolant being used should be suitable to reactor purpose, because reactor performance and the design constraints may change depending on the coolant. There are basically two major groups of coolants for FFHR. One group of coolant does not contain Li. They are Na, Pb-Bi, H 2 O and D 2 O. The other group contains Li for tritium breeding. They are Li, LiPb, LiSN, FLIBE and FLiNaBe. Currently, the issue in FFHR is its implication for radioactive waste transmutation (FFHR for WT). Because radioactive wastes of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) are transmuted using fusion neutron source. Therefore a suitable coolant should be used for effective waste transmutation. . In FFHR for WT, LiPb coolant is being used mainly because of tritium production in Li and high neutron economic through reaction in Pb. However different coolants use such as Na, Pb-Bi are used in fast reactors and accelerator driven systems (ADS) having same purpose. In this study, radioactive waste transmutation performance of various coolants mentioned above will be compared and analyzed. Through this study, the coolants are judged primarily for their support to waste transmutation disregarding their limitation to reactor design and tritium breeding capability. First, performance of the light water coolant regarding radioactive waste transmutation was analyzed among various coolants mentioned above. In this paper, performance of radioactive waste transmutation can be known depending on different volume fractions (54.53, 60.27, 97.94vol.%) of the light water. Light water dose required fusion power lower than LiPb due to

  16. Symbiotic treatment. A new biological technology for treating waste waters from the canning industry; Depuracion simbiotica. Una nueva tecnologia biologica para la depuracion de aguas residuales del sector de conservas vegetales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayuso Garcia, L. M.; Canova Perez, J. L.; Llorens Pascual del Riquelme, M.; Saez Mercader, J.

    2008-07-01

    Many studies show that biological processes are the most suitable for the canned food industry waste water treatment. A new biological technology that minimizes the management, operation and maintenance problems associated to the waste water treatment is proposed. The results obtained in pilot plant of a new natural technology for treating waste water are presented in this paper. This technology was applied to the treatment of canned food industry waste water and received the effluent coming from peach and pear processing. A pilot plant composed of five treatment stages with vertical distribution has been constructed. This plant treats 80 l/h and have a surface of 1 m{sup 2}. The effluent of this plant complies the requirements established in Decreto 16/1999 (BORM no.97, 29 april 1999), about discharge of industrial waste water to sewers. (Author) 10 refs.

  17. Underwater light field determined by water constituents in highly turbid water: the case of Taihu lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Chun Huang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The relationships between optical properties and water constituents in highly turbid productivewater were studied on the basis of the multiple bio-optical measurements and samplings of water constituents made during five cruises from 2006 to 2008 in Taihu lake. Taihu lake is a high dynamic ratio [(square root of area/depth] inland shallow lake. The spatial and temporal variation of water constituents and optical properties is significant. The inorganic suspended matter (ISMhas become the primary constituent in Taihu lake: its average percentage can reach 65.21%. The concentration of ISM is highly correlated to the optical properties in Taihu lake due to the sediment resuspension. Consequently, the ISM can be taken into account as an important optically-active constituent in Taihu lake. Resuspended sediments also lead to a poor correlation between scattering optical property and chlorophyll-a concentration (CChl-a. However, empirical relationship between the CChl-a and phytoplankton absorption coefficient at 675 nm is still valid when the package effect is removed. The parameters of linear equation in the present study have slight temporal variation, especially for the relationship between inherent optical properties (IOPs and concentration of total suspended matter (TSM. The relationship between apparent optical property (AOP (diffuse attenuation coefficient of particle, Kdbio and ISM has been examined as well. The Kdbio is strongly affected by ISM, and correlates to it with linear function. Thedifference between specific diffuse attenuation coefficients of organic [K*dOSM(λ] and inorganic [K*dISM(λ] particles is significant. K*dOSM(λ includes the absorption property of chlorophyll-a (chl-a at 675 nm, which is much higher than that of K*dISM(λ. This indicates that the attenuation ability of OSM is stronger than that of ISM although the Kdbio induced by large concentration of ISM is bigger than the Kdbio induced by small concentration of OSM

  18. Mechanism for migration of light nonaqueous phase liquids beneath the water table

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krueger, J.P.; Portman, M.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on an interesting transport mechanism may account for the presence of light nonaqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) found beneath the water table in fine-grained aquifers. During the course of two separate site investigations related to suspected releases from underground petroleum storage tanks, LNAPL was found 7 to 10 feet below the regional water table. In both cases, the petroleum was present within a sand seam which was encompassed within a deposit of finer-grained sediments. The presence of LNAPL below the water table is uncommon; typically, LNAPL is found floating on the water table or on the capillary fringe. The occurrence of LNAPL below the water table could have resulted from fluctuating regional water levels which allowed the petroleum to enter the sand when the water table was a lower stage or, alternately, could have occurred as a result of the petroleum depressing the water table beneath the level of the sand. In fine-grained soils where the lateral migration rate is low, the infiltrating LNAPL may depress the water table to significant depth. The LNAPL may float on the phreatic surface with the bulk of its volume beneath the phreatic surface. Once present in the sand and surrounded by water-saturated fine-grained sediments, capillary forces prevent the free movement of the petroleum back across the boundary from the coarse-grained sediments to the fine-grained sediments. Tapping these deposits with a coarser grained filter packed monitoring well releases the LNAPL, which may accumulate to considerable thickness in the monitoring well

  19. Stability analysis of supercritical-pressure light water-cooled reactor in constant pressure operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suhwan, JI; Shirahama, H.; Koshizuka, S.; Oka, Y.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the thermal-hydraulic and the thermal-nuclear coupled stabilities of a supercritical pressure light water-cooled reactor. A stability analysis code at supercritical pressure is developed. Using this code, stabilities of full and partial-power reactor operating at supercritical pressure are investigated by the frequency-domain analysis. Two types of SCRs are analyzed; a supercritical light water reactor (SCLWR) and a supercritical water-cooled fast reactor (SCFR). The same stability criteria as Boiling Water Reactor are applied. The thermal-hydraulic stability of SCLWR and SCFR satisfies the criteria with a reasonable orifice loss coefficient. The decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability in SCFR is almost zero because of a small coolant density coefficient of the fast reactor. The evaluated decay ratio of the thermal-nuclear coupled stability is 3,41 ∼ 10 -V at 100% power in SCFR and 0,028 at 100% power in SCLWR. The sensitivity is investigated. It is found that the thermal-hydraulic stability is sensitive to the mass flow rate strongly and the thermal-nuclear coupled stability to the coolant density coefficient. The bottom power peak distribution makes the thermal-nuclear stability worse and the thermal-nuclear stability better. (author)

  20. Secondary flows in the cooling channels of the high-performance light-water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurien, E.; Wintterle, Th. [Stuttgart Univ., Institute for Nuclear Technolgy and Energy Systems (IKE) (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The new design of a High-Performance Light-Water Reactor (HPLWR) involves a three-pass core with an evaporator region, where the compressed water is heated above the pseudo-critical temperature, and two superheater regions. Due to the strong dependency of the supercritical water density on the temperature significant mass transfer between neighboring cooling channels is expected if the temperature is unevenly distributed across the fuel element. An inter-channel flow is then superimposed to the secondary flow vortices induced by the non-isotropy of turbulence. In order to gain insight into the resulting flow patterns as well as into temperature and density distributions within the various subchannels of the fuel element CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) calculations for the 1/8 fuel element are performed. For simplicity adiabatic boundary conditions at the moderator box and the fuel element box are assumed. Our investigation confirms earlier results obtained by subchannel analysis that the axial mass flux is significantly reduced in the corner subchannel of this fuel element resulting in a net mass flux towards the neighboring subchannels. Our results provide a first estimation of the magnitude of the secondary flows in the pseudo-critical region of a supercritical light-water reactor. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that CFD is an efficient tool for investigations of flow patterns within nuclear reactor fuel elements. (authors)

  1. Guidebook on quality control of mixed oxides and gadolinium bearing fuels for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-02-01

    Under the coverage of an efficient quality assurance system, quality control in nuclear fuel fabrication is an essential element to assure the reliable performance of all its components in service. Incentives to increase fuel performance, by extending reactor cycles or achieving higher burnups and, in some countries to use recycled plutonium in light water reactors (LWRs) necessitated the development of new types of fuels. In the first case, due to higher uranium enrichments, a burnable neutron absorber was integrated to the fuel pellets. Gadolinia was found to form a solid solution with Uranium dioxide and, to present a burnup rate which matches fissile uranium depletion. (U,Gd)O 2 fuels which have been successfully used since the seventies, in boiling water reactors have more recently found an increased utilization, in pressurized water reactors. This amply justifies the publication of this TECDOC to encourage authorities, designers and manufacturers of these types of fuel to establish a more uniform, adapted and effective system of control, thus promoting improved materials reliability and good performance in advanced fuel for light water reactors. The Guidebook is subdivided into four chapters written by different authors. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these chapters. Refs, figs and tabs

  2. Neutron absorption profile in a reactor moderated by different mixtures of light and heavy waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagy, Mohamed E.; Aly, Mohamed N.; Gaber, Fatma A.; Dorrah, Mahmoud E.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We studied neutron absorption spectra in a mixed water moderated reactor. • Changing D 2 O% in moderator induced neutron energy spectral shift. • Most of the neutrons absorbed in control rods were epithermal. • Control rods worth changes were not proportional to changes of D 2 O% in moderator. • Control rod arrangement influenced the neutronic behavior of the reactor. - Abstract: A Monte-Carlo parametric study was carried out to investigate the neutron absorption profile in a model of LR-0 reactor when it is moderated by different mixtures of heavy/light waters at molecular ratios ranging from 0% up to 100% D 2 O at increments of 10% in D 2 O. The tallies included; neutron absorption profiles in control rods and moderator, and neutron capture profile in 238 U. The work focused on neutron absorption in control rods entailing; total mass of control rods needed to attain criticality, neutron absorption density and total neutron absorption in control rods at each of the studied mixed water moderators. The aim was to explore whether thermal neutron poisons are the most suitable poisons to be used in control rods of nuclear reactors moderated by mixed heavy/light water moderators

  3. Efficient Light-Driven Water Oxidation Catalysis by Dinuclear Ruthenium Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berardi, Serena; Francàs, Laia; Neudeck, Sven; Maji, Somnath; Benet-Buchholz, Jordi; Meyer, Franc; Llobet, Antoni

    2015-11-01

    Mastering the light-induced four-electron oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key step towards the achievement of overall water splitting to produce alternative solar fuels. In this work, we report two rugged molecular pyrazolate-based diruthenium complexes that efficiently catalyze visible-light-driven water oxidation. These complexes were fully characterized both in the solid state (by X-ray diffraction analysis) and in solution (spectroscopically and electrochemically). Benchmark performances for homogeneous oxygen production have been obtained for both catalysts in the presence of a photosensitizer and a sacrificial electron acceptor at pH 7, and a turnover frequency of up to 11.1 s(-1) and a turnover number of 5300 were obtained after three successive catalytic runs. Under the same experimental conditions with the same setup, the pyrazolate-based diruthenium complexes outperform other well-known water oxidation catalysts owing to both electrochemical and mechanistic aspects. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Feasibility Study of Supercritical Light Water Cooled Fast Reactors for Actinide Burning and Electric Power Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mac Donald, Philip Elsworth; Buongiorno, Jacopo; Davis, Cliff Bybee; Weaver, Kevan Dean

    2002-01-01

    The use of supercritical temperature and pressure light water as the coolant in a direct-cycle nuclear reactor offers potential for considerable plant simplification and consequent capital and O&M cost reduction compared with current light water reactor (LWR) designs. Also, given the thermodynamic conditions of the coolant at the core outlet (i.e. temperature and pressure beyond the water critical point), very high thermal efficiencies of the power conversion cycle are possible (i.e. up to 46%). Because no change of phase occurs in the core, the need for steam separators and dryers as well as for BWR-type recirculation pumps is eliminated, which, for a given reactor power, results in a substantially shorter reactor vessel than the current BWRs. Furthermore, in a direct cycle the steam generators are not needed. If a tight fuel rod lattice is adopted, it is possible to significantly reduce the neutron moderation and attain fast neutron energy spectrum conditions. In this project a supercritical water reactor concept with a simple, blanket-free, pancake-shaped core will be developed. This type of core can make use of either fertile or fertile-free fuel and retain the hard spectrum to effectively burn plutonium and minor actinides from LWR spent fuel while efficiently generating electricity.

  5. Light Modulation and Water Splitting Enhancement Using a Composite Porous GaN Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chao; Xi, Xin; Yu, Zhiguo; Cao, Haicheng; Li, Jing; Lin, Shan; Ma, Zhanhong; Zhao, Lixia

    2018-02-14

    On the basis of the laterally porous GaN, we designed and fabricated a composite porous GaN structure with both well-ordered lateral and vertical holes. Compared to the plane GaN, the composite porous GaN structure with the combination of the vertical holes can help to reduce UV reflectance and increase the saturation photocurrent during water splitting by a factor of ∼4.5. Furthermore, we investigated the underlying mechanism for the enhancement of the water splitting performance using a finite-difference time-domain method. The results show that the well-ordered vertical holes can not only help to open the embedded pore channels to the electrolyte at both sides and reduce the migration distance of the gas bubbles during the water splitting reactions but also help to modulate the light field. Using this composite porous GaN structure, most of the incident light can be modulated and trapped into the nanoholes, and thus the electric fields localized in the lateral pores can increase dramatically as a result of the strong optical coupling. Our findings pave a new way to develop GaN photoelectrodes for highly efficient solar water splitting.

  6. Mixing of cooling water in the mixing chambers of the HPLWR-High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wank, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.wank@siemens.co [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Starflinger, Joerg; Schulenberg, Thomas [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technologies, P.O. Box 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Laurien, Eckart [University of Stuttgart, Institute for Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE) Pfaffenwaldring 31, D-70550 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-10-15

    The High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), a supercritical water cooled reactor concept with multiple heat-up steps, requires efficient mixing of the coolant between these steps to minimize hot spots in the core. Analyzing and improving the mixing in the mixing chamber above the core, situated between evaporator and superheater assemblies, and below the core, between the first and second superheater, is one of the challenges in the design process of the HPLWR. Different measures to enhance mixing have been studied with CFD analyses, in which a new design approach has been applied to the upper mixing chamber. It simplifies the complex structures and takes the effects of the disregarded structures into account by introducing source terms into the momentum equations.

  7. Fuel cycle options for light water reactors and heavy water reactors. Proceedings of a technical committee meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-11-01

    In the second half of the 20th century nuclear power has evolved from the research and development environment to an industry that supplies 16% of the world's electricity. By the end of 1997, over 8500 reactor-years of operating experience had been accumulated. Global environmental change, and the continuing increase in global energy supply required to provide increasing populations with an improving standard of living, make the contribution from nuclear energy even more important for the next century. For nuclear power to achieve its full potential and make its needed contribution, it must be safe, economical, reliable and sustainable. All of these factors can be enhanced by judicious choice and development of advanced fuel cycle options. The Technical Committee Meeting (TCM) on Fuel Cycle Options for Light Water Reactors and Heavy Water Reactors was hosted by Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL) on behalf of the Canadian Government and was jointly conducted within the frame of activities of the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Light Water Reactors (IWG-LWR) and the IAEA International Working Group on Advanced Technologies for Heavy Water Reactors (IWG-HWR). The TCM provided the opportunity to have in-depth discussions on important technical topics which were highlighted in the International Symposium on Nuclear Fuel Cycle and Reactor Strategies: Adjusting to New Realities, held in Vienna, 3-6 June 1997. The main results and conclusions of the TCM were presented as input for discussion at the first meeting of the IAEA newly formed International Working Group on Fuel Cycle Options

  8. Recent performance experience with US light water reactor self-actuating safety and relief valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammer, C.G.

    1996-12-01

    Over the past several years, there have been a number of operating reactor events involving performance of primary and secondary safety and relief valves in U.S. Light Water Reactors. There are several different types of safety and relief valves installed for overpressure protection of various safety systems throughout a typical nuclear power plant. The following discussion is limited to those valves in the reactor coolant systems (RCS) and main steam systems of pressurized water reactors (PWR) and in the RCS of boiling water reactors (BWR), all of which are self-actuating having a setpoint controlled by a spring-loaded disk acting against system fluid pressure. The following discussion relates some of the significant recent experience involving operating reactor events or various testing data. Some of the more unusual and interesting operating events or test data involving some of these designs are included, in addition to some involving a number of similar events and those which have generic applicability.

  9. Automated procedure for selection of optimal refueling policies for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, B.I.; Zolotar, B.; Weisman, J.

    1979-01-01

    An automated procedure determining a minimum cost refueling policy has been developed for light water reactors. The procedure is an extension of the equilibrium core approach previously devised for pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Use of 1 1/2-group theory has improved the accuracy of the nuclear model and eliminated tedious fitting of albedos. A simple heuristic algorithm for locating a good starting policy has materially reduced PWR computing time. Inclusion of void effects and use of the Haling principle for axial flux calculations extended the nuclear model to boiling water reactors (BWRs). A good initial estimate of the refueling policy is obtained by recognizing that a nearly uniform distribution of reactivity provides low-power peaking. The initial estimate is improved upon by interchanging groups of four assemblies and is subsequently refined by interchanging individual assemblies. The method yields very favorable results, is simpler than previously proposed BWR fuel optimization schemes, and retains power cost as the objective function

  10. Disinfection of deionised water inoculated with enterobacter using ultra violet light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathrani, M.

    2001-01-01

    For the first time the enterobacter, not the escherichia coli,was used as a model bacteria to asses the disinfection of microorganisms in water by UV (Ultra Violet) irradiation. The cell density of the liquid culture was followed by optical density of 1.837 at 600 nm on spectrometer. For the disinfection purpose, a laboratory scale batch reactor (10 cm wide, 20 cm long, and 10 cm height), containing 250 ml sterilised deionized water inoculated with enterobacter,was run under supra-band gap light (wavelength < 400 nm, peaking between 340 and 365 nm with a maximum of 350 nm). After carrying out seven batch experiments it is concluded that the complete inactivation of Enterobacter ( approx. equal to x 10/sup 6/ CFU/ml) in the water can be achieved by UV irradiation for 2 hours. (author)

  11. Neutron collar calibration for assay of LWR [light-water reactor] fuel assemblies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menlove, H.O.; Pieper, J.E.

    1987-03-01

    The neutron-coincidence collar is used for the verification of the uranium content in light-water reactor fuel assemblies. An AmLi neutron source is used to give an active interrogation of the fuel assembly to measure the 235 U content, and the 238 U content is verified from a passive neutron-coincidence measurement. This report gives the collar calibration data of pressurized-water reactor and boiling-water reactor fuel assemblies. Calibration curves and correction factors are presented for neutron absorbers (burnable poisons) and different fuel assembly sizes. The data were collected at Exxon Nuclear, Franco-Belge de Fabrication de Combustibles, ASEA-Atom, and other nuclear fuel fabrication facilities

  12. Neutronic investigations of an equilibrium core for a tight-lattice light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broeders, C.H.M.

    1992-01-01

    Calculation procedures and first results concerning the neutronic design of an equilibrium core of an advanced pressurized water reactor (APWR) with mixed oxide fuel in a compact light water moderated triangular lattice are presented. Principle and qualification of the cell burnup calculations with the KARBUS program are briefly discussed. The fuel assembly design with single control rod positions filled with control rod material or coolant water requires special transport theory calculations, which are performed with a one-dimensional supercell model. The macroscopic fuel assembly cross section data is collected in a special library to be used in a new calculational procedure, ARCOSI, for multi-cycle reactor core simulations. Its first application for a reference design resulted in an equilibrium configuration with moderator density reactivity coefficients which are satisfactory as regards safety. (orig.) [de

  13. Pigment specific in vivo light absorption of phytoplankton from estuarine, coastal and oceanic waters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stæhr, A.; Markager, S.; Sand-Jensen, K.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of phytoplankton photoacclimation and adaptation to natural growth conditions on the chlorophyll a-specific in vivo absorption coefficient (a* ph) was evaluated for samples collected in estuarine, coastal and oceanic waters. Despite an overall gradient in the physio......-chemical environment from estuaries, over coastal, to oceanic waters, no clear relationships were found between a* ph and the prevailing light, temperature, salinity and nutrient concentrations, indicating that short-term cellular acclimation was of minor importance for the observed variability in a* ph. The clear...... decline in a* ph from oceanic, over coastal, to estuarine waters was, however, strongly correlated with an increase in cell size and intracellular chlorophyll a (chl a) content of the phytoplankton, and a reduction of photosynthetic carotenoids relative to chl a. Variations in photoprotective carotenoids...

  14. Note: Three wavelengths near-infrared spectroscopy system for compensating the light absorbance by water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutta, M. Raheel; Hong, Keum-Shik; Kim, Beop-Min; Hong, Melissa Jiyoun; Kim, Yun-Hee; Lee, Se-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Given that approximately 80% of blood is water, we develop a wireless functional near-infrared spectroscopy system that detects not only the concentration changes of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin (HbO and HbR) during mental activity but also that of water (H2O). Additionally, it implements a water-absorption correction algorithm that improves the HbO and HbR signal strengths during an arithmetic task. The system comprises a microcontroller, an optical probe, tri-wavelength light emitting diodes, photodiodes, a WiFi communication module, and a battery. System functionality was tested by means of arithmetic-task experiments performed by healthy male subjects.

  15. Improved correction methods for field measurements of particulate light backscattering in turbid waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxaran, David; Leymarie, Edouard; Nechad, Bouchra; Dogliotti, Ana; Ruddick, Kevin; Gernez, Pierre; Knaeps, Els

    2016-02-22

    Monte Carlo simulations are used to compute the uncertainty associated to light backscattering measurements in turbid waters using the ECO-BB (WET Labs) and Hydroscat (HOBI Labs) scattering sensors. ECO-BB measurements provide an accurate estimate of the particulate volume scattering coefficient after correction for absorption along the short instrument pathlength. For Hydroscat measurements, because of a longer photon pathlength, both absorption and scattering effects must be corrected for. As the standard (sigma) correction potentially leads to large errors, an improved correction method is developed then validated using field inherent and apparent optical measurements carried out in turbid estuarine waters. Conclusions are also drawn to guide development of future short pathlength backscattering sensors for turbid waters.

  16. Comparison of two thorium fuel cycles for use in light water prebreeder/breeder reactor systems (AWBA Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merriman, F.C.; McCoy, D.F.; Boyd, W.A.; Dwyer, J.R.

    1983-05-01

    Light water prebreeder/breeder conceptual reactor systems have been developed which have the potential to significantly improve the fuel utilization of present generation light water reactors. The purpose of this study is to describe and compare two possible types of thorium fuel cycles for use in these light water prebreeder and breeder concepts. The two types of thorium fuel cycles basically differ in the fuel rod design used in the prebreeder cores and the uranium isotopic concentration of fuel supplied to the breeder cores

  17. Biomimetic Water-Collecting Fabric with Light-Induced Superhydrophilic Bumps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanfeng; Wang, Xiaowen; Lai, Chuilin; Hu, Huawen; Kong, Yeeyee; Fei, Bin; Xin, John H

    2016-02-10

    To develop an efficient water-collecting surface that integrates both fast water-capturing and easy drainage properties is of high current interest for addressing global water issues. In this work, a superhydrophobic surface was fabricated on cotton fabric via manipulation of both the surface roughness and surface energy. This was followed by a subsequent spray coating of TiO2 nanosol that created light-induced superhydrophilic bumps with a unique raised structure as a result of the interfacial tension of the TiO2 nanosol sprayed on the superhydrophobic fiber surface. These raised TiO2 bumps induce both a wettability gradient and a shape gradient, synergistically accelerating water coalescence and water collection. The in-depth study revealed that the quantity and the distribution of the TiO2 had a significant impact on the final water collection efficiency. This inexpensive and facilely fabricated fabric biomimicks the desert beetle's back and spider silk, which are capable of fog harvesting without additional energy consumption.

  18. Water-light interaction: A novel pathway for multi hallmark therapy in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Santana-Blank

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Laser photobiomodulation (LPBM has been proposed as a multi-target (multi-hallmark therapy for cancer and other complex diseases based on an approach that aims to substitute and/or complement metabolic energy pathways through oxygen-dependent (e.g., cytochrome c oxidase (CcO and/or oxygen-independent (e.g., light-water interactions (e.g., F0-F1 motors mechanisms with critical signaling pathways in primarily aqueous media. Cellular and molecular bases for water-mediated, long-range, energy supplementation aimed at inducing and modulating physiologically reparative processes, including apoptosis, have been previously presented through a mechanism termed Photo Infrared Pulsed Biomodulation (PIPBM. Water’s role as an oscillator in LPBM has also been documented. These ideas were recently complemented by integrating the role of the quasi-crystalline exclusion zone (EZ described by Pollack as the fourth phase of water. This is retrospective analysis of experimental and clinical data using an infrared pulsed laser device (IPLD. It found photo-induced effects over the water dynamics of burned rat tissue monitored by 1H-NMR transverse relaxation times (1/T2, indicating significantly greater structuring of water. In addition, a microdensitometry study of T2 weighted tumor heterogeneities from a phase I clinical trial of the IPLD in patients with advanced neoplasias and an algorithm for tumor characterization indicated significantly increased structuring of water, possibly proving a photobiomodulation effect over the EZ associated with histologically-confirmed selective photo-induced tumor cell death. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first clinical demonstration of light-induced effects over the EZ. It supports our premise that LPBM can increase potential energy in the EZ, which then acts as a rechargeable electrolytic bio-battery for the external selective supplementation of the energy demand required for cellular work, signaling pathways and

  19. Concept of low pressure water cracking for hydrogen production in the conventional Light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Jae Young; Lee, Bong Ju

    2006-01-01

    The global warnings associated with the global warming due to the flue gas from fossil fuel and with the unstable market of the fossil fuel have been expanding. As a solution, it has been widely accepted that hydrogen can be a good candidate for the future energy source. Hydrogen can be produced by splitting water, an abundant material in the earth, and no pollutants are produced during its combustion. Furthermore, it can produce electricity directly in the fuel cell. Therefore, transport industry is preparing the vehicles for the hydrogen fuel. The future society based on the hydrogen energy naturally needs the power station for the mass production of the hydrogen and distribution and storage systems

  20. Zeaxanthin and the Heat Dissipation of Excess Light Energy in Nerium oleander Exposed to a Combination of High Light and Water Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demmig, B; Winter, K; Krüger, A; Czygan, F C

    1988-05-01

    Upon termination of watering of plants of Nerium oleander exposed to high light, photochemical efficiency became reduced as leaf water content decreased. Evidence is presented that this type of photoinhibition reflects to a substantial degree radiationless dissipation of excitation energy, probably mediated by the carotenoid zeaxanthin. During the imposition of water stress, the zeaxanthin content of leaves increased at the expense of violaxanthin and beta-carotene as a water deficit developed over a period of several days. The increase in zeaxanthin content was linearly related to an increase in the rate of radiationless energy dissipation in the antenna chlorophyll as calculated from the characteristics of chlorophyll a fluorescence measured with a pulse amplitude modulated fluorometer at room temperature. The increase in the rate of radiationless dissipation was also linearly related to a decrease in PSII photochemical efficiency as indicated by the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence. Leaves of well-watered shade plants of N. oleander exposed to strong light showed a similar increase in zeaxanthin content as sun leaves of the same species subjected to drought in strong light. Shade leaves possessed the same capacity as sun leaves to form zeaxanthin at the expense of both violaxanthin and beta-carotene. The resistance of this species to the destructive effects of excess light appears to be related to interconversions between beta-carotene and the three carotenoids of the xanthophyll cycle.

  1. Stress as a Normal Cue in the Symbiotic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Julia A; Ruby, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    All multicellular hosts form associations with groups of microorganisms. These microbial communities can be taxonomically diverse and dynamic, and their persistence is due to robust, and sometimes coevolved, host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. Chemical and physical sources of stress are prominently situated in this molecular exchange, as cues for cellular responses in symbiotic microbes. Stress in the symbiotic environment may arise from three sources: host tissues, microbe-induced immune responses, or other microbes in the host environment. The responses of microbes to these stresses can be general or highly specialized, and collectively may contribute to the stability of the symbiotic system. In this review, we highlight recent work that emphasizes the role of stress as a cue in the symbiotic environment of plants and animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Symbiotic and phenotypic characterization of Rhizobium isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pisum sativum L.) Fabaceae, from central and southern Ethiopia. ... and NSRlFP18 were the elite rhizobia that can be selected and further tested for their genetic and symbiotic performance in field trials for future bio-inoculant formulation.

  3. An ongoing, record-breaking outburst of the unique symbiotic binary MWC 560 = V694 Mon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munari, U.; Righetti, G. L.; Dallaporta, S.; Moretti, S.; Graziani, M.; Valisa, P.

    2016-02-01

    The unique symbiotic binary MWC 560 = V694 Mon is on a steep rise in brightness, about to surpass the record level attained during the last - and much studied - outburst of 1990 (Tomov et al. 1990, Nature 346, 637), the brightest event in the historical light-curve of the object (Leibowitz and Formiggini 2014, AJ 150, 52). At that time MWC 560 attracted special interest by showing deep and broad absorptions, blue-shifted by 6000 km/s and completely detached from corresponding emission lines, as if originating in discrete blobs, ejected from the central star and rapidly accelerated to large velocities.

  4. NITRITE REDUCTASE ACTIVITY OF NON-SYMBIOTIC HEMOGLOBINS FROM ARABIDOPSIS THALIANA†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiso, Mauro; Tejero, Jesús; Kenney, Claire; Frizzell, Sheila; Gladwin, Mark T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant non-symbiotic hemoglobins possess hexa-coordinate heme geometry similar to the heme protein neuroglobin. We recently discovered that deoxygenated neuroglobin converts nitrite to nitric oxide (NO), an important signaling molecule involved in many processes in plants. We sought to determine whether Arabidopsis thaliana non-symbiotic hemoglobins class 1 and 2 (AHb1 and AHb2) might function as nitrite reductases. We found that the reaction of nitrite with deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 generates NO gas and iron-nitrosyl-hemoglobin species. The bimolecular rate constants for nitrite reduction to NO are 19.8 ± 3.2 and 4.9 ± 0.2 M−1s−1, at pH = 7.4 and 25°C, respectively. We determined the pH dependence of these bimolecular rate constants and found a linear correlation with the concentration of protons, indicating the requirement for one proton in the reaction. Release of free NO gas during reaction in anoxic and hypoxic (2% oxygen) conditions was confirmed by chemiluminescence detection. These results demonstrate that deoxygenated AHb1 and AHb2 reduce nitrite to form NO via a mechanism analogous to that observed for hemoglobin, myoglobin and neuroglobin. Our findings suggest that during severe hypoxia and in the anaerobic plant roots, especially in water submerged species, non-symbiotic hemoglobins provide a viable pathway for NO generation via nitrite reduction. PMID:22620259

  5. Bioindication of mercury, arsenic and uranium in the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata (Caenogastropoda, Ampullariidae): Bioconcentration and depuration in tissues and symbiotic corpuscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campoy-Diaz, Alejandra D; Arribére, María A; Guevara, Sergio Ribeiro; Vega, Israel A

    2018-04-01

    Pomacea canaliculata is a mollusk potentially useful as a biomonitor species of freshwater quality. This work explores the ability of snail tissues and symbiotic corpuscles to bioconcentrate and depurate mercury, arsenic, and uranium. Adult snails cultured in metal-free reconstituted water were exposed for eight weeks (bioaccumulation phase) to water with Hg (2 μgL -1 ), As (10 μgL -1 ), and U (30 μgL -1 ) and then returned to the reconstituted water for other additional eight weeks (depuration phase). Elemental concentrations in digestive gland, kidney, symbiotic corpuscles and particulate excreta were determined by neutron activation analysis. The glandular symbiotic occupancy was measured by morphometric analysis. After exposure, the kidney showed the highest concentration of Hg, while the digestive gland accumulated mainly As and U. The subcellular distribution in symbiotic corpuscles was ∼71%, ∼48%, and ∼11% for U, Hg, and As, respectively. Tissue depuration between weeks 8 and 16 was variable amongst elements. At week 16, the tissue depuration of U was the highest (digestive gland = 92%; kidney = 80%), while it was lower for Hg (digestive gland = 51%; kidney = 53%). At week 16, arsenic showed a differential pattern of tissue depuration (digestive gland = 23%; kidney = 88%). The symbiotic detoxification of the three elements in excreta was fast between weeks 8 and 10 and it was slower after on. At the end of the depuration, each element distributed differentially in digestive gland and symbiotic corpuscles. Our findings show that symbiotic corpuscles, digestive gland and kidney P. canaliculata are sensitive places for biomonitoring of Hg, As and U. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.; Ogden, J.S.; Potter, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport and fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behaviour of simulant fission product species such as caesium iodide, caesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapour deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high-density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO/sub 2/ clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 2500 0 C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapour phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  7. Chemical aspects of fission product transport in the primary circuit of a light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowsher, B.R.; Dickinson, S.; Nichols, A.L.; Ogden, J.S.; Potter, P.E.

    1985-01-01

    The transport and deposition of fission products in the primary circuit of a light water reactor are of fundamental importance in assessing the consequences of severe accidents. Recent experimental studies have concentrated upon the behavior of simulant fission product species such as cesium iodide, cesium hydroxide and tellurium, in terms of their vapor deposition characteristics onto metals representative of primary circuit materials. An induction furnace has been used to generate high density/structural materials aerosols for subsequent analysis, and similar equipment has been incorporated into a glove-box to study lightly-irradiated UO 2 clad in Zircaloy. Analytical techniques are being developed to assist in the identification of fission product chemical species released from the fuel at temperatures from 1000 to 2500 0 C. Matrix isolation-infrared spectroscopy has been used to identify species in the vapor phase, and specific data using this technique are reported

  8. Results of an aging-related failure survey of light water safety systems and components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meale, B.M.; Satterwhite, D.G.; MacDonald, P.E.

    1988-01-01

    The collection and evaluation of operating experience data are necessary in determining the effects of aging on the safety of operating nuclear plants. This paper presents the final results of a two-year research effort evaluating aging impacts on components in light water reactor systems. This research was performed as a part of the Nuclear Plant Aging Research program, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two unique types of data analyses were performed. In the first, an aging-survey study, aging-related failure data for fifteen light water reactor systems were obtained from the Nuclear Plant Reliability Data System (NPRDS). These included safety, support, and power conversion systems. A computerized sort of these records classified each record into one of five generic categories, based on the utility's choice of the failure's NPRDS cause category. Systems and components within the systems that were most affected by aging were identified. In the second analysis, information on aging-related reported causes of failures was evaluated for component failures reported to NPRDS for auxiliary feedwater, high pressure injection, service water, and Class 1E electrical power distribution systems. 3 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs

  9. Intrinsic climate dependency of ecosystem light and water-use-efficiencies across Australian biomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Hao; Li, Longhui; Eamus, Derek; Cleverly, James; Huete, Alfredo; Yu, Qiang; Beringer, Jason; Van Gorsel, Eva; Hutley, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    The sensitivity of ecosystem gross primary production (GPP) to availability of water and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) differs among biomes. Here we investigated variations of ecosystem light-use-efficiency (eLUE: GPP/PAR) and water-use-efficiency (eWUE: GPP/evapotranspiration) among seven Australian eddy covariance sites with differing annual precipitation, species composition and temperature. Changes to both eLUE and eWUE were primarily correlated with atmospheric vapor pressure deficit (VPD) at multiple temporal scales across biomes, with minor additional correlations observed with soil moisture and temperature. The effects of leaf area index on eLUE and eWUE were also relatively weak compared to VPD, indicating an intrinsic dependency of eLUE and eWUE on climate. Additionally, eLUE and eWUE were statistically different for biomes between summer and winter, except eWUE for savannas and the grassland. These findings will improve our understanding of how light- and water-use traits in Australian ecosystems may respond to climate change. (letter)

  10. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program Status of Silicon Carbide Joining Technology Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Advanced, accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems are currently being investigated for potential application in currently operating light water reactors (LWR) or in reactors that have attained design certification. Evaluation of potential options for accident tolerant nuclear fuel systems point to the potential benefits of silicon carbide (SiC) relative to Zr-based alloys, including increased corrosion resistance, reduced oxidation and heat of oxidation, and reduced hydrogen generation under steam attack (off-normal conditions). If demonstrated to be applicable in the intended LWR environment, SiC could be used in nuclear fuel cladding or other in-core structural components. Achieving a SiC-SiC joint that resists corrosion with hot, flowing water, is stable under irradiation and retains hermeticity is a significant challenge. This report summarizes the current status of SiC-SiC joint development work supported by the Department of Energy Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. Significant progress has been made toward SiC-SiC joint development for nuclear service, but additional development and testing work (including irradiation testing) is still required to present a candidate joint for use in nuclear fuel cladding.

  11. Microbiome change by symbiotic invasion in lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Stefanie; Wedin, Mats; Fernandez-Brime, Samantha; Cronholm, Bodil; Westberg, Martin; Weber, Bettina; Grube, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) seal the soil surface from erosive forces in many habitats where plants cannot compete. Lichens symbioses of fungi and algae often form significant fraction of these microbial assemblages. In addition to the fungal symbiont, many species of other fungi can inhabit the lichenic structures and interact with their hosts in different ways, ranging from commensalism to parasitism. More than 1800 species of lichenicolous (lichen-inhabiting) fungi are known to science. One example is Diploschistes muscorum, a common species in lichen-dominated BSC that infects lichens of the genus Cladonia. D. muscorum starts as a lichenicolous fungus, invading the lichen Cladonia symphycarpa and gradually develops an independent Diploschistes lichen thallus. Furthermore, bacterial groups, such as Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria, have been consistently recovered from lichen thalli and evidence is rapidly accumulating that these microbes may generally play integral roles in the lichen symbiosis. Here we describe lichen microbiome dynamics as the parasitic lichen D. muscorum takes over C. symphycarpa. We used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene and photobiont-specific ITS rDNA sequencing to track bacterial and algal transitions during the infection process, and employed fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize bacteria in the Cladonia and Diploschistes lichen thalli. We sampled four transitional stages, at sites in Sweden and Germany: A) Cladonia with no visible infection, B) early infection stage defined by the first visible Diploschistes thallus, C) late-stage infection with parts of the Cladonia thallus still identifiable, and D) final stage with a fully developed Diploschistes thallus, A gradual microbiome shift occurred during the transition, but fractions of Cladonia-associated bacteria were retained during the process of symbiotic reorganization. Consistent changes observed across sites included a notable decrease in the relative abundance of

  12. Rhizobial exopolysaccharides: genetic control and symbiotic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur Andrzej

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific complex interactions between soil bacteria belonging to Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Phylorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium and Azorhizobium commonly known as rhizobia, and their host leguminous plants result in development of root nodules. Nodules are new organs that consist mainly of plant cells infected with bacteroids that provide the host plant with fixed nitrogen. Proper nodule development requires the synthesis and perception of signal molecules such as lipochitooligosaccharides, called Nod factors that are important for induction of nodule development. Bacterial surface polysaccharides are also crucial for establishment of successful symbiosis with legumes. Sugar polymers of rhizobia are composed of a number of different polysaccharides, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS, capsular polysaccharides (CPS or K-antigens, neutral β-1, 2-glucans and acidic extracellular polysaccharides (EPS. Despite extensive research, the molecular function of the surface polysaccharides in symbiosis remains unclear. This review focuses on exopolysaccharides that are especially important for the invasion that leads to formation of indetermined (with persistent meristem type of nodules on legumes such as clover, vetch, peas or alfalfa. The significance of EPS synthesis in symbiotic interactions of Rhizobium leguminosarum with clover is especially noticed. Accumulating data suggest that exopolysaccharides may be involved in invasion and nodule development, bacterial release from infection threads, bacteroid development, suppression of plant defense response and protection against plant antimicrobial compounds. Rhizobial exopolysaccharides are species-specific heteropolysaccharide polymers composed of common sugars that are substituted with non-carbohydrate residues. Synthesis of repeating units of exopolysaccharide, their modification, polymerization and export to the cell surface is controlled by clusters of genes, named exo/exs, exp or

  13. Cell death and degeneration in the symbiotic\\ud dinoflagellates of the coral Stylophora pistillata\\ud during bleaching

    OpenAIRE

    Franklin, Daniel J.; Hoegh-Guldberg, O.; Jones, R.J.; Berges , John A.

    2004-01-01

    Rising sea temperatures are increasing the incidences of mass coral bleaching (the dissociation\\ud of the coral–algal symbiosis) and coral mortality. In this study, the effects of bleaching\\ud (induced by elevated light and temperature) on the condition of symbiotic dinoflagellates (Symbiodinium\\ud sp.) within the tissue of the hard coral Stylophora pistillata (Esper) were assessed using a suite\\ud of techniques. Bleaching of S. pistillata was accompanied by declines in the maximum potential\\...

  14. Energy Research Advisory Board, Civilian Nuclear Power Panel: Subpanel 1 report, Light water reactor utilization and improvement: Volume 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-10-01

    The Secretary of Energy requested that the Office of Nuclear Energy prepare a strategic national plan that outlines the Department's role in the future development of civilian nuclear power and that the Energy Research Advisory Board establish an ad hoc panel to review and comment on this plan. The Energy Research Advisory Board formed a panel for this review and three subpanels were formed. One subpanel was formed to address the institutional issues surrounding nuclear power, one on research and development for advanced nuclear power plants and a third subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. The subpanel on light water reactors held two meetings at which representatives of the DOE, the NRC, EPRI, industry and academic groups made presentations. This is the report of the subpanel on light water reactor utilization and improvement. This report presents the subpanel's assessment of initiatives which the Department of Energy should undertake in the national interest, to develop and support light water reactor technologies

  15. Guidance for Developing Principal Design Criteria for Advanced (Non-Light Water) Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holbrook, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Kinsey, Jim [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    In July 2013, the US Department of Energy (DOE) and US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) established a joint initiative to address a key portion of the licensing framework essential to advanced (non-light water) reactor technologies. The initiative addressed the “General Design Criteria for Nuclear Power Plants,” Appendix A to10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 50, which were developed primarily for light water reactors (LWRs), specific to the needs of advanced reactor design and licensing. The need for General Design Criteria (GDC) clarifications in non-LWR applications has been consistently identified as a concern by the industry and varied stakeholders and was acknowledged by the NRC staff in their 2012 Report to Congress1 as an area for enhancement. The initiative to adapt GDC requirements for non-light water advanced reactor applications is being accomplished in two phases. Phase 1, managed by DOE, consisted of reviews, analyses and evaluations resulting in recommendations and deliverables to NRC as input for NRC staff development of regulatory guidance. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) developed this technical report using technical and reactor technology stakeholder inputs coupled with analysis and evaluations provided by a team of knowledgeable DOE national laboratory personnel with input from individual industry licensing consultants. The DOE national laboratory team reviewed six different classes of emerging commercial reactor technologies against 10 CFR 50 Appendix A GDC requirements and proposed guidance for their adapted use in non-LWR applications. The results of the Phase 1 analysis are contained in this report. A set of draft Advanced Reactor Design Criteria (ARDC) has been proposed for consideration by the NRC in the establishment of guidance for use by non-LWR designers and NRC staff. The proposed criteria were developed to preserve the underlying safety bases expressed by the original GDC, and recognizing that advanced reactors may take

  16. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E.

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1996 to June 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288 degrees C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in air and high-purity, low-DO water. 83 refs., 60 figs., 14 tabs

  17. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual progress report, January 1996--June 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gruber, E.E. [and others

    1997-05-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from January 1996 to June 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, and (c) EAC of Alloys 600 and 690. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen (DO) to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated boiling water reactor (BWR) water at 288{degrees}C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from several heats of Alloys 600 and 690 in air and high-purity, low-DO water. 83 refs., 60 figs., 14 tabs.

  18. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors. Semiannual report July 1996--December 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.; Gavenda, D.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [and others

    1997-10-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors from July 1996 to December 1996. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon, low-alloy, and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS, (c) EAC of Alloy 600, and (d) characterization of residual stresses in welds of boiling water reactor (BWR) core shrouds by numerical models. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic and austenitic SSs in water that contained various concentrations of dissolved oxygen to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during various portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Slow-strain-rate-tensile tests were conducted in simulated BWR water at 288 C on SS specimens irradiated to a low fluence in the Halden reactor and the results were compared with similar data from a control-blade sheath and neutron-absorber tubes irradiated in BWRs to the same fluence level. Crack-growth-rate tests were conducted on compact-tension specimens from a low-carbon content heat of Alloy 600 in high-purity oxygenated water at 289 C. Residual stresses and stress intensity factors were calculated for BWR core shroud welds.

  19. Normal and compact spent fuel storage in light water reactor power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuenel, R.R.

    1978-01-01

    The compact storage of light water reactor spent fuel is a safe, cheap and reliable contribution towards overcoming the momentarily existing shortage in spent fuel reprocessing. The technical concept is described and physical behaviour discussed. The introduction of compact storage racks in nuclear power plants increases the capacity from 100 to about 240 %. The increase in decay heat is not more than about 14%, the increase in activity inventory and hazard potential does not exceed 20%. In most cases the existing power plant equipment fulfils the new requirements. (author)

  20. Two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, G.A. dos; Freitas, R.L.

    1990-01-01

    The two-phase coolant pump model of pressurized light water nuclear reactors is an important point for the loss of primary coolant accident analysis. The homologous curves set up the complete performance of the pump and are input for accidents analysis thermal-hydraulic codes. This work propose a mathematical model able to predict the two-phase homologous curves where it was incorporated geometric and operational pump condition. The results were compared with the experimental tests data from literature and it has showed a good agreement. (author)

  1. Comparison between Nuclear Data Libraries of Different Density of Data for H in Light Water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres, Lourdes; Gillette, Victor

    2003-01-01

    We introduce the results of comparison between nuclear data libraries at different density of data.Nuclear data libraries were produced for hydrogen (H) in light water at different density of data.These libraries were produced using the NJOY nuclear data processing system.With this code we produce pointwise cross sections and related quantities, in the ENDF format, and in the ACE format for MCNP.Experimental neutron spectrum was compared with MCNP4C simulations, based on the produced libraries and calculation time

  2. Multiregion, multigroup collision probability method with white boundary condition for light water reactor thermalization calculations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozgener, B.; Ozgener, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    A multiregion, multigroup collision probability method with white boundary condition is developed for thermalization calculations of light water moderated reactors. Hydrogen scatterings are treated by Nelkin's kernel while scatterings from other nuclei are assumed to obey the free-gas scattering kernel. The isotropic return (white) boundary condition is applied directly by using the appropriate collision probabilities. Comparisons with alternate numerical methods show the validity of the present formulation. Comparisons with some experimental results indicate that the present formulation is capable of calculating disadvantage factors which are closer to the experimental results than alternative methods

  3. Light water reactor - pressure-vessel neutron spectrometry with solid state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Gold, R.; Roberts, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Solid State Track Recorders have been used to measure absolute fission rates in the Light Water Reactor - Pressure Vessel Simulator at the Oak Ridge Pool Critical Assembly. Measurements were made in the 12/13 configuration with 237 Np, 238 U, and 235 U at the TSF, TSB, PVF, 1/4 T, 1/2 T, and 3/4 T locations. To avoid relative power normalization uncertainties, all locations were measured simultaneously in a single run for each isotope. Comparison of SSTR results are made with the results of measurements performed by NBS and CEN/SCK using benchmark referenced fission chambers and with the trends of theoretical calculations

  4. Verification of calculational methods for light water high converter reactors by critical experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berger, H.D.

    1988-01-01

    Calculational results relevant to the physics characteristics of PuO 2 /UO 2 -fueled light water high converter reactors (LWHCR) are discussed in the context of three particular codes and their associated data libraries, viz. WIMS/D, KARBUS (GRUCAH) and SPEKTRA. Analysis of various critical experiments - from the PROTEUS-LWHCR Phase I and Phase II programmes in particular - has demonstrated the importance of having a representative and comprehensive integral data base for identifying specific shortcomings in the calculational tools employed. (orig./DG)

  5. Prospects for plutonium recycling in light-water reactors in the European Communities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haijtink, B.

    1977-01-01

    On the basis of a forecast on nuclear power installation programmes and spent nuclear fuel reprocessing capacities in the European Community, an assessment has been made of the developmnt of the plutonium handling industry up to the year 1990. Data on plutonium recovered in the reprocessing plants, requirements for fuelling the fast-breeder reactors and the remaining stockpile have been evaluated. A possible strategy for recycling the plutonium surplus in light-water reactors has been developed and its effects as regards saving on requirements for natural uranium and enrichment services have been estimated

  6. Siting of light-water reactor power plants in the Federal Republic of Germany

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, H.A.G.

    1975-01-01

    The nuclear power plant site requirements formulated for environment protection in Germany allow nuclear power plants to be built at any site provided these requirements are duly taken into account in preparing and monitoring the site and in the design of the proposed power plant. After a brief discussion of light water reactor power plant sites, prevailing practice in site planning, site selection criteria, licensing procedure and used criteria, rules and guidelines, this paper reports on some considerations taken into account by the expert advisers and by the licensing authorities and future site planning. (orig.) [de

  7. Study of High Fluence Radiation-induced Swelling and Hardening under Light Water Reactor Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golubov, Stanislav I. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Barashev, Alexander V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Stoller, Roger E. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report documents a comprehensive model that has been developed to enable simulations of microstructural evolution under the irradiation conditions typical of light water reactor (LWR) internal components. The model, which accounts cascade production of point defects and vacancy, interstitial faulted dislocation loops, interstitial clusters migrating one-dimensionally and the evolution of the network dislocation structure, has been parameterized to account damage accumulation in austenitic stainless steels. Nucleation and growth of an ensemble of cavities is based on accounting the residual and produced by irradiation He atoms and existence of the dislocation and production biases. Additional applications and potential future developments for the model are also discussed.

  8. Evaluation of Proactive Management Issues Associated with Materials Aging in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoji, T.; Takeda, Y.; Kuniya, J.

    2012-01-01

    A Proactive Materials Degradation Management (PMDM) project has been carried out at the Fracture Research Institute (FRI), Tohoku University for 4 years, as a part of a Nuclear Industries Safety Agency (NISA) project that was formed in 2007 to define an Aging Management Program that addresses unexpected structural material failures in Light Water Reactors (LWRs). Such a program required, therefore, the development of a life prediction capability for specific combinations of degradation modes, structural materials, and reactor components. In this paper, the research subjects needed to predict quantitatively aging degradation phenomena in LWR structural materials are introduced. (author)

  9. LWR (light water reactor) pressure vessel irradiation surveillance dosimetry. Quarterly progress report, January-March 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guthrie, G.L.; McElroy, W.N.

    1980-12-01

    The report describes progress made in the Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Irradiation Surveillance Dosimetry Program during the reporting period. The primary objective of the multi-laboratory program is to prepare an updated and improved set of dosimetry, damage correlation, and associated reactor analysis ASTM Standards for LWR-PV irradiation surveillance programs. Supporting this objective are a series of analytical and experimental validation and calibration studies in 'Standard, Reference, and Controlled Environment Benchmark Fields', reactor 'Test Regions', and operating power reactor 'Surveillance Positions'

  10. Environment sensitive cracking in pressure boundary materials of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanninen, H.; Aho-Mantila, I.; Torronen, K.

    1987-08-01

    A review of the various forms of environment sensitive cracking in pressure boundary materials of light water reactors is presented. The available methods and the most promising future possibilities of preventive maintenance to counteract the environmental degradation are evaluated. Environment sensitive cracking is considered from the metallurgical, mechanical and environmental point of view. The main emphasis is on intergranular stress corrosion cracking of austenitic stainless steels and high strength Ni-base alloys as well as on corrosion fatigue of low alloy and stainless steels. Additionally, some general ideas on how to predict, reduce, monitor or eliminate environment sensitive cracking in service are presented

  11. Reactor and turbine building layout of the high performance light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittermann, D.

    2010-01-01

    Based on the information generated within the European funded project ''High Per-formance Light Water Reactor Phase 2'', a general plant layout has been developed. The central building is the reactor building, in which the containment and safety sys-tems are located. The reactor building is with app. 90.000 m 3 considerably smaller compared to other BWR buildings, thus providing a huge potential for cost savings. The turbine building with app 250,000 m 3 is of approximately the same size like for existing BWRs. (orig.)

  12. Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented

  13. Research of application of new material to light water reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihara, Tanetoyo

    1992-01-01

    Advanced Nuclear Equipment Research Institute (ANERI) has been doing the research to apply the new material including metal, fine ceramics and high polymer which were developed and applied in other industries to components and parts of light water reactor for the purpose of Improvement of reliability of components, improvement of efficiency of periodic inspection, improvement of repair and reduction of radiation exposure of worker. This project started upon the sponsorship of Ministry of International Trade and Industry (MITI) by the schedule of FY1985-FY1993 (9 years) and effective results has been obtained. (author)

  14. Development of Advanced High Uranium Density Fuels for Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, James [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Butt, Darryl [Boise State Univ., ID (United States); Meyer, Mitchell [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Xu, Peng [Westinghouse Electric Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    This work conducts basic materials research (fabrication, radiation resistance, thermal conductivity, and corrosion response) on U3Si2 and UN, two high uranium density fuel forms that have a high potential for success as advanced light water reactor (LWR) fuels. The outcome of this proposed work will serve as the basis for the development of advance LWR fuels, and utilization of such fuel forms can lead to the optimization of the fuel performance related plant operating limits such as power density, power ramp rate and cycle length.

  15. Terms and definitions of conversion ratio for High Conversion Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimada, Shoichiro

    1990-01-01

    Conversion ratio is an important index as a term to indicate fuel source utilization. It was used to indicate breeding ratio in FBR and its definition was discussed in the paper. Studies for High Conversion Light Water Reactor have been started and the conversion ratio has been used as an index of fuel utilization. Its definition is not unique and there are some confusions among the papers. In this data the author tries to review various definitions of conversion ratio and clarify their physical meaning and its relation among the definitions. (author)

  16. Energy-analysis of the total nuclear energy cycle based on light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kistemaker, J.

    1975-01-01

    The energy economy of the total nuclear energy cycle is investigated. Attention is paid to the importance of fossil fuel saving by using nuclear energy. The energy analysis is based on the construction and operation of power plants with an electric output of 1000MWe. Light water moderated reactors with a 2.7 - 3.2% enriched uranium core are considered. Additionally, the whole fuel cycle including ore winning and refining, enrichment and fuel element manufacturing and reprocessing has been taken into account. Neither radioactive waste storage problems nor safety problems related to the nuclear energy cycle and safeguarding have been dealt with, as exhaustive treatments can be found elswhere

  17. Light-water-reactor coupled neutronic and thermal-hydraulic codes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diamond, D.J.

    1982-01-01

    An overview is presented of computer codes that model light water reactor cores with coupled neutronics and thermal-hydraulics. This includes codes for transient analysis and codes for steady state analysis which include fuel depletion and fission product buildup. Applications in nuclear design, reactor operations and safety analysis are given and the major codes in use in the USA are identified. The neutronic and thermal-hydraulic methodologies and other code features are outlined for three steady state codes (PDQ7, NODE-P/B and SIMULATE) and four dynamic codes (BNL-TWIGL, MEKIN, RAMONA-3B, RETRAN-02). Speculation as to future trends with such codes is also presented.

  18. Microencapsulated fuel technology for commercial light water and advanced reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terrani, Kurt A.; Snead, Lance L.; Gehin, Jess C.

    2012-01-01

    The potential application of microencapsulated fuels to light water reactors (LWRs) has been explored. The specific fuel manifestation being put forward is for coated fuel particles embedded in silicon carbide or zirconium metal matrices. Detailed descriptions of these concepts are presented, along with a review of attributes, potential benefits, and issues with respect to their application in LWR environments, specifically from the standpoints of materials, neutronics, operations, and economics. Preliminary experiment and modeling results imply that with marginal redesign, significant gains in operational reliability and accident response margins could be potentially achieved by replacing conventional oxide-type LWR fuel with microencapsulated fuel forms.

  19. Variation in pupil diameter in North American Gartersnakes (Thamnophis) is regulated by immersion in water, not by light intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Clifford L

    2008-07-01

    A variable pupil generally regulates the amount of incoming light available for image formation on the retina. However, some of the semi-aquatic snakes (North American Gartersnakes, Thamnophis) that forage in relatively low light conditions reduce the pupil aperture in response to submergence underwater at the expense incoming light. Given that these snakes have all-cone retinas, reduction of incoming light because of pupillary constriction upon immersion seems counterintuitive. To test the effect of light and water on pupil aperture, three species of North American Gartersnakes (T. atratus, T. hammondii, and T. sirtalis) were exposed to nine light intensities in air and water. There was no effect of light on relative pupil aperture for any species. However, all three species showed a significant reduction in pupil aperture upon submergence underwater. The lack of a light response is surprising, and may be related to the method of accommodation in snakes. Snakes lack a ciliary muscle, and move the lens by constricting the pupil, which increases pressure in the posterior chamber and pushes the lens forward. Upon submergence, the snakes may be attempting to overcome the change in refractive index and defocus imposed by the water, by constricting the pupil. Thus, having the iris muscle involved in accommodation may preclude it from much of a light regulating function.

  20. Temperature coefficients of reactivity in light water moderated cores with soluble poisons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyoshi, Y.; Yamamoto, T.; Suzaki, T.; Kobayashi, I.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports that experimental studies on temperature coefficients of reactivity in light water moderated and reflected cores with soluble poisons such as boron and gadolinium have been performed with the tank- type critical assembly (TCA) in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). The critical water levels were measured in the range from room temperature to about 60 degrees C to study the dependence of temperature effect on the core configuration and concentrations of soluble poison. Temperature coefficients were calculated with SRAC code system and compared with experimental data. It was found that the temperature coefficients are always negative for the experimental cores in which the moderator contain soluble poison of boron. On the other hand, the temperature coefficients become positive in the cores with soluble poison of gadolinium due to the deviation of the absorption cross section from 1/v characteristics and the effect of the neutron spectral shift with increase of the temperature

  1. Passive autocatalytic recombiners for combustible gas control in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolff, U.; Sliter, G.

    2004-01-01

    A key aspect of the worldwide effort to develop advanced nuclear power plants is designing to address severe accident phenomena, including the generation of hydrogen during core melt progression (metal-water and core-concrete reactions). This design work not only resolves safety concerns with hydrogen, but also supports the development of a technical basis for simplification of off-site emergency planning. The dominant challenge to any emergency planning approach is a large, early containment failure due to pressure excursions. Among the potential contributors to large and rapid increases in containment pressure is hydrogen combustion. The more improbable a containment-threatening combustion becomes, the more appropriate the argument for significant emergency planning simplification. As discussed in this paper, catalytic recombiners provide a means to passively and reliably limit hydrogen combustion to a continuous oxidation process with virtually no potential for containment failure in passive advanced light water reactors (ALWRs). (author)

  2. Water Treatment Using Advanced Ultraviolet Light Sources Final Report CRADA No. TC02089.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoppes, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Oster, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-08-15

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC as manager and operator of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Teknichal Services, LLC (TkS), to develop water treatment systems using advanced ultraviolet light sources. The Russian institutes involved with this project were The High Current Electronics Institute (HCEI) and Russian Institute of Technical Physics-Institute of Experimental Physics (VNIIEF). HCEI and VNIIEF developed and demonstrated the potential commercial viability of short-wavelength ultraviolet excimer lamps under a Thrust 1 Initiatives for Proliferation Prevention (IPP) Program. The goals of this collaboration were to demonstrate both the commercial viability of excilampbased water disinfection and achieve further substantial operational improvement in the lamps themselves; particularly in the area of energy efficiency.

  3. Carrier dynamics of a visible-light-responsive Ta3N5 photoanode for water oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Ziani, Ahmed

    2015-01-01

    The physicochemical properties of a tantalum nitride (Ta3N5) photoanode were investigated in detail to understand the fundamental aspects associated with the photoelectrochemical (PEC) water oxidation. The Ta3N5 thin films were synthesized using DC magnetron sputtering followed by annealing in air and nitridation under ammonia (NH3). A polycrystalline structure with a dense morphology of the monoclinic Ta3N5 films was obtained. A relatively low absorption coefficient (104 to 105 cm-1) in the visible light range was measured for Ta3N5, consistent with the nature of the indirect band-gap. Ultra-fast spectroscopic measurements revealed that the Ta3N5 with different thicknesses films possess low transport properties and fast carrier recombination (<10 ps). These critical kinetic properties of Ta3N5 as a photoanode may necessitate high overpotentials to achieve appreciable photocurrents for water oxidation (onset ∼0.6 V vs. RHE). This journal is

  4. Shippingport operations with the Light Water Breeder Reactor core. (LWBR Development Program)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budd, W.A.

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the operation of the Shippingport Atomic Power Station during the LWBR (Light Water Breeder Reactor) Core lifetime. It also summarizes the plant-oriented operations during the period preceding LWBR startup, which include the defueling of The Pressurized Water Reactor Core 2 (PWR-2) and the installation of the LWBR Core, and the operations associated with the defueling of LWBR. The intent of this report is to examine LWBR experience in retrospect and present pertinent and significant aspects of LWBR operations that relate primarily to the nuclear portion of the Station. The nonnuclear portion of the Station is discussed only as it relates to overall plant operation or to unusual problems which result from the use of conventional equipment in radioactive environments. 30 refs., 69 figs., 27 tabs

  5. Visible light photoactivity of Polypropylene coated Nano-TiO2 for dyes degradation in water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, R.; Amato, C. A. D’; Zannotti, M.; Rommozzi, E.; Gunnella, R.; Minicucci, M.; Di Cicco, A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of Polypropylene as support material for nano-TiO2 photocatalyst in the photodegradation of Alizarin Red S in water solutions under the action of visible light was investigated. The optimization of TiO2 pastes preparation using two commercial TiO2, Aeroxide P-25 and Anatase, was performed and a green low-cost dip-coating procedure was developed. Scanning electron microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy and X-Ray Diffraction analysis were used in order to obtain morphological and structural information of as-prepared TiO2 on support material. Equilibrium and kinetics aspects in the adsorption and successive photodegradation of Alizarin Red S, as reference dye, are described using polypropylene-TiO2 films in the Visible/TiO2/water reactor showing efficient dyes degradation. PMID:26627118

  6. Once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Y.; Koshizuka, S.

    2001-01-01

    Concept of once-through cycle, supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactors was developed. The research covered major aspects of conceptual design such as cores of thermal and fast reactors, plant system and heat balance, safety system and criteria, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control and start-up. The advantages of the reactor lie in the compactness of the plant from high specific enthalpy of supercritical water, the simplicity of the once-through cycle and the experiences of major component technologies which are based on supercritical fossil-fired power plants and LWRs. The operating temperatures of the major components are within the experience in spite of high coolant outlet temperature. The once-through cycle is compatible with the tight fuel lattice fast reactor because of high head pumps and small coolant flow rate. (author)

  7. Visible-Light-Responsive Graphitic Carbon Nitride: Rational Design and Photocatalytic Applications for Water Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qinmin; Durkin, David P; Elenewski, Justin E; Sun, Yingxue; Banek, Nathan A; Hua, Likun; Chen, Hanning; Wagner, Michael J; Zhang, Wen; Shuai, Danmeng

    2016-12-06

    Graphitic carbon nitride (g-C 3 N 4 ) has recently emerged as a promising visible-light-responsive polymeric photocatalyst; however, a molecular-level understanding of material properties and its application for water purification were underexplored. In this study, we rationally designed nonmetal doped, supramolecule-based g-C 3 N 4 with improved surface area and charge separation. Density functional theory (DFT) simulations indicated that carbon-doped g-C 3 N 4 showed a thermodynamically stable structure, promoted charge separation, and had suitable energy levels of conduction and valence bands for photocatalytic oxidation compared to phosphorus-doped g-C 3 N 4 . The optimized carbon-doped, supramolecule-based g-C 3 N 4 showed a reaction rate enhancement of 2.3-10.5-fold for the degradation of phenol and persistent organic micropollutants compared to that of conventional, melamine-based g-C 3 N 4 in a model buffer system under the irradiation of simulated visible sunlight. Carbon-doping but not phosphorus-doping improved reactivity for contaminant degradation in agreement with DFT simulation results. Selective contaminant degradation was observed on g-C 3 N 4 , likely due to differences in reactive oxygen species production and/or contaminant-photocatalyst interfacial interactions on different g-C 3 N 4 samples. Moreover, g-C 3 N 4 is a robust photocatalyst for contaminant degradation in raw natural water and (partially) treated water and wastewater. In summary, DFT simulations are a viable tool to predict photocatalyst properties and oxidation performance for contaminant removal, and they guide the rational design, fabrication, and implementation of visible-light-responsive g-C 3 N 4 for efficient, robust, and sustainable water treatment.

  8. Parameterization of light scattering for solving the inverse problem of determining the concentrations of the principal light scattering and absorbing admixtures in shelf waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Pelevin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available A method for estimating the water backscattering coefficient was put forward on the basis of experimental data of diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance and irradiance reflectance. Calculations were carried out for open sea waters of different types and the spectral dependencies were found ("anomalous" spectra and explained. On this basis, a new model of light backscattering on particles in the sea is proposed. This model may be useful for modelling remote sensing reflectance spectra in order to solve the inverse problems of estimating the concentration of natural admixtures in shelf waters.

  9. Acclimations to light quality on plant and leaf level affect the vulnerability of pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) to water deficit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Anna M; Noga, Georg; Hunsche, Mauricio

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the influence of light quality on the vulnerability of pepper plants to water deficit. For this purpose plants were cultivated either under compact fluorescence lamps (CFL) or light-emitting diodes (LED) providing similar photon fluence rates (95 µmol m(-2) s(-1)) but distinct light quality. CFL emit a wide-band spectrum with dominant peaks in the green and red spectral region, whereas LEDs offer narrow band spectra with dominant peaks at blue (445 nm) and red (665 nm) regions. After one-week acclimation to light conditions plants were exposed to water deficit by withholding irrigation; this period was followed by a one-week regeneration period and a second water deficit cycle. In general, plants grown under CFL suffered more from water deficit than plants grown under LED modules, as indicated by the impairment of the photosynthetic efficiency of PSII, resulting in less biomass accumulation compared to respective control plants. As affected by water shortage, plants grown under CFL had a stronger decrease in the electron transport rate (ETR) and more pronounced increase in heat dissipation (NPQ). The higher amount of blue light suppressed plant growth and biomass formation, and consequently reduced the water demand of plants grown under LEDs. Moreover, pepper plants exposed to high blue light underwent adjustments at chloroplast level (e.g., higher Chl a/Chl b ratio), increasing the photosynthetic performance under the LED spectrum. Differently than expected, stomatal conductance was comparable for water-deficit and control plants in both light conditions during the stress and recovery phases, indicating only minor adjustments at the stomatal level. Our results highlight the potential of the target-use of light quality to induce structural and functional acclimations improving plant performance under stress situations.

  10. Technologies For Maintaining Animals In Space: Lighting, Air Quality, Noise, Food And Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winget, C. M.; Skidmore, M. G.; Holley, D. C.; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In the terrestrial environment multiple time cues exist. Zeitgebers have been identified and studied for their ability to convey temporal information to various physiological systems. In the microgravity experiment it is necessary to define time cues within the flight hardware prior to flight. During flight if changes in the Circadian System (e.g., mean, phase angle, period) occur this would indicate that the gravity vector is important relative to biological timing. This presentation is concerned with the environmental parameter: to support rodent experiments in microgravity. The Animal Enclosure Module (AEM) provides solid food bars and water via lixits and ad libitum. Flight animals (Sprague-Dawley rats, 60 - 300g) when compared to ground controls show similar growth (mean growth per day g, plus or minus SD; flight 5.4 plus or minus 2.0, ground 5.9 plus or minus 2.1). Current AEMs use incandescent lighting (approx. 5 Lux). Light emitting diode (LED) arrays are being developed that provide a similar light environment as cool-white fluorescent sources (40 Lux). In ground based tests (12L:12D), these arrays show normal circadian entrainment (Tau = 24.0) with respect to the behavioral responses, measured (drinking, eating, gross locomotor activity). A newly developed ultra high efficiency filter system can entrap all feces, urine and odors from 6 rats for 24 days. Maximum sound level exposure limits (per octave band 22 Hz - 179 kHz) have been established. The AEM will effectively support animal experiments in microgravity.

  11. Effect of light conditions and chemical characteristics of water on dissipation of glyphosate in aqueous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Veena; Kaur, Pervinder; Kaur, Paawan

    2017-11-06

    The present study was conducted to determine the effect of light conditions and chemical properties of water on dissipation of glyphosate. The residues of glyphosate and aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) were quantified using fluorescence spectrophotometer after derivatization with 9-fluoroenylmethoxycarbonyl chloride (FMOC-Cl) and orthopthaldehyde (OPA). Average percent recoveries of glyphosate and AMPA from distilled, tap, and ground water ranged from 87.5 to 94.9, 87.3 to 93.7, and 80.6 to 92.0, respectively, with relative standard deviation less than 10%. The limit of detection and limit of quantification of glyphosate and AMPA from different water matrices ranged from 0.001 to 0.03 μg mL -1 and 0.003 to 0.01 μg mL -1 , respectively. The dissipation of glyphosate followed the first-order kinetics, and half-life varied from 1.56 to 14.47 and 13.14 to 42.38 days under UV and sunlight, respectively. The pH and electrical conductivity (EC) of water has differential influence on dissipation of glyphosate, and it increased with increase in pH and EC.

  12. Optical fluence modelling for ultraviolet light emitting diode-based water treatment systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simons, R; Gabbai, U E; Moram, M A

    2014-12-01

    This work presents a validated optical fluence rate model optimised for ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs), which allow a very wide range of emission wavelengths and source geometries to be used in water treatment units. The model is based on a Monte Carlo approach, in which an incremental ray-tracing algorithm is used to calculate the local volumetric rate of energy absorption and subsequently convert it to the local fluence rate distribution for an UV-LED water treatment chamber of arbitrary design. The model includes contributions from optical reflections and scattering by treatment chamber walls and from scattering due to particulates and/or microorganisms. The model successfully predicts optical fluence rates in point-of-use water treatment units, as verified using biodosimetry with MS-2 bacteriophage at a UV-LED emission wavelength of 254 nm. The effects of chamber geometry are also modelled effectively and are consistent with the inactivation data for E. coli at 254 nm. The data indicate that this model is suitable for application in the design and optimisation of UV-LED-based water treatment systems. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Nondestructive Examination (NDE) Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Diaz, A.A.; Friley, J.R.; Greenwood, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Kurtz, R.J.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Vo, T.V.

    1993-11-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs);using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvements that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to the Regulatory and ASME Code requirements, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel and other components inspected in accordance with Section XI of the ASME Code. This is a programs report covering the programmatic work from April 1992 through September 1992

  14. American National Standard: design requirements for light-water-reactor fuel-handling systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1980-01-01

    This standard defines the required functions of fuel handling systems at light water reactor nuclear power plants. It provides minimum design requirements for equipment and tools for safe handling of nuclear fuel and control components at light water reactor nuclear power plants. The fuel handling system covered by this standard consists of handling equipment used for receiving and inspecting fuel containing new and recycled uranium; transporting on-site and loading fuel containing new and recycled uranium or irradiated fuel and control components in the reactor; removing from the reactor, transporting to storage, and inspecting irradiated fuel and loading casks for shipment of irradiated fuel from the site. It includes basic requirements and configuration for design, fabrication, maintenance, and operation. The basis of this standard is that the intended function of the equipment will be performed in an efficient and economical manner that assures protection to plant personnel and to the public, and that any radiation exposurers are maintained as low as reasonably achievable

  15. Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R.; Carson, S.D.; Peterson, P.K.

    1997-01-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term

  16. Evaluation and improvement of nondestructive evaluation reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bates, D.J.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Heasler, P.G.; Mart, G.A.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.; Van Fleet, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection (ISI) of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) was established to determine the reliability of current ISI techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this NRC program are to: determine the reliability of ultrasonic ISI performed on commercial light-water reactor (LWR) primary systems, using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis, determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety and determine the level of inspection reliability required to ensure a suitably low failure probability, evaluate the degree of reliability improvement that could be achieved using improved and advanced NDE techniques, based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE uncertainties, recommend revisions to ASME Code, Section XI, and Regulatory Requirements that will ensure suitably low failure probabilities. The scope of this program is limited to ISI of primary systems; the results and recommendations may also be applicable to Class II piping systems

  17. Commercial Light Water Reactor -Tritium Extraction Facility Process Waste Assessment (Project S-6091)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsu, R.H.; Delley, A.O.; Alexander, G.J.; Clark, E.A.; Holder, J.S.; Lutz, R.N.; Malstrom, R.A.; Nobles, B.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Carson, S.D. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States); Peterson, P.K. [Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico, NM (United States)

    1997-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has been tasked by the Department of Energy (DOE) to design and construct a Tritium Extraction Facility (TEF) to process irradiated tritium producing burnable absorber rods (TPBARs) from a Commercial Light Water Reactor (CLWR). The plan is for the CLWR-TEF to provide tritium to the SRS Replacement Tritium Facility (RTF) in Building 233-H in support of DOE requirements. The CLWR-TEF is being designed to provide 3 kg of new tritium per year, from TPBARS and other sources of tritium (Ref. 1-4).The CLWR TPBAR concept is being developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The TPBAR assemblies will be irradiated in a Commercial Utility light water nuclear reactor and transported to the SRS for tritium extraction and processing at the CLWR-TEF. A Conceptual Design Report for the CLWR-TEF Project was issued in July 1997 (Ref. 4).The scope of this Process Waste Assessment (PWA) will be limited to CLWR-TEF processing of CLWR irradiated TPBARs. Although the CLWR- TEF will also be designed to extract APT tritium-containing materials, they will be excluded at this time to facilitate timely development of this PWA. As with any process, CLWR-TEF waste stream characteristics will depend on process feedstock and contaminant sources. If irradiated APT tritium-containing materials are to be processed in the CLWR-TEF, this PWA should be revised to reflect the introduction of this contaminant source term.

  18. Nondestructive examination (NDE) reliability for inservice inspection of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doctor, S.R.; Deffenbaugh, J.D.; Good, M.S.; Green, E.R.; Heasler, P.G.; Simonen, F.A.; Spanner, J.C.; Taylor, T.T.

    1989-10-01

    The Evaluation and Improvement of NDE Reliability for Inservice Inspection of Light Water Reactors (NDE Reliability) Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory was established by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission to determine the reliability of current inservice inspection (ISI) techniques and to develop recommendations that will ensure a suitably high inspection reliability. The objectives of this program include determining the reliability of ISI performed on the primary systems of commercial light-water reactors (LWRs); using probabilistic fracture mechanics analysis to determine the impact of NDE unreliability on system safety; and evaluating reliability improvement that can be achieved with improved and advanced technology. A final objective is to formulate recommended revisions to ASME Code and Regulatory requirements based on material properties, service conditions, and NDE capabilities and uncertainties. The program scope is limited to ISI of the primary systems including the piping, vessel, and other inspected components. This is a progress report covering the programmatic work from October 1987 through March 1988. 21 refs., 28 figs., 2 tabs

  19. Theoretical investigation of oxidation mechanism of fuel cladding in light-water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Yasunori; Morishita, Kazunori; Iwakiri, Hirotomo; Kaneta, Yasunori

    2013-01-01

    Aging management is one of the main issues to keep the safety of currently operating light-water reactors. In many cases plant aging is caused by material's degradation due to energetic particle irradiation, high temperature, high pressure, etc. In order to keep the safety of light-water reactors, material's degradation is accurately inspected, and then, based on the results thus obtained the appropriate plant design and timely maintenance should be made. To do so, we should develop the methodology to predict the behavior of materials under severe environments. In the present study, the theoretical and computational investigation was done to understand the mechanism of oxidation process of fuel cladding, which is one of the main degradation processes. Our calculation results have indicated that a difference between the oxidation rates of Zr at normal operating temperature and high temperature may be explained by the stress effect on the diffusion process of an oxygen atom in the oxide film. (author)

  20. Standard Practice for Design of Surveillance Programs for Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Power Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers procedures for designing a surveillance program for monitoring the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels. This practice includes the minimum requirements for the design of a surveillance program, selection of vessel material to be included, and the initial schedule for evaluation of materials. 1.2 This practice was developed for all light-water moderated nuclear power reactor vessels for which the predicted maximum fast neutron fluence (E > 1 MeV) at the end of license (EOL) exceeds 1 × 1021 neutrons/m2 (1 × 1017 n/cm2) at the inside surface of the reactor vessel. 1.3 This practice applies only to the planning and design of surveillance programs for reactor vessels designed and built after the effective date of this practice. Previous versions of Practice E185 apply to earlier reactor vessels. 1.4 This practice does not provide specific procedures for monitoring the radiation induced cha...

  1. Application of Photocatalysts and LED Light Sources in Drinking Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gopal Achari

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates a cross-section of TiO2 compositions for which existing evidence suggests the prospect of improved performance compared to standard Degussa P25. In the context of a program aimed toward a 365 nm LED based photo-reactor, the question is whether a distinctly superior photocatalyst composition for drinking water treatment is now available that would shape design choices. An answer was sought by synthesizing several photocatalysts with reported high reactivity in some context in the literature, and by performing photocatalysts reactivity tests using common pollutants of water system including Natural Organic Matter (NOM and Emerging Contaminants (ECs from the pesticide and pharmaceutical classes. 365 nm Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs were used as the irradiation source. Since LEDs are now available in the UV, we did not examine the TiO2 modifications that bring band gap excitation into the region beyond 400 nm. The results suggest that the choice of the photocatalyst should be best made to fit the reactor design and photocatalyst mounting constraints such as mass transport, reactive surface, and light field. No photocatalyst composition overall, superior for all classes emerged.

  2. Flow-induced vibration for light water reactors. Progress report, January-June 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Coster, M.A.

    1981-02-01

    Flow-Induced Vibration for Light Water Reactors (FIV for LWRs) is a four-year program designed to improve the FIV performance of light water reactors through the development of design criteria, analytical models for predicting behavior of components, general scaling laws to improve the accuracy of reduced-scale tests, and the identification of high FIV risk areas. The program is managed by the General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department and has three major contributors: General Electric Nuclear Power Systems Engineering Department (NPSED), General Electric Corporate Research and Development (CR and D) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The program commenced December 1, 1976, but was suspended on September 30, 1978, due to a shift in Department of Energy (DOE) priorities away from LWR productivity/availability. It was reinitiated as of August 1, 1979. A second program suspension occurred from March 29, 1980 through May 16, 1980, due to funding limits. This progress report summarizes the accomplishments achieved during the period from Janury 1980 to June 1980

  3. Development of a simplified methodology for the isotopic determination of fuel spent in Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez N, H.; Francois L, J.L.

    2005-01-01

    The present work presents a simplified methodology to quantify the isotopic content of the spent fuel of light water reactors; their application is it specific to the Laguna Verde Nucleo electric Central by means of a balance cycle of 18 months. The methodology is divided in two parts: the first one consists on the development of a model of a simplified cell, for the isotopic quantification of the irradiated fuel. With this model the burnt one is simulated 48,000 MWD/TU of the fuel in the core of the reactor, taking like base one fuel assemble type 10x10 and using a two-dimensional simulator for a fuel cell of a light water reactor (CPM-3). The second part of the methodology is based on the creation from an isotopic decay model through an algorithm in C++ (decay) to evaluate the amount, by decay of the radionuclides, after having been irradiated the fuel until the time in which the reprocessing is made. Finally the method used for the quantification of the kilograms of uranium and obtained plutonium of a normalized quantity (1000 kg) of fuel irradiated in a reactor is presented. These results will allow later on to make analysis of the final disposition of the irradiated fuel. (Author)

  4. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors. Volume 16: Semiannual report, October 1992--March 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Ruther, W.E.; Kassner, T.F.; Michaud, W.F.; Park, J.Y.; Sanecki, J.E.; Shack, W.J.

    1993-09-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRs) during the six months from October 1992 to March 1993. Fatigue and EAC of piping, pressure vessels, and core components in LWRs are important concerns as extended reactor lifetimes are envisaged. Topics that have been investigated include (1) fatigue of low-alloy steel used in piping, steam generators, and reactor pressure vessels. (2) EAC of cast stainless steels (SSs), (3) radiation-induced segregation and irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of Type 304 SS after accumulation of relatively high fluence, and (4) EAC of low-alloy steels. Fatigue tests were conducted on medium-sulfur-content A106-Gr B piping and A533-Gr B pressure vessel steels in simulated PWR water and in air. Additional crack growth data were obtained on fracture-mechanics specimens of cast austenitic SSs in the as-received and thermally aged conditions and chromium-nickel-plated A533-Gr B steel in simulated boiling-water reactor (BWR) water at 289{degrees}C. The data were compared with predictions based on crack growth correlations for ferritic steels in oxygenated water and correlations for wrought austenitic SS in oxygenated water developed at ANL and rates in air from Section XI of the ASME Code. Microchemical and microstructural changes in high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath from operating BWRs were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy.

  5. Drinking water treatment with ultraviolet light for travelers -- Evaluation of a mobile lightweight system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Lisa F; Ritter, Klaus; Hillebrandt, David; Küpper, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The SteriPEN(®) is a handheld device for disinfecting water with ultraviolet (UV) radiation. The manufacturer claims a reduction of at least 99.9% of bacteria, viruses, and protozoa. The present study intends to verify the general effectiveness of the device. Furthermore, the influence of bottle geometry and water movement is examined and the issue of user safety with regard to UV-C radiation is addressed. The device was applied on water containing a known number of microorganisms (Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, and the spore of Geobacillusstearothermophilus) and the survival rate was examined. Three different types of bottles commonly used among travelers served as test containers. All tests were conducted with and without agitating the water during irradiation. Furthermore, a spectral analysis was performed on the light of the device. The SteriPEN(®) reached a mean reduction of more than 99.99% of bacteria and 99.57% of the spores when applied correctly. However, the results of the trials without agitating the water only yielded a 94.98% germ reduction. The device's maximal radiation intensity lies at 254 nm which is the wavelength most efficient in inactivating bacteria. The UV-C fraction is filtered out completely by common bottle materials. However, when applied in larger containers a portion of the UV-C rays exits the water surface. If applied according to the instructions the device manages a satisfactory inactivation of bacteria. However, it bears the danger of user errors relevant to health. Therefore, education on the risks of incorrect application should be included in the travel medical consultation. Also there are still aspects that need to be subject to further independent research. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  6. Biomimetic fabrication of WO{sub 3} for water splitting under visible light with high performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Chao; Zhu, Shenmin, E-mail: smzhu@sjtu.edu.cn; Yao, Fan; Gu, Jiajun; Zhang, Wang [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites (China); Chen, Zhixin [University of Wollongong, Faculty of Engineering (Australia); Zhang, Di, E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, State Key Laboratory of Metal Matrix Composites (China)

    2013-08-15

    Inspired by the high light-harvesting properties of typical butterfly wings, ceramic WO{sub 3} butterfly wings with hierarchical structures of bio-butterfly wings was fabricated using a template of PapilioParis butterfly wings through a sol-gel method. The effect of calcination temperatures on the structures of the ceramic butterfly wings was investigated and the results showed that the WO{sub 3} butterfly wing replica calcined at 550 Degree-Sign C (WO{sub 3} replica-550) is a single phase and has a high crystallinity and relatively fine hierarchical structure. The average grain size of WO{sub 3} replica-550 and WO{sub 3} powder are around 32.6 and 42.2 nm, respectively. Compared with pure WO{sub 3} powder, WO{sub 3} replica-550 demonstrated a higher light-harvesting capability in the region from 460 to 700 nm and more importantly the higher charge separation rate, as evidenced by electron paramagnetic resonance measurements. Photocatalytic O{sub 2} evolutions from water were investigated on the ceramic butterfly wings and pure WO{sub 3} powder under visible light ({lambda} > 420 nm). The results showed that the amount of O{sub 2} produced from WO{sub 3} replica-550 is 50 % higher than that of the pure WO{sub 3} powder. The improved photocatalytic performance of WO{sub 3} replica-550 is attributed to the quasi-honeycomb structure inherited from the PapilioParis butterfly wings, providing both high light-harvesting efficiency and efficient charge transport through the WO{sub 3}.

  7. New evaluation of thermal neutron scattering libraries for light and heavy water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquez Damian Jose Ignacio

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve the design and safety of thermal nuclear reactors and for verification of criticality safety conditions on systems with significant amount of fissile materials and water, it is necessary to perform high-precision neutron transport calculations and estimate uncertainties of the results. These calculations are based on neutron interaction data distributed in evaluated nuclear data libraries. To improve the evaluations of thermal scattering sub-libraries, we developed a set of thermal neutron scattering cross sections (scattering kernels for hydrogen bound in light water, and deuterium and oxygen bound in heavy water, in the ENDF-6 format from room temperature up to the critical temperatures of molecular liquids. The new evaluations were generated and processable with NJOY99 and also with NJOY-2012 with minor modifications (updates, and with the new version of NJOY-2016. The new TSL libraries are based on molecular dynamics simulations with GROMACS and recent experimental data, and result in an improvement of the calculation of single neutron scattering quantities. In this work, we discuss the importance of taking into account self-diffusion in liquids to accurately describe the neutron scattering at low neutron energies (quasi-elastic peak problem. To improve modeling of heavy water, it is important to take into account temperature-dependent static structure factors and apply Sköld approximation to the coherent inelastic components of the scattering matrix. The usage of the new set of scattering matrices and cross-sections improves the calculation of thermal critical systems moderated and/or reflected with light/heavy water obtained from the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP handbook. For example, the use of the new thermal scattering library for heavy water, combined with the ROSFOND-2010 evaluation of the cross sections for deuterium, results in an improvement of the C/E ratio in 48 out of

  8. New evaluation of thermal neutron scattering libraries for light and heavy water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquez Damian, Jose Ignacio; Granada, Jose Rolando; Cantargi, Florencia; Roubtsov, Danila

    2017-09-01

    In order to improve the design and safety of thermal nuclear reactors and for verification of criticality safety conditions on systems with significant amount of fissile materials and water, it is necessary to perform high-precision neutron transport calculations and estimate uncertainties of the results. These calculations are based on neutron interaction data distributed in evaluated nuclear data libraries. To improve the evaluations of thermal scattering sub-libraries, we developed a set of thermal neutron scattering cross sections (scattering kernels) for hydrogen bound in light water, and deuterium and oxygen bound in heavy water, in the ENDF-6 format from room temperature up to the critical temperatures of molecular liquids. The new evaluations were generated and processable with NJOY99 and also with NJOY-2012 with minor modifications (updates), and with the new version of NJOY-2016. The new TSL libraries are based on molecular dynamics simulations with GROMACS and recent experimental data, and result in an improvement of the calculation of single neutron scattering quantities. In this work, we discuss the importance of taking into account self-diffusion in liquids to accurately describe the neutron scattering at low neutron energies (quasi-elastic peak problem). To improve modeling of heavy water, it is important to take into account temperature-dependent static structure factors and apply Sköld approximation to the coherent inelastic components of the scattering matrix. The usage of the new set of scattering matrices and cross-sections improves the calculation of thermal critical systems moderated and/or reflected with light/heavy water obtained from the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) handbook. For example, the use of the new thermal scattering library for heavy water, combined with the ROSFOND-2010 evaluation of the cross sections for deuterium, results in an improvement of the C/E ratio in 48 out of 65

  9. Parameterizing ecosystem light use efficiency and water use efficiency to estimate maize gross primary production and evapotranspiration using MODIS EVI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quantifying global carbon and water balances requires accurate estimation of gross primary production (GPP) and evapotranspiration (ET), respectively, across space and time. Models that are based on the theory of light use efficiency (LUE) and water use efficiency (WUE) have emerged as efficient met...

  10. How do light and water acquisition strategies affect species selection during secondary succession in moist tropical forests?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schönbeck, Leonie; Lohbeck, Madelon; Bongers, Frans; Ramos, Miguel Martínez; Sterck, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Pioneer tree species have acquisitive leaf characteristics associated with high demand of light and water, and are expected to be shade and drought intolerant. Using leaf functional traits (specific leaf area, photosynthetic rate, relative water content and stomatal conductance) and tree

  11. Cell division and density of symbiotic Chlorella variabilis of the ciliate Paramecium bursaria is controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Yuuki; Fujishima, Masahiro

    2012-10-01

    The association of ciliate Paramecium bursaria with symbiotic Chlorella sp. is a mutualistic symbiosis. However, both the alga-free paramecia and symbiotic algae can still grow independently and can be reinfected experimentally by mixing them. Effects of the host's nutritional conditions against the symbiotic algal cell division and density were examined during early reinfection. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that algal cell division starts 24 h after mixing with alga-free P. bursaria, and that the algal mother cell wall is discarded from the perialgal vacuole membrane, which encloses symbiotic alga. Labelling of the mother cell wall with Calcofluor White Stain, a cell-wall-specific fluorochrome, was used to show whether alga had divided or not. Pulse labelling of alga-free P. bursaria cells with Calcofluor White Stain-stained algae with or without food bacteria for P. bursaria revealed that the fluorescence of Calcofluor White Stain in P. bursaria with bacteria disappeared within 3 days after mixing, significantly faster than without bacteria. Similar results were obtained both under constant light and dark conditions. This report is the first describing that the cell division and density of symbiotic algae of P. bursaria are controlled by the host's nutritional conditions during early infection. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. Outbursts In Symbiotic Binaries (FUSE 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the past year, we made good progress on analysis of FUSE observations of the symbiotic binary Z And. For background, Z And is a binary system composed of a red giant and a hot component of unknown status. The orbital period is roughly 750 days. The hot component undergoes large-scale eruptions every 10-20 yr. An outburst began several years ago, triggering this FUSE opportunity. First, we obtained an excellent set of ground-based optical data in support, of the FUSE observations. We used FAST, a high throughput low resolution spectrograph on the 1.5-m telescope at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. A 300 g/ mm grating blazed at 4750 A, a 3 in. slit, and a thinned Loral 512 x 2688 CCD gave us spectra covering 3800-7500 A at a resolution of 6 A. The wavelength solution for each spectrum has a probable error of +/- 0.5 A or better. Most of the resulting spectra have moderate signal-to-noise, S/.N approx. greater than 30 per pixel. The time coverage for these spectra is excellent. Typically, we acquired spectra every 1-2 nights during dark runs at Mt. Hopkins. These data cover most of the rise and all of the decline of the recent outburst. The spectra show a wealth of emission lines, including H I, He I, He II, [Fe V11], and the Raman scattering bands at 6830 A and 7088 A. The Raman bands and other high ionization features vary considerably throughout the outburst. These features will enable us to correlate variations in the FUSE spectra with variations in the optical spectra. Second, we began an analysis of FUSE spectra of Z And. We have carefully examined the spectra, identifying real features and defects. We have identified and measured fluxes for all strong emission lines, including the O VI doublet at 1032 A and 1038 A. These and several other strong emission lines display pronounced P Cygni absorption components indicative of outgrowing gas. We will attempt to correlate these velocities with similar profiles observed on optical spectra. The line velocities - together

  13. Interval Timing Is Preserved Despite Circadian Desynchrony in Rats: Constant Light and Heavy Water Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Christian C; Mistlberger, Ralph E

    2017-08-01

    The mechanisms that enable mammals to time events that recur at 24-h intervals (circadian timing) and at arbitrary intervals in the seconds-to-minutes range (interval timing) are thought to be distinct at the computational and neurobiological levels. Recent evidence that disruption of circadian rhythmicity by constant light (LL) abolishes interval timing in mice challenges this assumption and suggests a critical role for circadian clocks in short interval timing. We sought to confirm and extend this finding by examining interval timing in rats in which circadian rhythmicity was disrupted by long-term exposure to LL or by chronic intake of 25% D 2 O. Adult, male Sprague-Dawley rats were housed in a light-dark (LD) cycle or in LL until free-running circadian rhythmicity was markedly disrupted or abolished. The rats were then trained and tested on 15- and 30-sec peak-interval procedures, with water restriction used to motivate task performance. Interval timing was found to be unimpaired in LL rats, but a weak circadian activity rhythm was apparently rescued by the training procedure, possibly due to binge feeding that occurred during the 15-min water access period that followed training each day. A second group of rats in LL were therefore restricted to 6 daily meals scheduled at 4-h intervals. Despite a complete absence of circadian rhythmicity in this group, interval timing was again unaffected. To eliminate all possible temporal cues, we tested a third group of rats in LL by using a pseudo-randomized schedule. Again, interval timing remained accurate. Finally, rats tested in LD received 25% D 2 O in place of drinking water. This markedly lengthened the circadian period and caused a failure of LD entrainment but did not disrupt interval timing. These results indicate that interval timing in rats is resistant to disruption by manipulations of circadian timekeeping previously shown to impair interval timing in mice.

  14. Comprehensive EST analysis of the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deleury Emeline

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reef ecosystems are renowned for their diversity and beauty. Their immense ecological success is due to a symbiotic association between cnidarian hosts and unicellular dinoflagellate algae, known as zooxanthellae. These algae are photosynthetic and the cnidarian-zooxanthellae association is based on nutritional exchanges. Maintenance of such an intimate cellular partnership involves many crosstalks between the partners. To better characterize symbiotic relationships between a cnidarian host and its dinoflagellate symbionts, we conducted a large-scale EST study on a symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis, in which the two tissue layers (epiderm and gastroderm can be easily separated. Results A single cDNA library was constructed from symbiotic tissue of sea anemones A. viridis in various environmental conditions (both normal and stressed. We generated 39,939 high quality ESTs, which were assembled into 14,504 unique sequences (UniSeqs. Sequences were analysed and sorted according to their putative origin (animal, algal or bacterial. We identified many new repeated elements in the 3'UTR of most animal genes, suggesting that these elements potentially have a biological role, especially with respect to gene expression regulation. We identified genes of animal origin that have no homolog in the non-symbiotic starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis genome, but in other symbiotic cnidarians, and may therefore be involved in the symbiosis relationship in A. viridis. Comparison of protein domain occurrence in A. viridis with that in N. vectensis demonstrated an increase in abundance of some molecular functions, such as protein binding or antioxidant activity, suggesting that these functions are essential for the symbiotic state and may be specific adaptations. Conclusion This large dataset of sequences provides a valuable resource for future studies on symbiotic interactions in Cnidaria. The comparison with the closest

  15. The risks of nuclear energy technology. Safety concepts of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raskob, Wolfgang; Landman, Claudia; Paesler-Sauer, Juergen; Kessler, Guenter; Veser, Anke; Schlueter, Franz-Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. Discusses the security concept of reactors. Analyzes possible crash of air planes on a reactor containment. Presents measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident. Written in engaging style for professionals and policy makers. The book analyses the risks of nuclear power stations. The security concept of reactors is explained. Measures against the spread of radioactivity after a severe accident, accidents of core melting and a possible crash of an air plane on a reactor containment are discussed. The book covers three scientific subjects of the safety concepts of Light Water Reactors: - A first part describes the basic safety design concepts of operating German Pressurized Water Reactors and Boiling Water Reactors including accident management measures introduced after the reactor accidents of Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. These safety concepts are also compared with the experiences of the Fukushima accidents. In addition, the safety design concepts of the future modern European Pressurized Water Reactor (EPR) and of the future modern Boiling Water Reactor SWR-1000 (KERENA) are presented. These are based on new safety research results of the past decades. - In a second, part the possible crash of military or heavy commercial air planes on a reactor containment is analyzed. It is shown that reactor containments can be designed to resist to such an airplane crash. - In a third part, an online decision system is presented. It allows to analyze the distribution of radioactivity in the atmosphere and to the environment after a severe reactor accident. It provides data for decisions to be taken by authorities for the minimization of radiobiological effects to the population. This book appeals to readers who have an interest in save living conditions and some understanding for physics or engineering.

  16. Fighting malaria with engineered symbiotic bacteria from vector mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibao; Ghosh, Anil K.; Bongio, Nicholas; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Lampe, David J.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The most vulnerable stages of Plasmodium development occur in the lumen of the mosquito midgut, a compartment shared with symbiotic bacteria. Here, we describe a strategy that uses symbiotic bacteria to deliver antimalaria effector molecules to the midgut lumen, thus rendering host mosquitoes refractory to malaria infection. The Escherichia coli hemolysin A secretion system was used to promote the secretion of a variety of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins by Pantoea agglomerans, a common mosquito symbiotic bacterium. These engineered P. agglomerans strains inhibited development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei by up to 98%. Significantly, the proportion of mosquitoes carrying parasites (prevalence) decreased by up to 84% for two of the effector molecules, scorpine, a potent antiplasmodial peptide and (EPIP)4, four copies of Plasmodium enolase–plasminogen interaction peptide that prevents plasminogen binding to the ookinete surface. We demonstrate the use of an engineered symbiotic bacterium to interfere with the development of P. falciparum in the mosquito. These findings provide the foundation for the use of genetically modified symbiotic bacteria as a powerful tool to combat malaria. PMID:22802646

  17. Hydraulic analysis of a backflow limiter for the high performance light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, K. [EnBW Kernkraft GmbH, Philippsburg (Germany). Kernkraftwerk Philippsburg; Laurien, E. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. for Nuclear Energy and Energy Systems; Class, A.G.; Schulenberg, T. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The high performance light water reactor (HPLWR) is one of the six concepts of the Generation IV program. It develops current light water reactor technologies and combines them with those of supercritical fossil fired power plants, using a once-through direct steam cycle. Water is used both as moderator and as coolant and flows as a single phase fluid through the core at a supercritical pressure of 25 MPa. The coolant exits with temperatures around 500 C. A conceptual design of the RPV and its internals has been presented by Fischer et al (2006). It features four circumferentially arranged inlets which are placed well above the four outlets. As recirculation pumps will not be required for this concept, a postulated break of one of the inlet feedwater lines will cause an immediate loss of flow and reduce the available water inventory in the vessel to cool the core. The following temperature peak can be reduced significantly if an additional safety component is installed in the feedwater lines to control and minimize this outflow until further steps are executed in order to maintain a reasonable amount of water inside the vessel to cool the core. The design of the backflow limiter features 10 inlet swirler vanes with an angle of 10 deg and 30 exit swirler vanes with an angle of 60 deg, the swirl chamber has an overall diameter of 0.95 m. The component fits inside the inlet flange and is therefore protected against damage from the outside. In case of a loss of coolant accident (LOCA), e.g. in case of a postulated break of one of the four inlet feedwater lines, the backflow limiter is able to reduce the mass flow for normal operation in reverse direction by a factor of approximately 5. Further work will include a sensitivity-study of the applied mesh and a comparison of the k-w SST turbulence model to non-linear RANS models, since the prediction of swirl flow is rather imprecise using the isotropic models.

  18. A critical heat flux correlation for advanced pressurized light water reactor application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Hame, W.

    1982-05-01

    Many CHF-correlations have been developed for water cooled rod clusters representing typical PWR or BWR fuel element geometries with relative wide rod lattices. However the fuel elements of an Advanced Pressurized Water Reactor (APWR) have a tight fuel rod lattice, in view of increasing the fuel utilization. It was therefore decided to produce a new CHF-correlation valid for rod bundles with tight lattices. The already available WSC-2 correlation was chosen as a basis. The geometry dependent parameters of this correlation were determined again with the method of the root mean square fitting from the experimental data of the CHF-tests performed in the frame of the Light Water Breeder Reactor programme at the Bettis Laboratory. These tests include triangular array rod bundles with very tight lattices. Furthermore the effect of spiral spacer ribs was investigated on the basis of experimental data from the Columbia University. Application of the new CHF-correlation to conditions typical for an APWR shows that the predicted critical heat fluxes are much smaller than those calculated with the usual PWR-CHF-correlations, but they are higher than those predicted by the B+W-VPI+SU correlation. (orig.) [de

  19. Static and Continuous flow-through pulsed light technology for pesticide abatement in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranda, Ana Beatriz; Lasagabaster, Amaia; de Marañón, Iñigo Martínez

    2017-10-15

    Perspectives concerning pulsed light (PL) technology as a novel water decontamination treatment are overviewed in this work. Degradation of atrazine, malathion, chlorpyriphos-methyl and bromopropylate in aqueous solutions at different concentrations was performed employing static and continuous flow-through PL units. Results for both PL systems were compared in terms of efficacy of pesticides degradation and derived photoproducts formed. The pesticides degradation increased with the applied total fluence for both PL systems. In general, PL induced rapid degradation of all studied compounds although some differences were observed in the rate of degradation among them. The most intense treatment in the static unit (11J/cm 2 ) yielded degradations between 60 and 85% whereas degradations between 74 and 93% were observed after exposure to slightly lower fluences (10J/cm 2 ) in the dynamic unit. For both PL systems bromopropylate was the most affected compound. Photodegradation products arose from chemical reactions involving structural changes like dehalogenation, desulfuration, dealkylaytion and oxidation of the alkyl chains. Although further research is needed before an efficient application in full-scale systems, PL appears as a promising technology in order to reduce the presence of pesticides residues in process or waste waters, allowing thereby recirculation of these waters with the subsequent economic and environmental advantages. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Small-angle light scattering studies of dense AOT-water-decane microemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Micali, N.; Trusso, S.; Mallamace, F.; Chen, S.H.

    1996-01-01

    It is performed extensive studies of a three-component microemulsion system composed of AOT-water-decane using small-angle light scattering (SALS). The small-angle scattering intensities are measured in the angular interval 0.001-0.1 radians, corresponding to a Bragg wave number range of 0.14 μm -1 -1 . The measurements were made by changing temperature and volume fraction φ of the dispersed phase in the range 0.65< φ < 0.75. All samples have a fixed water-to-AOT molar ratio, w [water[/[AOT[ = 40.8, in order to keep the same average droplet size in the stable one-phase region. With the SALS technique it is observed all the phase boundaries of a very complex phase diagram with a percolation line and many structural organizations within it. It is observed at the percolation transition threshold, a scaling behavior of the intensity data. In addition it is described in detail a structural transition from a droplet microemulsion to a bi continuous one a suggested by a recent small-angle neutron scattering experiment. From the data analysis it is show that both the percolation phenomenon and this novel structural transition are described from a large-scale aggregation between microemulsion droplets

  1. Treatment of ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds using second generation ultraviolet light technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lyandres, S.E.; Rees, J.T.; Folsom, E.N.; Boegel, A.J.

    1991-03-01

    Pilot tests, using a second generation ultraviolet (UV) light technology, were run on ground water samples taken f rom two separate aquifers contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCS) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Alameda County, California. The VOCs included gasoline, TCE, and 1,2-DCA. VOC concentrations in the ground water ranged from 11 to 1,000 ppB. Discharges of treated ground water at LLNL are not to exceed 5 ppb total VOCs under a Federal National Pollution Discharge Elimination System discharge permit. Test results indicated that double-bonded VOCS, including aromatic compounds and TCE, were decomposed quickly and efficiently to low or nondetectable levels (<0.5 ppB, analyzed with a gas chromatograph). An equivalent level of degradation for 1,2-DCA required a moderately higher UV energy input and greater concentrations of additives. Concentrations of peroxide tested ranged between 10 and 60 ppM; however, those above 30 ppM did not significantly increase the rate of VOC destruction

  2. Application of ultraviolet light-emitting diodes (UV-LEDs) for water disinfection: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Kai; Mohseni, Madjid; Taghipour, Fariborz

    2016-05-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) disinfection is an effective technology for the inactivation of pathogens in water and is of growing interest for industrial application. A new UV source - ultraviolet light-emitting diode (UV-LED) - has emerged in the past decade with a number of advantages compared to traditional UV mercury lamps. This promising alternative raises great interest in the research on application of UV-LEDs for water treatment. Studies on UV-LED water disinfection have increased during the past few years. This article presents a comprehensive review of recent studies on UV-LEDs with various wavelengths for the inactivation of different microorganisms. Many inconsistent and incomparable data were found from published studies, which underscores the importance of establishing a standard protocol for studying UV-LED inactivation of microorganisms. Different UV sensitivities to UV-LEDs and traditional UV lamps were observed in the literature for some microorganisms, which requires further investigation for a better understanding of microorganism response to UV-LEDs. The unique aspects of UV-LEDs improve inactivation effectiveness by applying LED special features, such as multiple wavelengths and pulsed illumination; however, more studies are needed to investigate the influencing factors and mechanisms. The special features of UV-LEDs offer the flexibility of novel reactor designs for a broad application of UV-LED reactors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmentally assisted cracking in Light Water Reactors: Semiannual report, October 1994--March 1995. Volume 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, H.M.; Chopra, O.K.; Gavenda, D.J.; Hins, A.G.; Kassner, T.F.; Ruther, W.E.; Shack, W.J.; Soppet, W.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-01-01

    This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking (EAC) in light water reactors (LWRS) from October 1994 to March 1995. Topics that have been investigated include (a) fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steel used in reactor piping and pressure vessels, (b) EAC of Alloy 600 and 690, and (c) irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) of Type 304 SS. Fatigue tests were conducted on ferritic steels in water with several dissolvedoxygen (DO) concentrations to determine whether a slow strain rate applied during different portions of a tensile-loading cycle are equally effective in decreasing fatigue life. Tensile properties and microstructures of several heats of Alloy 600 and 690 were characterized for correlation with EAC of the alloys in simulated LWR environments. Effects of DO and electrochemical potential on susceptibility to intergranular cracking of high- and commercial-purity Type 304 SS specimens from control-blade absorber tubes and a control-blade sheath irradiated in boiling water reactors were determined in slow-strain-rate-tensile tests at 289{degrees}C. Microchemical changes in the specimens were studied by Auger electron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy to determine whether trace impurity elements may contribute to IASCC of these materials.

  4. Recent advances in severe accident technology - direct containment heating in advanced light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fontana, M.H.

    1993-01-01

    The issues affecting high-pressure melt ejection (HPME) and the consequential containment pressurization from direct containment heating (DCH), as they affect advanced light water reactors (ALWRs), specifically advanced pressurized water reactors (APWRs), were reviewed by the U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Reactor Severe Accident Program (ARSAP). Recommendations from ARSAP regarding the design of APWRs to minimize DCH are embodied within the Electric Power Research Institute ALWR Utility Requirements Document, which specifies (a) a large, strong containment; (b) an in-containment refueling water storage tank; (c) a reactor cavity configuration that minimizes energy transport to the containment atmosphere; and (d) a reactor coolant system depressurization system. Experimental and analytical efforts, which have focused on current-generation plants, and analyses for APWRs were reviewed. Although DCH is a subject of continuous research and considerable uncertainties remain, it is the judgment of the ARSAP that reactors complying with the recommended design requirements would have a low probability of early containment failure due to HPME and DCH

  5. Multimodal Imaging and Lighting Bias Correction for Improved μPAD-based Water Quality Monitoring via Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Katherine E.; Angus, Scott V.; Reynolds, Kelly A.; Yoon, Jeong-Yeol

    2016-06-01

    Smartphone image-based sensing of microfluidic paper analytical devices (μPADs) offers low-cost and mobile evaluation of water quality. However, consistent quantification is a challenge due to variable environmental, paper, and lighting conditions, especially across large multi-target μPADs. Compensations must be made for variations between images to achieve reproducible results without a separate lighting enclosure. We thus developed a simple method using triple-reference point normalization and a fast-Fourier transform (FFT)-based pre-processing scheme to quantify consistent reflected light intensity signals under variable lighting and channel conditions. This technique was evaluated using various light sources, lighting angles, imaging backgrounds, and imaging heights. Further testing evaluated its handle of absorbance, quenching, and relative scattering intensity measurements from assays detecting four water contaminants - Cr(VI), total chlorine, caffeine, and E. coli K12 - at similar wavelengths using the green channel of RGB images. Between assays, this algorithm reduced error from μPAD surface inconsistencies and cross-image lighting gradients. Although the algorithm could not completely remove the anomalies arising from point shadows within channels or some non-uniform background reflections, it still afforded order-of-magnitude quantification and stable assay specificity under these conditions, offering one route toward improving smartphone quantification of μPAD assays for in-field water quality monitoring.

  6. Environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors annual report January - December 2005.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexandreanu, B.; Chen, Y.; Chopra, O. K.; Chung, H. M.; Gruber, E. E.; Shack, W. J.; Soppet, W. K.

    2007-08-31

    This report summarizes work performed from January to December 2005 by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking in light water reactors (LWRs). Existing statistical models for estimating the fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels and austenitic stainless steels (SSs) as a function of material, loading, and environmental conditions were updated. Also, the ASME Code fatigue adjustment factors of 2 on stress and 20 on life were critically reviewed to assess the possible conservatism in the current choice of the margins. An approach, based on an environmental fatigue correction factor, for incorporating the effects of LWR environments into ASME Section III fatigue evaluations is discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic stainless steels and their welds to irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) is being evaluated as a function of the fluence level, water chemistry, material chemistry, and fabrication history. For this task, crack growth rate (CGR) tests and slow strain rate tensile (SSRT) tests are being conducted on various austenitic SSs irradiated in the Halden boiling water reactor. The SSRT tests are currently focused on investigating the effects of the grain boundary engineering process on the IASCC of the austenitic SSs. The CGR tests were conducted on Type 316 SSs irradiated to 0.45-3.0 dpa, and on sensitized Type 304 SS and SS weld heat-affected-zone material irradiated to 2.16 dpa. The CGR tests on materials irradiated to 2.16 dpa were followed by a fracture toughness test in a water environment. The effects of material composition, irradiation, and water chemistry on growth rates are discussed. The susceptibility of austenitic SS core internals to IASCC and void swelling is also being evaluated for pressurized water reactors. Both SSRT tests and microstructural examinations are being conducted on specimens irradiated in the BOR-60 reactor in Russia to doses up to 20 dpa. Crack growth rate data

  7. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Research in Support of Light Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hallbert, Bruce P.; Kenneth, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II and C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R and D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals to ensure that legacy analog II and C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and to implement digital II and C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II and C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security

  8. Development of the accident simulation system 'IMPACT' for light water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naitoh, Masanori; Ando, Yasumasa; Ujita, Hiroshi

    1999-01-01

    The total plan, software contents and analysis results of IMPACT are reported. IMPACT is entrusted business from Ministry of International Trade and Industry to verify safety against severe accidents in light water nuclear power plants by computer simulation. The IMPACT codes for simulation are featured by adoption of mechanistic models and module structure, assuming use of parallel computers for a series of events from normal operation to severe accidents. The IMPACT business is a long term project for 10 years, and aims at completion of a boiling transition behavior analysis code and a fluid/structure interaction analysis code as short-term targets and a severe accident analysis code as a long-term target. So far the codes of the former two items and a prototype version of the latter have been completed, and their verification analysis is being carried out. (M.M.)

  9. Out-of-pile safety studies performed for light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtaud, M.

    1975-01-01

    The out-of-pile experimental program performed at the Heat Transfer Laboratory of the CEN-Grenoble in view of constructing the physical models and correlations employed in the computer codes used for describing loss-of-coolant accidents in light water reactors is presented. This program is mainly concerned - for the blowdown phase - with studies of heat transfer in rod bundles performed in the OMEGA loop (4,5MW 170 bars) and of critical flow and flashing in the Moby Dick (10 bars, 360kW) and Canon facilities; -for the core reflooding phase- with the study of heat transfer in rod bundles and rewetting of clads performed on the ERSEC loop (450kW, 6 bars) [fr

  10. Impact of nuclear library difference on neutronic characteristics of thorium-loaded light water reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unesaki, H.; Isaka, S.; Nakagome, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Impact of nuclear library difference on neutronic characteristics of thorium-loaded light water reactor fuel is investigated through cell burnup calculations using SRAC code system. Comparison of k ∞ and nuclide composition was made between the results obtained by JENDL-3.3, ENDF/B-VI.8 and JEFF3.0 for (U, Th)O 2 fuels as well as UO 2 fuels, with special interest on the burnup dependence of the neutronic characteristics. The impact of nuclear data library difference on k ∞ of (U, Th)O 2 fuels was found to be significantly large compared to that of UO 2 fuels. Notable difference was also found in nuclide concentration of TRU nuclides. (authors)

  11. Categorization of failed and damaged spent LWR [light-water reactor] fuel currently in storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, W.J.

    1987-11-01

    The results of a study that was jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the Electric Power Research Institute are described in this report. The purpose of the study was to (1) estimate the number of failed fuel assemblies and damaged fuel assemblies (i.e., ones that have sustained mechanical or chemical damage but with fuel rod cladding that is not breached) in storage, (2) categorize those fuel assemblies, and (3) prepare this report as an authoritative, illustrated source of information on such fuel. Among the more than 45,975 spent light-water reactor fuel assemblies currently in storage in the United States, it appears that there are nearly 5000 failed or damaged fuel assemblies. 78 refs., 23 figs., 19 tabs

  12. Influence of water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering coefficients of the Central European aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zieger

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The influence of aerosol water uptake on the aerosol particle light scattering was examined at the regional continental research site Melpitz, Germany. The scattering enhancement factor f(RH, defined as the aerosol particle scattering coefficient at a certain relative humidity (RH divided by its dry value, was measured using a humidified nephelometer. The chemical composition and other microphysical properties were measured in parallel. f(RH showed a strong variation, e.g. with values between 1.2 and 3.6 at RH=85% and λ=550 nm. The chemical composition was found to be the main factor determining the magnitude of f(RH, since the magnitude of f(RH clearly correlated with the inorganic mass fraction measured by an aerosol mass spectrometer (AMS. Hysteresis within the recorded humidograms was observed and explained by long-range transported sea salt. A closure study using Mie theory showed the consistency of the measured parameters.

  13. Programme of research and development on plutonium recycling in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    The state of progress on 31 December 1977 of the work relating to the research and development programme on plutonium recycling in light-water nuclear power stations is presented in this second annual report. Since almost the entire programme is in the process of implementation, the report contains either the technical specifications and the objectives of recently concluded contracts or the initial results obtained. The prime objective of the programme is to facilitate the acceptance of the plutonium industry in the Community. Among the projects necessary to attain this prime objective is a forward analysis of plutonium utilization and of its impact on the environment. Various preliminary projects have been implemented in order to lessen this impact. The second objective is aimed at improving scientific and technical knowledge of the basic neutron physics of the higher isotopes of plutonium and transplutonium elements, of the behavior of the power station (static and dynamic) and of the fuel

  14. Advanced reactor design study. Assessing nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fleischman, R.M.; Goldsmith, S.; Newman, D.F.; Trapp, T.J.; Spinrad, B.I.

    1981-09-01

    The objective of the Advanced Reactor Design Study (ARDS) is to identify and evaluate nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in light water reactors (LWRs). The results of this study provide a basis for selecting and demonstrating specific nonbackfittable concepts that have good potential for implementation. Lead responsibility for managing the study was assigned to the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). Nonbackfittable concepts for improving uranium utilization in LWRs on the once-through fuel cycle were selected separately for PWRs and BWRs due to basic differences in the way specific concepts apply to those plants. Nonbackfittable concepts are those that are too costly to incorporate in existing plants, and thus, could only be economically incorporated in new reactor designs or plants in very early stages of construction. Essential results of the Advanced Reactor Design Study are summarized

  15. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas Baldwin; Magdy Tawfik; Leonard Bond

    2010-06-01

    In support of expanding the use of nuclear power, interest is growing in methods of determining the feasibility of longer term operation for the U.S. fleet of nuclear power plants, particularly operation beyond 60 years. To help establish the scientific and technical basis for such longer term operation, the DOE-NE has established a research and development (R&D) objective. This objective seeks to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which addresses the needs of this objective, is being developed in collaboration with industry R&D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. In moving to identify priorities and plan activities, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Technologies was held June 10–12, 2010, in Seattle, Washington. The workshop was run to enable industry stakeholders and researchers to identify the nuclear industry needs in the areas of future OLM technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. It also sought to identify approaches for collaboration that would be able to bridge or fill the technology gaps. This report is the meeting proceedings, documenting the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for a plan which is under development that will enable the I&C research pathway to achieve its goals. Benefits to the nuclear industry accruing from On Line Monitoring Technology cannot be ignored. Information gathered thus far has contributed significantly to the Department of Energy’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. DOE has

  16. Problem statement: international safeguards for a light-water reactor fuels reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shipley, J.P.; Hakkila, E.A.; Dietz, R.J.; Cameron, C.P.; Bleck, M.E.; Darby, J.L.

    1979-03-01

    This report considers the problem of developing international safeguards for a light-water reactor (LWR) fuel reprocessing/conversion facility that combines the Purex process with conversion of plutonium nitrate to the oxide by means of plutonium (III) oxalate precipitation and calcination. Current international safeguards systems are based on the complementary concepts of materials accounting and containment and surveillance, which are designed to detect covert, national diversion of nuclear material. This report discusses the possible diversion threats and some types of countermeasures, and it represents the first stage in providing integrated international safeguards system concepts that make optimum use of available resources. The development of design methodology to address this problem will constitute a significant portion of the subsequent effort. Additionally, future technology development requirements are identified. 8 figures, 1 table

  17. A quality assurance programme for reload fuel for light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilson, R.

    1976-01-01

    The Exxon Nuclear quality assurance programme for the design and fabrication of reload fuel for light-water reactors is described. The programme is based on the 18 quality assurance criteria used for the design and construction of nuclear facilities in the United States of America, but is broadened considerably to reflect other inputs and experiences unique to nuclear fuel production. The government and utility interfaces with the fuel supplier in the area of quality assurance, and future trends, for example, the development of topical quality assurance reports, are also discussed. Quality assurance is discussed in terms of three fundamental categories: management control, engineering assurance and quality control. Examples of specific design, processing and inspection considerations which relate to known fuel failure mechanisms are discussed. The results of irradiated fuel examinations to date have shown that certain fuel failure mechanisms can be alleviated by the considerations described and that fuel of the requisite quality can be consistently produced. (author)

  18. Safety aspects of designs for future light water reactors (evolutionary reactors)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-07-01

    The main purpose of this document is to describe the major innovations of proposed designs of future light water reactors, to describe specific safety characteristics and safety analysis methodologies, and to give a general overview of the most important safety aspects related to future reactors. The reactors considered in this report are limited to those intended for fixed station electrical power production, excluding most revolutionary concepts. More in depth discussion is devoted to those designs that are in a more advanced state of completion and have been more extensively described and analysed in the open literature. Other designs will be briefly described, as evidence of the large spectrum of new proposals. Some designs are similar; others implement unique features and require specific discussion (not all aspects of designs with unique features are fully discussed in this document). 131 refs, 22 figs

  19. Report from the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring Technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldwin, Thomas; Tawfik, Magdy; Bond, Leonard

    2010-01-01

    In support of expanding the use of nuclear power, interest is growing in methods of determining the feasibility of longer term operation for the U.S. fleet of nuclear power plants, particularly operation beyond 60 years. To help establish the scientific and technical basis for such longer term operation, the DOE-NE has established a research and development (R and D) objective. This objective seeks to develop technologies and other solutions that can improve the reliability, sustain the safety, and extend the life of current reactors. The Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program, which addresses the needs of this objective, is being developed in collaboration with industry R and D programs to provide the technical foundations for licensing and managing the long-term, safe, and economical operation of nuclear power plants. The LWRS Program focus is on longer-term and higher-risk/reward research that contributes to the national policy objectives of energy and environmental security. In moving to identify priorities and plan activities, the Light Water Reactor Sustainability Workshop on On-Line Monitoring (OLM) Technologies was held June 10-12, 2010, in Seattle, Washington. The workshop was run to enable industry stakeholders and researchers to identify the nuclear industry needs in the areas of future OLM technologies and corresponding technology gaps and research capabilities. It also sought to identify approaches for collaboration that would be able to bridge or fill the technology gaps. This report is the meeting proceedings, documenting the presentations and discussions of the workshop and is intended to serve as a basis for a plan which is under development that will enable the I and C research pathway to achieve its goals. Benefits to the nuclear industry accruing from On Line Monitoring Technology cannot be ignored. Information gathered thus far has contributed significantly to the Department of Energy's Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program. DOE

  20. Application of advanced irradiation analysis methods to light water reactor pressure vessel test and surveillance programs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odette, R.; Dudey, N.; McElroy, W.; Wullaert, R.; Fabry, A.

    1977-01-01

    Inaccurate characterization and inappropriate application of neutron irradiation exposure variables contribute a substantial amount of uncertainty to embrittlement analysis of light water reactor pressure vessels. Damage analysis involves characterization of the irradiation environment (dosimetry), correlation of test and surveillance metallurgical and dosimetry data, and projection of such data to service conditions. Errors in available test and surveillance dosimetry data are estimated to contribute a factor of approximately 2 to the data scatter. Non-physical (empirical) correlation procedures and the need to extrapolate to the vessel may add further error. Substantial reductions in these uncertainties in future programs can be obtained from a more complete application of available damage analysis tools which have been developed for the fast reactor program. An approach to reducing embrittlement analysis errors is described, and specific examples of potential applications are given. The approach is based on damage analysis techniques validated and calibrated in benchmark environments

  1. Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control Systems Technologies Research in Support of Light Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hallbert, Bruce P.; Kenneth, Thomas [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho (United States)

    2014-08-15

    The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II and C) Systems Technologies Pathway conducts targeted research and development (R and D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals to ensure that legacy analog II and C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet, and to implement digital II and C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the nuclear power plant operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II and C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation's energy and environmental security.

  2. Light water reactor fuel analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2). Detailed structure and user's manual

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Motoe; Saitou, Hiroaki.

    1997-11-01

    A light water reactor fuel behavior analysis code FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2) was developed as an improved version of FEMAXI-IV. Development of FEMAXI-IV has been already finished in 1992, though a detailed structure and input manual of the code have not been open to users yet. Here, the basic theories and structure, the models and numerical solutions applied to FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), and the material properties adopted in the code are described in detail. In FEMAXI-IV(Ver.2), programming bugs in previous FEMAXI-IV were eliminated, renewal of the pellet thermal conductivity was performed, and a model of thermal-stress restraint on FP gas release was incorporated. For facilitation of effective and wide-ranging application of the code, methods of input/output of the code are also described in detail, and sample output is included. (author)

  3. Surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels in IMEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, Yong-Sun; Ahn, Sang-Bok; Park, Dae-Gyu; Jung, Yang-Hong; Yoo, Byung-Ok; Oh, Wan-Ho; Baik, Seung-Je; Koo, Dae-Seo; Lee, Key-Soon

    1999-01-01

    The surveillance tests for light-water cooled nuclear power reactor vessels were established to monitor the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties of ferritic materials in the beltline according to US NRC 10 CFR 50 App. G, US NRC RG1.99-rev.2, ASTM E185-82 and E185-94 in Irradiated Materials Examination Facility(IMEF). The surveillance capsule was transported from NPPs pool sites to KAERI IMEF by using a shipping cask. The capsule was cut and dismantled by capsule cutting machine and milling machine in M2 hot cell. Charpy tests and tension tests were performed in M5a and M5b hot cells respectively. Especially the EPMA located at hot lab was used to analyze the Ni and Cu wt% composition of base metal and weld for predicting the adjusted reference temperature(ART). The established process and test results were summarized in this paper. (author)

  4. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrovic, Bojan; Memmott, Matthew; Boy, Guy; Charit, Indrajit; Manera, Annalisa; Downar, Thomas; Lee, John; Muldrow, Lycurgus; Upadhyaya, Belle; Hines, Wesley; Haghighat, Alierza

    2017-01-01

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project ''Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I 2 S-LWR)''. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  5. Radiological characteristics of light-water reactor spent fuel: A literature survey of experimental data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roddy, J.W.; Mailen, J.C.

    1987-12-01

    This survey brings together the experimentally determined light-water reactor spent fuel data comprising radionuclide composition, decay heat, and photon and neutron generation rates as identified in a literature survey. Many citations compare these data with values calculated using a radionuclide generation and depletion computer code, ORIGEN, and these comparisons have been included. ORIGEN is a widely recognized method for estimating the actinide, fission product, and activation product contents of irradiated reactor fuel, as well as the resulting heat generation and radiation levels. These estimates are used as source terms in safety evaluations of operating reactors, for evaluation of fuel behavior and regulation of the at-reactor storage, for transportation studies, and for evaluation of the ultimate geologic storage of spent fuel. 82 refs., 4 figs., 17 tabs

  6. Advanced dry head-end reprocessing of light water reactor spent nuclear fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Emory D; Delcul, Guillermo D; Hunt, Rodney D; Johnson, Jared A; Spencer, Barry B

    2013-11-05

    A method for reprocessing spent nuclear fuel from a light water reactor includes the step of reacting spent nuclear fuel in a voloxidation vessel with an oxidizing gas having nitrogen dioxide and oxygen for a period sufficient to generate a solid oxidation product of the spent nuclear fuel. The reacting step includes the step of reacting, in a first zone of the voloxidation vessel, spent nuclear fuel with the oxidizing gas at a temperature ranging from 200-450.degree. C. to form an oxidized reaction product, and regenerating nitrogen dioxide, in a second zone of the voloxidation vessel, by reacting oxidizing gas comprising nitrogen monoxide and oxygen at a temperature ranging from 0-80.degree. C. The first zone and the second zone can be separate. A voloxidation system is also disclosed.

  7. Tritium isotope separation from light and heavy water by bipolar electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petek, M.; Ramey, D.W.; Taylor, R.D.; Kobisk, E.H.

    1980-01-01

    A process for separating tritium from light and heavy water is described. Hydrogen is transferred at and through bipolar electrodes at rates H > D > T. In a cell containing several bipolar electrodes placed in series between two terminal electrodes, a flow of hydrogen is established from the terminal anode compartment toward the terminal cathode. An electrolyte feed containing tritium is continuously added to the system and is subsequently transported countercurrent to the hydrogen mass transfer. A cascaded system is established, in which effluent streams enriched and depleted in tritium can be withdrawn. The voltage drop is smaller at any bipolar electrode as compared to the voltage for normal electrolysis. Cell design is compact because isotope separation occurs at bipolar electrodes without evolution of gas. Isotope separation was demonstrated in laboratory cells where a steady-state tritium concentration gradient was attained. This gradient was in agreement with concentrations calculated from a derived mathematical model

  8. Advanced fuel assemblies for economic and flexible operation of light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urban, P.; Bender, D.

    2001-01-01

    Increasing competition in the electricity market sets up a corresponding competition between the different electricity producing technologies. This makes further improvements in the economics of nuclear power generation a vital item for the future of nuclear energy. Though the costs for development, design and fabrication of fuel assemblies contribute only about 10% to the fuel cycle costs, the design and the performance of the fuel assemblies considerably influences total electricity generation cost. By the recent creation of Framatome ANP the nuclear activities of Framatome and Siemens were combined into one company. In the past, both had made considerable achievements in the development of fuel assemblies and related services supporting the goal of safe and economic electricity generation by light water reactors. The examples described in this paper cover former Siemens products and experience. In the future, our combined experience bases will be an ideal platform to offer further substantial improvements to our customers. (author)

  9. Mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in light water reactor environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.; Muscara, J.

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels (SSs) in light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments. The effects of key material and loading variables on the fatigue lives of wrought and cast austenitic SSs in air and LWR environments have been evaluated. The influence of reactor coolant environments on the formation and growth of fatigue cracks in polished smooth SS specimens is discussed. The results indicate that the fatigue lives of these steels are decreased primarily by the effects of the environment on the growth of cracks <200 μm and, to a lesser extent, on enhanced growth rates of longer cracks. The fracture morphology in the specimens has been characterized. Exploratory fatigue tests were conducted to study the effects of surface micropits or minor differences in the surface oxide on fatigue crack initiation. (author)

  10. Flaw evaluation of thermally aged cast stainless steel in light-water reactor applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S.; Kuo, P.T.; Wichman, K.; Chopra, O.

    1997-01-01

    Cast stainless steel may be used in the fabrication of the primary loop piping, fittings, valve bodies, and pump casings in light-water reactors. However, this material is subject to embrittlement due to thermal aging at the reactor temperature, that is 290 o C (550 o F). The Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) recently completed a research program and the results indicate that the lower-bound fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel is similar to that of submerged arc welds (SAWs). Thus, the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff has accepted the use of SAW flaw evaluation procedures in IWB-3640 of Section XI of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code to evaluate flaws in thermally aged cast stainless steel for a license renewal evaluation. Alternatively, utilities may estimate component-specific fracture toughness of thermally aged cast stainless steel using procedures developed at ANL for a case-by-case flaw evaluation. (Author)

  11. Parametric study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of high conversion light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mori, Takamasa; Nakagawa, Masayuki; Fujii, Sadao.

    1988-11-01

    To assess the feasibility of high conversion light water reactors (HCLWRs) from the thermal-hydraulic viewpoint, parametric study on thermal-hydraulic characteristics of HCLWR has been carried out by using a unit cell model. It is assumed that a HCLWR core is contained in a current 1000 MWe PWR plant. At the present study, reactor core parameters such as fuel pin diameter, pitch, core height and linear heat rate are widely and parametrically changed to survey the relation between these parameters and the basic thermal-hydraulic characteristics, i.e. maximum fuel temperature, minimum DNBR, reduction of reactor thermal output and so on. The validity of the unit cell model used has been ensured by comparison with the result of a subchannel analysis carried out for a whole core. (author)

  12. Standard Guide for In-Service Annealing of Light-Water Moderated Nuclear Reactor Vessels

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2003-01-01

    1.1 This guide covers the general procedures to be considered for conducting an in-service thermal anneal of a light-water moderated nuclear reactor vessel and demonstrating the effectiveness of the procedure. The purpose of this in-service annealing (heat treatment) is to improve the mechanical properties, especially fracture toughness, of the reactor vessel materials previously degraded by neutron embrittlement. The improvement in mechanical properties generally is assessed using Charpy V-notch impact test results, or alternatively, fracture toughness test results or inferred toughness property changes from tensile, hardness, indentation, or other miniature specimen testing (1). 1.2 This guide is designed to accommodate the variable response of reactor-vessel materials in post-irradiation annealing at various temperatures and different time periods. Certain inherent limiting factors must be considered in developing an annealing procedure. These factors include system-design limitations; physical constrain...

  13. Plan for research to improve the safety of light-water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-03-01

    This is the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's first annual report to Congress on recommendations for research on improving the safety of light-water nuclear power plants. Suggestions for reactor safety research were identified in, or received from, various sources, including the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, the NRC regulatory staff, and the consultants to the Research Review Group. After an initial screening to eliminate those not related to improved reactor safety, all the suggestions were consolidated into research topics. It is recommended that the following research projects be carried out: alternate containment concepts, especially vented containments; alternate decay heat removal concepts, especially add-on bunkered systems; alternate emergency core cooling concepts; improved in-plant accident response; and advanced seismic designs

  14. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs

  15. Passive and inherent safety technologies for light-water nuclear reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forsberg, C.W.

    1990-07-01

    Passive/inherent safety implies a technical revolution in our approach to nuclear power safety. This direction is discussed herein for light-water reactors (LWRs) -- the predominant type of power reactor used in the world today. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) the approach to the development of passive/inherent safety for LWRs consists of four steps: identify and quantify safety requirements and goals; identify and quantify the technical functional requirements needed for safety; identify, invent, develop, and quantify technical options that meet both of the above requirements; and integrate safety systems into designs of economic and reliable nuclear power plants. Significant progress has been achieved in the first three steps of this program. The last step involves primarily the reactor vendors. These activities, as well as related activities worldwide, are described here. 27 refs., 7 tabs.

  16. Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactor (I2S-LWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrovic, Bojan [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Memmott, Matthew [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States); Boy, Guy [Florida Inst. of Technology, Melbourne, FL (United States); Charit, Indrajit [Univ. of Idaho, Moscow, ID (United States); Manera, Annalisa [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Downar, Thomas [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Lee, John [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Muldrow, Lycurgus [Morehouse College, Atlanta, GA (United States); Upadhyaya, Belle [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Hines, Wesley [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Haghighat, Alierza [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2017-10-02

    This final report summarizes results of the multi-year effort performed during the period 2/2013- 12/2016 under the DOE NEUP IRP Project “Integral Inherently Safe Light Water Reactors (I2S-LWR)”. The goal of the project was to develop a concept of a 1 GWe PWR with integral configuration and inherent safety features, at the same time accounting for lessons learned from the Fukushima accident, and keeping in mind the economic viability of the new concept. Essentially (see Figure 1-1) the project aimed to implement attractive safety features, typically found only in SMRs, to a larger power (1 GWe) reactor, to address the preference of some utilities in the US power market for unit power level on the order of 1 GWe.

  17. ENFORM II: a calculational system for light water reactor logistics and effluent analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heeb, C.M.; Lewallen, M.A.; Purcell, W.L.; Cole, B.M.

    1979-09-01

    ENFORM is a computer-based information system that addresses the material logistics, environmental releases and economics of light water reactor (LWR) operation. The most important system inputs consist of electric energy generation requirements, details of plant construction scheduling, unit costs, and environmental release factors. From these inputs the ENFORM system computes the mass balances and generates the environmental release information for noxious chemicals and radionuclides from various fuel cycle facilities (except waste disposal). Fuel cycle costs and electric power costs are also computed. All code development subsequent to 1977 is summarized. Programming instructions are provided for the modules that are comprised in the ENFORM system. ENGEN, a code that uses a generation schedule specified by the user and isotopic data generated by ORIGEN, has been developed to produce a scenario-specific data base. Other codes (ENMAT, ENRAD, etc) have been developed to use data base information to estimate radioactive and nonradioactive release information

  18. Advantages of liquid fluoride thorium reactor in comparison with light water reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bahri, Che Nor Aniza Che Zainul, E-mail: anizazainul@gmail.com; Majid, Amran Ab.; Al-Areqi, Wadeeah M. [Nuclear Science Program, School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2015-04-29

    Liquid Fluoride Thorium Reactor (LFTR) is an innovative design for the thermal breeder reactor that has important potential benefits over the traditional reactor design. LFTR is fluoride based liquid fuel, that use the thorium dissolved in salt mixture of lithium fluoride and beryllium fluoride. Therefore, LFTR technology is fundamentally different from the solid fuel technology currently in use. Although the traditional nuclear reactor technology has been proven, it has perceptual problems with safety and nuclear waste products. The aim of this paper is to discuss the potential advantages of LFTR in three aspects such as safety, fuel efficiency and nuclear waste as an alternative energy generator in the future. Comparisons between LFTR and Light Water Reactor (LWR), on general principles of fuel cycle, resource availability, radiotoxicity and nuclear weapon proliferation shall be elaborated.

  19. Special issue on the "Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors Research and Development Progress"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turinsky, Paul J.; Martin, William R.

    2017-04-01

    In this special issue of the Journal of Computational Physics, the research and development completed at the time of manuscript submission by the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is presented. CASL is the first of several Energy Innovation Hubs that have been created by the Department of Energy. The Hubs are modeled after the strong scientific management characteristics of the Manhattan Project and AT&T Bell Laboratories, and function as integrated research centers that combine basic and applied research with engineering to accelerate scientific discovery that addresses critical energy issues. Lifetime of a Hub is expected to be five or ten years depending upon performance, with CASL being granted a ten year lifetime.

  20. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Curtis; Rabiti, Cristian; Martineau, Richard; Szilard, Ronaldo

    2016-01-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly ''over-design'' portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as ''safety margin.'' Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on ''engineering judgment.''

  1. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Risk-Informed Safety Margins Characterization (RISMC) Pathway Technical Program Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Curtis [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Rabiti, Cristian [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Martineau, Richard [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Szilard, Ronaldo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Safety is central to the design, licensing, operation, and economics of Nuclear Power Plants (NPPs). As the current Light Water Reactor (LWR) NPPs age beyond 60 years, there are possibilities for increased frequency of Systems, Structures, and Components (SSCs) degradations or failures that initiate safety-significant events, reduce existing accident mitigation capabilities, or create new failure modes. Plant designers commonly “over-design” portions of NPPs and provide robustness in the form of redundant and diverse engineered safety features to ensure that, even in the case of well-beyond design basis scenarios, public health and safety will be protected with a very high degree of assurance. This form of defense-in-depth is a reasoned response to uncertainties and is often referred to generically as “safety margin.” Historically, specific safety margin provisions have been formulated, primarily based on “engineering judgment.”

  2. Improvement in the reliability of shells for light water reactors by manufacture from hollow ingots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bocquet, P.; Blondeau, R.; Poitrault, I.; Badeau, J.P.; Dumont, R.

    1991-01-01

    The problems associated to the segregation located at the inner surface and subsurface of heavy shell forgings used in nuclear light water reactors are presented. The effect of A segregation on cold or reheat cracking HAZ has conducted fabricators to use severe welding procedures with high preheat temperature and refining HAZ grain size sequences. For shells and rings, the hollow ingot as developed by CLI, with a good control of the location of the center line of segregation, is an excellent answer to these problems. The use of core shell forgings issued from this type of hollow ingots, free of segregation at the inner surface and subsurface area, contributes, by reducing the irradiation embrittlement effect, to increase the safety factor relatively to the risk of failure of the reactor. (orig.)

  3. Comparative of fuel cycle cost for light water nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocic, A.; Dimitrijevic, Z.

    1978-01-01

    Starting from ost general fuel cycle scheme for light water reactors this article deals with conceptual differences of BWR, PWR and WWER as well as with the influence of certain phases of fuel cycle on economic parameters of an equivalent 1000 MWe reactor using a computer program CENA /1/ and typical parameters of each reactor type. An analysis of two particular power plants 628 MWe and 440 MWe WWER by means of the same program is given in the second part of this paper taking into account the differences of in-core fuel management. This second approach is especially interesting for the economy of the power plant itself in the period of planning. (author)

  4. Dynamic operator actions analysis for inherently safe fast reactors and light water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, V.; Apostolakis, G.

    1988-01-01

    A comparative dynamic human actions analysis of inherently safe fast reactors (ISFRs) and light water reactors (LWRs) in terms of systems response and estimated human error rates is presented. Brief overviews of the ISFR and LWR systems are given to illustrate the design differences. Key operator actions required by the ISFR reactor shutdown and decay heat removal systems are identified and are compared with those of the LWR. It is observed that, because of the passive nature of the ISFR safety-related systems, a large time window is available for operator actions during transient events. Furthermore, these actions are fewer in number, are less complex, and have lower error rates and less severe consequences than those of the LWRs. We expect the ISFR operator errors' contribution to risk is smaller (at least in the context of the existing human reliability models) than that of the LWRs. (author)

  5. Sources of radioactive waste from light-water reactors and their physical and chemical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, M.J.; Collins, J.T.

    1979-01-01

    The general physical and chemical properties of waste streams in light-water reactors (LWRs) are described. The principal mechanisms for release and the release pathways to the environment are discussed. The calculation of liquid and gaseous source terms using one of the available models is presented. These calculated releases are compared with observed releases from operating LWRs. The computerized mathematical model used is the GALE Code which is the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) staff's model for calculating source terms for effluents from LWRs (USNRC76a, USNRC76b). Programs currently being conducted at operating reactors by the NRC, Electric Power Research Institute, and various utilities to better define the characteristics of waste streams and the performance of radwaste process equipment are described

  6. Visible Light Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified Ti02 for Air and Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Levine, Lanfang H.; Richards, Jeffrey T.; Hintze, paul; Clausen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The method of photocatalysis utilizing titanium dioxide, TiO2, as the catalyst has been widely studied for trace contaminant control for both air and water applications because of its low energy consumption and use of a regenerable catalyst. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors and are a setback for the technology for space application due to the possibility of Hg contamination. The development of a visible light responsive (VLR) TiO2-based catalyst could lead to the use of solar energy in the visible region (approx.45% of the solar spectrum lies in the visible region; > 400 nm) or highly efficient LEDs (with wavelengths > 400 nm) to make PCO approaches more efficient, economical, and safe. Though VLR catalyst development has been an active area of research for the past two decades, there are few commercially available VLR catalysts; those that are available still have poor activity in the visible region compared to that in the UV region. Thus, this study was aimed at the further development of VLR catalysts by a new method - coupling of quantum dots (QD) of a narrow band gap semiconductor (e.g., CdS, CdSe, PbS, ZnSe, etc.) to the TiO2 by two preparation methods: 1) photodeposition and 2) mechanical alloying using a high-speed ball mill. A library of catalysts was developed and screened for gas and aqueous phase applications, using ethanol and 4-chlorophenol as the target contaminants, respectively. Both target compounds are well studied in photocatalytic systems serve as model contaminants for this research. Synthesized catalysts were compared in terms of preparation method, type of quantum dots, and dosage of quantum dots.

  7. Symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. with an echinoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); De Ridder, C. [Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium). Lab. de Biologie Marine

    1998-09-01

    Thiothrix-like bacteria have been reported as symbionts in invertebrates from sulfide-rich habitats. Isolation of these symbiotic Thiothrix-like bacteria has failed, and the organisms have not been previously identified with certainty. The genus Thiothrix was created for ensheathed filamentous bacteria that oxidize sulfide and deposit sulfur granules internally, attach to substrates, produce gliding gonidia, and form rosettes. Immunoassay procedures were used to investigate the symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. in the intestinal cecum of the spatangoid species Echinocardium cordatum. Thiothrix spp. were identified in nodule samples from E. cordatum digestive tubes based on microscopic examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and indirect immunofluorescence. Thiothrix spp. protein made up as much as 84% of the total protein content of the nodules. This is the first identification of Thiothrix spp. internally symbiotic with marine invertebrates.

  8. Non-symbiotic hemoglobin and its relation with hypoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Riquelme

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we know that several types of hemoglobins exist in plants. The symbiotic hemoglobins were discovered in 1939 and are only found in nodules of plants capable of symbiotically fixing atmospheric N. Another class, called non-symbiotic hemoglobin, was discovered 32 yr ago and is now thought to exist throughout the plant kingdom, being expressed in different organs and tissues. Recently the existence of another type of hemoglobin, called truncated hemoglobin, was demonstrated in plants. Although the presence of hemoglobins is widespread in the plant kingdom, their role has not yet been fully elucidated. This review discusses recent findings regarding the role of plant hemoglobins, with special emphasis on their relationship to plants adaptation to hypoxia. It also discusses the role of nitric oxide in plant cells under hypoxic conditions, since one of the functions of hemoglobin appears to be modulating nitric oxide levels in the cells.

  9. Genetically engineering cyanobacteria to convert CO₂, water, and light into the long-chain hydrocarbon farnesene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfmann, Charles; Gu, Liping; Gibbons, William; Zhou, Ruanbao

    2014-12-01

    Genetically engineered cyanobacteria offer a shortcut to convert CO2 and H2O directly into biofuels and high value chemicals for societal benefits. Farnesene, a long-chained hydrocarbon (C15H24), has many applications in lubricants, cosmetics, fragrances, and biofuels. However, a method for the sustainable, photosynthetic production of farnesene has been lacking. Here, we report the photosynthetic production of farnesene by the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 using only CO2, mineralized water, and light. A codon-optimized farnesene synthase gene was chemically synthesized and then expressed in the cyanobacterium, enabling it to synthesize farnesene through its endogenous non-mevalonate (MEP) pathway. Farnesene excreted from the engineered cyanobacterium volatilized into the flask head space and was recovered by adsorption in a resin column. The maximum photosynthetic productivity of farnesene was 69.1 ± 1.8 μg·L(-1)·O.D.(-1)·d(-1). Compared to the wild type, the farnesene-producing cyanobacterium also exhibited a 60 % higher PSII activity under high light, suggesting increased farnesene productivity in such conditions. We envision genetically engineered cyanobacteria as a bio-solar factory for photosynthetic production of a wide range of biofuels and commodity chemicals.

  10. Modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters: Implications for underwater optical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabhakaran, Sai Shri; Sahu, Sanjay Kumar; Dev, Pravin Jeba; Shanmugam, Palanisamy

    2018-05-01

    Spectral absorption coefficients of particulate (algal and non-algal components) and dissolved substances are modelled and combined with the pure seawater component to determine the total light absorption coefficients of seawater in the Bay of Bengal. Two parameters namely chlorophyll-a (Chl) concentration and turbidity were measured using commercially available instruments with high sampling rates. For modelling the light absorption coefficients of oceanic waters, the measured data are classified into two broad groups - algal dominant and non-algal particle (NAP) dominant. With these criteria the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP were established based on their concentrations using an iterative method. To account for the spectral dependence of absorption by phytoplankton, the wavelength-dependent coefficients were introduced into the model. The CDOM absorption was determined by subtracting the individual absorption coefficients of phytoplankton and NAP from the measured total absorption data and then related to the Chl concentration. Validity of the model is assessed based on independent in-situ data from certain discrete locations in the Bay of Bengal. The total absorption coefficients estimated using the new model by considering the contributions of algal, non-algal and CDOM have good agreement with the measured total absorption data with the error range of 6.9 to 28.3%. Results obtained by the present model are important for predicting the propagation of the radiant energy within the ocean and interpreting remote sensing observation data.

  11. Nano-ferrites for water splitting: Unprecedented high photocatalytic hydrogen production under visible light

    KAUST Repository

    Mangrulkar, Priti A.

    2012-01-01

    In the present investigation, hydrogen production via water splitting by nano-ferrites was studied using ethanol as the sacrificial donor and Pt as co-catalyst. Nano-ferrite is emerging as a promising photocatalyst with a hydrogen evolution rate of 8.275 μmol h -1 and a hydrogen yield of 8275 μmol h -1 g -1 under visible light compared to 0.0046 μmol h -1 for commercial iron oxide (tested under similar experimental conditions). Nano-ferrites were tested in three different photoreactor configurations. The rate of hydrogen evolution by nano-ferrite was significantly influenced by the photoreactor configuration. Altering the reactor configuration led to sevenfold (59.55 μmol h -1) increase in the hydrogen evolution rate. Nano-ferrites have shown remarkable stability in hydrogen production up to 30 h and the cumulative hydrogen evolution rate was observed to be 98.79 μmol h -1. The hydrogen yield was seen to be influenced by several factors like photocatalyst dose, illumination intensity, irradiation time, sacrificial donor and presence of co-catalyst. These were then investigated in detail. It was evident from the experimental data that nano-ferrites under optimized reaction conditions and photoreactor configuration could lead to remarkable hydrogen evolution activity under visible light. Temperature had a significant role in enhancing the hydrogen yield. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  12. Oil flow in deep waters: comparative study between light oils and heavy oils

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreolli, Ivanilto [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-12-19

    Ultra deeper waters fields are being exploited due to technological development. Under this scenario, the flow design is accomplished through pipelines subjected to low temperature and high pressure. Moreover, these flow lines are usually long causing a fast fluid cooling, which may affect flow assurance in some cases. Problems during topsides production plant's restart might occur if the oil is viscous and even in steady state a significant different behavior can be noticed, if compared to a less viscous oil. A comparison between light and heavy oil through a case study with the objective to show some heavy oil flow particularities is the purpose of this paper. Permanent and transient analyses for a specific geometry are presented. The results showed that thermal and proper viscosity modeling are required for heavy oil flow, differently from that of light oil flow, due to the exponential viscosity dependence to temperature and because the predominant laminar regime. In addition, on heavier and heavier oil flow systems, it is essential to consider exportation system's restart. (author)

  13. A novel water-assisted pulsed light processing for decontamination of blueberries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yaoxin; Chen, Haiqiang

    2014-06-01

    Sample heating and shadowing effect have limited the application of pulsed light (PL) technology for decontamination of fresh produce. In this study, a novel setup using water-assisted PL processing was developed to overcome these limitations. Blueberries inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 or Salmonella were either treated with PL directly (dry PL treatment) or immersed in agitated water during the PL treatment (wet PL treatment) for 5-60 s. Although both pathogens were effectively inactivated by the dry PL treatments, the appearance of the blueberries was adversely affected and a maximum temperature of 64.8 °C on the blueberry surface was recorded. On the other hand, the visual appearance of blueberries remained unchanged after wet PL treatments and sample heating was significantly reduced. The wet PL treatments were more effective than chlorine washing on inactivating both pathogens. After a 60-s wet PL treatment, the populations of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated on calyx and skin of blueberries were reduced by 3.0 and >5.8 log CFU/g, respectively. Salmonella on blueberry calyx and skin was reduced by 3.6 and >5.9 log CFU/g, respectively. No viable bacterial cells were recovered from the water used in the wet PL treatments, demonstrating that this setup could prevent the risk of cross-contamination during fresh produce washing. Our results suggest that this new water-assisted PL treatment could be a potential non-chemical alternative (residue free) to chlorine washing since it is both more effective and environmentally friendly than chlorine washing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Research and development of the supercritical-pressure light water cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oka, Yoshiaki

    2003-01-01

    The concept of high temperature reactor cooled by light water (SCR) has been developed at the University of Tokyo since 1989. Major elements of reactor conceptual design and safety were studied. It includes fuel rod design, core design of thermal and fast reactors, plant heat balance, safety design, accident and transient analysis, LOCA, PSA, plant control, start-up and stability. The big advantage of the SCR concept is that the temperatures of major components such as reactor pressure vessel, control rod drive mechanisms, containments, coolant pumps, main steam piping and turbines are within the temperatures of the components of LWR and supercritical FPP in spite of the high outlet coolant temperature. The experience of these components of LWR and supercritical fossil Fired Power Plants (FPP) will be fully utilized for SCR. Although the concept was developed at the University of Tokyo mostly with our own funds and resources, four funding was/is provided for the research in Japan so far. Those are TEPCO studies with Japanese vendors in 1994 and 1995. JSPS (Monbusho) funding of pulse radiolysis of supercritical water to the University of Tokyo, Japanese-NERI program of METI to Toshiba team on thermal hydraulics, corrosion and plant system and Japanese-NERI program of MEXT on water chemistry to the University of Tokyo. The concept was taken as the reference of HPLWR study in Europe with funding of EU in 2000 and 2001. The concept was evaluated in the Generation 4 reactor program in USA. It was selected as only one water-cooled Generation 4 reactor. This paper describes the overview of the conceptual design at the University of Tokyo and R and D in the world

  15. Dynamics of three types of annual plants competing for water and light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pȩkalski, Andrzej; Szwabiński, Janusz

    2013-02-01

    We present and discuss a Monte Carlo model describing the dynamics of three types of annual plants which have different tolerances to shade and drought. External conditions (water and light) fluctuate around some values which are our control parameters and which decide how many resources the system receives. The plants compete with their nearest neighbours for the resources, however not in the same way. We show that for certain ranges of the control parameters a coexistence of the three species is observed. We discuss how the characteristics of the the plants - their number, germination, biomass or the number of nearest neighbours, depend on the two control parameters characterising external conditions. We show that elimination is done at the level of adult plants, not seedlings. We find also cooperative behaviour of plants in difficult conditions, as observed in field studies and we propose an explanation for this fact. Apart from plants tolerating shade but requiring more water and those tolerating drought but needing more light, which are common in nature, we introduce a third species with intermediary demands. We investigate under what conditions this new species could dominate and whether the total number of plants, regardless of their type, is larger with or without the intermediate plant. We show that in our model, like in nature, systems with two kinds of plants with opposite characteristics are, in general, as effective as a system with an additional third type of plants. We show that two contradictory hypotheses made by biologists, concerning the demands of plants in drought and shade, could be both true, however in different regimes.

  16. An optimized power conversion system concept of the integral, inherently-safe light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Memmott, Matthew J.; Wilding, Paul R.; Petrovic, Bojan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Three power conversion systems (PCS) for the I 2 S-LWR are presented. • An optimization analyses was performed to evaluate these PCS alternatives. • The ideal PCS consists of 5 turbines, and obtains an overall efficiency of 35.7%. - Abstract: The integral, inherently safe light water reactor (I 2 S-LWR) has been developed to significantly enhance passive safety capabilities while maintaining cost competitiveness relative to the current light water reactor (LWR) fleet. The compact heat exchangers of the I 2 S-LWR preclude boiling of the secondary fluid, which decreases the probability of heat exchanger failure, but this requires the addition of a flash drum, which negatively affects the overall plant thermodynamic efficiency. A state of the art Rankine cycle is proposed for the I 2 S-LWR to increase the thermodynamic efficiency by utilizing a flash drum with optimized operational parameters. In presenting this option for power conversion in the I 2 S-LWR power plant, the key metric used in rating the performance is the overall net thermodynamic efficiency of the cycle. In evaluating the flash-Rankine cycle, three basic industrial concepts are evaluated, one without an intermediate pressure turbine, one with an intermediate turbine and one reheat stream, and one with an intermediate turbine and two reheat streams. For each configuration, a single-path multi-variable optimization is undertaken to maximize the thermal efficiency. The third configuration with an intermediate turbine and 2 reheat streams is the most effective concept, with an optimized efficiency of 35.7%.

  17. Final report for the Light Water Breeder Reactor proof-of-breeding analytical support project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Hoh, J.C.; Martino, F.J.; Nelson, R.E.; Osudar, J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1987-05-01

    The technology of breeding /sup 233/U from /sup 232/Th in a light water reactor is being developed and evaluated by the Westinghouse Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) through operation and examination of the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Bettis is determining the end-of-life (EOL) inventory of fissile uranium in the LWBR core by nondestructive assay of a statistical sample comprising approximately 500 EOL fuel rods. This determination is being made with an irradiated-fuel assay gauge based on neutron interrogation and detection of delayed neutrons from each rod. The EOL fissile inventory will be compared with the beginning-of-life fissile loading of the LWBR to determine the extent of breeding. In support of the BAPL proof-of-breeding (POB) effort, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) carried out destructive physical, chemical, and radiometric analyses on 17 EOL LWBR fuel rods that were previously assayed with the nondestructive gauge. The ANL work included measurements on the intact rods; shearing of the rods into pre-designated contiguous segments; separate dissolution of each of the more than 150 segments; and analysis of the dissolver solutions to determine each segment's uranium content, uranium isotopic composition, and loading of selected fission products. This report describes the facilities in which this work was carried out, details operations involved in processing each rod, and presents a comprehensive discussion of uncertainties associated with each result of the ANL measurements. Most operations were carried out remotely in shielded cells. Automated equipment and procedures, controlled by a computer system, provided error-free data acquisition and processing, as well as full replication of operations with each rod. Despite difficulties that arose during processing of a few rod segments, the ANL destructive-assay results satisfied the demanding needs of the parent LWBR-POB program.

  18. Final report for the Light Water Breeder Reactor proof-of-breeding analytical support project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graczyk, D.G.; Hoh, J.C.; Martino, F.J.; Nelson, R.E.; Osudar, J.; Levitz, N.M.

    1987-05-01

    The technology of breeding 233 U from 232 Th in a light water reactor is being developed and evaluated by the Westinghouse Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory (BAPL) through operation and examination of the Shippingport Light Water Breeder Reactor (LWBR). Bettis is determining the end-of-life (EOL) inventory of fissile uranium in the LWBR core by nondestructive assay of a statistical sample comprising approximately 500 EOL fuel rods. This determination is being made with an irradiated-fuel assay gauge based on neutron interrogation and detection of delayed neutrons from each rod. The EOL fissile inventory will be compared with the beginning-of-life fissile loading of the LWBR to determine the extent of breeding. In support of the BAPL proof-of-breeding (POB) effort, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) carried out destructive physical, chemical, and radiometric analyses on 17 EOL LWBR fuel rods that were previously assayed with the nondestructive gauge. The ANL work included measurements on the intact rods; shearing of the rods into pre-designated contiguous segments; separate dissolution of each of the more than 150 segments; and analysis of the dissolver solutions to determine each segment's uranium content, uranium isotopic composition, and loading of selected fission products. This report describes the facilities in which this work was carried out, details operations involved in processing each rod, and presents a comprehensive discussion of uncertainties associated with each result of the ANL measurements. Most operations were carried out remotely in shielded cells. Automated equipment and procedures, controlled by a computer system, provided error-free data acquisition and processing, as well as full replication of operations with each rod. Despite difficulties that arose during processing of a few rod segments, the ANL destructive-assay results satisfied the demanding needs of the parent LWBR-POB program

  19. Expert assessments of the cost of light water small modular reactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulla, Ahmed; Azevedo, Inês Lima; Morgan, M Granger

    2013-06-11

    Analysts and decision makers frequently want estimates of the cost of technologies that have yet to be developed or deployed. Small modular reactors (SMRs), which could become part of a portfolio of carbon-free energy sources, are one such technology. Existing estimates of likely SMR costs rely on problematic top-down approaches or bottom-up assessments that are proprietary. When done properly, expert elicitations can complement these approaches. We developed detailed technical descriptions of two SMR designs and then conduced elicitation interviews in which we obtained probabilistic judgments from 16 experts who are involved in, or have access to, engineering-economic assessments of SMR projects. Here, we report estimates of the overnight cost and construction duration for five reactor-deployment scenarios that involve a large reactor and two light water SMRs. Consistent with the uncertainty introduced by past cost overruns and construction delays, median estimates of the cost of new large plants vary by more than a factor of 2.5. Expert judgments about likely SMR costs display an even wider range. Median estimates for a 45 megawatts-electric (MWe) SMR range from $4,000 to $16,300/kWe and from $3,200 to $7,100/kWe for a 225-MWe SMR. Sources of disagreement are highlighted, exposing the thought processes of experts involved with SMR design. There was consensus that SMRs could be built and brought online about 2 y faster than large reactors. Experts identify more affordable unit cost, factory fabrication, and shorter construction schedules as factors that may make light water SMRs economically viable.

  20. Using In Situ Symbiotic Seed Germination to Restore Over-collected Medicinal Orchids in Southwest China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Cheng Shao

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to increasing demand for medicinal and horticultural uses, the Orchidaceae is in urgent need of innovative and novel propagation techniques that address both market demand and conservation. Traditionally, restoration techniques have been centered on ex situ asymbiotic or symbiotic seed germination techniques that are not cost-effective, have limited genetic potential and often result in low survival rates in the field. Here, we propose a novel in situ advanced restoration-friendly program for the endangered epiphytic orchid species Dendrobium devonianum, in which a series of in situ symbiotic seed germination trials base on conspecific fungal isolates were conducted at two sites in Yunnan Province, China. We found that percentage germination varied among treatments and locations; control treatments (no inoculum did not germinate at both sites. We found that the optimal treatment, having the highest in situ seed germination rate (0.94-1.44% with no significant variation among sites, supported a warm, moist and fixed site that allowed for light penetration. When accounting for seed density, percentage germination was highest (2.78-2.35% at low densities and did not vary among locations for the treatment that supported optimal conditions. Similarly for the same treatment, seed germination ranged from 0.24 to 5.87% among seasons but also did vary among sites. This study reports on the cultivation and restoration of an endangered epiphytic orchid species by in situ symbiotic seed germination and is likely to have broad application to the horticulture and conservation of the Orchidaceae.

  1. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Christian; Krishnan, Hari B

    2015-09-15

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial Nops (nodulation outer proteins) play a crucial symbiotic role in many strain-host combinations. Nops are defined as proteins secreted via a rhizobial T3SS (type III secretion system). Functional T3SSs have been characterized in many rhizobial strains. Nops have been identified using various genetic, biochemical, proteomic, genomic and experimental approaches. Certain Nops represent extracellular components of the T3SS, which are visible in electron micrographs as bacterial surface appendages called T3 (type III) pili. Other Nops are T3 effector proteins that can be translocated into plant cells. Rhizobial T3 effectors manipulate cellular processes in host cells to suppress plant defence responses against rhizobia and to promote symbiosis-related processes. Accordingly, mutant strains deficient in synthesis or secretion of T3 effectors show reduced symbiotic properties on certain host plants. On the other hand, direct or indirect recognition of T3 effectors by plant cells expressing specific R (resistance) proteins can result in effector triggered defence responses that negatively affect rhizobial infection. Hence Nops are double-edged swords that may promote establishment of symbiosis with one legume (symbiotic factors) and impair symbiotic processes when bacteria are inoculated on another legume species (asymbiotic factors). In the present review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of Nops. We summarize their symbiotic effects, their biochemical properties and their possible modes of action. Finally, we discuss future perspectives in the field of T3 effector research. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  2. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-06-29

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of

  3. Potential improvements in the once-through fuel cycle for light water reactors (PWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-06-01

    The light water reactor (LWR) operating with low enriched uranium (LEU) constitutes a well established, mature system which has proved its potential for economic energy production in large-scale commercial operation. In the Federal Republic of Germany, approximately 7000 MWsub(e) of LWR capacity have been installed up to mid-1978 and further capacity is under construction or planned for the future. However, the concern over possible nuclear arms proliferation in a growing nuclear energy economy has fostered a reassessment of the plutonium recycle concept and a search for possible alternatives. Various scenarios have been suggested as alternatives to the uranium and plutonium recycle. One of them is to utilize only slightly-enriched uranium in a throwaway fuel cycle. Such a situation would justify or even necessitate considering deployment of alternate reactor concepts with substantially better fuel utilization in the long range, and improvements of resource utilization in the framework of current reactor technology to the maximum feasible extent in the short range. In this paper, a number of potential modifications to existing PWR fuel management and core design is examined which would possibly enhance uranium resource utilization somewhat without requiring major departures from existing LWR technologies. Possibilities identified include shorter cycle length, increased burnup of the discharged fuel, reinsertion of once burnt first core fuel assemblies, increasing the pellet diameter and greater lattice water-to-fuel volume ratio

  4. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seppaelae, Malla

    2008-01-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  5. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels.

  6. Protected Light-Trapping Silicon by a Simple Structuring Process for Sunlight-Assisted Water Splitting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santinacci, Lionel; Diouf, Maïmouna W; Barr, Maïssa K S; Fabre, Bruno; Joanny, Loïc; Gouttefangeas, Francis; Loget, Gabriel

    2016-09-21

    Macroporous layers are grown onto n-type silicon by successive photoelectrochemical etching in HF-containing solution and chemical etching in KOH. This specific latter treatment gives highly antireflective properties of the Si surface. The duration of the chemical etching is optimized to render the surface as absorbent as possible, and the morphology of the as-grown layer is characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Further functionalization of such structured Si surface is carried out by atomic layer deposition of a thin conformal and homogeneous TiO2 layer that is crystallized by an annealing at 450 °C. This process allows using such surfaces as photoanodes for water oxidation. The 40 nm thick TiO2 film acts indeed as an efficient protective layer against the photocorrosion of the porous Si in KOH, enhances its wettability, and improves the light absorption of the photoelectrode. The macroporous dual-absorber TiO2/Si has a beneficial effect on water oxidation in 1 M KOH and leads to a considerable negative shift of the onset potential of ∼400 mV as well as a 50% increase in photocurrent at 1 V vs SCE.

  7. Burnup credit validation of SCALE-4 using light water reactor criticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowman, S.M.; Hermann, O.W.; Brady, M.C.

    1993-01-01

    The ANSI/ANS 8.1 criticality safety standard recommends validation and benchmarking of the calculational methods used in evaluating criticality safety limits for away-from-reactor applications. The lack of critical experiments with burned light-water-reactor (LWR) fuel in racks or in casks necessitates the validation of burnup credit methods by comparison to LWR core criticals. These are relevant benchmarks because they test a methodology's ability to predict spent fuel isotopics and to evaluate the reactivity effects of heterogeneities and strong absorbers. Data are available to perform analyses at precise state points. The US Department of Energy Burnup Credit Program has sponsored analysis of selected reactor core critical configurations from commercial pressurized-water-reactors (PWRs) in order to validate an appropriate analysis methodology. The initial methodology used the SCALE-4 code system to analyze a set of reactor critical configurations from Virginia Power's Surry and North Anna reactors. The methodology has since been revised to simplify both the data requirements and the calculational procedure for the criticality analyst. This revised methodology is validated here by comparison to three reactor critical configurations from Tennessee Valley Authority's Sequoyah Unit 2 Cycle 3 and two from Virginia Power's Surry Unit 1 Cycle 2

  8. Neutronic and Thermal-hydraulic Modelling of High Performance Light Water Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seppaelae, Malla [VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, P.O.Box 1000, FI02044 VTT (Finland)

    2008-07-01

    High Performance Light Water Reactor (HPLWR), which is studied in EU project 'HPLWR2', uses water at supercritical pressures as coolant and moderator to achieve higher core outlet temperature and thus higher efficiency compared to present reactors. At VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, functionality of the thermal-hydraulics in the coupled reactor dynamics code TRAB3D/ SMABRE was extended to supercritical pressures for the analyses of HPLWR. Input models for neutronics and thermal-hydraulics were made for TRAB3D/ SMABRE according to the latest HPLWR design. A preliminary analysis was performed in which the capability of SMABRE in the transition from supercritical pressures to subcritical pressures was demonstrated. Parameterized two-group cross sections for TRAB3D neutronics were received from Hungarian Academy of Sciences KFKI Atomic Energy Research Institute together with a subroutine for handling them. PSG, a new Monte Carlo transport code developed at VTT, was also used to generate two-group constants for HPLWR and comparisons were made with the KFKI cross sections and MCNP calculations. (author)

  9. ABB-CE2s System 80+ advanced light water reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynn, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    This presentation will focus on the evolutionary improvements that have been made to System 80 which is the current operating design that was selected as the basis for developing System 80+. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has developed and issued the Advanced Light Water Reactor (ALWR) requirements as the basis for future ALWR's. ABB-CE and its associates were active participants in the development of the ALWR design requirements. System 80+ development has been in accordance with the EPRI requirements and System 80+ is the only Evolutionary Pressurized Water Reactor design to these requirements. The System 80+ design currently is in the final stages of NRC review leading to certification as a complete power plant1 Nuclear Island, Turbine lsland, and Balance of Plant, which are integrated for safe and reliable operation. Improved safety is a major feature of System 80+ with redundancy and diversity providing a prudent balance between accident prevention and mitigation. Safety Injection and Emergency Feedwater are dedicated four-train systems. The containment structure is a large spherical steel vessel surrounded by a cylindrical concrete shield building. The entire nuclear Island is founded on a common basemat to provide seismic resistance. The Nuclear Steam Supply System design has incorporated increased margin and improved reliability. High technology focused the control complex on the human operator. Programmable logic controllers, distributed system architecture, super mini-computers, fiber optic communications, touch sensitive cathode ray tube and advanced signal validation tecniques greatly simplify the design

  10. A parametric thermohydraulic study an advanced pressurized light water reactor with a tight fuel rod lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Hame, W.

    1982-12-01

    A parametric thermohydraulic study for an Advanced Pressurized Light Water Reactor (APWR) with a tight fuel rod lattice has been performed. The APWR improves the uranium utilisation. The APWR core should be placed in a modern German PWR plant. Within this study about 200 different reactors have been calculated. The tightening of the fuel rod lattice implies a decrease of the net electrical output of the plant, which is greater for the heterogeneous reactor than for the homogeneous reactor. APWR cores mean higher core pressure drops and higher water velocities in the core region. The cores tend to be shorter and the number of fuel rods to be higher than for the PWR. At the higher fuel rod pitch to diameter ratios (p/d) the DNB limitation is more stringent than the limitation on the fuel rod linear rating given by the necessity of reflooding after a reactor accident. The contrary is true for the lower p/d ratios. Subcooled boiling in the highest rated coolant channels occurs for the most of the calculated reactors. (orig.) [de

  11. Solid-state track recorder neutron dosimetry in light water reactor pressure vessel surveillance mockups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Roberts, J.H.; Gold, R.; Preston, C.C.

    1984-09-01

    Solid-State Track Recorder (SSTR) measurements of neutron-induced fission rates have been made in several pressure vessel mockup facilities as part of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) Light Water Reactor Pressure Vessel Surveillance Dosimetry Improvement Program (LWR-PV-SDIP). The results of extensive physics-dosimetry measurements made at the Pool Critical Assembly (PCA) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in Oak Ridge, TN are summarized. Included are 235 U, 238 U, 237 Np and 232 Th fission rates in the PCA 12/13, 8/7, and 4/12 SSC configurations. Additional low power measurements have been made in an engineering mockup at the VENUS critical assembly at CEN-SCK, Mol, Belgium. 237 Np and 238 U fission rates were made at selected locations in the VENUS mockup, which models the in-core and near-core regions of a pressurized water reactor (PWR). Absolute core power measurements were made at VENUS by exposing solid-state track recorders (SSTRs) to polished fuel pellets within in-core fuel pins. 8 references, 4 figures, 10 tables

  12. The management plan of liquid effluent in Korean advanced light water reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S. H.; Lim, H. S.; Jeong, D. W.; Jeong, D. Y.

    2001-01-01

    Non-radioactive liquid effluent in Korean Advanced Light Water Reactor is transferred and treated in centralized waste treatment facility after the radioactivity in effluent is checked within power block. The liquid effluent from centralized waste treatment facility will be discharged by way of discharge canal in order to be in the sufficient condition. As a result of investigating the radiation monitoring design in accordance with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring with 20 provisions by Korean Regulatory Authority, each effluent radiation monitoring design satisfies the regulatory guideline. In relation to sampling and analyses, most systems satisfy the regulatory guideline except for some effluents from turbine building. And, though sampling and analyses are performed after radioactivity is monitored at each system in turbine building, these exceptions in turbine building effluents are expected to cause no significant problems because radioactivity is monitored by direct or indirect methods prior to release from turbine building. Integrated monitoring on liquid effluent from the centralized waste water treatment facility is not necessary because radiation monitoring, sampling and analyses on each system within power block are performed, and operational effectiveness compared with cost according to adding the radiation monitoring equipment is too low. So, whether the radiation monitoring in this effluent is reflected on design or not is planned to be determined through discussion with regulatory authority

  13. The Development of the Advanced Light Water Reactor in Korea - The Korean Next Generation Reactor -

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.G.; Park, Y.S.; Kim, B.S.; Cho, S.J. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1999-07-01

    Korean next generation reactor (KNGR), which is to be designed as a standard evolutionary advanced light water reactor (ALWR) in Korea, has been developed from 1992 as one of long-term government projects. The major characteristics of the KNGR are as follows; KNGR is 2-loop PWR and its design lift time is 60 years. The CDF and the CFF will be much lower than 10{sup -5}/RY and 10{sup -6}/RY, respectively. For the design improvement, KNGR adopted inconel-690 as a steam generator tube material, four train ECCS, refueling water storage tank inside containment, and double cylindrical concrete containment. For more reliable and easier control, compact workstations have been adopted in the design of main control complex and digital I and C technology is used for protection, control, and monitoring. In addition, KNGR has some passive design features such as fluidic device in safety injection tank, passive secondary condensing system, and passive auto-catalytic hydrogen recombiner to enhance safety. (author). 4 refs., 4 figs.

  14. OECD - HRP Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials. August 26th - 30th, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    In cooperation with the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), the Halden Reactor Project organised a Summer School on Light Water Reactor Structural Materials in the period August 26 - 30, 2002. The summer school was primarily intended for people who wanted to become acquainted with materials-related subjects and issues without being experts. It is especially hoped that the summer school served to transfer knowledge to the ''young generation'' in the field of nuclear. Experts from Halden Project member organisations were solicited for the following programme: (1) Overview of The Nuclear Community and Current Issues, (2) Regulatory Framework for Ensuring Structural Integrity, (3) Non-Destructive Testing for Detection of Cracks, (4) Part I - Basics of Radiation and Radiation Damage, (5) Part II - Radiation Effects on Reactor Internal Materials, (6) Water Chemistry and Radiolysis Effects in LWRs, (7) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (8) PWR and Fast Breeder Reactor Internals, (9) Secondary Side Corrosion Cracking of PWR Steam Generator Tubes, (10) BWR Materials and Their Interaction with the Environment, (11) Radiation Damage in Reactor Pressure Vessels

  15. Maintenance Cycle Extension in the IRIS Advanced Light Water Reactor Plant Design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galvin, Mark R.; Todreas, Neil E.; Conway, Larry E.

    2003-01-01

    New nuclear power generation in the United States will be realized only if the economic performance can be made competitive with other methods of electrical power generation. The economic performance of a nuclear power plant can be significantly improved by increasing the time spent on-line generating electricity relative to the time spent off-line conducting maintenance and refueling. Maintenance includes planned actions (surveillances) and unplanned actions (corrective maintenance) to respond to component degradation or failure. A methodology is described that can be used to resolve, in the design phase, maintenance-related operating cycle length barriers. A primary goal was to demonstrate the applicability and utility of the methodology in the context of the International Reactor, Innovative and Secure (IRIS) design. IRIS is an advanced light water nuclear power plant that is being designed to maximize this on-line generating time by increasing the operating cycle length. This is consequently a maintenance strategy paper using the IRIS plant as the example.Potential IRIS operating cycle length maintenance-related barriers, determined by modification of an earlier operating pressurized water reactor (PWR) plant cycle length analysis to account for differences between the design of IRIS and this operating PWR, are presented. The proposed methodology to resolve these maintenance-related barriers by the design process is described. The results of applying the methodology to two potential IRIS cycle length barriers, relief valve testing and emergency heat removal system testing, are presented

  16. Visible-Light Responsive Catalysts Using Quantum Dot-Modified TiO2 for Air and Water Purification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutts, Janelle L.; Hintze, Paul E.; Clausen, Christian A.; Richards, Jeffrey T.

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalysis, the oxidation or reduction of contaminants by light-activated catalysts, utilizing titanium dioxide (TiO2) as the catalytic substrate has been widely studied for trace contaminant control in both air and water applications. The interest in this process is due primarily to its low energy consumption and capacity for catalyst regeneration. Titanium dioxide requires ultraviolet light for activation due to its relatively large band gap energy of 3.2 eV. Traditionally, Hg-vapor fluorescent light sources are used in PCO reactors; however, the use of mercury precludes the use of this PCO technology in a spaceflight environment due to concerns over crew Hg exposure.

  17. Self-action of continuous laser radiation and Pearcey diffraction in a water suspension with light-absorbing particles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelsky, O. V.; Bekshaev, A. Ya.; Maksimyak, P. P.

    2014-01-01

    Water suspension of light-absorbing nano-sized particles is an example of a medium in which non-linear effects are present at moderate light intensities favorable for optical treatment of organic and biological objects. We study experimentally the phenomena emerging in a thin layer of such a medium......-diffraction of the incident light, here being strongly sensitive to the medium position with respect to the focus. This technique, based on the complex spatial structure of both the incident and the diffracted fields, can be employed for the detection and measurement of weak non-linearities....

  18. Effect of Subliminal Stimulation of Symbiotic Fantasies on Behavior Modification Treatment of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Silverman, Lloyd H.

    1978-01-01

    Obese women were treated in behavior modification programs for overeating. Behavior programs were accompanied by subliminal stimulation and by symbiotic and control messages. The symbiotic condition gave evidence of enhancing weight loss. This finding supports the proposition that subliminal stimulation of symbiotic fantasies can enhance the…

  19. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-15

    In Sweden, most of the nuclear power plants are planning power uprates within the next few years. The Dept. of Occupational and Medical Exposures at the Swedish Radiation Protection Agency, SSI, has initiated a research project to investigate the radiological implications of power uprates on light-water reactors throughout the world. The project was divided into three tasks: 1. A compilation of power uprates of light-water reactors worldwide. The compilation contains a technical description in brief of how the power uprates were carried out. 2. An analysis of the radiological consequences at four selected Nuclear Power Plants, which was the main objective of the inquiry. Affects on the radiological and chemical situation due to the changed situation were discussed. 3. Review of technical and organisational factors to be considered in uprate projects to keep exposures ALARA. The project was carried out, starting with the collecting of information on the implemented and planned uprates on reactors internationally. The information was catalogued in accordance with criteria focusing on radiological impact. A detailed analysis followed of four plants selected for uprates chosen according to established criteria, in line with the project requirements. The selected plants were Olkiluoto 1 and 2, Cofrentes, Asco and Tihange. The plants were selected with design and operation conditions close to the Swedish plants. All information was compiled to identify good and bad practices that are impacting on the occupational exposure. Important factors were discussed concerning BWRs and PWRs which affect radiation levels and occupational exposures in general, and especially at power uprates. Conclusions related to each task are in detail presented in a particular chapter of the report. Taking into account the whole project and its main objective the following conclusions are considered to be emphasized: Optimisation of the work processes to limit the duration of the time spent in

  20. Inquiry into the radiological consequences of power uprates at light-water reactors worldwide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilic Zabric, Tea; Tomic, Bojan; Lundgren, Klas; Sjoeberg, Mats

    2007-05-01

    In Sweden, most of the nuclear power plants are planning power uprates within the next few years. The Dept. of Occupational and Medical Exposures at the Swedish Radiation Protection Agency, SSI, has initiated a research project to investigate the radiological implications of power uprates on light-water reactors throughout the world. The project was divided into three tasks: 1. A compilation of power uprates of light-water reactors worldwide. The compilation contains a technical description in brief of how the power uprates were carried out. 2. An analysis of the radiological consequences at four selected Nuclear Power Plants, which was the main objective of the inquiry. Affects on the radiological and chemical situation due to the changed situation were discussed. 3. Review of technical and organisational factors to be considered in uprate projects to keep exposures ALARA. The project was carried out, starting with the collecting of information on the implemented and planned uprates on reactors internationally. The information was catalogued in accordance with criteria focusing on radiological impact. A detailed analysis followed of four plants selected for uprates chosen according to established criteria, in line with the project requirements. The selected plants were Olkiluoto 1 and 2, Cofrentes, Asco and Tihange. The plants were selected with design and operation conditions close to the Swedish plants. All information was compiled to identify good and bad practices that are impacting on the occupational exposure. Important factors were discussed concerning BWRs and PWRs which affect radiation levels and occupational exposures in general, and especially at power uprates. Conclusions related to each task are in detail presented in a particular chapter of the report. Taking into account the whole project and its main objective the following conclusions are considered to be emphasized: Optimisation of the work processes to limit the duration of the time spent in

  1. Aerosols, light, and water: Measurements of aerosol optical properties at different relative humidities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco, Daniel

    The Earth's atmosphere is composed of a large number of different gases as well as tiny suspended particles, both in solid and liquid state. These tiny particles, called atmospheric aerosols, have an immense impact on our health and on our global climate. Atmospheric aerosols influence the Earth's radiation budget both directly and indirectly. In the direct effect, aerosols scatter and absorb sunlight changing the radiative balance of the Earth-atmosphere system. Aerosols indirectly influence the Earth's radiation budget by modifying the microphysical and radiative properties of clouds as well as their water content and lifetime. In ambient conditions, aerosol particles experience hygroscopic growth due to the influence of relative humidity (RH), scattering more light than when the particles are dry. The quantitative knowledge of the RH effect and its influence on the light scattering coefficient and, in particular, on the phase function and polarization of aerosol particles is of substantial importance when comparing ground based observations with other optical aerosol measurements techniques such satellite and sunphotometric retrievals of aerosol optical depth and their inversions. This dissertation presents the aerosol hygroscopicity experiment investigated using a novel dryer-humidifier system, coupled to a TSI-3563 nephelometer, to obtain the light scattering coefficient (sp) as a function of relative humidity (RH) in hydration and dehydration modes. The measurements were performed in Porterville, CA (Jan 10-Feb 6, 2013), Baltimore, MD (Jul 3-30, 2013), and Golden, CO (Jul 12-Aug 10, 2014). Observations in Porterville and Golden were part of the NASA-sponsored DISCOVER-AQ project. The measured sp under varying RH in the three sites was combined with ground aerosol extinction, PM2:5mass concentrations, particle composition measurements, and compared with airborne observations performed during campaigns. The enhancement factor, f(RH), defined as the ratio of sp

  2. Effects of light and microbial activity on the degradation of two fluoroquinolone antibiotics in pond water and sediment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Juo-Shan; Pan, Hung-Yu; Liu, Shiu-Mei; Lai, Hong-Thih

    2010-07-01

    Enrofloxacin (ENR) and ciprofloxacin (CIP) are two fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics widely used to treat diseases of human beings and cultured animals. These two FQs are usually detected in the effluent of municipal sewage plants and related aquatic environments. The purpose of this study was to understand the fates of ENR and CIP in aquaculture pond water and a sediment slurry in a laboratory-scale experiment. Effects of light and microbial activity on the degradation of these two FQs were investigated. Results indicated that natural irradiation plays a major role in the degradation of ENR and CIP in pond water and the sediment slurry. The 50 % dissipation times (DT(50)) with non-sterile treatment were 0.01 and 18.4 d for ENR, and 0.04 and 17.3 d for CIP in the water and sediment slurry, respectively. On the other hand, the degradation of ENR and CIP under dark conditions was slow or even hindered, and all of their DT(50) values exceeded 100 d. These two FQs degraded faster in the sediment slurry than in pond water under dark conditions. Artificial ultraviolet (UV) and fluorescence light had similar effects on the degradation of ENR in the pond water and sediment slurry. Degradation of CIP was faster with UV than with fluorescence light treatment, while no such difference was found for ENR degradation. CIP was a degradation product of ENR under both light and dark conditions, and DT(50) values for both compounds were shorter in the presence of light. The phenomenon of biodegradation was observed during degradation of CIP in the sediment slurry under natural light.

  3. Interacting Winds in Eclipsing Symbiotic Systems – The Case Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The most adopted physical modeling for many symbiotic stars is that of interacting binaries: a cool giant, a hot .... envelopes the area behind the hot component; and if mw > 1, the hot wind predom- inates the cool wind. ...... Tomov, N., Tomova, M. 2001, Astrophysics and Space Science, 278, 311. Torbett, M. V., Campbell, B.

  4. Diversity of the Symbiotic Alga Symbiodinium in Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—With the current increase in frequency of coral bleaching events, knowledge on the genetic diversity of symbiotic algae in the genus Symbiodinium harboured by reef-building corals is important to understand how coral reefs will respond to global climate change. This study was undertaken as very little is known.

  5. Survivability of probiotics in symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study, symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt prototypes (plain and blueberry) were developed using a commercial starter containing probiotics. Samples were analyzed for physicochemical and microbiological properties, and the survivability of probiotics during 10 weeks of storage. Gross composition results were: ...

  6. Interacting Winds in Eclipsing Symbiotic Systems–The Case Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We report the mathematical representation of the so called eccentric eclipse model, whose numerical solutions can be used to obtain the physical parameters of a quiescent eclipsing symbiotic system. Indeed the nebular region produced by the collision of the stellar winds should be shifted to the orbital ...

  7. Symbiotic Blue Green Algae (Azolla): A Potential Bio fertilizer for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symbiotic Blue Green Algae (Azolla): A Potential Bio fertilizer for Paddy Rice Production in Fogera Plain, Northwestern Ethiopia. ... They were maintained and multiplied in plastic containers at Adet in a greenhouse and then inoculated into concrete tanks for testing their adaptability. Both strains were well adapted to Adet ...

  8. Competitive interactions among symbiotic fungi of the southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier D. Klepzig; Richard T. Wilkens

    1997-01-01

    The southern pine beetle, a damaging pest of conifers, is intimately linked to three symbiotic fungi.Two fungi, Ceratocystiopsis ranaculosus and Entomocorticium sp. A, are transported within specialized structures (mycangia) in the beetle exoskeleton and are mutualists of the beetle.A third fungus, Ophiostoma minus, is transported externally on the beetle exoskeleton (...

  9. Symbiotic effectiveness of pea-rhizobia associations and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    微软用户

    2011-05-02

    May 2, 2011 ... Interactions between pea (Pisum sativa L.) cultivars and Rhizobium strain affect the symbiotic relationship and ultimately both the nitrogen fixing capacity and the yield. Since Pisum sativum L. is poorly nodulated in the Loess Plateau of China where this crop is grown, the response of pea cultivars. Yannong ...

  10. Binding Cultures: A Symbiotic Vision of Francis Bebey in Agatha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Binding Cultures: A Symbiotic Vision of Francis Bebey in Agatha Moudio's Son. Kelvin Ngong Toh. Abstract. No Abstract. LWATI: A Journal of Contemporary Research, 9(3), 126-135, 2012. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online.

  11. Role of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the improvement of legume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the improvement of legume productivity under stressed environments. R Serraj, J Adu-Gyamfi. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/wajae.v6i1.45613.

  12. Optical flickering of the symbiotic star CH Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, K. A.; Martí, J.; Zamanov, R.; Dimitrov, V. V.; Kurtenkov, A.; Sánchez-Ayaso, E.; Bujalance-Fernández, I.; Latev, G. Y.; Nikolov, G.

    2018-02-01

    Here we present quasi-simultaneous observations of the flickering of the symbiotic binary star CH Cyg in U, B and V bands. We calculate the flickering source parameters and discuss the possible reason for the flickering cessation in the period 2010-2013.

  13. The symbiotic intestinal ciliates and the evolution of their hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon-van der Staay, S.Y.; Staay, G.W. van der; Michalowski, T.; Jouany, J.P.; Pristas, P.; Javorsky, P.; Kisidayova, S.; Varadyova, Z.; McEwan, N.R.; Newbold, C.J.; Alen, T. van; Graaf, R. de; Schmid, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Hackstein, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of sophisticated differentiations of the gastro-intestinal tract enabled herbivorous mammals to digest dietary cellulose and hemicellulose with the aid of a complex anaerobic microbiota. Distinctive symbiotic ciliates, which are unique to this habitat, are the largest representatives

  14. A symbiotic shell-encrusting bryozoan provides subtidal whelks with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subtidal whelk Burnupena papyracea co-occurs with a voracious predator, the rock lobster Jasus lalandii, in situations where other potential prey are largely eliminated. The survival of B. papyracea has been ascribed to a symbiotic bryozoan, Alcyonidium nodosum, which characteristically encrusts the shells of this ...

  15. Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program: Digital Technology Business Case Methodology Guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, Ken [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lawrie, Sean [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Hart, Adam [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States); Vlahoplus, Chris [ScottMadden, Inc., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2014-09-01

    The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Light Water Reactor Sustainability Program aims to develop and deploy technologies that will make the existing U.S. nuclear fleet more efficient and competitive. The program has developed a standard methodology for determining the impact of new technologies in order to assist nuclear power plant (NPP) operators in building sound business cases. The Advanced Instrumentation, Information, and Control (II&C) Systems Technologies Pathway is part of the DOE’s Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program. It conducts targeted research and development (R&D) to address aging and reliability concerns with the legacy instrumentation and control and related information systems of the U.S. operating light water reactor (LWR) fleet. This work involves two major goals: (1) to ensure that legacy analog II&C systems are not life-limiting issues for the LWR fleet and (2) to implement digital II&C technology in a manner that enables broad innovation and business improvement in the NPP operating model. Resolving long-term operational concerns with the II&C systems contributes to the long-term sustainability of the LWR fleet, which is vital to the nation’s energy and environmental security. The II&C Pathway is conducting a series of pilot projects that enable the development and deployment of new II&C technologies in existing nuclear plants. Through the LWRS program, individual utilities and plants are able to participate in these projects or otherwise leverage the results of projects conducted at demonstration plants. Performance advantages of the new pilot project technologies are widely acknowledged, but it has proven difficult for utilities to derive business cases for justifying investment in these new capabilities. Lack of a business case is often cited by utilities as a barrier to pursuing wide-scale application of digital technologies to nuclear plant work activities. The decision to move forward with funding usually hinges on

  16. Reduced graphene oxide as a solid-state electron mediator in Z-scheme photocatalytic water splitting under visible light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwase, Akihide; Ng, Yun Hau; Ishiguro, Yoshimi; Kudo, Akihiko; Amal, Rose

    2011-07-27

    The effectiveness of reduced graphene oxide as a solid electron mediator for water splitting in the Z-scheme photocatalysis system is demonstrated. We show that a tailor-made, photoreduced graphene oxide can shuttle photogenerated electrons from an O(2)-evolving photocatalyst (BiVO(4)) to a H(2)-evolving photocatalyst (Ru/SrTiO(3):Rh), tripling the consumption of electron-hole pairs in the water splitting reaction under visible-light irradiation.

  17. Red Light Represses the Photophysiology of the Scleractinian Coral

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijgerde, T.; van Melis, A.; Silva, C.I.F.; Leal, M.C.; Vogels, L.; Mutter, C.; Osinga, R.

    2014-01-01

    Light spectrum plays a key role in the biology of symbiotic corals, with blue light resulting in higher coral growth, zooxanthellae density, chlorophyll a content and photosynthesis rates as compared to red light. However, it is still unclear whether these physiological processes are blue-enhanced

  18. Molecular and biochemical analysis of symbiotic plant receptor kinase complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Douglas R; Riely, Brendan K

    2010-09-01

    DE-FG02-01ER15200 was a 36-month project, initiated on Sept 1, 2005 and extended with a one-year no cost extension to August 31, 2009. During the project period we published seven manuscripts (2 in review). Including the prior project period (2002-2005) we published 12 manuscripts in journals that include Science, PNAS, The Plant Cell, Plant Journal, Plant Physiology, and MPMI. The primary focus of this work was to further elucidate the function of the Nod factor signaling pathway that is involved in initiation of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and in particular to explore the relationship between receptor kinase-like proteins and downstream effectors of symbiotic development. During the project period we have map-base cloned two additional players in symbiotic development, including an ERF transcription factor and an ethylene pathway gene (EIN2) that negatively regulates symbiotic signaling; we have also further characterized the subcellular distribution and function of a nuclear-localized symbiosis-specific ion channel, DMI1. The major outcome of the work has been the development of systems for exploring and validating protein-protein interactions that connect symbiotic receptor-like proteins to downstream responses. In this regard, we have developed both homologous (i.e., in planta) and heterologous (i.e., in yeast) systems to test protein interactions. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens we isolated the only known interactor of the nuclear-localized calcium-responsive kinase DMI3. We have also used yeast 2-hybrid methodology to identify interactions between symbiotic signaling proteins and certain RopGTPase/RopGEF proteins that regulate root hair polar growth. More important to the long-term goals of our work, we have established a TAP tagging system that identifies in planta interactions based on co-immuno precipitation and mass spectrometry. The validity of this approach has been shown using known interactors that either co-iummnoprecipate (i.e., remorin) or co

  19. Performance of Ag-TiO2 Photocatalysts towards the Photocatalytic Disinfection of Water under Interior-Lighting and Solar-Simulated Light Irradiations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilo A. Castro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports the characterization and photoactivity of Ag-TiO2 materials using different amounts of silver during the hydrothermal synthesis. Photocatalysts were characterized by means of TEM, XPS, XRD, DRS, and N2 sorption isotherms to determine the textural properties. The photocatalyst's configuration was observed to be as anatase-brookite mixed phase particles with Ag partially oxidized aggregates on the TiO2 surface, which increased visible light absorption of the material. Moreover, photoproduction of singlet oxygen was followed by EPR analysis under visible light irradiations following the formation of TEMPOL. Such photoproduction was totally decreased by using the singlet oxygen scavenger DABCO. Photocatalysts were tested towards the photocatalytic disinfection of water suing a solar light simulator and an interior-light irradiation setup. Results evidenced an increase in the photooxidative effect of TiO2, while dark processes evidenced that part of the inactivation process is due to the Ag-TiO2 surface bactericidal effect and possible lixiviated Ag+.

  20. Thermodynamic Modelling of Fe-Cr-Ni-Spinel Formation at the Light-Water Reactor Conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurepin, V. A.; Kulik, D. A.; Hitpold, A.; Nicolet, M.

    2002-03-01

    In the light water reactors (LWR), the neutron activation and transport of corrosion products is of concern in the context of minimizing the radiation doses received by the personnel during maintenance works. A practically useful model for transport and deposition of the stainless steel corrosion products in LWR can only be based on an improved understanding of chemical processes, in particular, on the attainment of equilibrium in this hydrothermal system, which can be described by means of a thermodynamic solid-solution -aqueous-solution (SSAS) model. In this contribution, a new thermodynamic model for a Fe-Cr-Ni multi-component spinel solid solutions was developed that considers thermodynamic consequences of cation interactions in both spinel sub-Iattices. The obtained standard thermodynamic properties of two ferrite and two chromite end-members and their mixing parameters at 90 bar pressure and 290 *c temperature predict a large miscibility gap between (Fe,Ni) chromite and (Fe,Ni) ferrite phases. Together with the SUPCRT92-98 thermo- dynamic database for aqueous species, the 'spinel' thermodynamic dataset was applied to modeling oxidation of austenitic stainless steel in hydrothermal water at 290*C and 90 bar using the Gibbs energy minimization (GEM) algorithm, implemented in the GEMS-PSI code. Firstly, the equilibrium compositions of steel oxidation products were modelIed as function of oxygen fugacity .fO 2 by incremental additions of O 2 in H 2 O-free system Cr-Fe- Ni-O. Secondly, oxidation of corrosion products in the Fe-Cr-Ni-O-H aquatic system was modelIed at different initial solid/water ratios. It is demonstrated that in the transition region from hydrogen regime to oxygen regime, the most significant changes in composition of two spinel-oxide phases (chromite and ferrite) and hematite must take place. Under more reduced conditions, the Fe-rich ferrite (magnetite) and Ni-poor chromite phases co-exist at equilibrium with a metal Ni phase, maintaining