WorldWideScience

Sample records for symbiotic fungi mycorrhiza

  1. Uptake and specification of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Larsen, E.H.; Lobinski, R.; Burger-Meijer, K.; Hansen, M.; Ruzik, R.; Mazurowska, L.; Rasmussen, P.H.; Sloth, J.J.; Scholten, O.E.; Kik, C.

    2006-01-01

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic

  2. Uptake and speciation of selenium in garlic cultivated in soil amended with symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) and selenate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Erik Huusfeldt; Lobinski, R.; Burger-Meyer, K.

    2006-01-01

    The scope of the work was to investigate the influence of selenate fertilisation and the addition of symbiotic fungi (mycorrhiza) to soil on selenium and selenium species concentrations in garlic. The selenium species were extracted from garlic cultivated in experimental plots by proteolytic...... in garlic. The selenium content in garlic, which was analysed by ICP-MS, showed that addition of mycorrhiza to the natural soil increased the selenium uptake by garlic tenfold to 15 mu g g(-1) (dry mass). Fertilisation with selenate and addition of mycorrhiza strongly increased the selenium content...... in garlic to around one part per thousand. The parallel analysis of the sample extracts by cation exchange and reversed-phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection showed that gamma-glutamyl-Se-methyl-selenocysteine amounted to 2/3, whereas methylselenocysteine, selenomethionine and selenate each amounted to a few...

  3. [Response of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals in mycorrhiza].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lei; Li, Yuanjing; Tian, Chunjie

    2016-01-04

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play an important role in energy flow and nutrient cycling, besides their wide distribution in the cosystem. With a long co-evolution, AM fungi and host plant have formed a symbiotic relationship, and fungal lipid metabolism may be the key point to find the symbiotic mechanism in arbusculart mycorrhiza. Here, we reviewed the most recent progress on the interaction between AM fungal lipid metabolism and symbiotic signaling networks, especially the response of AM fungal lipid metabolism to symbiotic signals. Furthermore, we discussed the response of AM fungal lipid storage and release to symbiotic or non-symbiotic status, and the correlation between fungal lipid metabolism and nutrient transfer in mycorrhiza. In addition, we explored the feedback of the lipolysis process to molecular signals during the establishment of symbiosis, and the corresponding material conversion and energy metabolism besides the crosstalk of fungal lipid metabolism and signaling networks. This review will help understand symbiotic mechanism of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi and further application in ecosystem.

  4. Mycorrhizae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin Jurgensen; Dana Richter; Carl C. Trettin; Mary Davis

    2000-01-01

    Mycorrhizae, a mutual partnership between certain soil fungi and fine root tips, contribute to tree growth and vigor by increasing both water and nutrient uptake, especially nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P). The fungal hyphae increase root surface contact with the soil, while the fungi are supplied with a reliable source of carbon (Allen 1991, George and Marschner 1995...

  5. Use of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi for improved crop production in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF), endophytic fungi reputed for their ability to enhance P uptake can be used to alleviate P deficiencies and improve crop productivity. Although the technology has been used in developed countries, it has not been applied in crop production systems in Africa to any significant level. This is ...

  6. Response of meloidogyne hapla to mycorrhiza fungi inoculation on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Five arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) isolated from pyrethrum were screened in the greenhouse for efficacy in improving pyrethrum growth and in suppressing a root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne hapla. The fungi screened were Glomus spp. (isolates LM61, ML34 and ML35), Scutellospora sp. (isolate KS74) and ...

  7. Mycorrhiza

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The symbiotic association between plant and fungi (mycor- rhizal association) is an amazing phenomenon observed in nature. The mycorrhizal association is one of nature's boons for sustainable agriculture. In today's changing environment, indiscriminate use of pesticides and chemicals pose a great threat to the existence ...

  8. Environment and Host Affects Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF) Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahim, Norahizah Abd; Jais, Hasnah Md; Hassan, Hasnuri Mat

    2016-11-01

    The association of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) and roots undoubtedly gives positive advantages to the host plant. However, heavily fertilised soil such as in oil palm plantation, inhibit the growth of mycorrhiza. Thus, the aim of this research is to distinguish and quantify the availability of AMF population and propagules at different sites of an oil palm plantation by Most Probable Number (MPN) assay. In addition, root infection method was employed to observe host compatibility through the propagation of AMF using two different types of hosts, monocotyledon ( Echinochloa cruss-galli ) and dicotyledon ( Vigna radiata ). Three different locations at an oil palm plantation were chosen for sampling. Each location was represented by a distinctive soil series, and were further divided into two sites, that is canopy and midway area. Midway site had a greater population of AMF compared to canopy. The result showed that different environments affect the availability of AMF in the soil. Higher number of AMF infection observed in monocotyledon host suggests that the fibrous root system provide a better association with mycorrhiza.

  9. Mycorrhizae in forest tree nurseries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelle M. Cram; R. Kasten Dumroese

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizae are symbiotic fungus-root associations. The colonization of roots by mycorrhizal fungi can benefit the host by improving nutrient and water uptake. In exchange, the host plant provides the mycorrhizal fungi carbohydrates (carbon) from photosynthesis. A substantial portion of this carbon is ultimately transferred to the rhizosphere and is estimated to...

  10. Competitive interactions among symbiotic fungi of the southern pine beetle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kier D. Klepzig; Richard T. Wilkens

    1997-01-01

    The southern pine beetle, a damaging pest of conifers, is intimately linked to three symbiotic fungi.Two fungi, Ceratocystiopsis ranaculosus and Entomocorticium sp. A, are transported within specialized structures (mycangia) in the beetle exoskeleton and are mutualists of the beetle.A third fungus, Ophiostoma minus, is transported externally on the beetle exoskeleton (...

  11. Radiocaesium in fruitbodies and mycorrhizae in ectomycorrhizal fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolova, Ivanka [N. Pouskharov Inst. of Soil Sciences and Agroecology, Sofia (Bulgaria); Johanson, K.J. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Radioecology Dept., Uppsala (Sweden); Dahlberg, Anders [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Forest Mycology and Pathology Dept., Uppsala (Sweden)

    1997-12-31

    Fruitbodies of Suillus variegatus and Lactarius rufus and, at a maximum distance of 50 cm, the corresponding mycorrhizae, were collected on a rocky area in a coniferous forest. The tuberculate mycorrhizae collected close to S. variegatus fruitbodies were identified by the RFLP pattern to be S. variegatus mycorrhizae. In contrast the smooth brown mycorrhizae collected close to fruitbodies of L. rufus were found to be of various species - L. rufus, but also Russula sp. The {sup 137}Cs activity concentrations in fruitbodies and the fungal part of the tuburculate mycorrhizae of S. variegatus were about the same. A local enrichment of {sup 137}Cs within fruitbodies was studied by collecting fruitbodies growing in clusters. Between 13 and 64% of the mean ground {sup 137}Cs deposition of the cluster area (400 or 625 cm{sup 2}) was found in the fruitbodies. This indicates that there might be an important fungal redistribution of {sup 137}Cs in the forest floor during the production of fruitbodies. The distribution of {sup 137}Cs within the fruitbodies was heterogenous. For example in Cortinarious armillatus, the {sup 137}Cs level in the cap was 2.7 times higher compared to in the stripe. (Author).

  12. Radiocaesium in fruitbodies and mycorrhizae in ectomycorrhizal fungi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, Ivanka; Johanson, K.J.; Dahlberg, Anders

    1997-01-01

    Fruitbodies of Suillus variegatus and Lactarius rufus and, at a maximum distance of 50 cm, the corresponding mycorrhizae, were collected on a rocky area in a coniferous forest. The tuberculate mycorrhizae collected close to S. variegatus fruitbodies were identified by the RFLP pattern to be S. variegatus mycorrhizae. In contrast the smooth brown mycorrhizae collected close to fruitbodies of L. rufus were found to be of various species - L. rufus, but also Russula sp. The 137 Cs activity concentrations in fruitbodies and the fungal part of the tuburculate mycorrhizae of S. variegatus were about the same. A local enrichment of 137 Cs within fruitbodies was studied by collecting fruitbodies growing in clusters. Between 13 and 64% of the mean ground 137 Cs deposition of the cluster area (400 or 625 cm 2 ) was found in the fruitbodies. This indicates that there might be an important fungal redistribution of 137 Cs in the forest floor during the production of fruitbodies. The distribution of 137 Cs within the fruitbodies was heterogenous. For example in Cortinarious armillatus, the 137 Cs level in the cap was 2.7 times higher compared to in the stripe. (Author)

  13. Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2015-12-28

    Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has been demonstrated recently. Some of the fungal ABC transporter-encoding genes are also induced during the mycorrhiza formation. However, no experimental evidences of the direct involvement of fungal ABC transporters in this process are available so far. To facilitate the identification of fungal ABC proteins with a potential role in the establishment of the mycorrhizal symbiosis, we have performed an inventory of the ABC protein-encoding genes in the genomes of 25 species of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. We have identified, manually annotated and curated more than 1300 gene models of putative ABC protein-encoding genes. Out of those, more than 1000 models are predicted to encode functional proteins, whereas about 300 models represent gene fragments or putative pseudogenes. We have also performed the phylogenetic analysis of the identified sequences. The sets of ABC proteins in the mycorrhiza-forming species were compared to the related saprotrophic or plant-pathogenic fungal species. Our results demonstrate the high diversity of ABC genes in the genomes of mycorrhiza-forming fungi. Via comparison of transcriptomics data from different species, we have identified candidate groups of ABC transporters that might have a role in the process of the mycorrhiza formation. Results of our inventory will facilitate the identification of fungal transporters with a role in the mycorrhiza formation. We also provide the first data on ABC protein-coding genes for the phylum Glomeromycota and for orders Pezizales, Atheliales, Cantharellales and Sebacinales, contributing to

  14. Temperature-mediated local adaptation alters the symbiotic function in arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Rong; Cai, Xiaobu; Li, Xiaolin; Christie, Peter; Zhang, Junling; Gai, Jingping

    2017-07-01

    Variation in the symbiotic function of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AM fungi) has been demonstrated among distinct biotic and abiotic interactions. However, there is little knowledge on how local temperature conditions influence the functional divergence of AM symbionts in alpine ecosystems. Here, we conduct a reciprocal inoculation experiment to explore the three-way interactions among plants, AM fungal inoculum and temperature at sites of contrasting elevation. Evidence of local adaptation of plant growth was found only under low temperature conditions, with no consistent local versus foreign effect found in AM fungal performance. The origin of either the plant or the inoculum relative to the temperature was important in explaining symbiotic function. Specifically, when inoculum and temperature were sympatric but allopatric to the plant, poor adaptation by the plant to the novel environment was clearly found under both temperature conditions. Further analysis found that the symbiotic function was inversely related to fungal diversity under high temperature conditions. These results suggest that local adaptation represents a powerful factor in the establishment of novel combinations of plant, inoculum and temperature, and confirms the importance of taking into account both biotic and abiotic interactions in the prediction of the response of symbionts to global environmental change. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Mycorrhiza

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The ectomycorrhizal fungi invade a partial region of the host root without penetrating the cortical cells and .... The arbuscular cells function as machines for nutrient .... disease, etc. Mycorrhizal associations also protect plants against heavy metal toxicity. Ectomycorrhizal fungi protect trees from high concen- tration of toxic ...

  16. Investigation of dryland wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Azar 2 plants response to symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhiza and mycorrhiza like fungi under different levels of drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Yaghoubian

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate arbuscular mycorrhiza (Glomuss mossea and mycorrhiza-like (Piriformospora indica effects on yield, yield components and some morphological (cv. Azar 2 traits of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. under water deficit stress, a pot experiment was conducted as factorial experiment based on completely randomized design with four replications. Treatments were drought stress at three levels (FC, -5 and -10 bar and fungi inoculation at four levels (mycorrhiza (AM, mycorrhiza-like (MLF and co-inoculation of AM+MLF and control. Results showed that the water stress significantly decreased 1000-grain weight, spike harvest index, fertility percent of spike, plant height, peduncle and extrusion length and colonization percent while grain density per spike markedly increased. Fungi inoculation significantly improved all studied traits except harvest index, 1000-grain weight and root colonization. Co-inoculation of AM and MLF had the best performance in terms of all mentioned parameters. Interaction effects of fungi and water stress was significant on grain and biological yield, spike and grain number and positively affected by fungi inoculation. Among fungi treatments, however, co-inoculation of AM+MLF had the best performance and recommended for both stress and non stress conditions.

  17. EFFECT OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA FUNGI INOCULATION ON TEAK (Tectona grandis Linn. F AT CIKAMPEK, WEST JAVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragil S.B. Irianto

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the effect of Arbuscular Mycorhiza Fungi (AMF on the early growth of teak (Tectona grandis Linn. F plantation. Teak seedlings were inoculated with Glomus aggregatum or Mycofer (mixing of four Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF : G. margarita, G. manihotis, G. etunicatum and Acalospora spinosa at the time of transplantation. At  three months old the seedlings were planted in Cikampek experimental forest. Results showed that application of G. aggregatum or mycofer to teak could accelerate height and diameter growth by up to 61%and4 7%, respectively, after three months in the field.

  18. Successful joint ventures of plants: arbuscular mycorrhiza and beyond

    OpenAIRE

    Ercolin, Flavia; Reinhardt, Didier

    2011-01-01

    Among the oldest symbiotic associations of plants are arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Although many of the symbiotic signaling components have been identified on the side of the plant, AM fungi have long evaded genetic analysis owing to their strict biotrophy and their exceptional genetics. Recently, the identification of the fungal symbiosis signal (Myc factor) and of a corresponding Myc factor receptor, and new insights into AM fungal genetics, have opened...

  19. Effect of native arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi inocula on the growth of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The use of symbiotic microorganisms as mycorrhizal fungi to improve the availability of nutrients to plants is of great importance in agriculture. In this study, we were interested in the response of cowpea, variety KVX 396-4–5-2D, to mycorrhizal inoculation in the context of selection of effective Arbuscular ...

  20. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZA FUNGI AS AN INDICATOR OF SOIL FERTILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Akhid Syibli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are ubiquitous organism that forms association with the root of most terrestrial plants. AMF association also influence soil fertility through the enhancement of chemical, biological and physical content. In this study, we enumerated AMF spores from rhizosphere of Tithonia difersivolia as an indicator of soil fertility. The results showed that the most fertile soil had the highest AMF spores density. This research has confirmed that AMF has high interaction with organic carbon, organic matter, total phosphorus, cation exchange capacity, water level, soil fungi and soil bacteria. Partial regression analysis revealed the mathematic equation for their interaction. This equation used the abundant of AMF spores as an indicator for chemical, biological and physical fertility of the soil.

  1. Effects of salt stress and mycorrhiza fungi on morpho-physiological characteristics of sweet corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    seyed Abdolreza kazemeini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In order to investigate the interaction of mycorrhizal fungi and salinity on growth and physiological characteristics of sweet corn, a greenhouse experiment was conducted at College of Agriculture, Shiraz University, in 2014. The experimental design was factorial based on Completely Randomized Design in three replications. Treatments included salinity at four levels (0.4 (control, 4, 7, 10 dS m-1, and the fungi at three levels (no fungi (control, Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices. Results indicated that at flowering stage, with increasing salinity levels, leaf chlorophyll a, b and a+b content and carotenoid decreased at a rate of 18.9, 52.4, 33.1, and 34.5 respectively. Application of mycorrhiza under salinity, partially offset the negative impacts and increased tolerance of maize to NaCl by enhancing SOD and CAT activities, chlorophyll contents, carotenoid and K concentrations in leaves, plant height, leaf area, and total dry weight at flowering stage significantly, compared to control. The Na/K ratio at salinity level of 10 dS m-1 in treatments inoculated with GIN and GM fungi decreased by 39.69 and 40.45 percentage, respectively. Increases plant height, leaf area, total dry weight, concentrations of chlorophyll a, b, chlorophyll a+b and carotenoid and K, the activity of antioxidant enzymes compared with the control. Moreover, GIN type fungi had a greater advantage over GM and reduced the negative effects of salinity. Results indicated that application of mycorrhiza alleviated the adverse effect of salinity stress and improve the sweet corn dry weight up to 38 percentage at salinity level of 10 dS m-1.

  2. Enzymatic evidence for the key role of arginine in nitrogen translocation by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cruz, C.; Egsgaard, Helge; Trujillo, C.

    2007-01-01

    Key enzymes of the urea cycle and N-15-labeling patterns of arginine (Arg) were measured to elucidate the involvement of Arg in nitrogen translocation by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. Mycorrhiza was established between transformed carrot (Daucus carota) roots and Glomus intraradices in two...... weight h(-1). The results highlight the synchronization of the spatially separated reactions involved in the anabolic and catabolic arms of the urea cycle. This synchronization is a prerequisite for Arg to be a key component in nitrogen translocation in the AM mycelium....... was used to follow the dynamics of nitrogen incorporation into and turnover of Arg. Both the absence of external nitrogen and the presence of L- norvaline, an inhibitor of Arg synthesis, prevented the synthesis of Arg in the ERM and resulted in decreased activity of arginase and urease in the AM root...

  3. The application of mycorrhiza in horticulture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija ZRNIC

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This article gives a review of scientific and professional literature regarding the application of mycorrhizas in horticulture. It defines the phenomenon of mycorrhizal symbiosis and describes some of the basic features of symbiotic relationships between plants and fungi. It specifies most common types of mycorrhizas appearing in nature, their characteristics and differences considering diverse hosts, symbiotic fungi and nature of their relationship. The main objective of the article is to demonstrate the effects of mycorrhizal colonization on various agricultural, physiological and biochemical properties of horticultural crops. It also proposes an important influence of mycorrhization on plant nutrition, nutrient uptake and crop yields. Researches show that plants with mycorrhiza are more tolerant to nutrients and water stress, soil salinity and high heavy metals concentrations. Also, it has been shown that mycorrhizal symbiosis positively affects plants during attacks of foliar pathogens and plant-parasitic nematodes. These effects propose the possibility of use of mycorrhizas in sustainable agroecosystems, but the relationship between plants, mycorrhizal fungi and soil type is yet to be elucidated.

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi mediate soil respiration response to climate change in California grasslands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estruch, Carme; Mcfarland, Jack; Haw, Monica P.; Schulz, Marjorie S.; Pugnaire, Francisco I.; Waldrop, Mark P.

    2017-04-01

    California grasslands store ca. 100 Tg of soil organic carbon (SOC) and almost 40% of those ecosystems are prone to land use changes. The fate of these carbon pools will largely depend on how the main components of soil respiration - i.e., roots, mycorrhiza, and 'bulk soil' communities- respond to such changes. In order to determine the sensitivity to environmental drivers we set up an experiment to address the effect of plant community composition, soil age and warming on soil respiration rate during the 2014-2015 winter. We tested differences among microbial, fungal and root respiration using an exclusion technique to assess the effect of plant community (open grasslands vs oak woodland) in two field sites differing in soil properties as nutrient content, related to geologic soil age (92 and 137 kyr). We also used open top chambers (OTC) to simulate global change effects on grasslands. Our results showed that arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were the main drivers of differences recorded between soils of different age, and that those differences were linked to nutrient availability. Bulk soil respiration was more sensitive to environmental variation than mycorrhizal or root respiration, indicating that the presence of mycorrhizae and roots can regulate the capacity of CO2 emission to the atmosphere. Soil age affected CO2 flux from grasslands but not under oak canopies, likely due to the high concentration of SOM in oak canopies which moderated any affect of soil mineralogy on nutrient availability. Overall our study shows that the ability of grasslands to mitigate CO2 emissions depends on interactions between vegetation and their rhizosphere on soil microbial communities.

  5. Global patterns of plant root colonization intensity by mycorrhizal fungi explained by climate and soil chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudzilovskaia, N.A.; Douma, J.C.; Akhmetzhanova, A.A.; Bodegom, van P.M.; Cornwell, W.K.; Moens, E.J.; Treseder, K.K.; Tibbett, M.; Wang, Y.P.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Most vascular plants on Earth form mycorrhizae, a symbiotic relationship between plants and fungi. Despite the broad recognition of the importance of mycorrhizae for global carbon and nutrient cycling, we do not know how soil and climate variables relate to the intensity of colonization of plant

  6. Global patterns of plant root colonization intensity by mycorrhizal fungi explained by climate and soil chemistry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soudzilovskaia, N.A.; Douma, J.C.; Akhmetzhanova, A.A.; van Bodegom, P.M.; Cornwell, W.K.; Moens, E.J.; Treseder, K.K.; Tibbett, M.; Wang, Y.-P.; Cornelissen, J.H.C.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Most vascular plants on Earth form mycorrhizae, a symbiotic relationship between plants and fungi. Despite the broad recognition of the importance of mycorrhizae for global carbon and nutrient cycling, we do not know how soil and climate variables relate to the intensity of colonization of

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi facilitate rapid adaptation of Elsholtzia splendens to copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Junmin; Liang, Huijuan; Yan, Ming; Chen, Luxi; Zhang, Huating; Liu, Jie; Wang, Suizi; Jin, Zexin

    2017-12-01

    Closely associated microbes have been shown to drive local adaptation of plants. However, few studies provide direct evidence, disclosing the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF) in their rapid adaptation of plants toward heavy metal tolerance. Elsholtzia splendens is a Cu-tolerant plant that was used as a model plant to study seed morphological traits as well as traits related to seed germination and seedling growth. This was achieved after acclimation for two generations with 1000mg/kg CuSO 4 in either absence or presence of AMF. In the absence of AMF, acclimation to Cu for two generations significantly decreased surface area, perimeter length, and perimeter width of E. splendens seeds, as well as seedling survival rate and fresh weight of the radicle of seedlings. However, in the presence of AMF, both the germination rate and the germination index of E. splendens seeds as well as the fresh weights of hypocotyl and radicle significantly increased. These results revealed that after Cu acclimation treatment, seeds and seedlings that had been inoculated with AMF outperformed those without AMF inoculation under Cu addition, indicating that AMF can facilitate rapid adaptation of E. splendens to Cu stress. In addition, two generations of Cu acclimation under AMF absence significantly increased radicle length, while amplitude increased under AMF presence, indicating that the direct adaptive plasticity response of radicle length to Cu stress helps with the Cu stress adaptation of E. splendens. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantitative Simulation of Damage Roots on Inoculated Alfalfa by Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Liu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Underground mining would cause ground subsidence damage and large amounts of cracks, which would result a loss of surface moisture and nutrient and intensifying drought. There are a few reports about damage to plant roots caused by coal mining. The irregular distribution of plant roots in soil and the different forces generated in process of surface subsidence are difficult to study comprehensively. The technologies to repair damaged plant roots have not been completely perfected yet. Based on quantitative simulation of alfalfa root cut-repair experiment, this paper discusses the influences of inoculated Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on alfalfa root and the mitigation effects of an inoculation on the growth of alfalfa. Root injured alfalfa were investigated by soil pot experiments. The result indicated that at the same cut degree, the growth situation of inoculated alfalfa is better than the contrast. Compared with the Olsen-P content, at cut level of 0 and 1/3, the sand of inoculated alfalfa has less Olsen-P than contrast, at cut degree of 1/2 and 2/3, the sand of inoculated alfalfa has more Olsen-P than contrast, at degree of 3/4, the sand of inoculated alfalfa has less Olsen-P than contrast, the change trend of Olsen-P content is concerned with the relative strength size of absorb Olsen-P by alfalfa root and dissolve Olsen-P by root exudates and hyphae interstate.

  9. Lights Off for Arbuscular Mycorrhiza: On Its Symbiotic Functioning under Light Deprivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Plants are often exposed to shade over different time scales and this may substantially affect not only their own growth, but also development and functioning of the energetically dependent organisms. Among those, the root symbionts such as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and rhizobia represent particularly important cases—on the one hand, they consume a significant share of plant carbon (C) budget and, on the other, they generate a number of important nutritional feedbacks on their plant hosts, often resulting in a net positive effect on their host growth and/or fitness. Here we discuss our previous results comparing mycorrhizal performance under different intensities and durations of shade (Konvalinková et al., 2015) in a broader context of previously published literature. Additionally, we review publicly available knowledge on the root colonization and mycorrhizal growth responses in AM plants under light deprivation. Experimental evidence shows that sudden and intensive decrease of light availability to a mycorrhizal plant triggers rapid deactivation of phosphorus transfer from the AM fungus to the plant already within a few days, implying active and rapid response of the AM fungus to the energetic status of its plant host. When AM plants are exposed to intensive shading on longer time scales (weeks to months), positive mycorrhizal growth responses (MGR) are often decreasing and may eventually become negative. This is most likely due to the high C cost of the symbiosis relative to the C availability, and failure of plants to fully compensate for the fungal C demand under low light. Root colonization by AM fungi often declines under low light intensities, although the active role of plants in regulating the extent of root colonization has not yet been unequivocally demonstrated. Quantitative information on the rates and dynamics of C transfer from the plant to the fungus is mostly missing, as is the knowledge on the involved molecular mechanisms. Therefore

  10. Relation of soil nutrients and light to prevalence of mycorrhizae on pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edward Hacskaylo; Albert G., Jr. Snow

    1959-01-01

    Odd relationships abound among the wonders of Nature. Just as men keep cows, some ants herd aphids. The bee pays Nature for its food by pollinating the flower. One symbiotic relationship that concerns foresters is the coupling of tree roots with certain fungi to form compound structures, part tree root and part fungus mycelium, which we call mycorrhizae.

  11. Nutrient acquisition by symbiotic fungi governs Palaeozoic climate transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Benjamin J W; Batterman, Sarah A; Field, Katie J

    2018-02-05

    Fossil evidence from the Rhynie chert indicates that early land plants, which evolved in a high-CO 2 atmosphere during the Palaeozoic Era, hosted diverse fungal symbionts. It is hypothesized that the rise of early non-vascular land plants, and the later evolution of roots and vasculature, drove the long-term shift towards a high-oxygen, low CO 2 climate that eventually permitted the evolution of mammals and, ultimately, humans. However, very little is known about the productivity of the early terrestrial biosphere, which depended on the acquisition of the limiting nutrient phosphorus via fungal symbiosis. Recent laboratory experiments have shown that plant-fungal symbiotic function is specific to fungal identity, with carbon-for-phosphorus exchange being either enhanced or suppressed under superambient CO 2 By incorporating these experimental findings into a biogeochemical model, we show that the differences in these symbiotic nutrient acquisition strategies could greatly alter the plant-driven changes to climate, allowing drawdown of CO 2 to glacial levels, and altering the nature of the rise of oxygen. We conclude that an accurate depiction of plant-fungal symbiotic systems, informed by high-CO 2 experiments, is key to resolving the question of how the first terrestrial ecosystems altered our planet.This article is part of a discussion meeting issue 'The Rhynie cherts: our earliest terrestrial ecosystem revisited'. © 2017 The Authors.

  12. Advances in the study of genetic diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Yanpeng Liu; Bokyoon Sohn; Miaoyan Wang; Guoyong Jiang; Runjin Liu

    2008-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are obligate symbiotic endophytes which have not been cultured in vitro. The life cycle of AM fungi can be completed only when the mycorrhiza forms between the fungi and plant roots. There are more than 200 genetically-diverse species of AM fungi belonging to Glomeromycota in the Kingdom Fungi. It is well documented that surprisingly high genetic variability exists between and within species, and even in a single spore of AM fungi. We summarize recent advance...

  13. Differential immune responses of Monochamus alternatus against symbiotic and entomopathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Meng, Jie; Ning, Jing; Qin, Peijun; Zhou, Jiao; Zou, Zhen; Wang, Yanhong; Jiang, Hong; Ahmad, Faheem; Zhao, Lilin; Sun, Jianghua

    2017-08-01

    Monochamus alternatus, the main vector beetles of invasive pinewood nematode, has established a symbiotic relationship with a native ectotrophic fungal symbiont, Sporothrix sp. 1, in China. The immune response of M. alternatus to S. sp. 1 in the coexistence of beetles and fungi is, however, unknown. Here, we report that immune responses of M. alternatus pupae to infection caused by ectotrophic symbiotic fungus S. sp. 1 and entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana differ significantly. The S. sp. 1 did not kill the beetles while B. bassiana killed all upon injection. The transcriptome results showed that the numbers of differentially expressed genes in M. alternatus infected with S. sp. 1 were 2-fold less than those infected with B. bassiana at 48 hours post infection. It was noticed that Toll and IMD pathways played a leading role in the beetle's immune system when infected by symbiotic fungus, but upon infection by entomopathogenic fungus, only the Toll pathway gets triggered actively. Furthermore, the beetles could tolerate the infection of symbiotic fungi by retracing their Toll and IMD pathways at 48 h. This study provided a comprehensive sequence resource of M. alternatus transcriptome for further study of the immune interactions between host and associated fungi.

  14. Bioactive potential of symbiotic bacteria and fungi from marine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Marine sponges are rich in microbial biota. In this study, totally four sponges namely Callyspongia diffusa, Hyattella Cribriformis, Sigmadocia carnosa, Spongia officininalis Var ceylonensis were collected and their associated bacteria and fungi were isolated. Among the microbes isolated, Pseudomonas fluorescens and ...

  15. Mysterious Mycorrhizae? A Field Trip & Classroom Experiment to Demystify the Symbioses Formed between Plants & Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Nancy C.; Chaudhary, V. Bala; Hoeksema, Jason D.; Moore, John C.; Pringle, Anne; Umbanhowar, James A.; Wilson, Gail W. T.

    2009-01-01

    Biology curricula cover fungi in units on bacteria, protists, and primitive plants, but fungi are more closely related to animals than to bacteria or plants. Like animals, fungi are heterotrophs and cannot create their own food; but, like plants, fungi have cell walls, and are for the most part immobile. Most species of fungi have a filamentous…

  16. Swainsonine Biosynthesis Genes in Diverse Symbiotic and Pathogenic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Cook

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Swainsonine—a cytotoxic fungal alkaloid and a potential cancer therapy drug—is produced by the insect pathogen and plant symbiont Metarhizium robertsii, the clover pathogen Slafractonia leguminicola, locoweed symbionts belonging to Alternaria sect. Undifilum, and a recently discovered morning glory symbiont belonging to order Chaetothyriales. Genome sequence analyses revealed that these fungi share orthologous gene clusters, designated “SWN,” which included a multifunctional swnK gene comprising predicted adenylylation and acyltransferase domains with their associated thiolation domains, a β-ketoacyl synthase domain, and two reductase domains. The role of swnK was demonstrated by inactivating it in M. robertsii through homologous gene replacement to give a ∆swnK mutant that produced no detectable swainsonine, then complementing the mutant with the wild-type gene to restore swainsonine biosynthesis. Other SWN cluster genes were predicted to encode two putative hydroxylases and two reductases, as expected to complete biosynthesis of swainsonine from the predicted SwnK product. SWN gene clusters were identified in six out of seven sequenced genomes of Metarhzium species, and in all 15 sequenced genomes of Arthrodermataceae, a family of fungi that cause athlete’s foot and ringworm diseases in humans and other mammals. Representative isolates of all of these species were cultured, and all Metarhizium spp. with SWN clusters, as well as all but one of the Arthrodermataceae, produced swainsonine. These results suggest a new biosynthetic hypothesis for this alkaloid, extending the known taxonomic breadth of swainsonine producers to at least four orders of Ascomycota, and suggest that swainsonine has roles in mutualistic symbioses and diseases of plants and animals.

  17. Improvement of Verticillium Wilt Resistance by Applying Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi to a Cotton Variety with High Symbiotic Efficiency under Field Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Gao, Xinpeng; Ren, Yanyun; Ding, Xinhua; Qiu, Jiajia; Li, Ning; Zeng, Fanchang

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) play an important role in nutrient cycling processes and plant stress resistance. To evaluate the effect of Rhizophagus irregularis CD1 on plant growth promotion (PGP) and Verticillium wilt disease, the symbiotic efficiency of AMF (SEA) was first investigated over a range of 3% to 94% in 17 cotton varieties. The high-SEA subgroup had significant PGP effects in a greenhouse. From these results, the highest-SEA variety of Lumian 1 was selected for a two-year field assay. Consistent with the performance from the greenhouse, the AMF-mediated PGP of Lumian 1 also produced significant results, including an increased plant height, stem diameter, number of petioles, and phosphorus content. Compared with the mock treatment, AMF colonization obviously inhibited the symptom development of Verticillium dahliae and more strongly elevated the expression of pathogenesis-related genes and lignin synthesis-related genes. These results suggest that AMF colonization could lead to the mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR) of Lumian 1 to V. dahliae. Interestingly, our results indicated that the AMF endosymbiont could directly inhibit the growth of phytopathogenic fungi including V. dahliae by releasing undefined volatiles. In summary, our results suggest that stronger effects of AMF application result from the high-SEA. PMID:29342876

  18. Proline and Abscisic Acid Content in Droughted Corn Plant Inoculated with Azospirillum sp. and Arbuscular Mycorrhizae Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NOVRI YOULA KANDOWANGKO

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plants that undergo drought stress perform a physiological response such as accumulation of proline in the leaves and increased content abscisic acid. A research was conducted to study proline and abscisic acid (ABA content on drought-stressed corn plant with Azospirillum sp. and arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF inoculated at inceptisol soil from Bogor, West Java. The experiments were carried out in a green house from June up to September 2003, using a factorial randomized block design. In pot experiments, two factors were assigned, i.e. inoculation with Azospirillum (0, 0.50, 1.00, 1.50 ml/pot and inoculation with AMF Glomus manihotis (0, 12.50, 25.00, 37.50 g/pot. The plants were observed during tasseling up to seed filling periods. Results of experiments showed that the interaction between Azospirillum sp. and AMF was synergistically increased proline, however it decreased ABA.

  19. Ectomycorrhizal fungi and exogenous auxins influence root and mycorrhiza formation of Scots pine hypocotyl cuttings in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, K; Vuorinen, T; Ernstsen, A; Häggman, H

    2002-12-01

    We studied the ability of the ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi, Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch and Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr. (Strain H), to produce indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and to affect the formation and growth of roots on Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) hypocotyl cuttings in vitro. Effects of indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) and the auxin transport inhibitor, 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA), on rooting and the cutting-fungus interaction were also studied. Both fungi produced IAA in the absence of exogenous tryptophan, but the mycelium and culture filtrate of Pisolithus tinctorius contained higher concentrations of free and conjugated IAA than the mycelium and culture filtrate of Paxillus involutus. Inoculation with either fungus or short-term application of culture filtrate of either fungus to the base of hypocotyl cuttings enhanced root formation. Inoculation with either fungus was even more effective in enhancing root formation than treatment of the hypocotyl bases with IBA. Fungal IAA production was not directly correlated with root formation, because rooting was enhanced more by Paxillus involutus than by Pisolithus tinctorius. This suggests that, in addition to IAA, other fungal components play an important role in root formation. Treatment with 5 microM TIBA increased the rooting percentage of non-inoculated cuttings, as well as of cuttings inoculated with Pisolithus tinctorius, perhaps as a result of accumulation of IAA at the cutting base. However, the marked reduction in growth of Pisolithus tinctorius in the presence of TIBA suggests that the effects of TIBA on rooting are complicated and not solely related to IAA metabolism. The high IAA-producer, Pisolithus tinctorius, formed mycorrhizas, and the IBA treatment increased mycorrhizal frequency in this species, whereas TIBA decreased it. Paxillus involutus did not form mycorrhizas, indicating that a low concentration of IAA together with other fungal components were sufficient to stimulate

  20. The characterization of novel mycorrhiza-specific phosphate transporters from ¤Lycopersicon esculentum¤ and ¤Solanum tuberosum¤ uncovers functional redundancy in symbiotic phosphate transport in solanaceous species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nagy, F.; Karandashov, V.; Chague, W.

    2005-01-01

    Solanaceous species are among the >200 000 plant species worldwide forming a mycorrhiza, that is, a root living in symbiosis with soil-borne arbuscular-mycorrhizal (AM) fungi. An important parameter of this symbiosis, which is vital for ecosystem productivity, agriculture, and horticulture...

  1. Successful joint ventures of plants: arbuscular mycorrhiza and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolin, Flavia; Reinhardt, Didier

    2011-07-01

    Among the oldest symbiotic associations of plants are arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) with fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota. Although many of the symbiotic signaling components have been identified on the side of the plant, AM fungi have long evaded genetic analysis owing to their strict biotrophy and their exceptional genetics. Recently, the identification of the fungal symbiosis signal (Myc factor) and of a corresponding Myc factor receptor, and new insights into AM fungal genetics, have opened new avenues to address early communication and functional aspects of AM symbiosis. These advances will pave the way for breeding programs towards adapted AM fungi for crop production, and will shed light on the ecology and evolution of this remarkably successful symbiosis. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Diversity and evolution of ABC proteins in mycorrhiza-forming fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Kovalchuk, Andriy; Kohler, Annegret; Martin, Francis; Asiegbu, Fred O

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background Transporter proteins are predicted to have an important role in the mycorrhizal symbiosis, due to the fact that this type of an interaction between plants and fungi requires a continuous nutrient and signalling exchange. ABC transporters are one of the large groups of transporter proteins found both in plants and in fungi. The crucial role of plant ABC transporters in the formation of the mycorrhizal symbiosis has bee...

  3. SymRK defines a common genetic basis for plant root endosymbioses with arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, rhizobia, and Frankiabacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gherbi, Hassen; Markmann, Katharina; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Estevan, Joan; Autran, Daphné; Giczey, Gabor; Auguy, Florence; Péret, Benjamin; Laplaze, Laurent; Franche, Claudine; Parniske, Martin; Bogusz, Didier

    2008-03-25

    Root endosymbioses vitally contribute to plant nutrition and fitness worldwide. Nitrogen-fixing root nodulation, confined to four plant orders, encompasses two distinct types of associations, the interaction of legumes (Fabales) with rhizobia bacteria and actinorhizal symbioses, where the bacterial symbionts are actinomycetes of the genus Frankia. Although several genetic components of the host-symbiont interaction have been identified in legumes, the genetic basis of actinorhiza formation is unknown. Here, we show that the receptor-like kinase gene SymRK, which is required for nodulation in legumes, is also necessary for actinorhiza formation in the tree Casuarina glauca. This indicates that both types of nodulation symbiosis share genetic components. Like several other legume genes involved in the interaction with rhizobia, SymRK is also required for the interaction with arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi. We show that SymRK is involved in AM formation in C. glauca as well and can restore both nodulation and AM symbioses in a Lotus japonicus symrk mutant. Taken together, our results demonstrate that SymRK functions as a vital component of the genetic basis for both plant-fungal and plant-bacterial endosymbioses and is conserved between legumes and actinorhiza-forming Fagales.

  4. Identification and symbiotic ability of Psathyrellaceae fungi isolated from a photosynthetic orchid, Cremastra appendiculata (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagame, Takahiro; Funabiki, Eriko; Nagasawa, Eiji; Fukiharu, Toshimitsu; Iwase, Koji

    2013-09-01

    Photosynthetic orchids found in highly shaded forests are often mixotrophic, receiving part of their carbon energy via ectomycorrhizal fungi that had originally received carbohydrate from trees. A photosynthetic orchid, Cremastra appendiculata, is also found under highly shaded forest, but our preliminary data suggested that its associated fungi were not ectomycorrhizal. We tested whether their relation is an unusual example of a mixotrophic orchid associating with saprotrophic fungi by direct detection of fungal DNAs in conjunction with isolation of the fungus in pure culture and experimental inoculation of orchid seeds with the fungus. • For isolated mycobionts of C. appendiculata plants, two regions of nuclear ribosomal DNA, the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU), were sequenced, and fruiting bodies of the one isolate, SI1-1 were induced. In addition, two fungal isolates, SI1-1 and KI1-1, were grown in symbiotic cultures with C. appendiculata to verify their status as mycobionts. • In phylogenetic analyses, all isolates clustered with fungi belonging to Coprinellus in Psathyrellaceae of Agaricales. Phylogenetic analyses of these DNA sequences showed that five fungal isolates from C. appendiculata, including SI1-1 and two mycobionts isolated from the mycoheterotrophic orchid Epipogium roseum, have very similar ITS sequences. Isolate SI1-1 was identified as Coprinellus domesticus based on the morphological characteristics of the fruiting body. Isolates SI1-1 and KI1-1 induced seed germination of C. appendiculata as mycobionts. • This report is the first of a mycorrhizal symbiosis between a fungus in Psathyrellaceae and a photosynthetic orchid, revealing a new pathway to full mycoheterotrophy and contributing to our understanding of the evolution of mycoheterotrophy.

  5. Symbiotic fungi that are essential for plant nutrient uptake investigated with NMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pallon, J.; Wallander, H.; Hammer, E.; Arteaga Marrero, N.; Auzelyte, V.; Elfman, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Nilsson, C.; Olsson, P.A.; Wegden, M.

    2007-01-01

    The nuclear microprobe (NMP) technique using PIXE for elemental analysis and STIM on/off axis for parallel mass density normalization has proven successful to investigate possible interactions between minerals and ectomycorrhizal (EM) mycelia that form symbiotic associations with forest trees. The ability for the EM to make elements biologically available from minerals and soil were compared in field studies and in laboratory experiments, and molecular analysis (PCR-RFLP) was used to identify ectomycorrhizal species from the field samplings. EM rhizomorphs associated with apatite in laboratory systems and in mesh bags incubated in forest ecosystems contained larger amounts of Ca than similar rhizomorphs connected to acid-washed sand. EM mycelium produced in mesh bags had a capacity to mobilize P from apatite-amended sand and a high concentration of K in some rhizomorphs suggests that these fungi are good accumulators of K and may have a significant role in transporting K to trees. Spores formed by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in laboratory cultures were compared with spores formed in saline soils in Tunisia in Northern Africa. We found lower concentrations of P and higher concentrations of Cl in the spores collected from the field than in the spores collected from laboratory cultures. For the case of laboratory cultures, the distribution of e.g. P and K was found to be clearly correlated

  6. Symbiotic fungi that are essential for plant nutrient uptake investigated with NMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallon, J.; Wallander, H.; Hammer, E.; Arteaga Marrero, N.; Auzelyte, V.; Elfman, M.; Kristiansson, P.; Nilsson, C.; Olsson, P. A.; Wegdén, M.

    2007-07-01

    The nuclear microprobe (NMP) technique using PIXE for elemental analysis and STIM on/off axis for parallel mass density normalization has proven successful to investigate possible interactions between minerals and ectomycorrhizal (EM) mycelia that form symbiotic associations with forest trees. The ability for the EM to make elements biologically available from minerals and soil were compared in field studies and in laboratory experiments, and molecular analysis (PCR-RFLP) was used to identify ectomycorrhizal species from the field samplings. EM rhizomorphs associated with apatite in laboratory systems and in mesh bags incubated in forest ecosystems contained larger amounts of Ca than similar rhizomorphs connected to acid-washed sand. EM mycelium produced in mesh bags had a capacity to mobilize P from apatite-amended sand and a high concentration of K in some rhizomorphs suggests that these fungi are good accumulators of K and may have a significant role in transporting K to trees. Spores formed by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi in laboratory cultures were compared with spores formed in saline soils in Tunisia in Northern Africa. We found lower concentrations of P and higher concentrations of Cl in the spores collected from the field than in the spores collected from laboratory cultures. For the case of laboratory cultures, the distribution of e.g. P and K was found to be clearly correlated.

  7. Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi and Pseudomonas fluorescent bactria on Nutrient Uptake of Pistachio Seedling (Pistacia Vera Cv. Qazvini under Four Irrigation Regimes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Shool

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pistachio is one of the most important products exported from the country, which due to the low rainfall, its production is faced with water deficiency in Iran. One of the strategies adopted to deal with water deficiency and drought stress in recent years is the use of mycorrhizal fungi and phosphate solubilizing bacteria. Therefore, to study the effect of co-inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus mosseae and Pseudomonas fluorescens P52 strain bacteria on nutrient uptake of pistachio seedling (Pistacia vera cv. Qazvini under drought stress, a greenhouse experiment was conducted using four levels of drought stress (%100 Field capacity (FC as control and 75, 50 and 25 %FC and four levels of biofertilizer (plant without mycorrhizae and bacteria as control, mycorrhizae alone (100 gr of mycorrhizal inoculum in every pot, bacteria alone (two ml of the bacterial suspension in every pot and mycorrhizae and bacteria combination (100 gr of mycorrhizal inoculum and two ml of the bacterial suspension in every pot in a completely randomized design as factorial with four replications. The experiment was carried out between the years of 2010 to 2011 on 3-months old seedlings with three seedlings per pot. In this experiment, bacteria inoculation in different levels of drought had no significant effect on root colonization by mycorrhizae, but regardless of bacterial treatment, an increase in drought intensity had a promotive effect on root colonization. The amount of phosphorus was increased using biofertilizer and in many cases the greatest amount of phosphorus was obtained in mycorrhizae and mixed treatments under 25 and 50% FC. The K+ content of shoot was maximum in the mixed treatment. The greatest amount of root Ca+ was recorded under 25% FC. Drought stress caused a significant increase in micronutrients compared with control at 25% of field capacity, but was ineffective in the roots. In conclusion, the results of this study showed that in many

  8. Symbiotic relationships between soil fungi and plants reduce N2O emissions from soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bender, S Franz; Plantenga, Faline; Neftel, Albrecht; Jocher, Markus; Oberholzer, Hans-Rudolf; Köhl, Luise; Giles, Madeline; Daniell, Tim J; van der Heijden, Marcel Ga

    2014-06-01

    N2O is a potent greenhouse gas involved in the destruction of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and contributing to global warming. The ecological processes regulating its emissions from soil are still poorly understood. Here, we show that the presence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), a dominant group of soil fungi, which form symbiotic associations with the majority of land plants and which influence a range of important ecosystem functions, can induce a reduction in N2O emissions from soil. To test for a functional relationship between AMF and N2O emissions, we manipulated the abundance of AMF in two independent greenhouse experiments using two different approaches (sterilized and re-inoculated soil and non-mycorrhizal tomato mutants) and two different soils. N2O emissions were increased by 42 and 33% in microcosms with reduced AMF abundance compared to microcosms with a well-established AMF community, suggesting that AMF regulate N2O emissions. This could partly be explained by increased N immobilization into microbial or plant biomass, reduced concentrations of mineral soil N as a substrate for N2O emission and altered water relations. Moreover, the abundance of key genes responsible for N2O production (nirK) was negatively and for N2O consumption (nosZ) positively correlated to AMF abundance, indicating that the regulation of N2O emissions is transmitted by AMF-induced changes in the soil microbial community. Our results suggest that the disruption of the AMF symbiosis through intensification of agricultural practices may further contribute to increased N2O emissions.

  9. An arctic community of symbiotic fungi assembled by long-distance dispersers: phylogenetic diversity of ectomycorrhizal basidiomycetes in Svalbard based on soil and sporocarp DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    J. Geml; I. Timling; C.H. Robinson; N. Lennon; H.C. Nusbaum; C. Brochmann; M.E. Noordeloos; D.L. Taylor

    2011-01-01

    Current evidence from temperate studies suggests that ectomycorrhizal (ECM) fungi require overland routes for migration because of their obligate symbiotic associations with woody plants. Despite their key roles in arctic ecosystems, the phylogenetic diversity and phylogeography of arctic ECM fungi remains little known. Here we assess the phylogenetic diversity of ECM...

  10. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi on Dry Matter and Concentrations of Nitrogen, Phosphorus and Potassium in Berseem Clover, by Cadmium stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hashem aram

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Soil contaminations with heavy metals represent a potential risk to the biosphere and leads to increased concentration in ground and surface water. Therefore metals mobility in soil has been extensively studied in the last decades. Use of agrochemicals such as synthetic fertilizers and pesticides has resulted in soil and water pollution, and loss of biodiversity. Cadmium is a heavy metal with a strong effect on crop quality. Moreover, it is a very mobile element in the environment. Plants can easily uptake cadmium and transfer it to other organs. Experiments on the effects of cadmium on the contents of macro elements in plants are scarce and therefore the mechanism of its effect has not yet been fully explained. Contaminated soil can be remediated by chemical, physical or biological techniques. Mycorrhiza is the mutualistic symbiosis (non-pathogenic association between soil-borne fungi with the roots of higher plants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF are obligate biotrophs, which can form mutualistic symbioses with the roots of around 80% of plant species. Arbuscular mycorrhiza have been observed to play a vital role in metal tolerance and accumulation. Many workers have reported enhancement of phosphate uptake and growth of leguminous plants by vesicular arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF. Materials and Methods: One study performed the factorial experiment based on completely randomized design (CRD with three replications in the greenhouse of Agriculture Faculty of Zanjan University. The examined factors include different levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae (with and without inoculation, and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 ppm. In this study, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi Glomus mosseae species were used. These fungi were prepared by the Plant Protection Clinic in Iran – Hamedan. The soil was prepared of arable land of depth of 0-20 cm at the University of

  11. Low variation in ribosomal DNA and internal transcribed spacers of the symbiotic fungi of leaf-cutting ants (Attini: Formicidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva-Pinhati A.C.O.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Leaf-cutting ants of the genera Atta and Acromyrmex (tribe Attini are symbiotic with basidiomycete fungi of the genus Leucoagaricus (tribe Leucocoprineae, which they cultivate on vegetable matter inside their nests. We determined the variation of the 28S, 18S, and 5.8S ribosomal DNA (rDNA gene loci and the rapidly evolving internal transcribed spacers 1 and 2 (ITS1 and ITS2 of 15 sympatric and allopatric fungi associated with colonies of 11 species of leafcutter ants living up to 2,600 km apart in Brazil. We found that the fungal rDNA and ITS sequences from different species of ants were identical (or nearly identical to each other, whereas 10 GenBank Leucoagaricus species showed higher ITS variation. Our findings suggest that Atta and Acromyrmex leafcutters living in geographic sites that are very distant from each other cultivate a single fungal species made up of closely related lineages of Leucoagaricus gongylophorus. We discuss the strikingly high similarity in the ITS1 and ITS2 regions of the Atta and Acromyrmex symbiotic L. gongylophorus studied by us, in contrast to the lower similarity displayed by their non-symbiotic counterparts. We suggest that the similarity of our L. gongylophorus isolates is an indication of the recent association of the fungus with these ants, and propose that both the intense lateral transmission of fungal material within leafcutter nests and the selection of more adapted fungal strains are involved in the homogenization of the symbiotic fungal stock.

  12. [Discussion on appraisal methods and key technologies of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and medicinal plant symbiosis system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meilan; Guo, Lanping; Yang, Guang; Chen, Min; Yang, Li; Huang, Luqi

    2011-11-01

    Applications of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in research of medicinal plant cultivation are increased in recent years. Medicinal plants habitat is complicated and many inclusions are in root, however crop habitat is simple and few inclusions in root. So appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of crop and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi can't completely suitable for the symbiotic system of medicinal plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. This article discuss the appraisal methods and key technologies about the symbiotic system of medicinal plant and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi from the isolation and identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza, and the appraisal of colonization intensity. This article provides guidance for application research of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in cultivation of medicinal plants.

  13. Symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, D J; Ducket, J G; Francis, R; Ligron, R; Russell, A

    2000-06-29

    An analysis of the current state of knowledge of symbiotic fungal associations in 'lower' plants is provided. Three fungal phyla, the Zygomycota, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, are involved in forming these associations, each producing a distinctive suite of structural features in well-defined groups of 'lower' plants. Among the 'lower' plants only mosses and Equisetum appear to lack one or other of these types of association. The salient features of the symbioses produced by each fungal group are described and the relationships between these associations and those formed by the same or related fungi in 'higher' plants are discussed. Particular consideration is given to the question of the extent to which root fungus associations in 'lower' plants are analogous to 'mycorrhizas' of 'higher' plants and the need for analysis of the functional attributes of these symbioses is stressed. Zygomycetous fungi colonize a wide range of extant lower land plants (hornworts, many hepatics, lycopods, Ophioglossales, Psilotales and Gleicheniaceae), where they often produce structures analogous to those seen in the vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizas of higher plants, which are formed by members of the order Glomales. A preponderance of associations of this kind is in accordance with palaeohbotanical and molecular evidence indicating that glomalean fungi produced the archetypal symbioses with the first plants to emerge on to land. It is shown, probably for the first time, that glomalean fungi forming typical VA mycorrhiza with a higher plant (Plantago lanceolata) can colonize a thalloid liverwort (Pellia epiphylla), producing arbuscules and vesicles in the hepatic. The extent to which these associations, which are structurally analogous to mycorrhizas, have similar functions remains to be evaluated. Ascomycetous associations are found in a relatively small number of families of leafy liverworts. The structural features of the fungal colonization of rhizoids and underground axes of

  14. Antifungal genes expressed in transgenic pea (Pisum sativum L.) do not affect root colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahlon, Jagroop Gill; Jacobsen, Hans-Jörg; Cahill, James F; Hall, Linda M

    2017-10-01

    Genetically modified crops have raised concerns about unintended consequences on non-target organisms including beneficial soil associates. Pea transformed with four antifungal genes 1-3 β glucanase, endochitinase, polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins, and stilbene synthase is currently under field-testing for efficacy against fungal diseases in Canada. Transgenes had lower expression in the roots than leaves in greenhouse experiment. To determine the impact of disease-tolerant pea or gene products on colonization by non-target arbuscular mycorrhizae and nodulation by rhizobium, a field trial was established. Transgene insertion, as single gene or stacked genes, did not alter root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungus (AMF) or root nodulation by rhizobium inoculation in the field. We found no effect of transgenes on the plant growth and performance although, having a dual inoculant with both AMF and rhizobium yielded higher fresh weight shoot-to-root ratio in all the lines tested. This initial risk assessment of transgenic peas expressing antifungal genes showed no deleterious effect on non-target organisms.

  15. Antifouling phenyl ethers and other compounds from the invertebrates and their symbiotic fungi collected from the South China Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Chao-Yi

    2016-10-26

    Marine organism-derived secondary metabolites are promising potential sources for discovering environmentally safe antifouling agents. In present study, 55 marine secondary metabolites and their synthesized derivatives were tested and evaluated for their antifouling activities and security. These compounds include 44 natural products isolated from marine invertebrates and their symbiotic microorganisms collected from the South China Sea and 11 structural modified products derived from the isolated compounds. The natural secondary metabolites, covering phenyl ether derivatives, terpenoids, 9, 11-secosteroids, anthraquinones, alkaloids, nucleoside derivatives and peptides, were isolated from two corals, one sponge and five symbiotic fungi. All of the isolated and synthesized compounds were tested for their antifouling activities against the cyprids of barnacle Balanus (Amphibalanus) amphitrite Darwin. Noticeably, five phenyl ether derivatives (9, 11, 13–15) exhibited potent anti-larval settlement activity with the EC50 values lower than 3.05 μM and the LC50/EC50 ratios higher than 15. The study of structure–activity relationship (SAR) revealed that the introduction of acetoxy groups and bromine atoms to phenyl ether derivatives could significantly improve their antifouling activities. This is the first report on the SAR of phenyl ether derivatives on antifouling activity against barnacle B. amphitrite. The polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, 2, 4, 6, 2′, 4′, 6′-hexabromo-diorcinol (13), which displayed excellent antifouling activity, was considered as a promising candidate of environmentally friendly antifouling agents.

  16. Mycorrhization between Cistus ladanifer L. and Boletus edulis Bull is enhanced by the mycorrhiza helper bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mediavilla, Olaya; Olaizola, Jaime; Santos-del-Blanco, Luis; Oria-de-Rueda, Juan Andrés; Martín-Pinto, Pablo

    2016-02-01

    Boletus edulis Bull. is one of the most economically and gastronomically valuable fungi worldwide. Sporocarp production normally occurs when symbiotically associated with a number of tree species in stands over 40 years old, but it has also been reported in 3-year-old Cistus ladanifer L. shrubs. Efforts toward the domestication of B. edulis have thus focused on successfully generating C. ladanifer seedlings associated with B. edulis under controlled conditions. Microorganisms have an important role mediating mycorrhizal symbiosis, such as some bacteria species which enhance mycorrhiza formation (mycorrhiza helper bacteria). Thus, in this study, we explored the effect that mycorrhiza helper bacteria have on the efficiency and intensity of the ectomycorrhizal symbiosis between C. ladanifer and B. edulis. The aim of this work was to optimize an in vitro protocol for the mycorrhizal synthesis of B. edulis with C. ladanifer by testing the effects of fungal culture time and coinoculation with the helper bacteria Pseudomonas fluorescens Migula. The results confirmed successful mycorrhizal synthesis between C. ladanifer and B. edulis. Coinoculation of B. edulis with P. fluorescens doubled within-plant mycorrhization levels although it did not result in an increased number of seedlings colonized with B. edulis mycorrhizae. B. edulis mycelium culture time also increased mycorrhization levels but not the presence of mycorrhizae. These findings bring us closer to controlled B. edulis sporocarp production in plantations.

  17. Evolution of trees and mycorrhizal fungi intensifies silicate mineral weathering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirk, Joe; Beerling, David J; Banwart, Steve A; Kakonyi, Gabriella; Romero-Gonzalez, Maria E; Leake, Jonathan R

    2012-12-23

    Forested ecosystems diversified more than 350 Ma to become major engines of continental silicate weathering, regulating the Earth's atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration by driving calcium export into ocean carbonates. Our field experiments with mature trees demonstrate intensification of this weathering engine as tree lineages diversified in concert with their symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi. Preferential hyphal colonization of the calcium silicate-bearing rock, basalt, progressively increased with advancement from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) to later, independently evolved ectomycorrhizal (EM) fungi, and from gymnosperm to angiosperm hosts with both fungal groups. This led to 'trenching' of silicate mineral surfaces by AM and EM fungi, with EM gymnosperms and angiosperms releasing calcium from basalt at twice the rate of AM gymnosperms. Our findings indicate mycorrhiza-driven weathering may have originated hundreds of millions of years earlier than previously recognized and subsequently intensified with the evolution of trees and mycorrhizas to affect the Earth's long-term CO(2) and climate history.

  18. The effect of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza isolated from Syrian soil on alfalfa growth and nitrogen fixation in saline soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Atrash, F

    2001-01-01

    The influence of vesicular - arbuscular Mycorrhiza fungi (VAM) on symbiotic fixation of N 2 n alfalfa plants has been observed. Beneficial effects of study the effect of VAM or phosphorous fertilization on alfalfa (Medicago sativa L,) yields, umber of nodules and N 2 fixation by N 15 isotope dilution at different salinity levels. This experiment was realized in green house conditions, using soil of 2.3 dsm -1 conductivity mixed with sand (5: 2V) for alfalfa plants growing at various levels of phosphorus, or infected by Mycorrhiza fungi. Different conductivities (13.18, 22.2, 28.8, 43.5 dsm -1 ) were applied on these treatment by increasing concentrations of Nacl, CaCl 2 and MgCl 2 and MgCl 2 by salinity soil irrigation. Ten days after planting, soil was enriched with 2 ppm of (NH 4 15 ) 2 SO 4 . Plant were grown under greenhouse condition for ten weeks. Our results confirmed that increased salinity reduced nitrogen - fixation and the number of nodules. The negative effect with increasing salinity was less in Mycorrhiza plants than in plants fertilized with various levels of phosphorus, and only the higher levels of salinity reduced significantly, the percentage of Mycorrhiza colonization, However, at all levels of salinity, VAM stimulated plant growth and nutrient uptake. (author)

  19. Carbon transport by symbiotic fungi in fourwing saltbush, Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerry R. Barrow

    2001-01-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi enhance the nutrition and survival of host plants in native ecosystems. Arid rangelands severely challenge plants because of chronic nutrient and water stress. Fourwing saltbush, Atriplex canescens (Pursh) Nutt., a dominant and important shrub of western arid rangelands, generally considered to be non-mycorrhizal, is more extensively colonized by dark...

  20. The response of Aster amellus ( Asteraceae ) to mycorrhiza depends on the origins of both the soil and the fungi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pánková, Hana; Münzbergová, Zuzana; Rydlová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 98, č. 5 (2011), s. 850-859 ISSN 0002-9122 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600050705; GA ČR GAP504/10/1486; GA ČR GD206/08/H049 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : dry grassland * local adaptation * native fungi Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.664, year: 2011

  1. Occurrence of symbiotic fungi and rhizospheric phosphate solubilization in weeds - doi: 10.4025/actasciagron.v35i1.15047

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Aparecido dos Santos

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the ecology of the organisms involved in the production process are necessary for the development of sustainable agriculture, and sustainability is currently closely linked to the profitability of production. The objective of this study was to verify the occurrence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in weeds infesting Brazilian crops and to evaluate the inorganic phosphate solubilization potential of the associated microbiota. A total of 36 weed species were evaluated for the occurrence of mycorrhizae; of these, 11 were selected to evaluate their potential for total and relative phosphate solubilization. All of the species demonstrated mycorrhizal colonization, including a member of the Brassicaceae family, which is usually assumed to be non-mycorrhizal. In most of the species, morphological types of arbuscular and coiled hyphae were observed, with the coiled hyphae being the most common in the grasses. Dark septate endophytic fungi were observed in most of the plants. The weeds presented different potentials for P solubilization in the rhizosphere; Amaranthus retroflexus, Bidens pilosa and Leonotis nepetaefolia showed high values of relative phosphate solubilization. This is the first report on the mycorrhizae and phosphate solubilization activity in weeds in Brazil.

  2. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    OpenAIRE

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomas...

  3. Arabitol provided by lichenous fungi enhances ability to dissipate excess light energy in a symbiotic green alga under desiccation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosugi, Makiko; Miyake, Hirohisa; Yamakawa, Hisanori; Shibata, Yutaka; Miyazawa, Atsuo; Sugimura, Takashi; Satoh, Kazuhiko; Itoh, Shigeru; Kashino, Yasuhiro

    2013-08-01

    Lichens are drought-resistant symbiotic organisms of mycobiont fungi and photobiont green algae or cyanobacteria, and have an efficient mechanism to dissipate excess captured light energy into heat in a picosecond time range to avoid photoinhibition. This mechanism can be assessed as drought-induced non-photochemical quenching (d-NPQ) using time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. A green alga Trebouxia sp., which lives within a lichen Ramalina yasudae, is one of the most common green algal photobionts. This alga showed very efficient d-NPQ under desiccation within the lichen thallus, whereas it lost d-NPQ ability when isolated from R. yasudae, indicating the importance of the interaction with the mycobiont for d-NPQ ability. We analyzed the water extracts from lichen thalli that enhanced d-NPQ in Trebouxia. Of several sugar compounds identified in the water extracts by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), mass spectrometry (MS) and gas chromatography (GC) analyses, only d-arabitol recovered d-NPQ in isolated Trebouxia to a level similar to that detected for R. yasudae thallus. Other sugar compounds did not help the expression of d-NPQ at the same concentrations. Thus, arabitol is essential for the expression of d-NPQ to dissipate excess captured light energy into heat, protecting the photobiont from photoinhibition. The relationship between mycobionts and photobionts is, therefore, not commensalism, but mutualism with each other, as shown by d-NPQ expression.

  4. Effects of prometryn and acetochlor on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and symbiotic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Miao, W; Gong, C; Jiang, H; Ma, W; Zhu, S

    2013-08-01

    Prometryn and acetochlor are common herbicides widely used to control weeds in agricultural systems. The impacts of the two herbicides on spore germination, hyphal elongation, the biomass and malondialdehyde content of carrot hairy roots were investigated using a strict in vitro cultivation system associating the Ri T-DNA-transferred carrot hairy roots with Glomus etunicatum. Alternatively, root colonization, daughter spore production and the proportion of hyphae with succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activities were also investigated. No significant impact on spore germination was noted in the presence of acetochlor at all three concentrations tested, while a significant decrease was observed with prometryn only at the highest concentration. Moreover, an inverse correlation was identified between herbicides concentrations and G. etunicatum root colonization and spore production as well as hyphal SDH and ALP activity, with a positive correlation identified among these four factors. Both herbicides exerted negative effects on the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus and symbiosis at increasing concentrations, with prometryn apparently more toxic than acetochlor. Furthermore, the AM symbiotic system was shown to improve biomass, reduce malondialdehyde accumulation and ease lipid peroxidation in carrot hairy roots and decrease damage in host plants, thus enhancing plant tolerance to adverse conditions. In this study, the effect of prometryn and acetochlor on the physiology and metabolic activities of the AM fungus Glomus etunicatum were investigated. Our findings demonstrate for the first time, the impact of the two herbicides at three concentrations (0.1, 1 and 10 mg l(-1)) on transformed carrot hairy roots/AM fungus association under strict in vitro culture conditions, which may guide the application of the two herbicides in modern agriculture. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  5. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services. PMID:25005713

  6. Glyphosate herbicide affects belowground interactions between earthworms and symbiotic mycorrhizal fungi in a model ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaller, Johann G.; Heigl, Florian; Ruess, Liliane; Grabmaier, Andrea

    2014-07-01

    Herbicides containing glyphosate are widely used in agriculture and private gardens, however, surprisingly little is known on potential side effects on non-target soil organisms. In a greenhouse experiment with white clover we investigated, to what extent a globally-used glyphosate herbicide affects interactions between essential soil organisms such as earthworms and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). We found that herbicides significantly decreased root mycorrhization, soil AMF spore biomass, vesicles and propagules. Herbicide application and earthworms increased soil hyphal biomass and tended to reduce soil water infiltration after a simulated heavy rainfall. Herbicide application in interaction with AMF led to slightly heavier but less active earthworms. Leaching of glyphosate after a simulated rainfall was substantial and altered by earthworms and AMF. These sizeable changes provide impetus for more general attention to side-effects of glyphosate-based herbicides on key soil organisms and their associated ecosystem services.

  7. Phylogenetic relatedness explains highly interconnected and nested symbiotic networks of woody plants and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in a Chinese subtropical forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Liang; Zheng, Yong; Gao, Cheng; Mi, Xiang-Cheng; Ma, Ke-Ping; Wubet, Tesfaye; Guo, Liang-Dong

    2017-05-01

    Elucidating symbiotic relationships between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and plants contributes to a better understanding of their reciprocally dependent coexistence and community assembly. However, the main drivers of plant and AMF community assembly remain unclear. In this study, we examined AMF communities from 166 root samples of 17 woody plant species from 10 quadrats in a Chinese subtropical forest using 454 pyrosequencing of 18S rRNA gene to describe symbiotic AMF-plant association. Our results show the woody plant-AMF networks to be highly interconnected and nested, but in antimodular and antispecialized manners. The nonrandom pattern in the woody plant-AMF network was explained by plant and AMF phylogenies, with a tendency for a stronger phylogenetic signal by plant than AMF phylogeny. This study suggests that the phylogenetic niche conservatism in woody plants and their AMF symbionts could contribute to interdependent AMF and plant community assembly in this subtropical forest ecosystem. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Mycorrhiza helper bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deveau, Aurelie [French National Insitute for Agricultural Research (INRA); Labbe, Jessy [ORNL

    2016-10-01

    This chapter focuses on the Mycorrhiza Helper Bacteria (MHB), a generic name given to bacteria which stimulate the formation of mycorrhizal symbiosis. By extension, some bacterial strains that positively impact the functioning of mycorrhizal symbiosis are also called MHB. These bacteria have applicative interests, as they indirectly improve the health and growth of tree seedlings. MHB are not restricted to a specific type of ecosystem, but are rather generalist in the way that they associate with both herbaceous and woody mycorrhizal plants from boreal, temperate, arid and tropical ecosystems. However, understanding the molecular mechanisms and their specificities will help us to know more about the ecology of the MHB. The process of acquisition varies between fungal species; while ectomycorrhizal fungi most probably recurrently acquire them from the environment, the association between bacterial endosymbionts and Glomeromycota probably dates back to very ancient times, and has since been vertically transmitted.

  9. ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI - AN ESSENTIAL TOOL TO SUSTAINABLE VINEYARD DEVELOPMENT: A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Cristian Popescu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Grapevine is one of the most important horticultural perennial crops grown in many countries from worldwide. In this paper, we review the global benefits of arbuscular mycorrhiza application for grapevine production and the impact of viticultural practices for these natural microorganisms to establish symbiotic associations with vine roots. This review aims to provide a brief overview of the status of and to outline the most important application and effects of AMF in viticulture in order to increase the sustainability of vineyards. Viticulture has to adapt to new challenges of pest and chemicals fertilizers management, climate change, global urbanization, land erosions, increasing droughts, world population growth and others factors that can affect the sustainability of viticultural production systems. One of eco-friendly approaches is to use the application of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi (AMF. Response of grapevine to AMF application demonstrated a lot of benefits for viticultural ecosystems. Technologies on sustainable agriculture and conservation of ecosystems vineyards may consider arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi as biofertilizers. Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi could be an effective tool for improving the agro-enviromental perfomance in viticultural farms.

  10. Identification and functional characterization of a sulfate transporter induced by both sulfur starvation and mycorrhiza formation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Marco; Tolosano, Matteo; Volpe, Veronica; Kopriva, Stanislav; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AMs) are one of the most widespread symbioses in the world. They allow plants to receive mineral nutrients from the symbiotic fungus which in turn gets back up to 20% of plant carbon and completes its life cycle. Especially in low-nutrient conditions, AM fungi are capable of significantly improving plant phosphate and nitrogen acquisition, but fewer data are available about sulfur (S) nutrition. We focused on S metabolism in Lotus japonicus upon mycorrhizal colonization under sulfur starvation or repletion. We investigated both tissue sulfate concentrations and S-related gene expression, at cell-type or whole-organ level. Gene expression and sulfate tissue concentration showed that Rhizophagus irregularis colonization can improve plant S nutritional status under S starvation. A group 1 sulfate transporter, LjSultr1;2, induced by both S starvation and mycorrhiza formation, was identified. Its transcript was localized in arbuscule-containing cells, which was confirmed with a promoter-GUS assay, and its function was verified through phenotyping of TILLING mutants in nonmycorrhizal seedlings. LjSultr1;2 thus appears to encode a key protein involved in plant sulfate uptake. In contrast to phosphate transporters, a single gene, LjSultr1;2, seems to mediate both direct and symbiotic pathways of S uptake in L. japonicus. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  11. Gibberellin regulates infection and colonization of host roots by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is established by the entry of AM fungi into the host plant roots and the formation of symbiotic structures called arbuscules. The host plant supplies photosynthetic products to the AM fungi, which in return provide phosphate and other minerals to the host through the arbuscules. Both partners gain great advantages from this symbiotic interaction, and both regulate AM development. Our recent work revealed that gibberellic acids (GAs) are required for AM development in the legume Lotus japonicus. GA signaling interact with symbiosis signaling pathways, directing AM fungal colonization in host roots. Expression analysis showed that genes for GA biosynthesis and metabolism were induced in host roots around AM fungal hyphae, suggesting that the GA signaling changes with both location and time during AM development. The fluctuating GA concentrations sometimes positively and sometimes negatively affect the expression of AM-induced genes that regulate AM fungal infection and colonization.

  12. Gibberellins interfere with symbiosis signaling and gene expression and alter colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeda, Naoya; Handa, Yoshihiro; Tsuzuki, Syusaku; Kojima, Mikiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-02-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza is a mutualistic plant-fungus interaction that confers great advantages for plant growth. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi enter the host root and form symbiotic structures that facilitate nutrient supplies between the symbionts. The gibberellins (GAs) are phytohormones known to inhibit AM fungal infection. However, our transcriptome analysis and phytohormone quantification revealed GA accumulation in the roots of Lotus japonicus infected with AM fungi, suggesting that de novo GA synthesis plays a role in arbuscular mycorrhiza development. We found pleiotropic effects of GAs on the AM fungal infection. In particular, the morphology of AM fungal colonization was drastically altered by the status of GA signaling in the host root. Exogenous GA treatment inhibited AM hyphal entry into the host root and suppressed the expression of Reduced Arbuscular Mycorrhization1 (RAM1) and RAM2 homologs that function in hyphal entry and arbuscule formation. On the other hand, inhibition of GA biosynthesis or suppression of GA signaling also affected arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the host root. Low-GA conditions suppressed arbuscular mycorrhiza-induced subtilisin-like serine protease1 (SbtM1) expression that is required for AM fungal colonization and reduced hyphal branching in the host root. The reduced hyphal branching and SbtM1 expression caused by the inhibition of GA biosynthesis were recovered by GA treatment, supporting the theory that insufficient GA signaling causes the inhibitory effects on arbuscular mycorrhiza development. Most studies have focused on the negative role of GA signaling, whereas our study demonstrates that GA signaling also positively interacts with symbiotic responses and promotes AM colonization of the host root. © 2015 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  13. Novel symbiotic protoplasts formed by endophytic fungi explain their hidden existence, lifestyle switching, and diversity within the plant kingdom.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter R Atsatt

    Full Text Available Diverse fungi live all or part of their life cycle inside plants as asymptomatic endophytes. While endophytic fungi are increasingly recognized as significant components of plant fitness, it is unclear how they interact with plant cells; why they occur throughout the fungal kingdom; and why they are associated with most fungal lifestyles. Here we evaluate the diversity of endophytic fungi that are able to form novel protoplasts called mycosomes. We found that mycosomes cultured from plants and phylogenetically diverse endophytic fungi have common morphological characteristics, express similar developmental patterns, and can revert back to the free-living walled state. Observed with electron microscopy, mycosome ontogeny within Aureobasidium pullulans may involve two organelles: double membrane-bounded promycosome organelles (PMOs that form mycosomes, and multivesicular bodies that may form plastid-infecting vesicles. Cultured mycosomes also contain a double membrane-bounded organelle, which may be homologous to the A. pullulans PMO. The mycosome PMO is often expressed as a vacuole-like organelle, which alternatively may contain a lipoid body or a starch grain. Mycosome reversion to walled cells occurs within the PMO, and by budding from lipid or starch-containing mycosomes. Mycosomes discovered in chicken egg yolk provided a plant-independent source for analysis: they formed typical protoplast stages, contained fungal ITS sequences and reverted to walled cells, suggesting mycosome symbiosis with animals as well as plants. Our results suggest that diverse endophytic fungi express a novel protoplast phase that can explain their hidden existence, lifestyle switching, and diversity within the plant kingdom. Importantly, our findings outline "what, where, when and how", opening the way for cell and organelle-specific tests using in situ DNA hybridization and fluorescent labels. We discuss developmental, ecological and evolutionary contexts that

  14. Novel Symbiotic Protoplasts Formed by Endophytic Fungi Explain Their Hidden Existence, Lifestyle Switching, and Diversity within the Plant Kingdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsatt, Peter R.; Whiteside, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse fungi live all or part of their life cycle inside plants as asymptomatic endophytes. While endophytic fungi are increasingly recognized as significant components of plant fitness, it is unclear how they interact with plant cells; why they occur throughout the fungal kingdom; and why they are associated with most fungal lifestyles. Here we evaluate the diversity of endophytic fungi that are able to form novel protoplasts called mycosomes. We found that mycosomes cultured from plants and phylogenetically diverse endophytic fungi have common morphological characteristics, express similar developmental patterns, and can revert back to the free-living walled state. Observed with electron microscopy, mycosome ontogeny within Aureobasidium pullulans may involve two organelles: double membrane-bounded promycosome organelles (PMOs) that form mycosomes, and multivesicular bodies that may form plastid-infecting vesicles. Cultured mycosomes also contain a double membrane-bounded organelle, which may be homologous to the A. pullulans PMO. The mycosome PMO is often expressed as a vacuole-like organelle, which alternatively may contain a lipoid body or a starch grain. Mycosome reversion to walled cells occurs within the PMO, and by budding from lipid or starch-containing mycosomes. Mycosomes discovered in chicken egg yolk provided a plant-independent source for analysis: they formed typical protoplast stages, contained fungal ITS sequences and reverted to walled cells, suggesting mycosome symbiosis with animals as well as plants. Our results suggest that diverse endophytic fungi express a novel protoplast phase that can explain their hidden existence, lifestyle switching, and diversity within the plant kingdom. Importantly, our findings outline “what, where, when and how”, opening the way for cell and organelle-specific tests using in situ DNA hybridization and fluorescent labels. We discuss developmental, ecological and evolutionary contexts that provide a robust

  15. Novel symbiotic protoplasts formed by endophytic fungi explain their hidden existence, lifestyle switching, and diversity within the plant kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atsatt, Peter R; Whiteside, Matthew D

    2014-01-01

    Diverse fungi live all or part of their life cycle inside plants as asymptomatic endophytes. While endophytic fungi are increasingly recognized as significant components of plant fitness, it is unclear how they interact with plant cells; why they occur throughout the fungal kingdom; and why they are associated with most fungal lifestyles. Here we evaluate the diversity of endophytic fungi that are able to form novel protoplasts called mycosomes. We found that mycosomes cultured from plants and phylogenetically diverse endophytic fungi have common morphological characteristics, express similar developmental patterns, and can revert back to the free-living walled state. Observed with electron microscopy, mycosome ontogeny within Aureobasidium pullulans may involve two organelles: double membrane-bounded promycosome organelles (PMOs) that form mycosomes, and multivesicular bodies that may form plastid-infecting vesicles. Cultured mycosomes also contain a double membrane-bounded organelle, which may be homologous to the A. pullulans PMO. The mycosome PMO is often expressed as a vacuole-like organelle, which alternatively may contain a lipoid body or a starch grain. Mycosome reversion to walled cells occurs within the PMO, and by budding from lipid or starch-containing mycosomes. Mycosomes discovered in chicken egg yolk provided a plant-independent source for analysis: they formed typical protoplast stages, contained fungal ITS sequences and reverted to walled cells, suggesting mycosome symbiosis with animals as well as plants. Our results suggest that diverse endophytic fungi express a novel protoplast phase that can explain their hidden existence, lifestyle switching, and diversity within the plant kingdom. Importantly, our findings outline "what, where, when and how", opening the way for cell and organelle-specific tests using in situ DNA hybridization and fluorescent labels. We discuss developmental, ecological and evolutionary contexts that provide a robust

  16. The dawn of symbiosis between plants and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidartondo, Martin I; Read, David J; Trappe, James M; Merckx, Vincent; Ligrone, Roberto; Duckett, Jeffrey G

    2011-08-23

    The colonization of land by plants relied on fundamental biological innovations, among which was symbiosis with fungi to enhance nutrient uptake. Here we present evidence that several species representing the earliest groups of land plants are symbiotic with fungi of the Mucoromycotina. This finding brings up the possibility that terrestrialization was facilitated by these fungi rather than, as conventionally proposed, by members of the Glomeromycota. Since the 1970s it has been assumed, largely from the observation that vascular plant fossils of the early Devonian (400 Ma) show arbuscule-like structures, that fungi of the Glomeromycota were the earliest to form mycorrhizas, and evolutionary trees have, until now, placed Glomeromycota as the oldest known lineage of endomycorrhizal fungi. Our observation that Endogone-like fungi are widely associated with the earliest branching land plants, and give way to glomeromycotan fungi in later lineages, raises the new hypothesis that members of the Mucoromycotina rather than the Glomeromycota enabled the establishment and growth of early land colonists. This journal is © 2011 The Royal Society

  17. Plant-symbiotic fungi as chemical engineers: multi-genome analysis of the clavicipitaceae reveals dynamics of alkaloid loci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L Schardl

    Full Text Available The fungal family Clavicipitaceae includes plant symbionts and parasites that produce several psychoactive and bioprotective alkaloids. The family includes grass symbionts in the epichloae clade (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species, which are extraordinarily diverse both in their host interactions and in their alkaloid profiles. Epichloae produce alkaloids of four distinct classes, all of which deter insects, and some-including the infamous ergot alkaloids-have potent effects on mammals. The exceptional chemotypic diversity of the epichloae may relate to their broad range of host interactions, whereby some are pathogenic and contagious, others are mutualistic and vertically transmitted (seed-borne, and still others vary in pathogenic or mutualistic behavior. We profiled the alkaloids and sequenced the genomes of 10 epichloae, three ergot fungi (Claviceps species, a morning-glory symbiont (Periglandula ipomoeae, and a bamboo pathogen (Aciculosporium take, and compared the gene clusters for four classes of alkaloids. Results indicated a strong tendency for alkaloid loci to have conserved cores that specify the skeleton structures and peripheral genes that determine chemical variations that are known to affect their pharmacological specificities. Generally, gene locations in cluster peripheries positioned them near to transposon-derived, AT-rich repeat blocks, which were probably involved in gene losses, duplications, and neofunctionalizations. The alkaloid loci in the epichloae had unusual structures riddled with large, complex, and dynamic repeat blocks. This feature was not reflective of overall differences in repeat contents in the genomes, nor was it characteristic of most other specialized metabolism loci. The organization and dynamics of alkaloid loci and abundant repeat blocks in the epichloae suggested that these fungi are under selection for alkaloid diversification. We suggest that such selection is related to the variable life histories

  18. Plant-Symbiotic Fungi as Chemical Engineers: Multi-Genome Analysis of the Clavicipitaceae Reveals Dynamics of Alkaloid Loci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardl, Christopher L.; Young, Carolyn A.; Hesse, Uljana; Amyotte, Stefan G.; Andreeva, Kalina; Calie, Patrick J.; Fleetwood, Damien J.; Haws, David C.; Moore, Neil; Oeser, Birgitt; Panaccione, Daniel G.; Schweri, Kathryn K.; Voisey, Christine R.; Farman, Mark L.; Jaromczyk, Jerzy W.; Roe, Bruce A.; O'Sullivan, Donal M.; Scott, Barry; Tudzynski, Paul; An, Zhiqiang; Arnaoudova, Elissaveta G.; Bullock, Charles T.; Charlton, Nikki D.; Chen, Li; Cox, Murray; Dinkins, Randy D.; Florea, Simona; Glenn, Anthony E.; Gordon, Anna; Güldener, Ulrich; Harris, Daniel R.; Hollin, Walter; Jaromczyk, Jolanta; Johnson, Richard D.; Khan, Anar K.; Leistner, Eckhard; Leuchtmann, Adrian; Li, Chunjie; Liu, JinGe; Liu, Jinze; Liu, Miao; Mace, Wade; Machado, Caroline; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Pan, Juan; Schmid, Jan; Sugawara, Koya; Steiner, Ulrike; Takach, Johanna E.; Tanaka, Eiji; Webb, Jennifer S.; Wilson, Ella V.; Wiseman, Jennifer L.; Yoshida, Ruriko; Zeng, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    The fungal family Clavicipitaceae includes plant symbionts and parasites that produce several psychoactive and bioprotective alkaloids. The family includes grass symbionts in the epichloae clade (Epichloë and Neotyphodium species), which are extraordinarily diverse both in their host interactions and in their alkaloid profiles. Epichloae produce alkaloids of four distinct classes, all of which deter insects, and some—including the infamous ergot alkaloids—have potent effects on mammals. The exceptional chemotypic diversity of the epichloae may relate to their broad range of host interactions, whereby some are pathogenic and contagious, others are mutualistic and vertically transmitted (seed-borne), and still others vary in pathogenic or mutualistic behavior. We profiled the alkaloids and sequenced the genomes of 10 epichloae, three ergot fungi (Claviceps species), a morning-glory symbiont (Periglandula ipomoeae), and a bamboo pathogen (Aciculosporium take), and compared the gene clusters for four classes of alkaloids. Results indicated a strong tendency for alkaloid loci to have conserved cores that specify the skeleton structures and peripheral genes that determine chemical variations that are known to affect their pharmacological specificities. Generally, gene locations in cluster peripheries positioned them near to transposon-derived, AT-rich repeat blocks, which were probably involved in gene losses, duplications, and neofunctionalizations. The alkaloid loci in the epichloae had unusual structures riddled with large, complex, and dynamic repeat blocks. This feature was not reflective of overall differences in repeat contents in the genomes, nor was it characteristic of most other specialized metabolism loci. The organization and dynamics of alkaloid loci and abundant repeat blocks in the epichloae suggested that these fungi are under selection for alkaloid diversification. We suggest that such selection is related to the variable life histories of the

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhiza contribution to the growth performance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2009-06-12

    Jun 12, 2009 ... plant height and stem girth of sunflower plants only at 80 mg Cd kg-1 concentration. Highest values of ... fungi colonization percentage was obtained with increase in Cd and Pb concentrations. Key words: Glomus ..... of plants, mycorrhizae and phytochelators in heavy metal contaminated land remediation.

  20. Indução in vitro da germinação de sementes de Oncidium flexuosum (Orchidaceae por fungos micorrízicos rizoctonióides In vitro symbiotic seed germination of Oncidium flexuosum (Orchidaceae by rhizoctonia-like mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olinto Liparini Pereira

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available A germinação de sementes e o desenvolvimento de protocórmios de Oncidium flexuosum (Orchidaceae induzidos simbioticamente são descritos pela primeira vez. As sementes de O. flexuosum foram inoculadas com dez fungos micorrízicos rizoctonióides, previamente isolados de micorrizas de dez espécies de orquídeas neotropicais do Brasil, incluindo O. flexuosum. Foram utilizados um isolado pertencente à espécie Epulorhiza repens, dois pertencentes à Epulorhiza epiphytica, seis de Ceratorhiza spp. e um de Rhizoctonia sp. Sementes inoculadas com o isolado M2 de Ceratorhiza sp., originalmente isolado do sistema radicular de O. flexuosum em habitat natural, promoveu a germinação das sementes em sete dias e em, aproximadamente, 30 % das plântulas, houve formação de folhas após 50 dias de incubação, apresentando pelotons em algumas células do protocórmio e das radicelas. Os demais isolados promoveram a germinação das sementes; entretanto, não promoveram um desenvolvimento ótimo dos protocórmios. Sementes incubadas na ausência de fungos micorrízicos não germinaram. A especificidade e a alta dependência de O. flexuosum pela associação micorrízica ficaram claras. Aspectos relativos à especificidade, anatomia da interação fungo-planta e a importância da seleção de estirpes fúngicas, previamente ao uso de fungos micorrízicos para o cultivo simbiótico a partir de sementes de O. flexuosum são discutidos.Symbiotic in vitro seed germination and protocorm development of Oncidium flexuosum is described for the first time. O. flexuosum seeds were inoculated with ten mycorrhizal isolates, originally obtained from the mycorrhiza of ten neotropical Brazilian orchid species, including O. flexuosum. One of the isolates belongs to Epulorhiza repens, two to Epulorhiza epiphytica, six to Ceratorhiza spp., and one to Rhizoctonia sp. Seeds inoculated with the M2 isolate of Ceratorhiza sp., originally isolated from the root system of wild O

  1. Effect of Mycorrhiza Symbiosis on Yield, Yield Components and Water Use Efficiency of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Affected by Different Irrigation Regimes in Mashhad Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Plant association with mycorrhiza has been considered as one of the options to improve input efficiency particularly for water and nutrient - (Allen and Musik, 1993; Bolan, 1991. This has been due to kncreasing the absorbing area of the root and therefore better contact with water and nutrients. Inoculation with mycorrhiza enhances nutrient uptake with low immobility such as phosphorus and solphur-, improve association and could be an option to drought and other environmental abnormalities such as salinity (Rice et al., 2002. Moreover, higher water use efficiency (WUE for crops -has been reported in the literatures (Sekhara and Reddy, 1993.The sustainable use of scarce water resources in Iran is a priority for agricultural development. The pressure of using water in agriculture sector is increasing, so creating ways to improve water-use efficiency and taking a full advantage of available water are crucial. Water stress reduce crop yield by impairing the growth of crop canopy and biomass. Scheduling water application is very crucial for efficient use of drip irrigation system, as excessive irrigation reduces yield, while inadequate irrigation causes water stress and reduces production. The aim of present study was to evaluate the symbiotic effect of mycorrhiza on yield, yield components and water use efficiency of sesame under different irrigation regimes in Mashhad. Material and Methods In order to investigate the impact of inoculation with two species of Arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi on yield, yield components and water use efficiency (WUE of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. under different irrigation regimes, an experiment was conducted as split plot based on a randomized complete block design with three replications during two growing seasons 2009-2010 and 2010-2011 at the Agricultural Research Station, College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad.. The experimental factors were three irrigation regimes include 2000, 3000 and

  2. Production of fungal and bacterial growth modulating secondary metabolites is widespread among mycorrhiza-associated streptomycetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schrey Silvia D

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies on mycorrhiza associated bacteria suggest that bacterial-fungal interactions play important roles during mycorrhiza formation and affect plant health. We surveyed Streptomyces Actinobacteria, known as antibiotic producers and antagonists of fungi, from Norway spruce mycorrhizas with predominantly Piloderma species as the fungal partner. Results Fifteen Streptomyces isolates exhibited substantial variation in inhibition of tested mycorrhizal and plant pathogenic fungi (Amanita muscaria, Fusarium oxysporum, Hebeloma cylindrosporum, Heterobasidion abietinum, Heterobasidion annosum, Laccaria bicolor, Piloderma croceum. The growth of the mycorrhiza-forming fungus Laccaria bicolor was stimulated by some of the streptomycetes, and Piloderma croceum was only moderately affected. Bacteria responded to the streptomycetes differently than the fungi. For instance the strain Streptomyces sp. AcM11, which inhibited most tested fungi, was less inhibitory to bacteria than other tested streptomycetes. The determined patterns of Streptomyces-microbe interactions were associated with distinct patterns of secondary metabolite production. Notably, potentially novel metabolites were produced by strains that were less antagonistic to fungi. Most of the identified metabolites were antibiotics (e.g. cycloheximide, actiphenol and siderophores (e.g. ferulic acid, desferroxiamines. Plant disease resistance was activated by a single streptomycete strain only. Conclusions Mycorrhiza associated streptomycetes appear to have an important role in inhibiting the growth of fungi and bacteria. Additionally, our study indicates that the Streptomyces strains, which are not general antagonists of fungi, may produce still un-described metabolites.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis induces a major transcriptional reprogramming of the potato SWEET sugar transporter family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmin eManck-Götzenberger

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the twelve induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10 corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  5. Arbuscular mycorrhiza Symbiosis Induces a Major Transcriptional Reprogramming of the Potato SWEET Sugar Transporter Family

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manck-Götzenberger, Jasmin; Requena, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Biotrophic microbes feeding on plants must obtain carbon from their hosts without killing the cells. The symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi colonizing plant roots do so by inducing major transcriptional changes in the host that ultimately also reprogram the whole carbon partitioning of the plant. AM fungi obtain carbohydrates from the root cortex apoplast, in particular from the periarbuscular space that surrounds arbuscules. However, the mechanisms by which cortical cells export sugars into the apoplast for fungal nutrition are unknown. Recently a novel type of sugar transporter, the SWEET, able to perform not only uptake but also efflux from cells was identified. Plant SWEETs have been shown to be involved in the feeding of pathogenic microbes and are, therefore, good candidates to play a similar role in symbiotic associations. Here we have carried out the first phylogenetic and expression analyses of the potato SWEET family and investigated its role during mycorrhiza symbiosis. The potato genome contains 35 SWEETs that cluster into the same four clades defined in Arabidopsis. Colonization of potato roots by the AM fungus Rhizophagus irregularis imposes major transcriptional rewiring of the SWEET family involving, only in roots, changes in 22 of the 35 members. None of the SWEETs showed mycorrhiza-exclusive induction and most of the 12 induced genes belong to the putative hexose transporters of clade I and II, while only two are putative sucrose transporters from clade III. In contrast, most of the repressed transcripts (10) corresponded to clade III SWEETs. Promoter-reporter assays for three of the induced genes, each from one cluster, showed re-localization of expression to arbuscule-containing cells, supporting a role for SWEETs in the supply of sugars at biotrophic interfaces. The complex transcriptional regulation of SWEETs in roots in response to AM fungal colonization supports a model in which symplastic sucrose in cortical cells could be cleaved

  6. III. MYCORRHIZAE IN AGROFORESTRY: A CASE-STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.T. NUHAMARA

    1987-01-01

    Full Text Available Census of mycorrhizae in Shorea javanica agroforests has been made periodically in the district of Krui, Lampung, Sumatra. Amanita hemibapha (Amanitaceae, Cantharellus cibarius (Cantharella-ceae, Lactarius spp., Russula spp. (Russulaceae and Scleroderma sp. (Sclerodermataceae were commonly encountered on the agroforest floor. These mycorrhizal fungi are naturally associated with the planted trees. The significance of mycorrhizae for the maximization of growth and sustained productivity of resin is discussed as well as the need to design well defined agroforestry systems to facilitate growth and to improve production management techniques. INTRODU

  7. Molecular Identification of Mycorrhizae of Cymbidium kanran (Orchidaceae) on Jeju Island, Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Ji Won; Suh, Hyoungmin; Kim, Oh Hong; Lee, Nam Sook

    2015-12-01

    A fungal internal transcribed spacer region was used to identify the mycorrhizae of Cymbidium kanran. The family Russulaceae was found to be the most frequently occurring group in both root and soil samples. In phylogenetic analyses, the majority of the Russulaceae clones were clustered with Russula brevipes and R. cyanoxantha. Therefore, C. kanran may form symbiotic relationships with the genus Russula.

  8. [Regulatory genes of garden pea (Pisum sativum L.) controlling the development of nitrogen-fixing nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza: a review of basic and applied aspects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borisov, A Iu; Vasil'chikov, A G; Voroshilova, V A

    2007-01-01

    . Progress in identifying and cloning symbiotic genes is adequately reflected. The feasibility of using double inoculation as a means of increasing the plant productivity is demonstrated, in which the potential of a tripartite symbiotic system (pea plants-root nodule bacteria-arbuscular mycorrhiza...

  9. Comparative genomics and transcriptomics depict ericoid mycorrhizal fungi as versatile saprotrophs and plant mutualists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Elena; Morin, Emmanuelle; Grelet, Gwen-Aëlle; Kuo, Alan; Kohler, Annegret; Daghino, Stefania; Barry, Kerrie W; Cichocki, Nicolas; Clum, Alicia; Dockter, Rhyan B; Hainaut, Matthieu; Kuo, Rita C; LaButti, Kurt; Lindahl, Björn D; Lindquist, Erika A; Lipzen, Anna; Khouja, Hassine-Radhouane; Magnuson, Jon; Murat, Claude; Ohm, Robin A; Singer, Steven W; Spatafora, Joseph W; Wang, Mei; Veneault-Fourrey, Claire; Henrissat, Bernard; Grigoriev, Igor V; Martin, Francis M; Perotto, Silvia

    2018-02-01

    Some soil fungi in the Leotiomycetes form ericoid mycorrhizal (ERM) symbioses with Ericaceae. In the harsh habitats in which they occur, ERM plant survival relies on nutrient mobilization from soil organic matter (SOM) by their fungal partners. The characterization of the fungal genetic machinery underpinning both the symbiotic lifestyle and SOM degradation is needed to understand ERM symbiosis functioning and evolution, and its impact on soil carbon (C) turnover. We sequenced the genomes of the ERM fungi Meliniomyces bicolor, M. variabilis, Oidiodendron maius and Rhizoscyphus ericae, and compared their gene repertoires with those of fungi with different lifestyles (ecto- and orchid mycorrhiza, endophytes, saprotrophs, pathogens). We also identified fungal transcripts induced in symbiosis. The ERM fungal gene contents for polysaccharide-degrading enzymes, lipases, proteases and enzymes involved in secondary metabolism are closer to those of saprotrophs and pathogens than to those of ectomycorrhizal symbionts. The fungal genes most highly upregulated in symbiosis are those coding for fungal and plant cell wall-degrading enzymes (CWDEs), lipases, proteases, transporters and mycorrhiza-induced small secreted proteins (MiSSPs). The ERM fungal gene repertoire reveals a capacity for a dual saprotrophic and biotrophic lifestyle. This may reflect an incomplete transition from saprotrophy to the mycorrhizal habit, or a versatile life strategy similar to fungal endophytes. © 2018 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2018 New Phytologist Trust.

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhiza in species of Commelinidae (Liliopsida) in the state of Pernambuco (Brazil)

    OpenAIRE

    Silva Gladstone Alves da; Santos Bartolomeu Acioli dos; Alves Marccus Vinícius; Maia Leonor Costa

    2001-01-01

    Mycorrhiza are a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, the main benefit to the plant being increased nutrient uptake. The arbuscular is the most important kind of mycorrhiza for agriculture and it is widespread in occurrence and distribution in most ecosystems. The aim of this work was to study the mycorrhizal status of the species of Commelinidae that occur in the State of Pernambuco. Plant roots, collected in ten municipalities, were washed, cleared in KOH, stained with Trypa...

  11. Colonização por fungos micorrízicos arbusculares e teores de nutrientes em cinco cultivares de bananeiras em um Latossolo da Amazônia Arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi and nutrient contents in five banana cultivars on an Amazonian Oxisol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlem Nascimento de Oliveira

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available A bananeira é uma espécie de grande importância sócio-econômica na Amazônia, mas precisa de altos insumos agrícolas para ser produtiva. A associação com fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs pode minimizar as suas necessidades nutricionais nos solos pobres da Amazônia. O presente trabalho objetivou verificar a ocorrência de associação micorrízica e os teores de nutrientes em bananeiras cultivadas em um Latossolo ácido da Amazônia. O bananal encontra-se deficiente em macro (Ca, Mg e P e micronutrientes (Fe, Mn, Zn e Cu. A colonização micorrízica foi de 54,9 %, no cultivar Mysore; 51,5 %, na Maçã, 47,6 %, na Pacovan; 47,3 %, na Nanica, e 44,7 %, na banana Prata, ocorrendo diferenças significativas. Os cultivares Mysore e Maçã apresentaram maiores índices de colonização radicular nos meses de janeiro e agosto, enquanto a Nanica, nos meses de julho, janeiro e agosto. Os cultivares Pacovan e Prata não apresentaram variações significativas de colonização por FMAs nas épocas estudadas. Nos cultivares, a associação micorrízica correlacionou-se significativamente com os teores de K, Mg, P e Zn no cultivar Maçã, K e P no Nanica e Zn no Prata.The Amazon banana plant is of great socio-economical importance, despite its requirement for high agricultural input in order to obtain good yields. An association with arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi could minimize the crop's nutritional needs in the poor soils of the Amazon. The present study aimed at verifying how the plant-fungus mycorrhizal symbiosis influences nutrient concentration in five varieties of adult banana plants cultivated in an acid Amazon Oxisol under field conditions. The banana plantation was defficient in macro (Ca, Mg and P and micronutrients (Fe, Mn, Zn and Cu. The mycorrhizae colonization varied from 33.6 to 66.5 % of the sampled roots. The average mycorrhizae colonization was 54.9 % in the Mysore, 51.5 % in Maçã, 47.6 % in Pacovan, 47.3 % in Nanica, and

  12. Terpenoids in plant and arbuscular mycorrhiza-reinforced defence against herbivorous insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Esha; Anand, Garima; Kapoor, Rupam

    2017-03-01

    Plants, though sessile, employ various strategies to defend themselves against herbivorous insects and convey signals of an impending herbivore attack to other plant(s). Strategies include the production of volatiles that include terpenoids and the formation of symbiotic associations with fungi, such as arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM). This constitutes a two-pronged above-ground/below-ground attack-defence strategy against insect herbivores. Terpenoids represent an important constituent of herbivore-induced plant volatiles that deter herbivores and/or attract their predators. Terpenoids serve as airborne signals that can induce defence responses in systemic undamaged parts of the plant and also prime defence responses in neighbouring plants. Colonization of roots by AM fungi is known to influence secondary metabolism in plants; this includes alteration of the concentration and composition of terpenoids, which can boost both direct and indirect plant defence against herbivorous insects. Enhanced nutrient uptake facilitated by AM, changes in plant morphology and physiology and increased transcription levels of certain genes involved in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway result in alterations in plant terpenoid profiles. The common mycorrhizal networks of external hyphae have added a dimension to the two-pronged plant defence strategy. These act as conduits to transfer defence signals and terpenoids. Improved understanding of the roles of terpenoids in plant and AM defences against herbivory and of interplant signalling in natural communities has significant implications for sustainable management of pests in agricultural ecosystems. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  13. [Effect of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) on Tolerance of Cattail to Cd Stress in Aquatic Environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Peng-cheng; Li, Hang; Wang, Shu-guang

    2016-02-15

    Hygrophytes are planted more and more in landscaping and greening in many cities, but they often encounter threat from environmental pollution. Arbuscular mycorrhiza ( AM ) have been confirmed to enhance the tolerance of terrestrial plants to environmental pollution in many previous studies, but it is unclear how they affect hygrophytes. In the present study, a hydroponic culture experiment was carried out to investigate the effects of AM fungi (Glomus etunicatum) inoculation on the tolerance of cattail (Typha latifolia) to different concentrations Cd2+ (0, 2.5, 5.0 mg x L(-1)). The aim was to provide reference for evaluating whether mycorrhizal technology can be used to enhance the tolerance of hygrophytes to environmental pollution. The results showed that symbiotic association was well established between AM fungi and cattail roots, and the mycorrhizal colonization rates (MCR) were beyond 30%. However, MCR presented downward trend one month after mycorrhizal cattails were transported to solution, and the maximal decrease was 25.5% (P < 0.05). AM increased pigment concentrations and peroxidase (POD) activity in cattail leaves, and also increased roots radial oxygen loss. However, AM only produced significant effect on increase of fresh weight in 5 mg x L(-1) Cd2+ solution. Although plant growth was inhibited by 5 mg x L(-1) Cd2+ and MCR was lower, AM increased Cd uptake of cattail at the two Cd2+ levels, and the maximal increments were 40.24% and 56.52% in aboveground and underground parts, respectively. This study indicates that AM has potential to enhance the tolerance of hygrophytes to environmental pollution and might be used to remedy heavy metal pollution.

  14. Symbiotic lifestyle expression by fungal endophytes and the adaptation of plants to stress: unraveling the complexities of intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Regina S.; Henson, Joan M.; Rodriguez, Russell J.

    2005-01-01

    The fossil record indicates that fungal symbionts have been associated with plants since the Ordovician period (approximately 400 million years ago), when plants first became established on land (Pirozynski and Malloch, 1975; Redecker et al., 2000; Remy et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1993). Transitioning from aquatic to terrestrial habitats likely presented plants with new stresses, including periods of desiccation. Since symbiotic fungi are known to confer drought tolerance to plants (Bacon, 1993; Read and Camp, 1986), it has been suggested that fungal symbiosis was involved with or responsible for the establishment of land plants (Pirozynski and Malloch, 1975). Symbiosis was first defined by De Bary in 1879, and since that time, all plants in natural ecosystems have been found to be colonized with fungal and bacterial symbionts. It is clear that individual plants represent symbiotic communities with microorganisms associated in or on tissues below- and aboveground.There are two major classes of fungal symbionts associated with internal plant tissues: fungal endophytes that reside entirely within plants and may be associated with roots, stems leaves, or flowers; and mycorrhizal fungi that reside only in roots but extend out into the rhizosphere. In addition, fungal endophytes may be divided into two classes: (1) a relatively small number of fastidious species that are limited to a few monocot hosts (Clay and Schardl, 2002), and (2) a large number of tractable species with broad host ranges, including both monocots and eudicots (Stone et al., 2000). While significant resources and research have been invested in mycorrhizae and class 1 endophytes, comparatively little is known about class 2 endophytes, which may represent the largest group of fungal symbionts. This is partially because the symbiotic functionalities of class 2 endophytes have only recently been elucidated and shown to be responsible for the adaptation of some plants to high-stress environments (Redman

  15. Occurrence and succession of mycorrhizas in Alnus incana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arveby, A.S. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Section of Forest Ecophysiology; Granhall, U. [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Microbiology

    1998-12-31

    The occurrence of different mycorrhizas of the grey alder, Alnus incana (L.) Moench., in Sweden was investigated. Root sampling was carried out in planted and natural grey alder stands, representing different soil types, geographical sites, and plant ages. Mycorrhizal infection of roots was found to be frequent at all investigated sites, except for some planted peat bogs, where alders do not occur naturally. At the latter sites, mycorrhizal infection was less frequent and consisted only of ectomycorrhizas. Young trees here were non-mycorrhizal. At all other sites vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) was found to be the almost exclusive type of mycorrhiza in first-year seedlings. In trees older than one year ectomycorrhiza was the dominating type. In the planted stands up to five years of age no fruitbodies of ectomycorrhizal fungi were found. In such stands the ectomycorrhizas generally had thin, translucent mantles and could be observed only by microscopic examination. In one old plantation (27 years) and in the natural stands sporocarps of several specific `alder fungi` were found. Here, the mycorrhizal root tips had thick, mostly whitish mantles. The Hartig net was in all cases confined to penetration between epidermal cells. Soil collected from one alder site and two non-alder biotopes readily infected grey alder seedlings with Frankia and VAM fungi whereas a peat soil failed to infect seedlings with any symbiont. In vitro inoculation of nodulated seedlings with Glomus mossae (Nicol. and Gerd.) Gerdemann and Trappe resulted in VAM-infection. Simultaneous syntheses with isolates of alder-specific, and other, ectomycorrhizal fungi, using three different methods, failed. On the basis of these results an endomycorrhizal-ectomycorrhizal succession after the first growth season in Alnus incana is concluded. A subsequent succession of ectomycorrhizal species from early-stage to late-stage ones is discussed 58 refs, 3 figs, 2 tabs

  16. The role of bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant sulfur supply

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacinta Mariea Gahan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Plant growth is highly dependent on bacteria, saprophytic and mycorrhizal fungi which facilitate the cycling and mobilization of nutrients. Over 95% of the sulfur (S in soil is present in an organic form. Sulfate-esters and sulfonates, the major forms of organo-S in soils, arise through deposition of biological material and are transformed through subsequent humification. Fungi and bacteria release S from sulfate-esters using sulfatases, however, release of S from sulfonates is catalyzed by a bacterial multi-component mono-oxygenase system. The asfA gene is used as a key marker in this desulfonation process to study sulfonatase activity in soil bacteria identified as Variovorax, Polaromonas, Acidovorax and Rhodococcus. The rhizosphere is regarded as a hot spot for microbial activity and recent studies indicate that this is also the case for the mycorrhizosphere where bacteria may attach to the fungal hyphae capable of mobilizing organo-S. While current evidence is not showing sulfatase and sulfonatase activity in arbuscular mycorrhiza, their effect on the expression of plant host sulfate transporters is documented. A revision of the role of bacteria, fungi and the interactions between soil bacteria and mycorrhiza in plant S supply was conducted.

  17. Effect of combined inoculations of Rhizobium-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Leucaena leucocephala CV: Perú

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lázaro Jesús Ojeda Quintana

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The work was conducted at the Experimental Station of Soil and Fertilizer “Escambray” land of farmers and associated rural extension. The experimental design was randomized blocks, and treatments: Rizhobium loti V-4033 (Research Institute of Pastures and Forages, mycorrhizal fungi trainers, Rhizobium +mycorrhiza fungi trainers, nitrogen and total control. Inoculation with my corrhiza forming fungi was performed at 10 g/bag Certificate MicoFert Strain the Institute of Ecology and Systematics-3: Glomus spurcum, Topes de Collantes, 85 % colonization of rootlets, while the Rhizobium was inoculated in a dose of 50 g/kg of seed. Variant was nitrogen at 25 kg/ha of urea. The plots occupied 18m2 , with an area of 9 m2 evaluable. When the plants reached 7.5 months and an average height of 143.4 cm proceeded to make the Court of establishment and then four foliage cuts were made every 90 days. Each cut dry biomass yield, and phosphorus content was determined crude protein. The combined inoculation of Rhizobium and mycorrhiza fungi Makers increased the yield of dry biomass, and phosphorus content of crude protein. We conclude proposing the adoption of an alternative methodology using mycorrhiza formers Fungi and Rhizobium in Leucaena leucocephala as a way to increase the yield of dry biomass, decreasing mineral fertilization and contribute to environmental protection

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of plants spontaneously colonizing the soda heap in Jaworzno (southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gucwa-Przepióra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of studies of the mycorrhizal status of plant species spontaneously established on the soda heap located in Jaworzno (Upper Silesia, Poland are presented. Additionally, the species of arbuscular fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota extracted from field-collected rhizosphere substrate samples of the heap are showed. Arbuscular mycorrhizae were described in 17 plant species. Five Glomus spp. were recognized in the spore populations of arbuscular fungi isolated. The investigation presented in this paper for the first time revealed Centaurea stoebe and Trifolium montanum to be hosts of arbuscular fungi.

  19. Mycorrhizal diversity in Apostasia (Orchidaceae) indicates the origin and evolution of orchid mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yukawa, Tomohisa; Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Shefferson, Richard P; Yokoyama, Jun

    2009-11-01

    We demonstrated that "orchid mycorrhiza," a specialized mycorrhizal type, appeared in the common ancestor of the largest plant family Orchidaceae and that the fungal partner shifted from Glomeromycota to a particular clade of Basidiomycota in association with this character evolution. Several unique mycorrhizal characteristics may have contributed to the diversification of the family. However, the origin of orchid mycorrhiza and the diversity of mycobionts across orchid lineages still remain obscure. In this study, we investigated the mycorrhizae of five Apostasia taxa, members of the earliest-diverging clade of Orchidaceae. The results of molecular identification using nrDNA ITS and LSU regions showed that Apostasia mycorrhizal fungi belong to families Botryobasidiaceae and Ceratobasidiaceae, which fall within the order Cantharellales of Basidiomycota. Most major clades in Orchidaceae also form mycorrhizae with members of Cantharellales, while the sister group and other closely related groups to Orchidaceae (i.e., Asparagales except for orchids and the "commelinid" families) ubiquitously form symbioses with Glomeromycota to form arbuscular mycorrhizae. This pattern of symbiosis indicates that a major shift in fungal partner occurred in the common ancestor of the Orchidaceae.

  20. Effect of mycorrhizas application on plant growth and nutrient uptake in cucumber production under field conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortas, I.

    2010-07-01

    Mycorrhizas application in horticultural production in the Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey has been studied under field conditions for several years. The effects of different arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have been evaluated under field conditions for cucumber production. The parameters measured were seedling survival, plant growth and yield, and root colonization. In 1998 and 1999, Glomus mosseae and Glomus etunicatum inoculated cucumber seedlings were treated with and without P (100 kg P2O5 ha-1) application. A second experiment was set up to evaluate the response of cucumber to the inoculation with a consortia of indigenous mycorrhizae, G. mosseae, G. etunicatum, Glomus clarum, Glomus caledonium and a mixture of these four species. Inoculated and control non inoculated cucumber seedlings were established under field conditions in 1998, 2001, 2002 and 2004. Seedling quality, seedling survival under field conditions and yield response to mycorrhiza were tested. Fruits were harvested periodically; at blossom, plant leaves and root samples were taken for nutrient content and mycorrhizal colonization analysis respectively. The field experiment results showed that mycorrhiza inoculation significantly increased cucumber seedling survival, fruit yield, P and Zn shoot concentrations. Indigenous mycorrhiza inoculum was successful in colonizing plant roots and resulted in better plant growth and yield. The relative effectiveness of each of the inocula tested was not consistent in the different experiments, although inoculated plants always grew better than control no inoculated. The most relevant result for growers was the increased survival of seedlings. (Author) 20 refs.

  1. Roles of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas in Plant Phosphorus Nutrition: Interactions between Pathways of Phosphorus Uptake in Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Roots Have Important Implications for Understanding and Manipulating Plant Phosphorus Acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, S.E.; Jakobsen, Iver; Grønlund, Mette

    2011-01-01

    In this Update, we review new findings about the roles of the arbuscular mycorrhizas (mycorrhiza = fungus plus root) in plant growth and phosphorus (P) nutrition. We focus particularly on the function of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbioses with different outcomes for plant growth (from positive...... and the regulation of P acquisition to the roles of AM fungi in determining the composition of natural plant assemblages in ecological settings and their changes with time....

  2. Effect of the single and combined inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR in micropropagated blackberry plants (Rubus glaucus L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urley Adrian Pérez Moncada

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to obtain blackberry seedlings of three ecotypes of blackberry (monterrico, sin espinas and castilla, from in vitro cultures inoculated individually and combined with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF Glomus sp. (GEV02 and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains of Pseudomonas migulae (Pf014 and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (Bs006. The growth variables were aerial and root length (cm, leaf and root fresh and dry weight (g , root volume (cm3 and leaf area (cm2. The symbiotic variables were root colonization (% by the AMF. The results show a possible synergism between Glomus sp. (GEV02 and rhizobacteria evaluated in combination as these showed the highest values in all variables analyzed. Using the mixture of these organisms a better establishment, development and seedling vigor of default in the three ecotypes was observed, improving survival (≥80 % in the stages of hardening and acclimatization.

  3. Plant nutrient transporter regulation in arbuscular mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen; Bechmann, I.E.

    2002-01-01

    of nutrition. Their down-regulation in mycorrhizal roots, therefore, would be predicted as a result of symbiotic function. A variety of studies on Pi- Zn- and ammonium- or nitrate-transporter genes from two plant species indirectly support this model. For example, one study showed that the expression......This review discusses the role arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi play in the regulation of plant nutrient transporter genes. Many plant nutrient transporter genes appear to be transcriptionally regulated by a feed-back mechanism that reduces their expression when the plant reaches an optimal level...... of the high-affinity Pi-transporter MtPT2 within mycorrhizal roots of Medicago truncatula was inversely correlated with the concentration of P within the shoots, which suggested that P supply from the fungus influenced this gene's expression. However, there is some evidence that these plant nutrient...

  4. Application of laser microdissection to identify the mycorrhizal fungi that establish arbuscules inside root cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berruti, Andrea; Borriello, Roberto; Lumini, Erica; Scariot, Valentina; Bianciotto, Valeria; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2013-01-01

    Obligate symbiotic fungi that form arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF; belonging to the Glomeromycota phylum) are some of the most important soil microorganisms. AMFs facilitate mineral nutrient uptake from the soil, in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon, and promote water-stress tolerance and resistance to certain diseases. AMFs colonize the root by producing inter- and intra-cellular hyphae. When the fungus penetrates the inner cortical cells, it produces a complex ramified structure called arbuscule, which is considered the preferential site for nutrient exchange. Direct DNA extraction from the whole root and sequencing of ribosomal gene regions are commonly carried out to investigate intraradical AMF communities. Nevertheless, this protocol cannot discriminate between the AMFs that actively produce arbuscules and those that do not. To solve this issue, the authors have characterized the AMF community of arbusculated cells (AC) through a laser microdissection (LMD) approach, combined with sequencing-based taxa identification. The results were then compared with the AMF community that was found from whole root DNA extraction. The AMF communities originating from the LMD samples and the whole root samples differed remarkably. Five taxa were involved in the production of arbuscules, while two taxa were retrieved inside the root but not in the AC. Unexpectedly, one taxon was found in the AC, but its detection was not possible when extracting from the whole root. Thus, the LMD technique can be considered a powerful tool to obtain more precise knowledge on the symbiotically active intraradical AMF community.

  5. Application of laser microdissection to identify the mycorrhizal fungi that establish arbuscules inside root cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eBerruti

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Obligate symbiotic fungi that form arbuscular mycorrhizae (AMF; belonging to the Glomeromycota phylum are some of the most important soil microorganisms. AMFs facilitate mineral nutrient uptake from the soil, in exchange for plant-assimilated carbon, and promote water-stress tolerance and resistance to certain diseases. AMFs colonize the root by producing inter- and intracellular hyphae. When the fungus penetrates the inner cortical cells, it produces a complex ramified structure called arbuscule, which is considered the preferential site for nutrient exchange. Direct DNA extraction from the whole root and sequencing of ribosomal gene regions are commonly carried out to investigate intraradical AMF communities. Nevertheless, this protocol cannot discriminate between the AMFs that actively produce arbuscules and those that do not. To solve this issue, the authors have characterized the AMF community of arbusculated cells through a laser microdissection (LMD approach, combined with sequencing-based taxa identification. The results were then compared with the AMF community that was found from whole root DNA extraction. The AMF communities originating from the LMD samples and the whole root samples differed remarkably. Five taxa were involved in the production of arbuscules, while two taxa were retrieved inside the root but not in the arbusculated cells. Unexpectedly, one taxon was found in the arbusculated cells, but its detection was not possible when extracting from the whole root. Thus, the LMD technique can be considered a powerful tool to obtain more precise knowledge on the symbiotically active intraradical AMF community.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi associating with roots of Alnus and Rubus in Europe and the Middle East

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pölme, S.; Öpik, M.; Moora, M.; Zobel, M.; Kohout, Petr; Oja, J.; Köljalg, U.; Tedersoo, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 24, Part A (2016), s. 27-34 ISSN 1754-5048 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * fungi * biogeography Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2016

  7. Community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi in Swedish boreal forests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonsson, Lena [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Mycology and Pathology

    1998-12-31

    The main aim of this work has been to elucidate the species composition and community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi associated with mature trees and naturally regenerated seedlings in natural boreal forests in Sweden. Further, the effects of disturbances, such as wildfire and nitrogen inputs, were studied. Sporocarp surveys, morphological stratification and DNA-based analyses of mycorrhizas were used to describe the mycorrhizal fungal communities. In addition, a reference database useful for identifying individual mycorrhizas was developed based on analyses of sporocarp tissue. Overall, the species richness of ectomycorrhizal fungi was at least 30 to 40 times higher than that of their host trees. Naturally regenerated seedlings were colonized by the ectomycorrhizal fungal species present in the mycelial network of the old trees, indicating that the species composition will remain about the same provided that the host does not disappear. Wildfire, disturbing the fungal continuum, caused a shift in the frequencies of ectomycorrhizal fungi rather than a change in species composition. Nitrogen addition did not have any detectable effect on the abundance or species richness of mycorrhizas, but led to a decrease in sporocarp production. In all the studies, there was little resemblance between the species composition of sporocarps and that of mycorrhizas. The ITS-RFLP reference database was very useful in identifying single mycorrhizas, and proved to be a powerful tool for species identification of unknown mycorrhizas 76 refs, 2 figs, 2 tabs

  8. Identification of genes and proteins involved in the regulation of orchid mycorrhiza

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael Borges da Silva Valadares

    2014-01-01

    Orchids are characterized by producing minute endosperm-lacking seeds, which depend on mycorrhizal fungi for germination and embryo development. Some aclorophyllous orchids remain dependent on the mycorrhizal association for carbon acquisition during their whole life history, whereasother orchids develop photosynthesis. Despite the biological significance of orchid mycorrhiza, gene expression studies are lacking. We have used different highthroughput approaches in order to understanding the m...

  9. SOME PRELIMINARY DATA ABOUT VESICULAR – ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAS AT DIFFERENT SPECIES OF PLANTAGO

    OpenAIRE

    Nicoleta IANOVICI

    2010-01-01

    Vesicular – arbuscular mycorrhizas are though widely distributed. Root colonization of VAM fungi was studied in seven different species of Plantago. Colonization was high among all species. The highest intensity of root cortex colonization (M%), relative arbuscular richness (A%) and arbuscule richness in root fragments were found in the Plantago schwarzenbergiana. Comparison of the VAM colonization in roots from different ecosystems suggested that plants grown in the saline habitats might be...

  10. Transcriptome analysis of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine stress

    OpenAIRE

    Fuqiang Song; Jize Li; Xiaoxu Fan; Quan Zhang; Wei Chang; Fengshan Yang; Gui Geng

    2016-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) protect host plants against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses, and promote biodegradation of various contaminants. In this study effect of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine degradation was investigated. It was observed that the atrazine degradation rates with any addition level in mycorrhizal treatments were all significantly higher than those in non- mycorrhizal treatments. When atrazine was applied at 20?mg kg?1, the removal efficienc...

  11. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the 'rust' lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-04-22

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the 'rust' lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants.

  12. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Katie J; Pressel, Silvia; Duckett, Jeffrey G; Rimington, William R; Bidartondo, Martin I

    2015-08-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed identity and biology of the fungi engaged in symbiosis with the earliest-diverging lineages of extant land plants. Here, we reconsider the existing paradigm and show that the symbiotic options available to the first plants emerging onto the land were more varied than previously thought. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fungos micorrízicos arbusculares em estéril revegetado com Acacia mangium, após mineração de bauxita Colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi in substrate, after bauxite mining, vegetated with Acacia mangium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucy Caproni

    2005-06-01

    micorrhizae fungi (AMF spore density was high and increased with age, whereas the number of species was constant. Glomus clarum had the highest density whereas Gigaspora margarita the lowest. Most of the AMF fungi showed different patterns of sporulation during the rainy and dry seasons.

  14. Symbiotic options for the conquest of land

    OpenAIRE

    Field, KJ; Pressel, S; Duckett, JG; Rimington, WR; Bidartondo, MI

    2015-01-01

    The domination of the landmasses of Earth by plants starting during the Ordovician Period drastically altered the development of the biosphere and the composition of the atmosphere, with far-reaching consequences for all life ever since. It is widely thought that symbiotic soil fungi facilitated the colonization of the terrestrial environment by plants. However, recent discoveries in molecular ecology, physiology, cytology, and paleontology have brought into question the hitherto-assumed iden...

  15. SOME PRELIMINARY DATA ABOUT VESICULAR – ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAS AT DIFFERENT SPECIES OF PLANTAGO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta IANOVICI

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Vesicular – arbuscular mycorrhizas are though widely distributed. Root colonization of VAM fungi was studied in seven different species of Plantago. Colonization was high among all species. The highest intensity of root cortex colonization (M%, relative arbuscular richness (A% and arbuscule richness in root fragments were found in the Plantago schwarzenbergiana. Comparison of the VAM colonization in roots from different ecosystems suggested that plants grown in the saline habitats might be more dependence on VAM. There is a suggestion that AM fungi were able to detect variations in land. There is also an indication that VAM abundance was a response to stress.

  16. Regulação do desenvolvimento de micorrizas arbusculares Regulation of arbuscular mycorrhizae development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soraya Gabriela Kiriachek

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available As micorrizas arbusculares (MAs são associações simbióticas mutualistas entre fungos do filo Glomeromycota e a maioria das plantas terrestres. A formação e o funcionamento das MAs depende de um complexo processo de troca de sinais, que resulta em mudanças no metabolismo dos simbiontes e na diferenciação de uma interface simbiótica no interior das células das raízes. Os mecanismos que regulam a formação das MAs são pouco conhecidos, mas sabe-se que a concentração de fosfato (P na planta é um fator determinante para o desenvolvimento da simbiose. A disponibilidade de P na planta pode afetar o balanço de açúcares e de fitormônios (FHs, além da expressão de genes de defesa vegetal. Com o advento da genômica e proteômica, vários genes essenciais para o desenvolvimento das MAs já foram identificados e seus mecanismos de regulação estão sendo estudados. Até o presente, sabe-se que as plantas secretam substâncias que estimulam a germinação de esporos e o crescimento de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs. Há evidências também de que os FMAs sintetizam moléculas sinalizadoras, que são reconhecidas pelas plantas hospedeiras. Pelo menos três genes são essenciais para o reconhecimento dessa molécula e a transdução do sinal molecular. Discutem-se os papéis desses genes e os possíveis mecanismos que regulam sua expressão, bem como os papéis dos FHs na regulação de MAs são discutidos.Arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM are mutualistic symbiotic associations between fungi of the phylum Glomeromycota and most terrestrial plants. The formation and functioning of AM depend on a complex signal exchange process, which ultimately results in shifts in the metabolism of the symbionts and differentiation of a symbiotic interface in cortical root cells. The mechanisms regulating AM development are not well understood, but it is known that phosphate (P concentration in plants plays a key role in this process. Plant P

  17. The life cycle of iron Fe(III) oxide: impact of fungi and bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonneville, Steeve

    2014-05-01

    Iron oxides are ubiquitous reactive constituents of soils, sediments and aquifers. They exhibit vast surface areas which bind a large array of trace metals, nutrients and organic molecules hence controlling their mobility/reactivity in the subsurface. In this context, understanding the "life cycle" of iron oxide in soils is paramount to many biogeochemical processes. Soils environments are notorious for their extreme heterogeneity and variability of chemical, physical conditions and biological agents at play. Here, we present studies investigating the role of two biological agents driving iron oxide dynamics in soils, root-associated fungi (mycorrhiza) and bacteria. Mycorrhiza filaments (hypha) grow preferentially around, and on the surface of nutrient-rich minerals, making mineral-fungi contact zones, hot-spots of chemical alteration in soils. However, because of the microscopic nature of hyphae (only ~ 5 µm wide for up to 1 mm long) and their tendency to strongly adhere to mineral surface, in situ observations of this interfacial micro-environment are scarce. In a microcosm, ectomycorrhiza (Paxillus involutus) was grown symbiotically with a pine tree (Pinus sylvestris) in the presence of freshly-cleaved biotite under humid, yet undersaturated, conditions typical of soils. Using spatially-resolved ion milling technique (FIB), transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopy (TEM/STEM-EDS), synchrotron based X-ray microscopy (STXM), we were able to quantify the speciation of Fe at the biotite-hypha interface. The results shows that substantial oxidation of biotite structural-Fe(II) into Fe(III) subdomains occurs at the contact zone between mycorrhiza and biotite. Once formed, iron(III) oxides can reductively dissolve under suboxic conditions via several abiotic and microbial pathways. In particular, they serve as terminal electron acceptors for the oxidation of organic matter by iron reducing bacteria. We aimed here to understand the role of Fe(III) mineral

  18. Reaction and interaction of mycorrhizae and rhizosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kottke, I.

    1989-01-01

    Mycorrhizae of forest trees react and interact in a sensitive manner to environmental stress but have evolved adaption mechanism. Soil acidification causes no reduction of mycorrhizal frequency but shorter life span which is frequently compensated for by a higher production rate of mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae of Norway spruce preferentially develop in soil pores. Nutrient availability probably relies more on the exchangeable ions at the surfaces of the pores than on the total ion exchange capacity. Additionally, organically bound compounds are mobilized by fungal hyphae and interaction on the rhizoplane. A lack of soil pores results in severe difficulties for Norway spruce to penetrate soil and to maintain mycorrhizal acticity. Water stress in the top soil causing a high percentage of dormant and dead mycorrhizae can be compensated for by a higher mycorrhizal production in deeper soil layers. At low nutrient availability in the mineral soil preferentially development of mycorrhizae is observed in the organic layer that may be regarded as an internal regulation mechanism, not as a toxic effect caused by Al in the mineral soil. Differentiated hyphal mantles protect mycorrhizae against water stress by impermeability and enhanced trehalose content and serve as storage and detoxification organs. There are indications of mycorrhizal types specially adapted to acidified soil conditions. (orig./vhe)

  19. The influence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas on production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    arbuscular mycorrhizas produced slight increases in dry mater production in unsterilized field plots at Cedara, Natal. Phosphorus levels in plant tops showed no increases due to mycorrhizas but crude protein content of all mycorrhizal plants were ...

  20. Functional properties and differential mode of regulation of the nitrate transporter from a plant symbiotic ascomycete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanini, Barbara; Viscomi, Arturo R.; Bolchi, Angelo; Martin, Yusé; Siverio, José M.; Balestrini, Raffaella; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2005-01-01

    Nitrogen assimilation by plant symbiotic fungi plays a central role in the mutualistic interaction established by these organisms, as well as in nitrogen flux in a variety of soils. In the present study, we report on the functional properties, structural organization and distinctive mode of regulation of TbNrt2 (Tuber borchii NRT2 family transporter), the nitrate transporter of the mycorrhizal ascomycete T. borchii. As revealed by experiments conducted in a nitrate-uptake-defective mutant of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha, TbNrt2 is a high-affinity transporter (Km=4.7 μM nitrate) that is bispecific for nitrate and nitrite. It is expressed in free-living mycelia and in mycorrhizae, where it preferentially accumulates in the plasma membrane of root-contacting hyphae. The TbNrt2 mRNA, which is transcribed from a single-copy gene clustered with the nitrate reductase gene in the T. borchii genome, was specifically up-regulated following transfer of mycelia to nitrate- (or nitrite)-containing medium. However, at variance with the strict nitrate-dependent induction commonly observed in other organisms, TbNrt2 was also up-regulated (at both the mRNA and the protein level) following transfer to a nitrogen-free medium. This unusual mode of regulation differs from that of the adjacent nitrate reductase gene, which was expressed at basal levels under nitrogen deprivation conditions and required nitrate for induction. The functional and expression properties, described in the present study, delineate TbNrt2 as a versatile transporter that may be especially suited to cope with the fluctuating (and often low) mineral nitrogen concentrations found in most natural, especially forest, soils. PMID:16201972

  1. Mycorrhiza formation and nutrient concentration in leeks (¤Allium porrum¤) in relation to previous crop and cover crop management on high P soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, J.N.; Larsen, J.; Jakobsen, I.

    2005-01-01

    An improved integration of mycorrhizas may increase the sustainability in plant production. Two strategies for increasing the soil inoculum potential of mycorrhizal fungi were investigated in field experiments with leeks: Pre-cropping with mycorrhizal main crops and pre-establishment of mycorrhiz...

  2. Rhizospheric fungi and their link with the nitrogen-fixing Frankia harbored in host plant Hippophae rhamnoides L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xue; Tian, Lei; Zhang, Jianfeng; Ma, Lina; Li, Xiujun; Tian, Chunjie

    2017-12-01

    Sea buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) is a pioneer plant used for land reclamation and an appropriate material for studying the interactions of symbiotic microorganisms because of its nitrogen-fixing root nodules and mycorrhiza. We used high-throughput sequencing to reveal the diversities and community structures of rhizospheric fungi and their link with nitrogen-fixing Frankia harbored in sea buckthorn collected along an altitude gradient from the Qinghai Tibet Plateau to interior areas. We found that the fungal diversities and compositions varied between different sites. Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, and Zygomycota were the dominant phyla. The distribution of sea buckthorn rhizospheric fungi was driven by both environmental factors and the geographic distance. Among all examined soil characteristics, altitude, AP, and pH were found to have significant (p < 0.05) effect on the rhizospheric fungal community. The rhizospheric fungal communities became more distinct as the distance increased. Moreover, co-inertia analysis identified significant co-structures between Frankia and AMF communities in the rhizosphere of sea buckthorn. We conclude that at the large scale, there are certain linkages between nitrogen-fixing bacteria and the AMF expressed in the distributional pattern. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Arsenic stress affects the expression profile of genes of 14-3-3 proteins in the shoot of mycorrhiza colonized rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathare, Varsha; Srivastava, Sudhakar; Sonawane, Balasaheb V; Suprasanna, Penna

    2016-10-01

    The intimate association between the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and host plants helps the latter in phosphate acquisition in exchange of carbohydrates and in enhanced stress tolerance. Similarly, the ubiquitous 14-3-3 protein family is known to be a major regulator of plant metabolism and stress responses. However, the involvement of mycorrhiza and plant 14-3-3 proteins interaction in plant response to environmental stimuli, such as arsenic (As) stress, is yet unknown. In this study, we analysed the impact of the As stress on the expression profile of 14-3-3 genes in the shoot of mycorrhiza colonized rice ( Oryza sativa ) plants. Ten day old rice seedlings were kept for 45 days for mycorrhizal colonisation (10 g inoculum per 120 g soilrite) and were then subjected to 12.5 µM arsenate [As(V)] exposure for 1 and 3 days, in hydroponics. Arsenate stress resulted in significant change in expression of 14-3-3 protein genes in non-colonized and mycorrhiza colonized rice plants which indicated As mediated effects on 14-3-3 proteins as well as interactive impact of mycorrhiza colonization. Indeed, mycorrhiza colonization itself induced up-regulation of all 14-3-3 genes in the absence of As stress. The results thus indicate that 14-3-3 proteins might be involved in As stress signalling and the mycorrhiza induced As stress response of the rice plants.

  4. Tracing {sup 13}C reveals the below ground connection between trees and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegwolf, R.T.W.; Steinmann, K.; Saurer, M.; Koerner, Ch.

    2003-03-01

    Freshly assimilated atmospheric CO{sub 2} is transferred as sugars from the leaves into the whole organism. Since mycorrhiza fungi and tree roots are in an intensive symbiosis, the fungi provide important information about the tree internal carbon distribution. (author)

  5. Growing poplars for research with and without mycorrhizas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eMüller

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades the importance of the genus Populus increased because the poplar genome has been sequenced and molecular tools for basic research are available. Furthermore, poplar species occur in different habitats and harbour large genetic variation, which can be exploited for economic applications and for increasing our knowledge on the basic molecular mechanisms of the woody life style. Poplars are, therefore, employed to unravel the molecular mechanisms of wood formation, stress tolerance, tree nutrition and interaction with other organisms such as pathogens or mycorrhiza. The basis of these investigations is the reproducible production of homogeneous plant material. In this method paper we describe techniques and growth conditions for the in vitro propagation of different poplar species (Populus × canescens, P. trichocarpa, P. tremula and P. euphratica and ectomycorrhizal fungi (Laccaria bicolor, Paxillus involutus as well as for their co-cultivation for ectomycorrhizal synthesis. Maintenance and plant preparation require different multiplication and rooting media. Growth systems to cultivate poplars under axenic conditions in agar and sand cultures with and without mycorrhizal fungi are described. Transfer of the plants from in vitro to in situ conditions is critical and hardening is important to prevent high mortality. Growth and vitality of the trees in vitro and outdoors with and without ectomycorrhizas are reported.

  6. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Pseudomonas in reduce drought stress damage in flax (Linum usitatissimum L.): a field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimzadeh, Saeedeh; Pirzad, Alireza

    2017-08-01

    Drought stress, which is one of the most serious world environmental threats to crop production, might be compensated by some free living and symbiotic soil microorganisms. The physiological response of flax plants to inoculation with two species of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi (Funneliformis mosseae or Rhizophagus intraradices) and a phosphate solubilizing bacterium (Pseudomonas putida P13; PSB) was evaluated under different irrigation regimes (irrigation after 60, 120, and 180 mm of evaporation from Class A pan as well-watered, mild, and severe stress, respectively). A factorial (three factors) experiment was conducted for 2 years (2014-2015) based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at Urmia University, Urmia, located at North-West of Iran (37° 39' 24.82″ N44° 58' 12.42″ E). Water deficit decreased biomass, showing that flax was sensitive to drought, and AM root colonization improved the performance of the plant within irrigation levels. In all inoculated and non-inoculated control plants, leaf chlorophyll decreased with increasing irrigation intervals. Water deficit-induced oxidative damage (hydrogen peroxide, malondialdehyde, and electrolyte leakage) were significantly reduced in dual colonized plants. All enzymatic (catalase, superoxide dismutase, glutathione reductase, and ascorbate peroxidase) and non-enzymatic (glutathione, ascorbic acid, total carotenoids) antioxidants were reduced by water-limiting irrigation. Dual inoculated plants with AM plus Pseudomonas accumulated more enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidants than plants with bacterial or fungal inoculation singly. Dual colonized plants significantly decreased the water deficit-induced glycine betaine and proline in flax leaves. These bacterial-fungal interactions in enzymatic and non-enzymatic defense of flax plants demonstrated equal synergism with both AM fungi species. In conclusion, increased activity of enzymatic antioxidants and higher production of non

  7. Atractiellomycetes belonging to the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina) form mycorrhizae with terrestrial and epiphytic neotropical orchids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kottke, Ingrid; Suárez, Juan Pablo; Herrera, Paulo; Cruz, Dario; Bauer, Robert; Haug, Ingeborg; Garnica, Sigisfredo

    2010-01-01

    Distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the diverse mycorrhizal associations of land plants. All previously known mycorrhiza-forming Basidiomycota associated with trees, ericads, liverworts or orchids are hosted in Agaricomycetes, Agaricomycotina. Here we demonstrate for the first time that Atractiellomycetes, members of the ‘rust’ lineage (Pucciniomycotina), are mycobionts of orchids. The mycobionts of 103 terrestrial and epiphytic orchid individuals, sampled in the tropical mountain rainforest of Southern Ecuador, were identified by sequencing the whole ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region and part of 28S rDNA. Mycorrhizae of 13 orchid individuals were investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Simple septal pores and symplechosomes in the hyphal coils of mycorrhizae from four orchid individuals indicated members of Atractiellomycetes. Molecular phylogeny of sequences from mycobionts of 32 orchid individuals out of 103 samples confirmed Atractiellomycetes and the placement in Pucciniomycotina, previously known to comprise only parasitic and saprophytic fungi. Thus, our finding reveals these fungi, frequently associated to neotropical orchids, as the most basal living basidiomycetes involved in mycorrhizal associations of land plants. PMID:20007181

  8. Auxin-mediated relationships between apple plants and root inhabiting fungi: impact on root pathogens and potentialities of growth-promoting populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies were conducted to examine the symbiotic relationship between plant hosts and endophytic fungi recovered in multi-generation replanted apple orchard soils. Based upon results obtained, subsequent studies were oriented toward investigating fungal populations showing a mutualistic symbiotic rel...

  9. The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on root precision nutrient foraging of two pioneer plant species during early reclamation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt-Burisch, Katja; Naeth, M. Anne

    2017-04-01

    On many post mining sites in the Lusatian Mining District (East Germany) soil heterogeneity consists of sandy soil with embedded clay-silt fragments. Those clays silt fragments might act as nutrient hotspots. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in an infertile ecosystem could enhance a plant's ability to selectively forage for those nutrients and thus to improve plants nutrient supply. In our study we investigated whether silt-clay fragments within a sandy soil matrix induced preferential root growth of Lotus corniculatus and Calamagrostis epigeios, whether arbuscular mycorrhizae influenced root foraging patterns, and to what extent selective rooting in clay silt fragments influenced plant growth were addressed in this research. Soil types were sterile and non-sterile sandy soil and clay-silt fragments. Treatments were with and without arbuscular mycorrhizae, with and without soil solution, and soil solution and mycorrhizal inoculum combined. Root biomass, root density and intraradical fungal alkaline phosphatase activity and frequency were determined in fragments relative to sandy soil. Furthermore, temporal relationship of number of roots in fragments and plant height was assessed. Lotus corniculatus showed strong selective rooting into fragments especially with those plants treated with commercial cultivated arbuscular mycorrhizae; Calamagrostis epigeios did not. Without arbuscular mycorrhizae, L. corniculatus growth was significantly reduced and selective rooting did not occur. Selective rooting induced significant growth spurts of L. corniculatus. Roots in fragments had higher fungal alkaline phosphatase activity suggesting that mycorrhizal efficiency and related plants phosphorus supply is enhanced in roots in fragments. The application of cultivated arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi significantly and quickly influenced root foraging patterns, especially those of L. corniculatus, suggesting mycorrhizae may also enhance the ability of other plants to selectively forage

  10. Deep sequencing-based comparative transcriptional profiles of Cymbidium hybridum roots in response to mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal beneficial fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiaolan; Zhang, Jianxia; Chen, Chunli; Yang, Jingze; Zhu, Haiyan; Liu, Min; Lv, Fubing

    2014-08-31

    The Orchidaceae is one of the largest families in the plant kingdom and orchid mycorrhizae (OM) are indispensable in the life cycle of all orchids under natural conditions. In spite of this, little is known concerning the mechanisms underlying orchid- mycorrhizal fungi interactions. Our previous work demonstrated that the non-mycorrhizal fungus Umbelopsis nana ZH3A-3 could improve the symbiotic effects of orchid mycorrhizal fungus Epulorhiza repens ML01 by co-cultivation with Cymbidium hybridum plantlets. Thus, we investigated the C. hybridum transcript profile associated with different beneficial fungi. More than 54,993,972 clean reads were obtained from un-normalized cDNA library prepared from fungal- and mock- treated Cymbidium roots at four time points using RNA-seq technology. These reads were assembled into 16,798 unique transcripts, with a mean length of 1127 bp. A total of 10,971 (65.31%) sequences were annotated based on BLASTX results and over ninety percent of which were assigned to plant origin. The digital gene expression profiles in Cymbidium root at 15 days post inoculation revealed that 1674, 845 and 1743 genes were sigificantly regulated in response to ML01, ZH3A-3 and ML01+ ZH3A-3 treatments, respectively. Twenty-six genes in different regulation patterns were validated using quantitative RT-PCR. Our analysis showed that general defense responses were co- induced by three treatments, including cell wall modification, reactive oxygen species detoxification, secondary biosynthesis and hormone balance. Genes involved in phosphate transport and root morphogenesis were also detected to be up-regulated collectively. Among the OM specifically induced transcripts, genes related to signaling, protein metabolism and processing, defense, transport and auxin response were identifed. Aside from these orchid transcripts, some putative fungal genes were also identified in symbiotic roots related to plant cell wall degradation, remodeling the fungal cell wall and

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhiza in species of Commelinidae (Liliopsida in the state of Pernambuco (Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva Gladstone Alves da

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhiza are a mutualistic symbiosis between fungi and plant roots, the main benefit to the plant being increased nutrient uptake. The arbuscular is the most important kind of mycorrhiza for agriculture and it is widespread in occurrence and distribution in most ecosystems. The aim of this work was to study the mycorrhizal status of the species of Commelinidae that occur in the State of Pernambuco. Plant roots, collected in ten municipalities, were washed, cleared in KOH, stained with Trypan blue in lactoglycerol and observed under a light microscope in order to assess presence and identification of the mycorrhizal type. Percentage of root colonization was evaluated by the gridline intersect method. Forty specimens representing 30 species were observed. From these specimens, 70% were colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF. In one family (Typhaceae, mycorrhizal structures were not observed, in two of them (Eriocaulaceae and Juncaceae all specimens showed the association, and three families (Commelinaceae, Cyperaceae and Poaceae presented specimens with or without AMF. In some of the roots, other fungi were observed together with the AMF. The results indicate that AMF are widely distributed among species of Commelinidae in Pernambuco, being probably important for their establishment in the areas visited.

  12. Inzet van mycorrhiza's in de bollenteelt

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, de M.; Breeuwsma, S.J.; Baar, J.; Hiddink, G.A.

    2005-01-01

    In samenwerking met PPO-paddestoelen is door PPO-bloembollen in Lisse een proef met hyacinten opgezet waarin het effect van mycorrhiza-preparaten op gewasgroei en bestrijding van Pythium-wortelrot werd getest. Uit de eerste resultaten in het voorjaar bleek dat er nauwelijks kolonisatie van de

  13. Outbursts in Symbiotic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor); Kenyon, Scott J.

    2004-01-01

    Two models have been proposed for the outbursts of symbiotic stars. In the thermonuclear model, outbursts begin when the hydrogen burning shell of a hot white dwarf reaches a critical mass. After a rapid increase in the luminosity and effective temperature, the white dwarf evolves at constant luminosity to lower effective temperatures, remains at optical maximum for several years, and then returns to quiescence along a white dwarf cooling curve. In disk instability models, the brightness rises when the accretion rate from the disk onto the central white dwarf abruptly increases by factors of 5-20. After a few month to several year period at maximum, both the luminosity and the effective temperature of the disk decline as the system returns to quiescence. If most symbiotic stars undergo thermonuclear eruptions, then symbiotics are probably poor candidates for type I supernovae. However, they can then provide approx. 10% of the material which stars recycle back into the interstellar medium. If disk instabilities are the dominant eruption mechanism, symbiotics are promising type Ia candidates but recycle less material into the interstellar medium.

  14. MULTIPLICACIÓN DE HONGOS MICORRIZA ARBUSCULAR (H.M.A Y EFECTO DE LA MICORRIZACIÓN EN PLANTAS MICROPROPAGADAS DE BANANO (Musa AAA cv. Gran Enano (Musaceae MULTIPLICATION OF ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAE FUNGI (AMF AND MYCORRHIZATION EFFECT IN MICROPROPAGATED PLANTS OF BANANA (Musa AAA cv. ‘Gran Enano’ (Musaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Elena Usuga Osorio

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Se evaluó el proceso de multiplicación de hongos que forman micorriza arbuscular (HMA, para lo cual se usaron diferentes tipos de inóculos entre ellos nativos de agroecosistemas bananeros del Urabá (Antioquia-Colombia, en sustrato sólido, con diferentes plantas hospedadoras y la infectividad y efectividad sobre plantas de banano (Musa AAA cv. Gran Enano. La colonización micorrizal promedio general de los HMA a las plantas trampa fue de 37,76 ± 21,86 %, con respecto a este porcentaje, las plantas B (Brachiaria decumbens y S (Sorgum vulgare fueron las que más favorecieron la simbiosis. Teniendo en cuenta el sustrato, el S2 (Arena 50 - suelo 50 y el S6 (Vermiculita 50-suelo 50 permitieron expresiones significativamente mayores respecto a los demás. El Sorgum vulgare y Pueraria phaseoloides y en el sustrato S1 (Arena 30 - suelo 70, se encontró un mayor número de esporas. La combinación planta-sustrato que más favoreció la asociación fue la planta trampa B en los sustratos S2 y S4 (cascarilla de arroz 50-suelo50 y la producción de esporas fueron las plantas K y S en el sustrato S1. La asociación micorrícica general en plantas de banano provenientes de cultivo de tejidos fue de 48,74 ± 30,44. No se encontraron diferencias significativas (P > 0,05 entre plantas de cero días con plantas de 30 de aclimatadas. Los inóculos que significativamente favorecieron la asociación fueron los provenientes de agroecosistemas bananeros al compararse con el inóculo comercial y el proveniente de ecosistemas naturales del Urabá. El mayor peso seco foliar y radical se encontró en plántulas de banano inoculadas con I5 (Inóculo proveniente de agroecosistema bananeros de la zona de estudio. Para las variables de crecimiento no se encontraron diferencias.The process of multiplication of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF from indigenous banana agro-environments from Urabá (Antioquia - Colombia was evaluated, using solid substrate, with different

  15. Morpho-anatomical characterization of Tuber macrosporum/Corylus avellana mycorrhizas from cultivated seedlings: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojković Jelena N.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the presence of mycorrhizae on seedlings from part of ten-year-old truffles plantation (about 3,000 m2 located in Eastern Serbia. This study is observation of the presence of ectomycorrhizal fungus from genus Tuber during its symbiotic stage on the roots of Corylus avellana L. Ten root samples were collected (randomly and observed macroscopically and microscopically analyzed. There were changes in morphology and anatomy of the infected roots of C. avellana. Mantle was clearly observed to cover the roots and the mycelia formed the Harting net. Among arbitrary selected seedlings, there were found mature fruiting bodies on the surface of the soil. The truffles, identified as Tuber macrosporum Vittad, were found in the immediate vicinity of the hazelnut trees. There has been no previous information of mycorrhizae Tuber macrosporum/Corylus avellana on artificially created truffles plantation in Serbia. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. 173032 and Grant no. 173015

  16. Mesocosm-Scale Experimental Quantification of Plant-Fungi Associations on Carbon Fluxes and Mineral Weathering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, M. Y.; Palmer, B.; Leake, J. R.; Banwart, S. A.; Beerling, D. J.

    2009-12-01

    The rise of land plants in the Paleozoic is classically implicated as driving lower atmospheric CO2 levels through enhanced weathering of Ca and Mg bearing silicate minerals. However, this view overlooks the fact that plants coevolved with associated mycorrhizal fungi over this time, with many of the weathering processes usually ascribed to plants actually being driven by the combined activities of roots and mycorrhizal fungi. Here we present initial results from a novel mesocosm-scale laboratory experiment designed to allow investigation of plant-driven carbon flux and mineral weathering at different soil depths under ambient (400 ppm) and elevated (1500 ppm) atmospheric CO2. Four species of plants were chosen to address evolutionary trends in symbiotic mycorrhizal association and rooting depth on biologically driven silicate weathering under the different CO2 regimes. Gymnosperms were used to investigate potential differences in weathering capabilities of two fungal symbioses: Sequoia sempervirens and Metasequoia glyptostroboides (arbuscular mycorrhizal, AM) and Pinus sylvestris (ectomycorrhizal, EM), and the shallow rooted ancient fern, Osmunda regalis, used to provide a contrast to the three more deeply rooted trees. Plants were grown in a cylindrical mesocosm with four horizontal inserts at each depth. These inserts are a mesh-covered dual-core unit whereby an inner core containing silicate minerals can be rotated within an outer core. The mesh excludes roots from the cylinders allowing fungal-rock pairings to be examined at each depth. Each core contains either basalt or granite, each with severed (rotated cores) or intact (static cores) mycorrhizae. This system provides a unique opportunity to examine the ability of a plant to weather minerals with and without its symbiotic fungi. Preliminary results indicate marked differences in nutritional and water requirements, and response to elevated CO2 between the species. The bulk solution chemistries (p

  17. Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza on Osmotic Adjustment and Photosynthetic Physiology of Maize Seedlings in Black Soils Region of Northeast China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwen Xu

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT To investigate the effect of arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi on maize growth, osmoregulation substances and photosynthetic physiology, a popular maize variety ZD 958 was measured under potted condition. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM symbiosis promoted plant growth, and enhanced plant height, leaf length, mean leaf width and dry weight. Higher soluble sugar and protein, but lower proline concentrations were detected in AM seedlings than corresponding non-AM seedlings. Quantum yield of PSII photochemistry and potential photochemical efficiency increased by arbuscular mycorrhiza fungi, meanwhile, AM plants had lower primary fluorescence but higher maximal fluorescence and variable fluorescence than non-AM plants. AM enhanced apparent quantum efficiency, maximum net photosynthetic rate, dark respiration rate and light saturation point, but reduced light compensation point. The conclusion was that, after the seedling inoculated with Glomus. tortuosum, AM symbioses could protect cell from being hurt through regulating substances related to osmotic adjustment, besides, the efficiency of light utilization, the capacity of using low light and the capacity of fitting and using high light were all increased by AM symbiosis.

  18. Mycorrhiza alters the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qiang-Sheng; Liu, Chun-Yan; Zhang, De-Jian; Zou, Ying-Ning; He, Xin-Hua; Wu, Qing-Hua

    2016-04-01

    Root hairs and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) coexist in root systems for nutrient and water absorption, but the relation between AM and root hairs is poorly known. A pot study was performed to evaluate the effects of four different AM fungi (AMF), namely, Claroideoglomus etunicatum, Diversispora versiformis, Funneliformis mosseae, and Rhizophagus intraradices on root hair development in trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) seedlings grown in sand. Mycorrhizal seedlings showed significantly higher root hair density than non-mycorrhizal seedlings, irrespective of AMF species. AMF inoculation generally significantly decreased root hair length in the first- and second-order lateral roots but increased it in the third- and fourth-order lateral roots. AMF colonization induced diverse responses in root hair diameter of different order lateral roots. Considerably greater concentrations of phosphorus (P), nitric oxide (NO), glucose, sucrose, indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) were found in roots of AM seedlings than in non-AM seedlings. Levels of P, NO, carbohydrates, IAA, and MeJA in roots were correlated with AM formation and root hair development. These results suggest that AMF could alter the profile of root hairs in trifoliate orange through modulation of physiological activities. F. mosseae, which had the greatest positive effects, could represent an efficient AM fungus for increasing fruit yields or decreasing fertilizer inputs in citrus production.

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhiza effects on plant performance under osmotic stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santander, Christian; Aroca, Ricardo; Ruiz-Lozano, Juan Manuel; Olave, Jorge; Cartes, Paula; Borie, Fernando; Cornejo, Pablo

    2017-10-01

    At present, drought and soil salinity are among the most severe environmental stresses that affect the growth of plants through marked reduction of water uptake which lowers water potential, leading to osmotic stress. In general, osmotic stress causes a series of morphological, physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that affect plant performance. Several studies have found that diverse types of soil microorganisms improve plant growth, especially when plants are under stressful conditions. Most important are the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) which form arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) with approximately 80% of plant species and are present in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. Beyond the well-known role of AM in improving plant nutrient uptake, the contributions of AM to plants coping with osmotic stress merit analysis. With this review, we describe the principal direct and indirect mechanisms by which AM modify plant responses to osmotic stress, highlighting the role of AM in photosynthetic activity, water use efficiency, osmoprotectant production, antioxidant activities, and gene expression. We also discuss the potential for using AMF to improve plant performance under osmotic stress conditions and the lines of research needed to optimize AM use in plant production.

  20. Outbursts of symbiotic novae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, S.J.; Truran, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    We discuss possible conditions under which thermonuclear burning episodes in the hydrogen-rich envelopes of accreting white dwarfs give rise to outbursts similar in nature to those observed in the symbiotic stars AG Peg, RT Ser, RR Tel, AS 239, V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, and HM Sge. In principle, thermonuclear runaways involving low-luminosity white dwarfs accreting matter at low rates produce configurations that evolve into A--F supergiants at maximum visual light and which resemble the outbursts of RR Tel, RT Ser, and AG peg. Very weak, nondegenerage hydrogen shell flashes on white dwarfs accreting matter at high rates (M> or approx. =10 -8 M/sub sun/ yr -1 ) do not produce cool supergiants at maximum, and may explain the outbursts in V1016 Cyg, V1329 Cyg, and HM Sge. The low accretion rates demanded for systems developing strong hydrogen shell flashes on low-luminsoity white dwarfs are not compatible with observations of ''normal'' quiescent symbiotic stars. The extremely slow outbursts of symbiotic novae appear to be typical of accreting white dwarfs in wide binaries, which suggests that the outbursts of classical novae may be accelerated by the interaction of the expanding white dwarf envelope with its close binary companion

  1. Responses of mycorrhizal fungi and other rootassociated fungi to climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merrild, Marie Porret

    of mycorrhizal fungi to climate change in a seasonal and long-term perspective. Effects of elevated CO2 (510 ppm), night-time warming and extended summer drought were investigated in the long-term field experiment CLIMAITE located in a Danish semi-natural heathland. Mycorrhizal colonization was investigated...... levels. Colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi increased under elevated CO2 and warming in spring while ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM) colonisation decreased in response to drought and warming. Increased AM colonization correlated with higher phosphorus and nitrogen root pools. Dark septate...

  2. Mycorrhiza-plant colonization patterns on a subalpine glacier forefront as a model system of primary succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efren Cazares; James M. Trappe; Ari Jumpponen

    2005-01-01

    Lyman glacier in the North Cascades Mountains of Washington has a subalpine forefront characterized by a well-developed terminal moraine, inconspicuous successional moraines, fluting, and outwash. These deposits were depleted of symbiotic fungi when first exposed but colonized by them over time after exposure. Four major groups of plant species in this system are (1)...

  3. What we know about arbuscular mycorhizal fungi and associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mycorrhizal fungi are common soil microorganisms and are well known for their symbiotic association with the roots of host plants. The soil is a complex environment harbouring a wide diversity of microorganisms. The interaction between soil bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi has been shown in several studies to ...

  4. Mosaic genome of endobacteria in arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi: Transkingdom gene transfer in an ancient mycoplasma-fungus association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Cortés, Gloria; Ghignone, Stefano; Bonfante, Paola; Schüßler, Arthur

    2015-06-23

    For more than 450 million years, arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) have formed intimate, mutualistic symbioses with the vast majority of land plants and are major drivers in almost all terrestrial ecosystems. The obligate plant-symbiotic AMF host additional symbionts, so-called Mollicutes-related endobacteria (MRE). To uncover putative functional roles of these widespread but yet enigmatic MRE, we sequenced the genome of DhMRE living in the AMF Dentiscutata heterogama. Multilocus phylogenetic analyses showed that MRE form a previously unidentified lineage sister to the hominis group of Mycoplasma species. DhMRE possesses a strongly reduced metabolic capacity with 55% of the proteins having unknown function, which reflects unique adaptations to an intracellular lifestyle. We found evidence for transkingdom gene transfer between MRE and their AMF host. At least 27 annotated DhMRE proteins show similarities to nuclear-encoded proteins of the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis, which itself lacks MRE. Nuclear-encoded homologs could moreover be identified for another AMF, Gigaspora margarita, and surprisingly, also the non-AMF Mortierella verticillata. Our data indicate a possible origin of the MRE-fungus association in ancestors of the Glomeromycota and Mucoromycotina. The DhMRE genome encodes an arsenal of putative regulatory proteins with eukaryotic-like domains, some of them encoded in putative genomic islands. MRE are highly interesting candidates to study the evolution and interactions between an ancient, obligate endosymbiotic prokaryote with its obligate plant-symbiotic fungal host. Our data moreover may be used for further targeted searches for ancient effector-like proteins that may be key components in the regulation of the arbuscular mycorrhiza symbiosis.

  5. PENGARUH MODEL PEMBELAJARAN PROBLEM BASED LEARNING DIPADU STUDENT FACILITATOR AND EXPLAINING TERHADAP KEMAMPUAN BERPIKIR KRITIS SISWA KELAS X SMAN 6 KEDIRI PADA POKOK BAHASAN FUNGI

    OpenAIRE

    Setiawan, M. Agung

    2017-01-01

         Kingdom Fungi material is material to learn about mushrooms. In the Kingdom Fungi consist of six phylum that zygomycota, Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Deuteromycota, Lumut crust, and Mycorrhiza. The material has many types of fungi kingdom, scientific name, and classification of fungi that constrain students to memorize and understand that students need learning model that can provide a good learning experience. This study aimed to determine the effect of learning model combined Student Pro...

  6. Effects of symbiotic bacteria and tree chemistry on the growth and reproduction of bark beetle fungal symbionts

    Science.gov (United States)

    A.S. Adams; C.R. Currie; Y. Cardoza; K.D. Klepzig; K.F. Raffa

    2009-01-01

    Bark beetles are associated with diverse assemblages of microorganisms, many of which affect their interactions with host plants and natural enemies. We tested how bacterial associates of three bark beetles with various types of host relationships affect growth and reproduction of their symbiotic fungi. Fungi were exposed to volatiles...

  7. Inoculation with a ligninolytic basidiomycete, but not root symbiotic ascomycetes, positively affects growth of highbush blueberry (Ericaceae) grown in a pine litter substrate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohník, Martin; Sadowsky, J. J.; Lukešová, Tereza; Albrechtová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 355, č. 1-2 (2012), s. 341-352 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/09/P340; GA MŠk OE08019 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : ericoid mycorrhiza * saprotrophic fungi * Ericaceae Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 2.638, year: 2012

  8. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Nitrogen Concentration of Berseem Clover in Contaminated Soil with Cadmium

    OpenAIRE

    H. Aram; A. Golchin

    2013-01-01

    The effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi on nitrogen concentration of berseem clover were examined in contaminated soil with cadmium. Examined factors included: levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae) (With and without inoculation), and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg.kg-1). The results showed that the effects of cadmium levels and mycorrhiza fungi were significant on nitrogen concentration (P≤ 0.01).  Arbuscular myc...

  9. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  10. Nutrient limitation drives response of Calamagrostis epigejos to arbuscular mycorrhiza in primary succession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rydlová, Jana; Püschel, David; Dostálová, Magdalena; Janoušková, Martina; Frouz, Jan

    2016-10-01

    Little is known about the functioning of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis over the course of primary succession, where soil, host plants, and AM fungal communities all undergo significant changes. Over the course of succession at the studied post-mining site, plant cover changes from an herbaceous community to the closed canopy of a deciduous forest. Calamagrostis epigejos (Poaceae) is a common denominator at all stages, and it dominates among AM host species. Its growth response to AM fungi was studied at four distinctive stages of natural succession: 12, 20, 30, and 50 years of age, each represented by three spatially separated sites. Soils obtained from all 12 studied sites were γ-sterilized and used in a greenhouse experiment in which C. epigejos plants were (1) inoculated with a respective community of native AM fungi, (2) inoculated with reference AM fungal isolates from laboratory collection, or (3) cultivated without AM fungi. AM fungi strongly boosted plant growth during the first two stages but not during the latter two, where the effect was neutral or even negative. While plant phosphorus (P) uptake was generally increased by AM fungi, no contribution of mycorrhizae to nitrogen (N) uptake was recorded. Based on N:P in plant biomass, we related the turn from a positive to a neutral/negative effect of AM fungi on plant growth, observed along the chronosequence, to a shift in relative P and N availability. No functional differences were found between native and reference inocula, yet root colonization by the native AM fungi decreased relative to the reference inoculum in the later succession stages, thereby indicating shifts in the composition of AM fungal communities reflected in different functional characteristics of their members.

  11. Root development during soil genesis: effects of root-root interactions, mycorrhizae, and substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salinas, A.; Zaharescu, D. G.

    2015-12-01

    A major driver of soil formation is the colonization and transformation of rock by plants and associated microbiota. In turn, substrate chemical composition can also influence the capacity for plant colonization and development. In order to better define these relationships, a mesocosm study was set up to analyze the effect mycorrhizal fungi, plant density and rock have on root development, and to determine the effect of root morphology on weathering and soil formation. We hypothesized that plant-plant and plant-fungi interactions have a stronger influence on root architecture and rock weathering than the substrate composition alone. Buffalo grass (Bouteloua dactyloides) was grown in a controlled environment in columns filled with either granular granite, schist, rhyolite or basalt. Each substrate was given two different treatments, including grass-microbes and grass-microbes-mycorrhizae and incubated for 120, 240, and 480 days. Columns were then extracted and analyzed for root morphology, fine fraction, and pore water major element content. Preliminary results showed that plants produced more biomass in rhyolite, followed by schist, basalt, and granite, indicating that substrate composition is an important driver of root development. In support of our hypothesis, mycorrhizae was a strong driver of root development by stimulating length growth, biomass production, and branching. However, average root length and branching also appeared to decrease in response to high plant density, though this trend was only present among roots with mycorrhizal fungi. Interestingly, fine fraction production was negatively correlated with average root thickness and volume. There is also slight evidence indicating that fine fraction production is more related to substrate composition than root morphology, though this data needs to be further analyzed. Our hope is that the results of this study can one day be applied to agricultural research in order to promote the production of crops

  12. Unravelling mycorrhiza-induced wheat susceptibility to the English grain aphid Sitobion avenae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Amma L.; Wellham, Peter A. D.; Aradottir, Gudbjorg I.; Gange, Alan C.

    2017-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are root symbionts that can increase or decrease aphid growth rates and reproduction, but the reason by which this happens is unknown. To investigate the underlying mechanisms of this interaction, we examined the effect of AM fungi on the English Grain aphid (Sitobion avenae) development, reproduction, attraction, settlement and feeding behaviour on two naturally susceptible varieties Triticum aestivum (L.) variety Solstice and T. monococcum MDR037, and two naturally resistant lines, T. monococcum MDR045 and MDR049. Mycorrhizal colonisation increased the attractiveness of T. aestivum var. Solstice to aphids, but there was no effect on aphid development on this variety. Using the Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) technique, we found that mycorrhizal colonisation increased aphid phloem feeding on T. monococcum MDR037 and MDR045, colonisation also increased growth rate and reproductive success of S. avenae on these varieties. Mycorrhizas increased vascular bundle size, demonstrating that these fungi can influence plant anatomy. We discuss if and how this could be related to an enhanced success rate in phloem feeding in two varieties. Overall, we present and discuss how mycorrhizal fungi can affect the feeding behaviour of S. avenae in wheat, inducing susceptibility in a resistant variety.

  13. Lights Off for Arbuscular Mycorrhiza: On Its Symbiotic Functioning under Light Deprivation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Konvalinková, Tereza; Jansa, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUNE (2016), s. 782 ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-19191S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : mycorrhizal symbiosis * costs and benefits * light intensity Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  14. Availability of caesium radionuclides to plants - classification of soils and role of mycorrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drissner, J.; Buermann, W.; Enslin, F.; Heider, R.; Klemt, E.; Miller, R.; Schick, G.; Zibold, G.

    1998-01-01

    At different locations in spruce stands spread rather homogeneously over southern Baden-Wuerttemberg, samples of soil and plants were taken and the vertical distribution of the caesium radionuclides in the soil was studied. As a direct measure of the bioavailability, the aggregated transfer factor, T ag , was determined for fern, bilberry, raspberry, blackberry, and clover. The T ag (in m2 kg -1 ) is defined by the specific caesium activity (in Bq kg -1 ) of the dry mass of the plants, divided by the total inventory (in Bq m -2 ) of the soil. It varies between 0·5 and 0·001 m2kg -1 , being highest for fern and lowest for blackberry or clover at all sampling sites. Most decisive for the value of the T ag are kind of humus deposit, thickness and pH value of the humus layers. Also important are the soil properties, whereas geology has only a minor influence on T ag . At different sampling sites in spruce forests, the T ag can vary by two orders of magnitude for one plant species. Caesium desorption experiments were performed. We could not find a dependence of the transfer of caesium to the plant on the desorbability of caesium from the soil, which implies a more complex transport mechanism than simple ion exchange in the soil solution. It is suggested that the transport of caesium is mediated by mycorrhiza fungi. Therefore, we studied the density of mycorrhiza hyphae in the O f , O h and A h soil horizons of two sites differing in T ag by a factor of 10. The densities of mycorrhiza hyphae in the O h and A h soil horizons each differ by a factor of 2 for the two sites. Yet, the effect of the hyphae density on radiocaesium uptake has to be a subject of further investigation. (Copyright (c) 1998 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Transcriptomes of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and litchi host interaction after tree girdling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo eShu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Trunk girdling can increase carbohydrate content above the girdling site and is an important strategy for inhibiting new shoot growth to promote flowering in cultivated litchi (Litchi chinenis Sonn.. However, girdling inhibits carbohydrate transport to the root in nearly all of the fruit development periods and consequently decreases root absorption. The mechanism through which carbohydrates regulate root development in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM remains largely unknown. Carbohydrate content, AM colonization, and transcriptome in the roots were analyzed to elucidate the interaction between host litchi and AM fungi when carbohydrate content decreases. Girdling decreased glucose, fructose, sucrose, quebrachitol and starch contents in the litchi mycorrhizal roots, thereby reducing AM colonization. RNA-seq achieved approximately 60 million reads of each sample, with an average length of reads reaching 100 bp. Assembly of all the reads of the 30 samples produced 671,316 transcripts and 381,429 unigenes, with average lengths of 780 and 643 bp, respectively. Litchi (54,100 unigenes and AM fungi unigenes (33,120 unigenes were achieved through sequence annotation during decreased carbohydrate content. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG showed that flavonoids, alpha-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid are the main factors that regulate AM colonization in litchi. However, flavonoids may play a role in detecting the stage at which carbohydrate content decreases; alpha-linolenic acid or linoleic acid may affect AM formation under the adaptation process. Litchi trees stimulated the expression of defense-related genes and downregulated symbiosis signal-transduction genes to inhibit new AM colonization. Moreover, transcription factors of the AP2, ERF, Myb, WRKY, bHLH families, and lectin genes altered maintenance of litchi mycorrhizal roots in the post-symbiotic stage for carbohydrate starvation. Similar to those of the litchi host, the E3 ubiquitin

  16. Transcriptomes of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi and Litchi Host Interaction after Tree Girdling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Bo; Li, Weicai; Liu, Liqin; Wei, Yongzan; Shi, Shengyou

    2016-01-01

    Trunk girdling can increase carbohydrate content above the girdling site and is an important strategy for inhibiting new shoot growth to promote flowering in cultivated litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.). However, girdling inhibits carbohydrate transport to the root in nearly all of the fruit development periods and consequently decreases root absorption. The mechanism through which carbohydrates regulate root development in arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) remains largely unknown. Carbohydrate content, AM colonization, and transcriptome in the roots were analyzed to elucidate the interaction between host litchi and AM fungi when carbohydrate content decreases. Girdling decreased glucose, fructose, sucrose, quebrachitol, and starch contents in the litchi mycorrhizal roots, thereby reducing AM colonization. RNA-seq achieved approximately 60 million reads of each sample, with an average length of reads reaching 100 bp. Assembly of all the reads of the 30 samples produced 671,316 transcripts and 381,429 unigenes, with average lengths of 780 and 643 bp, respectively. Litchi (54,100 unigenes) and AM fungi unigenes (33,120 unigenes) were achieved through sequence annotation during decreased carbohydrate content. Analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEG) showed that flavonoids, alpha-linolenic acid, and linoleic acid are the main factors that regulate AM colonization in litchi. However, flavonoids may play a role in detecting the stage at which carbohydrate content decreases; alpha-linolenic acid or linoleic acid may affect AM formation under the adaptation process. Litchi trees stimulated the expression of defense-related genes and downregulated symbiosis signal-transduction genes to inhibit new AM colonization. Moreover, transcription factors of the AP2, ERF, Myb, WRKY, bHLH families, and lectin genes altered maintenance of litchi mycorrhizal roots in the post-symbiotic stage for carbohydrate starvation. Similar to those of the litchi host, the E3 ubiquitin ligase complex

  17. Plants, mycorrhizal fungi, and bacteria: a network of interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfante, Paola; Anca, Iulia-Andra

    2009-01-01

    This review focuses on interactions among plants, mycorrhizal fungi, and bacteria, testing the hypothesis whether mycorrhizas can be defined as tripartite associations. After summarizing the main biological features of mycorrhizas, we illustrate the different types of interaction occurring between mycorrhizal fungi and bacteria, from loosely associated microbes to endobacteria. We then discuss, in the context of nutritional strategies, the mechanisms that operate among members of the consortium and that often promote plant growth. Release of active molecules, including volatiles, and physical contact among the partners seem important for the establishment of the bacteria/mycorrhizal fungus/plant network. The potential involvement of quorum sensing and Type III secretion systems is discussed, even if the exact nature of the complex interspecies/interphylum interactions remains unclear.

  18. Mosaic stunting in bareroot Pinus banksiana seedlings is unrelated to colonization by mycorrhizal fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynette R. Potvin; Martin F. Jurgensen; R. Kasten Dumroese; Dana L. Richter; Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2014-01-01

    Mosaic stunting, the occurrence of random patches of chlorotic seedlings with reduced shoot and diameter growth amidst more robust cohorts within bareroot nurseries, is classically associated with poor colonization by mycorrhizal fungi. We examined possible relationships among soil fertility, mycorrhizas, and random patches of mosaic stunting in bareroot Pinus...

  19. Green symbiotic cloud communications

    CERN Document Server

    Mustafa, H D; Desai, Uday B; Baveja, Brij Mohan

    2017-01-01

    This book intends to change the perception of modern day telecommunications. Communication systems, usually perceived as “dumb pipes”, carrying information / data from one point to another, are evolved into intelligently communicating smart systems. The book introduces a new field of cloud communications. The concept, theory, and architecture of this new field of cloud communications are discussed. The book lays down nine design postulates that form the basis of the development of a first of its kind cloud communication paradigm entitled Green Symbiotic Cloud Communications or GSCC. The proposed design postulates are formulated in a generic way to form the backbone for development of systems and technologies of the future. The book can be used to develop courses that serve as an essential part of graduate curriculum in computer science and electrical engineering. Such courses can be independent or part of high-level research courses. The book will also be of interest to a wide range of readers including b...

  20. Changes in Nutrient Content of Root and Grain of Wheat Cultivars Inoculated by Azospirillum and Mycorrhiza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Jiriaie

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Providing the nutritional requirements of agricultural crops by non-chemical resources is a new approach in the organic farming that has attracted the attention of both the researchers and the consumers in recent years. Therefore, it is highly important to find new fertilizer resources that are both economically able to provide the nutritional needs of the crop plants and have no adverse effects on the consumers and the environment. Materials and Methods: With this approach, an experiment was conducted in the research station of Shahid Chamran University of Ahvaz, Iran in 2012-13. The experimental design was factorial based on randomized complete blocks design with three replications. The treatments including Mycorrhizal fungi in three levels (i.e. no use of strain; use of Glomus intraradices strain; and use of Glomus mosseae strain, bacteria Azospirillum lipoferum in two-levels (i.e. non-inoculated and inoculated and wheat cultivars in three levels (i.e. Chamran; Dena; and Behrang. The measured parameters include the concentration of macronutrients (i.e. nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium and some micronutrients (i.e. zinc, iron and manganese in two part seed and the root of wheat. Results and Discussion: Surveying the elements content in the root and the grain indicated a significant and positive effect of the use the Azospirillum and Mycorrhiza to improve the concentration of the elements in wheat cultivars. However, the simultaneous use of these microorganisms led to an increase of the effects of their application on their assessed traits.Finally the highest concentration of N (2.21 present, P (0.50 present and Fe (33.88 mg.kg-1 were observed in the grain; the highest concentration of K (0.93 present and 0.54 present and Mn (43.11 and 23.63 mg.kg-1 were observed in the grain and root, respectively. Moreover, the highest concentration of Zn in the root (19.70 mg.kg-1 was obtained from inoculation of C.V Dena seeds with

  1. Mycorrhizal fungi increase coffee plants competitiveness against Bidens pilosa interference

    OpenAIRE

    França,André Cabral; Freitas,Ana Flávia de; Santos,Edson Aparecido dos; Grazziotti,Paulo Henrique; Andrade Júnior,Valter Carvalho de

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mycorrhizae provide several benefits to coffee plants. This study evaluated whether these benefits influence the damage caused by the Bidens pilosa competition with coffee seedlings. A randomized blocks design was used, with treatments established in a 2 x 3 factorial scheme (presence and absence of B. pilosa interference in non-inoculated control or plants inoculated with either Claroideoglomus etunicatum or Dentiscutata heterogama). Coffee seedlings were inoculated with fungi spore...

  2. Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    K?hdorf, Katja; M?nzenberger, B.; Begerow, D.; G?mez-Laurito, J.; H?ttl, R. F.

    2014-01-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where...

  3. Myco-heterotrophy: when fungi host plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merckx, Vincent; Bidartondo, Martin I; Hynson, Nicole A

    2009-12-01

    Myco-heterotrophic plants are partly or entirely non-photosynthetic plants that obtain energy and nutrients from fungi. These plants form a symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal or saprotrophic fungi to meet their nutrient demands. This Botanical Briefing summarizes current knowledge about myco-heterotrophy, discusses its controversial aspects and highlights future directions for research. Considerable recent progress has been made in terms of understanding the evolutionary history, germination and nutrition of myco-heterotrophic plants. Myco-heterotrophic plants: (1) are diverse and often ancient lineages that have coevolved with fungi, (2) often demonstrate unusually high specificity towards fungi during germination and maturity, and (3) can either cheat common mycorrhizal networks supported by neighbouring photosynthetic plants to satisfy all or part of their energetic and nutritional needs, or recruit free-living saprotrophic fungi into novel mycorrhizal symbioses. However, several fundamental aspects of myco-heterotrophy remain controversial or unknown, such as symbiotic costs and physiology.

  4. Microbiome change by symbiotic invasion in lichens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Stefanie; Wedin, Mats; Fernandez-Brime, Samantha; Cronholm, Bodil; Westberg, Martin; Weber, Bettina; Grube, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Biological soil crusts (BSC) seal the soil surface from erosive forces in many habitats where plants cannot compete. Lichens symbioses of fungi and algae often form significant fraction of these microbial assemblages. In addition to the fungal symbiont, many species of other fungi can inhabit the lichenic structures and interact with their hosts in different ways, ranging from commensalism to parasitism. More than 1800 species of lichenicolous (lichen-inhabiting) fungi are known to science. One example is Diploschistes muscorum, a common species in lichen-dominated BSC that infects lichens of the genus Cladonia. D. muscorum starts as a lichenicolous fungus, invading the lichen Cladonia symphycarpa and gradually develops an independent Diploschistes lichen thallus. Furthermore, bacterial groups, such as Alphaproteobacteria and Acidobacteria, have been consistently recovered from lichen thalli and evidence is rapidly accumulating that these microbes may generally play integral roles in the lichen symbiosis. Here we describe lichen microbiome dynamics as the parasitic lichen D. muscorum takes over C. symphycarpa. We used high-throughput 16S rRNA gene and photobiont-specific ITS rDNA sequencing to track bacterial and algal transitions during the infection process, and employed fluorescence in situ hybridization to localize bacteria in the Cladonia and Diploschistes lichen thalli. We sampled four transitional stages, at sites in Sweden and Germany: A) Cladonia with no visible infection, B) early infection stage defined by the first visible Diploschistes thallus, C) late-stage infection with parts of the Cladonia thallus still identifiable, and D) final stage with a fully developed Diploschistes thallus, A gradual microbiome shift occurred during the transition, but fractions of Cladonia-associated bacteria were retained during the process of symbiotic reorganization. Consistent changes observed across sites included a notable decrease in the relative abundance of

  5. Mycorrhiza Reduces Adverse Effects of Dark Septate Endophytes (DSE) on Growth of Conifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reininger, Vanessa; Sieber, Thomas N.

    2012-01-01

    Mycorrhizal roots are frequently colonized by fungi of the Phialocephala fortinii s.l. – Acephala applanata species complex (PAC). These ascomycetes are common and widespread colonizers of tree roots. Some PAC strains reduce growth increments of their hosts but are beneficial in protecting roots against pathogens. Nothing is known about the effects of PAC on mycorrhizal fungi and the PAC-mycorrhiza association on plant growth, even though these two fungal groups occur closely together in natural habitats. We expect reduced colonization rates and reduced negative effects of PAC on host plants if roots are co-colonized by an ectomycorrhizal fungus (ECM). Depending on the temperature regime interactions among the partners in this tripartite ECM-PAC-plant system might also change. To test our hypotheses, effects of four PAC genotypes (two pathogenic and two non-pathogenic on the Norway spruce), mycorrhization by Laccaria bicolor (strain S238N) and two temperature regimes (19°C and 25°C) on the biomass of the Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii) and Norway spruce (Picea abies) seedlings were studied. Mycorrhization compensated the adverse effects of PAC on the growth of the Norway spruce at both temperatures. The growth of the Douglas-fir was not influenced either by PAC or mycorrhization at 19°C, but at 25°C mycorrhization had a similar protective effect as in the Norway spruce. The compensatory effects probably rely on the reduction of the PAC-colonization density by mycorrhizae. Temperature and the PAC strain only had a differential effect on the biomass of the Norway spruce but not on the Douglas-fir. Higher temperature reduced mycorrhization of both hosts. We conclude that ectomycorrhizae form physical and/or physiological barriers against PAC leading to reduced PAC-colonization of the roots. Additionally, our results indicate that global warming could cause a general decrease of mycorrhization making primary roots more accessible to other symbionts and

  6. Nutrient transfer to plants by phylogenetically diverse fungi suggests convergent evolutionary strategies in rhizospheric symbionts

    OpenAIRE

    Behie, Scott W.; Padilla-Guerrero, Israel E.; Bidochka, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Most land plants are able to form symbiotic associations with fungi, and in many cases these associations are necessary for plant and fungal survival. These plant/fungal associations are formed with mycorrhizal (arbuscular mycorrhizal or ectomycorrhizal) or endophytic fungi, fungi from distinct phylogenetic lineages. While it has been shown that mycorrhizal fungi are able to transfer nutrients to plant roots in exchange for carbon, endophytes have been thought as asymptomatic colonizers. Rece...

  7. Relative symbiont input and the lichen symbiotic outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spribille, Toby

    2018-03-09

    The term symbiosis was first used in biology to describe the 'living together' of fungi and algae in lichens. For much of the 20th century, the fungal partner was assumed to be invested with the ability to produce the lichen body plan in presence of a photosynthesizing partner. However, studies of fungal evolution have uncovered discordance between lichen symbiotic outcomes and genome evolution of the fungus. At the same time, evidence has emerged that the structurally important lichen cortex contains lichen-specific, single-celled microbes, suggesting it may function like a biofilm. Together, these observations suggest we may not have a complete overview of symbiotic interactions in lichens. Understanding phenotype development and evolution in lichens will require greater insight into fungal-fungal and fungal-bacterial interplay and the physical properties of the cortex. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Vesicular-arbuscular-/ecto-mycorrhiza succession in seedlings of. Eucalyptus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santos Vera Lúcia dos

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM and ectomycorrhizae (ECM in the same root system was observed when species of Eucalyptus urophylla S.T. Blake, E. citriodora Hook f., E. grandis W. Hill ex Maiden, E. cloeziana F. Muell. and E. camaldulensis Dehnh were simultaneously inoculated with Glomus etunicatum Becker & Gederman and Pisolithus tinctorius (Per. Cocker & Couch, isolate Pt 90A. The succession between the two fungi was observed. In general ectomycorrhizal colonization increased followed by a decrease in AM. Pisolithus tinctorius was favored in simultaneous inoculation with G. etunicatum, and the positive effect of the simultaneous inoculation of both fungi in the percent colonization by the AM fungus occurred up to 60 days after inoculation. After 120 days, colonization of roots by G. etunicatum decreased in the presence of P. tinctorius. When inoculated simultaneously, the proportion of AM and ECM varied with evaluation time, while the combined percentage of mycorrhizal roots approached the maximum and remained more or less constant after 60 days, suggesting that there could be competition between the fungi for limiting substrate. The maximum percent mycorrhizal colonization varied with Eucalyptus species and the highest value was observed for E. camaldulensis, followed in order by E. citriodora, E. urophylla, E. grandis and E. cloeziana.

  9. The effect of ectomycorrhizal fungi and bacteria on pine seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanna Dahm

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ecomycorrhizal fungi (Hebelon crustuliniforme(Bull.: Fr. Quél. 5392 and Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers. Coker et Couch 5335 and bacteria (Bacillus polymyxa and Azospirillum brasilense. associated with mycorrhizas on the growth of pine seedligs was investigated. In addition the influence of bacteria on fungal biomass production and the relationship between ectomycorrhizal fungi and fungi pathogenic to root of pine seedlings were determined. In general, the shoot/root ratio was higher in plants inoculated with Hebeloma crustuliniforme and bacteria than in the control seedlings (grown only under sterile conditions. In non-sterile substrate the root/shoot ratio of the mycorrhizal seedlings was lower as compared to the control. Similar phenomenon was noted in plants inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Pisolithus tinetorius. The bacteria used as well as the time of introduction of these organisms into the cultures of mycorrhiza fungi affected the production of fungal biomass. Hebeloma crustuliniforme and Pisolithus tinctorius inhibited the growth of Rizoctonia solani and Fusarium oxysporum fungi pathogenic to pine seedlings.

  10. Fungi with multifunctional lifestyles: endophytic insect pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barelli, Larissa; Moonjely, Soumya; Behie, Scott W; Bidochka, Michael J

    2016-04-01

    This review examines the symbiotic, evolutionary, proteomic and genetic basis for a group of fungi that occupy a specialized niche as insect pathogens as well as endophytes. We focus primarily on species in the genera Metarhizium and Beauveria, traditionally recognized as insect pathogenic fungi but are also found as plant symbionts. Phylogenetic evidence suggests that these fungi are more closely related to grass endophytes and diverged from that lineage ca. 100 MYA. We explore how the dual life cycles of these fungi as insect pathogens and endophytes are coupled. We discuss the evolution of insect pathogenesis while maintaining an endophytic lifestyle and provide examples of genes that may be involved in the transition toward insect pathogenicity. That is, some genes for insect pathogenesis may have been co-opted from genes involved in endophytic colonization. Other genes may be multifunctional and serve in both lifestyle capacities. We suggest that their evolution as insect pathogens allowed them to effectively barter a specialized nitrogen source (i.e. insects) with host plants for photosynthate. These ubiquitous fungi may play an important role as plant growth promoters and have a potential reservoir of secondary metabolites.

  11. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced arsenic resistance of both white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants in an arsenic-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Smith, F Andrew; Wang, Youshan; Chen, Baodong

    2008-09-01

    In a compartmented cultivation system, white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), with their roots freely intermingled, or separated by 37 microm nylon mesh or plastic board, were grown together in an arsenic (As) contaminated soil. The influence of AM inoculation on plant growth, As uptake, phosphorus (P) nutrition, and plant competitions were investigated. Results showed that both plant species highly depended on mycorrhizas for surviving the As contamination. Mycorrhizal inoculation substantially improved plant P nutrition, and in contrast markedly decreased root to shoot As translocation and shoot As concentrations. It also showed that mycorrhizas affected the competition between the two co-existing plant species, preferentially benefiting the clover plants in term of nutrient acquisition and biomass production. Based on the present study, the role of AM fungi in plant adaptation to As contamination, and their potential use for ecological restoration of As contaminated soils are discussed.

  12. Competitive interactions are mediated in a sex-specific manner by arbuscular mycorrhiza in Antennaria dioica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varga, S; Vega-Frutis, R; Kytöviita, M-M

    2017-03-01

    Plants usually interact with other plants, and the outcome of such interaction ranges from facilitation to competition depending on the identity of the plants, including their sexual expression. Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have been shown to modify competitive interactions in plants. However, few studies have evaluated how AM fungi influence plant intraspecific and interspecific interactions in dioecious species. The competitive abilities of female and male plants of Antennaria dioica were examined in a greenhouse experiment. Females and males were grown in the following competitive settings: (i) without competition, (ii) with intrasexual competition, (iii) with intersexual competition, and (iv) with interspecific competition by Hieracium pilosella - a plant with similar characteristics to A. dioica. Half of the pots were grown with Claroideoglomus claroideum, an AM fungus isolated from the same habitat as the plant material. We evaluated plant survival, growth, flowering phenology, and production of AM fungal structures. Plant survival was unaffected by competition or AM fungi. Competition and the presence of AM fungi reduced plant biomass. However, the sexes responded differently to the interaction between fungal and competition treatments. Both intra- and interspecific competition results were sex-specific, and in general, female performance was reduced by AM colonization. Plant competition or sex did not affect the intraradical structures, extraradical hyphae, or spore production of the AM fungus. These findings suggest that plant sexual differences affect fundamental processes such as competitive ability and symbiotic relationships with AM fungi. © 2016 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  13. Growth and development of symbiotic Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Alachlor reduced the spore germination and hyphal growth significantly at treatments higher than recommended field application rates, but non-significant effect caused by the glyphosate. The development of external hyphae was insignificantly affected in the herbicides treated soils compared with that of the untreated soil.

  14. Arbuscular mycorrhiza in soil quality assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kling, M.; Jakobsen, I.

    1998-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi constitute a living bridge for the transport of nutrients from soil to plant roots, and are considered as the group of soil microorganisms that is of most direct importance to nutrient uptake by herbaceous plants. AM fungi also contribute to the formation of soil...... aggregates and to the protection of plants against drought and root pathogens. Assessment of soil quality, defined as the capacity of a soil to function within ecosystem boundaries to sustain biological productivity, maintain environmental quality, and promote plant health, should therefore include both...

  15. Take a Trip Through the Plant and Fungal Transportome of Mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Kevin; Doidy, Joan; Zimmermann, Sabine D; Wipf, Daniel; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel

    2016-11-01

    Soil nutrient acquisition and exchanges through symbiotic plant-fungus interactions in the rhizosphere are key features for the current agricultural and environmental challenges. Improved crop yield and plant mineral nutrition through a fungal symbiont has been widely described. In return, the host plant supplies carbon substrates to its fungal partner. We review here recent progress on molecular players of membrane transport involved in nutritional exchanges between mycorrhizal plants and fungi. We cover the transportome, from the transport proteins involved in sugar fluxes from plants towards fungi, to the uptake from the soil and exchange of nitrogen, phosphate, potassium, sulfate, and water. Together, these advances in the comprehension of the mycorrhizal transportome will help in developing the future engineering of new agro-ecological systems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in cordate gametophytes of two ferns, Angiopteris lygodiifolia and Osmunda japonica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura-Tsujita, Yuki; Sakoda, Aki; Ebihara, Atsushi; Yukawa, Tomohisa; Imaichi, Ryoko

    2013-01-01

    Mycorrhizal symbiosis is common among land plants including pteridophytes (monilophytes and lycophytes). In pteridophytes with diplohaplontic life cycle, mycorrhizal formations were mostly reported for sporophytes, but very few for gametophytes. To clarify the mycorrhizal association of photosynthetic gametophytes, field-collected gametophytes of Angiopteris lygodiifolia (Marattiaceae, n = 52) and Osmunda japonica (Osmundaceae, n = 45) were examined using microscopic and molecular techniques. Collected gametophytes were mostly cut into two pieces. One piece was used for light and scanning microscopic observations, and the other for molecular identification of plant species (chloroplast rbcL sequences) and mycorrhizal fungi (small subunit rDNA sequences). Microscopic observations showed that 96 % (50/52) of Angiopteris and 95 % (41/43) of Osmunda gametophytes contained intracellular hyphae with arbuscules and/or vesicles and fungal colonization was limited to the inner tissue of the thick midribs (cushion). Fungal DNA analyses showed that 92 % (48/52) of Angiopteris and 92 % (35/38) of Osmunda have sequences of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which were highly divergent but all belonged to Glomus group A. These results suggest that A. lygodiifolia and O. japonica gametophytes consistently form arbuscular mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizal formation in wild fern gametophytes, based on large-scale sampling with molecular identification of host plant species, was demonstrated for the first time.

  17. Effects of mycorrhiza on growth and essential oil production in selected aromatic plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waed Tarraf

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM symbiosis is widely investigated in aromatic herbs. Several studies have shown different effects on secondary metabolites, biomass production, as well as oil quantitative and qualitative aspects. The seeking to increase the yield of plants and their oils is an interesting topic in the world of medicinal and aromatic plant production. In tune with that, this study evaluated the effectiveness of two mycorrhiza fungi, Funneliformis mosseae (syn. Glomus mosseae and Septoglomus viscosum (syn. Glomus viscosum, on three species from Lamiaceae family: Salvia officinalis L., Origanum vulgare L., and Thymus vulgaris L. besides untreated control. It was found that the effect of symbiosis on growth was more favourable with S. viscosum than other AM fungus. The S. viscosum inoculation raised the yield of essential oil in oregano. Analysis of gas chromatography/mass spectrometry showed that manool obtained the highest abundance in leaf essential oil of inoculated sage; thymol was the major component whatever the treatment in thyme and lower relative content of carvacrol was reported with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation in oregano. The results suggest the mycorrhizal inoculation as a promising technology in sustainable agricultural system to improve the plant productivity performance. Specific inocula are strategic to enhance the chemical profile of essential oils.

  18. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitterlich, Michael; Franken, Philipp; Graefe, Jan

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT) plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC) mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6-1500 kPa) was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  19. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Improves Substrate Hydraulic Conductivity in the Plant Available Moisture Range Under Root Growth Exclusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Bitterlich

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF proliferate in soils and are known to affect soil structure. Although their contribution to structure is extensively investigated, the consequences of those processes for soil water extractability and transport has, so far, gained surprisingly little attention. Therefore we asked, whether AMF can affect water retention and unsaturated hydraulic conductivity under exclusion of root ingrowth, in order to minimize plant driven effects. We carried out experiments with tomato inoculated with Rhizoglomus irregulare in a soil substrate with sand and vermiculite that created variation in colonization by mixed pots with wild type (WT plants and mycorrhiza resistant (RMC mutants. Sampling cores were introduced and used to assess substrate moisture retention dynamics and modeling of substrate water retention and hydraulic conductivity. AMF reduced the saturated water content and total porosity, but maintained air filled porosity in soil spheres that excluded root ingrowth. The water content between field capacity and the permanent wilting point (6–1500 kPa was only reduced in mycorrhizal substrates that contained at least one RMC mutant. Plant available water contents correlated positively with soil protein contents. Soil protein contents were highest in pots that possessed the strongest hyphal colonization, but not significantly affected. Substrate conductivity increased up to 50% in colonized substrates in the physiologically important water potential range between 6 and 10 kPa. The improvements in hydraulic conductivity are restricted to substrates where at least one WT plant was available for the fungus, indicating a necessity of a functional symbiosis for this effect. We conclude that functional mycorrhiza alleviates the resistance to water movement through the substrate in substrate areas outside of the root zone.

  20. ESTs analysis reveals putative genes involved in symbiotic seed germination in Dendrobium officinale.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ming Zhao

    Full Text Available Dendrobiumofficinale (Orchidaceae is one of the world's most endangered plants with great medicinal value. In nature, D. officinale seeds must establish symbiotic relationships with fungi to germinate. However, the molecular events involved in the interaction between fungus and plant during this process are poorly understood. To isolate the genes involved in symbiotic germination, a suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH cDNA library of symbiotically germinated D. officinale seeds was constructed. From this library, 1437 expressed sequence tags (ESTs were clustered to 1074 Unigenes (including 902 singletons and 172 contigs, which were searched against the NCBI non-redundant (NR protein database (E-value cutoff, e(-5. Based on sequence similarity with known proteins, 579 differentially expressed genes in D. officinale were identified and classified into different functional categories by Gene Ontology (GO, Clusters of orthologous Groups of proteins (COGs and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathways. The expression levels of 15 selected genes emblematic of symbiotic germination were confirmed via real-time quantitative PCR. These genes were classified into various categories, including defense and stress response, metabolism, transcriptional regulation, transport process and signal transduction pathways. All transcripts were upregulated in the symbiotically germinated seeds (SGS. The functions of these genes in symbiotic germination were predicted. Furthermore, two fungus-induced calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs, which were upregulated 6.76- and 26.69-fold in SGS compared with un-germinated seeds (UGS, were cloned from D. officinale and characterized for the first time. This study provides the first global overview of genes putatively involved in D. officinale symbiotic seed germination and provides a foundation for further functional research regarding symbiotic relationships in orchids.

  1. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on 137Cs uptake by plants grown on different soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vinichuk, M.; Mårtensson, A.; Ericsson, T.; Rosén, K.

    2013-01-01

    The potential use of mycorrhiza as a bioremediation agent for soils contaminated by radiocesium was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment. The uptake of 137 Cs by cucumber, perennial ryegrass, and sunflower after inoculation with a commercial arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) product in soils contaminated with 137 Cs was investigated, with non-mycorrhizal quinoa included as a “reference” plant. The effect of cucumber and ryegrass inoculation with AM fungi on 137 Cs uptake was inconsistent. The effect of AM fungi was most pronounced in sunflower: both plant biomass and 137 Cs uptake increased on loamy sand and loamy soils. The total 137 Cs activity accumulated within AM host sunflower on loamy sand and loamy soils was 2.4 and 3.2-fold higher than in non-inoculated plants. Although the enhanced uptake of 137 Cs by quinoa plants on loamy soil inoculated by the AM fungi was observed, the infection of the fungi to the plants was not confirmed. - Highlights: ► Effect of soil inoculation on 137 Cs uptake by crops was studied in greenhouse. ► 137 Cs uptake by inoculated sunflower plants was most pronounced. ► The higher 137 Cs uptake by inoculated sunflower due to presence of mycorrhiza. ► Studies suggest potential for use of mycorrhiza on contaminated sites.

  2. Relations between wood-inhabiting insects and fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nina P. Krivosheina

    1991-01-01

    It is widely known that xylophagous insects do not usually attack healthy, resistant trees. In order to overcome these defenses, inner-bark feeding insects have developed symbiotic interrelationships with various organisms, fungi in particular. In this paper, using our own data together with that available in the literature, we analyze the forms of relationships...

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizae under CuSO4 stress community structure of arbuscular mycorrhizae under CuSO4 stress in Capsicum annuum L. and Zea mays L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raza, A.; Chaudhry, M.S.

    2017-01-01

    Community structure and ecology of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi was studied in the present study using two host plant species i.e. Capsicum annuum L. and Zea mays L. under CuSO4 stress. Five levels of copper sulfate (CuSO4) i.e. 0 ppm (control), 25 ppm, 50 ppm, 75 ppm, and 100 ppm were used to elucidate their influence on mycorrhizal community. Results showed that some spores disappeared with increased metal content while other spores were abundant even at a high level of stress. Present studies supported the stress tolerance mechanism conferred by AMF spore density and diversity. Value of Simpson index was shown to decrease from 3.58 to 2.42. Shannon index value was changed from 0.27 to 0.51. Similar rise in the values was observed for spore diversity i.e. 20.94 to 79.13. However, it may be concluded that spore ecotypes might vary in their abundance depending upon the host plant and soil physical-chemical characters that control the metal availability to plants. Among all the four plant varieties, ghotki chilli seemed to have less species associated with it. It can be concluded that when compared to the control, more mycorrhizal types were found to be associated with plants under stress which could prove the tolerance of mycorrhizae against the heavy metals and their positive role in protecting plant from the toxicity of heavy metals. (author)

  4. Arbuscular mycorrhizas in cycads of southern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthukumar, T; Udaiyan, K

    2002-08-01

    Root and soil samples of three potted or ground-grown cycads ( Cycas circinalis, C. revoluta, Zamiasp.) were collected between November 1999 and June 2000 and surveyed for arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization and spore populations. AM fungi were associated with all root systems and rhizosphere samples examined. Root colonization was of a typical Arum type and AM colonization levels differed significantly between species and between potted and ground-grown cycads. Mycorrhizal colonization levels were inversely related to root hair number and length. Spores of nine morphotypes belonging to three genera ( Acaulospora, Glomus, Scutellospora) were extracted from soil. The percentage root length colonized by AM fungi was not related to soil factors, but total AM fungal spore numbers in the rhizosphere soil were inversely related to soil nitrogen and phosphorus levels. AM fungal spore numbers in the soil were linearly related to root length colonized. The co-occurrence of septate non-mycorrhizal fungi was recorded for the first time in cycads. These observations and the relationship between plant mycorrhizal status and soil nutrients are discussed.

  5. Evaluation of Two Mycorrhiza Species and Nitroxin on Yield and Yield Components of Garlic (Allium sativum L. in an Ecological Agroecosystem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Rezvani Moghaddam

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Maintenance of soil fertility is one of the most important issues affecting the sustainability of food production. The application of ecological inputs such as mycorrhiza and biofertilizers are one of those approaches which are needed to maintain soil fertility Biofetilizers include different types of free living organisms that convert unavailable nutrients to available forms and enhance root development and better seed germination. Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR occupy the rhizosphere of many plant species and have beneficial effects on the host plant. They may directly and indirectly influence the plant growth. A direct mechanism would be to increase plant growth by supplying the plant with nutrients and hormones. Indirect mechanisms, on the other hand, include reduced susceptibility to diseases and acting as a form of defense referred to as induces systematic resistance. Mycorrhiza arbuscular fungi are other coexist microorganisms that improve soil fertility, nutrients cycling and agroecosystem health. Mycorrhizal fungi are the most abundant organisms in agricultural soils. Many researchers have pointed to the positive roles of mycorrhizal fungi on plants growth characteristics. Arbuscular mycorrhizas are found in 85% of all plant families and occur in many crop species. Mineral nutrients such as potassium, calcium, copper, zinc and iron are assimilated more quickly and in greater amounts by mycorrhizal plants. Arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation has also been shown to increase plant resistance of pathogen attack. Garlic (Allium sativum L. is a very powerful medicinal plant that is often underestimated. Garlic is easy to grow and can be grown year-round in any mild climates. Garlic cloves are used for consumption (row and cooked or for medicinal purposes. They have a characteristic pungent, spicy flavor that mellows and sweetens considerably with cooking. Despite of many studies on the effects of mycorrhiza and

  6. Community assembly and coexistence in communities of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vályi, Kriszta; Mardhiah, Ulfah; Rillig, Matthias C; Hempel, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are asexual, obligately symbiotic fungi with unique morphology and genomic structure, which occupy a dual niche, that is, the soil and the host root. Consequently, the direct adoption of models for community assembly developed for other organism groups is not evident. In this paper we adapted modern coexistence and assembly theory to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. We review research on the elements of community assembly and coexistence of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, highlighting recent studies using molecular methods. By addressing several points from the individual to the community level where the application of modern community ecology terms runs into problems when arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi are concerned, we aim to account for these special circumstances from a mycocentric point of view. We suggest that hierarchical spatial structure of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal communities should be explicitly taken into account in future studies. The conceptual framework we develop here for arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi is also adaptable for other host-associated microbial communities.

  7. Nitrate transport processes in Fagus-Laccaria-mycorrhizae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kreuzwieser, J; Stulen, [No Value; Wiersema, P; Vaalburg, W; Rennenberg, H

    2000-01-01

    The contribution of influx and efflux of NO3- on NO3- net uptake has been studied in excised mycorrhizae of 18-20 week old beech (Fagus sylvatica L.) trees. Net uptake rates of NO3- followed uniphasic Michaelis-Menten kinetics in the concentration range between 10 mu M and 1.0 mM external NO3-, with

  8. Leotia cf. lubrica forms arbutoid mycorrhiza with Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kühdorf, Katja; Münzenberger, B; Begerow, D; Gómez-Laurito, J; Hüttl, R F

    2015-02-01

    Arbutoid mycorrhizal plants are commonly found as understory vegetation in forests worldwide where ectomycorrhiza-forming trees occur. Comarostaphylis arbutoides (Ericaceae) is a tropical woody plant and common in tropical Central America. This plant forms arbutoid mycorrhiza, whereas only associations with Leccinum monticola as well as Sebacina sp. are described so far. We collected arbutoid mycorrhizas of C. arbutoides from the Cerro de la Muerte (Cordillera de Talamanca), Costa Rica, where this plant species grows together with Quercus costaricensis. We provide here the first evidence of mycorrhizal status for the Ascomycete Leotia cf. lubrica (Helotiales) that was so far under discussion as saprophyte or mycorrhizal. This fungus formed arbutoid mycorrhiza with C. arbutoides. The morphotype was described morphologically and anatomically. Leotia cf. lubrica was identified using molecular methods, such as sequencing the internal-transcribed spacer (ITS) and the large subunit (LSU) ribosomal DNA regions, as well as phylogenetic analyses. Specific plant primers were used to confirm C. arbutoides as the host plant of the leotioid mycorrhiza.

  9. Effects of Mycorrhiza on the Growth and Productivity of Faidherbia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of mycorrhiza on growth and growth components of Faidherbia albida (Del.) A. Chev. was investigated in the semi arid environment of Sokoto State, Nigeria. A complete randomized block design with five replications and factorial combination of three watering regimes (daily for unstressed plant, twice weekly for ...

  10. Effects of Mycorrhiza on the Growth and Productivity of Faidherbia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    the plant including height, basal diameter, leaf number, leaf area, root length and dry weights as well as its moisture utilization efficiency. Therefore, the use of mycorrhiza is recommended for sustained production of high-grade seedlings of the apple ring acacia in the semi arid environment. KEYWORDS: Faidherbia albida ...

  11. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza and composted market waste on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study determined effects of composted market waste and Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) on Root Colonization (RC) and fibre yield of kenaf. The experimental design was 2 x 12 factorial in a Completely Randomized Design replicated three times. The treatments were with AM (AM+) and without (AM-) and twelve levels of ...

  12. Influence of vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and phosphate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A field experiment was carried out to find out the effect of biofertilizers, vesicular arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM), and phosphate solubilising bacteria (PSB) individually and in combination on growth and physiological attributing properties of Marsdenia volubilis plant under nursery conditions. The plant seedlings were ...

  13. Effects of Moisture and Mycorrhiza on Stomatal Conductance and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    acer

    ISSN 0794-5698. Effects of Moisture and Mycorrhiza on Stomatal Conductance and Xylem Pressure Potential of Faidherbia albida (Del.) A. Chev. *. 1. M.A. Shinkafi and. 2. A.M. Aduradola. 1Department of Forestry and Fisheries, Usmanu Danfodiyo University, Sokoto, Nigeria. 2Department of Forest Resources Management ...

  14. Adaptive evolution of the symbiotic gene NORK is not correlated with shifts of rhizobial specificity in the genus Medicago

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mita, De S.; Santoni, S.; Ronfort, J.; Bataillon, T.

    2007-01-01

    The NODULATION RECEPTOR KINASE (NORK) gene encodes a Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR)-containing receptor-like protein and controls the infection by symbiotic rhizobia and endomycorrhizal fungi in Legumes. The occurrence of numerous amino acid changes driven by directional selection has been reported in

  15. Arbuscular mycorrhiza formation and its function under elevated atmospheric O3: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuguang; Augé, Robert M; Toler, Heather D

    2017-07-01

    We quantitatively evaluated the effects of elevated O 3 on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formation and on AM role in promoting plant growth in regard to several moderating variables (O 3 levels, O 3 exposure duration, plant types, AM fungi family, and additional stress) by means of meta-analysis of published data. The analysis consisted of 117 trials representing 20 peer-reviewed articles and 16 unpublished trials. Relative to non-mycorrhizal controls, AM inoculation did not significantly alter plant growth (shoot biomass, root biomass, total biomass and plant height) when O 3 concentration was less than 80 ppb, but at concentrations above 80 ppb symbiosis was associated with increases of 68% in shoot biomass and 131% in root biomass. AM effects on plant growth were affected by the duration of O 3 exposure but did not differ much with AM fungi taxa or plant type. AM symbiosis has also led to higher yields under O 3 stress, relative to the non-mycorrhizal plants, and the AM effects have been more pronounced as O 3 concentration increases. As with biomass, AM effects on yield have been affected by the duration of O 3 exposure, with the greatest increase (100%) occurring at 61-90 d. AM-induced promotion of yield differed with fungal species but not with plant type or other abiotic stress. Colonization of roots by AM fungi has been negatively affected by elevated O 3 compared to ambient O 3 ; total mycorrhizal colonization rate (MCR), arbuscular MCR, vesicular MCR and hyphal coil MCR declined as O 3 levels rose. AM colonization rates were affected by duration of O 3 exposure, plant type, AM fungal taxa and other concurrent stresses in most cases. The analysis showed that AM inoculation has the potential to ameliorate detrimental effects of elevated O 3 on plant growth and productivity, despite colonization rates being negatively affected by elevated O 3 . Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Filamentous fungi for production of food additives and processing aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, David B; Connerton, Ian F; MacKenzie, Donald A

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi are metabolically versatile organisms with a very wide distribution in nature. They exist in association with other species, e.g. as lichens or mycorrhiza, as pathogens of animals and plants or as free-living species. Many are regarded as nature's primary degraders because they secrete a wide variety of hydrolytic enzymes that degrade waste organic materials. Many species produce secondary metabolites such as polyketides or peptides and an increasing range of fungal species is exploited commercially as sources of enzymes and metabolites for food or pharmaceutical applications. The recent availability of fungal genome sequences has provided a major opportunity to explore and further exploit fungi as sources of enzymes and metabolites. In this review chapter we focus on the use of fungi in the production of food additives but take a largely pre-genomic, albeit a mainly molecular, view of the topic.

  17. Evaluation of Mycorrhizal Fungi, Vermicompost and Humic Acid on Essence Yield and Root Colonization of Fennel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Akbari

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The main objective of sustainable agriculture is to decrease the off-farm inputs such as chemical fertilizers, increased farm nutrient cycle through reduced tillage and the use of biological and organic fertilizers. Studies on medicinal plants indicates that the use of sustainable farming systems provide the best conditions for the production of these plants. Mycorrhizal fungi, vermicompost and humic acid are samples of biological and organic fertilizer that can be used, to eliminate or substantially reduce the use of chemical inputs in order to increase the quantity, quality and stability of the products. Mycorrhizal fungi are one of the most important rhizosphere microorganisms which have symbiotic relation with root of most crops. Mycorrhizal symbiosis improves the soil physical (through expansion of hyphae of fungus, chemical (through increased absorption of nutrients and biological (the soil food web quality. These fungus increased nutrient uptake, such as phosphorus and some micronutrients, water uptake, reducing the negative effects of environmental stress and increase resistance to pathogens and improve the quality of their host plants. Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill is one of the most important medicinal plants, as the essential oil from the seeds used in a variety of industries, pharmaceutical, food and cosmetic use. Anethole is important component of the essential oil of fennel seed. Materials and Methods This experiment was conducted as a factorial based on randomized complete block design in order to evaluate the effects of vermicompost application, humic acid and mycorrhizal fungi on quantitative and qualitative aspects of fennel yield at experimental farm of Shahrood University during growing season of 1391-92. This experiment includes 12 treatments and 3 applications. Vermicompost levels include: v1 (no application v2 (4 ton ha-1 v3 (8 ton ha-1. Mycorrhizal fungi include: m1 (no inoculation and m2 (inoculation and

  18. Flavonoids and Strigolactones in Root Exudates as Signals in Symbiotic and Pathogenic Plant-Fungus Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horst Vierheilig

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Secondary plant compounds are important signals in several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions. The present review is limited to two groups of secondary plant compounds, flavonoids and strigolactones, which have been reported in root exudates. Data on flavonoids as signaling compounds are available from several symbiotic and pathogenic plant-microbe interactions, whereas only recently initial data on the role of strigolactones as plant signals in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis have been reported. Data from other plant-microbe interactions and strigolactones are not available yet. In the present article we are focusing on flavonoids in plant-fungalinteractions such as the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM association and the signaling between different Fusarium species and plants. Moreover the role of strigolactones in the AM association is discussed and new data on the effect of strigolactones on fungi, apart from arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, are provided.

  19. Evaluation of integrated management of organic manure application and mycorrhiza inoculation on growth criteria, qualitative and essential oil yield of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L. under Mashhad climatic conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Shabahang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to study impacts of organic manure levels and inoculation with mycorrhiza fungi on growth, quantitative and qualitative yield of hyssop (Hyssopus officinalis L., a field experiment was conducted as factorial based on a randomized complete block design with three replications at the Agricultural Research Station, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, during two growing seasons of 2009-2010 and 2010-2011. Mycorhiza inoculation (with and without inoculation and five levels of organic manure as decomposed cow manure (zero, 10, 20, 30 and 40 t.ha-1 were considered as treatments. Plant height, canopy diameter, leaf to shoot ratio, shoot dry weight, essential oil content and essential oil yield of hyssop were measured and calculated accordingly. The results showed that the simple and interaction effects between organic manure and mycorrhiza were significant (p≤0.01 on plant height, canopy diameter, leaf to stem ratio, shoot dry weight and essential oil content and yield of hyssop. By increasing organic manure level from zero to 30 t.ha-1 enhanced shoot dry weight and essential oil yield of hyssop up to 127 and 43%, respectively. Whereas by increasing organic manure level up to 40 t.ha-1 improved these traits up to 12 and 24%, respectively. Mycorrhiza inoculation enhanced shoot dry weight and essential oil yield up to 19 and 14%, respectively. The second year, growth of hyssop plants due to suitable establishment and more availability of nutrients were higher than the first year. Organic manure enhanced growth and yield of hyssop due to availability of nutrients and improvement in soil characteristics. Mycorrhiza inoculation promoted growth and yield of this valuable medicinal plant because of root development and nutrient availability particularly phosphorus.

  20. The beneficial effect of dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin, XG.

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation on the effect of phosphorus on vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection, and dual inoculation of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae + rhizobium on growth of white clover under field microplots and pot experiments was conducted on fluvo-aquic soils of semi-arid region in north China. The results showed that 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate was the most favorable phosphorus level for vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal infection ; mycorrhizal infection, nodulation, dry weight of shoots and roots, total uptake of nitrogen, phosphorus and other elements, the final yields and recovery of phosphorus of white clover were significantly increased by vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal inoculation and dual inoculation with vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobium. The highest response of inoculation was obtained by adding fertilizer phosphorus at the level of 60 kg P205 ha in form of superphosphate.

  1. Occurrence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizas and Dark Septate Endophytes in Hydrophytes from Lakes and Streams in Southwest China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Wang; Zhiwei, Zhao

    2006-02-01

    In this study, the colonization of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in 140 specimens of 32 hydrophytes collected from four lakes and four streams in southwest China were investigated. The arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and DSE colonization in these hydrophytes were rare. Typical AM structures were observed in one of the 25 hydrophytic species collected in lakes and six of the 17 species collected in streams.Spores of 10 identified AMF species and an unidentified Acaulospora sp. were isolated from the sediments. The identified AMF came from the four genera, Acaulospora, Gigaspora, Glomus and Scutellospora . Glomus and G. mosseae were the dominant genus and species respectively in these aquatic environments.The presence of DSE in hydrophytes was recorded for the first time. DSE occurred in one of the 25 hydrophyte species collected in lakes and three of the 17 species collected in streams.

  2. Ericoid mycorrhizal fungi are common root associates of a Mediterranean ectomycorrhizal plant (Quercus ilex).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergero, R; Perotto, S; Girlanda, M; Vidano, G; Luppi, A M

    2000-10-01

    Mycorrhiza samples of neighbouring Quercus ilex and Erica arborea plants collected in a postcutting habitat were processed to see whether plants differing in mycorrhizal status harbour the same root endophytes. Three experiments were performed in parallel: (i) isolation, identification and molecular characterization of fungi from surface-sterilized roots of both plant species; (ii) re-inoculation of fungal isolates on axenic E. arborea and Q. ilex seedlings; (iii) direct inoculation of field-collected Q. ilex ectomycorrhizas onto E. arborea seedlings. About 70 and 150 fungal isolates were obtained from roots of Q. ilex and E. arborea, respectively. Among them, Oidiodendron species and five cultural morphotypes of sterile isolates formed typical ericoid mycorrhizas on E. arborea in vitro. Fungi with such mycorrhizal ability were derived from both host plants. Isolates belonging to one of these morphotypes (sd9) also exhibited an unusual pattern of colonization, with an additional extracellular hyphal net. Ericoid mycorrhizas were also readily obtained by direct inoculation of E. arborea seedlings with Q. ilex ectomycorrhizal tips. Polymerase chain-restriction fragment length polymorphism and random amplified polymorphic DNA analyses of the shared sterile morphotypes demonstrate, in the case of sd9, the occurrence of the same genet on the two host plants. These results indicate that ericoid mycorrhizal fungi associate with ectomycorrhizal roots, and the ecological significance of this finding is discussed.

  3. and fungi

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    2012-05-15

    May 15, 2012 ... protein extracts from wild mushroom fungi and native plant species against hospital pathogens. J. Pharma. Phytotherap. 2: 103-107. Hu M, McClements D, Decker E (2003). Lipid oxidation in corn oil-in- water emulsions stabilized by casein, whey protein isolate, and soy protein isolate, J. Agric. Food Chem.

  4. Symbiotic in vitro seed propagation of Dendrobium: fungal and bacterial partners and their influence on plant growth and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira da Silva, Jaime A; Tsavkelova, Elena A; Zeng, Songjun; Ng, Tzi Bun; Parthibhan, S; Dobránszki, Judit; Cardoso, Jean Carlos; Rao, M V

    2015-07-01

    The genus Dendrobium is one of the largest genera of the Orchidaceae Juss. family, although some of its members are the most threatened today. The reason why many species face a vulnerable or endangered status is primarily because of anthropogenic interference in natural habitats and commercial overexploitation. The development and application of modern techniques and strategies directed towards in vitro propagation of orchids not only increases their number but also provides a viable means to conserve plants in an artificial environment, both in vitro and ex vitro, thus providing material for reintroduction. Dendrobium seed germination and propagation are challenging processes in vivo and in vitro, especially when the extreme specialization of these plants is considered: (1) their biotic relationships with pollinators and mycorrhizae; (2) adaptation to epiphytic or lithophytic life-styles; (3) fine-scale requirements for an optimal combination of nutrients, light, temperature, and pH. This review also aims to summarize the available data on symbiotic in vitro Dendrobium seed germination. The influence of abiotic factors as well as composition and amounts of different exogenous nutrient substances is examined. With a view to better understanding how to optimize and control in vitro symbiotic associations, a part of the review describes the strong biotic relations of Dendrobium with different associative microorganisms that form microbial communities with adult plants, and also influence symbiotic seed germination. The beneficial role of plant growth-promoting bacteria is also discussed.

  5. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1986-01-01

    The importance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) and P fertilizer for P nutrition and dry matter production in field peas (Pisum sativum L.) was studied in moderately P-deficient soil. Half of the experimental plots were fumigated to reduce the level of VAM infection. Shoots and 0 to 30 cm...... procedure is being used. These results indicate that VAM is of major importance to P uptake by the field-grown pea....

  6. Growth and reproductive characteristics of the columnar cactus Stenocereus queretaroensis and their relationships with environmental factors and colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimienta-Barrios, Eulogio; Pimienta-Barrios, Enrique; Salas-Galván, Mariá Eugenia; Zañudo-Hernandez, Julia; Nobel, Park S

    2002-06-01

    Three natural populations of pitayo (Stenocereus queretaroensis (Weber) Buxbaum), a columnar arborescent cactus, were studied in their subtropical environments in western Mexico. All of the sites were characterized by shallow, nutrient-poor soils. Percentage of colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) fungi, stem growth, fruit mass, and percentage germination were greater in S. queretaroensis at Autlan, Jalisco (AJ) than at Zacoalco de Torres, Jalisco (ZTJ) or Santa Rosa, Zacatecas (SRZ). The onset of root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhizae during the middle of the summer wet period preceded increases in stem extension rate and stem phosphorus concentration. Based on previous studies of effects of environmental factors on photosynthesis, climatic conditions were more favorable for photosynthesis at AJ than at SRZ and ZTJ, as indicated by the amount of summer rainfall, the amount of light, and the moderate air temperatures that prevailed during the fall and winter seasons. There was a significant positive correlation between stem growth and percentage of total root length colonized by arbuscules of AM fungi for S. queretaroensis at SRZ and AJ, but not at ZTJ. A negative significant correlation was observed between stem growth and maximal and minimal air temperatures at the three study sites. Stem growth was positively related to rainfall only at SRZ, and light was statistically related to stem growth only at ZTJ. Among sites, S. queretaroensis at AJ had the highest carbon gain and greatest AM colonization, creating physiological conditions that led to the highest stem growth, fruit mass and percentage of seed germination.

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhizas contribute to phytostabilization of uranium in uranium mining tailings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Baodong [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Roos, Per [Radiation Research Department, Technical University of Denmark, Riso National Laboratory, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark); Zhu Yongguan [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Jakobsen, Iver [Biosystems Department, Riso National Laboratory, Technical University of Denmark, DK-4000 Roskilde (Denmark)], E-mail: iver.jakobsen@risoe.dk

    2008-05-15

    Uranium (U) tailings pose environmental risks and call for proper remediation. In this paper medic and ryegrass plants were used as host plants to examine whether inoculation with an AM fungus, Glomus intraradices, would help phytostabilization of U tailings. The need of amending with uncontaminated soil for supporting plant survival was also examined by mixing soil with U tailing at different mixing ratios. Soil amendment increased plant growth and P uptake. Ryegrass produced a more extensive root system and a greater biomass than medic plants at all mixing ratios. Medic roots were extensively colonized by G. intraradices whereas ryegrass were more sparsely colonized. Plant growth was not improved by mycorrhizas, which, however, improved P nutrition of medic plants. Medic plants contained higher U concentrations and showed higher specific U uptake efficiency compared to ryegrass. In the presence of U tailing, most U had been retained in plant roots, and this distribution pattern was further enhanced by mycorrhizal colonization. The results suggest a role for AM fungi in phytostabilization of U tailings.

  8. The Role of Mycorrhiza in Drought Tolerance of Marigold (Calendula officinalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sh. Moghadasan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of mycorrhizal symbiosis and drought stress on marigold, a factorial experiment in a completely randomized design with three replications was conducted at the Plant Research Laboratory of Islamic Azad University, Neyshabur branch in 2014. The first factor consisted of application and non-application of mycorrhiza (Glomus intraradices and the second factor consisted of drought stress with three levels (irrigation based on 100%, 75% and 50% of field capacity. The results showed that growth parameters like plant height, leaf number, leaf area, root, shoot dry/fresh weight, Chla and Chlb content were significantly decreased by drought stress in both mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal plants. However, inoculation of plants by mycorrhizal fungus increased growth parameters and photosynthetic pigments as compared with non-mycorrhizal ones. Traits like RWC, potassium and phosphorus in response to drought stress were decreased. Inoculation of plant roots with Mycorrhizal fungi increased significantly RWC, potassium and phosphorus content of the plants under drought conditions as compared with non-inoculated plants. The results also showed the mycorrhizal symbiosis by Glomus intraradices improved drought tolerance of marigold through enhancing the absorption of water and mineral ions.

  9. Cell viability of mycorrhiza helper bacteria solid inoculant in different carrier material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asyiah, Iis Nur; Hindersah, Reginawanti; Harni, Rita

    2018-02-01

    Roots of food crops are colonized by nonpathogenic mycorrhizal fungi which show natural ability to control plant pathogen. Mycorrhizal establishment in plant roots is affected by rhizobacteria, known as mycorrhiza helper bacteria (MHB), which has synergetic effects on mycorrhizal associations. Laboratory experiment has been conducted to assess the best carrier material to develop well-qualified MHB of Pseudomonas diminuta and Bacillus subtilis solid inoculant. Carrier materials were 100 mesh organic matter of agricultural waste. Different spore concentration of both bacterial liquid inoculants were grown on three kinds of 100-mesh organic matter and stored at room temperature up to 90 days. Cell viability of both MHB were counted by serial dilution plate method by using specific medium. The results showed that sugar cane baggase ash was the best carrier material to maintain cell viability for both MHB. However, the population of Pseudomonas diminuta and Bacillus subtilis in sugar cane baggase ash were slightly decreased after 90 days. The use of sugarcane baggase ash for solid MHB inoculant development could be suggested.

  10. Co-inoculation of arbusculr mycorrhizae and nitrogen fixing bacteria enhance alfalfa yield under saline conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, R.; Tang, F.; Liu, F.; Chen, J.

    2016-01-01

    The study was to investigate the effects of combined inoculation of Glomus mosseae (arbusculr mycorrhizae fungi, AMF) and Sinorhizobium meliloti (nitrogen-fixing bacteria, i.e., an Rhizobium meliloti, RM) on yield, nutrient contents, nodulation and mycorrhizal colonization of different alfalfa cultivars under saline conditions. An experiment was conducted to test the efficacy of AMF and RM inoculation in development of salt tolerance in alfalfa cultivars (Zhaodong, Nongjing and Longmu) under different salinity levels (0, 60, 120 and 180 mM NaCl). We found that under non stress condition, double inoculation of alfalfa with rhizobium and AM increased the alfalfa yield, nodule weight and number, as well as shoot proline contents, the most when plants were double inoculated followed by AM and rhizobium inoculation, respectively. Whereas under salinity condition, double inoculation of alfalfa with rhizobium and AM increased alfalfa yield, mycorrhizal infection, nodule weight and number as well as increased in shoot proline content, the most followed by AM and rhizobium inoculation, respectively. The Results suggest that growth of alfalfa may be improved by combined inoculation of alfalfa with AM and rhizobium under salt and non-stress conditions. Alleviation of alfalfa growth under saline condition was perhaps due to an increase in mycorrhizal infection and nodule weight and number as well as an increased in shoot proline content by dual inoculation. (author)

  11. Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza on Plant Chemistry and the Development and Behavior of a Generalist Herbivore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Viktoria V; Schweiger, Rabea; Müller, Caroline

    2016-12-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) formed between plants and AM fungi (AMF) can alter host plant quality and thus influence plant-herbivore interactions. While AM is known to affect the development of generalist chewing-biting herbivores, AM-mediated impacts on insect behavior have been neglected until now. In this study, the effects of Rhizophagus irregularis, a generalist AMF, on phenotypic and leaf metabolic traits of Plantago major plants were investigated. Further, the influence of AM-mediated host plant modifications on the development and on seven behavioral traits of larvae of the generalist Mamestra brassicae were recorded. Tests were carried out in the third (L3) and fourth (L4) larval instar, respectively. While shoot water content, specific leaf area, and foliar concentrations of the secondary metabolite aucubin were higher in AM-treated compared to non-mycorrhized (NM) plants, lower concentrations of the primary metabolites citric acid and isocitric acid were found in leaves of AM plants. Larvae reared on AM plants gained a higher body mass and tended to develop faster than individuals reared on NM plants. However, plant treatment had no significant effect on any of the behavioral traits. Instead, differences between larvae of different ages were detected in several behavioral features, with L4 being less active and less bold than L3 larvae. The results demonstrate that AM-induced modifications of host plant quality influence larval development, whereas the behavioral phenotype seems to be more fixed at least under the tested conditions.

  12. Transcriptome analysis of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Fuqiang; Li, Jize; Fan, Xiaoxu; Zhang, Quan; Chang, Wei; Yang, Fengshan; Geng, Gui

    2016-02-02

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) protect host plants against diverse biotic and abiotic stresses, and promote biodegradation of various contaminants. In this study effect of Glomus mosseae/Medicago sativa mycorrhiza on atrazine degradation was investigated. It was observed that the atrazine degradation rates with any addition level in mycorrhizal treatments were all significantly higher than those in non-mycorrhizal treatments. When atrazine was applied at 20 mg kg(-1), the removal efficiency was up to 74.65%. Therefore, G. mosseae can be considered as ideal inhabitants of technical installations to facilitate phytoremediation. Furthermore, a total of 10.4 Gb was used for de novo transcriptome assembly, resulting in a comprehensive data set for the identification of genes corresponding to atrazine stress in the AM association. After comparative analysis with edgeR, a total of 2,060 differential expressed genes were identified, including 570 up-regulated genes and 1490 down-regulated genes. After excluding 'function unknown' and 'general function predictions only' genes, 172 up-regulated genes were obtained. The differentially expressed genes in AM association with and without atrazine stress were associated with molecular processes/other proteins, zinc finger protein, intracellular/extracellular enzymes, structural proteins, anti-stress/anti-disease protein, electron transport-related protein, and plant growth associated protein. Our results not only prove AMF has important ecological significance on atrazine degradation but also provide evidence for the molecular mechanisms of atrazine degradation by AMF.

  13. Host range, symbiotic effectiveness and nodulation competitiveness ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... This symbiotic interaction is of agronomic and ecological importance because of its significant amount of nitrogen to the total nitrogen budget in terrestrial ecosystems (Postgate,. 1998). An important characteristic of this symbiotic interaction is host specificity, where defined species of rhizobia forms nodules ...

  14. iTRAQ and RNA-Seq Analyses Provide New Insights into Regulation Mechanism of Symbiotic Germination of Dendrobium officinale Seeds (Orchidaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juan; Liu, Si Si; Kohler, Annegret; Yan, Bo; Luo, Hong Mei; Chen, Xiao Mei; Guo, Shun Xing

    2017-06-02

    Mycorrhizal fungi colonize orchid seeds and induce germination. This so-called symbiotic germination is a critical developmental process in the lifecycle of all orchid species. However, the molecular changes that occur during orchid seed symbiotic germination remain largely unknown. To better understand the molecular mechanism of orchid seed germination, we performed a comparative transcriptomic and proteomic analysis of the Chinese traditional medicinal orchid Dendrobium officinale to explore the change in protein expression at the different developmental stages during asymbiotic and symbiotic germination and identify the key proteins that regulate the symbiotic germination of orchid seeds. Among 2256 identified plant proteins, 308 were differentially expressed across three developmental stages during asymbiotic and symbiotic germination, and 229 were differentially expressed during symbiotic germination compared to asymbiotic development. Of these, 32 proteins were coup-regulated at both the proteomic and transcriptomic levels during symbiotic germination compared to asymbiotic germination. Our results suggest that symbiotic germination of D. officinale seeds shares a common signaling pathway with asymbiotic germination during the early germination stage. However, compared to asymbiotic germination, fungal colonization of orchid seeds appears to induce higher and earlier expression of some key proteins involved in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism and thus improves the efficiency of utilization of stored substances present in the embryo. This study provides new insight into the molecular basis of orchid seed germination.

  15. Effects of exogenous diamines on the interaction between ectomycorrhizal fungi and adventitious root formation in Scots pine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, K; Häggman, H; Sarjala, T

    2002-04-01

    Production of free and conjugated polyamines by two ectomycorrhizal fungi, Pisolithus tinctorius (Pers.) Coker and Couch and Paxillus involutus (Batsch) Fr., was studied in vitro. Spermidine was the main polyamine in the mycelium of both fungi. Paxillus involutus also produced large amounts of the diamine putrescine, whereas Pisolithus tinctorius contained traces of the diamine cadaverine and released into the culture medium an unknown compound probably related to cadaverine or N-methylputrescine. Both fungi accelerated adventitious root formation and increased subsequent root growth of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) hypocotyl cuttings in vitro. Exogenous cadaverine enhanced rooting caused by Pisolithus tinctorius and also promoted mycorrhiza formation by the fungus. Putrescine and Paxillus involutus had a synergistic effect on root initiation, but not on subsequent root growth. We conclude that specific diamines may be involved in the interaction between ectomycorrhizal fungi and adventitious root formation in Scots pine, and that the effects of specific exogenous polyamines are dependent on the fungal strain and its ability to produce these compounds. The finding that Paxillus involutus enhanced rooting and root growth without mycorrhiza formation indicates that fungal-induced rooting is not necessarily related to visible mycorrhiza formation.

  16. Symbiotic propagation of seedlings of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi (Orchidaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Aparecida Rodrigues Guimarães

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In nature, orchid seeds obtain the nutrients necessary for germination by degrading intracellular fungal structures formed after colonization of the embryo by mycorrhizal fungi. Protocols for asymbiotic germination of orchid seeds typically use media with high concentrations of soluble carbohydrate and minerals. However, when reintroduced into the field, seedlings obtained via asymbiotic germination have lower survival rates than do seedlings obtained via symbiotic germination. Tree fern fiber, the ideal substrate for orchid seedling acclimatization, is increasingly scarce. Here, we evaluated seed germination and protocorm development of Cyrtopodium glutiniferum Raddi cultivated in asymbiotic media (Knudson C and Murashige & Skoog and in oatmeal agar (OA medium inoculated with the mycorrhizal fungus Epulorhiza sp., using non-inoculated OA medium as a control. We also evaluated the performance of tree fern fiber, pine bark, eucalyptus bark, corncob and sawdust as substrates for the acclimatization of symbiotically propagated plants. We determined germination percentages, protocorm development and growth indices at 35 and 70 days of cultivation. Relative growth rates and the effects of substrates on mycorrhizal formation were calculated after 165 days of cultivation. Germination efficiency and growth indices were best when inoculated OA medium was used. Corncob and pine bark showed the highest percentages of colonized system roots. The OA medium inoculated with Epulorhiza sp. shows potential for C. glutiniferum seedling production. Corncob and pine bark are promising substitutes for tree fern fiber as substrates for the acclimatization of orchid seedlings.

  17. Interactions of mycorrhizal fungi with Pteris vittata (As hyperaccumulator) in As-contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leung, H.M.; Ye, Z.H.; Wong, M.H.

    2006-01-01

    A greenhouse trial was conducted to investigate the role of arbuscular mycorrhizas (AM) in aiding arsenic (As) uptake and tolerance by Pteris vittata (As hyperaccumulator) and Cynodon dactylon (a multi-metal root accumulator). Plants inoculated with lived and killed native mycorrhizas isolated from an As mine site were grown in a sterile and slightly acidic soil. The infectious percentage of mycorrhizas (0 mg/kg As: 26.4%, 50 mg/kg As: 30.3%, 100 mg/kg As: 40.6%) and the average biomass of shoots in infected P. vittata increased (0 mg/kg As: 2.45 g/pot, 50 mg/kg As: 2.48 g/pot, 100 mg/kg As: 10.9 g/pot) according to the increase of As levels when compared to control. The indigenous mycorrhizas enhanced As accumulation (0 mg/kg As: 3.70 mg/kg, 50 mg/kg As: 58.3 mg/kg; 100 mg/kg As: 88.1 mg/kg) in the As mine populations of P. vittata and also sustained its growth by aiding P absorption. For C. dactylon, As was mainly accumulated in mycorrhizal roots and translocation to shoots was inhibited. - Indigenous mycorrhizal fungi play an important role in As tolerance

  18. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhizae on microbial population and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are ubiquitous fungi distributed widely in soil ecosystems. It has been showed that AM fungi play an important role in improving soil nutrition and enhancing crop disease resistance, which have great application potentials in overcoming crop replant problems. In order to evaluate the effects ...

  19. Diet of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi: Bread and Butter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Mélanie K; Nouri, Eva; Courty, Pierre-Emmanuel; Reinhardt, Didier

    2017-08-01

    Most plants entertain mutualistic interactions known as arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) with soil fungi (Glomeromycota) which provide them with mineral nutrients in exchange for reduced carbon from the plant. Mycorrhizal roots represent strong carbon sinks in which hexoses are transferred from the plant host to the fungus. However, most of the carbon in AM fungi is stored in the form of lipids. The absence of the type I fatty acid synthase (FAS-I) complex from the AM fungal model species Rhizophagus irregularis suggests that lipids may also have a role in nutrition of the fungal partner. This hypothesis is supported by the concerted induction of host genes involved in lipid metabolism. We explore the possible roles of lipids in the light of recent literature on AM symbiosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Mycorrhizal fungi associated with Taiwanese Pyrola morrisonensis (Ericaceae in a naturally regenerated forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yosuke MATSUDA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Pyrola morrisonensis, an evergreen herb in the family Ericaceae, is endemic to Taiwan. We examined mycorrhizal development and the associated fungi in this species. Nine plants were collected in a naturally regenerated forest in central Taiwan. The plants were genetically identical in their internal transcribed spacer (ITS region, and their sequences matched the known sequence for P. morrisonensis. Fine roots of each plant were colonized by mycorrhizal fungi that formed mycorrhizas either with or without fungal mantles. DNA sequences of the ITS region of these fungi suggested that they belonged to mycorrhizal taxa that are common tree symbionts. Among them, members of Thelephoraceae were the dominant taxon in the host plants. These results indicate that P. morrisonensis is intimately associated with mycorrhizal fungi that might also connect with neighboring trees.

  1. Fungal and plant gene expression in the Tulasnella calospora-Serapias vomeracea symbiosis provides clues about nitrogen pathways in orchid mycorrhizas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fochi, Valeria; Chitarra, Walter; Kohler, Annegret; Voyron, Samuele; Singan, Vasanth R; Lindquist, Erika A; Barry, Kerrie W; Girlanda, Mariangela; Grigoriev, Igor V; Martin, Francis; Balestrini, Raffaella; Perotto, Silvia

    2017-01-01

    Orchids are highly dependent on their mycorrhizal fungal partners for nutrient supply, especially during early developmental stages. In addition to organic carbon, nitrogen (N) is probably a major nutrient transferred to the plant because orchid tissues are highly N-enriched. We know almost nothing about the N form preferentially transferred to the plant or about the key molecular determinants required for N uptake and transfer. We identified, in the genome of the orchid mycorrhizal fungus Tulasnella calospora, two functional ammonium transporters and several amino acid transporters but found no evidence of a nitrate assimilation system, in agreement with the N preference of the free-living mycelium grown on different N sources. Differential expression in symbiosis of a repertoire of fungal and plant genes involved in the transport and metabolism of N compounds suggested that organic N may be the main form transferred to the orchid host and that ammonium is taken up by the intracellular fungus from the apoplatic symbiotic interface. This is the first study addressing the genetic determinants of N uptake and transport in orchid mycorrhizas, and provides a model for nutrient exchanges at the symbiotic interface, which may guide future experiments. © 2016 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2016 New Phytologist Trust.

  2. Radiocaesium distribution in fruitbodies and mycorrhizae of fungi in Swedish forests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikolova, I.; Johanson, K. J.; Dahlberg, A.

    1995-01-01

    In Sweden, transfer of 137 Cs from the forest ecosystems to man seems to be a major part of the total 137 Cs transfer to man. There are three important pathways: by berries, by game animals and by mushrooms. In mushrooms the 137 Cs activity concentration vary between different species with at least one order of magnitude. There has been a suggestion that a large fraction of the 137 Cs in the forest soils might be bound in fungal mycelium. (author)

  3. Proteome changes in Oncidium sphacelatum (Orchidaceae) at different trophic stages of symbiotic germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valadares, R B S; Perotto, S; Santos, E C; Lambais, M R

    2014-07-01

    Mutualistic symbioses between plants and fungi are a widespread phenomenon in nature. Particularly in orchids, association with symbiotic fungi is required for seed germination and seedling development. During the initial stages of symbiotic germination, before the onset of photosynthesis, orchid protocorms are fully mycoheterotrophic. The molecular mechanisms involved in orchid symbiotic germination and development are largely unknown, but it is likely that changes in plant energy metabolism and defense-related responses play a central role in these processes. We have used 2D-LC-MS/MS coupled to isobaric tagging for relative and absolute quantification to identify proteins with differential accumulation in Oncidium sphacelatum at different stages of mycorrhizal protocorm development (achlorophyllous and green protocorms) after seed inoculation with a Ceratobasidium sp. isolate. We identified and quantified 88 proteins, including proteins putatively involved in energy metabolism, cell rescue and defense, molecular signaling, and secondary metabolism. Quantitative analysis showed that the expected changes in carbon metabolism in green protocorms were accompanied by enhanced accumulation of proteins involved in the modulation of reactive oxygen species homeostasis, defense-related responses, and phytoalexins and carotenoid biosynthesis. Our results suggest profound metabolic changes in orchid protocorms during the switch from the fully mycoheterotrophic to the photosynthetic stage. Part of these changes may be also related to the obligatory nature of the interaction with the endomycorrhizal fungus.

  4. Mycorrhizal compatibility and symbiotic seed germination of orchids from the Coastal Range and Andes in south central Chile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Hector; Valadares, Rafael; Contreras, Domingo; Bashan, Yoav; Arriagada, Cesar

    2017-04-01

    Little is known about Orchidaceae plants in Chile and their mycorrhizal associations, a key issue for designing protective actions for endangered species. We investigated root fungi from seven terrestrial orchid species to identify potential mycorrhizal fungi. The main characteristics of Rhizoctonia-like fungi were observed under light microscopy, and isolates were identified through PCR-ITS sequencing. Molecular identification of fungal sequences showed a high diversity of fungi colonizing roots. Fungal ability to germinate seeds of different orchids was determined in symbiotic germination tests; 24 fungal groups were isolated, belonging to the genera Tulasnella, Ceratobasidium, and Thanatephorus. Furthermore, dark septate and other endophytic fungi were identified. The high number of Rhizoctonia-like fungi obtained from adult orchids from the Coastal mountain range suggests that, after germination, these orchids may complement their nutritional demands through mycoheterotrophy. Nonetheless, beneficial associations with other endophytic fungi may also co-exist. In this study, isolated mycorrhizal fungi had the ability to induce seed germination at different efficiencies and with low specificity. Germin ation rates were low, but protocorms continued to develop for 60 days. A Tulasnella sp. isolated from Chloraea gavilu was most effective to induce seed germination of different species. The dark septate endophytic (DSE) fungi did not show any effect on seed development; however, their widespread occurrence in some orchids suggests a putative role in plant establishment.

  5. EFFECT OF DIESEL AND BIODIESEL ON THE GROWTH OF Brachiaria decumbens INOCULATED WITH ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dora Trejo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi have been found to be associated with plants useful in soil phytoremediation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of diesel and biodiesel in soil and sand on the growth of Brachiaria decumbens inoculated with mycorrhizae. Two experiments were carried out: one experiment in soil and another in sand. A two-level- factorial design with three factors was used (one on sterile and another on non-sterile soil, with and without mycorrhizae; and one with diesel and another with biodiesel. In sand, a two-factor design with two levels was used (with and without mycorrhizae and with diesel and biodiesel, both with three replications. NOVADIESEL, biodiesel and PEMEX diesel were use as contaminants, both at 7%. The fresh and dry weight of the plants and percentage of mycorrhizal colonization, were assessed 30 days after planting. In soil, biodiesel was more toxic and reduced the fresh and dry weights of plants, especially in non-sterile soil. Biodiesel yielded greater mycorrhizal colonization values that doubled those of the control. In sand, diesel was found to reduce three times the fresh and dry weights of plants, compared to the biodiesel. In sand diesel presented high values of mycorrhizal colonization in comparison with biodiesel.  Plants inoculated with mycorrhizal fungi exhibited better development than non-inoculated plants, even in the presence of contaminants.

  6. Mutualistic mycorrhiza-like symbiosis in the most ancient group of land plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Claire P; Franks, Peter J; Rees, Mark; Bidartondo, Martin I; Leake, Jonathan R; Beerling, David J

    2010-11-02

    Over 35 years ago, it was hypothesized that mutualistic symbiotic soil fungi assisted land plants in their initial colonization of terrestrial environments. This important idea has become increasingly established with palaeobotanical and molecular investigations dating the interactions between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and land plants to at least 400 Ma, but the functioning of analogous partnerships in 'lower' land plants remains unknown. In this study, we show with multifactorial experiments that colonization of a complex thalloid liverwort, a member of the most ancient extant clade of land plants, with AMF significantly promotes photosynthetic carbon uptake, growth and asexual reproduction. Plant fitness increased through fungal-enhanced acquisition of phosphorus and nitrogen from soil, with each plant supporting 100-400 m of AMF mycelia. A simulated CO(2)-rich atmosphere, similar to that of the Palaeozoic when land plants originated, significantly amplified the net benefits of AMF and likely selection pressures for establishment of the symbiosis. Our analyses provide essential missing functional evidence supporting AMF symbionts as drivers of plant terrestrialization in early Palaeozoic land ecosystems.

  7. Heavy metal pollution and genetic adaptations in ectomycorrhizal fungi

    OpenAIRE

    COLPAERT, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Heavy metal toxicity is a strong trigger for evolutionary adaptation in terrestrial biota that colonise metalliferous soils. Here, I will focus on the occurrence of metal tolerance in ectomycorrhizal fungi, the predominant group of root symbionts of pioneer trees that try to colonise severely polluted sites. A considerable amount of literature exists on metal-tolerant plants, which is in sharp contrast to what we know about the tolerance in the fungal symbiotic partners that associate with th...

  8. Strigolactones Stimulate Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi by Activating Mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Arnaud; Puech-Pagès, Virginie; Kiefer, Patrick; Gomez-Roldan, Victoria; Jauneau, Alain; Roy, Sébastien; Portais, Jean-Charles; Roux, Christophe; Bécard, Guillaume

    2006-01-01

    The association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi with plant roots is the oldest and ecologically most important symbiotic relationship between higher plants and microorganisms, yet the mechanism by which these fungi detect the presence of a plant host is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that roots secrete a branching factor (BF) that strongly stimulates branching of hyphae during germination of the spores of AM fungi. In the BF of Lotus, a strigolactone was found to be the active molecule. Strigolactones are known as germination stimulants of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche. In this paper, we show that the BF of a monocotyledonous plant, Sorghum, also contains a strigolactone. Strigolactones strongly and rapidly stimulated cell proliferation of the AM fungus Gigaspora rosea at concentrations as low as 10 −13 M. This effect was not found with other sesquiterperne lactones known as germination stimulants of parasitic weeds. Within 1 h of treatment, the density of mitochondria in the fungal cells increased, and their shape and movement changed dramatically. Strigolactones stimulated spore germination of two other phylogenetically distant AM fungi, Glomus intraradices and Gl. claroideum. This was also associated with a rapid increase of mitochondrial density and respiration as shown with Gl. intraradices. We conclude that strigolactones are important rhizospheric plant signals involved in stimulating both the pre-symbiotic growth of AM fungi and the germination of parasitic plants. PMID:16787107

  9. Strigolactones stimulate arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi by activating mitochondria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnaud Besserer

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The association of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi with plant roots is the oldest and ecologically most important symbiotic relationship between higher plants and microorganisms, yet the mechanism by which these fungi detect the presence of a plant host is poorly understood. Previous studies have shown that roots secrete a branching factor (BF that strongly stimulates branching of hyphae during germination of the spores of AM fungi. In the BF of Lotus, a strigolactone was found to be the active molecule. Strigolactones are known as germination stimulants of the parasitic plants Striga and Orobanche. In this paper, we show that the BF of a monocotyledonous plant, Sorghum, also contains a strigolactone. Strigolactones strongly and rapidly stimulated cell proliferation of the AM fungus Gigaspora rosea at concentrations as low as 10(-13 M. This effect was not found with other sesquiterperne lactones known as germination stimulants of parasitic weeds. Within 1 h of treatment, the density of mitochondria in the fungal cells increased, and their shape and movement changed dramatically. Strigolactones stimulated spore germination of two other phylogenetically distant AM fungi, Glomus intraradices and Gl. claroideum. This was also associated with a rapid increase of mitochondrial density and respiration as shown with Gl. intraradices. We conclude that strigolactones are important rhizospheric plant signals involved in stimulating both the pre-symbiotic growth of AM fungi and the germination of parasitic plants.

  10. Influence of mycorrhizal fungi (glomus intraradices) on survival of Salmonella and E.coli 0157:H7 in soil and translocation into romaine lettuce roots and shoot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern agriculture practices disrupt the natural symbiotic relationship that arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have with most vegetable plants, which may affect translocation of human pathogens into the plant and/or survival in the soil. AM-fungi are frequently utilized in organic farming to improv...

  11. Effect of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza with compost, vermicompost and sulfural geranole on some quantitative and qualitative characteristics of sesame (Sesamum indicum L. in a low input cropping system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P rezvani moghaddam

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction In recent years, by increasing human knowledge and using different technology on food production, human concerns have increased on safety of food products especially medicinal crops. In order to achieve healthy food production, application of ecological inputs such as organic and biological fertilizers are inevitable. Organic fertilizers are fertilizer compounds that contain one or more kinds of organic matter. They can improve the soil ability to hold water and nutrients. They create a beneficial environment for earthworms and microbial organisms that break the soil down into rich, fine humus (Motta & Magggiore, 2013. Compost is organic matter that has been decomposed and recycled as a fertilizer and soil amendment. Compost can greatly enhance the physical structure of soil. The addition of compost may provide greater drought resistance and more efficient water utilization. Vermicompost is the final product of composting organic material using different types of worms, such as red wigglers or earthworms, to create a homogenized blend of decomposed vegetable and food waste, bedding materials and manure. Vermicompost helps store nutrients and keeps them safe from leaching and irrigation, functioning to balance hormones within plant physiology, and adding beneficial biology to soil (Raja Sekar & Karmegan, 2010. Mycorrhiza arbuscular fungi are other coexist microorganisms that improves soil fertility, nutrients cycling and agroecosystem health. Mycorrhizal fungi are the most abundant organisms in agricultural soils. Many researchers have pointed to the positive roles of mycorrhizal fungi on plants growth characteristics. Despite of many researches on the effect of organic and biological fertilizers on different crops, information on the effects of these fertilizers for many medicinal plants is scarce, therefore, in this study the effect of simultaneous application of mycorrhiza with compost, vermicompost and sulfural geranole on some

  12. Unraveling the signaling and signal transduction mechanisms controlling arbuscular mycorrhiza development Desenredando os mecanismo de sinalização e transdução de sinais que controlam o desenvolvimento de micorrizas arbusculares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcio Rodrigues Lambais

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM are the most widespread symbiotic associations between plant roots and soil fungi. AM can contribute to increasing the survival and fitness of plants to limiting environments mostly due to their ability in improving nutrient uptake from the soil solution. Despite their ecological significance, the mechanisms controlling AM development and functioning are largely unknown. The obligate mutualistic nature of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF has hampered the advances on the understanding and application of the symbiosis. Significant alterations in the genetic programs of both symbionts are required for the successful establishment of an AM, and complex signaling and signal transduction mechanisms are likely involved. The analyses of legume mutants affected in the development of nitrogen fixing nodules and AM suggest that part of the signal transduction pathways involved in the regulation of both symbioses are conserved. Even though the use of genomics of model plants has helped to advance our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms in AM, identifying the signal molecules involved in plant-AMF communication and determining their transduction pathways is still essential for its biotechnological application in agriculture.As micorrizas arbusculares (MAs são as associações simbióticas entre raízes de plantas e fungos mais comuns na natureza. Elas podem contribuir para o aumento da sobrevivência e adaptação das plantas a ambientes limitantes, principalmente devido a sua maior capacidade em absorver nutrientes da solução do solo. Apesar de sua importância ecológica, os mecanismos que controlam o desenvolvimento e fisiologia das MAs são pouco conhecidos. A natureza mutualística obrigatória dos fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs tem limitado os avanços na compreensão e aplicação da simbiose. Alterações significativas nos programas genéticos de ambos simbiontes são necessárias para o

  13. The effect of soil carbon on symbiotic nitrogen fixation and symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil organic carbon (SOC) is the main attribute of high-quality soil. The amount of nitrogen fixed by Rhizobium symbiotically with Trifolium repens (white clover) is ultimately determined by the quality of the soil environment. The effect of SOC on the total number of symbiotic and saprophytic rhizobia was determined.

  14. Increasing diveristy of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in agroecosystems using specific cover crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall-planted cover crops provide a plant host for obligate symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) during otherwise fallow periods and thus may increase AMF numbers in agroecosystems. Increased AMF numbers should increase mycorrhizal colonization of the subsequent cash crops, which has been li...

  15. The nitrogen availability interferes with mycorrhiza-induced resistance against Botrytis cinerea in tomato

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Sanchez-Bel

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal plants are generally quite efficient in coping with environmental challenges. It has been shown that the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF can confer resistance against root and foliar pathogens, although the molecular mechanisms underlying such mycorrhiza-induced resistance (MIR are poorly understood. Tomato plants colonized with the AMF Rhizophagus irregularis display enhanced resistance against the necrotrophic foliar pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Leaves from arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM plants develop smaller necrotic lesions, mirrored also by a reduced levels of fungal biomass. A plethora of metabolic changes takes place in AMF colonized plants upon infection. Certain changes located in the oxylipin pathway indicate that several intermediaries are over-accumulated in the AM upon infection. AM plants react by accumulating higher levels of the vitamins folic acid and riboflavin, indolic derivatives and phenolic compounds such as ferulic acid and chlorogenic acid. Transcriptional analysis support the key role played by the LOX pathway in the shoots associated with MIR against B. cinerea.Interestingly, plants that have suffered a short period of nitrogen starvation appear to react by reprogramming their metabolic and genetic responses by prioritizing abiotic stress tolerance. Consequently, plants subjected to a transient nitrogen depletion become more susceptible to B. cinerea. Under these experimental conditions, MIR is severely affected although still functional. Many metabolic and transcriptional responses which are accumulated or activated by MIR such NRT2 transcript induction and OPDA and most Trp and indolic derivatives accumulation during MIR were repressed or reduced when tomato plants were depleted of N for 48 h prior infection. These results highlight the beneficial roles of AMF in crop protection by promoting induced resistance not only under optimal nutritional conditions but also buffering the susceptibility

  16. Impacts of manganese mining activity on the environment: interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera-Becerril, Facundo; Juárez-Vázquez, Lucía V; Hernández-Cervantes, Saúl C; Acevedo-Sandoval, Otilio A; Vela-Correa, Gilberto; Cruz-Chávez, Enrique; Moreno-Espíndola, Iván P; Esquivel-Herrera, Alfonso; de León-González, Fernando

    2013-02-01

    The mining district of Molango in the Hidalgo State, Mexico, possesses one of the largest deposits of manganese (Mn) ore in the world. This research assessed the impacts of Mn mining activity on the environment, particularly the interactions among soil, plants, and arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) at a location under the influence of an open Mn mine. Soils and plants from three sites (soil under maize, soil under native vegetation, and mine wastes with some vegetation) were analyzed. Available Mn in both soil types and mine wastes did not reach toxic levels. Samples of the two soil types were similar regarding physical, chemical, and biological properties; mine wastes were characterized by poor physical structure, nutrient deficiencies, and a decreased number of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) spores. Tissues of six plant species accumulated Mn at normal levels. AM was absent in the five plant species (Ambrosia psilostachya, Chenopodium ambrosoides, Cynodon dactylon, Polygonum hydropiperoides, and Wigandia urens) established in mine wastes, which was consistent with the significantly lower number of AMF spores compared with both soil types. A. psilostachya (native vegetation) and Zea mays showed mycorrhizal colonization in their root systems; in the former, AM significantly decreased Mn uptake. The following was concluded: (1) soils, mine wastes, and plant tissues did not accumulate Mn at toxic levels; (2) despite its poor physical structure and nutrient deficiencies, the mine waste site was colonized by at least five plant species; (3) plants growing in both soil types interacted with AMF; and (4) mycorrhizal colonization of A. psilostachya influenced low uptake of Mn by plant tissues.

  17. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced arsenic resistance of both white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Yan; Zhu Yongguan; Smith, F. Andrew; Wang Youshan; Chen Baodong

    2008-01-01

    In a compartmented cultivation system, white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), with their roots freely intermingled, or separated by 37 μm nylon mesh or plastic board, were grown together in an arsenic (As) contaminated soil. The influence of AM inoculation on plant growth, As uptake, phosphorus (P) nutrition, and plant competitions were investigated. Results showed that both plant species highly depended on mycorrhizas for surviving the As contamination. Mycorrhizal inoculation substantially improved plant P nutrition, and in contrast markedly decreased root to shoot As translocation and shoot As concentrations. It also showed that mycorrhizas affected the competition between the two co-existing plant species, preferentially benefiting the clover plants in term of nutrient acquisition and biomass production. Based on the present study, the role of AM fungi in plant adaptation to As contamination, and their potential use for ecological restoration of As contaminated soils are discussed. - Both white clover and ryegrass highly depend on the mycorrhizal associations for surviving heavy arsenic contamination

  18. Arbuscular mycorrhiza enhanced arsenic resistance of both white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) plants in an arsenic-contaminated soil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Yan; Zhu Yongguan [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China); Smith, F. Andrew [Soil and Land Systems, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Waite Campus, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA 5005 (Australia); Wang Youshan [Institute of Plant Nutrition and Resources, Beijing Academy of Agriculture and Forestry, Beijing 100089 (China); Chen Baodong [Department of Soil Environmental Science, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 18 Shuangqing Road, Beijing 100085 (China)], E-mail: bdchen@rcees.ac.cn

    2008-09-15

    In a compartmented cultivation system, white clover (Trifolium repens Linn.) and ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.), with their roots freely intermingled, or separated by 37 {mu}m nylon mesh or plastic board, were grown together in an arsenic (As) contaminated soil. The influence of AM inoculation on plant growth, As uptake, phosphorus (P) nutrition, and plant competitions were investigated. Results showed that both plant species highly depended on mycorrhizas for surviving the As contamination. Mycorrhizal inoculation substantially improved plant P nutrition, and in contrast markedly decreased root to shoot As translocation and shoot As concentrations. It also showed that mycorrhizas affected the competition between the two co-existing plant species, preferentially benefiting the clover plants in term of nutrient acquisition and biomass production. Based on the present study, the role of AM fungi in plant adaptation to As contamination, and their potential use for ecological restoration of As contaminated soils are discussed. - Both white clover and ryegrass highly depend on the mycorrhizal associations for surviving heavy arsenic contamination.

  19. Arum-type of arbuscular mycorrhizae, dark septate endophytes and Olpidium spp. in fine roots of container-grown seedlings of Sorbus torminalis (Rosaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman M. Bzdyk

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the mycorrhizal status of nursery seedlings of the wild service tree (Sorbus torminalis, which belongs to the Rosaceae family. Its mycorrhizal associations are still fragmentarily known, and data from the few existing studies indicate that it forms ectomycorrhizal symbiosis (ECM. We analyzed the degree of mycorrhizal colonization of thirty 2-year-old container-grown S. torminalis nursery seedlings, which belonged to three single-tree progenies. The roots were dominated by arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM, with the morphology of the Arum-type containing arbuscules, vesicles and hyphae; however, no ECM structures were found. The degree of root colonization of the analyzed seedlings by AM fungi was 83.6% and did not differ significantly between the three single-tree progenies. In addition to AM, structures of dark septate endophytes (0.7% and sporangia of Olpidium spp. (1.1% were found in wild service tree roots. In agreement with previous studies, we confirmed arbuscular mycorrhizae for S. torminalis. Moreover, this is the first report that roots of this Sorbus species show the Arum-type morphology of AM and are associated with Olpidium species.

  20. Distinguishing ectomycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi using carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiguo Hou

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ectomycorrhizal fungi, a group of widespread symbiotic fungi with plant, obtain carbon source from trees and improve plant mineral nutrient uptake with their widespread hyphal network. Ectomycorrhizal fungi can be used as inoculants to improve the survival rates of plantation. Saprophytic fungi use the nutrition from the debris of plant or animals, and it is difficult to distinguish the saprophytic and ectomycorrhizal fungi by morphological and anatomic methods. In this research, the differences of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions of these fungi were analyzed. The results showed that the abundances of 13C of were higher than those of ectomycorrhizal fungi and the abundances of 15N of saprophytic fungi were lower than those of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Such differences of stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions between ectomycorrhizal fungi and saprophytic fungi can be ascribed to their different nutrition sources and ecological functions. These results collectively indicate that stable carbon and nitrogen isotopic compositions are an effective proxy for distinguishing between ectomycorrhizal and saprophytic fungi.

  1. Symbiotic Stars in X-rays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna, G. J. M.; Sokoloski, J. L.; Mukai, K.; Nelson, T.

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, symbiotic binary systems in which a white dwarf accretes from a red giant were thought to be mainly a soft X-ray population. Here we describe the detection with the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Swift satellite of 9 white dwarf symbiotics that were not previously known to be X-ray sources and one that was previously detected as a supersoft X-ray source. The 9 new X-ray detections were the result of a survey of 41 symbiotic stars, and they increase the number of symbiotic stars known to be X-ray sources by approximately 30%. Swift/XRT detected all of the new X-ray sources at energies greater than 2 keV. Their X-ray spectra are consistent with thermal emission and fall naturally into three distinct groups. The first group contains those sources with a single, highly absorbed hard component, which we identify as probably coming from an accretion-disk boundary layer. The second group is composed of those sources with a single, soft X-ray spectral component, which likely arises in a region where low-velocity shocks produce X-ray emission, i.e. a colliding-wind region. The third group consists of those sources with both hard and soft X-ray spectral components. We also find that unlike in the optical, where rapid, stochastic brightness variations from the accretion disk typically are not seen, detectable UV flickering is a common property of symbiotic stars. Supporting our physical interpretation of the two X-ray spectral components, simultaneous Swift UV photometry shows that symbiotic stars with harder X-ray emission tend to have stronger UV flickering, which is usually associated with accretion through a disk. To place these new observations in the context of previous work on X-ray emission from symbiotic stars, we modified and extended the alpha/beta/gamma classification scheme for symbiotic-star X-ray spectra that was introduced by Muerset et al. based upon observations with the ROSAT satellite, to include a new sigma classification for sources with

  2. Arbuscular mycorrhiza reduces phytoextraction of uranium, thorium and other elements from phosphate rock

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roos, Per; Jakobsen, Iver

    2008-01-01

    Uptake of metals from uranium-rich phosphate rock was studied in Medicago truncatula plants grown in symbiosis with the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices or in the absence of mycorrhizas. Shoot concentrations of uranium and thorium were lower in mycorrhizal than in non......-mycorrhizal plants and root-to-shoot ratio of most metals was increased by mycorrhizas. This protective role of mycorrhizas was observed even at very high supplies of phosphate rock. In contrast, phosphorus uptake was similar at all levels of phosphate rock, suggesting that the P was unavailable to the plant......-fungus uptake systems. The results support the role of arbuscular mycorrhiza as being an important component in phytostabilization of uranium. This is the first study to report on mycorrhizal effect and the uptake and root-to-shoot transfer of thorium from phosphate rock. (c) 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights...

  3. The Recent Evolution of a Symbiotic Ion Channel in the Legume Family Altered Ion Conductance and Improved Functionality in Calcium Signaling[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Cosme, Ana; Han, Lu; Banba, Mari; Satyshur, Kenneth A.; Schleiff, Enrico; Parniske, Martin; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2012-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza and the rhizobia-legume symbiosis are two major root endosymbioses that facilitate plant nutrition. In Lotus japonicus, two symbiotic cation channels, CASTOR and POLLUX, are indispensable for the induction of nuclear calcium spiking, one of the earliest plant responses to symbiotic partner recognition. During recent evolution, a single amino acid substitution in DOES NOT MAKE INFECTIONS1 (DMI1), the POLLUX putative ortholog in the closely related Medicago truncatula, rendered the channel solo sufficient for symbiosis; castor, pollux, and castor pollux double mutants of L. japonicus were rescued by DMI1 alone, while both Lj-CASTOR and Lj-POLLUX were required for rescuing a dmi1 mutant of M. truncatula. Experimental replacement of the critical serine by an alanine in the selectivity filter of Lj-POLLUX conferred a symbiotic performance indistinguishable from DMI1. Electrophysiological characterization of DMI1 and Lj-CASTOR (wild-type and mutants) by planar lipid bilayer experiments combined with calcium imaging in Human Embryonic Kidney-293 cells expressing DMI1 (the wild type and mutants) suggest that the serine-to-alanine substitution conferred reduced conductance with a long open state to DMI1 and improved its efficiency in mediating calcium oscillations. We propose that this single amino acid replacement in the selectivity filter made DMI1 solo sufficient for symbiosis, thus explaining the selective advantage of this allele at the mechanistic level. PMID:22706284

  4. The recent evolution of a symbiotic ion channel in the legume family altered ion conductance and improved functionality in calcium signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkateshwaran, Muthusubramanian; Cosme, Ana; Han, Lu; Banba, Mari; Satyshur, Kenneth A; Schleiff, Enrico; Parniske, Martin; Imaizumi-Anraku, Haruko; Ané, Jean-Michel

    2012-06-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza and the rhizobia-legume symbiosis are two major root endosymbioses that facilitate plant nutrition. In Lotus japonicus, two symbiotic cation channels, CASTOR and POLLUX, are indispensable for the induction of nuclear calcium spiking, one of the earliest plant responses to symbiotic partner recognition. During recent evolution, a single amino acid substitution in DOES NOT MAKE INFECTIONS1 (DMI1), the POLLUX putative ortholog in the closely related Medicago truncatula, rendered the channel solo sufficient for symbiosis; castor, pollux, and castor pollux double mutants of L. japonicus were rescued by DMI1 alone, while both Lj-CASTOR and Lj-POLLUX were required for rescuing a dmi1 mutant of M. truncatula. Experimental replacement of the critical serine by an alanine in the selectivity filter of Lj-POLLUX conferred a symbiotic performance indistinguishable from DMI1. Electrophysiological characterization of DMI1 and Lj-CASTOR (wild-type and mutants) by planar lipid bilayer experiments combined with calcium imaging in Human Embryonic Kidney-293 cells expressing DMI1 (the wild type and mutants) suggest that the serine-to-alanine substitution conferred reduced conductance with a long open state to DMI1 and improved its efficiency in mediating calcium oscillations. We propose that this single amino acid replacement in the selectivity filter made DMI1 solo sufficient for symbiosis, thus explaining the selective advantage of this allele at the mechanistic level.

  5. Effects of mycorrhiza inoculation and different irrigation levels on yield, yield components and essential oil contents of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and ajwain (Trachyspermum ammi L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Koocheki

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Fertilizers are the key components which provide plant nutrients' needs in recent years (Omid Jangir & Sing, 1996; Kapoor et al., 2007. In many cases, using chemical fertilizers has different negative environmental effects such as soil, water and air pollution, which increase environmental hazardous and production costs (Jangir & Sing, 1996; Kapoor et al., 2007. Biological activities are markedly enhanced by microbial interactions in the rhizosphere of plants (Kapoor et al., 2007. Many investigators have successfully used mycorrhiza to increase the availability of immobilized phosphate and thus minimize the use of mineral fertilizers. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF can better enable a plant to withstand environmental stresses such as drought and salinity. AMF interacts with pathogens and other rhizosphere inhabitants which affect plant health and nutrition. More importantly, mycorrhizal fungi are capable of dissolving weakly soluble soil minerals, especially phosphate, by releasing acids or increasing CO2 partial pressure (Gupta et al., 2002; Gosling et al., 2006; Kapoor et al., 2007. Therefore, they have the ability to enhance host plant uptake of relatively immobile nutrients particularly P, S and Zn. Limited water supply is also another major environmental constraint in the productivity of crop and medicinal plants. Moisture deficiency induces various physiological and metabolic responses such as stomatal closure, decline in growth rate and photosynthesis (Flexas and Medrano, 2002. The results of Baher et al. (2002 showed that greater soil water stress decreased plant height and total fresh and dry weight of Satureja hortensis. Materials and Methods In order to study the effects of mycorrhiza inoculation and different irrigation levels on the growth, quantitative and qualitative yield of fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill. and ajwain (Trachyspermum ammi L., a field experiment was conducted as factorial based on randomized

  6. Morphological and molecular characterization of selected Ramaria mycorrhizae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouhra, Eduardo R; Horton, Thomas R; Cazares, Efren; Castellano, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Ramaria species are conspicuous mycorrhizal symbionts of conifers in the Pacific Northwest. Here we collected and identified sporocarps and associated ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria acrisiccescens Marr & Stuntz, R. cyaneigranosa Marr & Stuntz, R. sandaracina Marr & Stuntz, R. celerivirescens Marr & Stuntz, and R. flavobrunnescens var. aromatica Marr & Stuntz. An internal transcribed spacer (ITS)- restriction fragment length polymorphism pattern was observed for each of the Ramaria species and used as a diagnostic tool to support the identification of mycorrhizae occurring in mats below the sporocarps. We provide a description of ectomycorrhizae of Ramaria, which exhibit similar macro- and microscopic characteristics such as ramification pattern, coloration, abundance of mycelial strands and emanating hyphae, mantle morphology and chemical reactions of mantle and mycelial strands with KOH, FeSO4 and Melzer's reagent. Sequences of the ITS region for each of the species are deposited in the GenBank.

  7. Metal content in fruit-bodies and mycorrhizas of Pisolithus arrhizus from zinc wastes in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Turnau

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Pisolithus arrhizus has been selected for investigation as one of the ectomycorrhizal species most resistant to stress factors. Metal content in fruit-bodies and mycorrhizas was estimated to evaluate their role as bioindicators and to check whether mycorrhizas have any special properties for heavy metal accumulation. Fruit-bodies and mycorrhizas were collected from zinc wastes in Katowice-Wełnowiec and analyzed using conventional atomic absorption spectroscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy accompanying scanning electron microscopy. Differences in tendencies to accumulate metals within sporophores and mycorrhizas were found. The fruit-bodies accumulated Al (up to 640 µg g-1, while high concentrations of Al, Zn, Fe, Ca and Si were noted in the outer mantle of the mycorrhizas. in the material secreted and in the mycelium wali. The content of elements varied depending on the agę of mycorrhizas. The ability of extramatrical mycelium and hyphae forming mycorrhizal mantle to immobilize potentially toxic elements might indicate biofiltering properties though thc next step should include investigations on ability of the fungus to prevent element uptake by the plant.

  8. Symbiots: Conceptual Interventions Into Urban Energy Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergström, Jenny; Mazé, Ramia; Redströmand, Johan

    2009-01-01

    Symbiots set out to examine values such as ease-of-use, comfort, and rationality assumed within conventions of ‘good design’, in order to expose issues related to energy consumption and current human- (versus eco-) centered design paradigms. Exploring re-interpretations of graphical patterns......, architectural configura- tions and electrical infrastructure typical in Swedish cities, Symbiots takes the form of a photo series in the genre of contemporary hy- per-real art photography. Painting a vivid pic- ture of alternatives to current local priorities around energy consumption, the three design concepts...

  9. The Effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi on Nitrogen Concentration of Berseem Clover in Contaminated Soil with Cadmium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Aram

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi on nitrogen concentration of berseem clover were examined in contaminated soil with cadmium. Examined factors included: levels of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inoculation (Glomus mosseae (With and without inoculation, and different levels of soil contamination by cadmium (0, 5, 10, 20, 40 and 80 mg.kg-1. The results showed that the effects of cadmium levels and mycorrhiza fungi were significant on nitrogen concentration (P≤ 0.01.  Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased nitrogen concentration in the root and aerial plant 30% and 40.3% respectively. Also cadmium in concentration of 80 mg.kg-1 reduced nitrogen concentration in root and aerial plant 28.3% and 35% respectively.

  10. Effect of the single and combined inoculation with Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi (AMF) and Plant Growth Promoting Rhizobacteria (PGPR) in micropropagated blackberry plants (Rubus glaucus L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Urley Adrian Pérez Moncada; María Margarita Ramírez Gómez; Yimmy Alexander Zapata Narváez; Juana Marcela Córdoba Sánchez

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to obtain blackberry seedlings of three ecotypes of blackberry (monterrico, sin espinas and castilla), from in vitro cultures inoculated individually and combined with Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Fungi (AMF) Glomus sp. (GEV02) and plant growth promoting rhizobacteria strains of Pseudomonas migulae (Pf014) and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens (Bs006). The growth variables were aerial and root length (cm), leaf and ro...

  11. The effect of potassium and mycorrhiza on growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrew

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I GEDE TIRTA

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available The few and shallow roots caused slow growth of vanilla seedling. Mycorrhiza may increased the absorption of water and nutrients, while potassium may increased the rate of growth and strength of seedlings. This study was conducted at Sambangan Village, Buleleng, Bali in 2003 (April-Agustus 2003. The experiment was done in polybag and was arranged in Randomized Block Design with three replications. The treatments were consisted of two factors. The first factor was the rates of KCl fertilizer ( 0, 100 and 200 kg ha-1 or 0, 0,10 and 0,20 9 plant-1 and the second factor was the rates of mycorrhiza (0, 20 and 30 g plant-1. The aim of the research to study interactions between potassium and mycorrhiza and The optimum dosage the mycorrhiza on growth of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrew. The resultes showed that there were interactions between potassium and mycorrhiza on fresh weight of the new shoot, root length and fresh root weight. The optimum dosage of the mycorrhiza was 20 g plant-1 with new shoot fresh weight was 25.63 g plant-1. The longest root (24.67 cm plant-1 was observed at the treatment without potasium with 20 g plant-1 mycorrhiza and this was 23% longer than control (19.93 cm plant-1. The highest fresh root weight (2.48 g plant-1 was observed at the dosage of 200 kg KCl ha-1 and 20 g mycorrhiza plant-1 and that was 55% heavier than control (1.60 g plant-1. The leaf number of the plant with 20 g plant-1 mycorrhiza was 6.22 and that was 18% more than control with leaf number 5.25. The total fresh weight of the seedling with 20 g plant-1 mycorrhiza was 86.74 g plant-1or 15% higher compared with control (75.18 g plant-1. The dosage of 100 kg KCl ha-1 increased the K content of the plant (2.45%K or 35% higher than control (1.81%K.

  12. Genomic DNA extraction and barcoding of endophytic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, Patricia L; Hennell, James R; Sucher, Nikolaus J

    2012-01-01

    Endophytes live inter- and/or intracellularly inside healthy aboveground tissues of plants without causing disease. Endophytic fungi are found in virtually every vascular plant species examined. The origins of this symbiotic relationship between endophytes go back to the emergence of vascular plants. Endophytic fungi receive nutrition and protection from their hosts while the plants benefit from the production of fungal secondary metabolites, which enhance the host plants' resistance to herbivores, pathogens, and various abiotic stresses. Endophytic fungi have attracted increased interest as potential sources of secondary metabolites with agricultural, industrial, and medicinal use. This chapter provides detailed protocols for isolation of genomic DNA from fungal endophytes and its use in polymerase chain reaction-based amplification of the internal transcribed spacer region between the conserved flanking regions of the small and large subunit of ribosomal RNA for barcoding purposes.

  13. Impact of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on uranium accumulation by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Boulois, H Dupré; Joner, E J; Leyval, C; Jakobsen, I; Chen, B D; Roos, P; Thiry, Y; Rufyikiri, G; Delvaux, B; Declerck, S

    2008-05-01

    Contamination by uranium (U) occurs principally at U mining and processing sites. Uranium can have tremendous environmental consequences, as it is highly toxic to a broad range of organisms and can be dispersed in both terrestrial and aquatic environments. Remediation strategies of U-contaminated soils have included physical and chemical procedures, which may be beneficial, but are costly and can lead to further environmental damage. Phytoremediation has been proposed as a promising alternative, which relies on the capacity of plants and their associated microorganisms to stabilize or extract contaminants from soils. In this paper, we review the role of a group of plant symbiotic fungi, i.e. arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which constitute an essential link between the soil and the roots. These fungi participate in U immobilization in soils and within plant roots and they can reduce root-to-shoot translocation of U. However, there is a need to evaluate these observations in terms of their importance for phytostabilization strategies.

  14. Learning fair play in industrial symbiotic relations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yazan, Devrim Murat; Yazdanpanah, Vahid; Fraccascia, Luca; Mancuso, Erika; Fantin, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide practical decision support to managers in firms involved in Industrial Symbiotic Relations (ISRs) in terms of strategy development and test the hypothesis that in the long-term, playing a fair strategy for sharing obtainable ISR-related benefits is dominant. We employ

  15. A report of symbiotic Siphonostomatoida (Copepoda) infecting ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Collected copepod specimens were fixed and preserved in 70% ethanol and studied with the stereo- and light microscopes. Most of the examined hosts (38) were infected with symbiotic siphonostomatoids. Ten different species representing five families were identified. Of these, seven represent new host records while four ...

  16. Screening for symbiotically effective and ecologically competitive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was initiated to isolate and characterize chickpea rhizobia for their symbiotic effectiveness adapted to local environmental conditions. A total of seventy root nodule bacteria were isolated from different sampling sites in central and northern Ethiopia of which only 52% were rhizobia and the remaining were ...

  17. Clade identification of symbiotic zooxanthellae of dominant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tidal pools have harsh conditions due to lack of nutrients, food and pronounced changes in physical conditions such as pH, salinity and temperature, hence the study of symbiotic zooxanthellae on coral reefs of tidal pool seems to be necessary. Samples of five coral species that include Siderastrea savignyana, ...

  18. Screening soybean genotypes for promiscuous symbiotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A greenhouse experiment was conducted at Makerere University Agricultural Research Institute, Kabanyolo (MUARIK) with the aim of screening of soybean germplasm for promiscuous symbiotic association with Bradyrhizobium sp. in order to identify genotypes with potential to be used as parents to initiate a breeding ...

  19. Arbuscular mycorrhiza of Deschampsia cespitosa (Poaceae at different soil depths in highly metal-contaminated site in southern Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Gucwa-Przepióra

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This study presents root colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa growing in the immediate vicinity of a former Pb/Zn smelter by arbuscular mycorhizal fungi (AMF and dark septated endophytes (DSE at different soil depths. AMF spores and species distribution in soil profile were also assessed. Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM and DSE were found in D. cespitosa roots at all investigated soil levels. However, mycorrhizal colonization in topsoil was extremely low with sporadically occurring arbuscules. AM parameters: frequency of mycorrhization of root fragments (F%, intensity of root cortex colonization (M%, intensity of colonization within individual mycorrhizal roots (m%, and arbuscule abundance in the root system (A% were markedly higher at 20–40, 40–60 cm soil levels and differed in a statistically significant manner from AM parameters from 0–10 and 10–20 cm layers. Mycorrhizal colonization was negatively correlated with bioavailable Cd, Pb and Zn concentrations. The number of AMF spores in topsoil was very low and increased with soil depth (20–40 and 40–60 cm. At the study area spores of three morphologically distinctive AMF species were found: Archaeospora trappei, Funneliformis mosseae and Scutellospora dipurpurescens. The fourth species Glomus tenue colonized roots of D. cespitosa and was observed in the root cortex at 20–40 and 40–60 soil depth, however, its spores were not found at the site.

  20. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAJA RISHI

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Kumar R, Tapwal A, Pandey S, Rishi R, Borah D. 2013. Observations on arbuscular mycorrhiza associated with important edible tuberous plants grown in wet evergreen forest in Assam, India. Biodiversitas 14: 67-72. Non-timber forest products constitute an important source of livelihood for rural households from forest fringe communities across the world. Utilization of wild edible tuber plants is an integral component of their culture. Mycorrhizal associations influence the establishment and production of tuber plants under field conditions.The aim of present study is to explore the diversity and arbuscular mycorrhizal (AMF colonization of wild edible tuber plants grown in wet evergreen forest of Assam, India. A survey was conducted in 2009-10 in Sunaikuchi, Khulahat, and Bura Mayong reserved forest of Morigaon district of Assam to determine the AMF spore population in rhizosphere soils and root colonization of 14 tuberous edible plants belonging to five families. The results revealed AMF colonization of all selected species in all seasons. The percent colonization and spore count was less in summer, moderate in winter and highest in rainy season. Seventeen species of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi were recorded in four genera viz. Acaulospora (7 species, Glomus (5 species, Sclerocystis (3 species and Gigaspora (2 species.

  1. Major fungal lineages are derived from lichen symbiotic ancestors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutzoni, F; Pagel, M; Reeb, V

    2001-06-21

    About one-fifth of all known extant fungal species form obligate symbiotic associations with green algae, cyanobacteria or with both photobionts. These symbioses, known as lichens, are one way for fungi to meet their requirement for carbohydrates. Lichens are widely believed to have arisen independently on several occasions, accounting for the high diversity and mixed occurrence of lichenized and non-lichenized (42 and 58%, respectively) fungal species within the Ascomycota. Depending on the taxonomic classification chosen, 15-18 orders of the Ascomycota include lichen-forming taxa, and 8-11 of these orders (representing about 60% of the Ascomycota species) contain both lichenized and non-lichenized species. Here we report a phylogenetic comparative analysis of the Ascomycota, a phylum that includes greater than 98% of known lichenized fungal species. Using a Bayesian phylogenetic tree sampling methodology combined with a statistical model of trait evolution, we take into account uncertainty about the phylogenetic tree and ancestral state reconstructions. Our results show that lichens evolved earlier than believed, and that gains of lichenization have been infrequent during Ascomycota evolution, but have been followed by multiple independent losses of the lichen symbiosis. As a consequence, major Ascomycota lineages of exclusively non-lichen-forming species are derived from lichen-forming ancestors. These species include taxa with important benefits and detriments to humans, such as Penicillium and Aspergillus.

  2. Novel root-fungus symbiosis in Ericaceae: sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza formed by a hitherto undescribed basidiomycete with affinities to Trechisporales.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Vohník

    Full Text Available Ericaceae (the heath family are widely distributed calcifuges inhabiting soils with inherently poor nutrient status. Ericaceae overcome nutrient limitation through symbiosis with ericoid mycorrhizal (ErM fungi that mobilize nutrients complexed in recalcitrant organic matter. At present, recognized ErM fungi include a narrow taxonomic range within the Ascomycota, and the Sebacinales, basal Hymenomycetes with unclamped hyphae and imperforate parenthesomes. Here we describe a novel type of basidiomycetous ErM symbiosis, termed 'sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza', discovered in two habitats in mid-Norway as a co-dominant mycorrhizal symbiosis in Vaccinium spp. The basidiomycete forming sheathed ErM possesses clamped hyphae with perforate parenthesomes, produces 1- to 3-layer sheaths around terminal parts of hair roots and colonizes their rhizodermis intracellularly forming hyphal coils typical for ErM symbiosis. Two basidiomycetous isolates were obtained from sheathed ErM and molecular and phylogenetic tools were used to determine their identity; they were also examined for the ability to form sheathed ErM and lignocellulolytic potential. Surprisingly, ITS rDNA of both conspecific isolates failed to amplify with the most commonly used primer pairs, including ITS1 and ITS1F + ITS4. Phylogenetic analysis of nuclear LSU, SSU and 5.8S rDNA indicates that the basidiomycete occupies a long branch residing in the proximity of Trechisporales and Hymenochaetales, but lacks a clear sequence relationship (>90% similarity to fungi currently placed in these orders. The basidiomycete formed the characteristic sheathed ErM symbiosis and enhanced growth of Vaccinium spp. in vitro, and degraded a recalcitrant aromatic substrate that was left unaltered by common ErM ascomycetes. Our findings provide coherent evidence that this hitherto undescribed basidiomycete forms a morphologically distinct ErM symbiosis that may occur at significant levels under natural conditions, yet

  3. Anastomosis behavior differs between asymbiotic and symbiotic hyphae of Rhizophagus clarus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purin, Sonia; Morton, Joseph B

    2013-01-01

    The life history of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, Glomeromycota) consists of a short asymbiotic phase when spores germinate and a longer symbiotic phase where hyphae form a network within roots and subsequently in the rhizosphere. Hyphal anastomosis contributes to colony formation, yet this process has been studied mostly in the asymbiotic phase rather than in mycorrhizal plants because of methodological limitations. We sought to compare patterns of anastomosis during each phase of fungal growth by measuring hyphal fusions in genetically identical and different single spore isolates of Rhizophagus clarus from different environments and geographic locations. These isolates were genotyped with two anonymous markers of microsatellite-flanking regions. Anastomosis of hyphae from germinating spores was examined in axenic Petri dishes. A rhizohyphatron consisting of agar-coated glass slides bridging single or paired mycorrhizal sorghum plants allowed evaluation of anastomosis of symbiotic hyphae. Anastomosis of hyphae within a colony, defined here as a mycelium from an individual germinating spore or from mycorrhizal roots of one plant, occurred with similar frequencies (8-38%). However, anastomosis between paired colonies was observed in germinating spores from either genetically identical or different isolates, but it was never detected in symbiotic hyphae. The frequency of anastomosis in asymbiotic hyphae from paired interactions was low, occurring in fewer than 6% of hyphal contacts. These data suggest that anastomosis is relatively unconstrained when interactions occur within a colony but is confined to asymbiotic hyphae when interactions occur between paired colonies. This pattern of behavior suggests that asymbiotic and symbiotic phases of mycelium development by R. clarus may differ in function. Anastomosis in the asymbiotic phase may provide brief opportunities for gene flow between populations of this and possibly other AMF species.

  4. Micorriza arbuscular e rizóbios no enraizamento e nutrição de mudas de angico-vermelho Arbuscular mycorrhizae and rhizobium in rooting and nutrition of angico-vermelho seedlings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poliana Coqueiro Dias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar o efeito da inoculação dos fungos micorrízicos arbusculares (FMAs e rizóbio no enraizamento, crescimento e nutrição de mudas de angico-vermelho (Anadenanthera macrocarpa (Benth Brenan propagadas via miniestaquia. Foram utilizadas seis progênies, das quais foram confeccionadas miniestacas com um par de folhas inteiras, bem como tubetes de 55 cm³ contendo substrato comercial Bioplant®. Foram testados quatro tratamentos: 8 kg m-3 de superfosfato simples (SS misturados ao substrato; 4 kg m-3 de SS misturados ao substrato; 4 kg m-3 de SS misturados ao substrato e adição de suspensão contendo rizóbios; e 4 kg m-3 de SS e adição de suspensão contendo rizóbios e 5 g de solo contendo esporos de FMAs. Não houve interação entre os tratamentos para percentagem de sobrevivência das miniestacas e percentagem de miniestacas com raízes observadas na extremidade inferior do tubete, na saída da casa de vegetação (30 dias e da casa de sombra (40 dias, provavelmente em função do sistema radicular ainda estar em formação. Houve diferenças entre as progênies para percentagem de sobrevivência das miniestacas, percentagem de miniestacas com raízes observadas na extremidade inferior do tubete, altura, diâmetro de colo e massa seca da parte aérea. As avaliações das características de crescimento das miniestacas enraizadas, principalmente com relação à sobrevivência a pleno sol (140 dias, evidenciam a eficiência dos rizóbios e FMAs na produção de mudas desta espécie. Conclui-se que a associação simbiótica com rizóbio e/ou FMA favorece a produção de mudas de A. macrocarpa via miniestaquia.The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of inoculation of arbuscular mycorrhizae fungi (AMF and rhizobium on rooting, growth and nutrition of seedlings of angico-red (Anadenanthera macrocarpa (Benth Brenan propagated by minicutting. Six progenies were used, of which were prepared

  5. Morphological characterization of the mycorrhiza formed by Helianthemum almeriense Pau with Terfezia claveryi Chatin and Picoa lefebvrei (Pat.) Maire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutiérrez, A; Morte, A; Honrubia, M

    2003-12-01

    This work presents the first anatomical description of the mycorrhizal systems of Helianthemum almeriense, and of the structure and ultrastructure of the mycorrhizae formed by this plant species with the ascomycetes Terfezia claveryi and Picoa lefebvrei. Four different mycorrhizal systems are described, the club-shaped mycorrhiza being the most abundant. The type of mycorrhiza formed depended on the mycorrhiza culture conditions, but not on the fungal species. For both fungal species, H. almeriense formed an endomycorrhiza in natural field conditions, an ecto- and ectendomycorrhiza without a sheath in pot cultures, and an ectomycorrhiza with a characteristic sheath and Hartig net in in vitro cultures. This is the first report of a typical sheath in Helianthemum-desert truffle mycorrhizal associations. The results support the idea that culture conditions can induce changes in mycorrhiza morphology and that there is no clear barrier between the two main types of mycorrhiza organization in Helianthemum species. The ultrastructural study confirmed the regular presence of T. claveryi intracellular hyphae in direct contact with the host wall, a localization which seems to be a characteristic of the T. claveryi mycorrhiza organization. The P. lefebvrei mycorrhiza organization was characterized by intracellular hyphae with large amounts of electron-dense globules, probably with a lipidic content, and a warty ornamentation on the wall of the root external hyphae.

  6. Effects of arbuscular mycorrhiza inoculation on growth and yield of tomato (Lycopersicum esculentum Mill. under salinity stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R.R. Damaiyanti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective of the research was to study the effect mycorrhiza on growth and yield of tomato. The experiment was conducted in screen house 14 m x 10.5 m, in Pasuruan on November 2013 until March 2014, The experiment was conducted as a factorial randomized complete design. The first factor was dose of mycorrhiza (without mycorrhiza, 5 g mycorrhiza, 10 g mycorrhiza, and 20 g mycorrhiza. The second factor was the salinity stress level (without NaCl, 2500 ppm NaCl, 5000 ppm NaCl, and 7500 ppm NaCl. The results showed that salinity stress at the level 7500 ppm decreased the amount of fruit by 30.84% and fresh weight per hectare decreased by 51.72%. Mycorrhizal application was not able to increase the growth and yield in saline stress conditions; it was shown by the level of infection and the number of spores on the roots of tomato plants lower the salinity level 5000 ppm and 7500 ppm. But separately, application of 20 g mycorrhiza enhanced plant growth, such as plant height, leaf area, leaf number and proline. Application of 20 g mycorrhiza increased the yield by 35.99%.

  7. Effect of mycorrhiza on growth criteria and phosphorus nutrition of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. under different phosphorus application rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Fatih Ergin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, effect of mycorrhiza on growth criteria and phosphorus nutrition of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. under different phosphorus fertilization rates were investigated. Phosphorus were added into growing media as 0, 50, 100 and 200 mg P2O5/kg with and without mycorrhiza applications. Phosphorus applications significantly increased yield criteria of lettuce according to the control treatment statistically. Mycorrhiza application also significantly increased plant diameter, plant dry weight and phosphor uptake by plant. The highest phosphorus uptakes by plants were determined in 200 mg P2O5/kg treatments as 88.8 mg P/pot with mycorrhiza and 83.1 mg P/pot without mycorrhiza application. In the control at 0 doses of phosphorus with mycorrhiza treatment, phosphorus uptake (69.9 mg P/pot, edible weight (84.36 g, dry weight (8.64 g and leaf number (28 of lettuce were higher than that (47.7 mg P/pot, 59.33 g, 6.75 g and 20, respectively in the control without mycorrhiza application. It was determined that mycorrhiza had positive effect on growth criteria and phosphorus nutrition by lettuce plant, and this effect decreased at higher phosphorus application rates.

  8. Mycorrhizae on dipterocarps in rubber agroforests (RAF) in Sumatra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tata, M.H.L.

    2008-01-01

    In tropical lowland forests, which dominated by trees of Dipterocarpaceae family, trees and fungi are strongly linked, through ectomycorrhiza (EcM) formation. However, as part of rapid deforestation and forest transformation, mixed dipterocarp forests have been replaced by other vegetation and land

  9. Oecologie van paddestoelen en schimmels 3. Arbusculaire mycorrhiza schimmels

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekkers, Th.B.M.

    1995-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) occur in symbiosis with a wide range of host plants and play an important role in natura! and agricultural ecosystems . AMF belang to six genera in three families in the order Glomales. Spore characteristics and differences in sequence of nucleic acids are used for

  10. Mycorrhizas and global environmental change: Research at different scales

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staddon, P.L.; Heinemeyer, A.; Fitter, A.H.

    2002-01-01

    of the ubiquitous mycorrhizal fungal root symbionts has received limited attention. Most of the research on the effects of GEC on mycorrhizal fungi has been pot-based with a few field (especially monoculture) studies. A major question that arises in all these studies is whether the GEC effects on the mycorrhizal...

  11. Physical Structure of Four Symbiotic Binaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    Disk accretion powers many astronomical objects, including pre-main sequence stars, interacting binary systems, and active galactic nuclei. Unfortunately, models developed to explain the behavior of disks and their surroundings - boundary layers, jets, and winds - lack much predictive power, because the physical mechanism driving disk evolution - the viscosity - is not understood. Observations of many types of accreting systems are needed to constrain the basic physics of disks and provide input for improved models. Symbiotic stars are an attractive laboratory for studying physical phenomena associated with disk accretion. These long period binaries (P(sub orb) approx. 2-3 yr) contain an evolved red giant star, a hot companion, and an ionized nebula. The secondary star usually is a white dwarf accreting material from the wind of its red giant companion. A good example of this type of symbiotic is BF Cygni: our analysis shows that disk accretion powers the nuclear burning shell of the hot white dwarf and also manages to eject material perpendicular to the orbital plane (Mikolajewska, Kenyon, and Mikolajewski 1989). The hot components in other symbiotic binaries appear powered by tidal overflow from a very evolved red giant companion. We recently completed a study of CI Cygni and demonstrated that the accreting secondary is a solar-type main sequence star, rather than a white dwarf (Kenyon et aL 1991). This project continued our study of symbiotic binary systems. Our general plan was to combine archival ultraviolet and optical spectrophotometry with high quality optical radial velocity observations to determine the variation of line and continuum sources as functions of orbital phase. We were very successful in generating orbital solutions and phasing UV+optical spectra for five systems: AG Dra, V443 Her, RW Hya, AG Peg, and AX Per. Summaries of our main results for these systems appear below. A second goal of our project was to consider general models for the

  12. Effects of symbiotic bacteria on chemical sensitivity of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manakul, Patcharaporn; Peerakietkhajorn, Saranya; Matsuura, Tomoaki; Kato, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Hajime

    2017-07-01

    The crustacean zooplankton Daphnia magna has been widely used for chemical toxicity tests. Although abiotic factors have been well documented in ecotoxicological test protocols, biotic factors that may affect the sensitivity to chemical compounds remain limited. Recently, we identified symbiotic bacteria that are critical for the growth and reproduction of D. magna. The presence of symbiotic bacteria on Daphnia raised the question as to whether these bacteria have a positive or negative effect on toxicity tests. In order to evaluate the effects of symbiotic bacteria on toxicity tests, bacteria-free Daphnia were prepared, and their chemical sensitivities were compared with that of Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria based on an acute immobilization test. The Daphnia with symbiotic bacteria showed higher chemical resistance to nonylphenol, fenoxycarb, and pentachlorophenol than bacteria-free Daphnia. These results suggested potential roles of symbiotic bacteria in the chemical resistance of its host Daphnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Changes in mycorrhiza development in maize induced by crop management practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavito, M.E.; Miller, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    mays L.) or a non-host (canola, Brassica napus L.) crop, and all of them with maize for the second year. Tillage and P fertilization treatments were applied to the plots in the second year. Mycorrhiza development in maize was measured in pot culture bioassays conducted before planting and after harvest...... of the previous and the subsequent crops, and in the field during the second crop season. Previous cropping of a soil with canola (Brassica napus L.), a non-host plant species, delayed mycorrhiza development of maize in a bioassay conducted with that soil in comparison with a previous cropping cycle with maize...

  14. Changes in host-mycorrhiza relationships revealed by stable isotopes after naturally-induced thinning of the stand: case study on Tuber aestivum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrichkova, Olga; Lauteri, Marco; Ciolfi, Marco; Chiocchini, Francesca; Paris, Pierluigi; Pisanelli, Andrea; Portarena, Silvia; Brugnoli, Enrico

    2016-04-01

    Terrestrial plants overcome nutrients and water limitations by forming mutualistic associations with mycorrhizal fungi. Fungi, in return, take advantage from the carbohydrates supplied by the host. Some mycorrhizal fruit bodies, like that of Tuber spp., have a peculiar gastronomic value with many efforts being undertaken to predict and enhance their productivity. However, many issues of truffle-producing mycorrhizal ecology are still poorly understood, in particular optimal conditions favoring fruit formation, potential host plants and host-mycorrhiza relationships. In this study, we tested the applicability of stable isotope measurements under natural abundance to identify the plants which likely host the mycorrhiza of Tuber aestivum and to characterize host-mycorrhizal nutrient, water and carbohydrate exchange under plant natural growing conditions and with the change of the forest cover after naturally occurred thinning. For these purposes, sampling of the fruit bodies of T. aestivum was performed during the growing season 2011 in a mixed broadleaved-coniferous forest in central Italy (initially the site was a manmade pine plantation). Nine truffle-producing parcels were identified with five being composed of the original Pinus pinaster -dominated vegetation and four in which pine was replaced by broadleaf species after both wind-induced thinning and natural dieback of pine trees. Seasonal variation of δ13C, δ15N and δ18O were analyzed in the fungal material, in the surrounding soil and in the plant material of the potential host species (xylem water in the trunk, branches and leaves, recently assimilated carbohydrates in phloem and leaves). The results showed a possibility of the identification of the mycorrhizal host species applying isotope analyses, with mycorrhiza receiving most part of the carbohydrates from the pine in pine-dominated parcels. Interestingly, in thinned parcels, the truffle bodies maintained isotope composition similar to bodies gathered

  15. The role of fungal symbiosis in the adaptation of plants to high stress environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Russell J.; Redman, Regina S.; Henson, Joan M.

    2004-01-01

    All plants studied in natural ecosystemsare symbiotic with fungi that either resideentirely (endophytes) or partially(mycorrhizae) within plants. Thesesymbioses appear to adapt to biotic andabiotic stresses and may be responsible forthe survival of both plant hosts and fungalsymbionts in high stress habitats. Here wedescribe the role of symbiotic fungi inplant stress tolerance and present astrategy based on adaptive symbiosis topotentially mitigate the impacts of globalchange on plant communities.

  16. Aerobiology of the built environment: Synergy between Legionella and fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alum, Absar; Isaacs, Galahad Zachariah

    2016-09-02

    The modern built environment (BE) design creates unique ecological niches ideal for the survival and mutual interaction of microbial communities. This investigation focused on the synergistic relations between Legionella and the fungal species commonly found in BEs and the impact of these synergistic relationships on the survival and transmission of Legionella. A field study was conducted to identify the types and concentrations of fungi in BEs. The fungal isolates purified from BEs were cocultured with Legionella to study their synergistic association. Cocultured Legionella cells were aerosolized in an air-tight chamber to evaluate the efficacy of ultraviolet (UV) to inactivate these cells. Aspergillus, Alternaria, and Cladosporium were the most common fungi detected in samples that tested positive for Legionella. After coculturing, Legionella cells were detected inside fungal hyphae. The microscopic observations of Legionella internalization in fungal hyphae were confirmed by molecular analyses. UV disinfection of the aerosolized Legionella cells that were cocultured with fungi indicated that fungal spores and propagules act as a shield against UV radiation. The shield effect of fungal spores on Legionella cells was quantified at >2.5 log10. This study provides the first evidence, to our knowledge, of Legionella cell presence inside fungi detected in an indoor environment. This symbiotic relationship with fungi results in longer survival of Legionella under ambient conditions and provides protection against UV rays. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Subsurface Ectomycorrhizal Fungi: A New Source of Atmospheric Methyl Halides?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treseder, K. K.; Redeker, K. R.; Allen, M. F.

    2001-12-01

    Incomplete source budgets for methyl halides---compounds that release inorganic halogen radicals which, in turn, catalyze atmospheric ozone depletion---limit our abilities to predict the fate of the stratospheric ozone layer. We tested the ability ectomycorrhizal fungi to produce methyl bromide and methyl iodide. These fungi are abundant in temperate forests, where they colonize tree roots and provide nutrients to their symbiotic plants in exchange for carbon compounds. The observed range of emissions from seven different species in culture is 0.001- to 100-μ g g-1 fungi d-1 for methyl bromide, and 0.5- to 500-μ g g-1 fungi d-1 for methyl iodide. While methyl chloride was not specifically tested, large emissions were observed from several species with little to no emissions observed from others. Further analyses of the effects of substrate concentration, headspace concentration, and temperature were performed on the species Cenococcum geophilum, one of the most abundant ectomycorrhizal fungi. Our results suggest that subsurface fungal emissions may be a significant global source of methyl halides.

  18. External hyphae of Rhizophagus irregularis DAOM 197198 are less sensitive to low pH than roots in arbuscular mycorrhizae: evidence from axenic culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Feng, Zengwei; Zhou, Yang; Zhu, Honghui; Yao, Qing

    2017-10-01

    The growth of plant roots and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) can be inhibited by low pH; however, it is largely unknown which is more sensitive to low pH. This study aimed to compare the physiological and molecular responses of external hyphae (EH) and roots to low pH in terms of growth, development and functioning. We established AM symbiosis in a two-compartmented system (root compartment, RC; hyphal compartment, HC) using AMF and transformed hairy roots and exposed them to pH 6.5 and/or pH 4.5. The results showed that pH 4.5 significantly decreased root cell viability, while EH at pH 6.5 attenuated the effect. In either RC or HC, pH 4.5 reduced biomass, P content, colonization, ALP activity in roots, and ALP activity and polyphosphate accumulation in EH. GintPT expression in EH was inhibited by pH 4.5 in HC but not in RC. The expression of mycorrhiza-responsive LePTs was significantly reduced by the lower colonization due to decreased pH in either RC or HC, while the expression of non-mycorrhiza-responsive LePTs was not affected. Variation partitioning analysis indicated that EH was less sensitive to low pH than roots. The interactions between roots and EH under low pH stress merit further investigation. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and pesticides on Cynara cardunculus growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. MARIN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Wild cardoon (Cynara cardunculus L. is a promising crop for biomass production. A nursery trial was conducted to investigate the effectiveness of mycorrhizal inoculation on the biomass yield of wild cardoon seedlings and the effect of the pesticides fosetyl-Al, folpet and propamocarb, as fungicides, and isofenphos, phoxim and oxamyl, as insecticides, on cardoon plant growth and the mycorrhization. The arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi inocula were: commercial inoculum with Glomus mosseae spores, and an inoculum of a Glomus sp. strain (AMF-i isolated locally. Mycorrhizal inoculation with either inoculum increased cardoon shoot biomass compared to non-inoculated control plants. The pesticide applications had a neutral or positive effect on cardoon seedling growth. However, the AM fungi colonisation did not decrease except for plants colonised by G. mosseae and treated with the insecticides isofenphos and oxamyl. Thus, the mycorrhiza can survive to pesticide concentrations employed in commercial nursery, and enhance cardoon plant productivity.

  20. Identity and specificity of Rhizoctonia-like fungi from different populations of Liparis japonica (Orchidaceae in Northeast China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Ding

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizal association is known to be important to orchid species, and a complete understanding of the fungi that form mycorrhizas is required for orchid ecology and conservation. Liparis japonica (Orchidaceae is a widespread terrestrial photosynthetic orchid in Northeast China. Previously, we found the genetic diversity of this species has been reduced recent years due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, but little was known about the relationship between this orchid species and the mycorrhizal fungi. The Rhizoctonia-like fungi are the commonly accepted mycorrhizal fungi associated with orchids. In this study, the distribution, diversity and specificity of culturable Rhizoctonia-like fungi associated with L. japonica species were investigated from seven populations in Northeast China. Among the 201 endophytic fungal isolates obtained, 86 Rhizoctonia-like fungi were identified based on morphological characters and molecular methods, and the ITS sequences and phylogenetic analysis revealed that all these Rhizoctonia-like fungi fell in the same main clade and were closely related to those of Tulasnella calospora species group. These findings indicated the high mycorrhizal specificity existed in L. japonica species regardless of habitats at least in Northeast China. Our results also supported the wide distribution of this fungal partner, and implied that the decline of L. japonica in Northeast China did not result from high mycorrhizal specificity. Using culture-dependent technology, these mycorrhizal fungal isolates might be important sources for the further utilizing in orchids conservation.

  1. [Effects of mycorrhizal colonization and medicine quality of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis inoculated by different foreign AM fungi species].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou Nong; Ding, Bo; Feng, Yuan; Qi, Wen-hua; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Dong-qin; Xiang, Jun

    2015-08-01

    After 28 foreign species of AM fungi were inoculated in sterilized soil, the effects of the AM mycorrhizal colonization and the medicine quality of Paris polyphylla var. yunnanensis were observed by combination of inoculation test in pot at room temperature and instrumental analysis. The results showed that, compared with control group (CK), the inoculation of foreign AM fungi in the soil influenced the spore density, mycorrhizal infection rate, and colonization intensity of AM fungi in root system of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis. The inoculation of foreign AM fungi enhanced the mycorrhiza viability of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis by increasing the activity of succinic dehydrogenase (SDH) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in intraradical hyphae. The content of single steroid saponin in rhizome of P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis showed variation after P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis was inoculated by different foreign species of AM fungi, which was beneficial for increasing the medicine quality; however, the kinds of steroid saponin showed no difference. In a degree, there was a selectivity of symbiosis between P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis and foreign AM fungi. And we found that the Claroideoglomus claroideum and Racocetra coralloidea were best foreign AM fungi species for cultivating P. polyphylla var. yunnanensis under field condition.

  2. A nutrient-regulated, dual localization phospholipase A2 in the symbiotic fungus Tuber borchii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soragni, Elisabetta; Bolchi, Angelo; Balestrini, Raffaella; Gambaretto, Claudio; Percudani, Riccardo; Bonfante, Paola; Ottonello, Simone

    2001-01-01

    Important morphogenetic transitions in fungi are triggered by starvation-induced changes in the expression of structural surface proteins. Here, we report that nutrient deprivation causes a strong and reversible up-regulation of TbSP1, a surface-associated, Ca2+-dependent phospholipase from the mycorrhizal fungus Tuber borchii. TbSP1 is the first phospholipase A2 to be described in fungi and identifies a novel class of phospholipid-hydrolyzing enzymes. The TbSP1 phospholipase, which is synthesized initially as a pre-protein, is processed efficiently and secreted during the mycelial phase. The mature protein, however, also localizes to the inner cell wall layer, close to the plasma membrane, in both free-living and symbiosis-engaged hyphae. It thus appears that a dual localization phospholipase A2 is involved in the adaptation of a symbiotic fungus to conditions of persistent nutritional limitation. Moreover, the fact that TbSP1-related sequences are present in Streptomyces and Neurospora, and not in wholly sequenced non-filamentous microorganisms, points to a general role for TbSP1 phospholipases A2 in the organization of multicellular filamentous structures in bacteria and fungi. PMID:11566873

  3. Proteomics of Filamentous Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passel, van M.W.J.; Schaap, P.J.; Graaff, de L.H.

    2013-01-01

    Filamentous fungi, such as Aspergillus niger and Aspergillus oryzae traditionally have had an important role in providing enzymes and enzyme cocktails that are used in food industry. In recent years the genome sequences of many filamentous fungi have become available. This combined with

  4. Marine fungi: A critique

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, S.; Raghukumar, C.

    in the sea have been ignored to a large extent. However, several instances of terrestrial species of fungi, active in marine environment have been reported. The arguments to support the view that terrestrial species of fungi by virtue of their physiological...

  5. Terpenoids from Endophytic Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucimar Jorgeane de Souza

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews the production of terpenoids by endophytic fungi and their biological activities, in period of 2006 to 2010. Sixty five sesquiterpenes, 45 diterpenes, five meroterpenes and 12 other terpenes, amounting to 127 terpenoids were isolated from endophytic fungi.

  6. Investigating Tactile Stimulation in Symbiotic Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orso, Valeria; Mazza, Renato; Gamberini, Luciano

    2017-01-01

    The core characteristics of tactile stimuli, i.e., recognition reliability and tolerance to ambient interference, make them an ideal candidate to be integrated into a symbiotic system. The selection of the appropriate stimulation is indeed important in order not to hinder the interaction from...... the user’s perspective. Here we present the process of selecting the most adequate tactile stimulation delivered by a tactile vest while users were engaged in an absorbing activity, namely playing a video-game. A total of 20 participants (mean age 24.78; SD= 1.57) were involved. Among the eight tactile...

  7. Arbuscular mycorrhiza differentially affects synthesis of essential oils in coriander and dill

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rydlová, Jana; Jelínková, M.; Dušek, K.; Dušková, E.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Püschel, David

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 26, č. 2 (2016), s. 123-131 ISSN 0940-6360 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0571 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * aromatic plants * essential oils Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2016

  8. Soil Structure and Mycorrhizae Encourage Black Walnut Growth on Old Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix Jr. Ponder

    1979-01-01

    Examination of black walnut seedlings grown in forest and field soils showed all root systems were infected with mycorrhizae; the amount of infection was influenced by treatments. Mean height and dry weight of tops and roots were greater for seedlings grown in forest than field soil. Seedling height growth was not increased by disturbing either soil; but, root dry...

  9. Effect of mycorrhiza symbiosis on the Nacl salinity in Sorghum bicolor

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-01

    Aug 1, 2011 ... Effect of mycorrhiza symbiosis on the Nacl salinity in. Sorghum bicolor. Ghanbar Laei*, M. H. Khajehzadeh, Hossein Afshari, Abdol Ghaffar Ebadi and Hossein. Abbaspour. Department of Agricultural Sciences, Damghan branch, Islamic Azad University, Damghan, Iran. Accepted 19 May, 2011. In order to ...

  10. Arbuscular mycorrhiza stimulates biological nitrogen fixation in two Medicago spp. through omproved phosphorus acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, Martina; Voříšková, Alena; Gryndlerová, H.; Vosátka, Miroslav; Jansa, J.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, MAR 27 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku no. 390. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05466S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * biological nitrogen fixation * phosphorus uptake Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour OBOR OECD: Ecology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  11. Effects of metal lead on growth and mycorrhizae of an invasive plant species (Solidago canadensis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruyi; Yu, Guodong; Tang, Jianjun; Chen, Xin

    2008-01-01

    It is less known whether and how soil metal lead (Pb) impacts the invasion of exotic plants. A greenhouse experiment was conducted to estimate the effects of lead on the growth and mycorrhizae of an invasive species (Solidago canadensis L.) in a microcosm system. Each microcosm unit was separated into HOST and TEST compartments by a replaceable mesh screen that allowed arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungal hyphae rather than plant roots to grow into the TEST compartments. Three Pb levels (control, 300, and 600 mg/kg soil) were used in this study to simulate ambient soil and two pollution sites where S. canadensis grows. Mycorrhizal inoculum comprised five indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal species (Glomus mosseae, Glomus versiform, Glomus diaphanum, Glomus geosporum, and Glomus etunicatum). The 15N isotope tracer was used to quantify the mycorrhizally mediated nitrogen acquisition of plants. The results showed that S. canadensis was highly dependent on mycorrhizae. The Pb additions significantly decreased biomass and arbuscular mycorrhizal colonization (root length colonized, RLC%) but did not affect spore numbers, N (including total N and 15N) and P uptake. The facilitating efficiency of mycorrhizae on nutrient acquisition was promoted by Pb treatments. The Pb was mostly sequestered in belowground of plant (root and rhizome). The results suggest that the high efficiency of mycorrhizae on nutrient uptake might give S. canadensis a great advantage over native species in Pb polluted soils.

  12. The development and significance of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizas as influenced by agricultural practices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruissen, M.A.

    1982-01-01

    The development and significance of vesicular- arbuscular mycorrhizas (VAM) in wheat and potatoes have been studied in relation to various farming systems and agricultural practices. The effects of farming systems on VAM have been observed on three neighbouring experimental farms in the vicinity of

  13. Gibberellin-Abscisic Acid Balances during Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Formation in Tomato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Martin-Rodriguez, J.A.; Huertas, R.; Ho-Plagaro, T.; Ocampo, J.A.; Turečková, Veronika; Tarkowská, Danuše; Ludwig-Mueller, J.; Garcia-Garrido, J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 7, AUG 23 (2016), s. 1273 ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-34792S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1204 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * plant hormones * gibberellins Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  14. Identification of mycorrhiza-regulated genes with arbuscule development-related expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunwald, Ulf; Nyamsuren, Oyunbileg; Tamasloukht, M'Barek; Lapopin, Laurence; Becker, Anke; Mann, Petra; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Krajinski, Franziska; Franken, Philipp

    2004-07-01

    Suppressive subtractive hybridisation was applied to the analysis of late stage arbuscular mycorrhizal development in pea. 96 cDNA clones were amplified and 81, which carried fragments more than 200 nt in size, were sequence analysed. Among 67 unique fragments, 10 showed no homology and 10 were similar to sequences with unknown function. RNA accumulation of the corresponding 67 genes was analysed by hybridisation of macro-arrays. The cDNAs used as probes were derived from roots of wild type and late mutant pea genotypes, inoculated or not with the AM fungus Glomus mosseae. After calibration, a more than 2.5-fold mycorrhiza-induced RNA accumulation was detected in two independent experiments in the wild type for 25 genes, 22 of which seemed to be induced specifically during late stage AM development. Differential expression for 7 genes was confirmed by RT-PCR using RNA from mycorrhiza and from controls of a different pea cultivar. In order to confirm arbuscule-related expression, the Medicago truncatula EST data base was screened for homologous sequences with putative mycorrhiza-related expression and among a number of sequences with significant similarities, a family of trypsin inhibitor genes could be identified. Mycorrhiza-induced RNA accumulation was verified for five members by real-time PCR and arbuscule-related activation of the promoter could be shown in transgenic roots for one of the genes, MtTi 1.

  15. Ondergrondse communicatie: de driehoeksrelatie gastheerplant, parasitaire plant en mycorrhiza-schimmel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kohlen, W.; Bouwmeester, H.J.

    2007-01-01

    De ontdekking van strigolactonen laat zien dat planten op grote schaal ondergronds communiceren. Planten produceren die strigolactonen niet om te communiceren met de parasitaire planten, maar met de mycorrhiza schimmels en mogelijk ook andere voor de plant nuttige organismen. De parasitaire planten

  16. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza and Growth in Barley - Effects of Irradiation and Heating of Soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver; Andersen, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    propagules. Mycorrhiza developed more slowly after inoculation in irradiated soils than in untreated soils. This could have been due to the small amounts of inoculum used, but the high concentrations of nutrients released by irradiation of the soil were probably of greater significance particularly...

  17. Distinct environmental variables drive the community composition of mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi at the alpine treeline ecotone

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vašutová, Martina; Edwards, Magda; Baldrian, Petr; Čermák, Martin; Cudlín, Pavel

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 27, A (2017), s. 116-124 ISSN 1754-5048 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415; GA MŠk(CZ) LD14039 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : treeline * altitudinal gradient * Fungi * amplion sequencing * 454 pyrosequencing * Mycorrhiza * Saprotrophs * Picea abies * Pinus mugo * Mycorrhizal network Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7); Microbiology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.219, year: 2016

  18. Toxicity of coal fly ash (CFA) and toxicological response of switchgrass in mycorrhiza-mediated CFA-soil admixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awoyemi, Olushola M; Dzantor, E Kudjo

    2017-10-01

    Increasing support for the use of Coal fly ash (CFA) in agriculture has necessitated a better understanding of the effects of the CFA in various cropping schemes. Experiments were conducted to assess mutagenic response of a mutant strain of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (TA100) to varying concentrations of CFA-water extracts, determine oxidative stress in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) at varying levels of CFA-soil admixtures, and evaluate mycorrhiza-mediated modulation of oxidative stress responses of CFA-grown switchgrass. The TA100 exposed to 0%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20% and 25% (w/v) CFA-water extracts elicited significant (p < 0.05) mutagenic responses at 20% and 25% extract levels but not below the 15% level. In greenhouse pot experiment, CFA-soil admixtures at 7.5% and 15% (w/w) significantly (p < 0.05) decreased the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD) by 19.1% and 28.3% respectively, compared to control soil (0% w/w CFA/soil). Under the same conditions, activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx) decreased by 75.9% and 66.9%. In contrast to the antioxidant enzyme activities, levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) an indicator of lipid peroxidation increased significantly (p < 0.05) by 30.49% and 38.38%. Inoculation of 7.5% and 15% CFA-soil admixtures with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF), Rhizophaga clarus enhanced the activities of both SOD and GPx in the switchgrass, while it significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the levels of MDA. The study demonstrated that incorporation of CFA (at concentrations considered to be non-mutagenic against TA100) as soil amendment produced concentration-dependent oxidative stress responses in switchgrass; however, inoculation of the CFA-soil admixtures with AMF significantly modulated the oxidative stress responses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Symbiotic regulation of plant growth, development and reproduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell J. Rodriguez; D. Carl Freeman; E. Durant McArthur; Yong Ok Kim; Regina S. Redman

    2009-01-01

    The growth and development of rice (Oryzae sativa) seedlings was shown to be regulated epigenetically by a fungal endophyte. In contrast to un-inoculated (nonsymbiotic) plants, endophyte colonized (symbiotic) plants preferentially allocated resources into root growth until root hairs were well established. During that time symbiotic roots expanded at...

  20. Eco-physiological responses and symbiotic nitrogen fixation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2010-11-01

    Nov 1, 2010 ... Nitrogen nutrition of Hedysarum carnosum, a pastoral legume common in Tunisian central and southern rangelands ... Despite the fact that Na+ accumulation decreased plant growth, both nodulation and symbiotic nitrogen fixation capacity of H. ... of the symbiotic interaction as well as nodule development.

  1. Symbiotic effectiveness of acid-tolerant Bradyrhizobium strains with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Further, symbiotic effectiveness of these strains was determined under the polyhouse conditions in sterilized soil (pH 4.5). Highest and lowest symbiotic characters, dry matter production and nitrogen improvement per plant were observed in PSR001 and NSR008 inoculated plants, respectively. All the examined isolates ...

  2. Symbiotic effectiveness of rhizobial mutualists varies in interactions with native Australian legume genera.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter H Thrall

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Interactions between plants and beneficial soil organisms (e.g. rhizobial bacteria, mycorrhizal fungi are models for investigating the ecological impacts of such associations in plant communities, and the evolution and maintenance of variation in mutualisms (e.g. host specificity and the level of benefits provided. With relatively few exceptions, variation in symbiotic effectiveness across wild host species is largely unexplored. METHODS: We evaluated these associations using representatives of several legume genera which commonly co-occur in natural ecosystems in south-eastern Australia and an extensive set of rhizobial strains isolated from these hosts. These strains had been previously assigned to specific phylotypes on the basis of molecular analyses. In the first of two inoculation experiments, the growth responses of each host species was evaluated with rhizobial strains isolated from that species. The second experiment assessed performance across genera and the extent of host specificity using a subset of these strains. RESULTS: While host growth responses to their own (sympatric isolates varied considerably, rhizobial phylotype was a significant predictor of symbiotic performance, indicating that bacterial species designations on the basis of molecular markers have ecological importance. Hosts responded in qualitatively different ways to sympatric and allopatric strains of rhizobia, ranging from species with a clear preference for their own strains, to those that were broad generalists, through to species that grew significantly better with allopatric strains. CONCLUSION: Theory has focused on trade-offs between the provision of benefits and symbiont competitive ability that might explain the persistence of less beneficial strains. However, differences in performance among co-occurring host species could also drive such patterns. Our results thus highlight the likely importance of plant community structure in

  3. [Metabolic integration of organisms within symbiotic systems].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provorov, N A; Dolgikh, E A

    2006-01-01

    Adaptation of organisms to coexisence in symbiotic systems is usually related to significant metabolic changes resulting in the integration of the biochemical pathways of the partners. In the symbioses between plants and nitrogen-fixing organisms, between heterotrophic and autotrophic organisms, as well as between animals and microorganisms providing the consumption of plant biomass, the systems of C- and N-metabolism, controlling the utilization of various sources of nitrogen (N2, organic and inorganic compounds, metabolic waste of the host) and carbon (CO2, plant polymers), of the partners are tightly integrated. Bilateral biochemical links between partners are typical to mutualistic symbioses (wherein biotrophic nutrition predominates, in some cases including necrotrophy of secondary origin). In antagonistic symbioses, unilateral links predominate, though active assimilation of the pathogen's secondary metabolites by the host is also possible. In most mutualistic symbioses, integrated metabolic ties have derived from trophic chains in biocenoses (syntrophic consortia, "predator-prey" systems), but not from the systems where the pathogens consume host metabolites. At the same time, molecular analysis of symbiotic interactions has shown that symbioses considerably differ from biocenoses, where the cycling of nutrients and energy implies no functional integration of the partner's genes.

  4. CIRCUMSTELLAR SHELL FORMATION IN SYMBIOTIC RECURRENT NOVAE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, Kevin; Bildsten, Lars [Department of Physics, Broida Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)

    2012-12-20

    We present models of spherically symmetric recurrent nova shells interacting with circumstellar material (CSM) in a symbiotic system composed of a red giant (RG) expelling a wind and a white dwarf accreting from this material. Recurrent nova eruptions periodically eject material at high velocities ({approx}> 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}) into the RG wind profile, creating a decelerating shock wave as CSM is swept up. High CSM densities cause the shocked wind and ejecta to have very short cooling times of days to weeks. Thus, the late-time evolution of the shell is determined by momentum conservation instead of energy conservation. We compute and show evolutionary tracks of shell deceleration, as well as post-shock structure. After sweeping up all the RG wind, the shell coasts at a velocity {approx}100 km s{sup -1}, depending on system parameters. These velocities are similar to those measured in blueshifted CSM from the symbiotic nova RS Oph, as well as a few Type Ia supernovae that show evidence of CSM, such as 2006X, 2007le, and PTF 11kx. Supernovae occurring in such systems may not show CSM interaction until the inner nova shell gets hit by the supernova ejecta, days to months after the explosion.

  5. Developing symbiotic consortia for lignocellulosic biofuel production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuroff, Trevor R.; Curtis, Wayne R. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    2012-02-15

    The search for petroleum alternatives has motivated intense research into biological breakdown of lignocellulose to produce liquid fuels such as ethanol. Degradation of lignocellulose for biofuel production is a difficult process which is limited by, among other factors, the recalcitrance of lignocellulose and biological toxicity of the products. Consolidated bioprocessing has been suggested as an efficient and economical method of producing low value products from lignocellulose; however, it is not clear whether this would be accomplished more efficiently with a single organism or community of organisms. This review highlights examples of mixtures of microbes in the context of conceptual models for developing symbiotic consortia for biofuel production from lignocellulose. Engineering a symbiosis within consortia is a putative means of improving both process efficiency and stability relative to monoculture. Because microbes often interact and exist attached to surfaces, quorum sensing and biofilm formation are also discussed in terms of consortia development and stability. An engineered, symbiotic culture of multiple organisms may be a means of assembling a novel combination of metabolic capabilities that can efficiently produce biofuel from lignocellulose. (orig.)

  6. Monogamy in a Hyper-Symbiotic Shrimp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Antonio Baeza

    Full Text Available Theory predicts that monogamy is adaptive in resource-specialist symbiotic crustaceans inhabiting relatively small and morphologically simple hosts in tropical environments where predation risk away from hosts is high. We tested this prediction in Pontonia manningi, a hyper-symbiotic shrimp that dwells in the mantle cavity of the Atlantic winged oyster Pteria colymbus that, in turn, infects gorgonians from the genus Pseudopterogorgia in the Caribbean Sea. In agreement with theory, P. manningi were found dwelling as heterosexual pairs in oysters more frequently than expected by chance alone. Males and females also inhabited the same host individual independent of the female gravid condition or of the developmental stage of brooded embryos. While the observations above argue in favor of monogamy in P. manningi, there is evidence to suggest that males of the studied species are moderately promiscuous. That females found living solitary in oysters most often brooded embryos, and that males allocated more to weaponry (major claw size than females at any given size suggest that males might be roaming among host individuals in search of and, fighting for, receptive females. All available information depicts a rather complex mating system in P. manningi: primarily monogamous but with moderately promiscuous males.

  7. The intracellular delivery of TAT-aequorin reveals calcium-mediated sensing of environmental and symbiotic signals by the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus Gigaspora margarita.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatiello, Roberto; Sello, Simone; Novero, Mara; Negro, Alessandro; Bonfante, Paola; Navazio, Lorella

    2014-08-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) is an ecologically relevant symbiosis between most land plants and Glomeromycota fungi. The peculiar traits of AM fungi have so far limited traditional approaches such as genetic transformation. The aim of this work was to investigate whether the protein transduction domain of the HIV-1 transactivator of transcription (TAT) protein, previously shown to act as a potent nanocarrier for macromolecule delivery in both animal and plant cells, may translocate protein cargoes into AM fungi. We evaluated the internalization into germinated spores of Gigaspora margarita of two recombinant TAT fusion proteins consisting of either a fluorescent (GFP) or a luminescent (aequorin) reporter linked to the TAT peptide. Both TAT-fused proteins were found to enter AM fungal mycelia after a short incubation period (5-10 min). Ca2+ measurements in G. margarita mycelia pre-incubated with TAT-aequorin demonstrated the occurrence of changes in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration in response to relevant stimuli, such as touch, cold, salinity, and strigolactones, symbiosis-related plant signals. These data indicate that the cell-penetrating properties of the TAT peptide can be used as an effective strategy for intracellularly delivering proteins of interest and shed new light on Ca2+ homeostasis and signalling in AM fungi. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  8. Taxonomy of Allergenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levetin, Estelle; Horner, W Elliott; Scott, James A

    2016-01-01

    The Kingdom Fungi contains diverse eukaryotic organisms including yeasts, molds, mushrooms, bracket fungi, plant rusts, smuts, and puffballs. Fungi have a complex metabolism that differs from animals and plants. They secrete enzymes into their surroundings and absorb the breakdown products of enzyme action. Some of these enzymes are well-known allergens. The phylogenetic relationships among fungi were unclear until recently because classification was based on the sexual state morphology. Fungi lacking an obvious sexual stage were assigned to the artificial, now-obsolete category, "Deuteromycetes" or "Fungi Imperfecti." During the last 20 years, DNA sequencing has resolved 8 fungal phyla, 3 of which contain most genera associated with important aeroallergens: Zygomycota, Ascomycota, and Basidiomycota. Advances in fungal classification have required name changes for some familiar taxa. Because of regulatory constraints, many fungal allergen extracts retain obsolete names. A major benefit from this reorganization is that specific immunoglobulin E (IgE) levels in individuals sensitized to fungi appear to closely match fungal phylogenetic relationships. This close relationship between molecular fungal systematics and IgE sensitization provides an opportunity to systematically look at cross-reactivity and permits representatives from each taxon to serve as a proxy for IgE to the group. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Patents on Endophytic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokhale, M; Gupta, D; Gupta, U; Faraz, R; Sandhu, S S

    2017-01-01

    Endophytic fungi are taxonomically and ecologically heterogeneous group of organisms, mainly belonging to the Ascomycotina and Deuteromycotina. Endophytes usually produce the enzymes necessary for the colonization of plant tissues. Endophytes are able to utilize components of plant cells without disturbing host metabolism, which is confirmed by isozyme analysis and studies on substrate utilization. The patents related to enzymes and metabolites produced by endophytic fungi are associated with their ecological significance. Application of metabolites and growth promoting factors produced from endophytic fungi, in the pharmaceutical and agricultural industries, is now well established. The patents on secretion of extracellular enzymes in vitro by endophytic fungi needed for cell wall degradation, support the hypothesis that fungal endophytes represent a group of organisms specialized to live within plant tissue. This review presents the patents granted on different aspects of endophytic fungi for the last 11 years. This expresses the scenario and impact of these patents regarding significance in human society. In the last few years, research and inventions regarding the different aspects of endophytic fungi beneficial for host plant as well as for human beings have been carried out, which is supported by the increasing number of patents granted on endophytic fungi. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  10. Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza in Field-Grown Crops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Iver

    1983-01-01

    The effect of inoculation with vesicular–arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi on the growth of barley in the field was studied at two levels of soil P on plots fumigated with methyl bromide. During the vegetative phase, growth and P uptake was influenced only by soil P; P uptake in the period from earing...... and inoculation increased the uptake of bromide, Zn and Cu significantly. Mycorrhizal infection in inoculated plots was first observed 25 days after seedling emergence, and final infection levels were c. 50% in contrast to 12 % without inoculation. The introduced endophyte had spread 30 cm horizontally during...

  11. Effect of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza colonization of Deschampsia cespitosa ecotype Warynski at different soil depths

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gucwa-Przepióra, E.; Malkowski, E.; Sas-Nowosielska, A.; Kucharski, R.; Krzyzak, J.; Kita, A.; Römkens, P.F.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of chemophytostabilization practices on arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) of Deschampsia cespitosa roots at different depths in soils highly contaminated with heavy metals were studied in field trials. Mycorrhizal parameters, including frequency of mycorrhization, intensity of root cortex

  12. Plant 9-lox oxylipin metabolism in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ocampo, Juan A; García Garrido, José M

    2012-12-01

    The establishment of an Arbuscular Mycorrhizal symbiotic interaction (MA) is a successful strategy to substantially promote plant growth, development and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the recognition and establishment of symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, the jasmonates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed upregulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and point a key regulatory feature for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly these derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOX). In this mini-review we highlight recent progress understanding the function of oxylipins in the establishment of the AM symbiosis and hypothesize that the activation of the 9-LOX pathway might be part of the activation of host defense responses which will then contribute to both, the control of AM fungal spread and the increased resistance to fungal pathogens in mycorrhizal plants.

  13. Large scale transcriptome analysis reveals interplay between development of forest trees and a beneficial mycorrhiza helper bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurth, Florence; Feldhahn, Lasse; Bönn, Markus; Herrmann, Sylvie; Buscot, François; Tarkka, Mika T

    2015-09-02

    Pedunculate oak, Quercus robur is an abundant forest tree species that hosts a large and diverse community of beneficial ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMFs), whereby ectomycorrhiza (EM) formation is stimulated by mycorrhiza helper bacteria such as Streptomyces sp. AcH 505. Oaks typically grow rhythmically, with alternating root flushes (RFs) and shoot flushes (SFs). We explored the poorly understood mechanisms by which oaks integrate signals induced by their beneficial microbes and endogenous rhythmic growth at the level of gene expression. To this end, we compared transcript profiles of oak microcuttings at RF and SF during interactions with AcH 505 alone and in combination with the basidiomycetous EMF Piloderma croceum. The local root and distal leaf responses to the microorganisms differed substantially. More genes involved in the recognition of bacteria and fungi, defence and cell wall remodelling related transcription factors (TFs) were differentially expressed in the roots than in the leaves of oaks. In addition, interaction with AcH 505 and P. croceum affected the expression of a higher number of genes during SF than during RF, including AcH 505 elicited defence response, which was attenuated by co-inoculation with P. croceum in the roots during SF. Genes encoding leucine-rich receptor-like kinases (LRR-RLKs) and proteins (LRR-RLPs), LRR containing defence response regulators, TFs from bZIP, ERF and WRKY families, xyloglucan cell wall transglycolases/hydrolases and exordium proteins were differentially expressed in both roots and leaves of plants treated with AcH 505. Only few genes, including specific RLKs and TFs, were induced in both AcH 505 and co-inoculation treatments. Treatment with AcH 505 induces and maintains the expression levels of signalling genes encoding candidate receptor protein kinases and TFs and leads to differential expression of cell wall modification related genes in pedunculate oak microcuttings. Local gene expression response to AcH 505

  14. Influence of mycorrhizal fungi on survival of salmonella and E.coli O157:H7 in soil and translocation into allium porrum roots and stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modern agriculture disrupts the natural symbiotic relationship arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi have with most vegetable plants, which may affect translocation of human pathogens into the plant. Five-month-old Allium porrum (leek) plants (with or without AMF [Glomus intraradices]) were used as a m...

  15. Phosphate Solubilising Fungi from Mangroves of Bhitarkanika, Orissa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NIBHA GUPTA

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Mangroves have evolved several adaptations to swampy and saline environments. It is situated at the inter-phase between marine and terrestrial environment, which is highly productive providing nutrients to surrounding micro biota. Similar adaptive characteristics in the form and function may occur with the associated microflora in such environments. Several free living and symbiotic microorganisms occurred in such saline habitats and some of them are reported for their beneficial activity in mangrove ecosystem like biomineralization of organic matter and bio-transformation of minerals. In view of this, 106 fungi isolated from rhizosphere and phyllosphere of mangrove plants grown in Bhitarkanika, Orissa were screened on plate culture containing Pikovaskaya medium for the phosphate solubilization. Selected fungi were evaluated for their phosphate solubilization potential under different cultural conditions. A total of 36 fungi were isolated that showed variable halo zone on medium containing tricalcium phosphate when grown under different pH and temperature. The highest zone was formed by Aspergillus PF8 (63 mm and Aspergillus PF127 (46.5 mm. The observation on tricalcium phosphate solubilization activity of Paecilomyces, Cladobotrytis, Helminthosporium is rare. However, a detailed and elaborative studies are needed to confirm better mineral solubilization potential of these fungi.

  16. Are there keystone mycorrhizal fungi associated to tropical epiphytic orchids?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cevallos, Stefania; Sánchez-Rodríguez, Aminael; Decock, Cony; Declerck, Stéphane; Suárez, Juan Pablo

    2017-04-01

    In epiphytic orchids, distinctive groups of fungi are involved in the symbiotic association. However, little is known about the factors that determine the mycorrhizal community structure. Here, we analyzed the orchid mycorrhizal fungi communities associated with three sympatric Cymbidieae epiphytic tropical orchids (Cyrtochilum flexuosum, Cyrtochilum myanthum, and Maxillaria calantha) at two sites located within the mountain rainforest of southern Ecuador. To characterize these communities at each orchid population, the ITS2 region was analyzed by Illumina MiSeq technology. Fifty-five mycorrhizal fungi operational taxonomic units (OTUs) putatively attributed to members of Serendipitaceae, Ceratobasidiaceae and Tulasnellaceae were identified. Significant differences in mycorrhizal communities were detected between the three sympatric orchid species as well as among sites/populations. Interestingly, some mycorrhizal OTUs overlapped among orchid populations. Our results suggested that populations of studied epiphytic orchids have site-adjusted mycorrhizal communities structured around keystone fungal species. Interaction with multiple mycorrhizal fungi could favor orchid site occurrence and co-existence among several orchid species.

  17. Agroecology: the key role of arbuscular mycorrhizas in ecosystem services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianinazzi, Silvio; Gollotte, Armelle; Binet, Marie-Noëlle; van Tuinen, Diederik; Redecker, Dirk; Wipf, Daniel

    2010-11-01

    The beneficial effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi on plant performance and soil health are essential for the sustainable management of agricultural ecosystems. Nevertheless, since the 'first green revolution', less attention has been given to beneficial soil microorganisms in general and to AM fungi in particular. Human society benefits from a multitude of resources and processes from natural and managed ecosystems, to which AM make a crucial contribution. These resources and processes, which are called ecosystem services, include products like food and processes like nutrient transfer. Many people have been under the illusion that these ecosystem services are free, invulnerable and infinitely available; taken for granted as public benefits, they lack a formal market and are traditionally absent from society's balance sheet. In 1997, a team of researchers from the USA, Argentina and the Netherlands put an average price tag of US $33 trillion a year on these fundamental ecosystem services. The present review highlights the key role that the AM symbiosis can play as an ecosystem service provider to guarantee plant productivity and quality in emerging systems of sustainable agriculture. The appropriate management of ecosystem services rendered by AM will impact on natural resource conservation and utilisation with an obvious net gain for human society.

  18. Genomic Encyclopedia of Fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grigoriev, Igor

    2012-08-10

    Genomes of fungi relevant to energy and environment are in focus of the Fungal Genomic Program at the US Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). Its key project, the Genomics Encyclopedia of Fungi, targets fungi related to plant health (symbionts, pathogens, and biocontrol agents) and biorefinery processes (cellulose degradation, sugar fermentation, industrial hosts), and explores fungal diversity by means of genome sequencing and analysis. Over 150 fungal genomes have been sequenced by JGI to date and released through MycoCosm (www.jgi.doe.gov/fungi), a fungal web-portal, which integrates sequence and functional data with genome analysis tools for user community. Sequence analysis supported by functional genomics leads to developing parts list for complex systems ranging from ecosystems of biofuel crops to biorefineries. Recent examples of such parts suggested by comparative genomics and functional analysis in these areas are presented here.

  19. Pigments in Thermophilic fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Somasundaram, T; Rao, Sanjay SR; Maheshwari, R

    1986-01-01

    UV and visible absorption spectra of thermophilic fungi were obtained by photoacoustic spectroscopy. Based on these data as well as on the chem. properties and IR spectra, it is suggested that the pigments may be hydroxylated polycyclic quinones.

  20. Adaptive Immunity to Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wüthrich, Marcel; Deepe, George S.; Klein, Bruce

    2013-01-01

    Only a handful of the more than 100,000 fungal species on our planet cause disease in humans, yet the number of life-threatening fungal infections in patients has recently skyrocketed as a result of advances in medical care that often suppress immunity intensely. This emerging crisis has created pressing needs to clarify immune defense mechanisms against fungi, with the ultimate goal of therapeutic applications. Herein, we describe recent insights in understanding the mammalian immune defenses deployed against pathogenic fungi. The review focuses on adaptive immune responses to the major medically important fungi and emphasizes how dendritic cells and subsets in various anatomic compartments respond to fungi, recognize their molecular patterns, and signal responses that nurture and shape the differentiation of T cell subsets and B cells. Also emphasized is how the latter deploy effector and regulatory mechanisms that eliminate these nasty invaders while also constraining collateral damage to vital tissue. PMID:22224780

  1. Maarja Unduski 'Fungi'

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    1999-01-01

    24. nov.-st Linnagaleriis Tallinnas Maarja Unduski kolmas isiknäitus 'Fungi'. Eksponeeritud hiigelseened ja rida värviliste lehtedega ramatuid, mille kaante valmistamisel on autor esmakordselt kasutanud ka lõuendit ja paberreljeefi.

  2. Manglicolous fungi from India

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Chinnaraj, S.; Untawale, A.G.

    This paper deals with nine Ascomycetous fungi viz. Rhizophila marina Hyde et Jones, Trematosphaeria striatispora Hyde, Lineolata rhizophorae (Kohlm. et. Kohlm.) Kohlm. et. Volkm.-Kohlm., Caryosporella rhizophorae Kohlm., Passeriniella savoryellopsis...

  3. Reductions in complexity of mitochondrial genomes in lichen-forming fungi shed light on genome architecture of obligate symbioses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogoda, Cloe S; Keepers, Kyle G; Lendemer, James C; Kane, Nolan C; Tripp, Erin A

    2018-03-01

    Symbioses among co-evolving taxa are often marked by genome reductions such as a loss of protein-coding genes in at least one of the partners as a means of reducing redundancy or intergenomic conflict. To explore this phenomenon in an iconic yet under-studied group of obligate symbiotic organisms, mitochondrial genomes of 22 newly sequenced and annotated species of lichenized fungi were compared to 167 mitochondrial genomes of nonlichenized fungi. Our results demonstrate the first broad-scale loss of atp9 from mitochondria of lichenized fungi. Despite key functions in mitochondrial energy production, we show that atp9 has been independently lost in three different lineages spanning 10 of the 22 studied species. A search for predicted, functional copies of atp9 among genomes of other symbionts involved in each lichen revealed the full-length, presumably functional copies of atp9 in either the photosynthetic algal partner or in other symbiotic fungi in all 10 instances. Together, these data yield evidence of an obligate symbiotic relationship in which core genomic processes have been streamlined, likely due to co-evolution. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Fractionation of Nitrogen Isotopes by Plants with Different Types of Mycorrhiza in Mountain Tundra Ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzin, Igor; Makarov, Mikhail; Maslov, Mikhail; Tiunov, Alexei

    2017-04-01

    We studied nitrogen concentration and nitrogen isotope composition in plants from four mountain tundra ecosystems in the Khibiny Mountains. The ecosystems consisted of a toposequence beginning with the shrub-lichen heath (SLH) on the ridge and upper slope, followed by the Betula nana dominated shrub heath (SH) on the middle slope, the cereal meadow (CM) on the lower slope and the sedge meadow (SM) at the bottom of the slope. The inorganic nitrogen concentration of the soils from the studied ecosystems were significantly different; the SLH soil was found to contain the minimum concentration of N-NH4+ and N-NO3- , while in the soils of the meadow ecosystems these concentrations were much higher. The concentration of nitrogen in leaves of the dominant plant species in all of the ecosystems is directly connected with the concentration of inorganic nitrogen in the soils, regardless of the plant's mycorrhizal symbiosis type. However, such a correlation is not apparent in the case of plant roots, especially for plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza. The majority of plant species with these types of mycorrhiza in the SH and particularly in the CM were enriched in 15N in comparison with the SLH (such plants were not found within the SM). This could be due to several reasons: 1) the decreasing role of mycorrhiza in nitrogen consumption and therefore in the fractionation of isotopes in the relatively-N-enriched ecosystems; 2) the use of relatively-15N-enriched forms of nitrogen for plant nutrition in meadow ecosystems. This heavier nitrogen isotope composition in plant roots with ectomycorrhiza and ericoid mycorrhiza in ecosystems with available nitrogen enriched soils doesn't correspond to the classical idea of mycorrhiza decreasing participation in nitrogen plant nutrition. The analysis of the isotope composition of separate labile forms of nitrogen makes it possible to explain the phenomenon. Not all arbuscular mycorrhizal species within the sedge meadow

  5. Kinematics of the symbiotic system R Aqr

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, S.; Corral, L. J.; Steffen, W.

    2014-04-01

    We present the results of the kinematical analysis of the symbiotic system R Aqr. We obtained high dispersion spectra with the MES spectrograph at the 2.1 m telescope of San Pedro Mártir (MEZCAL). The used filter were Ha + [NII], (λc = 6575Å, Δλ = 90Å). We analyse the [NII] λλ6583 line. When the observations are compared with previous ones by Solf (1992) we detected an important change in the projected velocities of the observed knots, supporting the idea of a precessing jet. We are working also in a 3-D kinematic model for the object using the measured velocities and the state of the model is presented.

  6. Establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius (Arecaceae: effect of inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A Ramos-Zapata

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi has often promoted increased growth of plants but very little work has been done in the tropics to evaluate the effects of inoculation on the establishment and development of seedlings in forests. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius is a scandent palm present both in early and late succession, and consequently can be used in restoration processes. A test was conducted to determine the effect of AM on the establishment of Desmoncus orthacanthos in tropical forest in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. Thirty inoculated and 30 non-inoculated seedlings were introduced in two sites of different successional age, a mature forest and an eight-year old abandoned cornfield (acahual.Survival and growth parameters were evaluated after 12 months. Leaf area and phosphorus, but not height, were greater in inoculated than non-inoculated plants in the forest but not in the acahual. However, mycorrhizae had a clear effect on plant survival in both sites, with a threefold increase in survival of inoculated compared with non-inoculated plants bassed on an odds ratio. The results suggest that inoculation will be important to increase the establishment of this commercially important palm. Rev. Biol. Trop. 54(1: 65-72. Epub 2006 Mar 31.La inoculación con hongos micorrizógenos arbusculares (AMpromueve un incremento en el crecimiento de las plantas, sin embargo poco trabajo se ha realizado en los trópicos para evaluar el efecto de la inoculación en el proceso de establecimiento de plántulas. Desmoncus orthacanthos Martius es una palmera trepadora que se distribuye tanto en etapas tempranas y tardías de la sucesión, por lo tanto puede ser empleada en procesos de restauración. Se realizó una prueba de establecimiento de D. orthacanthos en una selva tropical de la península de Yucatán, México. Treinta plántulas inoculadas y 30 no inoculadas se establecieron en dos sitios con diferentes etapas sucesionales: selva madura

  7. MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI INCREASED EARLY GROWTH OF TROPICAL TREE SEEDLINGS IN ADVERSE SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maman Turjaman

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The rate of reforestation  has increased throughout the countries in Southeast Asia region during the last 20 years.  At the same time, inconvenient situations such as forest destruction, forest exploitation, illegal logging, clear-cut forest areas, old agricultural lands, post-wildfire areas, conversion  of natural  forests into  plantations, resettlement areas, mine  lands,  and amended adverse soils have also been increasing  significantly. Mycorrhizas, hovewer,  play important role  to increase  plant  growth,  enrich  nutrient content  and enhance  survival rates of forest tree species in temperate  and sub-tropical  regions.  Unfortunately, a little information so far is available  regarding  the effect of mycorrhizas on growth  of tree species growing  in tropical  forests. In relevant,  several experiments  were carried  out to determine whether  ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi and arbuscular  mycorrhizal (AM fungi can enhance mycorrhizal colonization, nutrient content, and plant growth of some tropical rain forest tree species in Indonesia under nursery  and field conditions.   The families of tropical  tree species used in the experiment were  Thymelaeaceae (Aquilaria crassna, Leguminosae  (Sesbania grandifolia, Guttiferae (Ploiarium alternifolium and Calophyllum hosei, Apocynaceae (Dyera polyphylla and Alstonia scholaris, and Dipterocarpaceae (Shorea belangeran. These families are important as they provide timber  and non-timber  forest products (NTFPs.   This paper discusses the role of mycorrhizal fungi in increasing  early  growth  of tropical  tree seedlings in adverse soil.

  8. Distinguishing between symbiotic stars and planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iłkiewicz, K.; Mikołajewska, J.

    2017-10-01

    Context. The number of known symbiotic stars (SySt) is still significantly lower than their predicted population. One of the main problems in finding the total population of SySt is the fact that their spectrum can be confused with other objects, such as planetary nebulae (PNe) or dense H II regions. This problem is reinforced by the fact that in a significant fraction of established SySt the emission lines used to distinguish them from other objects are not present. Aims: We aim at finding new diagnostic diagrams that could help separate SySt from PNe. Additionally, we examine a known sample of extragalactic PNe for candidate SySt. Methods: We employed emission line fluxes of known SySt and PNe from the literature. Results: We found that among the forbidden lines in the optical region of spectrum, only the [O III] and [N II] lines can be used as a tool for distinguishing between SySt and PNe, which is consistent with the fact that they have the highest critical densities. The most useful diagnostic that we propose is based on He I lines, which are more common and stronger in SySt than forbidden lines. All these useful diagnostic diagrams are electron density indicators that better distinguish PNe and ionized symbiotic nebulae. Moreover, we found six new candidate SySt in the Large Magellanic Cloud and one in M 81. If confirmed, the candidate in M 81 would be the farthest known SySt thus far.

  9. Symbiote transmission and maintenance of extra-genomic associations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Minault Fitzpatrick

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotes can be transmitted from parents to offspring or horizontally from unrelated hosts or the environment. A key question is whether symbiote transmission is similar enough to Mendelian gene transmission to generate and maintain coevolutionary associations between host and symbiote genes. Recent papers come to opposite conclusions, with some suggesting that any horizontal transmission eliminates genetic association. These studies are hard to compare owing to arbitrary differences in modeling approach, parameter values, and assumptions about selection. I show that associations between host and symbiote genes (extra-genomic associations can be described by the same dynamic model as conventional linkage disequilibria between genes in the same genome. Thus, covariance between host and symbiote genomes depends on population history, geographic structure, selection, and co-transmission rate, just as covariance between genes within a genome. The conclusion that horizontal transmission rapidly erodes extra-genomic associations is equivalent to the conclusion that recombination rapidly erodes associations between genes within a genome. The conclusion is correct in the absence of population structure or selection. However, population structure can maintain spatial associations between host and symbiote traits, and non-additive selection (interspecific epistasis can generate covariances between host and symbiote genotypes. These results can also be applied to cultural or other nongenetic traits. This work contributes to a growing consensus that genomic, symbiotic, and gene-culture evolution can be analyzed under a common theoretical framework. In terms of coevolutionary potential, symbiotes can be viewed as lying on a continuum between the intimacy of genes and the indifference of casually co-occuring species.

  10. Effect of competitive interactions between ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi on Castanea sativa performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Eric; Coelho, Valentim; Tavares, Rui Manuel; Lino-Neto, Teresa; Baptista, Paula

    2012-01-01

    In Northeast of Portugal, the macrofungal community associated to chestnut tree (Castanea sativa Mill.) is rich and diversified. Among fungal species, the ectomycorrhizal Pisolithus tinctorius and the saprotroph Hypholoma fasciculare are common in this habitat. The aim of the present work was to assess the effect of the interaction between both fungi on growth, nutritional status, and physiology of C. sativa seedlings. In pot experiments, C. sativa seedlings were inoculated with P. tinctorius and H. fasciculare individually or in combination. Inoculation with P. tinctorius stimulated the plant growth and resulted in increased foliar-N, foliar-P, and photosynthetic pigment contents. These effects were suppressed when H. fasciculare was simultaneously applied with P. tinctorius. This result could be related to the inhibition of ectomycorrhizal fungus root colonization as a result of antagonism or to the competition for nutrient sources. If chestnut seedlings have been previously inoculated with P. tinctorius, the subsequent inoculation of H. fasciculare 30 days later did not affect root colonization, and mycorrhization benefits were observed. This work confirms an antagonistic interaction between ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi with consequences on the ectomycorrhizal host physiology. Although P. tinctorius is effective in promoting growth of host trees by establishing mycorrhizae, in the presence of other fungi, it may not always be able to interact with host roots due to an inability to compete with certain fungi.

  11. Root colonization by symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increases sesquiterpenic acid concentrations in Valeriana officinalis L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Monika; Wawrosch, Christoph; Steinkellner, Siegrid; Vierheilig, Horst; Kopp, Brigitte; Lössl, Andreas; Franz, Chlodwig; Novak, Johannes; Zitterl-Eglseer, Karin

    2010-03-01

    In some medicinal plants a specific plant-fungus association, known as arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis, increases the levels of secondary plant metabolites and/or plant growth. In this study, the effects of three different AM treatments on biomass and sesquiterpenic acid concentrations in two IN VITRO propagated genotypes of valerian ( VALERIANA OFFICINALIS L., Valerianaceae) were investigated. Valerenic, acetoxyvalerenic and hydroxyvalerenic acid levels were analyzed in the rhizome and in two root fractions. Two of the AM treatments significantly increased the levels of sesquiterpenic acids in the underground parts of valerian. These treatments, however, influenced the biomass of rhizomes and roots negatively. Therefore this observed increase was not accompanied by an increase in yield of sesquiterpenic acids per plant. Furthermore, one of the two genotypes had remarkably high hydroxyvalerenic acid contents and can be regarded as a hydroxyvalerenic acid chemotype. Copyright Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart New York.

  12. Regulation of a chemical defense against herbivory produced by symbiotic fungi in grass plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong-Xiu; Nagabhyru, Padmaja; Schardl, Christopher L

    2009-06-01

    Neotyphodium uncinatum and Neotyphodium siegelii are fungal symbionts (endophytes) of meadow fescue (MF; Lolium pratense), which they protect from insects by producing loline alkaloids. High levels of lolines are produced following insect damage or mock herbivory (clipping). Although loline alkaloid levels were greatly elevated in regrowth after clipping, loline-alkaloid biosynthesis (LOL) gene expression in regrowth and basal tissues was similar to unclipped controls. The dramatic increase of lolines in regrowth reflected the much higher concentrations in young (center) versus older (outer) leaf blades, so LOL gene expression was compared in these tissues. In MF-N. siegelii, LOL gene expression was similar in younger and older leaf blades, whereas expression of N. uncinatum LOL genes and some associated biosynthesis genes was higher in younger than older leaf blades. Because lolines are derived from amino acids that are mobilized to new growth, we tested the amino acid levels in center and outer leaf blades. Younger leaf blades of aposymbiotic plants (no endophyte present) had significantly higher levels of asparagine and sometimes glutamine compared to older leaf blades. The amino acid levels were much lower in MF-N. siegelii and MF-N. uncinatum compared to aposymbiotic plants and MF with Epichloë festucae (a closely related symbiont), which lacked lolines. We conclude that loline alkaloid production in young tissue depleted these amino acid pools and was apparently regulated by availability of the amino acid substrates. As a result, lolines maximally protect young host tissues in a fashion similar to endogenous plant metabolites that conform to optimal defense theory.

  13. Interaction between grass and trees mediated by extraradical mycelium of symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Batkhuugyin, Enkhtuya; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 38, - (2005), s. 261-277 ISSN 0334-5114 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA526/99/0895; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : extraradical mycelium network * transfer of 32P * soil aggragation Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 0.947, year: 2005

  14. 134Cs in heather seed plants grown with and without mycorrhiza

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strandberg, M.; Johansson, M.

    1988-01-01

    Experiments were carried out to determine differences between mycorrhized and non-mycorrhized seed plants of heather, Calluna vulgaris(L)Hull, as regards the uptake of 134 Cs. In most treatments heather with mycorrhiza had a significantly higher transfer of 134 Cs to the shoots than heather without mycorrhiza. As an average the concentration of 134 Cs was 18% higher in the mycorrhized plants than in the non-mycorrhized. Application of 10 kg K/ha reduced the concentration of 134 Cs in shoots of heather by 49% as an average. Because of improved growth in the potassium fertilized pots the reduction viewed on the basis of the area was only 33%. Nitrogen application does not significantly influence the concentration of 134 Cs in shoots of heather regardless of mycorrhizal status. (Copyright (c) 1988 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  15. Dipterocarps and Mycorrhiza. An ecological adaptation and a factor in forest regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, W.Th.M.

    1983-01-01

    Each dipterocarp has its own species of fungus, forming an ectomycorrhiza. From literature and experiments (in East Kalimantan and in vitro) ecological consequences are explored. These help explain the clumping of dipterocarp trees in the forest, the lack of hybrids, the poor dispersal, and speciation as dependent on the viability of the root-fungus combination on a particular soil type. Mycorrhizas are located in the top soil. They are extremely sensitive to increase of soil temperatures as ...

  16. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Stimulates Biological Nitrogen Fixation in Two Medicago spp. through Improved Phosphorus Acquisition

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Janoušková, M.; Voříšková, A.; Gryndlerová, Hana; Vosátka, M.; Jansa, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, MAR 27 (2017), s. 1-12, č. článku 390. ISSN 1664-462X R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-05466S; GA MŠk(CZ) LK11224 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhiza * nitrogen acquisition * phosphorus uptake Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 4.298, year: 2016

  17. The development of arbuscular mycorrhiza in two simulated stages of spoil-bank succession

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Püschel, David; Rydlová, Jana; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 35, č. 2 (2007), s. 363-369 ISSN 0929-1393 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA526/04/0996; GA ČR(CZ) GD206/03/H137 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516 Keywords : mycorrhiza * plant succession * spoil bank s Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.810, year: 2007

  18. Morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza on bulbous plants (Taurus mountain in Turkey)

    OpenAIRE

    Karaarslan Emel; Uyanöz Refik; Doğu Süleyman

    2015-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM) on bulbous plants in the Taurus Mountains in Turkey. Thirteen soil samples and bulbous roots were taken from the rhizosphere of bulbous plants. The soils were analyzed for the number of VAM spores and chemical and physical properties. In addition, the roots were examined for infection levels, and morphological identification of VAM spores was ma...

  19. Isolation and Identification of Vesicular-Arbuscular Mycorrhiza-Stimulatory Compounds from Clover (Trifolium repens) Roots

    OpenAIRE

    Nair, Muraleedharan G.; Safir, Gene R.; Siqueira, Jose O.

    1991-01-01

    Two isoflavonoids isolated from clover roots grown under phosphate stress were characterized as formononetin (7-hydroxy,4′-methoxy isoflavone) and biochanin A (5,7-dihydroxy,4′-methoxy isoflavone). At 5 ppm, these compounds stimulated hyphal growth in vitro and root colonization of an undescribed vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza, a Glomus sp. (INVAM-112). The permethylated products of the two compounds were inactive. These findings suggest that the isoflavonoids studied may act as signal molec...

  20. Stress as a Normal Cue in the Symbiotic Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartzman, Julia A; Ruby, Edward G

    2016-05-01

    All multicellular hosts form associations with groups of microorganisms. These microbial communities can be taxonomically diverse and dynamic, and their persistence is due to robust, and sometimes coevolved, host-microbe and microbe-microbe interactions. Chemical and physical sources of stress are prominently situated in this molecular exchange, as cues for cellular responses in symbiotic microbes. Stress in the symbiotic environment may arise from three sources: host tissues, microbe-induced immune responses, or other microbes in the host environment. The responses of microbes to these stresses can be general or highly specialized, and collectively may contribute to the stability of the symbiotic system. In this review, we highlight recent work that emphasizes the role of stress as a cue in the symbiotic environment of plants and animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Symbiotic and phenotypic characterization of Rhizobium isolates of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Pisum sativum L.) Fabaceae, from central and southern Ethiopia. ... and NSRlFP18 were the elite rhizobia that can be selected and further tested for their genetic and symbiotic performance in field trials for future bio-inoculant formulation.

  2. A.B. Frank and mycorrhizae: the challenge to evolutionary and ecologic theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trappe, James M

    2005-06-01

    A. B. Frank's observations and hypotheses about mycorrhizae in 1885 flew in the face of conventional thinking of the time. He reported that what we now term ectomycorrhizae were widespread on root systems of many woody plant species in a great diversity of habitats and soils. He hypothesized that mycorrhizae represent a pervasive mutualistic symbiosis in which fungus and host nutritionally rely on each other; that the fungus extracts nutrients from both mineral soil and humus and translocates them to the tree host; and that the tree, in turn, nourishes the fungus. Initially opposed by much of the scientific community, nearly all of Frank's major hypotheses have since been unequivocally demonstrated, although many decades were required to achieve conclusive evidence. Nonetheless, the revolution in thinking about plant and fungal evolution, ecology and physiology generated by Frank is still in the process of acceptance by much of the scientific community, 120 years and tens of thousands of scientific papers since he coined the term "mycorrhiza". The reasons for this extraordinary lag time in themselves present an intriguing research subject.

  3. Genetically Engineering Entomopathogenic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, H; Lovett, B; Fang, W

    2016-01-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi have been developed as environmentally friendly alternatives to chemical insecticides in biocontrol programs for agricultural pests and vectors of disease. However, mycoinsecticides currently have a small market share due to low virulence and inconsistencies in their performance. Genetic engineering has made it possible to significantly improve the virulence of fungi and their tolerance to adverse conditions. Virulence enhancement has been achieved by engineering fungi to express insect proteins and insecticidal proteins/peptides from insect predators and other insect pathogens, or by overexpressing the pathogen's own genes. Importantly, protein engineering can be used to mix and match functional domains from diverse genes sourced from entomopathogenic fungi and other organisms, producing insecticidal proteins with novel characteristics. Fungal tolerance to abiotic stresses, especially UV radiation, has been greatly improved by introducing into entomopathogens a photoreactivation system from an archaean and pigment synthesis pathways from nonentomopathogenic fungi. Conversely, gene knockout strategies have produced strains with reduced ecological fitness as recipients for genetic engineering to improve virulence; the resulting strains are hypervirulent, but will not persist in the environment. Coupled with their natural insect specificity, safety concerns can also be mitigated by using safe effector proteins with selection marker genes removed after transformation. With the increasing public concern over the continued use of synthetic chemical insecticides and growing public acceptance of genetically modified organisms, new types of biological insecticides produced by genetic engineering offer a range of environmentally friendly options for cost-effective control of insect pests. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nematode-Trapping Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xiangzhi; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Xingzhong

    2017-01-01

    Nematode-trapping fungi are a unique and intriguing group of carnivorous microorganisms that can trap and digest nematodes by means of specialized trapping structures. They can develop diverse trapping devices, such as adhesive hyphae, adhesive knobs, adhesive networks, constricting rings, and nonconstricting rings. Nematode-trapping fungi have been found in all regions of the world, from the tropics to Antarctica, from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems. They play an important ecological role in regulating nematode dynamics in soil. Molecular phylogenetic studies have shown that the majority of nematode-trapping fungi belong to a monophyletic group in the order Orbiliales (Ascomycota). Nematode-trapping fungi serve as an excellent model system for understanding fungal evolution and interaction between fungi and nematodes. With the development of molecular techniques and genome sequencing, their evolutionary origins and divergence, and the mechanisms underlying fungus-nematode interactions have been well studied. In recent decades, an increasing concern about the environmental hazards of using chemical nematicides has led to the application of these biological control agents as a rapidly developing component of crop protection.

  5. Structural characterization and molecular identification of arbuscular mycorrhiza morphotypes of Alzatea verticillata (Alzateaceae), a prominent tree in the tropical mountain rain forest of South Ecuador.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Adela; Haug, Ingeborg; Oberwinkler, Franz; Kottke, Ingrid

    2007-10-01

    The vast majority of the highly diverse trees in the tropical mountain rain forest of South Ecuador form arbuscular mycorrhizas, and previous molecular investigations revealed a high diversity of fungi. In this study, we present a first trial to link fungal DNA-sequences with defined morphotypes characterized on the basis of partly new mycelial features obtained from field material of one tree species, Alzatea verticillata. Fine roots were halved lengthwise to study the mycelium anatomy on one half and to obtain fungal nuclear rDNA coding for the small subunit rRNA of Glomeromycota from the other half. Light microscopy revealed conspicuously large amounts of mycelium attaching to the surface of the rootlets. The mycelium formed fine- or large-branched appressoria-like plates, vesicles of regular or irregular shape, and very fine, multibranched structures ensheathed by septate hyphae. These previously undescribed features of the supraradical mycelia combined with intraradical mycelium structures were used for distinguishing of four main morphogroups and subordinate 14 morphotypes. DNA sequences of Glomus group A, Acaulospora and Gigaspora, were obtained and linked to three morphogroups. Two sequence types within Glomus group A could be tentatively associated to subordinate morphotypes.

  6. Identification of two conserved cis-acting elements, MYCS and P1BS, involved in the regulation of mycorrhiza-activated phosphate transporters in eudicot species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Aiqun; Gu, Mian; Sun, Shubin; Zhu, Lingling; Hong, Shuai; Xu, Guohua

    2011-03-01

    • In this study, six putative promoter regions of phosphate transporter Pht1;3, Pht1;4 and Pht1;5 genes were isolated from eggplant and tobacco using the inverse polymerase chain reaction (iPCR). The isolated sequences show evolutionary conservation and divergence within/between the two groups of Pht1;3 and Pht1;4/Pht1;5. • Histochemical analyses showed that all six promoter fragments were sufficient to drive β-glucuronidase (GUS) expression specifically in arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) tobacco roots and were confined to distinct cells containing AM fungal structures (arbuscules or intracellular hyphae). • A series of promoter truncation and mutation analyses combined with phylogenetic footprinting of these promoters revealed that at least two cis-regulatory elements--the mycorrhiza transcription factor binding sequence (MYCS) first identified in this study and P1BS--mediated the transcriptional activation of the AM-mediated inorganic phosphate (Pi) transporter genes. Deletion or partial mutation of either of the two motifs in the promoters could cause a remarkable decrease, or even complete absence, of the promoter activity. • Our results propose that uptake of inorganic phosphate (Pi) by AM fungi is regulated, at least partially, in an MYCS- and P1BS-dependent manner in eudicot species. Our finding offers new insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordination between the AM and the Pi signalling pathways. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. The use of nuclear and related techniques for evaluating the agronomic effectiveness of phosphate fertilizers, in particular rock phosphate, in Venezuela: II. Monitoring mycorrhizas and phosphate solubilizing microorganisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casanova, E.; Salas, A.M.; Toro, M.

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of the study were to quantify and isolate P solubilizing microorganisms (fungus and bacteria) from corn, sorghum and beans rhizosphere from El Sombrero soil, located in Guarico state, a very important agricultural area in Venezuela. Rhizospheric soil samples were taken from the crops in the field and taken to the laboratory to conduct a serial dilution procedure in specific medium culture to obtain pure cultures and isolate microorganisms according to their function. The spores of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) from the soils were reproduced using trap pots in the greenhouse and after 4-6 months a dilute soil sample was wet-sieved and decanted for isolation of AM spores which were used for classification and for obtaining native pure cultures. Finally, the infective potential of AM was determined by setting pots with test crops and determining the AM colonization and efficiency to produce potential infection in the root system. There were no differences in the total microflora in both crop rhizospheres but there was a tendency of higher values in the corn rhizosphere due to the root exudates. Two solubilizing fungi identified were Aspergillus terreus and Aspergillus niger. (author)

  8. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass production and nitrogen fixation of berseem clover plants subjected to water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saia, Sergio; Amato, Gaetano; Frenda, Alfonso Salvatore; Giambalvo, Dario; Ruisi, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N) fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season) on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions) or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment.

  9. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on biomass production and nitrogen fixation of berseem clover plants subjected to water stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Saia

    Full Text Available Several studies, performed mainly in pots, have shown that arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis can mitigate the negative effects of water stress on plant growth. No information is available about the effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis on berseem clover growth and nitrogen (N fixation under conditions of water shortage. A field experiment was conducted in a hilly area of inner Sicily, Italy, to determine whether symbiosis with AM fungi can mitigate the detrimental effects of drought stress (which in the Mediterranean often occurs during the late period of the growing season on forage yield and symbiotic N2 fixation of berseem clover. Soil was either left under water stress (i.e., rain-fed conditions or the crop was well-watered. Mycorrhization treatments consisted of inoculation of berseem clover seeds with arbuscular mycorrhizal spores or suppression of arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis by means of fungicide treatments. Nitrogen biological fixation was assessed using the 15N-isotope dilution technique. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis was able to mitigate the negative effect of water stress on berseem clover grown in a typical semiarid Mediterranean environment. In fact, under water stress conditions, arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis resulted in increases in total biomass, N content, and N fixation, whereas no effect of crop mycorrhization was observed in the well-watered treatment.

  10. Rhizobial exopolysaccharides: genetic control and symbiotic functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazur Andrzej

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Specific complex interactions between soil bacteria belonging to Rhizobium, Sinorhizobium, Mesorhizobium, Phylorhizobium, Bradyrhizobium and Azorhizobium commonly known as rhizobia, and their host leguminous plants result in development of root nodules. Nodules are new organs that consist mainly of plant cells infected with bacteroids that provide the host plant with fixed nitrogen. Proper nodule development requires the synthesis and perception of signal molecules such as lipochitooligosaccharides, called Nod factors that are important for induction of nodule development. Bacterial surface polysaccharides are also crucial for establishment of successful symbiosis with legumes. Sugar polymers of rhizobia are composed of a number of different polysaccharides, such as lipopolysaccharides (LPS, capsular polysaccharides (CPS or K-antigens, neutral β-1, 2-glucans and acidic extracellular polysaccharides (EPS. Despite extensive research, the molecular function of the surface polysaccharides in symbiosis remains unclear. This review focuses on exopolysaccharides that are especially important for the invasion that leads to formation of indetermined (with persistent meristem type of nodules on legumes such as clover, vetch, peas or alfalfa. The significance of EPS synthesis in symbiotic interactions of Rhizobium leguminosarum with clover is especially noticed. Accumulating data suggest that exopolysaccharides may be involved in invasion and nodule development, bacterial release from infection threads, bacteroid development, suppression of plant defense response and protection against plant antimicrobial compounds. Rhizobial exopolysaccharides are species-specific heteropolysaccharide polymers composed of common sugars that are substituted with non-carbohydrate residues. Synthesis of repeating units of exopolysaccharide, their modification, polymerization and export to the cell surface is controlled by clusters of genes, named exo/exs, exp or

  11. Immunity against fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lionakis, Michail S.; Iliev, Iliyan D.; Hohl, Tobias M.

    2017-01-01

    Pathogenic fungi cause a wide range of syndromes in immune-competent and immune-compromised individuals, with life-threatening disease primarily seen in humans with HIV/AIDS and in patients receiving immunosuppressive therapies for cancer, autoimmunity, and end-organ failure. The discovery that specific primary immune deficiencies manifest with fungal infections and the development of animal models of mucosal and invasive mycoses have facilitated insight into fungus-specific recognition, signaling, effector pathways, and adaptive immune responses. Progress in deciphering the molecular and cellular basis of immunity against fungi is guiding preclinical studies into vaccine and immune reconstitution strategies for vulnerable patient groups. Furthermore, recent work has begun to address the role of endogenous fungal communities in human health and disease. In this review, we summarize a contemporary understanding of protective immunity against fungi. PMID:28570272

  12. Casuarina in Africa: distribution, role and importance of arbuscular mycorrhizal, ectomycorrhizal fungi and Frankia on plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diagne, Nathalie; Diouf, Diegane; Svistoonoff, Sergio; Kane, Aboubacry; Noba, Kandioura; Franche, Claudine; Bogusz, Didier; Duponnois, Robin

    2013-10-15

    Exotic trees were introduced in Africa to rehabilitate degraded ecosystems. Introduced species included several Australian species belonging to the Casuarinaceae family. Casuarinas trees grow very fast and are resistant to drought and high salinity. They are particularly well adapted to poor and disturbed soils thanks to their capacity to establish symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi -both arbuscular and ectomycorrhizal- and with the nitrogen-fixing bacteria Frankia. These trees are now widely distributed in more than 20 African countries. Casuarina are mainly used in forestation programs to rehabilitate degraded or polluted sites, to stabilise sand dunes and to provide fuelwood and charcoal and thus contribute considerably to improving livelihoods and local economies. In this paper, we describe the geographical distribution of Casuarina in Africa, their economic and ecological value and the role of the symbiotic interactions between Casuarina, mycorrhizal fungi and Frankia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Cloning, characterization, and immunolocalization of a mycorrhiza-inducible 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase in arbuscule-containing cells of maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hans, Joachim; Hause, Bettina; Strack, Dieter; Walter, Michael H

    2004-02-01

    Colonization of plant roots by symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi frequently leads to the accumulation of several apocarotenoids. The corresponding carotenoid precursors originate from the plastidial 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway. We have cloned and characterized 1-deoxy-d-xylulose 5-phosphate reductoisomerase (DXR), catalyzing the first committed step of the pathway, from maize (Zea mays). Functional identification was accomplished by heterologous expression of sequences coding for the mature protein in Escherichia coli. DXR is up-regulated in maize roots during mycorrhization as shown at transcript and protein levels, but is also abundant in leaves and young seedlings. Inspection of sequenced genomes and expressed sequence tag (EST) databases argue for a single-copy DXR gene. Immunolocalization studies in mycorrhizal roots using affinity-purified antibodies revealed a DXR localization in plastids around the main symbiotic structures, the arbuscules. DXR protein accumulation is tightly correlated with arbuscule development. The highest level of DXR protein is reached around maturity and initial senescence of these structures. We further demonstrate the formation of a DXR-containing plastidial network around arbuscules, which is highly interconnected in the mature, functional state of the arbuscules. Our findings imply a functional role of a still unknown nature for the apocarotenoids or their respective carotenoid precursors in the arbuscular life cycle.

  14. Recent Insights on Biological and Ecological Aspects of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Their Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, Antonietta; Balestrini, Raffaella

    2018-01-01

    The roots of most terrestrial plants are colonized by mycorrhizal fungi. They play a key role in terrestrial environments influencing soil structure and ecosystem functionality. Around them a peculiar region, the mycorrhizosphere, develops. This is a very dynamic environment where plants, soil and microorganisms interact. Interest in this fascinating environment has increased over the years. For a long period the knowledge of the microbial populations in the rhizosphere has been limited, because they have always been studied by traditional culture-based techniques. These methods, which only allow the study of cultured microorganisms, do not allow the characterization of most organisms existing in nature. The introduction in the last few years of methodologies that are independent of culture techniques has bypassed this limitation. This together with the development of high-throughput molecular tools has given new insights into the biology, evolution, and biodiversity of mycorrhizal associations, as well as, the molecular dialog between plants and fungi. The genomes of many mycorrhizal fungal species have been sequenced so far allowing to better understanding the lifestyle of these fungi, their sexual reproduction modalities and metabolic functions. The possibility to detect the mycelium and the mycorrhizae of heterothallic fungi has also allowed to follow the spatial and temporal distributional patterns of strains of different mating types. On the other hand, the availability of the genome sequencing from several mycorrhizal fungi with a different lifestyle, or belonging to different groups, allowed to verify the common feature of the mycorrhizal symbiosis as well as the differences on how different mycorrhizal species interact and dialog with the plant. Here, we will consider the aspects described before, mainly focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi and their interactions with plants and other soil microorganisms.

  15. Recent Insights on Biological and Ecological Aspects of Ectomycorrhizal Fungi and Their Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonietta Mello

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The roots of most terrestrial plants are colonized by mycorrhizal fungi. They play a key role in terrestrial environments influencing soil structure and ecosystem functionality. Around them a peculiar region, the mycorrhizosphere, develops. This is a very dynamic environment where plants, soil and microorganisms interact. Interest in this fascinating environment has increased over the years. For a long period the knowledge of the microbial populations in the rhizosphere has been limited, because they have always been studied by traditional culture-based techniques. These methods, which only allow the study of cultured microorganisms, do not allow the characterization of most organisms existing in nature. The introduction in the last few years of methodologies that are independent of culture techniques has bypassed this limitation. This together with the development of high-throughput molecular tools has given new insights into the biology, evolution, and biodiversity of mycorrhizal associations, as well as, the molecular dialog between plants and fungi. The genomes of many mycorrhizal fungal species have been sequenced so far allowing to better understanding the lifestyle of these fungi, their sexual reproduction modalities and metabolic functions. The possibility to detect the mycelium and the mycorrhizae of heterothallic fungi has also allowed to follow the spatial and temporal distributional patterns of strains of different mating types. On the other hand, the availability of the genome sequencing from several mycorrhizal fungi with a different lifestyle, or belonging to different groups, allowed to verify the common feature of the mycorrhizal symbiosis as well as the differences on how different mycorrhizal species interact and dialog with the plant. Here, we will consider the aspects described before, mainly focusing on ectomycorrhizal fungi and their interactions with plants and other soil microorganisms.

  16. Fresh perspectives on the roles of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in plant nutrition and growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sally E; Smith, F Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Recent research on arbuscular mycorrhizas has demonstrated that AM fungi play a significant role in plant phosphorus (P) uptake, regardless of whether the plant responds positively to colonization in terms of growth or P content. Here we focus particularly on implications of this finding for consideration of the balance between organic carbon (C) use by the fungi and P delivery (i.e. the C-P trade between the symbionts). Positive growth responses to arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) colonization are attributed frequently to increased P uptake via the fungus, which results in relief of P deficiency and increased growth. Zero AM responses, compared with non-mycorrhizal (NM) plants, have conventionally been attributed to failure of the fungi to deliver P to the plants. Negative responses, combined with excessive C use, have been attributed to this failure. The fungi were viewed as parasites. Demonstration that the AM pathway of P uptake operates in such plants indicates that direct P uptake by the roots is reduced and that the fungi are not parasites but mutualists because they deliver P as well as using C. We suggest that poor plant growth is the result of P deficiency because AM fungi lower the amount of P taken up directly by roots but the AM uptake of P does compensate for the reduction. The implications of interplay between direct root uptake and AM fungal uptake of P also include increased tolerance of AM plants to toxins such as arsenate and increased success when competing with NM plants. Finally we discuss the new information on C-P trade in the context of control of the symbiosis by the fungus or the plant, including new information (from NM plants) on sugar transport and on the role of sucrose in the signaling network involved in responses of plants to P deprivation.

  17. The Medicago truncatula DMI1 protein modulates cytosolic calcium signaling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peiter, Edgar; Sun, Jongho; Heckmann, Anne Birgitte Lau

    2007-01-01

    In addition to establishing symbiotic relationships with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, legumes also enter into a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with rhizobial bacteria that results in the formation of root nodules. Several genes involved in the development of both arbuscular mycorrhiza and legume nodu...

  18. Study the concentration of macroelements in forage mays (Zea mays L. (SC 704 as effected by inoculation with mycorrhizal fungi and Azotobacter chroococcum under different levels of nitrogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Amirabadi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen and phosphorus are two necessary macronutrients for plant growth and yield. These two elements now will be added to soil by chemical fertilizers. This research has been carried out based on randomized completely block design with three replications at Markazi Provience Agricultural Research Station, Iran, during growing season of 2004-2005 to evaluate the effects of Azotobacter chroococcum and Mycorrhiza (Glomus intraradices as biofertilizers and urea as chemical fertilizers on concentrations of N, P, K, Na, Ca and crude protein (% in corn (Zea mays L. shoot tissues and dry matter of corn. Azotobacter chroococcum used as two levels (inoculated and uninoculated, mycorrhiza (Glomus intraradices in two levels (inoculated and uninoculated and urea in four levels (0, 75, 150 and 300 kg.ha-1. Results showed that Azotobacter chroococcum affected significantly all studied criteria except of K shoot concentration, but mycorrhizan (Glomus intraradices only had a increasing significantly effect on N, K, Na and Crude protein. The interaction between Azotobacter chroococcum and Mycorrhiza (Glomus intraradices had the most increasing effect on dry matter, N, Na and Crude protein. Therefore, based on our results it can be concluded that in order to prevent polluting the agricultural soil, environmental and other water supplies from nitrogen chemical fertilizers, application of Azotobacter chroococcum or combined with mycorrhizal fungi with 150 kg.ha-1 Urea is recommended.

  19. Effect of Inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with Mycorrhiza and Rhizobia on soil properties and microbial community structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assigbetsé, K.; Ciss, I.; Bakhoum, N.; Dieng, L.

    2012-04-01

    Inoculation of legume plants with symbiotic microorganisms is widely used to improve their development and productivity. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of inoculation of Acacia senegal mature trees with rhizobium (Sinorhizobium) and arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus (G. mosseae, G. fasciculatum, G. intraradices) either singly or in combination, on soil properties, activity and the genetic structure of soil microbial communities. The experiment set up in Southern Senegal consisted of 4 randomized blocks of A. senegal mature trees with 4 treatments including inoculated trees with Rhizobium (R), mycorrhizal fungus (M) and with Rhizobium+mycorhizal fungus (RM) and non-inoculated control (CON). Soil were sampled 2 years after the inoculation. Soil pH, C and N and available P contents were measured. The microbial abundance and activity were measured in terms of microbial biomass C (MBC) and basal soil respiration. The community structure of the total bacterial, diazotrophic and denitrifying communities was assessed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of 16S rDNA, nifH and nirK genes respectively. Inoculations with symbiont under field conditions have increased soil pH. The C and N contents were enhanced in the dual-inoculated treatments (RM). The mycorrhized treatment have displayed the lowest available P contents while RM and R treatments exhibited higher contents rates. The microbial biomass C rates were higher in treatments co-inoculated with AM fungi and Rhizobium than in those inoculated singly with AM fungi or Rhizobium strains. The basal soil respiration were positively correlated to MBC, and the highest rates were found in the co-inoculated treatments. Fingerprints of 16S rDNA gene exhibited similar patterns between inoculated treatments and the control showing that the inoculation of mature trees have not impacted the total bacterial community structure. In contrast, the inoculated treatments have displayed individually different

  20. Diversity of arbuscular mycorrhiza in the rhizosphere of Cajeput in agroforestry system with different fertilizer management of maize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parwi; Pudjiasmanto, B.; Purnomo, D.; Cahyani, VR

    2017-11-01

    This study investigated the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhiza in rhizosphere of cajeput with different fertilizer management of maize. This research was conducted by observation on cajeput agroforestry system in Ponorogo that have different fertilizer management of maize: conventional management (CM), universal management (UM) and alternative management (AM1, AM2, and AM3). The result showed that the highest infection of arbuscular mycorrhiza was observed in the plot of AM3, while the lowest colonization was observed in the plot of CM. Infection of arbuscular mycorrhiza in roots cajeput from five fertilizer management, ranging from 32.64% - 63.33%. In all fertilizer management, there were eight species of arbuscular mycorrhiza which five species were Glomus genus, one species was Acaulospora genus and two species were Gigaspora genus. Glomus constrictum was the dominant species in all fertilizer management. Acaulospora favoeta was found only in the plot of AM3. Spore density varies between 150-594 / 100g of soil. The highest spore density was observed in the plot of AM3, while the lowest spore density was observed in the plot of AM1. The highest diversity index value of arbuscular mycorrhiza (Species richness and Shannon-Wiener) was observed in the plot of AM3.

  1. Transposable element dynamics among asymbiotic and ectomycorrhizal Amanita fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, Jaqueline; Skrede, Inger; Wolfe, Benjamin E; LaButti, Kurt; Ohm, Robin A; Grigoriev, Igor V; Pringle, Anne

    2014-06-12

    Transposable elements (TEs) are ubiquitous inhabitants of eukaryotic genomes and their proliferation and dispersal shape genome architectures and diversity. Nevertheless, TE dynamics are often explored for one species at a time and are rarely considered in ecological contexts. Recent work with plant pathogens suggests a link between symbiosis and TE abundance. The genomes of pathogenic fungi appear to house an increased abundance of TEs, and TEs are frequently associated with the genes involved in symbiosis. To investigate whether this pattern is general, and relevant to mutualistic plant-fungal symbioses, we sequenced the genomes of related asymbiotic (AS) and ectomycorrhizal (ECM) Amanita fungi. Using methods developed to interrogate both assembled and unassembled sequences, we characterized and quantified TEs across three AS and three ECM species, including the AS outgroup Volvariella volvacea. The ECM genomes are characterized by abundant numbers of TEs, an especially prominent feature of unassembled sequencing libraries. Increased TE activity in ECM species is also supported by phylogenetic analysis of the three most abundant TE superfamilies; phylogenies revealed many radiations within contemporary ECM species. However, the AS species Amanita thiersii also houses extensive amplifications of elements, highlighting the influence of additional evolutionary parameters on TE abundance. Our analyses provide further evidence for a link between symbiotic associations among plants and fungi, and increased TE activity, while highlighting the importance individual species' natural histories may have in shaping genome architecture. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  2. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides ; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients- Candida , Pneumocystis , and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  3. Fun with Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLure, John W.

    1993-01-01

    Describes hands-on activities with fungi that may provoke the curiosity of early adolescents and increase their enjoyment and understanding of a vast, important portion of botany. Some of the activities may be conducted during the winter months when most fieldwork ceases. (PR)

  4. Senescence in Fungi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 7; Issue 3. Senescence in Fungi. Anthony Deepak D'souza Ramesh Maheshwari. General Article Volume 7 Issue 3 March 2002 pp 51-55. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/007/03/0051-0055 ...

  5. Senescence in Fungi

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fungi are non-photosynthetic, filamentous organisms (Box 1). The filaments or the hyphae are branched and divided into segments by transverse walls or septa. The growth of the hypha is restricted to its tip, which grows linearly by the apical addi- tion of new cell wall material. The hyphal tip perpetuates itself.

  6. Co-Inoculation Effects of Thiobacillus thiooxidans Bacteria and Mycorrhiza (Glomus spp. on Maize Nutrition at Different Levels of Sulfur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Gholami

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Sulfur is the key element for higher crops and plays an important role in the formation of proteins, vitamins, and enzymes. It is a constituent of amino acids such as cysteine and methionine, which act for the synthesis of other compounds containing reduced sulfur, such as chlorophyll and utilization of phosphorus and otheressential nutrients.Deficiency of this nutrient in soil is usually compensated by using chemical fertilizers. However, these fertilizers have harmful effects on the environment and decrease the quality of the agriculture products. Therefore, biological fertilizers are more useful for using in agricultural ecosystems.Sulfurshould be addedto the soil, usually in a reduced form such as elemental sulfur. Use of S oxidizers enhances the rate of natural oxidation of S and speeds up the production of sulfates and makes them available to plants consequently resulting in an increased plant yield. The role of chemolithotrophic bacteria of the genus Thiobacillus through oxidation process in the soil is usually emphasized. Sulfur oxidation is the most important step of sulfur cycle, which improves soil fertility. The result is formation of sulfate, which can be used by the plants, while the acidity produced by oxidation helps to solubilize nutrients in alkaline soils. These bacteria can solubilise the soil minerals through the production of H2SO4 that reacts with these non-soluble minerals and oxidised them to be available nutrients to the cultivated plants. Arbuscular MycorrhizalFungi isan important component ofthe microbiota, mutualistic symbioticsoilfungithatcolonizesthe rootsofmost cropplants.The AM symbiosis involves an about 80% of land plant species and 92% of plant families. They have theability to enhance host uptake of relativelyimmobile nutrientsparticularly phosphorus (P andzinc (Zn,Manganese (Mn andiron(Fe.Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi increased plant uptake of phosphorus, nitrogen and water absorption

  7. Philatelic Mycology: Families of Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marasas, W.F.O.; Marasas, H.M.; Wingfield, M.J.; Crous, P.W.

    2014-01-01

    Philately, the study of postage stamps, and mycology, the study of fungi, are seldom connected by those that practice these very different activities. When associated, philatelic mycology would be considered as the study of fungi on stamps. The Fungi touch every aspect of our daily lives, most

  8. Impact of abiotic factors on development of the community of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the soil: a Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamiołkowska, Agnieszka; Księżniak, Andrzej; Gałązka, Anna; Hetman, Beata; Kopacki, Marek; Skwaryło-Bednarz, Barbara

    2018-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi inhabiting soil play an important role for vascular plants. Interaction between arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, plants and soil microorganisms leads to many mutual advantages. However, the effectiveness of mycorrhizal fungi depends not only on biotic, but also abiotic factors such as physico-chemical properties of the soil, availability of water and biogenic elements, agricultural practices, and climatic conditions. First of all, it is important to adapt the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi species to changing environmental conditions. The compactness of the soil and its structure have a huge impact on its biological activity. Soil pH reaction has a substantial impact on the mobility of ions in soil dilutions and their uptake by plants and soil microflora. Water excess can be a factor negatively affecting arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi because these microorganisms are sensitive to a lower availability of oxygen. Mechanical cultivation of the soil has a marginal impact on the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi spores. However, soil translocation can cause changes to the population of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi abundance in the soil profile. The geographical location and topographic differentiation of cultivated soils, as well as the variability of climatic factors affect the population of the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi in the soils and their symbiotic activity.

  9. Sexual selection in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwenhuis, B P S; Aanen, D K

    2012-12-01

    The significance of sexual selection, the component of natural selection associated with variation in mating success, is well established for the evolution of animals and plants, but not for the evolution of fungi. Even though fungi do not have separate sexes, most filamentous fungi mate in a hermaphroditic fashion, with distinct sex roles, that is, investment in large gametes (female role) and fertilization by other small gametes (male role). Fungi compete to fertilize, analogous to 'male-male' competition, whereas they can be selective when being fertilized, analogous to female choice. Mating types, which determine genetic compatibility among fungal gametes, are important for sexual selection in two respects. First, genes at the mating-type loci regulate different aspects of mating and thus can be subject to sexual selection. Second, for sexual selection, not only the two sexes (or sex roles) but also the mating types can form the classes, the members of which compete for access to members of the other class. This is significant if mating-type gene products are costly, thus signalling genetic quality according to Zahavi's handicap principle. We propose that sexual selection explains various fungal characteristics such as the observed high redundancy of pheromones at the B mating-type locus of Agaricomycotina, the occurrence of multiple types of spores in Ascomycotina or the strong pheromone signalling in yeasts. Furthermore, we argue that fungi are good model systems to experimentally study fundamental aspects of sexual selection, due to their fast generation times and high diversity of life cycles and mating systems. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  10. Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers for Tulasnella (Tulasnellaceae) mycorrhizal fungi associated with Australian orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruibal, Monica P; Peakall, Rod; Smith, Leon M; Linde, Celeste C

    2013-03-01

    Phylogenetic and microsatellite markers were developed for Tulasnella mycorrhizal fungi to investigate fungal species identity and diversity. These markers will be useful in future studies investigating the phylogenetic relationship of the fungal symbionts, specificity of orchid-mycorrhizal associations, and the role of mycorrhizae in orchid speciation within several orchid genera. • We generated partial genome sequences of two Tulasnella symbionts originating from Chiloglottis and Drakaea orchid species with 454 genome sequencing. Cross-genus transferability across mycorrhizal symbionts associated with multiple genera of Australian orchids (Arthrochilus, Chiloglottis, Drakaea, and Paracaleana) was found for seven phylogenetic loci. Five loci showed cross-transferability to Tulasnella from other orchid genera, and two to Sebacina. Furthermore, 11 polymorphic microsatellite loci were developed for Tulasnella from Chiloglottis. • Highly informative markers were obtained, allowing investigation of mycorrhizal diversity of Tulasnellaceae associated with a wide variety of terrestrial orchids in Australia and potentially worldwide.

  11. No significant contribution of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi to transfer of radiocesium from soil to plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joner, E J; Roos, P; Jansa, J; Frossard, E; Leyval, C; Jakobsen, I

    2004-11-01

    The diffuse pollution by fission and activation products following nuclear accidents and weapons testing is of major public concern. Among the nuclides that pose a serious risk if they enter the human food chain are the cesium isotopes 137Cs and 134Cs (with half-lives of 30 and 2 years, respectively). The biogeochemical cycling of these isotopes in forest ecosystems is strongly affected by their preferential absorption in a range of ectomycorrhiza-forming basidiomycetes. An even more widely distributed group of symbiotic fungi are the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, which colonize most herbaceous plants, including many agricultural crops. These fungi are known to be more efficient than ectomycorrhizas in transporting mineral elements from soil to plants. Their role in the biogeochemical cycling of Cs is poorly known, in spite of the consequences that fungal Cs transport may have for transfer of Cs into the human food chain. This report presents the first data on transport of Cs by these fungi by use of radiotracers and compartmented growth systems where uptake by roots and mycorrhizal hyphae is distinguished. Independent experiments in three laboratories that used different combinations of fungi and host plants all demonstrated that these fungi do not contribute significantly to plant uptake of Cs. The implications of these findings for the bioavailability of radiocesium in different terrestrial ecosystems are discussed.

  12. Arbuscular Mycorrhiza Augments Arsenic Tolerance in Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Strengthening Antioxidant Defense System and Thiol Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Surbhi; Anand, Garima; Singh, Neeraja; Kapoor, Rupam

    2017-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) can help plants to tolerate arsenic (As) toxicity. However, plant responses are found to vary with the host plant and the AM fungal species. The present study compares the efficacy of two AM fungi Rhizoglomus intraradices (M1) and Glomus etunicatum (M2) in amelioration of As stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L. var. HD-2967). Mycorrhizal (M) and non-mycorrhizal (NM) wheat plants were subjected to four levels of As (0, 25, 50, and 100 mg As kg-1 soil). Although As additions had variable effects on the percentage of root colonized by the two fungal inoculants, each mycobiont conferred benefits to the host plant. Mycorrhizal plants continued to display better growth than NM plants. Formation of AM helped the host plant to overcome As-induced P deficiency and maintained favorable P:As ratio. Inoculation of AMF had variable effects on the distribution of As in plant tissues. While As translocation factor decreased in low As (25 mg kg-1 soil), it increased under high As (50 and 100 mg As kg-1 soil). Further As translocation to grain was reduced (As grain:shoot ratio) in M plants compared with NM plants. Arsenic-induced oxidative stress (generation of H2O2 and lipid peroxidation) in plants reduced significantly by AMF inoculation. The alleviation potential of AM was more evident with increase in severity of As stress. Colonization of AMF resulted in higher activities of the antioxidant enzymes (superoxide dismutase, catalase, and guaiacol peroxidase). It increased the concentrations of the antioxidant molecules (carotenoids, proline, and α-tocopherol) than their NM counterparts at high As addition level. Comparatively higher activities of enzymes of glutathione-ascorbate cycle in M plants led to higher ascorbate:dehydroascorbate (AsA:DHA) and glutathione:glutathione disulphide (GSH:GSSG) ratios. Inoculation by AMF also augmented the glyoxalase system by increasing the activities of both glyoxalase I and glyoxalase II enzymes. Mycorrhizal

  13. Dinâmica e contribuição da micorriza arbuscular em sistemas de produção com rotação de culturas Dynamics and contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza in culture systems with crop rotation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne Christine Claessen de Miranda

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Rotação de culturas e variações sazonais podem promover alterações quantitativas e qualitativas na comunidade de fungos micorrízicos arbusculares nativos e na formação da micorriza arbuscular. Essa dinâmica foi avaliada, em campo, num Latossolo Vermelho, em relação ao tempo de cultivo e variação sazonal, em sistemas de rotação de culturas. Em casa de vegetação, avaliou-se, em solo proveniente da área experimental, a contribuição da micorriza arbuscular no crescimento de soja e capim-andropógon utilizados na rotação. O número de esporos dos fungos aumentou no solo cultivado. O número de esporos e o porcentual de colonização radicular, inicialmente maiores sob pastagem, variaram de acordo com o tempo de cultivo, as estações seca e chuvosa, a cultura e o sistema de rotação utilizados. O número de gêneros e espécies aumentou com o tempo de cultivo e manejo de culturas e foi maior sob culturas anuais em rotação. A presença dos fungos no solo contribuiu no crescimento da soja e do capim-andropógon em 53% e 95%, respectivamente. A cultura e o sistema de cultivo são fatores determinantes para o enriquecimento do sistema com micorriza arbuscular.Crop rotation and seasonal variations can promote quantitative and qualitative changes in the indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi population in the soil and arbuscular mycorrhiza establishment. These fungi dynamics were evaluated in the field, in a Red Latosol, in relation to cropping time, seasonal variation and rotation systems. The contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza to the growth of andropogon grass and soybean, which were used in the systems, was evaluated in a greenhouse experiment using soil from the experimental area. The number of spores of the fungi increased in the cultivated soil. The spores number and percent root colonization varied according to cropping time, soil moisture, crops and rotation system and were, initially, higher under pasture. The number

  14. Outbursts In Symbiotic Binaries (FUSE 2000)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Scott J.; Sonneborn, George (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the past year, we made good progress on analysis of FUSE observations of the symbiotic binary Z And. For background, Z And is a binary system composed of a red giant and a hot component of unknown status. The orbital period is roughly 750 days. The hot component undergoes large-scale eruptions every 10-20 yr. An outburst began several years ago, triggering this FUSE opportunity. First, we obtained an excellent set of ground-based optical data in support, of the FUSE observations. We used FAST, a high throughput low resolution spectrograph on the 1.5-m telescope at Mt. Hopkins, Arizona. A 300 g/ mm grating blazed at 4750 A, a 3 in. slit, and a thinned Loral 512 x 2688 CCD gave us spectra covering 3800-7500 A at a resolution of 6 A. The wavelength solution for each spectrum has a probable error of +/- 0.5 A or better. Most of the resulting spectra have moderate signal-to-noise, S/.N approx. greater than 30 per pixel. The time coverage for these spectra is excellent. Typically, we acquired spectra every 1-2 nights during dark runs at Mt. Hopkins. These data cover most of the rise and all of the decline of the recent outburst. The spectra show a wealth of emission lines, including H I, He I, He II, [Fe V11], and the Raman scattering bands at 6830 A and 7088 A. The Raman bands and other high ionization features vary considerably throughout the outburst. These features will enable us to correlate variations in the FUSE spectra with variations in the optical spectra. Second, we began an analysis of FUSE spectra of Z And. We have carefully examined the spectra, identifying real features and defects. We have identified and measured fluxes for all strong emission lines, including the O VI doublet at 1032 A and 1038 A. These and several other strong emission lines display pronounced P Cygni absorption components indicative of outgrowing gas. We will attempt to correlate these velocities with similar profiles observed on optical spectra. The line velocities - together

  15. Research on: A. Reclamation of borrow pits and denuded lands; B. Biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae of forest trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marx, D.H. (comp.)

    1990-12-01

    This report furnishes a list of compiled and ongoing studies and a list of publications which resulted from the research accomplished by Institute scientists and other collaborators. The research accomplished can be placed in four categories: I. Research on borrow pit rehabilitation with 12 publications; II. Research on artificial regeneration of southern pines with 34 publications; III. Research on artificial regeneration of eastern hardwoods with 16 publications; and IV. Cooperative research with the University of Georgia on biochemical aspects of mycorrhizae with 5 publications. Major accomplishments of this research are: 1. Procedures to successfully reclaim borrow pits with sludge, subsoiling and seedlings with specific mycorrhizae. 2. Protocols to successfully artificially regenerate southern pines (particularly ling leaf pine) and certain eastern hardwoods. 3. Basic understanding of the biochemistry of mycorrhizae and the discovery of a new pathway for sucrose utilization in plants. 67 refs.

  16. Response of free-living soil protozoa and microorganisms to elevated atmospheric CO2 and presence of mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønn, R.; Gavito, M.; Larsen, J.

    2002-01-01

    Possible interactions between mycorrhiza, atmospheric CO2, free-living soil microorganisms and protozoa were investigated in pot experimental systems. Pea plants (Pisum sativum L. cv. Solara) were grown under ambient (360 mul l(-1)) or elevated (700 mul l(-1)) atmospheric CO2 concentration...... with or without the presence of the arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus caledonium. It was hypothesised that (1) the populations of free-living soil protozoa would increase as a response to elevated CO2, (2) the effect of elevated CO2 on protozoa would be moderated by the presence of mycorrhiza and (3......) the presence of arbuscular mycorrhiza would affect soil protozoan numbers regardless of atmospheric CO2. After 3 weeks growth there was no difference in bacterial numbers (direct counts) in soil, but the number of free-living bacterial-feeding protozoa was significantly higher under elevated CO2...

  17. Comprehensive EST analysis of the symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deleury Emeline

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral reef ecosystems are renowned for their diversity and beauty. Their immense ecological success is due to a symbiotic association between cnidarian hosts and unicellular dinoflagellate algae, known as zooxanthellae. These algae are photosynthetic and the cnidarian-zooxanthellae association is based on nutritional exchanges. Maintenance of such an intimate cellular partnership involves many crosstalks between the partners. To better characterize symbiotic relationships between a cnidarian host and its dinoflagellate symbionts, we conducted a large-scale EST study on a symbiotic sea anemone, Anemonia viridis, in which the two tissue layers (epiderm and gastroderm can be easily separated. Results A single cDNA library was constructed from symbiotic tissue of sea anemones A. viridis in various environmental conditions (both normal and stressed. We generated 39,939 high quality ESTs, which were assembled into 14,504 unique sequences (UniSeqs. Sequences were analysed and sorted according to their putative origin (animal, algal or bacterial. We identified many new repeated elements in the 3'UTR of most animal genes, suggesting that these elements potentially have a biological role, especially with respect to gene expression regulation. We identified genes of animal origin that have no homolog in the non-symbiotic starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis genome, but in other symbiotic cnidarians, and may therefore be involved in the symbiosis relationship in A. viridis. Comparison of protein domain occurrence in A. viridis with that in N. vectensis demonstrated an increase in abundance of some molecular functions, such as protein binding or antioxidant activity, suggesting that these functions are essential for the symbiotic state and may be specific adaptations. Conclusion This large dataset of sequences provides a valuable resource for future studies on symbiotic interactions in Cnidaria. The comparison with the closest

  18. Mycorrhizal fungi increase coffee plants competitiveness against Bidens pilosa interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Cabral França

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycorrhizae provide several benefits to coffee plants. This study evaluated whether these benefits influence the damage caused by the Bidens pilosa competition with coffee seedlings. A randomized blocks design was used, with treatments established in a 2 x 3 factorial scheme (presence and absence of B. pilosa interference in non-inoculated control or plants inoculated with either Claroideoglomus etunicatum or Dentiscutata heterogama. Coffee seedlings were inoculated with fungi spores and developed for 120 days. Then, they were subjected to the interference of B. pilosa for more 120 days, when data were collected for growth traits, mycorrhizal colonization, dry matter and foliar nutrient concentrations in coffee plants. Dry matter and nutrient contents in B. pilosa plants were also evaluated. Inoculation provided better growth and nutrition of coffee plants. The competition with B. pilosa reduced mycorrhizal colonization, height, leaf area, leaf and stem dry mass, root dry weight, number of reproductive branches and levels of P and Fe in the coffee plants. However, the harmful effect of the interference was lower in inoculated coffee plants. The dry mass of B. pilosa decreased under the interference of inoculated coffee plants. The inoculation of C. etunicatum and D. heterogama in Arabica coffee seedlings increases the competitiveness of the crop against B. pilosa interference.

  19. Effects of Cropping System and Cowpea Variety on Symbiotic Potential and Yields of Cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp and Pearl Millet (Pennisetum glaucum L. in the Sudano-Sahelian Zone of Mali

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoumana Kouyaté

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Many cowpea varieties (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp have been proposed by research in Mali. None of these varieties were investigated for their symbiotic potential in terms of root nodulation and mycorrhizal infection. An experiment was conducted at Cinzana Research Station, from 2007 to 2009 with an objective to identify a cowpea variety with high symbiotic potential which may improve millet/cowpea cropping global production. Randomized complete block (RCBD design with a factorial combination of 3 cowpea varieties (IT89KD-374, CZ1-94-23-1, and CZ11-94-5C and 2 cropping systems (millet/cowpea intercropping and cowpea-millet rotation was used. On farm test was conducted to evaluate CZ11-94-5C and IT89KD-374 nodulation performance. Cowpea variety CZ11-94-5-C had the highest nodule number and nodule weight. Millet/cowpea alternate rows intercropping (1/1, only, had a significant influence on cowpea root infection rates by mycorrhizae, on the 45th day after emergence. IT89KD-374 gave the best cowpea grain yield (1540 kg ha−1 in sole crop. The highest millet grain yield (1650 kg ha−1 was obtained under CZ11-94-5C-millet rotation. Farmers' fields assessments results confirmed CZ11-94-5C performance on research station. The CZ11-94-5C cowpea variety needs to be more characterized.

  20. Mycorrhizae Alter Toxin Sequestration and Performance of Two Specialist Herbivores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda R. Meier

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Multitrophic species interactions are shaped by both top-down and bottom-up factors. Belowground symbionts of plants, such as arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF, can alter the strength of these forces by altering plant phenotype. For example, AMF-mediated changes in foliar toxin and nutrient concentrations may influence herbivore growth and fecundity. In addition, many specialist herbivores sequester toxins from their host plants to resist natural enemies, and the extent of sequestration varies with host plant secondary chemistry. Therefore, by altering plant phenotype, AMF may affect both herbivore performance and their resistance to natural enemies. We examined how inoculation of plants with AMF influences toxin sequestration and performance of two specialist herbivores feeding upon four milkweed species (Asclepias incarnata, A. curassavica, A. latifolia, A. syriaca. We raised aphids (Aphis nerii and caterpillars (Danaus plexippus on plants for 6 days in a fully factorial manipulation of milkweed species and level of AMF inoculation (zero, medium, and high. We then assessed aphid and caterpillar sequestration of toxins (cardenolides and performance, and measured defensive and nutritive traits of control plants. Aphids and caterpillars sequestered higher concentrations of cardenolides from plants inoculated with AMF across all milkweed species. Aphid per capita growth rates and aphid body mass varied non-linearly with increasing AMF inoculum availability; across all milkweed species, aphids had the lowest performance under medium levels of AMF availability and highest performance under high AMF availability. In contrast, caterpillar survival varied strongly with AMF availability in a plant species-specific manner, and caterpillar growth was unaffected by AMF. Inoculation with AMF increased foliar cardenolide concentrations consistently among milkweed species, but altered aboveground biomasses and foliar phosphorous concentrations in a plant

  1. Fighting malaria with engineered symbiotic bacteria from vector mosquitoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Sibao; Ghosh, Anil K.; Bongio, Nicholas; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Lampe, David J.; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2012-01-01

    The most vulnerable stages of Plasmodium development occur in the lumen of the mosquito midgut, a compartment shared with symbiotic bacteria. Here, we describe a strategy that uses symbiotic bacteria to deliver antimalaria effector molecules to the midgut lumen, thus rendering host mosquitoes refractory to malaria infection. The Escherichia coli hemolysin A secretion system was used to promote the secretion of a variety of anti-Plasmodium effector proteins by Pantoea agglomerans, a common mosquito symbiotic bacterium. These engineered P. agglomerans strains inhibited development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum and rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei by up to 98%. Significantly, the proportion of mosquitoes carrying parasites (prevalence) decreased by up to 84% for two of the effector molecules, scorpine, a potent antiplasmodial peptide and (EPIP)4, four copies of Plasmodium enolase–plasminogen interaction peptide that prevents plasminogen binding to the ookinete surface. We demonstrate the use of an engineered symbiotic bacterium to interfere with the development of P. falciparum in the mosquito. These findings provide the foundation for the use of genetically modified symbiotic bacteria as a powerful tool to combat malaria. PMID:22802646

  2. Comparative response of six grapevine rootstocks to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi based on root traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogiatzis, Antreas; Bowen, Pat; Hart, Miranda; Holland, Taylor; Klironomos, John

    2017-04-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiosis has been proven to be essential in grapevines, sustaining plant growth especially under abiotic and biotic stressors. The mycorrhizal growth response of young grapevines varies among rootstock cultivars and the underlying mechanisms involved in this variation are unknown. We predicted that this variation in mycorrhizal response may be explained by differences in root traits among rootstocks. We analyzed the entire root system of six greenhouse-grown rootstocks (Salt Creek, 3309 Couderc, Riparia Gloire, 101-14 Millardet et de Grasset, Swarzmann, Teleki 5C), with and without AM fungal inoculation (Rhizophagus irregularis) and characterized their morphological and architectural responses. Twenty weeks after the inoculation, aboveground growth was enhanced by AM colonization. The rootstock varieties were distinctly different in their response to AM fungi, with Salt Creek receiving the highest growth benefit, while Schwarzmann and 5C Teleki receiving the lowest. Plant responsiveness to AM fungi was negatively correlated with branching intensity (fine roots per root length). Furthermore, there was evidence that mycorrhizas can influence the expression of root traits, inducing a higher branching intensity and a lower root to shoot ratio. The results of this study will help to elucidate how interactions between grapevine rootstocks and AM fungi may benefit the establishment of new vineyards.

  3. Preliminary findings on identification of mycorrhizal fungi from diverse orchids in the Central Highlands of Madagascar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoya, Kazutomo; Zettler, Lawrence W; Kendon, Jonathan P; Bidartondo, Martin I; Stice, Andrew L; Skarha, Shannon; Corey, Laura L; Knight, Audrey C; Sarasan, Viswambharan

    2015-11-01

    The Orchid flora of Madagascar is one of the most diverse with nearly 1000 orchid taxa, of which about 90% are endemic to this biodiversity hotspot. The Itremo Massif in the Central Highlands of Madagascar with a Highland Subtropical climate range encompasses montane grassland, igneous and metamorphic rock outcrops, and gallery and tapia forests. Our study focused on identifying culturable mycorrhizae from epiphytic, lithophytic, and terrestrial orchid taxa to understand their diversity and density in a spatial matrix that is within the protected areas. We have collected both juvenile and mature roots from 41 orchid taxa for isolating their orchid mycorrhizal fungi (OMF), and to culture, identify, and store in liquid nitrogen for future studies. Twelve operational taxonomic units (OTUs), of three known orchid mycorrhizal genera, were recognized by analysis of internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of 85 isolates, and, by comparing with GenBank database entries, each OTU was shown to have closely related fungi that were also found as orchid associates. Orchid and fungal diversity were greater in gallery forests and open grasslands, which is very significant for future studies and orchid conservation. As far as we know, this is the first ever report of detailed identification of mycorrhizal fungi from Madagascar. This study will help start to develop a programme for identifying fungal symbionts from this unique biodiversity hotspot, which is undergoing rapid ecosystem damage and species loss. The diversity of culturable fungal associates, their density, and distribution within the Itremo orchid hotspot areas will be discussed.

  4. Effect of Household Solid Waste on Initial Growth Performance of Acacia auriculiformis and Cedrela toona in Mycorrhiza Inoculated Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Abdullah-Al-Mamun

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Solid waste disposal and management became one of the major environmental concerns in Bangladesh. Realising the problem, the present study has been undertaken with a view to find a sound and effective way of bio-degradable solid waste management. The study was carried out in the nursery of Institute of Forestry and Environmental Sciences at University of Chittagong to determine the effects of solid waste and waste inoculated with mycorrhizal soil on initial growth performance of Acacia auriculiformis and Cedrela toona. Before planting the seedlings, decomposable waste and mycorrhiza inoculated decomposable waste were placed on the planting holes. Physical growth parameters of seedlings (shoot and root length, leaf and branch number, fresh and dry weight of shoot and root and nodulation status and the macro nutrients (N, P and K were recorded after six months of planting. The highest performance of physical parameters was recorded in the soil treated by mycorrhiza inoculated waste. Cedrela toona was represented by maximum nutrients uptake (N-2.60%, P-0.21% and K-2.34% respectively in the soil treated with mycorrhiza. In case of Acacia auriculiformis, N uptake was maximum (3.02% in control while K uptake was highest (1.27% in soil with waste and P (0.18% uptake was highest in the soil treated with mycorrhiza inoculated waste. Highest initial growth performance was revealed by seedlings treated with mycorrhiza inoculated waste. This study suggested to use mycorrhiza and waste for plantation purposes for hygienic disposal of solid waste and to reduce cost of cultivation.

  5. Continent-wide distribution in mycorrhizal fungi: implications for the biogeography of specialized orchids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Belinda J; Phillips, Ryan D; Wright, Magali; Linde, Celeste C; Dixon, Kingsley W

    2015-09-01

    Although mycorrhizal associations are predominantly generalist, specialized mycorrhizal interactions have repeatedly evolved in Orchidaceae, suggesting a potential role in limiting the geographical range of orchid species. In particular, the Australian orchid flora is characterized by high mycorrhizal specialization and short-range endemism. This study investigates the mycorrhizae used by Pheladenia deformis, one of the few orchid species to occur across the Australian continent. Specifically, it examines whether P. deformis is widely distributed through using multiple fungi or a single widespread fungus, and if the fungi used by Australian orchids are widespread at the continental scale. Mycorrhizal fungi were isolated from P. deformis populations in eastern and western Australia. Germination trials using seed from western Australian populations were conducted to test if these fungi supported germination, regardless of the region in which they occurred. A phylogenetic analysis was undertaken using isolates from P. deformis and other Australian orchids that use the genus Sebacina to test for the occurrence of operational taxonomic units (OTUs) in eastern and western Australia. With the exception of one isolate, all fungi used by P. deformis belonged to a single fungal OTU of Sebacina. Fungal isolates from eastern and western Australia supported germination of P. deformis. A phylogenetic analysis of Australian Sebacina revealed that all of the OTUs that had been well sampled occurred on both sides of the continent. The use of a widespread fungal OTU in P. deformis enables a broad distribution despite high mycorrhizal specificity. The Sebacina OTUs that are used by a range of Australian orchids occur on both sides of the continent, demonstrating that the short-range endemism prevalent in the orchids is not driven by fungal species with narrow distributions. Alternatively, a combination of specific edaphic requirements and a high incidence of pollination by sexual

  6. Endophytic fungi in elms

    OpenAIRE

    Blumenstein, Kathrin

    2015-01-01

    Integrated pest management calls for new biocontrol solutions in management of forest diseases. Endophytic fungi that are commonly found in tree tissue may have potential in biocontrol. However, the links between endophyte status and disease tolerance are still unclear, and we know little about the mechanisms by which the endophytes can influence tree pathogens. The first goal of the thesis was to compare the endophyte status in elm (Ulmus spp.) trees with low vs. high susceptibility t...

  7. Deep-sea fungi

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raghukumar, C.; Damare, S.

    > and can reach fresh habitats. It has been recently reported that spores of Aspergillus sydowii are croTied from the Saharan deserts across the Atlantic Ocean during dust storm!) to the Carihhean islands and cause aspergillosis disease in seafan~(87). Fungi... hand, heat shock pre treatment increased barotolerance in S. cerevisiae (strain IFO-0224) cells, indicating that hydrostatic pressure and high temperature may have the same physiological effects on this yeast (31). Heat shock treatment also prevented...

  8. Symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. with an echinoderm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); De Ridder, C. [Univ. Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels (Belgium). Lab. de Biologie Marine

    1998-09-01

    Thiothrix-like bacteria have been reported as symbionts in invertebrates from sulfide-rich habitats. Isolation of these symbiotic Thiothrix-like bacteria has failed, and the organisms have not been previously identified with certainty. The genus Thiothrix was created for ensheathed filamentous bacteria that oxidize sulfide and deposit sulfur granules internally, attach to substrates, produce gliding gonidia, and form rosettes. Immunoassay procedures were used to investigate the symbiotic relationship of Thiothrix spp. in the intestinal cecum of the spatangoid species Echinocardium cordatum. Thiothrix spp. were identified in nodule samples from E. cordatum digestive tubes based on microscopic examination, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and indirect immunofluorescence. Thiothrix spp. protein made up as much as 84% of the total protein content of the nodules. This is the first identification of Thiothrix spp. internally symbiotic with marine invertebrates.

  9. Non-symbiotic hemoglobin and its relation with hypoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Riquelme

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Today we know that several types of hemoglobins exist in plants. The symbiotic hemoglobins were discovered in 1939 and are only found in nodules of plants capable of symbiotically fixing atmospheric N. Another class, called non-symbiotic hemoglobin, was discovered 32 yr ago and is now thought to exist throughout the plant kingdom, being expressed in different organs and tissues. Recently the existence of another type of hemoglobin, called truncated hemoglobin, was demonstrated in plants. Although the presence of hemoglobins is widespread in the plant kingdom, their role has not yet been fully elucidated. This review discusses recent findings regarding the role of plant hemoglobins, with special emphasis on their relationship to plants adaptation to hypoxia. It also discusses the role of nitric oxide in plant cells under hypoxic conditions, since one of the functions of hemoglobin appears to be modulating nitric oxide levels in the cells.

  10. Early phosphorus nutrition, mycorrhizae development, dry matter partitioning and yield of maize

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gavito, M.E.; Miller, M.H.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a field experiment to test the hypothesis that improved phosphorus nutrition occurs in maize plants with rapid arbuscular (AM) mycorrhizae development at early developmental stages and that this also is reflected in dry matter allocation and final yield. A split-split plot design...... to a mycorrhizal mycelium network (no-tillage treatments). Maize yield and harvest index were lower after cropping With canola. The yield for conventional tillage was higher than that for no-tillage but the harvest index was lower. The hypothesis was supported at early stages of maize growth by the effect...

  11. Nuclear movement in fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Xin

    2017-12-11

    Nuclear movement within a cell occurs in a variety of eukaryotic organisms including yeasts and filamentous fungi. Fungal molecular genetic studies identified the minus-end-directed microtubule motor cytoplasmic dynein as a critical protein for nuclear movement or orientation of the mitotic spindle contained in the nucleus. Studies in the budding yeast first indicated that dynein anchored at the cortex via its anchoring protein Num1 exerts pulling force on an astral microtubule to orient the anaphase spindle across the mother-daughter axis before nuclear division. Prior to anaphase, myosin V interacts with the plus end of an astral microtubule via Kar9-Bim1/EB1 and pulls the plus end along the actin cables to move the nucleus/spindle close to the bud neck. In addition, pushing or pulling forces generated from cortex-linked polymerization or depolymerization of microtubules drive nuclear movements in yeasts and possibly also in filamentous fungi. In filamentous fungi, multiple nuclei within a hyphal segment undergo dynein-dependent back-and-forth movements and their positioning is also influenced by cytoplasmic streaming toward the hyphal tip. In addition, nuclear movement occurs at various stages of fungal development and fungal infection of plant tissues. This review discusses our current understanding on the mechanisms of nuclear movement in fungal organisms, the importance of nuclear positioning and the regulatory strategies that ensure the proper positioning of nucleus/spindle. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Nodulation outer proteins: double-edged swords of symbiotic rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staehelin, Christian; Krishnan, Hari B

    2015-09-15

    Rhizobia are nitrogen-fixing bacteria that establish a nodule symbiosis with legumes. Nodule formation depends on signals and surface determinants produced by both symbiotic partners. Among them, rhizobial Nops (nodulation outer proteins) play a crucial symbiotic role in many strain-host combinations. Nops are defined as proteins secreted via a rhizobial T3SS (type III secretion system). Functional T3SSs have been characterized in many rhizobial strains. Nops have been identified using various genetic, biochemical, proteomic, genomic and experimental approaches. Certain Nops represent extracellular components of the T3SS, which are visible in electron micrographs as bacterial surface appendages called T3 (type III) pili. Other Nops are T3 effector proteins that can be translocated into plant cells. Rhizobial T3 effectors manipulate cellular processes in host cells to suppress plant defence responses against rhizobia and to promote symbiosis-related processes. Accordingly, mutant strains deficient in synthesis or secretion of T3 effectors show reduced symbiotic properties on certain host plants. On the other hand, direct or indirect recognition of T3 effectors by plant cells expressing specific R (resistance) proteins can result in effector triggered defence responses that negatively affect rhizobial infection. Hence Nops are double-edged swords that may promote establishment of symbiosis with one legume (symbiotic factors) and impair symbiotic processes when bacteria are inoculated on another legume species (asymbiotic factors). In the present review, we provide an overview of our current understanding of Nops. We summarize their symbiotic effects, their biochemical properties and their possible modes of action. Finally, we discuss future perspectives in the field of T3 effector research. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  13. The effects of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and phosphorus levels ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2015-01-21

    Jan 21, 2015 ... Burleigh SH, Cavagnaro T, Jakobsen I (2002). Functional diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizas extends to the expression of plant genes involved in P nutrition. J. Exp. Bot. 53:1593-1601. Demir S (2004). Influence of arbuscular mycorrhiza on some physiological‚ growth parameters of pepper. Turkish J. Biol.

  14. Temporal dynamics of ectomycorrhizal fungi and persistence of Tuber melanosporum in inoculated Quercus robur seedlings in North Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsing, Eveli; Tedersoo, Leho

    2015-01-01

    Tuber melanosporum is widely cultivated outside its natural habitat in various climatic conditions. This study aims to monitor the persistence of T. melanosporum in inoculated oak seedlings and document temporal changes of native ectomycorrhizal fungi in an Estonian 5-year-old plantation. Sampling of ectomycorrhizal fungi was carried out in June-July 2011-2013 to provide DNA-based identification of the inoculated truffle species and other co-occurring ectomycorrhizal fungi. The mycorrhiza of T. melanosporum proved resistant to cold winters, and the fungus persisted well in the root systems of surviving seedlings albeit slight decline in relative colonization level over 3 years. We identified the genera Hymenogaster and Hebeloma to be the dominant ectomycorrhizal competing fungi in root systems. Good vegetative growth of mycelia and the presence of two compatible mating types suggest that cultivation of T. melanosporum is possible in the Nordic climate. Evaluation of fruit-body production will be a critical next step, because fruiting efficiency allows to determine economic feasibility and ecological sustainability of the Périgord truffle cultivation in northern climate.

  15. Do photobionts influence the ecology of lichens? A case study of environmental preferences in symbiotic green alga Asterochloris (Trebouxiophyceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peksa, Ondřej; Skaloud, Pavel

    2011-09-01

    The distribution patterns of symbiotic algae are thought to be conferred mainly by their hosts, however, they may originate in algal environmental requirements as well. In lichens, predominantly terrestrial associations of fungi with algae or cyanobacteria, the ecological preferences of photobionts have not been directly studied so far. Here, we examine the putative environmental requirements in lichenized alga Asterochloris, and search for the existence of ecological guilds in Asterochloris-associating lichens. Therefore, the presence of phylogenetic signal in several environmental traits was tested. Phylogenetic analysis based on the concatenated set of internal transcribed spacer rDNA and actin type I intron sequences from photobionts associated with lichens of the genera Lepraria and Stereocaulon (Stereocaulaceae, Ascomycota) revealed 13 moderately to well-resolved clades. Photobionts from particular algal clades were found to be associated with taxonomically different, but ecologically similar lichens. The rain and sun exposure were the most significant environmental factor, clearly distinguishing the Asterochloris lineages. The photobionts from ombrophobic and ombrophilic lichens were clustered in completely distinct clades. Moreover, two photobiont taxa were obviously differentiated based on their substrate and climatic preferences. Our study, thus reveals that the photobiont, generally the subsidiary member of the symbiotic lichen association, could exhibit clear preferences for environmental factors. These algal preferences may limit the ecological niches available to lichens and lead to the existence of specific lichen guilds. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Effect of Subliminal Stimulation of Symbiotic Fantasies on Behavior Modification Treatment of Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    And Others; Silverman, Lloyd H.

    1978-01-01

    Obese women were treated in behavior modification programs for overeating. Behavior programs were accompanied by subliminal stimulation and by symbiotic and control messages. The symbiotic condition gave evidence of enhancing weight loss. This finding supports the proposition that subliminal stimulation of symbiotic fantasies can enhance the…

  17. Late activation of the 9-oxylipin pathway during arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in tomato and its regulation by jasmonate signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Angel, José; Martín-Rodríguez; Vierheilig, Horst; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2012-06-01

    The establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic interaction is a successful strategy for the promotion of substantial plant growth, development, and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the establishment of functional AM symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed up-regulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and indicate a key regulatory role for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly those derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOXs). Continuing with the tomato as a model, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of genes involved in the 9-LOX pathway during the different stages of AM formation in tomato was analysed. The effects of JA signalling pathway changes on AM fungal colonization were assessed and correlated with the modifications in the transcriptional profiles of 9-LOX genes. The up-regulation of the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway in mycorrhizal wild-type roots seems to depend on a particular degree of AM fungal colonization and is restricted to the colonized part of the roots, suggesting that these genes could play a role in controlling fungal spread in roots. In addition, the results suggest that this strategy of the plant to control AM fungi development within the roots is at least partly dependent on JA pathway activation.

  18. Late activation of the 9-oxylipin pathway during arbuscular mycorrhiza formation in tomato and its regulation by jasmonate signalling

    Science.gov (United States)

    León-Morcillo, Rafael Jorge; Ángel, José; Martín-Rodríguez; Vierheilig, Horst; Ocampo, Juan Antonio; García-Garrido, José Manuel

    2012-01-01

    The establishment of an arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) symbiotic interaction is a successful strategy for the promotion of substantial plant growth, development, and fitness. Numerous studies have supported the hypothesis that plant hormones play an important role in the establishment of functional AM symbiosis. Particular attention has been devoted to jasmonic acid (JA) and its derivates, which are believed to play a major role in AM symbiosis. Jasmonates belong to a diverse class of lipid metabolites known as oxylipins that include other biologically active molecules. Recent transcriptional analyses revealed up-regulation of the oxylipin pathway during AM symbiosis in mycorrhizal tomato roots and indicate a key regulatory role for oxylipins during AM symbiosis in tomato, particularly those derived from the action of 9-lipoxygenases (9-LOXs). Continuing with the tomato as a model, the spatial and temporal expression pattern of genes involved in the 9-LOX pathway during the different stages of AM formation in tomato was analysed. The effects of JA signalling pathway changes on AM fungal colonization were assessed and correlated with the modifications in the transcriptional profiles of 9-LOX genes. The up-regulation of the 9-LOX oxylipin pathway in mycorrhizal wild-type roots seems to depend on a particular degree of AM fungal colonization and is restricted to the colonized part of the roots, suggesting that these genes could play a role in controlling fungal spread in roots. In addition, the results suggest that this strategy of the plant to control AM fungi development within the roots is at least partly dependent on JA pathway activation. PMID:22442425

  19. The role of pH in Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum mycorrhiza development within commercial orchards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul W. Thomas

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The accepted advice when establishing a plantation of Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum is that young inoculated trees should be planted on calcareous soils with a naturally high pH level. When a site is employed that has a naturally low pH level, lime is often applied to raise the pH to a considered ideal level of c.7.5. However, this may not be the correct approach. Here we present data from 33 data points taken from commercial truffle orchards in England, UK. Soil pH is correlated to Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum mycorrhiza survivorship and development. The optimal observed pH was 7.51 but the actual optimal pH for cultivation may be higher. Sub optimal pH levels lead to a reduction of Tuber aestivum syn. uncinatum mycorrhiza. This reduction is not permanent and mycorrhization levels may be improved within a 12 month period by amending the soil pH. The importance of understanding the interaction of pH with other variables and the results in relation truffle cultivation are discussed.

  20. Seasonal dynamics of extraradical mycelium and mycorrhizas in a black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) plantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queralt, Mikel; Parladé, Javier; Pera, Joan; DE Miguel, Ana María

    2017-08-01

    Seasonal dynamics of black truffle (Tuber melanosporum) extraradical mycelium as well as the associated mycorrhizal community have been evaluated in a 16-year-old plantation with productive and non-productive trees. Mycelium biomass was seasonally quantified by real-time PCR over two consecutive years and the correlation with environmental variables explored. Extraradical mycelium biomass varied seasonally and between the two consecutive years, being correlated with the precipitation that occurred 1 month before sampling. In addition, productive trees had more mycelium in the brûlé area than non-productive trees did. The ectomycorrhizal community composition inside the burnt areas was seasonally evaluated during a year. Ten mycorrhizal morphotypes were detected; T. melanosporum was the most abundant in productive and non-productive trees. Black truffle mycorrhizas were more abundant (mycorrhizal tips per unit of soil volume) in productive trees, and no seasonal variation was observed. The occurrence of black truffle mycorrhizas was significantly and positively correlated with the biomass of extraradical mycelium. The mycorrhizal community within the brûlé areas was significantly different between productive and non-productive trees, and no variation was detected between seasons. The assessment of the fungal vegetative structures in a mature plantation is of paramount importance to develop trufficulture methods based on the knowledge of the biological cycle of the fungus and its relationships with the associated ectomycorrhizal communities.

  1. Transcriptional changes in response to arbuscular mycorrhiza development in the model plant Medicago truncatula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulf, Anne; Manthey, Katja; Doll, Jasmin; Perlick, Andreas M; Linke, Burkhard; Bekel, Thomas; Meyer, Folker; Franken, Philipp; Küster, Helge; Krajinski, Franziska

    2003-04-01

    Significant changes in root morphology and physiology during arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) development are likely to be controlled by specific gene expression pattern in the host plant. Until now, little was known about transcriptional changes which occur AM-exclusively; that is, they do not occur during other root-microbe associations, nor are they induced by improved phosphate nutrition. In order to identify such AM-exclusive gene inductions of Medicago truncatula, we used a pool of different RNA samples as subtractor population in a suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH) experiment. This approach resulted in the identification of a number of new AM-regulated genes. None of these genes were expressed in nonmycorrhiza roots or leaves. Electronic data obtained by comparison of the cDNA sequences to expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences from a wide range of cDNA libraries in the M. truncatula EST database (Gene Index, MtGI) support the mycorrhiza specificity of the corresponding genes, because sequences in the MtGI that were found to match the identified SSH-cDNA sequences originated exclusively from AM cDNA libraries. The promoter of one of those genes, MtGst1, showing similarities to plant glutathione-S-transferase (GST) encoding genes, was cloned and used in reporter gene studies. In contrast to studies with the potato GST gene PRP, MtGst 1 promoter activity was detected in all zones of the root cortex colonized by Glomus intraradices, but nowhere else.

  2. Reduced germination of Orobanche cumana seeds in the presence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi or their exudates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann Louarn

    Full Text Available Broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp are parasitic plants responsible for important crop losses, and efficient procedures to control these pests are scarce. Biological control is one of the possible strategies to tackle these pests. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM fungi are widespread soil microorganisms that live symbiotically with the roots of most plant species, and they have already been tested on sorghum for their ability to reduce infestation by witchweeds, another kind of parasitic plants. In this work AM fungi were evaluated as potential biocontrol agents against Orobanche cumana, a broomrape species that specifically attacks sunflower. When inoculated simultaneously with O. cumana seeds, AM fungi could offer a moderate level of protection against the broomrape. Interestingly, this protection did not only rely on a reduced production of parasitic seed germination stimulants, as was proposed in previous studies. Rather, mycorrhizal root exudates had a negative impact on the germination of O. cumana induced by germination stimulants. A similar effect could be obtained with AM spore exudates, establishing the fungal origin of at least part of the active compounds. Together, our results demonstrate that AM fungi themselves can lead to a reduced rate of parasitic seed germination, in addition to possible effects mediated by the mycorrhizal plant. Combined with the other benefits of AM symbiosis, these effects make AM fungi an attractive option for biological control of O. cumana.

  3. Reduced germination of Orobanche cumana seeds in the presence of Arbuscular Mycorrhizal fungi or their exudates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louarn, Johann; Carbonne, Francis; Delavault, Philippe; Bécard, Guillaume; Rochange, Soizic

    2012-01-01

    Broomrapes (Orobanche and Phelipanche spp) are parasitic plants responsible for important crop losses, and efficient procedures to control these pests are scarce. Biological control is one of the possible strategies to tackle these pests. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal (AM) fungi are widespread soil microorganisms that live symbiotically with the roots of most plant species, and they have already been tested on sorghum for their ability to reduce infestation by witchweeds, another kind of parasitic plants. In this work AM fungi were evaluated as potential biocontrol agents against Orobanche cumana, a broomrape species that specifically attacks sunflower. When inoculated simultaneously with O. cumana seeds, AM fungi could offer a moderate level of protection against the broomrape. Interestingly, this protection did not only rely on a reduced production of parasitic seed germination stimulants, as was proposed in previous studies. Rather, mycorrhizal root exudates had a negative impact on the germination of O. cumana induced by germination stimulants. A similar effect could be obtained with AM spore exudates, establishing the fungal origin of at least part of the active compounds. Together, our results demonstrate that AM fungi themselves can lead to a reduced rate of parasitic seed germination, in addition to possible effects mediated by the mycorrhizal plant. Combined with the other benefits of AM symbiosis, these effects make AM fungi an attractive option for biological control of O. cumana.

  4. Chewing up the Wood-Wide Web: Selective Grazing on Ectomycorrhizal Fungi by Collembola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarisse Kanters

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The mycelia of some symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi form extensive networks—the so called “wood-wide web”—that have key roles in biogeochemical cycling. By interacting with myriad soil organisms such as collembola, the fungi directly affect the functioning of above- and below-ground multitrophic interactions in ecosystems. Here we tested whether the grazing activities of collembola affected the growth of ectomycorrhizal fungi in single or mixed species axenic cultures, and their impact on ectomycorrhizal diversity in litterbags in the field. We also used 14CO2 pulse-labelling to test the effects of collembola on respiratory losses of recent plant assimilate from external mycelium of ectomycorrhizal fungi in symbiosis with Scots pine or birch. We found that the effects of collembola varied across species, and caused a significant reduction in the amount of 14CO2 released from external mycorrhizal mycelium from three of the eight species combinations but increased it in one. Selective grazing also significantly affected the community structure of ectomycorrhizal fungi. Our findings demonstrate the importance of collembola in regulating ectomycorrhizal fungal diversity and activity and below-ground pathways of carbon flow.

  5. Occurrence of fungi in combs of fungus-growing termites (Isoptera: Termitidae, Macrotermitinae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guedegbe, Herbert J; Miambi, Edouard; Pando, Anne; Roman, Jocelyne; Houngnandan, Pascal; Rouland-Lefevre, Corinne

    2009-10-01

    Fungus-growing termites cultivate their mutualistic basidiomycete Termitomyces species on a substrate called a fungal comb. Here, the Suicide Polymerase Endonuclease Restriction (SuPER) method was adapted for the first time to a fungal study to determine the entire fungal community of fungal combs and to test whether fungi other than the symbiotic cultivar interact with termite hosts. Our molecular analyses show that although active combs are dominated by Termitomyces fungi isolated with direct Polymerase Endonuclease Restriction - Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), they can also harbor some filamentous fungi and yeasts only revealed by SuPER PCR-DGGE. This is the first molecular evidence of the presence of non-Termitomyces species in active combs. However, because there is no evidence for a species-specific relationship between these fungi and termites, they are mere transient guests with no specialization in the symbiosis. It is however surprising to notice that termite-associated Xylaria strains were not isolated from active combs even though they are frequently retrieved when nests are abandoned by termites. This finding highlights the implication of fungus-growing termites in the regulation of fungi occurring within the combs and also suggests that they might not have any particular evolutionary-based association with Xylaria species.

  6. Plant Identity Exerts Stronger Effect than Fertilization on Soil Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi in a Sown Pasture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yong; Chen, Liang; Luo, Cai-Yun; Zhang, Zhen-Hua; Wang, Shi-Ping; Guo, Liang-Dong

    2016-10-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi play key roles in plant nutrition and plant productivity. AM fungal responses to either plant identity or fertilization have been investigated. However, the interactive effects of different plant species and fertilizer types on these symbiotic fungi remain poorly understood. We evaluated the effects of the factorial combinations of plant identity (grasses Avena sativa and Elymus nutans and legume Vicia sativa) and fertilization (urea and sheep manure) on AM fungi following 2-year monocultures in a sown pasture field study. AM fungal extraradical hyphal density was significantly higher in E. nutans than that in A. sativa and V. sativa in the unfertilized control and was significantly increased by urea and manure in A. sativa and by manure only in E. nutans, but not by either fertilizers in V. sativa. AM fungal spore density was not significantly affected by plant identity or fertilization. Forty-eight operational taxonomic units (OTUs) of AM fungi were obtained through 454 pyrosequencing of 18S rDNA. The OTU richness and Shannon diversity index of AM fungi were significantly higher in E. nutans than those in V. sativa and/or A. sativa, but not significantly affected by any fertilizer in all of the three plant species. AM fungal community composition was significantly structured directly by plant identity only and indirectly by both urea addition and plant identity through soil total nitrogen content. Our findings highlight that plant identity has stronger influence than fertilization on belowground AM fungal community in this converted pastureland from an alpine meadow.

  7. SYMBIOTIC STAR BLOWS BUBBLES INTO SPACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    A tempestuous relationship between an unlikely pair of stars may have created an oddly shaped, gaseous nebula that resembles an hourglass nestled within an hourglass. Images taken with Earth-based telescopes have shown the larger, hourglass-shaped nebula. But this picture, taken with NASA's Hubble Space Telescope, reveals a small, bright nebula embedded in the center of the larger one (close-up of nebula in inset). Astronomers have dubbed the entire nebula the 'Southern Crab Nebula' (He2-104), because, from ground-based telescopes, it looks like the body and legs of a crab. The nebula is several light-years long. The possible creators of these shapes cannot be seen at all in this Wide Field and Planetary Camera 2 image. It's a pair of aging stars buried in the glow of the tiny, central nebula. One of them is a red giant, a bloated star that is exhausting its nuclear fuel and is shedding its outer layers in a powerful stellar wind. Its companion is a hot, white dwarf, a stellar zombie of a burned-out star. This odd duo of a red giant and a white dwarf is called a symbiotic system. The red giant is also a Mira Variable, a pulsating red giant, that is far away from its partner. It could take as much as 100 years for the two to orbit around each other. Astronomers speculate that the interaction between these two stars may have sparked episodic outbursts of material, creating the gaseous bubbles that form the nebula. They interact by playing a celestial game of 'catch': as the red giant throws off its bulk in a powerful stellar wind, the white dwarf catches some of it. As a result, an accretion disk of material forms around the white dwarf and spirals onto its hot surface. Gas continues to build up on the surface until it sparks an eruption, blowing material into space. This explosive event may have happened twice in the 'Southern Crab.' Astronomers speculate that the hourglass-shaped nebulae represent two separate outbursts that occurred several thousand years apart

  8. Autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiao-Hong; Xu, Fei; Snyder, John Hugh; Shi, Huan-Bin; Lu, Jian-Ping; Lin, Fu-Cheng

    2016-09-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular process that degrades cytoplasmic constituents in vacuoles. Plant pathogenic fungi develop special infection structures and/or secrete a range of enzymes to invade their plant hosts. It has been demonstrated that monitoring autophagy processes can be extremely useful in visualizing the sequence of events leading to pathogenicity of plant pathogenic fungi. In this review, we introduce the molecular mechanisms involved in autophagy. In addition, we explore the relationship between autophagy and pathogenicity in plant pathogenic fungi. Finally, we discuss the various experimental strategies available for use in the study of autophagy in plant pathogenic fungi. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Natural substrata for corticioid fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene O. Yurchenko

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper reviews the types of substrata inhabited by non-poroid resupinate Homobasidiomycetes in situ in global scale with both examples from literature sources and from observations on Belarus corticioid fungi biota. The groups of organic world colonized by corticioid basidiomata and vegetative mycelium are arboreous, semi-arboreous, and herbaceous vascular plants, Bryophyta, epiphytic coccoid algae, lichenized and non-lichenized fungi, and occasionally myxomycetes and invertebrates. The fungi occur on living, dying, and dead on all decay stages parts of organisms. Besides, the fungi are known on soil, humus, stones, artificial inorganic and synthetic materials and dung.

  10. Mycorrhizas and soil ecosystem function of co-existing woody vegetation islands at the alpine tree line

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Wang, L.; Otgonsuren, B.; Godbold, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 411, 1-2 (2017), s. 467-481 ISSN 0032-079X R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Ectoenzymes * Ectomycorrhizas * Enzyme activity * Ericoid mycorrhizas * Nitrogen-mineralization Subject RIV: EF - Botanics OBOR OECD: Environmental sciences (social aspects to be 5.7) Impact factor: 3.052, year: 2016

  11. Novel root-fungus symbiosis in Ericaceae: sheathed ericoid mycorrhiza formed by a hitherto undescribed basidiomycete with affinities to Trechisporales

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vohník, Martin; Sadowsky, J. J.; Kohout, Petr; Lhotáková, Z.; Nestby, R.; Kolařík, Miroslav

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 6 (2012), e39524 E-ISSN 1932-6203 R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/09/P340 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 ; RVO:61388971 Keywords : ericoid mycorrhiza * Ericaceae * Basidiomycetes Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EE - Microbiology, Virology (MBU-M) Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  12. No significant transfer of N and P from Pueraria Phaseoloides to Hevea Brasiliensis via Hyphal links of Arbuscular Mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ikram, A.; Jensen, E.S.; Jakobsen, I.

    1994-01-01

    and averaged 0.05 and 0.03% for mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhizal H. brasiliensis. The estimated transfer of N and P from P. phaseoloides to H. brasiliensis was not affected by mycorrhizas despite the high degree of root colonization in both species. The percentage of total legume N transferred to H...

  13. Role of arbuscular mycorrhiza in alleviating salinity stress in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) grown under ambient and elevated CO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, X.; Song, F.; Liu, S.

    2016-01-01

    Plant growth and development are influenced by future elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and increased salinity stress. AM (arbuscular mycorrhiza) symbiosis has been shown to improve plant growth and resistance to environmental stresses. The aim of this study was to investigate the potential...

  14. Effect Mycorrhizal Fungi on Reduction of Drought Stress Effect in Some Growth Traits of Sesame (Sesamum indicum L. Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    esmaeel gholinezhad

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Sesame (Sesamum indicum plays an important role in human health because of its high oil capacity (47 - 52%.. Arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis protects host plants against the detrimental effects of drought stress through mechanisms of drought avoidance. Strategies of drought avoidance in mycorrhizal plants rely on the ability to maintain an adequate hydration status on the level of whole plants as characterized by relative water content. So the aim of current study was to evaluate the symbiosis effect of two different species of mycorrhizae fungi on yield and physiological characteristics of sesame landraces under different drought stress levels in Urmia. Materials and Methods This experiment was conducted in 2014-2015 by using factorial split plot based on randomized complete block design with three replications in the research field of Urmia agricultural high school with 12 Km distance from Urmia. The main plot factor was consisted of different irrigation levels: normal irrigation (irrigation after 70 mm evaporation of crop (ETC, moderate drought stress (irrigation after 90 mm evaporation of crop (ETC and severe drought stress (irrigation after 110 mm evaporation of crop (ETC. Also three levels of Sub plot factors included two species of mycorrhizae fungi Glomus mosseae, Glomus intraradices and no -inoculation (control. Sub-sub plot factorss consisted of eight landraces of sesames (named Jiroft13, Zanjan Tarom landrace, Moghan landrace, Naz of several branches, TC-25,TS-3, Darab 14 and Dashtestan 5. Then Leaf Area Index (LAI, Total Dry Matter (TDM, Leaf relative water content (RWC, Specific leaf area (SLA, Specific leaf weight (SLW, Leaf Area Ratio (LAR, Leaf Weight Ratio (LWR of different landraces calculated using SAS and MSTATC. To compare the means, Tukey's test at 5% probability level was used. Results and Discussion The results of the experiment showed that with increasing the levels of drought stress, RWC, LAI, seed yield

  15. Communication in Fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabien Cottier

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We will discuss fungal communication in the context of fundamental biological functions including mating, growth, morphogenesis, and the regulation of fungal virulence determinants. We will address intraspecies but also interkingdom signaling by systematically discussing the sender of the message, the molecular message, and receiver. Analyzing communication shows the close coevolution of fungi with organisms present in their environment giving insights into multispecies communication. A better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying microbial communication will promote our understanding of the “fungal communicome.”

  16. Biochemiluminescence of certain fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Sławiński

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Twelve species of fungi growing on the Sabouraud medium in darkness and illumination in an incubator, were tested to find out their ability to emit the ultra-weak biochemiluminescence. Using a sensitive photon-counling device, it was possible to measure biochemiluminescence intensity during ten days of cultures growth. Boletus edulis, Pestalotia funerea and Microsporum gypseum displayed biochemiluminescence, while Aspergillus nidulans, A. quadrilineatus, Beauveria bassiana, Macrophoma candollei, Mucor lausanensis, Paecilomyces farinosus, Penicillium sp., Trichoderma lignorum and Tricholoma equestre failed to do it. Illumination put down biochemiluminescence and stimulated colour formation in both mycelia and in the medium.

  17. Interacting Winds in Eclipsing Symbiotic Systems – The Case Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The most adopted physical modeling for many symbiotic stars is that of interacting binaries: a cool giant, a hot .... envelopes the area behind the hot component; and if mw > 1, the hot wind predom- inates the cool wind. ...... Tomov, N., Tomova, M. 2001, Astrophysics and Space Science, 278, 311. Torbett, M. V., Campbell, B.

  18. Diversity of the Symbiotic Alga Symbiodinium in Tanzanian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract—With the current increase in frequency of coral bleaching events, knowledge on the genetic diversity of symbiotic algae in the genus Symbiodinium harboured by reef-building corals is important to understand how coral reefs will respond to global climate change. This study was undertaken as very little is known.

  19. Survivability of probiotics in symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In present study, symbiotic low fat buffalo milk yogurt prototypes (plain and blueberry) were developed using a commercial starter containing probiotics. Samples were analyzed for physicochemical and microbiological properties, and the survivability of probiotics during 10 weeks of storage. Gross composition results were: ...

  20. Interacting Winds in Eclipsing Symbiotic Systems–The Case Study ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-01-27

    Jan 27, 2016 ... We report the mathematical representation of the so called eccentric eclipse model, whose numerical solutions can be used to obtain the physical parameters of a quiescent eclipsing symbiotic system. Indeed the nebular region produced by the collision of the stellar winds should be shifted to the orbital ...

  1. Symbiotic Blue Green Algae (Azolla): A Potential Bio fertilizer for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Symbiotic Blue Green Algae (Azolla): A Potential Bio fertilizer for Paddy Rice Production in Fogera Plain, Northwestern Ethiopia. ... They were maintained and multiplied in plastic containers at Adet in a greenhouse and then inoculated into concrete tanks for testing their adaptability. Both strains were well adapted to Adet ...

  2. Symbiotic effectiveness of pea-rhizobia associations and the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    微软用户

    2011-05-02

    May 2, 2011 ... Interactions between pea (Pisum sativa L.) cultivars and Rhizobium strain affect the symbiotic relationship and ultimately both the nitrogen fixing capacity and the yield. Since Pisum sativum L. is poorly nodulated in the Loess Plateau of China where this crop is grown, the response of pea cultivars. Yannong ...

  3. Binding Cultures: A Symbiotic Vision of Francis Bebey in Agatha ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Binding Cultures: A Symbiotic Vision of Francis Bebey in Agatha Moudio's Son. Kelvin Ngong Toh. Abstract. No Abstract. LWATI: A Journal of Contemporary Research, 9(3), 126-135, 2012. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · AJOL African Journals Online.

  4. Role of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the improvement of legume ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Role of symbiotic nitrogen fixation in the improvement of legume productivity under stressed environments. R Serraj, J Adu-Gyamfi. Abstract. No Abstract. Full Text: EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/wajae.v6i1.45613.

  5. Optical flickering of the symbiotic star CH Cyg

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoyanov, K. A.; Martí, J.; Zamanov, R.; Dimitrov, V. V.; Kurtenkov, A.; Sánchez-Ayaso, E.; Bujalance-Fernández, I.; Latev, G. Y.; Nikolov, G.

    2018-02-01

    Here we present quasi-simultaneous observations of the flickering of the symbiotic binary star CH Cyg in U, B and V bands. We calculate the flickering source parameters and discuss the possible reason for the flickering cessation in the period 2010-2013.

  6. The symbiotic intestinal ciliates and the evolution of their hosts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moon-van der Staay, S.Y.; Staay, G.W. van der; Michalowski, T.; Jouany, J.P.; Pristas, P.; Javorsky, P.; Kisidayova, S.; Varadyova, Z.; McEwan, N.R.; Newbold, C.J.; Alen, T. van; Graaf, R. de; Schmid, M.; Huynen, M.A.; Hackstein, J.H.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of sophisticated differentiations of the gastro-intestinal tract enabled herbivorous mammals to digest dietary cellulose and hemicellulose with the aid of a complex anaerobic microbiota. Distinctive symbiotic ciliates, which are unique to this habitat, are the largest representatives

  7. Biodiversity and studies of marine symbiotic siphonostomatoids off ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Current knowledge of the biodiversity of the symbiotic marine siphonostomatoids from South African waters (136 species) is sparse compared to that globally (1 388 species). The difference is especially apparent when taking into account the diversity of fish (more than 2 000 species) and invertebrates (approximately 12 ...

  8. A symbiotic shell-encrusting bryozoan provides subtidal whelks with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The subtidal whelk Burnupena papyracea co-occurs with a voracious predator, the rock lobster Jasus lalandii, in situations where other potential prey are largely eliminated. The survival of B. papyracea has been ascribed to a symbiotic bryozoan, Alcyonidium nodosum, which characteristically encrusts the shells of this ...

  9. Molecular and biochemical analysis of symbiotic plant receptor kinase complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Douglas R; Riely, Brendan K

    2010-09-01

    DE-FG02-01ER15200 was a 36-month project, initiated on Sept 1, 2005 and extended with a one-year no cost extension to August 31, 2009. During the project period we published seven manuscripts (2 in review). Including the prior project period (2002-2005) we published 12 manuscripts in journals that include Science, PNAS, The Plant Cell, Plant Journal, Plant Physiology, and MPMI. The primary focus of this work was to further elucidate the function of the Nod factor signaling pathway that is involved in initiation of the legume-rhizobium symbiosis and in particular to explore the relationship between receptor kinase-like proteins and downstream effectors of symbiotic development. During the project period we have map-base cloned two additional players in symbiotic development, including an ERF transcription factor and an ethylene pathway gene (EIN2) that negatively regulates symbiotic signaling; we have also further characterized the subcellular distribution and function of a nuclear-localized symbiosis-specific ion channel, DMI1. The major outcome of the work has been the development of systems for exploring and validating protein-protein interactions that connect symbiotic receptor-like proteins to downstream responses. In this regard, we have developed both homologous (i.e., in planta) and heterologous (i.e., in yeast) systems to test protein interactions. Using yeast 2-hybrid screens we isolated the only known interactor of the nuclear-localized calcium-responsive kinase DMI3. We have also used yeast 2-hybrid methodology to identify interactions between symbiotic signaling proteins and certain RopGTPase/RopGEF proteins that regulate root hair polar growth. More important to the long-term goals of our work, we have established a TAP tagging system that identifies in planta interactions based on co-immuno precipitation and mass spectrometry. The validity of this approach has been shown using known interactors that either co-iummnoprecipate (i.e., remorin) or co

  10. Proteomics provides insights into biological pathways altered by plant growth promoting bacteria and arbuscular mycorrhiza in sorghum grown in marginal soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawi, Faten; Datta, Rupali; Ramakrishna, Wusirika

    2017-02-01

    Sorghum is an economically important crop, a model system for gene discovery and a biofuel source. Sorghum seedlings were subjected to three microbial treatments, plant growth promoting bacteria (B), arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi mix with two Glomus species (G. aggregatum and G. etunicatum), Funelliformis mosseae and Rhizophagus irregularis (My), and B and My combined (My+B). Proteomic analysis was conducted followed by integration with metabolite, plant biomass and nutrient data. Out of 366 differentially expressed proteins in sorghum roots, 44 upregulated proteins overlapping among three treatment groups showed positive correlation with sorghum biomass or element uptake or both. Proteins upregulated only in B group include asparagine synthetase which showed negative correlation with biomass and uptake of elements. Phosphoribosyl amino imidazole succinocarboxamide protein with more than 50-fold change in My and My+B groups correlated positively with Ca, Cu, S and sucrose levels in roots. The B group showed the highest number of upregulated proteins among the three groups with negative correlation with sorghum biomass and element uptake. KEGG pathway analysis identified carbon fixation as the unique pathway associated with common upregulated proteins while biosynthesis of amino acids and fatty acid degradation were associated with common downregulated proteins. Protein-protein interaction analysis using STRING identified a major network with thirteen downregulated proteins. These findings suggest that plant-growth-promoting-bacteria alone or in combination with mycorrhiza enhanced radical scavenging system and increased levels of specific proteins thereby shifting the metabolism towards synthesis of carbohydrates resulting in sorghum biomass increase and uptake of nutrients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Interaction between C 4 barnyard grass and C 3 upland rice under elevated CO 2: Impact of mycorrhizae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianjun; Xu, Liming; Chen, Xin; Hu, Shuijin

    2009-03-01

    Atmospheric CO 2 enrichment may impact arbuscular mycorrhizae (AM) development and function, which could have subsequent effects on host plant species interactions by differentially affecting plant nutrient acquisition. However, direct evidence illustrating this scenario is limited. We examined how elevated CO 2 affects plant growth and whether mycorrhizae mediate interactions between C 4 barnyard grass ( Echinochloa crusgalli (L.) Beauv.) and C 3 upland rice ( Oryza sativa L.) in a low nutrient soil. The monocultures and combinations with or without mycorrhizal inoculation were grown at ambient (400 ± 20 μmol mol -1) and elevated CO 2 (700 ± 20 μmol mol -1) levels. The 15N isotope tracer was introduced to quantify the mycorrhizally mediated N acquisition of plants. Elevated CO 2 stimulated the growth of C 3 upland rice but not that of C 4 barnyard grass under monoculture. Elevated CO 2 also increased mycorrhizal colonization of C 4 barnyard grass but did not affect mycorrhizal colonization of C 3 upland rice. Mycorrhizal inoculation increased the shoot biomass ratio of C 4 barnyard grass to C 3 upland rice under both CO 2 concentrations but had a greater impact under the elevated than ambient CO 2 level. Mycorrhizae decreased relative interaction index (RII) of C 3 plants under both ambient and elevated CO 2, but mycorrhizae increased RII of C 4 plants only under elevated CO 2. Elevated CO 2 and mycorrhizal inoculation enhanced 15N and total N and P uptake of C 4 barnyard grass in mixture but had no effects on N and P acquisition of C 3 upland rice, thus altering the distribution of N and P between the species in mixture. These results implied that CO 2 stimulation of mycorrhizae and their nutrient acquisition may impact competitive interaction of C 4 barnyard grass and C 3 upland rice under future CO 2 scenarios.

  12. AM Fungi Influences the Photosynthetic Activity, Growth and Antioxidant Enzymes in Allium sativum L. under Salinity Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh BORDE

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Potential of Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM fungi in alleviating adverse salt effects on growth was tested in garlic (Allium sativum L.. Towards this objective we analyzed the AM root colonization and the activities of various antioxidant enzymes like peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase at 0, 100, 200 and 300 mM salinity levels. The activities of all the antioxidant enzymes studied were found to be increased in AM garlic plants. Antioxidant activity was maximum in 100 and 200 mM NaCl (sodium chloride in AM and non-AM plants. Proline accumulation was induced by salt levels and it was more in leaves as well as roots of AM plants as compared to non-AM plants, this indicating that mycorrhiza reduced salt injury. Growth parameters of garlic plants like leaf area, plant fresh and dry weight and antioxidant enzyme activities were higher at moderate salinity level. This work suggests that the mycorrhiza helps garlic plants to perform better under moderate salinity level by enhancing the antioxidant activity and proline content as compared to non-AM plants.

  13. The Effects of Organic Fertilizers and Mycorrhizae Inoculation (Glomus mosseae and G. intraradices on Quantitative and Qualitative Yield of Dwarf Chicory (Cichorium pumilum Jacq. in Different Cuttings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Naghibi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In recent years many farmers in Iran interested in to cultivate and produce different medicinal plants which are so important in traditional agriculture in Iran. In order to reduce the environmental impacts of using chemical inputs and also to increase the quality of plant secondary metabolite components, the emphasis is on sustainable agriculture base on using of organic and biological fertilizer. Dwarf chicory (Cichorium pumilum Jacq. is an annual plant from Asteraceae family. Dwarf chicory is classified by jacq as subspecies of the cultivated species Cichorium endeva which consumed for healing a variety of diseases such as bacterial infection, poisoning and rheumatism. The use of organic fertilizer in the form of humic acid and fulvic acid play an important role in sustainable agriculture. Humic substances can be added to the soil for improvement the crop yield. A benefit of humic acid due to its ability to complex metal ions and form aqueous complexes with micronutrients and also may form an enzymatically active complex, which can be carry on reactions that are usually assigned to the metabolic activity of living microorganisms. In additional of using organic fertilizers, the biological fertilizer like mycorrhiza fungi is a good approach in agriculture. Mycorrhizal fungi have been used to enhance the plant growth and yield of medicinal crops and to help maintain good soil health and fertility that contributes to a greater extent to a sustainable yield and good quality of the products. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effects of organic fertilizers and mycorrhizae inoculation on quantitative and qualitative characteristics of dwarf chicory (Cichorium pumilum Jacq. in different cuttings. Materials and Methods: The experiment was carried out in a factorial layout based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Research Station, Faculty of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad (59°28 E and

  14. ANTIMALARIAL COMPOUNDS FROM ENDOPHYTIC FUNGI OF BROTOWALI (Tinaspora crispa L

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elfita Elfita

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The term endophytic refers to a bacteria or a fungi microorganism that colonizes interior organs of plants, but does not have pathogenic effects on its host. In their symbiotic association, the host plant protects and feeds the endophytic, which ";in return"; produces bioactive metabolites to enhance the growth and compotitiveness of the host and to protect it from herbivores and plant pathogens. Plants with ethnobotanical history, for example brotowali (Tinaspora crispa L, are likely candidates to find bioactive compounds. Two alkaloids have been isolated from endophytic fungi of brotowali. The molecular structures of the isolated compounds were determined based on spectroscopic data, including UV, IR, NMR 1D and 2D spectrum. The compounds were determined as: 7- hydroxy-3,4,5-trimethyl-6-on-2,3,4,6-tetrahydroisoquinoline-8-carboxylic acid (1 and 2,5-dihydroxy-1-(hydroxymethylpyridin-4-on (2. The compound has antimalarial activity against Plasmodium falciparum 3D7, with IC50 values 0,129 µM and 0,127 µM.

  15. Linking plants, fungi and soil mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildiz, Anil; Graf, Frank

    2017-04-01

    Plants provide important functions in respect soil strength and are increasingly considered for slope stabilisation within eco-engineering methods, particularly to prevent superficial soil failure. The protective functions include hydrological regulation through interception and evapo-transpiration as well as mechanical stabilisation through root reinforcement and, to a certain extent, chemical stabilisation through sticky metabolites. The ever-growing application of plants in slope stabilisation demanded more precise information of the vegetation effects and, concomitant, led the models for quantifying the reinforcement shoot up like mushrooms. However, so far, the framework and interrelationships for both the role of plants and the quantification concepts have not been thoroughly analysed and comprehensively considered, respectively, often resulting in unsatisfactory results. Although it seems obvious and is implicitly presupposed that the plant specific functions related to slope stability require growth and development, this is anything but given, particularly under the often hostile conditions dominating on bare and steep slopes. There, the superficial soil layer is often characterised by a lack of fines and missing medium-sized and fine pores due to an unstable soil matrix, predominantly formed by coarse grains. Low water retention capacity and substantial leaching of nutrients are the adverse consequences. Given this general set-up, sustainable plant growth and, particularly, root development is virtually unachievable. At exactly this point mycorrhizal fungi, the symbiotic partners of almost all plants used in eco-engineering, come into play. Though, they are probably well-known within the eco-engineering community, mycorrhizal fungi lead a humble existence. This is in spite of the fact that they supply their hosts with water and nutrients, improving the plant's ability to master otherwise unbridgeable environmental conditions. However, in order to support

  16. Plant biomass degradation by fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mäkelä, Miia R; Donofrio, Nicole; de Vries, Ronald P; van den Brink, J.

    2014-01-01

    Plant biomass degradation by fungi has implications for several fields of science. The enzyme systems employed by fungi for this are broadly used in various industrial sectors such as food & feed, pulp & paper, detergents, textile, wine, and more recently biofuels and biochemicals. In addition, the

  17. Molecular Systematics of Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insect parasitism has multiple and diverse origins within the Kingdom Fungi, with shifts to trophic specialization on insects having evolved one or more times in each of the four traditionally recognized phyla of fungi, the Ascomycota, Basidiomycota, Chytridiomycota, and Zygomycota. The rich legacy ...

  18. Combined effects of fungal inoculants and the cytokinin-like growth regulator thidiazuron on growth, phytohormone contents and endophytic root fungi in Miscanthus × giganteus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schmidt, Christoph Stephan; Mrnka, Libor; Frantík, Tomáš; Motyka, Václav; Dobrev, Petre; Vosátka, Miroslav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 120, č. 9 (2017), s. 120-131 ISSN 0981-9428 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020080; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-14649S Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : Miscanthus * symbiotic fungi * phytohormones Subject RIV: EF - Botanics; EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology (UEB-Q) OBOR OECD: Plant sciences, botany; Biochemistry and molecular biology (UEB-Q) Impact factor: 2.724, year: 2016

  19. The Effects of Arbuscular-Mycorrhizal Fungi and Phosphorous on Arsenic Uptake by Sunflower Plant in Soils Spiked with Arsenite and Arsenate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Bagherifam

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Arsenic is a highly toxic metalloid in group 15 of periodic table. The information on environmental behaviour of arsenic, however, is still scarce. Contamination of soils and water with arsenic and antimony due to their widespread industrial application and mining activities has raised serious environmental concerns. Nearly all Arsenic-contaminated soils results from human activities and it has different environmental and sociological impacts. Various strategies and methods have been proposed for environmental management and remediation of contaminated soils. Among all methods, the phytoremediation is receiving more attention due to its cost effective and environmental friendly characteristics. In the case of arsenic contaminated soils, there are effective factors such as soil fertility, nutrients content and microorganisms function, which can improve the uptake of As by plants. Up to now, several studies have been evaluated the effects of symbiotic fungal association in plants on increasing nutrients and toxic elements uptake. Many of authors reported that the mycorrhizal symbiosis increases the uptake of toxic elements in root and shoot of plants and consequently improve the efficacy of phytostabilization and phytoextraction processes. There are conflicting results about the effect of arbuscular- mycorrhizal fungi (AMF on As uptake by various plants. Chen et al. (4 found that Glomus mosseae symbiosis with plant reduces As concentration and enhance phosphorus content in shoot and root of plant. Whilst Cozzolino et al. (7 reported that the AMF increases as concentration in shoot and root of cabbage. Phosphorus has important role on mycorrhizal symbiosis and also As uptake by plants. Therefore, current study was conducted to evaluated effect of Glomus intraradices and Glomus mosseae symbiosis with sunflower and also soil phosphorus concentration on uptake of arsenic from arsenite and arsenate contaminated soils. Materials and

  20. Filamentous Fungi Fermentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørregaard, Anders; Stocks, Stuart; Woodley, John

    2014-01-01

    Filamentous fungi (including microorganisms such as Aspergillus niger and Rhizopus oryzae) represent an enormously important platform for industrial fermentation. Two particularly valuable features are the high yield coefficients and the ability to secrete products. However, the filamentous...... morphology, together with non-Newtonian rheological properties (shear thinning), result in poor oxygen transfer unless sufficient energy is provided to the fermentation. While genomic research may improve the organisms, there is no doubt that to enable further application in future it will be necessary...... to match such research with studies of oxygen transfer and energy supply to high viscosity fluids. Hence, the implementation of innovative solutions (some of which in principle are already possible) will be essential to ensure the further development of such fermentations....

  1. Genotypic variation in the response of chickpea to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and non-mycorrhizal fungal endophytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazghaleh, Navid; Hamel, Chantal; Gan, Yantai; Tar'an, Bunyamin; Knight, Joan Diane

    2018-04-01

    Plant roots host symbiotic arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi and other fungal endophytes that can impact plant growth and health. The impact of microbial interactions in roots may depend on the genetic properties of the host plant and its interactions with root-associated fungi. We conducted a controlled condition experiment to investigate the effect of several chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) genotypes on the efficiency of the symbiosis with AM fungi and non-AM fungal endophytes. Whereas the AM symbiosis increased the biomass of most of the chickpea cultivars, inoculation with non-AM fungal endophytes had a neutral effect. The chickpea cultivars responded differently to co-inoculation with AM fungi and non-AM fungal endophytes. Co-inoculation had additive effects on the biomass of some cultivars (CDC Corrine, CDC Anna, and CDC Cory), but non-AM fungal endophytes reduced the positive effect of AM fungi on Amit and CDC Vanguard. This study demonstrated that the response of plant genotypes to an AM symbiosis can be modified by the simultaneous colonization of the roots by non-AM fungal endophytes. Intraspecific variations in the response of chickpea to AM fungi and non-AM fungal endophytes indicate that the selection of suitable genotypes may improve the ability of crop plants to take advantage of soil ecosystem services.

  2. Growth responses of maritime sand dune plant species to arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz Tadych

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In a pot experiment conducted in a greenhouse, the response of 6 plant species dominating in the succession of vegetation of a deflation hollow of the Łeba Bar to inoculation with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF was investigated. The inoculum was a mixture of soil, roots and spores of 5 species of AMF with the dominant species Glomus aggregatum. Except for Corynephorus canescens and Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria, both the growth and the dry matter of above-ground parts of plants of Agrostis stolonifera, Ammophila arenaria, Corynephorus canescens, Juncus articulatus and J. balticus inoculated with AMF were higher than those growing in soils lacking infection propagules of these fungi. Inoculation with AMF decreased the dry matter of root: shoot ratios in 5 plant species. This property was not determined in Festuca rubra subsp. arenaria due to the death of all control plants. The level of mycorrhizal infection was low and did not correlate with the growth responses found. The high growth reaction of Juncus spp. to AMF found in this study suggests that the opinion of non-mycotrophy or low dependence of plants of Juncaceae on AMF was based on results of investigations of plants growing in wet sites known to inhibit the formation of mycorrhizae.

  3. Morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza on bulbous plants (Taurus mountain in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karaarslan Emel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to investigate the morphological identification of vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhiza (VAM on bulbous plants in the Taurus Mountains in Turkey. Thirteen soil samples and bulbous roots were taken from the rhizosphere of bulbous plants. The soils were analyzed for the number of VAM spores and chemical and physical properties. In addition, the roots were examined for infection levels, and morphological identification of VAM spores was made. All tested plants are considered mycorrhizal plants. We determined three spore species (Glomus mosseae, Glomus hoi and Scutellospora calospora from the surveyed soils. The spore distribution rates were as follows: G. Mossea 61.54 %, G. Hoi 23.07 % and Scutellospora calospora 15.38 %. Results suggest that VAM fungal spores and root colonization display variation in rhizosphere under bulbous plants in different ecological conditions.

  4. The relationship between thiamine and two symbioses: Root nodule symbiosis and arbuscular mycorrhiza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagae, Miwa; Parniske, Martin; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi; Takeda, Naoya

    2016-12-01

    Lotus japonicus THIC is expressed in all organs, and the encoded protein catalyzes thiamine biosynthesis. Loss of function produces chlorosis, a typical thiamine-deficiency phenotype, and mortality. To investigate thiamine's role in symbiosis, we focused on THI1, a thiamine-biosynthesis gene expressed in roots, nodules, and seeds. The thi1 mutant had green leaves, but formed small nodules and immature seeds. These phenotypes were rescued by THI1 complementation and by exogenous thiamine. Thus, THI1 is required for nodule enlargement and seed maturation. On the other hand, colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungus Rhizophagus irregularis was not affected in the thi1 mutant or by exogenous thiamine. However, spores of R. irregularis stored more thiamine than the source (host plants), despite lacking thiamine biosynthesis genes. Therefore, disturbance of the thiamine supply would affect progeny phenotypes such as spore formation and hyphal growth. Further investigation will be required to elucidate thiamine's effect on AM.

  5. Influence of arbuscular mycorrhizae on photosynthesis and water status of maize plants under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Min; Tang, Ming; Chen, Hui; Yang, Baowei; Zhang, Fengfeng; Huang, Yanhui

    2008-09-01

    The influence of arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungus Glomus mosseae on characteristics of the growth, water status, chlorophyll concentration, gas exchange, and chlorophyll fluorescence of maize plants under salt stress was studied in the greenhouse. Maize plants were grown in sand and soil mixture with five NaCl levels (0, 0.5, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 g/kg dry substrate) for 55 days, following 15 days of non-saline pretreatment. Under salt stress, mycorrhizal maize plants had higher dry weight of shoot and root, higher relative chlorophyll content, better water status (decreased water saturation deficit, increased water use efficiency, and relative water content), higher gas exchange capacity (increased photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance and transpiration rate, and decreased intercellular CO(2) concentration), higher non-photochemistry efficiency [increased non-photochemical quenching values (NPQ)], and higher photochemistry efficiency [increased the maximum quantum yield in the dark-adapted state (Fv/Fm), the maximum quantum yield in the light-adapted sate (Fv'/Fm'), the actual quantum yield in the light-adapted steady state (phiPSII) and the photochemical quenching values (qP)], compared with non-mycorrhizal maize plants. In addition, AM symbiosis could trigger the regulation of the energy biturcation between photochemical and non-photochemical events reflected in the deexcitation rate constants (kN, kN', kP, and kP'). All the results show that G. mosseae alleviates the deleterious effect of salt stress on plant growth, through improving plant water status, chlorophyll concentration, and photosynthetic capacity, while the influence of AM symbiosis on photosynthetic capacity of maize plants can be indirectly affected by soil salinity and mycorrhizae-mediated enhancement of water status, but not by the mycorrhizae-mediated enhancement of chlorophyll concentration and plant biomass.

  6. The Efficiency of Mycorrhizal Fungi on Growth Characteristics and some Nutrients Uptake of Plane tree Seedling (Platanus orientalis L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Alipour

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Drought stress is one of the most important abiotic stresses which significantly reduce yield and growth of most of plants. Plane tree is one of the important trees planted in the urban landscapes of Iran. One of the major limiting factors of landscapes development is providing water for plants. Deficit irrigation is a desirable method for saving water use in water deficit conditions and ultimately reducing necessary cost of water securement to landscape plants. Moreover, inoculation of plant root with mycorrhizal fungi can be considered as a method to reduce water demand of plants. In addition, mycorrhiza can increase plant resistance against environmental stress, such as salinity, temperature stress, drought stress and etc. Mycorrhiza can improve drought stress through enhancing water uptake as result of extra radical hyphae and stomatal regulation or transpiration. Increasing P concentration by mycorrhiza inoculation can be another mechansim for drought resistance in plants. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate two Glomus species in combination together on plane tree under water deficit for growth characteristics and nutrients uptake such as P, Fe and Zn concentration. Materials and Methods: This outdoor experiment was conducted at - Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, Iran, with average temperature 14.2 ºC and 27.9 ºC night/day, respectively and relative humidity 35-70% between Mar and Aug 2012 and repeated under the same condition in 2013. This experiment was carried out to evaluate the effect of inoculation with mycorrhizal fungus on plane saplings response to different applicable water levels (50 and 100% of water needs based on a completely randomized design with 3 replications. The treatments were control (without fertilizer, Germans peat + fertilizer, Germans peat + fertilizer + mycorrhiza in 50% of field capacity and Germans peat + fertilizer + mycorrhizain 100% of field capacity. The Mycorrhiza

  7. Symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus assayed on serradella plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mieczysława Deryło

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Physiological and symbiotic properties of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus nodule isolates were compared to the standard slow-growing Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strain USDA 3045. Lupine nodules isolates showed typical characteristics for bradyrhizobial strains and nodulated small seed legume, serradella (Ornithopus sativus, in tube test. We observed a permanent physiological segregation of the effective (Fix' and ineffective (Fix- symbiotic phenotype for all tested bradyrhizobial strains during the growth of serradella in plant tube test. The ultrastructural differences between Fix* and Fix serradella nodules were observed. Rapid and visible nodulation as well as easy assay of the reduction of acetylene make serradella a convenient system for studies of Bradyrhizobium sp. (Lupinus strains in laboratory conditions.

  8. Leguminous plants: inventors of root nodules to accommodate symbiotic bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzaki, Takuya; Yoro, Emiko; Kawaguchi, Masayoshi

    2015-01-01

    Legumes and a few other plant species can establish a symbiotic relationship with nitrogen-fixing rhizobia, which enables them to survive in a nitrogen-deficient environment. During the course of nodulation, infection with rhizobia induces the dedifferentiation of host cells to form primordia of a symbiotic organ, the nodule, which prepares plants to accommodate rhizobia in host cells. While these nodulation processes are known to be genetically controlled by both plants and rhizobia, recent advances in studies on two model legumes, Lotus japonicus and Medicago truncatula, have provided great insight into the underlying plant-side molecular mechanism. In this chapter, we review such knowledge, with particular emphasis on two key processes of nodulation, nodule development and rhizobial invasion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Flickering of the symbiotic variable CH Cygni during outburst

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slovak, M.H.; Africano, J.

    1978-01-01

    High-speed and conventional BVRI photometry are reported for the bright symbiotic variable CH Cygni (M6 IIIe), obtained during the course of a recent outburst. Unlike the quiescent symbiotic stars, the presence of flickering similar in nature to that seen in the cataclysmic variables has been confirmed during this active phase. The BVRI photometry for a sample of stars in the field is used to derive the reddening and the distance to CH Cyg. A composite energy distribution is derived from 0.35 to 11.0 μm which clearly establishes the existence of a variable, blue continuum. The lack of variability in the near infrared suggests that the blue continuum arises from a hot companion. A binary model including a subluminous hot companion accreting material from the stellar wind of an SRa variable is discussed to account for the observed photometric properties. (author)

  10. Discovery of optical flickering from the symbiotic star EF Aquilae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanov, R. K.; Boeva, S.; Nikolov, Y. M.; Petrov, B.; Bachev, R.; Latev, G. Y.; Popov, V. A.; Stoyanov, K. A.; Bode, M. F.; Martí, J.; Tomov, T.; Antonova, A.

    2017-07-01

    We report optical CCD photometry of the recently identified symbiotic star EF Aql. Our observations in Johnson V and B bands clearly show the presence of stochastic light variations with an amplitude of about 0.2 mag on a time scale of minutes. The observations point toward a white dwarf (WD) as the hot component in the system. It is the 11-th object among more than 200 symbiotic stars known with detected optical flickering. Estimates of the mass accretion rate onto the WD and the mass loss rate in the wind of the Mira secondary star lead to the conclusion that less than 1 per cent of the wind is captured by the WD. Eight further candidates for the detection of flickering in similar systems are suggested.

  11. Symbiotic N fixation of several soybean varieties and mutants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gandanegara, S.; Hendratno, K.

    1988-01-01

    Symbiotic N fixation of several soybean varieties and mutants. Research activities comprising of three experiments were carried out to screen several soybean varieties and mutants for symbiotic N fixation potential. Depending on the medium used, plant response to strains was different. In sterile medium, Rhizobium strain USDA 136, 142 and TAL 102 showed a high nitrogen potential. In soil only Rhizobium strain USDA 110 had better performance and proved to be competitive to the native strains. Nitrogen-15 dilution method was used to screen nitrogen fixing ability of several soybean varieties and mutants. Guntur variety showed a better response to high dose of N fertilizer without disturbance in its fixing ability. This variety then was considered good to be introduced in the cropping system. (author). 8 refs

  12. Training Feedforward Neural Networks Using Symbiotic Organisms Search Algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haizhou; Zhou, Yongquan; Luo, Qifang; Basset, Mohamed Abdel

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic organisms search (SOS) is a new robust and powerful metaheuristic algorithm, which stimulates the symbiotic interaction strategies adopted by organisms to survive and propagate in the ecosystem. In the supervised learning area, it is a challenging task to present a satisfactory and efficient training algorithm for feedforward neural networks (FNNs). In this paper, SOS is employed as a new method for training FNNs. To investigate the performance of the aforementioned method, eight different datasets selected from the UCI machine learning repository are employed for experiment and the results are compared among seven metaheuristic algorithms. The results show that SOS performs better than other algorithms for training FNNs in terms of converging speed. It is also proven that an FNN trained by the method of SOS has better accuracy than most algorithms compared.

  13. Some mycogenous fungi from Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Chlebicki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the results of earlier studies on mycogenous fungi which were gathered occasionally are summarized. Fifieen specres. previously Pyrenomycetes s.l., have been found growing on other fungi Immothia hypoxylon and Lophiostoma polyporicola are new species to the Polish mycoflora. Sphaeronaemella Kulczyńskiana described by K. R o u p p e r t (1912 is considered to be Eleuteromyces subultus. Relatively high number of fungi inhabiting stromata of Diatrypella favacea is probably connected with its early colonization of the Polish area.

  14. 15N Content Reflects Development of Mycorrhizae and Nitrogen Dynamics During Primary Succession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbie, E. A.; Jumpponen, A.

    2004-05-01

    Mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous symbionts on terrestrial plants that are particularly important for plant nitrogen nutrition. 15N content appears to be a useful marker of the mycorrhizal role in plant nitrogen supply because of an apparent fractionation against 15N during transfer of nitrogen from mycorrhizal fungi to host plants. Because plants developing during primary succession are gradually colonized by mycorrhizal fungi, such situations provide good opportunities to study interactions between mycorrhizal colonization and plant 15N content. Here, we present results of a study of nitrogen isotope patterns in ecosystem components during the first 100 years of ecosystem development after glacial retreat, and compare those patterns with those on adjacent mature terrain. Soils in primary succession were depleted in 15N relative to nitrogen-fixing plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants generally colonized by ectomycorrhizal, ericoid, or arbuscular fungi showed similar 15N content very early in succession (-4 to -6‰ ), corresponding to low colonization levels of all plant species. Subsequent colonization of evergreen plants by ectomycorrhizal and ericoid fungi led to a 5-6‰ decline in 15N content, indicating transfer of 15N-depleted N from fungi to plants. The values recorded (-10 to -14‰ ) are among the lowest yet observed in vascular plants. Nonmycorrhizal plants and plants colonized by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi did not decline in 15N content. Most ectomycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungi were similar in 15N content in early succession (-1 to -3‰ ), with the notable exception of ectomycorrhizal fungi suspected of proteolytic capabilities, which were 15N enriched relative to all other fungi. 15N contents in both plants and soil from the mature site were 5‰ greater than in recently exposed sites. We conclude that 1) the primary nitrogen source to this ecosystem must be atmospheric deposition, 2) low plant 15N content generally corresponds with greater

  15. Seedling mycorrhiza

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Nina; Rasmussen, Finn N.

    2014-01-01

    rhizoctonious mycelia are presently involved in OSM, presumably evolving secondarily and often in parallel in different orchid clades. Structural features and internal patterns of mycobiont behaviour appear to have remained largely the same, implying that OSM needs only minor physiological adjustment...... to accommodate new mycobionts. Such modifications will have involved checkpoints for recognition/rejection and the formation/breakdown of pelotons. These physiological mechanisms are so far largely unknown. The trophic versatility of the mycobionts and the apparently easy shifts could be a main factor...

  16. Formulation of a peach ice cream as potential symbiotic food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Josué VILLALVA

    Full Text Available Abstract Today’s population increasingly demands and consumes healthy products. For this reason, the food industry has been developing and marketing food with added bioactive components. The aim of this work was to formulate a peach ice cream reduced in calories with an added probiotic (Bifidobacterium lactis Bb-12 and prebiotics (inulin, and to evaluate its sensory quality and acceptability as potential symbiotic food. The moisture content was 76.47%; 7.14% protein; 0.15% fat; 6.37%; carbohydrates; 9.87% inulin; 1.22% ash; 0.201% calcium, 0.155% phosphorus and 0.168% sodium. On the first and 21th day of storage counts of B. lactis Bb – 12 was 4 x 108 CFU/mL and 1.5 x 107 CFU/mL, respectively. It was possible to formulate a peach ice cream reduced in calories, fat, and sugar and with potential symbiotic effect, by addition of B. lactis Bb – 12. A product with suitable organoleptic characteristics, creamy texture, peachy colour, taste and flavour, and no ice crystals was obtained. This ice cream would be a suitable food matrix to incorporate prebiotic and probiotic ingredients as a potential symbiotic food.

  17. Studies on foliicolous fungi VI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hosagoudar, V.B.

    2002-01-01

    An account is given of three foliicolous fungi from India. Two new species, viz. Clasterosporium cyperacearum and Questieriella grewiae are described. Dysrhynchis uncinata forms a new generic and specific record to India and is reported on an endemic host.

  18. Integrating Mycorrhizas Into Global Scale Models : A Journey Toward Relevance in the Earth's Climate System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brzostek, E. R.; Rebel, K. T.; Smith, K.R.; Phillips, R.P.

    2017-01-01

    Associations between plants and mycorrhizal fungi are ubiquitous in nature and are among the most important trophic interactions affecting ecosystem services and global change. Despite their evolutionary history and current ecological importance, mycorrhizal dynamics have rarely been included in the

  19. Methyl Halide Production by Fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailey, G. D.; Varner, R. K.; Blanchard, R. O.; Sive, B. C.; Crill, P. M.

    2005-12-01

    Methyl chloride (CH3Cl), methyl bromide (CH3Br) and methyl iodide (CH3I) are methyl halide gases that contribute significant amounts of halogen radicals to the atmosphere. In an effort to better understand the global budget of methyl halides and their impact on the atmosphere, we need to identify the natural sources in addition to the known anthropogenic sources of these compounds. We are investigating the role of fungi in the production of methyl halides in the soils and wetlands in southern New Hampshire, USA. Previous research has shown that wood decay fungi and ectomycorrhizal fungi, which are within a group of fungi called basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. In our study, measurements of headspace gas extracted from flasks containing fungi grown in culture demonstrate that a variety of fungi, including basidiomycetes and non-basidiomycetes, emit methyl halides. Our research sites include four ecosystems: an agricultural field, a temperate forest, a fresh water wetland, and coastal salt marshes. We have collected and isolated fungi at each site by culturing tissue samples of fruiting bodies and plant material, by using wood baits, and from the direct culture of soil. We compared the rates of methyl halide emissions from the fungi in the four ecosystems. In addition, we measured emissions from previously assayed fungal isolates after reintroducing them to sterilized soils that were collected from their original environments. Fungal biomass was determined by substrate-induced respiration (SIR). The emission rate by the fungus was determined by a linear regression of the concentration of methyl halide in the sample headspace over time divided by the fungal biomass.

  20. [Chitinolytic activity of filamentous fungi].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shubakov, A A; Kucheriavykh, P S

    2004-01-01

    The chitinolytic activity of nine species of filamentous fungi, classified with seven genera (specifically, Aspergillus, Penicillium, Trichoderma, Paecilomyces, Sporotrichum, Beaueria, and Mucor), was studied. When cultured in liquid medium containing 1% crystalline chitin, all fungi produced extracellular chitosans with activity varying from 0.2 U/mg protein (Sporotrichum olivaceum, Mucor sp., etc.) to 4.0-4.2 U/mg protein (Trichoderma lignorum, Aspergillus niger).

  1. Ancient horizontal gene transfer from bacteria enhances biosynthetic capabilities of fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imke Schmitt

    Full Text Available Polyketides are natural products with a wide range of biological functions and pharmaceutical applications. Discovery and utilization of polyketides can be facilitated by understanding the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the biosynthetic machinery and the natural product potential of extant organisms. Gene duplication and subfunctionalization, as well as horizontal gene transfer are proposed mechanisms in the evolution of biosynthetic gene clusters. To explain the amount of homology in some polyketide synthases in unrelated organisms such as bacteria and fungi, interkingdom horizontal gene transfer has been evoked as the most likely evolutionary scenario. However, the origin of the genes and the direction of the transfer remained elusive.We used comparative phylogenetics to infer the ancestor of a group of polyketide synthase genes involved in antibiotic and mycotoxin production. We aligned keto synthase domain sequences of all available fungal 6-methylsalicylic acid (6-MSA-type PKSs and their closest bacterial relatives. To assess the role of symbiotic fungi in the evolution of this gene we generated 24 6-MSA synthase sequence tags from lichen-forming fungi. Our results support an ancient horizontal gene transfer event from an actinobacterial source into ascomycete fungi, followed by gene duplication.Given that actinobacteria are unrivaled producers of biologically active compounds, such as antibiotics, it appears particularly promising to study biosynthetic genes of actinobacterial origin in fungi. The large number of 6-MSA-type PKS sequences found in lichen-forming fungi leads us hypothesize that the evolution of typical lichen compounds, such as orsellinic acid derivatives, was facilitated by the gain of this bacterial polyketide synthase.

  2. Computational investigation of small RNAs in the establishment of root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza in leguminous plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Danfeng; Meng, Xianwen; Wang, Yue; Wang, Jingjing; Zhao, Yuhua; Chen, Ming

    2018-01-03

    Many small RNAs have been confirmed to play important roles in the development of root nodules and arbuscular mycorrhiza. In this study, we carried out the identification of certain small RNAs in leguminous plants (Medicago truncatula, soybean, peanut and common bean), such as miRNAs, tRFs and srRNAs, as well as the computational investigation of their regulations. Thirty miRNAs were predicted to be involved in establishing root nodules and mycorrhiza, and 12 of them were novel in common bean and peanut. The generation of tRFs in M. truncatula was not associated with tRNA gene frequencies and codon usage. Six tRFs exhibited different expressions in mycorrhiza and root nodules. Moreover, srRNA 5.8S in M. truncatula was generated from the regions with relatively low conservation at the rRNA 3' terminal. The protein-protein interactions between the proteins encoded by the target genes of miRNAs, tRFs and srRNAs were computed. The regulation of these three types of sRNAs in the symbiosis between leguminous plants and microorganisms is not a single regulation of certain signaling or metabolic pathways but a global regulation for the plants to own growth or specific events in symbiosis.

  3. Mycorrhiza analyses in New Zealand truffières reveal frequent but variable persistence of Tuber melanosporum in co-existence with other truffle species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin-Laguette, Alexis; Cummings, Nicholas; Hesom-Williams, Nina; Butler, Ruth; Wang, Yun

    2013-02-01

    This study compiles the results from an examination of mycorrhizae on root samples from Tuber melanosporum truffières in New Zealand. Samples were taken over 5 years from 328 trees in 43 truffières established with nursery-inoculated trees. Mycorrhizae were analysed using a combination of morphological and molecular techniques, focusing on the identification of Tuber species. Results show that 49% of the trees, and nearly 90% of the truffières, retained T. melanosporum mycorrhizae up to 21 years after planting. Tuber mycorrhizae with spiky cystidia were found on 26.9% of the tested trees: Tuber brumale (5.5%), Tuber maculatum (10.7%), and unidentified Tuber species (10.7%), and were detected in 67% of the truffières tested. T. brumale was found in 28% and T. maculatum in 35% of the truffières. In 56% of the truffières, T. melanosporum was found to occur with spiky Tuber species. The existence of T. brumale and T. maculatum in the same truffière was recorded only once. Forty-four percent of trees examined had Scleroderma-like (SCL) mycorrhizae and 50% of trees hosted other ectomycorrhizal species (OE). For all categories of mycorrhizal species examined, the variation between truffières was greater than variation within each truffière. Overall results indicate that Corylus avellana tends to be more receptive to mycorrhizae of Tuber species than Quercus robur but is not necessarily more productive. In productive truffières, Q. robur appears to host SCL mycorrhizae more often than C. avellana. This is the first study of its scale to analyse the mycorrhizal species associated with T. melanosporum truffières in the Southern Hemisphere.

  4. Uptake of heavy metals in berries and edible fungi, and changes in the floral composition after treatment with ashes on forest soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruehling, Aa.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of treatment with ash on fungi and vascular plants, and on metal contents in berries and edible fungi, were studied in pine, spruce and birch forest stands in southern Sweden. Different types of ashes were studied. The changes to the vascular flora and the fungal flora that are today taking place in southern Sweden, and probably influenced by soil acidification and nitrogen deposition, are characterised by an impoverishment of mycorrhiza-forming species and thus cannot be corrected by supply of wood ashes. Instead, supply of at least raw ashes appears to hasten the process towards a nitrogen-favoured flora. It is known that raw ashes can cause nitrate-formation whereas granulated ashes have hardly increased the pH or lead to the formation of nitrate in any field experiment. The study has now been completed and has thus largely provided answers to the questions posed: Spreading of ashes does not lead to a general increase in the uptake of heavy metals in fungi and berries. The risk that berries and fungi will contain increased contents of heavy metals during the first season after spreading is small. The studies do not suggest that raw ashes can offer a short-term answer to counteracting the changes that are taking place to the composition of the fungal flora, probably as a result of soil acidification, or as a means of recreating conditions suitable for species requiring more alkaline conditions. 7 refs, 32 tabs

  5. AM fungi root colonization increases the production of essential isoprenoids vs. nonessential isoprenoids especially under drought stress conditions or after jasmonic acid application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Dolores; Rapparini, Francesca; Peñuelas, Josep

    2012-05-01

    Previous studies have shown that root colonization by arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) fungi enhances plant resistance to abiotic and biotic stressors and finally plant growth. However, little is known about the effect of AM on isoprenoid foliar and root content. In this study we tested whether the AM symbiosis affects carbon resource allocation to different classes of isoprenoids such as the volatile nonessential isoprenoids (monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes) and the non-volatile essential isoprenoids (abscisic acid, chlorophylls and carotenoids). By subjecting the plants to stressors such as drought and to exogenous application of JA, we wanted to test their interaction with AM symbiosis in conditions where isoprenoids usually play a role in resistance to stress and in plant defence. Root colonization by AM fungi favoured the leaf production of essential isoprenoids rather than nonessential ones, especially under drought stress conditions or after JA application. The increased carbon demand brought on by AM fungi might thus influence not only the amount of carbon allocated to isoprenoids, but also the carbon partitioning between the different classes of isoprenoids, thus explaining the not previously shown decrease of root volatile isoprenoids in AM plants. We propose that since AM fungi are a nutrient source for the plant, other carbon sinks normally necessary to increase nutrient uptake can be avoided and therefore the plant can devote more resources to synthesize essential isoprenoids for plant growth. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Fungi producing significant mycotoxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Mycotoxins are secondary metabolites of microfungi that are known to cause sickness or death in humans or animals. Although many such toxic metabolites are known, it is generally agreed that only a few are significant in causing disease: aflatoxins, fumonisins, ochratoxin A, deoxynivalenol, zearalenone, and ergot alkaloids. These toxins are produced by just a few species from the common genera Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, and Claviceps. All Aspergillus and Penicillium species either are commensals, growing in crops without obvious signs of pathogenicity, or invade crops after harvest and produce toxins during drying and storage. In contrast, the important Fusarium and Claviceps species infect crops before harvest. The most important Aspergillus species, occurring in warmer climates, are A. flavus and A. parasiticus, which produce aflatoxins in maize, groundnuts, tree nuts, and, less frequently, other commodities. The main ochratoxin A producers, A. ochraceus and A. carbonarius, commonly occur in grapes, dried vine fruits, wine, and coffee. Penicillium verrucosum also produces ochratoxin A but occurs only in cool temperate climates, where it infects small grains. F. verticillioides is ubiquitous in maize, with an endophytic nature, and produces fumonisins, which are generally more prevalent when crops are under drought stress or suffer excessive insect damage. It has recently been shown that Aspergillus niger also produces fumonisins, and several commodities may be affected. F. graminearum, which is the major producer of deoxynivalenol and zearalenone, is pathogenic on maize, wheat, and barley and produces these toxins whenever it infects these grains before harvest. Also included is a short section on Claviceps purpurea, which produces sclerotia among the seeds in grasses, including wheat, barley, and triticale. The main thrust of the chapter contains information on the identification of these fungi and their morphological characteristics, as well as factors

  7. LTR retrotransposons in fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Muszewska

    Full Text Available Transposable elements with long terminal direct repeats (LTR TEs are one of the best studied groups of mobile elements. They are ubiquitous elements present in almost all eukaryotic genomes. Their number and state of conservation can be a highlight of genome dynamics. We searched all published fungal genomes for LTR-containing retrotransposons, including both complete, functional elements and remnant copies. We identified a total of over 66,000 elements, all of which belong to the Ty1/Copia or Ty3/Gypsy superfamilies. Most of the detected Gypsy elements represent Chromoviridae, i.e. they carry a chromodomain in the pol ORF. We analyzed our data from a genome-ecology perspective, looking at the abundance of various types of LTR TEs in individual genomes and at the highest-copy element from each genome. The TE content is very variable among the analyzed genomes. Some genomes are very scarce in LTR TEs (8000 elements. The data shows that transposon expansions in fungi usually involve an increase both in the copy number of individual elements and in the number of element types. The majority of the highest-copy TEs from all genomes are Ty3/Gypsy transposons. Phylogenetic analysis of these elements suggests that TE expansions have appeared independently of each other, in distant genomes and at different taxonomical levels. We also analyzed the evolutionary relationships between protein domains encoded by the transposon pol ORF and we found that the protease is the fastest evolving domain whereas reverse transcriptase and RNase H evolve much slower and in correlation with each other.

  8. Growth response of drought-stressed Pinus sylvestris seedlings to single- and multi-species inoculation with ectomycorrhizal fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tabea Kipfer

    Full Text Available Many trees species form symbiotic associations with ectomycorrhizal (ECM fungi, which improve nutrient and water acquisition of their host. Until now it is unclear whether the species richness of ECM fungi is beneficial for tree seedling performance, be it during moist conditions or drought. We performed a pot experiment using Pinus sylvestris seedlings inoculated with four selected ECM fungi (Cenococcum geophilum, Paxillus involutus, Rhizopogon roseolus and Suillus granulatus to investigate (i whether these four ECM fungi, in monoculture or in species mixtures, affect growth of P. sylvestris seedlings, and (ii whether this effect can be attributed to species number per se or to species identity. Two different watering regimes (moist vs. dry were applied to examine the context-dependency of the results. Additionally, we assessed the activity of eight extracellular enzymes in the root tips. Shoot growth was enhanced in the presence of S. granulatus, but not by any other ECM fungal species. The positive effect of S. granulatus on shoot growth was more pronounced under moist (threefold increase than under dry conditions (twofold increase, indicating that the investigated ECM fungi did not provide additional support during drought stress. The activity of secreted extracellular enzymes was higher in S. granulatus than in any other species. In conclusion, our findings suggest that ECM fungal species composition may affect seedling performance in terms of aboveground biomass.

  9. Importance and Implications of the Production of Phenolic Secondary Metabolites by Endophytic Fungi: A Mini-Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negreiros de Carvalho, Patrícia Lunardelli; Silva, Eliane de Oliveira; Chagas-Paula, Daniela Aparecida; Hortolan Luiz, Jaine Honorata; Ikegaki, Masaharu

    2016-01-01

    In the natural products research, a valuable approach is the prospection of uncommon sources and unexplored habitat. Special attention has been given to endophytic fungi because of their ability to produce new and interesting secondary metabolites, which have several biological applications. The endophytes establish exclusive symbiotic relationships with plants and the metabolic interactions may support the synthesis of some similar valuables compounds. Among secondary metabolites, phenol-derived structures are responsible for several bioactivities such as antioxidant, cytotoxic, antimicrobial, among others. Phenolic compounds might be biosynthesized from the shikimate pathway. Although shikimic acid is a common precursor in plants, it is described as rare in microorganisms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first review about phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi and a comparison has been made with those produced by the plant host. This review covers 124 phenolic secondary metabolites produced by endophytic fungi. Considering the data analyzed by us, only seven of such compounds were isolated from fungi and from their hosts. These observations claim for more attention to phenolic compounds produced by endophytic fungi with a view to understand the real importance of these compounds to endophytes survival.

  10. Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nitrate uptake by the pea crop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jensen, E.S.

    1986-08-01

    Symbiotic nitrogen fixation and nitrate uptake by pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) were studied in field and pot experiments using the 15 N isotope dilution technique and spring barley as a non-fixing reference crop. Barley, although not ideal, seemed to be a suitable reference for pea in the 15 N-technique. Maximum N 2 fixation activity of 10 kg N fixed per ha per day was reached around the flat pod growth stage, and the activity decreased rapidly during pod-filling. The pea crop fixed between 100 and 250 kg N ha -1 , corresponding to from 45 to 80 per cent of total crop N. The amount of symbiotically fixed N 2 depended on the climatic conditions in the experimental year, the level of soil mineral N and the pea cultivar. Field-grown pea took up 60 to 70 per cent of the N-fertilizer supplied. The supply of 50 kg NO 3 -N ha -1 inhibited the N 2 fixation approximately 15 per cent. Small amounts of fertilizer N, supplied at sowing (starter-N), slightly stimulated the vegetative growth of pea, but the yields of seed dry matter and protein were not significantly influenced. In the present field experiments the environmental conditions, especially the distribution of rainfall during the growth season, seemed to be more important in determining the protein and dry matter yield of the dry pea crop, than the ability of pea to fix nitrogen symbiotically. However, fertilizer N supplied to pot-grown pea plants at the flat pod growth stage or as split applications significantly increased the yield of seed dry matter and protein. (author)

  11. Melanized fungi in human disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revankar, Sanjay G; Sutton, Deanna A

    2010-10-01

    Melanized or dematiaceous fungi are associated with a wide variety of infectious syndromes, including chromoblastomycosis, mycetoma, and phaeohyphomycosis. [corrected]. Many are soil organisms and are generally distributed worldwide, though certain species appear to have restricted geographic ranges. Though they are uncommon causes of disease, melanized fungi have been increasingly recognized as important pathogens, with most reports occurring in the past 20 years. The spectrum of diseases with which they are associated has also broadened and includes allergic disease, superficial and deep local infections, pneumonia, brain abscess, and disseminated infection. For some infections in immunocompetent individuals, such as allergic fungal sinusitis and brain abscess, they are among the most common etiologic fungi. Melanin is a likely virulence factor for these fungi. Diagnosis relies on careful microscopic and pathological examination, as well as clinical assessment of the patient, as these fungi are often considered contaminants. Therapy varies depending upon the clinical syndrome. Local infection may be cured with excision alone, while systemic disease is often refractory to therapy. Triazoles such as voriconazole, posaconazole, and itraconazole have the most consistent in vitro activity. Further studies are needed to better understand the pathogenesis and optimal treatment of these uncommon infections.

  12. What Defines the "Kingdom" Fungi?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Thomas A; Leonard, Guy; Wideman, Jeremy G

    2017-06-01

    The application of environmental DNA techniques and increased genome sequencing of microbial diversity, combined with detailed study of cellular characters, has consistently led to the reexamination of our understanding of the tree of life. This has challenged many of the definitions of taxonomic groups, especially higher taxonomic ranks such as eukaryotic kingdoms. The Fungi is an example of a kingdom which, together with the features that define it and the taxa that are grouped within it, has been in a continual state of flux. In this article we aim to summarize multiple lines of data pertinent to understanding the early evolution and definition of the Fungi. These include ongoing cellular and genomic comparisons that, we will argue, have generally undermined all attempts to identify a synapomorphic trait that defines the Fungi. This article will also summarize ongoing work focusing on taxon discovery, combined with phylogenomic analysis, which has identified novel groups that lie proximate/adjacent to the fungal clade-wherever the boundary that defines the Fungi may be. Our hope is that, by summarizing these data in the form of a discussion, we can illustrate the ongoing efforts to understand what drove the evolutionary diversification of fungi.

  13. Ad-hoc Symbiotic Interactive Displays through DLNA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bitsch, Jannick Elimar; Bouvin, Niels Olof

    2012-01-01

    - tructure means that the concept has seen little use. We design and implement a solution for using DLNA playback devices as symbiotic screens. DLNA devices are not designed to support interactive content, but to share and play media content in the home. Our work includes constructing a mechanism for real...... time generation of a video stream containing screen content, as well as a buffer starving mechanism that reduces buffer induced playback latency. The resulting system allows Android applications to use DLNA devices as a secondary screens. Latencies and update rates are such, that only applications...

  14. Microsatellite Primers in the Lichen Symbiotic Alga Trebouxia decolorans (Trebouxiophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Dal Grande

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Premise of the study: Polymorphic microsatellite markers were developed for the symbiotic green alga Trebouxia decolorans to study fine-scale population structure and clonal diversity. Methods and Results: Using Illumina pyrosequencing, 20 microsatellite primer sets were developed for T. decolorans. The primer sets were tested on 43 individuals sampled from four subpopulations in Germany. The primers amplified di-, tri-, and tetranucleotide repeats with three to 15 alleles per locus, and the unbiased haploid diversity per locus ranged from 0.636 to 0.821. Conclusions: The identified microsatellite markers will be useful to study the genetic diversity, dispersal, and reproductive mode of this common lichen photobiont.

  15. A multi-frequency study of symbiotic stars: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivison, R.J.; Bode, M.F.; Roberts, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between optical line flux and 5 GHz radio flux is investigated for a sample of 17 northern sky symbiotic stars. Data were obtained near-simultaneously with the Manchester Echelle Spectrograph mounted on the Isaac Newton Telescope, La Palma and the Broad Band Interferometer at Jodrell Bank. Colour excesses, calculated from Balmer hydrogen line fluxes assuming Case B recombination ratios, are compared with other reddening estimates and also combined with extinction maps to provide improved distance estimates. Optical line fluxes are used in combination with radio fluxes to estimate physical parameters of these objects, including mass-loss rates. (author)

  16. The 1982 ultraviolet eclipse of the symbiotic binary AR Pav

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, J. B.; Cowley, A. P.; Ake, T. B.; Imhoff, C. L.

    1983-01-01

    Observations with the International Ultraviolet Explorer (IUE) of the symbiotic binary AR Pav through its 1982 eclipse show that the hot star is not eclipsed. The hot star is associated with an extended region of continuum emission which is partially eclipsed. The eclipsed radiation is hotter near to its center, with a maximum temperature of about 9000 K. The uneclipsed flux is hotter than this. UV emission lines are not measurably eclipsed and presumably arise in a much larger region than the continuum. These data provide new constraints on models of the system but also are apparently in contradiction to those based on ground-based data.

  17. On the nature of the symbiotic binary CI Cygni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, S.J.; Oliversen, N.A.; Mikolajewska, J.; Mikolajewski, M.; Stencel, R.E.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of ultraviolet and optical spectroscopy is presented for the symbiotic binary CI Cyg. This system contains an M5 II asymptotic branch giant Mg of about 1.5 solar mass, transfering material at a few times 0.00001 solar mass/yr into a large accretion disk surrounding a main-sequence star with Mh of about 0.5 solar mass. A boundary layer at the inner edge of the disk photoionizes a small nebula approximately confined to the Roche volume of the accreting star. An extended, more highly ionized region forms when material ejected from the disk interacts with the red giant wind. 115 refs

  18. Symbiotic and nonsymbiotic hemoglobin genes of Casuarina glauca

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen-Lyon, K; Jensen, Erik Østergaard; Jørgensen, Jan-Elo

    1995-01-01

    Casuarina glauca has a gene encoding hemoglobin (cashb-nonsym). This gene is expressed in a number of plant tissues. Casuarina also has a second family of hemoglobin genes (cashb-sym) expressed at a high level in the nodules that Casuarina forms in a nitrogen-fixing symbiosis with the actinomycete...... of the Casuarina gene. The finding that the nonsymbiotic Casuarina gene is also correctly expressed in L. corniculatus suggests to us that a comparable non-symbiotic hemoglobin gene will be found in legume species. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Feb...

  19. Effects of Tissue Culture and Mycorrhiza Applications in Organic Farming on Concentrations of Phytochemicals and Antioxidant Capacities in Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) Rhizomes and Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Byungrok R; Marsh, Lurline E; Brathwaite, Keegan; Daramola, Adebola O

    2017-04-01

    Tissue culture and mycorrhiza applications can provide disease-free seedlings and enhanced nutrient absorption, respectively, for organic farming. Ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) is rich in phytochemicals and has various health-protective potentials. This study was aimed at determining effects of tissue culture and mycorrhiza applications alone or in combinations in organic farming on phytochemical contents (total phenolics and flavonoids [TP and TF, respectively], gingerol and shogaol homologues, phenolic acids, and carotenoids) and antioxidant capacities (DPPH [2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl] radical scavenging, oxygen radical absorbance (ORAC), and iron-chelating capacities [ICC]) in solvent-extractable (Free) and cell-wall-matrix-bound (Bound) fractions of ginger rhizome and Free fraction of the leaves in comparison with non-organics. Concentrations of the phytochemicals and antioxidant capacities, except for carotenoids and ICC, were significantly higher in organic ginger rhizomes and leaves than in non-organics regardless of the fractions and treatments (P Mycorrhiza application in organic farming significantly increased levels of TP, TF, gingerols, and ORAC in the Free fraction of the rhizome (P mycorrhiza significantly increased concentrations of TF and gingerols and ORAC in the Free fraction of the rhizome (P mycorrhiza and tissue culture applications can increase concentrations of phytochemicals and antioxidant capacities in ginger rhizomes and leaves and therefore improve their health-protective potentials. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  20. Plant kin recognition enhances abundance of symbiotic microbial partner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda L File

    Full Text Available The stability of cooperative interactions among different species can be compromised by cheating. In the plant-mycorrhizal fungi symbiosis, a single mycorrhizal network may interact with many plants, providing the opportunity for individual plants to cheat by obtaining nutrients from the fungi without donating carbon. Here we determine whether kin selection may favour plant investment in the mycorrhizal network, reducing the incentive to cheat when relatives interact with a single network.We show that mycorrhizal network size and root colonization were greater when Ambrosia artemisiifolia L. was grown with siblings compared to strangers. Soil fungal abundance was positively correlated with group leaf nitrogen, and increased root colonization was associated with a reduced number of pathogen-induced root lesions, indicating greater benefit to plants grown with siblings.Plants can benefit their relatives through investment in mycorrhizal fungi, and kin selection in plants could promote the persistence of the mycorrhizal symbiosis.

  1. Arbuscular mycorrhiza improves yield and nutritional properties of onion (Allium cepa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozpądek, Piotr; Rąpała-Kozik, Maria; Wężowicz, Katarzyna; Grandin, Anna; Karlsson, Stefan; Ważny, Rafał; Anielska, Teresa; Turnau, Katarzyna

    2016-10-01

    Improving the nutritional value of commonly cultivated crops is one of the most pending problems for modern agriculture. In natural environments plants associate with a multitude of fungal microorganisms that improve plant fitness. The best described group are arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF). These fungi have been previously shown to improve the quality and yield of several common crops. In this study we tested the potential utilization of Rhizophagus irregularis in accelerating growth and increasing the content of important dietary phytochemicals in onion (Allium cepa). Our results clearly indicate that biomass production, the abundance of vitamin B1 and its analogues and organic acid concentration can be improved by inoculating the plant with AM fungi. We have shown that improved growth is accompanied with up-regulated electron transport in PSII and antioxidant enzyme activity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Fungi and mycotoxins: Food contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kocić-Tanackov Sunčica D.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The growth of fungi on food causes physical and chemical changes which, further affect negatively the sensory and nutritive quality of food. Species from genera: Aspergillus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Alternariа, Cladosporium, Mucor, Rhizopus, Eurotium and Emericella are usually found. Some of them are potentially dangerous for humans and animals, due to possible synthesis and excretion of toxic secondary metabolites - mycotoxins into the food. Their toxic syndroms in animals and humans are known as mycotoxicoses. The pathologic changes can be observed in parenhimatic organs, and in bones and central nervous system also. Specific conditions are necessary for mycotoxin producing fungi to synthetize sufficient quantities of these compounds for demonstration of biologic effects. The main biochemical paths in the formation of mycotoxins include the polyketide (aflatoxins, sterigmatocystin, zearalenone, citrinine, patulin, terpenic (trichothecenes, aminoacid (glicotoxins, ergotamines, sporidesmin, malformin C, and carbonic acids path (rubratoxins. Aflatoxins are the most toxigenic metabolites of fungi, produced mostly by Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus species. Aflatoxins appear more frequently in food in the tropic and subtropic regions, while the food in Europe is more exposed to also very toxic ochratoxin A producing fungi (A. ochraceus and some Penicillium species. The agricultural products can be contaminated by fungi both before and after the harvest. The primary mycotoxicoses in humans are the result of direct intake of vegetable products contaminated by mycotoxins, while the secondary mycotoxicoses are caused by products of animal origin. The risk of the presence of fungi and mycotoxin in food is increasing, having in mind that some of them are highly thermoresistent, and the temperatures of usual food sterilization is not sufficient for their termination. The paper presents the review of most important mycotoxins, their biologic effects

  3. Fungi isolated in school buildings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elżbieta Ejdys

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine the species composition of fungi occurring on wall surfaces and in the air in school buildings. Fungi isolated from the air using the sedimentation method and from the walls using the surface swab technique constituted the study material. Types of finish materials on wall surfaces were identified and used in the analysis. Samples were collected in selected areas in two schools: classrooms, corridors, men's toilets and women's toilets, cloakrooms, sports changing rooms and shower. Examinations were conducted in May 2005 after the heating season was over. Fungi were incubated on Czapek-Dox medium at three parallel temperatures: 25, 37 and 40°C, for at least three weeks. A total of 379 isolates of fungi belonging to 32 genera of moulds, yeasts and yeast-like fungi were obtained from 321 samples in the school environment. The following genera were isolated most frequently: Aspergillus, Penicillium and Cladosporium. Of the 72 determined species, Cladosporium herbarum, Aspergillus fumigatus and Penicillium chrysogenum occurred most frequently in the school buildings. Wall surfaces were characterised by an increased prevalence of mycobiota in comparison with the air in the buildings, with a slightly greater species diversity. A certain species specificity for rough and smooth wall surfaces was demonstrated. Fungi of the genera Cladosporium and Emericella with large spores adhered better to smooth surfaces while those of the genus Aspergillus with smaller conidia adhered better to rough surfaces. The application of three incubation temperatures helped provide a fuller picture of the mycobiota in the school environment.

  4. Evidence that northern pioneering pines with tuberculate mycorrhizae are unaffected by varying soil nitrogen levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, William Kenneth; Paul, Leslie

    2012-11-01

    Tuberculate mycorrhizae on Pinus contorta (lodgepole pine) have previously been shown to reduce acetylene, but an outstanding question has been to what degree these structures could meet the nitrogen requirements of the tree. We compared the growth, tissue nitrogen contents, and stable nitrogen isotope ratios of P. contorta growing in gravel pits to the same species growing on adjacent intact soil. Trees growing in severely nitrogen deficient gravel pits had virtually identical growth rates and tissue nitrogen contents to those growing on intact soil that had nitrogen levels typical for the area. δ(15)N values for trees in the gravel pits were substantially lower than δ(15)N values for trees on intact soil, and isotope ratios in vegetation were lower than the isotope ratios of the soil. The form of soil nitrogen in the gravel pits was almost exclusively nitrate, while ammonium predominated in the intact soil. Discrimination against (15)N during plant uptake of soil nitrate in the highly N-deficient soil should be weak or nonexistent. Therefore, the low δ(15)N in the gravel pit trees suggests that trees growing in gravel pits were using another nitrogen source in addition to the soil. Precipitation-borne nitrogen in the study area is extremely low. In conjunction with our other work, these findings strongly suggests that P. contorta and its microbial symbionts or associates fix nitrogen in sufficient amounts to sustain vigorous tree growth on the most nitrogen-deficient soils.

  5. Lime and phosphate application as mycorrhizae stimulation to enhance growth and yield of Marandu grass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin Eduardo Melo Santiago

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Pastures are important food sources for Brazilian cattle herds. However, inadequate management of soil fertility has emerged as a major cause of low yield rates and of progressive degradation of these areas. The objective of the present study was to evaluate growth, by means of morphogenetic and structural characteristics, and yield of Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. cv. Marandu as functions of the application of the mycorrhizae stimulant formononetin, associated with lime and phosphate application. The experimental design was completely randomised with four replications, and the treatments were arranged in a 2 x 2 x 5 factorial scheme, consisting of two liming treatments (with and without limestone, two formononetin treatments (with and without application and five P2O5 doses (0, 25, 50, 100 and 200 mg dm-3. Three shoot cuttings were carried out after a first standardisation cutting to evaluate the morphogenetic and structural characteristics as well as the dry matter yield of different morphological fractions. Liming and phosphate application at the dose of 141 mg dm-3 P2O5 increased growth and yield of Marandu grass, and these practices are essential for the cultivation of this pasture grass in Yellow Latosol of the Cerrado region of Piauí, Brazil. The application of formononetin increased stem elongation rate, total number of tillers and green stem dry matter, and decreased dead dry matter of Marandu grass, which are effects that contribute to the improvement of pasture quality.

  6. A Medicago truncatula mutant hyper-responsive to mycorrhiza and defective for nodulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Dominique; le Signor, Christine; Gianinazzi-Pearson, Vivienne; Duc, Gérard

    2009-08-01

    One key strategy for the identification of plant genes required for mycorrhizal development is the use of plant mutants affected in mycorrhizal colonisation. In this paper, we report a new Medicago truncatula mutant defective for nodulation but hypermycorrhizal for symbiosis development and response. This mutant, called B9, presents a poor shoot and, especially, root development with short laterals. Inoculation with Glomus intraradices results in significantly higher root colonisation of the mutant than the wild-type genotype A17 (+20% for total root length, +16% for arbuscule frequency in the colonised part of the root, +39% for arbuscule frequency in the total root system). Mycorrhizal effects on shoot and root biomass of B9 plants are about twofold greater than in the wild-type genotype. The B9 mutant of M. truncatula is characterised by considerably higher root concentrations of the phytoestrogen coumestrol and by the novel synthesis of the coumestrol conjugate malonyl glycoside, absent from roots of wild-type plants. In conclusion, this is the first time that a hypermycorrhizal plant mutant affected negatively for nodulation (Myc(++), Nod (-/+) phenotype) is reported. This mutant represents a new tool for the study of plant genes differentially regulating mycorrhiza and nodulation symbioses, in particular, those related to autoregulation mechanisms.

  7. Carbon Uptake and the Metabolism and Transport of Lipids in an Arbuscular Mycorrhiza1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfeffer, Philip E.; Douds, David D.; Bécard, Guillaume; Shachar-Hill, Yair

    1999-01-01

    Both the plant and the fungus benefit nutritionally in the arbuscular mycorrhizal symbiosis: The host plant enjoys enhanced mineral uptake and the fungus receives fixed carbon. In this exchange the uptake, metabolism, and translocation of carbon by the fungal partner are poorly understood. We therefore analyzed the fate of isotopically labeled substrates in an arbuscular mycorrhiza (in vitro cultures of Ri T-DNA-transformed carrot [Daucus carota] roots colonized by Glomus intraradices) using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Labeling patterns observed in lipids and carbohydrates after substrates were supplied to the mycorrhizal roots or the extraradical mycelium indicated that: (a) 13C-labeled glucose and fructose (but not mannitol or succinate) are effectively taken up by the fungus within the root and are metabolized to yield labeled carbohydrates and lipids; (b) the extraradical mycelium does not use exogenous sugars for catabolism, storage, or transfer to the host; (c) the fungus converts sugars taken up in the root compartment into lipids that are then translocated to the extraradical mycelium (there being little or no lipid synthesis in the external mycelium); and (d) hexose in fungal tissue undergoes substantially higher fluxes through an oxidative pentose phosphate pathway than does hexose in the host plant. PMID:10364411

  8. Nonlegume Parasponia andersonii deploys a broad rhizobium host range strategy resulting in largely variable symbiotic effectiveness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camp, op den R.H.M.; Polone, E.; Fedorova, E.; Roelofsen, W.; Squartini, A.; Camp, op den H.J.M.; Bisseling, T.; Geurts, R.

    2012-01-01

    The non-legume genus Parasponia has evolved the rhizobium symbiosis independent from legumes and has done so only recently. We aim to study the promiscuity of such newly evolved symbiotic engagement and determine the symbiotic effectiveness of infecting rhizobium species. It was found that

  9. Effect of Subliminal Stimulation of Symbiotic Fantasies on College Student Self-Disclosure in Group Counseling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Edward; O'Toole, James

    1982-01-01

    Studied subliminal symbiotic stimulation as a treatment aid in conjunction with counselor self-disclosures in group counseling. Results showed that subliminal exposure to MOMMY AND I ARE ONE stimulus would lead to more client self-disclosures in group counseling. Suggests impact of symbiotic stimulus can be affected by counselor behavior. (RC)

  10. Gene expression in gut symbiotic organ of stinkbug affected by extracellular bacterial symbiont.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryo Futahashi

    Full Text Available The bean bug Riptortus pedestris possesses a specialized symbiotic organ in a posterior region of the midgut, where numerous crypts harbor extracellular betaproteobacterial symbionts of the genus Burkholderia. Second instar nymphs orally acquire the symbiont from the environment, and the symbiont infection benefits the host by facilitating growth and by occasionally conferring insecticide resistance. Here we performed comparative transcriptomic analyses of insect genes expressed in symbiotic and non-symbiotic regions of the midgut dissected from Burkholderia-infected and uninfected R. pedestris. Expression sequence tag analysis of cDNA libraries and quantitative reverse transcription PCR identified a number of insect genes expressed in symbiosis- or aposymbiosis-associated patterns. For example, genes up-regulated in symbiotic relative to aposymbiotic individuals, including many cysteine-rich secreted protein genes and many cathepsin protease genes, are likely to play a role in regulating the symbiosis. Conversely, genes up-regulated in aposymbiotic relative to symbiotic individuals, including a chicken-type lysozyme gene and a defensin-like protein gene, are possibly involved in regulation of non-symbiotic bacterial infections. Our study presents the first transcriptomic data on gut symbiotic organ of a stinkbug, which provides initial clues to understanding of molecular mechanisms underlying the insect-bacterium gut symbiosis and sheds light on several intriguing commonalities between endocellular and extracellular symbiotic associations.

  11. The response of Anabaena -free Azolla and the symbiotic Azolla to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The performance of Anabaena-free (algae free) and symbiotic types of three speeies of Azolla (A. filiculoides, A. pinnata and A. microphylla) were studied in a phytotron at two average temperatures (22 and 33 oC). The growth of both the Anabaena-free and symbiotic types were depressed at a high temperature (33 DC) to ...

  12. Gene expression analyses in tomato near isogenic lines provide evidence for ethylene and abscisic acid biosynthesis fine-tuning during arbuscular mycorrhiza development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fracetto, Giselle Gomes Monteiro; Peres, Lázaro Eustáquio Pereira; Lambais, Marcio Rodrigues

    2017-07-01

    Plant responses to the environment and microorganisms, including arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi, involve complex hormonal interactions. It is known that abscisic acid (ABA) and ethylene may be involved in the regulation of arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM) and that part of the detrimental effects of ABA deficiency in plants is due to ethylene overproduction. In this study, we aimed to determine whether the low susceptibility to mycorrhizal colonization in ABA-deficient mutants is due to high levels of ethylene and whether AM development is associated with changes in the steady-state levels of transcripts of genes involved in the biosynthesis of ethylene and ABA. For that, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ethylene overproducer epinastic (epi) mutant and the ABA-deficient notabilis (not) and sitiens (sit) mutants, in the same Micro-Tom (MT) genetic background, were inoculated with Rhizophagus clarus, and treated with the ethylene biosynthesis inhibitor aminoethoxyvinylglycine (AVG). The development of AM, as well as the steady-state levels of transcripts involved in ethylene (LeACS2, LeACO1 and LeACO4) and ABA (LeNCED) biosynthesis, was determined. The intraradical colonization in epi, not and sit mutants was significantly reduced compared to MT. The epi mutant completely restored the mycorrhizal colonization to the levels of MT with the application of 10 µM of AVG, probably due to the inhibition of the ACC synthase gene expression. The steady-state levels of LeACS2 and LeACO4 transcripts were induced in mycorrhizal roots of MT, whereas the steady-state levels of LeACO1 and LeACO4 transcripts were significantly induced in sit, and the steady-state levels of LeNCED transcripts were significantly induced in all genotypes and in mycorrhizal roots of epi mutants treated with AVG. The reduced mycorrhizal colonization in sit mutants seems not to be limited by ethylene production via ACC oxidase regulation. Both ethylene overproduction and ABA deficiency impaired AM fungal

  13. The incidence of arbuscular mycorrhiza in two submerged Isoëtes species

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sudová, Radka; Rydlová, Jana; Čtvrtlíková, Martina; Havránek, P.; Adamec, Lubomír

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 94, č. 4 (2011), s. 183-187 ISSN 0304-3770. [The Biology of Fungi . IMC9. Edinburgh, (01.08.2010-06.08.2010)] R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP504/10/0781; GA ČR GA206/07/1200 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60050516; CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Keywords : arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi * aquatic macrophytes * dark septate endophytes Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.516, year: 2011

  14. Concept evaluation of nuclear fusion driven symbiotic energy systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renier, J.P.; Hoffman, T.J.

    1979-01-01

    This paper analyzes systems based on D-T and semi-catalyzed D-D fusion-powered U233 breeders. Two different blanket types were used: metallic thorium pebble-bed blankets with a batch reprocessing mode and a molten salt blanket with on-line continuous or batch reprocessing. All fusion-driven blankets are assumed to have spherical geometries, with a 85% closure. Neutronics depletion calculations were performed with a revised version of the discrete ordinates code XSDRN-PM, using multigroup (100 neutron, 21 gamma-ray groups) coupled cross-section libraries. These neutronics calculations are coupled with a scenario optimization and cost analysis code. Also, the fusion burn was shaped so as to keep the blanket maximum power density below a preset value, and to improve the performance of the fusion-driven systems. The fusion-driven symbiotes are compared with LMFBR-driven energy systems. The nuclear fission breeders that were used as drivers have parameters characteristic of heterogeneous, oxide LMFBRs. They are net plutonium users - the plutonium is obtained from the discharges of LWRs - and U233 is bred in the fission breeder thorium blankets. The analyses of the symbiotic energy systems were performed at equilibrium, at maximum rate of grid expansion, and for a given nuclear power demand

  15. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth in sign language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Wendy

    2009-04-01

    Current conceptions of human language include a gestural component in the communicative event. However, determining how the linguistic and gestural signals are distinguished, how each is structured, and how they interact still poses a challenge for the construction of a comprehensive model of language. This study attempts to advance our understanding of these issues with evidence from sign language. The study adopts McNeill's criteria for distinguishing gestures from the linguistically organized signal, and provides a brief description of the linguistic organization of sign languages. Focusing on the subcategory of iconic gestures, the paper shows that signers create iconic gestures with the mouth, an articulator that acts symbiotically with the hands to complement the linguistic description of objects and events. A new distinction between the mimetic replica and the iconic symbol accounts for the nature and distribution of iconic mouth gestures and distinguishes them from mimetic uses of the mouth. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth is a salient feature of human language, regardless of whether the primary linguistic modality is oral or manual. Speakers gesture with their hands, and signers gesture with their mouths.

  16. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth in sign language*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandler, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    Current conceptions of human language include a gestural component in the communicative event. However, determining how the linguistic and gestural signals are distinguished, how each is structured, and how they interact still poses a challenge for the construction of a comprehensive model of language. This study attempts to advance our understanding of these issues with evidence from sign language. The study adopts McNeill’s criteria for distinguishing gestures from the linguistically organized signal, and provides a brief description of the linguistic organization of sign languages. Focusing on the subcategory of iconic gestures, the paper shows that signers create iconic gestures with the mouth, an articulator that acts symbiotically with the hands to complement the linguistic description of objects and events. A new distinction between the mimetic replica and the iconic symbol accounts for the nature and distribution of iconic mouth gestures and distinguishes them from mimetic uses of the mouth. Symbiotic symbolization by hand and mouth is a salient feature of human language, regardless of whether the primary linguistic modality is oral or manual. Speakers gesture with their hands, and signers gesture with their mouths. PMID:20445832

  17. Non-symbiotic Bradyrhizobium ecotypes dominate North American forest soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanInsberghe, David; Maas, Kendra R; Cardenas, Erick; Strachan, Cameron R; Hallam, Steven J; Mohn, William W

    2015-11-01

    The genus Bradyrhizobium has served as a model system for studying host-microbe symbiotic interactions and nitrogen fixation due to its importance in agricultural productivity and global nitrogen cycling. In this study, we identify a bacterial group affiliated with this genus that dominates the microbial communities of coniferous forest soils from six distinct ecozones across North America. Representative isolates from this group were obtained and characterized. Using quantitative population genomics, we show that forest soil populations of Bradyrhizobium represent ecotypes incapable of nodulating legume root hairs or fixing atmospheric nitrogen. Instead, these populations appear to be free living and have a greater potential for metabolizing aromatic carbon sources than their close symbiotic relatives. In addition, we identify fine-scaled differentiation between populations inhabiting neighboring soil layers that illustrate how diversity within Bradyrhizobium is structured by habitat similarity. These findings reconcile incongruent observations about this widely studied and important group of bacteria and highlight the value of ecological context to interpretations of microbial diversity and taxonomy. These results further suggest that the influence of this genus likely extends well beyond facilitating agriculture, especially as forest ecosystems are large and integral components of the biosphere. In addition, this study demonstrates how focusing research on economically important microorganisms can bias our understanding of the natural world.

  18. Ecology of planktonic foraminifera and their symbiotic algae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastrich, M.D.

    1986-01-01

    Two types of symbiotic algae occurred abundantly and persistently in the cytoplasm of several species of planktonic Foraminifera over a ten year period in different tropical and subtropical areas of the North Atlantic Ocean. These planktonic Foraminifera host species consistently harbored either dinoflagellates or a newly described minute coccoid algal type. There appeared to be a specific host-symbiont relationship in these species regardless of year, season or geographic locality. The larger ovoid dinoflagellates (Pyrrhophycophyta) occur in the spinose species Globigerinoides ruber, Globigerinoides sacculifer, G. conglobatus and Orbulina universa. The smaller alga, from 1.5 to 3.5 um in diameter, occurs in one spinose species Globigerinella aequilateralis and also in the non-spinose species Globigerinita glutinata, Globoquadrina dutertrei, Globorotalia menardii, Globorotalia cristata, Globorotalia inflata, Candeina nitida, in various juvenile specimens and at all seasons except the winter months in Pulleniatina obliquiloculata and Globorotalial hirsuta. Controlled laboratory studies indicated a significant C incorporation into the host cytoplasm and inorganic calcium carbonate test of Globigerinoides ruber. During incubation for up to two hours, the 14 C uptake into the cytoplasm and test in the light was significantly greater than uptake in the dark by living specimens or by dead foraminifers. There appears to be light-enhanced uptake of 14 C into the test with dinoflagellate photosynthesis contributing to host calcification. In culture, symbiotic algae were observed to survive for the duration of the lifespan of their hosts

  19. Adaptive symbiotic organisms search (SOS algorithm for structural design optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanshyam G. Tejani

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The symbiotic organisms search (SOS algorithm is an effective metaheuristic developed in 2014, which mimics the symbiotic relationship among the living beings, such as mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism, to survive in the ecosystem. In this study, three modified versions of the SOS algorithm are proposed by introducing adaptive benefit factors in the basic SOS algorithm to improve its efficiency. The basic SOS algorithm only considers benefit factors, whereas the proposed variants of the SOS algorithm, consider effective combinations of adaptive benefit factors and benefit factors to study their competence to lay down a good balance between exploration and exploitation of the search space. The proposed algorithms are tested to suit its applications to the engineering structures subjected to dynamic excitation, which may lead to undesirable vibrations. Structure optimization problems become more challenging if the shape and size variables are taken into account along with the frequency. To check the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed algorithms, six different planar and space trusses are subjected to experimental analysis. The results obtained using the proposed methods are compared with those obtained using other optimization methods well established in the literature. The results reveal that the adaptive SOS algorithm is more reliable and efficient than the basic SOS algorithm and other state-of-the-art algorithms.

  20. Fatty acid variations in symbiotic dinoflagellates from Okinawan corals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhukova, Natalia V; Titlyanov, Eduard A

    2003-01-01

    The fatty acid composition of polar lipids and triacylglycerols was determined in different morphophysiological types of symbiotic dinoflagellates (SD) isolated from the hydrocoral Millepora intricata and the scleractinian corals Pocillopora damicornis, Seriatopora caliendrum, Seriatopora hystrix and Stylophora pistillata from a fringing reef of Sesoko Island, Okinawa, Japan. The distribution of the fatty acids among the morphophysiologically distinct types of SD reported in these corals makes it possible to readily distinguish one type of SD from the other. Moreover, differences were found both in polar lipids and triacylglycerols. The polar lipids of SD from M. intricata showed a very distinctive fatty acid profile. A combination of large proportions of 18:4 (n-3), 18:5 (n-3), 22:5 (n-6), and 22:6 (n-3) and negligible amounts of 20:4 (n-6), and 20:5 (n-3) in SD from M. intricata was particularly noteworthy. The fatty acid profiles of SD from P. damicornis and SD isolated from S. caliendrum and S. hystrix differed in the proportion of 18:4 (n-3) and 22:6 (n-3). It is suggested that fatty acids might provide useful information on possible taxonomic differences among symbiotic dinoflagellates. It is assumed that biochemical differences can reflect the genetic diversity of the morphophysiological types of SD associated with several species of hermatypic corals from this region.